WorldWideScience

Sample records for blue stellar objects

  1. A 'variable' stellar object in a variable blue nebula V-V 1-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, N.K.; Gilra, D.P.

    1981-01-01

    V-V 1-7 is supposed to be one of the few planetary nebulae with Ao central stars and was included in the planetary-nebula catalogue as PK 235 + 1 0 1. The nebula was seen on the blue Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) print but not on the red print; as a result it was thought that it might be a reflection nebula. However, the symmetry of the nebula around the central star (HD 62001), and also the ultraviolet photometric variability of this central star led others to suggest that the nebula might be a nova shell. Subsequently it was found that the nebula V-V 1-7 has disappeared. It is not seen on any direct plate known to us except the POSS blue plate. In this paper the disappearance is reported (along with the nebula) of a stellar object, which appears within the 'nebular shell' of V-V 1-7 on the POSS blue plate, but not on the red plate. (author)

  2. Disks around young stellar objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Star formation; young stellar objects; circumstellar disks; exoplanets. Abstract. By 1939, when Chandrasekhar's classic monograph on the theory of Stellar Structure was published, although the need for recent star formation was fully acknowledged, no one had yet recognized an object that could be called a star ...

  3. Disks around young stellar objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    flattened disk around the central young stellar object and planets form in these disks by processes that involve growth of dust grains and their sedimentation, collisions and coag- ulation of planetesimals, accretion of gaseous material and gravitational instabilities on various time-scales as proposed in different models.

  4. Young stellar objects and their environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Rumpa

    This paper presents the results of a Ph.D thesis emphasizing the studies of various characteristics of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) and their environment. The main objective of the thesis is to study the effects of mechanical and radiative feedback of massive stars on their surroundings including triggered star formation in Cometary Globules (CGs) and Bright-Rimmed Clouds (BRCs) situated at the borders of Galactic HII regions and time dependent interaction of Pre-Main Sequence (PMS) stars with their circumstellar environment through accretion and outflow processes. Some of the important results of this thesis are (i) star formation in BRC SFO~38 is triggered by massive OB type stars in HII region IC 1396 (ii) distribution of CGs at the border of HII region Gum Nebula is shaped by photoevaporation powered by UV radiation of massive stars in Vela OB2 association (iii) interaction of Herbig Ae star V351 Ori with its circumstellar environment is time-dependent and episodic in nature. Dynamic magnetospheric accretion and disk wind emerge as the most satisfactory model for interpreting the observed line profile variations of V351 Ori. The full version of the thesis is available from the Indian Institute of Astrophysics Repository webpage: http://prints.iiap.res.in/handle/2248/5529

  5. Dust Disks Around Young Stellar Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Won Suh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To reproduce the spectral energy distributions (SEDs of young stellar objects (YSOs, we perform radiative transfer model calculations for the circumstellar dust disks with various shapes and many dust species. For eight sample objects of T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be stars, we compare the theoretical model SEDs with the observed SEDs described by the infrared space observatory and Spitzer space telescope spectral data. We use the model, CGPLUS, for a passive irradiated circumstellar dust disk with an inner hole and an inner rim for the eight sample YSOs. We present model parameters for the dust disk, which reproduce the observed SEDs. We find that the model requires a higher mass, luminosity, and temperature for the central star for the Herbig Ae/Be stars than those for the T Tauri stars. Generally, the outer radius, total mass, thickness, and rim height of the theoretical dust disk for the Herbig Ae/Be stars are larger than those for the T Tauri stars.

  6. Operations of a non-stellar object tracker in space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels; Jørgensen, John Leif; Betto, Maurizio

    1999-01-01

    The ability to detect and track non-stellar objects by utilizing a star tracker may seem rather straight forward, as any bright object, not recognized as a star by the system is a non stellar object. However, several pitfalls and errors exist, if a reliable and robust detection is required. To te...

  7. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE GOULD BELT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, Michael M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Allen, Lori E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ (United States); Evans II, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul M. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada); Cieza, Lucas A. [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441, Santiago (Chile); Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Matthews, Brenda C. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics Programs, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Gutermuth, Robert A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Hatchell, Jennifer [Physics and Astronomy, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Heiderman, Amanda [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Huard, Tracy L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Kirk, Jason M. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Miller, Jennifer F. [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Peterson, Dawn E. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Young, Kaisa E., E-mail: mdunham@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physical Sciences, Nicholls State University, P.O. Box 2022, Thibodaux, LA 70310 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We present the full catalog of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) identified in the 18 molecular clouds surveyed by the Spitzer Space Telescope “cores to disks” (c2d) and “Gould Belt” (GB) Legacy surveys. Using standard techniques developed by the c2d project, we identify 3239 candidate YSOs in the 18 clouds, 2966 of which survive visual inspection and form our final catalog of YSOs in the GB. We compile extinction corrected spectral energy distributions for all 2966 YSOs and calculate and tabulate the infrared spectral index, bolometric luminosity, and bolometric temperature for each object. We find that 326 (11%), 210 (7%), 1248 (42%), and 1182 (40%) are classified as Class 0 + I, Flat-spectrum, Class II, and Class III, respectively, and show that the Class III sample suffers from an overall contamination rate by background Asymptotic Giant Branch stars between 25% and 90%. Adopting standard assumptions, we derive durations of 0.40–0.78 Myr for Class 0 + I YSOs and 0.26–0.50 Myr for Flat-spectrum YSOs, where the ranges encompass uncertainties in the adopted assumptions. Including information from (sub)millimeter wavelengths, one-third of the Class 0 + I sample is classified as Class 0, leading to durations of 0.13–0.26 Myr (Class 0) and 0.27–0.52 Myr (Class I). We revisit infrared color–color diagrams used in the literature to classify YSOs and propose minor revisions to classification boundaries in these diagrams. Finally, we show that the bolometric temperature is a poor discriminator between Class II and Class III YSOs.

  8. The Blue Tip of the Stellar Locus: Measuring Reddening with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Schlafly, Edward F.; Finkbeiner, Douglas; Schlegel, David J.; Juric, Mario; Ivezic, Zeljko; Gibson, Robert R.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2010-01-01

    We present measurements of reddening due to dust using the colors of stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We measure the color of main-sequence turnoff stars by finding the "blue tip" of the stellar locus: the prominent blue edge in the distribution of stellar colors. The method is sensitive to color changes of order 18, 12, 7, and 8 mmag of reddening in the colors u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z, respectively, in regions measuring 90' by 14'. We present maps of the blue tip colors in...

  9. Tracking Non-stellar Objects on Ground and in Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels; Jørgensen, John Leif

    1999-01-01

    Many space exploration missions require a fast, early and accurate detection of a specific target. E.g. missions to asteroids, x-ray source missions or interplanetary missions.A second generation star tracker may be used for accurate detection of non-stellar objects of interest for such missions...... approximately down to CCD magnitude mv 7.5), the objects thus listed will include galaxies, nebulae, planets, asteroids, comets and artefacts as satellites.The angular resolution in inertial reference coordinates is a few arcseconds, allowing quite accurate tracking of these objects. Furthermore, the objects...... are easily divided into two classes; Stationary (galaxies, nebulae etc.), and moving object (planets, asteroids, satellite etc.).For missions targeting moving objects, detection down to mv 11 is possible without any system impacts, simply by comparing lists of objects with regular intervals, leaving out all...

  10. Constraining the Stellar Populations and Star Formation Histories of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies with SED Fits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janowiecki, Steven [International Center for Radio Astronomy Research, M468, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia); Salzer, John J.; Zee, Liese van [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Rosenberg, Jessica L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Skillman, Evan, E-mail: steven.janowiecki@uwa.edu.au [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street, SE Minneapolis, MN, 55455 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    We discuss and test possible evolutionary connections between blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) and other types of dwarf galaxies. BCDs provide ideal laboratories to study intense star formation episodes in low-mass dwarf galaxies, and have sometimes been considered a short-lived evolutionary stage between types of dwarf galaxies. To test these connections, we consider a sample of BCDs as well as a comparison sample of nearby galaxies from the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey for context. We fit the multi-wavelength spectral energy distributions (SED, far-ultra-violet to far-infrared) of each galaxy with a grid of theoretical models to determine their stellar masses and star formation properties. We compare our results for BCDs with the LVL galaxies to put BCDs in the context of normal galaxy evolution. The SED fits demonstrate that the star formation events currently underway in BCDs are at the extreme of the continuum of normal dwarf galaxies, both in terms of the relative mass involved and in the relative increase over previous star formation rates. Today’s BCDs are distinctive objects in a state of extreme star formation that is rapidly transforming them. This study also suggests ways to identify former BCDs whose star formation episodes have since faded.

  11. Warm gas towards young stellar objects in Corona Australis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Johan; Jørgensen, Jes Kristian; D. Green, Joel

    2014-01-01

    by an intermediate-mass young star. We study the effects on the warm gas and dust in a group of low-mass young stellar objects from the irradiation by the young luminous Herbig Be star R CrA. Herschel/PACS far-infrared datacubes of two low-mass star-forming regions in the R CrA dark cloud are presented....... The distribution of CO, OH, H2O, [C II], [O I], and continuum emission is investigated. We have developed a deconvolution algorithm which we use to deconvolve the maps, separating the point-source emission from the extended emission. We also construct rotational diagrams of the molecular species. By deconvolution...... Be star R CrA. Our results show that a nearby luminous star does not increase the molecular excitation temperatures in the warm gas around a young stellar object (YSO). However, the emission from photodissociation products of H2O, such as OH and O, is enhanced in the warm gas associated...

  12. Employing Machine-Learning Methods to Study Young Stellar Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    Vast amounts of data exist in the astronomical data archives, and yet a large number of sources remain unclassified. We developed a multi-wavelength pipeline to classify infrared sources. The pipeline uses supervised machine learning methods to classify objects into the appropriate categories. The program is fed data that is already classified to train it, and is then applied to unknown catalogues. The primary use for such a pipeline is the rapid classification and cataloging of data that would take a much longer time to classify otherwise. While our primary goal is to study young stellar objects (YSOs), the applications extend beyond the scope of this project. We present preliminary results from our analysis and discuss future applications.

  13. THE STELLAR POPULATION AND STAR FORMATION PROPERTIES OF BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yinghe; Gao Yu; Gu Qiusheng

    2011-01-01

    We study stellar populations, star formation histories (SFHs), and star formation properties for a sample of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) selected by cross-correlating the Gil de Paz et al. sample with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6. The sample includes 31 BCDs, which span a large range of galactic parameters. Using a stellar population synthesis method, we derive stellar populations and reconstruct SFHs for these BCDs. Our studies confirm that BCDs are not young systems experiencing their first star formation, but old systems undergoing a starburst activity. The stellar mass-weighted ages can be up to 10 Gyr, while the luminosity-weighted ages might be up to approximately three orders of magnitude younger (∼10 Myr) for most galaxies. Based on multiwavelength data, we also study the integrated star formation properties. The star formation rate (SFR) for our sample galaxies spans nearly three orders of magnitude, from a few 10 -3 to ∼1 M sun yr -1 , with a median value of ∼0.1 M sun yr -1 . We find that about 90% of BCDs in our sample have their birthrate parameter (the ratio of the current SFR to the averaged past SFR) b>2-3. We further discuss correlations of the current SFR with the integrated galactic stellar mass and explore the connection between SFR and metallicity.

  14. YOUNG STELLAR CLUSTERS CONTAINING MASSIVE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE VVV SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borissova, J.; Alegría, S. Ramírez; Kurtev, R.; Medina, N.; Navarro, C.; Kuhn, M.; Gromadzki, M.; Retamales, G.; Fernandez, M. A.; Agurto-Gangas, C.; Amigo, P. [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Casilla 5030 (Chile); Alonso, J.; Decany, I. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics (MAS), Santiago (Chile); Lucas, P. W.; Pena, C. Contreras; Thompson, M. A. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Chené, A.-N. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Minniti, D. [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Republica 220, Santiago (Chile); Catelan, M. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Morales, E. F. E., E-mail: jura.borissova@uv.cl [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the connections of the global properties of eight young stellar clusters projected in the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) ESO Large Public Survey disk area and their young stellar object (YSO) populations. The analysis is based on the combination of spectroscopic parallax-based reddening and distance determinations with main-sequence and pre-main-sequence ishochrone fitting to determine the basic parameters (reddening, age, distance) of the sample clusters. The lower mass limit estimations show that all clusters are low or intermediate mass (between 110 and 1800  M {sub ⊙}), the slope Γ of the obtained present-day mass functions of the clusters is close to the Kroupa initial mass function. The YSOs in the cluster’s surrounding fields are classified using low resolution spectra, spectral energy distribution fits with theoretical predictions, and variability, taking advantage of multi-epoch VVV observations. All spectroscopically confirmed YSOs (except one) are found to be massive (more than 8 M {sub ⊙}). Using VVV and GLIMPSE color–color cuts we have selected a large number of new YSO candidates, which are checked for variability and 57% are found to show at least low-amplitude variations. In few cases it was possible to distinguish between YSO and AGB classifications on the basis of light curves.

  15. Young stellar objects in the Monoceros OB1 molecular cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, M.; Lada, C.J.; Young, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    Detailed results of an IRAS survey of a large portion of the Monoceros OB1 molecular cloud for discrete far-IR sources are presented. IRAS spectral energy distributions are constructed for 27 of the 30 sources identified in the region. Many are bright class I energy distributions, indicating that star formation is still occurring in the complex which produced the visible cluster, NGC 2264. Far-IR luminosities are calculated for each source, and the bolometric luminosity functions for class I and class II sources in the Mon OB1 cloud are found to be significantly different. Of all class I and II sources more luminous than 5 solar, 50 percent of class I sources are more luminous than 60 solar while only 4 percent of class II sources are. An attempt is made to determine the type of young stellar object in the cloud with which molecular outflows are associated. 35 refs

  16. THE BLUE TIP OF THE STELLAR LOCUS: MEASURING REDDENING WITH THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlafly, Edward F.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Juric, Mario; Schlegel, David J.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Gibson, Robert R.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2010-01-01

    We present measurements of reddening due to dust using the colors of stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We measure the color of main-sequence turnoff stars by finding the 'blue tip' of the stellar locus: the prominent blue edge in the distribution of stellar colors. The method is sensitive to color changes of order 18, 12, 7, and 8 mmag of reddening in the colors u - g, g - r, r - i, and i - z, respectively, in regions measuring 90' by 14'. We present maps of the blue tip colors in each of these bands over the entire SDSS footprint, including the new dusty southern Galactic cap data provided by the SDSS-III. The results disfavor the best-fit O'Donnell and Cardelli et al. reddening laws, but are described well by a Fitzpatrick reddening law with R V = 3.1. The Schlegel et al. (SFD) dust map is found to trace the dust well, but overestimates reddening by factors of 1.4, 1.0, 1.2, and 1.4 in u - g, g - r, r - i, and i - z largely due to the adopted reddening law. In select dusty regions of the sky, we find evidence for problems in the SFD temperature correction. A dust map normalization difference of 15% between the Galactic north and south sky may be due to these dust temperature errors.

  17. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATION TRANSFER IN YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, B. A.; Honor, J.; Robitaille, T. P.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Dong, R.; Wolff, M. J.; Wood, K.

    2013-01-01

    We have updated our publicly available dust radiative transfer code (HOCHUNK3D) to include new emission processes and various three-dimensional (3D) geometries appropriate for forming stars. The 3D geometries include warps and spirals in disks, accretion hotspots on the central star, fractal clumping density enhancements, and misaligned inner disks. Additional axisymmetric (2D) features include gaps in disks and envelopes, ''puffed-up inner rims'' in disks, multiple bipolar cavity walls, and iteration of disk vertical structure assuming hydrostatic equilibrium (HSEQ). We include the option for simple power-law envelope geometry, which, combined with fractal clumping and bipolar cavities, can be used to model evolved stars as well as protostars. We include non-thermal emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains, and external illumination from the interstellar radiation field. The grid structure was modified to allow multiple dust species in each cell; based on this, a simple prescription is implemented to model dust stratification. We describe these features in detail, and show example calculations of each. Some of the more interesting results include the following: (1) outflow cavities may be more clumpy than infalling envelopes. (2) PAH emission in high-mass stars may be a better indicator of evolutionary stage than the broadband spectral energy distribution slope; and related to this, (3) externally illuminated clumps and high-mass stars in optically thin clouds can masquerade as young stellar objects. (4) Our HSEQ models suggest that dust settling is likely ubiquitous in T Tauri disks, in agreement with previous observations

  18. Testing the Formation Mechanism of Sub-Stellar Objects in Lupus (A SOLA Team Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregorio-Monsalvo, Itziar; Lopez, C.; Takahashi, S.; Santamaria-Miranda

    2017-06-01

    The international SOLA team (Soul of Lupus with ALMA) has identified a set of pre- and proto-stellar candidates in Lupus 1 and 3 of substellar nature using 1.1mm ASTE/AzTEC maps and our optical to submillimeter database. We have observed with ALMA the most promising pre- and proto-brown dwarfs candidates. Our aims are to provide insights on how substellar objects form and evolve, from the equivalent to the pre-stellar cores to the Class II stage in the low mass regime of star formation. Our sample comprises 33 pre-stellar objects, 7 Class 0 and I objects, and 22 Class II objects.

  19. 77 FR 23318 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “African Cosmos: Stellar Arts”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... Determinations: ``African Cosmos: Stellar Arts'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the following determinations... the exhibition ``African Cosmos: Stellar Arts,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within... object at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African Arts, Washington, DC, from on or about...

  20. The Early History of Stellar Spin: the Theory of Accretion onto Young Stellar Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pudritz Ralph E.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the magnetospheres of forming stars with their surrounding protostellar disks results in magnetospheric accretion flow onto the star. How is the associated angular momentum of accreting material channelled? The resolution of this issue is crucial for understanding the origin of the spins of pre main sequence stars. A significant fraction of these rotate very slowly, which indicates that an efficient angular momentum transport mechanism is at work to counteract the strong accretion spin up torques. We review the observational, theoretical, and computational advances in the field and argue that an accretion powered stellar winds together with highly time variable mass ejections from the disk/magnetosphere interface is a likely solution.

  1. SOAR Adaptive Optics Observations of Young Stellar Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceno, Cesar

    2018-01-01

    I present results from recent studies of nearby star-forming regions using the SOAR 4.1m telescope Ground-layer Adaptive Optics system.Using narrow-band Hα and [SII] imaging we discovered a spectacular extended Herbig-Haro jet powered by a 26 MJup young brown dwarf located in the vicinity of the σ Orionis cluster. The collimated structure of multiple knots spans 0.26 pc, making it a scaled down version of the parsec-length jets seen in T Tauri stars, and the first substellar analog of an HH jet system.In the ε Chamaeleon stellar group we carried out an Adaptive Optics-aided speckle imaging study of 47 members and candidate members, to characterize the multiplicity of this, one of the nearest groups of young (~3-5 Myr) stars. We resolved 10 new binary pairs, 5 previously know binaries and two triple systems. We find a companion frequency of 0.010±0.04 per decade of separation, in the 4 to 300 AU separation range, a result comparable to main sequence dwarfs in the field. However, the more massive association members, with B and A spectral types, all have companions in this separation range. Finally, we provide new constraints on the orbital elements of the ε Cha triple system.

  2. 76 FR 81004 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Woman in Blue, Against...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 7739] Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Woman in Blue, Against Blue Water'' by Edvard Munch SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the..., Delegation of Authority No. 257 of April 15, 2003), I hereby determine that the object ``Woman in Blue...

  3. Exploring Cosmic Voids with GALEX: Stellar Populations and Primordial Jeans Mass Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Michael

    This proposed research program will revolutionize the study of cosmic voids and their inhabitant galaxy populations. By combining archival GALEX photometry with SDSS data for thousands of galaxies in hundreds of voids, we will be able to characterize voids, void galaxies, and the formation and evolution of galaxies in the lowest density environments of the Universe. In addition, we propose to use the joint GALEX-SDSS database to search in several of the nearest cosmic voids for the original building blocks of galaxy formation: surviving Jeans mass primordial objects which formed right after recombination during the earliest stages of structure formation in the Universe. Our program will first characterize known void galaxies in the UV using the extensive GALEX NUV and FUV imaging archives. Adding GALEX UV photometry to SDSS optical enables estimating star formation rates and also separating stars from unresolved galaxies. Based on this effort, we will look for trends in galaxy properties with location within a void and with global void properties such as size and underdensity. We are particularly interested in identifying and characterizing the early type galaxy population in voids. While most void galaxies are blue, there do exist ellipticals in voids; comparison with ellipticals in denser regions will inform elliptical galaxy models in new ways, and teach us about the oldest and earliest stages of galaxy formation in voids. Early type galaxies are easy to miss in void redshift surveys, even with the comprehensive nature of SDSS, because most have relied on emission line searches or infrared excess. Our approach is fundamentally different, using an enhanced GALEX UV-optical selection technique which we have developed specifically for this work. A search for early type objects is necessary to fully understand void galaxy populations. In parallel, we will use our UV-optical selection technique to search for primordial Jeans mass sized objects in the nearest voids

  4. An Infrared Search for Young Stellar Objects in IC 1396

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chelen H.; Linahan, Marcella; Gibbs, John; Rebull, Luisa M.; Archibald, Andrew R.; Dickmann, Samantha Rose; Hart, Erica A.; Hedlund, Audrey R.; Hilfer, Shannon L.; Lacher, Thomas; McKernan, John T.; Medeiros, Emma M.; Nelson, Samantha Brooks; O'Leary, Harrison; Peña, Nicholas D.; Peterson, Alexis; Reader, Livia K.; Ropinski, Brandi Lucia; Scarpa, Gabriella; Sundeen, Kiera A.; Takara, Amber L.; Thiel, Theresa

    2017-01-01

    About 700 parsecs away from Earth, IC1396 lies along the galactic plane, in the direction of the constellation Cepheus, and includes many dark nebulae, including the Elephant’s Trunk Nebula. IC 1396A has been examined with a variety of telescopes, including Spitzer, 2MASS, IPHAS, Chandra, and WISE. The YSOVAR project (Rebull et al. 2014) also has Spitzer monitoring data in this region at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. Our team has merged these catalogs and identified candidate YSOs using IR color selection, X-ray detection, and variability metrics. In order to interpret the YSOVAR light curves, it is critical to understand which of the 700+ YSO candidates in this region are likely YSOs, and which are foreground/background stars or are extragalactic objects. As a first attempt to confirm these candidate YSOs, we have created spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for wavelengths from IPHAS r band to 24 microns, which we use, coupled with image inspection, to confirm (or refute) YSO candidates from this list of identified YSO candidates. We will then compare our vetted list of YSO candidates to the lists of YSO candidates already identified in the literature in this region. The goal of this study is to identify candidate YSO sources, as well as support the greater understanding of the variety, evolution and variability of young stars. This project is a collaborative effort of high school students from three states. They analyzed data individually and later collaborated online to compare results. This project is the result of many years of work with the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP).

  5. A search for shock-excited optical emission from the outflows of massive young stellar objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez, C; Hoare, MG

    We have searched for optical shock-excited emission lines in the outer parts of the bipolar outflows from massive young stellar objects where the flow terminates and the extinction is expected to be low. The Taurus Tunable Filter (TTF) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) was used to obtain

  6. High Energy Emissions from Young Stellar Objects A. C. Das1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High Energy Emissions from Young Stellar Objects. A. C. Das1,∗. & Ashok Ambastha2,†. 1Physical Research Laboratory, Navarangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009, India. 2Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Udaipur 313 001, India e-mail: ∗ acd@prl.res.in. †ambastha@prl.res.in. Received 2011 April 21 ...

  7. Complex organic molecules in organic-poor massive young stellar objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fayolle, Edith C.; Öberg, Karin I.; Garrod, Robin T.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) with hot cores are classic sources of complex organic molecules. The origins of these molecules in such sources, as well as the small-and large-scale differentiation between nitrogen-and oxygen-bearing complex species, are poorly understood. Aims. We...

  8. The flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship of blue supergiant stars as a constraint for stellar evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynet, Georges; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Georgy, Cyril

    2015-09-01

    Context. The flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship (FGLR) of blue supergiant stars (BSG) links their absolute magnitude to the spectroscopically determined flux-weighted gravity log g/T_text{eff ^4}. BSG are the brightest stars in the universe at visual light and the application of the FGLR has become a powerful tool for determining extragalactic distances. Aims: Observationally, the FGLR is a tight relationship with only small scatter. It is, therefore, ideal for using as a constraint for stellar evolution models. The goal of this work is to investigate whether stellar evolution can reproduce the observed FGLR and to develop an improved foundation for the FGLR as an extragalactic distance indicator. Methods: We used different grids of stellar models for initial masses between 9 and 40 M⊙ and for metallicities between Z = 0.002 and 0.014, with and without rotation, which were computed with various mass loss rates during the red supergiant phase. For each of these models, we discuss the details of post-main sequence evolution and construct theoretical FGLRs by means of population synthesis models that we then compare with the observed FGLR. Results: In general, the stellar evolution model FGLRs agree reasonably well with the observed one. There are, however, differences between the models, in particular with regard to the shape and width (scatter) in the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity plane. The best agreement is obtained with models that include the effects of rotation and assume that the large majority, if not all, of the observed BSG evolve toward the red supergiant phase and that only a few are evolving back from this stage. The effects of metallicity on the shape and scatter of the FGLR are small. Conclusions: The shape, scatter, and metallicity dependence of the observed FGLR are explained well by stellar evolution models. This provides a solid theoretical foundation for using this relationship as a robust extragalactic distance indicator.

  9. A discovery of young stellar objects in older clusters of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    For, Bi-Qing; Bekki, Kenji

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that an extended main-sequence turn-off is a common feature among intermediate-age clusters (1-3 Gyr) in the Magellanic Clouds. Multiple-generation star formation and stellar rotation or interacting binaries have been proposed to explain the feature. However, it remains controversial in the field of stellar populations. Here we present the main results of an ongoing star formation among older star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Cross-matching the positions of star clusters and young stellar objects has yielded 15 matches, with 7 located in the cluster centre. We demonstrate that this is not by chance by estimating local number densities of young stellar objects for each star cluster. This method is not based on isochrone fitting, which leads to some uncertainties in age estimation and methods of background subtraction. We also find no direct correlation between atomic hydrogen and the clusters. This suggests that gas accretion for fueling the star formation must be happening in situ. These findings support for the multiple-generations scenario as a plausible explanation for the extended main-sequence turn-off.

  10. Ultracompact Blue Dwarf Galaxies: Hubble Space Telescope Imaging and Stellar Population Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Michael R.; Vacca, William D.; Cid Fernandes, Roberto; Hibbard, John E.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    2006-11-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys/High Resolution Channel U-, narrow-V-, and I-band images of nine ``ultracompact'' blue dwarf galaxies (UCBDs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We define UCBDs as local (zPOX 186, but the structure of several of them suggests that their current star formation has been triggered by the collisions/mergers of smaller clumps of stars. In one case, HS 0822+3542, the images resolve what may be two small (~100 pc) components that have recently collided, supporting this interpretation. In six of the objects much of the star formation is concentrated in young massive clusters, contributing to their compactness in ground-based images. The evidence that the galaxies consist mainly of ~10 Gyr old stars establishes that they are not protogalaxies, forming their first generation of stars. Their low metallicities are more likely to be the result of the escape of supernova ejecta, rather than youth.

  11. 78 FR 8682 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Vermeer's Woman in Blue...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8177] Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Vermeer's Woman in Blue Reading a Letter'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the following... object to be included in the exhibition ``Vermeer's Woman in Blue Reading a Letter,'' imported from...

  12. Accretion-induced variability links young stellar objects, white dwarfs, and black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaringi, Simone; Maccarone, Thomas J; Körding, Elmar; Knigge, Christian; Vaughan, Simon; Marsh, Thomas R; Aranzana, Ester; Dhillon, Vikram S; Barros, Susana C C

    2015-10-01

    The central engines of disc-accreting stellar-mass black holes appear to be scaled down versions of the supermassive black holes that power active galactic nuclei. However, if the physics of accretion is universal, it should also be possible to extend this scaling to other types of accreting systems, irrespective of accretor mass, size, or type. We examine new observations, obtained with Kepler/K2 and ULTRACAM, regarding accreting white dwarfs and young stellar objects. Every object in the sample displays the same linear correlation between the brightness of the source and its amplitude of variability (rms-flux relation) and obeys the same quantitative scaling relation as stellar-mass black holes and active galactic nuclei. We also show that the most important parameter in this scaling relation is the physical size of the accreting object. This establishes the universality of accretion physics from proto-stars still in the star-forming process to the supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies.

  13. Accretion-induced variability links young stellar objects, white dwarfs, and black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaringi, Simone; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Körding, Elmar; Knigge, Christian; Vaughan, Simon; Marsh, Thomas R.; Aranzana, Ester; Dhillon, Vikram S.; Barros, Susana C. C.

    2015-01-01

    The central engines of disc-accreting stellar-mass black holes appear to be scaled down versions of the supermassive black holes that power active galactic nuclei. However, if the physics of accretion is universal, it should also be possible to extend this scaling to other types of accreting systems, irrespective of accretor mass, size, or type. We examine new observations, obtained with Kepler/K2 and ULTRACAM, regarding accreting white dwarfs and young stellar objects. Every object in the sample displays the same linear correlation between the brightness of the source and its amplitude of variability (rms-flux relation) and obeys the same quantitative scaling relation as stellar-mass black holes and active galactic nuclei. We also show that the most important parameter in this scaling relation is the physical size of the accreting object. This establishes the universality of accretion physics from proto-stars still in the star-forming process to the supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies. PMID:26601307

  14. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF LONG-TERM INFRARED VARIABILITY AMONG YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN CHAMAELEON I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaherty, Kevin M.; Herbst, William [Van Vleck Observatory, Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, 96 Foss Hill Drive, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); DeMarchi, Lindsay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Colgate University, 13 Oak Drive, Hamilton, NY 13346 (United States); Muzerolle, James [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Balog, Zoltan [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Megeath, S. Thomas [Ritter Astrophysical Research Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Furlan, Elise [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 770 S. Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gutermuth, Robert [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2016-12-10

    Infrared variability is common among young stellar objects, with surveys finding daily to weekly fluctuations of a few tenths of a magnitude. Space-based observations can produce highly sampled infrared light curves, but are often limited to total baselines of about 1 month due to the orientation of the spacecraft. Here we present observations of the Chameleon I cluster, whose low declination makes it observable by the Spitzer Space Telescope over a 200-day period. We observe 30 young stellar objects with a daily cadence to better sample variability on timescales of months. We find that such variability is common, occurring in ∼80% of the detected cluster members. The change in [3.6]–[4.5] color over 200 days for many of the sources falls between that expected for extinction and fluctuations in disk emission. With our high cadence and long baseline we can derive power spectral density curves covering two orders of magnitude in frequency and find significant power at low frequencies, up to the boundaries of our 200-day survey. Such long timescales are difficult to explain with variations driven by the interaction between the disk and stellar magnetic field, which has a dynamical timescale of days to weeks. The most likely explanation is either structural or temperature fluctuations spread throughout the inner ∼0.5 au of the disk, suggesting that the intrinsic dust structure is highly dynamic.

  15. Luminosity excesses in low-mass young stellar objects - a statistical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, K.M.; Strom, S.E.; Kenyon, S.J.; Hartmann, L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical study in which the observed total luminosity is compared quantitatively with an estimate of the stellar luminosity for a sample of 59 low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Taurus-Auriga complex. In 13 of the analyzed YSOs, luminosity excesses greater than 0.20 are observed together with greater than 0.6 IR excesses, which typically contribute the bulk of the observed excess luminosity and are characterized by spectral energy distributions which are flat or rise toward long wavelengths. The analysis suggests that YSOs showing the largest luminosity excesses typically power optical jets and/or molecular outflows or have strong winds, as evidenced by the presence of O I emission, indicating a possible correlation between accretion and mass-outflow properties. 38 references

  16. Candidate stellar occultations by Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects up to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, J. I. B.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Assafin, M.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Sicardy, B.; Desmars, J.; Andrei, A. H.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Dias-Oliveira, A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. We study trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) from stellar occultations. Aims: We predict stellar occultations from 2012.5 to the end of 2014 by 5 Centaurs and 34 TNOs. Methods: These predictions were achieved in two ways: first, we built catalogues with precise astrometric positions of the stellar content around the paths on the sky of these targets, as seen by a ground-based observer; second, the observed positions of the targets were determined with the help of these same catalogues so that we could improve their ephemerides and the reliability of the predictions. The reference system is the International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) as realised by the Fourth US Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC4). All the sky paths as well as the selected targets were observed from Oct. 2011 to May 2013 with the ESO/MPG 2.2 m telescope equipped with the Wide Field Imager (WFI). All astrometric results were obtained with the platform for reduction of astronomical images automatically (PRAIA) after correcting the images for overscan, bias, and flatfield. Results: The catalogues with the stellar content around the sky path of each selected target are complete down to magnitude R = 19 and have an average positional accuracy of about 50 milliarcseconds. This same average accuracy also holds for the observed positions of the targets. In the catalogues from the sky paths, stellar proper motions for non-UCAC4 objects were derived from the combination of the current epoch WFI observations with either the 2MASS or the USNO-B1 catalogues. The offsets between the observed and (JPL) ephemeris positions of the targets frequently reach absolute values of some hundreds of milliarcseconds. Conclusions: We present here stellar occultation predictions for the selected 5 Centaurs and 34 TNOs from 2012.5 to the end of 2014. This work is also an extension of two previous prediction works by us, the first one for Pluto, Charon, Nix, and Hydra, and the second for ten other large

  17. Cosmic-Ray Propagation in Turbulent Spiral Magnetic Fields Associated with Young Stellar Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Adams, Fred C.

    2018-04-01

    External cosmic rays impinging upon circumstellar disks associated with young stellar objects provide an important source of ionization, and, as such, play an important role in disk evolution and planet formation. However, these incoming cosmic rays are affected by a variety of physical processes internal to stellar/disk systems, including modulation by turbulent magnetic fields. Globally, these fields naturally provide both a funneling effect, where cosmic rays from larger volumes are focused into the disk region, and a magnetic mirroring effect, where cosmic rays are repelled due to the increasing field strength. This paper considers cosmic-ray propagation in the presence of a turbulent spiral magnetic field, analogous to that produced by the solar wind. The interaction of this wind with the interstellar medium defines a transition radius, analogous to the heliopause, which provides the outer boundary to this problem. We construct a new coordinate system where one coordinate follows the spiral magnetic field lines and consider magnetic perturbations to the field in the perpendicular directions. The presence of magnetic turbulence replaces the mirroring points with a distribution of values and moves the mean location outward. Our results thus help quantify the degree to which cosmic-ray fluxes are reduced in circumstellar disks by the presence of magnetic field structures that are shaped by stellar winds. The new coordinate system constructed herein should also be useful in other astronomical applications.

  18. X-shooter spectroscopy of young stellar objects in Lupus. Accretion properties of class II and transitional objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, J. M.; Manara, C. F.; Natta, A.; Frasca, A.; Testi, L.; Nisini, B.; Stelzer, B.; Williams, J. P.; Antoniucci, S.; Biazzo, K.; Covino, E.; Esposito, M.; Getman, F.; Rigliaco, E.

    2017-04-01

    The mass accretion rate, Ṁacc, is a key quantity for the understanding of the physical processes governing the evolution of accretion discs around young low-mass (M⋆ ≲ 2.0 M⊙) stars and substellar objects (YSOs). We present here the results of a study of the stellar and accretion properties of the (almost) complete sample of class II and transitional YSOs in the Lupus I, II, III and IV clouds, based on spectroscopic data acquired with the VLT/X-shooter spectrograph. Our study combines the dataset from our previous work with new observations of 55 additional objects. We have investigated 92 YSO candidates in total, 11 of which have been definitely identified with giant stars unrelated to Lupus. The stellar and accretion properties of the 81 bona fide YSOs, which represent more than 90% of the whole class II and transition disc YSO population in the aforementioned Lupus clouds, have been homogeneously and self-consistently derived, allowing for an unbiased study of accretion and its relationship with stellar parameters. The accretion luminosity, Lacc, increases with the stellar luminosity, L⋆, with an overall slope of 1.6, similar but with a smaller scatter than in previous studies. There is a significant lack of strong accretors below L⋆ ≈ 0.1 L⊙, where Lacc is always lower than 0.01 L⋆. We argue that the Lacc - L⋆ slope is not due to observational biases, but is a true property of the Lupus YSOs. The log Ṁacc - log M⋆ correlation shows a statistically significant evidence of a break, with a steeper relation for M⋆ ≲ 0.2 M⊙ and a flatter slope for higher masses. The bimodality of the Ṁacc - M⋆ relation is confirmed with four different evolutionary models used to derive the stellar mass. The bimodal behaviour of the observed relationship supports the importance of modelling self-gravity in the early evolution of the more massive discs, but other processes, such as photo-evaporation and planet formation during the YSO's lifetime, may

  19. Near-infrared spectroscopic observations of massive young stellar object candidates in the central molecular zone

    OpenAIRE

    Nandakumar, G.; Schultheis, M.; Feldmeier-Krause, A; Schödel, Rainer; Neumayer, N; Matteucci, F; Ryde, N; Rojas-Arriagada, A; Tej, A

    2018-01-01

    Context. The central molecular zone (CMZ) is a similar to 200 pc region around the Galactic centre. The study of star formation in the central part of the Milky Way is of great interest as it provides a template for the closest galactic nuclei. Aims. We present a spectroscopic follow-up of photometrically selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the CMZ of the Galactic centre. Our goal is to quantify the contamination of this YSO sample by reddened giant stars with circumstellar...

  20. Spectroscopic Assessment of WISE-based Young Stellar Object Selection Near λ and σ Orionis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Xavier; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Padgett, Deborah L.; DeFelippis, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    We have conducted a sensitive search down to the hydrogen burning limit for unextincted stars over ∼200 square degrees around Lambda Orionis and 20 square degrees around Sigma Orionis using the methodology of Koenig & Leisawitz. From WISE and 2MASS data we identify 544 and 418 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the vicinity of λ and σ respectively. Based on our followup spectroscopy for some candidates and the existing literature for others, we found that ∼80% of the K14-selected candidates are probable or likely members of the Orion star-forming region. The yield from the photometric selection criteria shows that WISE sources with {K}S-w3\\gt 1.5 mag and KS between 10 and 12 mag are most likely to show spectroscopic signs of youth, while WISE sources with {K}S-w3 > 4 mag and {K}S\\gt 12 were often active galactic nuclei when followed up spectroscopically. The population of candidate YSOs traces known areas of active star formation, with a few new “hot spots” of activity near Lynds 1588 and 1589 and a more dispersed population of YSOs in the northern half of the H ii region bubble around σ and ɛ Ori. A minimal spanning tree analysis of the two regions to identify stellar groupings finds that roughly two-thirds of the YSO candidates in each region belong to groups of 5 or more members. The population of stars selected by WISE outside the MST groupings also contains spectroscopically verified YSOs, with a local stellar density as low as 0.5 stars per square degree.

