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Sample records for bluetongue virus isolates

  1. Detection and isolation of Bluetongue virus from commercial vaccine batches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbarov, Velizar; Golender, Natalia; Erster, Oran; Khinich, Yevgeny

    2016-06-14

    In this report we describe the detection and identification of Bluetongue virus (BTV) contaminations in commercial vaccines. BTV RNA was detected in vaccine batches of Lumpy skin disease (LSD) and Sheep pox (SP) using quantitative PCR (qPCR) for VP1 and NS3 genes. Both batches were positive for VP1 and NS3 in qPCR. The LSD vaccine-derived sample was positive for VP1 and VP2 in conventional PCR. The SP vaccine-derived sample was examined by amplification of VP1, VP4, VP6, VP7, NS2 and NS3 gene segments in conventional PCR. The SP vaccine-derived sample was further propagated in embryonated chicken eggs (ECE) and Vero cells. Preliminary sequence analysis showed that the LSD vaccine-derived sequence was 98-99% similar to BTV9. Analysis of the six genomic segments from the SP vaccine-derived isolate showed the highest similarity to BTV26 (66.3-97.8%). These findings are particularly important due to the effect of BTV on cattle and sheep, for which the vaccines are intended. They also demonstrate the necessity of rigorous vaccine inspection and strict vaccine production control. PMID:27171751

  2. PHYLOGENY OF BLUETONGUE VIRUS ISOLATES BY SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF THE VP5 CODING GENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an arthropod-borne Orbivirus that infects domestic and wild ruminants. Worldwide, there are at least 24 serotypes and numerous strains within each serotype. Bluetongue virus has 10 double-stranded genome segments that encode the viral structural and non-structural proteins...

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of bluetongue virus serotype 4 field isolates from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legisa, D; Gonzalez, F; De Stefano, G; Pereda, A; Dus Santos, M J

    2013-03-01

    Bluetongue is an insect-transmitted viral disease of ruminant species, which represents a major barrier to the international trade of animals and their products. Bluetongue virus (BTV) has a genome composed of ten linear segments of dsRNA, which code for at least ten different viral proteins. In South America, serological evidence for the presence of BTV has been found in Peru, Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador and Chile. Brazil and Argentina are the only South American countries where BTV has been isolated. In Brazil, only one BTV isolate, serotype 12, has been reported, whereas in Argentina five BTV serotype 4 isolates have been obtained from cattle without clinical signs. Three of these five isolates were isolated during 1999-2001, whereas two of them were obtained as part of the present work. This study describes sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses of segment (Seg)-2, Seg-3, Seg-6, Seg-7 and Seg-10 of the first Argentinian field isolates of BTV. The analysis of Seg-2 and Seg-6 resulted in a single cluster of Argentinian sequences into the serotype 4 clade. In addition, the Argentinian sequences grouped within the nucleotype A clade, along with reference strains. The analysis of Seg-3, Seg-7 and Seg-10 showed that the Argentinian isolates grouped into the western topotype, indicating that the circulating virus had an African/European origin. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Argentinian sequences present a South American genetic identity, suggesting an independent lineage evolution. PMID:23152367

  4. Full genome sequencing of the bluetongue virus-1 isolate MKD20/08/Ind from goat in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Karam; Biswas, Sanchay Kumar; Sharma, Gaurav; Saxena, Arpit; Tewari, Neha; Mahajan, Sonalika; Pandey, Awadh Bihari

    2016-01-01

    This communication reports full genome sequencing of the bluetongue virus-1 (BTV-1) isolate MKD20/08/Ind from goat in northern India. The total BTV-1 genome size was found to be 19,190bp. A comparison study between the Indian isolate and other global isolates revealed that it belongs to the 'Eastern' BTV topotype. The full genome sequence of BTV-1 will provide vital information on its geographical origin and it will also be proved useful for comparing the Indian isolate with global isolates from other host species. PMID:27266632

  5. POSSIBLE OVERWINTERING MECHANISM OF BLUETONGUE VIRUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The overwintering mechanism of bluetongue virus (BTV) has eluded researchers for many years. While overwintering in the vertebrate host has been the favored hypothesis, it has been shown that several arboviruses overwinter in their invertebrate vectors. Overwintering _Culicoides sonorensis_ larvae...

  6. Whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of Bluetongue virus serotype 2 strains isolated in the Americas including a novel strain from the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluetongue is caused by an arbovirus which produces widespread edema and tissue necrosis in domestic and wild ruminants that can be fatal. Bluetongue virus serotypes 10, 11, 13, and 17 are typically found throughout the United States (US), while serotype 2 was previously only detected in the southea...

  7. Experimental infection of white-tailed deer with bluetongue virus serotype 8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drolet, B.S.; Reister, L.M.; Mecham, J.O.; Wilson, W.C.; Nol, P.; Vercauteren, K.C.; Rijn, van P.A.; Bowen, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is an insect-transmitted, economically important disease of domestic and wild ruminants. Although only five of the 26 reported bluetongue virus (BTV) serotypes are considered endemic to the USA, 10 exotic serotypes have been isolated primarily in the southeastern region of the countr

  8. Bluetongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclachlan, N J; Mayo, C E; Daniels, P W; Savini, G; Zientara, S; Gibbs, E P J

    2015-08-01

    Summary Bluetongue (BT) is an arthropod-transmitted viral disease of non-African ungulates, principally sheep. The disease results from vascular injury analogous to that of human haemorrhagic viral fevers, with characteristic tissue infarction, haemorrhage, vascular leakage, oedema, and hypovolaemic shock. Importantly, BT is not zoonotic. Bluetongue virus (BTV) infection of ruminants and vector Culicoides midges is endemic throughout many tropical and temperate regions of the world; however, within this global range the virus exists within relatively discrete ecosystems (syn. episystems) where specific constellations of BTV serotypes are spread by different species of biting Culicoides midges. Recently discovered goat-associated BTVs, notably BTV serotype 25 (BTV-25) in central Europe, appear to have distinctive biological properties and an epidemiology that is not reliant on Culicoides midges as vectors for virus transmission. Bluetongue virus infection of ruminants is often subclinical, but outbreaks of severe disease occur regularly at the upper and lower limits of the virus's global range, where infection is distinctly seasonal. There have been recent regional alterations in the global distribution of BTV infection, particularly in Europe. It is proposed that climate change is responsible for these events through its impact on vector midges. However, the role of anthropogenic factors in mediating emergence of BTV into new areas remains poorly defined; for example, it is not clear to what extent anthropogenic factors were responsible for the recent translocation to northern and eastern Europe of live attenuated vaccine viruses and an especially virulent strain of BTV-8 with distinctive properties. Without thorough characterisation of all environmental and anthropogenic drivers of the recent emergence of BT in northern Europe and elsewhere, it is difficult to predict what the future holds in terms of global emergence of BTV infection. Accurate and convenient

  9. Genetic analysis of two Taiwanese bluetongue viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Fan; Ting, Lu-Jen; Lee, Ming-Shiuh; Chang, Wei-Ming; Wang, Fun-In

    2011-03-24

    BTV2/KM/2003 and BTV12/PT/2003 are the first identified bluetongue viruses in Taiwan. The prototype virus BTV2/KM/2003 was previously characterized in various respects as low virulent. In the present study, nucleotide sequences of the ten genome segments and their coding regions of the Taiwan strains were determined and analyzed. The two strains had >96.8% nucleotide and >97.9% deduced amino acid identities to each other, except for the VP2 genes. Their genome sequences, except for NS1 and VP2 genes, clustered overall in the Asian lineage, and were closely related to strains from China, India, Indonesia, and Japan. The phylogenetic trees and nucleotide identities of six BTV genes were suggestive of the geographical origin of the bluetongue virus strains analyzed, with a few exceptions. To examine which genes better distinguished strains from different origins (topography), the distribution of and the levels of differences in nucleotide identities were analyzed, revealing that VP3, NS2, and NS3 genes were more suitable for topotyping of BTVs. Analysis of ratios of non-synonymous/synonymous substitutions (dN/dS values) between putative ancestry and their descendant strains suggested that most BTV genes evolved under a negative selection, whereas the VP7 gene evolved under positive selection, and its non-synonymous substitutions accumulated more rapidly in strains from the Mediterranean region. PMID:20855174

  10. Potential role of ticks as vectors of bluetongue virus

    OpenAIRE

    Bouwknegt, C.; Rijn, van, Michela; Schipper, J.M.J.; Holzel, D.R.; Boonstra, J.; Nijhof, A.; de, Rooij, R.; Jongejan, F.

    2010-01-01

    When the first outbreak of bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV8) was recorded in North-West Europe in August 2006 and renewed outbreaks occurred in the summer of 2007 and again in 2008, the question was raised how the virus survived the winter. Since most adult Culicoides vector midges are assumed not to survive the northern European winter, and transovarial transmission in Culicoides is not recorded, we examined the potential vector role of ixodid and argasid ticks for bluetongue virus. Four sp...

  11. Nucleic acid hybridization techniques for the detection of bluetongue virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virus isolation, antigen detection, and in situ hybridization were compared in their abilities to detect in cell culture, the five serotypes of bluetongue virus (BTV) occurring in the United States, serotypes 2, 10, 11, 13, and 17. For isolation, virus was propagated in baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cell culture. For antigen detection, two techniques, indirect fluorescent-antibody (IFA) and enzyme immunocytoassay (EICA) were used. For in situ hybridization, a complementary DNA (cDNA) of the L3 RNA genome segment of BTV, serotype 17 (BTV-17) labeled with 35S was used as a group-specific probe. Virus isolation was the most sensitive technique, often detecting input virus and then detecting virus throughout the course of the study. IFA and EICA were of similar sensitivity and detected BTV antigen shortly after detection of virus by isolation. A direct-blot hybridization technique using a 32P-labeled, strand-specific RNA transcript probe was developed, optimized, and used to detect BTV in pools of infected Culicoides variipennis midges. The technique was able to detect as few as one infected Culicoides midge in a pool of 100 and as little as 3.5 log10 TCID50 per ml of virus. A sandwich hybridization technique was developed and used to detect BTV in pools of infected Culicoides variipennis midges. The sandwich hybridization technique used a single-stranded DNA catcher sequence bound to a solid support and a 32P-labeled, single-stranded RNA detector sequence. Sandwich hybridization was compared to direct blot hybridization using a strand-specific RNA transcript probe or a cDNA probe. Sandwich hybridization was able to detect as few as one infected Culicoides midge in a pool of 50; however, the technique was approximately tenfold less sensitive than direct blot hybridization

  12. Potential role of ticks as vectors of bluetongue virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwknegt, C.; Rijn, van P.A.; Schipper, J.M.J.; Holzel, D.R.; Boonstra, J.; Nijhof, A.; Rooij, van E.M.A.; Jongejan, F.

    2010-01-01

    When the first outbreak of bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV8) was recorded in North-West Europe in August 2006 and renewed outbreaks occurred in the summer of 2007 and again in 2008, the question was raised how the virus survived the winter. Since most adult Culicoides vector midges are assumed not

  13. Outbreak of Bluetongue virus serotype 4 in dairy sheep in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaro, Mario Felipe Alvarez; Dos Santos Lima, Michele; Del Fava, Claudia; de Oliveira, Glenda Ribeiro; Pituco, Edviges Maristela; Brandão, Felipe Zandonadi

    2014-06-10

    In late January 2013, 10 nonpregnant Lacaune dairy ewes raised under extensive husbandry management on a farm in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, presented with the general clinical signs of lethargy, hyporexia, edema of the face, hyperemia of the exposed parts of the skin, mouth lesions, pyrexia, and lameness. Additionally, 2 pregnant ewes died suddenly after the onset of respiratory signs. The complete blood counts and biochemistry analyses showed neutrophilic leukocytosis with monocytosis and reactive lymphocytes, normocytic normochromic anemia and increased aspartate aminotransferase levels. Postmortem examination revealed erosions on the lingual mucosa, bilateral submandibular ganglia infarctions, yellow foamy fluid accumulation in the trachea and bronchial bifurcation, pulmonary congestion, and edema associated with hemorrhagic lesions on the pulmonary artery and heart. The clinical and pathological findings were suggestive of bluetongue. For a molecular and virological diagnosis, tissue samples were analyzed by Bluetongue virus-specific real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and viral isolation was performed in embryonated chicken eggs. For viral typing, positive tissue and egg-isolated samples were analyzed by qRT-PCR using primers and probes specific for the structural VP2 gene in genome segment 2 of all 26 serotypes. There are still no contingency plans for responding to an outbreak of bluetongue disease in Brazil, and this episode emphasizes the need for continuing serological and entomological surveillance programs. Additionally, this report describes the isolation of Bluetongue virus serotype 4 in sheep in the Americas. PMID:24916443

  14. STUDIES ON OVERWINTERING OF BLUETONGUE VIRUSES IN INSECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluetongue viruses (BTVs) are economically important arboviruses that affect sheep and cattle. The overwintering mechanism of BTVs in temperate climates has eluded researchers for many years. Many arboviruses overwinter in their invertebrate vectors. To test the hypothesis that BTVs overwinter in...

  15. Epidemiological studies on bluetongue virus infection in West Java, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In monitoring of sentinel cattle in West Java, seroconversions to orbiviruses occurred mostly at the end of the wet season. A low altitude site gave more reactors than did a high altitude site. Due to perceived inefficiencies of the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test, a competitive ELISA (C-ELISA) was applied and the results compared with the AGID test results. C-ELISA detected antibodies at an earlier stage of infection than did the AGID test. Not all sera reacting in the AGID test reacted in C-ELISA, suggesting that the C-ELISA is more specific in detecting bluetongue virus (BTV) antibodies than the AGID. However, as the infection status of most field sera was not known, this could not be confirmed conclusively from the available data. A comparison of isolation methods indicated that isolates were obtained more frequently if samples were passaged in embryonated eggs before blind passage in A edes albopictus cells followed by passage in BHK-21 cells. Six BTV serotypes, 1,7,9,12,20,21 and 23 were identified and confirmed from apparently healthy sentinel cattle blood at low altitudes; BTV serotype 21 was also isolated from a pool of the Avaritia sub-genus of the Culicoides spp which contained 227 C. fulvus and 20 C. orientalis. (author). 17 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  16. Evidence for the presence of bluetongue virus in Kosovo between 2001 and 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmani, A; Murati, B; Kabashi, Q; Goga, I; Berisha, B; Wilsmore, A J; Hamblin, C

    2006-03-25

    In 2001, clinical cases of bluetongue were observed in Kosovo, and in that year and in 2003 and 2004, serum samples were collected from cattle and small ruminants and tested for antibodies to bluetongue virus. The results provide evidence that bluetongue virus was not present in Kosovo before the summer of 2001, but that the virus circulated subclinically among the cattle and sheep populations of Kosovo in 2002, 2003 and 2004. PMID:16565337

  17. Requirements and comparative analysis of reverse genetics for bluetongue virus (BTV) and African horse sickness virus (AHSV)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, van Piet A.; Water, van de Sandra G.P.; Feenstra, Femke; Gennip, van René G.P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bluetongue virus (BTV) and African horse sickness virus (AHSV) are distinct arthropod borne virus species in the genus Orbivirus (Reoviridae family), causing the notifiable diseases Bluetongue and African horse sickness of ruminants and equids, respectively. Reverse genetics systems f

  18. The use of recombinant DNA technology for the development of a bluetongue virus subunit vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The double-standed RNA gene coding for the surface antigen responsible for inducing neutralising anti-bodies has been isolated, converted to DNA, and cloned in the plasmid pBR322. So far, only plasmids containing inserts smaller than the gene have been obtained. The recombinant plasmids were isolated by screening for specific antibiotic resistance markers and characterized by size, restriction enzymes and hybridization with a 32P-labelled DNA probe made with BTV-m RNA as template. Possible strategies for the development of a bluetongue virus submit vaccine are discussed

  19. Genome Sequence of Bluetongue Virus Type 2 from India: Evidence for Reassortment between Outer Capsid Protein Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Narender S.; Belaganahalli, Manjunatha N.; Kumar, Aman; Batra, Kanisht; Rao, Pavuluri Panduranga; Hemadri, Divakar; Reddy, Yella Narasimha; Putty, Kalyani; Krishnajyothi, Yadlapati; Reddy, G. Hanmanth; Singh, Karam Pal; Hegde, Nagendra R.; Nomikou, Kyriaki; Sreenivasulu, Daggupati

    2015-01-01

    Southern Indian isolate IND1994/01 of bluetongue virus serotype 2 (BTV-2), from the Orbivirus Reference Collection at the Pirbright Institute (http://www.reoviridae.org/dsRNA_virus_proteins/ReoID/btv-2.htm#IND1994/01), was sequenced. Its genome segment 6 (Seg-6) [encoding VP5(OCP2)] is identical to that of the Indian BTV-1 isolate (IND2003/05), while Seg-5 and Seg-9 are closely related to isolates from South Africa and the United States, respectively. PMID:25858823

  20. Bluetongue virus: comparative evaluation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunodiffusion, and serum neutralization for detection of viral antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Poli, G.; Stott, J.; Liu, Y. S.; Manning, J S

    1982-01-01

    Comparative studies on the detection of bovine serum immunoglobulin G antibodies to bluetongue virus with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, an immunodiffusion method, and a serum neutralization assay demonstrated complete concordance between the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the serum neutralization assay results. However, the immunodiffusion method failed to detect bluetongue virus antibody in a substantial number of sera found to possess bluetongue virus immunoglobulin G with th...

  1. Full-Genome Sequence Analysis of a Reassortant Strain of Bluetongue virus Serotype 16 from Southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lalit; Batra, Kanisht; Chaudhary, Deepika; Gupta, Akhil Kumar; Dalal, Anita; Kalyanaraman, Brindha; Irulappan, Ganesan P.; Kumar, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a reassortant field strain (IND2014/01) of Bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 16, isolated from sheep from southern India in 2014, was sequenced. The total genome size was 19,186 bp. Sequence comparisons of all genome segments, except segment 5 (Seg-5), showed that IND2014/01 belonged to the major eastern topotype of BTV. PMID:27540057

  2. An investigation into the possibility of bluetongue virus transmission by transfer of infected ovine embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Venter, Estelle H; Truuske Gerdes; Isabel Wright; Johan Terblanche

    2011-01-01

    Bluetongue (BT), a disease that affects mainly sheep, causes economic losses owing to not only its deleterious effects on animals but also its associated impact on the restriction of movement of livestock and livestock germplasm. The causative agent, bluetongue virus (BTV), can occur in the semen of rams and bulls at the time of peak viraemia and be transferred to a developing foetus. The risk of the transmission of BTV by bovine embryos is negligible if the embryos are washed according ...

  3. Culicoides fauna and bluetongue virus serotype 8 infection in South American camelid herds in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is a Culicoides-born infectious disease caused by bluetongue virus (BTV). From 2006 to 2010, BTV serotype 8 (BTV-8) spread throughout Europe, causing severe disease in domestic and some wild ruminant species and in an alpaca. Compulsory vaccination of susceptible animals was the most effective strategy to control and eradicate the BTV-8 epizootic in Europe. However, South American camelids (SAC) were not included in the BTV-8 vaccination programmes in Europe. The presented...

  4. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies to Bluetongue Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Veerakyathappa Bhanuprakash; Madhusudhan Hosamani; Vinayagamurthy Balamurugan; Pradeep Narayan Gandhale; Gnanavel Venkatesan; Raj Kumar Singh

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, a total of 24 Mabs were produced against bluetongue virus (BTV) by polyethyleneglycol (PEG) mediated fusion method using sensitized lymphocytes and myeloma cells. All these clones were characterized for their reactivity to whole virus and recombinant BTV-VP7 protein, titres, isotypes and their reactivity with 24 BTV-serotype specific sera in cELISA. Out of 24 clones, a majority of them (n = 18)belong to various IgG subclasses and the remaining (n = 6) to the IgM class. A panel of eight clones reactive to both whole BTV and purified rVP7 protein were identified based on their reactivity in iELISA. For competitive ELISA, the clone designated as 4A10 showed better inhibition to hyperimmune serum of BTV serotype 23. However, this clone showed a variable percent of inhibition ranging from 16.6% with BTV 12 serotype to 78.9% with BTV16 serotype using 24 serotype specific sera of BTV originating from guinea pig at their lowest dilutions. From the available panel of clones, only 4A 10 was found to have a possible diagnostic application.

  5. Purification of infective bluetongue virus particles by immuno-affinity chromatography using anti-core antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Karam; Biswas, Sanchay K; Mondal, Bimalendu

    2016-03-01

    An immuno-affinity chromatography technique for purification of infective bluetongue virus (BTV) has been descried using anti-core antibodies. BTV anti-core antibodies (prepared in guinea pig) were mixed with cell culture-grown BTV-1 and then the mixture was added to the cyanogens bromide-activated protein-A Sepharose column. Protein A binds to the antibody which in turn binds to the antigen (i.e. BTV). After thorough washing, antigen-antibody and antibody-protein A couplings were dissociated with 4M MgCl2, pH6.5. Antibody molecules were removed by dialysis and virus particles were concentrated by spin column ultrafiltration. Dialyzed and concentrated material was tested positive for BTV antigen by a sandwich ELISA and the infectivity of the chromatography-purified virus was demonstrated in cell culture. This method was applied for selective capture of BTV from a mixture of other viruses. As group-specific antibodies (against BTV core) were used to capture the virus, it is expected that virus of all BTV serotypes could be purified by this method. This method will be helpful for selective capture and enrichment of BTV from concurrently infected blood or tissue samples for efficient isolation in cell culture. Further, this method can be used for small scale purification of BTV avoiding ultracentrifugation. PMID:26925450

  6. Detection of bluetongue virus by using bovine endothelial cells and embryonated chicken eggs.

    OpenAIRE

    Wechsler, S J; Luedke, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    Two systems, inoculation of bovine endothelial cells and of embryonated chicken eggs, were compared for detection of bluetongue virus (BTV) in blood specimens from experimentally inoculated sheep. For all BTV serotypes tested, embryonated chicken eggs detected longer periods of viremia than did bovine endothelial cells, primarily by detecting BTV in samples containing lower virus concentrations.

  7. Surveillance of antibodies to bluetongue virus in livestock in Mongolia using C-ELISA: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (C-ELISA) was used to conduct surveillance of bluetongue virus antibodies (BTV) in sheep, goats and cattle in Mongolia. The highest prevalence was recorded in goats (86%) followed by sheep (51%) and cattle (9%). The results are the first confirmation of the presence of such antibodies in Mongolian livestock. Studies are now underway to conduct more detailed investigations concerning bluetongue, including to determine the virus serotypes that are and have been circulating in the country. (author)

  8. Colostral transmission of bluetongue virus nucleic acid among newborn dairy calves in California

    OpenAIRE

    Mayo, Christie E.; Crossley, Beate M.; Hietala, Sharon K.; Gardner, Ian A; Breitmeyer, Richard E.; Maclachlan, N. James

    2010-01-01

    There have been substantial recent changes in the global distribution and nature of bluetongue virus (BTV) infection of ungulates, perhaps as a result of climate change. To evaluate the epidemiology of BTV infection in California, an area historically endemic for the virus, we monitored newborn dairy calves at different sites for one year for the presence of BTV RNA and virus-specific antibodies. The data confirm both localized, vector-mediated, seasonal transmission of BTV as well as dissemi...

  9. Transplacental Transmission of Bluetongue Virus Serotype 1 and Serotype 8 in Sheep: Virological and Pathological Findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, van der M.T.W.; Schroer-Joosten, D.P.H.; Fid-Fourkour, A.; Vrijenhoek, M.P.; Debyser, I.; Moulin, V.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Smit, de A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) strain, which emerged in Europe in 2006, had an unusually high ability to cause foetal infection in pregnant ruminants. Other serotypes of BTV had already been present in Europe for more than a decade, but transplacental transmission of these strains had never

  10. The first survey for antibody against Bluetongue virus in sheep flocks in Southeast of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Asghar Mozaffari; Mohammad Khalili

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Bluetongue virus is an arthropod-borne Orbivirus in the family Reoviridae which infects both domestic and wild ruminants. Bluetongue disease is a "List A" disease of the Office of International Epizootics. To the best of our knowledge, no report has been published on bluetongue disease of sheep flocks of Southeast of Iran. The objective of this study was to describe the seroprevalence rates of BTV in sheep flocks in southeast of Iran. Methods: The blood samples were collected randomly from herds of Southeast of Iran. A total of 188 sera samples (94 male, 94 female) collected between 2009 and 2010, were available. Antibodies to BTV in sera were detected by using a commercial competitive ELISA (Institute Pourquier, Montpellier, France) according to manufacturer’s instructions. Results: The seroprevalence rates were 6.57 %for sheep herds. Within a herd, prevalence of BTV seropositive animals ranged from 0% to 42.85%. 33.3% sheep flocks were positive to BTV antibodies. Sex didn't affect the rate of seropositivity, but the rate of seropositivity was significantly changed in different age groups. Conclusion: This study describes the seroprevalence rates of Bluetongue virus (BTV) in sheep flocks in southeast of Iran for the first time.

  11. Evidence for transmission of bluetongue virus serotype 26 through direct contact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Batten

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the mechanisms of transmission of bluetongue virus serotype 26 (BTV-26 in goats. A previous study, which investigated the pathogenicity and infection kinetics of BTV-26 in goats, unexpectedly revealed that one control goat may have been infected through a direct contact transmission route. To investigate the transmission mechanisms of BTV-26 in more detail an experimental infection study was carried out in which three goats were infected with BTV-26, three goats were kept uninfected, but were housed in direct contact with the infected goats, and an additional four goats were kept in indirect contact separated from infected goats by metal gates. This barrier allowed the goats to have occasional face-to-face contact in the same airspace, but feeding, watering, sampling and environmental cleaning was carried out separately. The three experimentally infected goats did not show clinical signs of BTV, however high levels of viral RNA were detected and virus was isolated from their blood. At 21 dpi viral RNA was detected in, and virus was isolated from the blood of the three direct contact goats, which also seroconverted. The four indirect barrier contact goats remained uninfected throughout the duration of the experiment. In order to assess replication in a laboratory model species of Culicoides biting midge, more than 300 Culicoides sonorensis were fed a BTV-26 spiked blood meal and incubated for 7 days. The dissemination of BTV-26 in individual C. sonorensis was inferred from the quantity of virus RNA and indicated that none of the insects processed at day 7 possessed transmissible infections. This study shows that BTV-26 is easily transmitted through direct contact transmission between goats, and the strain does not seem to replicate in C. sonorensis midges using standard incubation conditions.

  12. Transplacental transmission of Bluetongue virus serotype 1 and serotype 8 in sheep: virological and pathological findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam T W van der Sluijs

    Full Text Available The Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8 strain, which emerged in Europe in 2006, had an unusually high ability to cause foetal infection in pregnant ruminants. Other serotypes of BTV had already been present in Europe for more than a decade, but transplacental transmission of these strains had never been demonstrated. To determine whether transplacental transmission is a unique feature of BTV-8 we compared the incidence and pathological consequences of transplacental transmission of BTV-8 to that of BTV-1. Nine pregnant ewes were infected with either BTV-8 or BTV-1. The BTV strains used for the infection were field strains isolated on embryonated chicken eggs and passaged twice on mammalian cells. Blood samples were taken to monitor the viraemia in the ewes. Four weeks after the infection, the foetuses were examined for pathological changes and for the presence of BTV. BTV-8 could be demonstrated in 12 foetuses (43% from 5 ewes (56%. %. BTV-1 was detected in 14 foetuses (82% from 6 ewes (67%. Pathological changes were mainly found in the central nervous system. In the BTV-8 group, lympho-histiocytic infiltrates, gliosis and slight vacuolation of the neuropil were found. BTV-1 infection induced a severe necrotizing encephalopathy and severe meningitis, with macroscopic hydranencephaly or porencephaly in 8 foetuses. In our experimental setting, using low passaged virus strains, BTV-1 was able to induce transplacental transmission to a higher incidence compared to BTV-8, causing more severe pathology.

  13. Widespread Reassortment Shapes the Evolution and Epidemiology of Bluetongue Virus following European Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriaki Nomikou

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Genetic exchange by a process of genome-segment 'reassortment' represents an important mechanism for evolutionary change in all viruses with segmented genomes, yet in many cases a detailed understanding of its frequency and biological consequences is lacking. We provide a comprehensive assessment of reassortment in bluetongue virus (BTV, a globally important insect-borne pathogen of livestock, during recent outbreaks in Europe. Full-genome sequences were generated and analysed for over 150 isolates belonging to the different BTV serotypes that have emerged in the region over the last 5 decades. Based on this novel dataset we confirm that reassortment is a frequent process that plays an important and on-going role in evolution of the virus. We found evidence for reassortment in all ten segments without a significant bias towards any particular segment. However, we observed biases in the relative frequency at which particular segments were associated with each other during reassortment. This points to selective constraints possibly caused by functional relationships between individual proteins or genome segments and genome-wide epistatic interactions. Sites under positive selection were more likely to undergo amino acid changes in newly reassorted viruses, providing additional evidence for adaptive dynamics as a consequence of reassortment. We show that the live attenuated vaccines recently used in Europe have repeatedly reassorted with field strains, contributing to their genotypic, and potentially phenotypic, variability. The high degree of plasticity seen in the BTV genome in terms of segment origin suggests that current classification schemes that are based primarily on serotype, which is determined by only a single genome segment, are inadequate. Our work highlights the need for a better understanding of the mechanisms and epidemiological consequences of reassortment in BTV, as well as other segmented RNA viruses.

  14. Colostral transmission of bluetongue virus nucleic acid among newborn dairy calves in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, C E; Crossley, B M; Hietala, S K; Gardner, I A; Breitmeyer, R E; Maclachlan, N James

    2010-08-01

    There have been substantial recent changes in the global distribution and nature of bluetongue virus (BTV) infection of ungulates, perhaps as a result of climate change. To evaluate the epidemiology of BTV infection in California, an area historically endemic for the virus, we monitored newborn dairy calves at different sites for 1 year for the presence of BTV RNA and virus-specific antibodies. The data confirm both localized, vector-mediated, seasonal transmission of BTV as well as dissemination of BTV and/or viral nucleic acid to newborn calves following ingestion of colostrum. PMID:20557494

  15. Full-Genome Sequencing as a Basis for Molecular Epidemiology Studies of Bluetongue Virus in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushila Maan

    Full Text Available Since 1998 there have been significant changes in the global distribution of bluetongue virus (BTV. Ten previously exotic BTV serotypes have been detected in Europe, causing severe disease outbreaks in naïve ruminant populations. Previously exotic BTV serotypes were also identified in the USA, Israel, Australia and India. BTV is transmitted by biting midges (Culicoides spp. and changes in the distribution of vector species, climate change, increased international travel and trade are thought to have contributed to these events. Thirteen BTV serotypes have been isolated in India since first reports of the disease in the country during 1964. Efficient methods for preparation of viral dsRNA and cDNA synthesis, have facilitated full-genome sequencing of BTV strains from the region. These studies introduce a new approach for BTV characterization, based on full-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analyses, facilitating the identification of BTV serotype, topotype and reassortant strains. Phylogenetic analyses show that most of the equivalent genome-segments of Indian BTV strains are closely related, clustering within a major eastern BTV 'topotype'. However, genome-segment 5 (Seg-5 encoding NS1, from multiple post 1982 Indian isolates, originated from a western BTV topotype. All ten genome-segments of BTV-2 isolates (IND2003/01, IND2003/02 and IND2003/03 are closely related (>99% identity to a South African BTV-2 vaccine-strain (western topotype. Similarly BTV-10 isolates (IND2003/06; IND2005/04 show >99% identity in all genome segments, to the prototype BTV-10 (CA-8 strain from the USA. These data suggest repeated introductions of western BTV field and/or vaccine-strains into India, potentially linked to animal or vector-insect movements, or unauthorised use of 'live' South African or American BTV-vaccines in the country. The data presented will help improve nucleic acid based diagnostics for Indian serotypes/topotypes, as part of control strategies.

  16. Full genome characterisation of bluetongue virus serotype 6 from the Netherlands 2008 and comparison to other field and vaccine strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushila Maan

    Full Text Available In mid September 2008, clinical signs of bluetongue (particularly coronitis were observed in cows on three different farms in eastern Netherlands (Luttenberg, Heeten, and Barchem, two of which had been vaccinated with an inactivated BTV-8 vaccine (during May-June 2008. Bluetongue virus (BTV infection was also detected on a fourth farm (Oldenzaal in the same area while testing for export. BTV RNA was subsequently identified by real time RT-PCR targeting genome-segment (Seg- 10, in blood samples from each farm. The virus was isolated from the Heeten sample (IAH "dsRNA virus reference collection" [dsRNA-VRC] isolate number NET2008/05 and typed as BTV-6 by RT-PCR targeting Seg-2. Sequencing confirmed the virus type, showing an identical Seg-2 sequence to that of the South African BTV-6 live-vaccine-strain. Although most of the other genome segments also showed very high levels of identity to the BTV-6 vaccine (99.7 to 100%, Seg-10 showed greatest identity (98.4% to the BTV-2 vaccine (RSAvvv2/02, indicating that NET2008/05 had acquired a different Seg-10 by reassortment. Although Seg-7 from NET2008/05 was also most closely related to the BTV-6 vaccine (99.7/100% nt/aa identity, the Seg-7 sequence derived from the blood sample of the same animal (NET2008/06 was identical to that of the Netherlands BTV-8 (NET2006/04 and NET2007/01. This indicates that the blood contained two different Seg-7 sequences, one of which (from the BTV-6 vaccine was selected during virus isolation in cell-culture. The predominance of the BTV-8 Seg-7 in the blood sample suggests that the virus was in the process of reassorting with the northern field strain of BTV-8. Two genome segments of the virus showed significant differences from the BTV-6 vaccine, indicating that they had been acquired by reassortment event with BTV-8, and another unknown parental-strain. However, the route by which BTV-6 and BTV-8 entered northern Europe was not established.

  17. Immune response of mice and sheep to bluetongue virus inactivated by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma irradiation is being tested as a means of inactivating bluetongue virus (BTV) for use in vaccines. Exposure of BTV 17 to various levels of irradiation revealed that a dose of approximately 0.6 megarad was required to reduce the virus titer by one log10, or 90%. To test the immunogenicity of irradiated BTV, mouse brain passaged virus and concentrated cell culture passaged virus were inactivated by 6 megarads of gamma irradiation, and vaccines were prepared by emulsifying the virus preparations in equal volumes of a modified incomplete Freund's adjuvant. These vaccines stimulated the production of neutralizing antibodies in mice and sheep, a cell mediated immune response in mice, and a protective immune response in sheep. The results suggest that gamma irradiation would be an effective means of inactivating BTV for the preparation of vaccines

  18. Interaction between Bluetongue virus outer capsid protein VP2 and vimentin is necessary for virus egress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Polly

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The VP2 outer capsid protein Bluetongue Virus (BTV is responsible for receptor binding, haemagglutination and eliciting host-specific immunity. However, the assembly of this outer capsid protein on the transcriptionally active viral core would block transcription of the virus. Thus assembly of the outer capsid on the core particle must be a tightly controlled process during virus maturation. Earlier studies have detected mature virus particles associated with intermediate filaments in virus infected cells but the viral determinant for this association and the effect of disrupting intermediate filaments on virus assembly and release are unknown. Results In this study it is demonstrated that BTV VP2 associates with vimentin in both virus infected cells and in the absence of other viral proteins. Further, the determinants of vimentin localisation are mapped to the N-terminus of the protein and deletions of aminio acids between residues 65 and 114 are shown to disrupt VP2-vimentin association. Site directed mutation also reveals that amino acid residues Gly 70 and Val 72 are important in the VP2-vimentin association. Mutation of these amino acids resulted in a soluble VP2 capable of forming trimeric structures similar to unmodified protein that no longer associated with vimentin. Furthermore, pharmacological disruption of intermediate filaments, either directly or indirectly through the disruption of the microtubule network, inhibited virus release from BTV infected cells. Conclusion The principal findings of the research are that the association of mature BTV particles with intermediate filaments are driven by the interaction of VP2 with vimentin and that this interaction contributes to virus egress. Furthermore, i the N-terminal 118 amino acids of VP2 are sufficient to confer vimentin interaction. ii Deletion of amino acids 65–114 or mutation of amino acids 70–72 to DVD abrogates vimentin association. iii Finally

  19. Genomic sequences of Australian bluetongue virus prototype serotypes reveal global relationships and possible routes of entry into Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, David B; Bulach, Dieter M; Amos-Ritchie, Rachel; Adams, Mathew M; Walker, Peter J; Weir, Richard

    2012-06-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is transmitted by biting midges (Culicoides spp.). It causes disease mainly in sheep and occasionally in cattle and other species. BTV has spread into northern Europe, causing disease in sheep and cattle. The introduction of new serotypes, changes in vector species, and climate change have contributed to these changes. Ten BTV serotypes have been isolated in Australia without apparent associated disease. Simplified methods for preferential isolation of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and template preparation enabled high-throughput sequencing of the 10 genome segments of all Australian BTV prototype serotypes. Phylogenetic analysis reinforced the Western and Eastern topotypes previously characterized but revealed unique features of several Australian BTVs. Many of the Australian BTV genome segments (Seg-) were closely related, clustering together within the Eastern topotypes. A novel Australian topotype for Seg-5 (NS1) was identified, with taxa spread across several serotypes and over time. Seg-1, -2, -3, -4, -6, -7, -9, and -10 of BTV_2_AUS_2008 were most closely related to the cognate segments of viruses from Taiwan and Asia and not other Australian viruses, supporting the conclusion that BTV_2 entered Australia recently. The Australian BTV_15_AUS_1982 prototype was revealed to be unusual among the Australian BTV isolates, with Seg-3 and -8 distantly related to other BTV sequences from all serotypes. PMID:22514341

  20. Full-Genome Sequencing as a Basis for Molecular Epidemiology Studies of Bluetongue Virus in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Sushila; Maan, Narender S.; Belaganahalli, Manjunatha N.; Rao, Pavuluri Panduranga; Singh, Karam Pal; Hemadri, Divakar; Putty, Kalyani; Kumar, Aman; Batra, Kanisht; Krishnajyothi, Yadlapati; Chandel, Bharat S.; Reddy, G. Hanmanth; Nomikou, Kyriaki; Reddy, Yella Narasimha; Attoui, Houssam; Hegde, Nagendra R.; Mertens, Peter P. C.

    2015-01-01

    Since 1998 there have been significant changes in the global distribution of bluetongue virus (BTV). Ten previously exotic BTV serotypes have been detected in Europe, causing severe disease outbreaks in naïve ruminant populations. Previously exotic BTV serotypes were also identified in the USA, Israel, Australia and India. BTV is transmitted by biting midges (Culicoides spp.) and changes in the distribution of vector species, climate change, increased international travel and trade are thought to have contributed to these events. Thirteen BTV serotypes have been isolated in India since first reports of the disease in the country during 1964. Efficient methods for preparation of viral dsRNA and cDNA synthesis, have facilitated full-genome sequencing of BTV strains from the region. These studies introduce a new approach for BTV characterization, based on full-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analyses, facilitating the identification of BTV serotype, topotype and reassortant strains. Phylogenetic analyses show that most of the equivalent genome-segments of Indian BTV strains are closely related, clustering within a major eastern BTV ‘topotype’. However, genome-segment 5 (Seg-5) encoding NS1, from multiple post 1982 Indian isolates, originated from a western BTV topotype. All ten genome-segments of BTV-2 isolates (IND2003/01, IND2003/02 and IND2003/03) are closely related (>99% identity) to a South African BTV-2 vaccine-strain (western topotype). Similarly BTV-10 isolates (IND2003/06; IND2005/04) show >99% identity in all genome segments, to the prototype BTV-10 (CA-8) strain from the USA. These data suggest repeated introductions of western BTV field and/or vaccine-strains into India, potentially linked to animal or vector-insect movements, or unauthorised use of ‘live’ South African or American BTV-vaccines in the country. The data presented will help improve nucleic acid based diagnostics for Indian serotypes/topotypes, as part of control strategies. PMID

  1. Evaluation of in vitro methods for assessment of infection of Australian Culicoides spp. with bluetongue viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Saag, Matthew; Nicholas, Adrian; Ward, Michael; Kirkland, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Biting midges from the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are the vectors of several globally important arboviruses that affect livestock. These include orbiviruses from the bluetongue virus (BTV) and African horse sickness virus (AHSV) groups and members of the Simbu serogroup of orthobunyaviruses, such as the recently emerged Schmallenberg virus. In this article, the authors evaluate several methods for feeding wild‑caught Australian Culicoides on BTV infected preparations of blood and sucrose. Feeding Culicoides on the membrane of embryonated chicken eggs was identified as the preferred feeding method. Although, cotton wool pads soaked in either virus‑infected blood or virus‑sucrose mixtures were also successful. A non‑destructive nucleic acid extraction technique for the detection of viral RNA in Culicoides was also evaluated as it allows for readily differentiating infected from non‑infected Culicoides. PMID:26741248

  2. Entry of Bluetongue Virus Capsid Requires the Late Endosome-specific Lipid Lysobisphosphatidic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Avnish; Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2016-06-01

    The entry of viruses into host cells is one of the key processes of infection. The mechanisms of cellular entry for enveloped virus have been well studied. The fusion proteins as well as the facilitating cellular lipid factors involved in the viral fusion entry process have been well characterized. The process of non-enveloped virus cell entry, in comparison, remains poorly defined, particularly for large complex capsid viruses of the family Reoviridae, which comprises a range of mammalian pathogens. These viruses enter cells without the aid of a limiting membrane and thus cannot fuse with host cell membranes to enter cells. Instead, these viruses are believed to penetrate membranes of the host cell during endocytosis. However, the molecular mechanism of this process is largely undefined. Here we show, utilizing an in vitro liposome penetration assay and cell biology, that bluetongue virus (BTV), an archetypal member of the Reoviridae, utilizes the late endosome-specific lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid for productive membrane penetration and viral entry. Further, we provide preliminary evidence that lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid facilitates pore expansion during membrane penetration, suggesting a mechanism for lipid factor requirement of BTV. This finding indicates that despite the lack of a membrane envelope, the entry process of BTV is similar in specific lipid requirements to enveloped viruses that enter cells through the late endosome. These results are the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that a large non-enveloped virus of the Reoviridae has specific lipid requirements for membrane penetration and host cell entry. PMID:27036941

  3. Susceptibility of in vitro produced hatched bovine blastocysts to infection with bluetongue virus serotype 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandaele Leen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8, which caused an epidemic in ruminants in central Western Europe in 2006 and 2007, seems to differ from other bluetongue serotypes in that it can spread transplacentally and has been associated with an increased incidence of abortion and other reproductive problems. For these reasons, and also because BTV-8 is threatening to spread to other parts of the world, there is a need for more information on the consequences of infection during pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether hatched (i.e. zona pellucida-free in vitro produced bovine blastocysts at 8-9 days post insemination are susceptible to BTV-8 and whether such infection induces cell death as indicated by apoptosis. Exposure of hatched in vitro produced bovine blastocysts for 1 h to a medium containing 103.8 or 104.9 TCID50 of the virus resulted in active viral replication in between 25 and 100% of the cells at 72 h post exposure. The infected blastocysts also showed growth arrest as evidenced by lower total cell numbers and a significant level of cellular apoptosis. We conclude from this in vitro study that some of the reproductive problems that are reported when cattle herds are infected with BTV-8 may be attributed to direct infection of blastocysts and other early-stage embryos in utero.

  4. Molecular detection technologies for arboviruses including bluetongue and Rift Valley fever viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Arthropod-borne animal viruses (arboviruses) cause significant livestock and economic losses to world agriculture. This paper discusses the current and potential impact of these viruses, as well as the current and developing molecular diagnostic tools for these emerging and re-emerging insect transmitted viruses affecting livestock and wildlife. The emphasis will be on those viruses which there have been significant recent outbreaks in livestock including bluetongue virus (BTV), epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). The current readiness for rapid detection of arboviruses is fairly high, but there is a need for global harmonization and continued evaluation due to the genetic variation of these unique pathogens. The tool chest for molecular detection contains a range of assays from low technology to high-throughput sophisticated devices. Biting midges in the genus Culicoides transmit arboviruses affecting livestock, including BTV and EHDV. These viruses cause sub-acute to lethal disease cattle, sheep, goats and/or wild ungulates resulting in worldwide losses attributed to BTV alone estimated at $3 billion annually. There was a fairly good understanding of the epidemiology of BTV until recent introduction of BTV into Europe. Of particular concern is the economic and unique disease impact BTV-8 has had on Europe and the fact that there have been multiple isolations of exotic BTV serotypes in the U.S. over the past 3 years. In Europe, killed BTV-8 vaccines are being utilized to control and potential eradicate the disease. In the U.S., there is only one commercial vaccine available nation-wide, and it is specific to BTV type 10. There is limited or no cross protection between serotypes thus complicates the control of the disease. The related orbivirus, EHDV, is of considerable interest to the captive cervid industry, and EHDV serotype 7 has been associated with clinical disease in

  5. Quantitative assessment of the probability of bluetongue virus overwintering by horizontal transmission: application to Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napp Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Even though bluetongue virus (BTV transmission is apparently interrupted during winter, bluetongue outbreaks often reappear in the next season (overwintering. Several mechanisms for BTV overwintering have been proposed, but to date, their relative importance remain unclear. In order to assess the probability of BTV overwintering by persistence in adult vectors, ruminants (through prolonged viraemia or a combination of both, a quantitative risk assessment model was developed. Furthermore, the model allowed the role played by the residual number of vectors present during winter to be examined, and the effect of a proportion of Culicoides living inside buildings (endophilic behaviour to be explored. The model was then applied to a real scenario: overwintering in Germany between 2006 and 2007. The results showed that the limited number of vectors active during winter seemed to allow the transmission of BTV during this period, and that while transmission was favoured by the endophilic behaviour of some Culicoides, its effect was limited. Even though transmission was possible, the likelihood of BTV overwintering by the mechanisms studied seemed too low to explain the observed re-emergence of the disease. Therefore, other overwintering mechanisms not considered in the model are likely to have played a significant role in BTV overwintering in Germany between 2006 and 2007.

  6. A review of experimental infections with bluetongue virus in the mammalian host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Peter; van Vuuren, Moritz; Venter, Estelle H; Stokstad, Maria

    2014-03-01

    Experimental infection studies with bluetongue virus (BTV) in the mammalian host have a history that stretches back to the late 18th century. Studies in a wide range of ruminant and camelid species as well as mice have been instrumental in understanding BTV transmission, bluetongue (BT) pathogenicity/pathogenesis, viral virulence, the induced immune response, as well as reproductive failures associated with BTV infection. These studies have in many cases been complemented by in vitro studies with BTV in different cell types in tissue culture. Together these studies have formed the basis for the understanding of BTV-host interaction and have contributed to the design of successful control strategies, including the development of effective vaccines. This review describes some of the fundamental and contemporary infection studies that have been conducted with BTV in the mammalian host and provides an overview of the principal animal welfare issues that should be considered when designing experimental infection studies with BTV in in vivo infection models. Examples are provided from the authors' own laboratory where the three Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement) have been implemented in the design of experimental infection studies with BTV in mice and goats. The use of the ARRIVE guidelines for the reporting of data from animal infection studies is emphasized. PMID:24462840

  7. Non-structural protein NS3/NS3a is required for propagation of bluetongue virus in Culicoides sonorensis

    OpenAIRE

    Feenstra, Femke; Drolet, B.S.; Boonstra, Jan; Rijn, van, C.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes non-contagious haemorrhagic disease in ruminants and is transmitted by Culicoides spp. biting midges. BTV encodes four non-structural proteins of which NS3/NS3a is functional in virus release. NS3/NS3a is not essential for in vitro virus replication. However, deletion of NS3/NS3a leads to delayed virus release from mammalian cells and largely reduces virus release from insect cells. NS3/NS3a knockout BTV in sheep causes no viremia, but induces sterile...

  8. High seroprevalence of bluetongue virus antibodies in goats in southeast Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Asghar Mozaffari; Mohammad Khalili; Sina Sabahi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the seroprevalence rate of bluetongue virus (BTV) in goat flocks in southeast of Iran.Methods:93 sera samples were collected between 2011 and 2012. Antibodies to BTV in sera were detected by using a commercial competitive ELISA 3 according to manufacturer’s instructions. The blood samples were collected randomly from herds of southeast of Iran. A total of Results: The seroprevalence rates were 67.7% for goats. Within a herd, prevalence of BTV seropositive animals ranged from 33.3% to 100.0%. All goat flocks were positive to BTV antibodies.Conclusions:This study describes a high seroprevalence rate of BTV in goat flocks in southeast of Iran for the first time.

  9. An investigation into the possibility of bluetongue virus transmission by transfer of infected ovine embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle H. Venter

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bluetongue (BT, a disease that affects mainly sheep, causes economic losses owing to not only its deleterious effects on animals but also its associated impact on the restriction of movement of livestock and livestock germplasm. The causative agent, bluetongue virus (BTV, can occur in the semen of rams and bulls at the time of peak viraemia and be transferred to a developing foetus. The risk of the transmission of BTV by bovine embryos is negligible if the embryos are washed according to the International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS protocol. Two experiments were undertaken to determine whether this holds for ovine embryos that had been exposed to BTV. Firstly, the oestrus cycles of 12 ewes were synchronised and the 59 embryos that were obtained were exposed in vitro to BTV-2 and BTV-4 at a dilution of 1 x 102.88 and 1 x 103.5 respectively. In the second experiment, embryos were recovered from sheep at the peak of viraemia. A total of 96 embryos were collected from BTV-infected sheep 21 days after infection. In both experiments half the embryos were washed and treated with trypsin according to the IETS protocol while the remaining embryos were neither washed nor treated. All were tested for the presence of BTV using cell culture techniques. The virus was detected after three passages in BHK-21 cells only in one wash bath in the first experiment and two unwashed embryos exposed to BTV-4 at a titre of 1 x 103.5. No embryos or uterine flush fluids obtained from viraemic donors used in the second experiment were positive for BTV after the standard washing procedure had been followed. The washing procedure of the IETS protocol can thus clear sheep embryos infected with BTV either in vitro or in vivo.

  10. Transient Bluetongue virus serotype 8 capsid protein expression in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertha R. van Zyl

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bluetongue virus (BTV causes severe disease in domestic and wild ruminants, and has recently caused several outbreaks in Europe. Current vaccines include live-attenuated and inactivated viruses; while these are effective, there is risk of reversion to virulence by mutation or reassortment with wild type viruses. Subunit or virus-like particle (VLP vaccines are safer options: VLP vaccines produced in insect cells by expression of the four BTV capsid proteins are protective against challenge; however, this is a costly production method. We investigated production of BTV VLPs in plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression, an inexpensive production system very well suited to developing country use. Leaves infiltrated with recombinant pEAQ-HT vectors separately encoding the four BTV-8 capsid proteins produced more proteins than recombinant pTRA vectors. Plant expression using the pEAQ-HT vector resulted in both BTV-8 core-like particles (CLPs and VLPs; differentially controlling the concentration of infiltrated bacteria significantly influenced yield of the VLPs. In situ localisation of assembled particles was investigated by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and it was shown that a mixed population of core-like particles (CLPs, consisting of VP3 and VP7 and VLPs were present as paracrystalline arrays in the cytoplasm of plant cells co-expressing all four capsid proteins.

  11. Antigenic profile of African horse sickness virus serotype 4 VP5 and identification of a neutralizing epitope shared with bluetongue virus and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, J.L.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Venteo, A.;

    1999-01-01

    function of VP5, the other component of the capsid, is unknown. In this report, AHSV VP5, expressed in insect cells alone or together with VP2, was able to induce AHSV-specific neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, two VP5-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that were able to neutralize the virus in a....... Neutralizing epitopes were defined at positions 85-92 (PDPLSPGE) for MAb 10AE12 and at 179-185 (EEDLRTR) for MAb 10AC6. Epitope 10AE12 is highly conserved between the different orbiviruses. MAb 10AE12 was able to recognize bluetongue virus VP5 and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus VP5 by several techniques...

  12. Genetic analysis of the NS1 and NS3 genes from the prototype serotype of Bluetongue and Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) are arthropod-borne viruses of significant animal agriculture importance. Clinical disease caused by BTV is most commonly observed in sheep and some wild ruminants; however, the recent outbreak in European Union has resulted in se...

  13. Antigenic evidence of bluetongue virus from small ruminant population of two different geographical regions of Odisha, India

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    Shaswati Subhadarsini Pany

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the present study was to carry out antigenic detection of bluetongue virus (BTV among the small ruminant population of two different geographical regions of Odisha (coastal and central using recombinant VP7 (r-VP-7 based sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (s-ELISA. Materials and Methods: Blood samples (n=274 were collected from two different geographical pockets of Odisha, which covered mostly the coastal and central regions. Of the total samples under study 185 were from goat and 89 were from sheep. The blood samples were tested for the presence of BTV antigen by r-VP7 based s-ELISA. Results: r-VP-7 s-ELISA detected BTV antigen in 52.43% and 44.94% of the goat and sheep population under study, respectively. This study highlights the antigenic persistence of BTV in the state for the 1st time. Conclusion: This high antigenic presence in both sheep and goat population suggests an alarming BTV infection in field conditions which warrants more systematic study directed toward isolation and characterization studies as well as the implementation of control strategy for BT in Odisha.

  14. Reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays for rapid identification of eastern and western strains of bluetongue virus in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, S; Maan, N S; Batra, K; Kumar, A; Gupta, A; Rao, Panduranga P; Hemadri, Divakar; Reddy, Yella Narasimha; Guimera, M; Belaganahalli, M N; Mertens, P P C

    2016-08-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) infects all ruminants, including cattle, goats and camelids, causing bluetongue disease (BT) that is often severe in naïve deer and sheep. Reverse-transcription-loop-mediated-isothermal-amplification (RT-LAMP) assays were developed to detect eastern or western topotype of BTV strains circulating in India. Each assay uses four primers recognizing six distinct sequences of BTV genome-segment 1 (Seg-1). The eastern (e)RT-LAMP and western (w)RT-LAMP assay detected BTV RNA in all positive isolates that were tested (n=52, including Indian BTV-1, -2, -3, -5, -9, -10, -16, -21 -23, and -24 strains) with high specificity and efficiency. The analytical sensitivity of the RT-LAMP assays is comparable to real-time RT-PCR, but higher than conventional RT-PCR. The accelerated eRT-LAMP and wRT-LAMP assays generated detectable levels of amplified DNA, down to 0.216 fg of BTV RNA template or 108 fg of BTV RNA template within 60-90min respectively. The assays gave negative results with RNA from foot-and-mouth-disease virus (FMDV), peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), or DNA from Capripox viruses and Orf virus (n=10), all of which can cause clinical signs similar to BT. Both RT-LAMP assays did not show any cross-reaction among themselves. The assays are rapid, easy to perform, could be adapted as a 'penside' test making them suitable for 'front-line' diagnosis, helping to identify and contain field outbreaks of BTV. PMID:27054888

  15. Multiserotype protection elicited by a combinatorial prime-boost vaccination strategy against bluetongue virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Calvo-Pinilla

    Full Text Available Bluetongue virus (BTV belongs to the genus Orbivirus within the family Reoviridae. The development of vector-based vaccines expressing conserved protective antigens results in increased immune activation and could reduce the number of multiserotype vaccinations required, therefore providing a cost-effective product. Recent recombinant DNA technology has allowed the development of novel strategies to develop marker and safe vaccines against BTV. We have now engineered naked DNAs and recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA expressing VP2, VP7 and NS1 proteins from BTV-4. IFNAR((-/- mice inoculated with DNA/rMVA-VP2,-VP7-NS1 in an heterologous prime boost vaccination strategy generated significant levels of antibodies specific of VP2, VP7, and NS1, including those with neutralizing activity against BTV-4. In addition, vaccination stimulated specific CD8(+ T cell responses against these three BTV proteins. Importantly, the vaccine combination expressing NS1, VP2 and VP7 proteins of BTV-4, elicited sterile protection against a lethal dose of homologous BTV-4 infection. Remarkably, the vaccine induced cross-protection against lethal doses of heterologous BTV-8 and BTV-1 suggesting that the DNA/rMVA-VP2,-VP7,-NS1 marker vaccine is a promising multiserotype vaccine against BTV.

  16. Report of the Bluetongue and Bovine Retroviruses Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterizing the Epidemiology of Bluetongue Virus Serotype 1 in Southern Louisiana. Will K. Reeves, Mike Becker, Cecilia Kato, Richard Mayer, and Lane D. Foil. In November 2004, BTV-1 was isolated from the tissues of a hunter-killed white tailed deer from southern Louisiana. There was signif...

  17. Climate Change Influences on the Global Potential Distribution of Bluetongue Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah M Samy

    Full Text Available The geographic distribution of arboviruses has received considerable attention after several dramatic emergence events around the world. Bluetongue virus (BTV is classified among category "A" diseases notifiable to the World Organization of Animal Health (OIE, and is transmitted among ruminants by biting midges of the genus Culicoides. Here, we developed a comprehensive occurrence data set to map the current distribution, estimate the ecological niche, and explore the future potential distribution of BTV globally using ecological niche modeling and based on diverse future climate scenarios from general circulation models (GCMs for four representative concentration pathways (RCPs. The broad ecological niche and potential geographic distribution of BTV under present-day conditions reflected the disease's current distribution across the world in tropical, subtropical, and temperate regions. All model predictions were significantly better than random expectations. As a further evaluation of model robustness, we compared our model predictions to 331 independent records from most recent outbreaks from the Food and Agriculture Organization Emergency Prevention System for Transboundary Animal and Plant Pests and Diseases Information System (EMPRES-i; all were successfully anticipated by the BTV model. Finally, we tested ecological niche similarity among possible vectors and BTV, and could not reject hypotheses of niche similarity. Under future-climate conditions, the potential distribution of BTV was predicted to broaden, especially in central Africa, United States, and western Russia.

  18. Development of a novel protein chip for the detection of bluetongue virus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Q Y; Sun, E C; Feng, Y F; Li, J P; Lv, S; Zhang, Q; Wang, H X; Zhang, J K; Wu, D L

    2016-08-01

    Bluetongue (BT), which is caused by the BT virus (BTV), is an important disease in ruminants that leads to significant economic losses in the husbandry industry. To detect BTV-specific antibodies in serum, a protein chip detection method based on a novel solid supporting material known as polymer-coated initiator-integrated poly (dimethyl siloxane) (iPDMS) was developed. With a threshold of 25% (signal-to-noise percentage), the sensitivity and specificity of the protein chip were 98.6% and 94.8%, respectively. Furthermore, spot serum samples obtained from six provinces of China were tested with the protein chip and a commercially available BTV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit (IDEXX). Of 615 samples, BTV-specific antibodies were detected in 200 (32.52%) by the protein chip and in 176 (28.62%) by the IDEXX BTV ELISA kit. Comparison of the protein chip with the commercial IDEXX BTV ELISA kit yielded the following spot serum detection results: a total coincidence, a negative coincidence and a positive coincidence of 95.12%, 99.28% and 86.5%, respectively. With the protein chip, the BTV-specific serum antibody was detected in samples from all six provinces, and the positive rates ranged from 4.12 to 74.4%. These results indicate that this protein chip detection method based on iPDMS is useful for the serological diagnosis of BTV infection and for epidemiological investigation. PMID:27063641

  19. Climate Change Influences on the Global Potential Distribution of Bluetongue Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samy, Abdallah M; Peterson, A Townsend

    2016-01-01

    The geographic distribution of arboviruses has received considerable attention after several dramatic emergence events around the world. Bluetongue virus (BTV) is classified among category "A" diseases notifiable to the World Organization of Animal Health (OIE), and is transmitted among ruminants by biting midges of the genus Culicoides. Here, we developed a comprehensive occurrence data set to map the current distribution, estimate the ecological niche, and explore the future potential distribution of BTV globally using ecological niche modeling and based on diverse future climate scenarios from general circulation models (GCMs) for four representative concentration pathways (RCPs). The broad ecological niche and potential geographic distribution of BTV under present-day conditions reflected the disease's current distribution across the world in tropical, subtropical, and temperate regions. All model predictions were significantly better than random expectations. As a further evaluation of model robustness, we compared our model predictions to 331 independent records from most recent outbreaks from the Food and Agriculture Organization Emergency Prevention System for Transboundary Animal and Plant Pests and Diseases Information System (EMPRES-i); all were successfully anticipated by the BTV model. Finally, we tested ecological niche similarity among possible vectors and BTV, and could not reject hypotheses of niche similarity. Under future-climate conditions, the potential distribution of BTV was predicted to broaden, especially in central Africa, United States, and western Russia. PMID:26959424

  20. Climate Change Influences on the Global Potential Distribution of Bluetongue Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samy, Abdallah M.; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2016-01-01

    The geographic distribution of arboviruses has received considerable attention after several dramatic emergence events around the world. Bluetongue virus (BTV) is classified among category “A” diseases notifiable to the World Organization of Animal Health (OIE), and is transmitted among ruminants by biting midges of the genus Culicoides. Here, we developed a comprehensive occurrence data set to map the current distribution, estimate the ecological niche, and explore the future potential distribution of BTV globally using ecological niche modeling and based on diverse future climate scenarios from general circulation models (GCMs) for four representative concentration pathways (RCPs). The broad ecological niche and potential geographic distribution of BTV under present-day conditions reflected the disease’s current distribution across the world in tropical, subtropical, and temperate regions. All model predictions were significantly better than random expectations. As a further evaluation of model robustness, we compared our model predictions to 331 independent records from most recent outbreaks from the Food and Agriculture Organization Emergency Prevention System for Transboundary Animal and Plant Pests and Diseases Information System (EMPRES-i); all were successfully anticipated by the BTV model. Finally, we tested ecological niche similarity among possible vectors and BTV, and could not reject hypotheses of niche similarity. Under future-climate conditions, the potential distribution of BTV was predicted to broaden, especially in central Africa, United States, and western Russia. PMID:26959424

  1. A Pair of Novel Primers for Universal Detection of the NS1 Gene from Various Bluetongue Virus Serotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-qiong YIN; Gai-ping ZHANG; Hong ZHANG; Jin-gang ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Twenty five serotypes of Bluetongue virus (BTV) have been identified worldwide. Rapid and reliable methods of virus universal detection are essential for fighting against bluetongue (BT). We have therefore developed and evaluated a pair of primers which can detect various serotypes of BTV by RT-PCR. Analysis of the viral protein 7 (VP7) and the non-structural protein (NS1) gene from different serotypes of BTV by DNAstar showed that the 5' end of the NS1 gene is the most conserved region. The primer pairs (P1 and P2) were designed based on the highly conserved region of NS1. The novel primers were evaluated by detecting BTV serotypes 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 11, 21 and 22. The specificity of the primers was estimated by comparing to gene sequences of viruses published in GenBank, and further assessed by detecting BTV serotype 1-12 and Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) serotype 1-4. The sensitivity and repeatability of PCR with the novel primers were evaluated by successfully detecting the recombinant plasmid pGEM-T121 containing the diagnosed nucleotide sequence. Our results suggest that these unique primers can be used in high throughout and universal detection of the NS1 gene from various BTV serotypes.

