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Sample records for blunt trauma fractures

  1. Isolated Multiple Fragmented Cricoid Fracture Associated with External Blunt Neck Trauma: A Case Report

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    Lee, Byung Hoon; Hwang, Yoon Joon; Kim, Yong Hoon; Seo, Jung Wook; Cho, Hyeon Je; Kim, Yeon Soo [Inje University School of Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Blunt laryngeal trauma is a relatively uncommon but possibly life-threatening injury. An isolated cricoid fracture associated with blunt trauma is rare. We report a case of an isolated multiple fragmented cricoid cartilage fracture that developed in a 20-year-old man after a blunt neck trauma that occurred during a baseball game and was diagnosed by 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT)

  2. Iliac Artery and Vein Injury Without Pelvic Fracture Due To Blunt Trauma: A Rare Case

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    Mustafa Cuneyt Cicek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Iliac vascular injuries have high morbidity and mortality rates. Penetrant abdominal and pelvic vascular injuries are more common compared to blunt traumas. Pelvic vascular injuries associated with blunt trauma are quite likely to occur in accompaniment with pelvic fracture. A 23 year old male patient was admitted to the emergency room due to a motorcycle accident. Shock picture was prevalent in the patient. Shaft fracture was present in left femur and flow was not detected in arterial and venous colour Doppler ultrasonography. Patient underwent emergency surgery. Left main iliac artery and vein were normal, however, external iliac vein was lacerated in two spots, and blood vessel wall integrity was damaged in one part of left external iliac artery. Clinical presentation and traumatic retroperitoneal hematoma management of iliac artery and venous injuries due to blunt trauma without pelvic fracture are discussed in the presented case.

  3. Delayed life-threatening hemothorax without rib fractures after blunt chest trauma

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    Chinnan Nevin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed hemothorax in blunt chest trauma is described as a late presentation of hemothorax after a normal chest X-ray on admission. To detect this clinical entity a repeat chest X-ray is advised after six hours, especially when the first radiograph reveals rib or thoracic vertebral fractures or any significant injury to the thoracic viscera. However, this repeats chest X-ray examination is often not done in patients in whom a significant thoracic trauma has been excluded in the primary and secondary survey. Here, we discuss a case of massive delayed hemothorax after 16 hours of the blunt chest trauma despite a near normal admission chest X-ray and absence of significant chest trauma in the primary and secondary surveys.

  4. Blunt cerebrovascular trauma causing vertebral arteryd issection in combination with a laryngeal fracture: a case report

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    Krettek Christian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The diagnosis and therapy of blunt cerebrovascular injuries has become a focus since improved imaging technology allows adequate description of the injury. Although it represents a rare injury the long-term complications can be fatal but mostly prevented by adequate treatment. Case presentation A 33-year-old Caucasian man fell down a 7-meter scarp after losing control of his quad bike in a remote area. Since endotracheal intubation was unsuccessfully attempted due to the severe cervical swelling as well as oral bleeding an emergency tracheotomy was performed on scene. He was hemodynamically unstable despite fluid resuscitation and intravenous therapy with vasopressors and was transported by a helicopter to our trauma center. He had a stable fracture of the arch of the seventh cervical vertebra and fractures of the transverse processes of C5-C7 with involvement of the lateral wall of the transverse foramen. An abort of the left vertebral artery signal at the first thoracic vertebrae with massive hemorrhage as well as a laryngeal fracture was also detected. Further imaging showed retrograde filling of the left vertebral artery at C5 distal of the described abort. After stabilization and reconfirmation of intracranial perfusion during the clinical course weaning was started. At the time of discharge, he was aware and was able to move all extremities. Conclusion We report a rare case of a patient with vertebral artery dissection in combination with a laryngeal fracture after blunt trauma. Thorough diagnostic and frequent reassessments are recommended. Most patients can be managed with conservative treatment.

  5. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

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    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  6. The blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Up to 1970 the number of patients suffering from blunt abdominal trauma showed a substantial increase. In more than 50% of all cases there are additional injuries. The most important factor influencing the prognosis of these patients is the early and correct indication for operation and the avoidance of unnecessary laparotomies. As a primary aim in diagnosis one should consider the recognition of an intraperitoneal bleeding without risk for the patient. Peritoneal lavage as an invasive method with low complication rates has proved good. First reports also show good results using the sonography of the abdomen. The recognition of the injured organ allows a carefully directed operation. Concerning the prognosis it is of minor importance. The diagnosis in patients with blunt abdominal trauma at the university clinic of Freiburg consists of: sonography, followed in positive cases by laparotomy or angiography and laparotomy. In cases with questionable results a lavage is done. (orig.)

  7. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.)

  8. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In western European countries most blunt chest traumas are associated with motor vehicle and sport-related accidents. In Switzerland, 39 of 10,000 inhabitants were involved and severely injured in road accidents in 1998. Fifty two percent of them suffered from blunt chest trauma. According to the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, traumas represented in men the fourth major cause of death (4 %) after cardiovascular disease (38 %), cancer (28 %), and respiratory disease (7 %) in 1998. The outcome of chest trauma patients is determined mainly by the severity of the lesions, the prompt appropriate treatment delivered on the scene of the accident, the time needed to transport the patient to a trauma center, and the immediate recognition of the lesions by a trained emergency team. Other determining factors include age as well as coexisting cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases. Our purpose was to review the wide spectrum of pathologies related to blunt chest trauma involving the chest wall, pleura, lungs, trachea and bronchi, aorta, aortic arch vessels, and diaphragm. A particular focus on the diagnostic impact of CT is demonstrated. (orig.)

  9. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

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    Wicky, S.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Capasso, P.; Denys, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-10-01

    In western European countries most blunt chest traumas are associated with motor vehicle and sport-related accidents. In Switzerland, 39 of 10,000 inhabitants were involved and severely injured in road accidents in 1998. Fifty two percent of them suffered from blunt chest trauma. According to the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, traumas represented in men the fourth major cause of death (4 %) after cardiovascular disease (38 %), cancer (28 %), and respiratory disease (7 %) in 1998. The outcome of chest trauma patients is determined mainly by the severity of the lesions, the prompt appropriate treatment delivered on the scene of the accident, the time needed to transport the patient to a trauma center, and the immediate recognition of the lesions by a trained emergency team. Other determining factors include age as well as coexisting cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases. Our purpose was to review the wide spectrum of pathologies related to blunt chest trauma involving the chest wall, pleura, lungs, trachea and bronchi, aorta, aortic arch vessels, and diaphragm. A particular focus on the diagnostic impact of CT is demonstrated. (orig.)

  10. Blunt Head Trauma and Headache

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    Ana B Chelse

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from New York Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital examined whether having an isolated headache following minor blunt head trauma was suggestive of traumatic brain injury (TBI among a large cohort of children 2-18 years of age.

  11. Sonography of blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonographic examination of the abdomen after blunt abdominal trauma represents a rapid and effective diagnostic method without bothering the patient. It has proved its value not only in the confirmation or exclusion of free fluid in the abdomen caused by liver of spleen rupture, but also in such cases actually it replaces peritoneal lavage or exploratory laparotomy. It is also qualified for diagnosis of intraparenchymal or subcapsular hemorrhages, intraperitoneal as well as retroperitoneal and for follow up. In particualr delayed bleedings including the risk of a retarded organ rupture can be detected early. A failure rate of 1.4% in 282 sonographically examined cases of blunt abdominal trauma further confirms the reliability of this method. (orig.)

  12. CT of abdominal blunt trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied CT findings and interventional radiology including therapeutic procedures in 43 cases with abdominal blunt trauma, retrospectively. All of parenchymal organ's injuries, and injuries of duodenum and retroperitoneum were correctly diagnosed by CT. In 14 cases with only hemoperitoneum or no positive findings on CT, 4 cases were jejunal perforations, and remaining 10 cases were conservatively treated and relieved. We have to take care that the similar CT findings include the opposite results to need surgery and not. (author)

  13. Are routine pelvic radiographs in major pediatric blunt trauma necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Screening pelvic radiographs to rule out pelvic fractures are routinely used for the initial evaluation of pediatric blunt trauma. Recently, the utility of routine pelvic radiographs in certain subsets of patients with blunt trauma has been questioned. There is a growing amount of evidence that shows the clinical exam is reliable enough to obviate the need for routine screening pelvic radiographs in children. To identify variables that help predict the presence or absence of pelvic fractures in pediatric blunt trauma. We conducted a retrospective study from January 2005 to January 2010 using the trauma registry at a level 1 pediatric trauma center. We analyzed all level 1 and level 2 trauma victims, evaluating history, exam and mechanism of injury for association with the presence or absence of a pelvic fracture. Of 553 level 1 and 2 trauma patients who presented during the study period, 504 were included in the study. Most of these children, 486/504 (96.4%), showed no evidence of a pelvic fracture while 18/504 (3.6%) had a pelvic fracture. No factors were found to be predictive of a pelvic fracture. However, we developed a pelvic fracture screening tool that accurately rules out the presence of a pelvic fracture P = 0.008, NPV 99, sensitivity 96, 8.98 (1.52-52.8). This screening tool combines eight high-risk clinical findings (pelvic tenderness, laceration, ecchymosis, abrasion, GCS <14, positive urinalysis, abdominal pain/tenderness, femur fracture) and five high-risk mechanisms of injury (unrestrained motor vehicle collision [MVC], MVC with ejection, MVC rollover, auto vs. pedestrian, auto vs. bicycle). Pelvic fractures in pediatric major blunt trauma can reliably be ruled out by using our pelvic trauma screening tool. Although no findings accurately identified the presence of a pelvic fracture, the screening tool accurately identified the absence of a fracture, suggesting that pelvic radiographs are not warranted in this subset of patients. (orig.)

  14. Are routine pelvic radiographs in major pediatric blunt trauma necessary?

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    Lagisetty, Jyothi [Memorial Hermann Medical Center, Emergency Medicine Department, Houston, TX (United States); Slovis, Thomas [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Pediatric Imaging, Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States); Thomas, Ronald [Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Detroit, MI (United States); Knazik, Stephen; Stankovic, Curt [Wayne State University of Medicine, Division of Emergency Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Screening pelvic radiographs to rule out pelvic fractures are routinely used for the initial evaluation of pediatric blunt trauma. Recently, the utility of routine pelvic radiographs in certain subsets of patients with blunt trauma has been questioned. There is a growing amount of evidence that shows the clinical exam is reliable enough to obviate the need for routine screening pelvic radiographs in children. To identify variables that help predict the presence or absence of pelvic fractures in pediatric blunt trauma. We conducted a retrospective study from January 2005 to January 2010 using the trauma registry at a level 1 pediatric trauma center. We analyzed all level 1 and level 2 trauma victims, evaluating history, exam and mechanism of injury for association with the presence or absence of a pelvic fracture. Of 553 level 1 and 2 trauma patients who presented during the study period, 504 were included in the study. Most of these children, 486/504 (96.4%), showed no evidence of a pelvic fracture while 18/504 (3.6%) had a pelvic fracture. No factors were found to be predictive of a pelvic fracture. However, we developed a pelvic fracture screening tool that accurately rules out the presence of a pelvic fracture P = 0.008, NPV 99, sensitivity 96, 8.98 (1.52-52.8). This screening tool combines eight high-risk clinical findings (pelvic tenderness, laceration, ecchymosis, abrasion, GCS <14, positive urinalysis, abdominal pain/tenderness, femur fracture) and five high-risk mechanisms of injury (unrestrained motor vehicle collision [MVC], MVC with ejection, MVC rollover, auto vs. pedestrian, auto vs. bicycle). Pelvic fractures in pediatric major blunt trauma can reliably be ruled out by using our pelvic trauma screening tool. Although no findings accurately identified the presence of a pelvic fracture, the screening tool accurately identified the absence of a fracture, suggesting that pelvic radiographs are not warranted in this subset of patients. (orig.)

  15. A comparative study of cranial, blunt trauma fractures as seen at medicolegal autopsy and by Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed Tomography (CT) has become a widely used supplement to medico legal autopsies at several forensic institutes. Amongst other things, it has proven to be very valuable in visualising fractures of the cranium. Also CT scan data are being used to create head models for biomechanical trauma analysis by Finite Element Analysis. If CT scan data are to be used for creating individual head models for retrograde trauma analysis in the future we need to ascertain how well cranial fractures are captured by CT scan. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic agreement between CT and autopsy regarding cranial fractures and especially the precision with which cranial fractures are recorded. The autopsy fracture diagnosis was compared to the diagnosis of two CT readings (reconstructed with Multiplanar and Maximum Intensity Projection reconstructions) by registering the fractures on schematic drawings. The extent of the fractures was quantified by merging 3-dimensional datasets from both the autopsy as input by 3D digitizer tracing and CT scan. The results showed a good diagnostic agreement regarding fractures localised in the posterior fossa, while the fracture diagnosis in the medial and anterior fossa was difficult at the first CT scan reading. The fracture diagnosis improved during the second CT scan reading. Thus using two different CT reconstructions improved diagnosis in the medial fossa and at the impact points in the cranial vault. However, fracture diagnosis in the anterior and medial fossa and of hairline fractures in general still remained difficult. The study showed that the forensically important fracture systems to a large extent were diagnosed on CT images using Multiplanar and Maximum Intensity Projection reconstructions. Difficulties remained in the minute diagnosis of hairline fractures. These inconsistencies need to be resolved in order to use CT scan data of victims for individual head modelling and trauma analysis

  16. A comparative study of cranial, blunt trauma fractures as seen at medicolegal autopsy and by computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Christina; Bech, Birthe H; Lynnerup, Niels

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Computed Tomography (CT) has become a widely used supplement to medico legal autopsies at several forensic institutes. Amongst other things, it has proven to be very valuable in visualising fractures of the cranium. Also CT scan data are being used to create head models for biomechani...... reconstructions. Difficulties remained in the minute diagnosis of hairline fractures. These inconsistencies need to be resolved in order to use CT scan data of victims for individual head modelling and trauma analysis....

  17. Blunt force trauma to skull with various instruments.

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    Sulaiman, Nur Amirah; Osman, Khairul; Hamzah, Noor Hazfalinda; Amir, Sri Pawita Albakri

    2014-04-01

    Deaths due to blunt force trauma to the head as a result of assault are some of the most common cases encountered by the practicing forensic pathologist. Previous studies have shown inflicting injury to the head region is one of the most effective methods of murder. The important factors that determine severity of trauma include the type of weapon used, type and site of skull fracture, intracranial haemorrhage and severity of brain injury. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of blunt force trauma to the skull produced by different instruments. Nine adult monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) skulls were used as models. Commonly found blunt objects comprising of Warrington hammer, hockey stick and open face helmet were used in this study. A machine calibrated force generator was used to hold the blunt object in place and to hit the skulls at forces of 12.5N and 25N. Resultant traumatic effects and fractures (linear, depressed, basilar, comminuted, and distastic) were analyzed according to type of blunt object used; surface area of contact and absolute force (N/cm(2)) delivered. Results showed that all investigated instruments were capable of producing similar injuries. The severity of trauma was not related to the surface area of contact with the blunt objects. However, only high absolute forces produced comminuted fractures. These findings were observational, as the samples were too small for statistical conclusions. PMID:24763233

  18. Management of blunt hepatic trauma.

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    Letoublon, C; Amariutei, A; Taton, N; Lacaze, L; Abba, J; Risse, O; Arvieux, C

    2016-08-01

    For the last 20 years, nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt hepatic trauma (BHT) has been the initial policy whenever this is possible (80% of cases), i.e., in all cases where the hemodynamic status does not demand emergency laparotomy. NOM relies upon the coexistence of three highly effective treatment modalities: radiology with contrast-enhanced computerized tomography (CT) and hepatic arterial embolization, intensive care surveillance, and finally delayed surgery (DS). DS is not a failure of NOM management but rather an integral part of the surgical strategy. When imposed by hemodynamic instability, the immediate surgical option has seen its effectiveness transformed by development of the concept of abbreviated (damage control) laparotomy and wide application of the method of perihepatic packing (PHP). The effectiveness of these two conservative and cautious strategies for initial management is evidenced by current experience, but the management of secondary events that may arise with the most severe grades of injury must be both rapid and effective. PMID:27519150

  19. Late clotted haemothorax after blunt chest trauma.

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    Sinha, P; Sarkar, P

    1998-01-01

    A clotted haemothorax can develop any time after blunt chest trauma. Two cases are described in which late clotted haemothoraces developed which were treated by limited thoracotomy and evacuation of clots. Late clotted haemothorax may occur even in the absence of any abnormal initial clinical findings. Early detection and treatment is important to avoid the complications of fibrothorax and empyema with permanent pulmonary dysfunction. After blunt chest trauma patients should be advised to ret...

  20. Cardiac injuries in blunt chest trauma

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    Tobon-Gomez Catalina; Huguet Marina; Bijnens Bart H; Frangi Alejandro F; Petit Marius

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Blunt chest traumas are a clinical challenge, both for diagnosis and treatment. The use of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance can play a major role in this setting. We present two cases: a 12-year-old boy and 45-year-old man. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging enabled visualization of myocardial damage resulting from the trauma.

  1. Anterior mediastinal abscess diagnosed in a young sumo wrestler after closed blunt chest trauma.

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    Sassa, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Ota, Masayuki; Washino, Takuya; Hikone, Mayu; Sakamoto, Naoya; Iwabuchi, Sentaro; Otsuji, Mizuto; Ohnishi, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Most mediastinal abscesses result from infections after thoracotomy, esophageal perforation or pene- trating chest trauma. This disease is rarely caused by closed blunt chest trauma. All previously reported such cases after closed blunt chest trauma presented with hematoma and sternal osteomyelitis resulting from sternal fracture. Here we report a 15-year-old sumo wrestler who presented with an anterior mediastinal abscess without any mediastinal fracture. The mediastinal abscess resulted from the hematogenous spread of Staphylococcus aureus to a hematoma that might have been caused by a closed blunt chest trauma incurred during sumo wrestling exercises. PMID:26917029

  2. Roentgenologic evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study comprises 25 cases of blunt abdominal trauma proved by surgery. It is concluded that visceral damage by blunt abdominal trauma may be suspected, but can not be satisfactorily diagnosed upon a single plane abdominal roentgenologic examination with clinical support. Contrary to some reports in the literature, rupture of the hallow, viscus is more susceptible than solid organ and ileum is more than jejunum. It is a useful roentgenologic sign denoting distension and small cresent air shadow in the duodenal sweep of the damaged pancreas

  3. Contemporary management of blunt aortic trauma.

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    Dubose, J J; Azizzadeh, A; Estrera, A L; Safi, H J

    2015-10-01

    Blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) remains a common cause of death following blunt mechanisms of trauma. Among patients who survive to reach hospital care, significant advances in diagnosis and treatment afford previously unattainable survival. The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) guidelines provide current best-evidence suggestions for treatment of BTAI. However, several key areas of controversy regarding optimal BTAI care remain. These include the refinement of selection criteria, timing for treatment and the need for long-term follow-up data. In addition, the advent of the Aortic Trauma Foundation (ATF) represents an important development in collaborative research in this field. PMID:25868973

  4. Isolated renal pelvis rupture secondary to blunt trauma: Case report

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    Kerem Taken

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Renal pelvic injury must be considered in the differential diagnosis of blunt trauma. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some cases. We present a case who underwent surgery due to isolated renal pelvis rupture caused by blunt abdominal trauma.

  5. Adhesive intestinal obstruction following blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in diagnosis and management of multiple trauma patients have lead to adopting a conservative approach for most patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Intestinal obstruction is a rare complication for this approach. Herein, we report a 37-year-old male, who did not have an abdominal operation, and who developed adhesive intestinal obstruction 7 weeks following blunt abdominal trauma. We detected no signs of peritonitis or intra-abdominal bleeding clinically or radiologically on admission. We initially treated the intestinal obstruction conservatively, but the obstruction did not resolve. Finally, we performed laparotomy, which showed that the small bowel was matted together by thick fibrous layers of adhesions. We performed adhesiolysis, and the patient was discharged home 3 weeks later. Histopathological findings of the fibrous layer were consistent with repair due to previous trauma and hemorrhage. We review the literature of this rare condition. (author)

  6. Cardiogenic shock following blunt chest trauma

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    Rodríguez-González Fayna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac contusion, usually caused by blunt chest trauma, has been recognized with increased frequency over the past decades. Traffic accidents are the most frequent cause of cardiac contusions resulting from a direct blow to the chest. Other causes of blunt cardiac injury are numerous and include violent fall impacts, interpersonal aggression, explosions, and various types of high-risk sports. Myocardial contusion is difficult to diagnose; clinical presentation varies greatly, ranging from lack of symptoms to cardiogenic shock and arrhythmia. Although death is rare, cardiac contusion can be fatal. We present a case of cardiac contusion due to blunt chest trauma secondary to a fall impact, which manifested as cardiogenic shock.

  7. Computer tomography following blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer tomographic appearances of lesions of parenchymatous organs following blunt abdominal trauma are described in 13 patients (five liver, four renal, two splenic and two pancreatic injuries). The value of abdominal computer tomography is discussed in relation to the interval between injury and time of abdominal examination and compared with the diagnostic value of abdominal angiography. (orig.)

  8. Tetanus after blunt lawn mower trauma

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    Camilla Normand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient presented with tetanus ten days after blunt trauma with a lawn mower. Our case describes the diagnosis and treatment of this patient with an infectious disease commonly seen in the developing world but rarely seen in the developed world.

  9. Tetanus after blunt lawn mower trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Camilla Normand; Aasmund Fostervold; Elin Haarr; Marie Skontorp; Åse Berg

    2015-01-01

    A patient presented with tetanus ten days after blunt trauma with a lawn mower. Our case describes the diagnosis and treatment of this patient with an infectious disease commonly seen in the developing world but rarely seen in the developed world.

  10. Renal Pelvis Injury in Case of Blunt Trauma Abdomen

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    Rajendra B. Nerli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Isolated renal pelvis/upper ureteric injuries are uncommon in a case of blunt abdominal trauma. These injuries are associated with fractures of transverse process of the adjoining vertebrae. We report a case of such a case in a 35 year old male involved in road traffic accident. He underwent exploration and repair of the right UPJ/Upper ureteric injury. This case presented with injury to the transverse processes on the left side, which is unusual.

  11. Blunt Facial Trauma Causing Isolated Optic Nerve Hematoma

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    R. Parab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic optic neuropathy is an uncommon, yet serious, result of facial trauma. The authors present a novel case of a 59-year-old gentleman who presented with an isolated blunt traumatic left optic nerve hematoma causing vision loss. There were no other injuries or fractures to report. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of this rare injury and reviews the current literature and management of traumatic optic neuropathy.

  12. Complimentary imaging technologies in blunt ocular trauma

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    Anton M Kolomeyer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe complimentary imaging technologies in traumatic chorioretinal injury. Color and fundus autofluorescence (FAF images were obtained with a non-mydriatic retinal camera. Optical coherence tomography (OCT helped obtain detailed images of retinal structure. Microperimetry was used to evaluate the visual function. A 40-year-old man sustained blunt ocular trauma with a stone. Color fundus image showed a large chorioretinal scar in the macula. Software filters allowed detailed illustration of extensive macular fibrosis. A 58-year-old man presented with blunt force trauma with a tennis ball. Color fundus imaging showed a crescentric area of macular choroidal rupture with fibrosis. FAF imaging delineated an area of hypofluorescence greater on fundus imaging. OCT showed chorioretinal atrophy in the macula. Microperimetry delineated an absolute scotoma with no response to maximal stimuli. Fundus imaging with digital filters and FAF illustrated the full extent of chorioretinal injury, while OCT and microperimetry corroborated the structure and function correlations.

  13. Multidetector CT of blunt abdominal trauma.

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    Soto, Jorge A; Anderson, Stephan W

    2012-12-01

    The morbidity, mortality, and economic costs resulting from trauma in general, and blunt abdominal trauma in particular, are substantial. The "panscan" (computed tomographic [CT] examination of the head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis) has become an essential element in the early evaluation and decision-making algorithm for hemodynamically stable patients who sustained abdominal trauma. CT has virtually replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage for the detection of important injuries. Over the past decade, substantial hardware and software developments in CT technology, especially the introduction and refinement of multidetector scanners, have expanded the versatility of CT for examination of the polytrauma patient in multiple facets: higher spatial resolution, faster image acquisition and reconstruction, and improved patient safety (optimization of radiation delivery methods). In this article, the authors review the elements of multidetector CT technique that are currently relevant for evaluating blunt abdominal trauma and describe the most important CT signs of trauma in the various organs. Because conservative nonsurgical therapy is preferred for all but the most severe injuries affecting the solid viscera, the authors emphasize the CT findings that are indications for direct therapeutic intervention. PMID:23175542

  14. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

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    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-02-28

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  15. CT of blunt chest trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While trauma is still the leading cause of death in the pediatric age range, it is surprising how little the CT appearances of pediatric chest injury have been investigated in the literature. We have reviewed the CT findings of blunt chest trauma in 44 children for whom chest CT examinations were requested to investigate the extent of intrathoracic injury. We noted a propensity for pulmonary contusions to be located posteriorly or posteromedially, and for them to be anatomically nonsegmental and crescentic in shape. This is possibly attributable to the relatively compliant anterior chest wall in children. The CT appearances of other major thoracic injuries are described, including pulmonary lacerations, pneumothoraces, malpositioned chest tubes, mediastinal hematomas, aortic injury, tracheobronchial injury, hemopericardium, and spinal injuries with paraspinal fluid collections. Children demonstrating findings incidental to the actual injury yet important to the subsequent therapy are also presented. We conclude that, in the event of clinically significant blunt chest trauma, the single supine chest examination in the trauma room is insufficient to adequately identify the extent of intrathoracic injury. With the exception of concern for aortic injury for which aortography is indicated, a dynamically enhanced CT scan of the thorax should be performed as clinically significant findings may result in altered therapy. (orig.)

  16. Open Surgical Bypass for Superficial Femoral Artery Occlusion Caused by Blunt Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Akihiko; Kudo, Yohei; Maeda, Michihiro; Tochiki, Aito; Ichimura, Haruto; Uesugi, Masafumi; Jikuya, Tomoaki

    2015-01-01

    Blunt vascular trauma of the lower extremities brings about a high amputation rate, because other organ injuries disturb revascularization. We experienced a case of a superficial femoral artery occlusion caused by blunt trauma. The patient also had a femoral bone fracture and a large skin defect with deep muscular injuries of the thigh. We performed a femoropopliteal (FP) bypass using a saphenous vein which was routed through the contaminated wound. Postoperative vacuum-assisted closure thera...

  17. VSD following blunt cardiac trauma: MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Andrew E; Maertins, Benjamin A; Richardson, Randy

    2013-10-01

    In this report, we describe the clinical and radiographic findings of ventricular septal defects (VSDs) following blunt cardiac trauma in two patients. VSDs following either penetrating or blunt cardiac trauma are a rare occurrence. The variable presentation and timing of symptom onset along with the common association of other injuries can make the diagnosis of a posttraumatic VSD difficult. Therefore, investigation should be initiated when elements from the history and physical examination (e.g., new onset murmur), laboratory tests (e.g., cardiac enzymes), EKG, and CT or echocardiography warrant it. The first patient was a 19-year-old male who was hemodynamically stable on initial presentation to this trauma center after a motor vehicle collision. A posttraumatic VSD was found by echocardiography on the day of admission and further defined on cardiac MRI (CMRI). The second patient was a 31-year-oid male who presented after a high-speed motorcycle accident and was found to have a VSD 40 days later on CMRI after a fluctuating clinical course and multiple normal echocardiograms. Both patients had good outcomes with subsequent surgical closure. PMID:23604922

  18. CT of blunt hepatic trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT findings of blunt hepatic trauma were studied in 27 children. Liver injury was classified into 3 types from mild to severe. Liver contusion was observed in 1, liver laceration in 21, and liver rupture in 5. Only 2 patients (7.4%) required surgery, and the others could be managed by conservative therapy. CT, which accurately reveals not only the severity of liver injury but also injuries of other abdominal organs and intraperitoneal bleeding, is important for the diagnosis of liver injury and determination of its treatment. (author)

  19. [Right atrium rupture due to blunt trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Thuboi, H; Okada, H

    2008-03-01

    We report 2 cases of surgical treatment of blunt cardiac trauma. The postoperative course was uneventful in either case. Pericardial drainage in patients with cardiac rupture should be performed with preparation for thoracotomy. Case 1: A 34-year-old male, hit in the chest by a collapsing 700-kg steel rod, was transported to our hospital via ambulance. The patient was diagnosed as having a cardiac rupture by echocardiography and underwent emergency thoracotomy. The right atrium near the inferior vena cava (IVC) was damaged, though bleeding from the wound had already ceased. No suture hemostusis was needed. Case 2: A 63-year-old female was hit by a car and transported to our hospital due to blunt trauma to the chest. Low blood pressure and chest computed tomography demonstrated cardiac tamponade, and subxiphoid pericardial drainage was performed. Blood pressure was recovered, but persistent hemorrhage necessitated emergency thoracotomy, which revealed a laceration at the right atrium near IVC. The injury was sutured to achieve complete hemostasis. PMID:18323181

  20. Pediatric blunt splenic trauma: a comprehensive review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, Karen N.; Werder, Gabriel M.; Callaghan, Rachel M.; Jafri, Zafar H. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Sullivan, Ashley N. [St. George' s University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies (Grenada); Bloom, David A. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States); William Beaumont Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Abdominal trauma is a leading cause of death in children older than 1 year of age. The spleen is the most common organ injured following blunt abdominal trauma. Pediatric trauma patients present unique clinical challenges as compared to adults, including different mechanisms of injury, physiologic responses, and indications for operative versus nonoperative management. Splenic salvage techniques and nonoperative approaches are preferred to splenectomy in order to decrease perioperative risks, transfusion needs, duration/cost of hospitalization, and risk of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection. Early and accurate detection of splenic injury is critical in both adults and children; however, while imaging findings guide management in adults, hemodynamic stability is the primary determinant in pediatric patients. After initial diagnosis, the primary role of imaging in pediatric patients is to determine the level and duration of care. We present a comprehensive literature review regarding the mechanism of injury, imaging, management, and complications of traumatic splenic injury in pediatric patients. Multiple patients are presented with an emphasis on the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma organ injury grading system. Clinical practice guidelines from the American Pediatric Surgical Association are discussed and compared with our experience at a large community hospital, with recommendations for future practice guidelines. (orig.)

  1. Unrecognized blunt tracheal trauma with massive pneumomediastinum and tension pneumothorax

    OpenAIRE

    Nanda Shetty; H M Krishna; Elsa Varghese; Subhashree, J; Arushi Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Blunt neck trauma with an associated laryngotracheal injury is rare. We report a patient with blunt neck trauma who came to the emergency room and was sent to ward without realizing the seriousness of the situation. He presented later with respiratory distress and an anesthesiologist was called in for emergency airway management. Airway management in such a situation is described in this report.

  2. Aortic bifurcation tear following blunt trauma in childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Shlomo Yellinek; Dimitri Gimelrich; Ofer Merin; Petachia Reissman; Marc Arkovitz

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of the abdominal aorta from blunt trauma is rare and aortic biforcation tear is extremely rare. We will present the management of a 2 year old boy who suffered blunt abdominal trauma and was operated in urgent fashion in our institution.

  3. Staging and treatment of blunt renal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on adequate radiological and other clinical data available in our 21 consecutive patients with blunt renal traumas (16 lacerations and 5 contusions), we studied whether the treatments adopted had been judicious and whether radiological and other clinical findings could be characterized for each group with different treatment modalities. In cases with stable vital signs, renal lacerations were associated with relatively small hematomas and these cases were treated safely by bed rest for about 1 month. Cases with unstable vital signs had large voluminous hematomas and renal lacerations often associated with significant diastasis. In these patients with major renal injuries who required surgical intervention, angiography was useful for evaluating the lesions and arterial embolization was very useful for stabilizing the patients' conditions and fascilitating the subsequent surgical treatments. (author)

  4. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF BLUNT TRAUMA ABDOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumawat

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blunt abdominal trauma is one of the important components of poly - trauma. It requires suspicion, investigation and proper management in time, to avoid morbidity & mortality. AIM: The aim of this retrospective study spanning 5 years w.e.f. Jan, 2010 to December, 2014 in this tertiary care institute of Geetanjali Medical College & Hospital, Udaipur was to find out BTA patients in RTA, fall from height, and assault like injuries. We studied type of injuries, male - female ratio, age group, urban & rural population involvement & their operative & non - operative management. MATERIAL & METHOD S : The study is based on 273 cases of BTA; managed in this institute from admission, investigation, management & possible follow up. Observations are depicted in different tables. RESULT: Liver is most commonly involved organ followed by spleen, kidney & pancreas respectively. Initially solid organ injuries cases where treated by surgery, but than non - operative management are tried in haemostatically stable patients. Hollow visceral injuries were always managed by laparotomy & repair or resection as and when needed . Mortality occurred in 35 patients out 273 patients because of delay to reach hospital or septicemia, renal failure and shock due to multi organ failure. CONCLUSION: Close supervision with sophisticated infrastructure and quick action significantly reduces mortality.

  5. Isolated duodenal rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celik Atilla

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal rupture following blunt abdominal trauma is rare and it usually seen with other abdominal organ injuries. It represents approximately 2% to 20% of patients with blunt abdominal injury and often occurs after blows to the upper abdomen, or abdominal compression from high-riding seat belts. Two cases of blunt duodenal rupture successfully treated surgically, are presented with their preoperative diagnosis and final out comes.

  6. Unrecognized blunt tracheal trauma with massive pneumomediastinum and tension pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Shetty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt neck trauma with an associated laryngotracheal injury is rare. We report a patient with blunt neck trauma who came to the emergency room and was sent to ward without realizing the seriousness of the situation. He presented later with respiratory distress and an anesthesiologist was called in for emergency airway management. Airway management in such a situation is described in this report.

  7. The molecular fingerprint of lung inflammation after blunt chest trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrnthaller, Christian; Flierl, Michael; Perl, Mario; Denk, Stephanie; Unnewehr, Heike; Ward, Peter A.; Radermacher, Peter; Ignatius, Anita; Gebhard, Florian; Chinnaiyan, Arul; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background After severe blunt chest trauma, the development of an acute lung injury (ALI) is often associated with severe or even lethal complications. Especially in multiple injured patients after blunt chest trauma ALI/ARDS [acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)] is frequent. However, in the initial posttraumatic phase, inflammatory clinical signs are often not apparent and underlying changes in gene-expression profile are unknown. Methods Therefore, inflammation in lung tissue followi...

  8. Diagnostic and therapeutic results of angiography of blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiographic findings in blunt abdominal trauma are reviewed. 693 posttraumatic angiograms were performed at the University of Freiburg from 1972-1980. 24% of these patients suffered from blunt abdominal trauma. It could be shown that recently ultrasongraphy and computerized tomography have replaced angiography as screening method. Remaining indications for angiography are primary vascular lesions, uncertain findings of US- and/or C Texamination and documentation of hemorrhage with the possibility of therapeutic intervention. (orig.)

  9. Transient Myopia and Hypotonia after Blunt Eye Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Müge Çoban Karataf; Aysel Pelit; Yonca Ayd›n Akova

    2011-01-01

    A patient whot received blunt trauma to the right eye one week ago referred to our clinic with complaints of low vision. Traumatic mMyopia and hypotonia were detected in the same eye after full ophthalmologic examination. The complaints of the patient completely disappeared after two weeks of medical treatment. Transient myopia and hypotonia after blunt ocular trauma may be temporary. After full ophthalmologic examination, proper treatment should be applied. (Turk J Ophthalmol 201...

  10. Diagnostic value of pelvic radiography in the initial trauma series in blunt trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Their, Micael E.A.; Bensch, Frank V.; Koskinen, Seppo K. [Toeoeloe Trauma Center, Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Handolin, Lauri [Toeoeloe Trauma Center, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Helsinki (Finland); Kiuru, Martti J. [Toeoeloe Trauma Center, Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Research Institut of Military Medicine, Helsinki (Finland)

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of pelvic radiography in the initial trauma series when compared to multidetector CT (MDCT) findings in serious blunt trauma. Inclusion criteria were blunt trauma and pelvic radiography in the initial trauma series, followed by a whole-body MDCT. A total of 1386 patients (874 male, 512 female, age 16-91 years, mean 41 years) met the inclusion criteria. Imaging studies were evaluated retrospectively by anatomical region and classified, when possible, using the Tile classification. Based on MDCT, a total of 629 injuries occurred in 226 (16%) of these 1386 patients. Radiography depicted 405 fractures in these 226 patients, giving an overall sensitivity of 55%. In 24 patients (11%) radiography was false-negatively normal. The sensitivity of radiography was mainly good in the anteroinferior parts of the pelvis, fair in the acetabulum and ileum, and poor in the posterior ring. By MDCT 141 (62%) patients were classified using the Tile classification and by radiography 133 patients (59%) were classified. MDCT and radiography showed the same type of pelvic injury in 72 patients (59%) and the subtype in 17 patients (14%). In 48 patients (40%) the pelvis was shown to be stable by radiography but unstable by MDCT. In conclusion, the sensitivity of pelvic radiography is low, and it is not reliable for determining if the pelvic injury is stable or not. (orig.)

  11. Prehospital advanced trauma life support for critical blunt trauma victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwinn, A A; Pons, P T; Moore, E E; Marx, J A; Honigman, B; Dinerman, N

    1987-04-01

    The ability of paramedics to deliver advanced trauma life support (ATLS) in an expedient fashion for victims of trauma has been strongly challenged. In this study, the records of 114 consecutive victims of blunt trauma who underwent laparotomy or thoracotomy were reviewed. Prehospital care was rendered by paramedics operating under strict protocols. The mean response time (minutes +/- SEM) to the scene was 5.6 +/- 0.27. On-scene time was 13.9 +/- 0.62. The time to return to the hospital was 8.0 +/- 0.4. On-scene time included assessing hazards at the scene, patient extrication, spine immobilization (n = 98), application of oxygen (n = 94), measurement of vital signs (n = 114), splinting of 59 limbs, and the following ATLS procedures: endotracheal intubation (n = 31), IV access (n = 106), ECG monitoring (n = 69), procurement of blood for tests including type and cross (n = 58), and application of a pneumatic antishock garment (PASG) (n = 31). On-scene times were analyzed according to the number of ATLS procedures performed: insertion of one IV line (n = 46), 14.8 +/- 1.03 minutes; two IV lines (n = 28), 13.4 +/- 0.92; one IV line plus intubation (n = 7), 14.0 +/- 2.94; two IV lines plus intubation (n = 9), 17.0 +/- 2.38; and two IV lines plus intubation plus PASG (n = 13), 12.4 +/- 1.36. Of the 161 IV attempts, 94% were completed successfully. Of 36 attempts at endotracheal intubation, 89% were successful.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3826807

  12. Multidetector CT findings of bowel Transection in blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity.

  13. Multidetector CT findings of bowel Transection in blunt abdominal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hong Il [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity.

  14. Isolated common femoral artery injury caused by blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avaro, J P; Biance, N; Savoie, P H; Peycru, T; Bonnet, P M; Balandraud, P

    2008-01-01

    The authors report an isolated common femoral artery injury caused by blunt trauma with dissection and secondary ischaemia. A 21-year-old man was admitted to hospital after being stabbed during acute alcoholic intoxication. He presented with a stab wound on the left leg and blunt trauma in the right groin. The surgical exploration of the left-sided wound did not disclose any vascular injury. After a 12-hour period of observation, the patient was discharged. Six hours later, he came back with severe ischaemia on the right leg caused by a femoral artery dissection. The patient underwent surgical revascularization, and fully recovered. Isolated artery blunt trauma is a rare event. In this observation, the absence of early symptoms resulted in delayed diagnosis. PMID:19241930

  15. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Palas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  16. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasonography in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohammadi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Patients in unstable clinical conditions with blunt abdominal trauma require rapid evaluation of the abdominal organ injury to assess the need for laparatomy. This prospective study was conducted to determine the use of emergency sonography for evaluating patients with blunt abdominal trauma and to compare the accuracy of sonography with the results of diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL, exploratory laparatomy and CT"nscan."nPatients and Methods: Emergency sonography was performed prior to any of the diagnostic methods, peritoneal lavage, exploratory laparatomy and CT, on 204 patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Sonography was performed with the "focused abdominal sonography for trauma" (FAST technique and six areas of the abdomen were examined to detect free peritoneal fluid."nResults: Sonography showed a sensitivity of 95.4%, specificity of 78.4% and an overall accuracy of 89% in the diagnosis of free peritoneal fluid. The positive and negative predictive values of sonography were 89.2% and 90.6%, respectively."nConclusion: Sonography is a reliable and accurate method for the emergency evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma.

  18. Severe Pulmonary Valve Regurgitation 40 Years After Blunt Chest Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglsang, Simon; Heiberg, Johan; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Severe pulmonary valve regurgitation caused by a pulmonary valve tear is a rare complication to a blunt chest trauma. In this case report, we present a patient with pulmonary regurgitation originating from a chest trauma 40 years ago. Possible mechanisms are osseous pinch of the pulmonary valve between the anterior chest wall and the vertebral column, and retrograde blowout from severe compression of the lungs. PMID:26434447

  19. Computed tomography for the assessment of blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) was carried out on 70 patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Damage to the abdominal organs was clearly demonstrated by CT. The positive rates of CT in traumatic lesions were higher than those of ultrasound (US). Intraperitoneal hemorrhage was well demonstrated by US. Serum GPT levels were significantly elevated in patients with liver damage (p<0.001). CT proved to be useful for detecting damage to organs in patients with abdominal trauma. (author)

  20. Chest X-rays in detecting injuries caused by blunt trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agladioglu, Kadir; Serinken, Mustafa; Dal, Onur; Beydilli, Halil; Eken, Cenker; Karcioglu, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The appropriate sequence of different imagings and indications of thoracic computed tomography (TCT) in evaluating chest trauma have not yet been clarified at present. The current study was undertaken to determine the value of chest X-ray (CXR) in detecting chest injuries in patients with blunt trauma. METHODS: A total of 447 patients with blunt thoracic trauma who had been admitted to the emergency department (ED) in the period of 2009–2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients met inclusion criteria (age>8 years, blunt injury to the chest, hemodynamically stable, and neurologically intact) and underwent both TCT and upright CXR in the ED. Radiological imagings were re-interpreted after they were collected from the hospital database by two skilled radiologists. RESULTS: Of the 447 patients, 309 (69.1%) were male. The mean age of the 447 patients was 39.5±19.2 (range 9 and 87 years). 158 (35.3%) patients were injured in motor vehicle accidents (MVA). CXR showed the highest sensitivity in detecting clavicle fractures [95%CI 78.3 (63.6–89)] but the lowest in pneuomediastinum [95%CI 11.8 (1.5–36.4)]. The specificity of CXR was close to 100% in detecting a wide array of entities. CONCLUSION: CXR remains to be the first choice in hemodynamically unstable patients with blunt chest trauma. Moreover, stable patients with normal CXR are candidates who should undergo TCT if significant injury has not been ruled out. PMID:27006740

  1. Blunt abdominal trauma with transanal small bowel evisceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushif Medappil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel evisceration through the anus can occur spontaneously or post traumatically. Traumatic transanal small bowel evisceration results from iatrogenic injuries, suction injuries, and blunt abdominal trauma (BAT. We report a 48-year-old female who presented with evisceration of small intestinal loops through the anus following BAT and discuss the etiologies and mechanisms of injury of this rare presentation.

  2. Peritoneal lavage and other diagnostic procedures in blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnostic procedures such as peritoneal lavage, computed tomography, emergency angiography, nuclear scintigraphy, and contrast studies of the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts can assist in the identification, quantification, and localization of injury after blunt abdominal trauma. Use of these procedures should be determined by careful clinically assessment as part of an aggressive approach to the diagnosis of the injured patient. 22 references

  3. The clinical picture of duodenal rupture after blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case of a 30 years old woman who suffered a pneumoretroperitoneum due to a blunt abdominal trauma is reported. The characteristic roentgen signs showing the source of the retroperitoneal air trappings are discussed. The exact analysis of simple abdominal plain films allows early references to an often life-threatening disease without expensive additional examinations. (orig.)

  4. Acute direct inguinal hernia resulting from blunt abdominal trauma: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Hipkins Gabrielle; Vedanayagam Maria; Biswas Seema; Leather Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of traumatic inguinal hernia following blunt abdominal trauma after a road traffic accident and describe the circumstances and technique of repair. The patient suffered multiple upper limb fractures and developed acute swelling of the right groin and scrotum. CT scan confirmed the acute formation of a traumatic inguinal hernia. Surgical repair was deferred until resolution of the acute swelling and subcutaneous haematoma. The indication for surgery was the potential ...

  5. Changing spleen size after blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied the incidence and significance of splenic enlargement on serial CT after abdominal trauma. Spleen size and density in 44 trauma patients were studied with serial, contrast-enhanced Ct. In 58% of the patients, ≥ 10% enlargement of the spleen was seen on follow-up scans. Ten patients had >50% enlargement. In several, the initial density of the spleen was less than that of the liver. Spleen density returned to normal on subsequent scans. Correlations between splenic changes and clinical parameters (such as blood replacement, hypotension, and various trauma indexes) were weak. The author's study indicated that serial splenic enlargement was a physiologic return to normal after major trauma, not a pathologic condition requiring splenectomy

  6. Optic Nerve Avulsion after Blunt Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacı Halil Karabulut

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve avulsion is an uncommon presentation of ocular trauma with a poor prognosis. It can be seen as complete or partial form due to the form of trauma. We assessed the complete optic nerve avulsion in a 16-year-old female patient complaining of loss of vision in her left eye after a traffic accident. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 249-51

  7. CT of blunt pancreatic trauma-A pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur [Diagnostic Radiology, National University Hospital, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119074 (Singapore)], E-mail: dnrskv@nus.edu.sg; Wan, John Mun Chin [Diagnostic Radiology, National University Hospital, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119074 (Singapore)

    2008-08-15

    Blunt trauma to pancreas is uncommon and clinical features are often non-specific and unreliable leading to possible delays in diagnosis and therefore increased morbidity. CT has been established as the imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis of abdominal solid-organ injury in the blunt trauma patient. The introduction of multidetector-row CT allows for high resolution scans and multiplanar reformations that improve diagnosis. Detection of pancreatic injuries on CT requires knowledge of the subtle changes produced by pancreatic injury. The CT appearance of pancreatic injury ranges from a normal initial appearance of the pancreas to active pancreatic bleeding. Knowledge of CT signs of pancreatic trauma and a high index of suspicion is required in diagnosing pancreatic injury.

  8. Diagnostic Accuracy of Secondary Ultrasound Exam in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, accurate diagnosis of visceral injuries is crucial. To determine whether repeating ultrasound exam will increase the sensitivity of focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) through revealing additional free intraperitoneal fluid in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. We performed a prospective observational study by performing primary and secondary ultrasound exams in blunt abdominal trauma patients. All ultrasound exams were performed by four radiology residents who had the experience of more than 400 FAST exams. Five routine intraperitoneal spaces as well as the interloop space were examined by ultrasound in order to find free fluid. All patients who expired or were transferred to the operating room before the second exam were excluded from the study. All positive ultrasound results were compared with intra-operative and computed tomography (CT) findings and/or the clinical status of the patients. Primary ultrasound was performed in 372 patients; 61 of them did not undergo secondary ultrasound exam; thus, were excluded from the study.Three hundred eleven patients underwent both primary and secondary ultrasound exams. One hundred and two of all patients were evaluated by contrast enhanced CT scan and 31 underwent laparotomy. The sensitivity of ultrasound exam in detecting intraperitoneal fluid significantly increased from 70.7% for the primary exam to 92.7% for the secondary exam. Examining the interloop space significantly improved the sensitivity of ultrasonography in both primary (from 36.6% to 70.7%) and secondary (from 65.9% to 92.7%) exams. Performing a secondary ultrasound exam in stable blunt abdominal trauma patients and adding interloop space scan to the routine FAST exam significantly increases the sensitivity of ultrasound in detecting intraperitoneal free fluid

  9. Diagnostic management of blunt abdominal trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children with abdominal injuries after blunt trauma can be managed non operatively in most cases. Rapid diagnosis is essential to select those patients who need immediate operation. Diagnostic methods of choice are ultrasonography, already performed in the emergency setting and contrast enhanced CT of the abdomen in hemodynamically stable patients. This work discusses the different diagnostic strategies and their use in the clinical practice. (orig.)

  10. COMPLETE LEFT MAIN BRONCHUS DISRUPTION DUE TO BLUNT CHEST TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Nasser Aldahmashi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Isolated tracheobronchial disruption is an uncommon injury usually associated with severe blunt thoracic trauma. We report a 14 year-old female case with avulsion of the left main bronchus occurring after blunt chest trauma due to a down fallen wall. A successful surgical repair of the totally avulsed left main bronchus was carried out. The postoperative course was uneventful with improvement in the respiratory status. The patient regained wellness within days in the intensive care unit, and the diagnosis of traumatic rupture of the left main bronchus was approved by bonchoscopy and the computerized tomography (CT scan of the chest. Surgical repair of the disrupted left main bronchus was accomplished 10 days from the admission and the bronchoscopic evaluation of the anastomosis and patency was achieved. The patient was discharged with her lung fully expanded on chest X-ray. The diagnosis and preoperative management of this uncommon post traumatic condition is discussed. We conclude that, in a patient with sustained severe blunt thoracic trauma, a high index of suspicion for trachea-bronchial disruptions must be maintained to detect these rare lesions. Skilful and early surgical treatment is required for proper management of such cases.

  11. Computed tomography and nonoperative treatment for blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were undertaken to determine if computed tomography (CT) could reliably assist physical examination in the initial assessment of blunt abdominal trauma, and also to examine how various abdominal injuries were managed with the guidance of CT. A total of 255 patients underwent emergency abdominal CT following blunt abdominal trauma over a period of seven years. One hundred and fifty two patients had abnormal CT scans, including 58 hepatic, 36 renal, 25 splenic and 9 pancreatic injuries as well as 67 patients with intra-abdominal hemorrhage and 21 patients with free abdominal air. A comparative study on the detection of pneumoperitoneum revealed CT to be far superior to plain radiography. One hundred and three patients had normal CT scans, all of whom were managed nonoperatively, except for three false-negative cases and two nontherapeutic cases. The patients with injury to the parenchymal organs were given nonoperative treatment if they had stable vital signs and no evidence of associated injuries demanding immediate surgery and the majority of these patients were managed well nonoperatively. CT was thus found to be a useful adjunct in the management of victims of blunt abdominal trauma, since in a rapid and noninvasive fashion, CT accurately defined the extent of parenchymal organ injury and also disclosed any other abdominal injuries. (author)

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of CT scan in abdominal blunt trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javad Salimi; Khadyjeh Bakhtavar; Mehdi Solimani; Patrcia Khashayar; Ali Pasha Meysamie; Moosa Zargar

    2009-01-01

    Obiective: To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of CT scan findings in Patients ith blunt abdominal trauma admitted to the university hospital.Methods: All the atients ith blunt abdominal trauma admitted at a tertiary teaching trauma center in Iran between 2005 and 2007 were enrolled in this study.In the absence of any clinical anifestations,he patients underwent a diagnostic CT scan.Laparatomy was performed in those with positive CT results.Others were observed for 48 hours and discharged in case no problem as reported;otherwise they underwent laparatomy.Information on patients'demographic ata,mechanism of trauma,indication for CT scan,CT scan findings,results of laparotomy ere gathered.The sensitivity,specificity and accuracy of the CT-scan images in regard ith the organ injured were calculated.The sensitivity,specificity and accuracy of the T scan were calculated in each case.Results: CT Scan had the highest sensitivity for etecting the injuries to liver (100%) and spleen (86.6%).The specificity of the method or detecting retroperitoneal hematoma (100%) and injuries to kidney (93.5%) was higher han other organs.The accuracy of CT images to detect the injuries to spleen,liver,idney and retroperitoneal hematoma was reported to be 96.1%,94.4%,91.6% and 91.6% espectively.Conclusion: The findings of the present study reveal that CT scan could econsidered as a good choice,especially for patients with blunt abdominal trauma in eaching hospitals where the radiologic academic staff is not present in the hospital in the night shifts.

  13. Imaging of blunt chest trauma; Bildgebung des stumpfen Thoraxtraumas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosch, H. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Negrin, L. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Univ.-Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Wien (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.) [German] Stumpfe Thoraxtraumen gehen mit einer hohen Morbiditaet und Mortalitaet einher. Daher sollten Patienten mit Verdacht auf ein stumpfes Thoraxtrauma rasch radiologisch untersucht werden, damit die entsprechenden therapeutischen Schritte zeitgerecht eingeleitet werden koennen. Zur Abklaerung von Patienten nach einem stumpfen Thoraxtrauma sind seit Jahren das konventionelle Lungenroentgen und die Computertomographie bewaehrte Verfahren. In den letzten Jahren hat die fokussierte Ultraschalluntersuchung (eFAST, Extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma) von schwerverletzten Patienten vermehrt an Bedeutung gewonnen. Durch eine eFAST-Untersuchung kann in der Akutphase rasch geklaert werden, ob bei dem Patienten ein therapiebeduerftiger Pneumothorax, Haematoperikard oder Haematothorax vorliegen. Auch das Lungenroentgen wird zur Diagnose eines Pneumothorax oder Haematothorax eingesetzt, wenngleich seine Sensitivitaet deutlich eingeschraenkt ist. Die CT ist das diagnostische Verfahren der Wahl, um v. a. Patienten mit einem schweren Thoraxtrauma abzuklaeren. (orig.)

  14. Bilateral blunt carotid artery trauma associated with a double lower thoracic spine fracture: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios S; Athanasakopoulos, Michalis; Kokkinis, Konstantinos; Korres, Dimitrios; Spyros G. Pneumaticos

    2008-01-01

    Background A 26 year old female suffering from a double fracture of the lower thoracic spine, as a result of a car accident, was referred to the Spine Unit of our Department. No neurological deficit was detected during clinical examination. Due to the fracture's instability, posterior stabilization was performed. Case presentation Postoperatively, the patient presented a decrease in Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) combined with motor and sensory deficit from the right upper and lower extremities. Ce...

  15. [Bronchial rupture in blunt thoracic trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Espadas, F; Zabalo, M; Encinas, M; Díaz Regañón, G; Pagola, M A; González Fernández, C

    2000-12-01

    In closed chest trauma, bronchial rupture is an unusual but potentially serious complication, with an associated mortality rate of 30%. Recent decades have seen an increase in incidence parallel to greater use of transport. Eighty percent of injuries are located 2.5 cm from the carina. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs, imaging and bronchoscopy. Subcutaneous emphysema and respiratory insufficiency are the most common findings. Images show the presence of pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum or both. Bronchoscopy is the diagnostic method of choice and must be performed early. Treatment consists of reestablishing anatomical continuity of the tracheobronchial tree by surgical repair if the lesion affects more than a third of the circumference and/or pneumothorax is not resolved after two chest drainages. This type of injury should be recognized and treated early, both to restore lung function and to prevent associated complications caused by delay. However, initial findings are seldom specific, requiring the physician to display a high degree of suspicion and explaining why diagnosis often comes late. PMID:11171438

  16. Screening US for blunt abdominal trauma: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To assess the accuracy of screening US in patients with blunt abdominal trauma first admitted in the trauma centre of our general hospital. Materials and methods. The reports of 864 abdominal US examinations of primary trauma patients (139 with major and 725 with minor injuries) obtained with standard protocols were retrieved. For each case, US reports were reviewed and compared to the test available reference standard. The accuracy of US was assessed by evaluating the method's overall ability to distinguish negative from positive cases by showing at least one of the lesions documented by the reference standard and its specific ability to depict injuries separately and independently. Results. US exhibited a satisfactory overall ability to distinguish negative from positive patients (91.5% sensibility and 97.5% specificity in major trauma patients vs. 73.3% sensibility and 98.1 % specificity in minor trauma patients) and a satisfactory specific ability to depict injuries separately and independently in major trauma patients. Of the 21/864 false negative reports (5 in patients with major and 16 in cases with minor trauma), only one affected patient management, a major trauma case, by delaying an emergency laparotomy. Conclusions. Its satisfactory accuracy for major trauma suggests that US could be employed not only to screen cases for emergency laparotomy but also as an alternative to screening CT. However, since major traumatic injuries generally carry an imperative indication for CT, especially as regards neurological, thoracic and skeletal evaluation, US has the not secondary task of performing a prompt preliminary examination using a simplified technique in the emergency room simultaneously with resuscitation

  17. Blunt pancreatic trauma: experience at a rural referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, G A

    1997-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare mechanism of injury, treatment methods, and outcome of blunt pancreas trauma patients transferred from another hospital to those of patients brought directly from the scene. A retrospective review was conducted of 6078 patients treated at a Level I trauma center from 1/1/90 to 12/31/94. Blunt pancreas injury was found in 39 (0.64%) patients (mean age, 33.2 years). Mechanism of injury included 34 (87%) motor vehicle crashes, 3 (8%) motorcycle crashes, and 2 (5%) other injuries. There were 11 transfer patients (28%), and 28 (72%) admitted directly from the scene. Eighty-two per cent of the motor vehicle crash patients were unrestrained, and 35 per cent had ethanol intoxication. Exploratory laparotomy was performed on 32 (82%); eight (25%) required repair or resection; 22 (69%) had trivial injuries, at most requiring drainage; and two (6.3%) exsanguinated. No patients required Whipple resection or pancreatiocojejunostomy. At operation, an average of 2.5 associated intra-abdominal injuries were found. Overall survival was 35 of 39 (90%). Among the patients brought directly to the trauma center, 93 per cent survived, whereas survival among transferred patients was 82 per cent (chi2 = 0.19; P = 0.66). Blunt pancreatic injuries vary in severity, but radical resection is rarely required. Lack of safety restraint and ethanol use are major risk factors. Despite the high likelihood of associated injuries, survivability is high. No difference in outcome was seen between directly admitted and transferred patients. PMID:9036900

  18. Diagnosis and management of colonic injuries following blunt trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Xiong Zheng; Li Chen; Si-Feng Tao; Ping Song; Shao-Ming Xu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To retrospectively evaluate the preoperative diagnostic approaches and management of colonic injuries following blunt abdominal trauma.METHODS: A total of 82 patients with colonic injuries caused by blunt trauma between January 1992 and December 2005 were enrolled. Data were collected on clinical presentation, investigations, diagnostic methods,associated injuries, and operative management. Colonic injury-related mortality and abdominal complications were analyzed.RESULTS: Colonic injuries were caused mainly by motor vehicle accidents. Of the 82 patients, 58 (70.3%) had other associated injuries. Laparotomy was performed within 6 h after injury in 69 cases (84.1%), laparoscopy in 3 because of haemodynamic instability. The most commonly injured site was located in the transverse colon. The mean colon injury scale score was 2.8. The degree of faecal contamination was classified as mild in 18 (22.0%), moderate in 42 (51.2%), severe in 14 (17.1%), and unknown in 8 (9.8%) cases. Sixty-seven patients (81.7%) were treated with primary repair or resection and anastomosis. Faecal stream diversion was performed in 15 cases (18.3%). The overall mortality rate was 6.1%. The incidence of colonic injuryrelated abdominal complications was 20.7%. The only independent predictor of complications was the degree of peritoneal faecal contamination (P = 0.02).CONCLUSION: Colonic injuries following blunt trauma are especially important because of the severity and complexity of associated injuries. A thorough physical examination and a combination of tests can be used to evaluate the indications for laparotomy. One stage management at the time of initial exploration is most often used for colonic injuries.

  19. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

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    Rathachai Kaewlai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an elevated CK-MB or abnormal echocardiography. There were 26 patients (19 men, mean age 45.1 years, mean ISS 34.4 in the study group; 20 had evidence of BCI. Of 52 patients in the control group (38 men, mean age 46.9 years, mean ISS 38.7, eighteen had evidence of BCI. There was a significantly higher rate of BCI in trauma patients with TAI versus those without TAI (77% versus 35%, P<0.001.

  20. CT diagnosis of unsuspected pneumothorax after blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review of abdominal CT scans for evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma yielded 35 cases of pneumothorax, 10 of which had not been diagnosed before CT by clinical examination of plain radiographs. Of the 10 cases initially diagnosed on CT, seven required tube thoracostomy for treatment of the pneumothorax. CT detection of pneumothorax is especially important if mechanical assisted ventilation or general anesthesia is used. Demonstration of pneumothorax requires viewing CT scans of the upper abdomen (lower thorax) at lung windows in addition to the usual soft-tissue windows

  1. Detection of abdominal bleeding in blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arterial hemorrhage is the most serious immediate complication of blunt abdominal trauma. This paper discusses the detection and localization of active hemorrhage in nonpenetrating injury, as a modification of the technique using technetium-99m sulfur colloid to localize the site of active bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. Any imaging protocol for suspected hepatosplenic injury can be easily modified to search for active intra-abdominal hemorrhage. The timely detection of unsuspected bleeding improves patient management by allowing the surgeon to reorder his or her treatment priorities. The early detection of clinically unsuspected intra-abdominal, retroperitoneal, or pelvic hemorrhage will identify those patients who may need more definitive diagnostic procedures, interventional angiography for control of bleeding, or surgical intervention. The 500,000-count view of the abdomen and pelvis can be easily incorporated into any existing trauma protocol using technetium-99m sulfur colloid, is of proven value, and adds little additional time to the study

  2. Testicular Infarction and Rupture After Blunt Trauma — Use of Diagnostic Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair Pace

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 23-year-old male who suffered localised testicular infarction and rupture following blunt trauma. This pathology is rare after blunt trauma and has not been previously described in literature. The appearance on ultrasound resembled malignancy, necessitating orchidectomy. An overview of the pathology of testicular trauma as well as its management is given with particular emphasis on the use diagnostic ultrasound in testicular trauma.