  1. X-shooter spectroscopy of young stellar objects. VI. H I line decrements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Giannini, T.; Rigliaco, E.; Alcalá, J. M.; Natta, A.; Stelzer, B.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Hydrogen recombination emission lines commonly observed in accreting young stellar objects represent a powerful tracer for the gas conditions in the circumstellar structures (accretion columns, and winds or jets). Aims: Here we perform a study of the H I decrements and line profiles, from the Balmer and Paschen H I lines detected in the X-shooter spectra of a homogeneous sample of 36 T Tauri objects in Lupus, the accretion and stellar properties of which were already derived in a previous work. We aim to obtain information on the H I gas physical conditions to delineate a consistent picture of the H I emission mechanisms in pre-main sequence low-mass stars (M∗four Balmer decrement types (which we classified as 1, 2, 3, and 4) and three Paschen decrement types (A, B, and C), characterised by different shapes. We first discussed the connection between the decrement types and the source properties and then compared the observed decrements with predictions from recently published local line excitation models. Results: We identify a few groups of sources that display similar H I properties. One third of the objects show lines with narrow symmetric profiles, and present similar Balmer and Paschen decrements (straight decrements, types 2 and A). Lines in these sources are consistent with optically thin emission from gas with hydrogen densities of order 109 cm-3 and 5000 11 cm-3). Type 1 (curved) Balmer decrements are observed only in three sub-luminous sources viewed edge-on, so we speculate that these are actually type 2 decrements that are reddened because of neglecting a residual amount of extinction in the line emission region. About 20% of the objects present type 3 Balmer decrements (bumpy), which, however, cannot be reproduced with current models. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory at Paranal, Chile, under programmes 084.C-0269(A), 085.C-238(A), 086.C-0173(A), 087.C-0244(A), and 089.C-0143(A).

  2. A Search for Water Maser Emission from Brown Dwarfs and Low-luminosity Young Stellar Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, José F.; Manjarrez, Guillermo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Palau, Aina [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090, Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico); Uscanga, Lucero [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Guanajuato, A.P. 144, 36000 Guanajuato, Gto., México (Mexico); Barrado, David, E-mail: jfg@iaa.es [Centro de Astrobiología, INTA-CSIC, PO BOX 28692, ESAC Campus, E-208691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    We present a survey for water maser emission toward a sample of 44 low-luminosity young objects, comprising (proto-)brown dwarfs, first hydrostatic cores (FHCs), and other young stellar objects (YSOs) with bolometric luminosities lower than 0.4 L {sub ⊙}. Water maser emission is a good tracer of energetic processes, such as mass-loss and/or accretion, and is a useful tool to study these processes with very high angular resolution. This type of emission has been confirmed in objects with L {sub bol} ≳ 1 L {sub ⊙}. Objects with lower luminosities also undergo mass-loss and accretion, and thus, are prospective sites of maser emission. Our sensitive single-dish observations provided a single detection when pointing toward the FHC L1448 IRS 2E. However, follow-up interferometric observations showed water maser emission associated with the nearby YSO L1448 IRS 2 (a Class 0 protostar of L {sub bol} ≃ 3.6–5.3 L {sub ⊙}) and did not find any emission toward L1448 IRS 2E. The upper limits for water maser emission determined by our observations are one order of magnitude lower than expected from the correlation between water maser luminosities and bolometric luminosities found for YSOs. This suggests that this correlation does not hold at the lower end of the (sub)stellar mass spectrum. Possible reasons are that the slope of this correlation is steeper at L {sub bol} ≤ 1 L {sub ⊙} or that there is an absolute luminosity threshold below which water maser emission cannot be produced. Alternatively, if the correlation still stands at low luminosity, the detection rates of masers would be significantly lower than the values obtained in higher-luminosity Class 0 protostars.

  3. NuSTAR Observations of X-Ray Flares from Young Stellar Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vievering, Juliana; Glesener, Lindsay; Grefenstette, Brian; Smith, David

    2018-01-01

    Young stellar objects (YSOs), which tend to flare more frequently and at higher temperatures than what is typically observed on Sun-like stars, are excellent targets for studying the physical processes behind large flaring events. In the hard x-ray regime, radiation can penetrate through dense circumstellar material, and it is possible to measure thermal emission from hot plasma and to search for nonthermal emission from accelerated particles, which are key components for understanding the nature of energy release in these flares. Additionally, high-energy x-ray emission can ionize material in the disk, which may have implications for planet formation. To investigate hard x-ray emission from YSOs, three 50ks observations of a star-forming region called rho Ophiuchi have been taken with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Through use of direct focusing optics, NuSTAR provides unprecedented sensitivity in the hard x-ray regime, making these YSO observations the first of their kind. Multiple stellar flares have been identified in the data set; here we present the current spectral and timing analyses of the brightest of the these events, exploring the way energy is released as well as the effects of these large flares on the surrounding environment.

  4. On the accretion properties of young stellar objects in the L1615/L1616 cometary cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biazzo, K.; Alcalá, J. M.; Frasca, A.; Zusi, M.; Getman, F.; Covino, E.; Gandolfi, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of FLAMES/UVES and FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectroscopic observations of 23 low-mass stars in the L1615/L1616 cometary cloud, complemented with FORS2 and VIMOS spectroscopy of 31 additional stars in the same cloud. L1615/L1616 is a cometary cloud in which the star formation was triggered by the impact of massive stars in the Orion OB association. From the measurements of the lithium abundance and radial velocity, we confirm the membership of our sample to the cloud. We use the equivalent widths of the Hα, Hβ, and the He i λ5876, λ6678, λ7065 Å emission lines to calculate the accretion luminosities, Lacc, and the mass accretion rates, Ṁacc. We find in L1615/L1616 a fraction of accreting objects (~30%), which is consistent with the typical fraction of accretors in T associations of similar age (~3 Myr). The mass accretion rate for these stars shows a trend with the mass of the central object similar to that found for other star-forming regions, with a spread at a given mass that depends on the evolutionary model used to derive the stellar mass. Moreover, the behavior of the 2MASS/WISE colors with Ṁacc indicates that strong accretors with log Ṁacc ≳ -8.5 dex show large excesses in the JHKs bands, as in previous studies. We also conclude that the accretion properties of the L1615/L1616 members are similar to those of young stellar objects in T associations, like Lupus. Based on FLAMES (UVES+GIRAFFE) observations collected at the Very Large Telescope (VLT; Paranal, Chile). Program 076.C-0385(A).Tables 3-6 and Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Candidate stellar occultations by large trans-Neptunian objects up to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assafin, M.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Vieira Martins, R.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Sicardy, B.; Andrei, A. H.; da Silva Neto, D. N.

    2012-05-01

    Context. We study large trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) using stellar occultations. Aims: We derive precise astrometric predictions for stellar occultations by Eris, Haumea, Ixion, Makemake, Orcus, Quaoar, Sedna, Varuna, 2002 TX300, and 2003 AZ84 for 2011-2015. We construct local astrometric catalogs of stars complete to magnitudes as faint as R = 18 - 19 in the UCAC2 (Second US Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog) frame covering the sky path of these objects. Methods: During 2007-2009, we carried out an observational program at the ESO2p2/WFI (2.2 m Max-Planck ESO telescope with the Wide Field Imager) instrument. The observations covered the sky path of the selected targets from 2008 to 2015. We performed the astrometry of 316 GB images using the Platform for Reduction of Astronomical Images Automatically (PRAIA). With the help of field distortion patterns derived for the WFI mosaic of CCDs, we reduced the overlapping mosaics of CCDs. Results: We derive positions in the UCAC2 frame with 40 mas precision for stars up to the catalog magnitude completeness limit (about R = 19). New stellar proper motions are also determined with 2MASS (Two Micron All Sky Survey) and the USNO B1.0 (United States Naval Observatory B 1.0) catalog positions as a first epoch. Astrometric catalogs with proper motions were produced for each TNO, containing more than 5.35 million stars covering the sky paths with 30' width in declination. The magnitude completeness is about R = 19 with a limit of about R = 21. We predicted 2717 stellar occultation candidates for all targets. Ephemeris offsets with about from 50 mas to 100 mas precision were applied to each TNO orbit to improve the predictions. They were obtained during 2007-2010 from a parallel observational campaign carried out with telescopes from 0.6 m to 2.2 m in size. Conclusions: This extends our previous work for the Pluto system to large TNOs, using the same observational and astrometric procedures. The obtained astrometric

  6. Pseudo-Newtonian potentials and the radiation emitted by a source swirling around a stellar object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crispino, Luis C.B.; Cruz Filho, Jaime L.C. da [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Fac. de Fisica; Letelier, Patricio S. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (IMECC/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Matematica, Estatistica e Computacao Cientifica

    2011-07-01

    Full text: We use pseudo-Newtonian potentials to compute the scalar radiation emitted by a source orbiting a stellar object. We compare the results obtained in this approach with the ones obtained via quantum field theory in Schwarzschild spacetime. We find that, up to the marginally stable circular orbit, the potential that better reproduces the Schwarzschild results is the Nowak-Wagoner one. For unstable circular orbits, none of the pseudo-Newtonian potentials considered in our analysis produces satisfactory results. We show that the Paczynski-Wiita potential, the most used in the literature to analyze accretion disks, generates the least satisfactory results for the scalar radiation emitted by the source in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole. (author)

  7. Optical evidence for the unification of active galactic nuclei and quasi-stellar objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J S

    1995-12-05

    There is a variety of optical evidence for some unification of different types of active galactic nuclei and quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). The case is very strong for the unification of at least some Seyfert galaxies, where polarization data show that the type assigned to the Seyfert galaxy must depend on viewing direction. It has been proposed that Fanaroff-Riley type 2 (FR2) radio galaxies are quasars seen in a direction from which the quasar is obscured, and there is some limited direct evidence for this picture. The broad absorption line QSOs may be normal QSOs seen from a special direction. Some of the sources observed to have high luminosities in the far infrared could be obscured QSOs and active nuclei. Mergers and interactions are likely to play an important role in nuclear activity, and active galaxies and QSOs could change their apparent types through these encounters followed by subsequent evolution.

  8. X-shooter spectroscopy of young stellar objects in Lupus. Atmospheric parameters, membership, and activity diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasca, A.; Biazzo, K.; Alcalá, J. M.; Manara, C. F.; Stelzer, B.; Covino, E.; Antoniucci, S.

    2017-06-01

    Aims: A homogeneous determination of basic stellar parameters of young stellar object (YSO) candidates is needed to confirm their pre-main sequence evolutionary stage and membership to star forming regions (SFRs), and to get reliable values of the quantities related to chromospheric activity and accretion. Methods: We used the code ROTFIT and synthetic BT-Settl spectra for the determination of the atmospheric parameters (Teff and log g), veiling (r), radial (RV), and projected rotational velocity (vsini) from X-shooter spectra of 102 YSO candidates (95 of infrared Class II and seven Class III) in the Lupus SFR. The spectral subtraction of inactive templates, rotationally broadened to match the vsini of the targets, enabled us to measure the line fluxes for several diagnostics of both chromospheric activity and accretion, such as Hα, Hβ, Ca II, and Na I lines. Results: We have shown that 13 candidates can be rejected as Lupus members based on their discrepant RV with respect to Lupus and/or the very low log g values. At least 11 of them are background giants, two of which turned out to be lithium-rich giants. Regarding the members, we found that all Class III sources have Hα fluxes that are compatible with a pure chromospheric activity, while objects with disks lie mostly above the boundary between chromospheres and accretion. Young stellar objects with transitional disks display both high and low Hα fluxes. We found that the line fluxes per unit surface are tightly correlated with the accretion luminosity (Lacc) derived from the Balmer continuum excess. This rules out that the relationships between Lacc and line luminosities found in previous works are simply due to calibration effects. We also found that the Ca II-IRT flux ratio, FCaII8542/FCaII8498, is always small, indicating an optically thick emission source. The latter can be identified with the accretion shock near the stellar photosphere. The Balmer decrement reaches instead, for several accretors, high

  9. BlueJ Visual Debugger for Learning the Execution of Object-Oriented Programs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens B.; Schulte, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an experiment undertaken in order to evaluate the effect of a program visualization tool for helping students to better understand the dynamics of object-orientedprograms. The concrete tool used was BlueJ?s debugger and object inspector. The study was done as a control......-group experiment in an introductory programming course.The results of the experiment show that the students who used BlueJ?s debugger did not perform statistically significantly better than the students not using it; both groups profited about the same amount from the exercises given in the experiment. We discuss...

  10. X-ray-selected broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, M. J.; Carrera, F. J.; Ceballos, M.; Corral, A.; Ebrero, J.; Esquej, P.; Krumpe, M.; Mateos, S.; Rosen, S.; Schwope, A.; Streblyanska, A.; Symeonidis, M.; Tedds, J. A.; Watson, M. G.

    2017-02-01

    We study a sample of six X-ray-selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the XMM-Newton Wide Angle Survey. All six objects are classified as BALQSOs using the classic balnicity index, and together they form the largest sample of X-ray-selected BALQSOs. We find evidence for absorption in the X-ray spectra of all six objects. An ionized absorption model applied to an X-ray spectral shape that would be typical for non-BAL QSOs (a power law with energy index α = 0.98) provides acceptable fits to the X-ray spectra of all six objects. The optical to X-ray spectral indices, αOX, of the X-ray-selected BALQSOs, have a mean value of = 1.69 ± 0.05, which is similar to that found for X-ray-selected and optically selected non-BAL QSOs of a similar ultraviolet luminosity. In contrast, optically selected BALQSOs typically have much larger αOX and so are characterized as being X-ray weak. The results imply that X-ray selection yields intrinsically X-ray bright BALQSOs, but their X-ray spectra are absorbed by a similar degree to that seen in optically selected BALQSO samples; X-ray absorption appears to be ubiquitous in BALQSOs, but X-ray weakness is not. We argue that BALQSOs sit at one end of a spectrum of X-ray absorption properties in QSOs related to the degree of ultraviolet absorption in C IV 1550 Å.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Displaced red and blue components objects (Jayson, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayson, J. S.

    2017-07-01

    This feasibility study aimed at demonstrating the value of the USNO-B catalogue for selecting objects with displaced blue and red components. The specifics of the approach were developed with the aid of analysis of three sample test sets of known properties. Over 91000 USNO-B entries were then sifted and analysed and the results visually screened to obtain a candidate list of 144 objects. (3 data files).

  12. Prediction of objectively measured physical activity and sedentariness among blue-collar workers using survey questionnaires

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Nidhi; Heiden, Marina; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Holtermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed at developing and evaluating statistical models predicting objectively measured occupational time spent sedentary or in physical activity from self-reported information available in large epidemiological studies and surveys.METHODS: Two-hundred-and-fourteen blue-collar workers responded to a questionnaire containing information about personal and work related variables, available in most large epidemiological studies and surveys. Workers also wore accelerometers for 1-4 d...

  13. DYNAMICAL EVIDENCE FOR A MAGNETOCENTRIFUGAL WIND FROM A 20 M☉ BINARY YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhill, L. J.; Goddi, C.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Chandler, C. J.; Matthews, L. D.

    2013-01-01

    In Orion BN/KL, proper motions of λ7 mm vibrationally excited SiO masers trace the rotation of a nearly edge-on disk and a bipolar wide-angle outflow 10-100 AU from radio source I, a binary young stellar object of ∼20 M ☉ . Here we map ground-state λ7 mm SiO emission with the Very Large Array and track proper motions over 9 yr. The innermost and strongest emission lies in two extended arcs bracketing Source I. The proper motions trace a northeast-southwest bipolar outflow 100-1000 AU from Source I with a median three-dimensional motion of ∼18 km s –1 . An overlying distribution of λ1.3 cm H 2 O masers betrays similar flow characteristics. Gas dynamics and emission morphology traced by the masers suggest the presence of a magnetocentrifugal disk wind. Reinforcing evidence lies in the colinearity of the flow, apparent rotation across the flow parallel to the disk rotation, and recollimation that narrows the flow opening angle ∼120 AU downstream. The arcs of ground-state SiO emission may mark the transition point to a shocked super-Alfvénic outflow.

  14. Young stellar object variability (YSOVAR): Long timescale variations in the mid-infrared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebull, L. M.; Cody, A. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Morales-Calderón, M.; Carey, S. J. [Spitzer Science Center (SSC), Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), 1200 East California Boulevard, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Covey, K. R. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Günther, H. M.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Hora, J. L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hillenbrand, L. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Plavchan, P. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI), Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), 1200 East California Boulevard, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gutermuth, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Song, I. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Barrado, D. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC), ESAC campus, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada (Spain); Bayo, A. [Max Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); James, D. [Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory (CTIO), Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Vrba, F. J. [US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station 10391 West Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86005 (United States); Alves de Oliveira, C. [European Space Agency (ESA/ESAC), P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Caãda, Madrid (Spain); Bouvier, J., E-mail: rebull@ipac.caltech.edu [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble (France); and others

    2014-11-01

    The YSOVAR (Young Stellar Object VARiability) Spitzer Space Telescope observing program obtained the first extensive mid-infrared (3.6 and 4.5 μm) time series photometry of the Orion Nebula Cluster plus smaller footprints in 11 other star-forming cores (AFGL 490, NGC 1333, Mon R2, GGD 12-15, NGC 2264, L1688, Serpens Main, Serpens South, IRAS 20050+2720, IC 1396A, and Ceph C). There are ∼29,000 unique objects with light curves in either or both IRAC channels in the YSOVAR data set. We present the data collection and reduction for the Spitzer and ancillary data, and define the 'standard sample' on which we calculate statistics, consisting of fast cadence data, with epochs roughly twice per day for ∼40 days. We also define a 'standard sample of members' consisting of all the IR-selected members and X-ray-selected members. We characterize the standard sample in terms of other properties, such as spectral energy distribution shape. We use three mechanisms to identify variables in the fast cadence data—the Stetson index, a χ{sup 2} fit to a flat light curve, and significant periodicity. We also identified variables on the longest timescales possible of six to seven years by comparing measurements taken early in the Spitzer mission with the mean from our YSOVAR campaign. The fraction of members in each cluster that are variable on these longest timescales is a function of the ratio of Class I/total members in each cluster, such that clusters with a higher fraction of Class I objects also have a higher fraction of long-term variables. For objects with a YSOVAR-determined period and a [3.6]-[8] color, we find that a star with a longer period is more likely than those with shorter periods to have an IR excess. We do not find any evidence for variability that causes [3.6]-[4.5] excesses to appear or vanish within our data set; out of members and field objects combined, at most 0.02% may have transient IR excesses.

  15. A 1.3 mm SMA survey of 29 variable young stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Dunham, Michael M.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Bourke, Tyler L.; Hirano, Naomi; Longmore, Steven; Andrews, Sean; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Forbrich, Jan; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Girart, Josep M.; Green, Joel D.; Juárez, Carmen; Kóspál, Ágnes; Manara, Carlo F.; Palau, Aina; Takami, Michihiro; Testi, Leonardo; Vorobyov, Eduard I.

    2018-04-01

    Context. Young stellar objects (YSOs) may undergo periods of active accretion (outbursts), during which the protostellar accretion rate is temporarily enhanced by a few orders of magnitude. Whether or not these accretion outburst YSOs possess similar dust and gas reservoirs to each other, and whether or not their dust and gas reservoirs are similar as quiescent YSOs, are issues yet to be clarified. Aims: The aim of this work is to characterize the millimeter thermal dust emission properties of a statistically significant sample of long and short duration accretion outburst YSOs (i.e., FUors and EXors) and the spectroscopically identified candidates of accretion outbursting YSOs (i.e., FUor-like objects). Methods: We have carried out extensive Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations mostly at 225 GHz (1.33 mm) and 272 GHz (1.10 mm), from 2008 to 2017. We covered accretion outburst YSOs located at 3σ significance. Detected sources except for the two cases of V883 Ori and NGC 2071 MM3 were observed with 1″ angular resolution. Overall our observed targets show a systematically higher millimeter luminosity distribution than those of the M* > 0.3 M⊙ Class II YSOs in the nearby (≲400 pc) low-mass star-forming molecular clouds (e.g., Taurus, Lupus, Upp Scorpio, and Chameleon I). In addition, at 1 mm our observed confirmed binaries or triple-system sources are systematically fainter than the rest of the sources even though their 1 mm fluxes are broadly distributed. We may have detected 30-60% millimeter flux variability from V2494 Cyg and V2495 Cyg, from the observations separated by approximately one year.

  16. Near-infrared spectroscopic observations of massive young stellar object candidates in the central molecular zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, G.; Schultheis, M.; Feldmeier-Krause, A.; Schödel, R.; Neumayer, N.; Matteucci, F.; Ryde, N.; Rojas-Arriagada, A.; Tej, A.

    2018-01-01

    Context. The central molecular zone (CMZ) is a 200 pc region around the Galactic centre. The study of star formation in the central part of the Milky Way is of great interest as it provides a template for the closest galactic nuclei. Aims: We present a spectroscopic follow-up of photometrically selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the CMZ of the Galactic centre. Our goal is to quantify the contamination of this YSO sample by reddened giant stars with circumstellar envelopes and to determine the star formation rate (SFR) in the CMZ. Methods: We obtained KMOS low-resolution near-infrared spectra (R 4000) between 2.0 and 2.5 μm of sources, many of which have been previously identified by mid-infrared photometric criteria as massive YSOs in the Galactic centre. Our final sample consists of 91 stars with good signal-to-noise ratio. We separated YSOs from cool late-type stars based on spectral features of CO and Brγ at 2.3 μm and 2.16 μm, respectively. We made use of spectral energy distribution (SED) model fits to the observed photometric data points from 1.25 to 24 μm to estimate approximate masses for the YSOs. Results: Using the spectroscopically identified YSOs in our sample, we confirm that existing colour-colour diagrams and colour-magnitude diagrams are unable to efficiently separate YSOs and cool late-type stars. In addition, we define a new colour-colour criterion that separates YSOs from cool late-type stars in the H-KS vs. H -[8.0] diagram. We use this new criterion to identify YSO candidates in the |l| Chile, programme number 097.C-0208(A).

  17. ARE ALL SHORT-HARD GAMMA-RAY BURSTS PRODUCED FROM MERGERS OF COMPACT STELLAR OBJECTS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgili, Francisco J.; Zhang Bing; O'Brien, Paul; Troja, Eleonora

    2011-01-01

    The origin and progenitors of short-hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain a puzzle and a highly debated topic. Recent Swift observations suggest that these GRBs may be related to catastrophic explosions in degenerate compact stars, denoted as 'Type I' GRBs. The most popular models include the merger of two compact stellar objects (NS-NS or NS-BH). We utilize a Monte Carlo approach to determine whether a merger progenitor model can self-consistently account for all the observations of short-hard GRBs, including a sample with redshift measurements in the Swift era (z-known sample) and the CGRO/BATSE sample. We apply various merger time delay distributions invoked in compact star merger models to derive the redshift distributions of these Type I GRBs, and then constrain the unknown luminosity function of Type I GRBs using the observed luminosity-redshift (L-z) distributions of the z-known sample. The best luminosity function model, together with the adopted merger delay model, is then applied to confront the peak flux distribution (log N-log P distribution) of the BATSE and Swift samples. We find that for all the merger models invoking a range of merger delay timescales (including those invoking a large fraction of 'prompt mergers'), it is difficult to reconcile the models with all the data. The data are instead statistically consistent with the following two possible scenarios. First, that short/hard GRBs are a superposition of compact-star-merger-origin (Type I) GRBs and a population of GRBs that track the star formation history, which are probably related to the deaths of massive stars (Type II GRBs). Second, the entire short/hard GRB population is consistent with a typical delay of 2 Gyr with respect to the star formation history with modest scatter. This may point toward a different Type I progenitor than the traditional compact star merger models.

  18. Multi-Sensory Approach to Search for Young Stellar Objects in CG4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoette, Vivian L.; Rebull, L. M.; McCarron, K.; Johnson, C. H.; Gartner, C.; VanDerMolen, J.; Gamble, L.; Matche, L.; McCartney, A.; Doering, M.; Crump, R.; Laorr, A.; Mork, K.; Steinbergs, E.; Wigley, E.; Caruso, S.; Killingstad, N.; McCanna, T.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities - specifically individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) and/or blind and visually-impaired (BVI) - have traditionally been underrepresented in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). The low incidence rate of these populations, coupled with geographic isolation, creates limited opportunities for students to work with and receive mentoring by professionals who not only have specialty knowledge in disability areas but also work in STEM fields. Yerkes Observatory scientists, along with educators from the Wisconsin School for the Deaf, the Wisconsin Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Breck School, and Oak Park and River Forest High School, are engaged in active research with a Spitzer Science Center (SSC) scientist. Our ultimate goals are threefold; to engage DHH and BVI students with equal success as their sighted and hearing peers, to share our techniques to make astronomy more accessible to DHH and BVI youth, and to generate a life-long interest which will lead our students to STEM careers. This poster tracks our work with an SSC scientist during the spring, summer, and fall of 2010. The group coauthored another AAS poster on finding Young Stellar Objects (YSO) in the CG4 Nebula in Puppis. During the project, the students, scientists and teachers developed a number of techniques for learning the necessary science as well as doing the required data acquisition and analysis. Collaborations were formed between students with disabilities and their non-disabled peers to create multi-media projects. Ultimately, the projects created for our work with NITARP will be disseminated through our professional connections in order to ignite a passion for astronomy in all students - with and without disabilities. This research was made possible through the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Project (NITARP) and was funded by NASA Astrophysics Data Program and Archive Outreach funds.

  19. Young Stellar Objects in the Massive Star-forming Regions W51 and W43

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saral, G.; Audard, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Geneva, Ch. d’Ecogia 16, 1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Hora, J. L.; Martínez-Galarza, J. R.; Smith, H. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Koenig, X. P. [Yale University, Department of Astronomy, 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Motte, F. [Institut de Plantologie et d’Astrophysique de Grenoble, Univ. Grenoble Alpes—CNRS-INSU, BP 53, F-38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Nguyen-Luong, Q. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Chile Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Saygac, A. T. [Istanbul University, Faculty of Science, Astronomy and Space Sciences Department, Istanbul-Turkey (Turkey)

    2017-04-20

    We present the results of our investigation of the star-forming complexes W51 and W43, two of the brightest in the first Galactic quadrant. In order to determine the young stellar object (YSO) populations in W51 and W43 we used color–magnitude relations based on Spitzer mid-infrared and 2MASS/UKIDSS near-infrared data. We identified 302 Class I YSOs and 1178 Class II/transition disk candidates in W51, and 917 Class I YSOs and 5187 Class II/transition disk candidates in W43. We also identified tens of groups of YSOs in both regions using the Minimal Spanning Tree (MST) method. We found similar cluster densities in both regions, even though Spitzer was not able to probe the densest part of W43. By using the Class II/I ratios, we traced the relative ages within the regions and, based on the morphology of the clusters, we argue that several sites of star formation are independent of one another in terms of their ages and physical conditions. We used spectral energy distribution-fitting to identify the massive YSO (MYSO) candidates since they play a vital role in the star formation process, and then examined them to see if they are related to any massive star formation tracers such as UCH ii regions, masers, or dense fragments. We identified 17 MYSO candidates in W51, and 14 in W43, respectively, and found that groups of YSOs hosting MYSO candidates are positionally associated with H ii regions in W51, though we do not see any MYSO candidates associated with previously identified massive dense fragments in W43.

  20. Migratory and resident blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus differ in their reaction to a novel object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Anna L. K.; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Alerstam, Thomas; Bäckman, Johan

    2010-11-01

    Individuals differ consistently in their behavioural reactions towards novel objects and new situations. Reaction to novelty is one part of a suit of individually consistent behaviours called coping strategies or personalities and is often summarised as bold or shy behaviour. Coping strategies could be particularly important for migrating birds exposed to novel environments on their journeys. We compared the average approach latencies to a novel object among migrants and residents in partially migratory blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus. In this test, we found migrating blue tits to have shorter approach latencies than had resident ones. Behavioural reactions to novelty can affect the readiness to migrate and short approach latency may have an adaptive value during migration. Individual behaviour towards novelty might be incorporated among the factors associated with migratory or resident behaviour in a partially migratory population.

  1. THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY ORION PROJECT: ECLIPSING BINARIES AND YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Eyken, Julian C.; Ciardi, David R.; Akeson, Rachel L.; Beichman, Charles A.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Gelino, Dawn M.; Kane, Stephen R.; Plavchan, Peter; RamIrez, Solange V.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Stauffer, John R.; Hoard, D. W.; Boden, Andrew F.; Howell, Steve B.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Law, Nicholas M.; Nugent, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project is one of the experiments within the broader PTF survey, a systematic automated exploration of the sky for optical transients. Taking advantage of the wide (3. 0 5 x 2. 0 3) field of view available using the PTF camera installed at the Palomar 48 inch telescope, 40 nights were dedicated in 2009 December to 2010 January to perform continuous high-cadence differential photometry on a single field containing the young (7-10 Myr) 25 Ori association. Little is known empirically about the formation of planets at these young ages, and the primary motivation for the project is to search for planets around young stars in this region. The unique data set also provides for much ancillary science. In this first paper, we describe the survey and the data reduction pipeline, and present some initial results from an inspection of the most clearly varying stars relating to two of the ancillary science objectives: detection of eclipsing binaries and young stellar objects. We find 82 new eclipsing binary systems, 9 of which are good candidate 25 Ori or Orion OB1a association members. Of these, two are potential young W UMa type systems. We report on the possible low-mass (M-dwarf primary) eclipsing systems in the sample, which include six of the candidate young systems. Forty-five of the binary systems are close (mainly contact) systems, and one of these shows an orbital period among the shortest known for W UMa binaries, at 0.2156509 ± 0.0000071 days, with flat-bottomed primary eclipses, and a derived distance that appears consistent with membership in the general Orion association. One of the candidate young systems presents an unusual light curve, perhaps representing a semi-detached binary system with an inflated low-mass primary or a star with a warped disk, and may represent an additional young Orion member. Finally, we identify 14 probable new classical T-Tauri stars in our data, along with one previously known (CVSO 35) and

  2. Resolved 24.5 micron emission from massive young stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, W. J.; Hoare, M. G.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Honda, M.; Kataza, H.; Miyata, T.; Okamoto, Y. K.; Onaka, T.; Sako, S.; Yamashita, T.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Massive young stellar objects (MYSO) are surrounded by massive dusty envelopes, whose physical structure and geometry are determined by the star formation process. Aims: Our principal aim is to establish the density structure of MYSO envelopes on scales of ~1000 AU. This constitutes an increase of a factor ~10 in angular resolution compared to similar studies performed in the (sub)mm. Methods: We have obtained diffraction-limited (0.6´´) 24.5 μm images (field of view of 40 arcsec×30 arcsec) of 14 well-known massive star formation regions with the COMICS instrument mounted on the 8.2 m Subaru telescope. We construct azimuthally averaged intensity profiles of the resolved MYSO envelopes and build spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from archival data and the COMICS 24.5 μm flux density. The SEDs range from near-infrared to millimeter wavelengths. Self-consistent 1-D radiative transfer models described by a density dependence of the form n(r) ∝ r-p are used to simultaneously compare the intensity profiles and SEDs to model predictions. Results: The images reveal the presence of discrete MYSO sources which are resolved on arcsecond scales, and, to first-order, the observed emission is circular on the sky. For many sources, the spherical models are capable of satisfactorily reproducing the 24.5 μm intensity profile, the 24.5 μm flux density, the 9.7 μm silicate absorption feature, and the submm emission. They are described by density distributions with p =1.0±0.25. Such distributions are shallower than those found on larger scales probed with single-dish (sub)mm studies. Other sources have density laws that are shallower/steeper than p=1.0 and there is evidence that these are viewed near edge-on or near face-on respectively. In these cases spherical models fail to provide good fits to the data. The images also reveal a diffuse component tracing somewhat larger scale structures, particularly visible in the regions S 140, AFGL 2136, IRAS 20126

  3. Envelope structure of deeply embedded young stellar objects in the Serpens Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogerheijde, M. R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Salverda, J. M.; Blake, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Aperture-synthesis and single-dish (sub-) millimeter molecular-line and continuum observations reveal in great detail the envelope structure of deeply embedded young stellar objects (SMM 1 = FIRS 1, SMM 2, SMM 3, SMM 4) in the densely star-forming Serpens Molecular Cloud. SMM 1, 3, and 4 show partially resolved (>2" = 800 AU) continuum emission in the beam of the Owens Valley Millimeter Array at lambda = 3.4-1.4 mm. The continuum visibilities accurately constrain the density structure in the envelopes, which can be described by a radial power law with slope -2.0 +/- 0.5 on scales of 300 to 8000 AU. Inferred envelope masses within a radius of 8000 AU are 8.7, 3.0, and 5.3 Msolar for SMM 1, 3, and 4, respectively. A point source with 20%-30% of the total flux at 1.1 mm is required to fit the observations on long baselines, corresponding to warm envelope material within approximately 100 AU or a circumstellar disk. No continuum emission is detected interferometrically toward SMM 2, corresponding to an upper limit of 0.2 Msolar assuming Td = 24 K. The lack of any compact dust emission suggests that the SMM 2 core does not contain a central protostar. Aperture-synthesis observations of the 13CO, C18O, HCO+, H13CO+, HCN, H13CN, N2H+ 1-0, SiO 2-1, and SO 2(2)-1(1) transitions reveal compact emission toward SMM 1, 3, and 4. SMM 2 shows only a number of clumps scattered throughout the primary field of view, supporting the conclusion that this core does not contain a central star. The compact molecular emission around SMM 1, 3, and 4 traces 5"-10" (2000-4000 AU) diameter cores that correspond to the densest regions of the envelopes, as well as material directly associated with the molecular outflow. Especially prominent are the optically thick HCN and HCO+ lines that show up brightly along the walls of the outflow cavities. SO and SiO trace shocked material, where their abundances may be enhanced by 1-2 orders of magnitude over dark-cloud values. A total of 31 molecular

  4. A Possible Origin of the H-H Objects in Young Stellar Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouveia dal Pino, E.; Opher, R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. La presencIa de flujos coljmados asocjados con objetos estelares j6venes es un fen6meno comun en reglones de formacI6n estelar. Estos chorros frecuentemente muestran una cadena de reglones de lineas de emjsI6n, a varIas de las cuales se les conoce desde bace mucho tlempo objetos HerbIg-Haro (HAl). En el presente trabajo examjnamos la poslbIlI dad de que estos nudos sean condensaciones producIdas por inestabilidad termica en un plasma que se se expande sujeto a `bremsstrahlung' reco - binaci6n y perdida por radjacj5n en lineas de emjsj6n. Nostramos que el valor minimo de = P0/PN0 bajo condjcjones Isobaricas para el crecimien to de la inestabilidad termica es = (6/5) [9/(STc\\)e) - 3/2]; en donde P0 es la presi6n de particulas, PM0 la presi6n magnetica, `)e la tasa de expansI5n y Tc el tiempo de enfriatniento radiativo en el flujo (3eI plasma ambiente. Haciendo calculos no lineales, encontratnos que l9s flujos colitnados de temperatura K, tasas de perdida de masa `4 = 10-6 - lO 8 Ne y velocidades de flujo VJ = 100-400 km/s, resultan favorables para la formacl6n de condensaciones por inestabilidad termica con contrastes de densidad Pp/ .3 -2.0 creados en intervalos de tiempo mas cortos que el tiempo estirnado de expansl6n en los chorros, en donde Pp(Po) es la densidad en la regi5n (ambiente) perturbada. ABSTRACT. The presence of collimated outflows associated with young stellar objects is a common phenomenon in star-fortning regions. These jets frequently show a chain of emission-line regions several of which have long been known as Herbig-Haro (H-H) objects. In this paper we examine the possibility that these knots are condensations produced by thermal instability in an expanding plasma , recombination and emission-line radiation losses. We show that the minimum value of = P /PNo under isobaric conditions for the growth of a thermal instability 0is = (6/5)1 [9/(STcN)e) - 3/2]; where P0 is the particle pressure, NQ tWe magnetic pressure, N) the expansion rate

  5. Stellar Rotation Periods of the Kepler Objects of Interest: A Dearth of Close-in Planets around Fast Rotators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, A.; Mazeh, T.; Aigrain, S.

    2013-09-01

    We present a large sample of stellar rotation periods for Kepler Objects of Interest, based on three years of public Kepler data. These were measured by detecting periodic photometric modulation caused by star spots, using an algorithm based on the autocorrelation function of the light curve, developed recently by McQuillan, Aigrain & Mazeh (2013). Of the 1919 main-sequence exoplanet hosts analyzed, robust rotation periods were detected for 737. Comparing the detected stellar periods to the orbital periods of the innermost planet in each system reveals a notable lack of close-in planets around rapid rotators. It appears that only slowly spinning stars with rotation periods longer than 5-10 days host planets on orbits shorter than 2 or 3 days, although the mechanism(s) that lead(s) to this is not clear.

  6. Pipeline for the Detection of Serendipitous Stellar Occultations by Kuiper Belt Objects with the Colibri Fast-photometry Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, E.; Metchev, S.; Brown, P.; Beauchemin, S.

    2018-01-01

    We report results from the preliminary trials of Colibri, a dedicated fast-photometry array for the detection of small Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) through serendipitous stellar occultations. Colibri’s novel data processing pipeline analyzed 4000 star hours with two overlapping-field EMCCD cameras, detecting no KBOs and one false positive occultation event in a high ecliptic latitude field. No occultations would be expected at these latitudes, allowing these results to provide a control sample for the upcoming main Colibri campaign. The empirical false positive rate found by the processing pipeline is consistent with the 0.002% simulation-determined false positive rate. We also describe Colibri’s software design, kernel sets for modeling stellar occultations, and method for retrieving occultation parameters from noisy diffraction curves. Colibri’s main campaign will begin in mid-2018, operating at a 40 Hz sampling rate. .

  7. Wide-field infrared survey explorer observations of young stellar objects in the Lynds 1509 dark cloud in Auriga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wilson M.; McCollum, Bruce; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Padgett, Deborah L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Terebey, Susan; Angione, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Rebull, Luisa M. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Leisawitz, David, E-mail: wliu@ipac.caltech.edu [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 605, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has uncovered a striking cluster of young stellar object (YSO) candidates associated with the L1509 dark cloud in Auriga. The WISE observations, at 3.4 μm, 4.6 μm, 12 μm, and 22 μm, show a number of objects with colors consistent with YSOs, and their spectral energy distributions suggest the presence of circumstellar dust emission, including numerous Class I, flat spectrum, and Class II objects. In general, the YSOs in L1509 are much more tightly clustered than YSOs in other dark clouds in the Taurus-Auriga star forming region, with Class I and flat spectrum objects confined to the densest aggregates, and Class II objects more sparsely distributed. We estimate a most probable distance of 485-700 pc, and possibly as far as the previously estimated distance of 2 kpc.