  2. Quantitative analysis of transmission parameters for bluetongue virus serotype 8 in Western Europe in 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Koeijer Aline A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The recent bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8 epidemic in Western Europe struck hard. Controlling the infection was difficult and a good and safe vaccine was not available until the spring of 2008. Little was known regarding BTV transmission in Western Europe or the efficacy of control measures. Quantitative details on transmission are essential to assess the potential and efficacy of such measures. To quantify virus transmission between herds, a temporal and a spatio-temporal analysis were applied to data on reported infected herds in 2006. We calculated the basic reproduction number between herds (Rh: expected number of new infections, generated by one initial infected herd in a susceptible environment. It was found to be of the same order of magnitude as that of an infection with Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD in The Netherlands, e.g. around 4. We concluded that an average day temperature of at least 15°C is required for BTV-8 transmission between herds in Western Europe. A few degrees increase in temperature is found to lead to a major increase in BTV-8 transmission. We also found that the applied disease control (spatial zones based on 20 km radius restricting animal transport to outside regions led to a spatial transmission pattern of BTV-8, with 85% of transmission restricted to a 20 km range. This 20 km equals the scale of the protection zones. We concluded that free animal movement led to substantial faster spread of the BTV-8 epidemic over space as compared to a situation with animal movement restrictions.

  3. Bluetongue virus RNA detection by real-time rt-PCR in post-vaccination samples from cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leeuw, I; Garigliany, M; Bertels, G; Willems, T; Desmecht, D; De Clercq, K

    2015-04-01

    Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) was responsible for a large outbreak among European ruminant populations in 2006-2009. In spring 2008, a massive vaccination campaign was undertaken, leading to the progressive disappearance of the virus. During surveillance programmes in Western Europe in 2010-2011, a low but significant number of animals were found weakly positive using BTV-specific real-time RT-PCR, raising questions about a possible low level of virus circulation. An interference of the BTV-8 inactivated vaccine on the result of the real-time RT-PCR was also hypothesized. Several studies specifically addressed the potential association between a recent vaccination and BTV-8 RNA detection in the blood of sheep. Results were contradictory and cattles were not investigated. To enlighten this point, a large study was performed to determine the risks of detection of bluetongue vaccine-associated RNA in the blood and spleen of cattle using real-time RT-PCR. Overall, the results presented clearly demonstrate that vaccine viral RNA can reach the blood circulation in sufficient amounts to be detected by real-time RT-PCR in cattle. This BTV-8 vaccine RNA carriage appears as short lasting. PMID:23611408

  4. European bluetongue serotype 8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drolet, Barbara S.; Reister-Hendricks, Lindsey M.; Podell, Brendan K.; Breitenbach, Jonathan E.; Mcvey, D.S.; Rijn, van Piet A.; Bowen, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an orbivirus transmitted by biting midges (Culicoides spp.) that can result in moderate to high morbidity and mortality primarily in sheep and white-tailed deer. Although only 5 serotypes of BTV are considered endemic to the United States, as many as 11 incursive serotyp

  5. Financial evaluation of different vaccination strategies for controlling the bluetongue virus serotype 8 epidemic in The Netherlands in 2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annet G J Velthuis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bluetongue (BT is a vector-borne disease of ruminants caused by bluetongue virus that is transmitted by biting midges (Culicoides spp.. In 2006, the introduction of BTV serotype 8 (BTV-8 caused a severe epidemic in Western and Central Europe. The principal effective veterinary measure in response to BT was believed to be vaccination accompanied by other measures such as movement restrictions and surveillance. As the number of vaccine doses available at the start of the vaccination campaign was rather uncertain, the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality and the Dutch agricultural industry wanted to evaluate several different vaccination strategies. This study aimed to rank eight vaccination strategies based on their efficiency (i.e. net costs in relation to prevented losses or benefits for controlling the bluetongue virus serotype 8 epidemic in 2008. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An economic model was developed that included the Dutch professional cattle, sheep and goat sectors together with the hobby farms. Strategies were evaluated based on the least cost - highest benefit frontier, the benefit-cost ratio and the total net returns. Strategy F, where all adult sheep at professional farms in The Netherlands would be vaccinated was very efficient at lowest costs, whereas strategy D, where additional to all adult sheep at professional farms also all adult cattle in the four Northern provinces would be vaccinated, was also very efficient but at a little higher costs. Strategy C, where all adult sheep and cattle at professional farms in the whole of The Netherlands would be vaccinated was also efficient but again at higher costs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that a financial analysis differentiates between vaccination strategies and indicates important decision rules based on efficiency.

  6. Seroprevalence and S7 gene characterization of bluetongue virus in the West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khezri

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence and S7 gene characterization of BTV of sheep in the West of Iran, during 2007-2008. Materials and Methods: A total 372 sheep blood samples were collected from known seropositive regions in the West of Iran. Anti-BTV antibodies were detected in the serum samples by group specific, c-ELISA. Extractions of the dsRNA from whole blood samples were carried out. The One-step RT-PCR kit was used for the detection of S7 BTV gene in the blood samples. PCR products of the first amplification (RT-PCR were used; template in the nested PCR. Products were separated by 1.2% Agarose gel electrophoresis. Nested PCR products of S7 segment from positive samples and the reference strain; BTV1 (RSA vvvv/01 were prepared for sequencing. All sequences were subjected to multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis. Results: The results showed widespread presence of the anti-BTV antibodies in the province's sheep population, where 46.77% of the tested sera were positive on ELISA. Bluetongue viruses were diagnosed in some animals by RT-PCR and nested PCR, by targeting S7 segment. This genome segment was sequenced and analyzed in four samples as a conserved gene in BTV serogroup. This group was very similar to the West BTV strains from US, Africa and Europe. This clustered was categorized with BTV4 from Turkey. Conclusion: Increases in epidemic disease may constitute a serious problem for Iran's rural economy in future, and the situation is likely to worsen in the next few years as the proportion of unvaccinated livestock increases. [Vet World 2012; 5(9.000: 549-555

  7. Simulating spread of Bluetongue Virus by flying vectors between hosts on pasture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Bødker, Rene; Enøe, Claes; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo

    2012-01-01

    Bluetongue is a disease of ruminants which reached Denmark in 2007. We present a process-based stochastic simulation model of vector-borne diseases, where host animals are not confined to a central geographic farm coordinate, but can be distributed onto pasture areas. Furthermore vectors fly free...

  8. How does increasing immunity change spread kernel parameters in subsequent outbreaks? – A simulation study on Bluetongue Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Bødker, Rene; Enøe, Claes; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo

    of such changes are: vaccinations, acquired immunity, vector density and control, meteorological variations, wind pattern, and so on. Including more and more variables leads to a more process oriented model. A full process oriented approach simulates the movement of virus between vectors and host......, describing density and motion of vectors/hosts, climatic variables, and so on will theoretically be able to describe an outbreak under any circumstances. It will most likely contain parameters not very well established, and is also very heavy in computer time. Nevertheless, we have tried to create a...... relatively detailed simulation spread model. And by using empirical spread kernels from past outbreaks we have fitted some of the more uncertain parameters for this case study. A stochastic simulation model was developed for the spread of bluetongue virus. In the model hosts (cattle) and vectors (Culicoides...

  9. Does the Bluetongue virus circulates in cattle population of Mat district, Albania?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KLODIAN DEDOLLI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bluetongue is a viral, infectious, non-contiguous, vector transmitted disease of ruminants animals, caused by an Orbivurus. Despite the disease is not zoonoses, it is with high economic importance and as other OIE listed disease, significantly interfere with animal health and trade. Clinically, most affected species are sheep, however cattle serve as reservoir of infection and play major role on epidemiology of disease. Presence of Blue tongue disease proved only when it is based on laboratory tests.

  10. The Impact of Bluetongue on Rumminants Mortality. (Bovine and Ovine)

    OpenAIRE

    NZUONKWELLE, Nzumenang

    2008-01-01

    Bluetongue is a disease of sheep, but cattle are the principal vertebrate reservoirs of the virus. Once established, "it is impossible to actively eradicate bluetongue virus". The virus will circulate, generally subclinically, in cattle and other ruminants, and in midges. The objective of this study was to examine the correlation between the bluetongue incidence data(2006) and the mortality data(2006). To achieve the main objective of this report, the difference in the 2006 mortality and mean...

  11. Structure based modification of Bluetongue virus helicase protein VP6 to produce a viable VP6-truncated BTV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Eiko [Microbiology and Immunology, Division of Animal Science, Department of Bioresource Science, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokkodai, Nada-ku, Kobe-City 657-8501 (Japan); Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT (United Kingdom); Leon, Esther; Matthews, Steve J. [Division of Molecular Biosciences, Centre for Structural Biology, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Roy, Polly, E-mail: polly.roy@lshtm.ac.uk [Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • NMR analysis on BTV VP6 reveals two large loop regions. • The loss of a loop (aa 34–130) does not affect the overall fold of the protein. • A region of VP6 (aa 34–92) is not required for BTV replication. • A region of VP6 (aa 93–130) plays an essential role in the virus replication. - Abstract: Bluetongue virus core protein VP6 is an ATP hydrolysis dependent RNA helicase. However, despite much study, the precise role of VP6 within the viral capsid and its structure remain unclear. To investigate the requirement of VP6 in BTV replication, we initiated a structural and biological study. Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were assigned on his-tagged full-length VP6 (329 amino acid residues) as well as several truncated VP6 variants. The analysis revealed a large structured domain with two large loop regions that exhibit significant conformational exchange. One of the loops (amino acid position 34–130) could be removed without affecting the overall fold of the protein. Moreover, using a BTV reverse genetics system, it was possible to demonstrate that the VP6-truncated BTV was viable in BHK cells in the absence of any helper VP6 protein, suggesting that a large portion of this loop region is not absolutely required for BTV replication.

  12. Structure based modification of Bluetongue virus helicase protein VP6 to produce a viable VP6-truncated BTV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • NMR analysis on BTV VP6 reveals two large loop regions. • The loss of a loop (aa 34–130) does not affect the overall fold of the protein. • A region of VP6 (aa 34–92) is not required for BTV replication. • A region of VP6 (aa 93–130) plays an essential role in the virus replication. - Abstract: Bluetongue virus core protein VP6 is an ATP hydrolysis dependent RNA helicase. However, despite much study, the precise role of VP6 within the viral capsid and its structure remain unclear. To investigate the requirement of VP6 in BTV replication, we initiated a structural and biological study. Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were assigned on his-tagged full-length VP6 (329 amino acid residues) as well as several truncated VP6 variants. The analysis revealed a large structured domain with two large loop regions that exhibit significant conformational exchange. One of the loops (amino acid position 34–130) could be removed without affecting the overall fold of the protein. Moreover, using a BTV reverse genetics system, it was possible to demonstrate that the VP6-truncated BTV was viable in BHK cells in the absence of any helper VP6 protein, suggesting that a large portion of this loop region is not absolutely required for BTV replication

  13. Rapid mapping of functional cis-acting RNA elements by recovery of virus from a degenerate RNA population: application to genome segment 10 of bluetongue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, M; McCrae, M A

    2015-10-01

    The regulatory elements which control the processes of virus replication and gene expression in the Orbivirus genus are uncharacterized in terms of both their locations within genome segments and their specific functions. The reverse genetics system for the type species, Bluetongue virus, has been used in combination with RNA secondary structure prediction to identify and map the positions of cis-acting regions within genome segment 10. Through the simultaneous introduction of variability at multiple nucleotide positions in the rescue RNA population, the functional contribution of these positions was used to map regions containing cis-acting elements essential for virus viability. Nucleotides that were individually lethal when varied mapped within a region of predicted secondary structure involving base pairing between the 5' and 3' ends of the transcript. An extended region of predicted perfect base pairing located within the 3' untranslated region of the genome segment was also found to be required for virus viability. In contrast to the identification of individually lethal mutations, gross alteration of the composition of this predicted stem region was possible, providing the base-pairing potential between the two strands was maintained, identifying a structural feature predicted to be conserved throughout the Orbivirus genus. The approach of identifying cis-acting sequences through sequencing the recovered virus following the rescue of a degenerate RNA population is broadly applicable to viruses where reverse genetics is available. PMID:26248463

  14. Longitudinal study of the detection of Bluetongue virus in bull semen and comparison of real-time polymerase chain reaction assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xingnian; Davis, Rodney J; Walsh, Susan J; Melville, Lorna F; Kirkland, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a significant impediment to the global movement of bovine semen. Repeat testing of blood from donor animals is specified in the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) Manual for the export of semen from regions where BTV may be present. Screening of blood or semen samples has usually been carried out by virus isolation (VI) either by inoculation of chicken embryos followed by passage onto insect and mammalian cell cultures or in vivo inoculation of sheep followed by serology to detect seroconversion. Direct testing of semen for BTV would enable earlier release of semen samples and avoid repeat testing of the donor, as well as provide an option for releasing batches of semen that were collected without certification of the donor. Quantitative (real-time) reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays overcome most of the limitations of other methods and have the potential to provide higher sensitivity. The present study compared 5 qRT-PCR assays, including 2 commercially available kits, for the detection of BTV in semen serially collected from 8 bulls over a period of 90 days after experimental infection. The results of the study show that at least one of the qRT-PCR assays is extremely reproducible and has both very high sensitivity and specificity to reliably detect all available serotypes. The preferred qRT-PCR gave consistently superior results to VI, sheep inoculation, and conventional RT-PCR. Therefore, the assay can be recommended for the screening of bovine semen for freedom from BTV. PMID:24532692

  15. VP2-serotyped live-attenuated bluetongue virus without NS3/NS3a expression provides serotype-specific protection and enables DIVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feenstra, Femke; Maris-Veldhuis, Mieke; Daus, Franz J; Tacken, Mirriam G J; Moormann, Rob J M; van Gennip, René G P; van Rijn, Piet A

    2014-12-12

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes Bluetongue in ruminants and is transmitted by Culicoides biting midges. Vaccination is the most effective measure to control vector borne diseases; however, there are 26 known BTV serotypes showing little cross protection. The BTV serotype is mainly determined by genome segment 2 encoding the VP2 protein. Currently, inactivated and live-attenuated Bluetongue vaccines are available for a limited number of serotypes, but each of these have their specific disadvantages, including the inability to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). BTV non-structural proteins NS3 and NS3a are not essential for virus replication in vitro, but are important for cytopathogenic effect in mammalian cells and for virus release from insect cells in vitro. Recently, we have shown that virulent BTV8 without NS3/NS3a is non-virulent and viremia in sheep is strongly reduced, whereas local in vivo replication leads to seroconversion. Live-attenuated BTV6 without NS3/NS3a expression protected sheep against BTV challenge. Altogether, NS3/NS3a knockout BTV6 is a promising vaccine candidate and has been named Disabled Infectious Single Animal (DISA) vaccine. Here, we show serotype-specific protection in sheep by DISA vaccine in which only genome segment 2 of serotype 8 was exchanged. Similarly, DISA vaccines against other serotypes could be developed, by exchange of only segment 2, and could therefore safely be combined in multi-serotype cocktail vaccines with respect to reassortment between vaccine viruses. Additionally, NS3 antibody responses are raised after natural BTV infection and NS3-based ELISAs are therefore appropriate tools for DIVA testing accompanying the DISA vaccine. To enable DIVA, we developed an experimental NS3 ELISA. Indeed, vaccinated sheep remained negative for NS3 antibodies, whereas seroconversion for NS3 antibodies was associated with viremia after heterologous BTV challenge. PMID:25454873

  16. Bluetongue in Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Bagley, Clell V, DVM; Burrell, W. Craig

    1997-01-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is a viral disease that is spread mainly by one specific type of gnat. Other gnats and blood sucking insects may occasionally transmit BT, but they are much less important in its transfer. Cattle are the main reservoir for overwintering of the virus in temperate climates. The gnats become infected from cattle and then spread the disease to other cattle and sheep as they take blood meals. It is also spread through infected semen and may be spread by blood sucking lice and a sof...

  17. 9 CFR 113.303 - Bluetongue Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... virus titer using the titration method used in paragraph (c)(2) of this section. To be eligible for... Master Seed shall be tested for transmissibility and reversion to virulence in sheep using a method... TCID50 of bluetongue virus or another method acceptable to Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service....

  18. Modelling the distributions of Culicoides bluetongue virus vectors in Sicily in relation to satellite-derived climate variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purse, B V; Tatem, A J; Caracappa, S; Rogers, D J; Mellor, P S; Baylis, M; Torina, A

    2004-06-01

    Surveillance data from 268 sites in Sicily are used to develop climatic models for prediction of the distribution of the main European bluetongue virus (BTV) vector Culicoides imicola Kieffer (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) and of potential novel vectors, Culicoides pulicaris Linnaeus, Culicoides obsoletus group Meigen and Culicoides newsteadi Austen. The models containing the 'best' climatic predictors of distribution for each species, were selected from combinations of 40 temporally Fourier-processed remotely sensed variables and altitude at a 1 km spatial resolution using discriminant analysis. Kappa values of around 0.6 for all species models indicated substantial levels of agreement between model predictions and observed data. Whilst the distributions of C. obsoletus group and C. newsteadi were predicted by temperature variables, those of C. pulicaris and C. imicola were determined mainly by normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), a variable correlated with soil moisture and vegetation biomass and productivity. These models were used to predict species presence in unsampled pixels across Italy and for C. imicola across Europe and North Africa. The predicted continuous presence of C. pulicaris along the appenine mountains, from north to south Italy, suggests BTV transmission may be possible in a large proportion of this region and that seasonal transhumance (seasonal movement of livestock between upland and lowland pastures) even in C. imicola-free areas should not generally be considered safe. The predicted distribution of C. imicola distribution shows substantial agreement with observed surveillance data from Greece and Iberia (including the Balearics) and parts of mainland Italy (Lazio, Tuscany and areas of the Ionian coast) but is generally much more restricted than the observed distribution (in Sardinia, Corsica and Morocco). The low number of presence sites for C. imicola in Sicily meant that only a restricted range of potential C. imicola habitats were

  19. Possible routes of introduction of bluetongue virus serotype 8 into the epicentre of the 2006 epidemic in north-western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintiens, K; Méroc, E; Mellor, P S; Staubach, C; Gerbier, G; Elbers, A R W; Hendrickx, G; De Clercq, K

    2008-10-15

    In August 2006, bluetongue (BT) was notified in The Netherlands on several animal holdings. This was the onset of a rapidly spreading BT-epidemic in north-western Europe (latitude >51 degrees N) that affected cattle and sheep holdings in The Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, France and Luxembourg. The outbreaks were caused by bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 8, which had not been identified in the European Union before. Bluetongue virus can be introduced into a free area by movement of infected ruminants, infected midges or by infected semen and embryos. In this study, information on animal movements or transfer of ruminant germ plasms (semen and embryos) into the Area of First Infection (AFI), which occurred before and during the onset of the epidemic, were investigated in order to establish the conditions for the introduction of this virus. All inbound transfers of domestic or wild ruminants, non-susceptible mammal species and ruminant germ plasms into the AFI during the high-risk period (HRP), registered by the Trade Control and Expert System (TRACES) of the EC, were obtained. Imports originating from countries with a known or suspected history of BTV-incidence of any serotype were identified. The list of countries with a reported history of BTV incidence was obtained from the OIE Handistatus II for the period from 1996 until 2004. No ruminants were imported from a Member State (MS) with a known history of BTV-8 or from any other country with a known or suspected history of BTV incidence of any serotype. Of all non-susceptible mammal species only 233 horses were transported directly into the AFI during the HRP. No importations of semen or embryos into the AFI were registered in TRACES during the period of interest. An obvious source for the introduction of BTV-8, such as import of infected ruminants, could not be identified and the exact origin and route of the introduction of BTV-8 thus far remains unknown. However, the absence of legal import of ruminants from

  20. Development of a real-time RT-PCR assay based on primer-probe energy transfer for the detection of all serotypes of bluetongue virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leblanc, N; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Fernandez, J;

    2010-01-01

    A real-time RT-PCR assay based on the primer–probe energy transfer (PriProET) was developed to detect all 24 serotypes of bluetongue virus (BTV). BTV causes serious disease, primarily in sheep, but in other ruminants as well. A distinguishing characteristic of the assay is its tolerance toward...... tests showed no positive results for heterologous pathogens. The assay was tested on clinical samples from BTV 8 outbreaks in Sweden and Denmark in 2008. The lowest detection limit for that serotype, determined with PCR standards, was 57 genome copies. The assay sensitivity for some other serotypes that...... circulate currently in Europe was also determined. BTV 2, 4, 9 and 16 were tested on available cell culture samples and the detection limits were 109, 12, 13 and 24 copies, respectively. This assay provides an important tool for early and rapid detection of a wide range of BTV strains, including emerging...

  1. Surveillance of bluetongue virus antibody in goats using a recombinant VP7-based indirect ELISA in the coastal saline area of West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K. Singh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the serological surveillance of bluetongue virus (BTV group-specific antibody in goats of the coastal saline (Sunderban area of West Bengal, India. A recombinant viral protein 7 (rVP7-based indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to detect the antibody in sera. The bacterially expressed rVP7 was purified by affinity chromatography. The diagnostic performance of the assay was assessed by comparing it to the commercially available previously validated competitive ELISA. Using the control and 1 202 test sera, the cut-off value, sensitivity and specificity as well as other performance characteristics e.g. the Youden index, efficiency, positive and negative predictive value and prevalence were estimated. Field-collected goat sera (n = 1 202 were tested and a serological prevalence rate of 47% was observed in the study area.

  2. Application of syndromic surveillance on routinely collected cattle reproduction and milk production data for the early detection of outbreaks of Bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Anouk; Brouwer-Middelesch, Henriëtte; Marceau, Alexis; Madouasse, Aurélien; Van der Stede, Yves; Fourichon, Christine; Welby, Sarah; Wever, Paul; van Schaik, Gerdien

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of routinely collected reproductive and milk production data for the early detection of emerging vector-borne diseases in cattle in the Netherlands and the Flanders region of Belgium (i.e., the northern part of Belgium). Prospective space-time cluster analyses on residuals from a model on milk production were carried out to detect clusters of reduced milk yield. A CUSUM algorithm was used to detect temporal aberrations in model residuals of reproductive performance models on two indicators of gestation length. The Bluetongue serotype-8 (BTV-8) epidemics of 2006 and 2007 and the Schmallenberg virus (SBV) epidemic of 2011 were used as case studies to evaluate the sensitivity and timeliness of these methods. The methods investigated in this study did not result in a more timely detection of BTV-8 and SBV in the Netherlands and BTV-8 in Belgium given the surveillance systems in place when these viruses emerged. This could be due to (i) the large geographical units used in the analyses (country, region and province level), and (ii) the high level of sensitivity of the surveillance systems in place when these viruses emerged. Nevertheless, it might be worthwhile to use a syndromic surveillance system based on non-specific animal health data in real-time alongside regular surveillance, to increase the sense of urgency and to provide valuable quantitative information for decision makers in the initial phase of an emerging disease outbreak. PMID:26732291

  3. Bluetongue virus surveillance in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania: Is serotype 26 circulating among cattle and dromedaries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, Alessio; Baba, Doumbia; Spedicato, Massimo; Teodori, Liana; Bonfini, Barbara; Marcacci, Maurilia; Di Provvido, Andrea; Isselmou, Katia; Marini, Valeria; Carmine, Irene; Scacchia, Massimo; Di Sabatino, Daria; Petrini, Antonio; Bezeid, Beyatt Ahmed; Savini, Giovanni

    2016-06-01

    In March 2013, EDTA-blood and serum samples were collected from 119 cattle and 159 dromedaries at the slaughterhouse of Nouakchott, the capital city of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania. Serum samples were screened for the presence of Bluetongue (BT) antibodies by competitive ELISA (cELISA). Positive samples were then tested by serum-neutralization (SN) to determine BTV serotype. RNA from blood samples was first tested by a genus-specific quantitative RT-PCR assay which is able to detect all 27 existing BTV serotypes (RT-qPCR1-27). Positive samples were further screened by a RT-qPCR assay which, instead, is able to detect the classical 24 BTV serotypes only (RT-qPCR1-24). Of the 278 serum samples tested, 177 (mean=63.7%; 95% CI: 57.9%-69.1%) resulted positive by cELISA. Of these, 69 were from cattle (mean=58.0%; 95% CI: 49.0%-66.5%) and 108 from dromedaries (mean=67.9%; 95% CI: 60.3%-74.7%). BTV-26 neutralizing antibodies were by far the most frequently found as they were detected in 146 animals with titres ranging from 1:10 to 1:80. Out of 278 blood samples, 25 (mean=9.0%; 95% CI: 6.2%-12.9%) were found positive for BTV by RT-qPCR1-27, 20 (mean=16.8%; 95% CI: 11.2%-24.6%) were from cattle and 5 (mean=3.1%; 95% CI: 1.4%-7.1%) from dromedaries. When tested by RT-qPCR1-24 the 25 BTV positive samples were negative. Unfortunately, no genetic information by molecular typing or by next generation sequencing has been obtained as for the very low levels of RNA in the blood samples. PMID:26932578

  4. High seroprevalence of bluetongue virus antibodies in Sheep, Goats, Cattle and Camel in different districts of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ahmed Al-Eesa

    Full Text Available Aim: To estimate the prevalence and distribution of serum antibodies to BTV in different domesticated animals in different localities of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A total of 4845 field sera collected from different animal species within 10 districts in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia were screened for the presence of group-specific BTV antibodies by competitive ELISA (c ELISA. Results: The overall BTV antibody prevalence was 54.1%, 53.3%, 44.8% and 25.7% in sheep, goat, cattle and camel respectively (at 95% confidence level. The Jizan and Eastern Province districts were the regions with the highest prevalence resulting 65.8% of sheep, 68.2% of goats, 49.3% of cattle, 44% of camel in Jizan and 65.8% of sheep, 62.5% of goats, 53.4% of cattle, 28.5% of camel in Eastern Province positive to c-ELISA. The second highest rate was in Najran district where the seropositivity for Bluetongue was found to be 60% of sheep, 57.9% of goats, 47.2% of cattle and 29.3% of camel. Our results recorded positive animals in all examined districts which indicate serological evidence of exposure to infection was widely distributed all over the country. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the high occurrence of the BTV that emphasize the necessity to a well-defined control strategy for preventing and controlling the BTV in Saudi Arabia. [Vet. World 2012; 5(7.000: 389-393

  5. Decode Fish Lymphocystis Virus Isolated from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Aresearch group headed by Prof. Zhang Qiya from the CAS Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB) has succeeded in sequencing the complete genome of lymphocystis disease virus isolated from China (LCDV-C), a virus isolated from cultured flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) with lymphocystis disease in China. Their work has been published in the recent issue of Journal of Virology (2004, 78 (13): 6982- 6994).

  6. Bluetongue virus serotype 1 outbreak in the Basque Country (Northern Spain 2007-2008. Data support a primary vector windborne transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo García-Lastra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bluetongue (BT is a vector-borne disease of ruminants that has expanded its traditional global distribution in the last decade. Recently, BTV-1 emerged in Southern Spain and caused several outbreaks in livestock reaching the north of the country. The aim of this paper was to review the emergence of BTV-1 in the Basque Country (Northern Spain during 2007 and 2008 analyzing the possibility that infected Culicoides were introduced into Basque Country by winds from the infected areas of Southern Spain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use a complex HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model to draw wind roses and backward wind trajectories. The analysis of winds showed September 28 to October 2 as the only period for the introduction of infected midges in the Basque Country. These wind trajectories crossed through the areas affected by serotype 1 on those dates in the South of the Iberian Peninsula. Additionally meteorological data, including wind speed and humidity, and altitude along the trajectories showed suitable conditions for Culicoides survival and dispersion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: An active infection in medium-long distance regions, wind with suitable speed, altitude and trajectory, and appropriate weather can lead to outbreaks of BTV-1 by transport of Culicoides imicola, not only over the sea (as reported previously but also over the land. This shows that an additional factor has to be taken into account for the control of the disease which is currently essentially based on the assumption that midges will only spread the virus in a series of short hops. Moreover, the epidemiological and serological data cannot rule out the involvement of other Culicoides species in the spread of the infection, especially at a local level.

  7. Did vaccination slow the spread of bluetongue in France?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryline Pioz

    Full Text Available Vaccination is one of the most efficient ways to control the spread of infectious diseases. Simulations are now widely used to assess how vaccination can limit disease spread as well as mitigate morbidity or mortality in susceptible populations. However, field studies investigating how much vaccines decrease the velocity of epizootic wave-fronts during outbreaks are rare. This study aimed at investigating the effect of vaccination on the propagation of bluetongue, a vector-borne disease of ruminants. We used data from the 2008 bluetongue virus serotype 1 (BTV-1 epizootic of southwest France. As the virus was newly introduced in this area, natural immunity of livestock was absent. This allowed determination of the role of vaccination in changing the velocity of bluetongue spread while accounting for environmental factors that possibly influenced it. The average estimated velocity across the country despite restriction on animal movements was 5.4 km/day, which is very similar to the velocity of spread of the bluetongue virus serotype 8 epizootic in France also estimated in a context of restrictions on animal movements. Vaccination significantly reduced the propagation velocity of BTV-1. In comparison to municipalities with no vaccine coverage, the velocity of BTV-1 spread decreased by 1.7 km/day in municipalities with immunized animals. For the first time, the effect of vaccination has been quantified using data from a real epizootic whilst accounting for environmental factors known to modify the velocity of bluetongue spread. Our findings emphasize the importance of vaccination in limiting disease spread across natural landscape. Finally, environmental factors, specifically those related to vector abundance and activity, were found to be good predictors of the velocity of BTV-1 spread, indicating that these variables need to be adequately accounted for when evaluating the role of vaccination on bluetongue spread.

  8. Seroepidemiology of bluetongue disease in small ruminants of north-east of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vahid Najarnezhad; Mahin Rajae

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence and distribution of bluetongue virus antibody in sheep and goats in 25 townships of Khorasan Razavi. Bluetongue is an infectious, non-contagious, arthropod born viral disease of ruminants and has been reported from most of the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Methods: A total number of 1 034 serum samples from sheep and goats were collected and transmitted to Serological Laboratory of Veterinary Council of Khorasan Razavi. Serums were screened for the presence of group-specific bluetongue virus antibody using competitive Enzyme Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (c-ELISA). Results: The seropositivity of sheep and goats for bluetongue was found to be 89.2%. The highest prevalence rate was seen in Taybad, Khalil-abad and Torbat-jam (100%) and the least prevalence rate was seen in Jovein (55%). Conclusions: The results showed that the majority of animals in the north-east of Iran are infected with bluetongue virus. High correlation between abortion history and seroposivity emphasize the economical importance of bluetongue virus in the sheep herds of the region.

  9. Molecular characterization of Korean rabies virus isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Dong-Kun; Park, Young-nam; Hong, Gyeong-Soo; Kang, Hee-Kyung; Oh, Yoon-I; Cho, Soo-Dong; SONG, Jae-Young

    2011-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (N) and glycoprotein (G) of 11 Korean rabies virus (RABV) isolates collected from animals diagnosed with rabies between 2008 and 2009 were subjected to molecular and phylogenetic analyses. Six isolates originated from domestic animals (cattle and dogs) and five were obtained from wild free-ranging raccoon dogs. The similarities in the nucleotide sequences of the N gene among all Korean isolates ranged from 98.1 to 99.8%, while those of the G gene ranged from 97.9 to 99.3%. B...

  10. Isolation of ancestral sylvatic dengue virus type 1, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Boon-Teong; Sam, Sing-Sin; Abd-Jamil, Juraina; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2010-11-01

    Ancestral sylvatic dengue virus type 1, which was isolated from a monkey in 1972, was isolated from a patient with dengue fever in Malaysia. The virus is neutralized by serum of patients with endemic DENV-1 infection. Rare isolation of this virus suggests a limited spillover infection from an otherwise restricted sylvatic cycle. PMID:21029545

  11. Isolation of Ancestral Sylvatic Dengue Virus Type 1, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Teoh, Boon-Teong; Sam, Sing-Sin; Abd-Jamil, Juraina; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2010-01-01

    Ancestral sylvatic dengue virus type 1, which was isolated from a monkey in 1972, was isolated from a patient with dengue fever in Malaysia. The virus is neutralized by serum of patients with endemic DENV-1 infection. Rare isolation of this virus suggests a limited spillover infection from an otherwise restricted sylvatic cycle.

  12. Transmission and epidemiology of bluetongue and epizootic hemorrhagic disease in North America: current perspectives, research gaps, and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) are arthropod-transmitted viruses in the genus Orbivirus of the family Reoviridae. These viruses infect a variety of domestic and wild ruminant hosts, although the susceptibility to clinical disease associated with BTV or EHDV inf...

  13. Experimental reproduction of severe bluetongue in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLachlan, N J; Crafford, J E; Vernau, W; Gardner, I A; Goddard, A; Guthrie, A J; Venter, E H

    2008-05-01

    Sheep inoculated with a virulent South African strain of bluetongue (BT) virus serotype 4 developed severe clinical signs and lesions characteristic of fulminant BT, including coronitis, hemorrhage and ulceration of the mucosal lining of the oral cavity and forestomaches, hemorrhage in the wall of the pulmonary artery, and focally extensive necrosis of skeletal muscle, especially of the neck. At necropsy, up to 14 days after infection, the infected sheep exhibited striking pulmonary edema, edema of the subcutaneous tissues and fascial planes of the head and neck, and pleural and pericardial effusion of varying severity. A reliable model for experimental reproduction of fulminant BT in sheep will facilitate future studies to better characterize the pathogenesis of this disease, particularly as it regards the mechanisms responsible for the increased vascular permeability that characterizes BT and related orbiviral diseases such as African horse sickness. PMID:18487487

  14. Isolation of genetically diverse Marburg viruses from Egyptian fruit bats.

    OpenAIRE

    Towner, Jonathan S.; Amman, Brian R.; Sealy, Tara K.; Serena A Reeder Carroll; Comer, James A.; Alan Kemp; Robert Swanepoel; Paddock, Christopher D.; Stephen Balinandi; Marina L Khristova; Formenty, Pierre B.H.; Albarino, Cesar G.; Miller, David M.; Reed, Zachary D.; John T. Kayiwa

    2009-01-01

    Author Summary Marburg virus, similar to its close cousin Ebola virus, can cause large outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever (HF) in rural Africa with case fatalities approaching 90%. For decades, a long-standing enigma has been the identity of the natural reservoir of this deadly virus. In this report, we identify the cave-dwelling Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) as a natural host of Marburg virus based on multiple lines of evidence which include, for the first time ever, the isolation o...

  15. An Improved Culture System for Virus Isolation and Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-chen XIA; Zhi-hong HU; Zhi-juan QIU; Zhong-bin MA; Hua-lin WANG; Fei DENG

    2008-01-01

    Cell culture plays an important role in virology. It provides a platform for the detection and isolation of viruses as well as for the biochemistry and molecular biology based studies of viruses. In the present work, a new system that could permits multiple (different) cell lines to be simultaneously cultured in one dish was developed. In the system, each cell line was cultured in an isolated zone in the same dish or well and the system is therefore called an isolated co-culture system. The usefulness of this novel approach for virus isolation was demonstrated using a model system based on adenovirus.

  16. Status of tobacco viruses in Serbia and molecular characterization of tomato spotted wilt virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanković, I; Bulajić, A; Vučurović, A; Ristić, D; Milojević, K; Berenji, J; Krstić, B

    2011-01-01

    In a four-year survey to determine the presence and distribution of viruses in tobacco crops at 17 localities of the Vojvodina Province and Central Serbia, 380 samples were collected and analyzed by DAS-ELISA. Out of the seven viruses tested, tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), potato virus Y (PVY), tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), and alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) were detected in 37.9, 33.4, 28.7, 23.9, and 15.5% of the total tested samples, respectively. TSWV was the most frequently found virus at the localities of Central Serbia, while PVY and CMV were the most frequent viruses in the Vojvodina Province. Single infections were prevalent in years 2005-2007 and the most frequent were those of PVY. A triple combination of those viruses was most frequent mixed infection type in 2008. The presence of all five detected viruses was confirmed in selected ELISA-positive samples by RT-PCR and sequencing. The comparisons of obtained virus isolate sequences with those available in NCBI, confirmed the authenticity of serologically detected viruses. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial nucleocapsid gene sequences revealed a joint clustering of Serbian, Bulgarian and Montenegrin TSWV isolates into one geographic subpopulation, which was distinct from the other subpopulation of TSWV isolates from the rest of the European countries. The high incidence of viruses in Serbian tobacco crops highlights the importance of enhancing farmers knowledge towards better implementation of control strategies for preventing serious losses. PMID:22149499

  17. High sequence conservation among cucumber mosaic virus isolates from lily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y K; Derks, A F; Langeveld, S; Goldbach, R; Prins, M

    2001-08-01

    For classification of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolates from ornamental crops of different geographical areas, these were characterized by comparing the nucleotide sequences of RNAs 4 and the encoded coat proteins. Within the ornamental-infecting CMV viruses both subgroups were represented. CMV isolates of Alstroemeria and crocus were classified as subgroup II isolates, whereas 8 other isolates, from lily, gladiolus, amaranthus, larkspur, and lisianthus, were identified as subgroup I members. In general, nucleotide sequence comparisons correlated well with geographic distribution, with one notable exception: the analyzed nucleotide sequences of 5 lily isolates showed remarkably high homology despite different origins. PMID:11676424

  18. Seroepidemiology of bluetongue in South Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkendu Halder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: With the aim of revealing the epidemiological intricacies of bluetongue (BT in the southern part of West Bengal state, the present study was undertaken to assess seroprevalence of BT along with identification of the vector of the disease, i.e., Culicoides midges available in the region in their breeding season with conducive environmental factors, if any. Materials and Methods: A total of 1509 (sheep-504, goat-1005 samples were collected from three different agroclimatic zones of South Bengal viz. new alluvial, red laterite and coastal saline. To detect anti-BT antibodies in the collected serum samples, indirect-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (i-ELISA was performed. Culicoides midges were collected from those agro-climatic zones of South Bengal for species identification. The meteorological parameters, viz. temperature (maximum and minimum, rainfall and relative humidity of three agro-climatic zones of South Bengal were analyzed for the months of July to December during 2010-2013. Results: The overall seropositivity was 33.13% and 30.24% in sheep and goat, respectively as assessed by i-ELISA. In South Bengal, the predominant species of Culicoides found were Culicoides schultzei, Culicoides palpifer and Culicoides definitus. Conclusion: Since virus transmitting species of Culicoides midges could be detected in South Bengal, besides high seropositivity in ruminants, the possibility of circulating BT virus in South Bengal is quite imminent.

  19. Infection and immunity with a virus isolate from turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterfield, R W; Reed, W M; Thacker, H L

    1985-11-01

    Avian pox virus was isolated from cutaneous pox lesions removed from turkey breeders that had been vaccinated three times with a commercial fowl pox vaccine. In three cross-immunization experiments with turkeys and two with chickens, the turkey pox isolate, designated NC5271, proved immunologically different from fowl, pigeon, and quail pox viruses. Significant protection against NC5271 virus infection and inducement of pox lesions was only attained when the homologous isolate was used as a vaccine. The potential need in the field for such a vaccine was discussed. PMID:2999743

  20. Seroprevalence of bluetongue disease in sheep in west and northwest provinces of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khezri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to describe the seroprevalence rates of bluetongue virus (BTV in sheep in west and northwest provinces of Iran. Bluetongue virus, an economically important orbivirus of the Reoviridae family, causes a hemorrhagic disease mainly in sheep and occasionally in cattle and some species of deer. Bluetongue virus is transmitted between its mammalian hosts by certain species of biting midges (Culicoides spp. and it can infect all ruminant species. Overall, 26 serotypes have been reported around the world. Due to its economic impact, bluetongue (BT is an Office of International des Epizooties (OIE-listed disease. A total of 756 sera samples collected during 2007-2008, were available. Sera were tested with competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (C-ELISA. The seroprevalence rate in sheep was 40.87%. The rate of positivity in sheep in west and northwest was 46.10% and 33.75%, respectively. The highest prevalence of antibodies in serum was in West Azerbaijan (64.86%, and lower was in Ardabil (23.77%.

  1. Agricultural production - Phase 2. Indonesia. Isolation of arboviruses, their identification and the identification of their culicoides vectors in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of the two-week mission were to provide assistance in studies to determine the incidence and importance of arbovirus infection in ruminants in Indonesia, specifically to help with identification of the vectors tat transmit bluetongue and related arbovirus infections, and to develop work plans for future studies under the project. The report contains detailed information on handling systems for Culicoides species, on identification of Culicoides to be used for viral isolation and on the isolation of virus from Culicoides

  2. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Zika Virus Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Jason T; Wiley, Michael R; Prieto, Karla; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Nagle, Elyse; Kasper, Matthew R; Reyes, Daniel; Vasilakis, Nikolaos; Heang, Vireak; Weaver, Scott C; Haddow, Andrew; Tesh, Robert B; Sovann, Ly; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus is an emerging human pathogen of great concern due to putative links to microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome. Here, we report the complete genomes, including the 5' and 3' untranslated regions, of five Zika virus isolates, one from the Asian lineage and four from the African lineage. PMID:27174284

  3. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Zika Virus Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Ladner, Jason T; Michael R Wiley; Prieto, Karla; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Nagle, Elyse; Kasper, Matthew R; Reyes, Daniel; Vasilakis, Nikolaos; Heang, Vireak; Scott C Weaver; Haddow, Andrew; Tesh, Robert B.; Sovann, Ly; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus is an emerging human pathogen of great concern due to putative links to microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome. Here, we report the complete genomes, including the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions, of five Zika virus isolates, one from the Asian lineage and four from the African lineage.

  4. A Circo-Like Virus Isolated from Penaeus monodon Shrimps.

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Hanh T.; Yu, Qian; Boisvert, Maude; Van, Hanh T; Bergoin, Max; Tijssen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A virus with a circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) (CRESS-DNA) genome (PmCV-1) was isolated from Penaeus monodon shrimps in Vietnam. The gene structure of the 1,777-nucleotide (nt) genome was similar to that of circoviruses and cycloviruses, but the nucleic acid and protein sequence identities to these viruses were very low.

  5. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Zika Virus Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Jason T.; Wiley, Michael R.; Prieto, Karla; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Nagle, Elyse; Kasper, Matthew R.; Reyes, Daniel; Vasilakis, Nikolaos; Heang, Vireak; Weaver, Scott C.; Haddow, Andrew; Tesh, Robert B.; Sovann, Ly

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus is an emerging human pathogen of great concern due to putative links to microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome. Here, we report the complete genomes, including the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions, of five Zika virus isolates, one from the Asian lineage and four from the African lineage. PMID:27174284

  6. Susceptibility testing of fish cell lines for virus isolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariel, Ellen; Skall, Helle Frank; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Passage of cell cultures may adversely influence cell susceptibility to virus infection through selection of cell clones that thrive in vitro but may not necessarily display high sensitivity to virus infection. Susceptibility to a given virus can therefore vary not only between cell lines and......-cell-culture-adapted" virus by propagating the virus in heterologous cell lines to the one tested. A stock of test virus was produced and stored at - 80 °C and tests were conducted biannually. This procedure becomes complicated when several cell lines are in use and does not account for variation among lineages. In comparing...... cell lineages, we increased the number of isolates of each virus, propagated stocks in a given cell line and tested all lineages of that line in use in the laboratory. Testing of relative cell line susceptibility between laboratories is carried out annually via the Inter-laboratory Proficiency Test...

  7. Detection and molecular characterization of Egyptian isolates of grapevine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattouh, F; Ratti, C; El-Ahwany, A M D; Aleem, E Abdel; Babini, A R; Autonell, C Rubies

    2014-01-01

    Selected commercial and/or local vineyards and nurseries in three different governorates of Egypt (Alexandria, El-Beheira and El-Menofia) were surveyed for symptoms indicative of infection by grapevine viruses. Leaf samples from red-fruited and white-fruited Vitis vinefera were tested for grapevine leafroll associated viruses (GLRaV-1, GLRaV-2, and GLRaV-3), grapevine viruses A and B (GVA, GVB), grapevine rupestris stem pitting virus (GRSPaV), grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), and grapevine fleck virus (GFKV) from early April to late October 2010. Incidence of these viruses was assessed by RT-PCR in 60 different samples. Selected amplicons were sequenced. While GVA was the most wide spread (30%), GLRaV-1, GVB, GFLV, and GFKV were not detected during the survey. However, GVA, GLRaV-2, GLRaV-3, and GRSPaV were detected in the form of single infection or in mixed infections of 2 to 4 viruses. Phylogenetic analysis was performed on all Egyptian isolates of GLRaV-2 (4), GLRaV-3 (7), GVA (3), and GRSPaV (6). GRSPaV was detected for the first time in Egypt. Phylogenetic analysis provided insights into the evolutionary relationship between the reported Egyptian isolates and other previously reported isolates. PMID:24957718

  8. Isolation and characterization of cidofovir resistant vaccinia viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prichard Mark N

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of drug resistant viruses, together with the possibility of increased virulence, is an important concern in the development of new antiviral compounds. Cidofovir (CDV is a phosphonate nucleotide that is approved for use against cytomegalovirus retinitis and for the emergency treatment of smallpox or complications following vaccination. One mode of action for CDV has been demonstrated to be the inhibition of the viral DNA polymerase. Results We have isolated several CDV resistant (CDVR vaccinia viruses through a one step process, two of which have unique single mutations within the DNA polymerase. An additional resistant virus isolate provides evidence of a second site mutation within the genome involved in CDV resistance. The CDVR viruses were 3–7 fold more resistant to the drug than the parental viruses. The virulence of the CDVR viruses was tested in mice inoculated intranasally and all were found to be attenuated. Conclusion Resistance to CDV in vaccinia virus can be conferred individually by at least two different mutations within the DNA polymerase gene. Additional genes may be involved. This one step approach for isolating resistant viruses without serial passage and in the presence of low doses of drug minimizes unintended secondary mutations and is applicable to other potential antiviral agents.

  9. The Effects of Pharmacological and Lentivirus-Induced Immune Suppression on Orbivirus Pathogenesis: Assessment of Virus Burden in Blood Monocytes and Tissues by Reverse Transcription-In Situ PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Brodie, Scott J.; Wilson, William C.; O’Hearn, Patricia M.; Muthui, David; Diem, Kurt; Pearson, Leonard D.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effects of pharmacological and lentivirus-induced immunosuppression on bluetongue virus (BTV) pathogenesis as a mechanism for virus persistence and induction of clinical disease. Immunologically normal and immunosuppressed sheep were infected subcutaneously with BTV serotype 3 (BTV-3), a foreign isolate with unknown pathogenicity in North American livestock, and with North American serotype 11 (BTV-11). Erythrocyte-associated BTV RNA was detected earlier and at greater con...

  10. First Isolation of a Giant Virus from Wild Hirudo medicinalis Leech: Mimiviridae isolation in Hirudo medicinalis

    OpenAIRE

    Mondher Boughalmi; Isabelle Pagnier; Sarah Aherfi; Philippe Colson; Didier Raoult; Bernard La Scola

    2013-01-01

    Giant viruses and amoebae are common in freshwater, where they can coexist with other living multicellular organisms. We screened leeches from the species Hirudo medicinalis for giant viruses. We analyzed five H. medicinalis obtained from Tunisia (3) and France (2). The leeches were decontaminated and then dissected to remove internal parts for co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga. The genomes of isolated viruses were sequenced on a 454 Roche instrument, and a comparative genomics analysis ...

  11. Isolation of influenza viruses in MDCK 33016PF cells and clearance of contaminating respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Bernhard; Mohr, Hannah; Enders, Martin; Garten, Wolfgang; Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2012-01-11

    This paper summarizes results obtained by multiplex PCR screening of human clinical samples for respiratory viruses and corresponding data obtained after passaging of virus-positive samples in MDCK 33016PF cells. Using the ResPlexII v2.0 (Qiagen) multiplex PCR, 393 positive results were obtained in 468 clinical samples collected during an influenza season in Germany. The overall distribution of positive results was influenza A 42.0%, influenza B 38.7%, adenovirus 1.5%, bocavirus 0.5%, coronavirus 3.3%, enterovirus 5.6%, metapneumovirus 1.0%, parainfluenza virus 0.8%, rhinovirus 4.1%, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) 2.5%. Double infections of influenza virus together with another virus were found for adenovirus B and E, bocavirus, coronavirus, enterovirus and for rhinovirus. These other viruses were rapidly lost upon passages in MDCK 33016PF cells and under conditions as applied to influenza virus passaging. Clinical samples, in which no influenza virus but other viruses were found, were also subject to passages in MDCK 33016PF cells. Using lower inoculum dilutions than those normally applied for preparations containing influenza virus (total dilution of the original sample of ∼10(4)), the positive results for the different viruses turned negative already after 2 or 3 passages in MDCK 33016PF cells. These results demonstrate that, under practical conditions as applied to grow influenza viruses, contaminating viruses can be effectively removed by passages in MDCK cells. In combination with their superior isolation efficiency, MDCK cells appear highly suitable to be used as an alternative to embryonated eggs to isolate and propagate influenza vaccine candidate viruses. PMID:22119922

  12. A Circo-Like Virus Isolated from Penaeus monodon Shrimps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hanh T; Yu, Qian; Boisvert, Maude; Van, Hanh T; Bergoin, Max; Tijssen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A virus with a circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) (CRESS-DNA) genome (PmCV-1) was isolated from Penaeus monodon shrimps in Vietnam. The gene structure of the 1,777-nucleotide (nt) genome was similar to that of circoviruses and cycloviruses, but the nucleic acid and protein sequence identities to these viruses were very low. PMID:24435870

  13. Evaluation of Rabies Biologics against Irkut Virus Isolated in China

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ye; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Shoufeng; Li, Nan; Lian, Hai; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Jinxia; Hu, Rongliang

    2013-01-01

    An Irkut virus (IRKV) was recently isolated from a bat in China. The protective ability of rabies biologics available in the Chinese market and experimental biologics against the rabies virus (RABV) and IRKV were assessed in a hamster model via preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) experiments. The results demonstrated that a single dose of rabies vaccine did not induce adequate protection against IRKV infection. However, routine PrEP with three doses of vaccine in...

  14. Bluetongue disease and seroprevalence in South American camelids from the northwestern region of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrew J; Stanton, James B; Evermann, James F; Fry, Lindsay M; Ackerman, Melissa G; Barrington, George M

    2015-03-01

    In late summer/early fall of 2013, 2 South American camelids from central Washington were diagnosed with fatal bluetongue viral disease, an event which is rarely reported. A 9-year-old intact male llama (Lama glama), with a 1-day history of anorexia, recumbency, and dyspnea before death. Abundant foam discharged from the mouth and nostrils, and the lungs were severely edematous on postmortem examination. Histologically, there was abundant intra-alveolar edema with fibrin. Hemorrhage and edema disrupted several other organs. Bluetongue viral RNA was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and serotype 11 was identified by sequencing a segment of the VP2 outer capsid gene. Approximately 1 month later, at a site 150 miles north of the index case, a 2-year-old female alpaca with similar, acutely progressive clinical signs was reported. A postmortem examination was performed, and histologic lesions from the alpaca were similar to those of the llama, and again serotype 11 was detected by PCR. The occurrence of bluetongue viral infection and disease is described in the context of seasonal Bluetongue virus activity within the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada. PMID:25680921

  15. Isolation of paralysis-inducing murine leukemia viruses from Friend virus passaged in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Kai, K; Furuta, T

    1984-01-01

    Four clones of murine leukemia viruses (PVC-111, PVC-211, PVC-321, and PVC-441) were isolated from a paralyzed Fischer rat which had been infected with rat-passaged Friend leukemia virus. PVC-211 and PVC-321 viruses induced hind leg paralysis in rats and killed them within 1 month, and PVC-441 did so within 2 months after infection, whereas PVC-111 did not within 4 months. PVC-321 and PVC-441 but not PVC-111 virus grew well in brain and spinal cord media. The viral antigens were found often i...

  16. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of infectious bursal disease virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormitorio, T V; Giambrone, J J; Guo, K; Jackwood, D J

    2007-06-01

    Two infectious bursal disease viruses (IBDVs 1174 and V1) were isolated from IBDV-vaccinated broiler flocks in California and Georgia. These flocks had a history of subclinical immunosuppression. These isolates are commonly used in IBDV progeny challenge studies at Auburn, AL, as well as vaccine manufacturer's vaccine efficacy studies, because they come from populated poultry-producing states, and are requested by poultry veterinarians from those states. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) generated viral genome products for sequencing. A 491-bp segment from the VP2 gene, covering the hypervariable region, from each isolate was analyzed and compared with previously sequenced isolates. Sequence analysis showed that they were more closely related to the Delaware (Del) E antigenic variant than they are to the Animal Health Plant Inspection Service (APHIS) standard, both at the nucleotide level (96%, 97%) and at the amino acid level (94%, 97%). Both isolates had the glutamine to lysine shift in amino acid 249 which has been reported to be critical in binding the virus neutralizing Mab B69. Phenotypic studies showed that both isolates produced rapid atrophy of the bursae and weight loss, without the edematous bursal phase, in 2-wk-old commercial broilers having antibody against IBDV. A progeny challenge study showed both isolates produced more atrophy of the bursae (less percentage of protection) than the Del E isolate. Molecular and phenotypic data of these important IBDV isolates help in the improved detection and control of this continually changing and important viral pathogen of chickens. PMID:17626491

  17. Isolation and identification of African horsesickness virus from naturally infected dogs in Upper Egypt.

    OpenAIRE

    Salama, S.A.; Dardiri, A. H.; Awad, F. I.; A. M. Soliman; M.M Amin

    1981-01-01

    African horsesickness virus was isolated from blood samples of street dogs in Aswan Province in Arab Republic of Egypt. Of six isolated "dog strain" African horsesickness viruses, three viruses designated D2, D6 and D10 have been identified as type 9 African horsesickness virus. Methods of isolation, tissue culture adaptation, serological indentification and typing are described. Horses experimentally infected with dog viruses showed febrile reaction and characteristic clinical and pathologic...

  18. Serological and genetic characterisation of putative new serotypes of bluetongue virus and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus isolated from an Alpaca / Isabella Maria Wright

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Isabella Maria

    2014-01-01

    Alpacas were first introduced into South Africa during the year 2000. They are valuable because of the fine quality wool they produce which has much better insulation properties than that of merino wool fibres. Alpacas are also used to act as guards of sheep herds against predators. During 2008, blood samples from an alpaca that died acutely with severe lung oedema, respiratory distress and froth exuding from the nose were received at Elsenburg Veterinary Laboratory. The alp...

  19. Mayaro virus fever in French Guiana: isolation, identification, and seroprevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarmin, A; Chandler, L J; Kazanji, M; de Thoisy, B; Debon, P; Lelarge, J; Labeau, B; Bourreau, E; Vié, J C; Shope, R E; Sarthou, J L

    1998-09-01

    This paper reports the first isolation of Mayaro (MAY) virus from a patient infected in French Guiana. The identification was initially performed using immunofluorescent antibody testing with specific mouse antibody, and confirmed by plaque-reduction neutralization testing and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. To determine if MAY virus infection is widespread in French Guiana, a serosurvey was performed to determine the prevalence of antibody to this virus in various ethnic groups and areas of French Guiana. Human sera (n = 1,962) were screened using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. To determine whether MAY virus circulates in the rain forest, a serosurvey in monkey populations was performed. Monkey sera (n = 150) were also screened for antibody to MAY virus using HI testing. Of the human sera tested, 6.3% were positive for anti-MAY virus antibodies. Significant differences in MAY virus seroprevalence between different age groups were observed. Seroprevalence rates increased with age, with a large increase in people 10-19 years of age in comparison with those less than 10 years of age. After adjustment for age, significant differences were also found between places of residence. The prevalence of anti-MAY virus antibody was higher in people living in contact with the forest, especially in the Haut Oyapock area (odds ratio [OR] = 97.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 48.2-197.9) and along the Maroni River (OR = 39.7, 95% CI = 20.6-76.6). The ethnic differences observed in this study were probably due to differences in residence. Among monkeys, higher seroprevalence rates were found in Alouatta seniculus (66.0%) than in Saguinus midas (18.2%). Among Alouatta, the seroprevalence increased significantly with weight (and therefore with age). This study indicates that MAY virus is present in French Guiana, and human infections occur in areas where people live near the tropical rain forest. PMID:9749643

  20. Amplification of 'variola virus-specific' sequences in German cowpox virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, H; Neubauer, H; Pfeffer, M

    2002-02-01

    In 1995 a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol describing the specific detection of variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, was published by Knight and others. Virulent variola major strains could be differentiated from less virulent variola minor strains because of the distinct amplicon sizes. Here, we applied this PCR protocol to DNA from various orthopoxvirus isolates. There was no amplification with the orthopoxvirus species vaccinia, monkeypox, mousepox, or camelpox viruses. However, amplification was observed in six out of 15 cowpox virus strains investigated. The size of the amplicons corresponded exactly with the size described for variola minor strains and the nucleotide sequence identity accounted for 97%. Findings are discussed with respect to the evolution of orthopoxvirus species assuming that variola virus most probably stems from a rodent-transmitted cowpox virus-like progenitor. PMID:11911586

  1. Molecular characterization of Duck Plague virus isolated from Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mostakin Ahamed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Duck plague (DP is the most feared duck disease in the world. For isolation, identification, molecular detection and characterization of DP virus (DPV, a total of 94 samples were collected from commercial farms (n=6 and households (n=13 from Rajshahi (n=37, Netrokona (n=35 and Mymensingh (n=22 districts of Bangladesh. The samples were processed and inoculated into 11-13 days old embryonated duck eggs for virus propagation. Virus was identified using agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGIT and passive hemagglutination (PHA test, and was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting DNA polymerase and gC genes, followed by sequencing. Pathogenicity tests were performed using duck embryos, ducklings and ducks. Among the 94 samples, 17 isolates were confirmed as DPV by PCR amplification of partial DNA polymerase (446-bp and gC genes (78-bp, respectively. One of the isolates (Anatid herpes 1 BAU DMH was sequenced and found to be closely related with a Chinese variant of DPV (GenBank: JQ647509.1. Thus, we assume that both Bangladeshi and Chinese isolates of DPV may have a common ancestor. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2015; 2(3.000: 296-303

  2. Report of isolations of unusual lyssaviruses (rabies and Mokola virus) identified retrospectively from Zimbabwe : short communication

    OpenAIRE

    Bingham, J; S. Javangwe; C.T. Sabeta; Wandeler, A. I.; Nel, L. H.

    2001-01-01

    Rabies isolates that had been stored between 1983 and 1997 were examined with a panel of anti-lyssavirus nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies. Out of 56 isolates from cats and various wild carnivore species, 1 isolate of Mokola virus and 5 other non-typical rabies viruses were identified. The Mokola virus isolate was diagnosed as rabies in 1993 from a cat. Genetic analysis of this isolate suggests that it falls in a distinct subgroup of the Mokola virus genotype. The 5 non-typical rabies viruse...

  3. The E116 isolate of Dutch pea early-browning virus is a recombinant virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, M M; MacFarlane, S A

    1999-03-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of RNA2 of the E116 isolate of Dutch pea early-browning virus (PEBV-D) was obtained from overlapping cDNA clones. The RNA was found to encode three open reading frames corresponding to, in 5' to 3' order, the coat protein, the 2b nematode transmission protein and the C-terminal part of the cysteine-rich 1b protein derived from RNA1. The 3' non-coding region of PEBV-D RNA2 was also shown to be derived from RNA1. This is the first demonstration that recombination of PEBV occurs in nature. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of the PEBV-D RNA2 proteins with those of British PEBV and several isolates of tobacco rattle virus reveals complex patterns of mixing of the genomes of these two viruses. PMID:10225277

  4. BLUETONGUE VIRUS ANTIBODIES DETECTIONS IN SHEEP FROM ARAÇATUBA REGION –SAO PAULO, BRAZIL DETECÇÃO DE ANTICORPOS CONTRA O VÍRUS DA LÍNGUA AZUL EM OVINOS NA REGIÃO DE ARAÇATUBA – SÃO PAULO, BRASIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Hellmeister de Campos Nogueira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Bluetongue (BT is an infectious, insect-born viral disease of ruminants. The causative agent of BT is bluetongue virus (BTV that belongs to the family Reoviridae genus Orbivirus. Insect vectors in the genus Culicoides transmit this virus. BT affects domestic and wild ruminants, however small ruminants are considered the most affected specie. The aim of the study was to detect antibodies against BTV in commercial sheep farms, of the Northeastern region of Sao Paulo State, Brazil. A total of 1002 sera samples collected from adult sheep (above 1 year-old, comprising a total of 31 farms, were screened for the presence of BTV antibodies, by agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID and ELISA-CFS (Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay – competitive solid phase, both produced by Pan American Center of FMDV. From a total of 1002 samples, 651 (65% were positive by AGID and 742 (74.1%, were positive by ELISA-CFS. These results suggest that the BTV is widespread among farms, probably causing subclinical infections.

    KEY WORDS: AGID, bluetongue virus, ELISA-CFS, seroepidemiological survey.