  3. Prospective study of screening for blunt intracranial carotid arterial injuries following basilar skull fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt intracranial carotid arterial injuries (BCIs) are considered rare, but have the potential for a devastating outcome. Early diagnosis of intracranial vascular injuries is extremely difficult, owing to the preferential use of computed tomographic (CT) scanning on its own as a method for the evaluation of head trauma cases. Patients are commonly referred for angiographies only when their clinical conditions become obvious. To diagnose BCIs at an early stage, we performed cerebral angiographies aggressively when initial head CT scanning revealed basilar skull fractures in the proximity to the carotid artery. From November 2000 to September 2002, 202 patients with blunt head trauma were admitted to the Nakakawachi Medical Center of Acute Medicine, a certified Level I trauma center. We investigated a total of 16 blunt head trauma patients with basilar skull fractures to determine the existence of BCIs. A total of 16 patients were angiographically examined, with 7 patients (44%) being identified as having BCIs. Five patients had unilateral BCIs, while 2 patients were found to have bilateral BCIs. We observed various types of BCIs, including 3 stenotic lesions of stenosis due to dissection, 3 cases of carotid-cavernous fistulas, 3 aneurysmal dilatation lesions and one case of occlusion, which were found at initial angiography. Two patients underwent endovascular surgery. One patient underwent craniotomy (wrapping). Both endovascular surgery and craniotomy (trapping with anastomosis) were performed on one patient. The other 3 patients managed conservatively. After the performance of initial angiographies, neurologically deteriorated patients were not observed. BCI is rare, but lethal, particularly when the diagnosis is delayed, thus aggressive screening is necessary to prevent deterioration. Basilar skull fractures near the carotid artery are the most important risk factor for BCI. When initial head CT scanning reveals basilar skull fracture near the carotid artery in

  4. Acute direct inguinal hernia resulting from blunt abdominal trauma: Case Report

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    Hipkins Gabrielle

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of traumatic inguinal hernia following blunt abdominal trauma after a road traffic accident and describe the circumstances and technique of repair. The patient suffered multiple upper limb fractures and developed acute swelling of the right groin and scrotum. CT scan confirmed the acute formation of a traumatic inguinal hernia. Surgical repair was deferred until resolution of the acute swelling and subcutaneous haematoma. The indication for surgery was the potential for visceral strangulation or ischaemia with the patient describing discomfort on coughing. At surgery there was complete obliteration of the inguinal canal with bowel and omentum lying immediately beneath the attenuated external oblique aponeurosis. A modified prolene mesh hernia repair was performed after reconstructing the inguinal ligament and canal in layers. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of the formation of an acute direct inguinal hernia caused as a result of blunt abdominal trauma with complete disruption of the inguinal canal. Surgical repair outlines the principles of restoration of normal anatomy in a patient who is physiologically recovered from the acute trauma and whose anatomy is distorted as a result of his injuries.

  5. Blunt thoracic trauma - an analysis of 264 patients in Rawalpindi, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyse the outcome in terms of morbidity and mortality in blunt thoracic trauma patients in tertiary care hospitals, Rawalpindi. Methods: The prospective study was conducted from March 2008 to February 2012 in surgical wards of public and private sector hospitals in Rawalpindi. A total of 221 patients were included from the Combined Military Hospital during 2008-10, and 43 patients from the Heart's International during 2011-12. The patients reported to emergency department within 48 hours of trauma. All patients were subjected to detailed history and respiratory system examination to ascertain fracture of ribs, flail segment and haemopneumothorax. The diagnosis of chest wall injuries, parenchymal pulmonary injuries and pleural involvement were made on the basis of chest radiographs and computed tomography scan of the chest. The lung contusion was assessed by the number of lobes involved. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 264 patients in the study, 211 (80%) were males and 54 (20%) females. The overall mean age was 44.8+-17.1 years. Over all morbidity was 222 (84.2%); morbidity (minor) was 128 (48.5%), and morbidity (major) was 94 (35.7%). Mortality was 26 (9.8%) and 16 (6%) cases had normal outcome. Conclusion: Early identification and aggressive management of blunt thoracic trauma is essential to reducing significant rates of morbidity and mortality. (author)

  6. Focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the role of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma patients, and to see if the role of computed tomography scan could be limited to only those cases in which sonography was positive. Methods: The retrospective study covered 10 years, from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009, and was conducted at the Department of Radiology and Department of Emergency Medicine, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised cases of 174 children from birth to 14 years who had presented with blunt abdominal trauma and had focussed abdominal sonography for trauma done at the hospital. The findings were correlated with computed tomography scan of the abdomen and clinical follow-up. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma were calculated for blunt abdominal trauma. SPSS 17 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the total 174 cases, 31 (17.81%) were later confirmed by abdominal scan. Of these 31 children, sonography had been positive in 29 (93.54%) children. In 21 (67.74%) of the 31 children, sonography had been true positive; 8 (25%) (8/31) were false positive; and 2 (6%) (2/31) were false negative. There were 6 (19.3%) children in which sonography was positive and converted to laparotomy. There was no significant difference on account of gender (p>0.356). Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in the study had sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value of 73%, and negative predictive value of 73% with accuracy of 94%. All patients who had negative sonography were discharged later, and had no complication on clinical follow-up. Conclusions: Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma is a fairly reliable mode to assess blunt abdominal trauma in children. It is a useful tool to pick high-grade solid and hollow viscous injury. The results suggest that the role of computed tomography scan can be

  7. Microscopic Pattern of Bone Fractures as an Indicator of Blast Trauma: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechníková, Marketa; Mazzarelli, Debora; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Scossa Baggi, Emilio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The assessment of fractures is a key issue in forensic anthropology; however, very few studies deal with the features of fractures due to explosion in comparison with other traumatic injuries. This study focuses on fractures resulting from blast trauma and two types of blunt force trauma (manual compression and running over), applied to corpses of pigs; 163 osteons were examined within forty fractures by the transmission light microscopy. Blast lesions showed a higher percentage of fracture lines through the Haversian canal, whereas in other types of trauma, the fractures went across the inner lamellae. Significant differences between samples hit by blast energy and those runover or manually compressed were observed (p<0.05). The frequency of pattern A is significantly higher in exploded bones than in runover and compressed. Microscopic analysis of the fracture line may provide information about the type of trauma, especially for what concerns blast trauma. PMID:26259072

  8. Isolated pancreatic injury following blunt abdominal trauma in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Sandeep

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic injury following blunt abdominal trauma is rare as compared to other visceral organs. Isolated injury to the pancreas is even more rare. The clinical presentation is subtle resulting in delayed treatment with high morbidity and mortality. A three-year-old female child presented with vomiting 18h following a motor vehicle accident. She was hemodynamically stable with no external signs of injury. Investigations revealed hyperamylasemia and isolated grade III pancreatic injury. Laparotomy with distal pancreatic resection and splenectomy was done. A high degree of clinical suspicion with due consideration to the mechanism of injury is the key to good outcome in these patients. Major ductal injury is the critical issue in the management and a number of therapeutic choices are available specific to the location of the insult.

  9. Blunt trauma of the heart: CT pattern of atrial appendage ruptures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt trauma patients with myocardial ruptures rarely survive long enough to reach a trauma center; however, for the survivors, prompt diagnosis and surgery are mandatory and save up to 80% of patients. Preoperative diagnosis of myocardial ruptures is assessed by echocardiography or, more rarely, by echocardiography. We report two cases of blunt trauma patients with an atrial appendage rupture which could be retrospectively identified on admission CT survey. (orig.)

  10. Is there any role for resuscitative emergency department thoracotomy in blunt trauma?

    OpenAIRE

    Khorsandi, Maziar; Skouras, Christos; Shah, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether there is any role for resuscitative emergency department thoracotomy in severe blunt trauma. Emergency thoracotomy is an accepted intervention for patients with penetrating cardiothoracic trauma. However, its role in blunt trauma has been challenged and has been a subject of considerable debate. Altogether, 186 relevant papers were identified, of which 14 represen...

  11. Pseudopancreatitis on computed tomography in a patient with isolated blunt head trauma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Ah-Ling; Lang, Eddy S

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Computed tomography is commonly used to exclude occult injuries in patients with trauma, but imaging can reveal findings that are of uncertain etiology or clinical significance. We present a case of unsuspected pancreatic abnormality in a female patient with trauma who sustained an isolated blunt head injury. Case presentation A 25-year-old female Caucasian patient sustained massive blunt and penetrating head trauma, secondary to a large object penetrating through the vehicle win...

  12. CT diagnosis of intraperitoneal bladder rupture with blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate CT examination in the diagnosis of intraperitoneal bladder rupture (IPBR) caused by blunt abdominal trauma. Methods: All CT and clinical data of 9 patients with IPBR were reviewed retrospectively. Results: IPBR was detected on CT scans in all 9 patients. CT findings of IPBR included low -attenuation free intraperitoneal fluid collections in the lateral paravesical fossae, the pericolic space, the culde-sac of the pelvis, Morison's pouch, the peri-hepatic space, the perisplenic space and interspace of bowel loops in 9 cases with a lower CT density compared with pure blood. The disruption of the bladder wall was located by CT scan in 5 cases: high-attenuation bladder wall with focal defect in 3 cases and a tear drop-like deformity of the bladder in 2 cases. Other CT findings supporting the diagnosis of IPBR included an underfilled bladder in 8 cases, bladder contusion in 4 cases, and blood clots within the bladder in 6 cases. Conclusion: The presence of intraperitoneal fluid with a CT density less than that of pure blood strongly suggests extravasated urine in the trauma. Intraperitoneal and extraperitoneal rupture can be distinguished based on location of extravasated urine seen on CT scans. The precise localization of the ruptured bladder wall may be demonstrated by CT scan, which is valuable for surgical treatment

  13. Imaging gastrointestinal perforation in pediatric blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To assess the role of imaging, in particular CT, in the early detection of GI perforation. Subjects and methods. In a 10-year period, 43 patients with surgically confirmed GI perforation were identified from hospital records; 22 of these had preoperative CT evaluation. Medical records and radiology were retrospectively reviewed and CT studies were particularly assessed for extraluminal air, free intraperitoneal fluid, bowel wall thickening, bowel wall enhancement, and bowel dilatation. During the study period an additional 12 trauma patients were identified who had CT studies demonstrating the above findings, but who had hypovolemic shock bowel or nondisrupting bowel injury without perforation evident. Results. Extraluminal air was demonstrated in 47 % of the imaged perforations. There was one false-positive extraluminal air. Perforation was confirmed in patients who had all five of the above CT findings, but this was the case for only 18 % of patients with perforation. One or more of the five specified CT findings were present in all CT studies reviewed. No false-negative CT study was performed in the study period. Conclusion. Separating nondisrupting bowel injury from perforation is diagnostically difficult; however, CT remains a good modality for assessing GI perforation in pediatric blunt trauma, but it cannot replace diligent and repeated clinical evaluation of all potential perforation victims. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Study of Duodenal Rupture Followed by Abdominal Blunt Trauma

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    Mohammad Reza Abdoulhosseini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal rupture followed by blunt trauma is usually very rare and happens by hit to epigastrium region caused by trauma, accident or sport injuries. Because of unclear signs or no specific signs of rupture, usually diagnosis of rupture is delayed and associated with dangerous or occasionally deathful complications. The patient was a 29-year-old male who three days after accident referred to emergency unit of Shahroud Imam Hossein hospital with severe pain of abdomen, nausea, decrease in level of consciousness and unstable vital signs. After resuscitation, the patient with diagnosis of peritonitis underwent laparotomy. He had transverse and severs rupture that after duodenal reconstruction, a jejunostomy was performed, then a drain was placed at the site of duodenum and pancreas and the patient was sent to ICU. After two days followed by leakage from abdominal drain, the patient underwent laparotomy again. Then after one week, followed by leakage from abdominal drain, the patient underwent laparotomy. One week after last operation, due to general condition improvement, the patient was transferred to surgical ward and jejunostomy feeding was started for him and duodenostomy and jejunostomy were excluded. Then with enough speed, and paying attention to clinical signs & symptoms and with patient's exact examination, it is possible to prevent the waste of time and expense and gain desired results of treatment.

  15. Spinal cord injury and its association with blunt head trauma

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    Paiva WS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Wellingson S Paiva, Arthur MP Oliveira, Almir F Andrade, Robson LO Amorim, Leonardo JO Lourenço, Manoel J TeixeiraDivision of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo, BrazilBackground: Severe and moderate head injury can cause misdiagnosis of a spinal cord injury, leading to devastating long-term consequences. The objective of this study is to identify risk factors involving spine trauma and moderate-to-severe brain injury.Methods: A prospective study involving 1617 patients admitted in the emergency unit was carried out. Of these patients, 180 with moderate or severe head injury were enrolled. All patients were submitted to three-view spine series X-ray and thin cut axial CT scans for spine trauma investigations.Results: 112 male patients and 78 female patients, whose ages ranged from 11 to 76 years (mean age, 34 years. The most common causes of brain trauma were pedestrians struck by motor vehicles (31.1%, car crashes (27.7%, and falls (25%. Systemic lesions were present in 80 (44.4% patients and the most common were fractures, and lung and spleen injuries. 52.8% had severe and 47.2% moderate head trauma. Fourteen patients (7.8% suffered spinal cord injury (12 in cervical spine, one in lumbar, and one thoracic spine. In elderly patients, the presence of associated lesions and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS < 9 were statistically significant as risk factors (P < 0.05 for spine injury.Conclusion: Spinal cord injury related to moderate and severe brain trauma usually affects the cervical spine. The incidence of spinal lesions and GCS < 9 points were related to greater incidence of spinal cord injury.Keywords: head injury, spine trauma, risk factors

  16. Penile injury due to blunt trauma after circumcision in a male child: A case report

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    Hulya Ozturk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Injury in the case presented here is different from the cause of penile trauma. Our case has been exposed to blunt trauma after circumcision. Type developments of the penile trauma, treatment, and precautions have been discussed with the literature.

  17. Surgical Management of Undiagnosed Laceration of Superior Vena Cava Caused by Blunt Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouabdallaoui, Nadia; Debbagh, Hassan; Schoell, Thibaut; Lebreton, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Intrapericardial rupture of the superior vena cava resulting from blunt thoracic trauma is a rare and life-threatening condition that has to be ruled out in the presence of signs of cardiac tamponade and a history of blunt thoracic trauma. We report the case of undiagnosed superior vena cava laceration caused by a high-speed road traffic accident in a 25 year-old patient revealed by cardiac tamponade. We highlight the need of urgent surgical exploration in all patients whose condition is unstable in the setting of blunt thoracic trauma regardless of imaging conclusions. PMID:27106431

  18. Right Atrium Laceration with Pericardial Tamponade: A Rare Presentation of Blunt Cardiac Trauma

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    Hamid Hoseinikhah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac laceration from blunt thoracic trauma is not a common presentation. The rate of mortality due to this injury is very high since it is not diagnosed and treated immediately. In this study, we present the case of a 65-year-old man with blunt cardiac trauma, causing right atrial rupture and pericardial tamponade. Successful management of this patient was firstly done with initial pericardiocentesis. Then, the patient was immediately transferred to the operating room for tamponade relief and cardiac wall repair. We recommend that cardiac surgeon have  an important suspicious for cardiac involvement in Blunt chest wall trauma

  19. Isolated Blunt Duodenal Trauma: Delayed Diagnosis and Favorable Outcome with "Quadruple Tube" Decompression

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    Stefano Crippa

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Isolated blunt duodenal injury is a rare finding associated with high morbidity and significant mortality. The early identification of a duodenal injury is usually difficult, considering the anatomical location of the duodenum and lack of peritoneal signs and diagnostic delay is part of the clinical picture in most cases. Case report A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital after a motor vehicle collision. At admission he underwent emergency surgery because of lower extremities fractures. Twelve hours later he started to complain an increasing abdominal pain; blood tests showed serum amylase up to 180 U/L and a CT scan demonstrated a perforation of the third duodenal portion. At laparotomy a Grade III injury of the duodenum was evident. The laceration was sutured and a “quadruple-tube” decompression was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful. One year after surgery he is well without any long-term complication. Conclusion A high degree of suspicion is necessary for early diagnosis of blunt duodenal trauma and CT scan should be performed in case of all significant epigastric trauma. In most cases primary direct repair of duodenal wounds can be safely achieved and duodenal decompression via triple or quadriple tube technique is required to decrease the risk of duodenal fistula.

  20. Value of ultrasound in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in an age group including from teenagers to young adults, in a male dominant proportion, resulting in great economic and social impact. Within the complex of trauma, blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is frequent event and presents difficulty in the evaluation and management since the clinical examination shows low sensitivity and specificity. The detection of hemo peritoneum is one of the methods of evaluation of possible indirect intra-abdominal injuries, initially using direct diagnostic abdominal paracentesis and posteriorly the diagnostic peritoneal lavage, that despite the effectiveness, have drawbacks such as invasiveness and the inability of hemo peritoneum quantification and the lesion staging, resulting in non-therapeutic laparotomies. Imaging methods provide useful information in the investigation of abdominal injuries, such as conventional and contrast radiology, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT), which is the best effective method, but has its own drawbacks, such as cost, accessibility, use of ionizing radiation and contrast media and the displacement of the patient to the machine. US presents itself as an alternative in the initial evaluation of these patients as noninvasive method, with lack of harmfulness, low cost, fast answer and portability. Nevertheless, this method also has its limitations, as in cases of abdominal injuries without free fluid. This study was conducted in order to establish the performance of the US in this setting, allowing to rationalise the use of CT. For this purpose we studied 163 patients treated in the ER of HC/FMUSP, with the completion of consecutive US and CT. The population fits the usual profile of trauma victims, with 83% male, 56% in the age group between 20 and 39 years and in 73% of cases victims of traffic accidents. They were brought to the service in an average time of 51 minutes, mainly stable and with satisfactory level of consciousness. US took on

  1. Traumatic Aniridia Following a Blunt Ocular Trauma in a Pseudophakic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran Gencer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt ocular traumas cause serious ocular problems in the anterior and posterior segments of the eye and even may result in globe perforation. In the literature, some cases have been reported with aniridia by traumatic iris expulsion and preserved intraocular lens after blunt trauma in pseudophakic eyes that had undergone cataract surgery with phacoemulsification. In this case, phacoemulsification was performed four months before a blunt trauma to the same eye, intraocular lens remained centralized although traumatic aniridia and partial zonulolysis occurred. This is the first case of traumatic aniridia in a pseudophakic eye in our country, and we aimed to present the possibility of relative protective effects of small cataract incisions after blunt trauma. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 80-2

  2. Hepatic arterial pseudoaneurysm: a rare complication of blunt abdominal trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a child who developed a hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm following blunt hepatic injury. This is a rare complication of hepatic trauma in children. The imaging evaluation and clinical management of hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms are presented. (orig.)

  3. Hepatic Enzyme Decline after Pediatric Blunt Trauma: A Tool for Timing Child Abuse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Amy L.; Lindberg, Daniel M.; Burke, Bonnie L.; Shults, Justine; Holmes, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research in adult patients with blunt hepatic injuries has suggested a pattern of serum hepatic transaminase concentration decline. Evaluating this decline after pediatric blunt hepatic trauma could establish parameters for estimating the time of inflicted injuries. Deviation from a consistent transaminase resolution pattern…

  4. Computed tomography of the chest in blunt thoracic trauma: results of a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt thoracic injuries detected by computed tomography of the chest infrequently require immediate therapy. If immediate therapy is needed, findings will be visible on plain roentgenograms or on clinical exam. Routine Computed Tomography of the chest in blunt trauma is not recommended but may be helpful in selected cases. (N.C.)

  5. Blunt renal trauma in children with pre-existing renal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Kelly; Dunoski, Brian; Zerin, Jeffrey Michael

    2015-01-01

    The kidneys are the most commonly injured genitourinary organ in children following blunt abdominal trauma. Though the retroperitoneal location affords the kidneys some protection from the forces experienced in blunt abdominal trauma, the kidneys are at greater risk of injury when a disease process exposes them from their normal shielded location. In such cases, the injuries may appear to be disproportionate in relation to the severity of the trauma history, confusing the imaging findings. Recognition of both the underlying disease process as well as the manifestations of acute trauma is important; therefore, we present a pictorial essay of traumatized kidneys in children with pre-existing renal abnormalities. PMID:25552392

  6. Perihepatic Packing versus Primary Surgical Repair in Patients with Blunt Liver Trauma; an 8-year Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Shahram Paydar; Mojtaba Mahmoodi; Mohammad(behdad) Jamshidi; Hadi Niakan; Mohammad Keshavarz; Nader Moeenvaziri; Mohammad Esmaeil Ghorbaninejad; Farnaz Farrokhnia; Forough Izadi Fard; Zahra Jaafari; Yalda Golshan; Hamidreza Abbasi; Shahram Bolandparvaz; Behnam Honarvar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the pros and cons of early versus delayed intervention when dealing with severe blunt liver injury with significant hemoperitoneum and hemodynamic instability. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study was performed at the Nemazi hospital, Shiraz, Southern Iran, level I trauma Center affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The study population comprised of all patients who were operated with the impression of blunt abdominal trauma and confir...

  7. Ocular blunt trauma: loss of sight from an ice hockey injury

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    A case of ocular blunt trauma is described in which a 17 year old male ice hockey player collided with an opponent during a game. The opponent's stick travelled under the patient's half face visor and struck his left eye causing hyphema, angle recession, lens subluxation, and choroidal rupture over the macula, permanently reducing his vision to counting fingers. Sequelae of ocular blunt trauma are discussed along with methods of injury prevention by addressing players' behaviour and safety eq...

  8. The Houdini effect--an unusual case of blunt abdominal trauma resulting in perforative appendicitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Kelly, F

    2012-03-01

    We present a unique case of perforative appendicitis that occurred in an adult following blunt abdominal trauma. This case represents the first such reported case from Ireland. It also represents a modern practical example of Laplace\\'s theory of the effect of increased pressure on colonic wall tension leading to localized perforation, and serves to highlight not only the importance in preoperative imaging for blunt abdominal trauma, but also the importance of considering appendiceal perforation.

  9. Massive hemothorax due to inferior phrenic artery injury after blunt trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, Makoto; Shibuya, Kei; Kaneko, Minoru; Koizumi, Ayana; Murata, Masato; Nakajima, Jun; Hagiwara, Shuichi; Kanbe, Masahiko; Koyama, Yoshinori; Tsushima, Yoshito; Oshima, Kiyohiro

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the inferior phrenic artery after blunt trauma is an extremely rare event, and it may occur under unanticipated conditions. This case report describes an injury to the left inferior phrenic artery caused by blunt trauma, which was complicated by massive hemothorax, and treated with transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). An 81 year-old female hit by a car while walking at the traffic intersection was transferred to the emergency department, computed tomography scanning revealed a...

  10. Perioperative management of tracheobronchial injury following blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh M Juvekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe tracheobronchial injury (TBI in a 17-year-old teenager following blunt trauma resulting from a road traffic accident. The patient presented to a peripheral hospital with swelling over the neck and face associated with bilateral pneumothorax for which bilateral intercostal drains were inserted and the patient was transferred to our institute. Fiber-optic videobronchoscopy (FOB was performed, the trachea and bronchi were visualized, and the site and extent of injury was assessed. Spontaneous respiration was maintained till assessment of the airway. Then the patient was anesthetized with propofol and paralyzed using succinylcholine and a double-lumen endobronchial tube was inserted; thereafter, the adequacy of controlled manual ventilation and air-leak through intercostal drains was assessed and the patient was transferred to operating room (OR for repair of the airway injury. The OR was kept ready during FOB to manage any catastrophe. This case describes the need for proper preparation and communication between health care team members to manage all possible scenarios of traumatic TBI.

  11. Emergency CT in blunt abdominal trauma of multiple injury patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple injury patients with blunt abdominal trauma (n = 110) were examined by abdominal CT. An i.v., but not peroral, contrast medium was used, thereby eliminating the delay caused by administering peroral contrast medium and any subsequent delay in making the diagnoses and beginning operative treatment. Eighteen patients underwent emergency laparotomy after the initial CT examination. The preoperative CT findings were compared to the laparotomy findings. CT revealed all but one of the severe parenchymal organ lesions requiring surgery. The one liver laceration that went undetected had caused hemoperitoneum, which was diagnosed by CT. The bowel and mesenteric lesions presented as intra-abdominal blood, and the hemoperitoneum was discovered in every patient with these lesions. Fourteen patients also initially had positive abdominal CT findings; 10 of them underwent an additional abdominal CT within 3 days, but the repeat studies did not reveal any lesions in need of surgery. Omission of the oral contrast medium did not jeopardize making the essential diagnoses, but it did save time. (orig.)

  12. Management of high-risk popliteal vascular blunt trauma: clinical experience with 62 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Pourzand

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ali Pourzand, Bassir A Fakhri, Ramin Azhough, Mohammad Ali Hassanzadeh, Shahryar Hashemzadeh, Amrollah M BayatDepartment of General Surgery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, East Azarbaijan Province, IranPurpose: The purpose of this study is to report the clinical and functional outcomes of patients, treated between 2004 and 2009, with high-risk popliteal vascular injuries due to compound fractures about the knee.Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of prospectively collected data from Tabriz Medical Trauma Center. Our aim was to perform surgical revascularization as soon as the arterial injury was recognized. The mechanism of injury was blunt in the entire cohort of patients, and all of them had bone fractures about the knee. The treatment of arterial injury included vein graft interposition in 39 (63%, primary anastomosis in 20 (32.3%, and lateral repair in 3 (4.8% patients. The patients were divided into 2 study groups: limb salvage group (group 1 and amputation group (group 2. Subgroup analysis consisted of univariate analysis comparing the 2 groups and multivariate analysis examining the factors associated negatively and positively with the primary endpoint, limb salvage.Results: In the entire cohort of patients, 60 patients (97% were male and 2 were female (3%; the mean age was 34.1 years (16–49 years. The overall amputation rate in this study was 37.1% (23 amputations. Significant (P < 0.05 independent factors associated negatively with limb salvage were combined tibia and fibula fracture, concomitant artery and vein injury, ligation of venous injury, and lack of backflow after Fogarty catheter thrombectomy, while repair of popliteal artery and vein injury, when present, was associated with improved early limb salvage. For 40 patients, we adopt a liberal attitude toward open 4-compartment fasciotomy through both medially and laterally placed incisions.Conclusion: Expeditious recognition of vascular

  13. Isolated inferior rectus muscle rupture after blunt orbital trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasetti, Patrick; Metzler, Philipp; Jacobsen, Christine

    2013-01-01

    A 44-year-old man was referred to our department with diplopia, periorbital swelling and haematoma of the left eye after orbital trauma due to a punch. During the examination, mild enophthalmos, hypertropia and a total absence of infraduction were observed. An orbital computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a left orbital floor blow-out fracture, with caudal herniation of periorbital fat and rectus inferior muscle. Repair was performed under total anaesthesia with placement of a Titan mesh. The following days were marked by the persistence of diplopia without improvement of infraduction. A postoperative, 0.5 mm CT scan highlighted a complete rupture of the inferior rectus muscle, not seen before operation, by a 1.0 mm-sliced CT. In this case, orthoptic therapy was undertaken with good results after 6 months and without need of a second repair. PMID:24963904

  14. [Isolated left ventricular--right atrial shunt after blunt chest trauma (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, E; Beyer, J

    1978-12-01

    A case of left-ventricular-right-atrial septal defect secundary to blunt chest trauma is described. The etiology of this type of septal defect, e. g. congenital, following aortic and mitral valve replacement, endocarditis and trauma, is discussed. Early defect closure is recommended in the presence of significant shunt volume. PMID:751280

  15. Bilateral ureteropelvic disruption following blunt abdominal trauma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Hiroko

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ureteral injury occurs in less than 1% of blunt abdominal trauma cases, partly because the ureters are relatively well protected in the retroperitoneum. Bilateral ureteral injury is extremely rare, with only 10 previously reported cases. Diagnosis may be delayed if ureteric injury is not suspected, and delay of 36 hours or longer has been observed in more than 50% of patients with ureteric injury following abdominal trauma, leading to increased morbidity. Case presentation A 29-year-old man was involved in a highway motor vehicle collision and was ejected from the front passenger seat even though wearing a seatbelt. He was in a preshock state at the scene of the accident. An intravenous line and left thoracic drain were inserted, and he was transported to our hospital by helicopter. Whole-body, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT scan showed left diaphragmatic disruption, splenic injury, and a grade I injury to the left kidney with a retroperitoneal haematoma. He underwent emergency laparotomy. The left diaphragmatic and splenic injuries were repaired. Although a retroperitoneal haematoma was observed, his renal injury was treated conservatively because the haematoma was not expanding. In the intensive care unit, the patient's haemodynamic state was stable, but there was no urinary output for 9 hours after surgery. Anuresis prompted a review of the abdominal x-ray which had been performed after the contrast-enhanced CT. Leakage of contrast material from the ureteropelvic junctions was detected, and review of the repeat CT scan revealed contrast retention in the perirenal retroperitoneum bilaterally. He underwent cystoscopy and bilateral retrograde pyelography, which showed bilateral complete ureteral disruption, preventing placement of ureteral stents. Diagnostic laparotomy revealed complete disruption of the ureteropelvic junctions bilaterally. Double-J ureteral stents were placed bilaterally and ureteropelvic

  16. CT findings of bowel injury following blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the diagnostic value of CT, the author retrospectively reviewed preoperative CT findings of 57 cases with surgically proven bowel injury following blunt trauma. The small bowel injuries were divided into two groups, i.e., those without mesenteric injury, group A, and those with mesenteric injury, group B. The incidence of CT findings including extraluminal air, bowel wall thickening, peritoneal fluid, mesenteric thickening, and high density hematoma, were determined. CT findings were also assessed by time intervals between injury and examination. CT scans of small bowel injury were compared with those of surgically proven 25 cases of mesenteric injury without bowel injury, group C. CT showed findings suggestive of bowel injury in 96.4% of the cases. There were 5 false negative CT scans, which consisted of 4 small bowel and one large bowel injuries, all performed within 2 hours from injury. The patients in group A small bowel injury had a higher incidence of pneumoperitoneum on CT scans performed over 4 hours after injury than on those performed within 4 hours. Bowel wall thickening was more frequent in group A than in group B or C. Peritoneal fluid collection within 4 hours from injury was less frequent in group A than in group B or C. High density hematoma was more frequent in group B and C than in group A. The analysis suggested that early diagnosis of isolated small bowel injury was difficult because of lack of signs indicating mesenteric injury. In these cases bowel wall thickening appeared earlier, then peritoneal fluid developed, with and without mesenteric thickening or extraluminal air. Thus in those with suspicion of bowel injury, bowel wall thickening on initial CT should be carefully followed up in regard to additional or progressive findings. Operative indication can be determined with careful clinical correlation before detection of extraluminal air. (K.H.)

  17. Predicting outcomes after blunt chest wall trauma: development and external validation of a new prognostic model

    OpenAIRE

    Battle, Ceri Elisabeth; Hutchings, Hayley; Lovett, Simon; Bouamra, Omar; Jones, Sally; Sen, Aruni; Gagg, James; Robinson, David; Hartford-Beynon, Jake; Williams, Jeremy; Evans, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Blunt chest wall trauma accounts for over 15% of all trauma admissions to Emergency Departments worldwide. Reported mortality rates vary between 4 and 60%. Management of this patient group is challenging as a result of the delayed on-set of complications. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a prognostic model that can be used to assist in the management of blunt chest wall trauma. Methods There were two distinct phases to the overall study; the development and the v...

  18. Liver injury following blunt abdominal trauma: a new mechanism-driven classification

    OpenAIRE

    Slotta, J. E.; Justinger, C.; Kollmar, O; Kollmar, C.; Schäfer, T.; Schilling, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    Purposes The current classifications for blunt liver trauma focus only on the extent of liver injury. However, these scores are independent from the localization of liver injury and mechanism of trauma. Methods The type of liver injury after blunt abdominal trauma was newly classified as type A when it was along the falciform ligament with involvement of segments IVa/b, III, or II, and type B when there was involvement of segments V–VIII. With the use of a prospectively established database, ...

  19. Emergency resuscitative thoracotomy performed in European civilian trauma patients with blunt or penetrating injuries: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Narvestad, Jon; Meskinfamfard, M.; Søreide, Kjetil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Emergency resuscitative thoracotomy (ERT) is a lifesaving procedure in selected patients. Indications are still being debated, but outcome in blunt trauma is believed to be poor. Recent reports from European populations, where blunt trauma predominates, have suggested favorable outcome also in blunt trauma. Our aim was to identify all European studies reported over the last decade and compare reported outcomes to existing knowledge. Methods: We performed a systematic literature se...

  20. Protocol compliance and time management in blunt trauma resuscitation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg, W.R.; Bergs, E.A.; Mushkudiani, N.; Klimek, M.; Schipper, I.B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study advanced trauma life support (ATLS) protocol adherence prospectively in trauma resuscitation and to analyse time management of daily multidisciplinary trauma resuscitation at a level 1 trauma centre, for both moderately and severely injured patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All vi

  1. Evaluation of the criteria for angiotomography indications in the diagnosis of carotid and vertebral arterial injury associated with blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almerindo Júnior

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blunt carotid and vertebral artery injury (BCVI occur infrequently. The incidence of this type of injury is difficult to determine as many emergency room patients are neurologically asymptomatic. The statistics have not been reported in Brazil. The objectives of the current study were: To evaluate the accuracy of criteria used to recommend angiotomography in the diagnosis of cervical BCVI in 100 patients with blunt cervical trauma in the trauma services section of a Brazilian quaternary care hospital. Methods During a 30-month (2006-2008, all patients admitted to the emergency room of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo with blunt cervical trauma and potential risk of cervical vessel injury, were subjected to cervical angiotomography to diagnose BCVI. The data analyzed are presented as mean ± standard deviation, and statistical analyses included Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests, and the Mann-Whitney test. Results During the study period 2467 blunt trauma patients were admitted. In 100 patients that met the criteria for inclusion in the study, angiotomography identified 23 with BCVI, including 17 males and six females. The mean patient age was 34.81 ± 14.84 years. Car crash (49% and car-pedestrian accidents (24% were the most frequent causes of injury. Ten patients had internal carotid artery injuries, two patients had common carotid artery injuries, and 11 patients had vertebral artery injuries. Seven patients presented with Degree I arterial injuries, 10 patients presented with Degree II artery injuries, four patients presented with Degree IV artery injuries, one patient presented with a Degree V artery injury, and one patient had a carotid fistula. Seven out of the 23 patients with BCVI (30.4% presented with cervical vertebrae fractures, and 11 out of the 23 patients with BCVI (47.8% presented with facial fractures (LeFort II and III. Conclusions Although there is no consensus

  2. Choroidal neovascularization after blunt ocular trauma in angioid streaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubota M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Masaomi Kubota, Takaaki Hayashi, Kota Arai, Hiroshi TsuneokaDepartment of Ophthalmology, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Patients with angioid streaks are prone to develop a subretinal hemorrhage after ocular injury, due to fragility of Bruch's membrane.Objective: The purpose of this study was to report a patient with angioid streaks in whom subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV developed after blunt ocular trauma.Case report: A 60-year-old man was accidentally struck in the left eye with a crowbar handle while engaged in the demolition of wooden building materials in May 2011 and was initially evaluated at our hospital. Corrected visual acuity was 0.3 in the right and 1.2 in the left eye, and relative afferent pupillary defect was negative. Funduscopy revealed choroidal atrophy around the optic papillae and angioid streaks radiating from around the optic discs in both eyes. In the right eye, there was macular atrophy. In the left eye, there was a subretinal hemorrhage around the macular region. Fluorescein angiography of the left eye showed a blockage due to subretinal hemorrhage and increasing hyperfluorescent spots superior to the fovea, suggestive of extrafoveal CNV. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography showed macular thinning in the right eye and no obvious abnormalities near the subfoveal region in the left eye. Two months later, the patient noticed decreased visual acuity in the left eye and was reevaluated. Visual acuity had decreased to 0.7, and well-defined CNV, one disc diameter in size, was presenting slightly superior to the macula, including the subfoveal region. Two weeks later, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF antibody (bevacizumab was injected intravitreally; the CNV then regressed, and visual acuity improved to 1.2.Conclusion: Marked improvement in visual acuity with early treatment has not been reported in angioid streaks with subfoveal CNV after ocular injury

  3. [Blunt abdominal trauma.--analysis of 201 cases (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannenborg, G; Wolf, O; Voigtsberger, P

    1978-01-01

    201 blunt abdominal traumata treated clinically at the surgical department of the Medical Academy in Erfurt from 1967 to 1976 are reported: No increase of blunt abdominal traumata within the period of the report in spite of considerable growth of trafficdensity and industrialization could be observed.--The percentage of severe secundary injuries remained approximately constant, too.--Intestinal lesions, combined hepatolienal ruptures caused the highest mortality especially in combination with severe craniocerebral lesions. PMID:685552

  4. Traumatic Abdominal Wall Hernia After a Blunt Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Dumlu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic abdominal wall hernia is a rare result of blunt abdominal traumas in adults. Altough the detection of the injuries of the abdominal organs is the priority in blunt traumas, abdominal wall defect may also occur in these patients. These hernias can go undetected due to preservation of the skin overlying the hernia defect. Traumatic abdominal wall hernias can have high morbidity and mortality rates due to incarceration and perforation of tubular hollow organs, especially if there is any delay. The possibility of traumatic hernia should always be considered in cases with serious blunt trauma. Computed Tomography (CT scan examinations should be performed routinely due to their high diagnostic value if trumatic hernia is suspected. In this report, a traumatic abdominal wall hernia patient who was treated by surgery has been presented with the review of the current literature.

  5. Comparison between plain abdominal radiographs and CT in patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plain abdominal radiographs (PAR) and CT in 186 cases of blunt abdominal trauma were reviewed. In the group of normal PAR, CT was normal in 56 cases (30%) and CT was abnormal in 9 (5%). They were all treated conservatively and had on uneventful course. It can be said that possibility of missing significant injury in cases of normal PAR is minimal. Both PAR and CT were abnormal in 88 cases (47%). All patients treated surgically were included in this group. CT is indicated in this group. False negative CT results were seen in 13 cases (7%). It consisted of minor fractures and had no clinical significance. False positive PAR findings were seen in 32 cases (18%). PAR is suitable as the first modality of choice. Among various findings on PAR, obliteration of organs and intraperitoneal fluid collection suggested abdominal injury most frequently. Thorough work-up is necessary when such findings were recognized on PAR. There was no relationship between abnormal injury and specific fractures as has been described in previous reports. (author)

  6. GLAUCOMA FOLLOWING BLUNT TRAUMA : AN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND CLINICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purvi R

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To study the demographic profile, clinical picture, treatment modalities and long term follow up of patients suffering from glaucoma developing after blunt trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective study over one year in which 75 eyes, newly diagnosed or referred with post traumatic glaucoma to M & J Institute of Ophthalmology were studied. All cases underwent thorough eye examination. Treatment was individualized and instituted. RESULTS: Patients ranged from 1 - 70 years with 32 patients (42.66% below 30 years of age. 61 patients (81.33% were males. 66.65% were students, laborers or housewives, with laborers topping the charts in vulnerability. In 46 cases (61.33%, left eye was affected, while in 29 pts. (38.66% right eye was affected. In 54.66% of cases, trauma was caused by stone, wooden stick or ball. Others included fist, firecracker, iron rod, handle, belt.16% patients presented with IOP in the normal range, 38 (50.66% patients had IOP in the range of 21-30 mm Hg, whereas 16 (21.33% patients had IOP more than 40 mm Hg. Within 1 week of instituting treatment, 41 (54.66% had IOP ≤ 20 mm Hg and only 3 patients had IOP more than 30 mm Hg. However, 70 (93.33% patients had IOP ≤ 20 mm Hg by the end of 6 months and all the patients were in this range after 6 months. On slit lamp examination, corneal edema, traumatic mydriasis and sphincter tears were seen in 32 patients each. 12 patients had hyphema and 19 patients had lens dislocated either into vitreous or into the anterior chamber. Iridodialysis was seen in 5 patients. Other findings included cataract, posterior synechiae, subluxation of lens and tobacco dusting. 57 (76% patients had vision less than 6/60, however after an interval of more than 6 months, 28 (37% patients had vision less than 3/60. The number of patients having vision ≥ 6/12 rose from 5 at initial presentation to 15 in follow-up more than 6 months. Disc changes could be assessed by ophthalmoscopy in 37

  7. Non-operative versus operative treatment for blunt pancreatic trauma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Michael V; Wettergren, André; Hillingsø, Jens Georg;

    2014-01-01

    or language of publication. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used relevant search strategies to obtain the titles and abstracts of studies that were relevant for the review. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility. MAIN RESULTS: The search found 83 relevant references. We excluded...... all of the references and found no randomised clinical trials investigating treatment of blunt pancreatic trauma in children. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: This review shows that strategies regarding non-operative versus operative treatment of severe blunt pancreatic trauma in children are not based on...

  8. Thyroid gland rupture: a rare finding after a blunt neck trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, Faisal; Varshney, Rickul; Payne, Richard J; Manoukian, John J

    2013-05-01

    This is a case report of a 13 years old boy with a thyroid rupture secondary to a hockey stick blunt trauma to his neck and a literature review focused on diagnosis and management. There are 14 other cases in the literature, 7 of which required surgical intervention mainly to evacuate a hematoma. The case in this review did not develop any complications. This is the first reported case in the literature of thyroid gland rupture due to a blunt trauma in a child. Patients with thyroid gland rupture should be monitored closely for developing a hematoma or thyroid storm. PMID:23522054

  9. Surgical Management of Undiagnosed Laceration of Superior Vena Cava Caused by Blunt Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Bouabdallaoui, Nadia; Debbagh, Hassan; Schoell, Thibaut; Lebreton, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    International audience Intrapericardial rupture of the superior vena cava resulting from blunt thoracic trauma is a rare and life-threatening condition that has to be ruled out in the presence of signs of cardiac tamponade and a history of blunt thoracic trauma. We report the case of undiagnosed superior vena cava laceration caused by a high-speed road traffic accident in a 25 year-old patient revealed by cardiac tamponade. We highlight the need of urgent surgical exploration in all patien...

  10. Evaluation of leadership skills during the simulation education course for the initial management of blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Eric; Brautigam, Robert T; Smola, Jacqueline; Burns, Karyl J

    2012-04-01

    Leadership skills of senior residents, trauma fellows, and a nurse practitioner were assessed during simulation training for the initial management of blunt trauma. This was a pilot, observational study, that in addition to skill development and assessment also sought to determine the need for a dedicated leadership training course for surgical residents. The study evaluated the leadership skills and adherence to Advance Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines of the team leaders during simulation training. The team leaders' performances on criteria regarding prearrival planning, critical actions based on ATLS, injury identification, patient management, and communication were evaluated for each of five blunt-trauma scenarios. Although there was a statistically significant increase in leadership skills for performing ATLS critical actions, P < 0.05, there were 10 adverse events. A structured simulation program dedicated to developing skills for team leadership willbe a worthwhile endeavor at our institution. PMID:22611722

  11. Lower Urinary Tract Injuries Following Blunt Trauma: A Review of Contemporary Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jennifer P. L; Bultitude, Matthew F; Royce, Peter; Gruen, Russell L; Cato, Alex; Corcoran, Niall M

    2011-01-01

    Lower urinary tract trauma, although relatively uncommon in blunt trauma, can lead to significant morbidity when diagnosed late or left untreated; urologists may only encounter a handful of these injuries in their career. This article reviews the literature and reports on the management of these injuries, highlighting the issues facing clinicians in this subspecialty. Also presented is a structured review detailing the mechanisms, classification, diagnosis, management, and complications of blunt trauma to the bladder and urethra. The prognosis for bladder rupture is excellent when treated. Significant intraperitoneal rupture or involvement of the bladder neck mandates surgical repair, whereas smaller extraperitoneal lacerations may be managed with catheterization alone. With the push for management of trauma patients in larger centers, urologists in these hospitals are seeing increasing numbers of lower urinary tract injuries. Prospective analysis may be achieved in these centers to address the current lack of Level 1 evidence. PMID:22114545

  12. Significance of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of vertebral artery injury associated with blunt cervical spine trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertebral artery injury associated with non-penetrating cervical trauma is rare. We report 11 cases of vertebral artery injury diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after blunt trauma to the cervical spine and discuss about the importance of MRI in the diagnosis of this injury. Seven cases were caused by motor vehicle accidents, three by diving accidents, and one by static compression of the neck. All of the patients had documented cervical spine fractures and dislocations. In three patients, the diagnosis of complete occlusion of the vertebral artery was made on the basis of MRI and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). In the other patients, mural injuries of the vertebral artery were demonstrated with DSA. These 11 patients presented with acute, nonspecific changes in neurological status. Two had infarctions of the cerebellum and brainstem. None were treated with anticoagulants. All of them survived and were discharged to other hospitals for physical and occupational therapy. Although DSA remains the gold standard for diagnosing vertebral artery injuries, MRI is a newer modality for assessing cervical cord injury, and it may be useful for evaluating the presence of vertebral injury after blunt cervical spine trauma. (author)

  13. A blunt chest trauma causing left anterior descending artery dissection and acute myocardial infarction treated by deferred angioplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafid Fayadh Al-Aqeedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of acute myocardial infarction (AMI. We report a case of blunt chest trauma resulting from a motorcycle collision causing ostial dissection of the left anterior descending (LAD artery in a 31-year-old previously healthy male. The patient also suffered from compound comminuted fractures of the humerus and ulna and severe liver laceration, which hampered both percutaneous and surgical acute revasularization. After a stormy hospital course, a bare metal stent was implanted to seal the LAD artery dissection. The patient was discharged in a stable condition and was followed-up for rehabilitation. This case report underscores the multidisciplinary approach in facing challenges encountered after rare sequelae of chest trauma.

  14. Divergent adaptive and innate immunological responses are observed in humans following blunt trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Lentsch Alex B; Solomkin Joseph S; Cave Cindy M; Robinson Chad T; Adediran Samuel G; Rasper Alison M; Reid Maria R; Goetzman Holly S; Kasten Kevin R; Johannigman Jay A; Caldwell Charles C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The immune response to trauma has traditionally been modeled to consist of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) followed by the compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS). We investigated these responses in a homogenous cohort of male, severe blunt trauma patients admitted to a University Hospital surgical intensive care unit (SICU). After obtaining consent, peripheral blood was drawn up to 96 hours following injury. The enumeration and functiona...

  15. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial infarction after blunt chest trauma: a heartbreaking soccer-shot

    OpenAIRE

    Fogarassy Peter; Maunz Martin; Beck Torsten; Baccouche Hannibal; Beyer Martin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac injury occasionally occurs as a result of blunt chest trauma. Most cardiac complications in chest trauma are due to myocardial contusion rather than direct damage to the coronary arteries. However, traumatic coronary injury has been reported, and a variety of underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed. We present a 26 year old patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome as a consequence of a soccer-shot impact to the chest. CMR showed apical inferior i...

  16. Intrathoracic Kidney after Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halis, Fikret; Amasyali, Akin Soner; Yucak, Aysel; Yildiz, Turan; Gokce, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal trauma is responsible for most genitourinary injuries. The incidence of renal artery injury and intrathoracic kidney is quite low in patients who present with blunt trauma experiencing damage. There are four defined etiologies for intrathoracic kidney, which include real intrathoracic ectopic kidney, eventration of the diaphragm, congenital diaphragmatic herniation, and traumatic diaphragmatic rupture. The traumatic intrathoracic kidney is an extremely rare case. We presented intrathoracic kidney case after traumatic posterior diaphragmatic rupture. PMID:26881170

  17. Intrathoracic Kidney after Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Fikret Halis; Akin Soner Amasyali; Aysel Yucak; Turan Yildiz; Ahmet Gokce

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal trauma is responsible for most genitourinary injuries. The incidence of renal artery injury and intrathoracic kidney is quite low in patients who present with blunt trauma experiencing damage. There are four defined etiologies for intrathoracic kidney, which include real intrathoracic ectopic kidney, eventration of the diaphragm, congenital diaphragmatic herniation, and traumatic diaphragmatic rupture. The traumatic intrathoracic kidney is an extremely rare case. We presented intrat...

  18. The effects of blunt trauma and cataract surgery on corneal endothelial cell density

    OpenAIRE

    Yeniad Baris; Corum Isik; Ozgun Cahit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the effects of trauma and cataract surgery on corneal endothelial cell density (ECD) in patients with a traumatic cataract due to blunt trauma without globe laceration. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, 31 subjects with traumatic cataract (traumatic cataract group) and 30 subjects with a senile cataract (control group) were enrolled. The subjects with traumatic cataract were subdivided into two groups: uncomplicated surgery subg...

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of Focused Abdominal Sonography for Trauma in blunt abdominal trauma patients in a trauma centre of Hong Kong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheung Kent Shek; Wong Hay Tai; Leung Ling Pong; Tsang Tat Chi; Leung Gilberto Ka Kit

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Focused Abdominal Sonography for Trauma (FAST) is widely used for the detection of intraperitoneal free fluids in patients suffering from blunt abdominal trauma (BAT).This study aimed at assessing the diagnostic accuracy of this investigation in a designated trauma centre.Methods: This was a retrospective study of BAT patients over a 6 year period seen in a trauma centre in Hong Kong.FAST findings were compared with laparotomy,abdominal computed tomography or autopsy findings,which served as the gold standard for presence of intrapcritoneal free fluids.The patients who did not have FAST or gold standard confirmatory test performed,had preexisting peritoneal fluid,died at resuscitation or had imcomplete documentation of FAST findings were excluded.The performance of FAST was expressed as sensitivity,specificity,predictive values (PV),likelihood ratios (LR) and accuracy.Results: FAST was performed in 302 patients and 153 of them were included in this analysis.The sensitivity,specificity,positive PV,negative PV,positive LR,negative LR and accuracy for FAST were respectively 50.0 %,97,3%,87.0%,84.6%,18.8,0.5 and 85.0%.FAST was found to be more sensitive in less severely injured patients and more specific in more severely injured patients.Conclusion: FAST is a reliable investigation iu the initial assessment of BAT patients.The diagnostic values of FAST could be affected by the severity of injury and staff training is needed to further enhance its effective use.

  20. Detection of active intraabdominal hemorrhage after blunt trauma: value of delayed CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active hemorrhage is a rare finding at CT following blunt abdominal trauma. The time interval between IV contrast administration and scanning the abdomen may impact on the ability to visualize active hemorrhage at CT. We report a case of active hemorrhage associated with splenic injury that was identified only at delayed CT scanning. (orig.)

  1. Delayed Presentation of Renocolic Fistula at 4 Months after Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Don Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Causes of previously reported reno-colic fistulas included primary renal and colonic pathologic states involving infectious, malignant or other inflammatory processes. However, reno-colic fistula after renal injury is extremely uncommon. We report an unusual delayed presentation of reno-colic fistula that occurred at 4 months later after blunt abdominal trauma.

  2. Delayed Presentation of Renocolic Fistula at 4 Months after Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Sang Don Lee; Tae Nam Kim; Hong Koo Ha

    2011-01-01

    Causes of previously reported reno-colic fistulas included primary renal and colonic pathologic states involving infectious, malignant or other inflammatory processes. However, reno-colic fistula after renal injury is extremely uncommon. We report an unusual delayed presentation of reno-colic fistula that occurred at 4 months later after blunt abdominal trauma.

  3. Blunt Trauma Performance of Fabric Systems Utilizing Natural Rubber Coated High Strength Fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blunt trauma performance of fabric systems against 9 mm bullets is reported. Three shots were fired at each fabric system with impact velocity of 367±9 m/s and the depth of indentation on the modeling clay backing was measured. The results showed that 18-layer and 21-layer all-neat fabric systems failed the blunt trauma test. However, fabric systems with natural rubber (NR) latex coated fabric layers gave lower blunt trauma of between 25-32 mm indentation depths. Deformations on the neat fabrics upon impact were identified as broken yarns, yarn stretching and yarn pull-out. Deflections of the neat fabrics were more localised. For the NR latex coated fabric layers, no significant deformation can be observed except for peeled-off regions of the NR latex film at the back surface of the last layer. From the study, it can be said that the NR latex coated fabric layers were effective in reducing the blunt trauma of fabric systems.

  4. Association between cervical spine and skull-base fractures and blunt cerebrovascular injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) are associated with high morbidity and mortality and can lead to neurological deficits. The established criteria for patients undergoing CT angiography (CTA) for BCVI are broad, and can expose patients to radiation unnecessarily. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of BCVI in patients on CTA and determine presentations associated with the highest rates of BCVI. With IRB approval, patients were selected for CTA screening for BCVI according to a predefined set of criteria at our hospital between 2007 and 2010. Patients were identified from our institution's trauma database. CTAs were retrospectively reviewed for BCVI including vasospasm and dissection. Electronic medical records were reviewed for clinical presentation and hospital course. Of 432 patients, vasospasm (n = 10) and/or dissection (n = 36) were found in 46 patients (10.6 %). BCVI was associated with cervical spine and/or skull-base fracture in 40/46 patients (87 %, P < 0.0001). Significant correlations were seen between dissection and fracture in 31/36 patients (86.2 %, p < 0.0001) and between BCVI and both neurological deficits and fractures (27/44, P < 0.0001). BCVI was significantly associated with cervical and/or skullbase fractures and neurological deficits with coexistent fractures. Patients with these injuries should be prioritized for rapid CTA evaluation for BCVI. (orig.)

  5. Association between cervical spine and skull-base fractures and blunt cerebrovascular injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buch, Karen; Nguyen, Thanh; Norbash, Alex; Mian, Asim [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Mahoney, Eric; Burke, Peter [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Libby, Brandon; Calner, Paul [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) are associated with high morbidity and mortality and can lead to neurological deficits. The established criteria for patients undergoing CT angiography (CTA) for BCVI are broad, and can expose patients to radiation unnecessarily. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of BCVI in patients on CTA and determine presentations associated with the highest rates of BCVI. With IRB approval, patients were selected for CTA screening for BCVI according to a predefined set of criteria at our hospital between 2007 and 2010. Patients were identified from our institution's trauma database. CTAs were retrospectively reviewed for BCVI including vasospasm and dissection. Electronic medical records were reviewed for clinical presentation and hospital course. Of 432 patients, vasospasm (n = 10) and/or dissection (n = 36) were found in 46 patients (10.6 %). BCVI was associated with cervical spine and/or skull-base fracture in 40/46 patients (87 %, P < 0.0001). Significant correlations were seen between dissection and fracture in 31/36 patients (86.2 %, p < 0.0001) and between BCVI and both neurological deficits and fractures (27/44, P < 0.0001). BCVI was significantly associated with cervical and/or skullbase fractures and neurological deficits with coexistent fractures. Patients with these injuries should be prioritized for rapid CTA evaluation for BCVI. (orig.)

  6. CT findings in children with blunt trauma in the spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated CT findings in 19 children with blunt injuries in the spleen. CT demonstrated laceration of the spleen in 7 children, rupture of the spleen in 7, and splenic hematoma in 5. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in 3 children, of whom 1 was treated by arterial embolization. Laparotomy was performed in 3 children (15.8%) other than the 3 showing contrast medium leakage; hemostasis by compression was performed in 1 with laceration, and splenectomy in 2 with rupture. Late splenic rupture or abscess did not occur in any child. One child (5.3%) died of complicating injuries. Many of children with blunt splenic injuries can be successfully treated with conservative treatment, and CT scanning is useful for evaluating the degree of splenic injuries and complicating injuries. (author)

  7. Pneumoperitoneum in a patient with pneumothorax and blunt neck trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Yaqoob Hakim

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Free air in the abdomen after blunt traumatic neck injury is very rare. If pneumoperitoneum is suspected in the presence of pneumothorax, exploratory laparotomy should be performed to rule out intraabdominal injury. As, there is no consensus for this plan yet, further prospective studies are warrant. Conservative management for pneumoperitoneum in the absence of viscus perforation is still a safe option in carefully selected cases.

  8. Management of Pancreatic Injuries after Blunt Abdominal Trauma. Experience at a Single Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ker-Kan Tan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma could result in significant morbidity, and even mortality if missed. Objective Our aim was to review our institution’s experience with blunt pancreatic trauma. Setting Our study included all cases of blunt traumatic pancreatic injuries. Patients Sixteen patients (median age 41 years; range: 18-60 years were treated for blunt pancreatic trauma from December 2002 to June 2008. Main outcome measure Pancreatic injuries were graded according to the definition of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST. Results CT scans were performed on 10 (62.5% patients, with the remaining 6 (37.5% sent to the operating theatre immediately due to their injuries. Of the 12 (75.0% patients who underwent exploratory laparotomy, 2 (12.5% had a distal pancreatectomy (AAST grade III, 1 (6.3% underwent a Whipple procedure (AAST grade IV while another 2 (12.5% were too hemodynamically unstable for any definitive surgery (AAST grade IV and V; the remaining 7 (43.8% pancreatic injuries were managed conservatively. Four (25.0% patients had their injuries managed non-operatively. Some of the associated complications included intra-abdominal collection (n=2, 12.5% and chest infection (n=2, 12.5%. Conclusion Blunt pancreatic trauma continues to pose significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. In view of the numerous associated injuries, priority must be given to stabilizing the patient before any definitive management of the pancreatic injuries is carried out. Mortality in these patients is usually a result of the magnitude of their associated injuries.