  8. Objects first with Java a practical introduction using BlueJ

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, David J

    2009-01-01

    Its close integration with the BlueJ development environment allows this book to focus on key aspects of object-oriented software development from day one. BlueJ's clear visualization of classes and objects means that students can immediately appreciate the differences between them, and gain a much better understanding of the nature of an object than they would from simply reading source code. Unlike traditional textbooks, the chapters are not ordered by language features but by software development concepts. Language features are introduced as a response to the problems to be solved. A large number of different, interesting projects are used to provide variety and avoid the monotony of a running problem. The authors avoid the dangers of trying to teach all there is to know about each topic by using a spiral approach - introducing topics in a simple context early on and then revisiting later to deepen understanding. Throughout, the emphasis is on developing a practical approach to programming, with students e...

  9. Prediction of objectively measured physical activity and sedentariness among blue-collar workers using survey questionnaires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Nidhi; Heiden, Marina; Mathiassen, Svend Erik

    2016-01-01

    responded to a questionnaire containing information about personal and work related variables, available in most large epidemiological studies and surveys. Workers also wore accelerometers for 1-4 days measuring time spent sedentary and in physical activity, defined as non-sedentary time. Least......OBJECTIVES: We aimed at developing and evaluating statistical models predicting objectively measured occupational time spent sedentary or in physical activity from self-reported information available in large epidemiological studies and surveys. METHODS: Two-hundred-and-fourteen blue-collar workers......-squares linear regression models were developed, predicting objectively measured exposures from selected predictors in the questionnaire. RESULTS: A full prediction model based on age, gender, body mass index, job group, self-reported occupational physical activity (OPA), and self-reported occupational sedentary...

  10. The reliability of age measurements for Young Stellar Objects from Hertzsprung-Russell or color-magnitude diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preibisch, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The possibility to estimate ages and masses of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) from their location in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD) or a color-magnitude diagram provides a very important tool for the investigation of fundamental questions related to the processes of star formation and early stellar evolution. Age estimates are essential for studies of the temporal evolution of circumstellar material around YSOs and the conditions for planet formation. The characterization of the age distribution of the YSOs in a star forming region allows researchers to reconstruct the star formation history and provides important information on the fundamental question of whether star formation is a slow or a fast process. However, the reliability of these age measurements and the ability to detect possible age spreads in the stellar population of star forming regions are fundamentally limited by several factors. The variability of YSOs, unresolved binary components, and uncertainties in the calibrations of the stellar parameters cause uncertainties in the derived luminosities that are usually much larger than the typical photometry errors. Furthermore, the pre-main sequence evolution track of a YSO depends to some degree on the initial conditions and the details of its individual accretion history. I discuss how these observational and model uncertainties affect the derived isochronal ages, and demonstrate how neglecting or underestimating these uncertainties can easily lead to severe misinterpretations, gross overestimates of the age spread, and ill-based conclusions about the star formation history. These effects are illustrated by means of Monte-Carlo simulations of observed star clusters with realistic observational uncertainties. The most important points are as follows. First, the observed scatter in the HRD must not be confused with a genuine age spread, but is always just an upper limit to the true age spread. Second, histograms of isochronal ages naturally show a

  11. Prediction of objectively measured physical activity and sedentariness among blue-collar workers using survey questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nidhi; Heiden, Marina; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Holtermann, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    We aimed at developing and evaluating statistical models predicting objectively measured occupational time spent sedentary or in physical activity from self-reported information available in large epidemiological studies and surveys. Two-hundred-and-fourteen blue-collar workers responded to a questionnaire containing information about personal and work related variables, available in most large epidemiological studies and surveys. Workers also wore accelerometers for 1-4 days measuring time spent sedentary and in physical activity, defined as non-sedentary time. Least-squares linear regression models were developed, predicting objectively measured exposures from selected predictors in the questionnaire. A full prediction model based on age, gender, body mass index, job group, self-reported occupational physical activity (OPA), and self-reported occupational sedentary time (OST) explained 63% (R (2)adjusted) of the variance of both objectively measured time spent sedentary and in physical activity since these two exposures were complementary. Single-predictor models based only on self-reported information about either OPA or OST explained 21% and 38%, respectively, of the variance of the objectively measured exposures. Internal validation using bootstrapping suggested that the full and single-predictor models would show almost the same performance in new datasets as in that used for modelling. Both full and single-predictor models based on self-reported information typically available in most large epidemiological studies and surveys were able to predict objectively measured occupational time spent sedentary or in physical activity, with explained variances ranging from 21-63%.

  12. YSOVAR: MID-INFRARED VARIABILITY OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS AND THEIR DISKS IN THE CLUSTER IRAS 20050+2720

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Hora, J. L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cody, A. M. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Covey, K. R. [Western Washington University, 516 High Street, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States); Günther, H. M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hillenbrand, L. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Plavchan, P. [Missouri State University, 901 S. National Avenue, Springfield, MO 65897 (United States); Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R. [Spitzer Science Center/Caltech, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Espaillat, C. [Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Forbrich, J. [University of Vienna, Department of Astrophysics, Türkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180, Vienna (Austria); Gutermuth, R. A. [Dept. of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Morales-Calderón, M. [Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC), ESAC Campus, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada (Spain); Song, Inseok [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602–2451 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We present a time-variability study of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cluster IRAS 20050+2720, performed at 3.6 and 4.5 μm with the Spitzer Space Telescope; this study is part of the Young Stellar Object VARiability (YSOVAR) project. We have collected light curves for 181 cluster members over 60 days. We find a high variability fraction among embedded cluster members of ca. 70%, whereas young stars without a detectable disk display variability less often (in ca. 50% of the cases) and with lower amplitudes. We detect periodic variability for 33 sources with periods primarily in the range of 2–6 days. Practically all embedded periodic sources display additional variability on top of their periodicity. Furthermore, we analyze the slopes of the tracks that our sources span in the color–magnitude diagram (CMD). We find that sources with long variability time scales tend to display CMD slopes that are at least partially influenced by accretion processes, while sources with short variability timescales tend to display extinction-dominated slopes. We find a tentative trend of X-ray detected cluster members to vary on longer timescales than the X-ray undetected members.

  13. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/NEAR-INFRARED CAMERA AND MULTI-OBJECT SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS OF THE GLIMPSE9 STELLAR CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messineo, Maria; Figer, Donald F.; Davies, Ben; Trombley, Christine; Kudritzki, R. P.; Rich, R. Michael; MacKenty, John

    2010-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope/Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer photometry, and low-resolution K-band spectra of the GLIMPSE9 stellar cluster. The newly obtained color-magnitude diagram shows a cluster sequence with H - K S = ∼1 mag, indicating an interstellar extinction A K s = 1.6 ± 0.2 mag. The spectra of the three brightest stars show deep CO band heads, which indicate red supergiants with spectral type M1-M2. Two 09-B2 supergiants are also identified, which yield a spectrophotometric distance of 4.2 ± 0.4 kpc. Presuming that the population is coeval, we derive an age between 15 and 27 Myr, and a total cluster mass of 1600 ± 400 M sun , integrated down to 1 M sun . In the vicinity of GLIMPSE9 are several H II regions and supernova remnants, all of which (including GLIMPSE9) are probably associated with a giant molecular cloud (GMC) in the inner galaxy. GLIMPSE9 probably represents one episode of massive star formation in this GMC. We have identified several other candidate stellar clusters of the same complex.

  14. X-shooter spectroscopy of young stellar objects in Lupus. Lithium, iron, and barium elemental abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biazzo, K.; Frasca, A.; Alcalá, J. M.; Zusi, M.; Covino, E.; Randich, S.; Esposito, M.; Manara, C. F.; Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Rigliaco, E.; Getman, F.

    2017-09-01

    Aims: With the purpose of performing a homogeneous determination of elemental abundances for members of the Lupus T association, we analyzed three chemical elements: lithium, iron, and barium. The aims were: 1) to derive the lithium abundance for the almost complete sample ( 90%) of known class II stars in the Lupus I, II, III, and IV clouds; 2) to perform chemical tagging of a region where few iron abundance measurements have been obtained in the past, and no determination of the barium content has been done up to now. We also investigated possible barium enhancement at the very young age of the region, as this element has become increasingly interesting in the last few years following the evidence of barium over-abundance in young clusters, the origin of which is still unknown. Methods: Using the X-shooter spectrograph mounted on the Unit 2 (UT2) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT), we analyzed the spectra of 89 cluster members, both class II (82) and class III (7) stars. We measured the strength of the lithium line at λ6707.8 Å and derived the abundance of this element through equivalent width measurements and curves of growth. For six class II stars we also derived the iron and barium abundances using the spectral synthesis method and the code MOOG. The veiling contribution was taken into account in the abundance analysis for all three elements. Results: We find a dispersion in the strength of the lithium line at low effective temperatures and identify three targets with severe Li depletion. The nuclear age inferred for these highly lithium-depleted stars is around 15 Myr, which exceeds by an order of magnitude the isochronal one. We derive a nearly solar metallicity for the members whose spectra could be analyzed. We find that Ba is over-abundant by 0.7 dex with respect to the Sun. Since current theoretical models cannot reproduce this abundance pattern, we investigated whether this unusually large Ba content might be related to effects due to stellar

  15. 2MASS J11151597+1937266: A Young, Dusty, Isolated, Planetary-mass Object with a Potential Wide Stellar Companion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theissen, Christopher A.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella C.; Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin K.; Gagné, Jonathan; Schmidt, Sarah J.; West, Andrew A.

    2018-01-01

    We present 2MASS J11151597+1937266, a recently identified low-surface-gravity L dwarf, classified as an L2γ based on Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical spectroscopy. We confirm this spectral type with near-infrared spectroscopy, which provides further evidence that 2MASS J11151597+1937266 is a low-surface-gravity L dwarf. This object also shows significant excess mid-infrared flux, indicative of circumstellar material; and its strong Hα emission (EWHα = 560 ± 82 Å) is an indicator of enhanced magnetic activity or weak accretion. Comparison of its spectral energy distribution to model photospheres yields an effective temperature of {1724}-38+184 {{K}}. We also provide a revised distance estimate of 37 ± 6 pc using a spectral type–luminosity relationship for low-surface-gravity objects. The three-dimensional galactic velocities and positions of 2MASS J11151597+1937266 do not match any known young association or moving group. Assuming a probable age in the range of 5–45 Myr, the model-dependent estimated mass of this object is between 7 and 21 M Jup, making it a potentially isolated planetary-mass object. We also identify a candidate co-moving, young stellar companion, 2MASS J11131089+2110086.

  16. A Mid-Infrared Imaging Survey of Embedded Young Stellar Objects in the (rho) Ophiuchi Cloud Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsony, Mary; Ressler, Michael E.; Marsh, Kenneth A.

    2005-01-01

    Results of a comprehensive, new, ground-based mid-infrared imaging survey of the young stellar population of the (rho) Ophiuchi cloud are presented. Data were acquired at the Palomar 5m and at the Keck 10m telescopes with the MIRLIN and LWS instruments, at 0'.5 and 0'.25 resolutions, respectively. Of 172 survey objects, 85 were detected. Among the 22 multiple systems observed, 15 were resolved and their individual component fluxes determined. A plot of the frequency distribution of the detected objects with SED spectral slope shows that YSOs spend approx.4 x 10(exp 5) yr in the flat-spectrum phase, clearing out their remnant infall envelopes. Mid-infrared variability is found among a significant fraction of the surveyed objects and is found to occur for all SED classes with optically thick disks. Large-amplitude near-infrared variability, also found for all SED classes with optically thick disks, seems to occur with somewhat higher frequency at the earlier evolutionary stages. Although a general trend of mid-infrared excess and near-infrared veiling exists progressing through SED classes, with Class I objects generally exhibiting r(sub K) >= 1, flat-spectrum objects with r(sub K) >= 0.58, and Class III objects with r(sub K) =0, Class II objects exhibit the widest range of r(sub K) values, ranging from 0 infrared versus near-infrared excesses in a subsample with well-determined effective temperatures and extinction values, disk-clearing mechanisms are explored. The results are consistent with disk clearing proceeding from the inside out.

  17. Variable quasi-stellar sources with particular emphasis on objects of the BL Lac type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinman, T.D.

    1975-01-01

    The optically variable quasars tend to have steep optical spectra and to show variable polarization; they tend to be associated with compact radio sources which have flat radio spectra at GHz frequencies. Objects are known which have continuous spectra (like BL Lac and OJ 287), but whose other properties closely parallel those of the variable quasars and N galaxies; in fact no sharp distinction can be drawn between them. The variation in the visibility of emission lines in quasars and N galaxies could be due to variations in the strength and spectral index of the radiation from the non-thermal source and from the differences in the amount and disposition of the material around it; it does not seem likely that a combination of these factors accounts for the observed range in emission line strength. The systematic difference in optical spectral index between continuous-spectrum objects (and OVV variables) on the one hand and those with emission lines on the other will produce a difference in K term between them, which may be expected to affect their distributions with respect to apparent magnitude. (Auth.)

  18. Growth of a Massive Young Stellar Object Fed by a Gas Flow from a Companion Gas Clump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi; Shen, Zhiqiang [Shanghai Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, Nandan Rd. 80, Shanghai (China); Ren, Zhiyuan [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, Chaoyang District Datun Rd. A20, Beijing (China); Zhang, Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Qiu, Keping [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Rd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093 (China)

    2017-02-01

    We present a Submillimeter Array (SMA) observation toward the young massive double-core system G350.69-0.49. This system consists of a northeast (NE) diffuse gas bubble and a southwest (SW) massive young stellar object (MYSO), both clearly seen in the Spitzer images. The SMA observations reveal a gas flow between the NE bubble and the SW MYSO in a broad velocity range from 5 to 30 km s{sup −1} with respect to the system velocity. The gas flow is well confined within the interval between the two objects and traces a significant mass transfer from the NE gas bubble to the SW massive core. The transfer flow can supply the material accreted onto the SW MYSO at a rate of 4.2×10{sup −4} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. The whole system therefore suggests a mode for the mass growth in the MYSO from a gas transfer flow launched from its companion gas clump, despite the driving mechanism of the transfer flow not being fully determined from the current data.

  19. OPTICAL/NEAR-INFRARED SELECTION OF RED QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS: EVIDENCE FOR STEEP EXTINCTION CURVES TOWARD GALACTIC CENTERS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Krogager, J.-K.; Vestergaard, M.; Geier, S. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Venemans, B. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Noterdaeme, P. [CNRS-UPMC, UMR7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis Bd. Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Moller, P. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschildstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Ledoux, C. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

    2013-01-15

    We present the results of a search for red QSOs using a selection based on optical imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and near-infrared imaging from UKIDSS. Our main goal with the selection is to search for QSOs reddened by foreground dusty absorber galaxies. For a sample of 58 candidates (including 20 objects fulfilling our selection criteria that already have spectra in the SDSS), 46 (79%) are confirmed to be QSOs. The QSOs are predominantly dust-reddened except for a handful at redshifts z {approx}> 3.5. However, the dust is most likely located in the QSO host galaxies (and for two, the reddening is primarily caused by Galactic dust) rather than in the intervening absorbers. More than half of the QSOs show evidence of associated absorption (BAL absorption). Four (7%) of the candidates turned out to be late-type stars, and another four (7%) are compact galaxies. We could not identify the remaining four objects. In terms of their optical spectra, these QSOs are similar to the QSOs selected in the FIRST-2MASS Red Quasar Survey except they are on average fainter, more distant, and only two are detected in the FIRST survey. As per the usual procedure, we estimate the amount of extinction using the SDSS QSO template reddened by Small-Magellanic-Cloud-(SMC) like dust. It is possible to get a good match to the observed (rest-frame ultraviolet) spectra, but it is not possible to match the observed near-IR photometry from UKIDSS for nearly all the reddened QSOs. The most likely reasons are that the SDSS QSO template is too red at optical wavelengths due to contaminating host galaxy light and because the assumed SMC extinction curve is too shallow. Three of the compact galaxies display old stellar populations with ages of several Gyr and masses of about 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} (based on spectral energy distribution modeling). The inferred stellar densities in these galaxies exceed 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} kpc{sup -2}, which is among the highest measured for early

  20. Stellar remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Kawaler, S D; Srinivasan, G

    1997-01-01

    This volume examines the internal structure, origin and evolution of white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, all objects at the final stage of stellar evolution. It covers topics such as: pulsation of white dwarfs; millisecond pulsars; and the dynamics around black holes.

  1. Herschel-PACS observations of far-IR lines in young stellar objects. I. [OI] and H2O at 63 μm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Merín, B.; Kamp, I.; Eiroa, C.; Montesinos, B.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Gas plays a major role in the dynamical evolution of young stellar objects (YSOs). Its interaction with the dust is the key to our understanding planet formation later on in the protoplanetary disc stage. Studying the gas content is therefore a crucial step towards understanding YSO and

  2. APEX-CHAMP(+) high-J CO observations of low-mass young stellar objects I. The HH 46 envelope and outflow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kempen, T. A.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Guesten, R.; Kristensen, L. E.; Schilke, P.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Boland, W.; Nefs, B.; Menten, K. M.; Baryshev, A.; Wyrowski, F.

    Context. The spectacular outflow of HH 46/47 is driven by HH 46 IRS 1, an embedded Class I Young Stellar Object (YSO). Although much is known about this region from extensive optical and infrared observations, the properties of its protostellar envelope and molecular outflow are poorly constrained.

  3. Nature versus nurture: Luminous blue variable nebulae in and near massive stellar clusters at the galactic center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, R. M.; Herter, T. L.; Adams, J. D.; Morris, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    Three luminous blue variables (LBVs) are located in and near the Quintuplet Cluster at the Galactic center: the Pistol Star, G0.120-0.048, and qF362. We present imaging at 19, 25, 31, and 37 μm of the region containing these three LBVs, obtained with SOFIA using FORCAST. We argue that Pistol and G0.120-0.048 are identical 'twins' that exhibit contrasting nebulae due to the external influence of their different environments. Our images reveal the asymmetric, compressed shell of hot dust surrounding the Pistol Star and provide the first detection of the thermal emission from the symmetric, hot dust envelope surrounding G0.120-0.048. However, no detection of hot dust associated with qF362 is made. Dust and gas composing the Pistol nebula are primarily heated and ionized by the nearby Quintuplet Cluster stars. The northern region of the Pistol nebula is decelerated due to the interaction with the high-velocity (2000 km s –1 ) winds from adjacent Wolf-Rayet Carbon (WC) stars. From fits to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the Pistol nebula with the DustEM code we determine that the Pistol nebula is composed of a distribution of very small, transiently heated grains (10 to ∼ 35 Å) having a total dust mass of 0.03 M ☉ , and that it exhibits a gradient of decreasing grain size from south to north due to differential sputtering by the winds from the WC stars. The total IR luminosity of the Pistol nebula is 5.2 × 10 5 L ☉ . Dust in the G0.120-0.048 nebula is primarily heated by the central star; however, the nebular gas is ionized externally by the Arches Cluster. Unlike the Pistol nebula, the G0.120-0.048 nebula is freely expanding into the surrounding medium. A grain size distribution identical to that of the non-sputtered region of the Pistol nebula satisfies the constraints placed on the G0.120-0.048 nebula from DustEM model fits to its SED and implies a total dust mass of 0.021 M ☉ . The total IR luminosity of the G0.120-0.048 nebula is

  4. Nature versus nurture: Luminous blue variable nebulae in and near massive stellar clusters at the galactic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, R. M.; Herter, T. L.; Adams, J. D. [Astronomy Department, 202 Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Morris, M. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Three luminous blue variables (LBVs) are located in and near the Quintuplet Cluster at the Galactic center: the Pistol Star, G0.120-0.048, and qF362. We present imaging at 19, 25, 31, and 37 μm of the region containing these three LBVs, obtained with SOFIA using FORCAST. We argue that Pistol and G0.120-0.048 are identical 'twins' that exhibit contrasting nebulae due to the external influence of their different environments. Our images reveal the asymmetric, compressed shell of hot dust surrounding the Pistol Star and provide the first detection of the thermal emission from the symmetric, hot dust envelope surrounding G0.120-0.048. However, no detection of hot dust associated with qF362 is made. Dust and gas composing the Pistol nebula are primarily heated and ionized by the nearby Quintuplet Cluster stars. The northern region of the Pistol nebula is decelerated due to the interaction with the high-velocity (2000 km s{sup –1}) winds from adjacent Wolf-Rayet Carbon (WC) stars. From fits to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the Pistol nebula with the DustEM code we determine that the Pistol nebula is composed of a distribution of very small, transiently heated grains (10 to ∼ 35 Å) having a total dust mass of 0.03 M {sub ☉}, and that it exhibits a gradient of decreasing grain size from south to north due to differential sputtering by the winds from the WC stars. The total IR luminosity of the Pistol nebula is 5.2 × 10{sup 5} L {sub ☉}. Dust in the G0.120-0.048 nebula is primarily heated by the central star; however, the nebular gas is ionized externally by the Arches Cluster. Unlike the Pistol nebula, the G0.120-0.048 nebula is freely expanding into the surrounding medium. A grain size distribution identical to that of the non-sputtered region of the Pistol nebula satisfies the constraints placed on the G0.120-0.048 nebula from DustEM model fits to its SED and implies a total dust mass of 0.021 M {sub ☉}. The total IR luminosity of the G

  5. Extreme Radio Flares and Associated X-Ray Variability from Young Stellar Objects in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbrich, Jan [Centre for Astrophysics Research, School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Reid, Mark J.; Wolk, Scott J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Menten, Karl M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Rivilla, Victor M. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Rau, Urvashi; Chandler, Claire J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Young stellar objects are known to exhibit strong radio variability on timescales of weeks to months, and a few reports have documented extreme radio flares with at least an order of magnitude change in flux density on timescales of hours to days. However, there have been few constraints on the occurrence rate of such radio flares or on the correlation with pre-main sequence X-ray flares, although such correlations are known for the Sun and nearby active stars. Here we report simultaneous deep VLA radio and Chandra X-ray observations of the Orion Nebula Cluster, targeting hundreds of sources to look for the occurrence rate of extreme radio variability and potential correlation with the most extreme X-ray variability. We identify 13 radio sources with extreme radio variability, with some showing an order of magnitude change in flux density in less than 30 minutes. All of these sources show X-ray emission and variability, but we find clear correlations with extreme radio flaring only on timescales <1 hr. Strong X-ray variability does not predict the extreme radio sources and vice versa. Radio flares thus provide us with a new perspective on high-energy processes in YSOs and the irradiation of their protoplanetary disks. Finally, our results highlight implications for interferometric imaging of sources violating the constant-sky assumption.

  6. Extreme star formation in the Milky Way: Luminosity distributions of young stellar objects in W49A and W51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, D. J.; Moore, T. J. T.; Urquhart, J. S.; Elia, D.; Plume, R.; König, C.; Baldeschi, A.; Schisano, E.; Rigby, A. J.; Morgan, L. K.; Thompson, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    We have compared the star-formation properties of the W49A and W51 regions by using far-infrared data from the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) and 850-μm observations from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) to obtain luminosities and masses, respectively, of associated compact sources. The former are infrared luminosities from the catalogue of Elia et al. (2017), while the latter are from the JCMT Plane survey source catalogue as well as measurements from new data. The clump-mass distributions of the two regions are found to be consistent with each other, as are the clump-formation efficiency and star-formation efficiency analogues. However, the frequency distributions of the luminosities of the young stellar objects are significantly different. While the luminosity distribution in W51 is consistent with Galaxy-wide samples, that of W49A is top-heavy. The differences are not dramatic, and are concentrated in the central regions of W49A. However, they suggest that physical conditions there, which are comparable in part to those in extragalactic starbursts, are significantly affecting the star-formation properties or evolution of the dense clumps in the region.

  7. DYNAMICAL EVIDENCE FOR A MAGNETOCENTRIFUGAL WIND FROM A 20 M{sub Sun} BINARY YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhill, L. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Goddi, C.; Humphreys, E. M. L. [Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe, Postbus 2 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Chandler, C. J. [NRAO, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Matthews, L. D., E-mail: greenhill@cfa.harvard.edu [MIT Haystack Observatory, Off Route 40, Westford, MA 01886 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    In Orion BN/KL, proper motions of {lambda}7 mm vibrationally excited SiO masers trace the rotation of a nearly edge-on disk and a bipolar wide-angle outflow 10-100 AU from radio source I, a binary young stellar object of {approx}20 M{sub Sun }. Here we map ground-state {lambda}7 mm SiO emission with the Very Large Array and track proper motions over 9 yr. The innermost and strongest emission lies in two extended arcs bracketing Source I. The proper motions trace a northeast-southwest bipolar outflow 100-1000 AU from Source I with a median three-dimensional motion of {approx}18 km s{sup -1}. An overlying distribution of {lambda}1.3 cm H{sub 2}O masers betrays similar flow characteristics. Gas dynamics and emission morphology traced by the masers suggest the presence of a magnetocentrifugal disk wind. Reinforcing evidence lies in the colinearity of the flow, apparent rotation across the flow parallel to the disk rotation, and recollimation that narrows the flow opening angle {approx}120 AU downstream. The arcs of ground-state SiO emission may mark the transition point to a shocked super-Alfvenic outflow.

  8. Differential binding of colors to objects in memory: red and yellow stick better than blue and green

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhbandner, Christof; Spitzer, Bernhard; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie; Pekrun, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Both evolutionary considerations and recent research suggest that the color red serves as a signal indicating an object’s importance. However, until now, there is no evidence that this signaling function of red is also reflected in human memory. To examine the effect of red on memory, we conducted four experiments in which we presented objects colored in four different colors (red, green, blue, and yellow) and measured later memory for the presence of an object and for the color of an object....

  9. Stellar Metamorphosis:

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    edge-on, where the direct starlight is blocked by the dusty cocoon. Otherwise, the starlight would overwhelm the nebular light, making it very difficult to see the butterfly-shaped nebula. In a few hundred years, intense ultraviolet radiation from the central star will energize the surrounding gas, causing it to glow brightly, and a planetary nebula is born. These observations were made with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 using three filters: yellow-green, blue, and near-infrared. The images were taken in 1997 by Sun Kwok and in 1996 by Matt Bobrowsky. Credits: Sun Kwok and Kate Su (University of Calgary), Bruce Hrivnak (Valparaiso University), and NASA ----------------- The Hubble Space Telescope Sees Remarkable Structure in the Heart of a Planetary Nebula [BOTTOM LEFT AND RIGHT] This Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image of NGC 6818 shows two distinct layers of gas (with dust): a spherical outer region and a brighter, vase-shaped interior 'bubble.' Astronomers believe that a fast wind - material propelled by radiation from the hot central star - is creating the inner elongated shape. The central star of the planetary nebula appears as a tiny blue dot. The material in the wind is traveling so fast that it smashes through older, slower-moving stellar debris, causing a 'blowout' at both ends of the bubble (lower right and upper left). This nebula looks like a twin of NGC 3918, another planetary nebula that has been observed by the Hubble telescope. The structure of NGC 3918 is remarkably similar to that of NGC 6818. It has an outer spherical envelope and an inner, brighter, elongated bubble. A fast-moving wind also appears to have created an orifice at one end (bottom right-hand corner) of the inner bubble. There are even faint wisps of material that were probably blown out of this hole. In the opposite direction (top left-hand corner), there is a protrusion that seems on the verge of breaking through to form a hole. By finding and studying such similar objects

  10. The Effects of Stellar Dynamics on the Evolution of Young, Dense Stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkus, H.; van Bever, J.; Vanbeveren, D.

    In this paper, we report on first results of a project in Brussels in which we study the effects of stellar dynamics on the evolution of young dense stellar systems using 3 decades of expertise in massive-star evolution and our population (number and spectral) synthesis code. We highlight an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) for Wolf Rayet binaries and study the effects of a luminous blue variable-type instability wind mass-loss formalism on the formation of intermediate-mass black holes.

  11. Differential binding of colors to objects in memory: red and yellow stick better than blue and green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhbandner, Christof; Spitzer, Bernhard; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie; Pekrun, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Both evolutionary considerations and recent research suggest that the color red serves as a signal indicating an object's importance. However, until now, there is no evidence that this signaling function of red is also reflected in human memory. To examine the effect of red on memory, we conducted four experiments in which we presented objects colored in four different colors (red, green, blue, and yellow) and measured later memory for the presence of an object and for the color of an object. Across experiments, we varied the type of objects (words vs. pictures), task complexity (single objects vs. multiple objects in visual scenes), and intentionality of encoding (intentional vs. incidental learning). Memory for the presence of an object was not influenced by color. However, in all four experiments, memory for the color of an object depended on color type and was particularly high for red and yellow-colored objects and particularly low for green-colored objects, indicating that the binding of colors into object memory representations varies as a function of color type. Analyzing the observers' confidence in their color memories revealed that color not only influenced objective memory performance but also subjective confidence. Subjective confidence judgments differentiated well between correct and incorrect color memories for red-colored objects, but poorly for green-colored objects. Our findings reveal a previously unknown color effect which may be of considerable interest for both basic color research and applied settings like eyewitness testimony in which memory for color features is relevant. Furthermore, our results indicate that feature binding in memory is not a uniform process by which any attended feature is automatically bound into unitary memory representations. Rather, memory binding seems to vary across different subtypes of features, a finding that supports recent research showing that object features are stored in memory rather independently from

  12. Average extinction curves and relative abundances for quasi-stellar object absorption-line systems at 1 <=zabs < 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Donald G.; Khare, Pushpa; Vanden Berk, Daniel; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Crotts, Arlin P. S.; Lauroesch, James T.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Welty, Daniel E.; Alsayyad, Yusra; Kumar, Abhishek; Lundgren, Britt; Shanidze, Natela; Smith, Tristan; Vanlandingham, Johnny; Baugher, Britt; Hall, Patrick B.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Menard, Brice; Rao, Sandhya; Tumlinson, Jason; Turnshek, David; Yip, Ching-Wa; Brinkmann, Jon

    2006-04-01

    We have studied a sample of 809 MgII absorption systems with 1.0 <=zabs<= 1.86 in the spectra of Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), with the aim of understanding the nature and abundance of the dust and the chemical abundances in the intervening absorbers. Normalized, composite spectra were derived, for abundance measurements, for the full sample and several subsamples, chosen on the basis of the line strengths and other absorber and QSO properties. Average extinction curves were obtained for the subsamples by comparing their geometric mean spectra with those of matching samples of QSOs without absorbers in their spectra. There is clear evidence for the presence of dust in the intervening absorbers. The 2175-Å feature is not present in the extinction curves, for any of the subsamples. The extinction curves are similar to the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) extinction curve with a rising ultraviolet (UV) extinction below 2200 Å. The absorber rest-frame colour excess, E(B-V), derived from the extinction curves, depends on the absorber properties and ranges from <0.001 to 0.085 for various subsamples. The column densities of MgII, AlII, SiII, CaII, TiII, CrII, MnII, FeII, CoII, NiII and ZnII do not show such a correspondingly large variation. The overall depletions in the high E(B-V) samples are consistent with those found for individual damped Lyman α systems, the depletion pattern being similar to halo clouds in the Galaxy. Assuming an SMC gas-to-dust ratio, we find a trend of increasing abundance with decreasing extinction; systems with NHI~ 1020cm-2 show solar abundance of Zn. The large velocity spread of strong MgII systems seems to be mimicked by weak lines of other elements. The ionization of the absorbers, in general appears to be low: the ratio of the column densities of AlIII to AlII is always less than 1/2. QSOs with absorbers are, in general, at least three times as likely to have highly reddened spectra as compared to QSOs without any

  13. Differential binding of colors to objects in memory: red and yellow stick better than blue and green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhbandner, Christof; Spitzer, Bernhard; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie; Pekrun, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Both evolutionary considerations and recent research suggest that the color red serves as a signal indicating an object’s importance. However, until now, there is no evidence that this signaling function of red is also reflected in human memory. To examine the effect of red on memory, we conducted four experiments in which we presented objects colored in four different colors (red, green, blue, and yellow) and measured later memory for the presence of an object and for the color of an object. Across experiments, we varied the type of objects (words vs. pictures), task complexity (single objects vs. multiple objects in visual scenes), and intentionality of encoding (intentional vs. incidental learning). Memory for the presence of an object was not influenced by color. However, in all four experiments, memory for the color of an object depended on color type and was particularly high for red and yellow-colored objects and particularly low for green-colored objects, indicating that the binding of colors into object memory representations varies as a function of color type. Analyzing the observers’ confidence in their color memories revealed that color not only influenced objective memory performance but also subjective confidence. Subjective confidence judgments differentiated well between correct and incorrect color memories for red-colored objects, but poorly for green-colored objects. Our findings reveal a previously unknown color effect which may be of considerable interest for both basic color research and applied settings like eyewitness testimony in which memory for color features is relevant. Furthermore, our results indicate that feature binding in memory is not a uniform process by which any attended feature is automatically bound into unitary memory representations. Rather, memory binding seems to vary across different subtypes of features, a finding that supports recent research showing that object features are stored in memory rather independently

  14. Differential Binding of Colors to Objects in Memory: Red and Yellow Stick Better Than Blue and Green

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof eKuhbandner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Both evolutionary considerations and recent research suggest that the color red serves as a signal indicating an object’s importance. However, until now, there is no evidence that this signaling function of red is also reflected in human memory. To examine the effect of red on memory, we conducted four experiments in which we presented objects colored in four different colors (red, green, blue, and yellow and measured later memory for the presence of an object and for the color of an object. Across experiments, we varied the type of objects (words versus pictures, task complexity (single objects versus multiple objects in visual scenes, and intentionality of encoding (intentional versus incidental learning. Memory for the presence of an object was not influenced by color. However, in all four experiments, memory for the color of an object depended on type of color and was particularly high for red and yellow-colored objects and particularly low for green-colored objects, indicating that the binding of colors into object memory representations varies as a function of color type. Analyzing the observers’ confidence in their color memories revealed that color not only influenced objective memory performance but also subjective confidence. Subjective confidence judgments differentiated well between correct and incorrect color memories for red-colored objects, but poorly for green-colored objects. Our findings reveal a previously unknown color effect which may be of considerable interest for both basic color research and applied settings like eyewitness testimony in which memory for color features is relevant. Furthermore, our results indicate that feature binding in memory is not a purely automatic process by which any attended feature is automatically bound into a unitary memory representation. Rather, binding in memory seems to vary across different subtypes of features, a finding that supports recent research showing that features of objects

  15. Association between objectively measured static standing and low back pain - a cross-sectional study among blue-collar workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locks, Francisco; Gupta, Nidhi; Hallman, David; Birk Jørgensen, Marie; Oliveira, Ana Beatriz; Holtermann, Andreas

    2018-04-02

    This study aims to investigate the cross-sectional association between objectively measured total time and temporal patterns of static standing (short bouts: 0-5 min; moderate bouts: >5-10 min; and long bouts: >10 min) during work and leisure and low back pain (LBP) among 698 blue-collar workers. Workers reported LBP on a 0-10 scale. The association between time spent on static standing and LBP was tested with linear regression. A positive association with LBP intensity was found for long bouts of static standing (β = 0.27) during total day (work + leisure), and total static standing time at leisure (β = 0.12). No significant associations were found for static standing during work and LBP intensity. These findings indicate that particularly long bouts of static standing over the entire day contribute to LBP in blue-collar workers. Practitioner Summary: The association between LBP and static standing time was investigated. This study indicates that prolonged time standing during total day and standing during leisure are positively associated with LBP among blue-collar workers. Therefore, practitioners should consider long periods of standing as a potential risk factor for LBP.

  16. Physical and Chemical Properties of Protocluster Clumps and Massive Young Stellar Objects Associated to Infrared Dark Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Gonzalez, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The study of high-mass stars is important not only because of the effects they produce in their environment through outflows, expanding HII regions, stellar winds, and eventually supernova shock waves, but also because they play a crucial role in estimating star formation rates in other galaxies. Although we have an accepted evolutionary scenario that explains (isolated) low-mass star formation, the processes that produce massive stars (M_star > 8 M_sol) and star clusters, especially their earliest stages, are not well understood. The newly discovered class of interstellar clouds now termed infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) represent excellent laboratories to study the earliest stages of high-mass star formation given that some of the clumps within them are known to have high masses (~100's M_sol), high densities (n > 10^5 cm^-3), and low temperatures (10-20K) as expected for the birthplaces of high-mass stars. Some questions remain unanswered: Do IRDCs harbor the very early stages of high-mass star formation, i.e., the pre-protocluster phase? If so, how do they compare with low-mass star formation sites? Is there chemical differentiation in IRDC clumps? What is the mass distribution of IRDCs? In this dissertation and for the first time, a catalog of 12529 IRDC candidates at 24 um has been created using archival data from the MIPSGAL/Spitzer survey, as a first step in searching for the massive pre-protocluster clumps. From this catalog, a sample of ~60 clumps has been selected in order to perform single-pointing observations with the IRAM 30m, Effelsberg 100m, and APEX 12m telescopes. One IRDC clump seems to be a promising candidate for being in the pre-protocluster phase. In addition, molecular line mapping observations have been performed on three clumps within IRDCs and a detailed chemical study of 10 molecular lines has been carried out. A larger difference in column densities and abundances has been found between these clumps and high-m! ass protostellar objects

  17. 75 FR 82128 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Vishnu: Hinduism's Blue...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... also determine that the exhibition or display of the exhibit objects at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, TN, from on or about February 20, 2011, until on or about May 29, 2011; at the...

  18. The effect of broadband soft X-rays in SO2-containing ices: Implication on the photochemistry of ices towards young stellar objects

    OpenAIRE

    Pilling, S.; Bergantini, A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effects produced mainly by broadband soft X-rays up to 2 keV (plus fast (keV) photoelectrons and low-energy (eV) induced secondary electrons) in the ice mixtures containing H2O:CO2:NH3:SO2 (10:1:1:1) at two different temperatures (50 K and 90 K). The experiments are an attempt to simulate the photochemical processes induced by energetic photons in SO2-containing ices present in cold environments in the ices surrounding young stellar objects (YSO) and in molecular clouds in ...