    A língua azul é uma doença viral, cujo agente etiológico pertence à família Reoviridae, gênero Orbivirus, transmitida por um vetor (artrópode hematófago, do gênero Culicoides. Os animais acometidos são ruminantes domésticos e selvagens, porém os pequenos ruminantes são os mais afetados. O estudo teve como objetivo detectar a presença de anticorpos para língua azul em ovinos da região de Araçatuba, por possuir um rebanho expressivo e condições climáticas favoráveis à multiplicação de insetos. Foram analisadas 1.002 amostras de soros ovinos, provenientes de 31 cabanhas, pelas provas de imunodifusão dupla em gel de ágar (AGID e ELISA (Enzyme Linked immunosorbent Assay de competição da fase sólida (ELISA CFS, provenientes do Centro Panamericano de Febre Aftosa. Desses soros, 651 (65% foram

  5. Genome sequencing and characterization analysis of a Beijing isolate of chicken corona virus infectious bronchitis virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Weiwu; YU Jialin; LI Ning; GONG Yuanshi; SUN Qixin; CHEN Zhangliang; CHEN Chen; ZHANG Ying; ZHAO Yiqiang; FENG Jidong; CHEN Fuyong; WU Qingming; YANG Hanchun; WANG Ming

    2004-01-01

    Avian infectious bronchitis virus (AIBV) is lassified as a member of the genus coronavirus in the family coronaviridae. The enveloped virus has a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of approximately 28 kilo-bases,which has a 5′ cap structure and 3′ polyadenylation tract.The complete genome sequence of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), Beijing isolate, was determined by cloning sequencing and primer walking. The whole genome is 27733 nucleotides in length, has ten open reading frames: 5′-orfla-orflab-s-3a-3b-e-m- 6a-6b-n-3′. Alignments of the genome sequence of IBV Beijing isolate with those of two AIBV strains and one SARS coronavirus were performed respectively. The genome sequence of IBV Beijing isolate compared with that of the IBV strain LX4 (uncompleted, 19440 bp in size) was 91.2%similarity. However, the full-length genome sequence of IBV Beijing isolate was 85.2% identity to that of IBV Strain Beaudette, and was only 50.8% homology to that of SARS coronavirus. The results showed that the genome of IBV has remarkable variation. And IBV Beijing isolate is not closely related to SARS coronavirus. Phylogenetic analyses based on the whole genome sequence, S protein, M protein and N protein, also showed that AIBV Beijing isolate is lone virus in group Ⅲ and is distant from SARS coronavirus. In conclusion, this study will contribute to the studies of diagnosis and diseases control on IBV in China.

  6. Psittacine pox virus: virus isolation and identification, transmission, and cross-challenge studies in parrots and chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boosinger, T R; Winterfield, R W; Feldman, D S; Dhillon, A S

    1982-01-01

    An avian pox virus was isolated from Amazon parrots dying with severe diphtheritic oral, esophageal, and crop lesions. The virus was propagated on chorioallantoic membranes (CAM) of 10-day-old chicken embryos, and a homogenate of the infected CAM was rubbed vigorously onto the conjunctiva, oral mucosa, and defeathered follicles of two healthy Amazon parrots and three conures. All experimental birds developed cutaneous and ocular pox lesions, and one parrot developed oral pox lesions. Specific-pathogen-free chicks inoculated with the virus isolate developed skin lesions identical to those of the parrots. Chickens vaccinated with fowl and pigeon pox vaccines and inoculated with the psittacine isolate developed lesions typical of avian pox. Chickens vaccinated with the psittacine virus were susceptible to fowl and pigeon pox virus infection. This pox virus isolate may thus be regarded as a potential pathogen for chickens. PMID:6285884

  7. Antigenic and genetic characterization of rabies virus isolates from Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Helena; Castilho, Juliana Galera; Souto, Juanita; Oliveira, Rafael de Novaes; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; Kotait, Ivanete

    2013-05-01

    After 25 years without any reported cases of rabies in Uruguay, the northern region of the country experienced an epizootic of bovine paralytic rabies in October 2007. The outbreak affected bovines and equines, and the main source of infection was the bat Desmodus rotundus, the only hematophagous species in the country. From October 2007 to July 2008, 42 bovine, 3 equine and 120 chiropteran samples were submitted to the National Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for rabies testing. A total of 12 samples (7 bovine, 2 equine and 3 from D. rotundus) were positive by the fluorescent antibody test, and viruses were isolated by the mouse inoculation test. The objective of this study was to compare the antigenic and genetic characteristics of these isolates and three isolates from insectivorous bats from other regions. Antigenic typing using a panel of eight monoclonal antibodies identified all 12 viruses as variant 3 (AgV3), a variant associated with D. rotundus. Two isolates from insectivorous bats (Tadarida brasiliensis and Molossus sp.) were characterized as antigenic variant 4 (AgV4) while the third, from Myotis sp., could not be characterized using this panel as its reactivity pattern did not match that of any of the known antigenic variants. Partial N-gene sequences (nt 149-1420) of these isolates were aligned with homologous sequences derived from GenBank by the CLUSTAL/W method and used to build a neighbor-joining distance tree with the Kimura 2-parameter model. All 12 isolates were genetically grouped into the D. rotundus cluster as they shared 100% identity. In the phylogenetic analysis, the three isolates from insectivorous bats segregated into three clusters: one related to T. brasiliensis, one to Myotis sp. and the other to Lasiurus sp., although the isolate associated with the latter came from a Molossus sp. specimen. These results indicate that AgV3 was associated with the outbreak of bovine paralytic rabies in Uruguay. This is the first report of rabies

  8. Report of isolations of unusual lyssaviruses (rabies and Mokola virus identified retrospectively from Zimbabwe : short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bingham

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Rabies isolates that had been stored between 1983 and 1997 were examined with a panel of anti-lyssavirus nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies. Out of 56 isolates from cats and various wild carnivore species, 1 isolate of Mokola virus and 5 other non-typical rabies viruses were identified. The Mokola virus isolate was diagnosed as rabies in 1993 from a cat. Genetic analysis of this isolate suggests that it falls in a distinct subgroup of the Mokola virus genotype. The 5 non-typical rabies viruses were isolated from honey badgers (Mellivora capensis, African civets (Civettictis civetta and an unidentified mongoose (Herpestidae. These isolates are representatives of rarely-reported wildlife-associated strains of rabies, probably maintained by the slender mongoose (Galerella sanguinea. These findings indicate that both Mokola virus and the mongoose-associated variant may be more common in Zimbabwe than is apparent from routine surveillance.

  9. Isolation and genetic characterization of a tembusu virus strain isolated from mosquitoes in Shandong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y; Diao, Y; Chen, H; Ou, Q; Liu, X; Gao, X; Yu, C; Wang, L

    2015-04-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a flavivirus, presumed to be a mosquito-borne flavivirus of the Ntaya virus subgroup. To date, however, there have been no reports indicating that mosquitoes are involved in the spread of TMUV. In this study, we report the first isolation of TMUV from Culex mosquitoes. We describe the isolation and characterization of a field strain of TMUV from mosquitoes collected in Shandong Province, China. The virus isolate, named TMUV-SDMS, grows well in mosquito cell line C6/36, in Vero and duck embryo fibroblast (DEF) cell lines, and causes significant cytopathic effects in these cell cultures. The TMUV-SDMS genome is a single-stranded RNA, 10 989 nt in length, consisting of a single open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3410 amino acids, with 5' and 3' untranslated regions of 142 and 617 nt, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the E and NS5 genes revealed that the TMUV-SDMS is closely related to the TMUV YY5 and BYD strains which cause severe egg-drop in ducks. The 3'NTR of TMUV-SDMS contains two pairs of tandem repeat CS and one non-duplicate CS, which have sequence similarities to the same repeats in the YY5 and BYD strains. Our findings indicate that mosquitoes carrying the TMUV may play an important role in the spread of this virus and in disease outbreak. PMID:23711093

  10. Isolasi, Identifikasi, Sifat Fisik, dan Biologi Virus Tetelo yang Diisolasi dari Kasus di Lapangan (ISOLATION, IDENTIFICATION, PHISICAL, AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTER OF NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS ISOLATED FROM FIELD CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Haryadi Wibowo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available native chicken farm suspected to Newcastle disease (ND virus infection. Specimens were taken andcollected from the lung was further processed. Suspected materials were inoculated into allantoic sacc inspecific pathogenic free of 10 days embryonating egg chicken. The growth of the virus was determined withthe ability to agglutinate the chicken red blood cells or hemaglutination test. Positive hemaglutinationwas performed with hemaglutinatin inhibition test using specific antibody against ND virus. Method forND virus isolation, propagation and identification were based on the standard procedure of serologicalidentification for ND virus serological identification. 13 out of 34 samples were identified as ND viruses.Observation on the course and time of the virus to kill the chicken embryo could be differentiated intomoderate virus patho-type were 10 isolates and a virulent strains were 3 isolates. Further characterizationbased on the elution time observation indicated 11 isolates were not pathogenic strain and 2 isolates werenot virulent strain. Hemagglutinin stability study revealed that 11 isolates were sensitive being heated at560C for 30 minutes while 2 isolates were resistant. Biological characteristic of ND virus to hemagglutinateon various mammalian red blood cells indicating that most isolates were HA negative. Two isolates wereHA positive with cattle, horse and sheep red blood cell, and one isolate indicated positive HA test by usingsheep red blood cell. Control virus was lentogenic patho-type of La Sota strain showed HA and HI testpositive, elution time was 29 minutes, stability on the hemagglutinin after heating was 2 minutes and HApositive with cattle, horse and sheep red blood cell.

  11. Evaluation of rabies biologics against Irkut virus isolated in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Shoufeng; Li, Nan; Lian, Hai; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Jinxia; Hu, Rongliang

    2013-11-01

    An Irkut virus (IRKV) was recently isolated from a bat in China. The protective ability of rabies biologics available in the Chinese market and experimental biologics against the rabies virus (RABV) and IRKV were assessed in a hamster model via preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) experiments. The results demonstrated that a single dose of rabies vaccine did not induce adequate protection against IRKV infection. However, routine PrEP with three doses of vaccine induced complete protection against IRKV infection. Higher doses of RABV immunoglobulins and alpha interferon were required during PEP to protect hamsters against IRKV versus RABV infection. Experimental recombinant vaccines containing IRKV glycoproteins induced more-reliable protection against IRKV than against RABV infection. Those findings may be explained by limited cross-neutralization of these viruses (confirmed via in vitro tests) in conjunction with antigenic distances between RABV and IRKV. These results indicate that the development and evaluation of new biologics for PrEP and PEP are required to ensure sufficient protection against IRKV infection in China and other territories where this virus is present. PMID:23946522

  12. Dengue-1 Virus Isolation during First Dengue Fever Outbreak on Easter Island, Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Perret, Cecilia; Abarca, Katia; Ovalle, Jimena; Ferrer, Pablo; Godoy, Paula; Olea, Andrea; Aguilera, Ximena; Ferrés, Marcela

    2003-01-01

    Dengue virus was detected for the first time in Chile, in an outbreak of dengue fever on Easter Island. The virus was isolated in tissue culture and characterized by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction as being dengue type 1.

  13. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Ebola Virus Isolates from the 2014 Outbreak in West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Hoenen, T.; Groseth, A.; Feldmann, F.; Marzi, A.; Ebihara, H.; Kobinger, G.; Günther, S. (Stefan); Feldmann, H.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences, including the genome termini, of three Ebola virus isolates (species Zaire ebolavirus) originating from Guinea that are now being widely used in laboratories in North America for research regarding West African Ebola viruses.

  14. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Hydrangea Ringspot Virus Isolates from Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusa, Akira; Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Koinuma, Hiroaki; Keima, Takuya; Neriya, Yutaro; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Maejima, Kensaku; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Hydrangea ringspot virus (HdRSV) is a plant RNA virus, naturally infecting Hydrangea macrophylla. Here, we report the first genomic sequences of two HdRSV isolates from hydrangea plants in Japan. The overall nucleotide sequences of these Japanese isolates were 96.0 to 96.3% identical to those of known European isolates. PMID:27034476

  15. Les porcheries : réservoirs des Culicoides (Diptera : Ceratopogonidae), vecteurs des virus de la Maladie de la Langue bleue et de Schmallenberg ?

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmer, JY.; Saegerman, C; Martinelle, L.; Losson, B.; Leroy, P.; Haubruge, E.; Francis, F.

    2014-01-01

    Pig farms: reservoirs of vectors of Bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses?. Bluetongue (BT) is a vector-borne disease that affects domestic and wild ruminants. Since its recent outbreak in northern Europe, this viral disease has caused considerable economic losses. The biological vectors of the bluetongue virus are biting midges belonging to the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Several light trapping campaigns targeting these adult midges have been previously conducted in Belgium w...

  16. First Isolation of a Giant Virus from Wild Hirudo medicinalis Leech: Mimiviridae isolation in Hirudo medicinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondher Boughalmi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Giant viruses and amoebae are common in freshwater, where they can coexist with other living multicellular organisms. We screened leeches from the species Hirudo medicinalis for giant viruses. We analyzed five H. medicinalis obtained from Tunisia (3 and France (2. The leeches were decontaminated and then dissected to remove internal parts for co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga. The genomes of isolated viruses were sequenced on a 454 Roche instrument, and a comparative genomics analysis was performed. One Mimivirus was isolated and the strain was named Hirudovirus. The genome assembly generated two scaffolds, which were 1,155,382 and 25,660 base pairs in length. Functional annotations were identified for 47% of the genes, which corresponds to 466 proteins. The presence of Mimividae in the same ecological niche as wild Hirudo may explain the presence of the mimivirus in the digestive tract of the leech, and several studies have already shown that viruses can persist in the digestive tracts of leeches fed contaminated blood. As leeches can be used medically and Mimiviruses have the potential to be an infectious agent in humans, patients treated with leeches should be surveyed to investigate a possible connection.

  17. Report of the Bluetongue and Bovine Retroviruses Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New strategies for preventing bluetongue in sheep, W.K. Reeves. Bluetongue disease is a sporadic and unpredictable disease in the northern Rocky Mountains. Epizootics can be separated by decades of little to no disease activity. Woolgrowers need access to control technologies that can be used after ...

  18. REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON BLUETONGUE AND BOVINE RETROVIRUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents the report of the `Bluetongue and Bovine Retrovirus Committee' meeting held October 21, 2002 during the annual meeting of the United States Animal Health Association in St. Louis, Missouri. An update was given on diagnostic observations for bluetongue, epizootic hemorrhagic dise...

  19. Molecular evolution of epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses in North America based on historical isolates using motif fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W C; Ruder, M G; Jasperson, D; Smith, T P L; Naraghi-Arani, P; Lenhoff, R; Stallknecht, D E; Valdivia-Granda, W A; Sheoran, D

    2016-08-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) is an orbivirus of the Reoviridae family that has significant impact on wild and captive white-tailed deer. Although closely related to bluetongue virus that can cause disease in sheep and cattle, North American EHDV historically has not been associated with disease in cattle or sheep. Severe disease in cattle has been reported with other EHDV strains from East Asia and the Middle East. To understand the potential role of viral genetics in the epidemiology of epizootic hemorrhagic disease, a molecular characterization of North American EHDV strains from 1955 to 2012 was conducted via conventional phylogenetic analysis and a new classification approach using motif fingerprint patterns. Overall, this study indicates that the genetic make-up of EHDV populations in North America have slowly evolved over time. The data also suggested limited reassortment events between serotypes 1 and 2 and introduces a new analysis tool for more detailed sequence pattern analysis. PMID:27107856

  20. First isolation of West Nile virus from a dromedary camel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Sunitha; Wernery, Ulrich; Teng, Jade Ll; Wernery, Renate; Huang, Yi; Patteril, Nissy Ag; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Fan, Rachel Yy; Lau, Susanna Kp; Kinne, Jörg; Woo, Patrick Cy

    2016-01-01

    Although antibodies against West Nile virus (WNV) have been detected in the sera of dromedaries in the Middle East, North Africa and Spain, no WNV has been isolated or amplified from dromedary or Bactrian camels. In this study, WNV was isolated from Vero cells inoculated with both nasal swab and pooled trachea/lung samples from a dromedary calf in Dubai. Complete-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis using the near-whole-genome polyprotein revealed that the virus belonged to lineage 1a. There was no clustering of the present WNV with other WNVs isolated in other parts of the Middle East. Within lineage 1a, the dromedary WNV occupied a unique position, although it was most closely related to other WNVs of cluster 2. Comparative analysis revealed that the putative E protein encoded by the genome possessed the original WNV E protein glycosylation motif NYS at E154-156, which contained the N-linked glycosylation site at N-154 associated with increased WNV pathogenicity and neuroinvasiveness. In the putative NS1 protein, the A70S substitution observed in other cluster 2 WNVs and P250, which has been implicated in neuroinvasiveness, were present. In addition, the foo motif in the putative NS2A protein, which has been implicated in neuroinvasiveness, was detected. Notably, the amino-acid residues at 14 positions in the present dromedary WNV genome differed from those in most of the closely related WNV strains in cluster 2 of lineage 1a, with the majority of these differences observed in the putative E and NS5 proteins. The present study is the first to demonstrate the isolation of WNV from dromedaries. This finding expands the possible reservoirs of WNV and sources of WNV infection. PMID:27273223

  1. Isolation and phylogenetic characterization of Canine distemper virus from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swati; Deka, Dipak; Uppal, Sanjeev Kumar; Verma, Ramneek

    2015-09-01

    Canine distemper (CD), caused by canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious disease that infects a variety of carnivores. Sequence analysis of CDVs from different geographical areas has shown a lot of variation in the genome of the virus especially in haemagglutinin gene which might be one of the causes of vaccine failure. In this study, we isolated the virus (place: Ludhiana, Punjab; year: 2014) and further cloned, sequenced and analyzed partial haemagglutinin (H) gene and full length genes for fusion protein (F), phosphoprotein (P) and matrix protein (M) from an Indian wild-type CDV. Higher sequence homology was observed with the strains from Switzerland, Hungary, Germany; and lower with the vaccine strains like Ondersteport, CDV3, Convac for all the genes. The multiple sequence alignment showed more variation in partial H (45 nucleotide and 5 amino acid substitutions) and complete F (79 nucleotide and 30 amino acid substitutions) than in complete P (44 nucleotide and 22 amino acid substitutions) and complete M (22 nucleotide and 4 amino acid substitutions) gene/protein. Predicted potential N-linked glycosylation sites in H, F, M and P proteins were similar to the previously known wild-type CDVs but different from the vaccine strains. The Indian CDV formed a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree clearly separated from the previously known wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26396979

  2. Isolation & molecular characterization of human parainfluenza virus in Chennai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C P Indumathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Human parainfluenza virus (HPIV accounts for a significant proportion of lower respiratory tract infections in children as well as adults. This study was done to detect the presence of different subtypes of HPIV from patients having influenza like illness (ILI. Methods: Throat and nasal swabs from 232 patients with ILI who were negative for influenza viruses were tested by multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction(mRT-PCR for the detection of human parainfluenza virus. All samples were inoculated in rhesus monkey kidney (LLC-MK2 cell line. Results: Of the 232 samples, 26(11.2% were positive by mRT-PCR and nine (34.6% showed cytopathic effect with syncytium formation for HPIV and all were HPIV-3 serotype, other serotypes like 1,2,4 were negative. The HPIV-3 strains (HN gene were sequenced and analysed. Two novel mutations were identified at amino acid residues 295 and 297. Interpretation & conclusions: The mRT-PCR assay offers a rapid, sensitive and accurate diagnostic method for detection of HPIV which enables early detection and control. In our study there was a predominance of HPIV among 1-5 yr age group and the school going age group was less affected. Further studies need to be done to characterize HPIV isolated from different parts of the country.

  3. Genotyping of Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) based on the glycoprotein gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W.-S.; Oh, M.-J.; Nishizawa, T.; Park, J.-W.; Kurath, G.; Yoshimizu, M.

    2007-01-01

    Glycoprotein (G) gene nucleotide sequences of four Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) were analyzed to evaluate their genetic relatedness to worldwide isolates. All Korean isolates were closely related to Japanese isolates of genogroup JRt rather than to those of North American and European genogroups. It is believed that Korean IHNV has been most likely introduced from Japan to Korea by the movement of contaminated fish eggs. Among the Korean isolates, phylogenetically distinct virus types were obtained from sites north and south of a large mountain range, suggesting the possibility of more than one introduction of virus from Japan. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  4. The equine arteritis virus isolate from the 2010 Argentinian outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, G E; Serena, M S; Panei, C J; Nosetto, E O; Echeverria, M G

    2014-12-01

    A semen sample from a stallion infected during the 2010 equine arteritis virus (EAV) outbreak was received for viral isolation prior to castration of the animal. The virus was identified using a polyclonal antibody immunofluorescence test. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to amplify a region of the GP5 gene with primers GL105F and GL673R. The PCR products were purified and sequences of both strands were determined in a MegaBACE™1000 with inner primers CR2 and EAV32. A phylogenetic dataset was built with the previously reported sequences of five strains isolated in Argentina, together with a group of selected sequences obtained from GenBank. The unrooted neighbour-joining tree was constructed using molecular evolutionary genetic analysis (MEGA) and bootstrap analyses were conducted using 1,000 replicate datasets. Evolutionary distances were computed using the maximum composite likelihood method. A NetNGlyc server analysis at the Technical University of Denmark (www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetNGlyc/) was used to predict N-glycosylation in GP5 sequences. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the new strain GLD-LP-ARG), together with other strains previously isolated, belongs to the European group EU-1 but in a different branch. The new strain shows 99% nucleotide identity with strain Al1and 98.1% with the Belgian strain 08P178. Persistently infected stallions and their cryopreserved semen constitute a reservoir of EAV, which ensures its persistence in the horse population around the world. These findings reinforce the importance of careful monitoring of persistently infected stallions, as well as semen straws, by RT-PCR or test mating, in accordance with national regulations. PMID:25812217

  5. Complete genome sequencing and comparative analysis of three dengue virus type 2 Pakistani isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Madiha; Idrees, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Dengue is currently one of the most important arthropod borne human viral diseases caused by a flavivirus named as dengue virus. It is now endemic in Pakistan since many dengue fever outbreaks have been observed in Pakistan during the last three decades. Major serotype of dengue virus circulating in Pakistan is serotype 2. Complete genome sequences of three Pakistani dengue virus serotype 2 isolates were generated. Analysis of complete genome sequences showed that Pakistani isolates of dengue virus serotype 2 belonged to cosmopolitan genotype. This study identifies a number of amino acid substitutions that were introduced in local dengue virus serotype 2 isolate over the years. The study provides a significant insight into the evolution of serotype 2 of dengue virus in Pakistan. This is the first report of complete genome sequence information of dengue virus from the most recent outbreak (2013) in Punjab, Pakistan. PMID:26925441

  6. Studies on antigenic and genomic properties of Brazilian rabies virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, R.; Batista, H.B.; Franco, A.C.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Roehe, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the recognized stability of rabies virus, differences among isolates from different species have been found. This work was carried out with the aim to identify antigenic and genomic differences in Brazilian rabies virus isolates and to verify whether such alterations would bear any relations

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Papaya Ringspot Virus Isolated from Genetically Modified Papaya in Hainan Island, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guangyuan; Yan, Pu; Shen, Wentao; Tuo, Decai; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence (10,326 nucleotides) of a papaya ringspot virus isolate infecting genetically modified papaya in Hainan Island of China was determined through reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The virus shares 92% nucleotide sequence identity with the isolate that is unable to infect PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya. PMID:26358610

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Papaya Ringspot Virus Isolated from Genetically Modified Papaya in Hainan Island, China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Guangyuan; Yan, Pu; Shen, Wentao; Tuo, Decai; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence (10,326 nucleotides) of a papaya ringspot virus isolate infecting genetically modified papaya in Hainan Island of China was determined through reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The virus shares 92% nucleotide sequence identity with the isolate that is unable to infect PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya.

  9. Molecular-genetic analysis of field isolates of Avian Leucosis Viruses in the Russian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commercial poultry farms in 14 regions of Russian Federation were monitored for avian leukosis virus (ALV) infection using virus isolation tests and serology. Results indicated the presence of two subgroups of ALV in farms located in 11 of 14 regions. Analysis of the genomes of 12 field isolates of...

  10. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Chikungunya Virus Strain Isolated from a Patient Diagnosed with Dengue Virus Infection in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Man Kwan; Gan, Han Ming; Rohani, Ahmad; Syed Hassan, Sharifah

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a chikungunya virus coinfection strain isolated from a dengue virus serotype 2-infected patient in Malaysia. This coinfection strain was determined to be of the Asian genotype and contains a novel insertion in the nsP3 gene. PMID:27563048

  11. Atypical myxomatosis--virus isolation, experimental infection of rabbits and restriction endonuclease analysis of the isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psikal, I; Smíd, B; Rodák, L; Valícek, L; Bendová, J

    2003-08-01

    Atypical form of myxomatosis, which caused non-lethal and clinically mild disease in domestic rabbits 1 month after immunization with a commercially available vaccine MXT, is described. The isolated myxoma virus designated as Litovel 2 (Li-2) did not induce systemic disease following subcutaneous and intradermal applications in susceptible experimental rabbits but led to the immune response demonstrated by ELISA. No severe disease was induced in those Li-2 inoculated rabbits by challenge with the virulent strains Lausanne (Lu) or Sanar (SA), while the control animals showed nodular form of myxomatosis with lethal course of the illness. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of genomic DNA with KpnI and BamHI endonucleases was used for genetic characterization of the Li-2 isolate, the vaccine strain MXT and both virulent strains Lu and SA, respectively. In general, RFLP analysis has shown to be informative for inferring genetic relatedness between myxoma viruses. Based on restriction endonuclease DNA fragment size distribution, it was evident that the pathogenic strain SA is genetically related to the reference strain Lu and the isolate Li-2 is more related, but not identical, to the vaccination strain MXT. PMID:14628995

  12. Viruses of symbiotic Chlorella-like algae isolated from Paramecium bursaria and Hydra viridis

    OpenAIRE

    James L Van Etten; Meints, Russel H.; Kuczmarski, Daniel; Burbank, Dwight E.; Lee, Kit

    1982-01-01

    We previously reported that isolation of symbiotic Chlorella-like algae from the Florida strain of Hydra viridis induced replication of a virus (designated HVCV-1) in the algae. We now report that isolation of symbiotic Chlorella-like algae from four other sources of green hydra and one source of the protozoan Paramecium bursaria also induced virus synthesis. Algae from one of these hydra contained a virus identical to HVCV-1 (based on its rate of sedimentation, buoyant density, reaction to H...

  13. Isolation and Identification of Virus dsRNA from Strawberry Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI He; DAI Hong-yan; ZHANG Zhi-hong; GAO Xiu-yan; DU Guo-dong; ZHANG Xin-yu

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of virus genome is based on nucleic acid isolation. The aims of this study were to develop a method for isolation and identification of virus double-stranded ribonucleic acid (dsRNA) and to elucidate the nucleotide sequences of strawberry virus. Using the modified method, virus dsRNA was extracted from strawberry virus indicator plants and cultivated strawberry plants and detected using agarose gel electrophoresis with ethidium bromide staining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The quantity of virus dsRNA varied among strawberry cultivars. The quantity of dsRNA from in vitro plantlets was higher than that from the young leaves of field plants. For the field-grown plants, there was more dsRNA in the young leaves. Virus dsRNA extracted from strawberry plants was resistant to deoxyribonuclease Ⅰ (DNase Ⅰ ), but evidently, it became resistant to ribonuclease A (RNase A) only in the presence of 0.5 M NaCl. Its bands in agarose gel could be readily recycled using an agarose gel DNA purification kit. With RT-PCR, the segments of both strawberry mottle virus and Strawberry mild yellow edge virus genomes were amplified by using the virus dsRNA recycled from gel or treated with DNase Ⅰ /RNase A as templates. The system developed for dsRNA isolation and identification in strawberry plants laid a sound foundation for the work on genome analysis of strawberry virus isolates in China.

  14. Zinc Salts Inactivate Clinical Isolates of Herpes Simplex Virus In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Arens, Max; Travis, Sharon

    2000-01-01

    Using a standard plaque assay and clinical isolates of herpes simplex virus (HSV), we have tested the ability of zinc salts to inactivate HSV. Virus was treated by incubation at 37°C with zinc salts in morpholinepropanesulfonic acid-buffered culture medium and was then diluted and plated onto CV-1 cells for detection and quantitation of remaining infectious virus. Of 10 randomly chosen clinical isolates (five HSV type 1 [HSV-1] isolates and five HSV-2 isolates), seven were inactivated >98% by...

  15. Analysis of infectious laryngotracheitis virus isolates from Ontario and New Brunswick by the polymerase chain reaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, H S; Key, D.W.; Nagy, E.

    1998-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify DNA of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) isolates obtained from field specimens. The examined 47 samples included 37 isolates representing 35 cases of infectious laryngotracheitis from Ontario and 10 isolates originating from 10 field cases in New Brunswick. The viruses were grown in either embryonated chicken eggs or cell culture, the DNA extracted and amplified using primers designed from the sequence information of a 1.1 kb Ba...

  16. Rapid typing of herpes simplex virus isolates by deoxyribonucleic acid:deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization.

    OpenAIRE

    Brautigam, A R; Richman, D D; Oxman, M N

    1980-01-01

    A method for typing clinical isolates of herpes simplex virus was developed. It utilizes hybridization between unlabeled deoxyribonucleic acid from infected cultures and tritium-labeled virus deoxyribonucleic acid, and it can be completed within a day using a single roller-tube culture of the clinical isolated. The data obtained are inherently quantitative, and the method yields unequivocal identification and typing. Thirty-nine coded clinical isolates were all correctly typed by this method.

  17. Antigenic characterization of Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus isolates by monoclonal antibodies and cross-neutralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botton S.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen Brazilian isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV were characterized antigenically with a panel of 19 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs (Corapi WV, Donis RO and Dubovi EJ (1990 American Journal of Veterinary Research, 55: 1388-1394. Eight isolates were further characterized by cross-neutralization using sheep monospecific antisera. Analysis of mAb binding to viral antigens by indirect immunofluorescence revealed distinct patterns of reactivity among the native viruses. Local isolates differed from the prototype Singer strain in recognition by up to 14 mAbs. Only two mAbs - one to the non-structural protein NS23/p125 and another to the envelope glycoprotein E0/gp48 - recognized 100% of the isolates. No isolate was recognized by more than 14 mAbs and twelve viruses reacted with 10 or less mAbs. mAbs to the major envelope glycoprotein E2/gp53 revealed a particularly high degree of antigenic variability in this glycoprotein. Nine isolates (47.3% reacted with three or less of 10 E2/gp53 mAbs, and one isolate was not recognized by any of these mAbs. Virus-specific antisera to eight isolates plus three standard BVDV strains raised in lambs had virus-neutralizing titers ranging from 400 to 3200 against the homologous virus. Nonetheless, many antisera showed significantly reduced neutralizing activity when tested against heterologous viruses. Up to 128-fold differences in cross-neutralization titers were observed for some pairs of viruses. When the coefficient of antigenic similarity (R was calculated, 49 of 66 comparisons (74.24% between viruses resulted in R values that antigenically distinguish strains. Moreover, one isolate had R values suggesting that it belongs to a distinct serologic group. The marked antigenic diversity observed among Brazilian BVDV isolates should be considered when planning diagnostic and immunization strategies.

  18. Isolation of a new herpes virus from human CD4 sup + T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenkel, N.; Schirmer, E.C.; Wyatt, L.S.; Katsafanas, G.; Roffman, E.; Danovich, R.M. (National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (USA)); June, C.H. (Naval Medical Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    A new human herpes virus has been isolated from CD4{sup +} T cells purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy individual (RK), following incubation of the cells under conditions promoting T-cell activation. The virus could not be recovered from nonactivated cells. Cultures of lymphocytes infected with the RK virus exhibited a cytopathic effect, and electron microscopic analyses revealed a characteristic herpes virus structure. RK virus DNA did not hybridize with large probes derived from herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, varicella-zoster virus, and human cytomegalovirus. The genetic relatedness of the RK virus to the recently identified T-lymphotropic human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) was investigated by restriction enzyme analyses using 21 different enzymes and by blot hydridization analyses using 11 probes derived from two strains of HHV-6 (Z29 and U1102). Whereas the two HHV-6 strains exhibited only limited restriction enzyme polymorphism, cleavage of the RK virus DNA yielded distinct patterns. Of the 11 HHV-6 DNA probes tested, only 6 cross-hybridized with DNA fragments derived from the RK virus. Taken together, the maximal homology amounted to 31 kilobases of the 75 kilobases tested. The authors conclude that the RK virus is distinct from previously characterized human herpesviruses. The authors propose to designate it as the prototype of a new herpes virus, the seventh human herpes virus identified to date.

  19. Adaptive evolution of simian immunodeficiency viruses isolated from two conventional progressor macaques with neuroaids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of macaques may result in neuroAIDS, a feature more commonly observed in macaques with rapid progressive disease than in those with conventional disease. This is the first report of two conventional progressors (H631 and H636) with encephalitis in rhesus macaques inoculated with a derivative of SIVsmES43-3. Phylogenetic analyses of viruses isolated from the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from both animals demonstrated tissue compartmentalization. Additionally, virus from the central nervous system (CNS) was able to infect primary macaque monocyte-derived macrophages more efficiently than virus from plasma. Conversely, virus isolated from plasma was able to replicate better in peripheral blood mononuclear cells than virus from CNS. We speculate that these viruses were under different selective pressures in their separate compartments. Furthermore, these viruses appear to have undergone adaptive evolution to preferentially replicate in their respective cell targets. Analysis of the number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) in gp160 showed that there was a statistically significant loss of PNGS in viruses isolated from CNS in both macaques compared to SIVsmE543-3. Moreover, virus isolated from the brain in H631, had statistically significant loss of PNGS compared to virus isolated from CSF and plasma of the same animal. It is possible that the brain isolate may have adapted to decrease the number of PNGS given that humoral immune selection pressure is less likely to be encountered in the brain. These viruses provide a relevant model to study the adaptations required for SIV to induce encephalitis.

  20. Bluetongue: vets and farmers urged to remain vigilant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbens, Nigel

    2016-04-23

    Nigel Gibbens, the UK's Chief Veterinary Officer, gives an update on the developing bluetongue situation in France and explains how vets can help their clients prepare for possible outbreaks in the UK this summer. PMID:27103689

  1. Comparison of flow cytometry and virus isolation in cell culture for identification of cattle persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Qvist, P.; Houe, H.; Aasted, B.; Meyling, A

    1991-01-01

    Detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus in 143 blood samples by virus isolation in cell culture and flow cytometry was performed. The material included 37 samples later shown to originate from persistently infected cattle. Thirty-three samples were positive by virus isolation, and all 37 samples were positive by the flow cytometric assay.

  2. Complete nucleotide sequence of an Olive latent virus 1 isolate from olive trees

    OpenAIRE

    Félix, M. Rosário; Cardoso, Joana M. S.; Varanda, Carla M.R.; Oliveira, Solange; Clara, M. Ivone E.

    2005-01-01

    Olive latent virus 1 (OLV-1) is a necrovirus belonging to the familyTombusviridae. It is a small icosahedral plant virus, which encapsidates a single stranded positivesense RNA. This virus was first isolated from symptomless olive trees in Italy [7] and afterwards in Jordan and Portugal [10, 4]. OLV-1 was also isolated from symptomatic hosts, such as citrus trees in Turkey [11] and tulips in Japan [9]. Up to now, only one complete genome sequence of an OLV-1 citrus isolate has ...

  3. A simple and rapid characterization of influenza virus isolates by monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioimmunoassay is described with infectious allantoic fluid directly bound to solid phase, suitable for the detection and further characterization of influenza virus isolates. This simple and rapid method was applied for the description of isolates obtained from different regions of Czechoslovakia during the influenza epidemic in 1983. The results confirmed that all 13 examined isolates represented influenza A viruses possessing H3 subtype haemagglutinin very similar to haemagglutinin of influenza viruses A/Bangkok/1/79 (H3N2), A/Belgium/2/81 (H3N2) and A/Philippines/2/82 (H3N2). (author)

  4. The isolation of Gurnbiro virus from larvae and darkling Ivelles (Carcinops pumilin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Parede

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Gumboro (infectious bursal disease, IBD virus was isolated from darkling beetles (Carrinaps pumilin and their larvae in a commercial pulletchicken farm with repeated outbreaks incidence of Gumboro disease in Tangertng, West Java. In addition, these over populated beetles and their larvae were suspected to be infected and then shed the virus or acted as vectors. Isolation was done by repeated passages of virus using chicken embryo fibroblast cells as prime media, which then showed the evidence of cylop: ihic effecis. The isolation was followed by antigen detection by means of ELISA test.

  5. Population structure and genetic diversity within California Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, P; Rubio, L; Polek, M; Falk, B W

    2000-10-01

    The Closterovirus, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is an aphid-borne RNA virus that is the causal agent of important worldwide economic losses in citrus. Biological and molecular variation has been observed for many CTV isolates. In this work we detected and analyzed sequence variants (haplotypes) within individual CTV isolates. We studied the population structure of five California CTV isolates by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of four CTV genomic regions. Also, we estimated the genetic diversity within and between isolates by analysis of haplotype nucleotide sequences. Most CTV isolates were composed of a population of genetically related variants (haplotypes), one being predominant. However in one case, we found a high nucleotide divergence between haplotypes of the same isolate. Comparison of these haplotypes with those from other isolates suggests that some CTV isolates could have arisen as result of a mixed infection of two divergent isolates. PMID:11129629

  6. Effect of Culicoides sonorensis salivary proteins on clinical disease outcome in experimental Bleutongue virus serotype 8 infection of Dorset sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drolet, B.S.; Reister, L.M.; Lehiy, C.J.; Rijn, van P.A.; Bowen, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    The severity of Bluetongue clinical disease in ruminants varies greatly depending on the outbreak serotype/strain, animal species/breed, and immune status of the herd. To predict disease risk from any of the 26 Bluetongue virus (BTV) serotypes identified to date, experimental animal susceptibility s

  7. Dengue virus serotype 2 from a sylvatic lineage isolated from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Cardosa

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses circulate in both human and sylvatic cycles. Although dengue viruses (DENV infecting humans can cause major epidemics and severe disease, relatively little is known about the epidemiology and etiology of sylvatic dengue viruses. A 20-year-old male developed dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF with thrombocytopenia (12,000/ul and a raised hematocrit (29.5% above baseline in January 2008 in Malaysia. Dengue virus serotype 2 was isolated from his blood on day 4 of fever. A phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome sequence revealed that this virus was a member of a sylvatic lineage of DENV-2 and most closely related to a virus isolated from a sentinel monkey in Malaysia in 1970. This is the first identification of a sylvatic DENV circulating in Asia since 1975.

  8. Dengue Virus Envelope Dimer Epitope Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Dengue Patients Are Protective against Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanstrom, J. A.; Plante, J. A.; Plante, K. S.; Young, E. F.; McGowan, E.; Gallichotte, E. N.; Widman, D. G.; Heise, M. T.; de Silva, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for thousands of cases of severe fetal malformations and neurological disease since its introduction to Brazil in 2013. Antibodies to flaviviruses can be protective, resulting in lifelong immunity to reinfection by homologous virus. However, cross-reactive antibodies can complicate flavivirus diagnostics and promote more severe disease, as noted after serial dengue virus (DENV) infections. The endemic circulation of DENV in South America and elsewhere raises concerns that preexisting flavivirus immunity may modulate ZIKV disease and transmission potential. Here, we report on the ability of human monoclonal antibodies and immune sera derived from dengue patients to neutralize contemporary epidemic ZIKV strains. We demonstrate that a class of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from DENV patients neutralizes ZIKV in cell culture and is protective in a lethal murine model. We also tested a large panel of convalescent-phase immune sera from humans exposed to primary and repeat DENV infection. Although ZIKV is most closely related to DENV compared to other human-pathogenic flaviviruses, most DENV immune sera (73%) failed to neutralize ZIKV, while others had low (50% effective concentration [EC50], 1:100 serum dilution; 9%) levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies. Our results establish that ZIKV and DENV share epitopes that are targeted by neutralizing, protective human antibodies. The availability of potently neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies provides an immunotherapeutic approach to control life-threatening ZIKV infection and also points to the possibility of repurposing DENV vaccines to induce cross-protective immunity to ZIKV. PMID:27435464

  9. Induction of brain tumors by a newly isolated JC virus (Tokyo-1 strain).

    OpenAIRE

    Nagashima, K.; Yasui, K; Kimura, J; Washizu, M.; Yamaguchi, K.; Mori, W.

    1984-01-01

    A newly isolated virus from a patient with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) (Tokyo-1 strain) was found serologically identical to JC virus (Mad-1 strain) and showed high neurooncogenicity in hamsters. Twenty-one animals inoculated intracerebrally with the virus developed brain tumors during a period that averaged 5 months. The tumors were cerebellar medulloblastoma (n = 20); plexus tumor (n = 2) occurred in 1 animal as a single tumor and in another in combination with a medull...

  10. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus Stability in Environmental and Clinical Substrates: Implications for Virus Detection and Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Dornas, Fábio P.; Silva, Lorena C. F.; de Almeida, Gabriel M.; Rafael K Campos; Boratto, Paulo V.M.; Ana P M Franco-Luiz; La Scola, Bernard; Ferreira, Paulo C. P.; Kroon, Erna G.; Abrahão, Jônatas S.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are extremely diverse and abundant and are present in countless environments. Giant viruses of the Megavirales order have emerged as a fascinating research topic for virologists around the world. As evidence of their ubiquity and ecological impact, mimiviruses have been found in multiple environmental samples. However, isolation of these viruses from environmental samples is inefficient, mainly due to methodological limitations and lack of information regarding the interactions betwee...

  11. Lethal Effect of Bluetongue Virus Strain HbC3 on Mouse Prostata Cancer RM-1 Cells%蓝舌病毒湖北株对小鼠前列腺癌RM-1细胞的杀伤效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王肖; 张杰; 杜贤进; 周晓光

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics and the mechanism of bluetongue virus strain HbC3(HCMV) infecting mouse prostate cancer RM-1 cells in vitro.Methods: BTV-HbC3 was used to infect RM-1 cells, the the cytopathic effect (CPE) was observed, and the inhibition activity of RM-1 cell infected with BTV-HbC3 was determined by MTT.Transmission electron microscope (TEM) was adopted to study the changes of cell ultrastructure.DNA Ladder was taken to detect the apoptosis of RM-1 cells induced by BTV-HbC3.The apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry (FCM).Results: RM-1 cells were sensitive to BTV-HbC3 infection, CPE was found in BTV-HbC3 infected RM-1 cells, and lots of virus particles were found in cytoplasm by TEM.Apoptotic cells were detected by FCM.Conclusion: BTV-HbC3 could infect RM-1 cells and replicate efficiently, and induce apoptosis in tumor cells.%目的:体外研究蓝舌病毒湖北株3(BTV-HbC3)对小鼠前列腺癌细胞RM-1的感染性并探讨BTV-HbC3靶向性溶瘤的机制.方法:观察RM-1细胞感染BTV-HbC3的细胞病变效应;MTT法研究病毒致细胞病变率的特征;透射电镜观察感染病毒后细胞超微结构的变化;DNA Ladder分析病毒诱导细胞凋亡的情况;流式细胞仪测定病毒对RM-1细胞凋亡的影响.结果:BTV-HbC3感染RM-1细胞后有明显的细胞病变效应;DNA Ladder分析为阶梯状条带;透射电镜发现胞质内有大量病毒颗粒和典型细胞凋亡形态变化;流式细胞仪可见明显的细胞凋亡.结论:BTV-HbCs在体外能有效的感染RM-1细胞,并能诱导RM-1细胞凋亡.

  12. Characterization of a natural Plum pox virus isolate bearing a truncated coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szathmáry, Erzsébet; Nádudvari, Júlia Novák; Szabó, László; Tóbiás, István; Balázs, Ervin; Palkovics, László

    2009-01-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates were collected in Hungary from plum varieties. PCR targeting the 3' genomic region resulted in a shorter PCR product in the case of the B1298 isolate bearing a 135-nucleotide deletion in frame in the N-terminal part of the coat protein (CP). The isolate was aphid-transmissible and the virion diameter was reduced compared to PPV-SK68. Detectability of this isolate by Western blot varied according to the antibody used. Integration of the deleted CP gene into an infectious PPV clone had no effect on infectivity and symptomatology. In competition experiments, B1298 had a considerable advantage in virus accumulation. PMID:19082685

  13. West Nile virus isolated from a Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) in northwestern Missouri, USA, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Harmon, Jessica R; Lash, R Ryan; Weiss, Sonja; Langevin, Stanley; Savage, Harry M; Godsey, Marvin S; Burkhalter, Kristen; Root, J Jeffrey; Gidlewski, Thomas; Nicholson, William L; Brault, Aaron C; Komar, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    We describe the isolation of West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) from blood of a Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) collected in northwestern Missouri, USA in August 2012. Sequencing determined that the virus was related to lineage 1a WNV02 strains. We discuss the role of wildlife in WNV disease epidemiology. PMID:25098303

  14. Extensive sequence divergence among bovine respiratory syncytial viruses isolated during recurrent outbreaks in closed herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.

    2000-01-01

    and veal calf production units) in different years and from all confirmed outbreaks in Denmark within a short period. The results showed that identical viruses were isolated within a herd during outbreaks and that viruses from recurrent infections varied by up to 11% in sequence even in closed herds...

  15. Full-Genome Sequence of a Novel Varicella-Zoster Virus Clade Isolated in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna María; Gonzalez-Durán, Elizabeth; Segura-Candelas, José Miguel; Pérez-Agüeros, Sandra Ivette; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Diaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Ramirez-González, José Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the Herpesviridae family, which causes varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles) in humans. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of varicella-zoster virus, isolated from a vesicular fluid sample, revealing the circulation of VZV clade VIII in Mexico.

  16. Full-Genome Sequence of a Novel Varicella-Zoster Virus Clade Isolated in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna María; Gonzalez-Durán, Elizabeth; Segura-Candelas, José Miguel; Pérez-Agüeros, Sandra Ivette; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Diaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Ramirez-González, José Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the Herpesviridae family, which causes varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles) in humans. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of varicella-zoster virus, isolated from a vesicular fluid sample, revealing the circulation of VZV clade VIII in Mexico. PMID:26159533

  17. Dengue-1 virus isolation during first dengue fever outbreak on Easter Island, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Cecilia; Abarca, Katia; Ovalle, Jimena; Ferrer, Pablo; Godoy, Paula; Olea, Andrea; Aguilera, Ximena; Ferrés, Marcela

    2003-11-01

    Dengue virus was detected for the first time in Chile, in an outbreak of dengue fever on Easter Island. The virus was isolated in tissue culture and characterized by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction as being dengue type 1. PMID:14718094

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Chikungunya Virus Isolated in Guangdong, China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Xue-Dong; Ye, Qing; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Shun-ya ZHU; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya virus belongs to the genus Alphavirus in the family Togaviridae. Here we report the complete genome sequence of a chikungunya virus strain, GD05/2010, isolated in 2010 from a patient with chikungunya fever in Guangdong, China. The sequence information is important for surveillance of this emerging arboviral infection in China.

  19. First Complete Genome Sequence of an Emerging Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus Isolate in North America

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Rugang; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; Ling, Kai-Shu

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence (6,423 nucleotides [nt]) of an emerging cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolate on cucumber in North America was determined through deep sequencing of small (sRNA) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The virus shares 99% nucleotide sequence identity with the Asian genotype but only 90% with the European genotype.

  20. Isolation and characterization of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 from water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Maidana, Silvina S; Lomonaco, Patricia M; Combessies, Gustavo; Craig, María I; Diodati, Julian; Rodriguez, Daniela; Parreño, Viviana; Zabal, Osvaldo; Konrad, José L; Crudelli, Gustavo; Mauroy, Axel; Thiry, Etienne; Romera, Sonia A

    2012-01-01

    Background Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) was isolated from dairy buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) naturally affected with respiratory and reproductive clinical conditions. Results Examination of nasal and vaginal swabs collected from 12 diseased buffaloes led to the isolation of three paramyxovirus isolates from two animals. Antigenic, morphological and biological characteristics of these three isolates were essentially similar to those of members of the Paramyxoviridae family. Antigenic analy...

  1. Genetic analysis of influenza B viruses isolated in Uganda during the 2009–2010 seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byarugaba Denis K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza B viruses can cause morbidity and mortality in humans but due to the lack of an animal reservoir are not associated with pandemics. Because of this, there is relatively limited genetic sequences available for influenza B viruses, especially from developing countries. Complete genome analysis of one influenza B virus and several gene segments of other influenza B viruses isolated from Uganda from May 2009 through December 2010 was therefore undertaken in this study. Methods Samples were collected from patients showing influenza like illness and screened for influenza A and B by PCR. Influenza B viruses were isolated on Madin-Darby Canine Kidney cells and selected isolates were subsequently sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. Findings Of the 2,089 samples collected during the period, 292 were positive by PCR for influenza A or B; 12.3% of the PCR positives were influenza B. Thirty influenza B viruses were recovered and of these 25 that grew well consistently on subculture were subjected to further analysis. All the isolates belonged to the B/Victoria-lineage as identified by hemagglutination inhibition assay and genetic analysis except one isolate that grouped with the B-Yamagata-lineage. The Ugandan B/Victoria-lineage isolates grouped in clade 1 which was defined by the N75K, N165K and S172P substitutions in hemagglutinin (HA protein clustered together with the B/Brisbane/60/2008 vaccine strain. The Yamagata-like Ugandan strain, B/Uganda/MUWRP-053/2009, clustered with clade 3 Yamagata viruses such as B/Bangladesh/3333/2007 which is characterized by S150I and N166Y substitutions in HA. Conclusion In general there was limited variation among the Ugandan isolates but they were interestingly closer to viruses from West and North Africa than from neighboring Kenya. Our isolates closely matched the World Health Organization recommended vaccines for the seasons.

  2. Identification and isolation of Genotype-I Japanese Encephalitis virus from encephalitis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gao Xiaoyan; Jiang Hongyue; Chen Weixin; Lv Zhi; Li Minghua; Zhai Yougang; Yuan Jun; Yu Deshan; Deng Zhang; Ye Xufang; Zhang Hailin; Fu Shihong; Wang Lihua; Cao Yuxi; Wang Huanyu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Historically, Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV) genotype III (GIII) has been responsible for human diseases. In recent years, JEV genotype I (GI) has been isolated from mosquitoes collected in numerous countries, but has not been isolated from patients with encephalitis. In this study, we report recovery of JEV GI live virus and identification of JEV GI RNA from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of encephalitis patients in JE endemic areas of China. Whole-genome sequencing and molecular phyl...

  3. Genomic variability of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates introduced into Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Lbida, B.; Fonseca, Filomena; C. Santos; Zemzami, M.; Bennani, A; Nolasco, Gustavo

    2004-01-01

    Genomic variability of the coat protein gene of Citrus tristeza virus isolates obtained from old Meyer lemon introductions in Morocco and more recent budwood introductions from Spain were studied. The coat protein gene of the virus was amplified directly from infected tissue by immunocapture RT-PCR and analysed by single stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and sequencing. Each isolate consisted of several related genomic variants, typical of a quasi-species. Although SSCP analysis has o...

  4. Comparison of a modified shell vial culture procedure with conventional mouse inoculation for rabies virus isolation

    OpenAIRE

    María de los Angeles Ribas Antúnez; Blanca Girón; Iraima Monsalvez; Luis Morier; Gretel Acosta; Yahisel Tejero; Yanislet Cordero; Dainelyd Piedra

    2013-01-01

    Rabies is a neurotropic disease that is often lethal. The early diagnosis of rabies infection is important and requires methods that allow for the isolation of the virus from animals and humans. The present study compared a modified shell vial (MSV) procedure using 24-well tissue culture plates with the mouse inoculation test (MIT), which is considered the gold standard for rabies virus isolation. Thirty brain samples (25 positive and 5 negative by the fluorescent antibody test) obtained from...

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Broad and Ultrapotent Human Monoclonal Antibodies with Therapeutic Activity against Chikungunya Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott A; Silva, Laurie A; Fox, Julie M; Flyak, Andrew I; Kose, Nurgun; Sapparapu, Gopal; Khomandiak, Solomiia; Khomadiak, Solomiia; Ashbrook, Alison W; Kahle, Kristen M; Fong, Rachel H; Swayne, Sherri; Doranz, Benjamin J; McGee, Charles E; Heise, Mark T; Pal, Pankaj; Brien, James D; Austin, S Kyle; Diamond, Michael S; Dermody, Terence S; Crowe, James E

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted RNA virus that causes acute febrile infection associated with polyarthralgia in humans. Mechanisms of protective immunity against CHIKV are poorly understood, and no effective therapeutics or vaccines are available. We isolated and characterized human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize CHIKV infectivity. Among the 30 mAbs isolated, 13 had broad and ultrapotent neutralizing activity (IC50 vaccine development. PMID:26159721

  6. Antiviral Activity of Liquorice Powder Extract against Varicella Zoster Virus Isolated from Egyptian Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Aly F. Mohamed; Essam H. Ibrahim; Amal S. Mostafa; Saad M. Bin Dajem; Magdy A. Amin; Amal Emad-Eldin; Rania I. Shebl

    2012-01-01

    Background: Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the etiologic agent of two diseases, varicella (chicken pox) and zoster (shingles). Varicella is a self- limited infection, while zoster is mainly a disease of adults. The present study was conducted to isolate VZV from clinically diagnosed children using cell cultures and compare the activity of liquorice powder extract, an alternative herbal antiviral agent, with acyclovir and interferon alpha 2a (IFN-α2a) against the isolated virus.Methods: Forty...

  7. Molecular Characteristics of H6N6 Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigeons in Guangxi, Southern China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Meng; Xie, Zhixun; Xie, Zhiqin; Luo, Sisi; Xie, Liji; Huang, Li; Deng, Xianwen; Huang, Jiaoling; Zhang, Yanfang; Zeng, Tingting; Wang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of an H6N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) isolated from a pigeon in Guangxi, southern China, in 2014. The eight RNA segment genes shared a high nucleotide identity (97 to 99%) with H6N6 subtypes of AIV isolated from ducks in the regions around Guangxi Province. The finding of this study will help us understand the ecology and molecular characteristics of H6 avian influenza virus in wild birds in southern China.

  8. Antigenic typing of brazilian rabies virus samples isolated from animals and humans, 1989-2000

    OpenAIRE

    FAVORETTO Silvana Regina; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; CUNHA Elenice Maria S.; Elizabeth A.C. Aguiar; SILVA Luzia Helena Q.; Miriam M. SODRÉ; SOUZA Maria Conceição A.M.; Kotait, Ivanete

    2002-01-01

    Animal and human rabies samples isolated between 1989 and 2000 were typified by means of a monoclonal antibody panel against the viral nucleoprotein. The panel had been previously established to study the molecular epidemiology of rabies virus in the Americas. Samples were isolated in the Diagnostic Laboratory of the Pasteur Institute and in other rabies diagnostic centers in Brazil. In addition to the fixed virus samples CVS-31/96-IP, preserved in mouse brain, and PV-BHK/97, preserved in cel...

  9. Characterization of an H10N8 influenza virus isolated from Dongting lake wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jianjun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wild birds, especially those in wetlands and aquatic environments, are considered to be natural reservoirs of avian influenza viruses. It is accepted that water is an important component in the transmission cycle of avian influenza virus. Monitoring the water at aggregation and breeding sites of migratory waterfowl, mainly wetland, is very important for early detection of avian influenza virus. The epidemiology investigation of avian influenza virus was performed in Dongting lake wetland which is an international important wetland. Results An H10N8 influenza virus was isolated from Dongting Lake wetland in 2007. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the virus was generated by multiple gene segment reassortment. The isolate was lowly pathogenic for chickens. However, it replicated efficiently in the mouse lung without prior adaptation, and the virulence to mice increased rapidly during adaptation in mouse lung. Sequence analysis of the genome of viruses from different passages showed that multiple amino acid changes were involved in the adaptation of the isolates to mice. Conclusions The water might be an important component in the transmission cycle of avian influenza virus, and other subtypes of avian influenza viruses (other than H5, H7 and H9 might evolve to pose a potential threat to mammals and even humans.

  10. Isolation of Madre de Dios Virus (Orthobunyavirus; Bunyaviridae), an Oropouche Virus Species Reassortant, from a Monkey in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Hernandez, Rosa; Auguste, Albert J; Tesh, Robert B; Weaver, Scott C; Montañez, Humberto; Liria, Jonathan; Lima, Anderson; Travassos da Rosa, Jorge Fernando Soares; da Silva, Sandro P; Vasconcelos, Janaina M; Oliveira, Rodrigo; Vianez, João L S G; Nunes, Marcio R T

    2016-08-01

    Oropouche virus (OROV), genus Orthobunyavirus, family Bunyaviridae, is an important cause of human illness in tropical South America. Herein, we report the isolation, complete genome sequence, genetic characterization, and phylogenetic analysis of an OROV species reassortant, Madre de Dios virus (MDDV), obtained from a sick monkey (Cebus olivaceus Schomburgk) collected in a forest near Atapirire, a small rural village located in Anzoategui State, Venezuela. MDDV is one of a growing number of naturally occurring OROV species reassortants isolated in South America and was known previously only from southern Peru. PMID:27215299

  11. Sequence analysis of a soil-borne wheat mosaic virus isolate from Italy shows that it is the same virus as European wheat mosaic virus and Soil-borne rye mosaic virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The complete sequence of the two RNAs of a furovirus isolate fromdurum wheat in Italy was determined. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis were done to compare the Italian virus with Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) from the USA and with furovirus sequences recently published as European wheat mosaic virus (EWMV), from wheat in France, and Soil-borne rye mosaic virus (SBRMV), from rye and wheat in Germany. Over the entire genome, the Italian isolate RNA1 and RNA2 had respectively 97.5% and 98.6% nucleotide identity with EWMV, 95.5% and 85.8% with SBRMV-G and 70.6% and 64.5% with SBWMV. The Italian isolate was therefore clearly distinct from SBWMV. The European isolates all appear to belong to the same virus and the name Soil-borne cereal mosaic virus may resolve earlier ambiguities.

  12. Viruses isolated from Aedeomyia squamipennis mosquitoes collected in Panama, Ecuador, and Argentina: establishment of the Gamboa serogroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisher, C H; Lazuick, J S; Justines, G; Francy, D B; Monath, T P; Gutierrez, E; Sabattini, M S; Bowen, G S; Jakob, W L

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-four virus strains were isolated from Aedeomyia squamipennis mosquitoes collected in Ecuador. One additional strain each was isolated from this species from Panama and ARgentina. All 26 isolates were shown to be related serologically to prototype Gamboa virus, originally isolated from Ad. squamipennis mosquitoes collected in Panama. Antigenic comparisons of eight strains, including prototype Gamboa virus, indicated the existence of four distinct viruses. Neutralization tests with sera from a variety of mammalian and avian species from Argentina provided further evidence that Gamboa serogroup viruses are transmitted between Ad. squamipennis and birds. PMID:6111232

  13. Isolation and genetic characterization of swinepox virus from pigs in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyesh, Thachamvally; Barua, Sanjay; Kumar, Naveen; Jindal, Naresh; Bera, Bidhan Chandra; Narang, Gulshan; Mahajan, Nand Kishore; Arora, Devan; Anand, Taruna; Vaid, Rajesh Kumar; Yadav, Mansi; Chandel, Surender Singh; Malik, Praveen; Tripathi, Bhupendra Nath; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Swinepox virus (SWPV), a member of the genus Suipoxvirus causes generalized pock-like lesions on the body of domestic and wild pigs. Although outbreak has been reported in India since 1987, virus isolation and genetic characterization remained elusive. In September 2013, an outbreak of acute skin infection occurred in piglets in a commercial piggery unit at Rohtak district in Haryana, India. The presence of SWPV in scab samples collected from piglets succumbed to infection was confirmed by virus isolation, PCR amplification of SWPV-specific gene segments and nucleotide sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of host-range genes of the SWPV revealed that the Indian isolate is genetically closely related to reference isolate SWPV/pig/U.S.A/1999/Nebraska. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on isolation and genetic characterization of SWPV from pigs in India. PMID:27260812

  14. Isolation and confirmation of bovine viral diarrhoea virus in Serbia and comparative typing with recent Slovenian isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Tamas

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of an investigation on bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV in fetal calf serum (FCS, whole blood and pathological material obtained from sick or dead cattle in Serbia are presented. Whole blood and FCS from sick animals were screened for BVDV antigen (Erns by ELISA. ELISA positive samples and pathological material from dead animals were inoculated into primary cell cultures of fetal calf testis (FTTe. After threefold passage in FTTe cells, BVDV was detected by direct immunofluorescence and indirect immunoperoxidase tests and by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Among 64 individual samples of FCS, two were positive for noncytopathogenic BVDV. One cytopathogenic BVDV was isolated from a whole blood sample from a heifer with clinical signs of mucosal disease. The 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR of three Serbian BVDV isolates was amplified by RT-PCR, sequenced and, together with 15 recent Slovenian BVDV isolates characterized by phylogenetic analysis. All isolates were classified as BVDV genotype 1 viruses. The majority of the BVDV isolates were of the 1f (Serbia - 2 isolates, Slovenia - 7 isolates and 1d subtypes (Slovenia - 7 isolates whilst one Serbian and one Slovenian isolate were genotyped as BVDV 1b.