  9. Abdominal computed tomography scan as a screening tool in blunt trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. One of the most difficult problems in blunt trauma is evaluation for potential intraabdominal injury. Admission for serial abdominal exams remains the standard of care after intraabdominal injury has been initially excluded. We hypothesized a normal abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan in a subgroup of minimally injured patients would obviate admission for serial abdominal examinations, allowing safe discharge from the emergency department (ED). Methods. We reviewed our blunt trauma experience with patients admitted solely for serial abdominal examinations after a normal CT. Patients were identified from the trauma registry at a Level 1 trauma center from July 1991 through June 1995. Patients with abnormal CTs, extra-abdominal injuries necessitating admission, hemodynamic abnormalities, a Glasgow Coma Scale less than 13, or injury severity scores (ISSs) greater than 15 were excluded. Records of 238 patients remained; we reviewed them to determine the presence of missed abdominal injury. Results. None of the 238 patients had a missed abdominal injury. Average ISS of these patients was 3.2 (range, 0 to 10). Discharging these patients from the ED would result in a yearly cost savings of $32,874 to our medical system. Conclusions. Abdominal CT scan is a safe and cost-effective screening tool in patients with blunt trauma. A normal CT scan in minimally injured patients allows safe discharge from the ED. (authors)

  10. Evaluation of an abbreviated abdominal-pelvic CT blunt trauma protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an attempt to expedite computed tomographic (CT) imaging in patients who have suffered multiple blunt trauma, an abbreviated abdominal-pelvic CT protocol was designed and tested. From 30 cases of abnormal full, 1.0-cm abdominal-pelvic scans, only post-contrast scans were selected for blind review at 1.0-cm increments through the spleen, 2.0-cm increments through the liver, and 3.0-cm increments to the symphysis pubis. Results and receiver operating characteristic curves were correlated with formal scan results and medical records. Preliminary results suggest that with adequate plain film spine and pelvic evaluation abbreviated abdominal -pelvic CT scanning may be effective in evaluating solid organ injury and in establishing trauma imaging protocols for the victim of multiple blunt trauma

  11. Postoperative blunt trauma to 7.5 mm scleral pocket wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J D; Claoué, C M; Steele, A D

    1994-05-01

    Two patients received blunt trauma to the operated eye after phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Both patients had a three-step 7.5 mm chord width, 3.0 mm long, curving incision, extending from sclera into clear cornea. One patient had rupture of the scleral tunnel and horizontal suture 20 days after surgery. The intraocular lens was dislocated into and along the scleral tunnel. The second patient had direct trauma four days after surgery, resulting in cheese-wiring of the horizontal nylon 10-0 suture and wound leakage but no other sequelae. Blunt trauma after scleral pocket phacoemulsification cataract surgery may result in clinical wound dehiscence if sufficient force is sustained. PMID:8064613

  12. MULTI - DETECTOR COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND INTRA - OPERATIVE CORRELATION IN BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : With the change in the pace of life fast , faster , fastest being the motto of the present day , the incidence of trauma and the associated mortality and morbidities is on a continuous rise.Imaging plays a very important role in the management of these injuries in deciding which injuries , in trauma the final verdict of organ injury in abdomen is intra - ope rative findings. AIMS : In view of the above said we considered to study to determine diagnostic accuracy of MDCT (Multi - Detector Computed Tomography in detection of intra - abdominal solid organ injury in blunt abdominal trauma and to highlight the importance of MDCT in evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma. METHODS AND MATERIALS : This was a prospective study done between over a period of 2 years from between January 2011 to February 2013 on patients who presented with blun t abdominal trauma after excluding patients who were managed conservatively and normal on imaging , the data we compared had 32 patients and the analysis was as follows. RESULTS : Blunt abdominal trauma was common in males , the male to female ratio was 9:1 , road traffic accident is the most common mode of injury in blunt abdominal trauma with 60% of the patients in this mode of injury , single organ injury is 22 patients (76% spleen is the most commonly injured organ 15(47% patients having splenic injury , wi th grade 3 being the commonest splenic injury 8 out of the 15 patients had splenic injury bowel injury was the second common organ injured in blunt trauma abdomen. In this study computed tomography grading correlated well with intra - operative grading with a PPV of= 95.45 % (95% ci: 84.50 % to 99.31 % Asensitivityof 76.36 % (95% ci: 62.98 % to 86.76 % . CONCLUSION : Computed tomography is an important imaging technique for diagnosis of organ injuries in patients with abdominal trauma. It helps in grading of the type of injury and accordingly deciding the management of patient. It is a highly

  13. Roles of B-ultrasonography, CT examination in diagnosis and treatment of blunt renal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From March 1993 to June 1996, 53 patients with Blunt renal trauma were admitted to authors' hospital. B-ultrasonography was performed in 22 patients and CT in 31 patients, and their accurate diagnosis rates were 77.2% and 100% respectively. Among 41 patients with type I or II trauma, 3(73%) underwent operation, 1(2.4%) was treated by nephrectomy. Among 12 patients with type III or IV trauma, 11(91.7%) underwent operation and 9 were treated by nephrectomy. In authors' opinions, B-Ultrasonography can be applied in screening in early stage, and observing renal trauma repeatedly. CT examination can show the site and degree of renal trauma directly and can be applied in the diagnosis of the function of renal. Checking-up the injured renal should be avoid as best the authors can during operation. The renal should be preserved without injuring the main vessels

  14. Angiographic frequency of blunt cerebrovascular injury in patients with carotid canal or vertebral foramen fractures on multidetector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Blunt carotid injuries (BCI's) and blunt vertebral artery injuries (BVI's), known jointly as BCVI's, are common in 'high risk' patients. The purpose is to evaluate the rate of occurrence of BCI/BVI in patients screened purely by the radiologic criteria of fracture through the carotid canal or vertebral transverse foramina, or significant cervical subluxation, noted by multidetector CT. Methods: Seventy-one patients with 108 catheterized vessels were included over a 13-month interval. The angiographic examinations were prompted by current hospital protocol, solely by the presence of fractures involving/adjacent to the carotid canal, cervical fractures involving/adjacent to the foramen transversarium, or cervical fractures with significant subluxation. The incidence of each grade of blunt injury was calculated after review of the CT scans and catheter angiograms by two neuroradiologists. Results: Two thousand and seventy-three total blunt trauma admissions occurred during the time period, with a BCVI rate of 0.92-1.0% (depending on the reviewer), similar to previous studies. Mean time to catheter angiography was 16.6 h. Of the 71 included patients, there were 11-12 BCI's and 10-12 BVI's, an overall rate of 27-30% of BCVI in the patients with foraminal fractures. Interobserver agreement in reviewing the catheter angiograms was excellent (Kappa 0.795). Of note, three internal carotid pseudoaneurysms resolved spontaneously after anticoagulation or aspirin. Conclusion: This study confirms that there is a high rate of BCVI in the presence of carotid canal or vertebral foramen fractures that are noted by multidetector CT. Utilization of purely radiologic criteria of foraminal involvement may be a significant screening tool in the decision of whether to evaluate these patients acutely by catheter or CT angiography, and for early detection of patients at risk for symptomatology, to initiate prompt, prophylactic treatment

  15. Angiographic frequency of blunt cerebrovascular injury in patients with carotid canal or vertebral foramen fractures on multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, Alexander [Department of Radiology, Hennepin County and University of Minnesota-Fairview and Medical Centers, Minneapolis, MN (United States)]. E-mail: mckin022@umn.edu; Ott, Frederick [Department of Radiology, Hennepin County and University of Minnesota-Fairview and Medical Centers, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Short, James [Department of Radiology, Hennepin County and University of Minnesota-Fairview and Medical Centers, Minneapolis, MN (United States); McKinney, Zeke [Department of Radiology, Hennepin County and University of Minnesota-Fairview and Medical Centers, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Truwit, Charles [Department of Radiology, Hennepin County and University of Minnesota-Fairview and Medical Centers, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Purpose: Blunt carotid injuries (BCI's) and blunt vertebral artery injuries (BVI's), known jointly as BCVI's, are common in 'high risk' patients. The purpose is to evaluate the rate of occurrence of BCI/BVI in patients screened purely by the radiologic criteria of fracture through the carotid canal or vertebral transverse foramina, or significant cervical subluxation, noted by multidetector CT. Methods: Seventy-one patients with 108 catheterized vessels were included over a 13-month interval. The angiographic examinations were prompted by current hospital protocol, solely by the presence of fractures involving/adjacent to the carotid canal, cervical fractures involving/adjacent to the foramen transversarium, or cervical fractures with significant subluxation. The incidence of each grade of blunt injury was calculated after review of the CT scans and catheter angiograms by two neuroradiologists. Results: Two thousand and seventy-three total blunt trauma admissions occurred during the time period, with a BCVI rate of 0.92-1.0% (depending on the reviewer), similar to previous studies. Mean time to catheter angiography was 16.6 h. Of the 71 included patients, there were 11-12 BCI's and 10-12 BVI's, an overall rate of 27-30% of BCVI in the patients with foraminal fractures. Interobserver agreement in reviewing the catheter angiograms was excellent (Kappa 0.795). Of note, three internal carotid pseudoaneurysms resolved spontaneously after anticoagulation or aspirin. Conclusion: This study confirms that there is a high rate of BCVI in the presence of carotid canal or vertebral foramen fractures that are noted by multidetector CT. Utilization of purely radiologic criteria of foraminal involvement may be a significant screening tool in the decision of whether to evaluate these patients acutely by catheter or CT angiography, and for early detection of patients at risk for symptomatology, to initiate prompt, prophylactic treatment.

  16. Risks of Brain Injury after Blunt Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The association of loss of consciousness (LOC and/or amnesia with traumatic brain injury (TBI identified on CT and TBI requiring acute intervention was evaluated in 2043 children <18 years old enrolled prospectively in a level 1 trauma center ED at University of California, Davis School of Medicine, CA.

  17. Mothers' unresolved trauma blunts amygdala response to infant distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    While the neurobiology of post-traumatic stress disorder has been extensively researched, much less attention has been paid to the neural mechanisms underlying more covert but pervasive types of trauma (e.g., those involving disrupted relationships and insecure attachment). Here, we report on a neur...

  18. Hyphema as a Complication of Blunt Ocular Trauma and Additional Ocular Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Giray Ersöz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the frequency of angle recession, commotio retinae, and other ocular findings in patients with hyphema due to blunt ocular trauma. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 66 patients hospitalized between July 2010 and May 2012 with a diagnosis of traumatic hyphema were retrospectively reviewed. The age, gender, period between injury and the first examination, visual acuity at presentation, intraocular pressure (IOP, time of disappearance of hyphema, cause of blunt injury, additional ocular findings, medical and/or surgical treatment, follow-up time, and visual outcome were noted. Results: The mean age of the patients was 23.8±19.2 years. Males constituted the 83.3% of the whole group. Game-related injury (43.9% and work-related injury (22.7% were the most common causes of blunt trauma. The bead gun was the most common tool involved in injury. Angle recession was detected in 36 patients (54.5%. Development of secondary glaucoma was higher in the patients with angle recession (chi-square test, p<0.05. Commotio retinae was observed in 47% of patients. The mean visual acuity at presentation was 0.4±0.3, while at the last visit, it was 0.8±0.3. There was a statistically significant difference between baseline and final visual acuity (paired-samples t-test, p<0.001. Conclusion: Hyphema due to blunt ocular trauma is observed mostly in young men and children. The most common blunt ocular injuries are game-and work-related. Angle recession and commotio retinae are the main complications of blunt ocular trauma causing hyphema. In cases with blunt ocular trauma, the presence of hyphema makes it difficult to examine the anterior chamber angle and the fundus. It is important to perform these investigations at the earliest stage to manage the complications since commotio retinae and angle recession accompany many cases with hyphema. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 19-22

  19. Isolated renal pelvis rupture secondary to blunt trauma: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kerem Taken; Mehmet Reşit Oncü; Müslüm Ergün; Recep Eryılmaz; Mustafa Güneş

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Isolated rupture of the renal pelvis is a very rare condition and thus causes delays in the diagnosis of the rupture. It is most commonly seen in the setting of obstructive ureteric calculus. Other rare causes include neoplasms, trauma, and iatrogenic procedures. Diagnosis is usually established on computed tomography (CT) which demonstrates the extravasation of the contrast in the peripelvic, perinephric, or retroperitoneal collections. Presentation of case: A 27-year-old ma...

  20. Ultrasonography or computed tomography for diagnosis in hemodynamically stable patients with recent blunt abdominal trauma? Critically appraised topic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We were unsure whether the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in hemodynamically stable patients in the emergency department with recent blunt abdominal trauma was sufficient to enable us to avoid performing computed tomography (CT) in selected patients. (author)

  1. Delayed presentation of a sigmoid colon injury following blunt abdominal trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertugrul Gokhan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The low incidence of colon injury due to blunt abdominal trauma and the lack of a definitive diagnostic method for the same can lead to delays in diagnosis and treatment, subsequently resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Case presentation A 66-year-old woman with sigmoid colon injury was admitted to our emergency department after sustaining blunt abdominal trauma. Her physical examination findings and laboratory results led to a decision to perform a laparotomy; exploration revealed a sigmoid colon injury that was treated by sigmoid loop colostomy. Conclusions Surgical abdominal exploration revealed gross fecal contamination and a perforation site. Intra-abdominal irrigation and a sigmoid loop colostomy were performed. Our patient was discharged on post-operative day six without any problems. Closure of the sigmoid loop colostomy was performed three months after the initial surgery.

  2. The usefulness of computed tomography in evaluating patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past 28 months since the opening of our critical care medical center, a total of 31 patients with blunt abdominal trauma underwent CT scanning. CT findings were analyzed and compared for intraoperative findings and clinical courses. Parenchymal organ trauma is easily able to be diagnosed by CT scan, which provides definite information about the site, shape and bleeding condition of the traumatic lesion. A high-density hematoma in the mesenterium indicating the site of trauma, following bowel ischemia should be carefully observed. For assessment of bowel trauma with any modality, careful observation is also needed, because there are almost no findings in the early stage. Contrast CT was valuable in that we could obtain definite information on the site of bleeding, roughly know the vascular injury, and examine the urinary tract by additional plain film. (author)

  3. Mechanisms and Clinical Management of Ventricular Arrhythmias following Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Wolbrom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonpenetrating, blunt chest trauma is a serious medical condition with varied clinical presentations and implications. This can be the result of a dense projectile during competitive and recreational sports but may also include other etiologies such as motor vehicle accidents or traumatic falls. In this setting, the manifestation of ventricular arrhythmias has been observed both acutely and chronically. This is based on two entirely separate mechanisms and etiologies requiring different treatments. Ventricular fibrillation can occur immediately after chest wall injury (commotio cordis and requires rapid defibrillation. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia can develop in the chronic stage due to underlying structural heart disease long after blunt chest injury. The associated arrhythmogenic tissue may be complex and provides the necessary substrate to form a reentrant VT circuit. Ventricular tachycardia in the absence of overt structural heart disease appears to be focal in nature with rapid termination during ablation. Regardless of the VT mechanism, patients with recurrent episodes, despite antiarrhythmic medication in the chronic stage following blunt chest injury, are likely to require ablation to achieve VT control. This review article will describe the mechanisms, pathophysiology, and treatment of ventricular arrhythmias that occur in both the acute and chronic stages following blunt chest trauma.

  4. Tc-99m sulfur colloid scanning in blunt trauma: detection of abdominal bleeding

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    Bronfman, H.J.; Kunkel, B.K.; Rabin, H.S.

    1981-11-01

    Tc-99m sulfur colloid scintigraphy can detect and locate active lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The same principles apply to the detection and location of active intra-abdominal or pelvic hemorrhage following blunt abdominal trauma. We report two patients with abdominal bleeding who were correctly diagnosed by this method. As part of the routine examination of all patients having Tc-99m sulfur colloid liver-spleen scans for trauma, 500,000-count images should be made of the rest of the abdomen and pelvis.

  5. Tc-99m sulfur colloid scanning in blunt trauma: detection of abdominal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tc-99m sulfur colloid scintigraphy can detect and locate active lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The same principles apply to the detection and location of active intra-abdominal or pelvic hemorrhage following blunt abdominal trauma. We report two patients with abdominal bleeding who were correctly diagnosed by this method. As part of the routine examination of all patients having Tc-99m sulfur colloid liver-spleen scans for trauma, 500,000-count images should be made of the rest of the abdomen and pelvis

  6. Divergent adaptive and innate immunological responses are observed in humans following blunt trauma

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    Lentsch Alex B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immune response to trauma has traditionally been modeled to consist of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS followed by the compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS. We investigated these responses in a homogenous cohort of male, severe blunt trauma patients admitted to a University Hospital surgical intensive care unit (SICU. After obtaining consent, peripheral blood was drawn up to 96 hours following injury. The enumeration and functionality of both myeloid and lymphocyte cell populations were determined. Results Neutrophil numbers were observed to be elevated in trauma patients as compared to healthy controls. Further, neutrophils isolated from trauma patients had increased raft formation and phospho-Akt. Consistent with this, the neutrophils had increased oxidative burst compared to healthy controls. In direct contrast, blood from trauma patients contained decreased naïve T cell numbers. Upon activation with a T cell specific mitogen, trauma patient T cells produced less IFN-gamma as compared to those from healthy controls. Consistent with these results, upon activation, trauma patient T cells were observed to have decreased T cell receptor mediated signaling. Conclusions These results suggest that following trauma, there are concurrent and divergent immunological responses. These consist of a hyper-inflammatory response by the innate arm of the immune system concurrent with a hypo-inflammatory response by the adaptive arm.

  7. Hyphema as a Complication of Blunt Ocular Trauma and Additional Ocular Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Giray Ersöz; Seda Adıyeke; Gamze Türe; Ekrem Talay; Hakkı Özgür Konya

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the frequency of angle recession, commotio retinae, and other ocular findings in patients with hyphema due to blunt ocular trauma. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 66 patients hospitalized between July 2010 and May 2012 with a diagnosis of traumatic hyphema were retrospectively reviewed. The age, gender, period between injury and the first examination, visual acuity at presentation, intraocular pressure (IOP), time of disappearance of hyphem...

  8. Diagnostic management of blunt abdominal trauma in children; Diagnostik des stumpfen Bauchtraumas bei Kindern und Jugendlichen

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    Wickede, M. von [Universitaetsklinikum Frankfurt (Germany). Abt. fuer Paediatrische Radiologie

    2007-06-15

    Children with abdominal injuries after blunt trauma can be managed non operatively in most cases. Rapid diagnosis is essential to select those patients who need immediate operation. Diagnostic methods of choice are ultrasonography, already performed in the emergency setting and contrast enhanced CT of the abdomen in hemodynamically stable patients. This work discusses the different diagnostic strategies and their use in the clinical practice. (orig.)

  9. Localized fluid collection of hepatic bare area in children with blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the incidence and significance of localized fluid collection in the hepatic bare area resulting from blunt abdominal trauma in children. We retrospectively reviewed the CT scans and medical records of eighty children with blunt abdominal trauma and evaluated the incidence of fluid collection in the hepatic bare area. The findings were correlated with the presence of injury to adjacent organs. Fluid collection in the hepatic bare area was noted in 23 of 80 patients (28.7%). Associated organ injuries included liver laceration (17/23), contusion of the right hemidiaphragm (7/23), right adrenal injury (5/23), and right renal injury (5/23). In one patient, organic injury was not detected in spite of fluid collection in the hepatic bare area. Eight of 23 patients (34.8%) showed fluid collection in this area, but not intraperitoneally. Fluid collection in the hepatic bare area after blunt abdominal trauma was noted in about 30% of patients and was frequently accompanied by injury to adjacent organs. Since right hemidiaphragmatic contusion associated with fluid collection in the bare area was not a uncommon CT finding, close observation of the condition is warranted. (author)

  10. The usefulness of physical examination and laboratory data in pediatric patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness of clinical and laboratory data in pediatric patients with abdominal blunt trauma, the case records of 43 pediatric cases with blunt trauma who were admitted to our hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Among these patients, 23 were determined to have intraabdominal injury. Abdominal physical examination was not statistically identified to be a predictor of intraabdominal injury, however, the hematocrit and serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) values were significantly aberrant in these cases. Furthermore, the mean AST and ALT values in the non-hepatic injury cases were also apt to be higher than those in the no-injury group. These findings suggested that the serum AST and ALT may be possible predictors of intraabdominal injury, not only that restricted to the liver. Additionally, in our cases, abdominal CT examination was more diagnostic than ultrasound examination. Accordingly, in cases of pediatric abdominal blunt trauma with aberrant serum values of the liver transaminases, CT san should be performed electively. (author)

  11. Rupture of the ureter following blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two male and one female patients, between the ages of four and 25 years, involved in road traffic accidents, sustained isolated ruptures of the right proximal ureter in addition to severe injuries to the skull and extremities. The typical urographic finding of an absent ureter was seen only once. In one incomplete rupture of the ureter from a solitary kidney; the ureter filled with contrast and there was no dilatation of the renal pelvis and in another case, the appearance of the ureter was simulated by a peri-ureteric contrast leak. Ultrasound examinations following abdominal trauma should be directed at finding peri-renal fluid; this should be followed by an urogram in order to recognize ureteric rupture at an early stage, when there may be few symptoms. (orig.)

  12. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miele, Vittorio; Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Sessa, Barbara; Trinci, Margherita

    2016-05-01

    Baseline ultrasound is essential in the early assessment of patients with a huge haemoperitoneum undergoing an immediate abdominal surgery; nevertheless, even with a highly experienced operator, it is not sufficient to exclude parenchymal injuries. More recently, a new ultrasound technique using second generation contrast agents, named contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been developed. This technique allows all the vascular phase to be performed in real time, increasing ultrasound capability to detect parenchymal injuries, enhancing some qualitative findings, such as lesion extension, margins and its relationship with capsule and vessels. CEUS has been demonstrated to be almost as sensitive as contrast-enhanced CT in the detection of traumatic injuries in patients with low-energy isolated abdominal trauma, with levels of sensitivity and specificity up to 95%. Several studies demonstrated its ability to detect lesions occurring in the liver, spleen, pancreas and kidneys and also to recognize active bleeding as hyperechoic bands appearing as round or oval spots of variable size. Its role seems to be really relevant in paediatric patients, thus avoiding a routine exposure to ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, CEUS is strongly operator dependent, and it has some limitations, such as the cost of contrast media, lack of panoramicity, the difficulty to explore some deep regions and the poor ability to detect injuries to the urinary tract. On the other hand, it is timesaving, and it has several advantages, such as its portability, the safety of contrast agent, the lack to ionizing radiation exposure and therefore its repeatability, which allows follow-up of those traumas managed conservatively, especially in cases of fertile females and paediatric patients. PMID:26607647

  13. Prevalence of Radiologic Findings in Patients with Blunt Chest Trauma in Isfahan

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    M. Haghighi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Chest trauma due to its vital organs can be very dangerous and lethal. Our country has the first grade of accidents in the word, so rapid diagnosis and treatment in patients with chest trauma is necessary. One cost benefit and available imaging modality in each Region of our country is X-ray."nCXR interpretation needs to knowledge about prevalence of abnormal Radiologic findings and their accuracy. Therefore, it is necessary to perform a study about the rate of CXR abnormal findings in patients with blunt chest trauma."nPatients and Methods: In this descriptive and prospective study, CXR of patients with blunt chest trauma that admitted in Alzahra and Kashani hospitals studied and percent of vital radiologic findings prevalence determined."nResults: The final results were as below:"n1- Rib FX (18.5% (143, 2- Hemothorax (13.6% (105, 3- Pneumothorax (11.8% (91, 4- Sub cutaneous emphysema (10.2% (79, 5- Lung laceration (8.1% (63, 6- Mediastinal winding (6.4% (50, 7- Clavicular and sternal FX (5.8% (44, 8- Pneumo mediastinum (4.1% (32, 9- spinal FX (3.5% (27, 10- Great vessels injury signs (1.4% (11."nConclusion: According to above results, accurate investigation of CXR, helps physician and radiologist to find any threatened finding, so determination of next step as clinical follow up or spiral CT, angiography or surgery; accordingly.

  14. Screening US and CT for blunt abdominal trauma: A retrospective study

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    Marco, Giuseppetti Gian [Institute of Radiology, Polytechnic University of Marche Medical School, Umberto I Hospital, Ancona (Italy)]. E-mail: gm.giuseppetti@ao-umbertoprimo.marche.it; Diego, Salera [Institute of Radiology, Polytechnic University of Marche Medical School, Umberto I Hospital, Ancona (Italy); Giulio, Argalia [Institute of Radiology, Polytechnic University of Marche Medical School, Umberto I Hospital, Ancona (Italy); Luca, Salvolini [Institute of Radiology, Polytechnic University of Marche Medical School, Umberto I Hospital, Ancona (Italy)

    2005-10-01

    Objective: To assess the accuracy of screening US and CT in patients with blunt abdominal trauma admitted to the trauma centre of our General Hospital. Materials and method: The abdominal US reports of 864 primary trauma patients (139 with major and 725 with minor injuries) and 162 CT reports of a subgroup of the same subjects (64 with major and 98 with minor injuries) were reviewed and compared to the best available reference standard. The accuracy of screening US was assessed by evaluating its overall ability to distinguish negative from positive cases by showing at least one of the lesions documented by the reference standard and its specific ability to depict all lesions; CT reports were evaluated only for the method's performance in depicting all lesions. Results: Screening US exhibited a satisfactory overall ability to distinguish negative from positive patients (91.5% sensitivity and 97.5% specificity in major trauma patients versus 73.3% sensitivity and 98.1% specificity in the minor trauma group) and a satisfactory specific ability to depict all injuries in major trauma patients. In minor trauma cases sensitivity was satisfactory for free fluid but unsatisfactory for organ injuries. Of the 21/864 false negative reports (5 in patients with major and 16 in cases with minor traumas), only one affected patient management, a major trauma case, by delaying an emergency laparotomy. The performance of CT in detecting each single lesion was predictably excellent in both patient groups. Conclusion: Its satisfactory accuracy for major trauma suggests that US could be employed not only to screen cases for emergency laparotomy but also as an alternative to CT. However, since major traumatic injuries generally carry an imperative indication for CT, especially as regards neurological, thoracic and skeletal evaluation, US should be employed to perform a prompt preliminary examination using a simplified technique in the emergency room simultaneously with resuscitation.

  15. Screening US and CT for blunt abdominal trauma: A retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the accuracy of screening US and CT in patients with blunt abdominal trauma admitted to the trauma centre of our General Hospital. Materials and method: The abdominal US reports of 864 primary trauma patients (139 with major and 725 with minor injuries) and 162 CT reports of a subgroup of the same subjects (64 with major and 98 with minor injuries) were reviewed and compared to the best available reference standard. The accuracy of screening US was assessed by evaluating its overall ability to distinguish negative from positive cases by showing at least one of the lesions documented by the reference standard and its specific ability to depict all lesions; CT reports were evaluated only for the method's performance in depicting all lesions. Results: Screening US exhibited a satisfactory overall ability to distinguish negative from positive patients (91.5% sensitivity and 97.5% specificity in major trauma patients versus 73.3% sensitivity and 98.1% specificity in the minor trauma group) and a satisfactory specific ability to depict all injuries in major trauma patients. In minor trauma cases sensitivity was satisfactory for free fluid but unsatisfactory for organ injuries. Of the 21/864 false negative reports (5 in patients with major and 16 in cases with minor traumas), only one affected patient management, a major trauma case, by delaying an emergency laparotomy. The performance of CT in detecting each single lesion was predictably excellent in both patient groups. Conclusion: Its satisfactory accuracy for major trauma suggests that US could be employed not only to screen cases for emergency laparotomy but also as an alternative to CT. However, since major traumatic injuries generally carry an imperative indication for CT, especially as regards neurological, thoracic and skeletal evaluation, US should be employed to perform a prompt preliminary examination using a simplified technique in the emergency room simultaneously with resuscitation

  16. The development of simple survival prediction models for blunt trauma victims treated at Asian emergency centers

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    Kimura Akio

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For real-time assessment of the probability of survival (Ps of blunt trauma victims at emergency centers, this study aimed to establish regression models for estimating Ps using simplified coefficients. Methods The data of 10,210 blunt trauma patients not missing both the binary outcome data about survival and the data necessary for Ps calculation by The Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS method were extracted from the Japan Trauma Data Bank (2004-2007 and analyzed. Half (5,113 of the data was allocated to a derivation data set, with the other half (5,097 allocated to a validation data set. The data of 6,407 blunt trauma victims from the trauma registry of Khon Kaen Regional Hospital in Thailand were analyzed for validation. The logistic regression models included age, the Injury Severity Score (ISS, the Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS, systolic blood pressure (SBP, respiratory rate (RR, and their coded values (cAGE, 0-1; cISS, 0-4; cSBP, 0-4; cGCS, 0-4; cRR, 0-4 as predictor variables. The coefficients were simplified by rounding off after the decimal point or choosing 0.5 if the coefficients varied across 0.5. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROCC was calculated for each model to measure discriminant ability. Results A group of formulas (log (Ps/1-Ps = logit (Ps = -9 + cISS - cAGE + cSBP + cGCS + cRR/2, where -9 becomes -7 if the predictor variable of cRR or cISS is missing was developed. Using these formulas, the AUROCCs were between 0.950 and 0.964. When these models were applied to the Khon Kean data, their AUROCCs were greater than 0.91. Conclusion: These equations allow physicians to perform real-time assessments of survival by easy mental calculations at Asian emergency centers, which are overcrowded with blunt injury victims of traffic accidents.

  17. Management of Blunt Trauma to the Spleen (Part 1

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    Seyed Abbas Banani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSpleen is the most frequent solid organ to be injured in bluntabdominal trauma. Considering its important role in providingimmunity and preventing infection by a variety of mechanisms,every attempt should be made, if possible, to salvagethe traumatized spleen at any age particularly in children. Afterprimary resuscitation, mandatory requirements for nonoperativemanagement include absence of homodynamic instability,lack of associated major organ injury, admission inthe intensive care unit for high-grade splenic injury and in theward for milder types with close monitoring. About two thirdof the patients would respond to non-operative management.In most patients, failure of non-operative measures usuallyoccur within 12 hours of management. Determinant role ofabdominal sonography or computed tomography, and in selectedcases, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, for appropriate decisioncannot be overemphasized. However, the high status ofclinical judgment would not be replaced by any paraclinicalinvestigations. When operation is unavoidable, if possible,spleen saving procedures (splenorrhaphy or partial splenectomyshould be tried. In case of total splenectomy, autotransplantation,preferably in the omental pouch, may lead toreturn of immunity, at least partially, to prevent or reduce thechance of subsequent infection. Although total splenectomywith autograft is immunologically superior to total splenectomy-only procedure, these patients should also be protectedby vaccination and daily antibiotic for certain period of time.The essential steps for prevention of overwhelming infectionafter total splenectomy are not only immunization and administrationof daily antibiotic (up to 5 years of age or one year inolder children, but include education and information aboutthis dangerous complication. When non-operative managementis successful, the duration of activity restriction (inweeks is almost equal to the grade of splenic injury plus 2.Iran J Med Sci 2010

  18. Investigation of childhood blunt abdominal trauma: A practical approach using ultrasound as the initial diagnostic modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a 5.5-year retrospective study (1979-84) 170 children with blunt abdominal trauma were investigated with intravenous urography (IVU), ultrasound (US) and scintigraphy. For the investigation of the last 71 children (after 1982) a 4th generation CT scanner was available in the same department. The results of radiologic investigations were compared with clinical outcome in 157 and results at laparotomy in 13 children. During the study period, real time US became the first line screening tool, and was combined with IVU in suspected renal trauma. In spite of permanent accessibility of CT since November 1982, the latter was used only in complex diagnostic problems or in children with multiple injuries (8% of the series). There were no deaths resulting from abdominal trauma. During the study, the incidence of splenectomy and exploratory laparotomy decreased, and no diagnostic peritoneal lavage was performed after 1980. (orig.)

  19. Benign hepatic portal venous gas following blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 71-year-old man presented to Royal Perth Hospital Emergency Department with back pain following a fall from the roof of his house. There was no history of loss of consciousness. Physical examination revealed epigastric tenderness and guarding and a suspicion of CSF otorrhoea. All other clinical parameters were normal. His past medical history included alcohol abuse, chronic obstructive airways disease, peripheral vascular disease, cerebellar infarction and a right total hip replacement. Spinal radiographs demonstrated crush fractures involving the T12 and L1 vertebral bodies and a CT scan of the skull base was normal. An abdominal CT scan performed with intravenous contrast demonstrated gas within the portal veins of the anterior segments of the liver and a small fluid collection in the anterior pararenal space. During the ensuing 24 hours a repeat non-contrast abdominal Ct scan was performed and reveled complete resolution of the fluid. No other intra-abdominal abnormality was detected to warrant an invasive procedure

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of a step-up imaging strategy in pediatric patients with blunt abdominal trauma

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    Schuppen, J. van [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olthof, D.C. [Trauma Unit Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wilde, J.C.H. [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Emma' s Children Hospital/Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beenen, L.F.M.; Rijn, R.R. van [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goslings, J.C., E-mail: j.c.goslings@amc.nl [Trauma Unit Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-01-15

    Introduction: Blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is an important but often unrecognized cause of death in children. Imaging plays a vital role in the early detection of abdominal trauma. The exact role of imaging in the management of BAT in children is still under research. The aim of this study was to assess diagnostic accuracy of a step-up imaging strategy, where the decision to observe or to perform an intervention depends on the vital parameters of the patient, in combination with the presence or absence of free fluid at Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) and the findings on CT (performed selectively), for pediatric patients presenting to the ED with a blunt abdominal trauma. Methods: Consecutive patients aged ≤16 years admitted between January 2008 and December 2012 to a Dutch level 1 trauma centre were included in this retrospective study. Sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV) and the negative likelihood ratio (LR−) of the imaging strategy were calculated. Results: The cohort consisted of 122 patients; 66 (54%) patients were discharged home after primary survey, 51 (41%) patients were admitted and observed, 3 (2%) patients underwent transarterial embolization and 2 (2%) patients underwent surgery. Treatment failed in 1 patient, initially selected for observation. The sensitivity of the imaging strategy was 0.833 (0.446–0.990). The NPV and LR− were 0.991 (0.963–1.000) and 0.167 (0.028–0.997), respectively. Conclusion: The step-up imaging strategy that is applied in our academic level 1 trauma centre has a high sensitivity and a high negative predictive value. No clinically relevant injuries were missed without doing unnecessary harm, e.g. radiation or an intervention.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of a step-up imaging strategy in pediatric patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is an important but often unrecognized cause of death in children. Imaging plays a vital role in the early detection of abdominal trauma. The exact role of imaging in the management of BAT in children is still under research. The aim of this study was to assess diagnostic accuracy of a step-up imaging strategy, where the decision to observe or to perform an intervention depends on the vital parameters of the patient, in combination with the presence or absence of free fluid at Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) and the findings on CT (performed selectively), for pediatric patients presenting to the ED with a blunt abdominal trauma. Methods: Consecutive patients aged ≤16 years admitted between January 2008 and December 2012 to a Dutch level 1 trauma centre were included in this retrospective study. Sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV) and the negative likelihood ratio (LR−) of the imaging strategy were calculated. Results: The cohort consisted of 122 patients; 66 (54%) patients were discharged home after primary survey, 51 (41%) patients were admitted and observed, 3 (2%) patients underwent transarterial embolization and 2 (2%) patients underwent surgery. Treatment failed in 1 patient, initially selected for observation. The sensitivity of the imaging strategy was 0.833 (0.446–0.990). The NPV and LR− were 0.991 (0.963–1.000) and 0.167 (0.028–0.997), respectively. Conclusion: The step-up imaging strategy that is applied in our academic level 1 trauma centre has a high sensitivity and a high negative predictive value. No clinically relevant injuries were missed without doing unnecessary harm, e.g. radiation or an intervention

  2. Diagnosis of an Inguinal Hernia after a Blunt Inguinal Trauma with an Intestinal Perforation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Farès; Avouac, Julien; Vaz, Marie-Aude; Schmidt, Jeannot

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Inguinal hernias are very common in men. A clinical exam can do the diagnosis easily. But bowel perforation inside an inguinal hernia caused by a directly blunt trauma is rare and can have important consequences. Up to now, there have been a few case reports that described blunt injury to the inguinal area causing traumatic perforation of the bowel in the inguinal hernia. Case Report. We present a case of a 45-year-old Eastern European man with a small perforation of ileal bowels and a peritonitis after direct blunt trauma to the inguinal hernia region, with no inguinal hernia known by the patient, and show how the diagnosis can be difficult. Conclusion. This case shows that external forces, that may seem too trivial to cause intraperitoneal injury, can cause significant injury when applied to a patient with a hernia and shows how a careful examination, with the help of an abdominal CT scan, is important even if the patient do not seem to have an inguinal hernia. PMID:24839569

  3. Criteria for the selective use of chest computed tomography in blunt trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, Monique; Dekker, Helena M.; Kool, Digna R.; Blickman, Johan G. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Deunk, Jaap; Edwards, Michael J.R. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vugt, Arie B. van [Radboud University Nijmegen, Medical Centre Nijmegen, Department of Emergency Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kuijk, Cornelis van [VU (Vrije Universiteit) University, Medical Center Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to derive parameters that predict which high-energy blunt trauma patients should undergo computed tomography (CT) for detection of chest injury. This observational study prospectively included consecutive patients ({>=}16 years old) who underwent multidetector CT of the chest after a high-energy mechanism of blunt trauma in one trauma centre. We included 1,047 patients (median age, 37; 70% male), of whom 508 had chest injuries identified by CT. Using logistic regression, we identified nine predictors of chest injury presence on CT (age {>=}55 years, abnormal chest physical examination, altered sensorium, abnormal thoracic spine physical examination, abnormal chest conventional radiography (CR), abnormal thoracic spine CR, abnormal pelvic CR or abdominal ultrasound, base excess <-3 mmol/l and haemoglobin <6 mmol/l). Of 855 patients with {>=}1 positive predictors, 484 had injury on CT (95% of all 508 patients with injury). Of all 192 patients with no positive predictor, 24 (13%) had chest injury, of whom 4 (2%) had injuries that were considered clinically relevant. Omission of CT in patients without any positive predictor could reduce imaging frequency by 18%, while most clinically relevant chest injuries remain adequately detected. (orig.)

  4. Trauma ocular contuso y afecciones de vítreo-retina Blunt ocular trauma and vitreous and retinal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Alejandro Guerra García

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se consultó la bibliografía actualizada para ofrecer una orientación práctica sobre el manejo de las afecciones vítreorretinales más frecuentes provocadas por los traumas oculares contusos. Estos se encuentran presentes en 31 % de los casos y presentan como complicación seria más frecuente el desprendimiento de retina en 44 %. Se explicó la importancia de la creación de un registro nacional de trauma como herramienta inicial para la prevención de esta enfermedad. Finalmente se expuso algunas consideraciones y un flujograma orientador para el manejo de esta urgencia.Current papers were reviewed to provide practical managing guidelines in most frequent vitreous and retinal disorders infringed by blunt ocular trauma. They are present in 31 % of traumas, with retinal detachment in 44 % of cases as the most frequent serious complication. The importance of the creation of a national eye injury registry as an initial tool to prevent this disease was explained. Finally, some considerations and a guiding flowchart for the management of this visual problem were included.

  5. The role of imaging studies in pancreatic injury due to blunt abdominal trauma in children

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    Bosboom, D. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center St Radboud, Postbus 9101, Route 667, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Braam, A.W.E. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Medical Center St Radboud, Postbus 9101, Route 815, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Blickman, J.G. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center St Radboud, Postbus 9101, Route 667, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Wijnen, R.M.H. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Medical Center St Radboud, Postbus 9101, Route 815, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)]. E-mail: R.Wijnen@kchir.umcn.nl

    2006-07-15

    Background: The role imaging studies play in the choice of treatment in traumatic pancreas damage remains unclear. This study was performed to gain insight into the role of radiological studies in children 16 years of age or younger admitted to our hospital with pancreatic damage due to a blunt abdominal trauma. Method: Retrospectively, the radiological as well as patient clinical records were reviewed of all children admitted to our hospital between 1975 and 2003 with a pancreatic lesion due to blunt abdominal trauma. Results: Thirty-four children with ages ranging from 3 to 14 years old were admitted with traumatic pancreas damage. Initially 33 children were treated conservatively for the pancreatic damage and only one had immediate surgery of the pancreas with a Roux-y pancreaticojejunostomy. Five other children had immediate surgery for other reasons. Overall, five children proved to have a pancreas transection on CT scans or during laparotomy. One child had a pancreas hematoma and 28 a pancreas contusion. In total 15 children developed a pseudocyst (44%), nine of which resolved spontaneously while six were treated by intervention. None of the children had residual morbidity, and there were no deaths. Considering the pancreas, the 11 available CT's were re-evaluated by two radiologists independently. Grade 3 pancreas damage (distal transection of the pancreatic duct) was diagnosed in five patients by radiologist A and four patients by radiologist B (80% match); Grade 1 was diagnosed in, respectively six and one patients (15% match). An US was performed on 19 children with 82 follow-up examinations, mostly for follow-up of the pseudocysts. Conclusion: Traumatic pancreas damage is a rare and difficult diagnosis. There is no straightforward answer for diagnostic imaging in blunt abdominal trauma in children. The diagnostic relevance of CT is limited. CT in combination with MRCP may be a better option for exclusion of pancreatic duct lesions.

  6. The role of imaging studies in pancreatic injury due to blunt abdominal trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The role imaging studies play in the choice of treatment in traumatic pancreas damage remains unclear. This study was performed to gain insight into the role of radiological studies in children 16 years of age or younger admitted to our hospital with pancreatic damage due to a blunt abdominal trauma. Method: Retrospectively, the radiological as well as patient clinical records were reviewed of all children admitted to our hospital between 1975 and 2003 with a pancreatic lesion due to blunt abdominal trauma. Results: Thirty-four children with ages ranging from 3 to 14 years old were admitted with traumatic pancreas damage. Initially 33 children were treated conservatively for the pancreatic damage and only one had immediate surgery of the pancreas with a Roux-y pancreaticojejunostomy. Five other children had immediate surgery for other reasons. Overall, five children proved to have a pancreas transection on CT scans or during laparotomy. One child had a pancreas hematoma and 28 a pancreas contusion. In total 15 children developed a pseudocyst (44%), nine of which resolved spontaneously while six were treated by intervention. None of the children had residual morbidity, and there were no deaths. Considering the pancreas, the 11 available CT's were re-evaluated by two radiologists independently. Grade 3 pancreas damage (distal transection of the pancreatic duct) was diagnosed in five patients by radiologist A and four patients by radiologist B (80% match); Grade 1 was diagnosed in, respectively six and one patients (15% match). An US was performed on 19 children with 82 follow-up examinations, mostly for follow-up of the pseudocysts. Conclusion: Traumatic pancreas damage is a rare and difficult diagnosis. There is no straightforward answer for diagnostic imaging in blunt abdominal trauma in children. The diagnostic relevance of CT is limited. CT in combination with MRCP may be a better option for exclusion of pancreatic duct lesions

  7. Neuroprotective effects of tetracyclines on blunt head trauma: An experimental study on rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozhan Merzuk Uckun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevention of primary damage caused by head trauma may be avoided with protective measures and techniques which is a public health concern. Experimental and clinical studies about treatment of head trauma were all centered to prevent secondary damage caused by physiopathological changes following primary injury. Neuroprotective features of tetracyclines were the focus of several experimental studies in the last decade. In the present study we aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of tetracycline in an experimental model of blunt brain injury in rats. Materials and Methods: 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four experimental groups (n = 8. Head trauma was not performed in control group (group 1, craniectomy only. In the second group, head trauma and craniectomy were performed. Intraperitoneal saline was used in addition to trauma and craniectomy for treatment in group 3 whereas intraperitoneal tetracycline and saline were used for treatment in group 4. Results: When histological examinations performed by transmission electron microscopy were evaluated, injury at ultrastructural level was demonstrated to be less pronounced in tetracycline group with decreased lipid peroxidation levels. Conclusion: In accordance with these findings, we conclude that systemic tetracycline administration is effective in reduction of secondary brain damage and brain edema and thus it may be considered as a therapeutic option.

  8. Histone deactylase gene expression profiles are associated with outcomes in blunt trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Bambakidis, Ted; Dekker, Simone E;

    2016-01-01

    between the groups, corrected for Injury Severity Score (ISS), base deficit, and volume of blood products transfused during the initial 12 hours following admission. Weighted gene correlation network analysis identified modules of genes with significant coexpression, and HDAC genes were mapped...... profiles in 172 blunt trauma patients were extracted from the Inflammation and the Host Response to Injury (Glue Grant) data set. Outcome was classified as complicated (death or no recovery by Day 28, n = 51) or uncomplicated (n = 121). Mixed modeling was used to compare the HDAC expression trajectories...... with adverse outcome (p cell signaling, and T-cell selection (HDAC3) as well...

  9. Aniridia after blunt trauma and presumed wound dehiscence in a pseudophakic eye

    OpenAIRE

    Kyeong Hwan Kim; Wan Soo Kim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This was a report about a pseudophakic patient who experienced isolated total aniridia without damage to other intraocular structures following blunt trauma to the eye. This patient had a history of uneventful cataract surgery using a small clear corneal incision (CCI). This 71-year-old male presented at our clinic with glare in his left eye. He reported that he had fallen down while drunk and struck his left eye against a stone on the road 15 days earlier. He had undergone cataract ...

  10. Complete bronchial transaction due to severe blunt trauma and chest; treatment and outcomes : A distinct entity

    OpenAIRE

    Rikki Singal; Dalal, Ashwani K.; Usha Dalal; Attri, Ashok K.; Samita Gupta; Rakesh Sadhu; Pradeep Sahu

    2012-01-01

    An 18-year-young male patient came to the emergency department with history of severe blunt trauma. He was having respiratory distress and diagnosed as bronchial injury on the right side. A chest tube was put immediately and there was continuous air leak in the form of air bubbles in the intercostal chest tube bag with each inspiratory effort. Chest injury can be a life-threatening condition, if not managed timely and properly. Bronchoscopy showed injury over the right main bronchus. The feat...

  11. Complete bronchial transaction due to severe blunt trauma and chest; treatment and outcomes : A distinct entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikki Singal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year-young male patient came to the emergency department with history of severe blunt trauma. He was having respiratory distress and diagnosed as bronchial injury on the right side. A chest tube was put immediately and there was continuous air leak in the form of air bubbles in the intercostal chest tube bag with each inspiratory effort. Chest injury can be a life-threatening condition, if not managed timely and properly. Bronchoscopy showed injury over the right main bronchus. The features of this uncommon entity are discussed, with special emphasis on early diagnosis and surgical management.

  12. Characteristics of Hollow Viscus Injury following Blunt Abdominal Trauma; a Single Centre Experience from Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawal Kishore Jha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the presentation, anatomical distribution, diagnostic method, management and outcome of hollow viscus injury (HVI from blunt abdominal trauma. Methods: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study including patients with blunt abdominal trauma leading to HVI admitted at Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences, Ranchi, over a period of 4.5 years (January 2009 to July 2014. Data were retrieved from patients’ medical records. Total 173 patients with HVI due to blunt abdominal trauma, who underwent laparotomy at our institute, were reviewed. Data regarding clinical presentation, anatomical distribution, management and outcome were recorded and analysed. Results: Out of 173 patients 87.1% were men and 12.9% were women. Mean age of patients was 29±14.02 years. The most common site of injury was ileum (46.2% followed by jejunum (44.5%. There were 5 gastric perforations (2.9%, 2 (1.15% duodenal, 2 (1.15% colonic, 2 (1.15% sigmoidal and 2 (1.15% rectal injuries. One caecal injury was also recorded. Road traffic accident was the most common mechanism of injury (57.2% followed by fall from height (36.4% and assault (6.4%. Free gas under diaphragm on erect abdomen radiography was seen in 85.5% of cases while preoperative CT Abdomen was done in 11.6% of cases. Treatment consisted of simple closure of the perforation (66.5%, resection and anastomosis (11.0% and stoma (22.5%. Major complication was anastamotic leak which was recorded in 6.4% cases and 15.6% patients developed burst abdomen. Average hospital stay was 13±6 days. Overall mortality rate was 12.7%. Conclusion: Although early recognition of intestinal injuries from blunt abdominal trauma may be difficult in all cases, it is very important due to its tremendous life threatening potential. Age of the patient, anatomical site and time of presentation are probably main prognostic factors.

  13. Clinical findings and diagnostic imaging of small intestinal rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight patients with small intestinal rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma were analyzed by their clinical findings and diagnostic imaging (plain film, ultrasound and computed tomography). Computed tomography was most useful for identification of intraabdominal extraluminal free air (pneumoperitoneum) and this finding was obtained in seven out of the eight patients (87.5 %). Intraabdominal fluid collection was observed in All the patients and was most clearly detectable by ultrasound and computed tomography. These examinations may be applied to identification of properties of the fluid collection. All the patients eventually developed peritonitis when laparotomy was decided. Thus, close follow up observation of abdominal physical signs was also of critical importance. (author)

  14. Blunt abdominal trauma in children. The role of ultrasound and conventional radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In blunt abdominal trauma in children, the basic diagnostic work-up should include, X-ray studies, ultrasound and color Doppler ultrasonography. With these methods, most lesions can be identified both in the acute phase and in follow-up. They are also helpful to decide if surgery is indicated or if conservative management is justified. The diagnostic hallmarks of the most common organ lesions are summarized. Additional imaging studies, e.g. CT, angiography, or MRI, should be reserved for specific questions. (orig./MG)

  15. Thoracic Esophageal Perforation After Blunt Trauma in a Child: A Delayed Diagnosis and Surgical Management.

    OpenAIRE

    Alper Avci; Sevval Eren; Bülent Öztürk

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal rupture due to external blunt trauma is extremely rare in children. A-13-year old boy was admitted to emergency room with shortness of breath and abdominal pain. His history revealed fall down from 3 metres height, falling of a wooden block over chest, 4 hours before at home. Thoracic esophageal perforation was diagnosed at the 6th day of hospital stay. Surgical management was planned and right-sided  thoracotomy was performed at the 7th day after admission. The esophageal...

  16. Characteristics of behind armor blunt trauma produced by bullets with different structural materials: an experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Ling-qing WANG; Xi-nan LAI; Zhang, Bo; Zheng-lin SU; Huang, Yi-Feng; Wang, Li-Li

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of structural materials of bullets on behind armor blunt trauma (BABT). Methods Ten healthy male Landraces were randomly divided into two groups (5 each): 56 type 7.62-mm rifle bullet group and SS109 5.56-mm rifle bullet group. The kinetic energy of two types of bullets was adjusted to the same level (about 1880J) by the way of grow downwards gunpowder. Then the animals as protected with both grade NIJ Ⅲ ceramic hard armor and grade Ⅱ police soft body armor...

  17. Emergency department evaluation and management of blunt chest and lung trauma (Trauma CME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Eric J; Johnson, Scott; Leibner, Evan; Shahid, Jawad

    2016-06-01

    The majority of blunt chest injuries are minor contusions or abrasions; however, life-threatening injuries, including tension pneumothorax, hemothorax, and aortic rupture can occur and must be recognized early. This review focuses on the diagnosis, management, and disposition of patients with blunt injuries to the ribs and lung. Utilization of decision rules for chest x-ray and computed tomography are discussed, along with the emerging role of bedside lung ultrasonography. Management controversies presented include the limitations of needle thoracostomy us¬ing standard needle, chest tube placement, and chest tube size. Finally, a discussion is provided related to airway and ventilation management to assist in the timing and type of interventions needed to maintain oxygenation. PMID:27177417

  18. Imaging of blunt pancreatic trauma: The value of initial and sequential CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to assess the value of initial, repeated and sequential computed tomography (CT) in patients with blunt pancreatic trauma, and then define and correlate CT findings with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), ultrasound (US), both laboratory and surgical findings. This retrospective study covers an eight-year period from 1999 to 2007. The material includes 21 patients (17 males and 4 females) with confirmed pancreatic injury. CT was performed on admission in all cases and in 15 cases follow-up CT was performed from 24 hrs to 14 days later. US was performed in 9 cases, ERCP in 8 cases and MRCP in one case. Serum amylase level was obtained at the admission in all cases. The CT at admission was positive in 17 patients (81.0%); the diagnosis was missed in 4 patients (19.0%), all performed on single row spiral CT. In all these four cases repeated CT was positive. ERCP showed rupture of the main pancreatic duct in 7 cases, one was inconclusive. One MRCP was positive. The serum amylase was elevated in 14 cases (66.7%) Specific CT features in initial and repeated examinations together were: organ fracture - 33.3%, swelling - 38.1%, haematoma/ contusion - 38.1%, fluid between splenic vein and pancreas - 19.0%. Non-specific features were: thickening of anterior-renal fascia- 23.8%, fluid in lesser sac - 28.6%, extra peritoneal fluid - 42.9%, associated splenic injury -14.3% and intraperitoneal fluid - 38.1%. On retrospective analysis, two out of four false negative CT results could have been avoided. No correlation between the CT features and the outcome of surgical and conservative management could be found in this study. A proper technique and accurate reading of images are mandatory for the diagnosis of pancreatic injury. When CT performed on admission is negative and there is abdominal pain and an elevated serum amylase, CT examination should be repeated within 24-48 hours

  19. NON - OPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF BLUNT HEPATIC AND/OR SPLENIC TRAUMA : A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The incidence of blunt splenic and hepatic injuries are on a rise not only because of an increase in the overall incidence of Road Traffic Accidents but also due to more liberal use of radiological tests in the work - up of these patients. Spleen and liver are respectively the first and the second most common intra - abdominal organs to be injured in blunt abdominal injury. However, most of these patients can be treated without a formal laparotomy and its associated complications, as long as they remain hemody namically stable. Although few studies have proven the efficacy of conservative management, most of them are retrospective. This prospective study aims to evaluate the efficacy of conservative management of blunt liver and/or splenic injuries. MATERIALS AN D METHODS: Over a 12 - month period, a total of 56 patients with blunt hepatic and/or splenic injury were evaluated prospectively. Fourteen [25%] patients underwent immediate exploration for hemodynamic instability and the rest 42 patients constituted the st udy group. Injury Severity Score [ISS] was used to assess the extent of overall injury. Unstable patients underwent emergent laparotomies, and stable patients had abdominal computed tomography (CT scans to grade the source and severity of their injury. He patic and splenic injuries were graded using AAST grading for solid organ injuries. Those with nonhepatic, nonsplenic operative indications underwent exploration, and the remaining patients were intentionally managed nonoperatively in the trauma intensive care unit. Frequent measurement of vitals and estimation of hemoglobin and hematocrit was done. The outcome was measured in terms of total blood transfused, total duration of hospital stay and complications due to conservative management. RESULTS: A total of 56 patients presented to our ED with blunt abdominal trauma. Fourteen patients had to undergo emergent surgery for hemodynamic stability. The rest 42 were

  20. Exposure to 100% Oxygen Abolishes the Impairment of Fracture Healing after Thoracic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmler, Julia; Bindl, Ronny; McCook, Oscar; Wagner, Florian; Gröger, Michael; Wagner, Katja; Scheuerle, Angelika; Radermacher, Peter; Ignatius, Anita

    2015-01-01

    In polytrauma patients a thoracic trauma is one of the most critical injuries and an important trigger of post-traumatic inflammation. About 50% of patients with thoracic trauma are additionally affected by bone fractures. The risk for fracture malunion is considerably increased in such patients, the pathomechanisms being poorly understood. Thoracic trauma causes regional alveolar hypoxia and, subsequently, hypoxemia, which in turn triggers local and systemic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to unravel the role of oxygen in impaired bone regeneration after thoracic trauma. We hypothesized that short-term breathing of 100% oxygen in the early post-traumatic phase ameliorates inflammation and improves bone regeneration. Mice underwent a femur osteotomy alone or combined with blunt chest trauma 100% oxygen was administered immediately after trauma for two separate 3 hour intervals. Arterial blood gas tensions, microcirculatory perfusion and oxygenation were assessed at 3, 9 and 24 hours after injury. Inflammatory cytokines and markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress were measured in plasma, lung and fracture hematoma. Bone healing was assessed on day 7, 14 and 21. Thoracic trauma induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation and impaired bone healing. Short-term exposure to 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase significantly attenuated systemic and local inflammatory responses and improved fracture healing without provoking toxic side effects, suggesting that hyperoxia could induce anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative effects after severe injury. These results suggest that breathing of 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase might reduce the risk of poorly healing fractures in severely injured patients. PMID:26147725

  1. Exposure to 100% Oxygen Abolishes the Impairment of Fracture Healing after Thoracic Trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Kemmler

    Full Text Available In polytrauma patients a thoracic trauma is one of the most critical injuries and an important trigger of post-traumatic inflammation. About 50% of patients with thoracic trauma are additionally affected by bone fractures. The risk for fracture malunion is considerably increased in such patients, the pathomechanisms being poorly understood. Thoracic trauma causes regional alveolar hypoxia and, subsequently, hypoxemia, which in turn triggers local and systemic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to unravel the role of oxygen in impaired bone regeneration after thoracic trauma. We hypothesized that short-term breathing of 100% oxygen in the early post-traumatic phase ameliorates inflammation and improves bone regeneration. Mice underwent a femur osteotomy alone or combined with blunt chest trauma 100% oxygen was administered immediately after trauma for two separate 3 hour intervals. Arterial blood gas tensions, microcirculatory perfusion and oxygenation were assessed at 3, 9 and 24 hours after injury. Inflammatory cytokines and markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress were measured in plasma, lung and fracture hematoma. Bone healing was assessed on day 7, 14 and 21. Thoracic trauma induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation and impaired bone healing. Short-term exposure to 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase significantly attenuated systemic and local inflammatory responses and improved fracture healing without provoking toxic side effects, suggesting that hyperoxia could induce anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative effects after severe injury. These results suggest that breathing of 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase might reduce the risk of poorly healing fractures in severely injured patients.

  2. Association between increased blood interleukin-6 levels on emergency department arrival and prolonged length of intensive care unit stay for blunt trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Masashi; Nakada, Taka-aki; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Background Systemic immune response to injury plays a key role in the pathophysiological mechanism of blunt trauma. We tested the hypothesis that increased blood interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels of blunt trauma patients on emergency department (ED) arrival are associated with poor clinical outcomes, and investigated the utility of rapid measurement of the blood IL-6 level. Methods We enrolled 208 consecutive trauma patients who were transferred from the scene of an accident to a level I trauma cen...

  3. Fatal right coronary artery rupture following blunt chest trauma: detection by postmortem selective coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuchi, Go; Makino, Yohsuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-05-01

    Coronary artery injury is a rare complication following blunt chest trauma (BCT), and can be fatal. Here we report findings on postmortem selective coronary angiography of right coronary artery rupture after an assault involving blunt trauma to the chest. A woman in her 60s died after her son stomped on her chest. There were no appreciable signs of injury on external examination, and cause of death could not be determined by postmortem computed tomography (PMCT). Internal findings indicated that an external force had been applied to the anterior chest, as evidenced by subcutaneous hemorrhage and pericardial and cardiac contusions. Postmortem coronary angiography revealed irregularity of the intima and of the fat tissue surrounding the proximal part of the right coronary artery associated with a local filling defect. Histopathological examination suggested coronary rupture with dissection of the tunica media and compression of the lumen cavity. The key points in the present case are that no fatal injuries could be determined on external examination, and the heart and coronary artery injuries were not evident on PMCT. Criminality might be overlooked in such cases, as external investigation at the crime scene would be inadequate and could result in a facile diagnosis of cause of death. This is the first report of coronary artery rupture with dissection that was detected by CT coronary angiography, and provides helpful findings for reaching an appropriate decision both forensically and clinically. PMID:26126482

  4. Radiologic findings of small bowel rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowel rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma is no longer rare, and is among the most challenging problems that confront the physicians and radiologists. It is frequently difficult to diagnose because the symptoms may be trivial during the early stage and masked by more obvious, but less lethal injuries. It is well known that the roentgen examination of the abdomen is also of little value to exclude bowel rupture because of infrequency of positive findings and free gas. The plain films of 23 cases of jejunal rupture and 8 cases of ileal rupture were evaluated to sort and diagnostic features of small bowel rupture caused by blunt abdominal trauma. 1. Free intraperitoneal gas was noted in 6 cases of jejunal rupture (26%) and 1 case of ileal rupture (13%), and definite radiological evidence of free intraperitoneal fluid was present in 16 cases of patients (52%). 2. The contour change of bowel loops such as tapering or indentation were seen in 11 cases of patients (36%), and local opacity along the mesenteric root axis was demonstrated in 19 cases of patients (61%). 3. Paralytic ileus was localized to LUQ in jejunal rupture and to mid-abdomen in ileal rupture, and gastric and transverse-colon distension with gas was noticeable especially in jejunal rupture

  5. Is CT really better than diagnostic peritoneal lavage in blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT is very successful in defining intraabdominal injuries caused by blunt trauma. To determine if it is more accurate than diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL), a prospective comparison of 301 patients was carried out. Negative findings on DPL and CT occurred in 196 (72.3%) patients. Fifty-one (18.85%) patients had true-positive findings on DPL and CT. Seven (13.7%) showed more injuries of exploration than were seen at CT. Nineteen (7.0%) false-negative CT examinations and one false-positive CT study were operatively confirmed. Three false-negative and two false-positive DPL studies occurred. Twenty-nine patients who were not explored are excluded from the statistics. CT had a sensitivity of 74.3, specificity of 99.5%, and accuracy of 92.6%; DPL had 95.9%, 99.0%, and 98.2%, respectively. Thus, while the sensitivity of CT is less than that of DPL, the former is a useful technique in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma

  6. An unusual complication of blunt ocular trauma: A horseshoe-shaped macular tear with spontaneous closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Karaca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of horseshoe-shaped macular tear after blunt trauma with the course of the tear and the relevant findings obtained by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT is described. A 21-year-old man who had suffered blunt trauma 5 days previously visited our clinic complaining of vision loss in his left eye. Ophthalmic examination and SD-OCT images revealed a horseshoe-shaped macular tear. A month later at the second visit, the macular tear was found to have spontaneously closed. There have been many cases reported previously of the spontaneous closure of traumatic macular holes. A horseshoe-shaped macular tear is an atypical clinical presentation. However, the mechanism of spontaneous closure is hypothetically as same as that for a macular hole. High-resolution images and three-dimensional maps taken with SD-OCT can provide more details on macular diseases and are more useful than time-domain OCT images.

  7. Asymptomatic diaphragmatic rupture with retroperitoneal opening as a result of blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narci Adnan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt traumas of the abdomen and thorax are important clinical problems in pediatric ages. Severity of trauma may not always be compatible with the patients′ clinical situation. A 2-year-old male child was admitted to our emergency clinic as a result of tractor crash accident. Physical examination of the child was normal. The abdominal and thoracic ultrasonography (USG examination performed in the emergency clinic was normal. In thoracic computed tomography (CT scan of the patient, there was irregularity of the right diaphragmatic contour that was described as micro perforation-rupture (the free air was just in the perihepatic and retroperitoneal area, which was not passing through the abdomen. The patient was followed-up for 1 week in the hospital with a diagnosis of retroperitoneal diaphragmatic rupture. It is not appropriate to decide the severity of trauma in childhood on the basis of clinical findings. Although severe trauma and sustaining radiological examinations, the patients′ clinical pictures may be surprisingly normal, as in our patient. In such cases, there may not be any clinical symptom. CT scan examination must be preferred to USG for both primary diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. According to the current literature, there is no reported case with retroperitoneal rupture of the diaphragm.