  19. SUZAKU OBSERVATION OF STRONG FLUORESCENT IRON LINE EMISSION FROM THE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT V1647 ORI DURING ITS NEW X-RAY OUTBURST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Grosso, Nicolas; Kastner, Joel H.; Richmond, Michael; Weintraub, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The Suzaku X-ray satellite observed the young stellar object (YSO) V1647 Ori on 2008 October 8 during the new mass accretion outburst reported in 2008 August. During the 87 ks observation with a net exposure of 40 ks, V1647 Ori showed a high level of X-ray emission with a gradual decrease in flux by a factor of 5 and then displayed an abrupt flux increase by an order of magnitude. Such enhanced X-ray variability was also seen in XMM-Newton observations in 2004 and 2005 during the 2003-2005 outburst, but has rarely been observed for other YSOs. The spectrum clearly displays emission from Helium-like iron, which is a signature of hot plasma (kT ∼ 5 keV). It also shows a fluorescent iron Kα line with a remarkably large equivalent width (EW) of ∼600 eV. Such a large EW suggests that a part of the incident X-ray emission that irradiates the circumstellar material and/or the stellar surface is hidden from our line of sight. XMM-Newton spectra during the 2003-2005 outburst did not show a strong fluorescent iron Kα line, so that the structure of the circumstellar gas very close to the stellar core that absorbs and re-emits X-ray emission from the central object may have changed in between 2005 and 2008. This phenomenon may be related to changes in the infrared morphology of McNeil's nebula between 2004 and 2008.

  20. Common Envelope Wind Tunnel: Coefficients of Drag and Accretion in a Simplified Context for Studying Flows around Objects Embedded within Stellar Envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Morgan; Antoni, Andrea; Murguia-Berthier, Ariadna; Macias, Phillip; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-03-01

    This paper examines the properties of flows around objects embedded within common envelopes in the simplified context of a “wind tunnel.” We establish characteristic relationships between key common envelope flow parameters like the Mach number and density scale height. Our wind tunnel is a three-dimensional, Cartesian geometry hydrodynamic simulation setup that includes the gravity of the primary and secondary stars and allows us to study the coefficients of drag and accretion experienced by the embedded object. Accretion and drag lead to a transformation of an embedded object and its orbit during a common envelope phase. We present two suites of simulations spanning a range of density gradients and Mach numbers—relevant for flow near the limb of a stellar envelope to the deep interior. In one suite, we adopt an ideal gas adiabatic exponent of γ =5/3, in the other, γ =4/3. We find that coefficients of drag rise in flows with steeper density gradients and that coefficients of drag and accretion are consistently higher in the more compressible, γ =4/3 flow. We illustrate the impact of these newly derived coefficients by integrating the inspiral of a secondary object through the envelopes of 3{M}⊙ (γ ≈ 5/3) and 80{M}⊙ (γ ≈ 4/3) giants. In these examples, we find a relatively rapid initial inspiral because, near the stellar limb, dynamical friction drag is generated mainly from dense gas focused from deeper within the primary-star’s envelope. This rapid initial inspiral timescale carries potential implications for the timescale of transients from early common envelope interaction.

  1. Two-Dimensional Study of Mass Outflow from Central Gravitational Astrophysical Object. Analytical 2-D solutions for thermo-radiatively driven stellar winds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakouris, A.

    The present PhD Thesis deals with the two-dimensional description of the plasma outflow from central astrophysical objects. The concept of stellar winds was originated by Eugene Parker 1958, and has become a very hot area of research the last decade. Mass outflow from all types of stars, as well as AGNs, quasars or planetary nebulae are observed in all astrophysical scales indicating at least two-dimensional (2-D) features (e.g. Hughes (editor), 1991, Beams and jets in astrophysics, Cambridge University Press). In a first stage, the flows are modeled empirically but their origin has to be in accordance with the fluid mechanics and the conservation laws. So, self-consistent 2-D models are needed (i.e. full solutions of the total set of equations which conserve mass, momentum and energy). The main mechanisms of ejecting plasma from an astrophysical object are the thermal (similar to solar wind), the radiative and the magnetic. Self consistent analytical 2-D steady hydrodynamic (HD) solutions for stellar winds have been presented by Tsinganos & Vlastou 1988, Tsinganos & Trussoni 1990, Tsinganos & Sauty 1992 and Lima & Priest 1993. Following their description we derive a new set of solutions in the present work. Our main assumptions are steady state (\\partial/\\partial t = 0), axisymmetry to the rotational axis (\\partial/\\partial \\phi = 0) and helicoidal geometry for the streamlines (meridional velocity {\\vec u}_{\\theta} = {\\vec 0} ). Besides, the fluid is assumed to be a nonmagnetized fully ionized hydrogen. The model could be named as non polytropic since we do not follow the polytropic assumption with a constant polytropic exponent but we evaluate the total external energy needed by the 1st law of Thermodynamics. Also, the solutions are \\theta-self similar since the dependence to the colatitude is given from the beginning. The generalized differential rotation of the fluid is taken into account considering a dependence of the rotational velocity of (V

  2. The influence of the charge-exchange reactions of carbon in the photoionization models for spectrum-line emitting region in the quasi-stellar objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Pellegrini, P.S. de.

    1976-08-01

    The charge exchange reactions: C +2 + H sub(e) 0 → H +1 + C +1 and C +2 + H 0 → H +1 + C +1 were taken into account in the ionization equilibrium of Carbon in photoionization models for line emitting regions of quasi-stellar objects. The new ionization structure of Carbon was obtained and the intensities of the most important emission lines of this element usually observed in QSO's with large redshifts were calculated. The charge exchange with Hidrogen produces negligible effects while the importance of taking into account the charge exchange with Helium can be seen from the change of the ionization structure of Carbon in all considered models. The homogeneous optically thin model is shown not to be consistent with the observations. For non homogeneous optically thick models observable changes in line intensities occur when in the region where charge exhange is dominant the electron density is high enough to produce collisional excitation and consequent line emission. (Author)

  3. Massive Young Stellar Object W42-MME: the Discovery of an Infrared Jet Using VLT/NACO Near-infrared Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Mayya, Y. D.; Luna, A.; Ojha, D. K.

    2015-04-01

    We report on the discovery of an infrared jet from a deeply embedded infrared counterpart of the 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission (MME) in W42 (i.e., W42-MME). We show that W42-MME drives a parsec-scale H2 outflow, with the detection of a bow shock feature at ˜0.52 pc to the north. The inner ˜0.4 pc part of the H2 outflow has a position angle of ˜18° and the position angle of ˜40° is found farther away on either side of the outflow from W42-MME. W42-MME is detected at wavelengths longer than 2.2 μm and is a massive young stellar object with an estimated stellar mass of 19 ± 4 {{M}⊙ }. We map the inner circumstellar environment of W42-MME using Very Large Telescope (VLT)/NACO adaptive optics Ks and L‧ observations at resolutions of ˜0.″ 2 and ˜0.″1, respectively. We discover a collimated jet in the inner 4500 AU using the L‧ band, which contains prominent Brα line emission. The jet is located inside an envelope/cavity (extent ˜10,640 AU) that is tapered at both ends and is oriented along the north-south direction. Such observed morphology of the outflow cavity around the massive star is scarcely known and is very crucial for understanding the jet-outflow formation process in massive star formation. Along the flow axis, which is parallel to the previously known magnetic field, two blobs are found in both the NACO images at distances of ˜11800 AU, located symmetrically from W42-MME. The observed W42-MME jet-outflow configuration can be used to constrain the jet launching and jet collimation models in massive star formation.

  4. A Snapshot Imaging Survey of Spitzer-selected Young Stellar Objects in Nearby Star Formation Regions*.t23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2015-10-01

    Young circumstellar disks are the dusty reservoirs in which planetary systems may eventually form. Previous HST imaging surveys have spatially resolved about twenty circumstellar disks around young stars in nearby molecular clouds. Providing key measurements of disk inclinations, outer radii, asymmetries, vertical thicknesses, and dust properties, these observations have supplied valuable constraints on theories of star and planet formation. Most of this prior work was based on source identifications made 30 years ago by the IRAS survey. With its improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, the Spitzer Space Telescope identified numerous new members of nearby star-forming regions that are optically visible, not yet observed with HST, and which possess infrared excess > 40 mJy at 24 microns (5 times fainter than the IRAS survey 25 micron sensitivity). This group of objects consists of low mass stars, young brown dwarfs, transition disks, and edge-on disks that obscure their central sources. We propose a high dynamic range ACS snapshot survey of this lower-luminosity young star population. Our goals are (1) to determine the frequency of disk detections in scattered light; (2) to measure disk sizes, internal structures, and constituent dust properties in order to test theories of protoplanetary disk evolution; (3) to identify the nearly edge-on systems which are particularly favorable for studies of disk geometry; and (4) to discover faint substellar companion objects. This survey will extend previous HST young star imaging of protoplanetary environments from a solar mass down to the substellar limit, revealing their nature and frequency in the galaxy.

  5. Blinded by the light: on the relationship between CO first overtone emission and mass accretion rate in massive young stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilee, J. D.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Wheelwright, H. E.; Pomohaci, R.

    2018-04-01

    To date, there is no explanation as to why disc-tracing CO first overtone (or `bandhead') emission is not a ubiquitous feature in low- to medium-resolution spectra of massive young stellar objects, but instead is only detected toward approximately 25 per cent of their spectra. In this paper, we investigate the hypothesis that only certain mass accretion rates result in detectable bandhead emission in the near infrared spectra of MYSOs. Using an analytic disc model combined with an LTE model of the CO emission, we find that high accretion rates (≳ 10-4 M⊙yr-1) result in large dust sublimation radii, a larger contribution to the K-band continuum from hot dust at the dust sublimation radius, and therefore correspondingly lower CO emission with respect to the continuum. On the other hand, low accretion rates (≲ 10-6 M⊙yr-1) result in smaller dust sublimation radii, a correspondingly smaller emitting area of CO, and thus also lower CO emission with respect to the continuum. In general, moderate accretion rates produce the most prominent, and therefore detectable, CO first overtone emission. We compare our findings to a recent near-infrared spectroscopic survey of MYSOs, finding results consistent with our hypothesis. We conclude that the detection rate of CO bandhead emission in the spectra of MYSOs could be the result of MYSOs exhibiting a range of mass accretion rates, perhaps due to the variable accretion suggested by recent multi-epoch observations of these objects.

  6. A FIRST LOOK AT THE AURIGA-CALIFORNIA GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD WITH HERSCHEL AND THE CSO: CENSUS OF THE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS AND THE DENSE GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, Paul M. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Fallscheer, Cassandra [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Ginsburg, Adam [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Terebey, Susan [Department of Physics and Astronomy PS315, 5151 State University Drive, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Andre, Philippe; Koenyves, Vera [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bourke, Tyler L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Di Francesco, James; Matthews, Brenda C. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Peterson, Dawn E., E-mail: pmh@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: Cassandra.Fallscheer@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: adam.ginsburg@colorado.edu, E-mail: sterebe@calstatela.edu, E-mail: pandre@cea.fr, E-mail: vera.konyves@cea.fr, E-mail: tbourke@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: James.DiFrancesco@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: Brenda.Matthews@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: dpeterson@spacescience.org [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    We have mapped the Auriga/California molecular cloud with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE cameras and the Bolocam 1.1 mm camera on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory with the eventual goal of quantifying the star formation and cloud structure in this giant molecular cloud (GMC) that is comparable in size and mass to the Orion GMC, but which appears to be forming far fewer stars. We have tabulated 60 compact 70/160 {mu}m sources that are likely pre-main-sequence objects and correlated those with Spitzer and WISE mid-IR sources. At 1.1 mm, we find 18 cold, compact sources and discuss their properties. The most important result from this part of our study is that we find a modest number of additional compact young objects beyond those identified at shorter wavelengths with Spitzer. We also describe the dust column density and temperature structure derived from our photometric maps. The column density peaks at a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (N {sub H2}) and is distributed in a clear filamentary structure along which nearly all of the pre-main-sequence objects are found. We compare the young stellar object surface density to the gas column density and find a strong nonlinear correlation between them. The dust temperature in the densest parts of the filaments drops to {approx}10 K from values {approx}14-15 K in the low-density parts of the cloud. We also derive the cumulative mass fraction and probability density function of material in the cloud, which we compare with similar data on other star-forming clouds.

  7. Identification of Stellar Sequences in Various Stellar Systems ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GIREESH C. JOSHI

    2017-11-27

    Nov 27, 2017 ... (CMRD) approach is used to separate the stellar sequences of cluster systems. The age, distance and reddening of each ... gravitational bound systems (Joshi & Tyagi 2015). Gen- erally, these objects are identified ...... identification of stellar clusters within embedded region of the Galactic disk and highly ...

  8. THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE SURVEY OF THE ORION A AND B MOLECULAR CLOUDS. II. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION AND DEMOGRAPHICS OF DUSTY YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megeath, S. T.; Kryukova, E.; Gutermuth, R.; Muzerolle, J.; Hora, J. L.; Myers, P. C.; Fazio, G. G.; Allen, L. E.; Flaherty, K.; Hartmann, L.; Pipher, J. L.; Stauffer, J.; Young, E. T.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the spatial distribution of dusty young stellar objects (YSOs) identified in the Spitzer Survey of the Orion Molecular clouds, augmenting these data with Chandra X-ray observations to correct for incompleteness in dense clustered regions. We also devise a scheme to correct for spatially varying incompleteness when X-ray data are not available. The local surface densities of the YSOs range from 1 pc −2 to over 10,000 pc −2 , with protostars tending to be in higher density regions. This range of densities is similar to other surveyed molecular clouds with clusters, but broader than clouds without clusters. By identifying clusters and groups as continuous regions with surface densities ≥10 pc −2 , we find that 59% of the YSOs are in the largest cluster, the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), while 13% of the YSOs are found in a distributed population. A lower fraction of protostars in the distributed population is evidence that it is somewhat older than the groups and clusters. An examination of the structural properties of the clusters and groups shows that the peak surface densities of the clusters increase approximately linearly with the number of members. Furthermore, all clusters with more than 70 members exhibit asymmetric and/or highly elongated structures. The ONC becomes azimuthally symmetric in the inner 0.1 pc, suggesting that the cluster is only ∼2 Myr in age. We find that the star formation efficiency (SFE) of the Orion B cloud is unusually low, and that the SFEs of individual groups and clusters are an order of magnitude higher than those of the clouds. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the young low mass stars in the Orion clouds and the Orion OB 1 association, and we determine upper limits to the fraction of disks that may be affected by UV radiation from OB stars or dynamical interactions in dense, clustered regions

  9. The Effect of Broadband Soft X-Rays in SO2-Containing Ices: Implications on the Photochemistry of Ices toward Young Stellar Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, S.; Bergantini, A.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the effects produced mainly by broadband soft X-rays up to 2 keV (plus fast (˜keV) photoelectrons and low-energy (˜eV) induced secondary electrons) in the ice mixtures containing H2O:CO2:NH3:SO2 (10:1:1:1) at two different temperatures (50 and 90 K). The experiments are an attempt to simulate the photochemical processes induced by energetic photons in SO2-containing ices present in cold environments in the ices surrounding young stellar objects (YSO) and in molecular clouds in the vicinity of star-forming regions, which are largely illuminated by soft X-rays. The measurements were performed using a high-vacuum portable chamber from the Laboratório de Astroquímica e Astrobiologia (LASA/UNIVAP) coupled to the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. In situ analyses were performed by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Sample processing revealed the formation of several organic molecules, including nitriles, acids, and other compounds such as H2O2, H3O+, SO3, CO, and OCN-. The dissociation cross section of parental species was on the order of (2-7) × 10-18 cm2. The ice temperature does not seem to affect the stability of SO2 in the presence of X-rays. Formation cross sections of new species produced were also determined. Molecular half-lives at ices toward YSOs due to the presence of incoming soft X-rays were estimated. The low values obtained employing two different models of the radiation field of YSOs (TW Hydra and typical T-Tauri star) reinforce that soft X-rays are indeed a very efficient source of molecular dissociation in such environments.

  10. Modeling CO, CO2, and H2O Ice Abundances in the Envelopes of Young Stellar Objects in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Tyler; Garrod, Robin T.

    2018-02-01

    Massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) in the Magellanic Clouds show infrared absorption features corresponding to significant abundances of CO, CO2, and H2O ice along the line of sight, with the relative abundances of these ices differing between the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way. CO ice is not detected toward sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud, and upper limits put its relative abundance well below sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud and the Milky Way. We use our gas-grain chemical code MAGICKAL, with multiple grain sizes and grain temperatures, and further expand it with a treatment for increased interstellar radiation field intensity to model the elevated dust temperatures observed in the MCs. We also adjust the elemental abundances used in the chemical models, guided by observations of H II regions in these metal-poor satellite galaxies. With a grid of models, we are able to reproduce the relative ice fractions observed in MC MYSOs, indicating that metal depletion and elevated grain temperature are important drivers of the MYSO envelope ice composition. Magellanic Cloud elemental abundances have a subgalactic C/O ratio, increasing H2O ice abundances relative to the other ices; elevated grain temperatures favor CO2 production over H2O and CO. The observed shortfall in CO in the Small Magellanic Cloud can be explained by a combination of reduced carbon abundance and increased grain temperatures. The models indicate that a large variation in radiation field strength is required to match the range of observed LMC abundances. CH3OH abundance is found to be enhanced in low-metallicity models, providing seed material for complex organic molecule formation in the Magellanic Clouds.

  11. Stellar formation

    CERN Document Server

    Reddish, V C

    1978-01-01

    Stellar Formation brings together knowledge about the formation of stars. In seeking to determine the conditions necessary for star formation, this book examines questions such as how, where, and why stars form, and at what rate and with what properties. This text also considers whether the formation of a star is an accident or an integral part of the physical properties of matter. This book consists of 13 chapters divided into two sections and begins with an overview of theories that explain star formation as well as the state of knowledge of star formation in comparison to stellar structure

  12. Stellar Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peletier, Reynier F.

    2013-01-01

    This is a summary of my lectures during the 2011 Canary Islands Winter School in Puerto de la Cruz. I give an introduction to the field of stellar populations in galaxies, and highlight some new results. Since the title of the Winter School is Secular Evolution in Galaxies I mostly concentrate on

  13. Gas-Grain Chemical Models: Inclusion of a Grain Size Distribution and a Study Of Young Stellar Objects in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Tyler Andrew

    2017-06-01

    Computational models of interstellar gas-grain chemistry have aided in our understanding of star-forming regions. Chemical kinetics models rely on a network of chemical reactions and a set of physical conditions in which atomic and molecular species are allowed to form and react. We replace the canonical single grain-size in our chemical model MAGICKAL with a grain size distribution and analyze the effects on the chemical composition of the gas and grain surface in quiescent and collapsing dark cloud models. We find that a grain size distribution coupled with a temperature distribution across grain sizes can significantly affect the bulk ice composition when dust temperatures fall near critical values related to the surface binding energies of common interstellar chemical species. We then apply the updated model to a study of ice formation in the cold envelopes surrounding massive young stellar objects in the Magellanic Clouds. The Magellanic Clouds are local satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, and they provide nearby environments to study star formation at low metallicity. We expand the model calculation of dust temperature to include a treatment for increased interstellar radiation field intensity; we vary the radiation field to model the elevated dust temperatures observed in the Magellanic Clouds. We also adjust the initial elemental abundances used in the model, guided by observations of Magellanic Cloud HII regions. We are able to reproduce the relative ice fractions observed, indicating that metal depletion and elevated grain temperature are important drivers of the envelope ice composition. The observed shortfall in CO in Small Magellanic Cloud sources can be explained by a combination of reduced carbon abundance and increased grain temperatures. The models indicate that a large variation in radiation field strength is required to match the range of observed LMC abundances. CH 3OH abundance is found to be enhanced (relative to total carbon abundance) in

  14. THE EFFECT OF BROADBAND SOFT X-RAYS IN SO{sub 2}-CONTAINING ICES: IMPLICATIONS ON THE PHOTOCHEMISTRY OF ICES TOWARD YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilling, S.; Bergantini, A., E-mail: sergiopilling@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade do Vale do Paraíba (UNIVAP), Laboratório de Astroquímica e Astrobiologia (LASA), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the effects produced mainly by broadband soft X-rays up to 2 keV (plus fast (∼keV) photoelectrons and low-energy (∼eV) induced secondary electrons) in the ice mixtures containing H{sub 2}O:CO{sub 2}:NH{sub 3}:SO{sub 2} (10:1:1:1) at two different temperatures (50 and 90 K). The experiments are an attempt to simulate the photochemical processes induced by energetic photons in SO{sub 2}-containing ices present in cold environments in the ices surrounding young stellar objects (YSO) and in molecular clouds in the vicinity of star-forming regions, which are largely illuminated by soft X-rays. The measurements were performed using a high-vacuum portable chamber from the Laboratório de Astroquímica e Astrobiologia (LASA/UNIVAP) coupled to the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. In situ analyses were performed by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Sample processing revealed the formation of several organic molecules, including nitriles, acids, and other compounds such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, H{sub 3}O{sup +}, SO{sub 3}, CO, and OCN{sup −}. The dissociation cross section of parental species was on the order of (2–7) × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2}. The ice temperature does not seem to affect the stability of SO{sub 2} in the presence of X-rays. Formation cross sections of new species  produced were also determined. Molecular half-lives at ices toward YSOs due to the presence of incoming soft X-rays were estimated. The low values obtained employing two different models of the radiation field of YSOs (TW Hydra and typical T-Tauri star) reinforce that soft X-rays are indeed a very efficient source of molecular dissociation in such environments.

  15. Stellar winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weymann, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    It is known that a steady outflow of material at comparable rates of mass loss but vastly different speeds is now known to be ubiquitous phenomenon among both the luminous hot stars and the luminous but cool red giants. The flows are probably massive enough in both cases to give rise to significant effects on stellar evolution and the mass balance between stars and the interstellar medium. The possible mechanisms for these phenomena as well as the methods of observation used are described. In particular, the mass-loss processes in stars other than the sun that also involve a steady flow of matter are considered. The evidence for their existence is described, and then the question of whether the process thought to produce the solar wind is also responsible for producing these stellar winds is explored

  16. Stellarator physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This document consists of the proceedings of the Seventh International Workshop on Stellarators, held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, 10-14 April, 1989. The document consists of a summary of presentations, an overview of experimental results, and papers presented at the workshop on transport, impurities and divertors, diagnostics, ECH confinement experiments, equilibrium and stability studies, RF heating, confinement, magnetic configurations, and new experiments. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. CENSUS OF BLUE STARS IN SDSS DR8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scibelli, Samantha; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yanny, Brian

    2014-01-01

    We present a census of the 12,060 spectra of blue objects ((g – r) 0 < –0.25) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). As part of the data release, all of the spectra were cross-correlated with 48 template spectra of stars, galaxies, and QSOs to determine the best match. We compared the blue spectra by eye to the templates assigned in SDSS DR8. 10,856 of the objects matched their assigned template, 170 could not be classified due to low signal-to-noise ratio, and 1034 were given new classifications. We identify 7458 DA white dwarfs, 1145 DB white dwarfs, 273 rarer white dwarfs (including carbon, DZ, DQ, and magnetic), 294 subdwarf O stars, 648 subdwarf B stars, 679 blue horizontal branch stars, 1026 blue stragglers, 13 cataclysmic variables, 129 white dwarf-M dwarf binaries, 36 objects with spectra similar to DO white dwarfs, 179, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), and 10 galaxies. We provide two tables of these objects, sample spectra that match the templates, figures showing all of the spectra that were grouped by eye, and diagnostic plots that show the positions, colors, apparent magnitudes, proper motions, etc., for each classification. Future surveys will be able to use templates similar to stars in each of the classes we identify to automatically classify blue stars, including rare types

  18. Objectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Daston, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    Objectivity has a history, and it is full of surprises. In Objectivity, Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison chart the emergence of objectivity in the mid-nineteenth-century sciences--and show how the concept differs from its alternatives, truth-to-nature and trained judgment. This is a story of lofty epistemic ideals fused with workaday practices in the making of scientific images. From the eighteenth through the early twenty-first centuries, the images that reveal the deepest commitments of the empirical sciences--from anatomy to crystallography--are those featured in scientific atlases, the compendia that teach practitioners what is worth looking at and how to look at it. Galison and Daston use atlas images to uncover a hidden history of scientific objectivity and its rivals. Whether an atlas maker idealizes an image to capture the essentials in the name of truth-to-nature or refuses to erase even the most incidental detail in the name of objectivity or highlights patterns in the name of trained judgment is a...

  19. Compact stellarator coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomphrey, N.; Berry, L.A.; Boozer, A.H.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental devices to study the physics of high-beta (β>∼4%), low aspect ratio (A<∼4.5) stellarator plasmas require coils that will produce plasmas satisfying a set of physics goals, provide experimental flexibility, and be practical to construct. In the course of designing a flexible coil set for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment, we have made several innovations that may be useful in future stellarator design efforts. These include: the use of Singular Value Decomposition methods for obtaining families of smooth current potentials on distant coil winding surfaces from which low current density solutions may be identified; the use of a Control Matrix Method for identifying which few of the many detailed elements of the stellarator boundary must be targeted if a coil set is to provide fields to control the essential physics of the plasma; the use of Genetic Algorithms for choosing an optimal set of discrete coils from a continuum of potential contours; the evaluation of alternate coil topologies for balancing the tradeoff between physics objective and engineering constraints; the development of a new coil optimization code for designing modular coils, and the identification of a 'natural' basis for describing current sheet distributions. (author)

  20. Ecology of blue straggler stars

    CERN Document Server

    Carraro, Giovanni; Beccari, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    The existence of blue straggler stars, which appear younger, hotter, and more massive than their siblings, is at odds with a simple picture of stellar evolution. Such stars should have exhausted their nuclear fuel and evolved long ago to become cooling white dwarfs. They are found to exist in globular clusters, open clusters, dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group, OB associations and as field stars. This book summarises the many advances in observational and theoretical work dedicated to blue straggler stars. Carefully edited extended contributions by well-known experts in the field cover all the relevant aspects of blue straggler stars research: Observations of blue straggler stars in their various environments; Binary stars and formation channels; Dynamics of globular clusters; Interpretation of observational data and comparison with models. The book also offers an introductory chapter on stellar evolution written by the editors of the book.

  1. Stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, A J

    2013-01-01

    Stellar Evolution, Second Edition covers the significant advances in the understanding of birth, life, and death of stars.This book is divided into nine chapters and begins with a description of the characteristics of stars according to their brightness, distance, size, mass, age, and chemical composition. The next chapters deal with the families, structure, and birth of stars. These topics are followed by discussions of the chemical composition and the evolution of main-sequence stars. A chapter focuses on the unique features of the sun as a star, including its evolution, magnetic fields, act

  2. WIRED for EC: New White Dwarfs with WISE Infrared Excesses and New Classification Schemes from the Edinburgh–Cape Blue Object Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennihy, E.; Clemens, J. C.; Dunlap, B. H.; O’Brien, P. C.; Fuchs, J. T.; Debes, John H.; Kilkenny, D.

    2017-01-01

    We present a simple method for identifying candidate white dwarf systems with dusty exoplanetary debris based on a single temperature blackbody model fit to the infrared excess. We apply this technique to a sample of Southern Hemisphere white dwarfs from the recently completed Edinburgh–Cape Blue Object Survey and identify four new promising dusty debris disk candidates. We demonstrate the efficacy of our selection method by recovering three of the four Spitzer confirmed dusty debris disk systems in our sample. Further investigation using archival high-resolution imaging shows that Spitzer data of the unrecovered fourth object is likely contaminated by a line-of-sight object that either led to a misclassification as a dusty disk in the literature or is confounding our method. Finally, in our diagnostic plot, we show that dusty white dwarfs, which also host gaseous debris, lie along a boundary of our dusty debris disk region, providing clues to the origin and evolution of these especially interesting systems.

  3. WIRED for EC: New White Dwarfs with WISE Infrared Excesses and New Classification Schemes from the Edinburgh–Cape Blue Object Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennihy, E.; Clemens, J. C.; Dunlap, B. H.; O’Brien, P. C.; Fuchs, J. T. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Debes, John H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kilkenny, D. [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2017-11-10

    We present a simple method for identifying candidate white dwarf systems with dusty exoplanetary debris based on a single temperature blackbody model fit to the infrared excess. We apply this technique to a sample of Southern Hemisphere white dwarfs from the recently completed Edinburgh–Cape Blue Object Survey and identify four new promising dusty debris disk candidates. We demonstrate the efficacy of our selection method by recovering three of the four Spitzer confirmed dusty debris disk systems in our sample. Further investigation using archival high-resolution imaging shows that Spitzer data of the unrecovered fourth object is likely contaminated by a line-of-sight object that either led to a misclassification as a dusty disk in the literature or is confounding our method. Finally, in our diagnostic plot, we show that dusty white dwarfs, which also host gaseous debris, lie along a boundary of our dusty debris disk region, providing clues to the origin and evolution of these especially interesting systems.

  4. Stellar astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Enhanced mass loss occurs at critical stages in the evolution of stars over a wide range of stellar mass. Observationally, these stages are difficult to identify because of their short duration and because the star is often obscured by dust which condenses in the ejecta. A study of a G-type star, of which only the outer envelope was directly visible, was undertaken by the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO). The star itself was obscured by dust clouds and its light was only feebly seen by reflection from some of these clouds. Other studies of the galaxy undertaken by the SAAO include observations of the following: the extreme carbon star IRAS 15194-5115; RV Tauri and T Tauri stars; pre-main sequence stars; the properties of circumstellar dust; rotational modulation and flares on RS CVn and BY Dra stars; heavy-element stars; hydrogen-deficient stars; the open cluster NGC6192; stars in Omega Centauri, and lunar occulations of stars. Simultaneous x-ray, radio and optical data of the flare star YZ CMi were also obtained. 1 fig

  5. THE ADVANCED STELLAR COMPASS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Liebe, Carl Christian

    1997-01-01

    The science objective of the Danish Geomagnetic Research Satellite "Ørsted" is to map the magnetic field of the Earth, with a vector precision of a fraction of a nanotesla. This necessitates an attitude reference instrument with a precision of a few arcseconds onboard the satellite. To meet...... this demand the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC), a fully autonomous miniature star tracker, was developed. This ASC is capable of both solving the "lost in space" problem and determine the attitude with arcseconds precision. The development, principles of operation and instrument autonomy of the ASC...

  6. Stellar Streams in the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, Nora; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Balbinot, Eduardo; DES Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    We present a search for Galactic stellar streams in the Dark Energy Survey (DES), using three years of optical data taken across 5000 sq. degrees of the southern sky. The wide-field, uniform DES photometry provides unprecedented sensitivity to the stellar density field in the southern hemisphere, allowing for the detection of faint stellar populations. We follow the “Field of Streams” procedure developed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Belokurov et al., 2006) to identify stellar density features such as dwarf galaxies, globular clusters, and the stellar streams resulting from the tidal disruption of these objects. Improved analysis techniques applied to the DES data enable the discovery of new stellar streams, and provide added insight into the origin and stellar populations of previously identified objects. An increased sample size together with detailed characterization of individual stellar streams and their progenitors can inform our understanding of the formation of the Milky Way stellar halo, as well as the large and small scale distribution of dark matter in the Milky Way.

  7. Stellar axion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowakowski, Daniel; Kuster, Markus; Meister, Claudia V.; Fuelbert, Florian; Hoffmann, Dieter H.H. [TU Darmstadt (Germany). Institut fuer Kernphysik; Weiss, Achim [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Garching (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    An axion helioscope is typically operated to observe the sun as an axion source. Additional pointings at celestial sources, e.g. stars in other galaxies, result in possible detections of axions from distant galactic objects. For the observation of supplementary axion sources we therefore calculate the thereotical axion flux from distant stars by extending axionic flux models for the axion Primakoff effect in the sun to other main sequence stars. The main sequence star models used for our calculations are based on full stellar structure calculations. To deduce the effective axion flux of stellar objects incident on the Earth the All-Sky catalogue was used to obtain the spectral class and distance of the stars treated. Our calculations of the axion flux in the galactic plane show that for a zero age main sequence star an maximum axion flux of {phi}{sub a}=303.43 cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} could be expected. Furthermore we present estimates of axion fluxes from time-evolved stars.

  8. Population statistics of faint stellar and non-stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbergh, S.

    1979-01-01

    A disc and halo population model is constructed to fit star counts and color data down to V approximately 23 at absolute value of b = 90 deg. This model is used to predict star counts and colors down to V approximately 30. Deviations from these extrapolated relationships provide constraints on the number of faint quasars and black dwarf stars. It is shown that extra-galactic globular clusters start contributing significantly to star counts at V approximately 25 and are more numerous than stars for V 31. Morphological studies of galaxies with approximately 0.5, were made with the space telescope. Significant constraints on theoretical models that describe the evolution of clusters of galaxies are provided.

  9. The ORNL stellarator program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.

    1986-11-01

    The main focus of magnetic confinement studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is stellarator research. The principal elements of the ORNL stellarator program are the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), stellarator theory, and related plasma technology development. These elements are discussed breifly. 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Blue lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Caterina; Scope, Alon; Lallas, Aimilios; Zalaudek, Iris; Moscarella, Elvira; Gardini, Stefano; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    Blue color is found in a wide range of malignant and benign melanocytic and nonmelanocytic lesions and in lesions that result from penetration of exogenous materials, such as radiation or amalgam tattoo or traumatic penetration of particles. Discriminating between different diagnostic entities that display blue color relies on careful patient examination and lesion assessment. Dermoscopically, the extent, distribution, and patterns created by blue color can help diagnose lesions with specificity and differentiate between benign and malignant entities. This article provides an overview of the main diagnoses whereby blue color can be found, providing simple management rules for these lesions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The “Building Blocks” of Stellar Halos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle A. Oman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The stellar halos of galaxies encode their accretion histories. In particular, the median metallicity of a halo is determined primarily by the mass of the most massive accreted object. We use hydrodynamical cosmological simulations from the apostle project to study the connection between the stellar mass, the metallicity distribution, and the stellar age distribution of a halo and the identity of its most massive progenitor. We find that the stellar populations in an accreted halo typically resemble the old stellar populations in a present-day dwarf galaxy with a stellar mass ∼0.2–0.5 dex greater than that of the stellar halo. This suggests that had they not been accreted, the primary progenitors of stellar halos would have evolved to resemble typical nearby dwarf irregulars.

  12. Stellar structure and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kippernhahn, R.; Weigert, A.

    1990-01-01

    This book introduces the theory of the internal structure of stars and their evolution in time. It presents the basic physics of stellar interiors, methods for solving the underlying equations, and the most important results necessary for understanding the wide variety of stellar types and phenomena. The evolution of stars is discussed from their birth through normal evolution to possibly spectacular final stages. Chapters on stellar oscillations and rotation are included

  13. Quark matter formation in dense stellar objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hadron phase tran- sition takes place. Lattice QCD calculations at zero baryon density indicate that the transition occurs at Tc. 150–170 MeV. The transition is likely to be second order or a cross over phenomenon. Although not much is known ...

  14. Quark matter formation in dense stellar objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Although not much is known about the density at which the phase transition takes place at small temperatures, it is expected to occur around the nuclear densities of few times nuclear matter density. Also, there is a strong reason to believe that the quark matter formed after the phase transition is in colour superconducting ...

  15. Quark matter formation in dense stellar objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is expected that at very large densities and/or temperatures a quark-hadron phase transition takes place. Lattice QCD calculations at zero baryon density indicate that the transition occurs at c∼ 150-170 MeV. The transition is likely to be second order or a cross over phenomenon. Although not much is known about the ...

  16. Quark matter formation in dense stellar objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    equilibrium are computed here. Our calculations show that the chemical equilibrium is reached in about 10-7 seconds. Further more during the equilibration process enormous amont of energy is released and copious numbers of neutrinos are produced. Implications of these on the evolution of supernovae will be discussed ...

  17. Stellar Physics 2: Stellar Evolution and Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Gennady S

    2011-01-01

    "Stellar Physics" is a an outstanding book in the growing body of literature on star formation and evolution. Not only does the author, a leading expert in the field, very thoroughly present the current state of knowledge on stellar physics, but he handles with equal care the many problems that this field of research still faces. A bibliography with well over 1000 entries makes this book an unparalleled reference source. "Stellar Evolution and Stability" is the second of two volumes and can be read, as can the first volume "Fundamental Concepts and Stellar Equilibrium," as a largely independent work. It traces in great detail the evolution of protostars towards the main sequence and beyond this to the last stage of stellar evolution, with the corresponding vast range from white dwarfs to supernovae explosions, gamma-ray bursts and black hole formation. The book concludes with special chapters on the dynamical, thermal and pulsing stability of stars. This second edition is carefully updated in the areas of pre...

  18. FSPS: Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Charlie; Gunn, James E.

    2010-10-01

    FSPS is a flexible SPS package that allows the user to compute simple stellar populations (SSPs) for a range of IMFs and metallicities, and for a variety of assumptions regarding the morphology of the horizontal branch, the blue straggler population, the post-AGB phase, and the location in the HR diagram of the TP-AGB phase. From these SSPs the user may then generate composite stellar populations (CSPs) for a variety of star formation histories (SFHs) and dust attenuation prescriptions. Outputs include the "observed" spectra and magnitudes of the SSPs and CSPs at arbitrary redshift. In addition to these fortran routines, several IDL routines are provided that allow easy manipulation of the output. FSPS was designed with the intention that the user would make full use of the provided fortran routines. However, the full FSPS package is quite large, and requires some time for the user to become familiar with all of the options and syntax. Some users may only need SSPs for a range of metallicities and IMFs. For such users, standard SSP sets for several IMFs, evolutionary tracks, and spectral libraries are available here.

  19. The Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy IZw18

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musella, I.; Marconi, M.; Fiorentino, G.; Clementini, G.; Aloisi, A.; Annibali, F.; Contreras, R.; Saha, A.; Tosi, M.; van der Marel, R. P.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results obtained for the Blue compact galaxy IZw18 on the basis of ACS HST data obtained from our group. In particular, we discuss the stellar population and the variable stars content of this galaxy to get information about its star formation history and distance.

  20. Stability in straight stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Yoshikawa, S.

    1981-07-01

    The stability of the straight stellarator against localized interchange modes is investigated employing the Mercier-Greene-Johnson criterion. Critical values of β are obtained both numerically and analytically. The conclusion is that for classical helical stellarators the average limiting β's are quite low of order three to four percent

  1. Stellar photometry and polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golay, M.; Serkowski, K.

    1976-01-01

    A critical review of progress made in stellar photometry and polarimetry over the period 1973-1975 is presented. Reports of photometric measurements from various observatories throughout the world are summarized. The summary of work on stellar polarimetry lists the review papers, the catalogues and lists of standard stars, and descriptions of new observing techniques. (B.R.H.)