  15. Genetic and antigenic characterization of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from cattle in Hokkaido, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yuri; Tamura, Tomokazu; Torii, Shiho; Wakamori, Shiho; Nagai, Makoto; Mitsuhashi, Kazuya; Mine, Junki; Fujimoto, Yuri; Nagashima, Naofumi; Yoshino, Fumi; Sugita, Yukihiko; Nomura, Takushi; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we genetically analyzed bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDVs) isolated from 2000 to 2006 in Japan and reported that subgenotype 1b viruses were predominant. In the present study, 766 BVDVs isolated from 2006 to 2014 in Hokkaido, Japan, were genetically analyzed to understand recent epidemics. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the 5'-untranslated region of viral genome revealed that 766 isolates were classified as genotype 1 (BVDV-1; 544 isolates) and genotype 2 (BVDV-2; 222). BVDV-1 isolates were further divided into BVDV-1a (93), 1b (371) and 1c (80) subgenotypes, and all BVDV-2 isolates were grouped into BVDV-2a subgenotype (222). Further comparative analysis was performed with BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a viruses isolated from 2001 to 2014. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the viral glycoprotein E2 gene, a major target of neutralizing antibodies, revealed that BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were further classified into several clusters. Cross-neutralization tests showed that BVDV-1b isolates were antigenically different from BVDV-1a isolates, and almost BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were antigenically similar among each subgenotype and each E2 cluster. Taken together, BVDV-1b viruses are still predominant, and BVDV-2a viruses have increased recently in Hokkaido, Japan. Field isolates of BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a show genetic diversity on the E2 gene with antigenic conservation among each subgenotype during the last 14 years. PMID:26400674

  16. The antigenic property of the H5N1 avian influenza viruses isolated in central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Wei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three influenza pandemics outbroke in the last century accompanied the viral antigen shift and drift, resulting in the change of antigenic property and the low cross protective ability of the existed antibody to the newly emerged pandemic virus, and eventually the death of millions of people. The antigenic characterizations of the viruses isolated in central China in 2004 and 2006–2007 were investigated in the present study. Results Hemagglutinin inhibition assay and neutralization assay displayed differential antigenic characteristics of the viruses isolated in central China in two periods (2004 and 2006–2007. HA genes of the viruses mainly located in two branches in phylogeny analysis. 53 mutations of the deduced amino acids of the HA genes were divided into 4 patterns. Mutations in pattern 2 and 3 showed the main difference between viruses isolated in 2004 and 2006–2007. Meanwhile, most amino acids in pattern 2 and 3 located in the globular head of the HA protein, and some of the mutations evenly distributed at the epitope sites. Conclusions The study demonstrated that a major antigenic drift had occurred in the viruses isolated in central China. And monitoring the antigenic property should be the priority in preventing the potential pandemic of H5N1 avian influenza virus.

  17. Phylogenetic and antigenic characterization of newly isolated porcine epidemic diarrhea viruses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Taimur; Kubota, Tomoe; Ujike, Makoto; Yahara, Yoshiriro; Taguchi, Fumihiro

    2016-08-15

    To evaluate the mechanism by which a large outbreak of porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) occurred in Japan, where the majority of sows are vaccinated, we isolated two new strains of PED virus (PEDV) from the intestines of piglets and found that they showed greater similarity to US isolates (group II PEDV) than to the Japanese vaccine strain (group I PEDV). We compared the antigenicity of the vaccine type strain and newly isolated strains by means of a neutralization test using sera from a number of pigs from various farms; the results revealed that they are antigenically similar. This is the first report of the similarity of group I and II viruses using sera from individual pigs vaccinated with group I virus. These data suggest that the large outbreak of PED in Japan cannot be attributed to inefficient vaccination but may be due to the extremely high virulence of the newly appearing viruses. PMID:27292080

  18. Genetic characterization of measles viruses isolated in Turkey during 2000 and 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellini William J

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular epidemiologic studies have made significant contributions to measles surveillance activities by helping to identify source and transmission pathways of the virus. This report describes the genetic characterization of wild-type measles viruses isolated in Turkey in 2000 and 2001. Results Wild-type measles viruses were isolated from 24 cases from five provinces in Turkey during 2001. The viruses were analyzed using the standard genotyping protocols. All isolates were classified as genotype D6, the same genotype that was identified in Turkey in previous outbreaks during 1998. Conclusion Turkey has begun implementation of a national program to eliminate measles by 2010. Therefore, this baseline genotype data will provide a means to monitor the success of the elimination program.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Alternanthera mosaic virus, Isolated from Achyranthes bidentata in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yusa, Akira; Nishida, Shuko; Tanno, Kazuyuki; Keima, Takuya; Nijo, Takamichi; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) infecting Achyranthes bidentata was first detected in Asia, and the complete genome sequence (6,604 nucleotides) was determined. Sequence identity analysis and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that this isolate is the most phylogenetically distant AltMV isolate worldwide.

  20. Complete genome sequence analysis of an American isolate of Grapevine virus E

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome sequence of an isolate of Grapevine virus E (GVE) collected from a red-berried wine grape cultivar (Cabernet Sauvignon) in Washington State was determined. The 7,568 nt long genome of GVE is similar in size and sequence identity with a GVE isolate from a wine grape cv. Shiraz fro...

  1. Isolation of Mycoplasma species from bronchoalveolar lavages of patients positive and negative for human immunodeficiency virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Teel, L D; Finelli, M R; Johnson, S C

    1994-01-01

    The rates of isolation of Mycoplasma species from bronchoalveolar lavages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and HIV-negative patients were compared. Mycoplasma species were more frequently isolated from HIV-positive patients. In most cases, a known pulmonary pathogen was also identified. All samples tested negative for Mycoplasma fermentans by PCR.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of a New H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated in China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jing-Yu; Ren, Juan-Juan; Liu, Wan-Hua; Tang, Pan; Wu, Ning; Wang, Chi-Young; Chang, Ching-Dong; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2013-01-01

    The complete genomic sequence of a new H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV), isolated in northwestern China, was determined. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses based on the sequences of eight genomic segments revealed that the isolate is phylogenetically related to the Y280-like sublineage.

  3. In Vitro Phenotypic Susceptibility of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Clinical Isolates to Protease Inhibitors▿

    OpenAIRE

    Desbois, Delphine; Roquebert, Bénédicte; Peytavin, Gilles; Damond, Florence; Collin, Gilles; Bénard, Antoine; Campa, Pauline; Matheron, Sophie; Chêne, Geneviève; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Descamps, Diane; Anrs Hiv-2 Cohort, French

    2008-01-01

    We determine phenotypic susceptibility of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) isolates to amprenavir, atazanavir, darunavir, indinavir, lopinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, and tipranavir. Saquinavir, lopinavir, and darunavir are potent against wild-type HIV-2 isolates and should be preferred as first-line options for HIV-2-infected patients. Other protease inhibitors are less active against HIV-2 than against HIV-1.

  4. Complete nucleotide sequence analysis of a Dengue-1 virus isolated on Easter Island, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, C; Yung, V; Araya, P; Tognarelli, J; Villagra, E; Vera, L; Fernández, J

    2008-01-01

    Dengue-1 viruses responsible for the dengue fever outbreak in Easter Island in 2002 were isolated from acute-phase sera of dengue fever patients. In order to analyze the complete genome sequence, we designed primers to amplify contiguous segments across the entire sequence of the viral genome. RT-PCR products obtained were cloned, and complete nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences were determined. This report constitutes the first complete genetic characterization of a DENV-1 isolate from Chile. Phylogenetic analysis shows that an Easter Island isolate is most closely related to Pacific DENV-1 genotype IV viruses. PMID:18815724

  5. [Molecular-genetic analysis of the field isolates of avian leucosis viruses in the Russian Federation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, V A; Grebennikova, T V; Iuzhakov, A G; Dudnikova, E K; Norkina, S N; Zaberezhnyĭ, A D; Aliper, T I; Fadly, A M

    2012-01-01

    Results of monitoring of different subtypes of avian leukosis virus (ALV) from commercial poultry farms in 14 regions of Russian Federation were discussed. Only three regions were found to be negative. ALV was detected in other 11 regions in 46-64% cases (for different regions). The phylogenetic analysis of the genomes for the 12 field isolates of ALV was carried out in different regions of Russian Federation. The isolates belong to different subtypes of the virus and form two large groups. The genomic differences between Russian and foreign isolates within each group range from 5% to 10%. PMID:23248858

  6. Effect of influenza A/equine/H3N8 virus isolate variation on the measurement of equine antibody responses.

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdan, J R; Morley, P S; Townsend, H G; Haines, D M

    1993-01-01

    This study has tested the effect of using homologous or heterologous equine influenza A virus isolates to evaluate serum antibody levels to influenza A virus in vaccinated and naturally-infected horses. In addition, the potential effect of antigenic selection of virus variants in egg versus tissue culture propagation systems was studied. Serum antibody levels in samples from horses recently infected with a local influenza A virus isolate (A/equine 2/Saskatoon/1/90) or recently vaccinated with...

  7. Analysis of infectious laryngotracheitis virus isolates from Ontario and New Brunswick by the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, H S; Key, D W; Nagy, E

    1998-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify DNA of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) isolates obtained from field specimens. The examined 47 samples included 37 isolates representing 35 cases of infectious laryngotracheitis from Ontario and 10 isolates originating from 10 field cases in New Brunswick. The viruses were grown in either embryonated chicken eggs or cell culture, the DNA extracted and amplified using primers designed from the sequence information of a 1.1 kb BamHI fragment of the Ontario 1598 ILTV strain. Thirty-four of the Ontario isolates and all of the New Brunswick isolates were amplified successfully. This suggests that the selected primers would be useful for the majority of the isolates encountered in outbreaks of ILTV. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:9442943

  8. Construction and identification of reverse genetics system of Dengue type 2 virus isolated in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wuyang; CHEN Shuiping; QIN Chenggeng; YU Man; JIANG Tao; DENG Yongqiang; QIN Ede

    2006-01-01

    To construct infectious full-length cDNA clone of dengue virus type 2 isolated in China (DEN2-43), according to the published nucleotide sequence of the virus strain, the approximately 11 kb full-length cDNAs of DEN2-43 were amplified by long RT-PCR and fusion PCR. Full-length cDNA clones were constructed by inserting the full-length cDNA into a low copy vector pWSK29, from which rescued virus D212 was acquired by transcription in vitro and electroporation. The full-length cDNA clone pD212 was infectious, and rescued virus acquired in C6/36 cells was indistinguishable from DEN2-43 virus in biological properties including suckling mice neurovirulence. The reverse genetics system helps elucidate the mechanism of pathogenesis of dengue virus and develop novel vaccine against dengue.

  9. Characterization of West Nile viruses isolated form captive American flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) in Medellin, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Jorge E.; Ciuoderis, Karl A.; Lopera, Juan G.; Piedrahita, Leidy D.; Murphy, Darby; LeVasseur, James; Carrillo, Lina; Ocampo, Martha C.; Hofmeister, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Serum samples from a total of 71 healthy captive birds belonging to 18 species were collected in July of 2008 in Medellin (Colombia) and tested for flaviviruses. Eighteen of 29 samples from American Flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) were positive for West Nile virus (WNV) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Selected positive samples were serially passaged and WNV was confirmed by immunofluorescence. Two isolates (524/08, 9835/08) were characterized in vitro and in vivo. Sequence analysis revealed WNV with 16 nucleotide substitutions resulting in six amino acid changes when compared with the NY99 strain. Colombian (COL) viruses were more closely related to Louisiana isolates from 2001. When compared with attenuated strains isolated from Texas, COL isolates differed in their plaque size and temperature sensitivity phenotype. The COL viruses were pathogenic in embryonated chicken eggs and Balb/c mice.

  10. GENOTYPING OF ISOLATED VIRUSES FROM RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Vardić

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV are important pathogens in rainbow trout aquaculture. Detection of these viruses in Croatia initiated investigation of their genetic relatedness to the worldwide IHNV and IPNV isolates. For this purpose, determination of nucleotide sequences of G and NV genes for IHNV and VP2/NS region for IPNV was performed. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that Croatian IHNV isolate was clustering within European clade most closely related to the North American M genogroup. Croatian IPNV isolate appeared in the cluster of genogroup III, together with French, English, Danish and Norwegian isolates. These results are important for further epidemiological studies of IHNV and IPNV outbreaks in Croatia.

  11. Amantadine resistance among highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1) isolated from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Aron; Sood, Richa; Chanu, Kh Victoria; Bhatia, Sandeep; Khandia, Rekha; Pateriya, A K; Nagarajan, S; Dimri, U; Kulkarni, D D

    2016-02-01

    Emergence of antiviral resistance among H5N1 avian influenza viruses is the major challenge in the control of pandemic influenza. Matrix 2 (M2) inhibitors (amantadine and rimantadine) and neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir) are the two classes of antiviral agents that are specifically active against influenza viruses and are used for both treatment and prophylaxis of influenza infections. Amantadine targets the M2 ion channel of influenza A virus and interrupts virus life cycle through blockade of hydrogen ion influx. This prevents uncoating of the virus in infected host cells which impedes the release of ribonucleoprotein required for transcription and replication of virion in the nucleus. The present study was carried out to review the status of amantadine resistance in H5N1 viruses isolated from India and to study their replicative capability. Results of the study revealed resistance to amantadine in antiviral assay among four H5N1 viruses out of which two viruses had Serine 31 Asparagine (AGT-AAT i.e., S31N) mutation and two had Valine 27 Alanine (GTT-GCT i.e., V27A) mutation. The four resistant viruses not only exhibited significant difference in effective concentration 50% (EC50) values of amantadine hydrochloride from that of susceptible viruses (P < 0.0001) but also showed significant difference between two different types (S31N and V27A) of mutant viruses (P < 0.05). Resistance to amantadine could also be demonstrated in a simple HA test after replication of the viruses in MDCK cells in presence of amantadine. The study identifies the correlation between in vitro antiviral assay and presence of established molecular markers of resistance, the retention of replicative capacity in the presence of amantadine hydrochloride by the resistant viruses and the emergence of resistant mutations against amantadine among avian influenza viruses (H5N1) without selective drug pressure. PMID:26639679

  12. A genetically novel, narrow-host-range isolate of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) from rosemary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepfer, Mark; Girardot, Gregory; Fénéant, Lucie; Ben Tamarzizt, Hana; Verdin, Eric; Moury, Benoît; Jacquemond, Mireille

    2016-07-01

    An isolate of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), designated CMV-Rom, was isolated from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) plants in several locations near Avignon, France. Laboratory studies showed that, unlike typical CMV isolates, CMV-Rom has a particularly narrow host range. It could be transmitted by aphids Aphis gossypii and Myzus persicae, but with low efficacy compared to a typical CMV isolate. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the CMV-Rom genomic RNAs shows that this isolate does not belong to any of the previously described CMV subgroups, IA, IB, II or III. PMID:27138549

  13. Molecular Characteristics of S1 Gene of Infectious Bronchitis Virus Isolated from Chicken Proventriculus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Li-qin; ZHOU Ji-yong; John Dikki; SHEN Xing-yan; CHEN Ji-gang; ZHANG De-yong

    2003-01-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus was isolated from swollen proventriculi of clinically ill chicken. Thesuspected virus samples (2/97, 3/97, 1/98) were adapted in SPF chicken embryos for virus isolation andidentification. All the virus isolates were able to agglutinate chicken erythrocytes after treatment with trypsin,and interfer with the reproduction of Newcastle disease virus in chicken embryos, and have low antigenic relat-edness values with reference positive IBV. The isolates 2/97, 3/97, 1/98 RNAs extracted from the allantoicfluid of inoculated embryonated eggs were converted to cDNA by reverse transcription with 3'-primer of S1gene of (IBV). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed with two primers which span the S1 gene.Amplified product of 1.93 kb was subjected to EcoR Ⅰ and BamH Ⅰ digestion and the fragments obtainedwere the same as expected size. The PCR product was ligated to pBlueScript-SK (+) vector, and its nucleotidesequence was determined by the dideoxy-mediated chain termination method. Nucleotide sequence analysisshowed 73.6 - 99.7 % homology between the isolated IBV and the IBV strains in GenBank. The homology ofamino acid was 71.4 - 99.4 %.

  14. Modelling spread of Bluetongue in Denmark: The code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Kaare

    This technical report was produced to make public the code produced as the main project of the PhD project by Kaare Græsbøll, with the title: "Modelling spread of Bluetongue and other vector borne diseases in Denmark and evaluation of intervention strategies".......This technical report was produced to make public the code produced as the main project of the PhD project by Kaare Græsbøll, with the title: "Modelling spread of Bluetongue and other vector borne diseases in Denmark and evaluation of intervention strategies"....

  15. Genetic diversity of Japanese encephalitis virus isolates obtained from the Indonesian archipelago between 1974 and 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Amy J; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B; Barrett, Alan D T

    2013-07-01

    Five genotypes (GI-V) of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) have been identified, all of which have distinct geographical distributions and epidemiologies. It is thought that JEV originated in the Indonesia-Malaysia region from an ancestral virus. From that ancestral virus GV diverged, followed by GIV, GIII, GII, and GI. Genotype IV appears to be confined to the Indonesia-Malaysia region, as GIV has been isolated in Indonesia from mosquitoes only, while GV has been isolated on three occasions only from a human in Malaysia and mosquitoes in China and South Korea. In contrast, GI-III viruses have been isolated throughout Asia and Australasia from a variety of hosts. Prior to this study only 13 JEV isolates collected from the Indonesian archipelago had been studied genetically. Therefore the sequences of the envelope (E) gene of 24 additional Indonesian JEV isolates, collected throughout the archipelago between 1974 and 1987, were determined and a series of molecular adaptation analyses were performed. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that over a 14-year time span three genotypes of JEV circulated throughout Indonesia, and a statistically significant association between the year of virus collection and genotype was revealed: isolates collected between 1974 and 1980 belonged to GII, isolates collected between 1980 and 1981 belonged to GIV, and isolates collected in 1987 belonged to GIII. Interestingly, three of the GII Indonesian isolates grouped with an isolate that was collected during the JE outbreak that occurred in Australia in 1995, two of the GIII Indonesian isolates were closely related to a Japanese isolate collected 40 years previously, and two Javanese GIV isolates possessed six amino acid substitutions within the E protein when compared to a previously sequenced GIV isolate collected in Flores. Several amino acids within the E protein of the Indonesian isolates were found to be under directional evolution and/or co-evolution. Conceivably, the tropical climate

  16. Comparison of monoclonal antibody-based sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus isolation for detection of peste des petits ruminants virus in goat tissues and secretions.

    OpenAIRE

    Saliki, J T; House, J A; MEBUS, C.A.; Dubovi, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody-based sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (S-ELISA) was developed for specific detection of peste des petits ruminants virus. Compared with virus isolation in Vero cell cultures using 89 paired tissue and secretion samples from six experimentally infected goats, S-ELISA was significantly more sensitive (71.9% versus 65.2%; P < 0.05). The S-ELISA is a suitable alternative to virus isolation.

  17. Isolation and partial characterization of a novel virus from different carp species suffering gill necrosis - ultrastructure and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granzow, H; Fichtner, D; Schütze, H; Lenk, M; Dresenkamp, B; Nieper, H; Mettenleiter, T C

    2014-06-01

    Two isolates of a novel enveloped RNA virus were obtained from carp and koi carp with gill necrosis. Both isolates behaved identically and could be propagated in different cyprinid cell lines forming large syncytia. The virus was sensitive to lipid solvents and neither exhibited haemadsorption/haemagglutination nor reverse transcriptase activity. Mature virus particles displayed a spherical shape with diameter of 100-350 nm after negative staining and 100-300 nm in ultrathin sections, covered by short projections of 8-10 nm in length. Maturation of virus progeny was shown to occur by budding and envelopment of the filamentous helical nucleocapsids at the cell surface. A detailed comparison of ultrastructure and morphogenesis of the novel virus isolates with selected arena-, ortho- and paramyxoviruses as possible candidates for evaluation of taxonomic classification yielded no consistency in all phenotypic features. Thus, on the basis of ultrastructure the novel virus isolates could not be assigned unequivocally to any established virus family. PMID:23865968

  18. Sequences of the coat protein gene from brazilian isolates of Papaya ringspot virus

    OpenAIRE

    LIMA ROBERTO C. A.; SOUZA JR. MANOEL T.; PIO-RIBEIRO GILVAN; LIMA J. ALBERSIO A.

    2002-01-01

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) is the causal agent of the main papaya (Carica papaya) disease in the world. Brazil is currently the world's main papaya grower, responsible for about 40% of the worldwide production. Resistance to PRSV on transgenic plants expressing the PRSV coat protein (cp) gene was shown to be dependent on the sequence homology between the cp transgene expressed in the plant genome and the cp gene from the incoming virus, in an isolate-specific fashion. Therefore, knowledge o...

  19. DENVirDB: A web portal of Dengue Virus sequence information on Asian isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Mary J. Asnet; Amal GP Rubia; G. Ramya; R. Nithya Nagalakshmi; R Shenbagarathai

    2014-01-01

    DENVirDB is a web portal that provides the sequence information and computationally curated information of dengue viral proteins. The advent of genomic technology has increased the sequences available in the public databases. In order to create relevant concise information on Dengue Virus (DENV), the genomic sequences were collected, analysed with the bioinformatics tools and presented as DENVirDB. It provides the comprehensive information of complete genome sequences of dengue virus isolates...

  20. Epornitic of avian pox in common buzzards (Buteo buteo): virus isolation and molecular biological characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Rampin, Tiziana; Pisoni, Giuliano; Manarolla, Giovanni; Gallazzi, Daniele; Sironi, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Six common buzzards from a bird rescue center showed wart-like lesions on their toes. The lesions consisted of multiple crusty and proliferative nodules surrounded by skin swelling. Histologically, epithelial cell hyperthrophy and hyperplasia with ballooning degeneration and large intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies consistent with avipox virus infection were seen. The virus was isolated in embryonated chicken eggs. Positive CAMs and samples of skin lesions were submitted fo...

  1. Development, Characterization and Application of Monoclonal Antibodies against Brazilian Dengue Virus Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Camila Zanluca; Giovanny Augusto Camacho Antevere Mazzarotto; Juliano Bordignon; Claudia Nunes Duarte Dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent human arboviral disease. The morbidity related to dengue infection supports the need for an early, quick and effective diagnostic test. Brazil is a hotspot for dengue, but no serological diagnostic test has been produced using Brazilian dengue virus isolates. This study aims to improve the development of immunodiagnostic methods for dengue virus (DENV) detection through the production and characterization of 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Brazilian isolat...

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of a Newcastle Disease Virus Strain Isolated from Broiler Breeder Flocks in China

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Feng; Liu, Jiajia; Liu, Di; Yan, Zhuanqiang; Ji, Jun; Qin, Jianping; Li, Haiyan; Ma, Jingyun; Bi, Yingzuo; Xie, Qingmei

    2012-01-01

    In 2010 and 2011, several devastating Newcastle disease (ND) outbreaks occurred in China, affecting broilers, layers, and breeders. The CK-JSX1-201005 virus was isolated from broiler breeder flocks vaccinated with the classical ND virus (NDV) vaccine program, but laying rate decreased from 80% to 30 to 40% in the clinic. Here, we report the complete genome sequence and molecular characteristic of the CK-JSX1-201005 NDV. These findings provide additional insights into the genetic variation of ...

  3. Genome Sequence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype O Isolated from Morocco in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachanek-Bankowska, K; Wadsworth, J; Gray, A; Abouchoaib, N; King, D P; Knowles, N J

    2016-01-01

    The genome of a virus isolated from an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Morocco in 2015 is described here. This virus is classified as lineage Ind-2001d within serotype O, topotype ME-SA (Middle East-South Asia). This lineage is endemic on the Indian subcontinent but has caused outbreaks in the Middle East and North Africa since 2013. PMID:27103736

  4. Genome Sequence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype O Isolated from Morocco in 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Bachanek-Bankowska, K.; Wadsworth, J; Gray, A; Abouchoaib, N.; King, D.P.; Knowles, N.J.

    2016-01-01

    The genome of a virus isolated from an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Morocco in 2015 is described here. This virus is classified as lineage Ind-2001d within serotype O, topotype ME-SA (Middle East-South Asia). This lineage is endemic on the Indian subcontinent but has caused outbreaks in the Middle East and North Africa since 2013.

  5. Wolbachia Blocks Currently Circulating Zika Virus Isolates in Brazilian Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Dutra, Heverton Leandro Carneiro; Rocha, Marcele Neves; Dias, Fernando Braga Stehling; Mansur, Simone Brutman; Caragata, Eric Pearce; Moreira, Luciano Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Summary The recent association of Zika virus with cases of microcephaly has sparked a global health crisis and highlighted the need for mechanisms to combat the Zika vector, Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Wolbachia pipientis, a bacterial endosymbiont of insect, has recently garnered attention as a mechanism for arbovirus control. Here we report that Aedes aegypti harboring Wolbachia are highly resistant to infection with two currently circulating Zika virus isolates from the recent Brazilian epide...

  6. Isolation of avian influenza virus (H9N2) from emu in China

    OpenAIRE

    Kang Wenhua; Pang Wanyong; Hao Junfeng; Zhao Deming

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This is the first reported isolation of avian influenza virus (AIV) from emu in China. An outbreak of AIV infection occurred at an emu farm that housed 40 four-month-old birds. Various degrees of haemorrhage were discovered in the tissues of affected emus. Cell degeneration and necrosis were observed microscopically. Electron microscopy revealed round or oval virions with a diameter of 80 nm to 120 nm, surrounded by an envelope with spikes. The virus was classified as low pathogenic ...

  7. Genome Sequence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype O Isolated from Morocco in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, J.; Gray, A.; Abouchoaib, N.; King, D. P.; Knowles, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    The genome of a virus isolated from an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Morocco in 2015 is described here. This virus is classified as lineage Ind-2001d within serotype O, topotype ME-SA (Middle East-South Asia). This lineage is endemic on the Indian subcontinent but has caused outbreaks in the Middle East and North Africa since 2013. PMID:27103736

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype O Isolated from Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana, Munawar; Siddique, Mohammad Anwar; Momtaz, Samina; Rahman, Arafat; Ullah, Huzzat; Nandi, Shuvro Prokash; Hossain, M. Anwar

    2014-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious enzootic disease caused by FMD virus. The complete genome sequence of a circulatory FMD virus (FMDV) serotype O isolated from Natore, Bangladesh, is reported here. Genomic analysis revealed antigenic heterogeneity within the VP1 region, a fragment deletion, and insertions at the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) and 3A region compared to the genome of the available vaccine strain.

  9. Genetic Diversity of a Natural Population of Apple stem pitting virus Isolated from Apple in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Ju Yeon; Joa, Jae Ho; Choi, Kyung San; Do, Ki Seck; Lim, Han Cheol; Chung, Bong Nam

    2014-01-01

    Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV), of the Foveavirus genus in the family Betaflexiviridae, is one of the most common viruses of apple and pear trees. To examine variability of the coat protein (CP) gene from ASPV, eight isolates originating from 251 apple trees, which were collected from 22 apple orchards located in intensive apple growing areas of the North Gyeongsang and North Jeolla Provinces in Korea, were sequenced and compared. The nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene of eight ASPV...

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of dengue virus types 1 and 3 isolated in Jakarta, Indonesia in 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjatha, Fithriyah; Takizawa, Yamato; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Konishi, Eiji

    2012-12-01

    Dengue viruses are mosquito-borne viruses that cause dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, both of which are globally important diseases. These viruses have evolved in a transmission cycle between human hosts and mosquito vectors in various tropical and subtropical environments. We previously isolated three strains of dengue type 1 virus (DENV1) and 14 strains of dengue type 3 virus (DENV3) during an outbreak of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in Jakarta, Indonesia in 1988. Here, we compared the nucleotide sequences of the entire envelope protein-coding region among these strains. The isolates were 97.6-100% identical for DENV1 and 98.8-100% identical for DENV3. All DENV1 isolates were included in two different clades of genotype IV and all DENV3 isolates were included in a single clade of genotype I. For DENV1, three Yap Island strains isolated in 2004 were the only strains closely related to the present isolates; the recently circulated Indonesian strains were in different clades. Molecular clock analyses estimated that ancestors of the genotype IV strains of DENV1 have been indigenous in Indonesia since 1948. We predict that they diverged frequently around 1967 and that their offspring distributed to Southeast Asia, the Western Pacific, and Africa. For DENV3, the clade containing all the present isolates also contained strains isolated from other Indonesian regions and other countries including Malaysia, Singapore, China, and East Timor from 1985-2010. Molecular clock analyses estimated that the common ancestor of the genotype I strains of DENV3 emerged in Indonesia around 1967 and diverged frequently until 1980, and that their offspring distributed mainly in Southeast Asia. The first dengue outbreak in 1968 and subsequent outbreaks in Indonesia might have influenced the divergence and distribution of the DENV1 genotype IV strains and the DENV3 genotype I strains in many countries. PMID:22959957

  11. Analysis of new aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV) isolates suggests evolution of two ALPV species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sijun; Vijayendran, Diveena; Carrillo-Tripp, Jimena; Miller, W Allen; Bonning, Bryony C

    2014-12-01

    Aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV; family Dicistroviridae) was first isolated from the bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi. ALPV-like virus sequences have been reported from many insects and insect predators. We identified a new isolate of ALPV (ALPV-AP) from the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and a new isolate (ALPV-DvV) from western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. ALPV-AP has an ssRNA genome of 9940 nt. Based on phylogenetic analysis, ALPV-AP was closely related to ALPV-AM, an ALPV isolate from honeybees, Apis mellifera, in Spain and Brookings, SD, USA. The distinct evolutionary branches suggested the existence of two lineages of the ALPV virus. One consisted of ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM, whilst all other isolates of ALPV grouped into the other lineage. The similarity of ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM was up to 88 % at the RNA level, compared with 78-79 % between ALPV-AP and other ALPV isolates. The sequence identity of proteins between ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM was 98-99 % for both ORF1 and ORF2, whilst only 85-87 % for ORF1 and 91-92 % for ORF2 between ALPV-AP and other ALPV isolates. Sequencing of RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) products and cDNA clones of the virus genome revealed sequence variation in the 5' UTRs and in ORF1, indicating that ALPV may be under strong selection pressure, which could have important biological implications for ALPV host range and infectivity. Our results indicated that ALPV-like viruses infect insects in the order Coleoptera, in addition to the orders Hemiptera and Hymenoptera, and we propose that ALPV isolates be classified as two separate viral species. PMID:25170050

  12. Isolation and life-cycle characterization of lytic viruses infecting heterotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middelboe, Mathias; Chan, Amy; Bertelsen, Sif Koldborg

    2010-01-01

    , and discusses the applications and limitations of different isolation procedures. Most work on phage isolation has been carried out with aerobic heterotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria, culturable both on agar plates and in enriched liquid cultures. The procedures presented here are limited to lytic viruses......Basic knowledge on viruses infecting heterotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria is key to future progress in understanding the role of viruses in aquatic systems and the influence of virus–host interactions on microbial mortality, biogeochemical cycles, and genetic exchange. Such studies require...... infecting such hosts. In addition to the isolation procedures, methods for life cycle characterization (one-step growth experiments) of bacteriophages and cyanophages are described. Finally, limitations and drawbacks of the proposed methods are assessed and discussed...

  13. The complete sequence of a sugarcane mosaic virus isolate causing maize dwarf mosaic disease in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG; Ye(程晔); CHEN; Jiong(陈炯); CHEN; Jianping(陈剑平)

    2002-01-01

    The complete sequence of a potyvirus from maize in Zhejiang Province was determined. The RNA was 9596 nucleotides long, excluding the 3′-poly (A) tail, and there was a single long open reading frame (ORF) of 9192 nts encoding a 346.1 ku polyprotein. The polyprotein had substantial amino acid sequence homology with those encoded by the RNAs of a Chinese isolate of sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV-C) and a Bulgarian isolate of maize dwarf mosaic virus, but it was most closely related to sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) isolates, for which only partial sequences have been published. According to the published criteria for distinguishing potyviruses, the sequence reported here is clearly a strain of SCMV, but it also showed a surprisingly high amino acid homology with SrMV-C in the HC-Pro, P3 and CI proteins.

  14. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus stability in environmental and clinical substrates: implications for virus detection and isolation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio P Dornas

    Full Text Available Viruses are extremely diverse and abundant and are present in countless environments. Giant viruses of the Megavirales order have emerged as a fascinating research topic for virologists around the world. As evidence of their ubiquity and ecological impact, mimiviruses have been found in multiple environmental samples. However, isolation of these viruses from environmental samples is inefficient, mainly due to methodological limitations and lack of information regarding the interactions between viruses and substrates. In this work, we demonstrate the long-lasting stability of mimivirus in environmental (freshwater and saline water and hospital (ventilator plastic device tube substrates, showing the detection of infectious particles after more than 9 months. In addition, an enrichment protocol was implemented that remarkably increased mimivirus detection from all tested substrates, including field tests. Moreover, biological, morphological and genetic tests revealed that the enrichment protocol maintained mimivirus particle integrity. In conclusion, our work demonstrated the stability of APMV in samples of environmental and health interest and proposed a reliable and easy protocol to improve giant virus isolation. The data presented here can guide future giant virus detection and isolation studies.

  15. Resistance breaking tomato spotted wilt virus isolates on resistant pepper varieties in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzi, A; Viggiano, A; Fanigliulo, A

    2013-01-01

    In spring 2012, resistance breaking (RB) isolates of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) that overcome the resistance conferred by the Tsw gene in different pepper hybrids have been recovered in different locations in southern Italy (Campania and Apulia regions) in protected cultivation, about one month after transplant. The percentage of symptomatic plants was 5-10% and, only in particular cases of advanced stage of cultivation, it reached 30-50% at the end of cycle. All TSWV isolates induced similar systemic symptoms in all resistant infected pepper hybrids: yellowing or browning of apical leaves, which later become necrotic, long necrotic streakson stems, extending to the terminal shoots, complete necrosis of younger fruits and large necrotic streaks and spots on fruits formed after infection. On ripe fruits, yellow spots with concentric rings or necrotic streaks could be observed. Leaf extracts of these samples were tested in ELISA for the detection of TSWV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), Potato virus Y (PVY), Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and Pepper Mottle Virus (PepMoV). Only TSWV was detected in all the field samples tested. The correspondent virus isolates were inoculated mechanically and by Frankliniella occidentalis on to a set of different pepper and tomato hybrids, as well as on some herbaceous test plants, in order to investigate for their ability to overcome the resistance genes Tsw and Sw5, respectively. Tomato hybrids carrying the Sw5 gene were uninfected by all RB isolates, whereas all resistant pepper hybrids became systemically infected. RB isolates did not differ noticeably in transmission efficiency when they were tested with the thrips F. occidentalis. Obtained results demonstrate that evolved strains of TSWV have emerged, that they are able to overcome the Tsw resistance gene in pepper plants experimentally inoculated both

  16. Antiviral Activity of Liquorice Powder Extract against Varicella Zoster Virus Isolated from Egyptian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly F. Mohamed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Varicella-zoster virus (VZV is the etiologic agent of two diseases, varicella (chicken pox and zoster (shingles. Varicella is a self- limited infection, while zoster is mainly a disease of adults. The present study was conducted to isolate VZV from clinically diagnosed children using cell cultures and compare the activity of liquorice powder extract, an alternative herbal antiviral agent, with acyclovir and interferon alpha 2a (IFN-α2a against the isolated virus.Methods: Forty-eight VZV specimens, 26 from vesicular aspirates and 22 from vesicular swabs, from children clinically diagnosed with varicella were isolated on the Vero cell line. Isolates were propagated and identified with specific antiserum using indirect immunofluorescence and immunodot blotting assays.The growth kinetics of the viral isolates was studied. The antiviral activity of liquorice powder extract, acyclovir (ACV and IFN-α2a was evaluated against the isolated virus.Results: VZV was successfully isolated in 4 of the 48 specimens, all from vesicular aspirates. The growth kinetics of the viral isolates was time dependent. The inhibitory activity of liquorice powder extract (containing 125 µg/ml glycyrrhizin when compared to ACV (250 µg/ml and IFN-α2a is the lowest.Conclusions: VZV isolates were successfully isolated and propagated using Vero cells. Isolates were identified using indirect immunofluorescent and immunodot blotting techniques. Growth kinetics of the isolates revealed an increase in the viral infectivity titer relative to time. Glycyrrhizin in the crude form has low antiviral activity against VZV compared with acyclovir and interferon.

  17. Isolation and Characterization of a Neuropathogenic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Derived from a Sooty Mangabey

    OpenAIRE

    Novembre, Francis J; de Rosayro, Juliette; O’Neil, Shawn P.; Anderson, Daniel C.; Klumpp, Sherry A.; McClure, Harold M.

    1998-01-01

    Transfusion of blood from a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)- and simian T-cell lymphotropic virus-infected sooty mangabey (designated FGb) to rhesus and pig-tailed macaques resulted in the development of neurologic disease in addition to AIDS. To investigate the role of SIV in neurologic disease, virus was isolated from a lymph node of a pig-tailed macaque (designated PGm) and the cerebrospinal fluid of a rhesus macaque (designated ROn2) and passaged to additional macaques. SIV-related ne...

  18. Molecular characterization of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) isolates from outbreak cases at Lipa City, Batangas Province, The Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Muharam Saepulloh

    2004-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to identify molecular character of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) isolates from commercial layer chicken farm located at Lipa City, Batangas Province, the Philippines using western blotting. The virus was first isolated in chorio allantoic membrane (CAM). A-total of five isolates (#IV, #VI-C28, #VI-C29, #VI-C30, and #VII) produced typical plaque lesions in CAM at second passages such as yellowish plaques with opaque edges. Furthermore, five isolates ...

  19. Animal viral diseases and global change: Bluetongue and West Nile fever as paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel eJimenez-Clavero

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Environmental changes have an undoubted influence on the appearance, distribution and evolution of infectious diseases, and notably on those transmitted by vectors. Global change refers to environmental changes arising from human activities affecting the fundamental mechanisms operating in the biosphere. This paper discusses the changes observed in recent times with regard to some important arboviral (arthropod-borne viral diseases of animals, and the role global change could have played in these variations. Two of the most important arboviral diseases of animals, bluetongue and West Nile fever/encephalitis, have been selected as models. In both cases, in the last 15 years an important leap forward has been observed, which has lead to considering them emerging diseases in different parts of the world. Bluetongue, affecting domestic ruminants, has recently afflicted livestock in Europe in an unprecedented epizootic, causing enormous economic losses. West Nile fever/encephalitis affects wildlife (birds, domestic animals (equines and humans, thus, beyond the economic consequences of its occurrence, as a zoonotic disease, it poses an important public health threat. West Nile virus has expanded in the last 12 years worldwide, and particularly in the Americas, where it first occurred in 1999, extending throughout the Americas relentlessly since then, causing a severe epidemic of disastrous consequences for public health, wildlife and livestock. In Europe, West Nile virus is known long time ago, but it is since the last years of the XXth century that its incidence has risen substantially. Circumstances such as global warming, changes in land use and water management, increase in travel, trade of animals, and others, can have an important influence in the observed changes in both diseases. The following question is raised: What is the contribution of global changes to the current increase of these diseases in the world?

  20. Molecular Characteristics of H6N6 Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigeons in Guangxi, Southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Xie, Zhiqin; Luo, Sisi; Xie, Liji; Huang, Li; Deng, Xianwen; Huang, Jiaoling; Zhang, Yanfang; Zeng, Tingting; Wang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of an H6N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) isolated from a pigeon in Guangxi, southern China, in 2014. The eight RNA segment genes shared a high nucleotide identity (97 to 99%) with H6N6 subtypes of AIV isolated from ducks in the regions around Guangxi Province. The finding of this study will help us understand the ecology and molecular characteristics of H6 avian influenza virus in wild birds in southern China. PMID:26634763

  1. Escherichia coli and virus isolated from ''sticky kits''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M.; Scheutz, F.; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    1996-01-01

    A total of 121 Escherichia coli strains isolated from 3-week-old mink kits were serotyped and examined for virulence factors. 56 strains were isolated from healthy kits while 65 were from ''sticky kits''. Among these, 34 different serotypes were detected. No difference in serotypes or the presenc...

  2. Diversity of Papaya ringspot virus isolates in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) devastates papaya production worldwide. In Puerto Rico, papaya fields can be completely infected with PRSV within a year of planting. Information about the diversity of the Puerto Rican PRSV population is relevant in order to establish a control strategy in the island. T...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Zika Virus Isolated in Mexico, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Peña-Alonso, Rocío; Mendieta-Condado, Edgar; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; González-Durán, Elizabeth; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Vázquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; Torres-Rodríguez, María de la Luz; Núñez-León, Alma; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Ruíz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus belongs to the genus Flavivirus, and its spread remains an international public health emergency. In this report, we describe the obtainment and molecular characterization of a complete viral genome through the direct metagenomic analysis from saliva from an autochthonous transmission case in Mexico. PMID:27491989

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Zika Virus Isolated in Mexico, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Alonso, Rocío; Mendieta-Condado, Edgar; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; González-Durán, Elizabeth; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Vázquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; Torres-Rodríguez, María de la Luz; Núñez-León, Alma; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Ruíz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Kuri-Morales, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus belongs to the genus Flavivirus, and its spread remains an international public health emergency. In this report, we describe the obtainment and molecular characterization of a complete viral genome through the direct metagenomic analysis from saliva from an autochthonous transmission case in Mexico. PMID:27491989

  5. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus: Monophyletic origin of European isolates from North American Genogroup M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzmann, P.-J.; Kurath, G.; Fichtner, D.; Bergmann, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was first detected in Europe in 1987 in France and Italy, and later, in 1992, in Germany. The source of the virus and the route of introduction are unknown. The present study investigates the molecular epidemiology of IHNV outbreaks in Germany since its first introduction. The complete nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein (G) and non-virion (NV) genes from 9 IHNV isolates from Germany have been determined, and this has allowed the identification of characteristic differences between these isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of partial G gene sequences (mid-G, 303 nucleotides) from North American IHNV isolates (Kurath et al. 2003) has revealed 3 major genogroups, designated U, M and L. Using this gene region with 2 different North American IHNV data sets, it was possible to group the European IHNV strains within the M genogroup, but not in any previously defined subgroup. Analysis of the full length G gene sequences indicated that an independent evolution of IHN viruses had occurred in Europe. IHN viruses in Europe seem to be of a monophyletic origin, again most closely related to North American isolates in the M genogroup. Analysis of the NV gene sequences also showed the European isolates to be monophyletic, but resolution of the 3 genogroups was poor with this gene region. As a result of comparative sequence analyses, several different genotypes have been identified circulating in Europe. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  6. Isolation of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus in a Danish swine herd and experimental infection of pregnant gilts with the virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtner, Anette; Nielsen, Jens; Bille-Hansen, Vivi

    The first case of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) in Denmark was diagnosed in March 1992 by the detection of specific antibodies against PRRS virus in serum samples originating from sows in a herd located on the island of Als. Subsequently, PRRS virus was isolated from a 200...... infection was demonstrated by the re-isolation of PRRS virus from approximately 45% of the piglets from the experimentally infected gilts. However, the experimental infection produced no significant reproductive disorders or other clinical signs. At autopsy, histopathological examination revealed slight......-sow farrow-to-finish herd with clinical signs consistent with PRRS. The virus was isolated by inoculation of pleural fluid from a stillborn piglet onto porcine pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The isolate was identified as PRRS virus by staining with a specific antiserum. By electron microscopy, the...

  7. An avian leukosis virus subgroup J isolate with a Rous sarcoma virus-like 5'-LTR shows enhanced replication capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanni; Guan, Xiaolu; Liu, Yongzhen; Li, Xiaofei; Yun, Bingling; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) was first isolated from meat-producing chickens that had developed myeloid leukosis. However, ALV-J infections associated with hemangiomas have occurred in egg-producing (layer) flocks in China. In this study, we identified an ALV-J layer isolate (HLJ13SH01) as a recombinant of ALV-J and a Rous sarcoma virus Schmidt-Ruppin B strain (RSV-SRB), which contained the RSV-SRB 5'-LTR and the other genes of ALV-J. Replication kinetic testing indicated that the HLJ13SH01 strain replicated faster than other ALV-J layer isolates in vitro. Sequence analysis indicated that the main difference between the two isolates was the 5'-LTR sequences, particularly the U3 sequences. A 19 nt insertion was uniquely found in the U3 region of the HLJ13SH01 strain. The results of a Dual-Glo luciferase assay revealed that the 19 nt insertion in the HLJ13SH01 strain increased the enhancer activity of the U3 region. Moreover, an additional CCAAT/enhancer element was found in the 19 nt insertion and the luciferase assay indicated that this element played a key role in increasing the enhancer activity of the 5'-U3 region. To confirm the potentiation effect of the 19 nt insertion and the CCAAT/enhancer element on virus replication, three infectious clones with 5'-U3 region variations were constructed and rescued. Replication kinetic testing of the rescued viruses demonstrated that the CCAAT/enhancer element in the 19 nt insertion enhanced the replication capacity of the ALV-J recombinant in vitro. PMID:25274857

  8. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of wheat dwarf virus (WDV) isolates from Hungary and Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóbiás, Istvan; Shevchenko, Oleksiy; Kiss, Balázs; Bysov, Andriy; Snihur, Halina; Polischuk, Valery; Salánki, Katalin; Palkovics, László

    2011-01-01

    Wheat dwarf virus (WDV) is the most ubiquitous virus in cereals causing huge losses in both Hungary and Ukraine. The presence of barley-and wheat-adapted strains has been confirmed, suggesting that the barley strain is restricted to barley, while the wheat strain is present in both wheat and barley plants. Five WDV isolates from wheat plants sampled in Hungary and Ukraine were sequenced and compared with known WDV isolates from GenBank. Four WDV isolates belonged to the wheat strain. Our results indicate that WDV-Odessa is an isolate of special interest since it has originated from wheat, but belongs to the barley-adapted strain, providing novel data on WDV biology and raising issues of pathogen epidemiology. PMID:21905629

  9. Isolation and identification of a bovine viral diarrhea virus from sika deer in china

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Nan; Sun Changjiang; Wang Quankai; Du Rui; Wang Shijie; Gao Yugang; Zhang Pengju; Zhang Lianxue

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections continue to cause significantly losses in the deer population. Better isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer may contribute significantly to the development of prophylactic therapeutic, and diagnostic reagents as well as help in prevention and control of BVDV. However, isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer is seldom reported in literature. In this study, we collected some samples according to clinical...

  10. Biological and molecular variability of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 isolates from The Gambia.

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, T F; Whitby, D; Hoad, J G; Corrah, T; Whittle, H.; Weiss, R A

    1990-01-01

    Seven new human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) isolates (CBL-20 to CBL-26) from The Gambia were characterized. Their cytopathogenicity and growth in vitro correlated with the severity of clinical disease. CBL-22 was highly sensitive to neutralization by HIV-2 sera and was cross-neutralized by some HIV-1 sera. These findings, the differing sizes of envelope glycoproteins of individual isolates, and the sequence analysis of amplified regions of the viral DNAs show that these HIV-2 isolat...

  11. Detection and genotyping of classical swine fever virus isolates in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Milićević Vesna; Radojičić Sonja; Valčić A.M.; Ivović V.; Maksimović-Zorić Jelena; Radosavljević V.

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious disease of pigs leading to significant economic losses worldwide. Classical swine fever virus can be classified into three genogroups, each consisting of three or four subgroups. However, there is a lack of knowledge on the genotypes of CSFV isolates in Republic of Serbia. This study, based on the sequences analysis of partial E2 gene and 5' non coding region (NCR) of 15 CSFV isolated during 2006-2008 from ...

  12. Demonstration of antigenic variation among rabies virus isolates by using monoclonal antibodies to nucleocapsid proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, J S; Reid-Sanden, F L; Roumillat, L. F.; Trimarchi, C; Clark, K; Baer, G M; Winkler, W G

    1986-01-01

    Rabies virus isolates from terrestrial animals in six areas of the United States were examined with a panel of monoclonal antibodies to nucleocapsid proteins. Characteristic differences in immunofluorescence reactions permitted the formation of four antigenically distinct reaction groups from the 231 isolates tested. The geographic distribution of these groups corresponded well with separate rabies enzootic areas recognized by surveillance of sylvatic rabies in the United States. Distinctive ...

  13. Genomic characterization of influenza A (H7N9) viruses isolated in Shenzhen, Southern China, during the second epidemic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shisong; Wang, Xin; Dong, Fangyuan; Jin, Tao; Liu, Guang; Lu, Xing; Peng, Bo; Wu, Weihua; Liu, Hui; Kong, Dongfeng; Tang, Xiujuan; Qin, Yanmin; Mei, Shujiang; Xie, Xu; He, Jianfan; Ma, Hanwu; Zhang, Renli; Cheng, Jinquan

    2016-08-01

    There were three epidemic waves of human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus in 2013-2014. While many analyses of the genomic origin, evolution, and molecular characteristics of the influenza A (H7N9) virus have been performed using sequences from the first epidemic wave, genomic characterization of the virus from the second epidemic wave has been comparatively less reported. In this study, an in-depth analysis was performed with respect to the genomic characteristics of 11 H7N9 virus strains isolated from confirmed cases and four H7N9 virus strains isolated from environmental samples in Shenzhen during the second epidemic wave. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that six internal segments of the influenza A (H7N9) virus isolated from confirmed cases and environmental samples in Shenzhen were clustered into two different clades and that the origin of the influenza A (H7N9) virus isolated from confirmed cases in Shenzhen was different from that of viruses isolated during the first wave. In addition, H9N2 viruses, which were prevalent in southern China, played an important role in the reassortment of the influenza A (H7N9) virus isolated in Shenzhen. HA-R47K and -T122A, PB2-V139I, PB1-I397M, and NS1-T216P were the signature amino acids of the influenza A (H7N9) virus isolated from confirmed cases in Shenzhen. We found that the HA, NA, M, and PA genes of the A(H7N9) viruses underwent positive selection in the human population. Therefore, enhanced surveillance should be carried out to determine the origin and mode of transmission of the novel influenza A (H7N9) virus and to facilitate the formulation of effective policies for prevention and containment of a human infection epidemics. PMID:27169600

  14. Escherichia coli and virus isolated from ''sticky kits''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M.; Scheutz, F.; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    1996-01-01

    A total of 121 Escherichia coli strains isolated from 3-week-old mink kits were serotyped and examined for virulence factors. 56 strains were isolated from healthy kits while 65 were from ''sticky kits''. Among these, 34 different serotypes were detected. No difference in serotypes or the presence...... of virulence factors could be detected between healthy and diseased kits. By electron microscopy of faecal samples corona-, rota-, and calicivirus were demonstrated among healthy as well as diseased kits....

  15. Molecular typing and phylogenetic analysis of classical swine fever virus isolates from Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Nimisha; Ravishankar, Chintu; Rajasekhar, R; Sumod, K; Sumithra, T G; John, Koshy; Mini, M; Ravindran, Reghu; Shaji, Shiju; Aishwarya, J

    2015-12-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an economically important disease of pigs caused by CSF virus (CSFV) belonging to the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae. The disease is endemic in many countries including India. A comprehensive study was carried out to assess the type of CSFV circulating in the South Indian state of Kerala. During the period 2013-2014, clinical samples were collected from 19 suspected CSF outbreaks of domestic pigs in different districts of Kerala. The samples were tested using nested reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) targeting the E2 gene and RT-PCR for 5'UTR of the virus. Partial 5' UTR and E2 gene regions of six CSFV isolates were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the CSFV isolates belonged to subgroup 2.2. The isolates showed close resemblance to the other CSFV isolates circulating in India. It was also observed that the CSFV viruses from Kannur district were distinct from those circulating in the other districts as evidenced by their divergence from other Kerala isolates in the phylogenetic tree. Close relationship was seen to the CSFV isolates from South East Asian countries. PMID:26645036

  16. Complete genome sequence of nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus reveals its relationship to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Ravendra P; Rajakaruna, Punsasi; Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2015-03-01

    Complete genome sequences were obtained from nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus (CaYSV). CaYSV belongs to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses with johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV) as its closest relative. Multiple sequence alignments showed a pattern of amino acid substitutions in the CP sequences, which enabled us to relate these isolates to South East Asian or European isolates. Biological characterization of CaYSV identified Nicotiana benthamiana, Chenopodium quinoa and Phaseolus vulgaris as experimental hosts. Given the popularity and global trade of cannas, a clear picture of the genetic diversity of CaYSV is critical to disease management. PMID:25567205

  17. Genetic characterization of wild-type measles viruses isolated in China, 2006-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Lijuan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular characterization of wild-type measles viruses in China during 1995-2004 demonstrated that genotype H1 was endemic and widely distributed throughout the country. H1-associated cases and outbreaks caused a resurgence of measles beginning in 2005. A total of 210,094 measles cases and 101 deaths were reported by National Notifiable Diseases Reporting System (NNDRS and Chinese Measles Laboratory Network (LabNet from 2006 to 2007, and the incidences of measles were 6.8/100,000 population and 7.2/100,000 population in 2006 and 2007, respectively. Five hundred and sixty-five wild-type measles viruses were isolated from 24 of 31 provinces in mainland China during 2006 and 2007, and all of the wild type virus isolates belonged to cluster 1 of genotype H1. These results indicated that H1-cluster 1 viruses were the predominant viruses circulating in China from 2006 to 2007. This study contributes to previous efforts to generate critical baseline data about circulating wild-type measles viruses in China that will allow molecular epidemiologic studies to help measure the progress made toward China's goal of measles elimination by 2012.

  18. Identification and isolation of Genotype-I Japanese Encephalitis virus from encephalitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Xiaoyan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Historically, Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV genotype III (GIII has been responsible for human diseases. In recent years, JEV genotype I (GI has been isolated from mosquitoes collected in numerous countries, but has not been isolated from patients with encephalitis. In this study, we report recovery of JEV GI live virus and identification of JEV GI RNA from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of encephalitis patients in JE endemic areas of China. Whole-genome sequencing and molecular phylogenetic analysis of the JEV isolate from the CSF samples was performed. The isolate in this study is highly similar to other JEV GI strains which isolated from mosquitoes at both the nucleotide and deduced amino acid levels. Phylogenetic analysis based on the genomic sequence showed that the isolate belongs to JEV GI, which is consistent with the phylogenetic analysis based on the pre-membrane (PrM and Glycoprotein genes. As a conclusion, this is the first time to isolate JEV GI strain from CSF samples of encephalitis patients, so continuous survey and evaluate the infectivity and pathogenecity of JEV GI strains are necessary, especially for the JEV GI strains from encephalitis patients. With respect to the latter, because all current JEV vaccines (live and inactivated are derived from JEV GIII strains, future studies should be aimed at investigating and monitoring cross-protection of the human JEV GI isolates against widely used JEV vaccines.

  19. Molecular characterization of banana bunchy top virus isolate from Sri Lanka and its genetic relationship with other isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramaarachchi, W A R T; Shankarappa, K S; Rangaswamy, K T; Maruthi, M N; Rajapakse, R G A S; Ghosh, Saptarshi

    2016-06-01

    Bunchy top disease of banana caused by Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV, genus Babuvirus family Nanoviridae) is one of the most important constraints in production of banana in the different parts of the world. Six genomic DNA components of BBTV isolate from Kandy, Sri Lanka (BBTV-K) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers using total DNA extracted from banana tissues showing typical symptoms of bunchy top disease. The amplicons were of expected size of 1.0-1.1 kb, which were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of sequence data revealed the presence of six DNA components; DNA-R, DNA-U3, DNA-S, DNA-N, DNA-M and DNA-C for Sri Lanka isolate. Comparisons of sequence data of DNA components followed by the phylogenetic analysis, grouped Sri Lanka-(Kandy) isolate in the Pacific Indian Oceans (PIO) group. Sri Lanka-(Kandy) isolate of BBTV is classified a new member of PIO group based on analysis of six components of the virus. PMID:27366766

  20. Complete genome sequence of an Argentinean isolate of Solenopsis invicta virus 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genome of an Argentinean isolate of Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3ArgSF) obtained from the Santa Fe region of Argentina was sequenced in entirety. Assembly of 9 overlapping fragments yielded a consensus genome sequence 10,386 nucleotides long, excluding the poly(A) tail present on the 3' en...

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Strain Isolated in Southern China

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Zhixun; Fan, Qing; Xie, Zhiqin; Liu, Jiabo; Pang, Yaoshan; Deng, Xianwen; Xie, Liji; Luo, Sisi; Khan, M. I.

    2014-01-01

    We report here the full-length RNA genomic sequence of the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain GX4, isolated from a cow in southern China. Studies indicate that BVDV GX4 belongs to the BVDV-1b subtype. This report will help in understanding the epidemiology and molecular characteristics of BVDV in southern China cattle.

  2. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of Canine Distemper Virus HLJ1-06, Isolated from Foxes in China

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Qian; Hu, Xiaoliang; Ge, Yanhua; Lin, Huan; Jiang, Yong; Liu, Jiasen; Guo, Dongchun; Si, Changde; Qu, Liandong

    2013-01-01

    A new strain of canine distemper virus, HLJ1-06, has been isolated from foxes in China, and its complete genome has been sequenced and analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that HLJ1-06 belongs to the Asia-1 cluster and has low identity to the vaccine strain.

  3. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of Canine Distemper Virus CDV-PS, Isolated from Dogs in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Li; Xu, Hongli; Wang, Jianke; Cheng, Yuening; Zhang, Hailing; Yan, Xijun; Cheng, Shipeng

    2013-01-01

    A new strain of canine distemper virus, CDV-PS, has been isolated from dogs in China, and its complete genome has been sequenced and analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that CDV-PS belongs to the Asia-1 cluster and has low identity to the vaccine strain.

  4. Resistance testing of clinical herpes simplex virus type 2 isolates collected over 4 decades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohn-Wippert, Kathrin; Schmidt, Susanne; Runtze, Anna; Zell, Roland; Sauerbrei, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    There is only little information about the role of mutations of the thymidine kinase (TK) and DNA polymerase (pol) genes of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) for the development of antiviral resistance. In this study, the polymorphism of TK and DNA pol genes was examined in 82 clinical isolates...

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Isolated in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Medina, J. E.; Monroy-Muñoz, I. E.; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, A.; Meza-Chávez, A.; Ángeles-Martínez, J.; Anguiano-Hernández, Y. M.; Santacruz-Tinoco, C. E.; González-Ibarra, J.; Martínez-Miguel, B.; Alvarado-Yaah, J. E.; Palomec-Nava, I. D.; Ortiz-Alcántara, J. M.; Garcés-Ayala, F.; Díaz-Quiñonez, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, which causes lower respiratory tract infections in neonates and children younger than 5 years. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of HRSV, isolated from a nasopharyngeal swab of a pregnant woman with cardiac complications. PMID:26769933

  6. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of Encephalomyocarditis Virus Isolated from South China Tigers in China

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Huimin; Yan, Qi; He, Hongxuan

    2013-01-01

    A strain of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), strain FJ13, has been isolated from South China tigers in China, and its complete genome has been sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that FJ13 belongs to the EMCV-1 serotype, and it is highly prevalent in China.

  7. Prevalence of HIV infection in seronegative high-risk individuals examined by virus isolation and PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C; Teglbjærg, Lars Stubbe; Pedersen, C;

    1991-01-01

    HIV seronegative individuals with high-risk behavior were tested for HIV infection by sensitive virus isolation techniques using T4 lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages, and by detection of proviral DNA using PCR with three different sets of nested primers. No evidence of HIV infection was found ...

  8. Avian influenza virus with Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase combination H8N8, isolated in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study reports the genome sequence of an avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H8N8 isolated in Russia. The genome analysis shows that all genes belong to AIV Eurasian lineages. The PB2 gene was similar to a Mongolian low pathogenic (LP) AIV H7N1 and a Chinese high pathogenic (HP) AIV H5N2....

  9. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic study of Newcastle disease virus isolates from recent outbreaks in eastern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otim, Maxwell O.; Christensen, Henrik; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik; Handberg, Kurt J.; Bisgaard, Magne

    2004-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus isolates from chickens in eastern Uganda in 2001 were found to be velogenic by fusion protein cleavage site sequence analysis and biological characterization; the intracerebral pathogenicity index was 1.8. Analysis of their hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein gene sequences...... revealed a novel genotype unrelated to those that caused previous outbreaks....

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Duck Tembusu Virus Isolated from Pekin Ducks in Shanghai, China

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Yuqiang; Zhang, Chuanpeng; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Yaxian; Ding, Chan; Sun, Jianhe

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence of the duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) SH001 strain, isolated from Pekin ducks in Shanghai, China, in 2013. The genome of SH001 is 10,990 nucleotides (nt) in length and contains a single open reading frame encoding a putative polyprotein of 3,425 amino acids.

  11. Complete genome sequence of duck tembusu virus isolated from pekin ducks in shanghai, china.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuqiang; Zhang, Chuanpeng; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Yaxian; Ding, Chan; Sun, Jianhe

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence of the duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) SH001 strain, isolated from Pekin ducks in Shanghai, China, in 2013. The genome of SH001 is 10,990 nucleotides (nt) in length and contains a single open reading frame encoding a putative polyprotein of 3,425 amino acids. PMID:25908131

  12. Genome sequences of nine Vesicular Stomatitis Virus isolates from South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report nine full-genome sequences of vesicular stomatitis virus obtrained by Illumina next-generation sequencing of RNA, isolated from either cattle epithelial suspensions or cell culture supernatants. Seven of these viral genomes belonged to the New Jersey serotype/species, clade III, while two...

  13. Genetic characterization of dengue virus type 3 isolates in the State of Rio de Janeiro, 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miagostovich M.P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic characterization of dengue virus type 3 (DEN-3 strains isolated from autochthonous cases in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2001 is presented. Restriction site-specific (RSS-PCR performed on 22 strains classified the Brazilian DEN-3 viruses as subtype C, a subtype that contains viruses from Sri Lanka, India, Africa and recent isolates from Central America. Nucleic acid sequencing (positions 278 to 2550 of one DEN-3 strain confirmed the origin of these strains, since genotype III - classified by sequencing - and RSS-PCR subtype C are correlated. This genetic subtype has been associated with hemorrhagic dengue epidemics and the information provided here could be useful to implement appropriate prevention and control measures.