  8. New scoring system for intra-abdominal injury diagnosis after blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shojaee Majid

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: An accurate scoring system for intra-abdominal injury (IAI based on clinical manifestation and examination may decrease unnecessary CT scans, save time, and reduce healthcare cost. This study is designed to provide a new scoring system for a better diagno- sis of IAI after blunt trauma. Methods: This prospective observational study was performed from April 2011 to October 2012 on patients aged above 18 years and suspected with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT admitted to the emergency department (ED of Imam Hussein Hospital and Shohadaye Hafte Tir Hospital. All patients were assessed and treated based on Advanced Trauma Life Support and ED protocol. Diagnosis was done according to CT scan findings, which was considered as the gold standard. Data were gathered based on patient's history, physical exam, ultrasound and CT scan findings by a general practitioner who was not blind to this study. Chisquare test and logistic regression were done. Factors with significant relationship with CT scan were imported in multivariate regression models, where a coefficient (β was given based on the contribution of each of them. Scoring system was developed based on the obtained total βof each factor. Results: Altogether 261 patients (80.1% male were enrolled (48 cases of IAI. A 24-point blunt abdominal trauma scoring system (BATSS was developed. Patients were divided into three groups including low (score<8, moderate (8≤score<12 and high risk (score≥12. In high risk group immediate laparotomy should be done, moderate group needs further assessments, and low risk group should be kept under observation. Low risk patients did not show positive CT-scans (specificity 100%. Conversely, all high risk patients had positive CT-scan findings (sensitivity 100%. The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated a close relationship between the results of CT scan and BATSS (sensitivity=99.3%. Conclusion: The present scoring system furnishes a

  9. Isolated hip fracture care in an inclusive trauma system : A trauma system wide evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laarhoven, J. J E M; van Lammeren, G. W.; Houwert, R. M.; van Laarhoven, C. J H C M; Hietbrink, F.; Leenen, L. P H; Verleisdonk, E. J M M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Elderly patients with a hip fracture represent a large proportion of the trauma population; however, little is known about outcome differences between different levels of trauma care for these patients. The aim of this study is to analyse the outcome of trauma care in patients with a h

  10. Invading of intrauterine contraceptive device into the sigmoid colon through uterine perforation caused by a blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodabadi, Abdoulhossein; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi; Amirbeigi, Mahdieh; Jazayeri, Hoda

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is relatively safe but still with some serious risks. Uterus perforation is rare and would be fatal. A case of Cu-7 IUCD invading into the sigmoid colon through uterine perforation caused by a pelvic blunt trauma was presented. Our case showed that uterus perforation by an IUCD could induce utero-sigmoid fistula which is likely to be missed. Imaging is required when the patients with IUCD present abdominal pain, particularly with a history of trauma. PMID:26764547

  11. Blunt Chest Trauma in Mice after Cigarette Smoke-Exposure: Effects of Mechanical Ventilation with 100 % O2

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Katja; Gröger, Michael; McCook, Oscar; Scheuerle, Angelika; Asfar, Pierre; Stahl, Bettina; Huber-Lang, Markus; Ignatius, Anita; Jung, Birgit; Duechs, Matthias; Möller, Peter; Georgieff, Michael; Calzia, Enrico; Radermacher, Peter; Wagner, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking (CS) aggravates post-traumatic acute lung injury and increases ventilator-induced lung injury due to more severe tissue inflammation and apoptosis. Hyper-inflammation after chest trauma is due to the physical damage, the drop in alveolar PO2, and the consecutive hypoxemia and tissue hypoxia. Therefore, we tested the hypotheses that 1) CS exposure prior to blunt chest trauma causes more severe post-traumatic inflammation and thereby aggravates lung injury, and that 2) hyperox...

  12. THE EVOLUTION OF ISOLATED BILATERAL LUNG CONTUSION FROM BLUNT CHEST TRAUMA IN RATS: CELLULAR AND CYTOKINE RESPONSES

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Davidson, Bruce A.; Woytash, James A.; Helinski, Jadwiga D.; Marschke, Cristi J.; Manderscheid, Patricia A.; Notter, Robert H.; Paul R. Knight

    2005-01-01

    Lung contusion is the leading cause of death from blunt thoracic trauma in adults, but its mechanistic pathophysiology remains unclear. This study uses a recently developed rat model to investigate the evolution of inflammation and injury in isolated lung contusion. Bilateral lung contusion with minimal cardiac trauma was induced in 54 anesthetized rats by dropping a 0.3-kg hollow cylindrical weight onto a precordial shield (impact energy, 2.45 Joules). Arterial oxygenation, pressure-volume (...

  13. Percutaneous injection of hemostatic agents for severe blunt hepatic trauma: an experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jie; Lv, Faqin; Li, Wenxiu; Zhang, Huiqin; Luo, Yukun; An, Lichun [Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Department of Ultrasound, Beijing (China); Li, Tanshi [Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Beijing (China)

    2008-12-15

    This study was designed to evaluate whether percutaneous injection of hemostatic agents under the guidance of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can stop hemorrhage from severe hepatic trauma. Eighteen dogs were impacted by a miniature impactor to create blunt hepatic trauma. Fourteen with appropriate liver lesions were divided into two groups: the treatment group (n=7) and the control group (n=7). In the treatment group, hemocoagulase atrox and {alpha}-cyanoacrylate were respectively injected into the injury sites and transected micro-vessels under the guidance of CEUS. In the control group, normal saline was injected into the injury sites. CEUS and CT were performed at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after the focal injection. Surviving animals were killed on the 21st day for pathologic examination. All animals of the treatment group survived. Three dogs of the control group died in the first 24 h. In the treatment group, CEUS and CT demonstrated that hepatic lesions became smaller gradually from the 3rd to the 21st day after injection. The focal injection of hemostatic agents under the guidance of CEUS can stop hemorrhage from hepatic trauma of grade III{proportional_to}IV or IV. During the period of 3 weeks, no side effect was found. (orig.)

  14. Percutaneous injection of hemostatic agents for severe blunt hepatic trauma: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to evaluate whether percutaneous injection of hemostatic agents under the guidance of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can stop hemorrhage from severe hepatic trauma. Eighteen dogs were impacted by a miniature impactor to create blunt hepatic trauma. Fourteen with appropriate liver lesions were divided into two groups: the treatment group (n=7) and the control group (n=7). In the treatment group, hemocoagulase atrox and α-cyanoacrylate were respectively injected into the injury sites and transected micro-vessels under the guidance of CEUS. In the control group, normal saline was injected into the injury sites. CEUS and CT were performed at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after the focal injection. Surviving animals were killed on the 21st day for pathologic examination. All animals of the treatment group survived. Three dogs of the control group died in the first 24 h. In the treatment group, CEUS and CT demonstrated that hepatic lesions became smaller gradually from the 3rd to the 21st day after injection. The focal injection of hemostatic agents under the guidance of CEUS can stop hemorrhage from hepatic trauma of grade III∝IV or IV. During the period of 3 weeks, no side effect was found. (orig.)

  15. Efficacy of aprotinin treatment on bilateral blunt chest trauma created in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of aprotinin, on blood gasses, oxidant-antioxidant status, and lung histopathology in an experimental bilateral blunt chest trauma model. Methods: Conducted at the Experimental Animal Laboratory of Meram Medical School at Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey, the study comprised 21 New Zealand female albino rabbits who were divided into three groups. Trauma was applied on the sham and aprotinin groups, which was administered intravenous Aprotinin 20.000 U/kg. Arterial blood samples were obtained from all rabbits at hours 0, 3, 24, and 96. At hour 96 after trauma, all rabbits were sacrificed using the decapitation method, and then blood and lung tissue samples were obtained. Blood nitric oxide, malondialdehyde and blood gas measurements were made. Histopathological changes in the lung were examined with a light microscope. Results: While no positive effect of aprotinin was observed on nitric oxide malondialdehyde and partial pressure of carbon dioxide values, it was seen to have an increasing effect on partial oxygen pressure level. Aprotinin had a partial effect on lung histopathology. Conclusion: Aprotinin was determined to have a positive effect on PO/sub 2/ levels. We could not find any positive effects especially on alveolar haemorrhage. (author)

  16. Ultrasonic and roentgenographic detection of retroperitoneal air in a case of duodenal rupture after blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of retroperitoneal duodenal rupture after a blunt abdominal trauma in a 16 year old boy is presented. Conventional X-ray examination and ultrasound examination made an early diagnosis possible. The diagnostic possibilities, especially concerning new techniques, are discussed. (orig.)

  17. The diagnosis of bilateral renal artery thrombosis due to circular rupture of the intima following blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of bilateral renal artery thrombosis due to circular rupture of the intima following blunt abdominal trauma is reported. A further 15 published cases are tabulated. The pathogenetic mechanism, symptoms, course and value of various diagnostic techniques are discussed. The importance of early and specific radiological diagnosis is stressed and the value of angiography is pointed out. The literature is quoted extensively. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of amylase and lipase levels in blunt trauma abdomen patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are studies to prove the role of amylase and lipase estimation as a screening diagnostic tool to detect diseases apart from acute pancreatitis. However, there is sparse literature on the role of serum and urine amylase, lipase levels, etc to help predict the specific intra-abdominal injury after blunt trauma abdomen (BTA. Aim: To elucidate the significance of elevation in the levels of amylase and lipase in serum and urine samples as reliable parameters for accurate diagnosis and management of blunt trauma to the abdomen. Materials and Methods: A prospective analysis was done on the trauma patients admitted in Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Center, AIIMS, with blunt abdomen trauma injuries over a period of six months. Blood and urine samples were collected on days 1, 3, and 5 of admission for the estimation of amylase and lipase, liver function tests, serum bicarbonates, urine routine microscopy for red blood cells, and complete hemogram. Clinical details such as time elapsed from injury to admission, type of injury, trauma score, and hypotension were noted. Patients were divided into groups according to the single or multiple organs injured and according to their hospital outcome (dead/discharged. Wilcoxon′s Rank sum or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare median values in two/three groups. Data analysis was performed using STATA 11.0 statistical software. Results: A total of 55 patients with median age 26 (range, 6-80 years, were enrolled in the study. Of these, 80% were males. Surgery was required for 20% of the patients. Out of 55 patients, 42 had isolated single organ injury [liver or spleen or gastrointestinal tract (GIT or kidney]. Patients with pancreatic injury were excluded. In patients who suffered liver injuries, urine lipase levels on day 1, urine lipase/amylase ratio along with aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP on days 1, 3, and 5, were found to

  19. Blunt abdominal trauma and hollow viscus injury in children: The diagnostic value of plain radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although blunt abdominal trauma is common in children, the G-I tract is involved only rarely. However, this paper deals with a series of 24 cases in whom a hollow viscus was injured. We present the radiological and operative findings as well as the results of subsequent radiological workup in patients who had no surgery. Contrary to the recent trend which stresses early abdominal CT as critically important for guiding treatment we have retained a more conservative attitude. Our present protocol includes plain radiography frequently combined with sonographic screening of the abdomen. In patients with stable vital signs and when necessary, we follow up with scintigraphy. CT is reserved for complicated cases with obscure clinical manifestations which do not fit the plain radiological findings and also cases running an unexpected course. (orig.)

  20. Ruptured Aneurysm of the Splenic Artery: A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain after Blunt Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalalludin Khoshnevis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Splenic artery aneurysms (SAAs are rare (0.2-10.4%; however, they are the most common form of visceral artery aneurysms. Splenic artery aneurysms are important to identify, because up to 25% of the cases are complicated by rupture. Post- rupture mortality rate is 25% -70% based on the underlying cause. Herein we present a young patient with abdominal pain after blunt abdominal trauma due to rupture of an SAA.Case Presentation: A 27-year-old male, without a remarkable medical history, who suffered from abdominal pain for 2 days after falling was admitted to the emergency department with hypovolemic shock. Upon performing emergency laparotomy a ruptured splenic artery aneurysm was found.Conclusions: It is important to consider rupture of a splenic artery aneurysm in patients with abdominal pain and hypovolemic shock.

  1. Thoracic Esophageal Perforation After Blunt Trauma in a Child: A Delayed Diagnosis and Surgical Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Avci

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal rupture due to external blunt trauma is extremely rare in children. A-13-year old boy was admitted to emergency room with shortness of breath and abdominal pain. His history revealed fall down from 3 metres height, falling of a wooden block over chest, 4 hours before at home. Thoracic esophageal perforation was diagnosed at the 6th day of hospital stay. Surgical management was planned and right-sided  thoracotomy was performed at the 7th day after admission. The esophageal layers were closed primarily and separately after muscular and mucosal debridement. Reinforcement of the primary repair was done with pleural and intercostal muscle flaps. The esophagus was tied with absorbable sutures at proximal and distal parts of the perforation to block the esophageal passage. Gastrostomy and jejunostomy were performed for nutrition. We report here a successful management with primary repair of this esophageal perforation of late diagnosis.

  2. Ultrasonographic findings in blunt abdominal trauma among Yemeni patients in Sana'a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hundred and thirty patients (104 males, and 26 females) with suspected blunt abdominal trauma were admitted to this prospective study at Althawra hospital, Sana'a, Yemen in the period between june and december 2003. Real-time ultrasonography of the abdomen was performed in all patients. Fifty-six patients showed U/S evidence of visceral injury. Fourteen injuries of spleen, 7 had evidence of liver and 8 had renal injuries. Only eight needed a laparatomy because of cardiovascular instability and the laparatomy confirmed the ultrasound findings. The remainder were treated conservatively with good results. It is of interest that there was one ultrasonic sign of fluid in one patient who progressed well on conservative therapy. Ultrasonic signs of visceral laceration or contusion were found in patients who had 2 up to 8 sonic findings. It appears that visceral injury always gives more than two sonic signs. The remaining 33 patients only had intraperitoneal fluid, only one of them had volvulus. It is not possible to state the nature of fluid, whether it is an exudate, transudate, blood or lymph. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage would have been helpful. Seven patients died, most of them due to associated injuries, mainly head injury and cardiovascular collapse, one patient died on table and had retroperitonieal haematoma extending from pelvis to the mesentery of transverse colon and had no abdominal organ injury. The sensitivity of ultrasonography for liver was 87.5% and for spleen 100%. Ultrasonography is sensitive, safe, cost effective and non invasive method for screening patients with blunt abdominal trauma.(Author)

  3. CT features for the detection of bowel perforation sites by blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the CT criteria useful for the diagnosis of the site of bowel perforation in patients with this or mesenteric injury caused by blunt abdominal trauma. CT findings of 26 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were retrospectively analyzed by two observers who were unaware of operative findings, and the results of their analysis were compared with those findings. Twenty cases of bowel perforation found at the jejunum (8), ileum (9), and colon (3), and six cases of mesenteric injuries were confirmed by operation. We evaluated CT findings of 1) segmental bowel wall thickening, b) focal mesenteric fat infiltration, c) loculated fluid collection and d) extraluminal air adjacent to the bowel, and in addition analyzed the locations of ascites and free air, and the associated injuries of solid organs. The most common finding at the site of bowel perforation was segmental bowel wall thickening (17 cases), followed by focal mesenteric fat infiltration (12 cases), loculated fluid (12 cases) and extraluminal air ajacent to the bowel (9 cases). Segmental bowel wall thickening was present at 34 sites, and the perforations were confirmed at 17 of these(50%). Focal mesenteric fat infiltration was present at 19 sites;the perforations were proven at 12(63%). Loculated fluid collections were confirmed at 12/20 sites(60%), and extraluminal air adjacent to the bowel at 9/12(75%). The positive predictive value of criteria a, b, d, c) was 100%, and the positive predictive values of a, b, c) and a, d) were 60 and 67%, respectively. We observed ascites in 16 cases and intraperitoneal free air in 8 cases, the locations of ascites and free air did not, however, significantly correlate with the perforation sites. Extraluminal air adjacent to the bowel was the most specific criterion, and segmental bowel wall thickening was the most sensitive criterion. of all criteria, the finding 'a, b, c, d' most accurately predicted the site of bowel perforation

  4. Dental trauma in association with maxillofacial fractures: an epidemiological study

    OpenAIRE

    Ruslin, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate the incidence and associated factors of dental trauma in patients with maxillofacial fractures at the VU Medical Center in Amsterdam. Material and methods: Data from 707 patients who were treated surgically for maxillofacial fractures were evaluated. The data were collected retrospectively from patient files and other available databases. The data collected included date of fracture, age, gender, type of fracture, and ...

  5. Blunt urogenital trauma in prepubescent female patients: more than meets the eye!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, J M; Gardner, M J; Albanese, C T

    1995-12-01

    Blunt traumatic injury to the urogenital region in the prepubescent girl is commonly evaluated in pediatric emergency departments (ED). The purpose of this study is: 1) to establish recommendations for an accurate, painless (both physically and psychologically), and timely diagnosis, and 2) to determine whether the ED examination can accurately determine the extent of the injury. Over a 24-month period (January 1991 through December 1992), 22 girls with blunt trauma to the urogenital region (mean age 5.7 years, range 2-9 years) were retrospectively evaluated. Initial ED evaluations were by both an emergency physician and a pediatric surgeon. All 22 patients underwent an examination under anesthesia (EUA) in the operating room to evaluate the extent of the injury and to repair the injury as needed. Follow-up was obtained in all patients and averaged 18 months. The findings at EUA demonstrated a significant disagreement with the preoperative ED evaluation. In only five patients was there agreement between the preoperative ED assessment and the findings during the EUA (24% concurrence). Thus, 16 patients (76%) had injuries of greater extent than was appreciated during the preoperative examination in the ED. Partial or complete disruption of the perianal sphincters occurred in six patients (27%) and was unrecognized preoperatively in each. Twenty-one of the 22 patients required suture repair of lacerations, the remaining patient did not require surgical therapy. Three patients had contusions or lacerations to the urethral area requiring repair and/or prolonged bladder catheter drainage for two to 14 days (average seven days). The average hospital stay was 19.3 hours. There were three minor wound complications following surgery: two required repeat EUA with suturing or cauterization, and one required no further therapy. This study clearly demonstrates that the ED examination, by both emergency physicians and pediatric surgeons, of young girls who have suffered blunt

  6. Aniridia after blunt trauma and presumed wound dehiscence in a pseudophakic eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeong Hwan Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This was a report about a pseudophakic patient who experienced isolated total aniridia without damage to other intraocular structures following blunt trauma to the eye. This patient had a history of uneventful cataract surgery using a small clear corneal incision (CCI. This 71-year-old male presented at our clinic with glare in his left eye. He reported that he had fallen down while drunk and struck his left eye against a stone on the road 15 days earlier. He had undergone cataract surgery on his left eye nine months before the accident at another eye clinic. Slit-lamp examination showed total aniridia in his left eye, but there was no hyphema or cells in the anterior chamber. The intraocular lens in his left eye was stable, without decentration, dislocation, or zonular dehiscence and remained in an intact capsular bag. Review of the medical records from the surgical clinic at which he had undergone cataract surgery indicated no specific findings for any intraocular structure including the iris. He had previously undergone an uneventful phacoemulsification for his left eye through a 2.2 mm CCI, followed by the implantation of a single piece acrylic intraocular lens inside an intact capsular bag. This report showed that small-sized CCIs can be opened postoperatively by trauma and that this can result in isolated total aniridia without damage to other intraocular structures.

  7. Aniridia after blunt trauma and presumed wound dehiscence in a pseudophakic eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Hwan; Kim, Wan Soo

    2016-02-01

    This was a report about a pseudophakic patient who experienced isolated total aniridia without damage to other intraocular structures following blunt trauma to the eye. This patient had a history of uneventful cataract surgery using a small clear corneal incision (CCI). This 71-year-old male presented at our clinic with glare in his left eye. He reported that he had fallen down while drunk and struck his left eye against a stone on the road 15 days earlier. He had undergone cataract surgery on his left eye nine months before the accident at another eye clinic. Slit-lamp examination showed total aniridia in his left eye, but there was no hyphema or cells in the anterior chamber. The intraocular lens in his left eye was stable, without decentration, dislocation, or zonular dehiscence and remained in an intact capsular bag. Review of the medical records from the surgical clinic at which he had undergone cataract surgery indicated no specific findings for any intraocular structure including the iris. He had previously undergone an uneventful phacoemulsification for his left eye through a 2.2 mm CCI, followed by the implantation of a single piece acrylic intraocular lens inside an intact capsular bag. This report showed that small-sized CCIs can be opened postoperatively by trauma and that this can result in isolated total aniridia without damage to other intraocular structures. PMID:26840167

  8. Small bowel perforation resulting from blunt abdominal trauma. Interval change of radiological characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed radiography and computed tomography (CT) findings of small bowel perforation due to blunt trauma to identify the keys to diagnosis. Twelve patients with surgically proven small bowel perforation were retrospectively studied. All patients underwent radiography and CT, and five underwent presurgical follow-up CT. Radiological findings were evaluated and correlated to the elapsed time from the onset of the trauma retrospectively. Radiography demonstrated free air in only 8% (1/12) and 25% (3/12) at the initial and follow-up examinations, respectively. In contrast, the initial and follow-up CT scans detected extraluminal air in 58% (7/12) and 92% (11/12), respectively. Mesenteric fat obliteration was seen in 58% (7/12) and 75% (9/12) at initial and follow-up CT, respectively. The incidence of both extraluminal air and mesenteric fat obliteration on CT increased as time elapsed, particularly after 8 h. High-density ascites was seen in 75% at initial CT, including two patients without extraluminal air, but was observed in all but one patient at follow-up CT. The chance of detecting extraluminal air increases as time elapses. High-density ascites may be seen without extraluminal air and might be an indirect or precedent sign of small bowel perforation. Radiologists need to be familiar with these radiological features. (author)

  9. Strangulated intercostal liver herniation subsequent to blunt trauma. First report with review of the world literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendinelli Cino

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Traumatic transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia, defined as an acquired herniation of abdominal contents through disrupted intercostal muscles, is a rarely reported entity. We present the first reported case of a traumatic transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia complicated by strangulation of the herniated visceral contents. Following blunt trauma, a 61-year old man developed a traumatic transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia complicated by strangulation of liver segment VI. Due to pre-existing respiratory problems and the presence of multiple other injuries (grade III kidney laceration and lung contusion the hernia was managed non-operatively for the first 2 weeks. The strangulated liver segment eventually underwent ischemic necrosis. Six weeks later the resulting subcutaneous abscess required surgical drainage. Nine months post injury the large symptomatic intercostal hernia was treated with laparoscopic mesh repair. Twelve months after the initial trauma, a small recurrence of the hernia required laparoscopic re-fixation of the mesh. This paper outlines important steps in managing a rare post traumatic entity. Early liver reduction and hernia repair would have been ideal. The adopted conservative approach caused liver necrosis and required staged procedures to achieve a good outcome.

  10. Surgical management for the first 48 h following blunt chest trauma: state of the art (excluding vascular injuries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lesquen, Henri; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Gust, Lucile; Ford, Robert Michael; Beranger, Fabien; Natale, Claudia; Bonnet, Pierre-Mathieu; D'Journo, Xavier-Benoît

    2015-03-01

    This review aims to answer the most common questions in routine surgical practice during the first 48 h of blunt chest trauma (BCT) management. Two authors identified relevant manuscripts published since January 1994 to January 2014. Using preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement, they focused on the surgical management of BCT, excluded both child and vascular injuries and selected 80 studies. Tension pneumothorax should be promptly diagnosed and treated by needle decompression closely followed with chest tube insertion (Grade D). All traumatic pneumothoraces are considered for chest tube insertion. However, observation is possible for selected patients with small unilateral pneumothoraces without respiratory disease or need for positive pressure ventilation (Grade C). Symptomatic traumatic haemothoraces or haemothoraces >500 ml should be treated by chest tube insertion (Grade D). Occult pneumothoraces and occult haemothoraces are managed by observation with daily chest X-rays (Grades B and C). Periprocedural antibiotics are used to prevent chest-tube-related infectious complications (Grade B). No sign of life at the initial assessment and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration >10 min are considered as contraindications of Emergency Department Thoracotomy (Grade C). Damage Control Thoracotomy is performed for either massive air leakage or refractive shock or ongoing bleeding enhanced by chest tube output >1500 ml initially or >200 ml/h for 3 h (Grade D). In the case of haemodynamically stable patients, early video-assisted thoracic surgery is performed for retained haemothoraces (Grade B). Fixation of flail chest can be considered if mechanical ventilation for 48 h is probably required (Grade B). Fixation of sternal fractures is performed for displaced fractures with overlap or comminution, intractable pain or respiratory insufficiency (Grade D). Lung herniation, traumatic diaphragmatic rupture and pericardial rupture are life

  11. Influence of molding pressure on blunt trauma effect and ballistic properties of unidirectional and bidirectional composites based on ultra high molecular weight polyethylene fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Dimeski, Dimko; Spaseska, Dijana; Smileski, Rose

    2003-01-01

    The influence of molding pressure on blunt traume effect and ballistic strength of unidirectional and bidirectional composites based on UHMWPE (Ultra Hight Molecular Weight Polyethylene) fibers is investigated. Two types of unidirectional and one type of bidirectional composites molded at 20, 60 and 100 bar were tested on their ballistic strength and their blunt traume depth and area were measured. It was found out that by increasing the molding pressure the blunt trauma effect was decreas...

  12. Invading of intrauterine contraceptive device into the sigmoid colon through uterine perforation caused by a blunt trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdoulhossein Davoodabadi; Mahdi Mohammadzadeh; Mahdieh Amirbeigi; Hoda Jazayeri

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is relatively safe but still with some serious risks.Uterus perforation is rare and would be fatal.A case of Cu-7 IUCD invading into the sigmoid colon through uterine perforation caused by a pelvic blunt trauma was presented.Our case showed that uterus perforation by an IUCD could induce utero-sigmoid fistula which is likely to be missed.Imaging is required when the patients with IUCD present abdominal pain,particularly with a history of trauma.

  13. Diaphragmatic rupture precipitated by intercostal chest tube drainage in a patient of blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Ashok Kumar; Feroz, Asif; Dawar, Sachet; Kumar, Prem; Singh, Anupam; Khublani, Trilok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma in collision injuries in road traffic accident (RTA) occasionally results in diaphragmatic injury and rupture besides other serious multisystem injuries. These diaphragmatic injuries (DI) frequently go undetected specially when occur on the right side. DI associated with hemothorax need insertion of intercostal tube drainage (ICTD). ICTD has never been reported to precipitate diaphragmatic rupture and hernia. We are reporting such a rare case for the first time in medical literature. PMID:26933316

  14. Imbalance between macrophage migration inhibitory factor and cortisol induces multiple organ dysfunction in patients with blunt trauma

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is associated with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Our purposes were to determine the serum MIF, cortisol and tumor narcosis factor-α (TNF-α) and to investigate the influences of the balance between the levels of MIF and cortisol in patients with blunt trauma. The cortisol levels were identical between the patients with and without MODS. However, the MIF and TNF-α levels in the patien...

  15. Comparative Effectiveness of Emergency Resuscitative Thoracotomy versus Closed Chest Compressions among Patients with Critical Blunt Trauma: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kodai; Inoue, Shigeaki; Morita, Seiji; Watanabe, Nobuo; Shintani, Ayumi; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Ogura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Background Although emergency resuscitative thoracotomy is performed as a salvage maneuver for critical blunt trauma patients, evidence supporting superior effectiveness of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy compared to conventional closed-chest compressions remains insufficient. The objective of this study was to investigate whether emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at the emergency department or in the operating room was associated with favourable outcomes after blunt trauma and to compa...

  16. Right hepatic vein injury after blunt abdominal trauma in a 12-year-old boy- case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt abdominal trauma in children is one of the most frequent causes of hospitalization. We present a rare case of traumatic liver injury. A 12-year-old boy was admitted to the Surgery Department after a bicycle fall and handlebar impact injury to the right infracostal area. At admission he was stable, with no abnormalities except for a subcutaneous hepatoma found in the injured area. Abdominal ultrasound examination revealed free intraperitoneal fluid. Computed tomography (CT) revealed irregular branching laceration of the right superior hepatic segments with extension into the hepatic veins. No active extravasation of contrast material was seen. On the next day, cause of the deterioration of the patient's condition, CT examination was repeated and revealed focal extravasation of contrast material in the portal hilum posterior to the gallbladder. An injury of the right hepatic vein was found on laparotomy. Hepatic vein injury is a rare but very serious complication after blunt liver trauma and it is an indication for surgical treatment. Diagnostic imaging is essential for therapeutic decisions, but its value is sometimes limited.The precise analysis of injury mechanism and localization may be very helpful.CT is currently the modality of choice for the evaluation of blunt liver trauma. If an active bleeding is suspected the delayed scans seem to be recommended. (author)

  17. A review of computerized tomography in blunt abdominal trauma at Christchurch Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review was undertaken of computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen, performed between March 1993 and December 1994 for blunt abdominal trauma at Christchurch Hospital. CT findings were correlated with the clinical outcome. The outcome was either recovery from an abdominal point of view with or without laparotomy, or post mortem. A total of 116 CTs were reviewed, of which 76 were normal. CT was highly sensitive and specific for a variety of abdominal traumatic lesions. there were 1 false positive and 4 false negatives (only 2 of these significant). There was 1 non-therapeutic laparotomy based on CT findings. There was only 1 case of delayed treatment based on CT results. Three patients had unexplained findings of pneumoperitoneum. Care should be taken when interpreting the presence of free intraperitoneal air on CT scan. The possibility of missed bowel perforation should be considered, especially in the presence of free intra-abdominal fluid and no solid organ injury to account for it. CT scans are useful in the conservative management of solid organ injuries. 15 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  18. Pattern of visceral injuries following blunt abdominal trauma in motor vehicular accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequency of various visceral injuries following, high-speed motor vehicle crashes with special reference to frequency of liver injuries, severity and complications. The study included 100 consecutive patients of blunt abdominal trauma. Patients of either gender and age above 12 and below 70 were included in this study. Purposive non-probability sampling was done. Injuries were identified, graded and managed accordingly. The data was then entered into SPSS and descriptive statistical tests were applied. Liver was the most common organ injured (35%), followed by spleen (32 %) and small gut (30 %). In 23 patients, liver was the only organ injured. Most of the liver injuries fell under grade I (42.8%) followed by grade II (28.35%) and grade III (22.85%) and were treated by suture hepatorrhaphy alone in 71.42% cases. The operated cases were mostly complicated by wound infection (33.76%). Overall mortality remained high (12%) and was related to a combination of delays in arriving at a diagnosis due to nonavailability of CT scan and routine use of peritoneal lavage. (author)

  19. Screening and detection of blunt vertebral artery injury in patients with upper cervical fractures: The role of cervical CT and CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payabvash, Seyedmehdi, E-mail: spayab@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Minnesota Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States); McKinney, Alexander M., E-mail: mckinrad@umn.edu [Department of Radiology, Hennepin County Medical Center, 701 Park Avenue, Minneapolis, MN (United States); McKinney, Zeke J., E-mail: zeke.mckinney@hcmed.org [Department of Radiology, Hennepin County Medical Center, 701 Park Avenue, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Palmer, Christopher S., E-mail: palme018@umn.edu [Department of Radiology, Hennepin County Medical Center, 701 Park Avenue, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Truwit, Charles L., E-mail: truwit@umn.edu [Department of Radiology, Hennepin County Medical Center, 701 Park Avenue, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical utility of nonenhanced CT (NECT)-based screening criteria and CTA in detection of blunt vertebral artery injury (BVAI) in trauma patients with C1 and/or C2 fractures. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of all blunt trauma patients with C1 and/or C2 fractures between 8/2006 and 9/2011. Cervical CTA was prompted by cervical fractures involving/adjacent to a transverse foramen, and/or subluxation on NECT. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed the CTA studies, and graded the BVAI. Results: 210 patients were included; of these, 124 underwent CTA (21/124 with digital subtraction angiography, DSA), and 2 underwent DSA only. Overall, 30/126 suffered BVAI. Among 21 patients who underwent both CTA and DSA, there was 1 false negative and 1 false positive (both grade 1). There was strong interobserver agreement regarding CTA-based BVAI detection (kappa = 0.93, p < 0.001) and grading (kappa = 0.90, p < 0001). Only 3/30 BVAI patients suffered a posterior circulation stroke; none of the patients who had a negative CTA or were not selected for CTA, based on NECT screening criteria, suffered symptomatic stroke. While C1/C2 comminuted fracture was more common in patients with high grade BVAI (p = 0.039), simultaneous C3–C7 comminuted fracture increased the overall BVAI risk (p = 0.011). Conclusion: CTA reliably detects symptomatic BVAI in patients with upper cervical fractures. Utilization of NECT-based screening criteria such as transverse foraminal involvement or subluxation may be adequate in deciding whether to perform CTA, as no patients who were not selected for CTA suffered a symptomatic stroke. However, CTA may miss lower grade, asymptomatic BVAI.

  20. Characterization and Comparison of Injuries Caused by Accidental and Non-accidental Blunt Force Trauma in Dogs and Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarapanich, Nida P; McCobb, Emily C; Reisman, Robert W; Rozanski, Elizabeth A; Intarapanich, Pichai P

    2016-07-01

    Motor vehicle accidents (MVA) are often difficult to distinguish from non-accidental injury (NAI). This retrospective case-control study compared animals with known MVA trauma against those with known NAI. Medical records of 426 dogs and cats treated after MVA and 50 after NAI were evaluated. Injuries significantly associated with MVA were pelvic fractures, pneumothorax, pulmonary contusion, abrasions, and degloving wounds. Injuries associated with NAI were fractures of the skull, teeth, vertebrae, and ribs, scleral hemorrhage, damage to claws, and evidence of older fractures. Odds ratios are reported for these injuries. MVA rib fractures were found to occur in clusters on one side of the body, with cranial ribs more likely to fracture, while NAI rib fractures were found to occur bilaterally with no cranial-caudal pattern. Establishing evidence-based patterns of injury may help clinicians differentiate causes of trauma and may aid in the documentation and prosecution of animal abuse. PMID:27364279

  1. Sensitivity of using blunt and sharp crack models in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J-integral values are calculated for both the blunt (smeared) crack and the sharp (discrete) crack models in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics problems involving metallic materials. A sensitivity study is performed to show the relative strengths and weaknesses of the two cracking models. It is concluded that the blunt crack model is less dependent on the orientation of the mesh. For the mesh which is in line with the crack direction, however, the sharp crack model is less sensitive to the mesh size. Both models yield reasonable results for a properly discretized finite-element mesh. A subcycling technique is used in this study in the explicit integration scheme so that large time steps can be used for the coarse elements away from the crack tip. The savings of computation time by this technique are reported. 6 refs., 9 figs

  2. Evaluation of gastrointestinal injury in blunt abdominal trauma "FAST is not reliable": the role of repeated ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi Afshin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the diagnostic Accuracy of Focused Assessment Sonography for Trauma (FAST and repeated FAST in the patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Methods In this retrospective study we collected the data of all patients from September 2007 to July 2011 with gastrointestinal injury. The intraoperative outcome was compared with FAST technique and the repeated or delayed sonography. Results A total number of 1550 patients with blunt abdominal trauma underwent FAST in a period of 4 years in our hospital. Eighty-eight (5.67% patients were found to have gastrointestinal injury after exploratory laparotomy. Fifty-five (62.5% patients had isolated gastrointestinal injury and 33 (37.5% patients had concomitant injury to the other solid organs. In those with isolated gastrointestinal injury, the sensitivity of FAST was 38.5%. Repeated ultrsonography was performed in 34 patients with false negative initial FAST after 12-24 hours. The sensitivity of repeated ultrasonography in negative initial FAST patients in detection of gastrointestinal injury was 85.2% (95% CI, 68.1%, and 94.4%. Conclusion Repeated sonography after 12 to 24 hours in patients with negative initial FAST but sustain abdominal symptom can facilitated a diagnosis of GI tract injury and can be as effective method instead of Computed tomography in developing country.

  3. Blunt abdominal trauma with handlebar injury: A rare cause of traumatic amputation of the appendix associated with acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Jensen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe traumatic appendicitis in a 7-year-old boy who presented after sustaining blunt abdominal trauma to his right lower abdomen secondary to bicycle handlebar injury. With diffuse abdominal pain following injury, he was admitted for observation. Computed axial tomography (CT obtained at an outside hospital demonstrated moderate stranding of the abdomen in the right lower quadrant. The CT was non-contrasted and therefore significant appendiceal distention could not be confirmed. However, there was a calcified structure in the right pelvis with trace amount of free fluid. Patient was observed with conservative management and over the course of 15 h his abdominal pain continued to intensify. With his worsening symptoms, we elected to take him for diagnostic laparoscopy. In the operating room we found an inflamed traumatically amputated appendix with the mesoappendix intact. We therefore proceeded with laparoscopic appendectomy. Pathology demonstrated acute appendicitis with fecalith. It was unclear as to whether the patient's appendicitis and perforation were secondary to fecalith obstruction, his blunt abdominal trauma or if they concurrently caused his appendicitis. Acute appendicitis is a common acute surgical condition in the pediatric population and continues to be a rare and unique cause of operative intervention in the trauma population.

  4. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the management of penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Milanchi S; Makey I; McKenna R; Margulies D

    2009-01-01

    Background: The role of video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) is still being defined in the management of thoracic trauma. We report our trauma cases managed by VATS and review the role of VATS in the management of thoracic trauma. Materials and Methods: All the trauma patients who underwent VATS from 2000 to 2007 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Results: Twenty-three trauma patients underwent 25 cases of VATS. The most common indication for VATS was reta...

  5. The effect of both a thoracic trauma and a soft-tissue trauma on fracture healing in a rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Lechner, Raimund; Gebhard, Florian; Kraus, Michael; Baumgärtel, Stefan; Recknagel, Stefan; Krischak, Gert D

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose There is some clinical evidence that fracture healing is impaired in multiply injured patients. Nothing is known, however, about the effects of various types of injuries and their contribution to a possible disturbance of the fracture-healing process. We investigated the effect of a thoracic trauma and an additional soft-tissue trauma on fracture healing in a rat tibia model. Methods 3 groups of rats were operated: group A with a simple fracture of the tibia and fibula,...

  6. Characteristics of behind armor blunt trauma produced by bullets with different structural materials: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-qing WANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of structural materials of bullets on behind armor blunt trauma (BABT. Methods Ten healthy male Landraces were randomly divided into two groups (5 each: 56 type 7.62-mm rifle bullet group and SS109 5.56-mm rifle bullet group. The kinetic energy of two types of bullets was adjusted to the same level (about 1880J by the way of grow downwards gunpowder. Then the animals as protected with both grade NIJ Ⅲ ceramic hard armor and grade Ⅱ police soft body armor, were shot at the left midclavicular line of fourth intercostal space (shooting distance was 25m. The damage to the animals was observed. Other 2 healthy male Landraces were selected, and biomechanical sensor was subcutaneously implanted into the soft tissue in precordium and intracalvarium to detect the pressure at the time point of bullet contact under the protection of armor, and the relationship between pressure and damage was analyzed. Results Respiration, heart rate and systolic arterial pressure of animals in two groups were all elevated after injury, but there was no significant difference between the two groups. No obvious change was found on blood oxygen saturation of both groups. Gross anatomy showed the predominant local injury was cardiac and pulmonary contusions. The area of pulmonary hemorrhage of 7.62mm group was 6.00%±3.18%, significantly higher than that of 5.56mm group (3.59%±2.11%, P<0.05. Histopathological examination revealed acute injuries of lung tissues, myocardial tissue and cerebral cortical neurons. The contents of cardiac troponin T (TnT, creatine kinase (CK and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB isoenzyme were all increased 3 hours after injury, and the rise was higher in 7.62mm group than in 5.56mm group (P<0.05. Biomechanical testing showed the pressure of precordium and intracalvarium was elevated at the moment of bullet contact, and the rise was higher in 7.62mm group than in 5.56mm group (P<0.05. Conclusions

  7. Relationship between trauma mechanism and etiology on mandibular fracture patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhrurrazi Fakhrurrazi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mandibular fracture occurs more commonly than maxillary fracture because of its prominent position and its arrow arch like bone anatomy. Many factors may cause mandibular fracture. Motorcycle accident is the main etiology of mandibular fracture in the world. Based on the literature, 43% mandibular fractures are caused by motorcycle accident, 34% by violence, 7% by accident at work, 7% by fall, 4% by sports and the others were caused by various things. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to know the relation between the etiology and mechanisms of trauma and the patterns of mandibular fracture at Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, from January 2006 to October 2007. Method: The study was taken on patients with mandibular fractures who came to Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung. The data were taken retrospectively by documenting the etiologies of mandibular fracture, the mechanisms of fracture, and the location of mandibular fracture. The data were analyzed with Chi Square statistic test. Result: The result showed that There were 83 mandibular fractures. The mandibular fracture more commonly attacks men about 77%, and women about 22.9%. Mandibular fracture occurs more often between the age group of 21-30 years old, about 31 people (37.3%. Mandibular fracture was mostles often caused by motorcycle accident, affecting about 71 people (85.5%. Parasymphysis fracture is the most common fracture location among mandibular fracture cases, about 47 people (56.6%. Conclusion: It can be concluded that there is no significant relationship between the etiology and mechanisms of trauma and the pattern of mandibular fracture.Latar belakang: Fraktur mandibula lebih sering terjadi dibandingkan dengan fraktur maksilla karenaposisinya yang lebihprominen dan bentuk anatomi tulang seperti busur panah. Banyak faktor yang dapat menyebabkan terjadinya fraktur mandibula. Kecelakaan kendaraan bermotor merupakan etiologi utama penyebab fraktur mandibula di dunia

  8. Evaluation of the safety of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO therapy in blunt thoracic trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Brian

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway clearance is frequently needed by patients suffering from blunt chest wall trauma. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO has been shown to be effective in helping to clear secretions from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, primary ciliary dyskinesia, emphysema, COPD, and many others. Chest wall trauma patients are at increased risk for development of pulmonary complications related to airway clearance. These patients frequently have chest tubes, drains, catheters, etc. which could become dislodged during HFCWO. This prospective observational study was conducted to determine if HFCWO treatment, as provided by The Vest™ Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Saint Paul, MN, was safe and well tolerated by these patients. Methods Twenty-five blunt thoracic trauma patients were entered into the study. These patients were consented. Each patient was prescribed 2, 15 minute HFCWO treatments per day using The Vest® Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Inc., St Paul, MN. The Vest® system was set to a frequency of 10–12 Hz and a pressure of 2–3 (arbitrary unit. Physiological parameters were measured before, during, and after treatment. Patients were free to refuse or terminate a treatment early for any reason. Results No chest tubes, lines, drains or catheters were dislodged as a result of treatment. One patient with flail chest had a chest tube placed after one treatment due to increasing serous effusion. No treatments were missed and continued without further incident. Post treatment survey showed 76% experienced mild or no pain and more productive cough. Thirty days after discharge there were no deaths or hospital re-admissions. Conclusion This study suggests that HFCWO treatment is safe for trauma patients with lung and chest wall injuries. These findings support further work to demonstrate the airway clearance benefits of HFCWO treatment.

  9. Blunt renal trauma: comparison of contrast-enhanced CT and angiographic findings and the usefulness of transcatheter arterial embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of contrast-enhanced CT and the usefulness of super selective embolization therapy in the management of arterial damage in patients with severe blunt renal trauma. Patients and Methods: Nine cases of severe renal trauma were evaluated. In all cases, we compared contrast enhanced CT findings with angiographic findings, and performed transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in six of them with microcoils and gelatin sponge particles. Morphological changes in the kidney and site of infarction after TAE were evaluated on follow-up CT Chronological changes in blood biochemistry findings after injury, degree of anemia and renal function were investigated. Adverse effects or complications such as duration of hematuria, fever, abdominal pain, renovascular hypertension and abscess formation were also evaluated. Results: The CT finding of extravasation was a reliable sign of active bleeding and useful for determining the indication of TAE. In all cases, bleeding was effectively controlled with super selective embolization. There was minimal procedure-related loss of renal tissue. None of the patients developed abscess, hypertension or other complications. Conclusions: In blunt renal injury, contrast-enhanced CT was useful for diagnosing arterial hemorrhage. Arterial bleeding may produce massive hematoma and TAE was a useful treatment for such cases. By using selective TAE for a bleeding artery, it was possible to minimize renal parenchymal damage, with complications of TAE rarely seen. (author)

  10. Blunt renal trauma: comparison of contrast-enhanced CT and angiographic findings and the usefulness of transcatheter arterial embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitase, M.; Mizutani, M.; Tomita, H.; Kono, T.; Sugie, C.; Shibamoto, Y. [Nagoya City University, Nagoya, (Japan). Graduate School of Medical Sciences. Dept. of Radiology

    2007-07-15

    Full text: Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of contrast-enhanced CT and the usefulness of super selective embolization therapy in the management of arterial damage in patients with severe blunt renal trauma. Patients and Methods: Nine cases of severe renal trauma were evaluated. In all cases, we compared contrast enhanced CT findings with angiographic findings, and performed transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in six of them with microcoils and gelatin sponge particles. Morphological changes in the kidney and site of infarction after TAE were evaluated on follow-up CT Chronological changes in blood biochemistry findings after injury, degree of anemia and renal function were investigated. Adverse effects or complications such as duration of hematuria, fever, abdominal pain, renovascular hypertension and abscess formation were also evaluated. Results: The CT finding of extravasation was a reliable sign of active bleeding and useful for determining the indication of TAE. In all cases, bleeding was effectively controlled with super selective embolization. There was minimal procedure-related loss of renal tissue. None of the patients developed abscess, hypertension or other complications. Conclusions: In blunt renal injury, contrast-enhanced CT was useful for diagnosing arterial hemorrhage. Arterial bleeding may produce massive hematoma and TAE was a useful treatment for such cases. By using selective TAE for a bleeding artery, it was possible to minimize renal parenchymal damage, with complications of TAE rarely seen. (author)

  11. The Applicability of Trauma and Injury Severity Score for a Blunt Trauma Population in Korea and a Proposal of New Models Using Score Predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yo; Lee, John Cook-Jong; Kim, Younghwan; Moon, Jonghwan; Youn, Seok Hwa; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Juryang; Kim, Hyoju

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to verify the utility of existing Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) coefficients and to propose a new prediction model with a new set of TRISS coefficients or predictors. Materials and Methods Of the blunt adult trauma patients who were admitted to our hospital in 2014, those eligible for Korea Trauma Data Bank entry were selected to collect the TRISS predictors. The study data were input into the TRISS formula to obtain "probability of survival" values, which were examined for consistency with actual patient survival status. For TRISS coefficients, Major Trauma Outcome Study-derived values revised in 1995 and National Trauma Data Bank-derived and National Sample Project-derived coefficients revised in 2009 were used. Additionally, using a logistic regression method, a new set of coefficients was derived from our medical center's database. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) for each prediction ability were obtained, and a pairwise comparison of ROC curves was performed. Results In the statistical analysis, the AUCs (0.879–0.899) for predicting outcomes were lower than those of other countries. However, by adjusting the TRISS score using a continuous variable rather than a code for age, we were able to achieve higher AUCs [0.913 (95% confidence interval, 0.899 to 0.926)]. Conclusion These results support further studies that will allow a more accurate prediction of prognosis for trauma patients. Furthermore, Korean TRISS coefficients or a new prediction model suited for Korea needs to be developed using a sufficiently sized sample. PMID:26996574

  12. The Effect of Pre-Injury Anti-Platelet Therapy on the Development of Complications in Isolated Blunt Chest Wall Trauma: A Retrospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Battle, Ceri; Hutchings, Hayley; Bouamra, Omar; Phillip A Evans

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The difficulties in the management of the blunt chest wall trauma patient in the Emergency Department due to the development of late complications are well recognised in the literature. Pre-injury anti-platelet therapy has been previously investigated as a risk factor for poor outcomes following traumatic head injury, but not in the blunt chest wall trauma patient cohort. The aim of this study was to investigate pre-injury anti-platelet therapy as a risk factor for the developmen...

  13. Global burden of trauma: Need for effective fracture therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew George; Hanson Beate

    2009-01-01

    Orthopedic trauma care and fracture management have advanced significantly over the last 50 years. New developments in the biology and biomechanics of the musculoskeletal system, fixation devices, and soft tissue management have greatly influenced our ability to care for musculoskeletal injuries. Many therapies and treatment modalities have the potential to transform future orthopedic treatment by decreasing invasive procedures and providing shorter healing times. Promising results in experim...

  14. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the management of penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanchi S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS is still being defined in the management of thoracic trauma. We report our trauma cases managed by VATS and review the role of VATS in the management of thoracic trauma. Materials and Methods: All the trauma patients who underwent VATS from 2000 to 2007 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Results: Twenty-three trauma patients underwent 25 cases of VATS. The most common indication for VATS was retained haemothorax. Thoracotomy was avoided in 21 patients. VATS failed in two cases. On an average VATS was performed on trauma day seven (range 1-26 and the length of hospital stay was 20 days (range 3-58. There was no mortality. VATS was performed in an emergency (day 1-2, or in the early (day 2-7 or late (after day 7 phases of trauma. Conclusion: VATS can be performed safely for the management of thoracic traumas. VATS can be performed before or after thoracotomy and at any stage of trauma. The use of VATS in trauma has a trimodal distribution (emergent, early, late, each with different indications.

  15. RETROSPECTIVE AND PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF MANAGEMENT AND OUTCOME OF BLUNT ABDOMEN TRAUMA IN TERTIARY HEALTH CENTER IN LAST 5 - YEAR 2009 - 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raikwar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: 1. To study the incidence of various intra - abdominal and extra - abdominal injuries in blunt abdominal trauma in tertiary health care center in five year (2009 - 14 . 2 . To study the relationship between mode of injury , severity of injury and clinical presentation and its outcome , mortality and morbidity. 3 . To study modalities for evaluating the abdomen after blunt abdominal trauma. 4 . To evaluate the major indication for operation in each cases . 5 . To study of outcome , mortality and morbidity . SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This study carried out in the Department of Surgery , MGM Medical College , M.Y. Hospital Indore and Trauma Department , M.Y. Hospital Indore both retrospectively and prospectively in patients with Blunt abdominal trauma over the period of from 2009 to 2014 with co - operation of the staff of Medicolegal section , Central record room and residents looking after the admitted pat ients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: On admission to hospital patient’s name , age , sex , address , registration number and date and time of admission , length of delay in treatment taken noted and mode of trauma also noted. Patient’s presenting complaint , detail his tory and time of trauma noted. RESULTS: During this study total 250 admission were included 170 ( P rospective and 80 ( R etrospective. There were over all 201 males (80.4% and 49 female (19.6%. Mortality was maximum due to RTA 64.52%. Highest number of ca ses (65 in the third decade i.e. 26%. Among these injuries hemoperitoneum was found in 94 cases i.e.37.6%. Small intestine (ileal>jejunal injury 45 cases i.e. , 18% was most common hollow viscous injury. In solid organ injury there was maximum incidence o f liver injury 34 cases. i.e. , 13.6% . CONCLUSION: This study concludes that young males are more prone to trauma and maximum blunt trauma is asso ciated with RTA. Almost half of patients required laparotomy and found injury to liver and small intestine in max cases. Overall

  16. Severe cardiac trauma or myocardial ischemia? Pitfalls of polytrauma treatment in patients with ST-elevation after blunt chest trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Orkun Özkurtul; Andreas Höch; Andreas Reske; Carsten Hädrich; Christoph Josten; Jörg Böhme

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Thoracic injuries are the third most common injuries in polytrauma patients. The mechanism of injury and the clinical presentation are crucially important for adequate emergency treatment. Presentation of case: Here we present a case of a 37-year-old male who was admitted to our level-1 trauma center after motor vehicle accident. The emergency physician on scene presented the patient with a myocardial infarction. During initial clinical trauma assessment the patient developed...

  17. The Relationship Between Oxidative Stress, Paraoxanase and Injury Severity in Blunt Trauma Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ýlhan Korkmaz

    2013-01-01

         Aim: Shock index and Glascow coma scale(GCS) are the parameters used for the follow-up of trauma patient’s prognosis. In case of trauma increased reactive oxygen species and oxidative stres induced increase in lipid peroxidation causes deterioration of the cell wall structure, and an increase of cell and tissue damage can be seen. We aimed to investigate the relationship between oxidative stress and paraoxonase, as an antioxidant, and prognosis of the trauma pat...

  18. A Patient With Blunt Trauma and Cardiac Arrest Arriving Pulseless at the Emergency Department; is that Enough Reason to Stop Resuscitation? Review of Literature and Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Hamidian Jahromi, Alireza; Northcutt, Ashley; Youssef, Asser M.

    2013-01-01

    The decision to stop or continue resuscitation in a patient with blunt trauma and cardiac arrest arriving pulseless to the hospital has always been controversial. While many authors still believe that it is a futile effort, with no chance of success for complete neurological recovery, some recent reports have challenged the idea. Here we report complete recovery of a severely injured patient following a motor vehicle accident who lost vital signs completely before arrival at our trauma center...

  19. "Osteoporosis and orthopods" incidences of osteoporosis in distal radius fracture from low energy trauma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bahari, Syah

    2007-07-01

    Fracture of the distal radius from low energy trauma is a common presentation to orthopaedic trauma services. This fragility type fracture is associated with underlying osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a \\'silent disease\\' where fragility fracture is a common presentation. Orthopaedic surgeons may be the only physician that these patients encounter. We found a high percentage of female patients who sustained a fragility fracture of the distal radius have an underlying osteoporosis. Further management of osteoporosis is important to prevent future fragility fractures.

  20. Unusual case of life threatening subcutaneous hemorrhage in a blunt trauma patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf F. Hefny

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Bleeding into the subcutaneous plane in closed degloving injury can cause severe hypovolemic shock. It is important for the clinicians managing trauma patients to be aware this serious injury.

  1. Blunt Chest Trauma in Mice after Cigarette Smoke-Exposure: Effects of Mechanical Ventilation with 100% O2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Wagner

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking (CS aggravates post-traumatic acute lung injury and increases ventilator-induced lung injury due to more severe tissue inflammation and apoptosis. Hyper-inflammation after chest trauma is due to the physical damage, the drop in alveolar PO2, and the consecutive hypoxemia and tissue hypoxia. Therefore, we tested the hypotheses that 1 CS exposure prior to blunt chest trauma causes more severe post-traumatic inflammation and thereby aggravates lung injury, and that 2 hyperoxia may attenuate this effect. Immediately after blast wave-induced blunt chest trauma, mice (n=32 with or without 3-4 weeks of CS exposure underwent 4 hours of pressure-controlled, thoraco-pulmonary compliance-titrated, lung-protective mechanical ventilation with air or 100% O2. Hemodynamics, lung mechanics, gas exchange, and acid-base status were measured together with blood and tissue cytokine and chemokine concentrations, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, activated caspase-3, and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α expression, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation, nitrotyrosine formation, purinergic receptor 2X4 (P2XR4 and 2X7 (P2XR7 expression, and histological scoring. CS exposure prior to chest trauma lead to higher pulmonary compliance and lower PaO2 and Horovitz-index, associated with increased tissue IL-18 and blood MCP-1 concentrations, a 2-4-fold higher inflammatory cell infiltration, and more pronounced alveolar membrane thickening. This effect coincided with increased activated caspase-3, nitrotyrosine, P2XR4, and P2XR7 expression, NF-κB activation, and reduced HIF-1α expression. Hyperoxia did not further affect lung mechanics, gas exchange, pulmonary and systemic cytokine and chemokine concentrations, or histological scoring, except for some patchy alveolar edema in CS exposed mice. However, hyperoxia attenuated tissue HIF-1α, nitrotyrosine, P2XR7, and P2XR4 expression, while it increased HO-1 formation in CS exposed mice. Overall, CS exposure

  2. Does Splenectomy Protect Against Immune-Mediated Complications in Blunt Trauma Patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Crandall, Marie; Shapiro, Michael B.; West, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the innate immune system results from severe trauma and the resultant systemic inflammatory response is thought to mediate remote organ injury. In animal models, vagal-mediated innate immune responses have been shown to modulate proinflammatory cytokine release in response to trauma or sepsis. In those models, vagal nerve transaction and splenectomy decreased cytokine release and protected against lung injury and mortality. We hypothesized that, if similar mechanisms are active ...

  3. Role of contrast-enhanced helical CT in the evaluation of acute thoracic aortic injuries after blunt chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaglione, M.; Pinto, A.; Pinto, F.; Romano, L.; Ragozzino, A. [Dept. of Emergency Radiology, Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Grassi, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Naples (Italy)

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the value of contrast-enhanced helical CT for detecting and managing acute thoracic aortic injury (ATAI). Between June 1995 and February 2000, 1419 consecutive chest CT examinations were performed in the setting of major blunt trauma. The following CT findings were considered indicative of ATAI: intimal flap; pseudoaneurysm; contour irregularity; lumen abnormality; and extravasation of contrast material. On the basis of these direct findings no further diagnostic investigations were performed. Isolated mediastinal hematoma on CT scans was considered an indirect sign of ATAI: In these cases, thoracic aortography was performed even if CT indicated normal aorta. Seventy-seven patients had abnormal CT scans: Among the 23 patients with direct CT signs, acute thoracic aortic injuries was confirmed at thoracotomy in 21. Two false-positive cases were observed. The 54 remaining patients had isolated mediastinal hematoma without aortic injuries at CT and corresponding negative angiograms. The 1342 patients with negative CT scans were included in the 8-month follow-up program and did not show any adverse sequela based on clinical and radiographic criteria. Contrast-enhanced helical CT has a critical role in the exclusion of thoracic aortic injuries in patient with major blunt chest trauma and prevents unnecessary thoracic aortography. Direct CT signs of ATAI do not require further diagnostic investigations to confirm the diagnosis: Isolated aortic bands or contour vessel abnormalities should be first considered as possible artifacts or related to non-traumatic etiologies especially when mediastinal hematoma is absent. In cases of isolated mediastinal hematoma other possible sources of bleeding should be considered before directing patients to thoracic aortography. (orig.)

  4. Role of contrast-enhanced helical CT in the evaluation of acute thoracic aortic injuries after blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the value of contrast-enhanced helical CT for detecting and managing acute thoracic aortic injury (ATAI). Between June 1995 and February 2000, 1419 consecutive chest CT examinations were performed in the setting of major blunt trauma. The following CT findings were considered indicative of ATAI: intimal flap; pseudoaneurysm; contour irregularity; lumen abnormality; and extravasation of contrast material. On the basis of these direct findings no further diagnostic investigations were performed. Isolated mediastinal hematoma on CT scans was considered an indirect sign of ATAI: In these cases, thoracic aortography was performed even if CT indicated normal aorta. Seventy-seven patients had abnormal CT scans: Among the 23 patients with direct CT signs, acute thoracic aortic injuries was confirmed at thoracotomy in 21. Two false-positive cases were observed. The 54 remaining patients had isolated mediastinal hematoma without aortic injuries at CT and corresponding negative angiograms. The 1342 patients with negative CT scans were included in the 8-month follow-up program and did not show any adverse sequela based on clinical and radiographic criteria. Contrast-enhanced helical CT has a critical role in the exclusion of thoracic aortic injuries in patient with major blunt chest trauma and prevents unnecessary thoracic aortography. Direct CT signs of ATAI do not require further diagnostic investigations to confirm the diagnosis: Isolated aortic bands or contour vessel abnormalities should be first considered as possible artifacts or related to non-traumatic etiologies especially when mediastinal hematoma is absent. In cases of isolated mediastinal hematoma other possible sources of bleeding should be considered before directing patients to thoracic aortography. (orig.)

  5. Detection of alveolar epithelial injury by 99mTc-DTPA radioaerosol inhalation lung scan following blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DTPA clearance rate is a reliable index of alveolar epithelial permeability, and is a highly sensitive marker of pulmonary epithelial damage, even of mild degree. In this study, 99mTc-DTPA aerosol inhalation scintigraphy was used to assess the pulmonary epithelial membrane permeability and to investigate the possible application of this permeability value as an indicator of early alveolar or interstitial changes in patients with blunt chest trauma. A total of 26 patients was chest trauma (4 female, 22 male, 31-80 yrs, mean age; 53±13 yrs) who were referred to the emergency department in our hospital participated in this study. Technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) aerosol inhalation scintigraphy was performed on the first and thirtieth days after trauma. Clearance half times (T1/2) were calculated by placing a mono-exponential fit on the curves. Penetration index (PI) was calculated on the first-minute image. On the first day, mean T1/2 value of the whole lung was 63±19 minutes (min), and thirtieth day mean T1/2 value was 67±21 min. On the first day, mean PI values of the lung and 30th day mean PI value were 0.60±0.05, and 0.63 ±0.05, respectively. Significant changes were observed in radioaerosol clearance and penetration indices. Following chest trauma, clearance of 99mTc-DTPA increased owing to breakdown of the alveolar-capillary barrier. This increase in the epithelial permeability of the lung appears to be an early manifestation of lung disease that may lead to efficient therapy in the early phase. (author)

  6. Occult Mediastinal Great Vessel Trauma: The Value of Aortography Performed During Angiographic Screening for Blunt Cervical Vascular Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To determine the value of aortography in the assessment of occult aortic and great vessel injuries when routinely performed during screening angiography for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI). Methods. One hundred and one consecutive patients who received both aortography and screening four-vessel angiography over 4 years were identified retrospectively. Angiograms for these patients were evaluated, and the incidence of occult mediastinal vascular injury was determined. Results. Of the 101 patients, 6 (6%) had angiographically documented traumatic aortic injuries. Of these 6 patients, one injury (17%) was unsuspected prior to angiography. Four of the 6 (67%) also had BCVI. One additional patient also had an injury to a branch of the subclavian artery. Conclusion. Routine aortography during screening angiography for BCVI is not warranted due to the low incidence (1%) of occult mediastinal arterial injury. However, in the setting of a BCVI screening study and no CT scan of the chest, aortography may be advantageous

  7. Cerebral Venous Air Embolism due to a Hidden Skull Fracture Secondary to Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Hosaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous air embolism is sometimes caused by head trauma. One of the paths of air entry is considered a skull fracture. We report a case of cerebral venous air embolism following head trauma. The patient was a 55-year-old man who fell and hit his head. A head computed tomography (CT scan showed the air in the superior sagittal sinus; however, no skull fractures were detected. Follow-up CT revealed a fracture line in the right temporal bone. Cerebral venous air embolism following head trauma might have occult skull fractures even if CT could not show the skull fractures.