  2. Clues from stellar catastrophes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rimoldi, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This thesis uses catastrophic stellar events (supernovae and stellar collisions) to investigate different aspects of their environment. The first part of the thesis examines what happens to supernova remnants near supermassive black holes like the one in the Milky Way Galaxy. To do so, a technique

  3. Compact stellarators as reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Valanju, P.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Hirshman, S.; Spong, D.A.; Strickler, D.; Williamson, D.E.; Ware, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two types of compact stellarators are examined as reactors: two- and three-field-period (M=2 and 3) quasi-axisymmetric devices with volume-average =4-5% and M=2 and 3 quasi-poloidal devices with =10-15%. These low-aspect-ratio stellarator-tokamak hybrids differ from conventional stellarators in their use of the plasma-generated bootstrap current to supplement the poloidal field from external coils. Using the ARIES-AT model with B max =12T on the coils gives Compact Stellarator reactors with R=7.3-8.2m, a factor of 2-3 smaller R than other stellarator reactors for the same assumptions, and neutron wall loadings up to 3.7MWm -2 . (author)

  4. Blue gods, blue oil, and blue people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, V F

    1994-09-01

    Studies of the composition of coal tar, which began in Prussia in 1834, profoundly affected the economies of Germany, Great Britain, India, and the rest of the world, as well as medicine and surgery. Such effects include the collapse of the profits of the British indigo monopoly, the growth in economic power of Germany based on coal tar chemistry, and an economic crisis in India that led to more humane tax laws and, ultimately, the independence of India and the end of the British Empire. Additional consequences were the development of antiseptic surgery and the synthesis of a wide variety of useful drugs that have eradicated infections and alleviated pain. Many of these drugs, particularly the commonly used analgesics, sulfonamides, sulfones, and local anesthetics, are derivatives of aniline, originally called "blue oil" or "kyanol." Some of these aniline derivatives, however, have also caused aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis, and methemoglobinemia (that is, "blue people"). Exposure to aniline drugs, particularly when two or three aniline drugs are taken concurrently, seems to be the commonest cause of methemoglobinemia today.

  5. Stellar evolution as seen by mixed modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosser Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of mixed modes in subgiants and red giants allows us to monitor stellar evolution from the main sequence to the asymptotic giant branch and draw seismic evolutionary tracks. Quantified asteroseismic definitions that characterize the change in the evolutionary stages have been defined. This seismic information can now be used for stellar modelling, especially for studying the energy transport in the helium burning core or for specifying the inner properties of stars all along their evolution. Modelling will also allow us to study stars identified in the helium subflash stage, high-mass stars either arriving or quitting the secondary clump, or stars that could be in the blue-loop stage.

  6. Principles of Stellar Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Glindemann, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, stellar interferometry has developed from a specialist tool to a mainstream observing technique, attracting scientists whose research benefits from milliarcsecond angular resolution. Stellar interferometry has become part of the astronomer’s toolbox, complementing single-telescope observations by providing unique capabilities that will advance astronomical research. This carefully written book is intended to provide a solid understanding of the principles of stellar interferometry to students starting an astronomical research project in this field or to develop instruments and to astronomers using interferometry but who are not interferometrists per se. Illustrated by excellent drawings and calculated graphs the imaging process in stellar interferometers is explained starting from first principles on light propagation and diffraction wave propagation through turbulence is described in detail using Kolmogorov statistics the impact of turbulence on the imaging process is discussed both f...

  7. Stellar Chromospheric Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Jeffrey C.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Sun, stars similar to it, and many rather dissimilar to it, have chromospheres, regions classically viewed as lying above the brilliant photosphere and characterized by a positive temperature gradient and a marked departure from radiative equilibrium. Stellar chromospheres exhibit a wide range of phenomena collectively called activity, stemming largely from the time evolution of their magnetic fields and the mass flux and transfer of radiation through the complex magnetic topology and the increasingly optically thin plasma of the outer stellar atmosphere. In this review, I will (1 outline the development of our understanding of chromospheric structure from 1960 to the present, (2 discuss the major observational programs and theoretical lines of inquiry, (3 review the origin and nature of both solar and stellar chromospheric activity and its relationship to, and effect on, stellar parameters including total energy output, and (4 summarize the outstanding problems today.

  8. Advanced Stellar Compass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta

    1997-01-01

    This document describes all interface properties for the Advanced Stellar Compass, developed for the German Research Satellite "CHAMP". Basic operations, modes, software protocol, calibration methods and closed loop test strategies are described.......This document describes all interface properties for the Advanced Stellar Compass, developed for the German Research Satellite "CHAMP". Basic operations, modes, software protocol, calibration methods and closed loop test strategies are described....

  9. Binary Populations and Stellar Dynamics in Young Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbeveren, D.; Belkus, H.; Van Bever, J.; Mennekens, N.

    2008-06-01

    We first summarize work that has been done on the effects of binaries on theoretical population synthesis of stars and stellar phenomena. Next, we highlight the influence of stellar dynamics in young clusters by discussing a few candidate UFOs (unconventionally formed objects) like intermediate mass black holes, η Car, ζ Pup, γ2 Velorum and WR 140.

  10. The Advanced Stellar Compass onboard the Oersted satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Eisenman, Allan R.; Liebe, Carl Christian

    1997-01-01

    In 1997 the first Danish satellite will be launched. The primarily scientific objective of the satellite is to map the magnetic field of the Earth. The attitude of the satellite is determined by an advanced stellar compass (star tracker). An advanced stellar compass consists of a CCD camera conne...

  11. PREFACE: A Stellar Journey A Stellar Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, M.

    2008-10-01

    The conference A Stellar Journey was held in Uppsala, Sweden, 23 27June 2008, in honour of Professor Bengt Gustafsson's 65th birthday. The choice of Uppsala as the location for this event was obvious given Bengt's long-standing association with the city stemming back to his school days. With the exception of a two-year postdoc stint in Copenhagen, five years as professor at Stockholm University and two years as director of the Sigtuna foundation, Bengt has forged his illustrious professional career at Uppsala University. The symposium venue was Museum Gustavianum, once the main building of the oldest university in Scandinavia. The title of the symposium is a paraphrasing of Bengt's popular astronomy book Kosmisk Resa (in English: Cosmic Journey) written in the early eighties. I think this aptly symbolizes his career that has been an astronomical voyage from near to far, from the distant past to the present. The original book title was modified slightly to reflect that most of his work to date has dealt with stars in one way or another. In addition it also gives credit to Bengt's important role as a guiding light for a very large number of students, colleagues and collaborators, indeed for several generations of astronomers. For me personally, the book Kosmisk Resa bears particular significance as it has shaped my life rather profoundly. Although I had already decided to become an astronomer, when I first read the book as a 14-year-old I made up my mind then and there that I would study under Bengt Gustafsson and work on stars. Indeed I have remained true to this somewhat audacious resolution. I suspect that a great number of us have similar stories how Bengt has had a major influence on our lives, whether on the professional or personal level. Perhaps Bengt's most outstanding characteristic is his enthralling enthusiasm. This is equally true whether he is pondering some scientific conundrum, supervising students or performing in front of an audience, be it an

  12. Stellar magnetic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrijver, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    The stellar emission in the chromospheric Ca II H+K lines is compared with the coronal soft X-ray emission, measuring the effects of non-radiative heating in the outer atmosphere at temperatures differing two orders of magnitude. The comparison of stellar flux densities in Ca II H+K and X-rays is extended to fluxes from the transition-region and the high-temperature chromosphere. The stellar magnetic field is probably generated in the differentially rotating convective envelope. The relation between rotation rate and the stellar level of activity measured in chromospheric, transition-region, and coronal radiative diagnostics is discovered. X-ray observations of the binary λ Andromedae are discussed. The departure of M-type dwarfs from the main relations, and the implications for the structure of the chromospheres of these stars are discussed. Variations of the average surface flux densities of the Sun during the 11-year activity cycle agree with flux-flux relations derived for other cool stars, suggesting that the interpretation of the stellar relations may be furthered by studying the solar analogue in more detail. (Auth.)

  13. Introduction to stellar structure

    CERN Document Server

    Maciel, Walter J

    2016-01-01

    In the first part of this book, the author presents the basic properties of the stellar interior and describes them thoroughly, along with deriving the main stellar structure equations of temperature, density, pressure and luminosity, among others. The process and application of solving these equations is explained, as well as linking these results with actual observations.  The second part of the text describes what happens to a star over time, and how to determine this by solving the same equations at different points during a star’s lifetime. The fate of various stars is quite different depending on their masses, and this is described in the final parts of the book. This text can be used for an upper level undergraduate course or an introductory graduate course on stellar physics.

  14. Posthuman blues

    CERN Document Server

    Tonnies, Mac

    2013-01-01

    Posthuman Blues, Vol. I is first volume of the edited version of the popular weblog maintained by author Mac Tonnies from 2003 until his tragic death in 2009. Tonnies' blog was a pastiche of his original fiction, reflections on his day-to-day life, trenchant observations of current events, and thoughts on an eclectic range of material he culled from the Internet. What resulted was a remarkably broad portrait of a thoughtful man and the complex times in which he lived, rendered with intellige...

  15. The Space Stellar Photometry Mission COROT: Asteroseismology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The main scientific objectives, asteroseismology and search for extrasolar planets for the COROT photometric mission are presented, and its interest in terms of stellar variability. A description of the payload, details of the scientific program, the ground based preparatory observations and bibliography can ...

  16. The Resolved Stellar Population of Leo A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoy, Eline

    1996-05-01

    New observations of the resolved stellar population of the extremely metal-poor Magellanic dwarf irregular galaxy Leo A in Thuan-Gunn r, g, i, and narrowband Hα filters are presented. Using the recent Cepheid variable star distance determination to Leo A by Hoessel et al., we are able to create an accurate color-magnitude diagram (CMD). We have used the Bavesian inference method described by Tolstoy & Saha to calculate the likelihood of a Monte Carlo simulation of the stellar population of Leo A being a good match to the data within the well understood errors in the data. The magnitude limits on our data are sensitive enough to look back at ~1 Gyr of star formation history at the distance of Leo A. To explain the observed ratio of red to blue stars in the observed CMD, it is necessary to invoke either a steadily decreasing star formation rate toward the present time or gaps in the star formation history. We also compare the properties of the observed stellar population with the known spatial distribution of the H I gas and H II regions to support the conclusions from CMD modeling. We consider the possibility that currently there is a period of diminished star formation in Leo A, as evidenced by the lack of very young stars in the CMD and the faint H II regions. How the chaotic H I distribution, with no observable rotation, fits into our picture of the evolution of Leo A is as yet unclear.

  17. Measurement of the abundance of stellar mass compact objects in the galactic halo by detecting micro-lenses in the Large Magellanic Cloud; Mesure de l'abondance des astres sombres de masse stellaire dans le halo galactique par la recherche de phenomenes de microlentilles vers les nuages de magellan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasserre, Th

    2000-05-09

    Many experimental and theoretical results lead to the conclusion that at least 80 percent of the mass of our Galaxy is dark. Part of this so-called dark matter could be in the form of stellar mass compact objects, called MACHOS; these could be detected using the gravitational microlensing effect. The first generation experiments EROS1 and MACHO have strongly constrained the galactic abundance of objects lighter than 0.01 solar mass to less than 10 percent of the total mass. In parallel, the observation by the MACHO group of massive candidates (half the Sun's mass), numerous enough to constitute 50 percent of galactic dark matter, was a further motivation for the EROS group to extend this search to stellar mass objects in a second phase, EROS2. The present work deals with the analysis of 25 million stellar light curves in the Large Magellanic Cloud, observed for three years in order to extract the rare microlensing candidates and to measure the galactic halo mass fraction in the form of compact objects. After recalling the motivations of this search and the theoretical context, I describe the EROS2 experiment. The observational strategy and the photometric reduction procedures needed to deal with the 1.2 To of data are then presented. A new method to detect micro-lenses is detailed, as well as a discussion of background light curves, poorly known. We do not find enough microlensing candidates to explain the galactic rotation curve; this confirms, and improve on previous EROS1 and EROS2 results. Combining all results from EROS allows to exclude that MACHOS with a mass between 10 e-7 and 10 solar mass are important constituents of the galactic halo. This statement agrees with recent results from the MACHO group, although our interpretations differ, namely on the topics of the location of the lenses, and of a possible contamination of the microlensing ample by background phenomena. (author)

  18. 8. stellarator workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The technical reports in this collection of papers were presented at the 8th International Workshop on Stellarators, and International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Committee Meeting. They include presentations on transport, magnetic configurations, fluctuations, equilibrium, stability, edge plasma and wall aspects, heating, diagnostics, new concepts and reactor studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Stellar Structure and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kippenhahn, Rudolf; Weiss, Achim

    2013-01-01

    This long-awaited second edition of the classical textbook on Stellar Structure and Evolution by Kippenhahn and Weigert is a thoroughly revised version of the original text. Taking into account modern observational constraints as well as additional physical effects such as mass loss and diffusion, Achim Weiss and Rudolf Kippenhahn have succeeded in bringing the book up to the state-of-the-art with respect to both the presentation of stellar physics and the presentation and interpretation of current sophisticated stellar models. The well-received and proven pedagogical approach of the first edition has been retained. The book provides a comprehensive treatment of the physics of the stellar interior and the underlying fundamental processes and parameters. The models developed to explain the stability, dynamics and evolution of the stars are presented and great care is taken to detail the various stages in a star’s life. Just as the first edition, which remained a standard work for more than 20 years after its...

  20. The galaxy population of Abell 1367: the stellar mass-metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouhcine, M.; Kriwattanawong, W.; James, P. A.

    2011-04-01

    Using wide baseline broad-band photometry, we analyse the stellar population properties of a sample of 72 galaxies, spanning a wide range of stellar masses and morphological types, in the nearby spiral-rich and dynamically young galaxy cluster Abell 1367. The sample galaxies are distributed from the cluster centre out to approximately half the cluster Abell radius. The optical/near-infrared colours are compared with simple stellar population synthesis models from which the luminosity-weighted stellar population ages and metallicities are determined. The locus of the colours of elliptical galaxies traces a sequence of varying metallicity at a narrow range of luminosity-weighted stellar ages. Lenticular galaxies in the red sequence, however, exhibit a substantial spread of luminosity-weighted stellar metallicities and ages. For red-sequence lenticular galaxies and blue cloud galaxies, low-mass galaxies tend to be on average dominated by stellar populations of younger luminosity-weighted ages. Sample galaxies exhibit a strong correlation between integrated stellar mass and luminosity-weighted stellar metallicity. Galaxies with signs of morphological disturbance and ongoing star formation activity, tend to be underabundant with respect to passive galaxies in the red sequence of comparable stellar masses. We argue that this could be due to tidally driven gas flows towards the star-forming regions, carrying less enriched gas and diluting the pre-existing gas to produce younger stellar populations with lower metallicities than would be obtained prior to the interaction. Finally, we find no statistically significant evidence for changes in the luminosity-weighted ages and metallicities for either red-sequence or blue-cloud galaxies, at fixed stellar mass, with location within the cluster. We dedicate this work to the memory of our friend and colleague C. Moss who died suddenly recently.

  1. Stellar Pulsations and Stellar Evolution: Conflict, Cohabitation, or Symbiosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Achim

    While the analysis of stellar pulsations allows the determination of current properties of a star, stellar evolution models connect it with its previous history. In many cases results from both methods do not agree. In this review some classical and current cases of disagreement are presented. In some cases these conflicts led to an improvement of the theory of stellar evolution, while in others they still remain unsolved. Some well-known problems of stellar physics are pointed out as well, for which it is hoped that seismology—or in general the analysis of stellar pulsations—will help to resolve them. The limits of this symbiosis will be discussed as well.

  2. Stellar Astrophysics with Arcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Wolk, Scott; Schulz, Norbert; Foster, Adam; Brenneman, Laura; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Arcus Team

    2018-01-01

    The Arcus mission is now in Phase A of the NASA Medium-Class Explorer competition. We present here the Arcus science case for stellar astrophysics. With spectral resolving power of at least 2500 and effective area greater than 400 cm^2, Arcus will measure new diagnostic lines, e.g. for H- and He-like ions of oxygen and other elements. Weak dielectronic recombination lines will provide sensitive measurements of temperature to test stellar coronal heating models. Arcus will also resolve the coronal and accretion line components in young accreting stars, allowing detailed studies of accretion shocks and their post-shock behavior. Arcus can resolve line shapes and variability in hot star winds to study inhomogeneities and dynamics of wind structure. Such profiles will provide an independent measure of mass loss rates, for which theoretical and observational discrepancies can reach an order of magnitude. Arcus will also study exoplanet atmospheres through X-ray absorption, determing their extent and composition.

  3. Convection and stellar oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarslev, Magnus Johan

    2017-01-01

    energy exchange between convection and pulsations, i.e. the modal part of the surface effect. Studying excitation and damping mechanisms requires a non-adiabatic treatment. A major part of my research has been modelling damping rates of red giant stars observed by {\\Kp}. The basis for the non...... atmospheres to replace the outer layers of stellar models. The additional turbulent pressure and asymmetrical opacity effects in the atmosphere model, compared to convection in stellar evolution models, serve to expand the atmosphere. The enlarged acoustic cavity lowers the pulsation frequencies bringing them....... However, the effects are barely prominent enough to be distinguishable with today's observational precision. But it does provide means of determining the mixing-length and enables consistent patching. The previously mentioned investigations are based on adiabatic frequency calculations, which neglect...

  4. Testing stellar evolution models with detached eclipsing binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higl, J.; Weiss, A.

    2017-12-01

    Stellar evolution codes, as all other numerical tools, need to be verified. One of the standard stellar objects that allow stringent tests of stellar evolution theory and models, are detached eclipsing binaries. We have used 19 such objects to test our stellar evolution code, in order to see whether standard methods and assumptions suffice to reproduce the observed global properties. In this paper we concentrate on three effects that contain a specific uncertainty: atomic diffusion as used for standard solar model calculations, overshooting from convective regions, and a simple model for the effect of stellar spots on stellar radius, which is one of the possible solutions for the radius problem of M dwarfs. We find that in general old systems need diffusion to allow for, or at least improve, an acceptable fit, and that systems with convective cores indeed need overshooting. Only one system (AI Phe) requires the absence of it for a successful fit. To match stellar radii for very low-mass stars, the spot model proved to be an effective approach, but depending on model details, requires a high percentage of the surface being covered by spots. We briefly discuss improvements needed to further reduce the freedom in modelling and to allow an even more restrictive test by using these objects.

  5. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Allende Prieto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  6. Active Luminous Blue Variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walborn, Nolan R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gamen, Roberto C.; Lajús, Eduardo Fernández [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata, CONICET–UNLP and Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, UNLP, Paseo del Bosque s/n, La Plata (Argentina); Morrell, Nidia I. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Barbá, Rodolfo H. [Departamento de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de La Serena, Cisternas 1200 Norte, La Serena (Chile); Angeloni, Rodolfo, E-mail: walborn@stsci.edu, E-mail: rgamen@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: eflajus@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: nmorrell@lco.cl, E-mail: rbarba@dfuls.cl, E-mail: rangelon@gemini.edu [Gemini Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2017-07-01

    We present extensive spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of two famous and currently highly active luminous blue variables (LBVs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), together with more limited coverage of three further, lesser known members of the class. R127 was discovered as an Ofpe/WN9 star in the 1970s but entered a classical LBV outburst in or about 1980 that is still in progress, thus enlightening us about the minimum state of such objects. R71 is currently the most luminous star in the LMC and continues to provide surprises, such as the appearance of [Ca ii] emission lines, as its spectral type becomes unprecedentedly late. Most recently, R71 has developed inverse P Cyg profiles in many metal lines. The other objects are as follows: HDE 269582, now a “second R127” that has been followed from Ofpe/WN9 to A type in its current outburst; HDE 269216, which changed from late B in 2014 to AF in 2016, its first observed outburst; and R143 in the 30 Doradus outskirts. The light curves and spectroscopic transformations are correlated in remarkable detail and their extreme reproducibility is emphasized, both for a given object and among all of them. It is now believed that some LBVs proceed directly to core collapse. One of these unstable LMC objects may thus oblige in the near future, teaching us even more about the final stages of massive stellar evolution.

  7. Active Luminous Blue Variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Gamen, Roberto C.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Barbá, Rodolfo H.; Fernández Lajús, Eduardo; Angeloni, Rodolfo

    2017-07-01

    We present extensive spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of two famous and currently highly active luminous blue variables (LBVs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), together with more limited coverage of three further, lesser known members of the class. R127 was discovered as an Ofpe/WN9 star in the 1970s but entered a classical LBV outburst in or about 1980 that is still in progress, thus enlightening us about the minimum state of such objects. R71 is currently the most luminous star in the LMC and continues to provide surprises, such as the appearance of [Ca II] emission lines, as its spectral type becomes unprecedentedly late. Most recently, R71 has developed inverse P Cyg profiles in many metal lines. The other objects are as follows: HDE 269582, now a “second R127” that has been followed from Ofpe/WN9 to A type in its current outburst; HDE 269216, which changed from late B in 2014 to AF in 2016, its first observed outburst; and R143 in the 30 Doradus outskirts. The light curves and spectroscopic transformations are correlated in remarkable detail and their extreme reproducibility is emphasized, both for a given object and among all of them. It is now believed that some LBVs proceed directly to core collapse. One of these unstable LMC objects may thus oblige in the near future, teaching us even more about the final stages of massive stellar evolution.

  8. Active Luminous Blue Variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Gamen, Roberto C.; Lajús, Eduardo Fernández; Morrell, Nidia I.; Barbá, Rodolfo H.; Angeloni, Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    We present extensive spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of two famous and currently highly active luminous blue variables (LBVs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), together with more limited coverage of three further, lesser known members of the class. R127 was discovered as an Ofpe/WN9 star in the 1970s but entered a classical LBV outburst in or about 1980 that is still in progress, thus enlightening us about the minimum state of such objects. R71 is currently the most luminous star in the LMC and continues to provide surprises, such as the appearance of [Ca ii] emission lines, as its spectral type becomes unprecedentedly late. Most recently, R71 has developed inverse P Cyg profiles in many metal lines. The other objects are as follows: HDE 269582, now a “second R127” that has been followed from Ofpe/WN9 to A type in its current outburst; HDE 269216, which changed from late B in 2014 to AF in 2016, its first observed outburst; and R143 in the 30 Doradus outskirts. The light curves and spectroscopic transformations are correlated in remarkable detail and their extreme reproducibility is emphasized, both for a given object and among all of them. It is now believed that some LBVs proceed directly to core collapse. One of these unstable LMC objects may thus oblige in the near future, teaching us even more about the final stages of massive stellar evolution.

  9. Teaching stellar interferometry with polymer optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illarramendi, M. A.; Arregui, L.; Zubia, J.; Hueso, R.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.

    2017-08-01

    In this manuscript we show the design of a simple experiment that reproduces the operation of the Michelson stellar interferometer by using step-index polymer optical fibers. The emission of stellar sources, single or binary stars, has been simulated by the laser light emerging from the output surface of the 2 meter-long polymer optical fiber. This light has an emission pattern that is similar to the emission pattern of stellar sources - circular, uniform, spatially incoherent, and quasi-monochromatic. Light coming from the fiber end faces passes through two identical pinholes located on a lid covering the objective of a small telescope, thus producing interference. Interference fringes have been acquired using a camera that is coupled to a telescope. The experiments have been carried out both outdoors in the daytime and indoors. By measuring the fringe visibilities, we have determined the size of our artificial stellar sources and the distance between them, when placing them at distances of 54 m from the telescope in the indoor measurements and of 75 m in the outdoor ones.

  10. [Anaphylaxis to blue dyes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner-Viviani, F; Chappuis, S; Bergmann, M M; Ribi, C

    2014-04-16

    In medicine, vital blue dyes are mainly used for the evaluation of sentinel lymph nodes in oncologic surgery. Perioperative anaphylaxis to blue dyes is a rare but significant complication. Allergic reactions to blue dyes are supposedly IgE-mediated and mainly caused by triarylmethanes (patent blue and isosulfane blue) and less frequently by methylene blue. These substances usually do not feature on the anesthesia record and should not be omitted from the list of suspects having caused the perioperative reaction, in the same manner as latex and chlorhexidine. The diagnosis of hypersensitivity to vital blue dyes can be established by skin test. We illustrate this topic with three clinical cases.

  11. Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David; Laskin, Robert; Shao, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory stand ready to advance science sensor technology for discrete-aperture astronomical instruments such as space-based optical interferometers. The objective of the Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE) is to demonstrate system-level functionality of a space-based stellar interferometer through the use of enabling and enhancing Controlled-Structures Technologies (CST). SITE mounts to the Mission Peculiar Experiment Support System inside the Shuttle payload bay. Starlight, entering through two apertures, is steered to a combining plate where it is interferred. Interference requires 27 nanometer pathlength (phasing) and 0.29 archsecond wavefront-tilt (pointing) control. The resulting 15 milli-archsecond angular resolution exceeds that of current earth-orbiting telescopes while maintaining low cost by exploiting active optics and structural control technologies. With these technologies, unforeseen and time-varying disturbances can be rejected while relaxing reliance on ground alignment and calibration. SITE will reduce the risk and cost of advanced optical space systems by validating critical technologies in their operational environment. Moreover, these technologies are directly applicable to commercially driven applications such as precision matching, optical scanning, and vibration and noise control systems for the aerospace, medical, and automotive sectors. The SITE team consists of experienced university, government, and industry researchers, scientists, and engineers with extensive expertise in optical interferometry, nano-precision opto-mechanical control and spaceflight experimentation. The experience exists and the technology is mature. SITE will validate these technologies on a functioning interferometer science sensor in order to confirm definitely their readiness to be baselined for future science missions.

  12. No Evidence for Multiple Stellar Populations in the Low-mass Galactic Globular Cluster E 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Ricardo; Strader, Jay

    2015-08-01

    Multiple stellar populations are a widespread phenomenon among Galactic globular clusters. Even though the origin of the enriched material from which new generations of stars are produced remains unclear, it is likely that self-enrichment will be feasible only in clusters massive enough to retain this enriched material. We searched for multiple populations in the low mass (M˜ 1.4× {10}4 {M}⊙ ) globular cluster E3, analyzing SOAR/Goodman multi-object spectroscopy centered on the blue cyanogen (CN) absorption features of 23 red giant branch stars. We find that the CN abundance does not present the typical bimodal behavior seen in clusters hosting multistellar populations, but rather a unimodal distribution that indicates the presence of a genuine single stellar population, or a level of enrichment much lower than in clusters that show evidence for two populations from high-resolution spectroscopy. E3 would be the first bona fide Galactic old globular cluster where no sign of self-enrichment is found. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the US National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  13. Are blue supergiants descendants of magnetic main sequence stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, Ilka; Langer, Norbert

    2013-06-01

    Red and blue supergiants are, together with luminous blue variables and Wolf-Rayet stars, evolved phases of massive (OB) stars. The position of blue supergiants (BSG) near the main sequence band cannot be reproduced by standard stellar evolution calculations. However, the assumption of a reduced convective core mass during the main sequence (MS) due to strong internal magnetic fields, established in roughly 10% of all stars on the upper MS, can recover this BSG population. For our calculations of the (non-rotating) massive stars at solar metallicity we used the 1D stellar evolution code MESA and compare their evolutionary tracks with positions from stars obtained from the VLT Flames survey of massive stars.

  14. The DEMO Quasisymmetric Stellarator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey B. McFadden

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The NSTAB nonlinear stability code solves differential equations in conservation form, and the TRAN Monte Carlo test particle code tracks guiding center orbits in a fixed background, to provide simulations of equilibrium, stability, and transport in tokamaks and stellarators. These codes are well correlated with experimental observations and have been validated by convergence studies. Bifurcated 3D solutions of the 2D tokamak problem have been calculated that model persistent disruptions, neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs and edge localized modes (ELMs occurring in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER, which does not pass the NSTAB simulation test for nonlinear stability. So we have designed a quasiaxially symmetric (QAS stellarator with similar proportions as a candidate for the demonstration (DEMO fusion reactor that does pass the test [1]. The configuration has two field periods and an exceptionally accurate 2D symmetry that furnishes excellent thermal confinement and good control of the prompt loss of alpha particles. Robust coils are found from a filtered form of the Biot-Savart law based on a distribution of current over a control surface for the coils and the current in the plasma defined by the equilibrium calculation. Computational science has addressed the issues of equilibrium, stability, and transport, so it remains to develop an effective plan to construct the coils and build a diverter.

  15. Gemini NIFS survey of feeding and feedback processes in nearby active galaxies - I. Stellar kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, Rogemar A.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Riffel, Rogerio; Dahmer-Hahn, Luis G.; Diniz, Marlon R.; Schönell, Astor J.; Dametto, Natacha Z.

    2017-09-01

    We use the Gemini Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) to map the stellar kinematics of the inner few hundred parsecs of a sample of 16 nearby Seyfert galaxies, at a spatial resolution of tens of parsecs and spectral resolution of 40 km s- 1. We find that the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity fields for most galaxies are well reproduced by rotating disc models. The kinematic position angle (PA) derived for the LOS velocity field is consistent with the large-scale photometric PA. The residual velocities are correlated with the hard X-ray luminosity, suggesting that more luminous active galactic nuclei have a larger impact in the surrounding stellar dynamics. The central velocity dispersion values are usually higher than the rotation velocity amplitude, what we attribute to the strong contribution of bulge kinematics in these inner regions. For 50 per cent of the galaxies, we find an inverse correlation between the velocities and the h3 Gauss-Hermitte moment, implying red wings in the blueshifted side and blue wings in the redshifted side of the velocity field, attributed to the movement of the bulge stars lagging the rotation. Two of the 16 galaxies (NGC 5899 and Mrk 1066) show an S-shape zero velocity line, attributed to the gravitational potential of a nuclear bar. Velocity dispersion (σ) maps show rings of low-σ values (˜50-80 km s- 1) for four objects and 'patches' of low σ for six galaxies at 150-250 pc from the nucleus, attributed to young/ intermediate age stellar populations.

  16. Inferring probabilistic stellar rotation periods using Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Ruth; Morton, Timothy; Aigrain, Suzanne; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Rajpaul, Vinesh

    2018-02-01

    Variability in the light curves of spotted, rotating stars is often non-sinusoidal and quasi-periodic - spots move on the stellar surface and have finite lifetimes, causing stellar flux variations to slowly shift in phase. A strictly periodic sinusoid therefore cannot accurately model a rotationally modulated stellar light curve. Physical models of stellar surfaces have many drawbacks preventing effective inference, such as highly degenerate or high-dimensional parameter spaces. In this work, we test an appropriate effective model: a Gaussian Process with a quasi-periodic covariance kernel function. This highly flexible model allows sampling of the posterior probability density function of the periodic parameter, marginalizing over the other kernel hyperparameters using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach. To test the effectiveness of this method, we infer rotation periods from 333 simulated stellar light curves, demonstrating that the Gaussian process method produces periods that are more accurate than both a sine-fitting periodogram and an autocorrelation function method. We also demonstrate that it works well on real data, by inferring rotation periods for 275 Kepler stars with previously measured periods. We provide a table of rotation periods for these and many more, altogether 1102 Kepler objects of interest, and their posterior probability density function samples. Because this method delivers posterior probability density functions, it will enable hierarchical studies involving stellar rotation, particularly those involving population modelling, such as inferring stellar ages, obliquities in exoplanet systems, or characterizing star-planet interactions. The code used to implement this method is available online.

  17. Tidal effects on stellar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppenhaeger, K.

    2017-10-01

    The architecture of many exoplanetary systems is different from the solar system, with exoplanets being in close orbits around their host stars and having orbital periods of only a few days. We can expect interactions between the star and the exoplanet for such systems that are similar to the tidal interactions observed in close stellar binary systems. For the exoplanet, tidal interaction can lead to circularization of its orbit and the synchronization of its rotational and orbital period. For the host star, it has long been speculated if significant angular momentum transfer can take place between the planetary orbit and the stellar rotation. In the case of the Earth-Moon system, such tidal interaction has led to an increasing distance between Earth and Moon. For stars with Hot Jupiters, where the orbital period of the exoplanet is typically shorter than the stellar rotation period, one expects a decreasing semimajor axis for the planet and enhanced stellar rotation, leading to increased stellar activity. Also excess turbulence in the stellar convective zone due to rising and subsiding tidal bulges may change the magnetic activity we observe for the host star. I will review recent observational results on stellar activity and tidal interaction in the presence of close-in exoplanets, and discuss the effects of enhanced stellar activity on the exoplanets in such systems.

  18. Stellar dynamics and black holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stellar dynamics and black holes. DAVID MERRITT. Department of Physics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 78 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester,. NY 14623, USA. E-mail: merritt@astro.rit.edu. Abstract. Chandrasekhar's most important contribution to stellar dynamics was the concept of dynamical friction. I briefly review ...

  19. A catalog of stellar spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, S. J.; Pyper, D. M.; Shore, S. N.; White, R. E.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A machine-readable catalog of stellar spectrophotometric measurements made with rotating grating scanner is introduced. Consideration is given to the processes by which the stellar data were collected and calibrated with the fluxes of Vega (Hayes and Latham, 1975). A sample page from the spectrophotometric catalog is presented.

  20. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the computations that follow have been made by assuming that a stellar core, existing just prior to core collapse, consists primarily of highly compressed and very hot iron nuclei and electrons. Although nuclei near iron in atomic number, as well as smaller concentrations of other subatomic particles, may also exist in a stellar ...

  1. Remarks on stellar clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teller, E.

    1985-01-01

    In the following, a few simple remarks on the evolution and properties of stellar clusters will be collected. In particular, globular clusters will be considered. Though details of such clusters are often not known, a few questions can be clarified with the help of primitive arguments. These are:- why are spherical clusters spherical, why do they have high densities, why do they consist of approximately a million stars, how may a black hole of great mass form within them, may they be the origin of gamma-ray bursts, may their invisible remnants account for the missing mass of our galaxy. The available data do not warrant a detailed evaluation. However, it is remarkable that exceedingly simple models can shed some light on the questions enumerated above. (author)

  2. Modelling of stellar convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupka, Friedrich; Muthsam, Herbert J.

    2017-07-01

    The review considers the modelling process for stellar convection rather than specific astrophysical results. For achieving reasonable depth and length we deal with hydrodynamics only, omitting MHD. A historically oriented introduction offers first glimpses on the physics of stellar convection. Examination of its basic properties shows that two very different kinds of modelling keep being needed: low dimensional models (mixing length, Reynolds stress, etc.) and "full" 3D simulations. A list of affordable and not affordable tasks for the latter is given. Various low dimensional modelling approaches are put in a hierarchy and basic principles which they should respect are formulated. In 3D simulations of low Mach number convection the inclusion of then unimportant sound waves with their rapid time variation is numerically impossible. We describe a number of approaches where the Navier-Stokes equations are modified for their elimination (anelastic approximation, etc.). We then turn to working with the full Navier-Stokes equations and deal with numerical principles for faithful and efficient numerics. Spatial differentiation as well as time marching aspects are considered. A list of codes allows assessing the state of the art. An important recent development is the treatment of even the low Mach number problem without prior modification of the basic equation (obviating side effects) by specifically designed numerical methods. Finally, we review a number of important trends such as how to further develop low-dimensional models, how to use 3D models for that purpose, what effect recent hardware developments may have on 3D modelling, and others.

  3. Alaska Athabascan stellar astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Stellar astronomy is a fundamental component of Alaska Athabascan cultures that facilitates time-reckoning, navigation, weather forecasting, and cosmology. Evidence from the linguistic record suggests that a group of stars corresponding to the Big Dipper is the only widely attested constellation across the Northern Athabascan languages. However, instruction from expert Athabascan consultants shows that the correlation of these names with the Big Dipper is only partial. In Alaska Gwich'in, Ahtna, and Upper Tanana languages the Big Dipper is identified as one part of a much larger circumpolar humanoid constellation that spans more than 133 degrees across the sky. The Big Dipper is identified as a tail, while the other remaining asterisms within the humanoid constellation are named using other body part terms. The concept of a whole-sky humanoid constellation provides a single unifying system for mapping the night sky, and the reliance on body-part metaphors renders the system highly mnemonic. By recognizing one part of the constellation the stargazer is immediately able to identify the remaining parts based on an existing mental map of the human body. The circumpolar position of a whole-sky constellation yields a highly functional system that facilitates both navigation and time-reckoning in the subarctic. Northern Athabascan astronomy is not only much richer than previously described; it also provides evidence for a completely novel and previously undocumented way of conceptualizing the sky---one that is unique to the subarctic and uniquely adapted to northern cultures. The concept of a large humanoid constellation may be widespread across the entire subarctic and have great antiquity. In addition, the use of cognate body part terms describing asterisms within humanoid constellations is similarly found in Navajo, suggesting a common ancestor from which Northern and Southern Athabascan stellar naming strategies derived.

  4. Blue cures blue but be cautious

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Sikka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Methemoglobinemia is a disorder characterized by the presence of >1% methemoglobin (metHb in the blood. Spontaneous formation of methemoglobin is normally counteracted by protective enzyme systems, for example, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH methemoglobin reductase. Methemoglobinemia is treated with supplemental oxygen and methylene blue (1-2 mg/kg administered slow intravenously, which acts by providing an artificial electron acceptor for NADPH methemoglobin reductase. But known or suspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is a relative contraindication to the use of methylene blue because G6PD is the key enzyme in the formation of NADPH through pentose phosphate pathway and G6PD-deficient individuals generate insufficient NADPH to efficiently reduce methylene blue to leukomethylene blue, which is necessary for the activation of the NADPH-dependent methemoglobin reductase system. So, we should be careful using methylene blue in methemoglobinemia patient before G6PD levels.

  5. Mass Ejection in Failed Supernovae: Variation with Stellar Progenitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Quataert, Eliot; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Coughlin, Eric R.

    2018-02-01

    We study the ejection of mass during stellar core-collapse when the stalled shock does not revive and a black hole forms. Neutrino emission during the protoneutron star phase causes a decrease in the gravitational mass of the core, resulting in an outward going sound pulse that steepens into a shock as it travels out through the star. We explore the properties of this mass ejection mechanism over a range of stellar progenitors using spherically-symmetric, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations that treat neutrino mass loss parametrically and follow the shock propagation over the entire star. We find that all types of stellar progenitor can eject mass through this mechanism. The ejected mass is a decreasing function of the surface gravity of the star, ranging from several M⊙ for red supergiants to ˜0.1M⊙ for blue supergiants and ˜10-3M⊙ for Wolf-Rayet stars. We find that the final shock energy at the surface is a decreasing function of the core-compactness, and is ≲ 1047 - 1048 erg in all cases. In progenitors with a sufficiently large envelope, high core-compactness, or a combination of both, the sound pulse fails to unbind mass. Successful mass ejection is accompanied by significant fallback accretion that can last from hours to years. We predict the properties of shock breakout and thermal plateau emission produced by the ejection of the outer envelope of blue supergiant and Wolf-Rayet progenitors in otherwise failed supernovae.

  6. Blue-Green Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with hepatitis C or hepatitis B. HIV/AIDS. Research on the effects of blue-green algae in people with HIV/AIDS has been inconsistent. Some early research shows that taking 5 grams of blue-green ...