  14. R5 to X4 coreceptor switch of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 B' and B'/C recombinant subtype isolates in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yan-fang; ZHANG Xiao-yan; RUAN Yu-hua; ZHANG Yao-xin; SHAO Yi-ming; MA Li-ying; YUAN Lin; WANG Shu-hua; SUN Jian-ping; XU Wei-si; Xu Jian-qing; XING Hui; HONG Kun-xue

    2007-01-01

    @@ The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 play an important role as coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entring into cells.HIV-1 isolates can be distinguished by the chemokine coreceptors. Nonsyncytium inducing (NSI), macrophage tropic viruses utilizing CCR5, are called R5 viruses;syncytium inducing (SI) isolates use CXCR4 and known as X4 viruses.

  15. Genetic diversity of Sugarcane bacilliform virus isolates infecting Saccharum spp. in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppaiah, R; Viswanathan, R; Kumar, V Ganesh

    2013-06-01

    Sugarcane bacilliform virus (SCBV), which causes leaf freckle in sugarcane, is a member of the genus Badnavirus. Studies were conducted to characterize SCBV in Saccharum officinarum germplasm and cultivated varieties in India by sequencing the complete genomes of five isolates. Genome lengths ranged from 7,553 to 7,884 nucleotides. Duplications in ORF3 and insertions in the RNase H-domain in some of the isolates were found to contribute to the large size of their genomes. The Indian SCBV isolates share identities of 69-85 % for the complete genomic sequence, indicating wide genetic diversity among them, and share 70-82 % identity with Sugarcane bacilliform Ireng Maleng virus (SCBIMV) and Sugarcane bacilliform Morocco virus (SCBMV), as well as 43-46 % identity with Banana streak virus (BSV) and BSV-related SCBV species from Guadeloupe, indicating that the Indian SCBV isolates are distinct from SCBV isolates reported to date. Irrespective of the region compared, SCBV isolates from India, Australia, and Morocco clustered together. BSV and BSV-related SCBV isolates from Guadeloupe formed another cluster. A phylogenetic analysis based on the partial RT/RNase H-sequence separated SCBV and BSV-related SCBV sequences into 11 SCBV groups viz. SCBV-A to -K. Among the 11 groups, the SCBV sequences separated under H, I, J, and K are newly identified in this study, representing three new species and are tentatively named as SCBBBV, SCBBOV, and SCBBRV. Thus, the PASC and phylogenetic analyses evidenced that the symptoms associated with badnaviruses in sugarcane in India are caused by at least three new species, SCBBBV, SCBBOV, and SCBBRV, besides SCBIMV and SCBMV represented by SCBV-BT and SCBV-Iscam, respectively. PMID:23430710

  16. Receptor specificity in human, avian, and equine H2 and H3 influenza virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, R J; Kawaoka, Y; Webster, R G; Paulson, J C

    1994-11-15

    The receptor specificity of 56 H2 and H3 influenza virus isolates from various animal species has been determined to test the relevance of receptor specificity to the ecology of influenza virus. The results show that the receptor specificity of both H2 and H3 isolates evaluated for sialic acid linkage specificity and inhibition of hemagglutination by horse serum correlates with the species of origin, as postulated earlier for H3 strains based on a limited survey of five human, three avian, and one equine strain. Elucidation of the amino acid sequence of several human H2 receptor variants and analysis of known sequences of H2 and H3 isolates revealed that receptor specificity varies in association with an amino acid change at residues 228 in addition to the change at residue 226 previously documented to affect receptor specificity of H3 but not H1 isolates. Residues 226 and 228 are leucine and serine in human isolates, which preferentially bind sialic acid alpha 2,6-galactose beta 1,4-N-acetyl glucosamine (SA alpha 2,6Gal), and glutamine and glycine in avian and equine isolates, which exhibit specificity for sialic acid alpha-2,3-galactose beta-1,3-N-acetyl galactosamine (SA alpha 2,3Gal). The results demonstrate that the correlation of receptor specificity and species of origin is maintained across both H2 and H3 influenza virus serotypes and provide compelling evidence that influenza virus hosts exert selective pressure to maintain the receptor specificity characteristics of strains isolated from that species. PMID:7975212

  17. A noda-like virus isolated from the sweetpotato pest spodoptera eridania (Cramer) (Lep.; noctuidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeddam; Rodriguez; Ravallec; Lagnaoui

    1999-11-01

    A small isometric virus has been isolated from larvae of the sweetpotato pest Spodoptera eridania (Cramer) collected near Pariacoto, Ancash province, Peru. It is designated the Pariacoto virus (PaV). In addition to its high pathogenicity on its natural host Spodoptera eridania, PaV was found to replicate in Spodoptera ochrea (Hampson) larvae but not in Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith) larvae. The size of the viral particle was estimated to be about 30 nm in diameter. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a protein of approximately 40.5 kDa. After agarose gel electrophoresis, the viral genome appeared to be bipartite RNA. Gel immunodiffusion tests showed no serological relationship between PaV and Nodamura virus, the type species for insect nodaviruses. Electron microscopy confirmed that viral replication occurs in the cytoplasm. These properties are similar to those of other members of family Nodaviridae, to which the virus is currently assigned. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10534414

  18. Wolbachia Blocks Currently Circulating Zika Virus Isolates in Brazilian Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Heverton Leandro Carneiro; Rocha, Marcele Neves; Dias, Fernando Braga Stehling; Mansur, Simone Brutman; Caragata, Eric Pearce; Moreira, Luciano Andrade

    2016-06-01

    The recent association of Zika virus with cases of microcephaly has sparked a global health crisis and highlighted the need for mechanisms to combat the Zika vector, Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Wolbachia pipientis, a bacterial endosymbiont of insect, has recently garnered attention as a mechanism for arbovirus control. Here we report that Aedes aegypti harboring Wolbachia are highly resistant to infection with two currently circulating Zika virus isolates from the recent Brazilian epidemic. Wolbachia-harboring mosquitoes displayed lower viral prevalence and intensity and decreased disseminated infection and, critically, did not carry infectious virus in the saliva, suggesting that viral transmission was blocked. Our data indicate that the use of Wolbachia-harboring mosquitoes could represent an effective mechanism to reduce Zika virus transmission and should be included as part of Zika control strategies. PMID:27156023

  19. Chapare virus, a newly discovered arenavirus isolated from a fatal hemorrhagic fever case in Bolivia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Delgado

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A small focus of hemorrhagic fever (HF cases occurred near Cochabamba, Bolivia, in December 2003 and January 2004. Specimens were available from only one fatal case, which had a clinical course that included fever, headache, arthralgia, myalgia, and vomiting with subsequent deterioration and multiple hemorrhagic signs. A non-cytopathic virus was isolated from two of the patient serum samples, and identified as an arenavirus by IFA staining with a rabbit polyvalent antiserum raised against South American arenaviruses known to be associated with HF (Guanarito, Machupo, and Sabiá. RT-PCR analysis and subsequent analysis of the complete virus S and L RNA segment sequences identified the virus as a member of the New World Clade B arenaviruses, which includes all the pathogenic South American arenaviruses. The virus was shown to be most closely related to Sabiá virus, but with 26% and 30% nucleotide difference in the S and L segments, and 26%, 28%, 15% and 22% amino acid differences for the L, Z, N, and GP proteins, respectively, indicating the virus represents a newly discovered arenavirus, for which we propose the name Chapare virus. In conclusion, two different arenaviruses, Machupo and Chapare, can be associated with severe HF cases in Bolivia.

  20. Genetic and serological typing of European infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Tove; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Batts, William;

    2009-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) causes the lethal disease infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in juvenile salmon and trout. The nucleocapsid (N) protein gene and partial glycoprotein (G) gene (nucleotides 457 to 1061) of the European isolates IT-217A, FR-32/87, DE-DF 13....../98 11621, DE-DF 4/99-8/99, AU-9695338 and RU-FR1 were sequenced and compared with IHNV isolates from the North American genogroups U, M and L. In phylogenetic studies the N gene of the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, though in a different subgroup than the...

  1. Complete Genome Sequences of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strains Isolated from Wild Boars in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Jeoung, Hye-Young; Lim, Ji-Ae; Lim, Seong-In; Kim, Jae-Jo; SONG, Jae-Young; Hyun, Bang-Hun; KIM, Yong Kwan; An, Dong-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever is a disease that is devastating the pig industry worldwide. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of two classical swine virus strains (YC11WB and PC11WB), isolated from Korean wild boars in 2011. Both strains belong to subgenotype 2.1b. The complete genome sequences of PC11WB and YC11WB are more similar to that of strain ZJ0801 (isolated in China) than to that of the SW03 strain isolated from domestic pigs in South Korea.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of a J Subgroup Avian Leukosis Virus Isolated from Local Commercial Broilers

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hongxin; Xue, Chunyi; Ji, Jun; CHANG, SHUANG; Shang, Huiqin; Zhang, Lingjun; Ma, Jingyun; Bi, Yingzuo; Xie, Qingmei

    2012-01-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) isolate GDKP1202 was isolated from a 50-day-old local yellow commercial broiler in the Guangdong province of China in 2012. Here we report the complete genomic sequence of the GDKP1202 isolate, which caused high mortality, serious growth suppression, thymic atrophy, and liver enlargement in commercial broilers. A novel potential binding site (5′-GGCACCTCC-3′) for c-myb was identified in the GDKP1202 genome. These findings will provide additional insight...

  3. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Kyeong Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. ‘Sorok’, ‘Sodam’ and ‘Somyeong’. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1–100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea.

  4. Incidence of Garlic common latent virus in Argentina, and phylogenetic and recombination analyses of isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Karina Torrico

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to estimate the incidence and prevalence of Garlic common latent virus (GarCLV in the main production regions of garlic (Allium sativum in Argentina, and to perform phylogenetic and recombination analyses in isolates from these regions. Leaf samples (3,050 were taken from four garlic commercial types, in 13 departments of the four main garlic-producing provinces of Argentina, in a 1,175-ha sampling area. Virus infection was evaluated with DAS-Elisa test using specific antiserum, and the phylogenetic and recombination analyses were done with capsid protein (CP nucleotide sequence of seven GarCLV isolates from the provinces. The incidence of GarCLV in the evaluated provinces varied between 6.7 and 22% of the samples, whereas the prevalence varied between 52.6 and 70%. In the analysis of garlic commercial types, Morado showed the highest incidence of the virus, in the province of San Juan, whereas Rosado Paraguayo had the lowest incidence, in the province of Cordoba. Nucleotide identity in the CP sequences ranged between 80.3 and 97.6%. The phylogenetic analysis shows the presence of two main groups of GarCLV and of a possible third group that would include only a German isolate. The recombination analysis between isolates from different parts of the world evidences the presence of recombinant isolates from Poland and Australia.

  5. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Su-Heon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-06-01

    A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. 'Sorok', 'Sodam' and 'Somyeong'. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1-100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea. PMID:25289004

  6. Complete nucleotide sequence of a Spanish isolate of alfalfa mosaic virus: evidence for additional genetic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrella, Giuseppe; Acanfora, Nadia; Orílio, Anelise F; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2011-06-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is a plant virus that is distributed worldwide and can induce necrosis and/or yellow mosaic on a large variety of plant species, including commercially important crops. It is the only virus of the genus Alfamovirus in the family Bromoviridae. AMV isolates can be clustered into two genetic groups that correlate with their geographic origin. Here, we report for the first time the complete nucleotide sequence of a Spanish isolate of AMV found infecting Cape honeysuckle (Tecoma capensis) and named Tec-1. The tripartite genome of Tec-1 is composed of 3643 nucleotides (nt) for RNA1, 2594 nt for RNA2 and 2037 nt for RNA3. Comparative sequence analysis of the coat protein gene revealed that the isolate Tec-1 is distantly related to subgroup I of AMV and more closely related to subgroup II, although forming a distinct phylogenetic clade. Therefore, we propose to split subgroup II of AMV into two subgroups, namely IIA, comprising isolates previously included in subgroup II, and IIB, including the novel Spanish isolate Tec-1. PMID:21327783

  7. Variation in the Coat Protein Gene of Papaya ringspot Virus Isolates from Multiple Locations of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The potyvirus Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) is an important pathogen of papaya that causes severe losses in economic crops for papaya production globally. The coat protein (CP) genes of five PRSV isolates originating from different locations in China were cloned and sequenced. The CP-coding region varied in size from 864-873 nucleotides, encoding proteins of 288-291 amino acids. The five Chinese isolates of PRSV have been characterized as papaya-infecting (PRSV-P). The CP sequences of the Chinese isolates were compared with those of previously published PRSV isolates originating from different countries at amino acid levels. A number of KE repeat boxes in the N terminus of the PRSV-CP were found in all Chinese isolates. The phylogenetic branching pattern revealed that there was certain extended grouping between geographic locations, and the Asian type probably represents the oldest population of PRSV. The information of CP genes will be useful in designing and developing durable virus resistant-PRSV transgenic papaya in China. Meanwhile broad-spectrum-virus resistant, strongly resistant-PRSV and good safe papaya lines are required.

  8. [Characteristics of virus double-stranded RNA, isolated from microscopic fungi parasitizing on sugar beet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nychuk, M D; Spyrydonov, V H; Oleksiienko, I P

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out comparative studies of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) of viral nature isolated from sugar beet leaves and from mycelium of microscopic fungi using different methods such as PAAG electrophoresis and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). It was shown that the fragments of dsRNA from sugar beet leaves and from mycelium microscopic fungi had the identical electrophoretic pattern and the same size (1.8 and 2.0 kbp). Using PCR technique it was shown, that isolated dsRNA have a common template for amplification. Electron microscopy of PCR-positive mycelium allows us to detect the virus particles of the spherical form with diameter 30-40 nm. The obtained data confirm our previous suppositions, concerning the belonging of isolated dsRNAs (size 1.8 and 2.0 kbp) to new mycovirus targeted a microscopic fungus, instead of beet cryptic viruses. PMID:16250236

  9. Genetic and biological characterization of a densovirus isolate that affects dengue virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Pamplona Mosimann

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Brevidensoviruses have an encapsidated, single-stranded DNA genome that predominantly has a negative polarity. In recent years, they have received particular attention due to their potential role in the biological control of pathogenic arboviruses and to their unnoticed presence in cell cultures as contaminants. In addition, brevidensoviruses may also be useful as viral vectors. This study describes the first genetic and biological characterization of a mosquito densovirus that was isolated in Brazil; moreover, we examined the phylogenetic relationship between this isolate and the other brevidensoviruses. We further demonstrate that this densovirus has the potential to be used to biologically control dengue virus (DENV infection with in vitro co-infection experiments. The present study provides evidence that this densovirus isolate is a fast-spreading virus that affects cell growth and DENV infection.

  10. Isolation of novel variants of infectious bursal disease virus from different outbreaks in Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morla, Sudhir; Deka, Pankaj; Kumar, Sachin

    2016-04-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a highly infectious disease of young chicken that predominantly affects the immune system. In the present study, we are reporting first comprehensive study of IBDV outbreaks from the Northeastern part of India. Northeast India shares a porous border with four different countries; and as a rule any outbreak in the neighboring countries substantially affects the poultry population in the adjoining states. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP2 gene of the IBDV isolates from the Northeastern part of India suggested the extreme virulent nature of the virus. The virulent marker amino acids (A222, I242, Q253, I256 and S299) in the hypervariable region of the Northeastern isolates were found identical with the reported very virulent strains of IBDV. A unique insertion of I/L294V was recorded in all the isolates of the Northeastern India. The study will be useful in understanding the circulating pathotypes of IBDV in India. PMID:26854869

  11. Bluetongue disease risk assessment based on observed and projected Culicoides obsoletus spp. vector densities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Brugger

    Full Text Available Bluetongue is an arboviral disease of ruminants causing significant economic losses. Our risk assessment is based on the epidemiological key parameter, the basic reproduction number. It is defined as the number of secondary cases caused by one primary case in a fully susceptible host population, in which values greater than one indicate the possibility, i.e., the risk, for a major disease outbreak. In the course of the Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8 outbreak in Europe in 2006 we developed such a risk assessment for the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Austria. Basic reproduction numbers were calculated using a well-known formula for vector-borne diseases considering the population densities of hosts (cattle and small ruminants and vectors (biting midges of the Culicoides obsoletus spp. as well as temperature dependent rates. The latter comprise the biting and mortality rate of midges as well as the reciprocal of the extrinsic incubation period. Most important, but generally unknown, is the spatio-temporal distribution of the vector density. Therefore, we established a continuously operating daily monitoring to quantify the seasonal cycle of the vector population by a statistical model. We used cross-correlation maps and Poisson regression to describe vector densities by environmental temperature and precipitation. Our results comprise time series of observed and simulated Culicoides obsoletus spp. counts as well as basic reproduction numbers for the period 2009-2011. For a spatio-temporal risk assessment we projected our results from the location of Vienna to the entire region of Austria. We compiled both daily maps of vector densities and the basic reproduction numbers, respectively. Basic reproduction numbers above one were generally found between June and August except in the mountainous regions of the Alps. The highest values coincide with the locations of confirmed BTV cases.

  12. Stone Lakes Virus (Family Togaviridae, Genus Alphavirus), a Variant of Fort Morgan Virus Isolated From Swallow Bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) West of the Continental Divide

    OpenAIRE

    Brault, Aaron C; Armijos, M. Veronica; Wheeler, Sarah; Wright, Stan; Fang, Ying; Langevin, Stanley; Reisen, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple isolates of an alphaviruses within the western equine encephalomyelitis-serocomplex that were related closely to Ft. Morgan and its variant Buggy Creek virus were made from swallow bugs, Oeciacus vicarius Horvath (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), collected from cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) nests at the Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Sacramento County, CA, during the summers of 2005 and 2006. This virus (hereafter Stone Lakes virus, family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus, STLV)...

  13. Clustering of classical swine fever virus isolates by codon pair bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leifer Immanuel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic code consists of non-random usage of synonymous codons for the same amino acids, termed codon bias or codon usage. Codon juxtaposition is also non-random, referred to as codon context bias or codon pair bias. The codon and codon pair bias vary among different organisms, as well as with viruses. Reasons for these differences are not completely understood. For classical swine fever virus (CSFV, it was suggested that the synonymous codon usage does not significantly influence virulence, but the relationship between variations in codon pair usage and CSFV virulence is unknown. Virulence can be related to the fitness of a virus: Differences in codon pair usage influence genome translation efficiency, which may in turn relate to the fitness of a virus. Accordingly, the potential of the codon pair bias for clustering CSFV isolates into classes of different virulence was investigated. Results The complete genomic sequences encoding the viral polyprotein of 52 different CSFV isolates were analyzed. This included 49 sequences from the GenBank database (NCBI and three newly sequenced genomes. The codon usage did not differ among isolates of different virulence or genotype. In contrast, a clustering of isolates based on their codon pair bias was observed, clearly discriminating highly virulent isolates and vaccine strains on one side from moderately virulent strains on the other side. However, phylogenetic trees based on the codon pair bias and on the primary nucleotide sequence resulted in a very similar genotype distribution. Conclusion Clustering of CSFV genomes based on their codon pair bias correlate with the genotype rather than with the virulence of the isolates.

  14. Isolation and identification of a bovine viral diarrhea virus from sika deer in china

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Nan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV infections continue to cause significantly losses in the deer population. Better isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer may contribute significantly to the development of prophylactic therapeutic, and diagnostic reagents as well as help in prevention and control of BVDV. However, isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer is seldom reported in literature. In this study, we collected some samples according to clinical sign of BVDV to isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer. Results we isolated a suspected BVDV strain from livers of an aborted fetus from sika deer in Changchun (China using MDBK cell lines, named as CCSYD strain, and identified it by cytopathic effect (CPE, indirect immunoperoxidase test (IPX and electron microscopy(EM. The results indicated that this virus was BVDV by a series of identification. The structural proteins E0 gene was cloned and sequenced. The obtained E0 gene sequence has been submitted to GenBank with the accession number: FJ555203. Alignment with other 9 strains of BVDV, 7 strains of classical swine fever virus (CSFV and 3 strains of border disease virus(BDV in the world, showed that the homology were 98.6%-84.8%, 76.0%-74.7%, 76.6%-77.0% for nucleotide sequence, respectively. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that new isolation and identification CCSYD strain belonged to BVDV1b. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that BVDV was isolated and identified in sika deer. This current research contributes development new BVDV vaccine to prevent and control of BVD in sika deer.

  15. Development of FPV140 antigen-specific ELISA differentiating fowlpox virus isolates from all other viral pathogens of avian origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Hong, Q; Ren, Y; Lillehoj, H S; He, C; Ren, X

    2012-10-01

    The FPV140 gene encodes an envelope protein of fowlpox virus (FPV). In this study, the FPV140 gene of FPV Chinese isolate HH2008 was cloned and the comparison of its sequence with other FPV isolates showed it to be highly conserved across all FPV isolates. A recombinant plasmid pET-FPV140 carrying FPV140 gene was constructed and transformed into Escherichia coli. The optimal expression condition for the FPV140 gene was developed and purified FPV140 recombinant protein was used to produce rabbit polyclonal antibody. An indirect ELISA using this anti-FPV140 polyclonal antibody was capable of distinguishing avian FPV isolates from other common avian pathogens such as mycoplasma gallisepticum, infectious laryngotracheitis virus, avian influenza virus, infectious bursal disease virus, and avian infectious bronchitis virus. This ELISA will serve as a useful diagnostic tool for the detection of FPV in clinical samples. PMID:22991535

  16. Stability of Citrus tristeza virus protective isolates in field conditions Estabilidade de isolados protetores contra Citrus tristeza virus em condições de campo

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra Tenório Costa; William Mário de Carvalho Nunes; Carlos Alexandre Zanutto; Gerd Walter Müller

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to monitor the maintenance of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) protective isolates stability in selected clones of 'Pêra' sweet orange (Citrus sinensis), preimmunized or naturally infected by the virus, after successive clonal propagations. The work was carried out in field conditions in the north of Paraná State, Brazil. Coat protein gene (CPG) analysis of 33 isolates collected from 16 clones of 'Pêra' sweet orange was performed using single strand conformational po...

  17. Phylogenetic and pathogenic analyses of avian influenza A H5N1 viruses isolated from poultry in Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongming Zhao

    Full Text Available Despite great efforts to control the infection of poultry with H5N1 viruses, these pathogens continue to evolve and spread in nature, threatening public health. Elucidating the characteristics of H5N1 avian influenza virus will benefit disease control and pandemic preparation. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 15 H5N1 avian influenza viruses isolated in Vietnam in 2006 and 2007 and performed phylogenetic analyses to compare these sequences with those of other viruses available in the public databases. Molecular characterization of the H5N1 viruses revealed that seven genetically distinct clades of H5N1 viruses have appeared in Vietnam. Clade 2.3.4 viruses existed in Vietnam as early as 2005. Fifteen viruses isolated during 2006 and 2007 belonged to clade 1 and clade 2.3.4, and were divided into five genotypes. Reassortants between the clade 1 and clade 2.3.4 viruses were detected in both North and South Vietnam. We also assessed the replication and pathogenicity of these viruses in mice and found that these isolates replicated efficiently and exhibited distinct virulence in mice. Our results provide important information regarding the diversity of H5N1 viruses in nature.

  18. Phylogenetic and Pathogenic Analyses of Avian Influenza A H5N1 Viruses Isolated from Poultry in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanbing; Jiang, Yongping; Liu, Liling; Chen, Hualan

    2012-01-01

    Despite great efforts to control the infection of poultry with H5N1 viruses, these pathogens continue to evolve and spread in nature, threatening public health. Elucidating the characteristics of H5N1 avian influenza virus will benefit disease control and pandemic preparation. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 15 H5N1 avian influenza viruses isolated in Vietnam in 2006 and 2007 and performed phylogenetic analyses to compare these sequences with those of other viruses available in the public databases. Molecular characterization of the H5N1 viruses revealed that seven genetically distinct clades of H5N1 viruses have appeared in Vietnam. Clade 2.3.4 viruses existed in Vietnam as early as 2005. Fifteen viruses isolated during 2006 and 2007 belonged to clade 1 and clade 2.3.4, and were divided into five genotypes. Reassortants between the clade 1 and clade 2.3.4 viruses were detected in both North and South Vietnam. We also assessed the replication and pathogenicity of these viruses in mice and found that these isolates replicated efficiently and exhibited distinct virulence in mice. Our results provide important information regarding the diversity of H5N1 viruses in nature. PMID:23226433

  19. A new subgenotype 2.1d isolates of classical swine fever virus in China, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Leng, Chaoliang; Feng, Liping; Zhai, Hongyue; Chen, Jiazeng; Liu, Chunxiao; Bai, Yun; Ye, Chao; Peng, Jinmei; An, Tongqing; Kan, Yunchao; Cai, Xuehui; Tian, Zhijun; Tong, Guangzhi

    2015-08-01

    The lapinized attenuated vaccine against classical swine fever (CSF) has been used in China for over half a century and has generally prevented large-scale outbreaks in recent years. However, since late 2014, a large number of new cases of CSF were detected in many immunized pig farms in China. Several of these CSV viruses were isolated and characterized. Phylogenetic and genomic sequence analyses indicate that these new isolates, as well as some reference isolates, form a new subgenotype named 2.1d, and share several consistent molecular characteristics. Since these new isolates emerged in disparate geographic regions within 5 months, this suggests that these isolates may be widespread. Given that current vaccines do not appear to provide effective protection against this new subgenotype, further investigation of these strains is urgently needed. PMID:26031602

  20. Isolation and identification of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valícek, L; Psikal, I; Smíd, B; Rodák, L; Kubalíková, R; Kosinová, E

    1997-10-01

    Three strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were isolated in porcine lung macrophage (PLM) cultures from three swine herds. This has been the first successful isolation of PRRSV in the Czech Republic and the strains received the designations CAPM V-501, CAPM V-502 and CAPM V-503, respectively. All the three isolates in PLM were identified by immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase tests and the strain CAPM V-502 also by electron microscopy using the ultrathin section technique. The strain CAPM V-502 has been adapted to the cell line MARC-145. Viral RNA in PLM cultures infected with any of the isolated PRRSV strains was demonstrated by RT-PCR targeted to the more conserved ORF 7 genomic region encoding the nucleocapsid protein. The assessment of PCR products in agarose gel revealed a uniform size of 394 bp in all the three isolates and the European prototype strain Lelystad used as positive control. PMID:9416008

  1. Isolation and characterization of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 from donkeys

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    Abdel-Ghany Ahmad E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly pathogenic H5N1 is a major avian pathogen that crosses species barriers and seriously affects humans as well as some mammals. It mutates in an intensified manner and is considered a potential candidate for the possible next pandemic with all the catastrophic consequences. Methods Nasal swabs were collected from donkeys suffered from respiratory distress. The virus was isolated from the pooled nasal swabs in specific pathogen free embryonated chicken eggs (SPF-ECE. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and sequencing of both haemagglutingin and neuraminidase were performed. H5 seroconversion was screened using haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay on 105 donkey serum samples. Results We demonstrated that H5N1 jumped from poultry to another mammalian host; donkeys. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus clustered within the lineage of H5N1 from Egypt, closely related to 2009 isolates. It harboured few genetic changes compared to the closely related viruses from avian and humans. The neuraminidase lacks oseltamivir resistant mutations. Interestingly, HI screening for antibodies to H5 haemagglutinins in donkeys revealed high exposure rate. Conclusions These findings extend the host range of the H5N1 influenza virus, possess implications for influenza virus epidemiology and highlight the need for the systematic surveillance of H5N1 in animals in the vicinity of backyard poultry units especially in endemic areas.

  2. Field Trials of CpGV Virus Isolates Overcoming Resistance to CpGV-M

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Berling; J. -B. Rey; S. -J. Ondet; Y. Tallot; O. Soubabère; A. Bonhomme; B. Sauphanor; M. Lopez-Ferber

    2009-01-01

    The Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV) has been used for many years as biological agent for codling moth control in apple orchards. Resistance to the Mexican strain of CpGV was detected in orchards in Germany, France and Italy. A laboratory insect colony was started from insects collected in a French resistant orchard. It was named RGV. Various virus isolates were identified as active against this resistant insect colony. Field tests were carried out in 2007 to test if the two virus isolates CpGV-I12 and NPP-R1 were effective in the field. Although these virus isolates were not able to reduce insect caused fruit damages, they significantly reduced the overwintering insect populations. NPP-R1 was subjected to eight passages on RGV larvae (NPP-R1.8) that improved its biological activity on RGV larvae. 2008 field trials were set up to test this improved virus strain, compared to CpGV-I12 and Madex plus active on RGV. These tests confirmed the ability to control both in susceptible and resistant insect populations.

  3. Characterization of a novel H3N2 influenza virus isolated from domestic ducks in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chong; Yu, Meng; Liu, Litao; Sun, Honglei

    2016-08-01

    Cases of human infection with a novel H7N9 avian influenza virus (AIV) were first reported in March 2013, which caused 115 deaths within a single year. Beyond that, other subtypes of H7 AIV were isolated from poultry in eastern China during the same period, including H7N7 and H7N2 AIV. In the present study, a subtype H3N2 AIV was isolated from ducks from Anhui Province, China. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that seven gene segments of this virus showed the highest sequence homology with that of the H7 subtype influenza virus, which is presumed to be the reassortants of the H3 and H7 subtypes AIV. The present study also reconfirmed that the reassortment between the H7 subtype and waterfowl-originating AIVs universally occurred in waterfowl. Animal inoculation tests showed that the virus has low pathogenicity in chickens; however, it could be replicated in the lungs of mice. The emergence of this H3N2 isolate emphasizes the importance of enhancing the surveillance of waterfowl-originating AIVs, the identification of novel reassortant strains, and characterization of their biological properties. PMID:27000112

  4. Newcastle Disease Viruses Causing Recent Outbreaks Worldwide Show Unexpectedly High Genetic Similarity to Historical Virulent Isolates from the 1940s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Kiril M; Lee, Dong-Hun; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Olivier, Timothy L; Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-05-01

    Virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), a devastating disease of poultry and wild birds. Phylogenetic analyses clearly distinguish historical isolates (obtained prior to 1960) from currently circulating viruses of class II genotypes V, VI, VII, and XII through XVIII. Here, partial and complete genomic sequences of recent virulent isolates of genotypes II and IX from China, Egypt, and India were found to be nearly identical to those of historical viruses isolated in the 1940s. Phylogenetic analysis, nucleotide distances, and rates of change demonstrate that these recent isolates have not evolved significantly from the most closely related ancestors from the 1940s. The low rates of change for these virulent viruses (7.05 × 10(-5) and 2.05 × 10(-5) per year, respectively) and the minimal genetic distances existing between these and historical viruses (0.3 to 1.2%) of the same genotypes indicate an unnatural origin. As with any other RNA virus, Newcastle disease virus is expected to evolve naturally; thus, these findings suggest that some recent field isolates should be excluded from evolutionary studies. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses show that these recent virulent isolates are more closely related to virulent strains isolated during the 1940s, which have been and continue to be used in laboratory and experimental challenge studies. Since the preservation of viable viruses in the environment for over 6 decades is highly unlikely, it is possible that the source of some of the recent virulent viruses isolated from poultry and wild birds might be laboratory viruses. PMID:26888902

  5. Isolation of avian influenza H5N1 virus from vaccinated commercial layer flock in Egypt

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    El-Zoghby Elham F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uninterrupted transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV H5N1 of clade 2.2.1 in Egypt since 2006 resulted in establishment of two main genetic clusters. The 2.2.1/C group where all recent human and majority of backyard origin viruses clustered together, meanwhile the majority of viruses derived from vaccinated poultry in commercial farms grouped in 2.2.1.1 clade. Findings In the present investigation, an HPAIV H5N1 was isolated from twenty weeks old layers chickens that were vaccinated with a homologous H5N1 vaccine at 1, 7 and 16 weeks old. At twenty weeks of age, birds showed cyanosis of comb and wattle, decrease in egg production and up to 27% mortality. Examined serum samples showed low antibody titer in HI test (Log2 3.2± 4.2. The hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of the isolated virus were closely related to viruses in 2.2.1/C group isolated from poultry in live bird market (LBM and backyards or from infected people. Conspicuous mutations in the HA and NA genes including a deletion within the receptor binding domain in the HA globular head region were observed. Conclusions Despite repeated vaccination of layer chickens using a homologous H5N1 vaccine, infection with HPAIV H5N1 resulted in significant morbidity and mortality. In endemic countries like Egypt, rigorous control measures including enforcement of biosecurity, culling of infected birds and constant update of vaccine virus strains are highly required to prevent circulation of HPAIV H5N1 between backyard birds, commercial poultry, LBM and humans.

  6. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of a coat protein of an Ukrainian isolate of Potato virus Y: comparison with homologous sequences of other isolates and phylogenetic analysis

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    Budzanivska I. G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Identification of the widespread Ukrainian isolate(s of PVY (Potato virus Y in different potato cultivars and subsequent phylogenetic analysis of detected PVY isolates based on NA and AA sequences of coat protein. Methods. ELISA, RT-PCR, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Results. PVY has been identified serologically in potato cultivars of Ukrainian selection. In this work we have optimized a method for total RNA extraction from potato samples and offered a sensitive and specific PCR-based test system of own design for diagnostics of the Ukrainian PVY isolates. Part of the CP gene of the Ukrainian PVY isolate has been sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. It is demonstrated that the Ukrainian isolate of Potato virus Y (CP gene has a higher percentage of homology with the recombinant isolates (strains of this pathogen (approx. 98.8– 99.8 % of homology for both nucleotide and translated amino acid sequences of the CP gene. The Ukrainian isolate of PVY is positioned in the separate cluster together with the isolates found in Syria, Japan and Iran; these isolates possibly have common origin. The Ukrainian PVY isolate is confirmed to be recombinant. Conclusions. This work underlines the need and provides the means for accurate monitoring of Potato virus Y in the agroecosystems of Ukraine. Most importantly, the phylogenetic analysis demonstrated the recombinant nature of this PVY isolate which has been attributed to the strain group O, subclade N:O.

  7. Coat protein-mediated resistance against an Indian isolate of the Cucumber mosaic virus subgroup IB in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Srivastava; S K Raj

    2008-06-01

    Coat protein (CP)-mediated resistance against an Indian isolate of the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup IB was demonstrated in transgenic lines of Nicotiana benthamiana through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Out of the fourteen independently transformed lines developed, two lines were tested for resistance against CMV by challenge inoculations. The transgenic lines exhibiting complete resistance remained symptomless throughout life and showed reduced or no virus accumulation in their systemic leaves after virus challenge. These lines also showed virus resistance against two closely related strains of CMV. This is the first report of CP-mediated transgenic resistance against a CMV subgroup IB member isolated from India.

  8. Co-culture: A quick approach for isolation of street rabies virus in murine neuroblastoma cells

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    A. Sasikalaveni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laboratory detection of rabies in most cases is based on detection of the antigen by fluorescent antibody test, however, in weak positive cases confirmative laboratory diagnosis depends on widely accepted mouse inoculation test. Cell lines like neuroblastoma have been used to isolate the virus with greater success not only to target for diagnosis, but also for molecular studies that determine the epidemiology of the circulating street rabies strains and in studies that look at the efficiency of the developed monoclonal antibodies to neutralize the different rabies strains. Due to the recent issues in obtaining ethical permission for mouse experimentation, and also the passages required in the cell lines to isolate the virus, we report herewith a co-culture protocol using the murine neuroblastoma (MNA cells, which enable quicker isolation of street rabies virus with minimum passages. Objective: This study is not to have an alternative diagnostic assay, but an approach to produce sufficient amount of rabies virus in minimum passages by a co-culture approach in MNA cells. Materials and Methods: The MNA cells are co-cultured by topping the normal cells with infected cells every 48 h and the infectivity was followed up by performing direct fluorescent-antibody test. Results: The co-culture approach results in 100% infectivity and hence the use of live mouse for experimentation could be avoided. Conclusion: Co-culture method provides an alternative for the situations with limited sample volume and for the quicker isolation of virus which warrants the wild type strains without much modification.

  9. Sequence comparisons of the variable VP2 region of eight infectious bursal disease virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormitorio, T V; Giambrone, J J; Duck, L W

    1997-01-01

    The VP2 gene is part of the genomic segment A of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). It has been identified as the major host-protective antigen of IBDV and is known to contain conformationally dependent protective epitopes. A 643-base pair segment covering the hypervariable region of this gene from three recent serologic variant IBDV isolates from the southeastern United States, two variants from the Delmarva Peninsula, and three serologic standard viruses were amplified and sequenced using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and cycle sequencing techniques. This was done to determine the molecular similarity among isolates that differ antigenically and pathologically. Sequence analysis suggested that the Arkansas (Ark) and Mississippi (Miss) isolates evolved closely and separately from the Delmarva variants (GLS and DELE), in contrast to the other southeastern variant Georgia (Ga), which is more closely related (98.32%) to Delaware E (DELE). All variants, except for Miss, underwent a shift in amino acid number 222 from proline to threonine. The sequence of Univax BD virus, a commercially available intermediate vaccine, was markedly different, evolving from a separate lineage than the others. Restriction enzyme sites could differentiate most isolates. Except for Miss, variants do not have EcoRII site at the larger hydrophilic domain. All variants lost their HaeIII, StuI, and StyI cutting sites with a change in base number 856. The TaqI site is in DELE, whereas the SpeI site is absent in the standard vaccine viruses. The SWASASGS heptapeptide is conserved in all virulent viruses, including APHIS, but not in the attenuated (Univax BD and Bursa Vac 3) and published (D78 and PBG98) vaccines. PMID:9087318

  10. Bluetongue in small ruminants: An opinionated review, with a brief appraisal of the 2014 outbreak of the disease in Greece and the south-east Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakis, C S; Billinis, C; Papadopoulos, E; Vasileiou, N G C; Athanasiou, L V; Fthenakis, G C

    2015-12-14

    Bluetongue is an arthropod-borne viral disease of ruminants, especially of sheep, caused by Bluetongue virus, which belongs to the genus Orbivirus of the family Reoviridae and is classified into 26 antigenically distinct serotypes. Once thought to be restricted in Africa and parts of the Middle East, bluetongue has now become a concern in sheep-rearing countries around the world. In the past 10 years, severe outbreaks have occurred in Europe with important economic consequences; of these, the 2006-20008 outbreak in Europe was caused by a serotype 8 strain and the 2014 outbreak in Greece and the other countries of south-east Europe was caused by a serotype 4 strain, suggested to be a reassortant strain with genome segments from lineages of serotype 1, 2 and 4. Immunisation campaigns can be implemented for successful control and limiting of the disease. Nevertheless, in both of the above outbreaks, late application of vaccinations led to a wide spread of the disease, which subsequently resulted in significant losses in livestock in the affected regions. In view of that, standardisation of control measures in the future will be beneficial for efficiently limiting outbreaks of the disease. PMID:26304745

  11. Isolation and genetic characterization of avian influenza viruses and a Newcastle disease virus from wild birds in Barbados: 2003-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Kirk O; Lavoie, Marc C; Kim, L Mia; Afonso, Claudio L; Suarez, David L

    2007-09-01

    Zoonotic transmission of an H5N1 avian influenza A virus to humans in 2003-present has generated increased public health and scientific interest in the prevalence and variability of influenza A viruses in wild birds and their potential threat to human health. Migratory waterfowl and shorebirds are regarded as the primordial reservoir of all influenza A viral subtypes and have been repeatedly implicated in avian influenza outbreaks in domestic poultry and swine. All of the 16 hemagglutinin and nine neuraminidase influenza subtypes have been isolated from wild birds, but waterfowl of the order Anseriformes are the most commonly infected. Using 9-to-11-day-old embryonating chicken egg culture, virus isolation attempts were conducted on 168 cloacal swabs from various resident, imported, and migratory bird species in Barbados during the months of July to October of 2003 and 2004. Hemagglutination assay and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to screen all allantoic fluids for the presence of hemagglutinating agents and influenza A virus. Hemagglutination positive-influenza negative samples were also tested for Newcastle disease virus (NDV), which is also found in waterfowl. Two influenza A viruses and one NDV were isolated from Anseriformes (40/168), with isolation rates of 5.0% (2/40) and 2.5% (1/40), respectively, for influenza A and NDV. Sequence analysis of the influenza A virus isolates showed them to be H4N3 viruses that clustered with other North American avian influenza viruses. This is the first report of the presence of influenza A virus and NDV in wild birds in the English-speaking Caribbean. PMID:17992942

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus 1 isolated from South Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumond, Betania Paiva; da Silva Fagundes, Luiz Gustavo; Rocha, Raissa Prado; Fumagalli, Marcilio Jorge; Araki, Carlos Shigueru; Colombo, Tatiana Elisa; Nogueira, Mauricio Lacerda; Castilho, Thiago Elias; da Silveira, Nelson José Freitas; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major worldwide public health problem, especially in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Primary infection with a single Dengue virus serotype causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness called dengue fever. However, a subset of patients who experience secondary infection with a different serotype can progress to a more severe form of the disease, called dengue hemorrhagic fever. The four Dengue virus serotypes (1–4) are antigenically and genetically distinct and each serotype is composed of multiple genotypes. In this study we isolated one Dengue virus 1 serotype, named BR/Alfenas/2012, from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever in Alfenas, South Minas Gerais, Brazil and molecular identification was performed based on the analysis of NS5 gene. Swiss mice were infected with this isolate to verify its potential to induce histopathological alterations characteristic of dengue. Liver histopathological analysis of infected animals showed the presence of inflammatory infiltrates, hepatic steatosis, as well as edema, hemorrhage and necrosis focal points. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses based on the envelope gene provided evidence that the isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 belongs to genotype V, lineage I and it is probably derived from isolates of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 showed two unique amino acids substitutions (SER222THRE and PHE306SER) when compared to other Brazilian isolates from the same genotype/lineage. Molecular models were generated for the envelope protein indicating that the amino acid alteration PHE 306 SER could contribute to a different folding in this region located within the domain III. Further genetic and animal model studies using BR/Alfenas/2012 and other isolates belonging to the same lineage/genotype could help determine the relation of these genetic alterations and dengue hemorrhagic fever in a susceptible population. PMID:26887252

  13. Molecular analysis of bovine viral diarrhoea virus isolates from South Africa

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    N. Kabongo

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of bovine viral diarrhoea virus in South Africa has been confirmed by several serological surveys. However, little is known about its biological properties. Twenty five isolates obtained by isolation in tissue culture and detected by means of the antigen capture ELISA from clinically sick cattle and from foetal calf serum in South Africa were characterized on the basis of analysis of the 5' non-translated (NTR region of the genome. A reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was used to amplify specific sequences from the 5'NTR of the genome. The oligonucleotide primers corresponding to positions 105-125 and 399-378, respectively, in the sequence of BVDV strain NADL were used to generate the PCR products. Both strands were sequenced directly with these primers and fluorescence-labelled dideoxynucleotides in an automated nucleic acid sequencer. Reference strains of pestiviruses [(BVDV type I, BVDV type II, border disease virus (BDV and hog cholera virus (HCV] and isolates from a previous investigation on BVDV in southern Africa were included for comparative purposes. All the BVDV strains obtained during this study belong to subgroups of BVDV genotype I. No association could be demonstrated between the geographic origin of the isolates. A number of isolates formed another branch separate from the existing branches Ia, Ib and Ic. These findings suggest that extensive genetic diversity can be found within BVDV type I isolates from southern Africa. Isolates that group with the classical BVDV type I strains, particularly of American origin, coexist with variants that appear to represent a local genetic pool and or variants evolving from the classical strains.

  14. Pathotyping of recent Indian field isolates of Marek's disease virus serotype 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, P; Johnson Rajeswar, J; Sukumar, K; Harikrishnan, T J; Srinivasan, P

    2015-06-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the virulence of Marek's disease virus (MDV) serotype 1 field isolates obtained from poultry flocks of southern part of India. Five representative MDV serotype 1 strains were isolated from eighty-six blood samples collected from fifteen farms. Three out of five isolates which were free from avian leukosis virus (ALV) and reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) were adapted in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) culture and designated as Ind/TN/11/01, Ind/KA/12/02 and Ind/TN/12/03. Pathotyping assay was conducted in two trials. In the first trial, non-vaccinated chickens were challenged (trial I), while in second trial, two types of vaccinated chickens along with non-vaccinated controls were challenged (trial II). Birds inoculated with field isolate Ind/TN/12/03 had very low body (75.34 ± 3.04 g 15 days post infection (dpi)) and bursa Fabricii weight (1.64 ± 0.06 at 15 dpi) when compared to those inoculated with the other two isolates (Ind/TN/11/01 and Ind/KA/12/02) and uninoculated controls (body weight 111.33 ± 1.30 g and bursa Fabricii weight 4.33 ± 0.11 15 dpi). Incidence of early mortality syndrome (53%) and lymphoma (86%) induced by Ind/TN/12/03 was comparable with very virulent strains published elsewhere. In protection test, the percentage of Marek's disease (MD) incidence induced by Ind/TN/12/03 was 57.5% and 25% in monovalent and bivalent vaccine inoculated birds respectively compared to uninoculated control (100%). Based on the above findings in pathotyping experimental trials with a supportive evidence of histopathological observations, isolate Ind/TN/12/03 was considered as very virulent MDV and other two isolates were considered as virulent MDVs. PMID:26104332

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus 1 isolated from South Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betania Paiva Drumond

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dengue is a major worldwide public health problem, especially in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Primary infection with a single Dengue virus serotype causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness called dengue fever. However, a subset of patients who experience secondary infection with a different serotype can progress to a more severe form of the disease, called dengue hemorrhagic fever. The four Dengue virus serotypes (1–4 are antigenically and genetically distinct and each serotype is composed of multiple genotypes. In this study we isolated one Dengue virus 1 serotype, named BR/Alfenas/2012, from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever in Alfenas, South Minas Gerais, Brazil and molecular identification was performed based on the analysis of NS5 gene. Swiss mice were infected with this isolate to verify its potential to induce histopathological alterations characteristic of dengue. Liver histopathological analysis of infected animals showed the presence of inflammatory infiltrates, hepatic steatosis, as well as edema, hemorrhage and necrosis focal points. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses based on the envelope gene provided evidence that the isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 belongs to genotype V, lineage I and it is probably derived from isolates of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 showed two unique amino acids substitutions (SER222THRE and PHE306SER when compared to other Brazilian isolates from the same genotype/lineage. Molecular models were generated for the envelope protein indicating that the amino acid alteration PHE 306 SER could contribute to a different folding in this region located within the domain III. Further genetic and animal model studies using BR/Alfenas/2012 and other isolates belonging to the same lineage/genotype could help determine the relation of these genetic alterations and dengue hemorrhagic fever in a susceptible population.

  16. Genotype diversity of H9N2 viruses isolated from wild birds and chickens in Hunan Province, China.

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    Ba Wang

    Full Text Available Three H9N2 avian influenza viruses were isolated from the Dongting Lake wetland, among which one was from fresh egret feces, the other two were from chicken cloacal swabs in poultry markets. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that eight genes of the egret-derived H9N2 virus might come from Korean-like or American-like lineages. The two poultry-derived H9N2 viruses were reassortants between the CK/BJ/94-like and G1-like viruses. Except the PB1 genes (90.6%, the nucleotide sequence of other internal genes of the two viruses exhibited high homology (>95%. In addition, they also exhibited high homology (96-98.3% with some genes of the H7N9 virus that caused an epidemic in China in 2013. Nucleotide sequence of the poultry-derived and egret-derived H9N2 viruses shared low homology. Infection studies showed that the egret-derived H9N2 virus was non-pathogenic to both mice and chickens, and the virus was unable to infect chickens even through 8 passages continuously in the lung. On the other hand, the chickens infected by poultry-derived viruses showed obvious clinical symptoms and even died; the infected mice showed no noticeable clinical symptoms and weight loss, but viruses could be detected in their lungs. In conclusion, for the egret-derived H9N2 virus, it would take a long adaptation process to achieve cross-species transmission in poultry and mammals. H9N2 viruses isolated at different times from the same host species in the same geographical region presented different evolutionary status, and virus isolated from different hosts in the same geographical region exhibited genetic diversity. Therefore, it is important to continue the H9N2 virus surveillance for understanding their evolutionary trends so as to provide guidance for disease control and prevention.

  17. Genetic characteristics of mumps viruses isolated in Korea from 2007 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Tae; Kim, You-Jin; Yang, Jeong-Sun; Nam, Jeong-Gu; Kim, Kisoon; Kim, Sung Soon; Kang, Hae Ji

    2016-09-01

    Mumps is a vaccine-preventable viral disease. Despite vaccine coverage of >95%, the incidence of mumps has increased in Korea since 2007. This study aimed to genetically characterize mumps virus (MuV) strains that circulated in Korea between 2007 and 2012 to determine the factors underlying mumps outbreaks. MuV was isolated from 175 clinical specimens between 2007 and 2012 in Korea. Upon analysis of the SH gene in Korean mumps virus isolates, three different genotypes were identified: I, H, and F. The MuV genotypes I and H co-circulated in Korea, and eight isolates of Korean genotype F were found within the same time period in 2008. An analysis of HN amino-acid sequence data showed that Korean isolates had no changes in their glycosylation sites. At putative neutralizing epitope sites, the Jeryl-Lynn strain showed 4-5 different amino acid sequences from those observed in Korean isolates. Korean isolates of genotypes I and H shared distinctive point mutations on putative neutralizing epitope positions in each genotype. This report describes the genetic characteristics of MuV strains circulating in Korea and provides information on endemic mumps infections. This information may be important to help prevent mumps and control outbreaks of mumps in Korea. J. Med. Virol. 88:1479-1486, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26950767

  18. Structure of a Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus assembly intermediate isolated from infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a prototypical enveloped ssRNA virus of the family Togaviridae. To better understand alphavirus assembly, we analyzed newly formed nucleocapsid particles (termed pre-viral nucleocapsids) isolated from infected cells. These particles were intermediates along the virus assembly pathway, and ultimately bind membrane-associated viral glycoproteins to bud as mature infectious virus. Purified pre-viral nucleocapsids were spherical with a unimodal diameter distribution. The structure of one class of pre-viral nucleocapsids was determined with single particle reconstruction of cryo-electron microscopy images. These studies showed that pre-viral nucleocapsids assembled into an icosahedral structure with a capsid stoichiometry similar to the mature nucleocapsid. However, the individual capsomers were organized significantly differently within the pre-viral and mature nucleocapsids. The pre-viral nucleocapsid structure implies that nucleocapsids are highly plastic and undergo glycoprotein and/or lipid-driven rearrangements during virus self-assembly. This mechanism of self-assembly may be general for other enveloped viruses.

  19. Characterization of pigeon paramyxoviruses (Newcastle disease virus isolated in South Africa from 2001 to 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Abolnik

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 (PPMV-1, a variant of Newcastle disease virus that primarily affects doves and pigeons has been isolated in South Africa since the mid-1980s. Phylogenetic evidence indicates that pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 viruses were introduced in to South Africa on multiple occasions, based on the presence of two separate lineages, 4bi and 4bii, that have been circulating in Europe and the Far East since the early 1990s. During 2006, a PPMV-1 virus was isolated from an African ground hornbil(l Bucorvus leadbeateri which becamea cutely infected with PPMV-1 and died, probably after scavenging off infected dove carcasses in the region, since a closely-related PPMV-1 strain was also isolated from doves collected nearby. The hornbill isolate had lCPl and MDT values characteristic of PPMV-1s trains. The threat of PPMV-1 to poultry production and biodiversity in southern Africa highlights the importance of monitoring the spread of this strain.

  20. FMD virus isolates: the candidate strains for polyvalent vaccine development in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayelet, G; Soressa, M; Sisay, T; Belay, A; Gelaye, E; Jembere, S; Skjerve, E; Asmare, K

    2013-06-01

    The study was conducted on foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) viruses with the aim of selecting appropriate vaccinal strain to control of FMD in Ethiopia. The study was conducted in two-dimensional virus neutralization assay to determine the antigenic relationship 'r' value between the candidate vaccine strains and field isolates. A total of 21 serotype O, 7 serotype A, and 8 serotype SAT 2 FMD viruses, which were isolated from cattle and swine. A couple of isolates from each serotype were identified as vaccine candidates in the trial (O-ETH/38/2005, O-ETH/58/2008, A-ETH/7/2008, A-ETH/6/2000, SAT2-ETH/76/2009 and SAT2-ETH/64/2009). The finding revealed all the vaccine candidate depicted high antigenic similarity, above the mean "r" value, to their own serotypes in the studied serotype population except for one serotype A field isolate, A-ETH/13/1981, with "r" value=0.14 and 0.25) which is significantly lower than the minimum requirement. In general, the result indicated that these candidate vaccinal strains can be used for polyvalent vaccine production in the country. PMID:23416124

  1. Characterization of H7N9 influenza A viruses isolated from humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tokiko; Kiso, Maki; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Nakajima, Noriko; Imai, Masaki; Yamada, Shinya; Murakami, Shin; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Takashita, Emi; McBride, Ryan; Noda, Takeshi; Hatta, Masato; Imai, Hirotaka; Zhao, Dongming; Kishida, Noriko; Shirakura, Masayuki; de Vries, Robert P; Shichinohe, Shintaro; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Tamura, Tomokazu; Tomita, Yuriko; Fujimoto, Naomi; Goto, Kazue; Katsura, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Eiryo; Ishikawa, Izumi; Watanabe, Shinji; Ito, Mutsumi; Sakai-Tagawa, Yuko; Sugita, Yukihiko; Uraki, Ryuta; Yamaji, Reina; Eisfeld, Amie J; Zhong, Gongxun; Fan, Shufang; Ping, Jihui; Maher, Eileen A; Hanson, Anthony; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko; Ozawa, Makoto; Neumann, Gabriele; Kida, Hiroshi; Odagiri, Takato; Paulson, James C; Hasegawa, Hideki; Tashiro, Masato; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-09-26

    Avian influenza A viruses rarely infect humans; however, when human infection and subsequent human-to-human transmission occurs, worldwide outbreaks (pandemics) can result. The recent sporadic infections of humans in China with a previously unrecognized avian influenza A virus of the H7N9 subtype (A(H7N9)) have caused concern owing to the appreciable case fatality rate associated with these infections (more than 25%), potential instances of human-to-human transmission, and the lack of pre-existing immunity among humans to viruses of this subtype. Here we characterize two early human A(H7N9) isolates, A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) and A/Shanghai/1/2013 (H7N9); hereafter referred to as Anhui/1 and Shanghai/1, respectively. In mice, Anhui/1 and Shanghai/1 were more pathogenic than a control avian H7N9 virus (A/duck/Gunma/466/2011 (H7N9); Dk/GM466) and a representative pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus (A/California/4/2009 (H1N1pdm09); CA04). Anhui/1, Shanghai/1 and Dk/GM466 replicated well in the nasal turbinates of ferrets. In nonhuman primates, Anhui/1 and Dk/GM466 replicated efficiently in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, whereas the replicative ability of conventional human influenza viruses is typically restricted to the upper respiratory tract of infected primates. By contrast, Anhui/1 did not replicate well in miniature pigs after intranasal inoculation. Critically, Anhui/1 transmitted through respiratory droplets in one of three pairs of ferrets. Glycan arrays showed that Anhui/1, Shanghai/1 and A/Hangzhou/1/2013 (H7N9) (a third human A(H7N9) virus tested in this assay) bind to human virus-type receptors, a property that may be critical for virus transmissibility in ferrets. Anhui/1 was found to be less sensitive in mice to neuraminidase inhibitors than a pandemic H1N1 2009 virus, although both viruses were equally susceptible to an experimental antiviral polymerase inhibitor. The robust replicative ability in mice, ferrets and nonhuman primates and the limited

  2. High-Throughput Isolation of Giant Viruses in Liquid Medium Using Automated Flow Cytometry and Fluorescence Staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Jacques Y B; Robert, Stephane; Reteno, Dorine G; Andreani, Julien; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The isolation of giant viruses using amoeba co-culture is tedious and fastidious. Recently, the procedure was successfully associated with a method that detects amoebal lysis on agar plates. However, the procedure remains time-consuming and is limited to protozoa growing on agar. We present here advances for the isolation of giant viruses. A high-throughput automated method based on flow cytometry and fluorescent staining was used to detect the presence of giant viruses in liquid medium. Development was carried out with the Acanthamoeba polyphaga strain widely used in past and current co-culture experiments. The proof of concept was validated with virus suspensions: artificially contaminated samples but also environmental samples from which viruses were previously isolated. After validating the technique, and fortuitously isolating a new Mimivirus, we automated the technique on 96-well plates and tested it on clinical and environmental samples using other protozoa. This allowed us to detect more than 10 strains of previously known species of giant viruses and seven new strains of a new virus lineage. This automated high-throughput method demonstrated significant time saving, and higher sensitivity than older techniques. It thus creates the means to isolate giant viruses at high speed. PMID:26858703

  3. Direct isolation and characterization of JC virus from urine samples of renal and bone marrow transplant patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, C; Frisque, R J; Arthur, R R

    1989-01-01

    JC virus DNA was extracted from urine-derived cells of bone marrow and renal transplant patients and cloned directly into the plasmid vector pBR322. These clones represent the first JC virus isolates obtained directly from individuals that did not have progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Three of the clones appeared to be identical to the prototype JC virus Mad 1, and the fourth clone was identical to the type II JC virus variant Mad8-Br. Importantly, the same JC virus strains h...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel H4N1 Influenza Virus Isolated from a Pig in Central China

    OpenAIRE

    Yong HU; Liu, Xiaokun; Li, Shuyun; Guo, Xuebo; Yang, Ying; Jin, Meilin

    2012-01-01

    Pigs are proposed to be “mixing vessel” hosts that can produce genetically novel reassortant viruses with pandemic potential. The appearance of any novel influenza viruses among pigs should pose concerns for human health. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a novel H4N1 influenza virus [A/Swine/HuBei/06/2009(H4N1)] isolated from a pig in Central China in 2009. The genomic sequence analysis indicates that this virus is a wholly avian-original influenza virus. Each gene may come fro...

  5. ISOLATION OF VIRUS IN PRODUCTS OF CONCEPTION IN SPONTANEOUS ABORTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAMYAB S.D. AZARI S.D. NATEGH R

    1980-08-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred pa t ient s o f t he l ow socioe conomic g roup wi th an aborti on o f the f i r s t t r i mest e r were stud 1ed . The s ter i l e produc ts o f concept ion were c ul t ured on Gr e e n Monke y Kidney ti s sue cul t ure f or v i r a l de t e c - tion. Four po s i t i ve Herpe s virus, two positive Rubella"nv~ru s and t hree pos i tive unidentifie d Entero v irus l ike Vlrus were obtained The sera of 192 of these patients were titrated for Rubella antibody. The sera of a control group of 150 normal pregnant women were titrated for Rubella antibody and 8.8 per cent of these patients had a negative titre and 21.3 per cent , 1 had a tltre over 40

  6. Seroprevalence of bluetongue in sheep and goats in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Mahmoud

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was undertaken to understand the epidemiological status of bluetongue infection in Egypt. Materials and Methods: Serum samples were collected from clinically healthy as well as suspected sheep and goats. Samples were collected during the vector breeding season from September to November 2010, from 14 Egyptian governorates which represent different geographical regions of Egypt, and were tested by Agar Gel Immuno-precipitation Test (AGPT. Results: Out of total 1293 animal serum samples (sheep-1028 and goats-265, 17.5% of sheep and 14.7% of goats serum samples were found positive. The overall prevalence of anti-BT antibodies in different governorates was 16.9%. The highest prevalence of bluetongue group specific antibodies was detected in Beni-Suef, Giza, and Al Sharqia governorates (13.2%. The results indicate that there is a necessity to run further studies to identify the negative governorates. In addition, there is a lack in information regarding the BTV serotypes in Egypt. Conclusion: This study reflected high seroprevalence of bluetongue infection in sheep than goats. The results indicated that further studies are needed to identify the vectors from different agro-climatic zones, in addition, the BTV serotypes that are circulating in Egypt.

  7. Isolation and Physiological Characterization of a Novel Algicidal Virus Infecting the Marine Diatom Skeletonema costatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JinJoo Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are a major component of the biological community, serving as the principal primary producers in the food web and sustaining oxygen levels in aquatic environments. Among marine planktonic diatoms, the cosmopolitan Skeletonema costatum is one of the most abundant and widespread species in the world’s oceans. Here, we report the basic characteristics of a new diatom-infecting S. costatum virus (ScosV isolated from Jaran Bay, Korea, in June 2008. ScosV is a polyhedral virus (45–50 nm in diameter that propagates in the cytoplasm of host cells and causes lysis of S. costatum cultures. The infectivity of ScosV was determined to be strain- rather than species-specific, similar to other algal viruses. The burst size and latent period were roughly estimated at 90–250 infectious units/cell and <48 h, respectively.

  8. Isolation and Physiological Characterization of a Novel Algicidal Virus Infecting the Marine Diatom Skeletonema costatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JinJoo; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Youn, Seok-Hyun; Choi, Tae-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Diatoms are a major component of the biological community, serving as the principal primary producers in the food web and sustaining oxygen levels in aquatic environments. Among marine planktonic diatoms, the cosmopolitan Skeletonema costatum is one of the most abundant and widespread species in the world's oceans. Here, we report the basic characteristics of a new diatom-infecting S. costatum virus (ScosV) isolated from Jaran Bay, Korea, in June 2008. ScosV is a polyhedral virus (45-50 nm in diameter) that propagates in the cytoplasm of host cells and causes lysis of S. costatum cultures. The infectivity of ScosV was determined to be strain- rather than species-specific, similar to other algal viruses. The burst size and latent period were roughly estimated at 90-250 infectious units/cell and <48 h, respectively. PMID:26060438

  9. Comparison of Rapid Centrifugation Assay with Conventional Tissue Culture Method for Isolation of Dengue 2 Virus in C6/36-HT Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, Rosmari Rodríguez; Alvarez, Mayling; María G. Guzmán; Morier, Luis; Kourí, Gustavo

    2000-01-01

    A rapid centrifugation assay was compared with conventional tube cell culture for dengue virus isolation in both sera and autopsy samples from dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome fatal cases. The rapid centrifugation assay allowed isolation of virus from 16.6% more samples than the conventional method, and it shortened the time for dengue virus detection. Finally, it allowed the isolation of dengue 2 virus in 42.8% of tissue samples from five fatal cases. Our results sug...