  8. The Relationship Between Oxidative Stress, Paraoxanase and Injury Severity in Blunt Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ýlhan Korkmaz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available      Aim: Shock index and Glascow coma scale(GCS are the parameters used for the follow-up of trauma patient’s prognosis. In case of trauma increased reactive oxygen species and oxidative stres induced increase in lipid peroxidation causes deterioration of the cell wall structure, and an increase of cell and tissue damage can be seen. We aimed to investigate the relationship between oxidative stress and paraoxonase, as an antioxidant, and prognosis of the trauma patients. Material and Method: Seventyone trauma patients who were admitted between July - September 2011 were included. Patients were classified according to GCS; Mild (61, moderate (6, and severe (3. Paraoxonase, oxidative stress index (OSI, total antioxidant capacity (TAC and total oxidative stress (TOS were compared with the shock index and the GCS. Results: We didn’t found any difference between GCS groups and paraoxonase, TAS, TOS, OSI (p> 0.05. Also there wasn’t any correlation between shock index and paraoxonase, TAC, TOS, OSI. Discussion: We make inferences that the admission levels of paraoxonase, TAC, TOS, OSI can’t be used for determination of the trauma patients prognosis.

  9. Effect of oral contrast administration for abdominal computed tomography in the evaluation of acute blunt trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to determine how frequently oral contrast medium (OC) is essential for computed tomography (CT) diagnosis of blunt abdominal injury and to quantify delay associated with OC administration and the incidence of adverse effects. In conclusion, OC is rarely essential for CT diagnostic of intraabdominal injury. It may improve sensitivity for pancreatic injury, but it does not help identify injuries requiring surgical treatment. Even with OC, CT is insensitive for intestinal injury. Vomiting and aspiration are significant risks. Use of OC adds a significant amount of time to ED evaluation. Adverse effects of OC administration, in this setting, mays outweigh its benefits. (N.C.)

  10. Blunt aortic trauma in a patient with the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome type VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Marco Yat Hang; Murray, Jennifer; Thompson, Errington C.

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male with the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VI (ocular scoliotic) who was kicked in the abdomen presented to the emergency room (ER) with abdominal pain. He was found to have a blunt traumatic aortic injury. The patient was treated nonoperatively. He was stable and discharged home on the eighth day. The patient returned to the ER several days later hypotensive and tachycardic. The patient was taken immediately to the operating room, but vascular repair was not possible. The patient expired. We discuss the challenges of taking care of a patient with EDS and offer suggestions that might improve future patient's outcome. PMID:26956239

  11. Blunt aortic trauma in a patient with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Marco Yat Hang; Murray, Jennifer; Thompson, Errington C

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VI (ocular scoliotic) who was kicked in the abdomen presented to the emergency room (ER) with abdominal pain. He was found to have a blunt traumatic aortic injury. The patient was treated nonoperatively. He was stable and discharged home on the eighth day. The patient returned to the ER several days later hypotensive and tachycardic. The patient was taken immediately to the operating room, but vascular repair was not possible. The patient expired. We discuss the challenges of taking care of a patient with EDS and offer suggestions that might improve future patient's outcome. PMID:26956239

  12. Prior blunt chest trauma may be a cause of single vessel coronary disease; hypothesis and review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Nielsen, PE; Sleight, P

    2006-01-01

    old, and only 2.5% more than 60 years old. The most common trauma was a road traffic accident, and the LAD was the vessel most often affected. Angiography revealed 12 cases with completely normal vessels, which might be due to spasm or recanalisation; 31 cases showed occlusion but no atherosclerosis...

  13. Vascular changes in the kidney after blunt abdominal trauma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A genuine trauma, which had been overlooked at first, resulted in macrohaematuria. Infusion urography showed an enlarged left kidney with delayed and incomplete visualisation of the renal pelvis. Angiography showed swelling of the left kidney and small arterial ruptures with pseudoaneurysmatic contrast medium deposits in the parenchyma. Three months later, the angiogram showed largely normalised vessels. (orig.)

  14. Role of Complement C5 in Experimental Blunt Chest Trauma-Induced Septic Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbach, Michael; Braumueller, Sonja; Kellermann, Philipp; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Perl, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe blunt chest trauma is associated with high mortality. Sepsis represents a serious risk factor for mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In septic patients with ARDS complement activation products were found to be elevated in the plasma. In single models like LPS or trauma complement has been studied to some degree, however in clinically highly relevant double hit models such as the one used here little data is available. Here, we hypothesized that absence of C5 is correlated with a decreased inflammatory response in trauma induced septic acute lung injury. Methods 12 hrs after DH in mice the local and systemic cytokines and chemokines were quantified by multiplex bead array or ELISA, activated caspase-3 by western blot. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Sidak’s multiple comparison test (significance, p≤ 0.05). Results In lung tissue interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was elevated in both C5-/- mice and wildtype littermates (wt), whereas caspase-3 was reduced in lungs after DH in C5-/- mice. Systemically, reduced keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) levels were observed after DH in C5-/- compared to wt mice. Locally, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO), protein, IL-6, MCP-1 and G-CSF in brochoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were elevated after DH in C5-/- compared to wt. Conclusions In the complex but clinically relevant DH model the local and systemic inflammatory immune response features both, C5-dependent and C5-independent characteristics. Activation of caspase-3 in lung tissue after DH was C5-dependent whereas local inflammation in lung tissue was C5-independent. PMID:27437704

  15. Operative treatment for cervical fracture and dislocation with blunt unilateral vertebral artery injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Tao; REN Xian-jun; WANG Wei-dong; ZHANG Xia; LI Chang-qing; HAO Yong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate risks and clinical effects of operative treatment for cervical vertebral fracture and dislocation associated with unilateral vertebral artery injury.Methods: This group consisted of 76 cases of closed cervical spine trauma combined with unilateral vertebral artery injury (23 cases of bilateral facet dislocation, 28 unilateral facet dislocation and 25 fracture). All patients underwent prospective examination of cervical spine MRI and vertebral artery two-dimensional time-of-flight (2D TOF)magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and anterior cervical decompression. The healthy vertebral artery paths were evaluated before the surgery, and were protected during the surgery according to the anatomical signs.Results: There were no acute or chronic clinical damage symptoms in 76 cases after surgery. No neural damage symptoms were observed in patients with normal neural functions. The neural functions of incomplete paralyzed patients were improved in different grades.Conclusions: Reliable anterior operation can produce good results for cervical fracture and dislocation with unilateral vertebral artery injury. Detecting the course of uninjured vertebral artery before operation and locating the anatomical site during operation are effective to avoid damaging vertebral artery of uninjured side.

  16. Serum IL-6 and CRP levels in patients with trauma involving low-extremity bone fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Karakaya, Cengiz; Tevfik, Noyana; Ekin, Suat; Elnur, Babayev

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Cytokines and acute phase proteins have been implicated in the systemic response to trauma. The aim of this study was to measure the IL-6, CRP, ALP, calcium and phosphorus levels in patients with trauma involving low-extremity bone fractures at 6, 24 and 48 hours following trauma. Serum samples were obtained from 21 trauma patients with femoral or tibial fractures at 6th, 24th and 48th hour following trauma. Serum IL-6, CRP, ALP, calcium and phosphorus levels were measured in these ...

  17. Exposure to 100% Oxygen Abolishes the Impairment of Fracture Healing after Thoracic Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Kemmler; Ronny Bindl; Oscar McCook; Florian Wagner; Michael Gröger; Katja Wagner; Angelika Scheuerle; Peter Radermacher; Anita Ignatius

    2015-01-01

    In polytrauma patients a thoracic trauma is one of the most critical injuries and an important trigger of post-traumatic inflammation. About 50% of patients with thoracic trauma are additionally affected by bone fractures. The risk for fracture malunion is considerably increased in such patients, the pathomechanisms being poorly understood. Thoracic trauma causes regional alveolar hypoxia and, subsequently, hypoxemia, which in turn triggers local and systemic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed...

  18. Local Inflammation in Fracture Hematoma: Results from a Combined Trauma Model in Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Horst, K.; Eschbach, D.; Pfeifer, R.; S. Hübenthal; Sassen, M.; T. Steinfeldt; Wulf, H; Ruchholtz, S.; Pape, H. C.; F. Hildebrand

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous studies showed significant interaction between the local and systemic inflammatory response after severe trauma in small animal models. The purpose of this study was to establish a new combined trauma model in pigs to investigate fracture-associated local inflammation and gain information about the early inflammatory stages after polytrauma. Material and Methods. Combined trauma consisted of tibial fracture, lung contusion, liver laceration, and controlled hemorrhage. Ani...

  19. The effect of head trauma on fracture healing: biomechanical testing and finite element analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ozan, Firat; Hasan YILDIZ; Bora, Osman Arslan; Pekedis, Mahmut; Coskun, Gulnihal Ay; Gore, Oya

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the effect of head trauma on fracture healing with biomechanical testing, to compare the results obtained from a femur model created by finite element analysis with experimental data, and to develop a finite element model that can be employed in femoral fractures. Methods: Twenty-two Wistar albino rats were randomized into two groups. The control group was subjected to femoral fracture followed by intramedullary fixation, whereas the head trauma group was ...

  20. The value of ultrasonography and computed tomography in the blunt abdominal trauma: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From August to December 1988, eleven patients with abdominal trauma, hemodynamically stable, were studied at Souza Aguiar Municipal Hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. After physical evaluation and initial resuscitation, these patients underwent abdominal paracentesis, basic roentgenographic examination and computed tomography. Either a conservative treatment or an exploratory laparotomy was carried out regarding the results of the examination. The use of ultrasound and computed tomography examination in patients with doubtful diagnosis proved to be effective and enable us to identify not only intra-abdominal and retroperitoneal lesions but also the presence of liquid collections in the peritoneal cavity. (author)

  1. A combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin is effective for the treatment of cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac contusion is a potentially fatal complication of blunt chest trauma. The effects of a combination of quercetin and methylprednisolone against trauma-induced cardiac contusion were studied. Thirty-five female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups (n=7) as follows: sham, cardiac contusion with no therapy, treated with methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg on the first day, and 3 mg/kg on the following days), treated with quercetin (50 mg·kg−1·day−1), and treated with a combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin. Serum troponin I (Tn-I) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels and cardiac histopathological findings were evaluated. Tn-I and TNF-α levels were elevated after contusion (P=0.001 and P=0.001). Seven days later, Tn-I and TNF-α levels decreased in the rats treated with methylprednisolone, quercetin, and the combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin compared to the rats without therapy, but a statistical significance was found only with the combination therapy (P=0.001 and P=0.011, respectively). Histopathological degeneration and necrosis scores were statistically lower in the methylprednisolone and quercetin combination group compared to the group treated only with methylprednisolone (P=0.017 and P=0.007, respectively). However, only degeneration scores were lower in the combination therapy group compared to the group treated only with quercetin (P=0.017). Inducible nitric oxide synthase positivity scores were decreased in all treatment groups compared to the untreated groups (P=0.097, P=0.026, and P=0.004, respectively). We conclude that a combination of quercetin and methylprednisolone can be used for the specific treatment of cardiac contusion

  2. A combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin is effective for the treatment of cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demir, F. [Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dicle University, Diyarbakır (Turkey); Güzel, A. [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Katı, C. [Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Karadeniz, C. [Pediatric Cardiology Services, Behçet Uz Children' s Hospital, İzmir (Turkey); Akdemir, U. [Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Okuyucu, A. [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Gacar, A. [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Özdemir, S. [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Güvenç, T. [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey)

    2014-08-01

    Cardiac contusion is a potentially fatal complication of blunt chest trauma. The effects of a combination of quercetin and methylprednisolone against trauma-induced cardiac contusion were studied. Thirty-five female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups (n=7) as follows: sham, cardiac contusion with no therapy, treated with methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg on the first day, and 3 mg/kg on the following days), treated with quercetin (50 mg·kg{sup −1}·day{sup −1}), and treated with a combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin. Serum troponin I (Tn-I) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels and cardiac histopathological findings were evaluated. Tn-I and TNF-α levels were elevated after contusion (P=0.001 and P=0.001). Seven days later, Tn-I and TNF-α levels decreased in the rats treated with methylprednisolone, quercetin, and the combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin compared to the rats without therapy, but a statistical significance was found only with the combination therapy (P=0.001 and P=0.011, respectively). Histopathological degeneration and necrosis scores were statistically lower in the methylprednisolone and quercetin combination group compared to the group treated only with methylprednisolone (P=0.017 and P=0.007, respectively). However, only degeneration scores were lower in the combination therapy group compared to the group treated only with quercetin (P=0.017). Inducible nitric oxide synthase positivity scores were decreased in all treatment groups compared to the untreated groups (P=0.097, P=0.026, and P=0.004, respectively). We conclude that a combination of quercetin and methylprednisolone can be used for the specific treatment of cardiac contusion.

  3. [Rupture of the interventricular septum after the blunt trauma of thorax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smejkal, K; Parízková, R; Harrer, J; Lukes, A; Koudelka, J; Zvák, I

    2008-02-01

    Authors present the case of little patient with the dissection, pseudoaneurysm and finally a rupture of the interventricular septum after the blunt thracic injury. The patient was smitten as a pedestrian by a car and during the whole period of her stay in the hospital she was showing signs of circulatory instability. Due to the current intraabdominal injuries this circulatory decompensation was first assigned to hemoperitoneum, for which the girl was operated on about 3 hours after admission. Nevertheless, even after the abdminal cavity check, after the treatment of supreficial liver lacerations and intensive volume resuscitation the patient showed signs of insufficiency. Diagnosis was finally determined on the base of the transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), which proved the traumatic rupture of interventricular septum. The operation followed correcting the defect, which was performed with a good result according to the TTE postoperatively. Nevertheless, 27 hours after the admission the patient died due to the electromechanical dissociation. In the discussion the authors then evoke a number of papers concerning the same topic. PMID:18380159

  4. COMPARATIVE ROLE AND EVALUATION OF ULTRASOUND AND MULTISLICE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN THE GRADING OF HEMOPERITONEUM IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA AND ITS CORRELATION WITH THE GRADING OF ORGAN INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Kunwarpal; Sukhdeep; Thukral; Amandeep; Harmeet; Sonali

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: 1. To assess the role of Ultrasound (US) and Multislice Computed Tomography (MSCT) in detecting hemoperitoneum in patients with acute blunt abdominal trauma. 2. To study the use of US and MSCT in grading of hemoperitoneum in blunt abdominal trauma patients. 3. To compare the US and MSCT grading of hemoperitoneum with the grading of organ injury. 4. To compare and statistically analyze the spectrum of findings observed in each moda...

  5. Severe upper airway obstruction due to delayed retropharyngeal hematoma formation following blunt cervical trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Ciceri David P; Artz Katie S; Puana Rudolph B; Ponzo John A; Lazott Laurie W; Culp William C

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background We report a case of severe upper airway obstruction due to a retropharyngeal hematoma that presented nearly one day after a precipitating traumatic injury. Retropharyngeal hematomas are rare, but may cause life-threatening airway compromise. Case presentation A 50 year-old man developed severe dyspnea with oropharyngeal airway compression due to retropharyngeal hematoma 20 hours after presenting to the emergency department. The patient also had a fractured first cervical v...

  6. The efficacy of ultrasonography in hemodynamically stable children with blunt abdominal trauma: a prospective comparison with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In this prospective study we aimed to investigate the diagnostic value of ultrasonography (US) in hemodynamically stable children after blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) using computed tomography (CT) as the gold standard. Materials and methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 96 children with BAT were evaluated prospectively. CT was performed first, followed by US. US and CT examinations were independently evaluated by two radiologists for free fluid and organ injury. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and overall accuracy of US were assessed regarding CT as the gold standard. Results: Overall 128 organ injuries were determined in 96 patients with CT; however, 20 (15.6%) of them could not be seen with US. Free intraabdominal fluid (FIF) was seen in 82 of 96 patients by CT (85.4%) and eight of them (9.7%) could not be seen by US. We found that sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and overall accuracy of the US for free intra-abdominal fluid were 90.2, 100, 100, 63.6 and 91.7%, respectively. Conclusions: US for BAT in children is highly accurate and specific. It is highly sensitive in detecting liver, spleen and kidney injuries whereas its sensitivity is moderate for the detection of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and pancreatic injuries

  7. Severe upper airway obstruction due to delayed retropharyngeal hematoma formation following blunt cervical trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciceri David P

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report a case of severe upper airway obstruction due to a retropharyngeal hematoma that presented nearly one day after a precipitating traumatic injury. Retropharyngeal hematomas are rare, but may cause life-threatening airway compromise. Case presentation A 50 year-old man developed severe dyspnea with oropharyngeal airway compression due to retropharyngeal hematoma 20 hours after presenting to the emergency department. The patient also had a fractured first cervical vertebra and was diagnosed with a left brachial plexopathy. The patient underwent emergent awake fiberoptic endotracheal intubation to provide a definitive airway. Conclusion Retropharyngeal hematoma with life-threatening airway compromise can develop hours or days after a precipitating injury. Clinicians should be alert to the potential for this delayed airway collapse, and should also be prepared to rapidly secure the airway in this patient population likely to have concomitant cervical spinal or head injuries.

  8. An Arteriovenous Fistula Between the Internal Mammary Artery and the Pulmonary Vein Following Blunt Chest Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 67-year-old man suffered a traffic accident and was transferred to an emergency hospital close to the scene. He was diagnosed to have bilateral pneumohemothorax with a lung contusion, an anterior fracture dislocation of the C6-vertebra and a cervical cord injury at the level of C7. On the 48th day, massive hemoptysis was suddenly recognized. He was transferred in a state of shock to our hospital to undergo hemostasis for the bleeding. On the day of admission, a selective arteriogram showed extravasation from the left bronchial artery, for which embolization was carried out using Gelfoam. In spite of this treatment, his hemoptysis continued. On the next day, a selective left internal mammary arteriogram showed an arteriovenous fistula between the left internal mammary artery and the left pulmonary vein without any apparent extravasation. The arteriovenous fistula was successfully embolized using platinum fiber coils. The patient no longer demonstrated any hemoptysis after embolization

  9. [Patient with massive hemothorax due to blunt trauma saved by transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Itaru; Oura, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Shiga, Kojiro; Sakatsume, Ko; Sasaki, Yasuo; Sekizawa, Takuro; Handa, Masashi

    2013-06-01

    A 78-year-old man who fell from a step ladder was transported to our hospital by ambulance under the diagnosis of multiple rib fractures and right hemothorax. Since he was in shock on arrival, endotracheal intubation and tube thoracotomy were immediately performed. Though 2 liters of blood was evacuated, persistent hemorrhage was observed, requiring continuous rapid infusion and blood transfusion. Emergency thoracic arteriography revealed active bleeding from a branch of the right internal thoracic artery. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) was performed using vascular embolization coils and porous gelatin particles. These procedures successfully controlled active hemorrhage from the chest. Intrathoracic hematoma was evacuated through the 2nd large chest tube. Chest tubes were removed on the 7th day. He was discharged on the 17th day without any complications. PMID:23917046

  10. Blunt splenic trauma: Can contrast enhanced sonography be used for the screening of delayed pseudoaneurysms?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre, E-mail: Pierre-Alexandre.Poletti@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D.; Arditi, Daniel; Terraz, Sylvain [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Buchs, Nicolas [Department of Surgery, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, 22 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Platon, Alexandra [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of contrast-enhanced sonography (CES) for the detection of delayed post-traumatic splenic pseudo-aneurysms, usually considered an indication for angiographic embolization. Methods: Sixty-three consecutive hemodynamically stable trauma patients in whom admission CT displayed a splenic injury of grade II or higher (AAST classification), without evidence of vascular involvement, were included in the study. CES of the spleen using a second generation contrast agent was systematically performed within 48–72 h after admission, for the detection of a pooling of contrast media suggestive of pseudoaneurysm. Within 6 h after contrast-enhanced sonography, all patients underwent an abdominal CT for control purposes. CES results were compared to CT findings, which were considered the reference standard. This study received approval from the institutional ethical board. Results: CES showed a blush of contrast consistent with a pseudoaneurysm in 6 of the 63 patients. All were confirmed at subsequent control CT. Pooling of contrast was found at CT in 2 patients in whom contrast-enhanced sonography was negative. There was no false positive CES examination for the suspicion of pseudoaneurysms. When compared to CT, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CES to suggest a pseudoaneurysms, were 75% (6/8), 100% (55/55), 100% (6/6), and 96% (55/57), respectively. Conclusion: Our data suggest that CES may be useful for the screening of delayed traumatic splenic pseudoaneurysms: if a negative CES does not absolutely rule out a pseudoaneurysm, a positive CES warrants an angiography, without need of control CT.

  11. Blunt splenic trauma: Can contrast enhanced sonography be used for the screening of delayed pseudoaneurysms?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the value of contrast-enhanced sonography (CES) for the detection of delayed post-traumatic splenic pseudo-aneurysms, usually considered an indication for angiographic embolization. Methods: Sixty-three consecutive hemodynamically stable trauma patients in whom admission CT displayed a splenic injury of grade II or higher (AAST classification), without evidence of vascular involvement, were included in the study. CES of the spleen using a second generation contrast agent was systematically performed within 48–72 h after admission, for the detection of a pooling of contrast media suggestive of pseudoaneurysm. Within 6 h after contrast-enhanced sonography, all patients underwent an abdominal CT for control purposes. CES results were compared to CT findings, which were considered the reference standard. This study received approval from the institutional ethical board. Results: CES showed a blush of contrast consistent with a pseudoaneurysm in 6 of the 63 patients. All were confirmed at subsequent control CT. Pooling of contrast was found at CT in 2 patients in whom contrast-enhanced sonography was negative. There was no false positive CES examination for the suspicion of pseudoaneurysms. When compared to CT, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CES to suggest a pseudoaneurysms, were 75% (6/8), 100% (55/55), 100% (6/6), and 96% (55/57), respectively. Conclusion: Our data suggest that CES may be useful for the screening of delayed traumatic splenic pseudoaneurysms: if a negative CES does not absolutely rule out a pseudoaneurysm, a positive CES warrants an angiography, without need of control CT

  12. Analysis of the association between periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT, after blunt abdominal trauma, and elevated central venous pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the causes of periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT, in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. From among 812 patients who underwent abdominal CT after blunt abdominal trauma, we retrospectively analysed the findings in 124 with evidence of periportal low attenuation. Among these, hepatic injury was noted in only 87. The presence or absence, and extent of hepatic injury, and of periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT, were carefully evaluated. In each case, the ratio of the transverse diameter of the inferior vena cava(IVC) to the aorta at the level of the right adrenal gland provided an indirect measurement of central venous pressure ; for control purposes, the ratio was also obtained in 21 non-traumatic patients with no abnormal abdominal CT findings. Of the 87 patients with hepatic injury, 46 showed no periportal low attenuation, and average value of the ratio between the IVC and aorta was 1.16±0.12, while the remaining 41 patients showed periportal low attenuation with a ratio of 1.51±0.21(p<0.05). In the 37 patients with periportal low attenuation but no evidence of concomitant hepatic injury, the average ratio was 1.52±0.25, while in 21 non-traumatic patients it was 1.15±0.16. For resuscitation, all patients had received 0.5-5.0 litre of IV fluid therapy before CT, and at the time of CT, were normotensive. Rapidly elevated central venous pressure following massive IV infusion therapy in patients with blunt abdominal trauma can be one of the causes of periportal low attenuation, as seen on CT

  13. Using 99mTc-DTPA radioaerosol inhalation lung scan as compared with computed tomography to detect lung injury in blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection of pulmonary contusion in patients with blunt chest trauma is very important so as to commence therapy immediately to avoid irreversible damage. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of technetium-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (99mTc-DTPA) aerosol inhalation lung scintigraphy in comparison with chest computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of pulmonary contusion at acute blunt chest trauma. Twenty-nine patients with isolated blunt chest trauma were referred to the emergency department of our hospital, and nine healthy people participated in this study. Sixteen patients who had pulmonary contusion on CT scans were referred to as group 1, and 13 patients who had normal CT scans as group 2. Nine healthy people comprised a control group. 99mTc-DTPA aerosol inhalation lung scintigraphy was performed on the first day in all patients. The mean half time (T1/2) and penetration index values of 99mTc-DTPA clearance were significantly lower in groups 1 and 2 compared with the control group. Among the three groups, there were no significant differences in arterial blood gas analysis except for PO2. The mean T1/2 value of 99mTc-DTPA clearance did correlate with PO2 values but not with pH, PCO2, or HCO3 values. 99mTc-DTPA radioaerosol inhalation lung imaging may serve as a useful adjunct and supportive method to chest CT scanning for detecting mild pulmonary contusion. (author)

  14. Degree of Trauma Differs for Major Osteoporotic Fracture Events in Older Men Versus Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensrud, Kristine E; Blackwell, Terri L; Cawthon, Peggy M; Bauer, Douglas C; Fink, Howard A; Schousboe, John T; Black, Dennis M; Orwoll, Eric S; Kado, Deborah M; Cauley, Jane A; Mackey, Dawn C

    2016-01-01

    To examine the degree of trauma in major osteoporotic fractures (MOF) in men versus women, we used data from 15,698 adults aged ≥65 years enrolled in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study (5994 men) and the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) (9704 women). Participants were contacted tri-annually to ascertain incident fractures, which were confirmed by radiographic reports and coded according to degree of self-reported trauma. Trauma was classified as low (fall from ≤ standing height; fall on stairs, steps, or curb; minimal trauma other than fall [coughing, turning over]); moderate (collisions with objects during normal activity without associated fall); or high (fall from > standing height; severe trauma [motor vehicle accident, assault]). MOF included hip, clinical vertebral, wrist, and humerus fractures. Mean fracture follow-up was 9.1 years in SOF and 8.7 years in MrOS. A total of 14.6% of the MOF in men versus 6.3% of the MOF in women were classified as high trauma (p standing height. High-trauma fractures were more significantly common in men versus women at the hip (p = 0.002) and wrist (p < 0.001) but not at the spine or humerus. Among participants with MOF, the odds ratio of a fracture related to high-trauma fracture among men versus women was 3.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.70-5.71) after adjustment for traditional risk factors. Findings were similar in analyses limited to participants with hip fractures (odds ratio [OR] = 3.34, 95% CI 1.04-10.67) and those with wrist fracture (OR = 5.68, 95% CI 2.03-15.85). Among community-dwelling older adults, MOF are more likely to be related to high trauma in men than in women. These findings are not explained by sex differences in conventional risk factors and may reflect a greater propensity among men to engage in risky behavior. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26178795

  15. MR imaging for blunt pancreatic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the MR imaging features of blunt pancreatic injury. Materials and methods: Nine patients with pancreatic injury related to blunt abdominal trauma confirmed by surgery performed MR imaging. Two abdominal radiologists conducted a review of the MR images to assess pancreatic parenchymal and pancreatic duct injury, and associated complications. Result: Diagnostic quality MR images were obtained in each of the nine patients. In the nine patients, pancreatic fracture, laceration and contusion were depicted on MR imaging in five, one and three patients, respectively. There were six patients with pancreatic duct disruption, eight patients with peripancreatic fluid collections, and four patients with peripancreatic pseudocyst or hematoma, respectively. All of the MR imaging findings was corresponded to surgical findings. Conclusion: MR imaging is an effective method to detect blunt pancreatic injury and may provide information to guide management decisions.

  16. MR imaging for blunt pancreatic injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Lin [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China); Zhang Xiaoming, E-mail: cjr.zhxm@vip.163.co [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China); Xu Xiaoxue; Tang Wei; Xiao Bo; Zeng Nanlin [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Objective: To study the MR imaging features of blunt pancreatic injury. Materials and methods: Nine patients with pancreatic injury related to blunt abdominal trauma confirmed by surgery performed MR imaging. Two abdominal radiologists conducted a review of the MR images to assess pancreatic parenchymal and pancreatic duct injury, and associated complications. Result: Diagnostic quality MR images were obtained in each of the nine patients. In the nine patients, pancreatic fracture, laceration and contusion were depicted on MR imaging in five, one and three patients, respectively. There were six patients with pancreatic duct disruption, eight patients with peripancreatic fluid collections, and four patients with peripancreatic pseudocyst or hematoma, respectively. All of the MR imaging findings was corresponded to surgical findings. Conclusion: MR imaging is an effective method to detect blunt pancreatic injury and may provide information to guide management decisions.

  17. The Sentinel Clot Sign: a Useful CT Finding for the Evaluation of Intraperitoneal Bladder Rupture Following Blunt Trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Chung, Tae Woong; Yoon, Woong; Kang, Heoung Keun; Kang, Taek Won; Shin, Hee Young [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    To evaluate the frequency and relevance of the 'sentinel clot' sign on CT for patients with traumatic intraperitoneal bladder rupture in a retrospective study. During a recent 42-month period, 74 consecutive trauma patients (45 men, 29 women; age range, 12 84 years; mean age, 50.8 years) with gross hematuria were examined by the use of intravenous contrast enhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis, followed by retrograde cystography. Contrast-enhanced CT scanning was performed by using a helical CT scanner. CT images were retrospectively reviewed in consensus by two radiologists. The CT findings including the sentinel clot sign, pelvic fracture, traumatic injury to other abdominal viscera, and the degree of intraperitoneal free fluid were assessed and statistically analyzed using the two-tailed x{sup 2} test. Twenty of the 74 patients had intraperitoneal bladder rupture. The sentinel clot sign was seen for 16 patients (80%) with intraperitoneal bladder rupture and for four patients (7%) without intraperitoneal bladder rupture (p < 0.001). Pelvic fracture was noted in five patients (25%) with intraperitoneal bladder rupture and in 39 patients (72%) without intraperitoneal bladder rupture (p < 0.001). Intraperitoneal free fluid was found in all patients (100%) with intraperitoneal bladder rupture, irrespective of an associated intraabdominal visceral injury, whereas 19 (35%) of the 54 patients without intraperitoneal bladder rupture had intraperitoneal free fluid (p < 0.001). Detection and localization of the sentinel clot sign abutting on the bladder dome may improve the accuracy of CT in the diagnosis of traumatic intraperitoneal bladder rupture, especially when the patients present with gross hematuria.

  18. Non-Osteotomy and Osteotomy Large Animal Fracture Models in Orthopedic Trauma Research

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Decker; Janin Reifenrath; Mohamed Omar; Christian Krettek; Müller, Christian W.

    2014-01-01

    Large animal fracture models are important in the field of orthopedic trauma research. New implants are tested in animals before being implanted into humans. Large animals like sheep or swine often are more properly to simulate conditions in humans, e.g. biomechanical demands, compared to rodents. Cited articles mainly analyze shock or fracture healing. Both osteotomy and non-osteotomy fracture models have been used in the past. However, comparative studies are rare and clear recommendation w...

  19. [Influence of the pelvic trauma registry of the DGU on treatment of pelvic ring fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, J H; Stuby, F M; Herath, S C; Culemann, U; Aghayev, E; Pohlemann, T

    2016-06-01

    Fractures of the pelvic ring are comparatively rare with an incidence of 2-8 % of all fractures depending on the study in question. The severity of pelvic ring fractures can be very different ranging from simple and mostly "harmless" type A fractures up to life-threatening complex type C fractures. Although it was previously postulated that high-energy trauma was necessary to induce a pelvic ring fracture, over the past decades it became more and more evident, not least from data in the pelvic trauma registry of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU), that low-energy minor trauma can also cause pelvic ring fractures of osteoporotic bone and in a rapidly increasing population of geriatric patients insufficiency fractures of the pelvic ring are nowadays observed with no preceding trauma.Even in large trauma centers the number of patients with pelvic ring fractures is mostly insufficient to perform valid and sufficiently powerful monocentric studies on epidemiological, diagnostic or therapeutic issues. For this reason, in 1991 the first and still the only registry worldwide for the documentation and evaluation of pelvic ring fractures was introduced by the Working Group Pelvis (AG Becken) of the DGU. Originally, the main objectives of the documentation were epidemiological and diagnostic issues; however, in the course of time it developed into an increasingly expanding dataset with comprehensive parameters on injury patterns, operative and conservative therapy regimens and short-term and long-term outcome of patients. Originally starting with 10 institutions, in the meantime more than 30 hospitals in Germany and other European countries participate in the documentation of data. In the third phase of the registry alone, which was started in 2004, data from approximately 15,000 patients with pelvic ring and acetabular fractures were documented. In addition to the scientific impact of the pelvic trauma registry, which is reflected in the numerous national and

  20. Tube thoracostomy complications in patients with acute blunt thoracic trauma due to road traffic accidents - a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the differences in the frequency and types of Tube thoracostomy complications (TICs) between two groups of patients (A and B)With blunt thoracic trauma (BIT), as a result of road traffic accidents (RTA). Study Design: Prospective, comparative study. Place and duration of Study: Dawadrrii General Hospital (DGH), a level II trauma center, Riyadh, from December 4, 2011 to December 3, 2012. Methodology: The problem of a high number and variety of TICs' resulting due to various technical aspects of tube thoracostomy (IT) are highlighted in this study. This is a prospective comparative study enrolling a total of 140 patients with BTT due to RTA, referred to this hospital with indwelling Tube thoracostomies (TIs) (group A) or undergoing TTs at this hospital (group B) by a single thoracic surgeon within 10-15 minutes of arrival. Patients' demographic and clinical details were recorded and confirmed with the referring physicians, if necessary. The two groups were matched for age, gender, indications for ITs and the number and types of accompanying injuries. Informed consent was obtained before the procedure. Results were analyzed using SPSS v 19. Statistical significance achieved was translated into p values at 95% confidence interval. Results: Of the J 19 patients, who satisfied the inclusion criteria, group A had 49 (41.2%) and group B, 70 (58.8%) patients. Males were in he majority in both groups. A total of 130 chest tubes were placed in 119 patients. Contralateral chest tubes were indicated in 3 patients in group A and 8 patients in group B (table I). The overall TTCs rate was 61.5% (80/130), with the majority in group A (88.7%; p= 0.0001). The number of technical, infective and miscellaneous TTC in group A and B were 47 (92.2%), 6 (85.7%), 18 (81.8%), and 4 (7.8%), 1(14.3%), and 4 (18.2%), respectively (table II). The majority of the chest tubes in group A were smaller than 28 Fr (p=0.0001; RR=2.98; 95% CI=2.17-4.10). Mortality due to TT in

  1. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 1. Liver and spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography is now widely used in the initial diagnostic workup of adult trauma victims with suspected intra-abdominal injuries. We review the role of CT in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in two parts. In the first part we discuss general aspects of performing CT in the setting of abdominal trauma and the diagnostic findings of intra-abdominal hemorrhage and blunt hepatic and splenic injuries. Hepatic and splenic injuries can be detected by means of CT with a high accuracy. The vast majority of hepatic injuries can be successfully managed conservatively, even when CT demonstrates parenchymal damage of more than three segments and major hemoperitoneum. Delayed complications, e. g., formation of biloma or a false aneurysm, can be readily detected on repeat CT studies, although they are quite uncommon. The outcome of conservative treatment of splenic injuries remains unpredictable because delayed splenic rupture may occur even when initial CT shows only minor parenchymal lesions and little or no intraperitoneal hemorrhage. (orig.)

  2. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 1. Liver and spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Terrier, F. [Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Mentha, G. [Department of Surgery, Division of Abdominal Surgery, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1998-05-01

    Computed tomography is now widely used in the initial diagnostic workup of adult trauma victims with suspected intra-abdominal injuries. We review the role of CT in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in two parts. In the first part we discuss general aspects of performing CT in the setting of abdominal trauma and the diagnostic findings of intra-abdominal hemorrhage and blunt hepatic and splenic injuries. Hepatic and splenic injuries can be detected by means of CT with a high accuracy. The vast majority of hepatic injuries can be successfully managed conservatively, even when CT demonstrates parenchymal damage of more than three segments and major hemoperitoneum. Delayed complications, e. g., formation of biloma or a false aneurysm, can be readily detected on repeat CT studies, although they are quite uncommon. The outcome of conservative treatment of splenic injuries remains unpredictable because delayed splenic rupture may occur even when initial CT shows only minor parenchymal lesions and little or no intraperitoneal hemorrhage. (orig.) With 11 figs., 5 tabs., 64 refs.

  3. Evolving Role of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Management of Extrahepatic Hepatic Ductal Injuries due to Blunt Trauma: Diagnostic and Treatment Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil P. Jaik

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Extrahepatic hepatic ductal injuries (EHDIs due to blunt abdominal trauma are rare. Given the rarity of these injuries and the insidious onset of symptoms, EHDI are commonly missed during the initial trauma evaluation, making their diagnosis difficult and frequently delayed. Diagnostic modalities useful in the setting of EHDI include computed tomography (CT, abdominal ultrasonography (AUS, nuclear imaging (HIDA scan, and cholangiography. Traditional options in management of EHDI include primary ductal repair with or without a T-tube, biliary-enteric anastomosis, ductal ligation, stenting, and drainage. Simple drainage and biliary decompression is often the most appropriate treatment in unstable patients. More recently, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP allowed for diagnosis and potential treatment of these injuries via stenting and/or papillotomy. Our review of 53 cases of EHDI reported in the English-language literature has focused on the evolving role of ERCP in diagnosis and treatment of these injuries. Diagnostic and treatment algorithms incorporating ERCP have been designed to help systematize and simplify the management of EHDI. An illustrative case is reported of blunt traumatic injury involving both the extrahepatic portion of the left hepatic duct and its confluence with the right hepatic duct. This injury was successfully diagnosed and treated using ERCP.

  4. Isolated scapula fracture: Ice hockey player without trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Memişoğlu

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Scapular fractures are generally seen along with other injuries, but in this case we wanted to emphasize that care has to been taken to diagnose an isolated scapular fracture while assessing shoulder pain.

  5. The song remains the same although the instruments are changing: complications following selective non-operative management of blunt spleen trauma: a retrospective review of patients at a level I trauma centre from 1996 to 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clancy Aisling A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a widespread shift to selective non-operative management (SNOM for blunt splenic trauma, there remains uncertainty regarding the role of adjuncts such as interventional radiological techniques, the need for follow-up imaging, and the incidence of long-term complications. We evaluated the success of SNOM (including splenic artery embolization, SAE for the management of blunt splenic injuries in severely injured patients. Methods Retrospective review (1996-2007 of the Alberta Trauma Registry and health records for blunt splenic trauma patients, aged 18 and older, with injury severity scores of 12 or greater, admitted to the Foothills Medical Centre. Results Among 538 eligible patients, 150 (26% underwent early operative intervention. The proportion of patients managed by SNOM rose from 50 to 78% over the study period, with an overall success rate of SNOM of 87%, while injury acuity remained unchanged over time. Among SNOM failures, 65% underwent surgery within 24 hours of admission. Splenic arterial embolization (SAE was used in only 7% of patients managed non-operatively, although at least 21% of failed SNOM had contrast extravasation potentially amenable to SAE. Among Calgary residents undergoing SNOM, hospital readmission within six months was required in three (2%, all of whom who required emergent intervention (splenectomy 2, SAE 1 and in whom none had post-discharge follow-up imaging. Overall, the use of post-discharge follow-up CT imaging was low following SNOM (10%, and thus no CT images identified occult hemorrhage or pseudoaneurysm. We observed seven cases of delayed splenic rupture in our population which occurred from five days to two months following initial injury. Three of these occurred in the post-discharge period requiring readmission and intervention. Conclusions SNOM was the initial treatment strategy for most patients with blunt splenic trauma with 13% requiring subsequent operative intervention

  6. Horner's syndrome after blunt cervical and chest trauma: case report Síndrome de Horner após trauma cérvico-torácico fechado: relato de caso

    OpenAIRE

    Wellingson Silva Paiva; Robson Luis Oliveira de Amorim; Wagner Malago Tavares; Eduardo Joaquim Lopes Alho; Brasil Ping Jeng; Eberval Gadelha Figueiredo

    2007-01-01

    Horner‘s syndrome is the triad of miosis, ptosis, and anhidrosis, resulting from disruption of the sympathetic pathways. This article describes an uncommon case of Horner‘s syndrome in a 22-year-old man after blunt trauma to the neck and chest without carotid artery dissection. The patient was brought to the emergency service after motorcycle fall. Neurologic examination revealed a patient presenting the score 15 at Glasgow Coma Scale. The left eyelid was 1-2 mm lower than the right. Carotid ...

  7. Comparative Effectiveness of Emergency Resuscitative Thoracotomy versus Closed Chest Compressions among Patients with Critical Blunt Trauma: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodai Suzuki

    Full Text Available Although emergency resuscitative thoracotomy is performed as a salvage maneuver for critical blunt trauma patients, evidence supporting superior effectiveness of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy compared to conventional closed-chest compressions remains insufficient. The objective of this study was to investigate whether emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at the emergency department or in the operating room was associated with favourable outcomes after blunt trauma and to compare its effectiveness with that of closed-chest compressions.This was a retrospective nationwide cohort study. Data were obtained from the Japan Trauma Data Bank for the period between 2004 and 2012. The primary and secondary outcomes were patient survival rates 24 h and 28 d after emergency department arrival. Statistical analyses were performed using multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis. We adjusted for the effects of different hospitals by introducing random intercepts in regression analysis to account for the differential quality of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at hospitals where patients in cardiac arrest were treated. Sensitivity analyses were performed using propensity score matching.In total, 1,377 consecutive, critical blunt trauma patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency department or operating room were included in the study. Of these patients, 484 (35.1% underwent emergency resuscitative thoracotomy and 893 (64.9% received closed-chest compressions. Compared to closed-chest compressions, emergency resuscitative thoracotomy was associated with lower survival rate 24 h after emergency department arrival (4.5% vs. 17.5%, respectively, P < 0.001 and 28 d after arrival (1.2% vs. 6.0%, respectively, P < 0.001. Multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis with and without a propensity score-matched dataset revealed that the odds ratio for an unfavorable survival rate after 24 h was lower for

  8. Are older adults with hip fractures disadvantaged in level 1 trauma centers?

    OpenAIRE

    Metcalfe, D; Olufajo, OA; Zogg, CK; Gates, JD; Weaver, MJ; Harris, MB; Rios Diaz, AJ; Haider, AH; Salim, A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Large regional hospitals achieve good outcomes for patients with complex conditions. However, recent studies have suggested that some patient groups might not benefit from treatment in higher-level trauma centers. Objective: To test the hypothesis that older adults with isolated hip fractures experience delayed surgical treatment and worse clinical outcomes when treated in higher-level trauma centers. Research Design: Retrospective cohort study using a statewide longitudinal...

  9. Association between a single-pass whole-body computed tomography policy and survival after blunt major trauma: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutter Martin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Single-pass, whole-body computed tomography (pan-scan remains a controversial intervention in the early assessment of patients with major trauma. We hypothesized that a liberal pan-scan policy is mainly an indicator of enhanced process quality of emergency care that may lead to improved survival regardless of the actual use of the method. Methods This retrospective cohort study included consecutive patients with blunt trauma referred to a trauma center prior to (2000 to 2002 and after (2002 to 2007 the introduction of a liberal single-pass pan-scan policy. The overall mortality between the two periods was compared and stratified according to the availability and actual use of the pan-scan. Logistic regression analysis was employed to adjust mortality estimates for demographic and injury-related independent variables. Results The study comprised 313 patients during the pre-pan-scan period, 223 patients after the introduction of the pan-scan policy but not undergoing a pan-scan and 608 patients undergoing a pan-scan. The overall mortality was 23.3, 14.8 and 7.9% (P Conclusions In this study, a liberal pan-scan policy was associated with lower trauma mortality. The causal role of the pan-scan itself must be interpreted in the context of improved structural and process quality, is apparently moderate and needs further investigation with regard to the diagnostic yield and changes in management decisions. (The Pan-Scan for Trauma Resuscitation [PATRES] Study Group, ISRCTN35424832 and ISRCTN41462125

  10. Fracture of the Fabella: A Rare Injury in Knee Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Andre Rodrigues Façanha Barreto; Francisco Abaete Chagas-Neto; Michel Daoud Crema; Mario Muller Lorenzato; Mariana Tiemi Teixeira Kobayashi; Carlos Ribeiro Monteiro; Marcello Henrique Nogueira-Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of a 21-year-old woman sustaining a traumatic [fabellar] fracture following a motor vehicle accident. The fabellar fracture was confirmed on plain films, which prompted further evaluation of the knee with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate other possible associated injuries. Fracture of the fabella is a rare condition. Clinically, patients present with posterolateral knee pain, edema, and limited knee extension. Occasionally these symptoms may be very subt...

  11. Management of open fractures of the tibial shaft in multiple trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Boltuc

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The work presents the assessment of the results of treatment of open tibial shaft fractures in polytrauma patients. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised 28 patients who underwent surgical treatment of open fractures of the tibial shaft with locked intramedullary nailing. The mean age of the patients was 43 years (range from 19 to 64 years. The criterion for including the patients in the study was concomitant multiple trauma. For the assessment of open tibial fractures, Gustilo classification was used. The most common concomitant multiple trauma included craniocerebral injuries, which were diagnosed in 12 patients. In 14 patients, the surgery was performed within 24 h after the injury. In 14 patients, the surgery was delayed and was performed 8-10 days after the trauma. Results: The assessment of the results at 12 months after the surgery included the following features: time span between the trauma and the surgery and complications in the form of osteomyelitis and delayed union. The efficacy of gait, muscular atrophy, edema of the operated limb and possible disturbances of its axis were also taken under consideration. In patients operated emergently within 24 h after the injury, infected nonunion was observed in three (10.8% males. These patients had grade III open fractures of the tibial shaft according to Gustilo classification. No infectious complications were observed in patients who underwent a delayed operation. Conclusion: Evaluation of patients with open fractures of the tibial shaft in multiple trauma showed that delayed intramedullary nailing performed 8-10 days after the trauma, resulted in good outcome and avoided development of delayed union and infected nonunion. This approach gives time for stabilization of general condition of the patient and identification of pathogens from wound culture.

  12. MR of vertebral compression fracture: Acute and chronic trauma versus metastasis -emphasis on the signal intensity and enhancement-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 41 patients with compression fracture of the spine. MR images of 14 patients with acute spinal trauma (within recent 1 month), eight patients with chronic trauma (over 1 month), and 19 patients with malignant cause without history for trauma were analyzed, retrospectively. Low signal intensities on T1-weighted images and high signal intensities on T2-weighted images were noted in 86% (12/14) of patients with acute trauma. Iso-signal intensities on all pulse sequence were noted in 50% (4/8) of patients with chronic trauma. Low signal intensities on T1-weighted images and high signal intensities on T2-weighted images were noted 100% (19/19) of patients with metastatic compression fracture. Contrast enhancement was observed in all the cases of acute trauma (4/4) and metastases (18/18), whereas only 20% (1/5) of chronic trauma showed enhancement. Fragmentation was seen in 35% (5/14) of patients with acute trauma, in 25% (2/8) with chronic trauma, and not seen in the patients with metastasis. In conclusion, acute traumatic compression fracture can not be differentiated from malignant cause by MR signal intensity or contrast enhancement, but chronic compression fracture can be distinguished from metastasis . Fragmentation may suggest traumatic compression fracture. So, MRI could be a useful method in differentiating the benign compression fracture from the pathologic ones caused by malignancy

  13. Local Inflammation in Fracture Hematoma: Results from a Combined Trauma Model in Pigs

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    K. Horst

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies showed significant interaction between the local and systemic inflammatory response after severe trauma in small animal models. The purpose of this study was to establish a new combined trauma model in pigs to investigate fracture-associated local inflammation and gain information about the early inflammatory stages after polytrauma. Material and Methods. Combined trauma consisted of tibial fracture, lung contusion, liver laceration, and controlled hemorrhage. Animals were mechanically ventilated and under ICU-monitoring for 48 h. Blood and fracture hematoma samples were collected during the time course of the study. Local and systemic levels of serum cytokines and diverse alarmins were measured by ELISA kit. Results. A statistical significant difference in the systemic serum values of IL-6 and HMGB1 was observed when compared to the sham. Moreover, there was a statistical significant difference in the serum values of the fracture hematoma of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and HMGB1 when compared to the systemic inflammatory response. However a decrease of local proinflammatory concentrations was observed while anti-inflammatory mediators increased. Conclusion. Our data showed a time-dependent activation of the local and systemic inflammatory response. Indeed it is the first study focusing on the local and systemic inflammatory response to multiple-trauma in a large animal model.

  14. The effect of inclement weather on ankle fracture management in an Irish trauma unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, B J

    2013-09-01

    Ireland is unfamiliar with extreme weather conditions. Such conditions occurred in winter 2009-2010 and 2010-2011, with much of the country being affected by snow and ice. We reviewed the effect that these conditions had on the treatment of ankle fractures in our trauma unit.

  15. Ruptura isolada da pelve renal secundária ao trauma abdominal contuso Isolated disruption of the renal pelvis by blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sizenando Vieira Starling

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Blunt rupture of the renal pelvis is a exceedingly rare injury. Hematuria is absent in one-third of cases. Such injuries are usually caused by desacceleration forces. Despite improved imaging techniques, diagnosis of this injuries is frequently delayed. Diagnosis is suggested by the presence of massive medial extravasation of contrast material at excretory urography or computed tomography. Surgical treatment consists in pyeloplasty or pyeloraphy with stent placement (double J or nephrostomy.

  16. Effects of Copper, Zinc, and Vitamin Complex (Cernevit®) on Hepatic Healing in Rats Experimentally Subjected to Blunt Hepatic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayten, Refik; Aygen, Erhan; Cerrahoglu, Yusuf Ziya; Camci, Cemalettin; Ilhan, Yavuz Selim; Girgin, Mustafa; Ilhan, Necip; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanefi

    2015-12-01

    Solid organ injuries following blunt trauma are frequently encountered. The use of non-operative approach is gradually increasing. Thus, research on the methods that could enhance healing in solid organ injuries is in progress. Agents known to have antioxidant property were used after an experimentally induced blunt hepatic trauma. Thirty-two Wistar albino rats weighing 200 g were dropped from a height of 40 cm on to the right upper abdominal quadrant to produce a grade II-III hepatic injury. Rats were divided into control, Zn-administered, Cu-administered, and vitamin complex-administered groups, with eight rats in each. Aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were measured in the blood samples. The percentage of cells displaying Ki-67 nuclear staining was estimated. The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and the degree of inflammation in the samples was semi-quantitatively assessed. Treatment with zinc, copper, and Cernevit® caused varying levels of decrease in AST, ALT, and LDH levels compared to the control group. Ki-67 positivity was significantly lower in group I compared with groups II and III (p = 0.002). Ki-67 positivity was significantly higher in group II compared to the other groups (p < 0.05). A marked improvement was observed in inflammation in group II. Copper and zinc treatment decreased inflammation as well as blood levels of AST and ALT, and enhanced the healing of traumatized hepatic tissue. However, Cernevit® reduced only the degree of inflammation. PMID:27011508

  17. Evaluating the Relationship between Rib Fractures and the Probability of Abdominal Trauma; a Brief Report

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    Vahid Monsef Kasmaei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trauma is one of the most important causes of death in patients under 40 years of age and the third common cause of death regardless of age. Rib cage damages are one of the major reasons for death in the early minutes post-trauma. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the frequency of intra-abdominal injury in the patients with rib fracture who were referred to emergency department. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 60 patients with rib fractures who were admitted to the emergency department of Poorsina Hospital, Rasht, Iran, from March 2011 to March2012. A checklist was filled out for all the patients including age, sex, trauma mechanism, side and site of fracture, the number of broken ribs, the results of abdominal ultrasonography, the need for laparotomy and mortality. The collected data were classified based on descriptive statistics and analyzed using SPSS 16. Results: 60 patients with the mean age of 47.26±13.71 years were admitted to the emergency department during this time (81.7% male. The most common mechanism of trauma was car accident [22(36.7%]. Among these 60 patients, 71 rib fractures in 3 levels of chest (upper, middle, lower were detected and 50 (83.3% in the same area. Mean number of fractured ribs was 2.85±2.2 (minimum: 1, maximum 10. In 3 (5% patients, fracture was on both sides. The results of abdominal ultrasonography in 7 (11.7% patients were positive. The number of fractured ribs (p=0.017 and the area of the fracture (p=0.048 showed a significant correlation with the presence of intra-abdominal free fluid. The fracture of more than 2 ribs directly correlated with the possibility of intra-abdominal hemorrhage (p<0.0001. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, it seems that the number and area of the fractured ribs directly and significantly correlate with the probability of abdominal trauma based on the results of abdominal ultrasonography.

  18. Congenital depressed skull fracture in the absence of trauma: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tovar-Spinoza ZS

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Zulma S Tovar-Spinoza, Peter D KimDepartment of Neurosurgery, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse NYAbstract: There are limited reports of neonatal depressed skull fractures in the absence of any known trauma or obvious risk factors. Here we describe a male neonate with a significant frontal nontraumatic depressed fracture, his course of treatment, and a literature review. A male neonate was attended for a significant congenital depressed skull fracture in the left frontal bone. He was born full term after an uncomplicated delivery to a multiparous mother who was a human immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV-positive immigrant from sub-Saharan Africa. The pregnancy was otherwise uncomplicated. There was no history of trauma to the mother during the pregnancy or delivery. Ultrasonography had been unremarkable. No other abnormalities were noted. The patient was brought to the operating room at the age of 13 days for elevation of his fracture due to its nonreducible nature. A small linear incision was made just posterior to the coronal suture. The dura mater was stripped and a combination of Penfield and periostial elevators was used to elevate the depressed fracture. Nontraumatic depressed skull fractures are uncommon in neonates. The cause of this entity has not been identified, and many theories about its origin have been proposed. Treatment can be either surgical or conservative.Keywords: neonatal, congenital, depressed fracture, spontaneous, nontraumatic

  19. Forensic aspects of paediatric fractures. Differentiating accidental trauma from child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fractures are a common finding in children and it is estimated that 2.1% of all children will suffer at least one fracture before the age of 16. With young children in particular, the question may arise if this is related to child abuse. The aim of this book is to help physicians involved in child abuse cases to interpret radiological findings in light of the forensic circumstances under which they occurred. The authors present up-to-date literature related to the mechanisms underlying non-accidental cases of trauma. In this book not only the radiological findings in child-abuse are discussed, but more importantly, these findings are analyzed from a forensic perspective. Careful attention is paid to evidence regarding reported trauma mechanisms and their clinical outcome; for example, can a fall from a couch result in a femoral fracture, and if not, where is the supporting evidence? (orig.)

  20. Forensic aspects of paediatric fractures. Differentiating accidental trauma from child abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilo, Rob A.C. [Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Hague (Netherlands). Department of Pathology and Toxicology; Rijn, Rick R. van [Emma Childrens' s Hospital/Academic, Medical Center Amsterdam (Netherlands). Department of Radiology; Robben, Simon G.F. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    Fractures are a common finding in children and it is estimated that 2.1% of all children will suffer at least one fracture before the age of 16. With young children in particular, the question may arise if this is related to child abuse. The aim of this book is to help physicians involved in child abuse cases to interpret radiological findings in light of the forensic circumstances under which they occurred. The authors present up-to-date literature related to the mechanisms underlying non-accidental cases of trauma. In this book not only the radiological findings in child-abuse are discussed, but more importantly, these findings are analyzed from a forensic perspective. Careful attention is paid to evidence regarding reported trauma mechanisms and their clinical outcome; for example, can a fall from a couch result in a femoral fracture, and if not, where is the supporting evidence? (orig.)

  1. Dual-source CT in blunt trauma patients: elimination of diaphragmatic motion using high-pitch spiral technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Teresa; McLaughlin, Patrick; Arepalli, Chesnal D; Louis, Luck J; Bilawich, Ana-Maria; Mayo, John; Nicolaou, Savvas

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare diaphragmatic motion on dual-source high-pitch (DS-HP) and conventional single-source (SS) CT scans in trauma patients. Seventy-five consecutive trauma patients who presented to a level one trauma center over a 6-month period were scanned with a standardized whole body trauma CT protocol including both DS-HP chest (pitch = 2.1-2.5) and SS abdominal CT scans. Subjective analysis of diaphragmatic motion was performed by two readers using a four-point motion scale in seven regions of the diaphragm on coronal and axial slices. An overall confidence score to exclude a diaphragmatic tear was determined (1 to 10, 10: completely confident and 1: impossible to exclude). Wilcoxon rank sum tests were used for statistical analysis, and p confidence score of 9.85 for DS-HP was significantly better than the mean score of 7.66 for SS images (p confidence to exclude a diaphragmatic tear (κ = 0.45). Dual-source high-pitch CT scanning is advantageous as it allows for significantly better evaluation of diaphragmatic structures by minimizing motion artifacts on images of freely breathing trauma patients. PMID:26637401

  2. Prevalence of permanent anterior tooth fracture due to trauma in South Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithra Nidharsh Hegde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to determine the prevalence of permanent anterior teeth fracture due to trauma in South Indian population. Materials and Methods: After formal consent, study was conducted on 2000 patients reporting for treatment in A B Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences and Rural Satellite Centers from June to December 2013. They were examined under good illumination using sterilized mouth mirror, explorer and cotton rolls. Results were evaluated using Pearson Chi-square test. Results: Of 2000 patients, overall prevalence of anterior teeth fracture due to trauma was 14.85%, 53.9% cases were noticed in the age group of 15-30 years, 20.2% cases in an age group of 12-15 years. Of 14.85% (297 cases, 53.9% males and 46.1% females had anterior teeth fracture, 88.67% cases were with respect to maxillary arch and 11.33% cases were with respect to mandibular arch. 43.9% patients had enamel and dentin fracture, only enamel fracture was seen in 31.6% patients and the least was 6.01% which showed displacement of tooth without crown or root fracture, 67% were because of falls and rest of the 33% of patients had anterior tooth fracture because of violence, sports and traffic accidents, 71.42% cases had fracture with maxillary central incisor. Furthermore, 59.6% cases were seen with Class II Division I malocclusion. Conclusions: In the present study we noticed that fall was the most frequent cause and are seen more in males with an increased prevalence in 15-30 years of age. Furthermore, fracture of maxillary central incisor was most common and among all, fractures involving enamel and dentin were most common.

  3. Value of CT to predict surgically important bowel and/or mesenteric injury in blunt trauma: performance of a preliminary scoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the performance of a computed tomography (CT) diagnostic score to predict surgical treatment for blunt bowel and/or mesentery injury (BBMI) in consecutive abdominal trauma. This was a retrospective observational study of 805 consecutive abdominal traumas with 556 patients included and screened by an abdominal radiologist blinded to the patient outcome, to evaluate numerous CT findings and calculate their diagnostic performances. These CT findings were compared using univariate and multivariate analysis between patients who had a laparotomy-confirmed BBMI requiring surgical repair, and those without BBMI requiring surgery. A CT score was obtained with an internal bootstrap validation. Fifty-six patients (10.1 %) had BBMI requiring surgery. Nine CT signs were independently associated with BBMI requiring surgery and were used to develop a CT diagnostic score. The AUC of our model was 0.98 (95 % CI 0.96-100), with a ≥5 cut-off. Its diagnostic performance was determined by internal validation: sensitivity 91.1-100 %, specificity 85.7-97.6 %, positive predictive value 41.4-82.3 % and negative predictive value 98.9-100 %. Bowel wall discontinuity and mesenteric pneumoperitoneum had the strongest association with BBMI requiring surgery (OR = 128.9 and 140.5, respectively). We developed a reliable CT scoring system which is easy to implement and highly predictive of BBMI requiring surgery. (orig.)