  7. The Origin of Stellar Species: constraining stellar evolution scenarios with Local Group galaxy surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbadhicary, Sumit; Badenes, Carles; Chomiuk, Laura; Maldonado, Jessica; Caprioli, Damiano; Heger, Mairead; Huizenga, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Our understanding of the progenitors of many stellar species, such as supernovae, massive and low-mass He-burning stars, is limited because of many poorly constrained aspects of stellar evolution theory. For my dissertation, I have focused on using Local Group galaxy surveys to constrain stellar evolution scenarios by measuring delay-time distributions (DTD). The DTD is the hypothetical occurrence rate of a stellar object per elapsed time after a brief burst of star formation. It is the measured distribution of timescales on which stars evolve, and therefore serves as a powerful observational constraint on theoretical progenitor models. The DTD can be measured from a survey of stellar objects and a set of star-formation histories of the host galaxy, and is particularly effective in the Local Group, where high-quality star-formation histories are available from resolved stellar populations. I am currently calculating a SN DTD with supernova remnants (SNRs) in order to provide the strongest constraints on the progenitors of thermonuclear and core-collapse supernovae. However, most SNRs do not have reliable age measurements and their evolution depends on the ambient environment. For this reason, I wrote a radio light curve model of an SNR population to extract the visibility times and rates of supernovae - crucial ingredients for the DTD - from an SNR survey. The model uses observational constraints on the local environments from multi-wavelength surveys, accounts for missing SNRs and employs the latest models of shock-driven particle acceleration. The final calculation of the SN DTD in the Local Group is awaiting completion of a systematic SNR catalog from deep radio-continuum images, now in preparation by a group led by Dr. Laura Chomiuk. I have also calculated DTDs for the LMC population of RR Lyrae and Cepheid variables, which serve as important distance calibrators and stellar population tracers. We find that Cepheids can have delay-times between 10 Myrs - 1 Gyr

  8. Identification of Stellar Sequences in Various Stellar Systems: ESO65-SC03, Teutsch 106, Turner 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Gireesh C.

    2017-12-01

    The spatial morphological study of stellar clusters has been carried out through their identified probable members. The field stars decontamination is performed by the statistical cleaning approach (depends on the magnitude and colour of stars within the field and cluster regions). The colour magnitude ratio diagram (CMRD) approach is used to separate the stellar sequences of cluster systems. The age, distance and reddening of each cluster is estimated through the visual inspection of best fitted isochrone in colour magnitude diagrams (CMDs). The mean proper motion values of stellar clusters are obtained through the extracted data from PPMXL and UCAC4 catalogs. Moreover, these values vary according to the extracted data-set from these catalogues. This variation has occurred due to different estimation efficiency of proper motions. The two colour ratio (TCR) and two colour magnitude ratio (TCMR) values of each cluster is determined by utilizing the WISE and PPMXL catalogues, these values are found abnormal for Teutsch 106. In addition, the TCMR values are similar to TCR values at longer wavelength, whereas both values are far away from each other at shorter wavelength. The fraction of young stellar objects (YSOs) is also computed for each cluster.

  9. Stellar Presentations (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) The AAVSO is in the process of expanding its education, outreach and speakers bureau program. powerpoint presentations prepared for specific target audiences such as AAVSO members, educators, students, the general public, and Science Olympiad teams, coaches, event supervisors, and state directors will be available online for members to use. The presentations range from specific and general content relating to stellar evolution and variable stars to specific activities for a workshop environment. A presentation—even with a general topic—that works for high school students will not work for educators, Science Olympiad teams, or the general public. Each audience is unique and requires a different approach. The current environment necessitates presentations that are captivating for a younger generation that is embedded in a highly visual and sound-bite world of social media, twitter and U-Tube, and mobile devices. For educators, presentations and workshops for themselves and their students must support the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the Common Core Content Standards, and the Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) initiative. Current best practices for developing relevant and engaging powerpoint presentations to deliver information to a variety of targeted audiences will be presented along with several examples.

  10. Stellar dynamics and black holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Chandrasekhar's most important contribution to stellar dynamics was the concept of dynamical friction. I briefly review that work, then discuss some implications of Chandrasekhar's theory of gravitational encounters for motion in galactic nuclei.

  11. Instability of prolate stellar systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyachenko, V.L.

    1979-11-01

    A general method is proposed for testing the stability of highly elongated stellar systems. If a nonrotating system is sufficiently prolate, it will inevitably be unstable. The stabilizing influence of various factors is assessed.

  12. Stellar magnetic activity and exoplanets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidotto A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that magnetic activity could be enhanced due to interactions between close-in massive planets and their host stars. In this article, I present a brief overview of the connection between stellar magnetic activity and exoplanets. Stellar activity can be probed in chromospheric lines, coronal emission, surface spot coverage, etc. Since these are manifestations of stellar magnetism, these measurements are often used as proxies for the magnetic field of stars. Here, instead of focusing on the magnetic proxies, I overview some recent results of magnetic field measurements using spectropolarimetric observations. Firstly, I discuss the general trends found between large-scale magnetism, stellar rotation, and coronal emission and show that magnetism seems to be correlated to the internal structure of the star. Secondly, I overview some works that show evidence that exoplanets could (or not act as to enhance the activity of their host stars.

  13. SMASH: Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nidever, David L.; Olsen, Knut; Blum, Robert D.; Saha, Abhijit [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Walker, Alistair R.; Vivas, A. Katherina [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Kaleida, Catherine [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Choi, Yumi; Besla, Gurtina; Olszewski, Edward W. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson AZ, 85721 (United States); Conn, Blair C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Gruendl, Robert A. [National Center for Supercomputing Applications, 1205 West Clark Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1107 (United States); Muñoz, Ricardo R. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Gallart, Carme; Monelli, Matteo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Martin, Nicolas F. [Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, UMR 7550, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Monachesi, Antonela [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); De Boer, Thomas J. L. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Johnson, L. Clifton, E-mail: dnidever@noao.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, UC San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0424 (United States); and others

    2017-11-01

    The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are unique local laboratories for studying the formation and evolution of small galaxies in exquisite detail. The Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) is an NOAO community Dark Energy Camera (DECam) survey of the Clouds mapping 480 deg{sup 2} (distributed over ∼2400 square degrees at ∼20% filling factor) to ∼24th mag in ugriz . The primary goals of SMASH are to identify low surface brightness stellar populations associated with the stellar halos and tidal debris of the Clouds, and to derive spatially resolved star formation histories. Here, we present a summary of the survey, its data reduction, and a description of the first public Data Release (DR1). The SMASH DECam data have been reduced with a combination of the NOAO Community Pipeline, the PHOTRED automated point-spread-function photometry pipeline, and custom calibration software. The astrometric precision is ∼15 mas and the accuracy is ∼2 mas with respect to the Gaia reference frame. The photometric precision is ∼0.5%–0.7% in griz and ∼1% in u with a calibration accuracy of ∼1.3% in all bands. The median 5 σ point source depths in ugriz are 23.9, 24.8, 24.5, 24.2, and 23.5 mag. The SMASH data have already been used to discover the Hydra II Milky Way satellite, the SMASH 1 old globular cluster likely associated with the LMC, and extended stellar populations around the LMC out to R  ∼ 18.4 kpc. SMASH DR1 contains measurements of ∼100 million objects distributed in 61 fields. A prototype version of the NOAO Data Lab provides data access and exploration tools.

  14. SMASH: Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidever, David L.; Olsen, Knut; Walker, Alistair R.; Vivas, A. Katherina; Blum, Robert D.; Kaleida, Catherine; Choi, Yumi; Conn, Blair C.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Bell, Eric F.; Besla, Gurtina; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Gallart, Carme; Martin, Nicolas F.; Olszewski, Edward W.; Saha, Abhijit; Monachesi, Antonela; Monelli, Matteo; de Boer, Thomas J. L.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Zaritsky, Dennis; Stringfellow, Guy S.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L.; Jin, Shoko; Majewski, Steven R.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Monteagudo, Lara; Noël, Noelia E. D.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Kunder, Andrea; Chu, You-Hua; Bell, Cameron P. M.; Santana, Felipe; Frechem, Joshua; Medina, Gustavo E.; Parkash, Vaishali; Serón Navarrete, J. C.; Hayes, Christian

    2017-11-01

    The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are unique local laboratories for studying the formation and evolution of small galaxies in exquisite detail. The Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) is an NOAO community Dark Energy Camera (DECam) survey of the Clouds mapping 480 deg2 (distributed over ˜2400 square degrees at ˜20% filling factor) to ˜24th mag in ugriz. The primary goals of SMASH are to identify low surface brightness stellar populations associated with the stellar halos and tidal debris of the Clouds, and to derive spatially resolved star formation histories. Here, we present a summary of the survey, its data reduction, and a description of the first public Data Release (DR1). The SMASH DECam data have been reduced with a combination of the NOAO Community Pipeline, the PHOTRED automated point-spread-function photometry pipeline, and custom calibration software. The astrometric precision is ˜15 mas and the accuracy is ˜2 mas with respect to the Gaia reference frame. The photometric precision is ˜0.5%-0.7% in griz and ˜1% in u with a calibration accuracy of ˜1.3% in all bands. The median 5σ point source depths in ugriz are 23.9, 24.8, 24.5, 24.2, and 23.5 mag. The SMASH data have already been used to discover the Hydra II Milky Way satellite, the SMASH 1 old globular cluster likely associated with the LMC, and extended stellar populations around the LMC out to R ˜ 18.4 kpc. SMASH DR1 contains measurements of ˜100 million objects distributed in 61 fields. A prototype version of the NOAO Data Lab provides data access and exploration tools.

  15. Design, construction and validation of the UST-1 modular stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queral, V., E-mail: vicentemanuel.queral@ciemat.es

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A small and simple low cost two period modular stellarator is reviewed. • It is defined as a monolithic circular surface torus with carved grooves. • The grooves are accurately mechanised by a new toroidal milling machine. • A very simple e-beam field mapping system has been built and utilized. - Abstract: Stellarator advancement is hindered, among others, by the requirement of geometric complexity at high accuracy and the still scarce universities and research centres following the stellarator line. In this framework, the objectives of the small UST-1 stellarator development were to: (i) explore and test the performance of one possible accurate construction method for stellarators (ii) encourage universities and small fusion research centres to build simple and economical stellarators (iii) educative purpose. Therefore, UST-1 was properly designed to be easily built by a milling machine working on toroidal coordinates, being the winding surface circular poloidally and toroidally. The coil frame is a sole monolithic toroidal thick surface equipped with grooves mechanised by the toroidal milling machine. Only one double pancake is wound in each groove so as to compress the conductor on the laterals of the groove in order to speed up and simplify the winding process. The physics design, the conceptual engineering design and the construction process of UST-1 is presented. The toroidal milling machine is described. The e-beam field line mapping experiments carried out to validate the resulting magnetic configuration are reported. The developed construction method has been proved for the small UST-1 stellarator. Small stellarators are valuable for quick tests of diagnostics, educative purposes, assessment of new confinement concepts, turbulence studies and other applications.

  16. Metal-rich, Metal-poor: Updated Stellar Population Models for Old Stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Charlie; Villaume, Alexa; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Lind, Karin

    2018-02-01

    We present updated stellar population models appropriate for old ages (>1 Gyr) and covering a wide range in metallicities (‑1.5 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ 0.3). These models predict the full spectral variation associated with individual element abundance variation as a function of metallicity and age. The models span the optical–NIR wavelength range (0.37–2.4 μm), include a range of initial mass functions, and contain the flexibility to vary 18 individual elements including C, N, O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, and Fe. To test the fidelity of the models, we fit them to integrated light optical spectra of 41 Galactic globular clusters (GCs). The value of testing models against GCs is that their ages, metallicities, and detailed abundance patterns have been derived from the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram in combination with high-resolution spectroscopy of individual stars. We determine stellar population parameters from fits to all wavelengths simultaneously (“full spectrum fitting”), and demonstrate explicitly with mock tests that this approach produces smaller uncertainties at fixed signal-to-noise ratio than fitting a standard set of 14 line indices. Comparison of our integrated-light results to literature values reveals good agreement in metallicity, [Fe/H]. When restricting to GCs without prominent blue horizontal branch populations, we also find good agreement with literature values for ages, [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], and [Ti/Fe].

  17. The Advanced Stellar Compass, Development and Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Liebe, Carl Christian

    1996-01-01

    The science objective of the Danish Geomagnetic Research Satellite "Ørsted" is to map the magnetic field of the Earth, with a vector precision of a fraction of a nanotesla. This necessitates an attitude reference instrument with a precision of a few arcseconds onboard the satellite. To meet...... this demand the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC), a fully autonomous miniature star tracker, was developed. This ASC is capable of both solving the "lost in space" problem and determine the attitude with arcseconds precision. The development, principles of operation and instrument autonomy of the ASC...

  18. Generating physically realizable stellar structures via embedding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, S.K. [University of Nizwa, Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, College of Arts and Science, Nizwa (Oman); Govender, M. [Durban University of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Durban (South Africa)

    2017-05-15

    In this work we present an exact solution of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations describing compact charged objects within the framework of classical general relativity. Our model is constructed by embedding a four-dimensional spherically symmetric static metric into a five-dimensional flat metric. The source term for the matter field is composed of a perfect fluid distribution with charge. We show that our model obeys all the physical requirements and stability conditions necessary for a realistic stellar model. Our theoretical model approximates observations of neutron stars and pulsars to a very good degree of accuracy. (orig.)

  19. Phototherapy with blue and green mixed-light is as effective against unconjugated jaundice as blue light and reduces oxidative stress in the Gunn rat model.

    OpenAIRE

    Uchida, Yumiko; Morimoto, Yukihiro; Uchiike, Takao; Kamamoto, Tomoyuki :4/0000339; Hayashi, Tamaki; Arai, Ikuyo; Nishikubo, Toshiya; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:Phototherapy using blue light-emitting diodes (LED) is effective against neonatal jaundice. However, green light phototherapy also reduces unconjugated jaundice. We aimed to determine whether mixed blue and green light can relieve jaundice with minimal oxidative stress as effectively as either blue or green light alone in a rat model.METHODS:Gunn rats were exposed to phototherapy with blue (420-520 nm), filtered blue (FB; 440-520 nm without

  20. Engineering aspects of compact stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.E.; Benson, R.D.; Brooks, A.

    2003-01-01

    Compact stellarators could combine the good confinement and high beta of a tokamak with the inherently steady state, disruption-free characteristics of a stellarator. Two U.S. compact stellarator facilities are now in the conceptual design phase: the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) and the Quasi- Poloidal Stellarator (QPS). NCSX has a major radius of 1.4 m and a toroidal field up to 2 T. The primary feature of both NCSX and QPS is the set of modular coils that provide the basic magnetic configuration. These coils represent a major engineering challenge due to the complex shape, precise geometric accuracy, and high current density of the windings. The winding geometry is too complex for conventional hollow copper conductor construction. Instead, the modular coils will be wound with flexible, multi strand cable conductor that has been compacted to a 75% copper packing fraction. Inside the NCSX coil set and surrounding the plasma is a highly contoured vacuum vessel. The vessel consists of three identical, 120 deg. segments that are bolted together at double sealed joints. The QPS device has a major radius of 0.9 m, a toroidal field of 1 T, and an aspect ratio of only 2.7. Instead of an internal vacuum vessel, the QPS modular coils will operate in an external vacuum tank. (author)

  1. Extra-galactic Distances with Massive Stars: The Role of Stellar Variability in the Case of M33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Chien-Hsiu, E-mail: leech@naoj.org [Subaru Telescope, NAOJ, 650 N Aohoku Pl, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    In modern cosmology, determining the Hubble constant (H{sub 0}) using a distance ladder to percent level and comparing with the results from the Planck  satellite can shed light on the nature of dark energy, physics of the neutrino, and curvature of the universe. Thanks to the endeavor of the SH0ES team, the uncertainty of the H{sub 0} has be dramatically reduced, from 10% to 2.4%, and with the promise of even reaching 1% in the near future. In this regard, it is fundamentally important to investigate the systematics. This is best done using other good independent distance indicators. One promising method is the flux-weighted gravity luminosity relation (FGLR) of the blue supergiants (BSGs). As BSGs are the brightest objects in galaxies, they can probe distances up to 10 Mpc with negligible blending effects. While the FGLR method delivered distance is in good agreement with other distance indicators, it has been shown that this method delivers greater distances in the cases of M33 and NGC 55. Here, we investigate whether the M33 distance estimate of FGLR suffers systematics from stellar variability. Using CFHT M33 monitoring data, we found that 9 out of 22 BSGs showed variability during the course of 500 days, although with amplitudes as small as 0.05 mag. This suggests that stellar variability plays a negligible role in the FGLR distance determination.

  2. Extra-galactic Distances with Massive Stars: The Role of Stellar Variability in the Case of M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Hsiu

    2017-08-01

    In modern cosmology, determining the Hubble constant (H0) using a distance ladder to percent level and comparing with the results from the Planck satellite can shed light on the nature of dark energy, physics of the neutrino, and curvature of the universe. Thanks to the endeavor of the SH0ES team, the uncertainty of the H0 has be dramatically reduced, from 10% to 2.4%, and with the promise of even reaching 1% in the near future. In this regard, it is fundamentally important to investigate the systematics. This is best done using other good independent distance indicators. One promising method is the flux-weighted gravity luminosity relation (FGLR) of the blue supergiants (BSGs). As BSGs are the brightest objects in galaxies, they can probe distances up to 10 Mpc with negligible blending effects. While the FGLR method delivered distance is in good agreement with other distance indicators, it has been shown that this method delivers greater distances in the cases of M33 and NGC 55. Here, we investigate whether the M33 distance estimate of FGLR suffers systematics from stellar variability. Using CFHT M33 monitoring data, we found that 9 out of 22 BSGs showed variability during the course of 500 days, although with amplitudes as small as 0.05 mag. This suggests that stellar variability plays a negligible role in the FGLR distance determination.

  3. The properties of the first galaxies in the BlueTides simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert; Lovell, Christopher C.; Waters, Dacen

    2017-08-01

    We employ the very large cosmological hydrodynamical simulation BlueTides to investigate the predicted properties of the galaxy population during the epoch of reionization (z > 8). BlueTides has a resolution and volume ((400/h ≈ 577)3 cMpc3) providing a population of galaxies that is well matched to depth and area of current observational surveys targeting the high-redshift Universe. At z = 8, BlueTides includes almost 160 000 galaxies with stellar masses >108 M⊙. The population of galaxies predicted by BlueTides closely matches observational constraints on both the galaxy stellar mass function and far-UV (150 nm) luminosity function. Galaxies in BlueTides are characterized by rapidly increasing star formation histories. Specific star formation rates decrease with redshift though remain largely insensitive to stellar mass. As a result of the enhanced surface density of metals, more massive galaxies are predicted to have higher dust attenuation resulting in a significant steepening of the observed far-UV luminosity function at high luminosities. The contribution of active supermassive black holes (SMBHs) to the UV luminosities of galaxies with stellar masses 109-10 M⊙ is around 3 per cent on average. Approximately 25 per cent of galaxies with M* ≈ 1010 M⊙ are predicted to have active SMBHs that contribute >10 per cent of the total UV luminosity.

  4. Planets, stars and stellar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, Howard; McLean, Ian; Barstow, Martin; Gilmore, Gerard; Keel, William; French, Linda

    2013-01-01

    This is volume 3 of Planets, Stars and Stellar Systems, a six-volume compendium of modern astronomical research covering subjects of key interest to the main fields of contemporary astronomy. This volume on “Solar and Stellar Planetary Systems” edited by Linda French and Paul Kalas presents accessible review chapters From Disks to Planets, Dynamical Evolution of Planetary Systems, The Terrestrial Planets, Gas and Ice Giant Interiors, Atmospheres of Jovian Planets, Planetary Magnetospheres, Planetary Rings, An Overview of the Asteroids and Meteorites, Dusty Planetary Systems and Exoplanet Detection Methods. All chapters of the handbook were written by practicing professionals. They include sufficient background material and references to the current literature to allow readers to learn enough about a specialty within astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology to get started on their own practical research projects. In the spirit of the series Stars and Stellar Systems published by Chicago University Press in...

  5. What drives the evolution of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies in Clusters vs. the Field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Gregory

    2017-08-01

    Present-day galaxy clusters consist chiefly of low-mass dwarf elliptical galaxies, but the progenitors of this dominant population remain unclear. A prime candidate is the class of objects known as Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies, common in intermediate-reshift clusters but virtually extinct today. Recent cosmological simulations suggest that the present-day dwarfs galaxies begin as irregular field galaxies, undergo an environmentally-driven starburst phase as they enter the cluster, and stop forming stars earlier than their counterparts in the field. This model predicts that cluster dwarfs should have lower stellar mass per unit dynamical mass than their counterparts in the field. We propose a two-pronged archival research program to test this key prediction using the combination of precision photometry from space and high-quality spectroscopy. First, we will combine optical HST/ACS imaging of five z=0.55 clusters (including two HST Frontier Fields) with Spitzer IR imaging and publicly-released Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to measure stellar-to-dynamical-mass ratios for a large sample of cluster LCBGs. Second, we will exploit a new catalog of LCBGs in the COSMOS field to gather corresponding data for a significant sample of field LCBGs. By comparing mass ratios from these datasets, we will test theoretical predictions and determine the primary physical driver of cluster dwarf-galaxy evolution.

  6. Collisions in spherical stellar systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyachenko, V.L.; Shukhman, I.G. (AN SSSR, Irkutsk. Sibirskij Inst. Zemnogo Magnetizma Ionosfery i Rasprostraneniya Radiovoln)

    From the set of the equations for the stellar distribution function and for the two-particle correlation in the action- angle variables, by averaging over fast finite motions the general expression for the collisional term of a finite stellar system with ''rare'' Coulomb collisions is obtained. In the case of a spherically symmetrical system with the distribution function f/sub 0/=f/sub 0/(E, L) (E, L being the energy and the angular momentum of a star), the kinetic equation is reduced to the standard form of the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equations.

  7. Blue Ocean Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, Donna

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a concept called the "blue ocean thinking strategy," developed by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne, professors at INSEAD, an international graduate school of business in France. The "blue ocean" thinking strategy considers opportunities to create new markets for services, rather than focusing solely on…

  8. Identification of Stellar Sequences in Various Stellar Systems ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spatial morphological study of stellar clusters has been carried out through their identified probable members. The field stars decontamination is performed by the statistical cleaning approach (depends on the magnitude and colour of stars within the field and cluster regions). The colour magnitude ratio diagram ...

  9. Discovering Our Stellar Neighborhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David V.

    2014-01-01

    The stars closest to Earth are not particularly remarkable or exciting. They are average stars typical of the spiral arms of our Milky Way galaxy. In fact, until recently, most astronomy and Earth science textbooks ignored all but the largest of them to focus on distant, more exotic objects like red supergiants or black holes. The recent discovery…

  10. Blue stragglers as the source of the high-velocity A stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, J.C.; Twarog, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    A quantitative estimate of the contribution of blue stragglers to the stellar population in the solar neighborhood is made, with particular attention to the spatial distribution of early-type stragglers at large distance from the Galactic plane. Blue stragglers are assumed to be created in the disk at a rate consistent with the empirical data from open clusters, while nine plausible combinations of star formation and scale height histories are modeled. It is concluded that normal evolution without the inclusion of blue stragglers is incapable of producing early-type stars at large distances from the plane, while the addition of blue stragglers adequately fulfills the rather weak observational constraints. In addition, it is shown that if blue stragglers are produced at the rate implied by the models, roughly 30 percent of the A stars in the solar neighborhood could be blue stragglers. 48 references.

  11. QUANTIFYING KINEMATIC SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE MILKY WAY'S STELLAR HALO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Xiangxiang; Zhao Gang; Luo Ali; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F.; Koposov, Sergey E.; Kang, Xi; Liu, Chao; Yanny, Brian; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Bullock, James S.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Morrison, Heather; Rockosi, Constance; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2011-01-01

    We present and analyze the positions, distances, and radial velocities for over 4000 blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars in the Milky Way's halo, drawn from SDSS DR8. We search for position-velocity substructure in these data, a signature of the hierarchical assembly of the stellar halo. Using a cumulative 'close pair distribution' as a statistic in the four-dimensional space of sky position, distance, and velocity, we quantify the presence of position-velocity substructure at high statistical significance among the BHB stars: pairs of BHB stars that are close in position on the sky tend to have more similar distances and radial velocities compared to a random sampling of these overall distributions. We make analogous mock observations of 11 numerical halo formation simulations, in which the stellar halo is entirely composed of disrupted satellite debris, and find a level of substructure comparable to that seen in the actually observed BHB star sample. This result quantitatively confirms the hierarchical build-up of the stellar halo through a signature in phase (position-velocity) space. In detail, the structure present in the BHB stars is somewhat less prominent than that seen in most simulated halos, quite possibly because BHB stars represent an older sub-population. BHB stars located beyond 20 kpc from the Galactic center exhibit stronger substructure than at r gc < 20 kpc.

  12. Stellar pulsations in beyond Horndeski gravity theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakstein, Jeremy; Kenna-Allison, Michael; Koyama, Kazuya

    2017-03-01

    Theories of gravity in the beyond Horndeski class recover the predictions of general relativity in the solar system whilst admitting novel cosmologies, including late-time de Sitter solutions in the absence of a cosmological constant. Deviations from Newton's law are predicted inside astrophysical bodies, which allow for falsifiable, smoking-gun tests of the theory. In this work we study the pulsations of stars by deriving and solving the wave equation governing linear adiabatic oscillations to find the modified period of pulsation. Using both semi-analytic and numerical models, we perform a preliminary survey of the stellar zoo in an attempt to identify the best candidate objects for testing the theory. Brown dwarfs and Cepheid stars are found to be particularly sensitive objects and we discuss the possibility of using both to test the theory.

  13. Stellar pulsations in beyond Horndeski gravity theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakstein, Jeremy [Center for Particle Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 S. 33rd St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kenna-Allison, Michael; Koyama, Kazuya, E-mail: sakstein@physics.upenn.edu, E-mail: mka1g13@soton.ac.uk, E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-01

    Theories of gravity in the beyond Horndeski class recover the predictions of general relativity in the solar system whilst admitting novel cosmologies, including late-time de Sitter solutions in the absence of a cosmological constant. Deviations from Newton's law are predicted inside astrophysical bodies, which allow for falsifiable, smoking-gun tests of the theory. In this work we study the pulsations of stars by deriving and solving the wave equation governing linear adiabatic oscillations to find the modified period of pulsation. Using both semi-analytic and numerical models, we perform a preliminary survey of the stellar zoo in an attempt to identify the best candidate objects for testing the theory. Brown dwarfs and Cepheid stars are found to be particularly sensitive objects and we discuss the possibility of using both to test the theory.

  14. Science with Synthetic Stellar Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Robyn Ellyn

    2018-04-01

    A new generation of observational projects is poised to revolutionize our understanding of the resolved stellar populations of Milky-Way-like galaxies at an unprecedented level of detail, ushering in an era of precision studies of galaxy formation. In the Milky Way itself, astrometric, spectroscopic and photometric surveys will measure three-dimensional positions and velocities and numerous chemical abundances for stars from the disk to the halo, as well as for many satellite dwarf galaxies. In the Local Group and beyond, HST, JWST and eventually WFIRST will deliver pristine views of resolved stars. The groundbreaking scale and dimensionality of this new view of resolved stellar populations in galaxies challenge us to develop new theoretical tools to robustly compare these surveys to simulated galaxies, in order to take full advantage of our new ability to make detailed predictions for stellar populations within a cosmological context. I will describe a framework for generating realistic synthetic star catalogs and mock surveys from state-of-the-art cosmological-hydrodynamical simulations, and present several early scientific results from, and predictions for, resolved stellar surveys of our Galaxy and its neighbors.

  15. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Lazerson, S. A.; Faber, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is addressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X (Beidler et al 1990 Fusion Technol. 17 148) and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT (Spong et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 711) code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stellarator experiment HSX (Anderson et al 1995 Fusion Technol. 27 273) is presented for which a reduction of the linear growth rates is achieved over a broad range of the operational parameter space. As an important consequence of this property, the turbulent heat flux levels are reduced compared with the initial configuration.

  16. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly ...

  17. Mixing in massive stellar mergers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaburov, E.; jr. Lombardi, J.C.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2008-01-01

    The early evolution of dense star clusters is possibly dominated by close interactions between stars, and physical collisions between stars may occur quite frequently. Simulating a stellar collision event can be an intensive numerical task, as detailed calculations of this process require

  18. The Supernova - A Stellar Spectacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, W. C.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. The following topics concerning supernovae are included: the outburst as observed and according to theory, the stellar remnant, the nebular remnant, and a summary…

  19. Stellar dynamics and black holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chandrasekhar's most important contribution to stellar dynamics was the concept of dynamical friction. I briefly review that work, then discuss some implications of Chandrasekhar's theory of gravitational encounters for motion in galactic nuclei. Author Affiliations. David Merritt1. Department of Physics, Rochester Institute ...

  20. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maximum stellar iron core mass mass of iron into a neutron star. The radius of this highly compressed theoretical sphere may be somewhat smaller than the actual radius of a real spherical mass of iron, just prior to core collapse, because an unstable real spherical mass of iron is likely to achieve the critical density only at its ...

  1. Study of stellar objects with strange quark matter crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hothi, N.; Bisht, S.

    2012-01-01

    The absolute stability of strange quark matter is a viable possibility and immensely effects physics at the astrophysical scale. Relativistic heavy-ion reactions offer a stage to produce this exotic state of matter and the enhanced production of strange particles during these reactions can be studied within the framework of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). We have tried to investigate the role of strangeness under the compact star phenomenology. Emphasis is laid upon the possibility of existence of a third family of strange quark stars and its study help in revealing a number of unexplored features of the cosmos. Bag model parameters have been used to determine some integral parameters for a sequence of strange stars with crust and strange dwarfs constructed out of strange quark matter crust. A comparative analysis is performed between the strange and neutron stars and the strange and white dwarfs based upon these intrinsic parameters and paramount differences are observed. The intimacy between astrophysics and strange quarks depends strongly upon the strange quark matter hypothesis. It states that for a collection of more than a few hundred u, d and s quarks, the energy per baryon E/A of strange quark matter (SQM) can be well below the energy per baryon of the most stable atomic nuclei

  2. The Stellar-Solar Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T. R.

    2004-05-01

    Many solar-stellar astronomers believe that the solar-stellar connection primarily is a one-way street: the exquisitely detailed studies of the solar surface, interior, and heliosphere strongly mold our views of the distant, unresolved stars. Perhaps many solar physicists have gone so far as to adopt the myopic view that stellar astronomy, by and large, is merely sponging up the fabulous insights from ever deeper examinations of our local star, but the ``dark side'' is not really capable of returning the favor. What could we possibly learn from the stars, that we don't already know from much better observations of the Sun? In my Introduction to this Topical Session, I will discuss two broad issues: (1) the present divergence between solar and stellar physics (driven by the different goals and tools of the two disciplines); and (2) the diversity of stars in the H-R diagram, to help inform our understanding of solar processes. Today, there are observations of stars that greatly exceed the quality of analogous solar measurements: e.g., HST/STIS UV echelle spectra of Alpha Cen A; Chandra transmission grating spectra of solar-type stars; and only recently have we obtained a definitive understanding of the Sun's soft X-ray luminosity in the key ROSAT/PSPC band. The lack of equivalent solar observations hinders practical applications of the solar-stellar connection. On the more informative side, the evolutionary paths of other stars can be quite different from the Sun's, with potentially dramatic influences on phenomena such as magnetic activity. Equally important, examples of Sun-like stars can be found at all stages of evolution, from proplyds to red giants, in the volume of nearby space out to 500 pc. In short, the solar-stellar connection need not be a one-way street, but rather a powerful tool to explore solar processes within the broader context of stars and stellar evolution. This work was supported by NASA grant NAG5-13058.

  3. Blue ocean strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2004-10-01

    Despite a long-term decline in the circus industry, Cirque du Soleil profitably increased revenue 22-fold over the last ten years by reinventing the circus. Rather than competing within the confines of the existing industry or trying to steal customers from rivals, Cirque developed uncontested market space that made the competition irrelevant. Cirque created what the authors call a blue ocean, a previously unknown market space. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profitable and rapid. In red oceans--that is, in all the industries already existing--companies compete by grabbing for a greater share of limited demand. As the market space gets more crowded, prospects for profits and growth decline. Products turn into commodities, and increasing competition turns the water bloody. There are two ways to create blue oceans. One is to launch completely new industries, as eBay did with online auctions. But it's much more common for a blue ocean to be created from within a red ocean when a company expands the boundaries of an existing industry. In studying more than 150 blue ocean creations in over 30 industries, the authors observed that the traditional units of strategic analysis--company and industry--are of limited use in explaining how and why blue oceans are created. The most appropriate unit of analysis is the strategic move, the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market-creating business offering. Creating blue oceans builds brands. So powerful is blue ocean strategy, in fact, that a blue ocean strategic move can create brand equity that lasts for decades.

  4. Targeted Optimization of Quasi-Symmetric Stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegna, Chris C. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Anderson, D. T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Talmadge, J. N. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-10-06

    The proposed research focuses on targeted areas of plasma physics dedicated to improving the stellarator concept. Research was pursued in the technical areas of edge/divertor physics in 3D configurations, magnetic island physics in stellarators, the role of 3D shaping on microinstabilities and turbulent transport and energetic ion confinement in stellarators.

  5. Thermodynamically stable blue phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, F; Morris, S M; Terentjev, E M; Coles, H J

    2010-04-16

    We show theoretically that flexoelectricity stabilizes blue phases in chiral liquid crystals. Induced internal polarization reduces the elastic energy cost of splay and bend deformations surrounding singular lines in the director field. The energy of regions of double twist is unchanged. This in turn reduces the free energy of the blue phase with respect to that of the chiral nematic phase, leading to stability over a wider temperature range. The theory explains the discovery of large temperature range blue phases in highly flexoelectric "bimesogenic" and "bent-core" materials, and predicts how this range may be increased further.

  6. Predictions of stellar occultations by TNOs/Centaurs using Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmars, Josselin; Camargo, Julio; Berard, Diane; Sicardy, Bruno; Leiva, Rodrigo; Vieira-Martins, Roberto; Braga-Ribas, Felipe; Assafin, Marcelo; Rossi, Gustavo; Chariklo occultations Team, Rio Group, Lucky Star Occultation Team, Granada Occultation Team

    2017-10-01

    Stellar occultations are the unique technique from the ground to access physical parameters of the distant solar system objects, such as the measure of the size and the shape at kilometric level, the detection of tenuous atmospheres (few nanobars), and the investigation of close vicinity (satellites, rings, jets).Predictions of stellar occultations require accurate positions of the star and the object.The Gaia DR1 catalog now allows to get stellar position to the milliarcsecond (mas) level. The main uncertainty in the prediction remains in the position of the object (tens to hundreds of mas).Now, we take advantage of the NIMA method for the orbit determination that uses the most recent observations reduced by the Gaia DR1 catalog and the astrometric positions derived from previous positive occultations.Up to now, we have detected nearly 50 positive occultations for about 20 objects that provide astrometric positions of the object at the time of the occultation. The uncertainty of these positions only depends on the uncertainty on the position of the occulted stars, which is a few mas with the Gaia DR1 catalog. The main limitation is now on the proper motion of the star which is only given for bright stars in the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution. This limitation will be solved with the publicationof the Gaia DR2 expected on April 2018 giving proper motions and parallaxes for the Gaia stars. Until this date, we use hybrid stellar catalogs (UCAC5, HSOY) that provide proper motions derived from Gaia DR1 and another stellar catalog.Recently, the Gaia team presented a release of three preliminary Gaia DR2 stellar positions involved in the occultations by Chariklo (22 June and 23 July 2017) and by Triton (5 October 2017).Taking the case of Chariklo as an illustration, we will present a comparison between the proper motions of DR2 and the other catalogs and we will show how the Gaia DR2 will lead to a mas level precision in the orbit and in the prediction of stellar

  7. HUBBLE SPIES BROWN DWARFS IN NEARBY STELLAR NURSERY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Probing deep within a neighborhood stellar nursery, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope uncovered a swarm of newborn brown dwarfs. The orbiting observatory's near-infrared camera revealed about 50 of these objects throughout the Orion Nebula's Trapezium cluster [image at right], about 1,500 light-years from Earth. Appearing like glistening precious stones surrounding a setting of sparkling diamonds, more than 300 fledgling stars and brown dwarfs surround the brightest, most massive stars [center of picture] in Hubble's view of the Trapezium cluster's central region. All of the celestial objects in the Trapezium were born together in this hotbed of star formation. The cluster is named for the trapezoidal alignment of those central massive stars. Brown dwarfs are gaseous objects with masses so low that their cores never become hot enough to fuse hydrogen, the thermonuclear fuel stars like the Sun need to shine steadily. Instead, these gaseous objects fade and cool as they grow older. Brown dwarfs around the age of the Sun (5 billion years old) are very cool and dim, and therefore are difficult for telescopes to find. The brown dwarfs discovered in the Trapezium, however, are youngsters (1 million years old). So they're still hot and bright, and easier to see. This finding, along with observations from ground-based telescopes, is further evidence that brown dwarfs, once considered exotic objects, are nearly as abundant as stars. The image and results appear in the Sept. 20 issue of the Astrophysical Journal. The brown dwarfs are too dim to be seen in a visible-light image taken by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 [picture at left]. This view also doesn't show the assemblage of infant stars seen in the near-infrared image. That's because the young stars are embedded in dense clouds of dust and gas. The Hubble telescope's near-infrared camera, the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer, penetrated those clouds to capture a view of those

  8. Blue Ribbon Panel Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog by the NCI acting director thanking the cancer community for contributing to the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel report, which was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board on September 7.

  9. New York Blue

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — New York Blue is used cooperatively by the Laboratory and Stony Brook University as part of the New York Center for Computation Sciences. Ranked as the 28th fastest...

  10. Structure of relativistic stellar configurations. Linear stellar model in GRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ureche, V.

    1980-01-01

    The equations which describe the hydrostatic equilibrium of a relativistic stellar configuration with a spherical symmetric gravitational field (without rotational, tidal or magnetic perturbations) are presented. With suitable transformations, the equations of mass continuity and of hydrostatic equilibrium are given in a non-dimensional form. With the obtained equations the homogeneous stellar model is studied. Instead of the general accepted condition R>(9/8)Rsub(g), the new stability conditions R(>=)(9/5)Rsub(g) and R(>=)(4/3)Rsub(g) were obtained, corresponding to the restrictions of the pressure P( 2 and respectively P( 2 . The linear stellar model, used by Stein for the study of the newtonian star structure, is transposed in the frame of GRT. In this case, for the equation of mass continuity an exact solution was obtained, while the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium was reduced to a numerical integrable form, with an adequate boundary restrictions of the pressure the stability criteria R> or approximately 1.85 Rsub(g) and respectively R> or approximately 1.49 Rsub(g) were obtained. (author)

  11. Classifying TDSS Stellar Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Rachael Christina; Green, Paul J.; TDSS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS), a subprogram of SDSS-IV eBOSS, obtains classification/discovery spectra of point-source photometric variables selected from PanSTARRS and SDSS multi-color light curves regardless of object color or lightcurve shape. Tens of thousands of TDSS spectra are already available and have been spectroscopically classified both via pipeline and by visual inspection. About half of these spectra are quasars, half are stars. Our goal is to classify the stars with their correct variability types. We do this by acquiring public multi-epoch light curves for brighter stars (rpulsating white dwarfs, and other exotic systems. The key difference between our catalog and others is that along with the light curves, we will be using TDSS spectra to help in the classification of variable type, as spectra are rich with information allowing estimation of physical parameters like temperature, metallicity, gravity, etc. This work was supported by the SDSS Research Experience for Undergraduates program, which is funded by a grant from Sloan Foundation to the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  12. Predicting gravitational lensing by stellar remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alexander J.; Stefano, R. Di; Lépine, S.; Urama, J.; Pham, D.; Baker, C.