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Equine Influenza Viruses (H3N8 from China, 2010~2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Lu1,§, Jie Chen2,§, Wei Guo1,§, Ting Qi1,§, Liping Zhao1, Hongmei Li1, Yuanyuan Ji1, Zheng Wang1, Cuiyun Liu1, Shihua Zhao1 and Wenhua Xiang1,*

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Two equine influenza virus (EIV strains were isolated during two restricted outbreaks from Heilongjiang Province, China in 2010 and 2011. Phylogenetic analysis of HA1 (hemagglutinin 1 gene revealed that the isolates belonged to Florida 2 sublineage of American lineage. Further analysis of the putative antigenic sites located in HA1 subunit protein revealed each isolate had a unique amino acid change. Analysis of antigenic sites between Chinese EIV and vaccine strains indicated equine influenza (EI vaccines containing Richmond/1/07-like antigen seemed to have an optimum effect in China. Meanwhile, the Ohio/03 vaccine strain contained in updated ProteqFlu had the most closely genetically relationship with recent EIV isolates in China. China has not its own commercially available EI vaccine and most horses are still unvaccinated. Therefore, to monitor antigenic variation of circulating EIVs and give considerable suggestions on selection of vaccine candidate plays an important role in preventing and controlling EIV in China.

  11. Detection and genotyping of classical swine fever virus isolates in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milićević Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical swine fever (CSF is a highly contagious disease of pigs leading to significant economic losses worldwide. Classical swine fever virus can be classified into three genogroups, each consisting of three or four subgroups. However, there is a lack of knowledge on the genotypes of CSFV isolates in Republic of Serbia. This study, based on the sequences analysis of partial E2 gene and 5' non coding region (NCR of 15 CSFV isolated during 2006-2008 from domestic pigs, revealed that all were clustered into genetic group 2.3. Additionally, we showed that the two most often used real time RT-PCR assays were able to detect all local CSF viruses circulated in Serbia in the last years during intensive vaccination campaign against CSF. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31075 and TR 31088

  12. Genome Sequences of Three Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus Isolates from Hawthorns in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Zheng, Wenyan; Wang, Mei; Li, Xiaohong; Ma, Yue; Dai, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequences of Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV) isolates from three accessions of hawthorns (Crataegus pinnatifida) grown at Shenyang Agricultural University were determined using Illumina RNA-seq. To confirm the assembly data from the de novo sequencing, two ACLSV genomic sequences (SY01 and SY02) were sequenced using the Sanger method. The SY01 and SY02 sequences obtained with the Sanger method showed 99.5% and 99.7% nucleotide identity with the transcriptome data, respectively. The genome sequences of the hawthorn isolates SY01, SY02 and SY03 (GenBank accession nos. KM207212, KU870524 and KU870525, respectively) consisted of 7,543, 7,561 and 7,545 nucleotides, respectively, excluding poly-adenylated tails. Sequence analysis revealed that these hawthorn isolates shared an overall nucleotide identity of 82.8-92.1% and showed the highest identity of 90.3% for isolate YH (GenBank accession no. KC935955) from pear and the lowest identity of 67.7% for isolate TaTao5 (GenBank accession no. EU223295) from peach. Hawthorn isolate sequences were similar to those of 'B6 type' ACLSV. The relationship between ACLSV isolates largely depends upon the host species. This represents the first comparative study of the genome sequences of ACLSV isolates from hawthorns. PMID:27519059

  13. Alstroemeria-infecting cucumber mosaic virus isolates contain additional sequences in the RNA 3 segment.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Y.K; Prins, M.W.; Derks, A.F.L.M.; Langeveld, S A; Goldbach, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    The coat protein (CP) genes and flanking regions of three alstroemeria-infecting cucumber mosaic virus isolates (CMV-ALS), denoted ALS-LBO, ALS-IPO, and ALS-NAK, were cloned and their nucleotide sequence determined and compared at both nucleic acid and deduced protein level with the published sequences of CMV RNA 3. The sequences of these isolates showed more than 95% nucleotide and peptide sequence homology to each other and to other members of subgroup II CMV. Strikingly, an additional sequ...

  14. Short communication. Genotyping and phylogenetic analysis of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV isolates in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izedin Goga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Three serum samples positive in Antigen ELISA BVDV have been tested to characterise genetic diversity of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV in Kosovo. Samples were obtained in 2011 from heifers and were amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, sequenced and analysed by computer-assisted phylogenetic analysis. Amplified products and nucleotide sequence showed that all 3 isolates belonged to BVDV 1 genotype and 1b sub genotype. These results enrich the extant knowledge of BVDV and represent the first documented data about Kosovo BVDV isolates.

  15. Isolation and molecular characterization of Fikirini rhabdovirus, a novel virus from a Kenyan bat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kading, Rebekah C; Gilbert, Amy T; Mossel, Eric C; Crabtree, Mary B; Kuzmin, Ivan V; Niezgoda, Michael; Agwanda, Bernard; Markotter, Wanda; Weil, M Ryan; Montgomery, Joel M; Rupprecht, Charles E; Miller, Barry R

    2013-11-01

    Zoonotic and vector-borne pathogens have comprised a significant component of emerging human infections in recent decades, and bats are increasingly recognized as reservoirs for many of these disease agents. To identify novel pathogens associated with bats, we screened tissues of bats collected in Kenya. Virus isolates were identified by next generation sequencing of viral nucleic acid preparations from the infected cell culture supernatant and characterized. Here we report the identification of Fikirini rhabdovirus, a novel rhabdovirus isolated from a bat, Hipposideros vittatus, captured along the Kenyan coast. PMID:23939976

  16. Genetic Diversity of a Natural Population of Apple stem pitting virus Isolated from Apple in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ju Yeon; Joa, Jae Ho; Choi, Kyung San; Do, Ki Seck; Lim, Han Cheol; Chung, Bong Nam

    2014-06-01

    Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV), of the Foveavirus genus in the family Betaflexiviridae, is one of the most common viruses of apple and pear trees. To examine variability of the coat protein (CP) gene from ASPV, eight isolates originating from 251 apple trees, which were collected from 22 apple orchards located in intensive apple growing areas of the North Gyeongsang and North Jeolla Provinces in Korea, were sequenced and compared. The nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene of eight ASPV isolates ranged from 77.0 to 97.0%, while the amino acid sequence identity ranged from 87.7 to 98.5%. The N-terminal region of the viral CP gene was highly variable, whereas the C-terminal region was conserved. Genetic algorithm recombination detection (GARD) and single breakpoint recombination (SBP) analyses identified base substitutions between eight ASPV isolates at positions 54 and 57 and position 771, respectively. GABranch analysis was used to determine whether the eight isolates evolved due to positive selection. All values in the GABranch analysis showed a ratio of substitution rates at non-synonymous and synonymous sites (dNS/dS) below 1, suggestive of strong negative selection forces during ASPV CP history. Although negative selection dominated CP evolution in the eight ASPV isolates, SLAC and FEL tests identified four possible positive selection sites at codons 10, 22, 102, and 158. This is the first study of the ASPV genome in Korea. PMID:25289003

  17. Genetic Diversity of a Natural Population of Apple stem pitting virus Isolated from Apple in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Yeon Yoon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV, of the Foveavirus genus in the family Betaflexiviridae, is one of the most common viruses of apple and pear trees. To examine variability of the coat protein (CP gene from ASPV, eight isolates originating from 251 apple trees, which were collected from 22 apple orchards located in intensive apple growing areas of the North Gyeongsang and North Jeolla Provinces in Korea, were sequenced and compared. The nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene of eight ASPV isolates ranged from 77.0 to 97.0%, while the amino acid sequence identity ranged from 87.7 to 98.5%. The N-terminal region of the viral CP gene was highly variable, whereas the C-terminal region was conserved. Genetic algorithm recombination detection (GARD and single breakpoint recombination (SBP analyses identified base substitutions between eight ASPV isolates at positions 54 and 57 and position 771, respectively. GABranch analysis was used to determine whether the eight isolates evolved due to positive selection. All values in the GABranch analysis showed a ratio of substitution rates at non-synonymous and synonymous sites (dNS/dS below 1, suggestive of strong negative selection forces during ASPV CP history. Although negative selection dominated CP evolution in the eight ASPV isolates, SLAC and FEL tests identified four possible positive selection sites at codons 10, 22, 102, and 158. This is the first study of the ASPV genome in Korea.

  18. Nucleotide sequence of both genomic RNAs of a North American tobacco rattle virus isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarshana, M R; Berger, P H

    1998-01-01

    The complete sequence of a North American tobacco rattle virus (TRV) isolate, 'Oregon yellow' (ORY), was determined from cDNA and RT-PCR clones derived from the two genomic RNAs of this isolate. The RNA-1 is 6790 bases and RNA-2 is 3261 bases. The sequence of TRV-ORY RNA-1 was similar to RNA-1 to TRV isolate SYM, and differs in 48 nucleotides. TRV-ORY RNA-1 was one base shorter than--SYM, and had 47 base substitutions resulting in 12 amino acid substitutions of which 4 were conservative. The RNA-2 of TRV-ORY was distinct from RNA-2 of other characterized TRV isolates and contained three open reading frames (ORFs) that could potentially code for proteins of MW 22.4 kDa, 37.6 kDa and 17.9 kDa. Based on the homology of the predicted amino acid sequence with those of other tobraviruses. ORF1 of RNA-2 encodes the coat protein (CP). The protein sequence of ORF2 had regions of limited similarity with those of ORF2 of two other TRV isolates and pea early browning tobravirus. The ORF3 was unique to TRV-ORY. Phylogenetic analysis of tobravirus CPs indicated that TRV-ORY was most closely related to pepper ringspot tobravirus and TRV-TCM. The relationship of tobravirus CPs to other rod-shaped tubular plant viruses is also discussed. PMID:9739332

  19. Complete genome sequence analysis of two Citrus tatter leaf virus (CTLV) isolates from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhen; LI Zhong-an; LIU Ke-hong; ZHOU Chang-yong

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand molecular characterization of Citrus tatter leaf virus (CTLV) isolated from China, ful-length cDNAs of CTLV-MTH and CTLV-XHC from Citrus reticulata and Citrus sinensis were cloned and sequenced based on whole-genome ampliifcation by RT-PCR. The complete nucleotide sequences of CTLV-MTH and CTLV-XHC were determined to be 6 497 nucleotides in length and shared 79.9–91.0%and 78.8–98.0%nucleotide sequence identity, respectively, with other Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV) or CTLV strains available in GenBank. Unexpectedly, CTLV-MTH showed the highest nucleo-tide sequence identity (91%) with an apple isolate of ASGV, fol owed by 86.5%with ASGV-HH and 85.7%with ASGV-CHN. Furthermore, CTLV-MTH and three ASGV strains were grouped to a separate cluster in the phylogenetic tree, suggesting it has a closer relationship to ASGV than to CTLV. Therefore, it can be concluded roughly that CTLV may be not a distinct strains of ASGV. We proposed that Citrus tatter leaf virus should be renamed Apple stem grooving virus.

  20. Phylogenetic study on the 5'-untranslated region of bovine viral diarrhoea virus isolates from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Esmaelizad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhoea virus is a pathogen of bovids associated with reproduction system, causing in infected animals a range of ailments, from abortion to congenital defects. In this article, the nucleotide structure of the 5'-untranslated region (5-UTR from 7 Iranian bovine diarrhoea virus (BVDV isolates was characterized and subjected to comparative analysis against a panel of BVDV isolates from different sources. To this end, a 288 bp-long stretch of the internal ribosome entry site was amplified by RT-PCR. The PCR products subsequently cloned into PTZ57T vector and sequenced using T7 promoter primers. This resulted in detection of 3 new point mutations G→A and G→T in 2 isolates. When these findings were phylogenetically assessed, all the examined Iranian isolates were deemed to belong to the type1 of BVDV. Besides, 2 subtypes were identified among these isolates. In group A, a high level of similarity (99.2% between Iranian isolates with a cytopathic Australian strain of BVDV-1c was detected; while in group B, the 4 Iranian isolates proved to be very similar to NADL-like BVDV-1a strains. We believe that the surprisingly high level of similarity between group A Iranian isolates and their corresponding Australian strain is likely to be an indication of a shared common ancestor. If correct, the most likely explanation of this observation is the introduction of such strains from Australia to Iran, possibly through exportation of infected live animals or animal productions (e.g. semen and meat at some points in the past. Nevertheless, this hypothesis remains to be proved as further epidemiological work at genomic level is required to understand population of BVDV in Iran.

  1. Neuropathogenicity of Two Saffold Virus Type 3 Isolates in Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Kotani, Osamu; Naeem, Asif; Suzuki, Tadaki; Iwata-Yoshikawa, Naoko; Sato, Yuko; Nakajima, Noriko; Hosomi, Takushi; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Kozawa, Kunihisa; Hasegawa, Hideki; Taguchi, Fumihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Saffold virus (SAFV), a picornavirus, is occasionally detected in children with acute flaccid paralysis, meningitis, and cerebellitis; however, the neuropathogenicity of SAFV remains undetermined. Methods The virulence of two clinical isolates of SAFV type 3 (SAFV-3) obtained from a patient with aseptic meningitis (AM strain) and acute upper respiratory inflammation (UR strain) was analyzed in neonatal and young mice utilizing virological, pathological, and immunological methods. Re...

  2. First isolation and genotyping of viruses from recent outbreaks of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) in Slovenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toplak, Ivan; Hostnik, Peter; Rihtaric, Danijela;

    2010-01-01

    clinical signs of VHS were observed among the diseased fish. VHSV was confirmed by virus isolation, immunoperoxidase test, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and phylogenetic analysis. Based on 1 complete (1524 nucleotides [nt]) and 9 partial (600 nt) glycoprotein gene nucleotide...... reliable tool for fast routine genotyping in diagnostic laboratories. This is the first report of a natural epidemic associated with VHSV infection in Slovenia since the eradication of the disease in 1977....

  3. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to Brazilian isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C. Kreutz

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Three Brazilian isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV, antigenically distinct from the standard North American isolates, were selected to immunize BALB/c mice in order to obtain hybridoma cells secreting anti-BVDV monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Two hybridoma clones secreting mAbs, reacting specifically with BVDV-infected cells (mAbs 3.1C4 and 6.F11, were selected after five fusions and screening of 1001 hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine-resistant clones. These mAbs reacted in an indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA assay with all 39 South and North American BVDV field isolates and reference strains available in our laboratory, yet failed to recognize other pestiviruses, namely the hog cholera virus. The mAbs reacted at dilutions up to 1:25,600 (ascitic fluid and 1:100 (hybridoma culture supernatant in IFA and immunoperoxidase (IPX staining of BVDV-infected cells but only mAb 3.1C4 neutralized virus infectivity. Furthermore, both mAbs failed to recognize BVDV proteins by IPX in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues and following SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analysis of virus-infected cells, suggesting they are probably directed to conformational-type epitopes. The protein specificity of these mAbs was then determined by IFA staining of CV-1 cells transiently expressing each of the BVDV proteins: mAb 3.1C4 reacted with the structural protein E2/gp53 and mAb 6.F11 reacted with the structural protein E1/gp25. Both mAbs were shown to be of the IgG2a isotype. To our knowledge, these are the first mAbs produced against South American BVDV isolates and will certainly be useful for research and diagnostic purposes.

  4. Experimental evaluation of sand fly collection and storage methods for the isolation and molecular detection of Phlebotomus-borne viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Remoli, Maria Elena; Bongiorno, Gioia; Fortuna, Claudia; Marchi, Antonella; Bianchi, Riccardo; Khoury, Cristina; Ciufolini, Maria Grazia; Gramiccia, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Background Several viruses have been recently isolated from Mediterranean phlebotomine sand flies; some are known to cause human disease while some are new to science. To monitor the Phlebotomus-borne viruses spreading, field studies are in progress using different sand fly collection and storage methods. Two main sampling techniques consist of CDC light traps, an attraction method allowing collection of live insects in which the virus is presumed to be fairly preserved, and sticky traps, an ...

  5. Genetics, Receptor Binding, Replication, and Mammalian Transmission of H4 Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Live Poultry Markets in China

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Libin; Deng, Guohua; Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Qianyi; Kong, Huihui; Gu, Chunyang; Guan, Yuntao; Suzuki, Yasuo; Li, Yanbing; Jiang, Yongping; Tian, Guobin; Liu, Liling; Li, Chengjun; Chen, Hualan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT H4 avian influenza virus (AIV) is one of the most prevalent influenza virus subtypes in the world. However, whether H4 AIVs pose a threat to public health remains largely unclear. Here, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationships, receptor binding properties, replication, and transmissibility in mammals of H4 AIVs isolated from live poultry markets in China between 2009 and 2012. Genomic sequence analysis of 36 representative H4 viruses revealed 32 different genotypes, indicating that...

  6. Isolation of Hepatitis C Virus in Norjizac Vials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zary Nokhodian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV has been recognized as a major health problem worldwide. The estimated number of infected individuals is over 170 million people worldwide (1. After hepatitis B, it is the most important cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Therefore, prevention of HCV infection is one of the most important public health concerns, because the majority of infected people would experience chronic hepatitis (2, 3. HCV can be easily transmitted through blood products transfusion and infected syringes. No surprise, the infection rate is remarkably high among injecting drug abusers (IDUs (4, 5.HCV has been identified as the most common viral infection affecting IDUs (6. Sharing contaminated needles and syringes, going to shooting galleries, using cocaine, unprotected sex, and sharing shaving equipments, are all among the major causes of contaminating IDUs with HCV (7, 8. In some countries such as India, Pakistan, Indonesia, and Thailand, the prevalence of anti-HCV antibody among the IDUs is reported to be at least 90% (9. The reported prevalence from Iran ranged from 38% to 47% (10 and in another study it is about 60% (11."Norjizac," also known as "hand-made Temgizac," and "Ab Crack (Crack solution," is a slang name for a drug which is abused by a number of IDUs in Iran since five years ego. It is usually used as intravenous injections, although some of drug abusers use Norjizac intramuscularly and/or subcutaneously. Norjizac is one of the most hard drugs in Iran and accompanying several complications like abscess formation, development of septic emboli and soft tissue infections in IDUs. Based on reports on probable human contamination in Norjizac vials, we conducted this study to find out why some of IDUs who used the drug have developed HCV infection without any history of sharing in injection tools. In a case series reported from Isfahan conducted in 2008, 14 vials of Norjizac bought from smugglers from various

  7. Molecular characterization of Indian isolate of peanut mottle virus and immunodiagnosis using bacterial expressed core capsid protein

    OpenAIRE

    Soumya, K.; Yogita, M.; Prasanthi, Y.; K.Anitha; Kishor, P. B. Kavi; Jain, R. K.; Mandal, Bikash

    2014-01-01

    Peanut mottle virus (PeMoV), a seed borne potyvirus was recorded in India in 1978, however the virus was not characterized at molecular level. In the present study, an isolate of PeMoV infecting peanut in southern India was characterized based on host reactions and coat protein (CP) gene sequence, which revealed that the Indian isolate was very close to a peanut isolate reported from Israel and distinct from pea isolate reported from USA. The core region of CP gene that contained majority of ...

  8. Status of sheep sera to bluetongue, peste des petits ruminants and sheep pox in a few northern states of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayagamurthy Balamurugan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Bluetongue (BT, peste des petits ruminants (PPR and sheep pox are the most economically important viral diseases of sheep in India. Serum samples obtained from sheep in five northern states of the country were screened for antibody against these agents to explore the extent of spread of these infections. A total of 516 serum samples were screened for the presence of antibodies against BT and PPR viruses. Of these, 155 samples were also tested for antibodies against sheep pox virus. BT antibodies were found in 293 (56.8% animals, PPR virus antibodies in 215 (41.7% and sheep pox virus antibodies in 106 (68.3%. Of the serum samples tested, 25.2% were positive for antibodies against all three viruses. These findings clearly demonstrated not only the enzootic nature of disease, but also the co-existence of antibodies to more than one of these viruses which would indicate that concurrent infections were common. Therefore, control measures should focus in combating all three diseases simultaneously by exploring the possibility of a trivalent vaccine or the use of multiple genes expressing vectored vaccine.

  9. Nasal Wipes for Influenza A Virus Detection and Isolation from Swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolting, Jacqueline M; Szablewski, Christine M; Edwards, Jody L; Nelson, Sarah W; Bowman, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance for influenza A viruses in swine is critical to human and animal health because influenza A virus rapidly evolves in swine populations and new strains are continually emerging. Swine are able to be infected by diverse lineages of influenza A virus making them important hosts for the emergence and maintenance of novel influenza A virus strains. Sampling pigs in diverse settings such as commercial swine farms, agricultural fairs, and live animal markets is important to provide a comprehensive view of currently circulating IAV strains. The current gold-standard ante-mortem sampling technique (i.e. collection of nasal swabs) is labor intensive because it requires physical restraint of the pigs. Nasal wipes involve rubbing a piece of fabric across the snout of the pig with minimal to no restraint of the animal. The nasal wipe procedure is simple to perform and does not require personnel with professional veterinary or animal handling training. While slightly less sensitive than nasal swabs, virus detection and isolation rates are adequate to make nasal wipes a viable alternative for sampling individual pigs when low stress sampling methods are required. The proceeding protocol outlines the steps needed to collect a viable nasal wipe from an individual pig. PMID:26709840

  10. Phylogenetic and biological characterization of virulent Newcastle disease viruses isolated in wild birds during 2002-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of a West Nile virus surveillance program in the Houston Metropolitan Area and in Rhode Island, extracts from brain from 5608 dead birds representing 21 avian orders, were cultured in Vero cells. Sixteen Newcastle disease virus isolates were recovered from birds of the order Columbiformes. ...

  11. Evaluation and optimization of avian embryos and cell culture methods for efficient isolation and propagation of avian influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surveillance of wild bird populations for avian influenza viruses (AIV) contributes to our understanding of AIV evolution and ecology. Both real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) and virus isolation in embryonating chicken eggs (ECE) are standard methods for detecting A...

  12. A complete sequence and comparative analysis of a SARS-associated virus (Isolate BJ01)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The genome sequence of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-associated virus provides essential information for the identification of pathogen(s), exploration of etiology and evolution, interpretation of transmission and pathogenesis, development of diagnostics, prevention by future vaccination, and treatment by developing new drugs. We report the complete genome sequence and comparative analysis of an isolate (BJ01) of the coronavirus that has been recognized as a pathogen for SARS. The genome is 29725 nt in size and has 11 ORFs (Open Reading Frames). It is composed of a stable region encoding an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (composed of 2 ORFs) and a variable region representing 4 CDSs (coding sequences) for viral structural genes (the S, E, M, N proteins) and 5 PUPs (putative uncharacterized proteins). Its gene order is identical to that of other known coronaviruses. The sequence alignment with all known RNA viruses places this virus as a member in the family of Coronaviridae. Thirty putative substitutions have been identified by comparative analysis of the 5 SARS- associated virus genome sequences in GenBank. Fifteen of them lead to possible amino acid changes (non-synonymousmutations) in the proteins. Three amino acid changes, with predicted alteration of physical and chemical features, have been detected in the S protein that is postulated to be involved in the immunoreactions between the virus and its host. Two amino acid changes have been detected in the M protein, which could be related to viral envelope formation. Phylogenetic analysis suggests the possibility of non-human origin of the SARS-associated viruses but provides no evidence that they are man-made. Further efforts should focus on identifying the etiology of the SARS-associated virus and ruling out conclusively the existence of other possible SARS-related pathogen(s).

  13. Phylogenetic analysis and pathogenicity of H3 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from live poultry markets in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongrui; Shi, Ying; Ruan, Tao; Li, Xuesong; Teng, Qiaoyang; Chen, Hongjun; Yang, Jianmei; Liu, Qinfang; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    H3 subtype influenza A virus is one of the main subtypes that threats both public and animal health. However, the evolution and pathogenicity of H3 avian influenza virus (AIV) circulating in domestic birds in China remain largely unclear. In this study, seven H3 AIVs (four H3N2 and three H3N8) were isolated from poultry in live poultry market (LPM) in China. Phylogenetic analyses of full genomes showed that all viruses were clustered into Eurasian lineage, except N8 genes of two H3N8 isolates fell into North American lineage. Intriguingly, the N8 gene of one H3N8 and PB2, PB1, NP and NS of two H3N2 isolates have close relationship with those of the highly pathogenic H5N8 viruses circulating in Korea and United States, suggesting that the H3-like AIV may contribute internal genes to the highly pathogenic H5N8 viruses. Phylogenetic tree of HA gene and antigenic cross-reactivity results indicated that two antigenically different H3 viruses are circulating in LPM in China. Most of the H3 viruses replicated in mice lung and nasal turbinate without prior adaptation, and the representative H3 viruses infected chickens without causing clinical signs. The reassortment of H3 subtype influenza viruses warrants continuous surveillance in LPM in China. PMID:27270298

  14. Phylogenetic analysis and pathogenicity of H3 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from live poultry markets in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongrui; Shi, Ying; Ruan, Tao; Li, Xuesong; Teng, Qiaoyang; Chen, Hongjun; Yang, Jianmei; Liu, Qinfang; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    H3 subtype influenza A virus is one of the main subtypes that threats both public and animal health. However, the evolution and pathogenicity of H3 avian influenza virus (AIV) circulating in domestic birds in China remain largely unclear. In this study, seven H3 AIVs (four H3N2 and three H3N8) were isolated from poultry in live poultry market (LPM) in China. Phylogenetic analyses of full genomes showed that all viruses were clustered into Eurasian lineage, except N8 genes of two H3N8 isolates fell into North American lineage. Intriguingly, the N8 gene of one H3N8 and PB2, PB1, NP and NS of two H3N2 isolates have close relationship with those of the highly pathogenic H5N8 viruses circulating in Korea and United States, suggesting that the H3-like AIV may contribute internal genes to the highly pathogenic H5N8 viruses. Phylogenetic tree of HA gene and antigenic cross-reactivity results indicated that two antigenically different H3 viruses are circulating in LPM in China. Most of the H3 viruses replicated in mice lung and nasal turbinate without prior adaptation, and the representative H3 viruses infected chickens without causing clinical signs. The reassortment of H3 subtype influenza viruses warrants continuous surveillance in LPM in China. PMID:27270298

  15. Multiple recombinants in two dengue virus, serotype-2 isolates from patients from Oaxaca, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cisneros Alejandro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue (DEN is a serious cause of mortality and morbidity in the world including Mexico, where the infection is endemic. One of the states with the highest rate of dengue cases is Oaxaca. The cause of DEN is a positive-sense RNA virus, the dengue virus (DENV that evolves rapidly increasing its variability due to the absence of a repair mechanism that leads to approximately one mutational event per genome replication; which results in enhancement of viral adaptation, including the escape from host immune responses. Additionally, recombination may play a role in driving the evolution of DENV, which may potentially affect virulence and cause host tropism changes. Recombination in DENV has not been described in Mexican strains, neither has been described the relevance in virus evolution in an endemic state such as Oaxaca where the four serotypes of DENV are circulating. Results To study whether there are isolates from Oaxaca having recombination, we obtained the sequence of 6 different isolates of DENV-2 Asian/American genotype from the outbreak 2005-6, one clone of the C(91-prM-E-NS1(2400 structural genes, and 10 clones of the E gene from the isolate MEX_OAX_1656_05. Evidence of recombination was found by using different methods along with two softwares: RDP3 and GARD. The Oaxaca MEX_OAX_1656_05 and MEX_OAX_1038_05 isolates sequenced in this study were recombinant viruses that incorporate the genome sequence from the Cosmopolitan genotype. Furthermore, the clone of the E gene namely MEX_OAX_165607_05 from this study was also recombinant, incorporating genome sequence from the American genotype. Conclusions This is the first report of recombination in DENV-2 in Mexico. Given such a recombinant activity new genomic combinations were produced, this could play a significant role in the DENV evolution and must be considered as a potentially important mechanism generating genetic variation in this virus with serious implications for

  16. Genetic diversity of subgenotype 2.1 isolates of classical swine fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wenjie; Wu, Jianmin; Lu, Zongji; Zhang, Li; Qin, Shaomin; Chen, Fenglian; Peng, Zhicheng; Wang, Qin; Ma, Ling; Bai, Anbin; Guo, Huancheng; Shi, Jishu; Tu, Changchun

    2016-07-01

    As the causative agent of classical swine fever, the economically devastating swine disease worldwide, classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is currently classified into the 11 subgenotypes, of which subgenotype 2.1 is distributed worldwide and showing more genetic diversity than other subgenotypes. Prior to this report, subgenotype 2.1 was divided into three sub-subgenotypes (2.1a-2.1c). To further analyze the genetic diversity of CSFV isolates in China, 39 CSFV isolates collected between 2004 and 2012 in two Chinese provinces Guangxi and Guangdong were sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analysis together with reference sequences retrieved from GenBank. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 190-nt and/or 1119-nt full length E2 gene fragments showed that current CSFV subgenotype 2.1 virus isolates in the world could be divided into 10 sub-subgenotypes (2.1a-2.1j) and the 39 isolates collected in this study were grouped into 7 of them (2.1a-2.1c and 2.1g-2.1j). Among the 10 sub-subgenotypes, 2.1d-2.1j were newly identified. Sub-subgenotype 2.1d isolates were circulated only in India, however the rest 9 sub-subgenotypes were from China with some of them closely related to isolates from European and neighboring Asian countries. According to the temporal and spatial distribution of CSFV subgenotype 2.1 isolates, the newly classified 10 sub-subgenotypes were further categorized into three groups: dominant sub-subgenotype, minor sub-subgenotype and silent sub-subgenotype, and each sub-subgenotype can be found only in certain geographical areas. Taken together, this study reveals the complex genetic diversity of CSFV subgenotype 2.1 and improves our understanding about the epidemiological trends of CSFV subgenotype 2.1 in the world, particularly in China. PMID:27085291

  17. Complete nucleotide sequence of Alfalfa mosaic virus isolated from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucco, Verónica; de Breuil, Soledad; Bejerman, Nicolás; Lenardon, Sergio; Giolitti, Fabián

    2014-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) isolate infecting alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina, AMV-Arg, was determined. The virus genome has the typical organization described for AMV, and comprises 3,643, 2,593, and 2,038 nucleotides for RNA1, 2 and 3, respectively. The whole genome sequence and each encoding region were compared with those of other four isolates that have been completely sequenced from China, Italy, Spain and USA. The nucleotide identity percentages ranged from 95.9 to 99.1 % for the three RNAs and from 93.7 to 99 % for the protein 1 (P1), protein 2 (P2), movement protein and coat protein (CP) encoding regions, whereas the amino acid identity percentages of these proteins ranged from 93.4 to 99.5 %, the lowest value corresponding to P2. CP sequences of AMV-Arg were compared with those of other 25 available isolates, and the phylogenetic analysis based on the CP gene was carried out. The highest percentage of nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene was 98.3 % with a Chinese isolate and 98.6 % at the amino acid level with four isolates, two from Italy, one from Brazil and the remaining one from China. The phylogenetic analysis showed that AMV-Arg is closely related to subgroup I of AMV isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a complete nucleotide sequence of AMV from South America and the first worldwide report of complete nucleotide sequence of AMV isolated from alfalfa as natural host. PMID:24510307

  18. Characterization of low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds in Mongolia 2005 through 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodnomdarjaa Ruuragchaa

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the emergence of H5N1 high pathogenicity (HP avian influenza virus (AIV in Asia, numerous efforts worldwide have focused on elucidating the relative roles of wild birds and domestic poultry movement in virus dissemination. In accordance with this a surveillance program for AIV in wild birds was conducted in Mongolia from 2005-2007. An important feature of Mongolia is that there is little domestic poultry production in the country, therefore AIV detection in wild birds would not likely be from spill-over from domestic poultry. Results During 2005-2007 2,139 specimens representing 4,077 individual birds of 45 species were tested for AIV by real time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR and/or virus isolation. Bird age and health status were recorded. Ninety rRT-PCR AIV positive samples representing 89 individual birds of 19 species including 9 low pathogenicity (LP AIVs were isolated from 6 species. A Bar-headed goose (Anser indicus, a Whooper swan (Cygnus cygnus and 2 Ruddy shelducks (Tadorna ferruginea were positive for H12N3 LP AIV. H16N3 and H13N6 viruses were isolated from Black-headed gulls (Larus ridibundus. A Red-crested pochard (Rhodonessa rufina and 2 Mongolian gulls (Larus vagae mongolicus were positive for H3N6 and H16N6 LP AIV, respectively. Full genomes of each virus isolate were sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically and were most closely related to recent European and Asian wild bird lineage AIVs and individual genes loosely grouped by year. Reassortment occurred within and among different years and subtypes. Conclusion Detection and/or isolation of AIV infection in numerous wild bird species, including 2 which have not been previously described as hosts, reinforces the wide host range of AIV within avian species. Reassortment complexity within the genomes indicate the introduction of new AIV strains into wild bird populations annually, however there is enough over-lap of infection for reassortment to occur. Further work is

  19. Complete genome sequence of an avian leukosis virus isolate associated with hemangioma and myeloid leukosis in egg-type and meat-type chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new virus isolate was separated from a commercial egg-type flock of chickens in China and was determined as subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J). ALV-J is known to cause myeloid leukosis. But this new isolate of viruses causes both hemangioma and myeloid leukosis in chickens. Hemangioma is an a...

  20. Biological and serological characterization of the C-type RNA viruses isolated from the C57BL/Ka strain of mice; 2. Induction and propagation of the isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several classes of C-type RNA viruses have been isolated from the tissues of C57BL/Ka mice. Normal lymphocytes and haemopoietic tissues, lymphoid tumors induced by X-rays or virus inoculation, and embryo fibroblast cultures have yielded an array of virus preparations with distinct biological and serological characteristics. The type of virus isolated depends on the cell of origin and on the procedures used for viral induction, isolation, and propagation. Parallel studies in vivo and in vitro indicate that some isolates are thymotropic and leukemogenic (TL+), while others which replicate well on fibroblastic cells in vitro (fibrotropism) lack TL activity in vivo. The thymotropic, leukemogenic isolates lose their TL activity, partially or totally, when passaged in fibroblastic cells, and the emerging virus has significantly different characteristics. This report describes the procedures of induction, isolation, and propagation which yield these two distinctively different classes of virus isolates, and characterizes their biological activities in vivo and in vitro

  1. Receptor-binding properties of modern human influenza viruses primarily isolated in Vero and MDCK cells and chicken embryonated eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the receptor specificity of modern human influenza H1N1 and H3N2 viruses, the analogs of natural receptors, namely sialyloligosaccharides conjugated with high molecular weight (about 1500 kDa) polyacrylamide as biotinylated and label-free probes, have been used. Viruses isolated from clinical specimens were grown in African green monkey kidney (Vero) or Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and chicken embryonated eggs. All Vero-derived viruses had hemagglutinin (HA) sequences indistinguishable from original viruses present in clinical samples, but HAs of three of seven tested MDCK-derived isolates had one or two amino acid substitutions. Despite these host-dependent mutations and differences in the structure of HA molecules of individual strains, all studied Vero- and MDCK-isolated viruses bound to Neu5Ac α2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc (6'SLN) essentially stronger than to Neu5Acα2-6Galβ1-4Glc (6'SL). Such receptor-binding specificity has been typical for earlier isolated H1N1 human influenza viruses, but there is a new property of H3N2 viruses that has been circulating in the human population during recent years. Propagation of human viruses in chicken embryonated eggs resulted in a selection of variants with amino acid substitutions near the HA receptor-binding site, namely Gln226Arg or Asp225Gly for H1N1 viruses and Leu194Ile and Arg220Ser for H3N2 viruses. These HA mutations disturb the observed strict 6'SLN specificity of recent human influenza viruses

  2. Propagation of Asian isolates of canine distemper virus (CDV in hamster cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi Ryoji

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds The aim of this study was to confirm the propagation of various canine distemper viruses (CDV in hamster cell lines of HmLu and BHK, since only a little is known about the possibility of propagation of CDV in rodent cells irrespective of their epidemiological importance. Methods The growth of CDV in hamster cell lines was monitored by titration using Vero.dogSLAMtag (Vero-DST cells that had been proven to be susceptible to almost all field isolates of CDV, with the preparations of cell-free and cell-associated virus from the cultures infected with recent Asian isolates of CDV (13 strains and by observing the development of cytopathic effect (CPE in infected cultures of hamster cell lines. Results Eleven of 13 strains grew in HmLu cells, and 12 of 13 strains grew in BHK cells with apparent CPE of cell fusion in the late stage of infection. Two strains and a strain of Asia 1 group could not grow in HmLu cells and BHK cells, respectively. Conclusion The present study demonstrates at the first time that hamster cell lines can propagate the majority of Asian field isolates of CDV. The usage of two hamster cell lines suggested to be useful to characterize the field isolates biologically.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of some Newcastle disease virus isolates from the Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Elmardi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was used to amplify 1412 bp of the fusion protein gene (F gene of four Newcastle disease virus (NDV isolates; two velogenic (TY-1/90 and DIK-90 and two lentogenic isolates (Dongla 88/1 and GD.S.1. Following sequencing, nucleotide sequences were annotated and 894 bp were compared phylogenetically with those from strains previously reported in the Sudan and the virus strains published on the GenBank. It could be demonstrated that TY-1/90 and DIK-90 strains belong to the genotype VI of NDV and are in close genetic relationship to sub- genotype VIb. TY-1/90 and DIK-90 strains were observed to be genetically unrelated to the earlier Sudanese isolates of 1970/80s and the late of 2000s suggesting a different origin. The close genetic relationship to the European and African pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 (PPMV-1 suggests a common ancestor. Dongola, GD.S.1 strains were classified into genotype II that comprises non-pathogenic lentogenic NDV strains. The present genetic classification of NDV isolates of the Sudan provides valuable information on genotypes of NDV. Further molecular epidemiological investigations of the recent outbreaks of Newcastle disease in the Sudan are needed in order to improve the efficiency of control strategies and vaccine development.

  4. Complete nucleotide sequence analysis of Cymbidium mosaic virus Indian isolate: further evidence for natural recombination among potexviruses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ang Rinzing Sherpa; Vipin Hallan; Promila Pathak; Aijaz Asghar Zaidi

    2007-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an Indian strain of Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) was determined and compared with other potexviruses. Phylogenetic analyses on the basis of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), triple gene block protein and coat protein (CP) amino acid sequences revealed that CymMV is closely related to the Narcissus mosaic virus (NMV), Scallion virus X (SVX), Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) and Potato aucuba mosaic virus (PAMV). Different sets of primers were used for the amplification of different regions of the genome through RT-PCR and the amplified genes were cloned in a suitable vector. The full genome of the Indian isolate of CymMV from Phaius tankervilliae shares 96–97% similarity with isolates reported from other countries. It was found that the CP gene of CymMV shares a high similarity with each other and other potexviruses. One of the Indian isolates seems to be a recombinant formed by the intermolecular recombination of two other CymMV isolates. The phylogenetic analyses, Recombination Detection Program (RDP2) analyses and sequence alignment survey provided evidence for the occurrence of a recombination between an Indian isolate (AM055720) as the major parent, and a Korean type-2 isolate (AF016914) as the minor parent. Recombination was also observed between a Singapore isolate (U62963) as the major parent, and a Taiwan CymMV (AY571289) as the minor parent.

  5. The complete genome sequence of a Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus isolated from an endemic region in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedushaj Iusuf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Balkan region and Kosovo in particular, is a well-known Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF endemic region, with frequent epidemic outbreaks and sporadic cases occurring with a hospitalized case fatality of approximately 30%. Recent analysis of complete genome sequences of diverse CCHF virus strains showed that the genome plasticity of the virus is surprisingly high for an arthropod-borne virus. High levels of nucleotide and amino acid differences, frequent RNA segment reassortment and even RNA recombination have been recently described. This diversity illustrates the need to determine the complete genome sequence of CCHF virus representatives of all geographically distinct endemic areas, particularly in light of the high pathogenicity of the virus and its listing as a potential bioterrorism threat. Here we describe the first complete CCHF virus genome sequence of a virus (strain Kosova Hoti isolated from a hemorrhagic fever case in the Balkans. This virus strain was isolated from a fatal CCHF case, and passaged only twice on Vero E6 cells prior to sequence analysis. The virus total genome was found to be 19.2 kb in length, consisting of a 1672 nucleotide (nt S segment, a 5364 nt M segment and a 12150 nt L segment. Phylogenetic analysis of CCHF virus complete genomes placed the Kosova Hoti strain in the Europe/Turkey group, with highest similarity seen with Russian isolates. The virus M segments are the most diverse with up to 31 and 27% differences seen at the nt and amino acid levels, and even 1.9% amino acid difference found between the Kosova Hoti and another strain from Kosovo (9553-01. This suggests that distinct virus strains can coexist in highly endemic areas.

  6. Characterization of an Avian Influenza Virus H9N2 Strain Isolated from a Wild Bird in Southern China

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Qian; Xie, Zhixun; Xie, Liji; Xie, Zhiqin; Deng, Xianwen; Liu, Jiabo; Luo, Sisi

    2014-01-01

    We isolated an avian influenza virus H9N2 strain from a wild bird in the Guangxi Province of southern China in 2013 named A/turtledove/Guangxi/49B6/2013(H9N2) (GX49B6). We aimed to understand the genetic characters of the GX49B6 strain by analyzing the complete genome sequence. The results showed that our isolated strain has features of low pathogenic avian influenza viruses and viruses that infect humans. The discovery of the complete genome sequence of the GX49B6 strain may be helpful to fu...

  7. Experimental infection with the Paderborn isolate of classical swine fever virus in 10-week-old pigs: determination of viral replication kinetics by quantitative RT-PCR, virus isolation and antigen ELISA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uttenthal, Åse; Storgaard, Torben; Oleksiewicz, M.B.;

    2003-01-01

    We performed experimental infection in 10-week-old pigs with the Paderborn isolate of classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Despite being epidemiologically linked to the major CSFV outbreak in The Netherlands in 1997, the in vivo replication kinetics of this isolate have to our knowledge not been...

  8. Characterization of Pigeon Paramyxoviruses (Newcastle disease virus) Isolated in Kazakhstan in 2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrey Bogoyavlenskiy; Vladimir Berezin; Alexey Prilipov; Eugeniy Usachev; Ilya Korotetskiy; Irina Zaitceva; Aydyn Kydyrmanov; Marat Sayatov

    2012-01-01

    Isolates of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from deceased wild and domestic pigeons in Kazakhstan were obtained from the Almaty region during 2005 and were genotypically analyzed by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers specific to the viral fusion (F) protein gene.Part of the amplified F protein DNA product (nucleotide sequence 47-422) and the deduced amino acid sequenceswere compared phylogenetically with those from strains previously reported in other geographic regions.Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Kazakhstanian pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 (PPMV-1) isolates belong to genotype Ⅵ or 4bii.To our knowledge,this is the first reported Ⅵ isolates that possess the sequences of 112 GKRQKR116* F117 within the F0 protein.The information is fundamental to improving the efficiency of control strategies and vaccine development for NDV.

  9. Isolation and complete genome sequencing of Mimivirus bombay, a Giant Virus in sewage of Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anirvan; Ali, Farhan; Bange, Disha; Kondabagil, Kiran

    2016-09-01

    We report the isolation and complete genome sequencing of a new Mimiviridae family member, infecting Acanthamoeba castellanii, from sewage in Mumbai, India. The isolated virus has a particle size of about 435 nm and a 1,182,200-bp genome. A phylogeny based on the DNA polymerase sequence placed the isolate as a new member of the Mimiviridae family lineage A and was named as Mimivirus bombay. Extensive presence of Mimiviridae family members in different environmental niches, with remarkably similar genome size and genetic makeup, point towards an evolutionary advantage that needs to be further investigated. The complete genome sequence of Mimivirus bombay was deposited at GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ under the accession number KU761889. PMID:27330993

  10. Differentiation of field isolates and vaccine strains of infectious laryngotracheitis virus by DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón, Jorge Luis; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2009-11-12

    Two different regions of the infected cell protein 4 (ICP4) gene of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) were amplified and sequenced for characterization of field isolates and tissue culture-origin (TCO) and chicken embryo-origin (CEO) vaccine strains. Phylogenetic analysis of the two regions showed differences in nucleotide and amino acid sequences between field isolates and attenuated vaccines. The PCR-RFLP results were identical to those obtained by DNA sequencing and validated their use to differentiate ILTV strains. The approach using the sequencing of the two fragments of the ICP4 gene showed to be an efficient and practical procedure to differentiate between field isolates and vaccine strains of ILTV. PMID:19747995

  11. Molecular epidemiological study of Arctic rabies virus isolates from Greenland and comparison with isolates from throughout the Arctic and Baltic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansfield, K.L.; Racloz, V.; McElhinney, L.M.;

    2006-01-01

    We report a Molecular epidemiological study of rabies in Arctic Countries by comparing a panel of novel Greenland isolates to a larger cohort of viral sequences from both Arctic and Baltic regions. Rabies Virus isolates originating from wildlife (Arctic/red foxes, raccoon-dogs and reindeer), from...... sequences from the Arctic and Arctic-like viruses, which were distinct from rabies isolates originating ill the Baltic region of Europe, the Steppes in Russia and from North America. The Arctic-like group consist of isolates from India, Pakistan, southeast Siberia and Japan. The Arctic group Was...... northeast Siberia and Alaska. Arctic 2b isolates represent a biotype, which is dispersed throughout the Arctic region. The broad distribution of rabies in the Arctic regions including Greenland, Canada and Alaska provides evidence for the movement of rabies across borders....

  12. Intersubtype Reassortments of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tinh Huu; Than, Van Thai; Thanh, Hien Dang; Hung, Vu-Khac; Nguyen, Duc Tan; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-01-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses are considered a threat to national animal industries, causing production losses and high mortality in domestic poultry. In recent years, quail has become a popular terrestrial poultry species raised for production of meat and eggs in Asia. In this study, to better understand the roles of quail in H5N1 viral evolution, two H5N1-positive samples, designated A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-49/2010 (CVVI-49/2010) and A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-50/2014 (CVVI-50/2014), were isolated from quail during H5N1 outbreaks in Vietnam, and their whole genome were analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis reveals new evolutionary variation in the worldwide H5N1 viruses. The quail HA genes were clustered into clades 1.1.1 (CVVI-49/2010) and clade 2.3.2.1c (CVVI-50/2014), which may have evolved from viruses circulating from chickens and/or ducks in Cambodia, mainland of China, Taiwan, Indonesia, and South Korea in recent years. Interestingly, the M2 gene of the CVVI-49/2010 strain contained amino acid substitutions at position 26L-I and 31S-N that are related to amantadine-resistance. In particular, the CVVI-50/2014 strain revealed evidence of multiple intersubtype reassortment events between virus clades 2.3.2.1c, 2.3.2.1b, and 2.3.2.1a. Data from this study supports the possible role of quail as an important intermediate host in avian influenza virus evolution. Therefore, additional surveillance is needed to monitor these HPAI viruses both serologically and virologically in quail. PMID:26900963

  13. Intersubtype Reassortments of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Quail.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinh Huu Nguyen

    Full Text Available H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI viruses are considered a threat to national animal industries, causing production losses and high mortality in domestic poultry. In recent years, quail has become a popular terrestrial poultry species raised for production of meat and eggs in Asia. In this study, to better understand the roles of quail in H5N1 viral evolution, two H5N1-positive samples, designated A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-49/2010 (CVVI-49/2010 and A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-50/2014 (CVVI-50/2014, were isolated from quail during H5N1 outbreaks in Vietnam, and their whole genome were analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis reveals new evolutionary variation in the worldwide H5N1 viruses. The quail HA genes were clustered into clades 1.1.1 (CVVI-49/2010 and clade 2.3.2.1c (CVVI-50/2014, which may have evolved from viruses circulating from chickens and/or ducks in Cambodia, mainland of China, Taiwan, Indonesia, and South Korea in recent years. Interestingly, the M2 gene of the CVVI-49/2010 strain contained amino acid substitutions at position 26L-I and 31S-N that are related to amantadine-resistance. In particular, the CVVI-50/2014 strain revealed evidence of multiple intersubtype reassortment events between virus clades 2.3.2.1c, 2.3.2.1b, and 2.3.2.1a. Data from this study supports the possible role of quail as an important intermediate host in avian influenza virus evolution. Therefore, additional surveillance is needed to monitor these HPAI viruses both serologically and virologically in quail.

  14. Phylogenetic and Pathogenic Analyses of Avian Influenza A H5N1 Viruses Isolated from Poultry in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Dongming; Liang, Libin; Li, Yanbing; Jiang, Yongping; Liu, Liling; Chen, Hualan

    2012-01-01

    Despite great efforts to control the infection of poultry with H5N1 viruses, these pathogens continue to evolve and spread in nature, threatening public health. Elucidating the characteristics of H5N1 avian influenza virus will benefit disease control and pandemic preparation. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 15 H5N1 avian influenza viruses isolated in Vietnam in 2006 and 2007 and performed phylogenetic analyses to compare these sequences with those of other viruses available in the public d...

  15. Phylogenetic Analysis of Citrus tristeza virus Isolates of Wild Type Citrus in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Long; ZHOU Chang-yong

    2014-01-01

    The genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from Chinese wild type citrus were analyzed by comparing the sequences of nine genomic regions (p23, p20, p13, p18, p25, p27, POL, HEL and k17) with the CTV isolates of cultivated citrus from different countries. The results showed that the divergence pattern of genomic RNA of the CTV isolates from wild type citrus was similar to that of other isolates from cultivated citrus, the 3´ proximal region was relatively conserved, and the 5´ proximal region had greater variability. The nine genomic regions of CTV isolates analyzed were found to have been under purifying selection in the evolution process. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the eleven Chinese wild CTV isolates were located at different clades and did not relfect their geographical origins, suggesting genetic diversity among the Chinese wild CTV populations. These results will aid in the understanding of molecular evolution of the Chinese CTV populations.

  16. The Development of Pathogenicity of Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Haryadi Wibowo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian infl uenza outbreak in Indonesia has been reported in various poultry due toH5N1 subtype. The presence of multiple basic amino acids within the cleavage site of HA glycoprotein hasbeen identifi ed to be associated with the pathogenicity of avian infl uenza virus. The study was retrospectivestudy which was designed to characterize the cleavage site and fusion site region of haemagglutinin gene ofAIV isolated from various poultry in 2003 to 2013. Isolation, Identifi cation and propagation were carried outto collect viral stock. For virus detection, reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR method on H5 and N1 genefragment was performed. All of RT-PCR HA gene positive products were sequenced for further nucleotideanalysis and to determine the nucleotide composition at the targeted fragment. The results are all AIV isolateswere identifi ed as H5N1 subtype. The sequence analyses revealed some motives of basic amino acid motivethat were classifi ed as highly pathogenic avian infl uenza virus. Further analyses on fusion domain of all AIVisolated during the period 2003 to 2013 showed conserved amino acid.Keywords: avian infl uenza, haemagglutinin, cleavage site, basic amino acid, fusion site

  17. Potato virus X isolation and purification and coat protein gene cloning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Duplat

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we describe the construction of potato virus X coat protein (PVX-CP gene clones from a Colombian isolate. Virus was isolated from field potato plants cultured at páramo de San Jorge. PVX particles were purified from Nicotiana tabacum leaves infected with a local lesion taken from Datura stramonium plants. The genomic RNA present in the virus particles consisted of a single species of about 6 Kb. cDNA synthesis representing genomic RNA was followed by Digoxigenin incorporation after priming with oligonucleotide 4DT/KPN. PCR amplification of CP gene sequence was made by using oligonucleotides OX6 and L/Kpn. An expected fragment of 870 bp, besides some 600-123 bp fragments, was obtained after PCR. The blunt-ended fragments were clonned into the PCR cloning pMOSblue plasmid. The insert size of the selected recombinant cDNA clones was determined by restriction analysis of the plasmidDNAwith Sma I and Hind III enzymes. Positive clones were also screened by direct colony PCR screening. The selected recombinant cDNA clones were stored in glycerol at .70 °C.

  18. Detection and isolation of infectious laryngotracheitis virus on a broiler farm after a disease outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormitorio, Teresa V; Giambrone, Joseph J; Macklin, Kenneth S

    2013-12-01

    A broiler farm in North Alabama suffered a mild infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) outbreak, as determined by clinical disease and PCR. The poultry integrator sought help to control further outbreaks in subsequent flocks. Samples were collected from various areas of the poultry houses on the farm over an 8-wk period. The first sampling was conducted 8 days after the infected farm was depopulated; the second was conducted 2 days prior to subsequent flock placement; and the third was conducted when the new flock was 5 wk of age. Samples were examined for ILT virus (ILTV) DNA by real-time PCR and virus isolation in embryos. The infected houses were cleaned, disinfected, heated, litter composted, and curtains replaced after the first sampling and prior to placement of the next flock. Samples from all periods were positive for ILTV DNA. However, the number of positive samples and crossing point values indicated a decrease in the amount of viral DNA, while virus isolation in embryos was successful only on the first sampling. The subsequent flock was vaccinated against ILTV by in ovo route using a commercial recombinant vaccine. Cleaning and sanitation after the disease outbreak reduced the amount of ILTV on the farm and together with in ovo vaccination of the new flock may have prevented a recurrence of another ILT outbreak. PMID:24597126

  19. Antiviral Activity of Bacillus sp. Isolated from the Marine Sponge Petromica citrina against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model of the Hepatitis C Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Clarice Weis Arns; Cláudia Beatriz Afonso de Menezes; Bárbara Pereira da Silva; Eduardo Furtado Flores; Fabiana Fantinatti-Garboggini; Marina Aiello Padilla; Juliana Cristina Santiago Bastos; Luciana Konecny Kohn

    2013-01-01

    The Hepatitis C virus causes chronic infections in humans, which can develop to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The Bovine viral diarrhea virus is used as a surrogate model for antiviral assays for the HCV. From marine invertebrates and microorganisms isolated from them, extracts were prepared for assessment of their possible antiviral activity. Of the 128 tested, 2 were considered active and 1 was considered promising. The best result was obtained from the extracts produced fro...

  20. Isolation and genetic characterization of novel reassortant H6N6 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from chickens in eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haibo; Lu, Rufeng; Peng, Xiuming; Peng, Xiaorong; Cheng, Linfang; Jin, Changzhong; Lu, Xiangyun; Xie, Tiansheng; Yao, Hangping; Wu, Nanping

    2016-07-01

    H6 subtype avian influenza viruses (AIVs) possess the ability to cross the species barrier to infect mammals and pose a threat to human health. From June 2014 to July 2015, 12 H6N6 AIVs were isolated from chickens in live-poultry markets in Zhejiang Province, Eastern China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these isolates received their genes from H6 and H9N2 subtype AIVs of poultry in China. These novel reassortant viruses showed moderate pathogenicity in mice and were able to replicate in mice without prior adaptation. Considering that novel reassorted H6N6 viruses were isolated from chickens in this study, it is possible that these chickens play an important role in the generation of novel reassorted H6N6 AIVs, and these results emphasize the need for continued surveillance of the H6N6 AIVs circulating in poultry. PMID:27101069

  1. Leek yellow stripe virus isolates from Brazil form a distant clade based on the P1 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genomic sequence of a garlic isolate of Leek yellow stripe virus from Brazil (LYSV-MG) has been determined, and phylogenetic comparisons made to LYSV isolates from other parts of the world. In addition, the nucleotide sequence of the 5'UTR and part of the P1 gene of multiple LYSV isolat...

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of a Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus of Serotype A Isolated from Vietnam in 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Ji-Hyeon; Nguyen, Tho Dang; Mai, Duoung Thuy; Kim, Su-Mi; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan; To, Thanh Long; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) found in an isolate collected in northern Vietnam in 2013 appears to be closely related to a genetic cluster formed with isolates from China, Mongolia, and Russia in 2013. All of these are classified to fall within the Sea-97 lineage, for which little complete genome data are available.

  3. Complete genome sequence of an american avian leukosis virus subgroup j isolate that causes hemangiomas and myeloid leukosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Sanandan; Justice, James; Lee, Nathan; Li, Yingying; Zavala, Guillermo; Ruano, Miguel; Morgan, Robin; Beemon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) isolate PDRC-59831, which causes myeloid leukosis and hemangiomas in chickens. This is an American ALV-J isolate, which was found in a 38-week-old broiler breeder chicken on a farm in Georgia in 2007. PMID:25858851

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of an American Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J Isolate That Causes Hemangiomas and Myeloid Leukosis

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Sanandan; Justice, James; Lee, Nathan; Li, Yingying; Zavala, Guillermo; Ruano, Miguel; Morgan, Robin; Beemon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) isolate PDRC-59831, which causes myeloid leukosis and hemangiomas in chickens. This is an American ALV-J isolate, which was found in a 38-week-old broiler breeder chicken on a farm in Georgia in 2007.

  5. Different pattern of haemagglutinin immunoreactivity of equine influenza virus strains isolated in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwaśnik Małgorzata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The immunoreactivity of haemagglutinin (HA polypeptides of equine influenza virus was compared among the strains isolated in Poland, using H3 monoclonal antibody. A stronger signal in immunoblot reaction was observed for A/equi/Pulawy/2008 HA polypeptides compared to A/equi/Pulawy/2006, despite the fact that both strains are phylogenetically closely related and belong to Florida clade 2 of American lineage. The strongest signal, observed in the case of A/equi/Pulawy/2008, seemed to be connected with the presence of G135, I213, E379, and/or V530 instead of R135, M213, G379, and I530 present in A/equi/Pulawy/2006 HA sequence. This implies that point mutations within amino acid sequences of HA polypeptides of equine influenza virus may change their immunoreactivity even when they are not located within five basic antigenic sites.

  6. Whole-Genome Sequence of a Reassortant H5N6 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from a Live Poultry Market in China, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Xian; Cui, Lunbiao; Yu, Huiyan; Ge, Yiyue; Tang, Fengyang

    2014-01-01

    An avian influenza virus, A/environment/Zhenjiang/C13/2013(H5N6), was isolated from a live poultry market in eastern China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate was a novel reassortant virus with a neuraminidase (NA) gene from H6N6 viruses and the other seven genes from H5N1 viruses, which may pose a potential threat to human and animal health.

  7. Isolation of a sp. nov. Ljungan virus from wild birds in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitake, Hiromichi; Fujii, Yuji; Nagai, Makoto; Ito, Naoto; Okadera, Kota; Okada, Kazuma; Nakagawa, Kento; Kishimoto, Mai; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Okazaki, Katsunori; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Takada, Ayato; Sugiyama, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    Ljungan virus (LV) has been isolated/detected from rodents in a limited area including European countries and the USA. In this study, we isolated an LV strain from faecal samples of wild birds that had been collected in Japan, and determined the nearly complete sequence of the genome. Sequence analyses showed that the isolate possesses an LV-like genomic organization: 5UTR-VP0-VP3-VP1-2A1-2A2-2B-2C-3A-3B-3C-3D-3UTR. Phylogenetic and similarity analyses based on the VP1 region indicated that the strain constitutes a novel genotype within LV. In addition, we identified species origin of the faeces as gull species by using the DNA barcoding technique. These data suggested that the novel LV strain infected a gull species, in which the virus had not been identified. Taken together, this study has provided the first evidence of the presence of a novel LV in Japan, highlighting the possibility of LV infection in birds. PMID:27207304

  8. Complete Genomic Sequence of a Chinese Isolate of Duck Hepatitis Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The complete genomic sequence of Duck hepatitis virus 1 (DHV-1) ZJ-V isolate was sequenced and determined to be 7 691 nucleotides (nt) in length with a 5'-terminal un-translated region (UTR) of 626 nt and a 3'-terminal UTR of 315 nt (not including the poly(A) tail). One large open reading frame (ORF) was found within the genome (nt 627 to 7 373) coding for a polypeptide of 2 249amino acids. Our data also showed that the poly (A) tail of DHV-1 has at least 22 A's. Sequence comparison revealed significant homology (from 91.9% to 95.7%) between the protein sequences of the virus in the Picornaviridae family, its genome showed some unique characteristics. DHV-1 contains 3copies of the 2A gene and only 1 copy of the 3B gene, and its 3'-NCR is longer than those of other picornaviruses. Phylogenetic analysis to do sequence homology based on the VP1 protein sequences showed that the ZJ-V isolate shares high sequence homology with the reported DHV-1 isolates (from 92.9% to 99.2%), indicating that DHV-1 is genetically stable.

  9. A study report on phylogenetic analysis of Classical swine fever virus isolated in different parts of the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Chakraborty

    Full Text Available Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV is the cause of an economically important and contagious disease in all age groups of pigs. Advances in molecular methods have facilitated genetic typing of this virus which is useful for classification, to trace patterns of virus spread and exposing the weaknesses in control strategies. Moreover, the genetic comparison of the isolates obtained from a series of outbreaks with known linkages can be used to validate and to interpret the genetic typing to determine the rate of virus mutation in the field. The CSF viruses are grouped into three groups under which there are ten subgroups. This review highlights the works on phylogenetic analysis carried out by different workers from time to time in different parts of the world including India to have better understanding of the diversified genogrouping of this virus. [Vet. World 2012; 5(7.000: 437-442

  10. Characteristics of a Lettuce mosaic virus Isolate Infecting Lettuce in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungmo Lim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV causes disease of plants in the family Asteraceae, especially lettuce crops. LMV isolates have previously been clustered in three main groups, LMV-Yar, LMV-Greek and LMVRoW. The first two groups, LMV-Yar and LMV-Greek, have similar characteristics such as no seed-borne transmission and non-resistance-breaking. The latter one, LMV-RoW, comprising a large percentage of the LMV isolates contains two large subgroups, LMV-Common and LMV-Most. To date, however, no Korean LMV isolate has been classified and characterized. In this study, LMV-Muju, the Korean LMV isolate, was isolated from lettuce showing pale green and mottle symptoms, and its complete genome sequence was determined. Classification method of LMV isolates based on nucleotide sequence divergence of the NIb-CP junction showed that LMV-Muju was categorized as LMV-Common. LMV-Muju was more similar to LMV-O (LMV-Common subgroup than to LMV-E (LMV-RoW group but not LMV-Common subgroup even in the amino acid domains of HC-Pro associated with pathogenicity, and in the CI and VPg regions related to ability to overcome resistance. Taken together, LMV-Muju belongs to the LMV-Common subgroup, and is expected to be a seed-borne, non-resistance-breaking isolate. According to our analysis, all other LMV isolates not previously assigned to a subgroup were also included in the LMV-RoW group.