  4. Value of CT to predict surgically important bowel and/or mesenteric injury in blunt trauma: performance of a preliminary scoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faget, Claire; Taourel, Patrice; Ruyer, Alban; Alili, Chakib; Millet, Ingrid [CHU Lapeyronie, Department of Medical Imaging, Montpellier (France); Charbit, Jonathan [CHU Lapeyronie, Department of Intensive Care and Anesthesiology, Montpellier (France); Molinari, Nicolas [UMR 729 MISTEA, CHU Montpellier, Department of Medical Information and Statistics, Montpellier (France)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the performance of a computed tomography (CT) diagnostic score to predict surgical treatment for blunt bowel and/or mesentery injury (BBMI) in consecutive abdominal trauma. This was a retrospective observational study of 805 consecutive abdominal traumas with 556 patients included and screened by an abdominal radiologist blinded to the patient outcome, to evaluate numerous CT findings and calculate their diagnostic performances. These CT findings were compared using univariate and multivariate analysis between patients who had a laparotomy-confirmed BBMI requiring surgical repair, and those without BBMI requiring surgery. A CT score was obtained with an internal bootstrap validation. Fifty-six patients (10.1 %) had BBMI requiring surgery. Nine CT signs were independently associated with BBMI requiring surgery and were used to develop a CT diagnostic score. The AUC of our model was 0.98 (95 % CI 0.96-100), with a ≥5 cut-off. Its diagnostic performance was determined by internal validation: sensitivity 91.1-100 %, specificity 85.7-97.6 %, positive predictive value 41.4-82.3 % and negative predictive value 98.9-100 %. Bowel wall discontinuity and mesenteric pneumoperitoneum had the strongest association with BBMI requiring surgery (OR = 128.9 and 140.5, respectively). We developed a reliable CT scoring system which is easy to implement and highly predictive of BBMI requiring surgery. (orig.)

  5. The Impact of Transient Hepatic Attenuation Differences in the Diagnosis of Pseudoaneurysm and Arteriovenous Fistula on Follow-Up CT Scans after Blunt Liver Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hjelm Brandt

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A feared complication to liver trauma is delayed vascular complication, such as pseudoaneurysm and arteriovenous fistula (PS/AF seen as focal enhancement on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT in the arterial phase. A hyperdense area termed transient hepatic attenuation difference (THAD representing altered hepatic blood flow can be seen in the arterial phase near the liver lesion. The objective of this study was to describe THAD and PS/AF on follow-up CT after blunt liver trauma, and to evaluate if THAD influenced the evaluation of PS/AF. Three radiology residents retrospectively evaluated scans of 78 patients. The gold standard for PS/AF was an evaluation by an experienced senior radiologist, while THAD was a consensus between the residents. PS/AF was present in 14% and THAD in 54%. THAD was located in the periphery of the lesion with hazy borders and mean HU levels of 100, while PS/AF was located within the lesion with focal enhancement and mean HU levels of 170 (p < 0.05. In evaluation of PS/AF, the likelihood of agreement between the observers and the gold standard was 89% when THAD was present, and 98% when THAD was absent (p = 0.04. THAD is common and can hamper the evaluation of PS/AF.

  6. Fracture line index of fibular stalk and the ankle joint bone in the classification of the ankle joint trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the fracture line index of fibular stalk and the ankle joint bone in the classification of the ankle joint trauma. Methods: Measure fracture line index of fibular stalk and the ankle joint in 217 adult cases of fracture and dislocation of ankle joint. And the cases were classified by the results of the measurement. Results: Measurement was unavailable in 9 cases of tearing fracture. In 31 cases, the lesions could not be particularly classified. And in the rest 176 cases the trauma were precisely classified. The over all successful rate was 81.6%. Conclusion: Fracture line index of fibular stalk and the ankle joint bone are valuable in classification of the trauma of the angle joint. While the specificity of this method is low in differentiating the adducting and abducting fracture of the medial angle, in which a combined investigation is recommended

  7. Determination of Sensitivity and Specificity of Ultrasonography Compared with CT-Scan in Diagnosis of Free Abdominal Fluid in Patients with Blunt Abdominal Trauma Admitted to Zahedan Khatam-al-anbia H

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    Mohammad Ghasemi Rad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Nowadays, trauma is the fourth cause of mortality and morbidity in developed countries. Intraabdominal hemorrhage due to blunt abdominal trauma is the major cause of these mortalities. Therefore, every action taken for quick diagnosis of intraabdominal hemorrhage could save the lives of patients more effectively."nPatients and Methods: This cross-sectional study concerns patients with blunt abdominal trauma admitted to the emergency of Khatam-al-anbia Hospital in a one-year period from 1385. Information from ultrasonography and CT scan were registered in a questionnaire and analyzed by statistical software SPSS 14. We used sensitivity, specifity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy as statistical tools for comparison."nResuIts: Of the 100 patients surveyed, 20% were female and 80% were male. The most common clinical symptoms in both groups were abdominal pain and then abdominal tenderness. There was significant statistical difference between clinical symptoms from the point view of existing free abdominal fluid and CT-scan report (P =0.017. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and positive predictive value of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of free abdominal fluid were respectively, 84%, 86%, 91% and 75%, which were respectively, 54%, 90%, 65% and 79% in the diagnosis of intra abdominal damage. "nConclusion: Ultrasonography has sensitivity, specificity and enough accuracy to detect free abdominal fluid in blunt abdominal trauma in comparison with CT-scan in the children's and adult's age group which if combined with abdominal viscera parenchymal abnormalities, these parameters would sensitively increase in the children's age group."nKeywords: CT Scan, Ultrasonography, Abdominal Blunt Trauma, Sensitivity, Specificity

  8. Value of ultrasound in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma;O valor da ultra-sonografia na avaliacao do traumatismo abdominal fechado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayanthi, Shri Krishna

    2008-07-01

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in an age group including from teenagers to young adults, in a male dominant proportion, resulting in great economic and social impact. Within the complex of trauma, blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is frequent event and presents difficulty in the evaluation and management since the clinical examination shows low sensitivity and specificity. The detection of hemo peritoneum is one of the methods of evaluation of possible indirect intra-abdominal injuries, initially using direct diagnostic abdominal paracentesis and posteriorly the diagnostic peritoneal lavage, that despite the effectiveness, have drawbacks such as invasiveness and the inability of hemo peritoneum quantification and the lesion staging, resulting in non-therapeutic laparotomies. Imaging methods provide useful information in the investigation of abdominal injuries, such as conventional and contrast radiology, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT), which is the best effective method, but has its own drawbacks, such as cost, accessibility, use of ionizing radiation and contrast media and the displacement of the patient to the machine. US presents itself as an alternative in the initial evaluation of these patients as noninvasive method, with lack of harmfulness, low cost, fast answer and portability. Nevertheless, this method also has its limitations, as in cases of abdominal injuries without free fluid. This study was conducted in order to establish the performance of the US in this setting, allowing to rationalise the use of CT. For this purpose we studied 163 patients treated in the ER of HC/FMUSP, with the completion of consecutive US and CT. The population fits the usual profile of trauma victims, with 83% male, 56% in the age group between 20 and 39 years and in 73% of cases victims of traffic accidents. They were brought to the service in an average time of 51 minutes, mainly stable and with satisfactory level of consciousness. US took on

  9. Geriatric trauma hip fractures: is there a difference in outcomes based on fracture patterns?

    OpenAIRE

    Mangram, Alicia; Moeser, Phillip; Corneille, Michael G; Prokuski, Laura J; Zhou, Nicolas; Sohn, Jacqueline; Chaliki, Shalini; Oguntodu, Olakunle F; Dzandu, James K

    2014-01-01

    Background Annually in the US, there are over 300,000 hospital admissions due to hip fractures in geriatric patients. Consequently, there have been several large observational studies, which continue to provide new insights into differences in outcomes among hip fracture patients. However, few hip fracture studies have specifically examined the relationship between hip fracture patterns, sex, and short-term outcomes including hospital length of stay and discharge disposition in geriatric trau...

  10. Vascular injuries after minor blunt upper extremity trauma: pitfalls in the recognition and diagnosis of potential "near miss" injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Bravman Jonathan T; Ipaktchi Kyros; Biffl Walter L; Stahel Philip F

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Low energy trauma to the upper extremity is rarely associated with a significant vascular injury. Due to the low incidence, a high level of suspicion combined with appropriate diagnostic algorithms are mandatory for early recognition and timely management of these potentially detrimental injuries. Methods Review of the pertinent literature, supported by the presentation of two representative "near miss" case examples. Results A major diagnostic pitfall is represented by th...

  11. Sternal fractures and their management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-achraf Khoriati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sternal fractures are predominantly associated with deceleration injuries and blunt anterior chest trauma. Sternal trauma must be carefully evaluated by monitoring of vital parameters and it is of paramount importance that concomitant injuries are excluded. Nevertheless, routine admission of patients with isolated sternal fractures for observation is still common in today′s practice, which is often unnecessary. This article aims to describe the prognosis, the recommended assessment and management of patients with sternal fractures, to help clinicians make an evidence-based judgment regarding the need for hospitalization.

  12. Geriatric Trauma Patients With Cervical Spine Fractures due to Ground Level Fall: Five Years Experience in a Level One Trauma Center

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hao; Coppola, Marco; Richard D Robinson; Scribner, James T.; Vithalani, Veer; de Moor, Carrie E.; Gandhi, Raj R.; Burton, Mandy; Delaney, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been found that significantly different clinical outcomes occur in trauma patients with different mechanisms of injury. Ground level falls (GLF) are usually considered “minor trauma” with less injury occurred in general. However, it is not uncommon that geriatric trauma patients sustain cervical spine (C-spine) fractures with other associated injuries due to GLF or less. The aim of this study is to determine the injury patterns and the roles of clinical risk factors in these...

  13. Gas accumulation in the subarachnoid space resulting from blunt trauma to the occipital region of a horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2-year-old Arabian filly was presented for evaluation after falling backwards. The injury was manifest radiographically by the presence of air within the subarachnoid space of the calvarium and the cervical spinal canal. Radiographic findings resulted from communication of the sphenopalatine sinus with the subarachnoid space as a sequela to a fracture involving the presphenoid bone

  14. Radiographically occult femoral and pelvic fractures are not mutually exclusive: a review of fractures detected by MRI following low-energy trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szewczyk-Bieda, Magdalena; Thomas, Naveena; Oliver, Thomas Barry [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Clinical Radiology, Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to review the MRI examinations of a large group of low-energy trauma patients in whom pelvic MRI had detected radiographically occult fractures, in order to characterize prevailing fracture patterns and determine how often co-existing proximal femoral and pelvic fractures were observed. All patients having pelvic MRI over 5 years were identified. Word-search software selected 269 MRI reports containing the term 'fracture'. Further scrutiny identified 168 with diagnosis of fracture. MRI request and imaging record review identified 102 low-energy trauma cases that had MRI for clinical suspicion of fracture despite normal radiographs. Sixty-six cases were excluded for the following reasons: no expressed clinical suspicion of occult fracture; history suggesting high-energy trauma; skeletal co-morbidity hindering acute fracture identification; interval more than 2 weeks between radiographs and MRI. The 102 study MRI examinations, which employed a limited two-sequence protocol, were reviewed. Any fracture that had not been appreciated on radiographs was recorded and characterized as femoral, pelvic, or co-existing femoral and pelvic fractures. The 102 study cases had a median age of 82 years. The median interval between pelvic radiographs and MRI was 3 days. MRI showed undiagnosed femoral fracture in 48/102 cases (47.1%), sacral fracture in 41/102 (40.2%), and pubic fracture in 55/102 (53.9%). In 11/102 cases (10.8%), MRI showed undiagnosed fractures of both proximal femur and pelvic ring (seven sacral, six pubic bone, two other site fractures). In 10/11 cases with co-existing femoral and pelvic fractures, the femoral fracture was incomplete. Limited pelvic MRI found a high prevalence of radiographically occult femoral and pelvic fractures in low-energy trauma patients, with clinical suspicion of fracture despite normal radiographs. Co-existing occult femoral and pelvic ring fractures were commonly observed, and in such cases, the

  15. Radiographically occult femoral and pelvic fractures are not mutually exclusive: a review of fractures detected by MRI following low-energy trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to review the MRI examinations of a large group of low-energy trauma patients in whom pelvic MRI had detected radiographically occult fractures, in order to characterize prevailing fracture patterns and determine how often co-existing proximal femoral and pelvic fractures were observed. All patients having pelvic MRI over 5 years were identified. Word-search software selected 269 MRI reports containing the term 'fracture'. Further scrutiny identified 168 with diagnosis of fracture. MRI request and imaging record review identified 102 low-energy trauma cases that had MRI for clinical suspicion of fracture despite normal radiographs. Sixty-six cases were excluded for the following reasons: no expressed clinical suspicion of occult fracture; history suggesting high-energy trauma; skeletal co-morbidity hindering acute fracture identification; interval more than 2 weeks between radiographs and MRI. The 102 study MRI examinations, which employed a limited two-sequence protocol, were reviewed. Any fracture that had not been appreciated on radiographs was recorded and characterized as femoral, pelvic, or co-existing femoral and pelvic fractures. The 102 study cases had a median age of 82 years. The median interval between pelvic radiographs and MRI was 3 days. MRI showed undiagnosed femoral fracture in 48/102 cases (47.1%), sacral fracture in 41/102 (40.2%), and pubic fracture in 55/102 (53.9%). In 11/102 cases (10.8%), MRI showed undiagnosed fractures of both proximal femur and pelvic ring (seven sacral, six pubic bone, two other site fractures). In 10/11 cases with co-existing femoral and pelvic fractures, the femoral fracture was incomplete. Limited pelvic MRI found a high prevalence of radiographically occult femoral and pelvic fractures in low-energy trauma patients, with clinical suspicion of fracture despite normal radiographs. Co-existing occult femoral and pelvic ring fractures were commonly observed, and in such cases, the femoral

  16. Diagnostic imaging of craniofacial trauma and fractures and their sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value and applications of the CT modalities are on the rise, particularly since the availability of spiral CT techniques, while conventional native diagnostics is increasingly used for special imaging purposes. Multiplanar spiral CT enables high-quality coronary 2D reconstructions which, in the acute phase, make redundant primary coronary imaging modalities. Exact knowledge of typical fracture patterns facilitates the analysis of images of the relevant facial areas. 3D reconstructions are indispensable in pin-pointed surgery planning, generation of stereolithographic models, and image-guided interventions for examination of post-traumatic deformities. Since a secondary correction only very rarely leads to restitutio ad integrum, it is necessary to detect the therapy-relevant injuries very early, during acute diagnostic imaging, in order to lay the basis for subsequent therapy and restoration of the craniofacial structures and functions. (orig./CB)

  17. Proximal Versus Distal Splenic Artery Embolisation for Blunt Splenic Trauma: What is the Impact on Splenic Immune Function?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, P. T., E-mail: pfoley@doctors.org.uk [The Canberra Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging (Australia); Kavnoudias, H., E-mail: h.kavnoudias@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Radiology Research Unit, Radiology Department (Australia); Cameron, P. U., E-mail: paul.cameron@unimelb.edu.au [The Alfred Hospital, Infectious Diseases Unit (Australia); Czarnecki, C., E-mail: caroline.czarnecki@gmail.com [Royal Melbourne Hospital, Radiology Department (Australia); Paul, E., E-mail: eldho.paul@monash.edu [Monash University, Department of Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Alfred Hospital (Australia); Lyon, S. M., E-mail: lyonsey@optusnet.com.au [Melbourne Endovascular (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo compare the impact of proximal or distal splenic artery embolisation versus that of splenectomy on splenic immune function as measured by IgM memory B cell levels.Materials and MethodsPatients with splenic trauma who were treated by splenic artery embolisation (SAE) were enrolled. After 6 months splenic volume was assessed by CT, and IgM memory B cells in peripheral blood were measured and compared to a local normal reference population and to a post-splenectomy population.ResultsOf the 71 patients who underwent embolisation, 38 underwent proximal embolisation, 11 underwent distal embolisation, 22 patients were excluded, 1 had both proximal and distal embolisation, 5 did not survive and 16 did not return for evaluation. There was a significant difference between splenectomy and proximal or distal embolisation and a trend towards greater preservation of IgM memory B cell number in those with distal embolisation—a difference that could not be attributed to differences in age, grade of injury or residual splenic volume.ConclusionIgM memory B cell levels are significantly higher in those treated with SAE compared to splenectomy. Our data provide evidence that splenic embolisation should reduce immunological complications of spleen trauma and suggest that distal embolisation may maintain better function.

  18. Proximal Versus Distal Splenic Artery Embolisation for Blunt Splenic Trauma: What is the Impact on Splenic Immune Function?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeTo compare the impact of proximal or distal splenic artery embolisation versus that of splenectomy on splenic immune function as measured by IgM memory B cell levels.Materials and MethodsPatients with splenic trauma who were treated by splenic artery embolisation (SAE) were enrolled. After 6 months splenic volume was assessed by CT, and IgM memory B cells in peripheral blood were measured and compared to a local normal reference population and to a post-splenectomy population.ResultsOf the 71 patients who underwent embolisation, 38 underwent proximal embolisation, 11 underwent distal embolisation, 22 patients were excluded, 1 had both proximal and distal embolisation, 5 did not survive and 16 did not return for evaluation. There was a significant difference between splenectomy and proximal or distal embolisation and a trend towards greater preservation of IgM memory B cell number in those with distal embolisation—a difference that could not be attributed to differences in age, grade of injury or residual splenic volume.ConclusionIgM memory B cell levels are significantly higher in those treated with SAE compared to splenectomy. Our data provide evidence that splenic embolisation should reduce immunological complications of spleen trauma and suggest that distal embolisation may maintain better function

  19. Vascular injuries after minor blunt upper extremity trauma: pitfalls in the recognition and diagnosis of potential "near miss" injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravman Jonathan T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low energy trauma to the upper extremity is rarely associated with a significant vascular injury. Due to the low incidence, a high level of suspicion combined with appropriate diagnostic algorithms are mandatory for early recognition and timely management of these potentially detrimental injuries. Methods Review of the pertinent literature, supported by the presentation of two representative "near miss" case examples. Results A major diagnostic pitfall is represented by the insidious presentation of significant upper extremity arterial injuries with intact pulses and normal capillary refill distal to the injury site, due to collateral perfusion. Thus, severe vascular injuries may easily be missed or neglected at the upper extremity, leading to a long-term adverse outcome with the potential need for a surgical amputation. Conclusion The present review article provides an outline of the diagnostic challenges related to these rare vascular injuries and emphasizes the necessity for a high level of suspicion, even in the absence of a significant penetrating or high-velocity trauma mechanism.

  20. Risk Factors for Vertebral Artery Injuries in Cervical Spine Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Harshavardhana, Nanjundappa S.; Harshad V. Dabke

    2014-01-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (i.e. involvement of carotid and vertebral arteries) are increasingly being recognized in setting of cervical spine trauma/fractures and are associated with high incidence of stroke/morbidity and mortality. The incidence of vertebral artery injuries (VAI) is more common than previously thought and regular screening is seldom performed. However there exists no screening criteria and conflicting reports exists between spine and trauma literature. Many clinicians d...

  1. Risk factors for vertebral artery injuries in cervical spine trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Harshavardhana, Nanjundappa S.; Harshad V. Dabke

    2014-01-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (i.e. involvement of carotid and vertebral arteries) are increasingly being recognized in setting of cervical spine trauma/fractures and are associated with high incidence of stroke/morbidity and mortality. The incidence of vertebral artery injuries (VAI) is more common than previously thought and regular screening is seldom performed. However there exists no screening criteria and conflicting reports exists between spine and trauma literature. Many clinicians d...

  2. Computer tomographic findings in pelvic and abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-two patients with trauma to the pelvis and abdomen were examined by computer tomography. Subcapsular haematomas, haematomas and rupture of organs, intra- and retroperitoneal haematomas and pelvic fractures could be reliably diagnosed in this way. Serial observations on the tissue density of an haematoma allows one to judge its age. Lack of contrast enhancement of an haematoma makes the injection of contrast a useful test. Computer tomography has reduced the indications for angiography in blunt abdominal trauma. (orig.)

  3. Report of a rare case: occult hemothorax due to blunt trauma without obvious injury to other organs

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Fumihiro; Naito, Masahito; Iyoda, Akira; Satoh, Yukitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic hemothorax commonly occurs accompanied by organ damage, such as rib fractures, lung injury and diaphragm rupture. Our reported patient was a 61-year-old man who fell down from a stepladder about 1 meter in height, resulting in a heavy blow to the left abdomen. He consulted a clinic because of left chest pain the next day and was transported to the emergency center of our hospital on diagnosis of hemothorax with hemorrhagic shock. On computed tomography scanning with contrast medium,...

  4. Early diagnosis of intrahepatic biliary injury by DIC-CT, complicating the non-operative management of blunt liver trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the patients with a blunt liver injury who were admitted to our hospital over a period of 2 years and 5 months, the subjects enrolled in the present study were 15 patients diagnosed with CT as having liver injury, and who underwent drip infusion cholangiography (DIC)-CT intended to diagnose intrahepatic biliary injury (IHBI) in its early stages. These 15 patients included 11 with a type IIIb injury and 4 with a type Ib injury. All of 5 patients with the type IIIb injury who underwent transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) were found to have some signs of IHBI on DIC-CT. Of these patients, 2 were found to have extrahepatic leakage and underwent local drainage; 1 also underwent ENBD and was discharged. Three patients were not found to have extrahepatic leakage even though they were found to have signs of HIBI; the 3 underwent conservative therapy with no other care and had a satisfactory course. In 6 patients with a type IIIb injury and without TAE, only 1 patient was found to have IHBI, but without extrahepatic leakage. Comparison of two groups, with or without TAE, in type IIIb injury, the former had a higher Injury Severity Score (ISS) and higher incidence of IHBI on DIC-CT. No TAE was needed and no sign of IHBI was found in type Ib injury patients. DIC-CT may, in cases of severe liver injury that might require TAE, help to diagnose IHBI in its early stages. Our strategy, namely performing an early examination and drainage when the extrahepatic biliary leakage is found, seemed to be adequate. (author)

  5. Aesthetic treatment on anterior teeth crown fracture caused by dental trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanik Zubaidah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Complicated crown fracture is a tooth fracture that involve enamel, dentine and pulp. The incidence of complicated crown fracture ranges from 2% to 13% of all dental injuries and the most commonly involved teeth are the maxillary central incisors. Various treatment modalities are available depending on the clinical, physiological and radiographic examination of the involved teeth. Purpose: The aim of this case report is to present the management of crown fractures with pulpal exposure caused by traumatic injury, through endorestoration approach to reconstruct the shape and function of the teeth. Case: A 17 years old male with complicated crown fractures of anterior teeth #11 #21 and #22. The patient wish for aesthetic dental treatment in both of its form and function. Case management: Crown fractures of anterior teeth with exposed pulp caused by traumatic injury were reconstructed by endorestoration approach. The endodontic treatment with post and core insertion in the root canal which will increase its retention and porcelain fused to metal crown which will aesthetically recover its original form and function. After restoration the patient feel very glad and confident with the result. Conclusion: Endorestoration treatment on anterior teeth with complicated crown fractures and exposed pulp is able to recover the normal form, function and dental aesthetic in accordance with stomatognatic system and self confidence.Latar belakang: Fraktur mahkota kompleks (complicated adalah fraktur pada mahkota gigi yang melibatkan enamel, dentin dan pulpa. Kejadian dari fraktur mahkota kompleks bervariasi antara 2-13% dari semua trauma gigi dan sebagian besar gigi yang terkena adalah gigi insisif pertama rahang atas. Berbagai macam cara perawatan yang dilakukan tergantung pada hasil pemeriksaan klinis, psikologis dan radiografis dari gigi yang terkena. Tujuan: Laporan kasus ini menjelaskan penatalaksanaan fraktur mahkota gigi dengan pulpa terbuka

  6. Multiple growing fractures and cerebral venous anomaly after penetrating injuries: delayed diagnosis in a battered child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A growing fracture usually results from a skull fracture with dural tear after blunt head trauma during infancy. We present a case of child abuse with multiple growing fractures resulting from penetrating head trauma by scissors. MR imaging confirmed the presence of growing fractures and revealed a presumably post-traumatic venous anomaly (occluded left cavernous sinus and aberrant posterior venous drainage via the internal cerebral veins). Diagnosis of the growing fractures and venous anomaly was delayed until the age of 15 years. Medical expertise should be more readily available to battered children, and MR imaging is advocated in growing skull fracture to exclude associated post-traumatic brain lesions. (orig.)

  7. Frequency and types of fractures in maxillofacial traumas. Assessment using MDCT with multiplanar and 3D reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Maxillofacial trauma (MFT) is a common reason for attendance at Emergency Departments. The complex anatomy of the facial bones requires multiplanar imaging techniques for a proper evaluation. Objectives. To describe frequency and types of fractures in a series of patients with MFT evaluated by multi-slice computed tomography (MDCT) with multiplanar and 3D reconstructions. Materials and Methods: Facial bone CTs ordered for MFT by the Emergency Department from June 2008 to December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. The following data were obtained: age, gender, cause of trauma, presence and type of fractures. Patients were evaluated with an 8-channel MDCT. Multiplanar reconstructions were performed in all cases using high resolution bone window and soft tissue window, as well as 3D reconstructions. Results: One-hundred and thirty-seven CTs were performed for MFT: 78 (57%) showed 131 fractures. Of these 78 patients, 52 (66%) were males and 26 (34%) were females; mean age 33 years old (range: 14-90 yrs.). Causes: 58 % were injuries from traffic accidents; 24% were injuries from fights; 13% were sport injuries; and 7% were due to miscellaneous etiologies. Type and frequency of fractures: 18.3% were orbital floor fractures, 16% were maxillary sinus fractures, 15.3% were nasal fractures, 13% were jaw fractures, 9.2% were orbital fractures, and 12.3% were fractures of the zygomatic-malar complex; two cases of Le Fort II-III fractures were also observed. Conclusions: Fractures were more common in males, in the age range from 15 to 35 years old. Most fractures, and the most complex ones, were caused by traffic accidents. The most common fracture, either isolated or associated with other fractures, was the orbital floor fracture. (authors)

  8. Radiology of trauma to kidney and lower urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents are trauma to kidney, imaging of kidney trauma, management of renal trauma, delayed complications, trauma to the lower urinary tract, trauma to urinary bladder, radiologic diagnosis, ethiology of blunt bladder injury, urethal injury (6 refs.)

  9. The evaluation of the role of ultrasonography and ultrasound-guided aspiration as an initial screening test in blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of ultrasonography (US) as an initial screening test was evaluated in 3000 consecutive cases of blunt abdominal trauma (BAT). Seventy-three were positive for free fluid collection or organ injury. US-guided aspiration was used to rule out the hollow visceral injury in those referred to nonsurgical therapy. Sixty patients underwent laparotomy. These included 53 clinically unstable patients, three stable patients with positive US-guided aspiration for bile or intestinal contents and four who deteriorated upon conservative treatment. The remaining patients with US negative for fluid had some evidence of abdominal injury on clinical examination. Ultrasonoraphy complemented the clinical examination. Both the sensitivity and specificity of US for the detection of free fluid were 100%. The overall sensitivity was 92% in spleen injuries, 88% in liver injuries and 100% in kidney injuries, with positive predictive value of 96%, 100% and 100% and a specificity of 97%, 100% and 100% respectively. Retrospective correlation of US with laparotomy findings regarding free fluid showed that 50-100 mL of free fluid was minimal, 100-500 mL significant. Thirteen patients completed conservative treatment with an uneventful course in hospital. Both the US findings and the clinical condition of the patient should be considered in decision-making in BAT. Unnecessary laparotomies can be avoided when the major bleeding site is not in the abdomen and such patients can be safely observed after excluding the hollow visceral injury by US-guided aspiration. US, being rapid to perform, sensitive and easily repeatable, is quite useful as an initial screening test in BAT patients. (author)

  10. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  11. Imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  12. Blunt traumatic diaphragmatic rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Nogueira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injury of the diaphragm ranges from 0.6 to 1.2% and rise up to 5%among patients who were victims of blunt trauma and underwent laparotomy.Clinical suspicion associated with radiological assessment contributes to earlydiagnosis. Isolated diaphragmatic injury has a good prognosis. Generallyworse outcomes are associated with other trauma injuries. Bilateral andright diaphragmatic lesions have worse prognosis. Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT scan of the chest and abdomen provides better diagnosticaccuracy using the possibility of image multiplanar reconstruction. Surgicalrepair via laparotomy and/ or thoracotomy in the acute phase of the injury hasa better outcome and avoids chronic complications of diaphragmatic hernia.The authors present the case of a young male patient, victim of blunt abdominaltrauma due to motor vehicle accident with rupture of the diaphragm, spleenand kidney injuries. The diagnosis was made by computed tomography of thethorax and abdomen and was confirmed during laparotomy.

  13. Horner's syndrome after blunt cervical and chest trauma: case report Síndrome de Horner após trauma cérvico-torácico fechado: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellingson Silva Paiva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Horner‘s syndrome is the triad of miosis, ptosis, and anhidrosis, resulting from disruption of the sympathetic pathways. This article describes an uncommon case of Horner‘s syndrome in a 22-year-old man after blunt trauma to the neck and chest without carotid artery dissection. The patient was brought to the emergency service after motorcycle fall. Neurologic examination revealed a patient presenting the score 15 at Glasgow Coma Scale. The left eyelid was 1-2 mm lower than the right. Carotid Doppler and angiotomography were undertaken and revealed no abnormalities of the carotid artery. CT disclosed a mediastinal hematoma extending to the left apex, compressing the left sympathetic chain. The understanding of this clinical entity may help the surgeon to make a better differential diagnosis in trauma patients in whom prompt diagnosis is critical to stablish the correct treatment.A síndrome de Horner compreende a tríade de miose, ptose e anidrose, resultado de lesão em algum ponto das vias simpáticas. O referido estudo apresenta um caso da referida síndrome em um jovem de 22 anos vitima de queda de moto, com escoriações no tórax e no pescoço, sem dissecção carotídea. Ao exame neurológico, encontrava-se com 15 pontos na Escala de Coma de Glasgow, com miose à esquerda e ptose palpebral ipsilateral. Realizado Doppler de carótidas e angiotomografia dos vasos cérvico-cranianos não sendo evidenciadas anormalidades. A tomografia de tórax mostrou um hematoma no ápice pulmonar esquerdo, comprimindo a cadeia simpática ipsilateral. O conhecimento desta entidade clínica pode ajudar o cirurgião a fazer um diagnóstico diferencial adequado nos pacientes vítimas de traumas, nos quais o diagnóstico correto e eficaz pode ser fundamental para a definição da conduta a ser tomada.

  14. Imaging of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt trauma to the chest results from transfer of kinetic energy to the human body. It may cause a wide range of mostly life-threatening injuries, including fractures of the thoracic skeleton, disintegration of the pleural space, contusion or laceration of pulmonary parenchyma and damage to the mediastinal structures. For a systematic approach it may be helpful to follow an organ-based evaluation of thoracic trauma. However, it should be borne in mind that subtle injuries may be associated with serious complications. Trauma to the chest may affect different anatomic compartments at the same time, requiring and extending diagnostic approach. Conventional radiography plays a major role in diagnosting thoracic trauma, complemented by ultrasound examination of the pleura and abdomen. It is well documented that CT scanning represents a major technological improvement for assessment of thoracic trauma. With the advent of fast helical CT scanning this method becomes more applicable for severly traumatized patients and potentially replaces other time-consuming procedures. State-of-the-art imaging of both projection and cross-sectional techniques provides useful information for immediate and appropriate treatment mandatory in patients with thoracic trauma. (orig.)

  15. The role of emergency radiology in spinal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Gianluigi; Izzo, Roberto; Muto, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Spinal trauma is very frequent injury with different severity and prognosis varying from asymptomatic condition to temporary neurological dysfunction, focal deficit or fatal event. The major causes of spinal trauma are high- and low-energy fall, traffic accident, sport and blunt impact. The radiologist has a role of great responsibility to establish the presence or absence of lesions, to define the characteristics, to assess the prognostic influence and therefore treatment. Imaging has an important role in the management of spinal trauma. The aim of this paper was to describe: incidence and type of vertebral fracture; imaging indication and guidelines for cervical trauma; imaging indication and guidelines for thoracolumbar trauma; multidetector CT indication for trauma spine; MRI indication and protocol for trauma spine. PMID:26612468

  16. Spinopelvic dissociation: multidetector computed tomographic evaluation of fracture patterns and associated injuries at a single level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pushpender; Barnwell, Jonathan C; Lenchik, Leon; Wuertzer, Scott D; Miller, Anna N

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) fracture patterns and associated injuries in patients with spinopelvic dissociation (SPD). Our institutional trauma registry database was reviewed from Jan. 1, 2006, to Sept. 30, 2012, specifically evaluating patients with sacral fractures. MDCT scans of patients with sacral fractures were reviewed to determine the presence of SPD. SPD cases were characterized into the following fracture patterns: U-shaped, Y-shaped, T-shaped, H-shaped, and burst. The following MDCT features were recorded: level of the horizontal fracture, location of vertical fracture, kyphosis between major fracture fragments, displacement of fracture fragment, narrowing of central spinal canal, narrowing of neural foramina, and extension into sacroiliac joints. Quantitative evaluation of the sacral fractures was performed in accordance with the consensus statement by the Spine Trauma Study Group. Medical records were reviewed to determine associated pelvic and non-pelvic fractures, bladder and bowel injuries, nerve injuries, and type of surgical intervention. Twenty-one patients had SPD, of whom 13 were men and eight were women. Mean age was 41.8 years (range 18.8 to 87.7). Five fractures (24 %) were U-shaped, six (29 %) H-shaped, four (19 %) Y-shaped, and six (29 %) burst. Nine patients (43 %) had central canal narrowing, and 19 (90 %) had neural foramina narrowing. Eleven patients (52 %) had kyphotic angulation between major fracture fragments, and seven patients (33 %) had either anterior (24 %) or posterior (10 %) displacement of the proximal fracture fragment. Fourteen patients (67 %) had associated pelvic fractures, and 20 (95 %) had associated non-pelvic fractures. Two patients (10 %) had associated urethral injuries, and one (5 %) had an associated colon injury. Seven patients (33 %) had associated nerve injuries. Six patients (29 %) had surgical fixation while 15 (71 %) were

  17. Risk Factors for Vertebral Artery Injuries in Cervical Spine Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (i.e. involvement of carotid and vertebral arteries) are increasingly being recognized in setting of cervical spine trauma/fractures and are associated with high incidence of stroke/morbidity and mortality. The incidence of vertebral artery injuries (VAI) is more common than previously thought and regular screening is seldom performed. However there exists no screening criteria and conflicting reports exists between spine and trauma literature. Many clinicians do not routinely screen/evaluate patients presenting with cervical spine trauma for potential VAI. This article provides a brief summary of existing evidence regarding the incidence of VAI in the background of cervical trauma/fractures. The type and fracture pattern that is associated with a high risk of VAI warranting mandatory screening/further work-up is discussed. A brief overview of diagnostic modalities and their respective sensitivity/specificity along with available treatment options is also summarized. PMID:25317310

  18. Risk factors for vertebral artery injuries in cervical spine trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanjundappa S. Harshavardhana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (i.e. involvement of carotid and vertebral arteries are increasingly being recognized in setting of cervical spine trauma/fractures and are associated with high incidence of stroke/morbidity and mortality. The incidence of vertebral artery injuries (VAI is more common than previously thought and regular screening is seldom performed. However there exists no screening criteria and conflicting reports exists between spine and trauma literature. Many clinicians do not routinely screen/evaluate patients presenting with cervical spine trauma for potential VAI. This article provides a brief summary of existing evidence regarding the incidence of VAI in the background of cervical trauma/fractures. The type and fracture pattern that is associated with a high risk of VAI warranting mandatory screening/further work-up is discussed. A brief overview of diagnostic modalities and their respective sensitivity/specificity along with available treatment options is also summarized.

  19. Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traumatic lesions of the skeleton are common occurrences in everyday living and at all ages. The presence of a fracture upon clinical examination may or may not be obvious, thus leaving the radiological investigation as a focal point for definitive diagnosis. With today's sophisticated imaging system which render a minimal dosage of radiation to the patient, whenever there is any doubt concerning the presence of a fracture, radiographs should be performed. There may be severe medicolegal ramifications when fractures have been overlooked due to the lack of appropriate radiographs being taken or the oversight of the observer. When a fracture or dislocation is identified, key features must be evaluated. Successful treatment of fractures starts with accurate diagnosis, which requires a well-performed and accurately interpreted radiographic examination. The minimum examination is considered to be two radiographs at 90 degrees to each other; anything less is considered an incomplete examination. The purpose of this chapter is to familiarize the reader with the most common types of fractures and dislocations. The chapter is presented in a regional manner, with a preliminary presentation of descriptive terminology, definitions, and a review of fracture repair

  20. Larynx Trauma and Hyoid Bone Fracture after Bite Injury in Dog: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchi, George; Brunnberg, Mathias M.; Shahid, Muhammad; Al Aiyan, Ahmad; Brunnberg, Leo; Stein, Silke

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old male Jack Russell crossbreed dog was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea and shock following a dog-bite injury on the ventral neck. Radiographs revealed subcutaneous emphysema and bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures. Intraoperatively, rupture of both sternohyoid muscles, both hyoepiglotticus muscles, both thyrohyoid muscles, and a partial cranial rupture of the superficial sphincter colli muscle were detected. Part of the epiglottis was detached from the thyroid cartilage. The patient’s severed muscles and torn epiglottis were reattached using a simple interrupted suture pattern. Hyoepiglotticus muscles could not be identified. The bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures were repaired with intraosseous wire suture. A temporary tracheostomy tube and an esophageal feeding tube were placed postoperatively. The dog was discharged after 8 days, re-examined at 2 and 6 months and laryngeal and pharyngeal function were evaluated as normal. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of a dog that presented with laryngeal trauma with hyoid bone fracture and acute dyspnea that underwent surgical treatment resulting in an acceptable outcome. PMID:27579303

  1. Larynx Trauma and Hyoid Bone Fracture after Bite Injury in Dog: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchi, George; Brunnberg, Mathias M; Shahid, Muhammad; Al Aiyan, Ahmad; Brunnberg, Leo; Stein, Silke

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old male Jack Russell crossbreed dog was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea and shock following a dog-bite injury on the ventral neck. Radiographs revealed subcutaneous emphysema and bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures. Intraoperatively, rupture of both sternohyoid muscles, both hyoepiglotticus muscles, both thyrohyoid muscles, and a partial cranial rupture of the superficial sphincter colli muscle were detected. Part of the epiglottis was detached from the thyroid cartilage. The patient's severed muscles and torn epiglottis were reattached using a simple interrupted suture pattern. Hyoepiglotticus muscles could not be identified. The bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures were repaired with intraosseous wire suture. A temporary tracheostomy tube and an esophageal feeding tube were placed postoperatively. The dog was discharged after 8 days, re-examined at 2 and 6 months and laryngeal and pharyngeal function were evaluated as normal. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a dog that presented with laryngeal trauma with hyoid bone fracture and acute dyspnea that underwent surgical treatment resulting in an acceptable outcome. PMID:27579303

  2. Blunt cardiac rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T D; Flynn, T C; Rowlands, B J; Ward, R E; Fischer, R P

    1984-04-01

    Blunt injury to the heart ranges from contusion to disruption. This report comprises 14 patients seen during a 6-year period with cardiac rupture secondary to blunt trauma. Eight patients were injured in automobile accidents, two patients were injured in auto-pedestrian accidents, two were kicked in the chest by ungulates, and two sustained falls. Cardiac tamponade was suspected in ten patients. Five patients presented with prehospital cardiac arrest or arrested shortly after arrival. All underwent emergency department thoracotomy without survival. Two patients expired in the operating room during attempted cardiac repair; both had significant extracardiac injury. Seven patients survived, three had right atrial injuries, three had right ventricular injuries, and one had a left atrial injury. Cardiopulmonary bypass was not required for repair of the surviving patients. There were no significant complications from the cardiac repair. The history of significant force dispersed over a relatively small area of the precordium as in a kicking injury from an animal or steering wheel impact should alert the physician to possible cardiac rupture. Cardiac rupture should be considered in patients who present with signs of cardiac tamponade or persistent thoracic bleeding after blunt trauma. PMID:6708151

  3. Development of skull fracture criterion based on real-world head trauma simulations using finite element head model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Yoganandan, Narayan; Willinger, Rémy

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance an existing finite element (FE) head model with composite modeling and a new constitutive law for the skull. The response of the state-of-the-art FE head model was validated in the time domain using data from 15 temporo-parietal impact experiments, conducted with postmortem human surrogates. The new model predicted skull fractures observed in these tests. Further, 70 well-documented head trauma cases were reconstructed. The 15 experiments and 70 real-world head trauma cases were combined to derive skull fracture injury risk curves. The skull internal energy was found to be the best candidate to predict skull failure based on an in depth statistical analysis of different mechanical parameters (force, skull internal energy), head kinematic-based parameter, the head injury criterion (HIC), and skull fracture correlate (SFC). The proposed tolerance limit for 50% risk of skull fracture was associated with 453mJ of internal energy. Statistical analyses were extended for individual impact locations (frontal, occipital and temporo-parietal) and separate injury risk curves were obtained. The 50% risk of skull fracture for each location: frontal: 481mJ, occipital: 457mJ, temporo-parietal: 456mJ of skull internal energy. PMID:26703363

  4. Multidisciplinary Approach to Lifesaving Measures in the Elderly Individuals With Flail Chest Injury With ORIF of Rib Fractures: A Report of 2 Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Zegg, Michael; Kammerlander, Christian; Schmid, Stefan; Roth, Tobias; Kammerlander-Knauer, Ursula; Gosch, Markus; Luger, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    In this case report, we present 2 cases of flail chest in geriatric patients after severe blunt chest trauma, which were treated at the University Hospital Innsbruck (Level I Trauma Center and Tyrolean Geriatric Fracture Center) by a multidisciplinary team of physicians from anesthesia, intensive care, trauma surgery, and acute geriatrics. We want to point out the benefit of a multidisciplinary approach in geriatric patients with flail chest.

  5. Traumatic bilateral carotid artery dissection following severe blunt trauma: a case report on the difficulties in diagnosis and therapy of an often overlooked life-threatening injury

    OpenAIRE

    Crönlein, Moritz; Sandmann, Gunther H.; Beirer, Marc; Wunderlich, Silke; Biberthaler, Peter; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Traumatic carotid artery dissections are very rare, often overlooked and life-threatening injuries. Diagnosis and treatment are difficult especially in multiple injured patients. Case presentation We report on a 28-year-old female major trauma patient (injury severity score, ISS 50) who was involved in a motor vehicle accident. She was primarily transferred to a level II trauma center. After initial assessment and operative management, an anisocoria was diagnosed on the intensive c...

  6. Mortality Factors in Geriatric Blunt Trauma Patients: Creation of a Highly Predictive Statistical Model for Mortality Using 50,765 Consecutive Elderly Trauma Admissions from the National Sample Project

    OpenAIRE

    Hranjec, Tjasa; Sawyer, Robert G; Young, Jeffrey S.; Swenson, Brian R.; CALLAND, JAMES F.

    2012-01-01

    Elderly patients are at high risk for mortality after injury. We hypothesized that trauma benchmarking efforts would benefit from development of a geriatric-specific model for risk-adjusted analyses of trauma center outcomes. A total of 57,973 records of elderly patients (age older than 65 years), which met our selection criteria, were submitted to the National Trauma Database and included within the National Sample Project between 2003 and 2006. These cases were used to construct a multivari...

  7. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiologic evaluation of abdominal trauma must provide a quick and accurate assessment of the lesions in order to improve the management of the patient. The technique used varies depending on the mechanism of the trauma (blunt trauma or stab wounds) and the hemodynamic status. Radiologic evaluation is usually performed in blunt trauma whereas stab wound trauma is usually explored surgically. The various techniques available are standard radiographs, ultrasonography, computed tomography and arteriography. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the immediate evaluation is still not well defined. It appears to be useful method in the delayed evaluation of diaphragmatic trauma. Computed tomography is the method most commonly performed in trauma patients. This technique is accurate and allows correct assessment of the lesions. The disadvantages are the radiation induced and the need for a hemo-dynamically stable patient. The aim of the radiologic evaluation is to provide the clinicians with an accurate description of the lesions. It can help in the management of the patient usually in association with clinical and laboratory data. It can also guide interventional procedures (drainage, embolization...). Finally, it allows radiographic follow-up when conservative treatment is performed. (authors). 26 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  8. Three-dimensional fracture visualisation of multidetector CT of the skull base in trauma patients: comparison of three reconstruction algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess the detection rate of skull-base fractures for three different three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction methods of cranial CT examinations in trauma patients. A total of 130 cranial CT examinations of patients with previous head trauma were subjected to 3D reconstruction of the skull base, using solid (SVR) and transparent (TVR) volume-rendering technique and maximum intensity projection (MIP). Three radiologists independently evaluated all reconstructions as well as standard high-resolution multiplanar reformations (HR-MPRs). Mean fracture detection rates for all readers reading rotating reconstructions were 39, 36, 61 and 64% for SVR, TVR, MIP and HR-MPR respectively. Although not significantly different from HR-MPR with respect to sensitivity (P = 0.9), MIP visualised 18% of fractures that were not reported in HR-MPR. Because of the relatively low detection rate using HR-MPRs alone, we recommend reading MIP reconstructions in addition to the obligatory HR-MPRs to improve fracture detection. (orig.)

  9. Experience on treatment of 200 cases with blunt abdominal trauma by integrated Chinese and western medicine%闭合性腹部创伤200例中西医诊疗体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰文贤

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察200例闭合性腹部损伤患者的中西医疗效。全面系统的体格检查。腹腔穿刺应作为常规首选的检查手段。腹部闭合创伤的治疗应遵循的原则是分秒必争、争取时机;细致探查、避免遗漏;遵循原则、处理果断;积极正确处理合并伤。闭合性腹部创伤术后功能恢复,早期可灌注以补益气血,逐癖通腑为治则的固脱清腑汤。%Objective: To observe the traditional Chinese and Western medical treatment effect of 200 cases of closed abdominal injury. A comprehensive system of physical examination. Abdominal paracentesis should be used as the preferred means of conventional check. Treatment of closed abdominal trauma should abide by the principle of count every minute and second, strive for the opportunity;detailed exploration, avoid missing; follow the principles, processes decisively; positive and correct treatment of associated injury. Functional recovery after blunt abdominal trauma, early reperfusion by replenishing qi and blood, by addiction Tongfu to treat solid De Qing Fu decoction.

  10. Imaging of blunt cerebrovascular injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, Diego B. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of St. Raphael, Yale University School of Medicine, 1450 Chapel St., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)]. E-mail: dnunez@srhs.org; Berkmen, Turgut [Department of Radiology, Hospital of St. Raphael, Yale University School of Medicine, 1450 Chapel St., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Arterial dissection, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula, arterial laceration and occlusion are uncommon complications of blunt trauma. Angiography has been considered the primary method of evaluation to assess for vascular injuries but, due to the low frequency of these lesions, its screening role has been challenged. Non-invasive imaging, particularly CT angiography (CTA), offers definitive advantages and has emerged as a promising diagnostic screening method. Angiography is shifting to a rather therapeutic role and the endovascular management of these lesions is briefly discussed.

  11. Establishing consensus on the definition of an isolated hip fracture for trauma system performance evaluation: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Tiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Risk-adjusted mortality is widely used to benchmark trauma center care. Patients presenting with isolated hip fractures (IHFs are usually excluded from these evaluations. However, there is no standardized definition of an IHF. We aimed to evaluate whether there is consensus on the definition of an IHF used as an exclusion criterion in studies evaluating the performance of trauma centers in terms of mortality. Materials and Methods: We conducted a systematic review of observational studies. We searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL, TRIP Database, and PROQUEST for cohort studies that presented data on mortality to assess the performance of trauma centers and excluded IHF. A standardized, piloted data abstraction form was used to extract data on study settings, IHF definitions and methodological quality of included studies. Consensus was considered to be reached if more than 50% of studies used the same definition of IHF. Results: We identified 8,506 studies of which 11 were eligible for inclusion. Only two studies (18% used the same definition of an IHF. Three (27% used a definition based on Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS Codes and five (45% on International Classification of Diseases (ICD codes. Four (36% studies had inclusion criteria based on age, five (45% on secondary injuries, and four (36% on the mechanism of injury. Eight studies (73% had good overall methodological quality. Conclusions: We observed important heterogeneity in the definition of an IHF used as an exclusion criterion in studies evaluating the performance of trauma centers. Consensus on a standardized definition is needed to improve the validity of evaluations of the quality of trauma care.

  12. Distribution assessment of maxillofacial fractures in trauma admitted patients in Yazd hospitals: An epidemiologic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Momeni

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: According to our result, most sites of fractures were in nasal bone. The main cause of maxillofacial fractures was motorcycle accident. However, in each age range the most common cause of accident was different.

  13. Aesthetic treatment on anterior teeth crown fracture caused by dental trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Nanik Zubaidah

    2012-01-01

    Background: Complicated crown fracture is a tooth fracture that involve enamel, dentine and pulp. The incidence of complicated crown fracture ranges from 2% to 13% of all dental injuries and the most commonly involved teeth are the maxillary central incisors. Various treatment modalities are available depending on the clinical, physiological and radiographic examination of the involved teeth. Purpose: The aim of this case report is to present the management of crown fractures with pulpal expo...

  14. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  15. COMPARATIVE ROLE AND EVALUATION OF ULTRASOUND AND MULTISLICE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN THE GRADING OF HEMOPERITONEUM IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA AND ITS CORRELATION WITH THE GRADING OF ORGAN INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunwarpal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: 1. To assess the role of Ultrasound (US and Multislice Computed Tomography (MSCT in detecting hemoperitoneum in patients with acute blunt abdominal trauma. 2. To study the use of US and MSCT in grading of hemoperitoneum in blunt abdominal trauma patients. 3. To compare the US and MSCT grading of hemoperitoneum with the grading of organ injury. 4. To compare and statistically analyze the spectrum of findings observed in each modality. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted at advanced diagnostics and institute of imaging , Amritsar. The study comprised of 50 patients who were stable enough to undergo both US and CT scans.US was preceded by MSCT in most of the patients and the time gap between the imaging modalities was less than 1 hour to make the study comparable. TECHNIQUES ADOPTED : 1. US was performed on Versa plus (Siemens and Xario (Toshiba with Cardiac , 3.5 - 5 Mhz - Convex and 5 - 7.5 Mhz - Line ar probes. Particular attention was paid to the amount of free fluid in the abdomen and pelvis. 2. MSCT was performed with MSCT Volume Zoom (Siemens Forchheim Germany AG. 500 - 1000cc of water orally or through nasogastric tube was given 15 - 20 minutes before the study , followed by 120cc I/V contrast at the rate of 2 - 3ml/second using power injector. Parameters used: Single breath hold ; A. 165 mAs . B. 120 kvp . C. Scan delay - 40 seconds . D. Collimation - 4x2.5mm . E. Pitch - 5mm . Following findings were observed : a. Presence of peritoneal fluid. B. Any tear or hematoma in the solid abdominal organs like spleen and liver. C. Status of hollow viscera like small bowel , large bowel and urinary bladder. Hemoperitoneum was scored on both US and MSCT. Visceral injuries were graded according to O.I.S grading system. Score was correlated with the underlying organ injury and the management of the patient. US scoring (Table A and MSCT quantification of hemoperitoneum was done. (Table B Location of hemoperitoneum . A

  16. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 2: Gastrointestinal tract and retroperitoneal organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Terrier, F. [Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Mentha, G. [Department of Surgery, Division of Abdominal Surgery, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Schmidlin, F. [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    1998-06-02

    Computed tomography plays an important role in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in adults. Current standard examination techniques enable detection of the majority of perforating or devascularizing bowel injuries, although diagnostic findings are often subtle and meticulous inspection is required. Computed tomography may demonstrate pancreatic contusions and lacerations and help in distinguishing minor traumatic lesions without involvement of the pancreatic duct (organ injury scale, grades I and II) from deep lacerations with ductal involvement (grades III and V). Computed tomography enables distinguishing renal contusions and minor cortical lacerations that can usually be managed conservatively (injuries of grades I-III) from corticomedullary lacerations and injuries of the major renal vessels (grades IV and V) that have a less favorable prognosis and more commonly require surgical repair. In addition, CT is well suited for the detection of active renal hemorrhage and guidance of transcatheter embolization treatment and delineation of preexisting benign or malignant pathologies that may predispose to posttraumatic hemorrhage. The radiologist`s awareness of the diagnostic CT findings of abdominal visceral injuries as well as their clinical and surgical implications are important prerequisites for optimal patient management. (orig.) With 11 figs., 5 tabs., 56 refs.

  17. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 2: Gastrointestinal tract and retroperitoneal organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography plays an important role in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in adults. Current standard examination techniques enable detection of the majority of perforating or devascularizing bowel injuries, although diagnostic findings are often subtle and meticulous inspection is required. Computed tomography may demonstrate pancreatic contusions and lacerations and help in distinguishing minor traumatic lesions without involvement of the pancreatic duct (organ injury scale, grades I and II) from deep lacerations with ductal involvement (grades III and V). Computed tomography enables distinguishing renal contusions and minor cortical lacerations that can usually be managed conservatively (injuries of grades I-III) from corticomedullary lacerations and injuries of the major renal vessels (grades IV and V) that have a less favorable prognosis and more commonly require surgical repair. In addition, CT is well suited for the detection of active renal hemorrhage and guidance of transcatheter embolization treatment and delineation of preexisting benign or malignant pathologies that may predispose to posttraumatic hemorrhage. The radiologist's awareness of the diagnostic CT findings of abdominal visceral injuries as well as their clinical and surgical implications are important prerequisites for optimal patient management. (orig.)

  18. Accuracy of non-contrast-enhanced and contrast-enhanced CT in the diagnosis of blunt renal trauma. JAST renal injury classification consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although many reports have described the diagnostic role of computed tomography (CT) scans in renal trauma, these reports only discuss the use of contrast-enhanced (CE) CT. We compared the diagnostic value of non-contrast-enhanced (NE) CT with that of CECT in 50 consecutive renal injuries. Additionally, we discuss the implications of CT findings on the controversy surrounding the Japanese Association for the Surgery of Trauma (JAST) renal injury classification system. All hematomas viewed using CECT (low density) were also cleary observed using NECT (high density). The actual size of the hematoma was more accurately demonstrated using NECT. Detecting small hematomas using CECT was sometimes difficult, and a considerable number of small injuries were only visible using NECT. If only CECT was performed, perirenal hematomas were sometimes underestimated and parenchymal lacerations were sometimes overestimated. CECT was superior to NECT for the diagnosis of active bleeding or pedicle injury. The purpose of the JAST classification system must be clarified and appropriate diagnosis methods included. If the purpose of this classification is the degree of severity for the subsequent management strategy, CECT is sufficient. However, we believe that the subdivisions for subcapsular injury are unnecessary and that the severity of renal artery occlusion should be reconsidered. If the purpose is just the morphological diagnosis, NECT is also required for an accurate diagnosis. (author)

  19. 损伤控制外科在闭合性胰腺创伤中的应用%Damage control surgery for pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵振国; 李幼生; 王剑; 李刚; 王凯; 胥子玮; 郑磊; 李宁; 黎介寿

    2012-01-01

    Objective To summarize the management of pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma.Methods The clinical data of 42 patients with blunt pancreatic injury admitted from January 2001to December 2010 was analyzed retrospectively.There were 38 male and 4 female patients,aging from 13 to 65 ycars with a mean of 31 years.The organ injury scaling of Committee of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST grade):grade Ⅰ in 3 patients,grade Ⅱ in 12 patients,grade Ⅲ in 9 patients,grade Ⅳ in 13 patients and grade Ⅴ in 5 patients.The mean injury severity score was 27 ± 21.Patients above AAST grade Ⅱ underwent peritoneal drainage and "three neostomy" (gastrostomy,jejunostomy and gallbladder) according to damage control theory.Results Thirty-eight patients got abdominal CT scanning with a positive rate of 79.9% (30/38).Forty patients underwent surgical procedures,and 2 patients with non-operative management.The surgical procedures include peritoneal drainage and "three neostomy" in 32patients,pancreas suture or pancreatic tail resection in 6 patients,pancreatoduodenectomy or caudal pancreaticojejunostomy in 2 patients.Forty patients (95.2%) survived,2 patients (4.8% ) died and 16patients (38.1% ) had complications such as pancreatic fistula,pulmonary infection.Conclusions Abdominal CT scanning will benefit the preoperative diagnosis of blunt pancreatic trauma. Although the survival rate of patients with blunt pancreatic trauma might be improved by using the damage control surgery,the management of damage control surgery also needs to be modified because of the high rate of complications.%目的 总结闭合性胰腺创伤的外科治疗经验.方法 回顾性分析2001年1月至2010年12月收治的42例闭合性胰腺创伤患者的临床资料.其中男性38例,女性4例;年龄13~65岁,平均年龄31岁.根据美国创伤外科协会脏器损伤委员会(AAST)的器官损伤分级:Ⅰ级3例,Ⅱ级12例,Ⅲ级9例,Ⅳ级13

  20. Blunt traumatic pericardial rupture and cardiac herniation with a penetrating twist: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galloway Robert

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blunt Traumatic Pericardial Rupture (BTPR with resulting cardiac herniation following chest trauma is an unusual and often fatal condition. Although there has been a multitude of case reports of this condition in past literature, the recurring theme is that of a missed injury. Its occurrence in severe blunt trauma is in the order of 0.4%. It is an injury that frequently results in pre/early hospital death and diagnosis at autopsy, probably owing to a combination of diagnostic difficulties, lack of familiarity and associated polytrauma. Of the patients who survive to hospital attendance, the mortality rate is in the order of 57-64%. Methods We present two survivors of BTPR and cardiac herniation, one with a delayed penetrating cardiac injury secondary to rib fractures. With these two cases and literature review, we hope to provide a greater awareness of this injury Conclusion BTPR and cardiac herniation is a complex and often fatal injury that usually presents under the umbrella of polytrauma. Clinicians must maintain a high index of suspicion for BTPR but, even then, the diagnosis is fraught with difficulty. In blunt chest trauma, patients should be considered high risk for BTPR when presenting with: Cardiovascular instability with no obvious cause Prominent or displaced cardiac silhouette and asymmetrical large volume pneumopericardium Potentially, with increasing awareness of the injury and improved use and availability of imaging modalities, the survival rates will improve and cardiac Herniation could even be considered the 5th H of reversible causes of blunt traumatic PEA arrest.

  1. Mortality Factors in Geriatric Blunt Trauma Patients: Creation of a Highly Predictive Statistical Model for Mortality Using 50,765 Consecutive Elderly Trauma Admissions from the National Sample Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    HRANJEC, TJASA; SAWYER, ROBERT G.; YOUNG, JEFFREY S.; SWENSON, BRIAN R.; CALLAND, JAMES F.

    2013-01-01

    Elderly patients are at high risk for mortality after injury. We hypothesized that trauma benchmarking efforts would benefit from development of a geriatric-specific model for risk-adjusted analyses of trauma center outcomes. A total of 57,973 records of elderly patients (age older than 65 years), which met our selection criteria, were submitted to the National Trauma Database and included within the National Sample Project between 2003 and 2006. These cases were used to construct a multivariable logistic regression model, which was compared with the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma’s Trauma Quality Improvement Project’s (TQIP) existing model. Additional spline regression analyses were performed to further objectively quantify the physiologic differences between geriatric patients and their younger counterparts. The geriatric-specific and TQIP mortality models shared several covariates: age, Injury Severity Score, motor component of the Glasgow Coma Scale, and systolic blood pressure. Our model additionally used temperature and the presence of mechanical ventilation. Our geriatric-specific regression mode generated a superior c-statistic as compared with the TQIP approximation (0.85 vs 0.77; P = 0.048). Spline analyses demonstrated that elderly patients appear to be less likely to tolerate relative hypotension with higher observed mortality at initial systolic blood pressures of 90 to 130 mmHg. Although the TQIP model includes a single age component, these data suggest that each variable needs to be adjusted for age to more accurately predict mortality in the elderly. Clearly, a separate geriatric model for predicting outcomes is not only warranted, but necessary. PMID:23265126

  2. Early intramedullary nailing for femoral fractures in patients with severe thoracic trauma: A systemic review and meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yuan Liu; Meng Jiang; Cheng-La Yi; Xiang-Jun Bai; David J.Hak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose:Early intramedullary nailing (IMN) within the first 24 h for multiply injured patients with femoral fracture and concomitant thoracic trauma is controversial.Previously published studies have been limited in size and their outcomes have been inconclusive.A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the available data in order to guide care and help improve the outcomes for these patients.Methods:We searched the literature up to December 2011 in the main medical search engines and identified 6 retrospective cohort studies that explored the safety of early IMN in patients with both femoral fracture and chest injury.Our primary outcome was the rates of pulmonary complication (pneumonia,adult respiratory distress syndrome,fat embolism syndrome),multiple organ failure (MOF) and mortality.Results:We found no statistically significant difference in the rate of pulmonary complications,MOF or mortality in the patients treated with early IMN.Conclusion:Early IMN for femoral fractures does not increase the mortality and morbidity in chestinjured patients in the studies analyzed.