    2018-03-01

    Gravitational lensing provides a means to measure mass that does not rely on detecting and analysing light from the lens itself. Compact objects are ideal gravitational lenses, because they have relatively large masses and are dim. In this paper, we describe the prospects for predicting lensing events generated by the local population of compact objects, consisting of 250 neutron stars, five black holes, and ≈35 000 white dwarfs. By focusing on a population of nearby compact objects with measured proper motions and known distances from us, we can measure their masses by studying the characteristics of any lensing event they generate. Here, we concentrate on shifts in the position of a background source due to lensing by a foreground compact object. With Hubble Space Telescope, JWST, and Gaia, measurable centroid shifts caused by lensing are relatively frequent occurrences. We find that 30-50 detectable events per decade are expected for white dwarfs. Because relatively few neutron stars and black holes have measured distances and proper motions, it is more difficult to compute realistic rates for them. However, we show that at least one isolated neutron star has likely produced detectable events during the past several decades. This work is particularly relevant to the upcoming data releases by the Gaia mission and also to data that will be collected by JWST. Monitoring predicted microlensing events will not only help to determine the masses of compact objects, but will also potentially discover dim companions to these stellar remnants, including orbiting exoplanets.

  13. Modular Stellarator Fusion Reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    A preliminary conceptual study is made of the Modular Stellarator Reactor (MSR). A steady-state ignited, DT-fueled, magnetic fusion reactor is proposed for use as a central electric-power station. The MSR concept combines the physics of the classic stellarator confinement topology with an innovative, modular-coil design. Parametric tradeoff calculations are described, leading to the selection of an interim design point for a 4-GWt plant based on Alcator transport scaling and an average beta value of 0.04 in an l = 2 system with a plasma aspect ratio of 11. The physics basis of the design point is described together with supporting magnetics, coil-force, and stress computations. The approach and results presented herein will be modified in the course of ongoing work to form a firmer basis for a detailed conceptual design of the MSR

  14. Characterizing stellar and exoplanetary environments

    CERN Document Server

    Khodachenko, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    In this book an international group of specialists discusses studies of exoplanets subjected to extreme stellar radiation and plasma conditions. It is shown that such studies will help us to understand how terrestrial planets and their atmospheres, including the early Venus, Earth and Mars, evolved during the host star’s active early phase. The book presents an analysis of findings from Hubble Space Telescope observations of transiting exoplanets, as well as applications of advanced numerical models for characterizing the upper atmosphere structure and stellar environments of exoplanets. The authors also address detections of atoms and molecules in the atmosphere of “hot Jupiters” by NASA’s Spitzer telescope. The observational and theoretical investigations and discoveries presented are both timely and important in the context of the next generation of space telescopes. 
 The book is divided into four main parts, grouping chapters on exoplanet host star radiation and plasma environments, exoplanet u...

  15. ACCELERATED FITTING OF STELLAR SPECTRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-01-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15–30 labels simultaneously.

  16. The SLUGGS survey: globular cluster stellar population trends from weak absorption lines in stacked spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Christopher; Forbes, Duncan A.; Brodie, Jean P.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay; Conroy, Charlie; Foster, Caroline; Pastorello, Nicola; Pota, Vincenzo; Arnold, Jacob A.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey, we stack 1137 Keck DEIMOS (Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph) spectra of globular clusters from 10 galaxies to study their stellar populations in detail. The stacked spectra have median signal-to-noise ratios of ˜90 Å-1. Besides the calcium triplet, we study weaker sodium, magnesium, titanium and iron lines as well as the Hα and higher order Paschen hydrogen lines. In general, the stacked spectra are consistent with old ages and a Milky Way-like initial mass function. However, we see different metal line index strengths at fixed colour and magnitude, and differences in the calcium triplet-colour relation from galaxy to galaxy. We interpret this as strong evidence for variations in the globular cluster colour-metallicity relation between galaxies. Two possible explanations for the colour-metallicity relation variations are that the average ages of globular clusters vary from galaxy to galaxy or that the average abundances of light elements (i.e. He, C, N and O) differ between galaxies. Stacking spectra by magnitude, we see that the colours become redder and metal line indices stronger with brighter magnitudes. These trends are consistent with the previously reported `blue tilts' being mass-metallicity relations.

  17. SECULAR EVOLUTION OF BINARIES NEAR MASSIVE BLACK HOLES: FORMATION OF COMPACT BINARIES, MERGER/COLLISION PRODUCTS AND G2-LIKE OBJECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodan, Snezana; Antonini, Fabio; Perets, Hagai B.

    2015-01-01

    Here we discuss the evolution of binaries around massive black holes (MBHs) in nuclear stellar clusters. We focus on their secular evolution due to the perturbation by the MBHs, while simplistically accounting for their collisional evolution. Binaries with highly inclined orbits with respect to their orbits around MBHs are strongly affected by secular processes, which periodically change their eccentricities and inclinations (e.g., Kozai-Lidov cycles). During periapsis approach, dissipative processes such as tidal friction may become highly efficient, and may lead to shrinkage of a binary orbit and even to its merger. Binaries in this environment can therefore significantly change their orbital evolution due to the MBH third-body perturbative effects. Such orbital evolution may impinge on their later stellar evolution. Here we follow the secular dynamics of such binaries and its coupling to tidal evolution, as well as the stellar evolution of such binaries on longer timescales. We find that stellar binaries in the central parts of nuclear stellar clusters (NSCs) are highly likely to evolve into eccentric and/or short-period binaries, and become strongly interacting binaries either on the main sequence (at which point they may even merge), or through their later binary stellar evolution. The central parts of NSCs therefore catalyze the formation and evolution of strongly interacting binaries, and lead to the enhanced formation of blue stragglers, X-ray binaries, gravitational wave sources, and possible supernova progenitors. Induced mergers/collisions may also lead to the formation of G2-like cloud-like objects such as the one recently observed in the Galactic center

  18. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    In the constellation of Ophiuchus, above the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, there lurks a stellar corpse spinning 30 times per second -- an exotic star known as a radio pulsar. This object was unknown until it was discovered last week by three high school students. These students are part of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) project, run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, and West Virginia University (WVU). The pulsar, which may be a rare kind of neutron star called a recycled pulsar, was discovered independently by Virginia students Alexander Snider and Casey Thompson, on January 20, and a day later by Kentucky student Hannah Mabry. "Every day, I told myself, 'I have to find a pulsar. I better find a pulsar before this class ends,'" said Mabry. When she actually made the discovery, she could barely contain her excitement. "I started screaming and jumping up and down." Thompson was similarly expressive. "After three years of searching, I hadn't found a single thing," he said, "but when I did, I threw my hands up in the air and said, 'Yes!'." Snider said, "It actually feels really neat to be the first person to ever see something like that. It's an uplifting feeling." As part of the PSC, the students analyze real data from NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to find pulsars. The students' teachers -- Debra Edwards of Sherando High School, Leah Lorton of James River High School, and Jennifer Carter of Rowan County Senior High School -- all introduced the PSC in their classes, and interested students formed teams to continue the work. Even before the discovery, Mabry simply enjoyed the search. "It just feels like you're actually doing something," she said. "It's a good feeling." Once the pulsar candidate was reported to NRAO, Project Director Rachel Rosen took a look and agreed with the young scientists. A followup observing session was scheduled on the GBT. Snider and Mabry traveled to West Virginia to assist in the

  19. Clinical and histological effects of blue light on normal skin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinpenning, M.M.; Smits, T.; Frunt, M.H.A.; Erp, P.E.J. van; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Gerritsen, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Phototherapy with visible light is gaining interest in dermatological practice. Theoretically, blue light could induce biological effects comparable to ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation. OBJECTIVES: To study the effects of blue light on normal skin in terms of photodamage, skin ageing and

  20. Fluctuating and Directional Asymmetry of the Blue Mussel (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lajus, D.; Katolikova, M.; Strelkov, P.; Hummel, H.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we examined morphological variation at different levels to study performance and population structuring of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Our objectives were: (i) to develop an integrated technique for analyzing morphological variation in blue mussels and, based on this technique; (ii)

  1. Characterization of dough baked via blue laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blutinger, Jonathan David; Meijers, Yorán; Chen, Peter Yichen; Zheng, Changxi; Grinspun, Eitan; Lipson, Hod

    2018-01-01

    Depth of heat penetration and temperature must be precisely controlled to optimize nutritional value, appearance, and taste of food products. These objectives can be achieved with the use of a high-resolution blue diode laser—which operates at 445 nm—by adjusting the water content of the dough and

  2. Natural Blue Food Colour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roda-Serrat, Maria Cinta

    In recent years, there has been a growing tendency to avoid the use of artificial colorants and additives in food products, especially after some studies linked their consumption with behavioural changes in children. However, the incorporation of colorants from natural origin remains a challenge...... for food technologists, as these are typically less vivid and less stable than their synthetic alternatives. Regarding blue colorants, phycocyanins from cyanobacteria are currently in the spotlight as promising new natural blue colorants. Phycocyanins are proteins which blue colour results from...... the presence of the chromophore phycocyanobilin (PCB), a covalently attached linear tetrapyrrole. The applications of phycocyanins as food colorants are however limited, as they show poor stability in certain conditions of pH, light and temperature. Cleavage of PCB from the protein followed by careful product...

  3. A Blue Lagoon Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen

    2007-01-01

    We consider a specific function of two variables whose graph surface resembles a blue lagoon. The function has a saddle point $p$, but when the function is restricted to any given straight line through $p$ it has a {\\em{strict local minimum}} along that line at $p$.......We consider a specific function of two variables whose graph surface resembles a blue lagoon. The function has a saddle point $p$, but when the function is restricted to any given straight line through $p$ it has a {\\em{strict local minimum}} along that line at $p$....

  4. Stellar-Mass Black Holes in the Solar Neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Chisholm, J S R; Kolb, Edward W; Chisholm, James R.; Dodelson, Scott; Kolb, Edward W.

    2003-01-01

    We search for nearby, isolated, accreting, ``stellar-mass'' (3 to $100M_\\odot$) black holes. Models suggest a synchrotron spectrum in visible wavelengths and some emission in X-ray wavelengths. Of 3.7 million objects in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Early Data Release, about 150,000 have colors and properties consistent with such a spectrum, and 47 of these objects are X-ray sources from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Optical spectra exclude seven of these. We give the positions and colors of these 40 black-hole candidates, as well as a measure of their distances from the stellar loci in color--color space. We discuss uncertainties the expected number of sources, and the contribution of black holes to local dark matter.

  5. Stellar Feedback from Galactic Bulges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shikui; Wang, D. Q.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that feedback from galactic bulges can play an essential role in the halo gas dynamics and the evolution of their host galaxies by conducting a series of 1-D and 3-D simulations. In our 1-D models we approximately divide the the bulge stellar feedback into two phases: 1) a starbusrt-induced blastwave from the formation of bulge built up through frequent major mergers at high redshift and 2) a gradual feedback in forms of stellar wind and Type Ia SNe from low mass stars. Our simulations show that the combination of the two-phase feedback can heat the surrounding gas beyond the virial radius and stop further gas accretion, which naturally produces a baryon deficit around MW-like galaxies and explains the lack of large-scale X-ray halos, consistent with observations. The hot gas dynamics depends sensitively on the environment and bulge formation history. This dependency may account for the large dispersion in the X-ray luminosities of the galaxies with similar L_B. In the 3-D simulations, we examine the spatial, thermal, and chemical substructures and their effects on X-ray measurements. The sporadic SN explosion creates wealth of filamentary and shell-like structures in the hot gas and produces a broad lognormal-like emission-measure distribution, which enhances the X-ray emission at a low and high temperatures. The luminosity at 0.3-2.0 keV band is nearly tripled due to the gas structures. We find that the SN Ia ejecta are not well-mixed with the ambient medium within the bulge scale, and the X-ray emission is primarily from shocked stellar wind materials which in general has low metallicity.

  6. Physics of Compact Advanced Stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarnstorff, M.C.; Berry, L.A.; Brooks, A.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.-Y.; Hirshman, S.; Hudson, S.; Ku, L.-P.; Lazarus, E.; Mikkelsen, D.; Monticello, D.; Neilson, G.H.; Pomphrey, N.; Reiman, A.; Spong, D.; Strickler, D.; Boozer, A.; Cooper, W.A.; Goldston, R.; Hatcher, R.; Isaev, M.; Kessel, C.; Lewandowski, J.; Lyon, J.; Merkel, P.; Mynick, H.; Nelson, B.E.; Nuehrenberg, C.; Redi, M.; Reiersen, W.; Rutherford, P.; Sanchez, R.; Schmidt, J.; White, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    Compact optimized stellarators offer novel solutions for confining high-beta plasmas and developing magnetic confinement fusion. The 3-D plasma shape can be designed to enhance the MHD stability without feedback or nearby conducting structures and provide drift-orbit confinement similar to tokamaks. These configurations offer the possibility of combining the steady-state low-recirculating power, external control, and disruption resilience of previous stellarators with the low-aspect ratio, high beta-limit, and good confinement of advanced tokamaks. Quasi-axisymmetric equilibria have been developed for the proposed National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) with average aspect ratio 4-4.4 and average elongation of approximately 1.8. Even with bootstrap-current consistent profiles, they are passively stable to the ballooning, kink, vertical, Mercier, and neoclassical-tearing modes for beta > 4%, without the need for external feedback or conducting walls. The bootstrap current generates only 1/4 of the magnetic rotational transform at beta = 4% (the rest is from the coils), thus the equilibrium is much less nonlinear and is more controllable than similar advanced tokamaks. The enhanced stability is a result of ''reversed'' global shear, the spatial distribution of local shear, and the large fraction of externally generated transform. Transport simulations show adequate fast-ion confinement and thermal neoclassical transport similar to equivalent tokamaks. Modular coils have been designed which reproduce the physics properties, provide good flux surfaces, and allow flexible variation of the plasma shape to control the predicted MHD stability and transport properties

  7. STELLAR MASS DEPENDENT DISK DISPERSAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Grant M.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    We use published optical spectral and infrared (IR) excess data from nine young clusters and associations to study the stellar mass dependent dispersal of circumstellar disks. All clusters older than ∼3 Myr show a decrease in disk fraction with increasing stellar mass for solar to higher mass stars. This result is significant at about the 1σ level in each cluster. For the complete set of clusters we reject the null hypothesis-that solar and intermediate-mass stars lose their disks at the same rate-with 95%-99.9% confidence. To interpret this behavior, we investigate the impact of grain growth, binary companions, and photoevaporation on the evolution of disk signatures. Changes in grain growth timescales at fixed disk temperature may explain why early-type stars with IR excesses appear to evolve faster than their later-type counterparts. Little evidence that binary companions affect disk evolution suggests that photoevaporation is the more likely mechanism for disk dispersal. A simple photoevaporation model provides a good fit to the observed disk fractions for solar and intermediate-mass stars. Although the current mass-dependent disk dispersal signal is not strong, larger and more complete samples of clusters with ages of 3-5 Myr can improve the significance and provide better tests of theoretical models. In addition, the orbits of extra-solar planets can constrain models of disk dispersal and migration. We suggest that the signature of stellar mass dependent disk dispersal due to photoevaporation may be present in the orbits of observed extra-solar planets. Planets orbiting hosts more massive than ∼1.6 M sun may have larger orbits because the disks in which they formed were dispersed before they could migrate.

  8. Development of quasi-isodynamic stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nührenberg, Jürgen

    2010-12-01

    Theoretical stellarator research from MHD-stable stellarators via quasi-helically symmetric ones to Wendelstein 7-X, quasi-axisymmetric tokamaks and quasi-isodynamic stellarators is sketched. Research strategy, computational aspects and various favorable properties are emphasized. The results found, but only together with the completion of according experimental devices and their scientific exploitation, may form a basis for selecting the confinement geometry most viable for fusion.

  9. Ambitious Survey Spots Stellar Nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    -dimensional geometry of the Magellanic system. Chris Evans from the VMC team adds: "The VISTA images will allow us to extend our studies beyond the inner regions of the Tarantula into the multitude of smaller stellar nurseries nearby, which also harbour a rich population of young and massive stars. Armed with the new, exquisite infrared images, we will be able to probe the cocoons in which massive stars are still forming today, while also looking at their interaction with older stars in the wider region." The wide-field image shows a host of different objects. The bright area above the centre is the Tarantula Nebula itself, with the RMC 136 cluster of massive stars in its core. To the left is the NGC 2100 star cluster. To the right is the tiny remnant of the supernova SN1987A (eso1032). Below the centre are a series of star-forming regions including NGC 2080 - nicknamed the "Ghost Head Nebula" - and the NGC 2083 star cluster. The VISTA Magellanic Cloud Survey is one of six huge near-infrared surveys of the southern sky that will take up most of the first five years of operations of VISTA. Notes [1] VISTA ― the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy ― is the newest telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory in northern Chile. VISTA is a survey telescope working at near-infrared wavelengths and is the world's largest survey telescope. Its large mirror, wide field of view and very sensitive detectors will reveal a completely new view of the southern sky. The telescope is housed on the peak adjacent to the one hosting ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and shares the same exceptional observing conditions. VISTA has a main mirror that is 4.1 m across. In photographic terms it can be thought of as a 67-megapixel digital camera with a 13 000 mm f/3.25 mirror lens. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries

  10. Recent advances in stellarator optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, D. A.; Boozer, A. H.; Brown, T.; Breslau, J.; Curreli, D.; Landreman, M.; Lazerson, S. A.; Lore, J.; Mynick, H.; Neilson, G. H.; Pomphrey, N.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Zolfaghari, A.

    2017-12-01

    Computational optimization has revolutionized the field of stellarator design. To date, optimizations have focused primarily on optimization of neoclassical confinement and ideal MHD stability, although limited optimization of other parameters has also been performed. The purpose of this paper is to outline a select set of new concepts for stellarator optimization that, when taken as a group, present a significant step forward in the stellarator concept. One of the criticisms that has been leveled at existing methods of design is the complexity of the resultant field coils. Recently, a new coil optimization code—COILOPT++, which uses a spline instead of a Fourier representation of the coils,—was written and included in the STELLOPT suite of codes. The advantage of this method is that it allows the addition of real space constraints on the locations of the coils. The code has been tested by generating coil designs for optimized quasi-axisymmetric stellarator plasma configurations of different aspect ratios. As an initial exercise, a constraint that the windings be vertical was placed on large major radius half of the non-planar coils. Further constraints were also imposed that guaranteed that sector blanket modules could be removed from between the coils, enabling a sector maintenance scheme. Results of this exercise will be presented. New ideas on methods for the optimization of turbulent transport have garnered much attention since these methods have led to design concepts that are calculated to have reduced turbulent heat loss. We have explored possibilities for generating an experimental database to test whether the reduction in transport that is predicted is consistent with experimental observations. To this end, a series of equilibria that can be made in the now latent QUASAR experiment have been identified that will test the predicted transport scalings. Fast particle confinement studies aimed at developing a generalized optimization algorithm are also

  11. Drift waves in a stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Sedlak, J.E.; Similon, P.L.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Ross, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    We investigate the eigenmode structure of drift waves in a straight stellarator using the ballooning mode formalism. The electrons are assumed to be adiabatic and the ions constitute a cold, magnetized fluid. The effective potential has an overall parabolic envelope but is modulated strongly by helical ripples along B. We have found two classes of solutions: those that are strongly localized in local helical wells, and those that are weakly localized and have broad spatial extent. The weakly localized modes decay spatially due to the existence of Mathieu resonances between the periods of the eigenfunction and the effective potential

  12. Characterizing Convection in Stellar Atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, Joel; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre; Robinson, Frank

    2011-01-01

    We perform 3D radiative hydrodynamic simulations to study the properties of convection in the superadiabatic layer of stars. The simulations show differences in both the stratification and turbulent quantities for different types of stars. We extract turbulent pressure and eddy sizes, as well as the T-τ relation for different stars and find that they are sensitive to the energy flux and gravity. We also show that contrary to what is usually assumed in the field of stellar atmospheres, the structure and gas dynamics of simulations of turbulent atmospheres cannot be parameterized with T eff and log(g) alone.

  13. On the threshold anisotropy for unstable spherical stellar systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyachenko, V. L.; Polyachenko, E. V., E-mail: epolyach@inasan.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation); Shukhman, I. G., E-mail: shukhman@iszf.irk.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2012-04-15

    The radial orbit instability generally arises in anisotropic collisionless stellar systems with the dominance of radial motions over transverse ones. Using the simplest anisotropic generalization of polytrope models for spherical clusters as an example, we show that the instability growth rates become exponentially small as the isotropic limit is approached. Given the finite lifetime of real astronomical objects, these systems should be assumed to become stable at some finite radial anisotropy.

  14. ASteCA: Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perren, G. I.; Vázquez, R. A.; Piatti, A. E.

    2015-04-01

    We present the Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis package (ASteCA), a suit of tools designed to fully automate the standard tests applied on stellar clusters to determine their basic parameters. The set of functions included in the code make use of positional and photometric data to obtain precise and objective values for a given cluster's center coordinates, radius, luminosity function and integrated color magnitude, as well as characterizing through a statistical estimator its probability of being a true physical cluster rather than a random overdensity of field stars. ASteCA incorporates a Bayesian field star decontamination algorithm capable of assigning membership probabilities using photometric data alone. An isochrone fitting process based on the generation of synthetic clusters from theoretical isochrones and selection of the best fit through a genetic algorithm is also present, which allows ASteCA to provide accurate estimates for a cluster's metallicity, age, extinction and distance values along with its uncertainties. To validate the code we applied it on a large set of over 400 synthetic MASSCLEAN clusters with varying degrees of field star contamination as well as a smaller set of 20 observed Milky Way open clusters (Berkeley 7, Bochum 11, Czernik 26, Czernik 30, Haffner 11, Haffner 19, NGC 133, NGC 2236, NGC 2264, NGC 2324, NGC 2421, NGC 2627, NGC 6231, NGC 6383, NGC 6705, Ruprecht 1, Tombaugh 1, Trumpler 1, Trumpler 5 and Trumpler 14) studied in the literature. The results show that ASteCA is able to recover cluster parameters with an acceptable precision even for those clusters affected by substantial field star contamination. ASteCA is written in Python and is made available as an open source code which can be downloaded ready to be used from its official site.

  15. Rapid mass segregation in small stellar clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, Mario; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Roberto

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we focus our attention on small-to-intermediate N-body systems that are, initially, distributed uniformly in space and dynamically `cool' (virial ratios Q=2T/|Ω| below ˜0.3). In this work, we study the mass segregation that emerges after the initial violent dynamical evolution. At this scope, we ran a set of high precision N-body simulations of isolated clusters by means of HiGPUs, our direct summation N-body code. After the collapse, the system shows a clear mass segregation. This (quick) mass segregation occurs in two phases: the first shows up in clumps originated by sub-fragmentation before the deep overall collapse; this segregation is partly erased during the deep collapse to re-emerge, abruptly, during the second phase, that follows the first bounce of the system. In this second stage, the proper clock to measure the rate of segregation is the dynamical time after virialization, which (for cold and cool systems) may be significantly different from the crossing time evaluated from initial conditions. This result is obtained for isolated clusters composed of stars of two different masses (in the ratio mh/ml=2), at varying their number ratio, and is confirmed also in presence of a massive central object (simulating a black hole of stellar size). Actually, in stellar systems starting their dynamical evolution from cool conditions, the fast mass segregation adds to the following, slow, secular segregation which is collisionally induced. The violent mass segregation is an effect persistent over the whole range of N (128 ≤ N ≤1,024) investigated, and is an interesting feature on the astronomical-observational side, too. The semi-steady state reached after virialization corresponds to a mass segregated distribution function rather than that of equipartition of kinetic energy per unit mass as it should result from violent relaxation.

  16. The Blue Hook Populations of Massive Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    Blue hook stars are a class of hot { 35,000 K} subluminous horizontal branch stars that have been recently discovered using HST ultraviolet images of the globular clusters omega Cen and NGC 2808. These stars occupy a region of the HR diagram that is unexplained by canonical stellar evolution theory. Using new theoretical evolutionary and atmospheric models, we have shown that the blue hook stars are very likely the progeny of stars that undergo extensive internal mixing during a late helium core flash on the white dwarf cooling curve. This "flash mixing" produces an enormous enhancement of the surface helium and carbon abundances, which suppresses the flux in the far ultraviolet. Although flash mixing is more likely to occur in stars that are born with high helium abundances, a high helium abundance, by itself, does not explain the presence of a blue hook population - flash mixing of the envelope is required. We propose ACS ultraviolet {SBC/F150LP and HRC/F250W} observations of the five additional globular clusters for which the presence of blue hook stars is suspected from longer wavelength observations. Like omega Cen and NGC 2808, these five targets are also among the most massive globular clusters, because less massive clusters show no evidence for blue hook stars. Because our targets span 1.5 dex in metallicity, we will be able to test our prediction that flash-mixing should be less drastic in metal-rich blue hook stars. In addition, our observations will test the hypothesis that blue hook stars only form in globular clusters massive enough to retain the helium-enriched ejecta from the first stellar generation. If this hypothesis is correct, then our observations will yield important constraints on the chemical evolution and early formation history in globular clusters, as well as the role of helium self-enrichment in producing blue horizontal branch morphologies and multiple main sequence turnoffs. Finally, our observations will provide new insight into the

  17. The "Blue Banana" Revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faludi, A.K.F.

    2015-01-01

    This essay is about the “Blue Banana”. Banana is the name given subsequently by others to a Dorsale européenne (European backbone) identified empirically by Roger Brunet. In a background study to the Communication of the European Commission ‘Europe 2000’, Klaus Kunzmann and Michael Wegener put

  18. The Blue Baby Syndrome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 10. The Blue Baby Syndrome - Nitrate Poisoning in Humans. Deepanjan Majumdar. General Article Volume 8 Issue 10 October 2003 pp 20-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in a stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, K.; Miyamoto, K.; Ohasa, K.; Wakatani, M.

    1977-05-01

    Numerical studies of stability on kink and resistive tearing modes in a linear stellarator are presented for various current profiles and helical fields. In the case of an l = 2 helical field, a magnetic shear vanishes and the stability diagram is given by the straight lines with iota sup(σ) + iota sup(delta) = const., where iota sup(σ) is a rotational transform due to the plasma current and iota sup(delta) is due to the helical field. In the l = 2 stellarator with chi sup(delta) > 0.5, the m.h.d. stability against kink and tearing modes is improved compared with that in tokamaks. While an l = 3 helical component exists, the magnetic shear plays an important role in the stability properties. The stability diagrams become fairly complex; however, they can be explained by properties of the Euler equation. It should be noted that the internal kink modes become more unstable than in tokamaks by the l = 3 helical field. (auth.)

  20. Computing experiments on stellar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bouvier, P

    1972-01-01

    A stellar system being usually conceived, in a first approximation, as a group of point-like stars held together by their own gravitational mutual attraction, one may discriminate between three or four different lines of attack on the problem of the dynamical evolution of such a system. These are the straight-forward integration of the n- body problem, the statistical model description, the Monte Carlo technique, the Boltzmann moment approach. Direct numerical integration can now be applied to the dynamical evolution of star clusters containing up to 500 stars, which includes small to medium open stellar clusters, while statistical and Monte Carlo descriptions are better suited for systems of at least several thousand stars. The overall dynamic evolution of an isolated star cluster is characterized by the formation of a dense core surrounded by an extended halo, with some stars escaping with positive energy. This general feature has been confirmed in all the numerical experiments carried out in the last ten y...

  1. Globular clusters as tracers of stellar bimodality in elliptical galaxies: the case of NGC 1399

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Juan C.; Faifer, Favio; Geisler, Doug

    2005-02-01

    Globular cluster systems (GCSs) frequently show a bimodal distribution of cluster integrated colours. This work explores the arguments to support the idea that the same feature is shared by the diffuse stellar population of the galaxy they are associated with. The particular case of NGC 1399, one of the dominant central galaxies in the Fornax cluster, for which a new B surface brightness profile and (B-RKC) colours are presented, is discussed taking advantage of a recently published wide-field study of its GCS. The results show that the galaxy brightness profile and colour gradient, as well as the behaviour of the cumulative globular cluster specific frequency, are compatible with the presence of two dominant stellar populations, associated with the so-called `blue' and `red' globular cluster families. These globular families are characterized by different intrinsic specific frequencies (defined in terms of each stellar population): Sn= 3.3 +/- 0.3 in the case of the red globulars and Sn= 14.3 +/- 2.5 for the blue ones. We stress that this result does not necessarily conflict with recent works that point out a clear difference between the metallicity distribution of (resolved) halo stars and globulars when comparing their number statistics. The region within 0.5arcmin of the centre shows a deviation from the model profile (in both surface brightness and colour) that may be explained in terms of the presence of a bulge-like high-metallicity component. Otherwise, the model gives an excellent fit up to 12arcmin (or 66.5Kpc) from the centre, the galactocentric limit of our blue brightness profile. The inferred specific frequencies imply that, in terms of their associated stellar populations, the formation of the blue globulars took place with an efficiency about six times higher than that corresponding to their red counterparts. The similarity of the spatial distribution of the blue globulars with that inferred for dark matter, as well as with that of the X

  2. FORMATION OF ULTRA-COMPACT BLUE DWARF GALAXIES AND THEIR EVOLUTION INTO NUCLEATED DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We propose that there is an evolutionary link between ultra-compact blue dwarf galaxies (UCBDs) with active star formation and nucleated dwarfs based on the results of numerical simulations of dwarf–dwarf merging. We consider the observational fact that low-mass dwarfs can be very gas-rich, and thereby investigate the dynamical and chemical evolution of very gas-rich, dissipative dwarf–dwarf mergers. We find that the remnants of dwarf–dwarf mergers can be dominated by new stellar populations formed from the triggered starbursts and consequently can have blue colors and higher metallicities (Z ∼ [0.2–1]Z ⊙ ). We also find that the remnants of these mergers can have rather high mass densities (10 4 M ⊙ pc −3 ) within the central 10 pc and small half-light radii (40−100 pc). The radial stellar structures of some merger remnants are similar to those of nucleated dwarfs. Star formation can continue in nuclear gas disks (R < 100 pc) surrounding stellar galactic nuclei (SGNs) so that the SGNs can finally have multiple stellar populations with different ages and metallicities. These very compact blue remnants can be identified as UCBDs soon after merging and as nucleated dwarfs after the young stars fade. We discuss these results in the context of the origins of metal-rich ultra-compact dwarfs and SGNs

  3. The LAMOST stellar parameter pipeline at Peking University - LSP3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, M. S.; Liu, X. W.; Yuan, H. B.; Huang, Y.; Huo, Z. Y.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. Q.; Zhang, H. H.; Sun, N. C.; Wang, C.; Zhao, Y. H.; Shi, J. R.; Luo, A. L.; Li, G. P.; Wu, Y.; Bai, Z. R.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y. H.; Yuan, H. L.; Li, G. W.; Wei, Z.

    2015-03-01

    We introduce the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) stellar parameter pipeline at Peking University - LSP3, developed and implemented for the determinations of radial velocity Vr and stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g, metallicity [Fe/H]) for the LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey of the Galactic Anticentre (LSS-GAC). We describe the algorithms of LSP3 and examine the accuracy of parameters yielded by it. The precision and accuracy of parameters yielded are investigated by comparing results of multi-epoch observations and of candidate members of open and globular clusters, with photometric calibration, as well as with independent determinations available from a number of external data bases, including the PASTEL archive, the APOGEE, SDSS and RAVE surveys, as well as those released in the LAMOST DR1. The uncertainties of LSP3 parameters are characterized and quantified as a function of the spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and stellar atmospheric parameters. We conclude that the current implementation of LSP3 has achieved an accuracy of 5.0 km s-1, 150 K, 0.25 dex, 0.15 dex for the radial velocity, effective temperature, surface gravity and metallicity, respectively, for LSS-GAC spectra of FGK stars of SNRs per pixel higher than 10. The LSP3 has been applied to over a million LSS-GAC spectra collected hitherto. Stellar parameters yielded by the LSP3 will be released to the general public following the data policy of LAMOST, together with estimates of the interstellar extinction E(B - V) and stellar distances, deduced by combining spectroscopic and multiband photometric measurements using a variety of techniques.

  4. [Blue light and eye health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Leilei; Dai, Jinhui

    2015-01-01

    Blue light, with the wavelength between 400 nm and 500 nm, has caused public concern because of the injury to the retinal cells. Meanwhile, it is important in circadian rhythm regulation, scotopic vision and ocular growth. Is the blue light safe? Should it be eliminated from the daily life? Here we review the effect and safety of the blue light.

  5. Theories for convection in stellar atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordlund, Aa.

    1976-02-01

    A discussion of the fundamental differences between laboratory convection in a stellar atmosphere is presented. The shortcomings of laterally homogeneous model atmospheres are analysed, and the extent to which these shortcoming are avoided in the two-component representation is discussed. Finally a qualitative discussion on the scaling properties of stellar granulation is presented. (Auth.)

  6. Stellar Spectral Classification with Locality Preserving Projections ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With the help of computer tools and algorithms, automatic stellar spectral classification has become an area of current interest. The process of stellar spectral classification mainly includes two steps: dimension reduction and classification. As a popular dimensionality reduction technique, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) ...

  7. Structure of stellar hydroxyl masers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, M.J.; Muhleman, D.O.; Moran, J.M.; Johnston, K.J.; Schwartz, P.R.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents the results of two spectral-line very long baseline (VLB) interferometric experiments on stellar OH masers. These masers are usually associated with long-period variable stars, and exhibit a characteristic double-peaked 1612 MHz OH spectrum. The sources IRC +10011, R Aql, and U Ori were carefully studied in order to determine the spatial structure of their masers. Maser components in these sources exhibited a complex structure which can be interpreted in terms of ''core-halo'' models. For these sources, the emission at any velocity appears to originate from a small (approximately-less-than0.''03) region of brightness approximately-greater-than10 9 K, and from a large (approximately-greater-than0.''5) region of brightness approximately-less-than10 8 K. In IRC+10011, ''core'' components in the two OH peaks probably are separated by less than the apparent size of the ''halos.'' A map of the low-velocity emission of U Ori with a resolution of 0.''01 indicates that the ''cores'' are distributed over a region of only 0.''2. This region is smaller than the apparent sizes of the ''halos.'' Other sources surveyed to determine apparent maser sizes include IRC+50137, OH 1821--12, OH 1837--05, OH 26.5+0.6, W43 A, and VX Sgr at 1612 MHz; and W Hya, R Aql, and IRC--10529 at 1667 MHz. The results of all VLB observations of 1612 MHz stellar OH masers are summarized.The apparent sizes of the strongest components (''halos'') of stellar OH masers typically are approximately-greater-than0.''5, corresponding to linear dimensions of approximately-greater-than3 x 10 15 cm. These surprisingly large sizes imply brightness temperatures much lower than those observed in most other types of astronomical masers. The large sizes rule out models of the 1612 MHz OH masers that require contracting or rotating circumstellar envelopes to explain the double-peaked OH spectra, or that try to explain the apparent maser sizes in terms of interstellar or interplanetary scattering

  8. Stellar Structure and Evolution: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, C. Simon

    The synthesis of new elements takes place inside stars. How do stars evolve and distribute this creation to the universe at large? This article starts with the observables that the theory of stellar evolution aims to reproduce, and gives a quick overview of what that theory predicts (Sects. 2-3). It presents the equations governing stellar structure and evolution (Sects. 4-6) and the physics of stellar interiors (Sects. 7-9). Approximate and numerical methods for their solution are outlined (Sects. 10-11) and the general results of stellar structure and evolution are discussed (Sects. 12-13). The structure and evolution of horizontal-branch stars, hydrogen-deficient stars and other stellar remnants are also considered (Sects. 14-15).

  9. Astrospheres and Solar-like Stellar Winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Brian E.

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Stellar analogs for the solar wind have proven to be frustratingly difficult to detect directly. However, these stellar winds can be studied indirectly by observing the interaction regions carved out by the collisions between these winds and the interstellar medium (ISM. These interaction regions are called "astrospheres", analogous to the "heliosphere" surrounding the Sun. The heliosphere and astrospheres contain a population of hydrogen heated by charge exchange processes that can produce enough H I Ly alpha absorption to be detectable in UV spectra of nearby stars from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST. The amount of astrospheric absorption is a diagnostic for the strength of the stellar wind, so these observations have provided the first measurements of solar-like stellar winds. Results from these stellar wind studies and their implications for our understanding of the solar wind are reviewed here. Of particular interest are results concerning the past history of the solar wind and its impact on planetary atmospheres.