  11. Isolation of Infective Zika Virus from Urine and Saliva of Patients in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Kely A. B.; de Castro, Marcia G.; Gerber, Alexandra L.; de Almeida, Luiz G. P.; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emergent threat provoking a worldwide explosive outbreak. Since January 2015, 41 countries reported autochthonous cases. In Brazil, an increase in Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly cases was linked to ZIKV infections. A recent report describing low experimental transmission efficiency of its main putative vector, Ae. aegypti, in conjunction with apparent sexual transmission notifications, prompted the investigation of other potential sources of viral dissemination. Urine and saliva have been previously established as useful tools in ZIKV diagnosis. Here, we described the presence and isolation of infectious ZIKV particles from saliva and urine of acute phase patients in the Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil. Methodology/Principal Findings Nine urine and five saliva samples from nine patients from Rio de Janeiro presenting rash and other typical Zika acute phase symptoms were inoculated in Vero cell culture and submitted to specific ZIKV RNA detection and quantification through, respectively, NAT-Zika, RT-PCR and RT-qPCR. Two ZIKV isolates were achieved, one from urine and one from saliva specimens. ZIKV nucleic acid was identified by all methods in four patients. Whenever both urine and saliva samples were available from the same patient, urine viral loads were higher, corroborating the general sense that it is a better source for ZIKV molecular diagnostic. In spite of this, from the two isolated strains, each from one patient, only one derived from urine, suggesting that other factors, like the acidic nature of this fluid, might interfere with virion infectivity. The complete genome of both ZIKV isolates was obtained. Phylogenetic analysis revealed similarity with strains previously isolated during the South America outbreak. Conclusions/Significance The detection of infectious ZIKV particles in urine and saliva of patients during the acute phase may represent a critical factor in the spread of virus. The epidemiological

  12. Isolation of Infective Zika Virus from Urine and Saliva of Patients in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna C Bonaldo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an emergent threat provoking a worldwide explosive outbreak. Since January 2015, 41 countries reported autochthonous cases. In Brazil, an increase in Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly cases was linked to ZIKV infections. A recent report describing low experimental transmission efficiency of its main putative vector, Ae. aegypti, in conjunction with apparent sexual transmission notifications, prompted the investigation of other potential sources of viral dissemination. Urine and saliva have been previously established as useful tools in ZIKV diagnosis. Here, we described the presence and isolation of infectious ZIKV particles from saliva and urine of acute phase patients in the Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.Nine urine and five saliva samples from nine patients from Rio de Janeiro presenting rash and other typical Zika acute phase symptoms were inoculated in Vero cell culture and submitted to specific ZIKV RNA detection and quantification through, respectively, NAT-Zika, RT-PCR and RT-qPCR. Two ZIKV isolates were achieved, one from urine and one from saliva specimens. ZIKV nucleic acid was identified by all methods in four patients. Whenever both urine and saliva samples were available from the same patient, urine viral loads were higher, corroborating the general sense that it is a better source for ZIKV molecular diagnostic. In spite of this, from the two isolated strains, each from one patient, only one derived from urine, suggesting that other factors, like the acidic nature of this fluid, might interfere with virion infectivity. The complete genome of both ZIKV isolates was obtained. Phylogenetic analysis revealed similarity with strains previously isolated during the South America outbreak.The detection of infectious ZIKV particles in urine and saliva of patients during the acute phase may represent a critical factor in the spread of virus. The epidemiological relevance of this finding, regarding the contribution

  13. Cytokine profiles and phenotype regulation of antigen presenting cells by genotype-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Gimeno Mariona; Darwich Laila; Diaz Ivan; de la Torre Eugenia; Pujols Joan; Martín Marga; Inumaru Shigeki; Cano Esmeralda; Domingo Mariano; Montoya Maria; Mateu Enric

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The present study examined the immunological response of antigen presenting cells (APC) to genotype-I isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection by analysing the cytokine profile induced and evaluating the changes taking place upon infection on immunologically relevant cell markers (MHCI, MHCII, CD80/86, CD14, CD16, CD163, CD172a, SWC9). Several types of APC were infected with 39 PRRSV isolates. The results show that different isolates were able...

  14. Vaccine Potential of Two Previously Uncharacterized African Swine Fever Virus Isolates from Southern Africa and Heterologous Cross Protection of an Avirulent European Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, R; Mutowembwa, P; van Heerden, J; Fosgate, G T; Heath, L; Vosloo, W

    2016-04-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a mostly fatal viral infection of domestic pigs for which there is no vaccine available. The disease is endemic to most of sub-Saharan Africa, causes severe losses and threatens food security in large parts of the continent. Naturally occurring attenuated ASF viruses have been tested as vaccine candidates, but protection was variable depending on the challenge virus. In this study, the virulence of two African isolates, one from a tick vector and the other from an indigenous pig, was determined in domestic pigs to identify a potential vaccine strain for southern Africa. Neither isolate was suitable as the tick isolate was moderately virulent and the indigenous pig virus was highly virulent. The latter was subsequently used as heterologous challenge in pigs first vaccinated with a naturally attenuated isolate previously isolated in Portugal. Although a statistically significant reduction in death rate and virus load was observed compared with unvaccinated pigs post-challenge, all pigs succumbed to infection and died. PMID:25073549

  15. Diagnosis and sequence analysis of avian leukosis virus subgroup J isolated from Chinese Partridge Shank chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xuan; Zhao, Peng; Li, Weihua; Chang, Shuang; Li, Jianliang; Li, Yang; Ju, Sidi; Sun, Peng; Meng, Fanfeng; Liu, Juan; Cui, Zhizhong

    2015-04-01

    The diagnosis of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) infection in Chinese Partridge Shank chickens was confirmed by necropsy, histopathological examinations, antibody tests, viral isolation, immunofluorescence assays, and sequence analysis. Myelocytoma, myeloma, and fibrosarcoma were simultaneously found in Partridge Shank flock with ALV-J infection. Sequence analysis of the env genes of ALV-J demonstrated that both gp85 and gp37 were highly homologous among the three strains from local chickens of those among ALV-J strains isolated from white meat-type chickens. The phylogenetic trees indicated that the three strains isolated in this study were closely related to reference strains isolated in so-called Chinese yellow chickens and some strains isolated from white meat-type chickens, both from the USA and China. The observed ALV-J infection was the first report on Partridge Shank chickens, and myelocytoma, myeloma, and fibrosarcoma were found at the same time in this batch of local chickens. PMID:25713393

  16. European Bluetongue Serotype 8: Disease Threat Assessment for U.S. Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Barbara S; Reister-Hendricks, Lindsey M; Podell, Brendan K; Breitenbach, Jonathan E; McVey, D Scott; van Rijn, Piet A; Bowen, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an orbivirus transmitted by biting midges (Culicoides spp.) that can result in moderate to high morbidity and mortality primarily in sheep and white-tailed deer. Although only 5 serotypes of BTV are considered endemic to the United States, as many as 11 incursive serotypes have been detected in livestock and wildlife in the past 16 years. Introductions of serotypes, with unknown virulence and disease risk, are constant threats to US agriculture. One potential incursive serotype of particular concern is the European strain of BTV-8, which was introduced into Northern Europe in 2006 and caused unprecedented livestock disease and mortality during the 2006-2007 vector seasons. To assess disease risk of BTV-8 in a common white-faced American sheep breed, eight Polled Dorset yearlings were experimentally infected and monitored for clinical signs. Viremia and viral tissue distribution were detected and quantified by real-time qRT-PCR. Overall, clinical disease was moderate with no mortality. Viremia reached as high as 9.7 log10 particles/mL and persisted at 5 logs or higher through the end of the study (28 days). Virus distribution in tissues was extensive with the highest mean titers at the peak of viremia (day 8) in the kidney (8.38 log10 particles/mg) and pancreas (8.37 log10 particles/mg). Virus persisted in tissues of some sheep at 8 logs or higher by day 28. Results of this study suggest that should BTV-8 emerge in the United States, clinical disease in this common sheep breed would likely be similar in form, duration, and severity to what is typically observed in severe outbreaks of endemic serotypes, not the extraordinary disease levels seen in Northern Europe. In addition, a majority of exposed sheep would be expected to survive and act as significant BTV-8 reservoirs with high titer viremias for subsequent transmission to other livestock and wildlife populations. PMID:27111674

  17. Propagation of Asian isolates of canine distemper virus (CDV) in hamster cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi Ryoji; Ueda Toshiki; Lan Nguyen; Sultan Serageldeen; Maeda Ken; Kai Kazushige

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Backgrounds The aim of this study was to confirm the propagation of various canine distemper viruses (CDV) in hamster cell lines of HmLu and BHK, since only a little is known about the possibility of propagation of CDV in rodent cells irrespective of their epidemiological importance. Methods The growth of CDV in hamster cell lines was monitored by titration using Vero.dogSLAMtag (Vero-DST) cells that had been proven to be susceptible to almost all field isolates of CDV, with the prep...

  18. Structure of simian virus 40-phiX174 recombinant genomes isolated from single cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Winocour, E; Lavie, V; Keshet, I

    1983-01-01

    Three simian virus (SV40)-phi X174 recombinant genomes were isolated from single BSC-1 monkey cells cotransfected with SV40 and phi X174 RF1 DNAs. The individual cell progenies were amplified, cloned, and mapped by a combination of restriction endonuclease and heteroduplex analyses. In each case, the 600 to 1,000 base pairs of phi X174 DNA (derived from different regions of the phi X174 genome) were present as single inserts, located in either the early or late SV40 regions; the deletion of S...

  19. Molecular characterization of Indian isolate of peanut mottle virus and immunodiagnosis using bacterial expressed core capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumya, K; Yogita, M; Prasanthi, Y; Anitha, K; Kishor, P B Kavi; Jain, R K; Mandal, Bikash

    2014-01-01

    Peanut mottle virus (PeMoV), a seed borne potyvirus was recorded in India in 1978, however the virus was not characterized at molecular level. In the present study, an isolate of PeMoV infecting peanut in southern India was characterized based on host reactions and coat protein (CP) gene sequence, which revealed that the Indian isolate was very close to a peanut isolate reported from Israel and distinct from pea isolate reported from USA. The core region of CP gene that contained majority of the predicted epitopes was successfully expressed (1.75 mg/l) in Escherichia coli as a 22 kDa protein. A high titer polyclonal antibody (PAb) to the expressed core CP was produced, which efficiently detected PeMoV. The antiserum was useful in specific detection of PeMoV as it showed negligible cross reactivity with the other potyviruses e.g., peanut stripe virus, potato virus Y, papaya ringspot virus and onion yellow dwarf virus. The PAb was validated in ELISA using 1,169 field and greenhouse samples of peanut which showed 1.85-26.3 % incidence of PeMoV in peanut seed multiplication field during 2011-2012. This is the first report of immunodiagnosis of PeMoV with a PAb to recombinant core CP of PeMoV. PMID:25674600

  20. Partial biological and molecular characterization of a Cucumber mosaic virus isolate naturally infecting Cucumis melo in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulpour, Rasoul; Afsharifar, Alireza; Izadpanah, Keramat

    2016-06-01

    Melon seedlings showing systemic chlorotic spots and mosaic symptoms were collected in central part of Iran, and a virus was isolated from diseased plants by mechanical inoculation. The virus systemically infected the most inoculated test plants by inducing mosaic symptoms, while, in the members of Fabaceae family and Chenopodium quinoa induced local lesions. Agar gel diffusion test using a polyclonal antiserum against a squash Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolate showed the presence of CMV in the mechanically inoculated plants (designated CMV-Me). The virus was purified by polyethylene glycol precipitation and differential centrifugation. A polyclonal antiserum was produced against the virus that reacted specifically with virus antigen in ELISA and agar gel diffusion tests. The virus was molecularly characterized by PCR amplification of the full length of the coat protein gene using cucumovirus genus specific primer pair CPTALL-3/CPTALL-5 and sequence analysis of the resulting product. No RNA satellite was detected using the primer pair CMVsat3H/sat5T7P. Phylogenetic analysis based on the coat protein amino acid sequences showed that CMV-Me belongs to Subgroup IB. These results may be helpful in melon breeding programs, focusing on plant resistance to plant viruses including CMV. PMID:27366772

  1. Study of oseltamivir and zanamivir resistance-related mutations in influenza viruses isolated from wild mallards in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Orozovic

    Full Text Available Resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs is a growing problem in battle against influenza A virus. However, little is known about the resistance of viruses isolated from dabbling ducks, the natural reservoir of the influenza virus. To our knowledge, no low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI virus resistant to NAIs has been detected. The aim of this study was to investigate mallard isolates of influenza A virus previously identified to carry oseltamivir carboxylate (OC or zanamivir (ZA resistance-related mutations. In this work, 21 viruses belonging to the N1, N3, N6 and N9 subtypes were analyzed using a colorimetric NA inhibition assay. The results of assay showed no NAIs-resistant phenotype for any of the viruses. The R118K mutation was the most recurrent, as it was observed in all subtypes except for N6. IC50 values confirmed the differences in sensitivity to OC or ZA observed in the N1 and N2 groups of NAs. Furthermore, both wild types (WTs in the N6 and one WT in the N9 subtype were less sensitive to ZA than were genotypically related mutants with R152K and R118K change in the respective subtypes. This may indicate that these and probably even other NAIs resistance-related mutations found in our virus collection were not induced by NAIs residuals in the environment and that the impact of such mutations in an avian influenza could be dependent on subtype, strain and host species.

  2. Identification and molecular characterization of a novel duck Tembusu virus isolate from Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kesen; Huang, Juan; Jia, Renyong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Mingshu; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Liu, Mafeng; Yin, Zhongqiong; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-11-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) has caused significant economic losses in the Chinese duck industry and may have been overlooked regarding its zoonotic transmission potential. A novel TMUV isolate (named CQW1) was separated from the liver tissue of a young duck in Southwest China. The CQW1 isolate proliferated in embryonated duck eggs and led to death within 3-4 days post-inoculation. Furthermore, CQW1 replicated in duck embryo fibroblast (DEF) cells and caused a cytopathic effect (CPE). The disease emerged on a duck farm in Southwest China and was reproduced by animal experiment. We found that CQW1 was detectable by RT-PCR in brain and liver tissues of dead ducklings within 5 days after inoculation. Most importantly, concentrated nuclei, neuronophagia and microglial nodules were observed in the brain tissue of the inoculated ducklings, and additionally, the liver tissue was affected, mainly by disordered lobular architecture, degeneration, necrosis and regenerated hepatocytes. Analysis of the complete genome sequence showed that CQW1 was 10,992 nt in length with two nucleotide insertions and shared 96.8% to 99.1% and 98.4% to 99.6% identity at nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively, with Chinese isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences demonstrated that the CQW1 isolate was closely related to other members of the genus Flavivirus and formed a new clade together with the GX2013H isolate. Also, the CQW1 isolate demonstrated the highest average pairwise distance value among the Chinese isolates. In the present study, we obtained evidence that TMUV is present in Southwest China. Extensive pathological and epidemiological studies are urgently needed. PMID:26303137

  3. Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of Potato virus Y Liaoning Isolate in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fang; GAO Zheng-liang; AN Meng-nan; ZHOU Ben-guo; and WU Yuan-hua

    2013-01-01

    Complete genome sequence of Potato virus Y Liaoning isolate (PVY-LN) causing tobacco vein necrosis symptoms were isolated from Liaoning Province in China. Genome sequences of PVY-LN was 9 714 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3′-terminal poly (A) tail. PVY-LN encodes a single long open reading frame (ORF) of polyprotein that is predicted to be cleaved into ten mature proteins by three viral proteases. No recombination can be predicted in PVY-LN sequences compared with that of the other PVY strains using Recombination Detection Programe v. 4.16 (RDP4). Complete genome sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis indicated that PVY-LN is closely related to PVY necrosis strain (PVYN).

  4. Cloning and Identification of S Gene from Chinese Isolate TH-98 of Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Chinese isolate of transmissible gastroenteritis virus(TGEV)was propagated and harvested in swine testicle (ST)cells. Two pairs of primers were designed according to the published sequence with Oligo 4. 1 and DNasis softwares. The products of RT-PCR were named Sa and Sb ,of 2. 3kb and 2. 1kb respectively. Sa was inserted in EcoR I and Kpn I sites after Sb was cloned in Kpn I and Pst I sites of the same pUC18 plasmid.The recombinant designated pUC- S was verified and analyzed by corresponding restriction endonuclease (RE)and nested PCR on the basis of genetic sites of S gene and physical map of pUC18 plasmid ,which was identified as S gene from Chinese isolate of TGEV.

  5. Sensitive detection of novel Indian isolate of BTV 21 using ns1 gene based real-time PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaya Prasad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was conducted to develop ns1 gene based sensitive real-time RT-PCR assay for diagnosis of India isolates of bluetongue virus (BTV. Materials and Methods: The BTV serotype 21 isolate (KMNO7 was isolated from Andhra Pradesh and propagated in BHK-21 cell line in our laboratory. The Nucleic acid (dsRNA of virus was extracted using Trizol method and cDNA was prepared using a standard protocol. The cDNA was allowed to ns1 gene based group specific PCR to confirm the isolate as BTV. The viral RNA was diluted 10 folds and the detection limit of ns1 gene based RT-PCR was determined. Finally the tenfold diluted viral RNA was subjected to real-time RT-PCR using ns1 gene primer and Taq man probe to standardized the reaction and determine the detection limit. Results: The ns1 gene based group specific PCR showed a single 366bp amplicon in agarose gel electrophoresis confirmed the sample as BTV. The ns1 gene RT-PCR using tenfold diluted viral RNA showed the detection limit of 70.0 fg in 1%agarose gel electrophoresis. The ns1 gene based real time RT-PCR was successfully standardized and the detection limit was found to be 7.0 fg. Conclusion: The ns1 gene based real-time RT-PCR was successfully standardized and it was found to be 10 times more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR. Key words: bluetongue, BTV21, RT-PCR, Real time RT-PCR, ns1 gene [Vet World 2013; 6(8.000: 554-557

  6. Molecular Characterization of Banana streak virus Isolate from Musa Acuminata in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Zhuang; Jian-hua Wang; Xin Zhang; Zhi-xinLiu

    2011-01-01

    Banana streak virus (BSV),a member of genus Badnavirus,is a causal agent of banana streak disease throughout the world.The genetic diversity of BSVs from different regions of banana plantations has previously been investigated,but there are relatively few reports of the genetic characteristic of episomal (non-integrated)BSV genomes isolated from China.Here,the complete genome,a total of 7722bp (GenBank accession number DQ092436),of an isolate of Banana streak virus (BSV) on cultivar Cavendish (BSAcYNV) in Yunnan,China was determined.The genome organises in the typical manner of badnaviruses.The intergenic region of genomic DNA contains a large stem-loop,which may contribute to the ribosome shift into the following open reading frames (ORFs).The coding region of BSAcYNV consists of three overlapping ORFs,ORF 1 with a non-AUG start eodon and ORF2 encoding two small proteins are individually involved in viral movement and ORF3 encodes a polyprotein.Besides the complete genome,a defective genome lacking the whole RNA leader region and a majority of ORF1 and which encompasses 6525bp was also isolated and sequenced from this BSV DNA reservoir in infected banana plants.Sequence analyses showed that BSAcYNV has closest similarity in terms of genome organization and the coding assignments with an BSV isolate from Vientam (BSAcVNV).The corresponding coding regions shared identities of 88% and ~95% at nucleotide and amino acid levels,respectively.Phylogenetic analysis also indicated BSAcYNV shared the closest geographical evolutionary relationship to BSAcVNV among sequenced banana streak badnaviruses.

  7. Isolation and characterization of a single-stranded DNA virus infecting the marine diatom Chaetoceros sp. strain SS628-11 isolated from western Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Kimura

    Full Text Available Diatoms are significant organisms for primary production in the earth's aquatic environment. Hence, their dynamics are an important focus area in current studies. Viruses are a great concern as potential factors of diatom mortality, along with other physical, chemical, and biological factors. We isolated and characterized a new diatom virus (Csp07DNAV that lyses the marine planktonic diatom Chaetoceros sp. strain SS628-11. This paper examines the physiological, morphological, and genomic characteristics of Csp07DNAV. The virus was isolated from a surface water sample that was collected at Hiroshima Bay, Japan. It was icosahedral, had a diameter of 34 nm, and accumulated in the nuclei of host cells. Rod-shaped virus particles also coexisted in the host nuclei. The latent period and burst size were estimated to be <12 h and 29 infectious units per host cell, respectively. Csp07DNAV had a closed circular single-stranded DNA genome (5,552 nucleotides, which included a double-stranded region and 3 open reading frames. The monophyly of Csp07DNAV and other Bacilladnavirus group single-stranded DNA viruses was supported by phylogenetic analysis that was based on the amino acid sequence of each virus protein. On the basis of these results, we considered Csp07DNAV to be a new member of the genus Bacilladnavirus.

  8. Isolation and sequence analysis of a canine distemper virus from a raccoon dog in Jilin Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Zhang, Miao; Zhao, Jianjun; Shao, Xiqun; Ma, Zengjun; Zhao, Hang; Lin, Peng; Wu, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a major pathogen not only in raccoon dogs but also in a variety of carnivorous animals, including domesticated animals, particularly if they have not been vaccinated. In this study, a wild-type strain of CDV was isolated from lung tissue from a raccoon dog kept at a fur farm in Jilin Province, China. Cytopathic effects typical of CDV infection were observed after three blind passages in Vero cells, yielding a virus titer of 10(4.6) TCID50/mL. Virus identification was carried out by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, and genome sequencing. The results showed that the isolated virus, termed the SY strain, corresponded to the Asia-1 genotype of CDV and has a genome of 15,690 nucleotides. This represents the first complete nucleotide sequence of a CDV strain circulating in raccoon dogs in China. PMID:26265248

  9. [Sequencing and analysis of the complete genome of a rabies virus isolate from Sika deer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun-Jiao; Guo, Li; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Li-Shi; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2008-05-01

    One DRV strain was isolated from Sika Deer brain and sequenced. Nine overlapped gene fragments were amplified by RT-PCR through 3'-RACE and 5'-RACE method, and the complete DRV genome sequence was assembled. The length of the complete genome is 11863bp. The DRV genome organization was similar to other rabies viruses which were composed of five genes and the initiation sites and termination sites were highly conservative. There were mutated amino acids in important antigen sites of nucleoprotein and glycoprotein. The nucleotide and amino acid homologies of gene N, P, M, G, L in strains with completed genomie sequencing were compared. Compared with N gene sequence of other typical rabies viruses, a phylogenetic tree was established . These results indicated that DRV belonged to gene type 1. The highest homology compared with Chinese vaccine strain 3aG was 94%, and the lowest was 71% compared with WCBV. These findings provided theoretical reference for further research in rabies virus. PMID:18683561

  10. Isolation of avian influenza virus (H9N2 from emu in china

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Wenhua

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is the first reported isolation of avian influenza virus (AIV from emu in China. An outbreak of AIV infection occurred at an emu farm that housed 40 four-month-old birds. Various degrees of haemorrhage were discovered in the tissues of affected emus. Cell degeneration and necrosis were observed microscopically. Electron microscopy revealed round or oval virions with a diameter of 80 nm to 120 nm, surrounded by an envelope with spikes. The virus was classified as low pathogenic AIV (LPAIV, according to OIE standards. It was named A/Emu/HeNen/14/2004(H9N2(Emu/HN/2004. The HA gene (1683bp was amplified by RT-PCR and it was compared with other animal H9N2 AIV sequences in GenBank, the US National Institutes of Health genetic sequence database. The results suggested that Emu/HN/2004 may have come from an avian influenza virus (H9N2 from Southern China.

  11. Hepatitis B virus genotypes circulating in Brazil: molecular characterization of genotype F isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgolino Helaine A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV isolates have been classified in eight genotypes, A to H, which exhibit distinct geographical distributions. Genotypes A, D and F are predominant in Brazil, a country formed by a miscegenated population, where the proportion of individuals from Caucasian, Amerindian and African origins varies by region. Genotype F, which is the most divergent, is considered indigenous to the Americas. A systematic molecular characterization of HBV isolates from different parts of the world would be invaluable in establishing HBV evolutionary origins and dispersion patterns. A large-scale study is needed to map the region-by-region distribution of the HBV genotypes in Brazil. Results Genotyping by PCR-RFLP of 303 HBV isolates from HBsAg-positive blood donors showed that at least two of the three genotypes, A, D, and F, co-circulate in each of the five geographic regions of Brazil. No other genotypes were identified. Overall, genotype A was most prevalent (48.5%, and most of these isolates were classified as subgenotype A1 (138/153; 90.2%. Genotype D was the most common genotype in the South (84.2% and Central (47.6% regions. The prevalence of genotype F was low (13% countrywide. Nucleotide sequencing of the S gene and a phylogenetic analysis of 32 HBV genotype F isolates showed that a great majority (28/32; 87.5% belonged to subgenotype F2, cluster II. The deduced serotype of 31 of 32 F isolates was adw4. The remaining isolate showed a leucine-to-isoleucine substitution at position 127. Conclusion The presence of genotypes A, D and F, and the absence of other genotypes in a large cohort of HBV infected individuals may reflect the ethnic origins of the Brazilian population. The high prevalence of isolates from subgenotype A1 (of African origin indicates that the African influx during the colonial slavery period had a major impact on the circulation of HBV genotype A currently found in Brazil. Although most genotype F

  12. Isolation and characterization of Newcastle disease virus from vaccinated commercial layer chicken

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    P. Balachandran

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Newcastle disease (ND is an infectious, highly contagious and destructive viral disease of poultry and controlled by vaccination. In spite of vaccination, incidence of ND was reported in commercial layers with gastrointestinal lesions. This study was undertaken to assess the prevalence and pathotypes of Newcastle disease virus (NDV involved in gastrointestinal tract abnormalities of vaccinated commercial layer chicken of Namakkal region for a period of three years from 2008 and 2011. Materials and Methods: Pooled tissue (trachea, lung, spleen, proventriculus, intestine and caecal tonsils samples collected from dead birds on postmortem examination from 100 layer flocks above 20 weeks of age with gastrointestinal lesions were subjected to isolation of NDV in embryonated specific pathogen free (SPF chicken eggs. Mean death time (MDT and intracerebral pathogenicity index of the isolates were characterized. Flock details were collected from NDV positive flocks to assess the prevalence and impact of NDV on vaccinated commercial layer chicken. Results: Among the 100 flocks examined Newcastle disease virus was detected in 14 flocks as a single infection and 10 flocks as combined infections with worm infestation, necrotic enteritis and coccidiosis. Chicken embryo mean death time (MDT and intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI values ranged from 50.4 to 96.0 hrs and from 0.650 to 1.675 respectively. Affected birds showed anorexia, diarrohea and drop in egg production. Macropathologically, matting of vent feathers, petechial haemorrhage on the tip of proventricular papilla, caecal tonsils and degeneration of ovarian follicles were noticed. The incidence of ND was most commonly noticed in 20-50 wk of age and between the months of September to November. Morbidity rate varied from 5% to 10% in the NDV alone affected flocks and 5 to 15% in NDV with other concurrent infections. Egg production drop from the expected level ranged between 3 to 7 % in ND and

  13. Genetic characterization of St. Louis encephalitis virus isolated from human in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Luiza Simões dos Santos

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The molecular characterization of SPH253157, a new strain of St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV, isolated in 2004 from the first case of human infection recognized in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, is reported. The patient, presenting a febrile illness without neurological involvement, was hospitalized as a probable case of dengue fever. Genomic RNA was isolated from the supernatant of C6/36 cells infected with acute phase-serum specimen of the patient and the envelope gene was amplified by reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The complete nucleotide sequence of the envelope gene of this isolate was directly sequenced from the amplified products and compared with other Brazilian and American SLEV strains. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out under maximum likelihood criterion with outgroups both included and excluded. Outgroups comprised four flavivirus of the Japanese encephalitis group. Phylogeny also included Bayesian analysis. The results indicated that the new SLEV isolate belongs to lineage III, being closely related to an Argentinean strain recovered from Culex sp. in 1979. It is concluded that there are at least 3 lineages of SLEV in Brazil.

  14. The differentiation and distribution of potato virus Y strains isolated from tobacco in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four strains of potato virus Y (PVY) orginally isolated from tobacco in South Africa belonging to three different strain groups (PVYN, PVYc and PVYo) were differentiated according to their effect on various tobacco cultivars. The results obtained in this study confirm previous reports which indicated that inoculation with PVY had a detrimental effect on the yield and quality of tobacco. The severity of the effects was generally related to the length of time that the virus was present in the host, with late infections having less effect than early infections. An important aspect that evolved from the present study is the differences in reactions of the various strains (necrotic to mild strains) of PVY on the tobacco cultivars tested. A direct correlation was evident between the virulence of the different PVY strains and the effect of O2-uptake of the host. cDNA probes prepared from PVY-RNA are specific to RNA extracted from purified PVY suspensions as well as crude sap from tobacco plants infected with the PVY strains used in this study. Radioactive probes and 32Phosporus labelling were used in the DNA and RNA studies of PVY. A procedure described by Bar-Joseph, et al (1983) were used successfully for the isolation of viral double-stranded RNA from various tissues. However, from the results obtained in this study it is clear that this method is of little or no value for the detection and diagnosis of PVY strains

  15. Rapid detection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus isolates by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qing-mei; Ji, Jun; Pickens, Tristan Tyler; Du, Li-qin; Cao, Yong-chang; Li, Hong-mei; Wang, Lin-guo; Ma, Jing-yun; Bi, Ying-zuo

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to detect infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) from commercial broiler and layer flocks in southern China. A set of six specific primers was designed to recognize six distinct genomic sequences of thymidine kinase (TK) from ILTV. The entire assay duration was recorded at 40 min under isothermal condition at 63.5 degrees C. The amplified products were analyzed by electrophoresis and visual judgment by the SYBR Green I dyeing. LAMP assay was 10-fold more sensitive than the routine PCR assay, with a detection limit of 46 copies per reaction. In detecting ILTV, the LAMP assay detected all 5 strains previously isolated, did not cross-react with other avian pathogens, and obtained a 100% sensitivity in 43 positive clinical samples with reference to virus isolation. Therefore, the LAMP assay may be a good alternative method for specific diagnosis of ILTV infection in primary care facilities, and in less well-equipped laboratories. PMID:20100518

  16. Genetic diversity among human parainfluenza virus type 2 isolated in Croatia between 2011 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šantak, Maja; Slović, Anamarija; Ljubin-Sternak, Sunčanica; Mlinarić Galinović, Gordana; Forčić, Dubravko

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics and evolution of the human parainfluenza virus type 2 (HPIV2) in Croatia, and also globally, are largely unknown. Most HPIV2 infections are treated symptomatically outside the hospital setting. Thus, the diagnosis is missing making it difficult to follow the genetic variation and evolution of the HPIV2. This study explores hospitalized HPIV2 cases in Croatia during 4-year period (2011-2014). Most cases in this period were reported in October or November (68.75%) and most of patients were under 2 years of age (81.25%). For molecular analyses, we used the F and HN gene sequences and showed that although both regions are equally suitable for phylogenetic analyses it would be advantageous to use regions longer than 2 kb for HPIV2 analyses of isolates which are spatially and temporally closely related. We show here that the dominant cluster in this area was cluster G3 while only one strain isolated in this period was positioned in the distant cluster G1a. Further monitoring of the HPIV2 will determine whether cluster G3 will remain dominant or it will be overruled by cluster G1a. This will be important for the surveillance of virus circulation in population and significance of the viral infection. J. Med. Virol. 88:1733-1741, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27004845

  17. Molecular Characterization of Avian-like H1N1 Swine Influenza A Viruses Isolated in Eastern China, 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian Qi; Yuning Pan; Yuanfang Qin; Rongqiang Zu; Fengyang Tang; Minghao Zhou; Hua Wang; Yongchun Song

    2012-01-01

    Currently,three predominant subtypes of influenza virus are prevalent in pig populations worldwide:H1N1,H3N2,and H1N2.European avian-like H1N1 viruses,which were initially detected in European pig populations in 1979,have been circulating in pigs in eastern China since 2007.In this study,six influenza A viruses were isolated from 60 swine lung samples collected from January to April 2011 in eastern China.Based on whole genome sequencing,molecular characteristics of two isolates were determined.Phylogenetic analysis showed the eight genes of the two isolates were closely related to those of the avian-like H1N1 viruses circulating in pig populations,especially similar to those found in China.Four potential glycosylation sites were observed at positions 13,26,198,277 in the HA1 proteins of the two isolates.Due to the presence of a stop codon at codon 12,the isolates contained truncated PB1-F2 proteins.In this study,the isolates contained 591Q,627E and 701N in the polymerase subunit PB2,which had been shown to be determinants of virulence and host adaptation.The isolates also had a D rather than E at position 92 of the NS1,a marker of mammalian adaptation.Both isolates contained the GPKV motif at the PDZ ligand domain of the 3' end of the NS1,a characteristic marker of the European avian-like swine viruses since about 1999,which is distinct from those of avian,human and classical swine viruses.The M2 proteins of the isolates have the mutation (S31N),a characteristic marker of the European avian-like swine viruses since about 1987,which may confer resistance to amantadine and rimantadine antivirals.Our findings further emphasize the importance of surveillance on the genetic diversity of influenza A viruses in pigs,and raise more concerns about the occurrence of cross-species transmission events.

  18. Identification and genome characterization of genotype B and genotype C bovine parainfluenza type 3 viruses isolated in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F.; Valayudhan, Binu T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bovine parainfluenza 3 viruses (BPI3V) are respiratory pathogens of cattle that cause disease singly but are often associated with bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in conjunction with other viral and bacterial agents. Bovine vaccines currently contain BPI3V to provide protection against the virus, but there is no current information regarding the BPI3V strains that are circulating in the U.S. Results A project was initiated to sequence archival BPI3V isolates to study vira...

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of a Chicken Embryo Fibroblast-Adapted Attenuated Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Isolate from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, T M A; Priyadharsini, C V; Raja, P; Kumanan, K

    2016-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus is an avian pathogen that causes huge morbidity and mortality in the poultry sector all over the world. Here, we report the full-length genome sequence of an Indian strain, MB11/ABT/MVC/2016, isolated from a commercial broiler flock. This is a first report of a complete genome sequence of infectious bursal disease virus from India. PMID:27174268

  20. Identify-Isolate-Inform: A tool for initial detection and management of Zika virus patients in the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, Kristi L; Almadhyan, Abdulmajeed; Burns, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    First isolated in 1947 from a monkey in the Zika forest in Uganda, and from mosquitoes in the same forest the following year, Zika virus has gained international attention due to concerns for infection in pregnant women potentially causing fetal microcephaly.  More than one million people have been infected since the appearance of the virus in Brazil in 2015.  While approximately 80% of infected patients are asymptomatic, an association with microcephaly and other birth defects as well as Gui...

  1. Identify-Isolate-Inform: A Tool for Initial Detection and Management of Zika Virus Patients in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, Kristi L.; Abdulmajeed Almadhyan; Burns, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    First isolated in 1947 from a monkey in the Zika forest in Uganda, and from mosquitoes in the same forest the following year, Zika virus has gained international attention due to concerns for infection in pregnant women potentially causing fetal microcephaly. More than one million people have been infected since the appearance of the virus in Brazil in 2015. Approximately 80% of infected patients are asymptomatic. An association with microcephaly and other birth defects as well as Guillain-Ba...

  2. Full Genome Sequence of an Avian Influenza H5N1 Virus Isolated from the Environment in Hunan Province, China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ba; Zhang, Hongbo; Chen, Quanjiao; Chen, Ze

    2013-01-01

    We isolated an avian influenza virus A/environment/Hunan/3/2011(H5N1) from a body of water in Hunan, China. The nucleotide sequence of the virus shares 95% homology with H5N1 from the east Asia region. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that its HA gene belongs to clade 2.3.2.1 and that other internal genes present different recombination features.

  3. Genetic Characteristics of 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza A Viruses Isolated from Mainland China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiu-ru Zhao; Han Xia; Na Han; Shuang Tang; Zhong Zhang; Zheng Kou; Simon Rayner; Tian-xian Li; Yong-dong Li; Li-min Pan; Na Zhu; Hong-xia Ni; Guo-zhang Xu; Yong-zhong Jiang; Xi-xiang Huo; Jun-qiang Xu

    2011-01-01

    A total of 100 HIN1 flu real-time-PCR positive throat swabs collected from fever patients in Zhejiang,Hubei and Guangdong between June and November 2009,were provided by local CDC laboratories.After MDCK cell culture,57 Influenza A Pandemic (H1N1) viruses were isolated and submitted for whole genome sequencing.A total of 39 HA sequences,52 NA sequences,36 PB2 sequences,31 PB1 sequences,40 PA sequences,48 NP sequences,51 MP sequences and 36 NS sequences were obtained,including 20 whole genome sequences.Sequence comparison revealed they shared a high degree of homology (96%~99%) with known epidemic strains (A/Califomia/04/2009(H1N1).Phylogenetic analysis showed that although the sequences were highly conserved,they clustered into a small number of groups with only a few distinct strains.Site analysis revealed three substitutions at loop 220 (221-228) of the HA receptor binding site in the 39 HA sequences:A/Hubei/86/2009 PKVRDQEG→PKVRDQEA,A/Zhejiang/08/2009 PKVRDQEG→PKVRDQER,A/Hubei/75/2009PKVRDQEG→PKVRDQGG,the A/Hubei/75/2009 was isolated from an acute case,while the other two were from patients with mild symptoms.Other key sites such as 119,274,292 and 294 amino acids of NA protein,627 of PB2 protein were conserved.Meanwhile,all the M2 protein sequences possessed the Ser32Asn mutation,suggesting that these viruses were resistant to adamantanes.Comparison of these sequences with other H1N1 viruses collected from the NCBI database provides insight into H1N1 transmission and circulation patterns.

  4. Use of λgt11 to isolate genes for two pseudorabies virus glycoproteins with homology to herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A library of pseudorabies virus (PRV) DNA fragments was constructed in the expression cloning vector λgt11. The library was screened with antisera which reacted with mixtures of PRV proteins to isolate recombinant bacteriophages expressing PRV proteins. By the nature of the λgt11 vector, the cloned proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli as β-galactosidase fusion proteins. The fusion proteins from 35 of these phages were purified and injected into mice to raise antisera. The antisera were screened by several different assays, including immunoprecipitation of [14C]glucosamine-labeled PRV proteins. This method identified phages expressing three different PRV glycoproteins: the secreted glycoprotein, gX; gI; and a glycoprotein that had not been previously identified, which we designate gp63. The gp63 and gI genes map adjacent to each other in the small unique region of the PRV genome. The DNA sequence was determined for the region of the genome encoding gp63 and gI. It was found that gp63 has a region of homology with a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) protein, encoded by US7, and also with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) gpIV. The gI protein sequence has a region of homology with HSV-1 gE and VZV gpI. It is concluded that PRV, HSV, and VZV all have a cluster of homologous glycoprotein genes in the small unique components of their genomes and that the organization of these genes is conserved

  5. Molecular characterization of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A viruses isolated from raccoon dogs in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Qi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus can infect a variety of animals and continually poses a threat to animal and human health. While many genotypes of H5N1 virus can be found in chicken, few are associated with the infection of mammals. Characterization of the genotypes of viral strains in animal populations is important to understand the distribution of different viral strains in various hosts. This also facilitates the surveillance and detection of possible emergence of highly pathogenic strains of specific genotypes from unknown hosts or hosts that have not been previously reported to carry these genotypes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two H5N1 isolates were obtained from lung samples of two raccoon dogs that had died from respiratory disease in China. Pathogenicity experiments showed that the isolates were highly pathogenic to chicken. To characterize the genotypes of these viruses, their genomic sequences were determined and analyzed. The genetic contents of these isolates are virtually identical and they may come from the same progenitor virus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the isolates were genetically closely related to genotype V H5N1 virus, which was first isolated in China in 2003, and were distinct from the dominant virus genotypes (e.g. genotype Z of recent years. The isolates also contain a multibasic amino acid motif at their HA cleavage sites and have an E residue at position 627 of the PB2 protein similar to the previously-identified avian viruses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report that genotype V H5N1 virus is found to be associated with a mammalian host. Our results strongly suggest that genotype V H5N1 virus has the ability to cross species barriers to infect mammalian animals. These findings further highlight the risk that avian influenza H5N1 virus poses to mammals and humans, which may be infected by specific genotypes that are not known to infect these hosts.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of an H10N5 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigs in Central China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Nan; Zou, Wei; Yang, Ying; Guo, Xuebo; Hua, Yafeng; Qiang ZHANG; Zhao, Zongzheng; Jin, Meilin

    2012-01-01

    An avian H10N5 influenza virus, A/swine/Hubei/10/2008/H10N5, was isolated from pigs in the Hubei Province of central China. Homology and phylogenetic analyses of all eight gene segments demonstrated that the strain was wholly of avian origin and closely homologous to the Eurasian lineage avian influenza virus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of interspecies transmission of an avian H10N5 influenza virus to domestic pigs under natural conditions.

  7. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Non-structural (NS) Gene of Influenza A Viruses Isolated in Kazakhstan in 2002-2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrey Bogoyavlenskiy; Marat Sayatov; Kainar Zhumatov; Vladimir Berezin; Alexey Prilipov; I lya Korotetskiy; Irina Zaitseva; Aydyn Kydyrmanov; Kobey Karamedin; Nailya Ishmukhametova; Saule Asanova

    2011-01-01

    Although the important role of the non-structural (NSI and NEP) gene of influenza A in virulence of the virus is well established,our knowledge about the extent of variation in the NS gene pool of influenza A viruses in their natural reservoirs in Kazakhstan is incomplete.17 influenza A viruses of different subtypes were studied in this paper.Seven types of haemagglutinin and five different neuraminidase subtypes in eight combinations were found among the isolated viruses.A comparison of nucleotide sequences of isolated viruses revealed a substantial number of silent mutations,which results in high degree of homology in amino acid sequences.By phylogenetic analysis it was shown that two distinct gene pools,corresponding to both NS allele A with 5 Clades and B,were present at the same time in Kazakhstan.The degree of variation within the alleles was very low.In our study allele A viruses had a maximum of 5% amino acid divergence in Clade while allele B viruses had only 4% amino acid divergence.

  8. Identification and genetic analysis of H3N8 subtype influenza viruses isolated from domestic pigeons in Central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhong; Chen, Sunrui; Liu, Ziduo; Jin, Meilin

    2016-02-01

    A novel strain of H3N8 influenza virus was isolated from domestic pigeons during the avian influenza virus (AIV) surveillance in wet markets in Anhui, China, during 2013. The virus was characterized by whole-genome sequencing with subsequent genetic comparison and phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the NA gene of AIV mapped to the North American lineage, and the remaining seven genes belong to a Eurasian lineage. These findings indicated that this H3N8 virus is a novel nature reassortant virus. Comparison of the hemagglutinin amino acid sequences indicated 9 substitutions. One substitution caused the loss of a potential glycosylation site, and six substitutions were not previously observed in avian H3 isolates. Q226 and T228 at the receptor binding sites suggested that Anhui-08 preferentially binds to a-2,3-linked sialic acid receptors, and the cleavage site sequence showed a low pathogenic feature. Animal experiments further confirmed that A/pigeon/Anhui/08/2013 (H3N8) is low or in pigeons. The results improve our understanding of these viruses as they evolve and also provide important information to aid ongoing risk assessment analyses because these zoonotic influenza viruses continue to circulate and adapt to new hosts. PMID:26611442

  9. Characterization and Construction of Functional cDNA Clones of Pariacoto Virus, the First Alphanodavirus Isolated outside Australasia

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Karyn N.; Zeddam, Jean-Louis; Ball, L. Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Pariacoto virus (PaV) was recently isolated in Peru from the Southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania). PaV particles are isometric, nonenveloped, and about 30 nm in diameter. The virus has a bipartite RNA genome and a single major capsid protein with a molecular mass of 39.0 kDa, features that support its classification as a Nodavirus. As such, PaV is the first Alphanodavirus to have been isolated from outside Australasia. Here we report that PaV replicates in wax moth larvae and that PaV geno...

  10. Study of the genetic variability of isolated belonging to the group B of the Respiratory Virus Human Sincicial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study allows analyzing the genetic variability of stumps belonging to the group B of the Breathing Virus Sincicial (Vrs), isolated in Uruguay among the years 1990 and 1996. They were evidenced by sequence the nucleotides changes and the changes were determined that take place at level of amino acids, the following ones were used technical: enzyme immunoassay, of extraction of viral RNA, of reverse transcription and Pcr, of purification of DNA and electrophoresis of nucleic acids. The result proven in the entirety of the isolated virus the genetic variability, enlarging and confirming the evolution pattern proposed by Sullender and collaborators, (1991) for the group B of Vrs

  11. Notification of the first isolation of Cacipacore virus in a human in the State of Rondônia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Cheli Batista

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Flavivirus is a genus of arthropod-transmitted viruses of the family Flaviviridae, and in Brazil, up to eleven different Flavivirus have been isolated. We collected blood from farmers in the municipality of Theobroma, which is located 320km from the City of Porto Velho, the former capital of the Brazilian State of Rondônia. For viral isolation, we used newborn mouse brain, followed by RT-PCR with specific universal Flavivirus primers. We obtained fragments 958bp and 800bp in length. Based on BLAST, these sequences were 91% similar to a sequence of Cacipacore virus.

  12. Genetic characterization of H1N2 influenza a virus isolated from sick pigs in Southern China in 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Kong Wei; Huang Liang; Qi Hai; Cao Nan; Zhang Liang; Wang Heng; Guan Shang; Qi Wen; Jiao Pei; Liao Ming; Zhang Gui

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In China H3N2 and H1N1 swine influenza viruses have been circulating for many years. In January 2010, before swine were infected with foot and mouth disease in Guangdong, some pigs have shown flu-like symptoms: cough, sneeze, runny nose and fever. We collected the nasopharyngeal swab of all sick pigs as much as possible. One subtype H1N2 influenza viruses were isolated from the pig population. The complete genome of one isolate, designated A/swine/Guangdong/1/2010(H1N2), was sequence...

  13. Genotyping of Cucumber mosaic virus isolates in western New York State during epidemic years: Characterization of an emergent plant virus population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jeremy R; Langenhan, Jamie L; Fuchs, Marc; Perry, Keith L

    2015-12-01

    In the early 2000s an epidemic of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) spread within the Midwestern and Eastern US affecting snap and dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivation. Fifty one CMV isolates from this period were partially characterized from varied hosts by sequencing a section from each of the three genomic RNAs. Aside from one subgroup II strain from pepper, all isolates, including those from snap bean, fell within the IA subgroup. The nucleotide sequence diversity of virus populations sampled at multiple sites and at different years was significantly higher than that of a population from single site in a single year, although in general the number of polymorphisms was low (greenhouse assays, respectively. To our knowledge Bn57 is the first CMV strain isolated from P. vulgaris to be fully sequenced and cloned, providing a useful tool for analyses of CMV-host interactions. PMID:26254084

  14. Molecular Characterization of Subtype H11N9 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Shorebirds in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Hurtado

    Full Text Available Migratory aquatic birds play an important role in the maintenance and spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV. Many species of aquatic migratory birds tend to use similar migration routes, also known as flyways, which serve as important circuits for the dissemination of AIV. In recent years there has been extensive surveillance of the virus in aquatic birds in the Northern Hemisphere; however in contrast only a few studies have been attempted to detect AIV in wild birds in South America. There are major flyways connecting South America to Central and North America, whereas avian migration routes between South America and the remaining continents are uncommon. As a result, it has been hypothesized that South American AIV strains would be most closely related to the strains from North America than to those from other regions in the world. We characterized the full genome of three AIV subtype H11N9 isolates obtained from ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres on the Amazon coast of Brazil. For all gene segments, all three strains consistently clustered together within evolutionary lineages of AIV that had been previously described from aquatic birds in North America. In particular, the H11N9 isolates were remarkably closely related to AIV strains from shorebirds sampled at the Delaware Bay region, on the Northeastern coast of the USA, more than 5000 km away from where the isolates were retrieved. Additionally, there was also evidence of genetic similarity to AIV strains from ducks and teals from interior USA and Canada. These findings corroborate that migratory flyways of aquatic birds play an important role in determining the genetic structure of AIV in the Western hemisphere, with a strong epidemiological connectivity between North and South America.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Subtype H11N9 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Shorebirds in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Renata; Fabrizio, Thomas; Vanstreels, Ralph Eric Thijl; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.; Durigon, Edison Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Migratory aquatic birds play an important role in the maintenance and spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV). Many species of aquatic migratory birds tend to use similar migration routes, also known as flyways, which serve as important circuits for the dissemination of AIV. In recent years there has been extensive surveillance of the virus in aquatic birds in the Northern Hemisphere; however in contrast only a few studies have been attempted to detect AIV in wild birds in South America. There are major flyways connecting South America to Central and North America, whereas avian migration routes between South America and the remaining continents are uncommon. As a result, it has been hypothesized that South American AIV strains would be most closely related to the strains from North America than to those from other regions in the world. We characterized the full genome of three AIV subtype H11N9 isolates obtained from ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) on the Amazon coast of Brazil. For all gene segments, all three strains consistently clustered together within evolutionary lineages of AIV that had been previously described from aquatic birds in North America. In particular, the H11N9 isolates were remarkably closely related to AIV strains from shorebirds sampled at the Delaware Bay region, on the Northeastern coast of the USA, more than 5000 km away from where the isolates were retrieved. Additionally, there was also evidence of genetic similarity to AIV strains from ducks and teals from interior USA and Canada. These findings corroborate that migratory flyways of aquatic birds play an important role in determining the genetic structure of AIV in the Western hemisphere, with a strong epidemiological connectivity between North and South America. PMID:26689791

  16. Tissue tropism and molecular characterization of a Japanese encephalitis virus strain isolated from pigs in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Wu, Rui; Liu, Hanyang; Wen, Xintian; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Yiping; Ma, Xiaoping; Yan, Qigui; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Qin; Cao, Sanjie

    2016-04-01

    Since September 2012, an epidemic has been spreading among swine in a pig farm located in Sichuan province, southwest China, which has resulted in abortion, stillbirth, and fetal mummification. The brains of stillborn pigs were collected and a previously unknown Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), namely SCYA201201, was isolated. According to the results of agarose gel diffusion precipitation, indirect immunofluorescence analysis, neutralization testing, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) amplification, and physical and chemical testing, the virus was conformed to have the characteristics of JEV. The virus titer in BHK-21 cells was 10(8.47)PFU/ml and the median lethal dose (LD50) to 3-week-old and 7-day-old mice was 1.99 log10 and 1.02 log10 PFU/LD50, respectively. The results of tissue tropism for mice showed that the viral load in the brain was significantly higher than other organs, indicating that the isolate was strongly neurotropic. Additionally, the complete genome sequence of the isolate was determined and compared with other JEV strains. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate belongs to genotype I and may be an imported virus. The isolate had 88.4% nucleotide identity with the Chinese vaccine strain SA14-14-2. However, there were 69 amino acid substitutions compared with the strain SA14-14-2. Some substitutions indicated that SCYA201201 was highly neurovirulent and infective, in accordance with the results of animal testing. PMID:26851509

  17. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of multiple genome regions of Korean isolates of infectious laryngotracheitis virus collected from chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Kang, Min-Su; Kim, Mi-Jin; Lee, Hee-Soo; Kwon, Yong-Kuk

    2013-08-01

    This study was conducted to characterize infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) viruses isolated from poultry in South Korea using RFLP analysis of PCR products. Seven wild-type Korean isolates from commercial chicken farms collected between 1986 and 2012 were compared with 3 imported commercial vaccine strains [LT Blen (Hudson strain, United States), Laryngo Vac (Cover strain, United States), and Nobilis ILT (Serva strain, France)] and a Korean chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccine strain [ILT-VAC (Gyeonggi97 strain, Korea)]. Six of the field isolates were highly virulent viruses, and the Kr12AD37 isolate was considered an attenuated type according to Han's RFLP method. These virulent Korean ILT viruses were divided into 3 classes (class I, II, and III). The Kr12AD37 isolate was found to have the same RFLP pattern as the Korean CEO vaccine strain, and both of these strains were different from the 3 foreign vaccine strains. The results suggest that the Korean CEO vaccine strain has been responsible for recent outbreaks, and the characterization of ILT viruses by RFLP was useful for diagnosis by providing epidemiological information. PMID:23873552

  18. Stone Lakes virus (family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus), a variant of Fort Morgan virus isolated from swallow bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) west of the Continental Divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Aaron C; Armijos, M Veronica; Wheeler, Sarah; Wright, Stan; Fang, Ying; Langevin, Stanley; Reisen, William K

    2009-09-01

    Multiple isolates of an alphaviruses within the western equine encephalomyelitis-serocomplex that were related closely to Ft. Morgan and its variant Buggy Creek virus were made from swallow bugs, Oeciacus vicarius Horvath (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), collected from cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) nests at the Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Sacramento County, CA, during the summers of 2005 and 2006. This virus (hereafter Stone Lakes virus, family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus, STLV) was the first record of this viral group west of the Continental Divide. STLV replicated well in Vero and other vertebrate cell cultures but failed to replicate in C6/36 cells or infect Culex tarsalis Coquillett mosquitoes. STLV failed to produce elevated viremias in adult chickens or house sparrows and was weakly immunogenic. In addition, STLV was not isolated from cliff swallow nestlings nor was antibody detected in adults collected at mist nets. We suggest that STL and related swallow bug viruses may be primarily infections of cimicids that are maintained and amplified either by vertical or nonviremic transmission and that cliff swallows may primarily be important as a bloodmeal source for the bugs rather than as an amplification host for the viruses. PMID:19769055

  19. Full-Genome Sequence Analysis of a Natural Reassortant H4N2 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from a Domestic Duck in Southern China

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Aiqiong; Xie, Zhixun; Xie, Liji; Xie, Zhiqin; Luo, Sisi; Deng, Xianwen; Huang, Li; Huang, Jiaoling; Zeng, Tingting

    2014-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a novel reassortant H4N2 avian influenza virus strain, A/duck/Guangxi/125D17/2012(H4N2) (GX125D17), isolated from a duck in Guangxi Province, China in 2012. We obtained the complete genome sequence of the GX125D17 virus isolation by PCR, cloning, and sequencing. Sequence analysis revealed that this H4N2 virus strain was a novel reassortant avian influenza virus (AIV). Information about the complete genome sequence of the GX125D17 virus strain will...

  20. Biological and Molecular Characterization of a Korean Isolate of Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus Infecting Cucumis Species in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Kook Choi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Surveys of yellowing viruses in plastic tunnels and in open field crops of melon (Cucumis melo cultivar catalupo, oriental melon (C. melo cultivar oriental melon, and cucumber (C. sativus were carried out in two melon-growing areas in 2014, Korea. Severe yellowing symptoms on older leaves of melon and chlorotic spots on younger leaves of melon were observed in the plastic tunnels. The symptoms were widespread and included initial chlorotic lesions followed by yellowing of whole leaves and thickening of older leaves. RT-PCR analysis using total RNA extracted from diseased leaves did not show any synthesized products for four cucurbit-infecting viruses; Beet pseudo-yellows virus, Cucumber mosaic virus, Cucurbit yellows stunting disorder virus, and Melon necrotic spot virus. Virus identification using RT-PCR showed Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows Virus (CABYV was largely distributed in melon, oriental melon and cucumber. This result was verified by aphid (Aphis gossypii transmission of CABYV. The complete coat protein (CP gene amplified from melon was cloned and sequenced. The CP gene nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequence comparisons as well as phylogenetic tree analysis of CABYV CPs showed that the CABYV isolates were undivided into subgroups. Although the low incidence of CABYV in infections to cucurbit crops in this survey, CABYV may become an important treat for cucurbit crops in many different regions in Korea, suggesting that CABYV should be taken into account in disease control of cucurbit crops in Korea.

  1. SEQUENCE COMPARISON OF THE CENTRAL REGION OF THE GLYCOPROTEIN GENE OF NEUTRALIZABLE, NON-NEUTRALIZABLE, AND SERIALLY PASSED ISOLATES OF VIRAL HEMORRHAGIC SEPTICEMIA VIRUS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, P. E. V.; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Higman, K.H.; Winton, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The region of the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus glycoprotein gene coding for amino acids 142 to 357 was sequenced and compared among 6 isolates of the virus from rainbow trout in Denmark, Isolates were selected that were strongly neutralized by polyclonal and monoclonal antisera, not neutr...

  2. Identification of amino acid changes in the envelope glycoproteins of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from alpaca that may be involved in host adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are most commonly associated with infections of cattle. However, BVDV is often isolated from closely related ruminants with a number of BVDV-1b viruses being isolated from alpacas that were both acutely and persistently infected (PI). The complete nucleotide se...

  3. Genetic characterization of a rare H12N3 avian influenza virus isolated from a green-winged teal in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Vuong Nghia; Ogawa, Haruko; Hussein, Islam T M; Hill, Nichola J; Trinh, Dai Quang; AboElkhair, Mohammed; Sultan, Serageldeen; Ma, Eric; Saito, Keisuke; Watanabe, Yukiko; Runstadler, Jonathan A; Imai, Kunitoshi

    2015-04-01

    This study reports on the genetic characterization of an avian influenza virus, subtype H12N3, isolated from an Eurasian green-winged teal (Anas crecca) in Japan in 2009. The entire genome sequence of the isolate was analyzed, and phylogenetic analyses were conducted to characterize the evolutionary history of the isolate. Phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes indicated that the virus belonged to the Eurasian-like avian lineage. Molecular dating indicated that this H12 virus is likely a multiple reassortant influenza A virus. This is the first reported characterization of influenza A virus subtype H12N3 isolated in Japan and these data contribute to the accumulation of knowledge on the genetic diversity and generation of novel influenza A viruses. PMID:25557930

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of a Genotype XVII Newcastle Disease Virus, Isolated from an Apparently Healthy Domestic Duck in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shittu, Ismaila; Sharma, Poonam; Joannis, Tony M; Volkening, Jeremy D; Odaibo, Georgina N; Olaleye, David O; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Solomon, Ponman; Abolnik, Celia; Miller, Patti J; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) of genotype XVII is described here. A velogenic strain (duck/Nigeria/903/KUDU-113/1992) was isolated from an apparently healthy free-roaming domestic duck sampled in Kuru, Nigeria, in 1992. Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion protein gene and complete genome classified the isolate as a member of NDV class II, genotype XVII. PMID:26847901

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Reassortant H3N6 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Domestic Green-Winged Teal

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Chaochao; Liu, Qian; Chen, Quanjiao; Yao, Yanfeng; Wang, Huadong; Chen, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    An avian influenza virus strain, A/domestic green-winged teal/Hunan/2036/2007(H3N6) (DGW-T2036), was isolated from healthy domestic green-winged teals (Anas crecca) in Hunan Province, South China. All eight gene segments of the isolate were sequenced. Genomic analysis demonstrated that this H3N6 virus is a novel reassortant avian influenza virus with a gene constellation originating from multiple ancestors.

  6. Molecular epidemiology of Rift Valley fever virus based on genetic analysis of the virus isolates recovered in 1944-2008 from distinct geographic regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an emerging mosquito-borne viral zoonosis caused by a RNA virus named Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a Phlebovirus member of the Bunyaviridae family. Historically the disease was present in Africa and Madagascar where outbreaks occur at irregular intervals when heavy rains facilitate the breeding of vector competent mosquito vectors. The occurrence of the first confirmed outbreaks of RVF in 2000-2001 among humans and livestock outside Africa, in the Arabian Peninsula, carries the implication of further spread of infection into non-endemic areas since the virus is capable of utilizing a wide range of mosquito vectors. This work undertook investigation of the molecular epidemiology of the disease (1944-2008) with special reference to South Africa where the first documented outbreak of RVF occurred in 1951 and the most recent in 2008. A total of 149 isolates of RVF recovered over a period of 65 years from various hosts and during endemic and epidemic periods of disease in 15 African countries, Madagascar and Saudi Arabia were characterised by partial genomic sequencing of a 535-nucleotide segment of the G2 glycoprotein coding region of the M segment and the genetic relatedness determined using MEGA software. Pair-wise comparison of RVF isolates revealed divergences ranging from 0-5.6% at the nucleotide level, corresponding to 0-2.8% at the amino acid level. Most isolates are compartmentalized geographically and belong to one of 16 genotypes within three main lineages. Isolates from South Africa collected over 57 years belong to one of 4 genotypes. The 2008 South African isolates were closely related to isolates from the recent east African outbreak in 2006 and a 2003 Mauritanian isolate. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that circulation of RVFV is highly compartmentalized but with favourable climatic conditions a single genotype can rapidly spread from endemic areas over vast distances to cause outbreaks in susceptible human and

  7. Pathogenesis and phylogenetic analyses of canine distemper virus strain ZJ7 isolate from domestic dogs in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Bin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new isolate of canine distemper virus (CDV, named ZJ7, was isolated from lung tissues of a dog suspected with CDV infection using MDCK cells. The ZJ7 isolate induced cytopathogenic effects of syncytia in MDCK cell after six passages. In order to evaluate pathogenesis of ZJ7 strain, three CDV sero-negative dogs were intranasally inoculated with its virus suspension. All infected dogs developed clinical signs of severe bloody diarrhea, conjunctivitis, ocular discharge, nasal discharge and coughing, fever and weight loss at 21 dpi, whereas the mock group infected with DMEM were normal. The results demonstrated that CDV-ZJ7 strain isolated by MDCK cell was virulent, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of strain ZJ7 had no change after isolation by MDCK cell when compared with the original virus from the fresh tissues. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses for the nucleocapsid (N, phosphoprotein (P and receptor binding haemagglutinin (H gene of the ZJ7 isolate clearly showed it is joins to the Asia 1 group cluster of CDV strains, the predominant genotype in China.