  3. Chest trauma in childhood. Radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt thoracic trauma is frequently associated with further injuries (head and/or blunt abdominal trauma). The prognosis also depends on the concurrent injuries. The initial evaluation of an injured child is based on the chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound examination. Additional information can be obtained by a CT scan in mediastinal injuries. (orig./MG)

  4. Open posterior dislocation of the knee with rupture of the patellar tendon and a tibial plateau fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Fahd Amar; Badr Chbani; Oussama Ammoumri; Amine Marzouki; Fawzi Boutayeb

    2010-01-01

    Knee dislocations are rare injuries. They represent a severe soft tissue injury following high-energy blunt trauma. We report a case of open posterior knee dislocation with rupture of the patellar tendon and a fracture of the tibial plateau. The treatment was surgical and consisted of reduction of the knee dislocation, fixation of the tibial plateau fracture by lag screws, and transosseous sutures for the patellar tendon protected by a patellotibial cerclage. The result was successful with fu...

  5. Dental trauma involving root fracture and periodontal ligament injury: a 10-year retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Sônia Regina Panzarini; Denise Pedrini; Wilson Roberto Poi; Celso Koogi Sonoda; Daniela Atili Brandini; José Carlos Monteiro de Castro

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the cases of traumatic dental injuries involving root fracture and/or periodontal ligament injury (except avulsion) treated at the Discipline of Integrated Clinic, School of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Brazil, from January 1992 to December 2002. Clinical and radiographic records from 161 patients with 287 traumatized teeth that had sustained root fracture and/or injuries to the periodontal ligament were exa...

  6. Blunt liver injury with intact ribs under impacts on the abdomen: a biomechanical investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Shao

    Full Text Available Abdominal trauma accounts for nearly 20% of all severe traffic injuries and can often result from intentional physical violence, from which blunt liver injury is regarded as the most common result and is associated with a high mortality rate. Liver injury may be caused by a direct impact with a certain velocity and energy on the abdomen, which may result in a lacerated liver by penetration of fractured ribs. However, liver ruptures without rib cage fractures were found in autopsies in a series of cases. All the victims sustained punches on the abdomen by fist. Many studies have been dedicated to determining the mechanism underlying hepatic injury following abdominal trauma, but most have been empirical. The actual process and biomechanism of liver injury induced by blunt impact on the abdomen, especially with intact ribs remained, are still inexhaustive. In order to investigate this, finite element methods and numerical simulation technology were used. A finite element human torso model was developed from high resolution CT data. The model consists of geometrically-detailed liver and rib cage models and simplified models of soft tissues, thoracic and abdominal organs. Then, the torso model was used in simulations in which the right hypochondrium was punched by a fist from the frontal, lateral, and rear directions, and in each direction with several impact velocities. Overall, the results showed that liver rupture was primarily caused by a direct strike of the ribs induced by blunt impact to the abdomen. Among three impact directions, a lateral impact was most likely to cause liver injury with a minimum punch speed of 5 m/s (the momentum was about 2.447 kg.m/s. Liver injuries could occur in isolation and were not accompanied by rib fractures due to different material characteristics and injury tolerance.

  7. Temporal bone trauma and complications: computed tomography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Ana Maria Doffemond; Gaiotti, Juliana Oggioni; Couto, Caroline Laurita Batista; Gomes, Natalia Delage; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira; Motta, Emilia Guerra Pinto Coelho, E-mail: anadoffemond@yahoo.com.br [Hospital Mater Dei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Unit of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis

    2013-03-15

    Most temporal bone fractures result from high-energy blunt head trauma, and are frequently related to other skull fractures or to polytrauma. Fractures and displacements of ossicular chain in the middle ear represent some of the main complications of temporal bone injury, and hence they will be more deeply approached in the present article. Other types of injuries include labyrinthine fractures, dural fistula, facial nerve paralysis and extension into the carotid canal. Computed tomography plays a fundamental role in the initial evaluation of polytrauma patients, as it can help to identify important structural injuries that may lead to severe complications such as sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, dizziness and balance dysfunction, perilymphatic fistulas, facial nerve paralysis, vascular injury and others. (author)

  8. Mandibular fractures - towards a national standard for "time to theatre" - national audit by the BAOMS Trauma Specialist Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsarelis, H; Lees, Tfa; McLeod, Nmh

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that in most patients, a delay of several days in the treatment of mandibular fractures is not associated with adverse outcomes, and this has challenged the traditional practice of recommending treatment within 24hours. Longer hospital stays cost more and lower the patients' quality of life, but we know of no standard recommendation about when these patients should be treated. Our aim therefore was to find out how many patients had reduction and fixation of a fractured mandible by the end of the next working day, with a view to developing a national standard. We invited all oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) units in the UK to participate in a prospective audit over two months, and 35 agreed. Overall, 506 patients (80%) were operated on by the end of the next working day. The time to theatre varied from 1 hour 15minutes to 11 days, 20hours and 51minutes (median 22hours 7minutes). Patients admitted to units with an OMFS trauma list were more likely to be operated on by the next working day (p=0.011) as were those operated on at the weekend (p=0.019). We think that early fixation, return of function, and discharge, benefit patients most in terms of quality of life. Also, shorter hospital stays and reduced costs increase the availability of resources for elective operations. Setting a standard will improve our service and the care we deliver. PMID:27282082

  9. Sonography of scrotal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meka Srinivasa Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to depict the spectrum of scrotal injuries in blunt trauma. Scrotal injuries are not very common and are mostly due to blunt trauma from direct injury, sports injuries or motor vehicle accidents. To minimize complications and ensure testicular salvage, rapid and accurate diagnosis is necessary. High-resolution USG is the investigation of choice, as it is readily available, accurate and has been seen to improve outcomes. An understanding of and familiarity with the sonographic appearance of scrotal injuries on the part of the radiologist/sonographer is therefore of key importance.

  10. Simultaneous Bilateral Transitional Fractures of the Proximal Tibia after Minor Sports Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Omar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a very rare case of a 16-year-old healthy athletic boy who sustained simultaneous bilateral transitional fractures of the proximal tibia after kicking a football with his right leg during a soccer game. Following minimal invasive plate osteosynthesis with bridging of the growth plate, the patient recovered rapidly without any growth disturbances.

  11. Prevalence of low trauma fractures in long-term kidney transplant patients with preserved renal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.W.R. Braga Júnior

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the prevalence of low bone mineral density (BMD and osteoporotic fractures in kidney transplantation (KT patients and determined risk factors associated with osteoporotic fractures. The study was conducted on 191 patients (94 men and 97 women with first KT for 3 years or more presenting stable and preserved renal function (serum creatinine levels lower than 2.5 mg/dl. KT patients were on immunosuppressive therapy and the cumulative doses of these drugs were also evaluated. BMD was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at multiple sites (spine, femur and total body. Quantitative ultrasound of the calcaneus (broadband ultrasound attenuation, speed of sound, and stiffness index, SI was also performed. Twenty-four percent (46 of all patients had either vertebral (29/46 or appendicular (17/46 fractures. We found osteoporosis and osteopenia in 8.5-13.4 and 30.9-35.1% of KT patients, respectively. Women had more fractures than men. In women, prevalent fractures were associated with diabetes mellitus [OR = 11.5, 95% CI (2.4-55.7], time since menopause [OR = 3.7, 95% CI (1.2-11.9], femoral neck BMD [OR = 1.99, 95% CI (1.4-2.8], cumulative dose of steroids [OR = 1.1, 95% CI (1.02-1.12] and low SI [OR = 1.1, 95% CI (1.0-1.2]. In men, fractures were associated with lower lumbar spine BMD [OR = 1.75, 95% CI (1.1-2.7], lower SI [OR = 1.1, 95% CI (1.03-1.13], duration of dialysis [OR = 1.3, 95% CI (1.13-2.7], and lower body mass index [OR = 1.24, 95% CI (1.1-1.4. Our results demonstrate high prevalence of low BMD and osteoporotic fractures in patients receiving a successful kidney transplant and indicate the need for specific intervention to prevent osteoporosis in this population.

  12. The ribs unfolded - a CT visualization algorithm for fast detection of rib fractures: effect on sensitivity and specificity in trauma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess a radiologist's detection rate of rib fractures in trauma CT when reading curved planar reformats (CPRs) of the ribs compared to reading standard MPRs. Two hundred and twenty trauma CTs (146 males, 74 females) were retrospectively subjected to a software algorithm to generate CPRs of the ribs. Patients were split into two equal groups. Sixteen patients were excluded due to insufficient segmentation, leaving 107 patients in group A and 97 patients in group B. Two radiologists independently evaluated group A using CPRs and group B using standard MPRs. Two different radiologists reviewed both groups with the inverse methods setting. Results were compared to a standard of reference created by two senior radiologists. The reference standard identified 361 rib fractures in 61 patients. Reading CPRs showed a significantly higher overall sensitivity (P < 0.001) for fracture detection than reading standard MPRs, with 80.9 % (584/722) and 71.5 % (516/722), respectively. Mean reading time was significantly shorter for CPRs (31.3 s) compared to standard MPRs (60.7 s; P < 0.001). Using CPRs for the detection of rib fractures accelerates the reading of trauma patient chest CTs, while offering an increased overall sensitivity compared to conventional standard MPRs. (orig.)

  13. The ribs unfolded - a CT visualization algorithm for fast detection of rib fractures: effect on sensitivity and specificity in trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringl, Helmut; Lazar, Mathias; Toepker, Michael; Woitek, Ramona; Prosch, Helmut; Asenbaum, Ulrika; Balassy, Csilla; Toth, Daniel; Weber, Michael; Mang, Thomas [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Hajdu, Stefan [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Trauma Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Soza, Grzegorz; Wimmer, Andreas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Computed Tomography, Forchheim (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    To assess a radiologist's detection rate of rib fractures in trauma CT when reading curved planar reformats (CPRs) of the ribs compared to reading standard MPRs. Two hundred and twenty trauma CTs (146 males, 74 females) were retrospectively subjected to a software algorithm to generate CPRs of the ribs. Patients were split into two equal groups. Sixteen patients were excluded due to insufficient segmentation, leaving 107 patients in group A and 97 patients in group B. Two radiologists independently evaluated group A using CPRs and group B using standard MPRs. Two different radiologists reviewed both groups with the inverse methods setting. Results were compared to a standard of reference created by two senior radiologists. The reference standard identified 361 rib fractures in 61 patients. Reading CPRs showed a significantly higher overall sensitivity (P < 0.001) for fracture detection than reading standard MPRs, with 80.9 % (584/722) and 71.5 % (516/722), respectively. Mean reading time was significantly shorter for CPRs (31.3 s) compared to standard MPRs (60.7 s; P < 0.001). Using CPRs for the detection of rib fractures accelerates the reading of trauma patient chest CTs, while offering an increased overall sensitivity compared to conventional standard MPRs. (orig.)

  14. The immune response after fracture trauma is different in old compared to young patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vester, Helen; Huber-Lang, Markus S.; Kida, Qerim; Scola, Alexander; van Griensven, Martijn; Gebhard, Florian; Nüssler, Andreas K.; Perl, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite significant medical progress and improved treatment, surgical procedures of proximal femur fractures in older patients are still associated with a high postoperative complication and mortality rate. Recently, several authors investigated the phenomenon of immunoageing, indicating differences in the ageing immune system. The aim of the present multi-center prospective clinical trial was to analyze differences in the posttraumatic immune response of old patients compared to y...

  15. Fractures of the thoracic spine in patients with minor trauma: Comparison of diagnostic accuracy and dose of biplane radiography and MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To investigate the accuracy of biplane radiography in the detection of fractures of the thoracic spine in patients with minor trauma using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as the reference and to compare the dose of both techniques. Methods: 107 consecutive trauma patients with suspected fractures of the thoracic spine on physical examination were included. All had undergone biplane radiography first, followed by a MDCT scan between October 2008 and October 2012. A fourfold table was used for the classification of the screening test results. Both the Chi-square test (χ2) and the mean dose-length product (DLP) were used to compare the diagnostic methods. Results: MDCT revealed 77 fractures in 65/107 patients (60.7%). Biplane radiography was true positive in 32/107 patients (29.9%), false positive in 19/107 patients (17.8%), true negative in 23/107 (21.5%) and false negative in 33/107 patients (30.8%), showing a sensitivity of 49.2%, a specificity of 54.7%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 62.7%, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 41.1%, and an accuracy of 51.4%. The presence of a fracture on biplane radiography was highly statistical significant, if this was simultaneously proven by MDCT (χ2 = 7.6; p = 0.01). None of the fractures missed on biplane radiography was unstable. The mean DLP on biplane radiography was 14.5 mGy cm (range 1.9–97.8) and on MDCT 374.6 mGy cm (range 80.2–871). Conclusions: The sensitivity and the specificity of biplane radiography in the diagnosis of fractures of the thoracic spine in patients with minor trauma are low. Considering the wide availability of MDCT that is usually necessary for taking significant therapeutic steps, the indication for biplane radiography should be very restrictive

  16. 川芎嗪干预钝性肺挫伤急性期大鼠肺组织细胞的凋亡*%Ligustrazine prevents lung cell apoptosis in the acute stage of pulmonary contusion induced by blunt chest trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹晨; 邓应忠; 郑明安; 刘芳; 孟庆涛

    2013-01-01

      背景:急性胸部撞击后所致的肺挫伤(钝性肺挫伤)常引起呼吸功能异常和继发性炎性反应,并参与全身炎性反应综合征和多器官功能障碍综合征,其发病原因及致病机制亟待明确。目的:观察胸部撞击所致钝性肺挫伤急性期细胞凋亡的变化及其川芎嗪对其的影响。方法:健康雄性 SD 大鼠随机分为正常对照组、模型组、川芎嗪治疗组,后两组制备胸部撞击伤模型,川芎嗪治疗组建模后立即腹腔注射川芎嗪80 mg/kg 1次。在创伤发生后1,2,3 h 观察肺组织病理形态学及细胞凋亡的改变、检测肺水肿程度和肺血管通透性改变,免疫组织化学检测肺组织 Bcl-2、Bax和 Caspase-3的表达及血液中肿瘤坏死因子α水平变化。结果与结论:模型组肿瘤坏死因子α水平在创伤后1 h 即显著增加,创伤后2 h 及3 h 间急剧增加(P <0.05);创伤后2 h 及3 h 肺组织细胞凋亡指数及肺组织损伤程度显著增高(均 P <0.05);肺血管通透性及肺水肿程度增加(P <0.05);Caspase-3表达显著增高(P <0.05),Bcl-2/Bax 比值显著降低(P <0.05)。川芎嗪治疗组在相应时间点相对于模型组肿瘤坏死因子α水平显著降低(P <0.05),肺组织内细胞凋亡指数及肺组织损伤程度降低(P <0.05),肺血管通透性及肺水肿程度减轻(P <0.05);Caspase-3表达下降(P <0.05),Bcl-2/Bax 比值增加(P <0.01)。结果提示,川芎嗪可通过抑制肿瘤坏死因子α表达,下调 Caspase-3的表达并提高 Bcl-2/Bax 的比值,以降低胸部撞击所致肺组织急性期的异常凋亡并减轻胸部撞击所致急性期肺挫伤。%BACKGROUND: Pulmonary contusion induced by blunt chest trauma can result in respiratory dysfunction and secondary inflammatory reaction, which can take part in the occurrence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome. However, the reason and mechanism

  17. Blunt indentation of core graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt indentation experiments were carried out on unoxidized and thermally oxidised IM1-24 graphite as a model to simulate local point stresses acting on graphite moderator bricks. Blunt indentation of unoxidized graphite initiates cracks close to the region of maximum tensile stress at the edge of the indentation. Cracks propagate and converge to form a cone of material. Failure is catastrophic, typically forming three pieces of graphite and ejecting the cone referred to above. The failure mode under indentation loading for highly oxidised graphite (weigh loss > 40%) is different from that for the unoxidized graphite. There is no longer a distinct crack path, the indentation is much deeper than in the case of the unoxidized graphite, and there is a region of crushed debris beneath the indentation, producing a crater-like structure. The reduction in the compressive fracture stress, σcf, under indentation loading with increasing fractional weight loss on oxidation, x, can be fitted to σcf/σ0 = exp-[5.2x] where σ0 is the compressive fracture stress of the unoxidized graphite. This indicates that the effect of thermal oxidation on indentation fracture stress is more severe than the effects of radiolytic oxidation on conventional strengths of nuclear graphites. (author). 8 refs, 12 figs

  18. Pelvic Fractures in Children Results from the German Pelvic Trauma Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwingmann, Jörn; Aghayev, Emin; Südkamp, Norbert P;

    2015-01-01

    (ISS) did not differ statistically. Lethality in the pediatric group was 6.3%, not statistically different from the adults' 4.6%. In all, 18.3% of the pediatric pelvic fractures were treated surgically as compared to 22.7% in the adult group. No child suffered any thrombosis/embolism, acute respiratory...... distress syndrome (ARDS), multiorgan failure (MOF), or neurologic deficit, nor was any septic MOF detected. The differences between adults and children were statistically significant in that the children suffered less frequently from thrombosis/embolism (P = 0.041) and ARDS and MOF (P = 0.006).This...

  19. Dental trauma involving root fracture and periodontal ligament injury: a 10-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarini, Sônia Regina; Pedrini, Denise; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Brandini, Daniela Atili; Monteiro de Castro, José Carlos

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the cases of traumatic dental injuries involving root fracture and/or periodontal ligament injury (except avulsion) treated at the Discipline of Integrated Clinic, School of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Brazil, from January 1992 to December 2002. Clinical and radiographic records from 161 patients with 287 traumatized teeth that had sustained root fracture and/or injuries to the periodontal ligament were examined. The results of this survey revealed that subluxation (25.09%) was the most common type of periodontal ligament injury, followed by extrusive luxation (19.86%). There was a predominance of young male patients and most of them did not present systemic alterations. Among the etiologic factors, the most frequent causes were falls and bicycle accidents. Injuries on extraoral soft tissues were mostly laceration and abrasion, while gingival and lip mucosa lacerations prevailed on intraoral soft tissues injuries. Radiographically, the most common finding was an increase of the periodontal ligament space. The most commonly performed treatment was root canal therapy. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that traumatic dental injuries occur more frequently in young male individuals, due to falls and bicycle accidents. Subluxation was the most common type of periodontal ligament injury. Root canal therapy was the type of treatment most commonly planned and performed. PMID:18949308

  20. Dental trauma involving root fracture and periodontal ligament injury: a 10-year retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Regina Panzarini

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the cases of traumatic dental injuries involving root fracture and/or periodontal ligament injury (except avulsion treated at the Discipline of Integrated Clinic, School of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP, Brazil, from January 1992 to December 2002. Clinical and radiographic records from 161 patients with 287 traumatized teeth that had sustained root fracture and/or injuries to the periodontal ligament were examined. The results of this survey revealed that subluxation (25.09% was the most common type of periodontal ligament injury, followed by extrusive luxation (19.86%. There was a predominance of young male patients and most of them did not present systemic alterations. Among the etiologic factors, the most frequent causes were falls and bicycle accidents. Injuries on extraoral soft tissues were mostly laceration and abrasion, while gingival and lip mucosa lacerations prevailed on intraoral soft tissues injuries. Radiographically, the most common finding was an increase of the periodontal ligament space. The most commonly performed treatment was root canal therapy. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that traumatic dental injuries occur more frequently in young male individuals, due to falls and bicycle accidents. Subluxation was the most common type of periodontal ligament injury. Root canal therapy was the type of treatment most commonly planned and performed.

  1. Use of intubating laryngeal mask airway in a morbidly obese patient with chest trauma in an emergency setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripat Bindra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A morbidly obese male who sustained blunt trauma chest with bilateral pneumothorax was referred to the intensive care unit for management of his condition. Problems encountered in managing the patient were gradually increasing hypoxemia (chest trauma with multiple rib fractures with lung contusions and difficult mask ventilation and intubation (morbid obesity, heavy jaw, short and thick neck. We performed awake endotracheal intubation using an intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA size 4 and provided mechanical ventilation to the patient. This report suggests that ILMA can be very useful in the management of difficult airway outside the operating room and can help in preventing adverse events in an emergency setting.

  2. Immediate Surgical Intervention for Penile Fracture: a Case Report and Literature Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Wen; Han-zhong Li; Zhi-gang Ji; Hong-jun Li

    2011-01-01

    @@ PENILE fracture is a critical urological emergency, which is caused by the rupture of the tunica al- buginea of the corpus cavernosum following blunt trauma to the erect penis.Traumatic injuries of the penis often occur in the erected state.1 Due to the possible embarrassment, this condition has been under- reported.Typically, the patient reports a snap or cracking Received for publication December 14, 2010.

  3. Synergism of clinical evaluation and penile sonographic imaging in diagnosis of penile fracture: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bello Jibril

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Penile fracture is an uncommon urologic emergency, and is the traumatic rupture of the tunica albuginea covering the corpus cavernosa. This usually occurs following blunt trauma sustained during coitus, masturbation or self-manipulations to hide or suppress an erection. Clinical diagnosis can often be easily made with typical history and examination findings. However, the patient may present atypically and/or with a suspicion of associated urethral injury. The roles of v...

  4. The epidemiology of renal trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Voelzke, Bryan B.; Leddy, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nonoperative and minimally invasive management techniques for both blunt and penetrating renal trauma have become standard of care over the past decades. We sought to examine the modern epidemiology of renal trauma over the past decade. Methods A systematic review of PubMed from the past decade was conducted to examine adult and pediatric renal trauma. A total of 605 articles were identified. Of these, 15 adult and 5 pediatric articles met our a priori search criteria. Results Th...

  5. Role of computed tomography in pancreatic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Yonsei University Hospital from January 1984 to August 1990, computed tomographic (CT) scans of 13 patients with surgically proven pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma, including 6 pancreatic lacerations or contusions, 6 pancreatic fractures, and one post-traumatic pseudocyst, were retrospectively reviewed to determine the role and accuracy of the CT in evaluating pancreatic injury. CT can document gross pancreatic injury by showing focal or diffuse enlargement (1), area of diminished attenuation (3), separation (5), focal hematoma (2), and peripancreatic change, including peripancreatic hematoma (2), fluid collection (11), perirenal fascial thickening (10), omental and mesenteric change (5), and bowel change (2). CT correctly diagnosed pancreatic fracture in 5 cases, post-raumatic pseudocyst in 1 case, and pancreatic laceration in 3 cases in 9 of these patients. There were 4 false negative diagnoses, including 3 pancreatic lacerations and 1 pancreatic fracture. A CT is of pancreatic trauma could be difficult to diagnosis in patients who are scanned within 24 hrs after an injury or to distinguish a motion or streak artifact caused by a nasogastric tube or air-oral contrast fluid level in the stomach

  6. Role of computed tomography in pancreatic trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Hee; Kim, Ki Whang; Lee, Jong Tae; Oh, Sei Jung [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-03-15

    At Yonsei University Hospital from January 1984 to August 1990, computed tomographic (CT) scans of 13 patients with surgically proven pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma, including 6 pancreatic lacerations or contusions, 6 pancreatic fractures, and one post-traumatic pseudocyst, were retrospectively reviewed to determine the role and accuracy of the CT in evaluating pancreatic injury. CT can document gross pancreatic injury by showing focal or diffuse enlargement (1), area of diminished attenuation (3), separation (5), focal hematoma (2), and peripancreatic change, including peripancreatic hematoma (2), fluid collection (11), perirenal fascial thickening (10), omental and mesenteric change (5), and bowel change (2). CT correctly diagnosed pancreatic fracture in 5 cases, post-raumatic pseudocyst in 1 case, and pancreatic laceration in 3 cases in 9 of these patients. There were 4 false negative diagnoses, including 3 pancreatic lacerations and 1 pancreatic fracture. A CT is of pancreatic trauma could be difficult to diagnosis in patients who are scanned within 24 hrs after an injury or to distinguish a motion or streak artifact caused by a nasogastric tube or air-oral contrast fluid level in the stomach.

  7. Patients with pelvic fractures due to falls: A paradigm that contributed to autopsy-based audit of trauma in Greece

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    Kotsilianou Olympia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of the pelvic fractures (PFx population in auditing effective components of trauma care is the subject of this study. Methods A retrospective, case-control, autopsy-based study compared a population with PFx to a control-group using a template with trauma outcome variables, which included demographics, ICD-9, intention, mechanisms, toxicology, Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS-90, Injury Severity Score (ISS, causes of haemorrhage, comorbidity, survival time, pre-hospital response, in hospital data, location of death, and preventable deaths. Results Of 970 consecutive patients with fatal falls, 209 (21.5% had PFx and constituted the PFx-group while 761 (78.5% formed the control-group. Multivariate analysis showed that gender, age, intention, and height of fall were risk factors for PFx. A 300% higher odds of a psychiatric history was found in the PFx-group compared to the control-group (p The median ISS was 50 (17-75 for the PFx-group and 26 (1-75 for the control-group (p Associated injuries were significantly more common in the PFx-group than in the control-group. Potentially preventable deaths (ISS A subset of 126 (60.3% potentially preventable deaths in the PFx-group had at least one AIS-90 code other than the PFx, denoting major haemorrhage. Deaths directly attributed to PFx were limited to 6 (2.9%. The median survival time was 30 minutes for the PFx-group and 20 hours for the control-group (p Pre-hospital mortality was significantly higher in the PFx-group i.e. 70.3% of the PFx-group versus 42.7% of the control-group (p Conclusions The PFx-group shared common causative risk factors, high severity and multiplicity of injuries that define the PFx-group as a paradigm of injury for audit. This reduced sample of autopsies substantially contributed to the audit of functional, infrastructural, management and prevention issues requiring transformation to reduce mortality.

  8. Urological injuries following trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.bent@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N. [Department of Urology, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Fotheringham, T. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  9. Resuscitative Long-Bone Sonography for the Clinician: Usefulness and Pitfalls of Focused Clinical Ultrasound to Detect Long-Bone Fractures During Trauma Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kadi, Azzam S; Gillman, Lawrence M; Ball, Chad G; Panebianco, Nova L; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W

    2009-08-01

    Bone has one of the highest acoustic densities (AD) in the human body. Traditionally, bone has been considered to be a hindrance to the use of ultrasound (US), as US waves are reflected by the dense matrix and obscure underlying structures. The intense wave reflection, however, can clearly illustrate the cortical bony anatomy of long bones, making cortical disruption obvious. Ultrasound can be used at the bedside concurrently with the overall trauma resuscitation, and may potentially limit the patient's and treating team's exposure to ionizing radiation, corroborate clinical findings, and augment procedural success. The extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (EFAST) is an essential tool in the resuscitation of severe torso trauma, frequently demonstrating intra- pericardial and intra-peritoneal fluid, inferring hemo/pneumothoraces, and demonstrating cardiac function. Although it is typically considered as a diagnosis of exclusion, multiple long-bone fractures may be a source of shock and can be quickly confirmed at the bedside with EFAST. Further, the early detection of long-bone fractures can also aid in the early stabilization of severely injured patients. Sonographic evaluation for long-bone fractures may be particularly useful in austere environments where other imaging modalities are limited, such as in the battlefield, developing world, and space. While prospective study has been limited, selected series have demonstrated high accuracy among both physician and para-medical clinicians in detecting long-bone fractures. Pitfalls in this technique include reduced accuracy with the small bones of the hands and feet, as well as great reliance on user experience. PMID:26815050

  10. Infarto do miocárdio causado por lesão arterial coronariana após trauma torácico fechado Infarto de miocardio causado por lesión arterial coronaria post traumatismo torácico cerrado Myocardial infarction caused by coronary artery injury after a blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Silva Miguel Lima

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos o caso de um indivíduo do sexo masculino de 29 anos de idade, vítima de um acidente de carro no qual sofreu trauma torácico fechado, evoluindo com insuficiência cardíaca congestiva. O paciente apresentava boa saúde previamente, sem sintomas de doença cardiovascular. Na avaliação inicial, o eletrocardiograma mostrou ondas Q nas derivações precordiais e o ecocardiograma mostrou disfunção ventricular esquerda importante. A angiografia coronária mostrou uma lesão na artéria coronária descendente anterior esquerda (ADE, com acinesia da parede anterior na ventriculografia com contraste. A tomografia computadorizada por emissão de fóton único (SPECT com Tálio-201 não mostrou viabilidade. O paciente foi mantido em tratamento clínico com boa evolução.Relatamos el caso de un individuo del sexo masculino, de 29 años de edad, víctima de accidente automovilístico en el cual sufrió traumatismo torácico cerrado, evolucionando con insuficiencia cardíaca congestiva. El paciente presentaba buena salud previamente, sin síntomas de enfermedad cardiovascular. En la evaluación inicial, el electrocardiograma mostró ondas Q en las derivaciones precordiales y el ecocardiograma mostró disfunción ventricular izquierda importante. La angiografía coronaria mostró una lesión en la arteria coronaria descendente anterior izquierda (ADI, con acinesia de la pared anterior en la ventriculografía de contraste. La tomografía computada por emisión de fotón único (SPECT con Talio-201 no mostró viabilidad. El paciente fue mantenido en tratamiento clínico con buena evolución.We report the case of a 29-year-old man, victim of a car accident, who suffered a severe blunt chest trauma, with evolving congestive heart failure. He had previously had a good overall health status, with no symptoms of cardiovascular disease. At the initial assessment, the electrocardiogram showed Q waves in the precordial leads and the echocardiogram

  11. Isolated rib fractures in geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmistekawy Elsayed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The goal of this study was to investigate the short-term outcomes in patients older than 60 years with isolated rib fractures and admitted to emergency hospital. Materials and Methods: This study included patients who were 60 years old or more and sustained blunt chest injury and had isolated rib fractures. The following data were obtained from the medical records: age, gender, number of fracture ribs, side of fracture ribs, mechanism and nature of injury, preexisting medical conditions, complications, admission to intensive care unit (ICU, need for mechanical ventilation, length of ICU and hospital stay and mortality. Results: For the study, 39 patients who were 60 years old or more and admitted to the hospital because of isolated rib fractures were enrolled. There were 28 males (71.7% and 11 females (28.3% with mean age of (66.84 ± 4.7 years. No correlation was found between comorbidities and hospital outcomes except in those who were diabetic (P-value = 0.005 and those with chronic lung disease (P-value = 0.006. Pulmonary complications were the most frequent complications encountered in those patients. Pulmonary complications were: lung contusion in 8 patients (20.5% and pulmonary infection in 6 patients (15.8%. Conclusion: Elderly patients sustaining blunt chest trauma had significant morbidity and potential for mortality.

  12. Emergency Room Thoracotomy for Thoracic Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammet Sayan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: In this study we discussed that indication and effect on survival of emergency room thoracotomy in cardiac and respiratory arrest patients after penetrating or blunt chest trauma. Material and Method: Between March 2013 and September 2014, five emergency room thoracotomies were performed. The medical record of patients were analyzed retrospectively.Results:Emergency room thoracotomy was performed for 4 patients with penetrating and 1 patient with blunt chest trauma. 2 patients have died ...

  13. Survivorship and Severe Complications Are Worse for Octogenarians and Elderly Patients with Pelvis Fractures as Compared to Adults: Data from the National Trauma Data Bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Matityahu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study examined whether octogenarians and elderly patients with pelvic fractures have a different risk of complication and mortality as compared to adults. Methods. Data was gathered from the National Trauma Data Bank from 2002 to 2006. There were 32,660 patients 18–65, 6,408 patients 65–79, and 5,647 patients ≥ 80 years old with pelvic fractures. Descriptive statistics and bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed with the adult population as a referent. Results. Multivariate analysis showed 4.7-fold higher odds of death and 4.57 odds of complications in the octogenarian group after a pelvic fracture compared to adults. The elderly had 1.81-fold higher odds of death and 2.18-fold higher odds of severe complications after sustaining a severe pelvic fracture relative to adults. An ISS ≥ 16 yielded 15.1-fold increased odds of mortality and 18.3-fold higher odds of severe complications. Hypovolemic shock had 7.65-fold increased odds of death and 6.31-fold higher odds of severe complications. Between the ages of 18 and 89 years, there is approximately a 1% decrease in survivorship every 10 years. Conclusions. This study illustrates that patients older than 80 years old with pelvis fractures have a higher mortality and complications rate than elderly or adult patients.

  14. External air compression: A rare cause of blunt esophageal injury, managed by a stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Muneer

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: High index of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis of esophageal perforation after blunt trauma. Appropriate drainage, antibiotic and temporary endoscopic esophageal stenting may be an optimal approach in selected patients, especially with delayed diagnosis.

  15. CLINICAL STUDY AND MANAGEMENT OF BLUNT INJURY ABDOMEN PERTAINING TO SOLID ORGANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katta Srinivasa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Blunt Abdominal trauma is one of the most common causes among injuries caused mainly due to road traffic accidents. 1 The rapid increase in number of motor vehicles and its aftermath has caused rapid increase in number of victims to blunt abdominal trauma. Motor vehicle accidents account for 75 to 80% of blunt abdominal trauma. 2 Blunt injury of abdomen is also a result of fall from height, assault with blunt objects, industrial mishaps, sport injuries, bomb blast and fall from riding bicycle. 2 In view of increasing number of vehicles and consequently road traffic accidents, this topic is chosen to study the cases of blunt abdominal trauma with reference to the patients presenting at Govt. General Hospital, attached to Guntur Medical College, Guntur. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the study are: 1. To evaluate the impact of blunt abdominal trauma on solid viscera. 2. To evaluate etiology and various modes of presentation. 3. To evaluate various available investigations for the detection of solid organ injuries. 4. To evaluate various modalities of treatment available with aim to reduce the mortality and morbidity. 5. To evaluate common complications of solid organ injury in blunt trauma abdomen. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients admitted in Government General Hospital, Guntur, from November 2012 to October 2014 and studied 50 cases. This is a prospective study conducted over 2 years. RESULTS: Male patients were commonly affected (80%, Peak age group being 21 – 30 years (48%. The commonest mode of injury was road traffic accident (58%. The common organ injured was spleen (54% followed by liver. 70% of the patients were treated by surgery, 30% conservatively. The mortality in this study was 14%. CONCLUSIONS : Blunt injury abdomen forms considerable load and health care system, most common age group is youngsters in road traffic accidents , so efforts should be made to formulate and execute road traffic regulations. Well established trauma care

  16. The effect of C1-esterase inhibitor on systemic inflammation in trauma patients with a femur fracture - The CAESAR study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    Strengers Paul FW

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic inflammation in response to a femur fracture and the additional fixation is associated with inflammatory complications, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. The injury itself, but also the additional procedure of femoral fixation induces a release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6. This results in an aggravation of the initial systemic inflammatory response, and can cause an increased risk for the development of inflammatory complications. Recent studies have shown that administration of the serum protein C1-esterase inhibitor can significantly reduce the release of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to acute systemic inflammation. Objective Attenuation of the surgery-induced additional systemic inflammatory response by perioperative treatment with C1-esterase inhibitor of trauma patients with a femur fracture. Methods The study is designed as a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. Trauma patients with a femur fracture, Injury Severity Score ≥ 18 and age 18-80 years are included after obtaining informed consent. They are randomized for administration of 200 U/kg C1-esterase inhibitor intravenously or placebo (saline 0.9% just before the start of the procedure of femoral fixation. The primary endpoint of the study is Δ interleukin-6, measured at t = 0, just before start of the femur fixation surgery and administration of C1-esterase inhibitor, and t = 6, 6 hours after administration of C1-esterase inhibitor and the femur fixation. Conclusion This study intents to identify C1-esterase inhibitor as a safe and potent anti-inflammatory agent, that is capable of suppressing systemic inflammation in trauma patients. This might facilitate early total care procedures by lowering the risk of inflammation in response to the surgical intervention. This could result in increased functional outcomes and reduced health care related

  17. Criteria for level 1 and level 2 trauma codes: Are pelvic ring injuries undertriaged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haws, Brittany E; Wuertzer, Scott; Raffield, Laura; Lenchik, Leon; Miller, Anna N

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the association of unstable pelvic ring injuries with trauma code status. METHODS A retrospective review of all pelvic ring injuries at a single academic center from July 2010 to June 2013 was performed. The trauma registry was used to identify level 1 and level 2 trauma codes for each injury. The computed tomography scans in all patients were classified as stable or unstable using the Abbreviated Injury Scale. Pelvic injury classifications in level 1 and level 2 groups were compared. Patient disposition at discharge in level 1 and level 2 groups were also compared. RESULTS There were 108 level 1 and 130 level 2 blunt trauma admissions. In the level 1 group, 67% of pelvic injuries were classified as stable fracture patterns and 33% were classified as unstable. In the level 2 group, 62% of pelvic injuries were classified as stable fracture patterns and 38% were classified as unstable. level 1 trauma code was not associated with odds of having an unstable fracture pattern (OR = 0.83, 95%CI: 0.48-1.41, P = 0.485). In the level 1 group with unstable pelvic injuries, 33% were discharged to home, 36% to a rehabilitation facility, and 32% died. In the level 2 group with unstable pelvic injuries, 65% were discharged to home, 31% to a rehabilitation facility, and 4% died. For those with unstable pelvic fractures (n = 85), assignment of a level 2 trauma code was associated with reduced odds of death (OR = 0.07, 95%CI: 0.01-0.35, P = 0.001) as compared to being discharged to home. CONCLUSION Trauma code level assignment is not correlated with severity of pelvic injury. Because an unstable pelvis can lead to hemodynamic instability, these injuries may be undertriaged. PMID:27622148

  18. Fetal trauma: brain imaging in four neonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe brain pathology in neonates after major traffic trauma in utero during the third trimester. Our patient cohort consisted of four neonates born by emergency cesarean section after car accident in the third trimester of pregnancy. The median gestational age (n=4) was 36 weeks (range: 30-38). Immediate post-natal and follow-up brain imaging consisted of cranial ultrasound (n=4), computed tomography (CT) (n=1) and post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (n=1). Pathology findings were correlated with the imaging findings (n=3). Cranial ultrasound demonstrated a huge subarachnoidal hemorrhage (n=1), subdural hematoma (n=1), brain edema with inversion of the diastolic flow (n=1) and severe ischemic changes (n=1). In one case, CT demonstrated the presence and extension of the subarachnoidal hemorrhage, a parietal fracture and a limited intraventricular hemorrhage. Cerebellar hemorrhage and a small cerebral frontal contusion were seen on post-mortem MRI in a child with a major subarachnoidal hemorrhage on ultrasound. None of these four children survived (three children died within 2 days and one child died after 1 month). Blunt abdominal trauma during pregnancy can cause fetal cranial injury. In our cases, skull fracture, intracranial hemorrhage and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy were encountered. (orig.)

  19. Chest trauma experience over eleven-year period at al-mouassat university teaching hospital-Damascus: a retrospective review of 888 cases

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    Al-Koudmani Ibrahim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thoracic trauma is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In this study, we present our 11-year experience in the management and clinical outcome of 888 chest trauma cases as a result of blunt and penetrating injuries in our university hospital in Damascus, Syria. Methods We reviewed files of 888 consequent cases of chest trauma between January 2000 and January 2011. The mean age of our patients was 31 ± 17 years mostly males with blunt injuries. Patients were evaluated and compared according to age, gender, etiology of trauma, thoracic and extra-thoracic injuries, complications, and mortality. Results The leading cause of the trauma was violence (41% followed by traffic accidents (33%. Pneumothorax (51%, Hemothorax (38%, rib fractures (34%, and lung contusion (15% were the most common types of injury. Associated injuries were documented in 36% of patients (extremities 19%, abdomen 13%, head 8%. A minority of the patients required thoracotomy (5.7%, and tube thoracostomy (56% was sufficient to manage the majority of cases. Mean hospital LOS was 4.5 ± 4.6 days. The overall mortoality rate was 1.8%, and morbidity (n = 78, 8.7%. Conclusions New traffic laws (including seat belt enforcement reduced incidence and severity of chest trauma in Syria. Violence was the most common cause of chest trauma rather than road traffic accidents in this series, this necessitates epidemiologic or multi-institutional studies to know to which degree violence contributes to chest trauma in Syria. The number of fractured ribs can be used as simple indicator of the severity of trauma. And we believe that significant neurotrauma, traffic accidents, hemodynamic status and GCS upon arrival, ICU admission, ventilator use, and complication of therapy are predictors of dismal prognosis.

  20. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often...... combined, the result is that more than 100 trauma scenarios exist, when the two dentitions are combined. Each of these trauma scenarios has a specific treatment demand and prospect for healing. With such a complexity in diagnosis and treatment, it is obvious that even experienced practitioners may have...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.DentalTrauma...

  1. The role of interventional radiology in trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a lecture on the role of interventional radiology in trauma. Trauma is classified into either blunt with a wide distribution of force to the patient or penetrating which has a narrower and knifing type of presentation. Penetrating trauma requires the tissues injured be fully examined by both cross-sectional imaging and, if hemorrhage is occurring, by arteriography where as blunt trauma is not so localized and requires the examination of much wider area of the body. Embolization of any bleeding site should occur at the time of diagnosis. embolization should be accomplished using either gelfoam or stainless or platinum coils. The treatments of pelvic trauma, renal trauma and ceres bral trauma are introduced in detail in this lecture

  2. Does Severity of Pelvic Fractures Correlate with the Incidence of Associated Intra-Abdominal Injuries in Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaid, Forat; Peleg, Kobi; Alfici, Ricardo; Olsha, Oded; Givon, Adi; Kessel, Boris

    2016-06-01

    Background Pelvic fractures are considered a marker of injury severity, especially in the pediatric population. However, the correlation between the severity of pelvic fractures and incidence of associated abdominal injuries is not clear. Methods A retrospective cohort study involving blunt trauma patients up to the age of 14 years, who suffered from pelvic fractures, with or without associated intra-abdominal injuries. Results A total of 812 trauma patients were included in this study. Overall, 671 of them suffered from pelvic fractures with abbreviated injury scale (AIS) of 2, 103 with AIS of 3, and 38 with AIS of 4 to 5. Overall mortality was found to be 5.2%, strongly correlating with the severity of the pelvic fractures (p value abdominal organ injuries (liver, spleen, small bowel, and pancreas) and the severity of pelvic fractures. A significant correlation was found with intrapelvic organ injuries (p value trauma patients with pelvic fractures is correlated with the severity of the fractures. An increase in the severity of pelvic fractures in this population is associated with an increased incidence of pelvic organ injury, but is not associated with the presence of extrapelvic abdominal injuries, except for kidney injuries. PMID:25988750

  3. Distal Ulna Fracture With Delayed Ulnar Nerve Palsy in a Baseball Player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasque, Charles B; Pearson, Clark; Margo, Bradley; Ethel, Robert

    2016-02-01

    We present a case report of a college baseball player who sustained a blunt-trauma, distal-third ulna fracture from a thrown ball with delayed presentation of ulnar nerve palsy. Even after his ulna fracture had healed, the nerve injury made it difficult for the athlete to control a baseball while throwing, resulting in a delayed return to full baseball activity for 3 to 4 months. He had almost complete nerve recovery by 6 months after his injury and complete nerve recovery by 1 year after his injury. PMID:26866319

  4. 腹部闭合伤致儿童胰腺外伤的诊治探讨%Pancreatic injury in children with blunt abdominal trauma: a report of 14 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李长春; 王珊; 李晓庆; 章均; 欧阳军

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the management of pancreatic injury in pediatric blunt abdominal trauma.Methods Fourteen children with closed pancreatic injury from January 1999 to May 2008 were reviewed.Results There were 11 boys and 3 of girls (M:F = 3.7:1).Five injuries were a result of bicycle handlebar injury,4 were from vehicle-related accidents,3 from direct blow and 2 from fall.The clinical presentations of pancreatic injury were abdominal pain,tenderness,leukocytosis,hy-peramylasemia and fever.The laboratory findings associated with pancreatic injury were elevated serum amylase level in 10 (71.5%) and leukocytosis in all cases.No correlation was found between leukocyte level,amylase value and the severity of pancreas injury.Repeated amylase values and CT scans were useful in detecting pancreatic injuries.CT scan was obtained in 11(78.6%) patients and was diagnostic in 6 (54.5%).Two of four children with negative CT scan finding had pancreatic injuries confirmed by exploratory laparotomy.Ultrasound scan was performed in 12 (85.7%) patients and was positive for pancreatic injury in 8 (66.7%).One child had emergency endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP).Nine children were treated conservatively.This included six with minor pancreas injuries,one with proximal pancreatic duct injury,and two with duct injuries that were missed at admission.Five children were operated.The procedures included exploratory laparoto-mies and external drainage of pseudocysts.Four children had external drainage of pseudocysts.Conclusions The diagnosis of pancreatic injury was confirmed by hyperamylasemia,CT evaluation and ultrasound scan,and laparotomy.Initial serum amylase level and leukocytosis do not correlate with the severity of pancreatic injury.The majority of pancreatic injuries can be managed non-operatively.The non-operative management of proximal pancreatic duct injury allows the formation pseudocyst which could be subsequently drained.Distal duct injuries are best

  5. Endoscopic orbital decompression of an isolated medial orbital wall fracture: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultekin, Erdogan; Ciftci, Zafer; Develioglu, Omer N; Celik, Oner; Yener, Murat; Kulekci, Mehmet

    2011-12-01

    Motor vehicle and bicycle accidents are the most common causes of blunt head trauma. Other common etiologies are falls, physical violence, and sports accidents. Blunt trauma toward the superior orbital rim, lateral orbital rim, frontal region, and cranium may lead to intraorbital hematoma. A fracture following the blunt head trauma may form a one-way valve, which leads to orbital emphysema and a more pronounced increase in orbital pressure. Increased tissue pressure in an enclosed space will eventually lead to an inevitable decrease in tissue perfusion. It is important to treat the patient within the first 48 hours following the trauma, which is accepted as the "critical period." In this report we present a case involving a 42-year-old man who was admitted to our clinic with left periorbital pain, edema, proptosis, and blurred vision after experiencing physical violence. The medical history and physical examination findings, along with imaging studies and a description of the endoscopic orbital decompression procedure within the first 24 hours, are reported. PMID:22180121

  6. Skeletal scintigraphy following incidental trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The significance of antecedent trauma in skeletal scintigraphy was assessed in 503 patients, of whom 241 (46%) had prior fracture or tooth extraction. In patients with sufficiently accurate histories for site-by-site analysis, 33 of 131 fracture sites and 16 of 83 dental-procedure sites were positive scintigraphically. In general, the frequency of scan positivity diminished as the interval between trauma and scanning increased, but a significant number of patients showed prolonged uptake at fracture sites. Several patterns of uptake suggested trauma rather than metastatic disease. Knowledge of a history of trauma is often critical in bone scan interpretation

  7. Trauma in elderly patients evaluated in a hospital emergency department in Konya, Turkey: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara H

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hasan Kara,1 Aysegul Bayir,1 Ahmet Ak,1 Murat Akinci,1 Necmettin Tufekci,1 Selim Degirmenci,1 Melih Azap21Department of Emergency Medicine, Selçuk University, Konya, Turkey; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Konya Numune Hospital, Konya, TurkeyPurpose: Trauma is a common cause of admission to the hospital emergency department. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cause of admission, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients aged ≥65 years admitted to an emergency department in Turkey because of blunt trauma.Materials and methods: Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 568 patients (314 women and 254 men aged ≥65 years who were admitted to an emergency department of a tertiary care hospital.Results: Trauma was caused by low-energy fall in 379 patients (67%, traffic accident in 79 patients (14%, high-energy fall in 69 patients (12%, and other causes in 41 patients (7%. The most frequent sites of injury were the lower extremity, thorax, upper extremity, and head. The femur was the most frequent fracture site. After evaluation in the emergency department, 377 patients (66% were hospitalized. There were 31 patients (5% who died. Risk of hospitalization after trauma was significantly associated with trauma to the lower extremity, thorax, and spine; fractures of the femur and rib; and intracranial injury.Conclusion: Emergency department admission after trauma in patients aged $65 years is common after low-energy falls, and most injuries occur to the extremities. It is important to focus on prevention of falls to decrease the frequency of trauma in the elderly.Keywords: fall, femur, fracture, injury

  8. Temporal bone trauma and the role of multidetector CT in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas, Julio O; Feliciano, Yara Z; Hadley, Celene R; Gomez, Angel A; Vidal, Jorge A

    2011-10-01

    The temporal bone anatomy is complex, with many critical structures in close association with one another. The temporal bone region comprises cranial nerves V, VI, VII, and VIII; vascular structures such as the internal carotid and middle meningeal arteries; sigmoid sinus; jugular bulb; and sensorineural and membranous structures of the inner ear. Most temporal bone fractures are a result of high-energy blunt head trauma. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) plays a fundamental role in the initial evaluation of patients with polytrauma in the emergency department. Multidetector CT may help identify important structural injuries that may have devastating complications such as sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, dizziness and balance dysfunction, perilymphatic fistulas, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, facial nerve paralysis, and vascular injury. Although classifying temporal bone fractures helps physicians understand and predict trauma-associated complications and guide treatment, identifying injury to critical structures is more important for guiding management and determining prognosis than is simply classifying temporal bone fractures into a general category. Many temporal bone fractures and complications may be readily identified and characterized at routine cervical, maxillofacial, and head multidetector CT performed in patients with polytrauma, without the need for dedicated temporal bone multidetector CT. Dedicated temporal bone multidetector CT should be considered when there is a high degree of suspicion for temporal bone fractures and no fractures are identified at head, cervical, or maxillofacial CT. PMID:21997992

  9. Contribution of Genetic Background and Clinical Risk Factors to Low-Trauma Fractures in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Positive Persons: The Swiss HIV Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junier, Thomas; Rotger, Margalida; Biver, Emmanuel; Ledergerber, Bruno; Barceló, Catalina; Bartha, Istvan; Kovari, Helen; Schmid, Patrick; Fux, Christoph; Bernasconi, Enos; Brun del Re, Claudia; Weber, Rainer; Fellay, Jacques; Tarr, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The impact of human genetic background on low-trauma fracture (LTF) risk has not been evaluated in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and clinical LTF risk factors. Methods. In the general population, 6 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associate with LTF through genome-wide association study. Using genome-wide SNP arrays and imputation, we genotyped these SNPs in HIV-positive, white Swiss HIV Cohort Study participants. We included 103 individuals with a first, physician-validated LTF and 206 controls matched on gender, whose duration of observation and whose antiretroviral therapy start dates were similar using incidence density sampling. Analyses of nongenetic LTF risk factors were based on 158 cases and 788 controls. Results. A genetic risk score built from the 6 LTF-associated SNPs did not associate with LTF risk, in both models including and not including parental hip fracture history. The contribution of clinical LTF risk factors was limited in our dataset. Conclusions. Genetic LTF markers with a modest effect size in the general population do not improve fracture prediction in persons with HIV, in whom clinical LTF risk factors are prevalent in both cases and controls.

  10. The radiologic spectrum of occipital condyle fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Occipital condyle fractures (OCFs) are increasingly diagnosed in survivors of high energy blunt trauma, and may be associated with craniocervical junction disruption.We aimed to describe and classify the imaging appearances of occipital condyle fractures in a large series of trauma patients. We reviewed conventional radiographs, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in 95 patients with 107 OCFs, who were treated at a level 1 trauma centre (1992-1999). We described fracture patterns according to two current classification systems (Anderson and Montesano, and Tuli), and correlated imaging appearances with clinical findings, neurosurgical management and patient outcome. Fracture morphology and craniocervical junction integrity were best assessed by 1-1.5mm collimation CT. Inferomedial occipital condyle avulsion fractures (Anderson and Montesano type III) were the commonest OCF category, comprising 80/107 (75%). Unilateral OCFs were found in 73/95 (77%) patients, 58 of whom were managed by cervical orthotic brace or collar. Bilateral OCFs or occipito-atlanto-axial joint injuries were seen in the remaining 22/95 (23%) patients. Occipitocervical fusion or craniocervical halo traction were required in 12 patients, all of whom had CT evidence of bilateral occipito-atlanto-axial joint disruption. Associated cervical spine injuries were present in 29/95 (31%) patients. Ten (10/95, 10.5%) patients died in hospital, and 30/95 (32%) showed continuing disability. The remaining 55/95 (57.5%) patients showed good outcome and functional independence at 1 month. Occipital condyle fractures are rare injuries with a wide range of morphology, stability and clinical significance. Thorough radiological evaluation of all components of the occipito-atlanto-axial joint complex must be performed in order to determine the full extent of injury. In this series, most unilateral OCFs were managed by non-operative immobilisation, whereas bilateral occipito

  11. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg;

    2012-01-01

    Diagnose and treatment of traumatic dental injuries is very complex due to the multiple trauma entities represented by 6 lunation types and 9 fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and lunation injuries are often combined......, the result is, that more than 100 trauma scenario exist when the two dentitions are combined. Each of these trauma scenarios have a specific treatment demand and prospect for healing. With such a complexity in diagnose and treatment it is obvious that even experienced practitioners may have problems may have...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an internet based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long term follow up is now available to the public and professionals, on the internet using the address www...

  12. CT diagnosis of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) findings from 95 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were evaluated. Among them, there was no false negative case. It can thus be said that if CT is negative the patient can be treated conservatively. The efficacy of CT in diagnosing injuries of various organs was also evaluated. (author)

  13. Geographic variations in orthopedic trauma billing and reimbursements for hip and pelvis fractures in the Medicare population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Ashley C; Lakomkin, Nikita; Bulka, Catherine; Thakore, Rachel; Collinge, Cory A; Sethi, Manish K

    2016-12-01

    We investigated geographic variations in Medicare spending for DRG 536 (hip and pelvis fracture). We identified 22,728 patients. The median number of charges, discharges, and payments were recorded. Hospitals were aggregated into core based statistical (CBS) areas and the coefficient of variation (CV) was calculated for each area. On average, hospitals charged 3.75 times more than they were reimbursed. Medicare charges and reimbursements demonstrated variability within each area. Geographic variation in Medicare spending for hip fractures is currently unexplained. It is imperative for orthopedists to understand drivers behind such high variability in hospital charges for management of hip and pelvis fractures. PMID:27408500

  14. Clinical Study on Ocular Trauma in Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zicai Huang; Hongni Li; Yixia Huang; Zhongxia Zhou

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical characteristics of ocular trauma in children and put forward the major treatment and prevention of ocular trauma in children.Methods: To analyze the clinical data by 77 eyes in 77 cases of ocular trauma in children from April 1999 to February 2002. Results: The male and female were in the ratio of 2.21: 1. Right eye ocular traumas were more than left ones. Ocular penetrating trauma was 83.12% and blunt trauma 12.99%. 41 cases (53.25%) were injured by themselves while 33 cases by others. 90.91% patients came from the countryside.Conclusion: The rate of blindness of children with ocular trauma could be reduced by prompt treatment. The study indicated that ocular trauma preventive publicity should be faced in the countryside in order to improve the understanding of the severity of ocular trauma and treat it as a social problem.

  15. Renal Trauma: Case Reports and Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Tait, Campbell D.; Somani, B. K.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Renal trauma patients are largely managed conservatively but on occasion have to be embolised or taken to theatre for definitive surgical management, usually in the form of emergency nephrectomy. Review. We present an overview of renal trauma as illustrated by three interesting cases of blunt renal trauma who presented in quick succession of each other to the Emergency Department. The first case—a 48-year-old-female passenger in a road traffic accident—was treated with life-savi...

  16. Dental trauma. Combination injuries 1. The risk of pulp necrosis in permanent teeth with concussion injuries and concomitant crown fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Hermann, Nuno Vibe; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Ahrensburg, Søren Steno; Kreiborg, Sven; Andreasen, Jens Ove

    2012-01-01

    The reported risk of pulp necrosis (PN) is low in teeth with concussion injuries. A concomitant crown fracture may affect the risk of PN. Aim:  To analyze the influence of a crown fracture (with and without pulp exposure) on the risk of PN in teeth with concussion injury. Material:  The study...... included 469 permanent incisors with concussion from 358 patients (226 male, 132 female). Among these, 292 had a concomitant crown fracture (70 with and 222 without pulp exposure). All teeth were examined and treated according to standardized protocol. Statistical analysis:  The risk of PN was analyzed by...... increased to 55.0% (95% CI: 34.3–75.8). Conclusion:  No response to EPT at the initial examination or a concomitant crown fracture significantly increased the risk of PN in teeth with concussion injury and mature root development. If both risk factors were present there was a synergetic effect....

  17. Concomitant Posterior Hip Dislocation, Ipsilateral Intertrochanteric- and Proximal Tibial- Fractures with Popliteal Artery Injury: A Challenging Trauma Mélange

    OpenAIRE

    Chotai, Pranit N.; Ebraheim, Nabil A.; Ryan Hart; Andrew Wassef

    2015-01-01

    Constellation of ipsilateral posterior hip dislocation, intertrochanteric- and proximal tibial fracture with popliteal artery injury is rare. Management of this presentation is challenging. A motor vehicle accident victim presented with these injuries, but without any initial signs of vascular compromise. Popliteal artery injury was diagnosed intra-operatively and repaired. This was followed by external fixation of tibial fracture, open reduction of dislocated hip and internal fixation of int...

  18. 枪弹射击致防弹衣后长白猪远达脑组织损伤特点及其机制%Characteristics and mechanism of behind armour blunt trauma in Landrace brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏正林; 许民辉; 赖西南; 张波; 黄艺峰; 王丽丽

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the characteristics of behind armor blunt trauma extending to the brain and to investigate the biomechanics mechanism of the remote injury. Methods Eighteen male Landraces were randomly divided into a sham injury group (n =4) , a bullet velocity 910 m/s group (re =6), a 740 m/s group (n =4) and a S90 m/s group (n =4). The injury model was anesthetized Landrace in right lateral position and wrapped in a two-layer bullet-proof vest. The outer layer was ceramic hard armor with NIJ Ⅲ protection grade. The inner layer was police grade II ultra-high molecular polyethylene soft body armor. Caliber 5. 8 mm ballistic guns were fired at 25 m range and three different projectile velocities, aimed at the left midclavicular line 4, 5 intercostal (heart window). Air bomb shooting was applied to sham injury group. EEG, ECG, invasive arterial blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory changes before and after injury were continuously monitored. Plasma was collected at 1, 2 and 3 h before and after injury to detect markers of brain injury. Lumbar puncture was taken at 3 h before and after injury to test specific brain injury protein in cerebrospinal fluid. In 3 h after injury the animals were deep anesthetized and bled to death. Their brain blocks were collected for toluidine blue staining and electron microscopy. The other 4 Landrace pigs were used for biomechanical testing. On the basis of the above model pressure sensors were placed in the subcutaneous layer of precordium at the point of impact, pericardial cavity, left chest, left common carotid artery and cranial cavity. Acceleration sensors and force sensors were placed in the sixth rib at precordial midclavicular line. When the target was hit, each parts biomechanical parameters and duration were recorded and analyzed. Results In the 3 groups of different speed, spectrum intensity of low-frequency EEG Delta and Theta wave within 2 minutes after injury was significantly lower than that before injury (P

  19. Staging rehabilitative management of functional disorder of intraarticular fracture of knee joint following lower limbs trauma%膝关节内骨折后功能障碍的分期康复治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁春祥; 王楚怀

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate staging rehabilitative management of intraarticular fracture of knee joint following lower limbs trauma.Method According to pathological changes during repair process,rehabilitation prescription was determined for 479 patients with intraarticular fracture of knee joint following lower limbs trauma.Knee joint scale was used to evaluate the patients before and after treatment.Result Mean range of motion of knee joint was increased by (45.73± 8.79) degree(t=8.79;P<0.01),mean total score of 6 indexes was increased by (41.16± 7.55) (t=9.28,P<0.01).Conclusion Rehabilitation treatment determined according to pathological process of fracture repair is necessary

  20. Intra-operative airway management in patients with maxillofacial trauma having reduction and immobilization of facial fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatunde Babasola Osinaike

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite advancements in airway management, treatment of fractures in the maxillofacial region under general anesthesia remains a unique anesthetic challenge. We reviewed the pattern of airway management in patients with maxillofacial fractures and assessed those challenges associated with the different airway management techniques employed. Materials and Methods: The anesthetic chart, theatre and maxillofacial operations records of patients who had reduction and immobilization of various maxillofacial fractures over a 2-year period were reviewed. Information obtained included the patient demographics, mechanisms of injury, types of fractures and details about airway management. Statistical Package for Social Sciences, SPSS version 17.0 was utilized for all data analysis. Results: Fifty-one patients were recruited during the 2-year study period. Mask ventilation was easy in 80-90% of the patients, 80% had Mallampati three or four, while 4 (7.8% had laryngoscopy grading of 4. There was no statistically significant difference between the fracture groups in terms of the laryngoscopy grading (P = 0.153 but there was statistical significant difference in the technique of airway management (P = 0.0001. Nasal intubation following direct laryngoscopy was employed in 64.7% of the patients, fiber-optic guided nasal intubation was utilized in only 7.8%. None of the patients had tracheostomy either before or during operative management. Conclusion: Laryngoscopic grading and not adequacy of mouth opening predicted difficult intubation in this group of patients in the immediate preoperative period. Despite the distortions in the anatomy of the upper airway that may result from maxillofacial fractures, nasal intubation following direct laryngoscopy may be possible in many patients with maxillofacial fractures.

  1. Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the ...

  2. Dental trauma. Combination injuries 2. The risk of pulp necrosis in permanent teeth with subluxation injuries and concomitant crown fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Hermann, Nuno Vibe; Gerds, Thomas Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    .0001), enamel–dentin–pulp fracture (log-rank test: P hazard ratio: 21 (95% confidence interval, CI: 2.5–172.5), P = 0.005]. Teeth with mature root development: the risk of PN was increased in teeth with an enamel–dentin fracture [hazard...... ratio: 12.2 (95% CI: 5.0–29.8), P hazard ratio: 5.1 (95% CI: 1.2–21.4) P = 0.04] and in teeth with no response to EPT at the initial examination [hazard ratio: 8 (95% CI: 3.3–19.5), P

  3. Trauma Kimia

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, Rodiah Rahmawaty

    2015-01-01

    Mata merupakan organ yang keberadaannya berhubungan langsung dengan lingkungan luar sehingga sering menyebabkan mata terkena dampak dari posisi anatominya tersebut. Mata sering terpapar dengan keadaan lingkungan sekitar seperti udara, debu, benda asing dan suatu trauma yang dapat langsung mengenai mata. Trauma pada mata meliputi trauma tumpul, trauma tajam, trauma kimia, dan trauma radiasi. Rodiah Rahmawaty Lubis

  4. Segond fracture: involvement of the iliotibial band, anterolateral ligament, and anterior arm of the biceps femoris in knee trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the involvement of the iliotibial band (ITB), the anterolateral ligament (ALL), and the anterior arm of the biceps femoris in MRI-diagnosed Segond fracture and to evaluate other associated findings of Segond fracture. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI of 13 cases of Segond fracture. The studies included proton density-weighted, T2-weighted, and proton density-weighted with fat saturation images in the three planes. We studied 2 cadaveric specimens with emphasis on the ALL. One cadaveric specimen was dissected while the other was sectioned in the sagittal plane. The mean age of the patients was 36 years (range, 17-52). There were 7 men and 6 women. The mean size of the Segond bone fragment was 8 x 10 x 2 mm. The distance from the tibia varied from 2 to 6 mm. Associated findings included anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear (n = 13), medial collateral ligament (MCL) tear (n = 8), meniscocapsular tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (n = 5), and posterolateral corner involvement (n = 4). Bone marrow edema involved the mid-lateral femoral condyle and the posterior tibial plateau on both the medial and the lateral side. Edema at the Segond area was seen, but was limited. Fibular head edema was also seen. The ITB (11 out of 13) and ALL (10 out of 13) inserted on the Segond bone fragment. The anterior arm of the biceps tendon did not insert on the Segond fracture. Associated findings of Segond fracture include ACL tear, MCL tear, medial meniscus tear, and posterolateral corner injury. Both the ITB and the ALL may be involved in the Segond avulsion. The anterior arm of the biceps femoris tendon is not involved. (orig.)

  5. Segond fracture: involvement of the iliotibial band, anterolateral ligament, and anterior arm of the biceps femoris in knee trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeseneer, Michel de; Boulet, Cedric; Willekens, Inneke; Mey, Johan de; Shahabpour, Maryam [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Lenchik, Leon [Wake Forest University, Department of Radiology, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Cattrysse, Erik [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Experimental Anatomy, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-12-04

    To evaluate the involvement of the iliotibial band (ITB), the anterolateral ligament (ALL), and the anterior arm of the biceps femoris in MRI-diagnosed Segond fracture and to evaluate other associated findings of Segond fracture. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI of 13 cases of Segond fracture. The studies included proton density-weighted, T2-weighted, and proton density-weighted with fat saturation images in the three planes. We studied 2 cadaveric specimens with emphasis on the ALL. One cadaveric specimen was dissected while the other was sectioned in the sagittal plane. The mean age of the patients was 36 years (range, 17-52). There were 7 men and 6 women. The mean size of the Segond bone fragment was 8 x 10 x 2 mm. The distance from the tibia varied from 2 to 6 mm. Associated findings included anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear (n = 13), medial collateral ligament (MCL) tear (n = 8), meniscocapsular tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (n = 5), and posterolateral corner involvement (n = 4). Bone marrow edema involved the mid-lateral femoral condyle and the posterior tibial plateau on both the medial and the lateral side. Edema at the Segond area was seen, but was limited. Fibular head edema was also seen. The ITB (11 out of 13) and ALL (10 out of 13) inserted on the Segond bone fragment. The anterior arm of the biceps tendon did not insert on the Segond fracture. Associated findings of Segond fracture include ACL tear, MCL tear, medial meniscus tear, and posterolateral corner injury. Both the ITB and the ALL may be involved in the Segond avulsion. The anterior arm of the biceps femoris tendon is not involved. (orig.)

  6. Fatigue crack growth from blunt notches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of methods have been proposed, by which the formation and early growth of fatigue cracks at blunt notches may be predicted. In this report, four methods are compared - i.e. analysis of the crack tip plastic deformation, the cyclic contour integral, δJ, the strain in a critical volume of material, and the notch root plastic strain range. It is shown that these approaches have fundamental elements in common, and that all are compatable with linear elastic fracture mechanics. Early results from a continuing experimental programme are reported. (orig.)

  7. Chest Traumas due to Bicycle accident in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Cobanoglu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim:Childhood injuries are the leading cause of death in children and result in significant healthcare utilization. Trauma is the second most common cause of mortality in children aged 1-4 years and leading cause of death in children older than 4 years. Thoracic injury is the second most leading cause of death in traumatized children. Multisystemic injury is found in more than 50% of children with thoracic injuries most of which are secondary to blunt traumas. We planned this study to evaluate thorax trauma cases secondary to bicycle driving in childhood and to draw attention to the importance of the regulation of traffic rules, the education of bicycle drivers.Material and Methods:  A retrospective evaluation was performed in 17 pediatric patients admitted to the Department of Thoracic Surgery during 2006-2010 with a diagnosis of chest trauma due to bicycle driving. For every patient, a pediatric trauma score (PTS was calculated. Descriptive statistics were performed for PTS. Results; Eleven (64.70% cases were injured due to the tricycle accidents and six cases 6 (35.29% were injured due to the two-wheeled bicycle accidents. The most frequent thoracic pathologies included pulmonary contusion (41.2% and chest wall contusion (29.41%. Extrathoracic injuries were seen in 35.29%, the extremities (17.64% and abdomino pelvic (11.76% being the most commonly involved. Treatment consisted of symptomatic treatment in 12 patients (70.58%, tube thoracostomy in 2 patients (11.76%, and thoracotomy in 1 patient (5.9%. The morbidity was seen in 3 patients (17.64%. The mortality rate was 5.9% (n:1. The mean PTS of the cases who had additional system injuries were significantly worse than the cases who had isolated chest traumas Conclusions: The pediatric thorax has a greater cartilage content and incomplete ossification of the ribs. Due to the pliability of the pediatric rib cage and mediastinal mobility, significant intrathoracic injury may exist in the

  8. Blunt cardiac injury: case report of salvaged traumatic right atrial rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ayyan, Muna; Aziz, Tanim; El Sherif, Amgad; Bekdache, Omar

    2016-11-01

    The incidence of cardiac rupture following blunt trauma is rare, occurring in 0.3%-0.5% of all blunt trauma patients. It can be fatal at the trauma scene, and is frequently missed in the emergency room setting. The severity of a cardiac trauma is based on the mechanism and degree of the force applied. The objective of this study was to report the case of a 32-year-old male patient who was involved in a motor vehicle collision and presented to the emergency room with signs of hypovolemic shock. The patient was found to have severe chest trauma associated with massive hemothorax requiring immediate intervention. The patient had an emergent thoracotomy revealing a right atrial injury. Repair of the atrial injury reversed the state of shock. The patient was discharged after 35 days of hospitalization in good condition. PMID:27054650

  9. Management of acetabular fractures: challenging work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zheng-rong; YANG Yi

    2006-01-01

    @@ Acetabular fractures are complex and special intraarticular fractures. For most orthopaedic surgeons management of acetabular fractures is hard and challenging because the fractures are the results of high-energy trauma, and usually accompany with severe associated injuries. In addition, these fractures are uncommon except in a few trauma centers. The number of cases a surgeon can encounter is scarce.

  10. Surgical management of odontoid fractures at Level one trauma center: A single-center series of 142 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dattaraj Paramanand Sawarkar

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Anterior OS fixation shows excellent fusion rates and should be the first-line management in reduced/non-displaced acute type II (including type IIA and high type III odontoid fractures as it preserves cervical motion. PF, that has also been associated with an excellent fusion rate, should be reserved for patients where OS fixation has either failed or has not been feasible.

  11. ROLE OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN SPINAL TRAUMA WITH SURGICAL CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Kumari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spinal trauma is a common cause of disability. The common causes of spinal trauma are blunt injuries – motor vehicle accidents, falls, sport injuries, assaults. MRI plays a crucial role in evaluating and detecting spinal trauma specially subtle bone marrow, soft tissue and spinal cord abnormalities. Many advantages of MRI such as high contrast resolution, absence of bony artifacts, multiplanar capability and choice of various pulse sequences make it possible to diagnose spinal trauma more accurately. Information about neural and extra - neural injuries requiring surgical interventions can be obtained. AIMS: Role of MRI in spinal trauma with surgical correlation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospective evaluation of 85 patients with history of spinal injury in hemodynamically stable patients on 1.5 Tesla MRI and surgical correlation. RESULTS: Age of patients ranged from 11 - 80 years with mean age 45 years. Cervical spine is most commonly involved and RTA being most common cause of spinal injury. Cord compression, haemorrhage are most common presentation in MRI. While MRI is less sensitive in detecting posterior element fractures, over estimates ligament injuries and shows highest sensitivity for intervertebral disc injury. In our study, we have seen one case of pseudomeningocele formation with brachial plexus injury and two cases of vertebral artery thrombosis. C ONCLUSION: Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the only tool available for depicting the changes within the cord, ligaments and paraspinal soft tissues which helps in the management of the patients and in predicting the prognosis of recovery.

  12. Pitfalls in penetrating trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vugt, A B

    2003-08-01

    In Western Europe the most frequent cause of multiple injuries is blunt trauma. Only few of us have experience with penetrating trauma, without exception far less than in the USA or South-Africa. In Rotterdam, the Erasmus Medical Centre is a level I trauma centre, situated directly in the town centre. All penetrating traumas are directly presented to our emergency department by a well organized ambulance service supported by a mobile medical team if necessary. The delay with scoop and run principles is very short for these cases, resulting in severely injured reaching the hospital alive in increasing frequency. Although the basic principles of trauma care according to the guidelines of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) (1-2) are the same for blunt and penetrating trauma with regard to priorities, diagnostics and primary therapy, there are some pitfalls in the strategy of management in penetrating trauma one should be aware of. Simple algorithms can be helpful, especially in case of limited experience (3). In case of life-saving procedures, the principles of Damage Control Surgery (DCS) must be followed (4-5). This approach is somewhat different from "traditional" surgical treatment. In the Ist phase prompt interventions by emergency thoracotomy and laparotomy are carried out, with only two goals to achieve: surgical control of haemorrhage and contamination. After temporary life-saving procedures, the 2nd phase is characterized by intensive care treatment, dealing with hypothermia, metabolic acidosis and clotting disturbances. Finally in the 3rd phase, within 6-24 hours, definitive surgical care takes place. In this overview, penetrating injuries of neck, thorax, abdomen and extremities will be outlined. Penetrating cranial injuries, as a neurosurgical emergency with poor prognosis, are not discussed. History and physical examination remain the corner stones of good medical praxis. In a work-up according to ATLS principles airway, breathing and circulation

  13. Radiographic evaluation of hepatic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of significant abdominal trauma continues to rise and accounts currently for approximately 10 percent of the annual 130,000 trauma-related deaths in the United States. Over 60 percent of patients are from 10 to 40 years of age, with a striking predominance of males. Children are mostly victims of blunt trauma, while some large reviews of liver trauma in adults show a prevalence of penetrating injuries. Injury to the liver is second only to the spleen in incidence of intraperitoneal injuries. Morbidity and mortality from hepatic trauma are related to the mechanism and extent of injury. Penetrating injuries generally have a lower mortality, about 5 percent, especially if they are due to stab wounds or low velocity gunshot wounds. Shotgun and high velocity gunshot wounds may cause massive fragmentation of the liver and are associated with proportionately greater mortality. The mortality from blunt trauma is from 15 to 45 percent in many large series. Death from isolated liver injury is uncommon, but is usually due to uncontrolled hemorrhage. Injury to other abdominal organs is associated in many cases, as are injuries to the head, chest, and limbs. The extraabdominal injuries are frequently more apparent clinically, but may mask potentially life-threatening abdominal visceral injuries

  14. CT scanning for diagnosing blunt ureteral and ureteropelvic junction injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Peter

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blunt ureteral and ureteropelvic (UPJ injuries are extremely rare and very difficult to diagnose. Many of these injuries are missed by the initial trauma evaluation. Methods Trauma registry data was used to identify all blunt trauma patients with ureteral or UPJ injuries, from 1 April 2001 to 30 November 2006. Demographics, injury information and outcomes were determined. Chart review was then performed to record initial clinical and all CT findings. Results Eight patients had ureteral or UPJ injuries. Subtle findings such as perinephric stranding and hematomas, and low density retroperitoneal fluid were evident on all initial scans, and prompted delayed excretory scans in 7/8 cases. As a result, ureteral and UPJ injuries were diagnosed immediately for these seven patients. These findings were initially missed in the eighth patient because significant associated visceral findings mandated emergency laparotomy. All ureteral and UPJ injuries have completely healed except for the case with the delay in diagnosis. Conclusion Most blunt ureteral and UPJ injuries can be identified if delayed excretory CT scans are performed based on initial CT findings of perinephric stranding and hematomas, or the finding of low density retroperitoneal fluid.

  15. Delaying urinary catheter insertion in the reception and resuscitation of blunt multitrauma and using a full bladder to tamponade pelvic bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sean; Vohora, Ashray; Russ, Matthias K; Mathew, Joseph K; Johnny, Cecil S; Stevens, Jeremy; Fitzgerald, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a counter-argument to standard Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) training--which advocates bladder catheterisation to be performed as an adjunct to the primary survey and resuscitation for early decompression of the bladder and urine output monitoring. We argue the case for delaying bladder catheterisation until after definitive truncal Computed Tomography (CT) imaging. To reduce pelvic volume and associated bleeding, our trauma team delay catheter insertion until after the initial CT scan. The benefits of a full bladder also include improved views on initial Focussed Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) scan and improved interpretation of injuries on CT. Our urinary catheter related infection rates anecdotally decreased when insertion was delayed and consequently performed in a more controlled, non-resuscitation setting following CT. Adult blunt multitrauma patients with pelvic ring fractures are at risk of significant haemorrhage. Venous, arterial and medullary injuries with associated bleeding may be potentiated by an increased pelvic volume with ring disruption, as well as a reduced pressure effect from retroperitoneal and intra-pelvic organs on bleeding sites. Various techniques are used to reduce intra-pelvic bleeding. For shocked patients who have sustained major pelvic injuries with no other signs of urinary tract trauma and minimal urine in the bladder on initial FAST scan, we advocate careful, aseptic Foley catheter insertion followed by bladder insufflation with 500-600 mL of Normal Saline (NS) and subsequent catheter clamping to tamponade pelvic bleeding. PMID:25805552

  16. Percutaneous artherial embolization in the treatment of liver trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percutaneous arterial embolization in the treatment of liver trauma. Liver trauma requires emergency therapy. Because it is highly vascular and because of its location, the hemostasis is difficult to achieve. The main causes of death associated to liver trauma are due to prolonged hipovolemia. The current forms of surgical treatment of liver wounds are associated with a high morbidity rate. In some hepatic injuries, hemorrage is so massive that operative control of bleeding is necessary, bu t in most cases, particularly in blunt trauma, an angiographic approach with diagnosis and embolotherapy is preferable. Six patients with blunt or perforating hepatic trauma were managed with percutaneous arterial embolization. Hemostasis was achieved immediately in all of them withoyt recurrence. Surgical intervention with additional trauma was thus avoided, decreasing the morbidity rate. The percutaneous arterial embolization presents an efficient alternative in the management of hemorrage due to liver trauma, being particularly useful in the poor risk patient. (author)

  17. Trauma in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rudra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma is the most common non-obstetrical cause of death in pregnant women. Pregnancy must always be suspected in any female trauma patient of childbearing age until proved otherwise. Unique changes in anatomy and physiology that takes place during pregnancy alter the pathophysiology and location of maternal injuries in pregnancy, which may be significantly different from the non-pregnant state. Trauma from road traffic accidents, falls and domestic violence are the most common causes of abdominal blunt trauma. As pregnancy progresses, the change of accidental injury increases. Head and neck injuries, respiratory failure, and hypovolemic shock constitute the most frequent causes of trauma related maternal death in pregnancy. Even the pregnant woman with minor injuries should be carefully observed. Initial management is directed at resuscitation and stabilization of the mother that takes precedence over that of the fetus, unless vital signs cannot be maintained and perimortem cesarean section decided upon. Fetal monitoring should be maintained after satisfactory resuscitation and stabilization of the mother. Preventive measures include proper seat belt use and identifying and counseling victims of suspected domestic violence.

  18. Classification and management of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To classify the predominant pattern of injuries following blunt and penetrating chest trauma and to assess the adequacy of treatment strategies, complications and mortality associated with such injuries. Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical Unit I, Holy Family Hospital, Rawalpindi, from December 2000 to December 2003. Patients and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with thoracic trauma either blunt or penetrating, admitted in the ward were evaluated. Their injuries were classified, treatment strategies outlined and complications and mortality were documented on a specially-designed proforma. Results: Out of the 100 patients presenting in emergency, 44% presented with blunt and 56% with penetrating trauma. Pneumothorax was detected in 39% of the patients, hemopneumothorax in 29%, hemothorax in 12%, flail chest in 9%. Two had involvement of the heart and major vessels, 4% had injury to the diaphragm and 5% had multiple trauma. During treatment, 3% of all the patients were managed conservatively, 83% of patients required chest intubations, 6% needed ventilatory support and 8 % required thoracotomy. Complications were experienced in 28% of the patients of which 9% had pneumonias, 14% empyema and 5% suffered from wound infections. The overall mortality was 7%. Conclusion: This series showed the pattern of injuries following blunt and penetrating chest trauma. Furthermore, it was found that chest incubation and simple resuscitation was adequate for majority of the cases. (author)

  19. Rib Tuberculosis Treatment By Steel Greft which has Fractured after a Thoracic Trauma: 10-year Follow up Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Oncel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rib tuberculosis is an uncommon form of osteoarticular tuberculosis. The physical and radiological examination can often mimic other conditions ,including primary and metastatic chest wall tumors . A 60 year-old male patient had a mass in the chest wall. Surgery aiming diagnosis and treatment based on physical and radiological findings were performed. Histopathological examination of the mass specimen revealed tuberculosis. The chest wall defect was supported with a stell greft after the six month . The patient had fallen from stairs and hit his chest six year after . The case had a significant fracture in the steel graft . This is unusual manifestation of chest wall grefts . This, chest wall, showing a softer steel materials should be used in grafts that would break a long-term follow-up is presented [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 295-298

  20. Emergency Room Thoracotomy for Thoracic Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Sayan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study we discussed that indication and effect on survival of emergency room thoracotomy in cardiac and respiratory arrest patients after penetrating or blunt chest trauma. Material and Method: Between March 2013 and September 2014, five emergency room thoracotomies were performed. The medical record of patients were analyzed retrospectively.Results:Emergency room thoracotomy was performed for 4 patients with penetrating and 1 patient with blunt chest trauma. 2 patients have died after the procedure. 1 patient died on the 10th day after surgery due to multi organ failure. 2 patients have survived and they discharged from the hospital without any sequelae. Discussion: Emergency room thoracotomy is a life-saving approach after thoracic trauma especially patients with penetrating trauma.

  1. Organización en el tratamiento del traumatismo panfacial y de las fracturas complejas del tercio medio Organization of treatment in panfacial trauma and complex midfacial fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Muñoz i Vidal

    2009-03-01

    between 2005 and 2006. There were 14 patients with midface high energy trauma, 4 of those associated to mandible or upper face subunit fractures. Extraocular motility, air way, correct oclussal relationship, minimum aesthetic sequel and correct recreating of facial dimensions define our goals. A multidisciplinary approach to these patients is imperative. Due to the complexity of these cases, there is not place allowed for improvisation and a previous accurate anamnesis, exploration and order of treatment is absolutely required. This leads to a proper management, an anatomic bone threedimensional reconstruction, preservation of soft structures according to previous patient's anthropometry and minimum aesthetic sequel in a single surgery time.

  2. Computed Tomographic Angiography (CTA) in Vascular Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    M. Tehrai

    2007-01-01

    In the evaluation of trauma patients, computed tomo-graphy and CT angiography (CTA) are powerful non-invasive tools that provide a large amount of informa-tion in so little time that they have virtually replaced plain film radiography and catheter angiography. In our hospital, CTA has replaced catheter angiogra-phy for diagnosing most vascular injuries, resulting from penetrating and blunt trauma to head, neck, thorax, abdomen and extremities. This lecture will cover current imaging protocols...

  3. Trauma imaging in the thorax and abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book thoroughly covers the radiologic diagnosis of traumatic injuries of the thorax and abdomen with special consideration given to the physical principles governing blunt, blast, and penetrating trauma and to the pathophysiology which they cause. The clinical experience forming the major data base for this book is drawn from the Ramban Medical Center in Haifa, Israel, the major trauma center for the Middle East wars

  4. Vertebral Artery Transection in Nonpenetrating Trauma: A Series of 4 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Ezekiel; Lehnert, Bruce; McNeeley, Michael F

    2015-10-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injury is a common and potentially devastating consequence of nonpenetrating trauma to the head and neck. The degree of injury ranges from minimal intimal disruption to complete transection with free extravasation. Although blunt carotid transection has been well characterized in clinical reports and radiologic studies, the computed tomographic angiography (CTA) features of blunt vertebral artery transection have not been well described. We report a series of 4 patients presenting to our level I trauma center with blunt vertebral artery transection, with an emphasis on their CTA imaging findings at presentation and their respective clinical courses. A brief review of the pertinent literature is provided. PMID:26122415

  5. Management of Temporal Bone Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Alpen; Groppo, Eli

    2010-01-01

    The temporal bones are paired structures located on the lateral aspects of the skull and contribute to the skull base. Trauma is usually the result of blunt head injury and can result in damage to the brain and meninges, the middle and internal ear, and the facial nerve. Complications can include intracranial hemorrhage, cerebral contusion, CSF leak and meningitis, hearing loss, vertigo, and facial paralysis. To prevent these complications, diagnosis followed by appropriate medical and surgic...

  6. Imaging of high-energy midfacial trauma: what the surgeon needs to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment goals in severe midfacial trauma are restoration of function and appearance. Restoration of function is directed at multiple organ systems, which support visual acuity, airway patency, mastication, lacrimation, smelling, tasting, hearing, and facial expression. Victims of blunt facial trauma expect to look the same after surgical treatment as before injury. Delicate soft tissues of the midface often make cosmetic reconstructive surgery technically challenging. Generally, clinical evaluation alone does not suffice to fully characterize facial fractures associated with extensive swelling, and the deeper midface is not accessible to physical examination. Properly performed computed tomography (CT) overcomes most limitations of presurgical examination. Thus, operative approaches and sequencing of surgical repair are guided by imaging information displayed by CT. Restoration of function and appearance relies on recreating normal maxillofacial skeletal anatomy, with particular attention to position of the malar eminences, mandibular condyles, vertical dimension and orbital morphology. Due to its pivotal role in surgical planning, CT scans obtained for the evaluation of severe midfacial trauma should be designed to easily depict the imaging information necessary for clinical decision making. Learning objectives: 1. Understand the facial skeletal buttress system; 2. Understand how the pattern of derangement of the buttress system determines the need for and choice of operative approach for repair of fractures in the middle third of the face; 3. Understand the role and importance of CT and CT reformations in the detection and classification of the pattern of buttress system derangement

  7. Diagnostic Yield and Clinical Utility of Abdominopelvic CT Following Emergent Laparotomy for Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haste, Adam K; Brewer, Brian L; Steenburg, Scott D

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To determine the incidence of unexpected injuries that are diagnosed with computed tomography (CT) after emergent exploratory laparotomy for trauma and whether identification of such injuries results in additional surgery or angiography. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. The trauma databases of two urban level 1 trauma centers were queried over a period of more than 5 years for patients who underwent abdominopelvic CT within 48 hours of emergent exploratory laparotomy for trauma. Comparisons were made between CT findings and those described in the surgical notes. Descriptive statistics were generated, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined by using an exact method based on a binomial distribution. Results The study cohort consisted of 90 patients, including both blunt and penetrating trauma victims with a median injury severity score of 17.5 (interquartile range, 9.25-34). Seventy-three percent (66 of 90) of patients sustained penetrating trauma, 82% (74 of 90) of whom were male. A total of 19 patients (21.1%; 95% CI: 13.2, 31.0) had additional injuries within the surgical field that were not identified during laparotomy. There were 17 unidentified solid organ injuries, and eight patients had active bleeding within the surgical field. Eight patients (8.9%; 95% CI: 3.9, 16.8) had unexpected injuries at CT that were substantial enough to warrant additional surgery or angiography. In addition, previously undiagnosed fractures were found in 45 patients (50%; 95% CI: 39.3, 60.7). Conclusion Performing CT after emergent exploratory laparotomy for trauma is useful in identifying unexpected injuries and confirming suspected injuries that were not fully explored at initial surgery. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:26963577

  8. Estudio comparativo del tratamiento ortésico en las fracturas toraco-lumbosacras según la gravedad del trauma Estudo comparativo do tratamento ortótico nas fraturas toraco-lombosacro segundo a gravidade do trauma Comparative study on orthotic treatment of thoraco-lumbo-sacral fractures according to severity of trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Manzone

    2011-01-01

    diferença significativa entre medições iniciais e seguimento. A única diferença significativa entre os grupos foi a cifose inicial da coluna vertebral. Sempre houve dife renças na comparação dos parâmetros geométricos do grupo controle e os grupos A e B, e entre o grupo controle e cada tipo (AO/Denis subdividido em alta ou baixa energia. As pontuações dos parâmetros funcionais finais sempre foram boas, com variações significativas entre os grupos A e B. CONCLUSÕES: É possível um bom resultado funcional em lesões toraco-lombo-sacrais estáveis, selecionando o tipo de órteses de acordo com a energia cinética do trauma. Esses resultados parecem ser melhores em traumas de alta energia tratados com dispositivos ortopédicos feitos à medida. No entanto, o tratamento ortésico diferenciado de acordo com a energia do trauma não altera os parâmetros radiológicos sagitais.OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the severity of stable thoraco-lumbo-sacral trauma is useful for deciding the selection of brace type in orthopedic treatment. METHODS: Retrospective study (16 years length. Inclusion criteria: 1 Minimum follow-up: 2 years. 2 Complete conventional radiologic studies. 3 no litigation. 4 TLSO custom-made treatment for high kinetic energy trauma and pre-fabricated orthoses for low energy one. 5 Treatment performed or supervised by the senior author. Evaluation by independent observers of geometric Parameters (sagittal Cobb, vertebral kyphosis, anterior vertebral collapse initially and at follow-up, and Functional Parameters (SRS pain scale, Oswestry Index, Return to Previous Activity. Subdivision of different fractures types (of AO and Denis classifications in High (group A and Low Energy (group b according to the amount of kinetic energy of trauma. Comparison with a control group. Statistical analysis: chi square and Student t-test. RESULTS: Forty-one patients were studied (44 fractures, 23 females/18 males, 25 fractures group A and 19 group b. Average age: 46

  9. Isolated blunt chest injury leads to transient activation of circulating neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, T.; Hietbrink, F.; Groeneveld, K. M.; Koenderman, L; Leenen, L.P.H.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe and frequently seen complication in multi-trauma patients. ARDS is caused by an excessive innate immune response with a clear role for neutrophils. As ARDS is more frequently seen in trauma patients with chest injury, we investigated the influence of chest injury on the systemic neutrophil response and the development of ARDS. Materials and methods Thirteen patients with isolated blunt chest injury [abbreviated injury sco...

  10. Pelvic Insufficiency Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    O’Connor, Timothy J.; Cole, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic insufficiency fractures may occur in the absence of trauma or as a result of low-energy trauma in osteoporotic bone. With a growing geriatric population, the incidence of pelvic insufficiency fracture has increased over the last 3 decades and will continue to do so. These fractures can cause considerable pain, loss of independence, and economic burden to both the patient and the health care system. While many of these injuries are identified and treated based on plain radiographs, some...

  11. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  12. Epidemiology of acute wrist trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C F; Lauritsen, Jens

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological data on wrist injuries in a population can be used for planning by applying them to criteria for care and thus deriving estimates of provisions for care according to currently desirable standards. In a 1-year study all patients > or = 15 years with acute wrist trauma and treated...... in the emergency room were examined according to an algorithm until a diagnosis was established. The overall incidence of wrist trauma was 69 per 10,000 inhabitants per year. Incidence of wrist trauma requiring x-ray examination was 58 per 10,000 per year. The incidence of distal radius fractures was 27 per 10...... using data from a population-based study. A completeness rate of 0.56 (95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.78) was found. An x-ray had been taken for all patients reporting a fracture thus justifying the use of fractures as an incidence measure when comparing groups of patients with wrist trauma....

  13. Splenic injury diagnosis & splenic salvage after trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Olthof

    2014-01-01

    Non-operative management (NOM) has replaced surgery as the treatment of choice for hemodynamically stable patients with splenic injury after trauma. The growing use of NOM for blunt abdominal organ injury has been made possible by the progress in the quality and availability of the multidetector CT

  14. James Blunt matuselaulude edetabeli tipus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Bereavement Registeri andmetel Suurbritannias matustel tellitavate laulude edetabelis: James Blunt "Goodbye My Lover", Robbie Williams "Angels", Jennifer Warnes ja Bill Medley "I've Had the Time Of My Life", Elton John "Candle in the Wind", Righteous Brothers "Unchained Melody"

  15. Usefulness of ultrasound examination in larynx traumas in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The aim of the paper was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasonographic examination in diagnosing laryngeal traumas, and monitoring the progress or complications in its treatment. Material/Method: In the years 2004 - 2009, 12 children, including 5 girls and 7 boys with laryngeal injuries, aged 5 - 12 years, were diagnosed and treated. In all the children, US examination of the neck and larynx, using a high-frequency linear transducer, as well as laryngoscopy and radiological examination of the cervical spine and chest were performed. Results: Blunt injury of the larynx was found in 12 children; in 9 children, the injury had been caused by hitting the neck against an obtuse object, 1 child had been kicked in the neck, and in one there had been an attempt of strangling. One of the children had sustained blunt injuries of the neck and chest in a traffic accident. In US examinations, the findings included: unilateral lack of vocal cord mobility in 5 children, asymmetry in vocal cord mobility in 1 child, fractured thyroid cartilage with local hematoma in the affected area in 2 children, and thickened vocal cords in 5 children. In radiological examination, the findings included: subcutaneous emphysema in the cervical area of the chest in 4 children, and mediastinal emphysema in 2 children with traumatic rupture of the trachea shown in laryngoscopy. Conclusions: US examination is helpful in the assessment of the extensiveness of laryngeal trauma, especially in the evaluation of vocal cord mobility, cervical cartilage and the soft tissues of the neck. A high level of conformity was demonstrated between the results of cervical US and the respective laryngoscopic findings. US examination does not allow to differentiate between vocal cord paralysis and their immobilization. (authors)

  16. Orbital fractures: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey M Joseph, Ioannis P GlavasDivision of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY, USA; Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, New York, NY, USAAbstract: This review of orbital fractures has three goals: 1 to understand the clinically relevant orbital anatomy with regard to periorbital trauma and orbital fractures, 2 to explain how to assess and examine a patient after periorbital trauma, and 3 to understand the medical and surgical management of orbital fractures. The article aims to summarize the evaluation and management of commonly encountered orbital fractures from the ophthalmologic perspective and to provide an overview for all practicing ophthalmologists and ophthalmologists in training.Keywords: orbit, trauma, fracture, orbital floor, medial wall, zygomatic, zygomatic complex, zmc fracture, zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures 

  17. Traumatic infra-renal aortic dissection after a high-energy trauma: a case report of a primary missed diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Godry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A traumatic infra-renal aortic dissection is a rare but life-threatening injury that follows deceleration injuries. The mechanism of blunt abdominal aortic injury involves both direct and indirect forces. The successful management of patients with traumatic injuries depends on a prompt suspicion of the injury and early diagnosis and therapy. Missed injuries in trauma patients are well-described phenomena and implementation of the ATLS® trauma schedule led to a decrease in the number of missed injuries, but trauma computed tomography (CT scans in injured patients are still not standard. We report on a 54-year old Caucasian female patient who was involved in a car accident. The fellow passenger of the car was seriously injured. The patient had been previously treated at two different hospitals, and a dislocated acetabular fracture had been diagnosed. Because of this injury, the patient was transferred to our institution, a level 1 trauma-center where, according to the nature of the accident as a high-energy trauma, a complete polytrauma management was performed at the time of admission. During the body check, a moderate tension of the lower parts of the abdomen was detected. During the CT scan, an aneurysm of the infra-renal aorta with a dissection from the height of the second lumbar vertebral body to the iliac artery was observed. The patient required an operation on the day of admission. After 19 days post-trauma care the patient was able to leave our hospital in good general condition. Therefore, missed injuries in multiple injury patients could be fatal, and it is essential that the orthopedic surgeon leaves room for suspicion of injuries based on the nature of the trauma. Traumatic injuries of the abdominal aorta are rare. According to the ATLS® trauma schedule, all of the patients who have experienced high-energy trauma and associated fractures should undergo routine screening using a trauma CT scan with contrast agents to detect

  18. Analysis of 133 patients with severe blunt liver injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the treatment and causes of death aboutsevere blunt liver injury.Methods: The data of 133 patients with severe blunt liver injury (Grade Ⅲ to Grade Ⅴ) were analyzed retrospectively. All the patients except 2 underwent operations. Different types of surgical procedures were adopted according to the severity of liver injury.Results: Operations were the major method to treat hepatic injury. The total mortality rate was 21.0% in this study. The mortality rates of Grade Ⅲ, Grade Ⅳ and Grade Ⅴ of liver injuries were 11.3%, 24.4% and 69.2%, respectively.Conclusions: Packing treatment plays an important role in the treatment of hepatic injury. The mortality rate is related closely to the severity of hepatic injury, multiple trauma, shock and disturbance of blood coagulation.

  19. Trauma renal Renal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Alves Pereira Júnior

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos uma revisão sobre trauma renal, com ênfase na avaliação radiológica, particularmente com o uso da tomografia computadorizada, que tem se tornado o exame de eleição, ao invés da urografia excretora e arteriografia. O sucesso no tratamento conservador dos pacientes com trauma renal depende de um acurado estadiamento da extensão da lesão, classificado de acordo com a Organ Injury Scaling do Colégio Americano de Cirurgiões. O tratamento conservador não-operatório é seguro e consiste de observação contínua, repouso no leito, hidratação endovenosa adequada e antibioti- coterapia profilática, evitando-se uma exploração cirúrgica desnecessária e possível perda renal. As indicações para exploração cirúrgica imediata são abdome agudo, rápida queda do hematócrito ou lesões associadas determinadas na avaliação radiológica. Quando indicada, a exploração renal após controle vascular prévio é segura, permitindo cuidadosa inspeção do rim e sua reconstrução com sucesso, reduzindo a probabilidade de nefrectomia.We present a revision of the renal trauma with emphasis in the radiographic evaluation, particularly CT scan that it has largely replaced the excretory urogram and arteriogram in the diagnostic worh-up and management of the patient with renal trauma. The successful management of renal injuries depends upon the accurate assessment of their extent in agreement with Organ Injury Scaling classification. The conservative therapy managed by careful continuous observation, bed rest, appropriate fluid ressuscitation and prophylactic antibiotic coverage after radiographic staging for severely injured kidneys can yield favorable results and save patients from unnecessary exploration and possible renal loss. The indications for immediate exploratory laparotomy were acute abdomen, rapidly dropping hematocrit or associated injuries as determinated from radiologic evaluation. When indicated, renal exploration

  20. The role of computed tomography in blunt hepatic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) images and medical records of 283 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were reviewed. There were 67 patients with hepatic injury. Liver was the most frequently injured organ in blunt abdominal trauma. Most hepatic injuries occurred in the right lobe of the liver. Of the 67 patients with hepatic injury, 60 patients had associated other injuries. There was a high incidence of associated lung injuries (35.8 %). Of importance is the high incidence of associated head injuries (22.4 %), because, in some patients such as those with concomitant head trauma, abdominal symptom is not obvious. The associated hemoperitoneum were correlated with the mode of therapy used in each case (operative vs. nonoperative). 32 patients with hepatic injury but no hemoperitoneum were managed nonoperatively. 9 patients with hepatic injury and little hemoperitoneum were also managed conservatively. 22 patients with high density hemoperitoneum were surgically treated. By combining information on the clinical state of the patient and CT finding, therapy of hepatic injury can be individualized and the incidence of nontherapeutic laparotomies decreased. (author)

  1. Infarto do miocárdio causado por lesão arterial coronariana após trauma torácico fechado Infarto de miocardio causado por lesión arterial coronaria post traumatismo torácico cerrado Myocardial infarction caused by coronary artery injury after a blunt chest trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Márcio Silva Miguel Lima; Jeane Mike Tsutsui; Victor Sarli Issa

    2009-01-01

    Relatamos o caso de um indivíduo do sexo masculino de 29 anos de idade, vítima de um acidente de carro no qual sofreu trauma torácico fechado, evoluindo com insuficiência cardíaca congestiva. O paciente apresentava boa saúde previamente, sem sintomas de doença cardiovascular. Na avaliação inicial, o eletrocardiograma mostrou ondas Q nas derivações precordiais e o ecocardiograma mostrou disfunção ventricular esquerda importante. A angiografia coronária mostrou uma lesão na artéria coronária de...

  2. Skeleton scintigraphy in trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeletal trauma is common and presents both an opportunity and a problem in skeletal scintigraphy. The opportunity arises in the ability of skeletal scintigraphy to demonstrate abnormalities early after direct trauma. It is well recognized that the early detection of fractures in some sites cannot be reliably achieved by standard radiography, especially in the femoral neck and scaphoid bone. The problem comes in recognizing the effects of skeletal trauma when using skeletal scintigraphy for another purpose, such as the detection of metastatic disease. iatrogenic trauma to either the skeleton or soft tissues may be manifest scintigraphic ally. For example Craniotomy typically leaves a rim pattern at the surgical margin. Rib Retraction during thoracotomy can elicit periosteal reaction. Areas of the skeletal receiving curative levels of ionizing radiation (typically 4000 rads or greater) characteristically demonstrate decreased uptake within 6 months to 1 year after therapy. The generally high sensitivity of the skeletal scintigraphy seems to make it an ideal survey test in cases of suspected child abuse especially in which radiographs are unrevealing. Because of difficulties in obtaining a history of trauma from a preschool child or even eliciting a satisfactory description of the location and nature of the pain, skeletal scintigraphy provides a simple and reliable investigation in these children. Subtle trauma, such as that from stress fractures is often difficult to visualize on a plain radiograph. Skeletal scintigraphy is frequently positive at the time of clinical presentation. Skeletal scintigraphy is exquisitely sensitive to the remodeling process and typically shows abnormalities 1 to 2 weeks or more before the appearance of radiographic changes in stress fractures. The periosteal reaction can be visualized within hours of the injury. Insufficiency and fatigue fractures such as vertebral compression fracture, which is probably the most common consequence of

  3. Chest trauma in children: A local experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest trauma in childhood is relatively uncommon in clinical practice andhas been the subject of few reports in literature. This study was undertakento examine our experience in dealing with chest trauma in children. This wasa retrospective study of 74 children who sustained chest trauma and werereferred to King Fahd Hospital in Medina over a two-year period. The age,cause of injury, severity of injury, associated extrathoracic injuries,treatment and outcome were analyzed. The median age of patients was nineyears. Fifty-nine of them (80%) sustained blunt trauma in 62% of thechildren, gun shot wounds were seen in five and stab wounds in 10 children.Head injury was the most common injury associated with thoracic trauma andwas seen in 14 patients (19%) and associated intra-abdominal injuries wereseen in nine patients. Chest x-ray of the blunt trauma patients revealedfractured ribs in 24 children, pneumothorax in six, hemothorax in four,hemoneumothorax in three, and pulmonary contusions in 22 patients. Fifty onepercent of children were managed conservatively, 37% required tubethoracostomy, 8% were mechanically ventilated and 4% underwent thoractomy.The prevalence of chest trauma in children due to road traffic accidents ishigh in Saudi Arabia. Head injury is thought to be the most common associatedextrathoracic injuries, however, most of these patients can be managedconservatively. (author)

  4. Facial trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxillofacial injury; Midface trauma; Facial injury; LeFort injuries ... Kellman RM. Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  5. Facial trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellman RM. Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 23. Mayersak RJ. Facial trauma. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, ...

  6. Vascular Injury in Orthopedic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Panagopoulos, George N; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Mantas, George; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Sfyroeras, George S; Lazaris, Andreas; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2016-07-01

    Vascular injury in orthopedic trauma is challenging. The risk to life and limb can be high, and clinical signs initially can be subtle. Recognition and management should be a critical skill for every orthopedic surgeon. There are 5 types of vascular injury: intimal injury (flaps, disruptions, or subintimal/intramural hematomas), complete wall defects with pseudoaneurysms or hemorrhage, complete transections with hemorrhage or occlusion, arteriovenous fistulas, and spasm. Intimal defects and subintimal hematomas with possible secondary occlusion are most commonly associated with blunt trauma, whereas wall defects, complete transections, and arteriovenous fistulas usually occur with penetrating trauma. Spasm can occur after either blunt or penetrating trauma to an extremity and is more common in young patients. Clinical presentation of vascular injury may not be straightforward. Physical examination can be misleading or initially unimpressive; a normal pulse examination may be present in 5% to 15% of patients with vascular injury. Detection and treatment of vascular injuries should take place within the context of the overall resuscitation of the patient according to the established principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Advances in the field, made mostly during times of war, have made limb salvage the rule rather than the exception. Teamwork, familiarity with the often subtle signs of vascular injuries, a high index of suspicion, effective communication, appropriate use of imaging modalities, sound knowledge of relevant technique, and sequence of surgical repairs are among the essential factors that will lead to a successful outcome. This article provides a comprehensive literature review on a subject that generates significant controversy and confusion among clinicians involved in the care of trauma patients. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):249-259.]. PMID:27322172

  7. Trauma is danger

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    Porterfield Nancy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trauma is one of the leading causes of death in young adult patients. Many pre-clinical and clinical studies attempt to investigate the immunological pathways involved, however the true mediators remain to be elucidated. Herein, we attempt to describe the immunologic response to systemic trauma in the context of the Danger model. Data Sources A literature search using PubMed was used to identify pertinent articles describing the Danger model in relation to trauma. Conclusions Our knowledge of Danger signals in relation to traumatic injury is still limited. Danger/alarmin signals are the most proximal molecules in the immune response that have many possibilities for effector function in the innate and acquired immune systems. Having a full understanding of these molecules and their pathways would give us the ability to intervene at such an early stage and may prove to be more effective in blunting the post-injury inflammatory response unlike previously failed cytokine experiments.

  8. Correlation of measurable serum markers of inflammation with lung levels following bilateral femur fracture in a rat model

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    Benjamin W Sears

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin W Sears1, Dustin Volkmer1, Sherri Yong2, Ryan D Himes1, Kristen Lauing1, Michele Morgan1, Michael D Stover1, John J Callaci11Department of Orthopaedics, 2Department of Pathology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL, USAIntroduction: Evaluation of the systemic inflammatory status following major orthopedic trauma has become an important adjunct in basing post-injury clinical decisions. In the present study, we examined the correlation of serum and lung inflammatory marker levels following bilateral femur fracture.Materials and methods: 45 Sprague Dawley rats underwent sham operation or bilateral femoral intramedullary pinning and mid-diaphyseal closed fracture via blunt guillotine. Animals were euthanized at specific time points after injury. Serum and lung tissue were collected, and 24 inflammatory markers were analyzed by immunoassay. Lung histology was evaluated by a blinded pathologist.Results: Bilateral femur fracture significantly increased serum markers of inflammation including interleukin (IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, GM-CSF, KC/GRO, MCP-1, and WBC. Femur fracture ­significantly increased serum and lung levels of IL-1a and KC/GRO at 6 hours. Lung levels of IL-6 ­demonstrated a trend towards significance. Histologic changes in pulmonary tissue after fracture included pulmonary edema and bone elements including cellular hematopoietic cells, bone fragments and marrow emboli.Discussion and conclusion: Our results indicate that bilateral femur fracture with fixation in rats results in increases in serum markers of inflammation. Among the inflammatory markers measured, rise in the serum KC/GRO (CINC-1, a homolog to human IL-8, correlated with elevated levels of lung KC/GRO. Ultimately, analysis of serum levels of KC/GRO (CINC-1, or human IL-8, may be a useful adjunct to guide clinical decisions regarding surgical timing.Keywords: blunt trauma, injury, cytokine, IL-8, bone marrow emboli

  9. Massive colonic haematoma following blunt trauma sustained playing rugby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Alan; Awwad, Amir; Harding, Brendan

    2009-01-01

    A case is presented of a 24-year-old man who sustained a forceful blow to the right side of the abdomen during a tackle while playing rugby union. The patient was thought to be "winded" and could not play on. He sought medical attention several hours later at the local hospital where initial evaluation revealed mild right iliac fossa tenderness with no signs of peritonism and clinical parameters showed haemodynamic stability. Subsequent ultrasound and CT evaluation revealed a large haematoma involving the caecum and ascending colon. Emergency right haemicolectomy with primary anastomosis was performed to remove the large haematoma within the intact colonic wall. He was observed in the high dependency unit and was discharged after 7 days following an uneventful postoperative course. He continues to make significant progress some 3 months later and a full return to contact sport is being proposed within 9-12 months. PMID:21754953

  10. Systemic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Rachel E; Martin, Christina Gamache; Smith, Carly Parnitzke

    2014-01-01

    Substantial theoretical, empirical, and clinical work examines trauma as it relates to individual victims and perpetrators. As trauma professionals, it is necessary to acknowledge facets of institutions, cultures, and communities that contribute to trauma and subsequent outcomes. Systemic trauma-contextual features of environments and institutions that give rise to trauma, maintain it, and impact posttraumatic responses-provides a framework for considering the full range of traumatic phenomena. The current issue of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation is composed of articles that incorporate systemic approaches to trauma. This perspective extends conceptualizations of trauma to consider the influence of environments such as schools and universities, churches and other religious institutions, the military, workplace settings, hospitals, jails, and prisons; agencies and systems such as police, foster care, immigration, federal assistance, disaster management, and the media; conflicts involving war, torture, terrorism, and refugees; dynamics of racism, sexism, discrimination, bullying, and homophobia; and issues pertaining to conceptualizations, measurement, methodology, teaching, and intervention. Although it may be challenging to expand psychological and psychiatric paradigms of trauma, a systemic trauma perspective is necessary on both scientific and ethical grounds. Furthermore, a systemic trauma perspective reflects current approaches in the fields of global health, nursing, social work, and human rights. Empirical investigations and intervention science informed by this paradigm have the potential to advance scientific inquiry, lower the incidence of a broader range of traumatic experiences, and help to alleviate personal and societal suffering. PMID:24617751

  11. Trauma systems, shock, and resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, W F

    1993-01-01

    This review of early care covers issues pertaining to the analysis of system function, prehospital intravascular volume replacement, diagnosis of proximity vascular injury, the role of emergency thoracotomy, and the value of transesophageal echocardiography. The first six articles deal with various aspects of system function, from triage to analysis of outcome. The next series of articles reviews work in progress evaluating optimal fluid for resuscitation. Hypertonic saline and dextran combinations have been shown to restore vital signs better than isotonic solutions; they are safe, require smaller volumes, and may improve head injury outcome. Danger lies in the restoration of perfusion without hemorrhage control. Two articles on emergency thoracotomy review the indications and outcome in blunt and penetrating trauma. Survival in blunt trauma is virtually zero. An article and two editorials summarize state of the art for diagnosis and treatment of proximity vascular injury. Two articles describe the potential use of the new technique of transesophageal echocardiography. This new modality has not formed a solid indication at present and can be considered investigational in trauma care. PMID:7584006

  12. Trauma dos ossos temporais e suas complicações: aspectos na tomografia computadorizada Temporal bone trauma and complications: computed tomography findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Doffémond Costa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A maioria das fraturas dos ossos temporais resulta de traumas cranianos bruscos, de alta energia, estando muitas vezes relacionadas a outras fraturas cranianas ou a politraumatismo. As fraturas e os deslocamentos da cadeia ossicular, na orelha média, representam umas das principais complicações das injúrias nos ossos temporais e, por isso, serão abordadas de maneira mais profunda neste artigo. Os outros tipos de injúrias englobam as fraturas labirínticas, fístula dural, paralisia facial e extensão da linha de fratura ao canal carotídeo. A tomografia computadorizada tem papel fundamental na avaliação inicial dos pacientes politraumatizados, pois é capaz de identificar injúrias em importantes estruturas que podem causar graves complicações, como perda auditiva de condução ou neurossensorial, tonturas e disfunções do equilíbrio, fístulas perilinfáticas, paralisia do nervo facial, lesões vasculares, entre outras.Most temporal bone fractures result from high-energy blunt head trauma, and are frequently related to other skull fractures or to polytrauma. Fractures and displacements of ossicular chain in the middle ear represent some of the main complications of temporal bone injury, and hence they will be more deeply approached in the present article. Other types of injuries include labyrinthine fractures, dural fistula, facial nerve paralysis and extension into the carotid canal. Computed tomography plays a fundamental role in the initial evaluation of polytrauma patients, as it can help to identify important structural injuries that may lead to severe complications such as sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, dizziness and balance dysfunction, perilymphatic fistulas, facial nerve paralysis, vascular injury and others.

  13. Synergism of clinical evaluation and penile sonographic imaging in diagnosis of penile fracture: a case report

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    Bello Jibril

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Penile fracture is an uncommon urologic emergency, and is the traumatic rupture of the tunica albuginea covering the corpus cavernosa. This usually occurs following blunt trauma sustained during coitus, masturbation or self-manipulations to hide or suppress an erection. Clinical diagnosis can often be easily made with typical history and examination findings. However, the patient may present atypically and/or with a suspicion of associated urethral injury. The roles of various diagnostic investigations are being evaluated in these situations. Case presentation We report the case of a 31-year-old African man with penile fracture and suspected associated urethral injury that occurred after self-manipulations to hide an erection. Conclusions Penile ultrasound and sonourethrography provide useful additional diagnostic information to supplement clinical history and physical examination findings and can be performed easily, at low cost and with no delays to surgery.

  14. Epidemiology of patients admitted to a major trauma centre in northern India

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    Rastogi Devarshi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Trauma in India is an increasingly significant problem, particularly in light of rapid development and increasing motorization. Social changes are resulting in alterations in the epidemiology of trauma. The aim of the study was to assess the various epidemiological parameters that influence the cause of injury in the patients admitted to a major trauma centre in northern India. Methods: An observational study of 748 patients chosen by random assortment was carried out over a period of 1 year (August 2008 to July 2009. Age, sex, injury type and pattern were noted. Injury mode of upper and lower limbs was also noted. Results:Injuries occur predominately in the age group of 15-30 years. Males incurred more injury with male to female ratio of 6:1. The most vulnerable group was motorcycle users. Among the injured, farmers were the most commonly involved. Blunt injuries (94.92% were much more common than penetrating injuries. Among patients with head injury, two wheelers related accidents were the most common (40.3%. Most spinal cord injuries were caused by falls from height (51.09%. Most lower limb fractures were simple type. Compound fractures of the lower limb were more common than upper limb fractures. Conclusion: Strict enforcement of traffic rules, combined with improved infrastructure and behavior change can decrease the burden of road traffic accidents in India and other developing countries. This study could assist in raising the profile of road traffic accidents as a public health problem which needs to be addressed as a preventable cause of mortality and morbidity, and planning appropriate interventions for this major challenge. Preventive strategies should be made on the basis of these epidemiological trends. Key words: Wounds and injuries; Epidemiology; Accidents, traffic; India

  15. Non-operative management of adult blunt splenic injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jun; GAO Jin-mou; Jean-Claude Baste

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the indication of nonoperative management of adult blunt splenic injuries.Methods: A retrospective review was performed on all adult patients (age > 15 years ) with blunt splenic injuries admitted to the department of vascular surgery of Pellegrin hospital in France from 1999 to 2003. We managed splenic injuries non-operatively in all appropriate patients without regard to age.Results: During the 4 years, 54 consecutive adult patients with blunt splenic injuries were treated in the hospital. A total of 27 patients with stable hemodynamic status were treated non-operatively at first, of which 2 patients were failed to non-operative treatment. The successful percentage of non-operative management was 92.6 %. In the 54 patients, 7 of 8 patients older than 55 years were treated with non-operative management. Two cases developing postoperatively subphrenic infection were healed by proper treatment. In the series, there was no death.Conclusions: Non-operative management of low-grade splenic injuries can be accomplished with an acceptable low-failure rate. If the clinical and laboratory parameters difficult for surgeons to make decisions, they can depend on Resciniti' s CT (computed tomography)scoring system to select a subset of adults with splenic trauma who are excellent candidates for a trial of nonoperative management. The patients older than 55 years are not absolutely inhibited to receive non-operative management.

  16. Perfil epidemiológico do trauma de face dos pacientes atendidos no pronto socorro de um hospital público Epidemiology of facial trauma of patients admitted to a public hospital emergency department

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    Jefferson Lessa Soares de Macedo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os dados epidemiológicos e a localização dos traumas de face de pacientes atendidos no Hospital Regional da Asa Norte (HRAN, Brasília, Distrito Federal. MÉTODO: Trata-se de um estudo retrospectivo, realizado no pronto socorro do HRAN-DF, visando avaliar o perfil epidemiológico dos pacientes atendidos pela equipe da Unidade de Cirurgia Plástica vítimas de trauma de face no período de 1 de janeiro a 31 dezembro de 2004. RESULTADOS: O estudo compreendeu 711 pacientes, destacando-se o sexo masculino (72,8%. Quanto à causa, predominou a agressão física, seguida por acidente com veículos/motos. As quedas foram a causa predominante das lesões em crianças, mas verificou-se a participação cada vez maior da agressão física como mecanismo de trauma facial com o aumento da idade. A relação de homem:mulher foi de 3:1. A faixa etária mais atingida foi de 21 a 30 anos, representando 35,3% dos pacientes. As fraturas foram encontradas em 24,9% das lesões faciais. O nariz foi o local mais acometido nas fraturas de face (76,8%. CONCLUSÃO: A violência interpessoal foi a principal causa de trauma de face. A queda da própria altura mostrou-se como importante mecanismo de trauma nos extremos de idade.BACKGROUND: To evaluate the etiology, age, gender and location of the lesions of facial trauma in patients arriving at our hospital. METHODS: The data were evaluated through retrospective analysis of patient charts from January 1st to December 31st, 2004. RESULTS: The group comprised 711 patients with facial trauma. Blunt assault was the most common cause, followed by motor vehicle crashes. Falls were, by far, the predominant cause of injury in children, but with increasing age, assaults became more common. It was observed a male:female ratio of 3:1. The most frequent age group was the 21-30 years one, with 52%. Facial fractures were found in 24.9% of facial injuries. The most frequent fracture was nasal (76.8%. CONCLUSION

  17. Bone traumas in late antique populations from Croatia.

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    Novak, Mario; Slaus, Mario

    2010-12-01

    We present the results of the analyses of traumatic bone injuries in two Late Antique (3r to 5th century AD) skeletal samples from Croatia: Zadar--located on the eastern Adriatic coast, and a composite skeletal series from continental Croatia consisting of skeletons from Osijek, Vinkovci, Strbinci, and Zmajevac. The osteological series from continental Croatia are related to settlements located on, or near the Danubian military border, while Zadar--350 km to the west, is located deep in the territory of the Roman Empire. Numerous historical sources describe barbaric incursions, as well as large battles related to civil wars during the Late Antique period in continental Croatia. Conversely, there is no mention of similar events in the Zadar region. In accordance with these data our analysis tests the hypothesis that the inhabitants of continental Croatia were exposed to greater levels of violence than those living in Zadar. Analysis of bone traumas in the two series shows a similar, relatively high prevalence of long bone fractures in both samples, with a slightly higher frequency recorded in Zadar. Both series exhibit a high frequency of cranial injuries with, once again, higher frequencies recorded in the Zadar series. Additionally, two perimortem cranial fractures (one caused by a sword, the other by a blunt object) were observed in Zadar. Some of the recorded traumas in both samples resulted from accidents, but a number of injuries clearly resulted from intentional violence of lesser intensity. Further multidisciplinary research incorporating osteological, archaeological, and historical analyses is necessary to confirm the results obtained from these samples. PMID:21874705

  18. Outcome of major cardiac injuries at a Canadian trauma center

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    Lamy Andre

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Canadian trauma units have relatively little experience with major cardiac trauma (disruption of a cardiac chamber so injury outcome may not be comparable to that reported from other countries. We compared our outcomes to those of other centers. Methods Records of patients suffering major cardiac trauma over a nine-year period were reviewed. Factors predictive of outcome were analyzed. Results Twenty-seven patients (11 blunt and 16 penetrating with major cardiac trauma were evaluated. Injury severity scores (ISS were similar for blunt (49.6 ± 16.6 and penetrating (39.5 ± 21.6, p = 0.20 injuries. Five of 11 blunt trauma patients, and 9 of 16 penetrating trauma patients, had detectable vital signs on hospital arrival (p = 0.43. Ten patients underwent emergency department thoracotomy and 11 patients had cardiac repair in the operating theatre. Eleven patients survived and 16 died. Survivors had a lower ISS (33.7 ± 15.4 than non-survivors (50.4 ± 20.4; p = 0.03. Two of 11 blunt trauma patients and 9 of 16 penetrating trauma patients survived (p = 0.06. Eleven of 14 patients with detectable vital signs survived; all 13 without detectable vital signs died (p = 0.00003. Ten of eleven patients treated in the operating theatre survived, while only one of the other 16 patients survived (p = 0.00002. Conclusions Patients with major cardiac injuries and detectable vital signs on hospital arrival can be salvaged by prompt surgical intervention in the operating theatre. Major cardiac injuries are infrequently encountered at our center but patient survival is comparable to that reported from trauma units in other countries.

  19. Radiological management of blunt polytrauma with computed tomography and angiography: an integrated approach

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    Kurdziel, J.C.; Dondelinger, R.F.; Hemmer, M.

    1987-01-01

    107 polytraumatized patients, who had experienced blunt trauma have been worked up at admission with computed tomography of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis following computed tomography study of the brain: significant lesions were revealed in 98 (90%) patients. 79 (74%) patients showed trauma to the thorax, in 69 (64%) patients abdominal or pelvic trauma was evidenced. No false positive diagnosis was established. 5 traumatic findings were missed. Emergency angiography was indicated in 3 (3%) patients, following computed tomography examination. 3 other trauma patients were submitted directly to angiography without computed tomography examination during the time period this study was completed. Embolization was carried out in 5/6 patients. No thoracotomy was needed. 13 (12%) patients underwent laparotomy following computed tomography. Overall mortality during hospital stay was 14% (15/107). No patient died from visceral bleeding. Conservative management of blunt polytrauma patients can be advocated in almost 90% of visceral lesions. Computed tomography coupled with angiography and embolization represent an adequate integrated approach to the management of blunt polytrauma patients.

  20. Radiological management of blunt polytrauma with computed tomography and angiography: an integrated approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    107 polytraumatized patients, who had experienced blunt trauma have been worked up at admission with computed tomography of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis following computed tomography study of the brain: significant lesions were revealed in 98 (90%) patients. 79 (74%) patients showed trauma to the thorax, in 69 (64%) patients abdominal or pelvic trauma was evidenced. No false positive diagnosis was established. 5 traumatic findings were missed. Emergency angiography was indicated in 3 (3%) patients, following computed tomography examination. 3 other trauma patients were submitted directly to angiography without computed tomography examination during the time period this study was completed. Embolization was carried out in 5/6 patients. No thoracotomy was needed. 13 (12%) patients underwent laparotomy following computed tomography. Overall mortality during hospital stay was 14% (15/107). No patient died from visceral bleeding. Conservative management of blunt polytrauma patients can be advocated in almost 90% of visceral lesions. Computed tomography coupled with angiography and embolization represent an adequate integrated approach to the management of blunt polytrauma patients