  8. Genomic variability and molecular evolution of Asian isolates of sugarcane streak mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shan-Shan; Alabi, Olufemi J; Damaj, Mona B; Fu, Wei-Lin; Sun, Sheng-Ren; Fu, Hua-Ying; Chen, Ru-Kai; Mirkov, T Erik; Gao, San-Ji

    2016-06-01

    Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV), an economically important causal agent of mosaic disease of sugarcane, is a member of the newly created genus Poacevirus in the family Potyviridae. In this study, we report the molecular characterization of three new SCSMV isolates from China (YN-YZ211 and HN-YZ49) and Myanmar (MYA-Formosa) and their genetic variation and phylogenetic relationship to SCSMV isolates from Asia and the type members of the family Potyviridae. The complete genome of each of the three isolates was determined to be 9781 nucleotides (nt) in size, excluding the 3' poly(A) tail. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete polyprotein amino acid (aa) sequences (3130 aa) revealed that all SCSMV isolates clustered into a phylogroup specific to the genus Poacevirus and formed two distinct clades designated as group I and group II. Isolates YN-YZ211, HN-YZ49 and MYA-Formosa clustered into group I, sharing 96.8-99.5 % and 98.9-99.6 % nt (at the complete genomic level) and aa (at the polyprotein level) identity, respectively, among themselves and 81.2-98.8 % and 94.0-99.6 % nt (at the complete genomic level) and aa (at the polyprotein level) identity, respectively, with the corresponding sequences of seven Asian SCSMV isolates. Population genetic analysis revealed greater between-group (0.190 ± 0.004) than within-group (group I = 0.025 ± 0.001 and group II = 0.071 ± 0.003) evolutionary divergence values, further supporting the results of the phylogenetic analysis. Further analysis indicated that natural selection might have contributed to the evolution of isolates belonging to the two identified SCSMV clades, with infrequent genetic exchanges occurring between them over time. These findings provide a comprehensive analysis of the population genetic structure and driving forces for the evolution of SCSMV with implications for global exchange of sugarcane germplasm. PMID:26973230

  9. Isolation of a reassortant H13N2 virus from a mallard fecal sample in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Hyun-Mi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virus subtype H13N2, A/mallard/Kr/SH38-45/2010 (H13N2, was first isolated from a mallard fecal sample in South Korea. Results Phylogenetic analysis of all eight viral genes revealed that this virus emerged by genetic mixing between Eurasian and North American gene pools, and possibly between wild ducks and gulls. The H13 and N2 surface genes clustered together in a group with Eurasian isolates from gulls and wild birds, respectively. The PB2, PA, NP, M and NS segments belonged to the Eurasian lineage, whereas the PB1 gene clustered in the North American lineage. Furthermore, they showed a bird-dependent pattern in phylogenetic analysis: the M gene was similar to subtype H13 viruses within gulls, whereas other segments were similar to avian influenza viruses of other subtypes from wild ducks. Conclusions The data suggests that the novel reassortant H13N2 virus isolated in South Korea might have emerged by genetic reassortment between intercontinental and interspecies transmission in wild birds.

  10. Complexities in Isolation and Purification of Multiple Viruses from Mixed Viral Infections: Viral Interference, Persistence and Exclusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    Full Text Available Successful purification of multiple viruses from mixed infections remains a challenge. In this study, we investigated peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV mixed infection in goats. Rather than in a single cell type, cytopathic effect (CPE of the virus was observed in cocultured Vero/BHK-21 cells at 6th blind passage (BP. PPRV, but not FMDV could be purified from the virus mixture by plaque assay. Viral RNA (mixture transfection in BHK-21 cells produced FMDV but not PPRV virions, a strategy which we have successfully employed for the first time to eliminate the negative-stranded RNA virus from the virus mixture. FMDV phenotypes, such as replication competent but noncytolytic, cytolytic but defective in plaque formation and, cytolytic but defective in both plaque formation and standard FMDV genome were observed respectively, at passage level BP8, BP15 and BP19 and hence complicated virus isolation in the cell culture system. Mixed infection was not found to induce any significant antigenic and genetic diversity in both PPRV and FMDV. Further, we for the first time demonstrated the viral interference between PPRV and FMDV. Prior transfection of PPRV RNA, but not Newcastle disease virus (NDV and rotavirus RNA resulted in reduced FMDV replication in BHK-21 cells suggesting that the PPRV RNA-induced interference was specifically directed against FMDV. On long-term coinfection of some acute pathogenic viruses (all possible combinations of PPRV, FMDV, NDV and buffalopox virus in Vero cells, in most cases, one of the coinfecting viruses was excluded at passage level 5 suggesting that the long-term coinfection may modify viral persistence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented evidence describing a natural mixed infection of FMDV and PPRV. The study not only provides simple and reliable methodologies for isolation and purification of two epidemiologically and economically important groups of

  11. Complexities in Isolation and Purification of Multiple Viruses from Mixed Viral Infections: Viral Interference, Persistence and Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naveen; Barua, Sanjay; Riyesh, Thachamvally; Chaubey, Kundan K.; Rawat, Krishan Dutt; Khandelwal, Nitin; Mishra, Anil K.; Sharma, Nitika; Chandel, Surender S.; Sharma, Shalini; Singh, Manoj K.; Sharma, Dinesh K.; Singh, Shoor V.; Tripathi, Bhupendra N.

    2016-01-01

    Successful purification of multiple viruses from mixed infections remains a challenge. In this study, we investigated peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) mixed infection in goats. Rather than in a single cell type, cytopathic effect (CPE) of the virus was observed in cocultured Vero/BHK-21 cells at 6th blind passage (BP). PPRV, but not FMDV could be purified from the virus mixture by plaque assay. Viral RNA (mixture) transfection in BHK-21 cells produced FMDV but not PPRV virions, a strategy which we have successfully employed for the first time to eliminate the negative-stranded RNA virus from the virus mixture. FMDV phenotypes, such as replication competent but noncytolytic, cytolytic but defective in plaque formation and, cytolytic but defective in both plaque formation and standard FMDV genome were observed respectively, at passage level BP8, BP15 and BP19 and hence complicated virus isolation in the cell culture system. Mixed infection was not found to induce any significant antigenic and genetic diversity in both PPRV and FMDV. Further, we for the first time demonstrated the viral interference between PPRV and FMDV. Prior transfection of PPRV RNA, but not Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and rotavirus RNA resulted in reduced FMDV replication in BHK-21 cells suggesting that the PPRV RNA-induced interference was specifically directed against FMDV. On long-term coinfection of some acute pathogenic viruses (all possible combinations of PPRV, FMDV, NDV and buffalopox virus) in Vero cells, in most cases, one of the coinfecting viruses was excluded at passage level 5 suggesting that the long-term coinfection may modify viral persistence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented evidence describing a natural mixed infection of FMDV and PPRV. The study not only provides simple and reliable methodologies for isolation and purification of two epidemiologically and economically important groups of viruses, but

  12. Complexities in Isolation and Purification of Multiple Viruses from Mixed Viral Infections: Viral Interference, Persistence and Exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naveen; Barua, Sanjay; Riyesh, Thachamvally; Chaubey, Kundan K; Rawat, Krishan Dutt; Khandelwal, Nitin; Mishra, Anil K; Sharma, Nitika; Chandel, Surender S; Sharma, Shalini; Singh, Manoj K; Sharma, Dinesh K; Singh, Shoor V; Tripathi, Bhupendra N

    2016-01-01

    Successful purification of multiple viruses from mixed infections remains a challenge. In this study, we investigated peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) mixed infection in goats. Rather than in a single cell type, cytopathic effect (CPE) of the virus was observed in cocultured Vero/BHK-21 cells at 6th blind passage (BP). PPRV, but not FMDV could be purified from the virus mixture by plaque assay. Viral RNA (mixture) transfection in BHK-21 cells produced FMDV but not PPRV virions, a strategy which we have successfully employed for the first time to eliminate the negative-stranded RNA virus from the virus mixture. FMDV phenotypes, such as replication competent but noncytolytic, cytolytic but defective in plaque formation and, cytolytic but defective in both plaque formation and standard FMDV genome were observed respectively, at passage level BP8, BP15 and BP19 and hence complicated virus isolation in the cell culture system. Mixed infection was not found to induce any significant antigenic and genetic diversity in both PPRV and FMDV. Further, we for the first time demonstrated the viral interference between PPRV and FMDV. Prior transfection of PPRV RNA, but not Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and rotavirus RNA resulted in reduced FMDV replication in BHK-21 cells suggesting that the PPRV RNA-induced interference was specifically directed against FMDV. On long-term coinfection of some acute pathogenic viruses (all possible combinations of PPRV, FMDV, NDV and buffalopox virus) in Vero cells, in most cases, one of the coinfecting viruses was excluded at passage level 5 suggesting that the long-term coinfection may modify viral persistence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented evidence describing a natural mixed infection of FMDV and PPRV. The study not only provides simple and reliable methodologies for isolation and purification of two epidemiologically and economically important groups of viruses, but

  13. Broome virus, a new fusogenic Orthoreovirus species isolated from an Australian fruit bat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the discovery and characterization of a new fusogenic orthoreovirus, Broome virus (BroV), isolated from a little red flying-fox (Pteropus scapulatus). The BroV genome consists of 10 dsRNA segments, each having a 3' terminal pentanucleotide sequence conserved amongst all members of the genus Orthoreovirus, and a unique 5' terminal pentanucleotide sequence. The smallest genome segment is bicistronic and encodes two small nonstructural proteins, one of which is a novel fusion associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein responsible for syncytium formation, but no cell attachment protein. The low amino acid sequence identity between BroV proteins and those of other orthoreoviruses (13-50%), combined with phylogenetic analyses of structural and nonstructural proteins provide evidence to support the classification of BroV in a new sixth species group within the genus Orthoreovirus.

  14. Temperature-sensitive mutants of fowl plague virus: isolation and genetic characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-nine temperature-sensitive mutants of fowl plague virus (FPV) strain Rostock and four ts mutants of FPV-strain Dobson were isolated by utilizing two methods of plaque screening, after either spontaneous or chemically induced mutagenesis. Twenty-nine of the FPV-Rostock mutants were further characterized by genetic recombination studies and were found to fall into six high frequency recombination groups. The genome segment carrying the ts mutation in each group was identified by analyzing the gene composition of ts+ recombinants generated from crosses between representatives of each group and ts mutants of FPV-Dobson. It was concluded that the six groups correspond to mutations in six different genome segments, namely, those coding for the P1, P2, P3, HA, NP, and NS proteins

  15. Isolation and Genetic Analysis of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus from Infected Cattle in Indiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman M. Pogranichniy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Species and biotype distribution was determined in 44 bovine viral diarrhea virus- (BVDV- positive samples submitted to the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (ADDL in Indiana during 2006–2008. BVDV RNA was detected in the 5′-untranslated region and Npro region using reverse transcriptase PCR followed by sequencing analysis of the PCR product. Additionally, cases were classified into one of six categories according to history and/or lesions: acute symptomatic, hemorrhagic, respiratory distress, reproductive, persistent infection (PI, and mucosal disease (MD. Of 44 BVDV-positive samples, 33 were noncytopathic (ncp, 10 were cytopathic (cp, and one presented both ncp and cp biotypes. Sequencing analysis demonstrated that all samples belonged to BVDV-1a, BVDV-1b, or BVDV-2. The most common isolate was ncp BVDV-1b, (44% followed by ncp BVDV-2a (24%. Among the six categories, respiratory clinical signs were the most common (36% followed by PI (25% and MD (16%.

  16. Isolation of dengue 2 virus from a patient with central nervous system involvement (transverse myelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leão Raimundo N.Q.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A dengue fever case is described in a 58-year-old male patient with febrile illness and thrombocytopenia complicated by neurological involvement characterized by transverse myelitis followed by weakness of both legs and flaccid paralysis. Muscle strength was much diminished and bilateral areflexia was observed. Dengue 2 (DEN-2 virus was isolated and the patient sero-converted by hemagglutination-inhibition and IgM-ELISA tests. The RT-PCR test was positive to DEN-2 in acute phase serum and culture supernatant, but negative in the cerebrospinal fluid. After three weeks of hospitalization the patient was discharged. No other infectious agent was detected in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. The patient had full recovery from paralysis six months after the onset of DEN-2 infection.

  17. An isolate of Apple stem grooving virus associated with Cleopatra mandarin fruit intumescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovisolo Osvaldo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A citrus tatter leaf isolate (CTLV-Cl of Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV has been found to be associated with a fruit rind intumescence in Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reshni in Limeira (SP. The CTLV-Cl was mechanically transmitted to the main experimental herbaceous hosts of CTLV. Chenopodium quinoa and C. amaranticolor reacted with local lesions and systemic symptoms while other test plants reacted somewhat differently than what is reported for CTLV. A pair of primers designed for specific detection of ASGV and CTLV amplified the expected 801 bp fragment from the CTLV-Cl-infected plants. Typical capillovirus-like particles were observed by the electron microscope in experimentally infected C. quinoa and C. amaranticolor leaves.

  18. Genomic sequence and virulence of clonal isolates of vaccinia virus Tiantan, the Chinese smallpox vaccine strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qicheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide eradication of smallpox in 1979, the potential bioterrorism threat from variola virus and the ongoing use of vaccinia virus (VACV as a vector for vaccine development argue for continued research on VACV. In China, the VACV Tiantan strain (TT was used in the smallpox eradication campaign. Its progeny strain is currently being used to develop a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV vaccine. Here we sequenced the full genomes of five TT clones isolated by plaque purification from the TT (752-1 viral stock. Phylogenetic analysis with other commonly used VACV strains showed that TT (752-1 and its clones clustered and exhibited higher sequence diversity than that found in Dryvax clones. The ∼190 kbp genomes of TT appeared to encode 273 open reading frames (ORFs. ORFs located in the middle of the genome were more conserved than those located at the two termini, where many virulence and immunomodulation associated genes reside. Several patterns of nucleotide changes including point mutations, insertions and deletions were identified. The polymorphisms in seven virulence-associated proteins and six immunomodulation-related proteins were analyzed. We also investigated the neuro- and skin- virulence of TT clones in mice and rabbits, respectively. The TT clones exhibited significantly less virulence than the New York City Board of Health (NYCBH strain, as evidenced by less extensive weight loss and morbidity in mice as well as produced smaller skin lesions and lower incidence of putrescence in rabbits. The complete genome sequences, ORF annotations, and phenotypic diversity yielded from this study aid our understanding of the Chinese historic TT strain and are useful for HIV vaccine projects employing TT as a vector.

  19. Puesta en evidencia del virus diarrea viral bovina en bovinos clínicamente afectados Isolation of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus from tissue of clinically affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O CELEDON

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Para conocer la presencia del virus diarrea viral bovina (VDVB en animales sospechosos de estar cursando un cuadro clínico provocado por este virus, se trabajó con un total de 33 animales, correspondiendo a 23 fetos abortados, 2 mortinatos, un nonato, 3 vacas: una madre de mortinato, una madre de aborto y una muerta, 2 novillos muertos y 2 terneros muertos. Muestras de órganos se inocularon en cultivos primarios de pulmón fetal bovino (PFB y en la línea MDBK. Después del primer pasaje en células de PFB, se detectó la presencia de antígenos del VDVB por la prueba de inmunoperoxidasa indirecta (IPI. Todas las muestras con reacción positiva a IPI se inocularon por segunda y tercera vez en células de PFB, aplicándose la prueba de IPI en el tercer pasaje. Sobre un cuarto pasaje se aplicó la prueba de inmunofluorescencia direccta (IFD. Todas las muestras, positivas y negativas a IPI, se inocularon en 3 pasajes seriados en las células MDBK. En 23 de los 33 animales se aisló VDVB cepas no citopatogénicas (NCP, correspondiendo a 14 fetos abortados, un nonato, un mortinato, 3 vacas, 2 novillos y 2 terneros. En 6 fetos abortados, independiente de los infectados con el VDVB, se aisló el virus de la rinotraqueítis infecciosa bovina (RIB. Se concluye que la presencia del VDVB es de alta frecuencia en muestras clínicas de ganado bovino con patologías asociables al VDVB, desconociéndose el rol patógeno del virus en estos aislados.Cattle infected with the bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD virus can present a variety of clinical signs. This research studied the presence of BVD virus in cattle by virus isolation in primary cell cultures of bovine embryo lungs. Virus identification was done using the immunoperoxidase staining assay and the direct fluorescent antibody staining. As a result, 23 out of 33 animals were identified as positive to BVD virus: 14 foetal abortions, 2 stillbirths, 3 dams, 2 steers and 2 calves. No cytopathogenic isolates were

  20. DENVirDB: A web portal of Dengue Virus sequence information on Asian isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary J. Asnet

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available DENVirDB is a web portal that provides the sequence information and computationally curated information of dengue viral proteins. The advent of genomic technology has increased the sequences available in the public databases. In order to create relevant concise information on Dengue Virus (DENV, the genomic sequences were collected, analysed with the bioinformatics tools and presented as DENVirDB. It provides the comprehensive information of complete genome sequences of dengue virus isolates of Southeast Asia, viz. India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, East Timor, Philippines, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Brunei and China. DENVirDB also includes the structural and non-structural protein sequences of DENV. It intends to provide the integrated information on the physicochemical properties, topology, secondary structure, domain and structural properties for each protein sequences. It contains over 99 entries in complete genome sequences and 990 entries in protein sequences, respectively. Therefore, DENVirDB could serve as a user friendly database for researchers in acquiring sequences and proteomic information in one platform.

  1. [Molecular identification and sequence analysis of broad bean wilt virus 2 isolates from atractylodes macrocephala Koidz].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yanbing; Shi, Xiaoli; Zhang, Ximei; Zhao, Huiqi; Zhao, Baojia

    2015-01-01

    To identity the pathogen that causes the mosaic and yellowing symptoms on Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz in Jiangxian, Shanxi province, biological inoculation, sequence-independent amplification (SIA),RT-PCR and other identification methods were used. The results showed that the chlorotic and necrosis symptoms occurred in the indicator plant Chenopodium quinoa after it was infected with the pathogen,and the same symptoms appeared after the reinoculation of healthy Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz; this reflected that the disease was likely to be caused by a virus. The results of SIA and sequencing showed that Broad bean wilt virus 2 (BBWV2) was present in severely mosaic Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz leaves. To further characterize the BBWV2 isolate from Atractylodes macrocephala (BBWV2-Am), the polyprotein partial gene encoded by BBWV2-Am RNA2 was cloned and sequenced. Sequence alignments showed that the nucleotide sequence identity of BBWV2-Am SCP and LCP genes ranged from 79.3% to 87.2% and from 80.1% to 89.2% compared to other BBWV2 strains,respectively; the deduced amino acid sequence similarities of the two gene products ranged from 91.2% to 95.7% and from 89.44 to 95.5%, respectively,compared to those of other BBWV2 strains. Phylogenetic comparisons showed that BBWV2-Am was most likely to be related to BBWV2-Rg,but formed an independent branch. This is the first report of BBWV2 in Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz. PMID:25997332

  2. Evolutionary and Ecological Characterization of Mayaro Virus Strains Isolated during an Outbreak, Venezuela, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auguste, Albert J; Liria, Jonathan; Forrester, Naomi L; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Moncada, Maria; Long, Kanya C; Morón, Dulce; de Manzione, Nuris; Tesh, Robert B; Halsey, Eric S; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Hernandez, Rosa; Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Weaver, Scott C

    2015-10-01

    In 2010, an outbreak of febrile illness with arthralgic manifestations was detected at La Estación village, Portuguesa State, Venezuela. The etiologic agent was determined to be Mayaro virus (MAYV), a reemerging South American alphavirus. A total of 77 cases was reported and 19 were confirmed as seropositive. MAYV was isolated from acute-phase serum samples from 6 symptomatic patients. We sequenced 27 complete genomes representing the full spectrum of MAYV genetic diversity, which facilitated detection of a new genotype, designated N. Phylogenetic analysis of genomic sequences indicated that etiologic strains from Venezuela belong to genotype D. Results indicate that MAYV is highly conserved genetically, showing ≈17% nucleotide divergence across all 3 genotypes and 4% among genotype D strains in the most variable genes. Coalescent analyses suggested genotypes D and L diverged ≈150 years ago and genotype diverged N ≈250 years ago. This virus commonly infects persons residing near enzootic transmission foci because of anthropogenic incursions. PMID:26401714

  3. Comparison of Cultureset and Bartels Immunodiagnostics with conventional tissue culture for isolation and identification of herpes simplex virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Sewell, D L; Horn, S A; Dilbeck, P W

    1984-01-01

    Two 48-h Vero cell systems were compared with viral culture in human fibroblastic cells for isolation and identification of herpes simplex virus from clinical specimens. Both 48-h systems had 79% sensitivity and greater than 99% specificity as compared with the conventional tissue culture method.

  4. Molecular Characterization of the First Ebola Virus Isolated in Italy, from a Health Care Worker Repatriated from Sierra Leone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilletti, Concetta; Carletti, Fabrizio; Gruber, Cesare E. M.; Bordi, Licia; Lalle, Eleonora; Quartu, Serena; Meschi, Silvia; Lapa, Daniele; Colavita, Francesca; Chiappini, Roberta; Mazzarelli, Antonio; Marsella, Patrizia; Petrosillo, Nicola; Nicastri, Emanuele; Chillemi, Giovanni; Valentini, Alessio; Desideri, Alessandro; Di Caro, Antonino; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of an Ebola virus (EBOV) isolated from a health worker repatriated from Sierra Leone to Italy in November 2014. The sequence, clustering in clade 3 of the Sierra Leone sequences, was analyzed with respect to mutations possibly affecting diagnostic and therapeutic targets as well as virulence. PMID:26089420

  5. Complete Genome Characterization of the Arumowot Virus (Unclassified Phlebovirus) Isolated from Turdus libonyanus Birds in the Central African Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthet, Nicolas; Nakouné, Emmanuel; Gessain, Antoine; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2016-02-01

    The Bunyaviridae family is currently composed of five genera, including Phlebovirus, in which several phleboviruses are associated with human diseases. Using high-throughput sequencing, we obtained and characterized one complete genome of the Arumowot virus (AMTV) isolated in 1978 from Turdus libonyanus, the Kurrichane Thrush, in the Central African Republic (CAR). The genomic segment of the new strain of AMTV isolated in the CAR had 75.4-83.5% sequence similarity and 82-98.4% amino acid similarity to the prototype sequence of AMTV. The different conserved proteins of the small (S) and large (L) segments (Nc, NSP, and RNA polymerase) showed close similarity at the amino acid level, whereas the polyprotein of the medium (M) segment was highly divergent, with 18% and 37.7%, respectively, for the prototype sequence of AMTV and the Odrenisrou virus (ODRV) isolated from Culex (Cx.) albiventris mosquitoes in the Tai forest, Ivory Coast. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the sequence homology analysis and indicated that AMTV-CAR clustered into the Salehabad virus antigenic complex. The two closest viruses were the prototype sequences of AMTV originally isolated from Cx. antennatus mosquitoes and ODRV. These molecular data suggest the need for a deep genetic characterization of the diversity of this viral species to enhance its detection in the Central African region and to understand better its behavior and life cycle so that its potential spread to the human population can be prevented. PMID:26807610

  6. Susceptibility of various Japanese freshwater fish species to an isolate of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ito, Takafumi; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Genotype IVb of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) was isolated for the first time in the Great Lakes basin in 2003, where it spread and caused mass mortalities in several wild fish species throughout the basin. In order to prevent further spreading of the disease and to assess risks of...

  7. Molecular characterization of Cirus tristeza virus isolates associated with stem pitting CTV cross-protection in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the 1970s and early 1980s, the Peruvian citrus industry was destroyed by severe Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) strains spread by the brown citrus aphid. The Topara Nursery, located 180 km south of Lima Peru, selected and identified CTV isolates that confer cross-protection against virulent stem...

  8. Complete genome sequence of an emerging melon necrotic spot virus isolate infecting greenhouse cucumber in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome (4,267 nt) of an Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) isolate (ABCA13-01) infecting greenhouse cucumber in Canada was determined through deep sequencing of small RNAs. Its genome sequence was most closely related to MNSV-N (97%), but lacking a 55-nt insertion at the 3’UTR for resista...

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of an Indian Field Isolate of Classical Swine Fever Virus Belonging to Subgenotype 1.1

    OpenAIRE

    Kamboj, Aman; Patel, Chhabi L.; Chaturvedi, V.K.; Saini, Mohini; Praveen K. Gupta

    2014-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of an Indian field isolate of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) belonging to predominant subgenotype 1.1 prevalent in India. This report will help in understanding the molecular diversity of CSFV strains circulating worldwide and to select and develop a suitable vaccine candidate for classical swine fever (CSF) control in India.

  10. Molecular characterization and phylogenetics of a reassortant H13N8 influenza virus isolated from gulls in Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    A double reassortant H13N8 influenza A virus was isolated from gulls in Mongolia. The basic virological characteristics were studied. Complete genome sequence analysis indicated the complicated evolutionary history. The PA gene belongs to classical Avian-like lineage and more likely originated fro...

  11. First Complete Genome Sequence of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus Isolated from Honey Bees (Apis mellifera) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Beibei; Hou, Chunsheng; Deng, Shuai; Zhang, Xuefeng; Chu, Yanna; Yuan, Chunying; Diao, Qingyun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is a serious viral disease affecting adult bees. We report here the complete genome sequence of CBPV, which was isolated from a honey bee colony with the symptom of severe crawling. The genome of CBPV consists of two segments, RNA 1 and RNA 2, containing respective overlapping fragments. PMID:27491983

  12. Molecular epidemiology of Crimean- Congo hemorrhagic fever virus genome isolated from ticks of Hamadan province of Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahmasebi, F; Ghiasi, Seyed Mojtaba; Mostafavi, E;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus is a tick-borne member of the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae. CCHFV has been isolated from at least 31 different tick species. The virus is transmitted through the bite of an infected tick, or by direct contact with CCHFV......-infected patients or the products of infected livestock. This study was undertaken to study the genetic relationship and distribution of CCHFV in the tick population of Hamadan province of Iran. METHOD: In this study, RT-PCR has been used for detection of the CCHFV genome. RESULTS: This genome was detected in 19.......2% of the ticks collected from livestock of different regions of the Hamadan province in western Iran. The infected species belonged to Hyalomma detritum, H. anatolicum, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Argas reflexus. With one exception, genetic analysis of the virus genome isolates showed high sequence...

  13. Isolation and Genetic Characterization of Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Wild Birds in the Azov-Black Sea Region of Ukraine (2001-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, Denys; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Spackman, Erica; Smith, Diane; Rula, Oleksandr; Muzyka, Nataliia; Stegniy, Borys

    2016-05-01

    Wild bird surveillance for avian influenza virus (AIV) was conducted from 2001 to 2012 in the Azov - Black Sea region of the Ukraine, considered part of the transcontinental wild bird migration routes from northern Asia and Europe to the Mediterranean, Africa, and southwest Asia. A total of 6281 samples were collected from wild birds representing 27 families and eight orders for virus isolation. From these samples, 69 AIVs belonging to 15 of the 16 known hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes and seven of nine known neuraminidase (NA) subtypes were isolated. No H14, N5, or N9 subtypes were identified. In total, nine H6, eight H1, nine H5, seven H7, six H11, six H4, five H3, five H10, four H8, three H2, three H9, one H12, one H13, one H15, and one H16 HA subtypes were isolated. As for the NA subtypes, twelve N2, nine N6, eight N8, seven N7, six N3, four N4, and one undetermined were isolated. There were 27 HA and NA antigen combinations. All isolates were low pathogenic AIV except for eight highly pathogenic (HP) AIVs that were isolated during the H5N1 HPAI outbreaks of 2006-08. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the HA genes revealed epidemiological connections between the Azov-Black Sea regions and Europe, Russia, Mongolia, and Southeast Asia. H1, H2, H3, H7, H8, H6, H9, and H13 AIV subtypes were closely related to European, Russian, Mongolian, and Georgian AIV isolates. H10, H11, and H12 AIV subtypes were epidemiologically linked to viruses from Europe and Southeast Asia. Serology conducted on serum and egg yolk samples also demonstrated previous exposure of many wild bird species to different AIVs. Our results demonstrate the great genetic diversity of AIVs in wild birds in the Azov-Black Sea region as well as the importance of this region for monitoring and studying the ecology of influenza viruses. This information furthers our understanding of the ecology of avian influenza viruses in wild bird species. PMID:27309081

  14. Phylogeography of rabies virus isolated from herbivores and bats in the Espírito Santo State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Luiz Fernando Pereira; Pereira, Sílvia Regina Ferreira Gonçalves; Carnieli, Pedro; Tavares, Luiz Carlos Barbosa; Kotait, Ivanete

    2013-04-01

    Rabies is enzootic in the State of Espírito Santo, Brazil. Every year, cattle and horses die from rabies that is transmitted by the vampire bat Desmodus rotundus. This paper describes the spread of the rabies virus by the continuous diffusion model using relaxed random walks with BEAST software. Forty-one (41) sequences of gene G from the rabies virus that was isolated from bats and domestic herbivores from several areas of the state between 2006 and 2010 were analyzed. The phylogenetic tree showed three main clusters as well as two sub-clusters under cluster 2. A spatial analysis showed that three strains of the rabies virus spread independently. In general, central Espírito Santo, which is mountainous, was the area where separation of the virus strains occurred. This physical barrier, however, was overcome at some point in time, as samples from different lineages were found in the same microarea. PMID:23264105

  15. Vektorers betydning for smitsomme sygdomme - kan vi vente andre sygdomme end bluetongue og schmallenberg i nær fremtid?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Rene

    Udbruddene i Nordvesteuropa af tropesygdommene bluetongue type 8 (2006-2009), bluetongue type 1 (2008) og schmallenberg (2011-12) er overraskende. Det er især overraskende, fordi de alle har spredt sig voldsomt og hurtigt, mens sygdomme, der spreder sig til nye miljøer og klimazoner, forventes at...

  16. Characterization of Newcastle disease virus isolates obtained from outbreak cases in commercial chickens and wild pigeons in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damena, Delesa; Fusaro, Alice; Sombo, Melaku; Belaineh, Redeat; Heidari, Alireza; Kebede, Abera; Kidane, Menbere; Chaka, Hassen

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease (ND), caused by virulent avian paramyxovirus type 1, is one of the most important diseases responsible for devastating outbreaks in poultry flocks in Ethiopia. However, the information about genetic characteristics of the Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs) circulating in commercial chickens and wild birds is scarce. In this study, we characterized isolates obtained from ND suspected outbreaks during 2012-2014 from poultry farms (n = 8) and wild pigeons (n = 4). The NDVs isolated from pathological specimens, through inoculation in embryonated chicken eggs, were characterized biologically by conventional intracerebral pathogenicity indices (ICPI), and genetically on the basis of Phylogenic analysis of partial F-gene sequences (260 bp) encompassing the cleavage site. The ICPI values of isolates from chickens ranged from 0.9 to 1.8; whereas, the ICPI of pigeon isolates was 1.4. All isolates contained multiple basic amino acids at the deduced cleavage site of fusion protein, which is a typical feature of virulent viruses. Phylogenic analysis of the partial cleavage site of F-gene (260 bp) indicated that all the sequences of viruses obtained from pigeons were identical and clustered within the genotype VIh while the sequences of viruses obtained from chickens were clustered together within the genotype VIf. The similarity between the viruses obtained from chickens and those obtained from pigeons ranged from 82.5 to 85.6 %. This suggests that different sub genotypes of genotype VI are circulating in chicken and wild pigeon population in Ethiopia. This warrants further study to understand the role of wild birds in the epidemiology of NDV in Ethiopia and as well highlights the importance of continuous surveillances both in wild birds and domestic poultry. PMID:27217991

  17. Detection of rainbow trout antibodies against viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) by neutralisation test is highly dependent on the virus isolate used

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fregeneda-Grandes, J.M.; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    50 %PNT, 90 % of the fish were found to be positive. By examining a panel of different VHSV isolates in 50 %PNT, it was demonstrated that the virus isolate used as test antigen could significantly affect the sensitivity and titre determination in 50 %PNT for detection of rainbow trout antibodies......Three serological tests, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 50 % plaque neutralisation test (50%PNT) and Western blotting (WB), were used to detect antibodies against viral haemorrhagic septicaerma virus (VHSV) in 50 rainbow trout broodstock from a rainbow trout farm endemically infected...... against VHSV. When the sera were examined for the presence of VHSV antibodies by ELISA or WB, 61 % were found to be positive. When conducting WB analysis, the viral glycoprotein was the protein most frequently recognized, followed by the viral nucleoprotein....

  18. Antiviral Activity of Bacillus sp. Isolated from the Marine Sponge Petromica citrina against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model of the Hepatitis C Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice Weis Arns

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hepatitis C virus causes chronic infections in humans, which can develop to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The Bovine viral diarrhea virus is used as a surrogate model for antiviral assays for the HCV. From marine invertebrates and microorganisms isolated from them, extracts were prepared for assessment of their possible antiviral activity. Of the 128 tested, 2 were considered active and 1 was considered promising. The best result was obtained from the extracts produced from the Bacillus sp. isolated from the sponge Petromica citrina. The extracts 555 (500 µg/mL, SI>18 and 584 (150 µg/mL, SI 27 showed a percentage of protection of 98% against BVDV, and the extract 616, 90% of protection. All of them showed activity during the viral adsorption. Thus, various substances are active on these studied organisms and may lead to the development of drugs which ensure an alternative therapy for the treatment of hepatitis C.

  19. A novel single-stranded RNA virus isolated from a phytopathogenic filamentous fungus, Rosellinia necatrix, with similarity to hypo-like viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui eZhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Here we report a biological and molecular characterization of a novel positive-sense RNA virus isolated from a field isolate (NW10 of a filamentous phytopathogenic fungus, the white root rot fungus that is designated as Rosellinia necatrix fusarivirus 1 (RnFV1. A recently developed technology using zinc ions allowed us to transfer RnFV1 to two mycelially incompatible Rosellinia necatrix strains. A biological comparison of the virus-free and -recipient isogenic fungal strains suggested that RnFV1 infects latently and thus has no potential as a virocontrol agent. The virus has an undivided positive-sense RNA genome of 6286 nucleotides excluding a poly (A tail. The genome possesses two non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs: a large ORF1 that encodes polypeptides with RNA replication functions and a smaller ORF2 that encodes polypeptides of unknown function. A lack of coat protein genes was suggested by the failure of virus particles from infected mycelia. No evidence was obtained by Northern analysis or classical 5'-RACE for the presence of subgenomic RNA for the downstream ORF. Sequence similarities were found in amino-acid sequence between RnFV1 putative proteins and counterparts of a previously reported mycovirus, Fusarium graminearum virus 1 (FgV1. Interestingly, several related sequences were detected by BLAST searches of independent transcriptome assembly databases one of which probably represents an entire virus genome. Phylogenetic analysis based on the conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase showed that RnFV1, FgV1, and these similar sequences are grouped in a cluster distinct from distantly related hypoviruses. It is proposed that a new taxonomic family termed Fusariviridae be created to include RnFV1and FgV1.

  20. Genetics, Receptor Binding, Replication, and Mammalian Transmission of H4 Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Live Poultry Markets in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Libin; Deng, Guohua; Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Qianyi; Kong, Huihui; Gu, Chunyang; Guan, Yuntao; Suzuki, Yasuo; Li, Yanbing; Jiang, Yongping; Tian, Guobin; Liu, Liling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT H4 avian influenza virus (AIV) is one of the most prevalent influenza virus subtypes in the world. However, whether H4 AIVs pose a threat to public health remains largely unclear. Here, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationships, receptor binding properties, replication, and transmissibility in mammals of H4 AIVs isolated from live poultry markets in China between 2009 and 2012. Genomic sequence analysis of 36 representative H4 viruses revealed 32 different genotypes, indicating that these viruses are undergoing complex and frequent reassortment events. All 32 viruses tested could replicate in the respiratory organs of infected mice without prior adaptation. Receptor binding analysis demonstrated that the H4 AIVs bound to α-2,6-linked glycans, although they retained the binding preference for α-2,3-linked glycans. When we tested the direct-contact transmission of 10 H4 viruses in guinea pigs, we found that three viruses did not transmit to any of the contact animals, one virus transmitted to one of three contact animals, and six viruses transmitted to all three contact animals. When we further tested the respiratory droplet transmissibility of four of the viruses that transmitted efficiently via direct contact, we found that three of them could transmit to one or two of the five exposed animals. Our study demonstrates that the current circulating H4 AIVs can infect, replicate in, and transmit to mammalian hosts, thereby posing a potential threat to human health. These findings emphasize the continual need for enhanced surveillance of H4 AIVs. IMPORTANCE Numerous surveillance studies have documented the wide distribution of H4 AIVs throughout the world, yet the biological properties of H4 viruses have not been well studied. In this study, we found that multiple genotypes of H4 viruses are cocirculating in the live poultry markets of China and that H4 viruses can replicate in mice, possess human-type receptor binding specificity, and transmit between

  1. Characterization of a new Vaccinia virus isolate reveals the C23L gene as a putative genetic marker for autochthonous Group 1 Brazilian Vaccinia virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe L Assis

    Full Text Available Since 1999, several Vaccinia virus (VACV isolates, the etiological agents of bovine vaccinia (BV, have been frequently isolated and characterized with various biological and molecular methods. The results from these approaches have grouped these VACV isolates into two different clusters. This dichotomy has elicited debates surrounding the origin of the Brazilian VACV and its epidemiological significance. To ascertain vital information to settle these debates, we and other research groups have made efforts to identify molecular markers to discriminate VACV from other viruses of the genus Orthopoxvirus (OPV and other VACV-BR groups. In this way, some genes have been identified as useful markers to discriminate between the VACV-BR groups. However, new markers are needed to infer ancestry and to correlate each sample or group with its unique epidemiological and biological features. The aims of this work were to characterize a new VACV isolate (VACV DMTV-2005 molecularly and biologically using conserved and non-conserved gene analyses for phylogenetic inference and to search for new genes that would elucidate the VACV-BR dichotomy. The VACV DMTV-2005 isolate reported in this study is biologically and phylogenetically clustered with other strains of Group 1 VACV-BR, the most prevalent VACV group that was isolated during the bovine vaccinia outbreaks in Brazil. Sequence analysis of C23L, the gene that encodes for the CC-chemokine-binding protein, revealed a ten-nucleotide deletion, which is a new Group 1 Brazilian VACV genetic marker. This deletion in the C23L open reading frame produces a premature stop-codon that is shared by all Group 1 VACV-BR strains and may also reflect the VACV-BR dichotomy; the deletion can also be considered to be a putative genetic marker for non-virulent Brazilian VACV isolates and may be used for the detection and molecular characterization of new isolates.

  2. Differential expression of two isolates of beak and feather disease virus capsid protein in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Edward I; Swarbrick, Crystall M D; Roman, Noelia; Forwood, Jade K; Raidal, Shane R

    2013-04-01

    Expression of recombinant beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) capsid-associated protein (Cap) has relied on inefficient techniques that typically produce low yields or use specialized expression systems, which greatly increase the cost and expertise required for mass production. An Escherichia coli system was used to express recombinant BFDV Cap derived from two isolates of BFDV, from a Long-billed Corella (Cacatua tenuirostris) and an Orange-bellied parrot (OBP; Neophema chrysogaster). Purification by affinity and size exclusion chromatography was optimized through an iterative process involving screening and modification of buffer constituents and pH. A buffer containing glycerol, β-mercaptoethanol, Triton X-100, and a high concentration of NaCl at pH 8 was used to increase solubility of the protein. The final concentration of the corella-isolated BFDV protein was fifteen- to twenty-fold greater than that produced in previous publications using E. coli expression systems. Immunoassays were used to confirm the specific antigenicity of recombinant Cap, verifying its validity for use in continued experimentation as a potential vaccine, a reagent in diagnostic assays, and as a concentrated sample for biological discoveries. PMID:23403150

  3. Complete genomic sequence and phylogenetic relatedness of hepatitis B virus isolates in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huy, Tran Thien Tuan; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Reynes, Jean Marc; Abe, Kenji

    2008-04-01

    Although it is known that Cambodia is one of the high endemic area of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, molecular characterization of HBV circulating in this country has not been reported. In this study, pre-S gene of HBV from 12 Cambodian patients was sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis based on the pre-S gene sequence revealed that 8 out of 12 isolates (66.7%) belonged to HBV/C1 and remaining four (33.3%) were HBV/B4. Furthermore, complete genomic sequences were also determined for three Cambodian HBV isolates. They all comprised of 3,215 bp long and two of them belonged to subgenotype B4, which had recombination event with genotype C in the precore/core gene confirmed by SimPlot and BootScanning analyses. Our results showed that both HBV strains belonged to subgenotypes B4 and C1, which are circulating in this country. This is the first report on molecular characterization of the HBV prevalent in Cambodia. PMID:18264750

  4. Isolation and identification of infectious laryngotracheitis virus from outbreaks at Lipa City, Batangas, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharam Saepulloh

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT is an acute, highly contagious respiratory disease of poultry characterized by respiratory disorder such as coughing with blood exudate from the trachea. The disease is caused by Herpesvirus of the family Herpesviridae and subfamily of Alphaherpesvirus. ILT is worldwide distribution and has been reported to be present in the Philippines since 1980. Since then, confirmation of subsequent outbreaks were not reported. Isolation was conducted from nine commercial layer chicken farms located at Lipa City, Batangas from May to July 2002. Tracheal and lung extracts were processed and inoculated into embryonated chicken eggs by chorio-allantoic membrane (CAM inoculation. Five samples produced typical pock lesions in CAM after the second passage. Lesions observed were yellowish pocks with opaque edges, distributed throughout the CAM. A vaccine strain of the virus used as the positive control also produced similar pock lesions. Serological confirmation using the Agar Gel Immunodiffusion (AGID test showed sharp precipitation lines reacting to a standard reference ILTV antisera (anti-NS175. All five isolates produced lines of precipitate identity among themselves and the positive control. This study confirms that the 2002 disease outbreak in the commercial layer chicken farms in Lipa City, Batangas was due to the ILTV.

  5. Evaluation of the protective capacity of new mild Citrus tristeza virus (CTV isolates selected for a preimmunization program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Zanutto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of tolerant rootstocks and preimmunization has satisfactorily controlled losses associated with the Citrus tristeza virus (CTV. Several researchers have shown that CTV mild isolates that are selected in the same region where they are used are superior to isolates obtained from other areas. Thus, budwoods of 20 outstanding citrus trees were collected in north and northwestern Paraná state (Brazil citrus-producing areas and established to be used in a preimmunization program. These budwoods were tested to evaluate the potential protection of the inherently present viral complex. Based on biological indexing and molecular characterization of the capsid protein gene by RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism, which indicated that the plants were infected with mild isolates of CTV, some of the selected plants could be used in a preimmunization program. These potentially mild and protective isolates were challenged with severe 'Rolândia' isolate inoculations by grafting and by the brown citrus aphid (Toxoptera citricida Kirkaldy vector, which was faster in transmitting the virus. Some isolates had a better protective value than others, particularly when challenged with the severe CTV isolate. The SSCP (single strand conformational polymorphism molecular analysis was an excellent complementary tool for monitoring the performance of the experiments and the stability of the viral complex present in the plants. Isolate number 1, collected in the municipality of Cruzeiro do Sul (CS-1, was the most promising for protecting commercial Pêra sweet orange (C. sinensis L. orchards in northern and northwestern Paraná. The Rolândia severe CTV isolate was stable and had a high genetic divergence among the severe isolates used as a control (Capão Bonito and Barão B and all of the isolates tested.

  6. Molecular characterization of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV isolates from outbreak cases at Lipa City, Batangas Province, The Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharam Saepulloh

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were carried out to identify molecular character of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV isolates from commercial layer chicken farm located at Lipa City, Batangas Province, the Philippines using western blotting. The virus was first isolated in chorio allantoic membrane (CAM. A-total of five isolates (#IV, #VI-C28, #VI-C29, #VI-C30, and #VII produced typical plaque lesions in CAM at second passages such as yellowish plaques with opaque edges. Furthermore, five isolates were then characterized by western blotting on 7.5% of acrylamide. These results showed that Chicken antisera to the ILTV strain NS-175 (as standard sera, and rabbit antisera to vaccine strain (BAL-ILT recognized four major viral protein with molecular weight of 205, 160, 85 and 60 kDa of isolates #VI-C28, #VI-C29, #VI-30 and #VII. While the isolate # IV produced viral protein of 205 and 85 kDa. The same four viral proteins were recognized by both ILTV antisera, indicating that the viral proteins of the vaccine strain and ILTV local isolates from Lipa City, Batangas Province, the Philippine had cross-reactivity. Thus, this cross reactivity may cause the effective protection afforded by the vaccine strain in the field.

  7. Molecular characterization of the Great Lakes viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV isolate from USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakharia Vikram N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV is a highly contagious viral disease of fresh and saltwater fish worldwide. VHSV caused several large scale fish kills in the Great Lakes area and has been found in 28 different host species. The emergence of VHS in the Great Lakes began with the isolation of VHSV from a diseased muskellunge (Esox masquinongy caught from Lake St. Clair in 2003. VHSV is a member of the genus Novirhabdovirus, within the family Rhabdoviridae. It has a linear single-stranded, negative-sense RNA genome of approximately 11 kbp, with six genes. VHSV replicates in the cytoplasm and produces six monocistronic mRNAs. The gene order of VHSV is 3'-N-P-M-G-NV-L-5'. This study describes molecular characterization of the Great Lakes VHSV strain (MI03GL, and its phylogenetic relationships with selected European and North American isolates. Results The complete genomic sequences of VHSV-MI03GL strain was determined from cloned cDNA of six overlapping fragments, obtained by RT-PCR amplification of genomic RNA. The complete genome sequence of MI03GL comprises 11,184 nucleotides (GenBank GQ385941 with the gene order of 3'-N-P-M-G-NV-L-5'. These genes are separated by conserved gene junctions, with di-nucleotide gene spacers. The first 4 nucleotides at the termini of the VHSV genome are complementary and identical to other novirhadoviruses genomic termini. Sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis show that the Great Lakes virus is closely related to the Japanese strains JF00Ehi1 (96% and KRRV9822 (95%. Among other novirhabdoviruses, VHSV shares highest sequence homology (62% with snakehead rhabdovirus. Conclusion Phylogenetic tree obtained by comparing 48 glycoprotein gene sequences of different VHSV strains demonstrate that the Great Lakes VHSV is closely related to the North American and Japanese genotype IVa, but forms a distinct genotype IVb, which is clearly different from the three European genotypes. Molecular

  8. Complete genome sequencing and evolutionary analysis of Indian isolates of Dengue virus type 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Complete genome of Indian DENV-2 was deciphered for the first time in this study. •The recent Indian DENV-2 revealed presence of many unique amino acid residues. •Genotype shift (American to Cosmopolitan) characterizes evolution of DENV-2 in India. •Circulation of a unique clade of DENV-2 in South Asia was identified. -- Abstract: Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of global public health significance. It is now endemic in most parts of the South East Asia including India. Though Dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) is predominantly associated with major outbreaks in India, complete genome information of Indian DENV-2 is not available. In this study, the full-length genome of five DENV-2 isolates (four from 2001 to 2011 and one from 1960), from different parts of India was determined. The complete genome of the Indian DENV-2 was found to be 10,670 bases long with an open reading frame coding for 3391 amino acids. The recent Indian DENV-2 (2001–2011) revealed a nucleotide sequence identity of around 90% and 97% with an older Indian DENV-2 (1960) and closely related Sri Lankan and Chinese DENV-2 respectively. Presence of unique amino acid residues and non-conservative substitutions in critical amino acid residues of major structural and non-structural proteins was observed in recent Indian DENV-2. Selection pressure analysis revealed positive selection in few amino acid sites of the genes encoding for structural and non-structural proteins. The molecular phylogenetic analysis based on comparison of both complete coding region and envelope protein gene with globally diverse DENV-2 viruses classified the recent Indian isolates into a unique South Asian clade within Cosmopolitan genotype. A shift of genotype from American to Cosmopolitan in 1970s characterized the evolution of DENV-2 in India. Present study is the first report on complete genome characterization of emerging DENV-2 isolates from India and highlights the circulation of a

  9. Complete genome sequencing and evolutionary analysis of Indian isolates of Dengue virus type 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, Paban Kumar, E-mail: pabandash@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Shashi; Soni, Manisha; Agarwal, Ankita; Parida, Manmohan; Rao, P.V.Lakshmana

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Complete genome of Indian DENV-2 was deciphered for the first time in this study. •The recent Indian DENV-2 revealed presence of many unique amino acid residues. •Genotype shift (American to Cosmopolitan) characterizes evolution of DENV-2 in India. •Circulation of a unique clade of DENV-2 in South Asia was identified. -- Abstract: Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of global public health significance. It is now endemic in most parts of the South East Asia including India. Though Dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) is predominantly associated with major outbreaks in India, complete genome information of Indian DENV-2 is not available. In this study, the full-length genome of five DENV-2 isolates (four from 2001 to 2011 and one from 1960), from different parts of India was determined. The complete genome of the Indian DENV-2 was found to be 10,670 bases long with an open reading frame coding for 3391 amino acids. The recent Indian DENV-2 (2001–2011) revealed a nucleotide sequence identity of around 90% and 97% with an older Indian DENV-2 (1960) and closely related Sri Lankan and Chinese DENV-2 respectively. Presence of unique amino acid residues and non-conservative substitutions in critical amino acid residues of major structural and non-structural proteins was observed in recent Indian DENV-2. Selection pressure analysis revealed positive selection in few amino acid sites of the genes encoding for structural and non-structural proteins. The molecular phylogenetic analysis based on comparison of both complete coding region and envelope protein gene with globally diverse DENV-2 viruses classified the recent Indian isolates into a unique South Asian clade within Cosmopolitan genotype. A shift of genotype from American to Cosmopolitan in 1970s characterized the evolution of DENV-2 in India. Present study is the first report on complete genome characterization of emerging DENV-2 isolates from India and highlights the circulation of a

  10. Experimental inoculation of late term pregnant sows with a field isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome vaccine-derived virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Bøtner, Anette; Bille-Hansen, Vivi; Oleksiewicz, Martin B.; Storgaard, Torben

    The use of a live attenuated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine in piglets has been associated with reproductive disorders in non-vaccinated sows. Vaccine-derived virus (VDV) has been isolated from foctuses, stillborn pigs, and dead: piglets, indicating that the...... live vaccine spread from vaccinated piglets to non-vaccinated sows, and that the virus might be implicated in the severe reproductive problems observed. In the present study, one such VDV isolate was used to experimentally infect pregnant sows in the last trimester. The chosen isolate, which had more...... than 99.6% identity to the attenuated vaccine virus, originated from the lungs of a stillborn pig from a swine herd with a sudden high level of stillborn pigs and increased piglet mortality in the nursing period. Intranasal inoculation of sows with the virus isolate resulted in congenital infection...

  11. Dengue Virus Serotype 2 from a Sylvatic Lineage Isolated from a Patient with Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Cardosa; Mong How Ooi; Phaik Hooi Tio; David Perera; Edward C Holmes; Khatijar Bibi; Zahara Abdul Manap

    2009-01-01

    Author Summary Dengue viruses are mosquito-borne RNA viruses that cause a spectrum of illness from mild disease to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Dengue viruses exist in two separate cycles in nature, circulating in either non-human primates or humans. The viruses that are endemic in humans today most likely evolved from non-human primate dengue viruses a few hundred years ago and have since established themselves as four distinct serotypes in human populations, causing peri...

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Against a Virion Core Protein of Orf Virus Strain NA1/11 As Potential Diagnostic Tool for Orf Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jiafeng; Hao, Wenbo; Peng, Yongzheng; Li, Hong; Li, Wei; Li, Ming; Luo, Shuhong

    2015-08-01

    Orf is caused by the orf virus (ORFV) and is a non-systemic, widespread disease afflicting sheep, goats, wild ruminants, and humans. Recent outbreaks in sheep and goats in Jilin and other northern Chinese provinces raise concerns about orf control in China. Thirty-five hybridoma clones were constructed from splenocytes of BALB/c mice immunized with natural orf virus protein. These hybridomas were used to produce antibodies targeting ORFV proteins. Immunological characterization of these monoclonal antibodies (MAb) showed that the 5F2D8 hybridoma line produced MAb that can recognize the 100, 70, and 20 kDa bands from total viral lysate. This hybridoma was further characterized by immunoprecipitation and peptide sequencing. The results indicate that 5F2D8 specifically recognizes orf virus encoded protein ORFV086, a late expression virion core protein that plays important roles in progeny virus particle assembly, morphogenesis, and maturity. Further experiments demonstrate that this MAb did not react with other viral proteins of ORFV orthopoxviruses, but reacted strongly to different field isolates of orf viruses from China. Additionally, this anti-ORFV086 MAb possesses ORFV neutralizing capability. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis determined that ORFV086 of NA1/11, clustered together with NZ2 and IA82, is highly conserved and has structural similarities with the Vaccinia virus core protein P4a. As such, this MAb has great potential as a diagnostic tool for orf viruses, in the further exploration of orf pathogenesis, and in disease control and prevention. PMID:26301926

  13. A spatial simulation model for the dispersal of the bluetongue vector Culicoides brevitarsis in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel K Kelso

    Full Text Available The spread of Bluetongue virus (BTV among ruminants is caused by movement of infected host animals or by movement of infected Culicoides midges, the vector of BTV. Biologically plausible models of Culicoides dispersal are necessary for predicting the spread of BTV and are important for planning control and eradication strategies.A spatially-explicit simulation model which captures the two underlying population mechanisms, population dynamics and movement, was developed using extensive data from a trapping program for C. brevitarsis on the east coast of Australia. A realistic midge flight sub-model was developed and the annual incursion and population establishment of C. brevitarsis was simulated. Data from the literature was used to parameterise the model.The model was shown to reproduce the spread of C. brevitarsis southwards along the east Australian coastline in spring, from an endemic population to the north. Such incursions were shown to be reliant on wind-dispersal; Culicoides midge active flight on its own was not capable of achieving known rates of southern spread, nor was re-emergence of southern populations due to overwintering larvae. Data from midge trapping programmes were used to qualitatively validate the resulting simulation model.The model described in this paper is intended to form the vector component of an extended model that will also include BTV transmission. A model of midge movement and population dynamics has been developed in sufficient detail such that the extended model may be used to evaluate the timing and extent of BTV outbreaks. This extended model could then be used as a platform for addressing the effectiveness of spatially targeted vaccination strategies or animal movement bans as BTV spread mitigation measures, or the impact of climate change on the risk and extent of outbreaks. These questions involving incursive Culicoides spread cannot be simply addressed with non-spatial models.

  14. Identification of a nanovirus-like DNA molecule associated with Tobacco curly shoot virus isolates containing satellite DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yan; WU Peijun; TAO Xiaorong; ZHOU Xueping

    2004-01-01

    A circular single-stranded DNA molecule, designated DNA1, was identified from Tobacco curly shoot virus (TbCSV) isolates Y35 and Y115 containing satellite DNAβ using abutting primers based on the two reported DNA1 sequences of whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses, while DNA1 molecule was not found in TbCSV isolates Y1 and Y121 without DNAβ. The immunotrapping PCR test showed that DNA1 could be encapsidated in virus particles. Southern blot further confirmed that DNA1 molecules were only associated with TbCSV isolates (Y35 and Y115) containing DNAβ. Sequences of Y35 and Y115 DNA1 comprise 1367 and 1368 nucleotides, respectively, each having a conserved ORF encoding nanovirus-like replication-associated protein (Rep). A low nucleotide sequence identity was found between DNA1 molecules and their cognate DNA-As. Y35 and Y115 DNA1 shared 92% overall nucleotide sequence identity and 96% amino acid sequence identity for Rep, while 69%~79% overall nucleotide sequence identity and 87%~90% amino acid sequence identity were found when compared with two reported DNA1 molecules associated with Ageratum yellow vein virus and Cotton leaf curl Multon virus. Sequence analysis showed that DNA1 was less related to nanovirus DNA.

  15. ISOLATION OF EGG DROP SYNDROME VIRUS AND ITS MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION USING SODIUM DODECYL SULPHATE POLYACRYLAMIDE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Rasool, S. U. Rahman and M. K. Mansoor

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Six isolates of egg drop syndrome (EDS virus were recovered from five different outbreaks of EDS in commercial laying hens in and around Faisalabad. The aberrant eggs were fed to the susceptible laying hens for experimental induction of infection. The samples from infected birds (egg washing, cloacal swabs, oviducts and spleens were collected, processed and inoculated into 11-day old duck embryos. The presence of virus in harvested allanto-amniotic fluid was monitored by spot and microhaemagglutination tests and confirmed by haemagglutination inhibition and agar gel precipitation tests. The EDS virus grew well in duck embryos and agglutinated only avian but not mammalian red blood cells. These isolates were purified through velocity density gradient centrifugation. Protein concentration was determined through Lowry method and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE was conducted by loading 300 µg protein concentration on 12.5% gel using discontinuous buffer system. All the six isolates showed 13 polypeptides, which were identical to those described in the referral EDS-76 virus (strain-127. The molecular weights of the polypeptides ranged from 6.5 KDa to 126 KDa.

  16. Enzootic Arbovirus Surveillance in Forest Habitat and Phylogenetic Characterization of Novel Isolates of Gamboa Virus in Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Gillian; Loaiza, Jose R; Pongsiri, Montira J; Sanjur, Oris I; Pecor, James E; Auguste, Albert J; Kramer, Laura D

    2016-04-01

    Landscape changes occurring in Panama, a country whose geographic location and climate have historically supported arbovirus transmission, prompted the hypothesis that arbovirus prevalence increases with degradation of tropical forest habitats. Investigations at four variably degraded sites revealed a diverse array of potential mosquito vectors, several of which are known vectors of arbovirus pathogens. Overall, 675 pools consisting of 25,787 mosquitoes and representing 29 species from nine genera (collected at ground and canopy height across all habitats) were screened for cytopathic viruses on Vero cells. We detected four isolates of Gamboa virus (family:Bunyaviridae; genus:Orthobunyavirus) from pools ofAedeomyia squamipenniscaptured at canopy level in November 2012. Phylogenetic characterization of complete genome sequences shows the new isolates to be closely related to each other with strong evidence of reassortment among the M segment of Panamanian Gamboa isolates and several other viruses of this group. At the site yielding viruses, Soberanía National Park in central Panama, 18 mosquito species were identified, and the predominant taxa includedA. squamipennis,Coquillettidia nigricans, andMansonia titillans. PMID:26834200

  17. Genetic variability of the coat protein sequence of pea seed-borne mosaic virus isolates and the current relationship between phylogenetic placement and resistance groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, S J; Coutts, B A; Jones, R A C

    2011-07-01

    Nucleotide sequences of complete or partial coat protein (CP) genes were determined for 11 isolates of pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV) from Australia and one from China, and compared with known sequences of 20 other isolates. On phylogenetic analysis, the isolates from Australia and China grouped into 2 of 3 clades. Clade A contained three sub-clades (Ai, Aii and Aiii), Australian isolates were in Ai or Aiii, and the Chinese isolate in Aii. Clade A contained isolates in pathotypes P-1, P-2 and U-2; clade B, one isolate in P-2; and clade C, only isolates in P-4. PMID:21519930

  18. Genetic clustering of recent classical swine fever virus isolates from Karnataka, India revealed the emergence of subtype 2.2 replacing subtype 1.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaraj, D B; Patil, S S; Rathnamma, D; Hemadri, D; Isloor, S; Geetha, S; Manjunathareddy, G B; Gajendragad, M R; Rahman, H

    2015-09-01

    The phylogenetic analysis of 11 CSFV isolates from Karnataka, India obtained during the year 2012-13 was undertaken to obtain the most reliable genetic typing of the CSFV isolates based on E2, NS5B and 5'UTR genomic regions. The study indicated that all the 11 CSFV isolates belonged to subgroup 2.2. The most reliable classification was obtained with sequence data from the NS5B region which separated all the isolates based on the history of outbreak and geographic origin. Analysis of full length E2 amino acid sequences revealed different genetic makeup of Indian 2.2 isolates compared to 2.2 isolates from different countries. The group 2.2 viruses are gradually spreading as confirmed by frequent detection/ isolation of group 2.2 viruses in the recent years and replacing the subgroup 1.1 viruses, which were hitherto predominantly involved in CSF outbreaks in India. PMID:26396984

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of strains of Orf virus isolated from two outbreaks of the disease in sheep in Greece

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    Billinis Charalambos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although orf is endemic around the world, there are few descriptions of Orf virus strains and comparisons of these strains. We report the sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the partial B2L gene of Orf virus from two outbreaks of the disease in Greece. The first was an outbreak of genital form of the disease in a flock imported from France, whilst the second was an outbreak of the disease in the udder skin of ewes and around the mouth of lambs in an indigenous flock. Results Phylogenetic analysis was performed on a part (498 bp of the B2L gene of 35 Parapoxvirus isolates, including the two Orf virus isolates recovered from each of the two outbreaks in the present study. This analysis revealed that the maximum nucleotide and amino-acid variation amongst Orf virus strains worldwide (n = 33 was 8.1% and 9.6%, respectively. The homology of the nucleotide and amino-acid sequences between the two Greek isolates was 99.0% and 98.8%, respectively. The two Greek isolates clustered only with Orf virus strains. Conclusions We suggest that there can be differences between strains based on their geographical origin. However, differences in the origin of strains or in the clinical presentation of the disease may not be associated with their pathogenicity. More work is required to determine if differing clinical presentations are linked to viral strain differences or if other factors, e.g., flock immunity, method of exposure or genetic susceptibility, are more important to determine the clinical presentation of the infection.

  20. Pock forming ability of fowl pox virus isolated from layer chicken and its adaptation in chicken embryo fibroblast cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    Varsha Rani Gilhare; Hirpurkar, S. D.; Ashish Kumar; Surendra Kumar Naik; Tarini Sahu

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The objective of the present study was to examine pock forming ability of field strain and vaccine strain of fowl pox virus (FPV) in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of embryonated chicken eggs and its adaptation in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cell culture. Materials and Methods: Dry scabs were collected from 25 affected birds in glycerin-saline and preserved at 4°C until processed. Virus was isolated in 10-day-old embryonated chicken eggs by dropped CAM method. The identity of the ...