  10. STELLAR 'EGGS' EMERGE FROM MOLECULAR CLOUD (Star-Birth Clouds in M16)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This eerie, dark structure, resembling an imaginary sea serpent's head, is a column of cool molecular hydrogen gas (two atoms of hydrogen in each molecule) and dust that is an incubator for new stars. The stars are embedded inside finger-like protrusions extending from the top of the nebula. Each 'fingertip' is somewhat larger than our own solar system. The pillar is slowly eroding away by the ultraviolet light from nearby hot stars, a process called 'photoevaporation'. As it does, small globules of especially dense gas buried within the cloud is uncovered. These globules have been dubbed 'EGGs' -- an acronym for 'Evaporating Gaseous Globules'. The shadows of the EGGs protect gas behind them, resulting in the finger-like structures at the top of the cloud. Forming inside at least some of the EGGs are embryonic stars -- stars that abruptly stop growing when the EGGs are uncovered and they are separated from the larger reservoir of gas from which they were drawing mass. Eventually the stars emerge, as the EGGs themselves succumb to photoevaporation. The stellar EGGS are found, appropriately enough, in the 'Eagle Nebula' (also called M16 -- the 16th object in Charles Messier's 18th century catalog of 'fuzzy' permanent objects in the sky), a nearby star-forming region 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Serpens. The picture was taken on April 1, 1995 with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The color image is constructed from three separate images taken in the light of emission from different types of atoms. Red shows emission from singly-ionized sulfur atoms. Green shows emission from hydrogen. Blue shows light emitted by doubly- ionized oxygen atoms. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA Image files in GIF and JPEG format and captions may be accessed on Internet via anonymous ftp from oposite.stsci.edu in /pubinfo:

  11. THE YOUNG STELLAR POPULATION OF LYNDS 1340. AN INFRARED VIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kun, M.; Moór, A. [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege út 15-17 (Hungary); Wolf-Chase, G. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium, 1300 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Apai, D. [Steward Observatory, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Balog, Z. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); O’Linger-Luscusk, J. [On leave from California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Moriarty-Schieven, G. H., E-mail: kun@konkoly.hu [National Research Council—Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    We present results of an infrared study of the molecular cloud Lynds 1340, forming three groups of low- and intermediate-mass stars. Our goals are to identify and characterize the young stellar population of the cloud, study the relationships between the properties of the cloud and the emergent stellar groups, and integrate L1340 into the picture of the star-forming activity of our Galactic environment. We selected candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) from the Spitzer and WISE databases using various published color criteria and classified them based on the slope of the spectral energy distribution (SED). We identified 170 Class II, 27 flat SED, and 45 Class 0/I sources. High angular resolution near-infrared observations of the RNO 7 cluster, embedded in L1340, revealed eight new young stars of near-infrared excess. The surface density distribution of YSOs shows three groups, associated with the three major molecular clumps of L1340, each consisting of ≲100 members, including both pre-main-sequence stars and embedded protostars. New Herbig–Haro objects were identified in the Spitzer images. Our results demonstrate that L1340 is a prolific star-forming region of our Galactic environment in which several specific properties of the intermediate-mass mode of star formation can be studied in detail.

  12. Stellar Equilibrium in Semiclassical Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Rubio, Raúl

    2018-02-01

    The phenomenon of quantum vacuum polarization in the presence of a gravitational field is well understood and is expected to have a physical reality, but studies of its backreaction on the dynamics of spacetime are practically nonexistent outside of the specific context of homogeneous cosmologies. Building on previous results of quantum field theory in curved spacetimes, in this Letter we first derive the semiclassical equations of stellar equilibrium in the s -wave Polyakov approximation. It is highlighted that incorporating the polarization of the quantum vacuum leads to a generalization of the classical Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation. Despite the complexity of the resulting field equations, it is possible to find exact solutions. Aside from being the first known exact solutions that describe relativistic stars including the nonperturbative backreaction of semiclassical effects, these are identified as a nontrivial combination of the black star and gravastar proposals.

  13. Stellarmak a hybrid stellarator: Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses hybridization of modified Stellarator-like transform windings (T-windings) with a Spheromak or Field-Reversed-Mirror configuration. This configuration, Stellarmak, retains the important topological advantage of the Spheromak or FRM of having no plasma linking conductors or blankets. The T-windings provide rotational transformation in toroidal angle of the outer poloidal field lines, in effect creating a reversed B/sub Toroidal/ Spheromak or adding average B/sub T/ to the FRM producing higher shear, increased limiting β, and possibly greater stability to kinks and tilt. The presence of field ripple in the toroidal direction may be sufficient to inhibit cancellation of directed ion current by electron drag to allow steady state operation with the toroidal as well as poloidal current maintained by neutral beams

  14. Magnetohydodynamics stability of compact stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, G.Y.; Ku, L.P.; Cooper, W.A.; Hirshman, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    Recent stability results of external kink modes and vertical modes in compact stellarators are presented. The vertical mode is found to be stabilized by externally generated poloidal flux. A simple stability criterion is derived in the limit of large aspect ratio and constant current density. For a wall at infinite distance from the plasma, the amount of external flux needed for stabilization is given by Fi = (k2 minus k)=(k2 + 1), where k is the axisymmetric elongation and Fi is the fraction of the external rotational transform. A systematic parameter study shows that the external kink mode in QAS can be stabilized at high beta (approximately 5%) without a conducting wall by magnetic shear via 3D shaping. It is found that external kinks are driven by both parallel current and pressure gradient. The pressure contributes significantly to the overall drive through the curvature term and the Pfirsch-Schluter current

  15. NEMO: A Stellar Dynamics Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Joshua; Hut, Piet; Teuben, Peter

    2010-10-01

    NEMO is an extendible Stellar Dynamics Toolbox, following an Open-Source Software model. It has various programs to create, integrate, analyze and visualize N-body and SPH like systems, following the pipe and filter architecture. In addition there are various tools to operate on images, tables and orbits, including FITS files to export/import to/from other astronomical data reduction packages. A large growing fraction of NEMO has been contributed by a growing list of authors. The source code consist of a little over 4000 files and a little under 1,000,000 lines of code and documentation, mostly C, and some C++ and Fortran. NEMO development started in 1986 in Princeton (USA) by Barnes, Hut and Teuben. See also ZENO (ascl:1102.027) for the version that Barnes maintains.

  16. Old star clusters: Bench tests of low mass stellar models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salaris M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Old star clusters in the Milky Way and external galaxies have been (and still are traditionally used to constrain the age of the universe and the timescales of galaxy formation. A parallel avenue of old star cluster research considers these objects as bench tests of low-mass stellar models. This short review will highlight some recent tests of stellar evolution models that make use of photometric and spectroscopic observations of resolved old star clusters. In some cases these tests have pointed to additional physical processes efficient in low-mass stars, that are not routinely included in model computations. Moreover, recent results from the Kepler mission about the old open cluster NGC6791 are adding new tight constraints to the models.

  17. Spitzer Reveals Stellar 'Family Tree'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] High resolution poster version Generations of stars can be seen in this new infrared portrait from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. In this wispy star-forming region, called W5, the oldest stars can be seen as blue dots in the centers of the two hollow cavities (other blue dots are background and foreground stars not associated with the region). Younger stars line the rims of the cavities, and some can be seen as pink dots at the tips of the elephant-trunk-like pillars. The white knotty areas are where the youngest stars are forming. Red shows heated dust that pervades the region's cavities, while green highlights dense clouds. W5 spans an area of sky equivalent to four full moons and is about 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. The Spitzer picture was taken over a period of 24 hours. Like other massive star-forming regions, such as Orion and Carina, W5 contains large cavities that were carved out by radiation and winds from the region's most massive stars. According to the theory of triggered star-formation, the carving out of these cavities pushes gas together, causing it to ignite into successive generations of new stars. This image contains some of the best evidence yet for the triggered star-formation theory. Scientists analyzing the photo have been able to show that the ages of the stars become progressively and systematically younger with distance from the center of the cavities. This is a three-color composite showing infrared observations from two Spitzer instruments. Blue represents 3.6-micron light and green shows light of 8 microns, both captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Red is 24-micron light detected by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer.

  18. Spinning like a blue straggler: the population of fast rotating blue straggler stars in ω Centauri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mucciarelli, A.; Lovisi, L.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Monaco, L. [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-12-10

    By using high-resolution spectra acquired with FLAMES-GIRAFFE at the ESO/VLT, we measured the radial and rotational velocities for 110 blue straggler stars (BSSs) in ω Centauri, the globular cluster-like stellar system harboring the largest known BSS population. According to their radial velocities, 109 BSSs are members of the system. The rotational velocity distribution is very broad, with the bulk of BSSs spinning at less than ∼40 km s{sup –1} (in agreement with the majority of such stars observed in other globular clusters) and a long tail reaching ∼200 km s{sup –1}. About 40% of the sample has v{sub e} sin i > 40 km s{sup –1} and about 20% has v{sub e} sin i > 70 km s{sup –1}. Such a large fraction is very similar to the percentage of fast rotating BSSs observed in M4. Thus, ω Centauri is the second stellar cluster, beyond M4, with a surprisingly high population of fast spinning BSSs. We found a hint of radial behavior for a fraction of fast rotating BSSs, with a mild peak within one core radius, and a possible rise in the external regions (beyond four core radii). This may suggest that recent formation episodes of mass transfer BSSs occurred preferentially in the outskirts of ω Centauri, or that braking mechanisms able to slow down these stars are least efficient in the lowest density environments.

  19. TESS Objects of Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Natalia; Glidden, Ana; Fausnaugh, Michael; TESS Team

    2018-01-01

    We describe the search for TESS Objects of Interest (TOIs), led by the MIT branch of the TESS Science Office (TSO). TSO has developed a tool called TESS Exoplanet Vetter (TEV) to facilitate this process. Individuals independently examine data validation products for each target and assign a category to the object: planet candidate, eclipsing binary, other astrophysical, stellar variability, or instrument noise/systematic. TEV assigns a preliminary follow-up priority designation to each object and allows for modification when final dispositions are decided on in a group setting. When all targets are vetted, TEV exports a catalogue of TOIs which is delivered to the TESS Follow-Up Observing Program (TFOP), working with ExoFOP-TESS, and made publicly available on the official TESS website and the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST).

  20. Dynamical evolution of spherical stellar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamical effect of heavy mass stars formed out of successive mergers among tidally captured binaries of evolution of spherical stellar systems is investigated. To maximize such effect assumed all tidally captured systems become mergers. Stellar evolution is simulated by computing mean age of mass group and applying death rate as function of mean age. For stellar systems with N = 10 5-6 , combined effect of three body binary heating among heavy mass stars and stellar evolution provides energy to drive post collapse expansion; long-term evolution is dominated by stellar evolution. Long-term behavior of clusters is similar to tidally captured binaries assuming no merger. Observed chemical inhomogeneities among stars in globular clusters may also be explained by stellar mergers. Three-body heating is important in small-N systems, while stellar evolution dominates evolution of large N systems. The effect of primordial degenerate stars is investigated in the second study. Very hard binaries composed of degenerate-normal pair form via tidal capture process and moderately hard degenerate-degenerate binaries form via three-body process. If initial degenerate population is large, initial core-collapse phase may be approximated as collapse of degenerate star. Three-body binaries among degenerate stars eventually provide enough energy to stop collapse and cause reexpansion

  1. Object and Objective Lost?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopdrup-Hjorth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the erosion and problematization of ‘the organization’ as a demarcated entity. Utilizing Foucault's reflections on ‘state-phobia’ as a source of inspiration, I show how an organization-phobia has gained a hold within Organization Theory (OT). By attending to the history...... of this organization-phobia, the paper argues that OT has become increasingly incapable of speaking about its core object. I show how organizations went from being conceptualized as entities of major importance to becoming theoretically deconstructed and associated with all kinds of ills. Through this history......, organizations as distinct entities have been rendered so problematic that they have gradually come to be removed from the center of OT. The costs of this have been rather significant. Besides undermining the grounds that gave OT intellectual credibility and legitimacy to begin with, the organization-phobia...

  2. Helical post stellarator. Part 1: Vacuum configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-08-01

    Results on a novel type of stellarator configuration, the Helical Post Stellarator (HPS), are presented. This configuration is different significantly from all previously known stellarators due to its unique geometrical characteristics and unique physical properties. Among those are: the magnetic field has only one toroidal period (M = 1), the plasma has an extremely low aspect ratio, A ∼ 1, and the variation of the magnetic field, B, along field lines features a helical ripple on the inside of the torus. Among the main advantages of a HPS for a fusion program are extremely compact, modular, and simple design compatible with significant rotational transform, large plasma volume, and improved particle transport characteristics

  3. Hydrodynamics and stellar winds an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Maciel, Walter J

    2014-01-01

    Stellar winds are a common phenomenon in the life of stars, from the dwarfs like the Sun to the red giants and hot supergiants, constituting one of the basic aspects of modern astrophysics. Stellar winds are a hydrodynamic phenomenon in which circumstellar gases expand towards the interstellar medium. This book presents an elementary introduction to the fundamentals of hydrodynamics with an application to the study of stellar winds. The principles of hydrodynamics have many other applications, so that the book can be used as an introduction to hydrodynamics for students of physics, astrophysics and other related areas.

  4. POSTPARTUM BLUES PADA PERSALINAN DIBAWAH USIA DUA PULUH TAHUN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurniasari Pratiwi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum blues or baby blues is a feeling of sadness experienced by mothers after childbirth related to the baby. Postpartum blues is like an iceberg that is difficult to detect because there are still many people who do not understand about the event. Nevertheless, postpartum blues not being handled properly is one of the factors precipitating the occurrence of postpartum depression,  can be fatal for mother and baby. Postpartum blues more common in women who marry in their early age. Indonesia has high percentage of early age marriage in the world (ranked 37 and is the second highest in ASEAN after Cambodia. Based on data, there was increasing number of woman cases delivering labor and having children in the village Panggungharjo Sewon Bantul from year 2013 to 2015. Research objectives are to determine the postpartum blues in labor under the age of 20 years. This study is a descriptive study with retrospective design. The study population consists of women who gave birth  under the age of 20 years in the village of Panggungharjo, Sewon, Bantul using total sampling (33 subjects. The result showed that 45.5% of respondents who experienced postpartum blues and 54.5% did not experience postpartum blues.

  5. The PAndAS field of streams: Stellar structures in the milky way halo toward Andromeda and Triangulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Ibata, Rodrigo A. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, PAB, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Collins, Michelle L. M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fardal, Mark A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Irwin, Michael J. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Lewis, Geraint F.; Bate, Nicholas F.; Conn, Anthony R. [Institute of Astronomy, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McConnachie, Alan W. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Babul, Arif; Navarro, Julio F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada); Chapman, Scott C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Road, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2 (Canada); Crnojević, Denija; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Peñarrubia, Jorge [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Mackey, A. Dougal [RSAA, The Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek ACT 2611 (Australia); Tanvir, Nial T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Valls-Gabaud, David, E-mail: nicolas.martin@astro.unistra.fr [Observatoire de Paris, LERMA, 61 Avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-05-20

    We reveal the highly structured nature of the Milky Way (MW) stellar halo within the footprint of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS) photometric survey from blue main sequence (MS) and MS turn-off stars. We map no fewer than five stellar structures within a heliocentric range of ∼5-30 kpc. Some of these are known (the Monoceros Ring, the Pisces/Triangulum globular cluster stream), but we also uncover three well-defined stellar structures that could be, at least partly, responsible for the so-called Triangulum/Andromeda and Triangulum/Andromeda 2 features. In particular, we trace a new faint stellar stream located at a heliocentric distance of ∼17 kpc. With a surface brightness of Σ {sub V} ∼ 32-32.5 mag arcsec{sup –2}, it follows an orbit that is almost parallel to the Galactic plane north of M31 and has so far eluded surveys of the MW halo as these tend to steer away from regions dominated by the Galactic disk. Investigating our follow-up spectroscopic observations of PAndAS, we serendipitously uncover a radial velocity signature from stars that have colors and magnitudes compatible with the stream. From the velocity of eight likely member stars, we show that this stellar structure is dynamically cold, with an unresolved velocity dispersion that is lower than 7.1 km s{sup –1} at the 90% confidence level. Along with the width of the stream (300-650 pc), its dynamics point to a dwarf-galaxy-accretion origin. The numerous stellar structures we can map in the MW stellar halo between 5 and 30 kpc and their varying morphology is a testament to the complex nature of the stellar halo at these intermediate distances.

  6. Cannibalization and rebirth in the NGC 5387 system. I. The stellar stream and star-forming region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaton, Rachael L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Verbiscer, Anne; Martínez-Delgado, David; D'Onghia, Elena; Zibetti, Stefano; Gabany, R. Jay; Blanton, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We have identified a low surface brightness stellar stream from visual inspection of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging for the edge-on, spiral galaxy NGC 5387. An optically blue overdensity coincident with the stream intersection with the NGC 5387 disk was also identified in SDSS and in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Deep Imaging Survey contributing 38% of the total far-UV integrated flux from NGC 5387. Deeper optical imaging was acquired with the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope that confirmed the presence of both features. The stellar stream is red in color, (B – V) = 0.7, has a stellar mass of 6 × 10 8 M ☉ , which implies a 1:50 merger ratio, has a circular radius, R circ ∼ 11.7 kpc, formed in ∼240 Myr, and the progenitor had a total mass of ∼4 × 10 10 M ☉ . Spectroscopy from LBT+MODS1 was used to determine that the blue overdensity is at the same redshift as NGC 5387, consists of young stellar populations (∼10 Myr), is metal-poor (12 + log (O/H) = 8.03), and is forming stars at an enhanced rate (∼1-3 M ☉ yr –1 ). The most likely interpretations are that the blue overdensity is (1) a region of enhanced star formation in the outer disk of NGC 5387 induced by the minor accretion event or (2) the progenitor of the stellar stream experiencing enhanced star formation. Additional exploration of these scenarios is presented in a companion paper.

  7. Cannibalization and rebirth in the NGC 5387 system. I. The stellar stream and star-forming region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, Rachael L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Verbiscer, Anne [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Martínez-Delgado, David [Max Planck Institut fur Astronomie, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); D' Onghia, Elena [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Zibetti, Stefano [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Gabany, R. Jay [Black Bird II Observatory, Alder Springs, CA 93602 (United States); Blanton, Michael, E-mail: rbeaton@virginia.edu [Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We have identified a low surface brightness stellar stream from visual inspection of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging for the edge-on, spiral galaxy NGC 5387. An optically blue overdensity coincident with the stream intersection with the NGC 5387 disk was also identified in SDSS and in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Deep Imaging Survey contributing 38% of the total far-UV integrated flux from NGC 5387. Deeper optical imaging was acquired with the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope that confirmed the presence of both features. The stellar stream is red in color, (B – V) = 0.7, has a stellar mass of 6 × 10{sup 8} M{sub ☉}, which implies a 1:50 merger ratio, has a circular radius, R{sub circ} ∼ 11.7 kpc, formed in ∼240 Myr, and the progenitor had a total mass of ∼4 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}. Spectroscopy from LBT+MODS1 was used to determine that the blue overdensity is at the same redshift as NGC 5387, consists of young stellar populations (∼10 Myr), is metal-poor (12 + log (O/H) = 8.03), and is forming stars at an enhanced rate (∼1-3 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}). The most likely interpretations are that the blue overdensity is (1) a region of enhanced star formation in the outer disk of NGC 5387 induced by the minor accretion event or (2) the progenitor of the stellar stream experiencing enhanced star formation. Additional exploration of these scenarios is presented in a companion paper.

  8. [The dangers of blue light: True story!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, G; Leid, J

    2016-05-01

    The dangers of the blue light are the object of numerous publications, for both the scientific community and the general public. The new prolific development of light sources emitting potentially toxic blue light (415-455nm) ranges from LED (Light Emitting Diodes) lamps for interior lighting to television screens, computers, digital tablets and smartphones using OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) or AMOLED (Active-Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode) technology. First we will review some technical terms and the main characteristics of light perceived by the human eye. Then we will discuss scientific proof of the toxicity of blue light to the eye, which may cause cataract or macular degeneration. Analysis of the light spectra of several light sources, from natural light to LED lamps, will allow us to specify even better the dangers related to each light source. LED lamps, whether used as components for interior lighting or screens, are of concern if they are used for extended viewing times and at short distance. While we can protect ourselves from natural blue light by wearing colored glasses which filter out, on both front and back surfaces, the toxic wavelengths, it is more difficult to protect oneself from LED lamps in internal lighting, the use of which should be restricted to "white warmth" lamps (2700K). As far as OLED or AMOLED screens are concerned, the only effective protection consists of using them occasionally and only for a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Massive Black Hole Implicated in Stellar Destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Magellan telescopes suggest that a dense stellar remnant has been ripped apart by a black hole a thousand times as massive as the Sun. If confirmed, this discovery would be a cosmic double play: it would be strong evidence for an intermediate mass black hole, which has been a hotly debated topic, and would mark the first time such a black hole has been caught tearing a star apart. This scenario is based on Chandra observations, which revealed an unusually luminous source of X-rays in a dense cluster of old stars, and optical observations that showed a peculiar mix of elements associated with the X-ray emission. Taken together, a case can be made that the X-ray emission is produced by debris from a disrupted white dwarf star that is heated as it falls towards a massive black hole. The optical emission comes from debris further out that is illuminated by these X-rays. The intensity of the X-ray emission places the source in the "ultraluminous X-ray source" or ULX category, meaning that it is more luminous than any known stellar X-ray source, but less luminous than the bright X-ray sources (active galactic nuclei) associated with supermassive black holes in the nuclei of galaxies. The nature of ULXs is a mystery, but one suggestion is that some ULXs are black holes with masses between about a hundred and several thousand times that of the Sun, a range intermediate between stellar-mass black holes and supermassive black holes located in the nuclei of galaxies. This ULX is in a globular cluster, a very old and crowded conglomeration of stars. Astronomers have suspected that globular clusters could contain intermediate-mass black holes, but conclusive evidence for this has been elusive. "Astronomers have made cases for stars being torn apart by supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies before, but this is the first good evidence for such an event in a globular cluster," said Jimmy Irwin of the University

  10. On the stability and collisions in triple stellar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Matthias Y.; Petrovich, Cristobal

    2018-02-01

    A significant fraction of main-sequence (MS) stars are part of a triple system. We study the long-term stability and dynamical outcomes of triple stellar systems using a large number of long-term direct N-body integrations with relativistic precession. We find that the previously proposed stability criteria by Eggleton & Kiseleva and Mardling & Aarseth predict the stability against ejections reasonably well for a wide range of parameters. Assuming that the triple stellar systems follow orbital and mass distributions from FGK binary stars in the field, we find that ˜ 1 per cent and ˜ 0.5 per cent of the triple systems lead to a direct head-on collision (impact velocity ˜ escape velocity) between MS stars and between a MS star and a stellar-mass compact object, respectively. We conclude that triple interactions are the dominant channel for direct collisions involving a MS star in the field with a rate of one event every ˜100 years in the Milky Way. We estimate that the fraction of triple systems that form short-period binaries is up to ˜ 23 per cent with only up to ˜ 13 per cent being the result of three-body interactions with tidal dissipation, which is consistent with previous work using a secular code.

  11. Stellar recipes for axion hunters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannotti, Maurizio; Ringwald, Andreas; Saikawa, Ken'ichi

    2017-08-01

    There are a number of observational hints from astrophysics which point to the existence of stellar energy losses beyond the ones accounted for by neutrino emission. These excessive energy losses may be explained by the existence of a new sub-keV mass pseudoscalar Nambu-Goldstone boson with tiny couplings to photons, electrons, and nucleons. An attractive possibility is to identify this particle with the axion - the hypothetical pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson predicted by the Peccei-Quinn solution to the strong CP problem. We explore this possibility in terms of a DFSZ-type axion and of a KSVZ-type axion/majoron, respectively. Both models allow a good global fit to the data, prefering an axion mass around 10 meV. We show that future axion experiments - the fifth force experiment ARIADNE and the helioscope IAXO - can attack the preferred mass range from the lower and higher end, respectively. An axion in this mass range can also be the main constituent of dark matter.

  12. Stellar recipes for axion hunters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannotti, Maurizio [Physical Sciences, Barry University, 11300 NE 2nd Ave., Miami Shores, FL 33161 (United States); Irastorza, Igor G.; Redondo, Javier [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, E-50009, Zaragoza (Spain); Ringwald, Andreas; Saikawa, Ken' ichi, E-mail: mgiannotti@barry.edu, E-mail: igor.irastorza@cern.ch, E-mail: jredondo@unizar.es, E-mail: andreas.ringwald@desy.de, E-mail: kenichi.saikawa@desy.de [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-10-01

    There are a number of observational hints from astrophysics which point to the existence of stellar energy losses beyond the ones accounted for by neutrino emission. These excessive energy losses may be explained by the existence of a new sub-keV mass pseudoscalar Nambu-Goldstone boson with tiny couplings to photons, electrons, and nucleons. An attractive possibility is to identify this particle with the axion—the hypothetical pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson predicted by the Peccei-Quinn solution to the strong CP problem. We explore this possibility in terms of a DFSZ-type axion and of a KSVZ-type axion/majoron, respectively. Both models allow a good global fit to the data, prefering an axion mass around 10 meV. We show that future axion experiments—the fifth force experiment ARIADNE and the helioscope IAXO—can attack the preferred mass range from the lower and higher end, respectively. An axion in this mass range can also be the main constituent of dark matter.

  13. Stellar X-Ray Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, J.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the stellar end-state black holes, pulsars, and white dwarfs that are X-ray sources should have polarized X-ray fluxes. The degree will depend on the relative contributions of the unresolved structures. Fluxes from accretion disks and accretion disk corona may be polarized by scattering. Beams and jets may have contributions of polarized emission in strong magnetic fields. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) will study the effects on polarization of strong gravity of black holes and strong magnetism of neutron stars. Some part of the flux from compact stars accreting from companion stars has been reflected from the companion, its wind, or accretion streams. Polarization of this component is a potential tool for studying the structure of the gas in these binary systems. Polarization due to scattering can also be present in X-ray emission from white dwarf binaries and binary normal stars such as RS CVn stars and colliding wind sources like Eta Car. Normal late type stars may have polarized flux from coronal flares. But X-ray polarization sensitivity is not at the level needed for single early type stars.

  14. A Wolf-Rayet-Like Progenitor of SN 2013cu from Spectral Observations of a Stellar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, I.; Ofek, E. O.; Ben-Ami, S.; Cenko, S. B.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cao, Y.; Yaron, O.; Tal, D.; Silverman, J. M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The explosive fate of massive Wolf-Rayet stars (WRSs) is a key open question in stellar physics. An appealing option is that hydrogen- deficient WRSs are the progenitors of some hydrogen-poor supernova explosions of types IIb, Ib and Ic. A blue object, having luminosity and colours consistent with those of some WRSs, has recently been identified in pre-explosion images at the location of a supernova of type Ib, but has not yet been conclusively determined to have been the progenitor. Similar work has so far only resulted in non-detections. Comparison of early photometric observations of type Ic supernovae with theoretical models suggests that the progenitor stars had radii of less than 10(exp 12) centimetres, as expected for some WRSs. The signature of WRSs, their emission line spectra, cannot be probed by such studies. Here we report the detection of strong emission lines in a spectrum of type IIb supernova 2013cu (iPTF13ast) obtained approximately 15.5 hours after explosion (by 'flash spectroscopy', which captures the effects of the supernova explosion shock breakout flash on material surrounding the progenitor star).We identify Wolf-Rayet-like wind signatures, suggesting a progenitor of the WN(h) subclass (those WRSs with winds dominated by helium and nitrogen, with traces of hydrogen). The extent of this dense wind may indicate increased mass loss from the progenitor shortly before its explosion, consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  15. The relation between stellar evolution and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayler, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of star clusters combined with the theory of stellar evolution enable us to estimate the ages of stars while cosmological observations and theories give us a value for the age of the Universe. This is the most important interaction between cosmology and stellar evolution because it is clearly necessary that stars are younger than the Universe. Stellar evolution also plays an important role in relating the present chemical composition of the Universe to its original composition. The author restricts the review to a discussion of the relation between stellar evolution and the big bang cosmological theory because there is such a good qualitative agreement between the hot big bang theory and observations. (Auth.)

  16. Diagnostics for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, B.C.; Johnson, D.; Feder, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Neilson, H.; Takahashi, H.; Zarnstorf, M.; Cole, M.; Goranson, P.; Lazarus, E.; Nelson, B.

    2003-01-01

    The status of planning of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) diagnostics is presented, with the emphasis on resolution of diagnostics access issues and on diagnostics required for the early phases of operation

  17. Development of the stellarator/heliotron research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.

    1991-05-01

    The author reviewed the history of the development of the stellarator/heliotron system, and pointed out the important role of the radial electric field in plasma transport in helical devices. (J.P.N.)

  18. Starspots: A Key to the Stellar Dynamo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berdyugina Svetlana V.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic activity similar to that of the Sun is observed on a variety of cool stars with external convection envelopes. Stellar rotation coupled with convective motions generate strong magnetic fields in the stellar interior and produce a multitude of magnetic phenomena including starspots in the photosphere, chromospheric plages, coronal loops, UV, X-ray, and radio emission and flares. Here I review the phenomenon of starspots on different types of cool stars, observational tools and diagnostic techniques for studying starspots as well as starspot properties including their temperatures, areas, magnetic field strengths, lifetimes, active latitudes and longitudes, etc. Evolution of starspots on various time scales allows us to investigate stellar differential rotation, activity cycles, and global magnetic fields. Together these constitute the basis for our understanding of stellar and solar dynamos and provide valuable constraints for theoretical models.

  19. Formation of stellar clusters in magnetized, filamentary infrared dark clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2018-01-01

    Star formation in a filamentary infrared dark cloud (IRDC) is simulated over the dynamic range of 4.2 pc to 28 au for a period of 3.5 × 105 yr, including magnetic fields and both radiative and outflow feedback from the protostars. At the end of the simulation, the star formation efficiency is 4.3 per cent and the star formation rate per free-fall time is εff ≃ 0.04, within the range of observed values. The total stellar mass increases as ∼t2, whereas the number of protostars increases as ∼t1.5. We find that the density profile around most of the simulated protostars is ∼ρ ∝ r-1.5. At the end of the simulation, the protostellar mass function approaches the Chabrier stellar initial mass function. We infer that the time to form a star of median mass 0.2 M⊙ is about 1.4 × 105 yr from the median mass accretion rate. We find good agreement among the protostellar luminosities observed in the large sample of Dunham et al., our simulation and a theoretical estimate, and we conclude that the classical protostellar luminosity problem is resolved. The multiplicity of the stellar systems in the simulation agrees, to within a factor of 2, with observations of Class I young stellar objects; most of the simulated multiple systems are unbound. Bipolar protostellar outflows are launched using a subgrid model, and extend up to 1 pc from their host star. The mass-velocity relation of the simulated outflows is consistent with both observation and theory.

  20. Circumstellar Disk Lifetimes In Numerous Galactic Young Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richert, A. J. W.; Getman, K. V.; Feigelson, E. D.; Kuhn, M. A.; Broos, P. S.; Povich, M. S.; Bate, M. R.; Garmire, G. P.

    2018-04-01

    Photometric detections of dust circumstellar disks around pre-main sequence (PMS) stars, coupled with estimates of stellar ages, provide constraints on the time available for planet formation. Most previous studies on disk longevity, starting with Haisch, Lada & Lada (2001), use star samples from PMS clusters but do not consider datasets with homogeneous photometric sensitivities and/or ages placed on a uniform timescale. Here we conduct the largest study to date of the longevity of inner dust disks using X-ray and 1-8 {μ m} infrared photometry from the MYStIX and SFiNCs projects for 69 young clusters in 32 nearby star-forming regions with ages t ≤ 5 Myr. Cluster ages are derived by combining the empirical AgeJX method with PMS evolutionary models, which treat dynamo-generated magnetic fields in different ways. Leveraging X-ray data to identify disk-free objects, we impose similar stellar mass sensitivity limits for disk-bearing and disk-free YSOs while extending the analysis to stellar masses as low as M ˜ 0.1 M⊙. We find that the disk longevity estimates are strongly affected by the choice of PMS evolutionary model. Assuming a disk fraction of 100% at zero age, the inferred disk half-life changes significantly, from t1/2 ˜ 1.3 - 2 Myr to t1/2 ˜ 3.5 Myr when switching from non-magnetic to magnetic PMS models. In addition, we find no statistically significant evidence that disk fraction varies with stellar mass within the first few Myr of life for stars with masses <2 M⊙, but our samples may not be complete for more massive stars. The effects of initial disk fraction and star-forming environment are also explored.

  1. Blue ocean leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2014-05-01

    Ten years ago, two INSEAD professors broke ground by introducing "blue ocean strategy," a new model for discovering uncontested markets that are ripe for growth. In this article, they apply their concepts and tools to what is perhaps the greatest challenge of leadership: closing the gulf between the potential and the realized talent and energy of employees. Research indicates that this gulf is vast: According to Gallup, 70% of workers are disengaged from their jobs. If companies could find a way to convert them into engaged employees, the results could be transformative. The trouble is, managers lack a clear understanding of what changes they could make to bring out the best in everyone. Here, Kim and Mauborgne offer a solution to that problem: a systematic approach to uncovering, at each level of the organization, which leadership acts and activities will inspire employees to give their all, and a process for getting managers throughout the company to start doing them. Blue ocean leadership works because the managers' "customers"-that is, the people managers oversee and report to-are involved in identifying what's effective and what isn't. Moreover, the approach doesn't require leaders to alter who they are, just to undertake a different set of tasks. And that kind of change is much easier to implement and track than changes to values and mind-sets.

  2. STELLAR ATMOSPHERES, ATMOSPHERIC EXTENSION, AND FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS: WEIGHING STARS USING THE STELLAR MASS INDEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Lester, John B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Baron, Fabien; Norris, Ryan; Kloppenborg, Brian, E-mail: neilson@astro.utoronto.ca [Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 5060, Atlanta, GA 30302-5060 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    One of the great challenges of understanding stars is measuring their masses. The best methods for measuring stellar masses include binary interaction, asteroseismology, and stellar evolution models, but these methods are not ideal for red giant and supergiant stars. In this work, we propose a novel method for inferring stellar masses of evolved red giant and supergiant stars using interferometric and spectrophotometric observations combined with spherical model stellar atmospheres to measure what we call the stellar mass index, defined as the ratio between the stellar radius and mass. The method is based on the correlation between different measurements of angular diameter, used as a proxy for atmospheric extension, and fundamental stellar parameters. For a given star, spectrophotometry measures the Rosseland angular diameter while interferometric observations generally probe a larger limb-darkened angular diameter. The ratio of these two angular diameters is proportional to the relative extension of the stellar atmosphere, which is strongly correlated to the star’s effective temperature, radius, and mass. We show that these correlations are strong and can lead to precise measurements of stellar masses.

  3. Stellar Atmospheres, Atmospheric Extension, and Fundamental Parameters: Weighing Stars Using the Stellar Mass Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Baron, Fabien; Norris, Ryan; Kloppenborg, Brian; Lester, John B.

    2016-10-01

    One of the great challenges of understanding stars is measuring their masses. The best methods for measuring stellar masses include binary interaction, asteroseismology, and stellar evolution models, but these methods are not ideal for red giant and supergiant stars. In this work, we propose a novel method for inferring stellar masses of evolved red giant and supergiant stars using interferometric and spectrophotometric observations combined with spherical model stellar atmospheres to measure what we call the stellar mass index, defined as the ratio between the stellar radius and mass. The method is based on the correlation between different measurements of angular diameter, used as a proxy for atmospheric extension, and fundamental stellar parameters. For a given star, spectrophotometry measures the Rosseland angular diameter while interferometric observations generally probe a larger limb-darkened angular diameter. The ratio of these two angular diameters is proportional to the relative extension of the stellar atmosphere, which is strongly correlated to the star’s effective temperature, radius, and mass. We show that these correlations are strong and can lead to precise measurements of stellar masses.

  4. SDSS IV MaNGA: the global and local stellar mass assemby histories of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Medel, Héctor J.; Sánchez, Sebastián F.; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Hernández-Toledo, Héctor M.; González, J. Jesús; Drory, Niv; Bundy, Kevin; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Cano-Díaz, Mariana; Malanushenko, Elena; Pan, Kaike; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Using the fossil record method implemented through Pipe3D, we reconstruct the global and radial stellar mass growth histories (MGHs) of a large sample of galaxies, ranging from dwarf to giant objects, from the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at the Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey. We confirm that the main driver of the global MGHs is mass, with more massive galaxies assembling earlier (downsizing), though for a given mass, the global MGHs segregate by colour, specific star formation rate and morphological type. From the inferred radial mean MGHs, we find that at fractions of assembled mass larger than ˜80 per cent, the innermost regions formed stars, on average, in the inside-out mode. At earlier epochs, when the age estimation of the method becomes poor, the MGHs seem to be spatially homogeneous or even in the outside-in mode, especially for the red/quiescent/early-type galaxies. The innermost MGHs are, in general, less scattered around the mean than the outermost MGHs. For dwarf and low-mass galaxies, we do not find evidence of an outside-in formation mode; instead, their radial MGHs are very diverse most of the time, with periods of outside-in and inside-out modes (or strong radial migration), suggesting this is an episodic star formation history. Blue/star-forming/late-type galaxies present, on average, a significantly more pronounced inside-out formation mode than red/quiescent/early-type galaxies, independently of mass. We discuss our results in the light of the processes of galaxy formation, quenching and radial migration. We also discuss the uncertainties and biases of the fossil record method and how these could affect our results.

  5. The Stellar Observations Network Group - first results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoci, Victoria; Grundahl, Frank; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen

    SONG - the Stellar Observations Network Group is a Danish-led project set to design and build a global network of 1-m telescopes to carry out detailed studies of solar-like stars using asteroseismology and to discover and characterise exo-planets and their star system. Here we present more than 100...... of individual modes over many orders in the frequency spectrum, leading to studies of rotation, convection, near-surface effects, core structure using mixed modes and stellar activity....

  6. The WEGA Stellarator: Results and Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otte, M.; Andruczyk, D.; Koenig, R.; Laqua, H. P.; Lischtschenko, O.; Marsen, S.; Schacht, J.; Podoba, Y. Y.; Wagner, F.; Warr, G. B.; Holzhauer, E.; Howard, J.; Krupnik, L.; Zhezhera, A.; Urban, J.; Preinhalter, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article an overview is given on results from magnetic flux surface measurements, applied ECR heating scenarios for 2.45 GHz and 28 GHz, fluctuation and transport studies and plasma edge biasing experiments performed in the WEGA stellarator. Examples for the development of new diagnostics and the machine control system are given that will be used at Wendelstein 7-X stellarator, which is currently under construction in Greifswald

  7. Ubiquitous time variability of integrated stellar populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Charlie; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Choi, Jieun

    2015-11-01

    Long-period variable stars arise in the final stages of the asymptotic giant branch phase of stellar evolution. They have periods of up to about 1,000 days and amplitudes that can exceed a factor of three in the I-band flux. These stars pulsate predominantly in their fundamental mode, which is a function of mass and radius, and so the pulsation periods are sensitive to the age of the underlying stellar population. The overall number of long-period variables in a population is directly related to their lifetimes, which is difficult to predict from first principles because of uncertainties associated with stellar mass-loss and convective mixing. The time variability of these stars has not previously been taken into account when modelling the spectral energy distributions of galaxies. Here we construct time-dependent stellar population models that include the effects of long-period variable stars, and report the ubiquitous detection of this expected ‘pixel shimmer’ in the massive metal-rich galaxy M87. The pixel light curves display a variety of behaviours. The observed variation of 0.1 to 1 per cent is very well matched to the predictions of our models. The data provide a strong constraint on the properties of variable stars in an old and metal-rich stellar population, and we infer that the lifetime of long-period variables in M87 is shorter by approximately 30 per cent compared to predictions from the latest stellar evolution models.

  8. The SOHO-Stellar Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1999-01-01

    I discusses practical aspects of the so-called "solar-stellar" connection; namely, the fundamental principles, the tools at the disposal of the stellar astronomer, and a few recent examples of the connection in action. I provide an overall evolutionary context for coronal activity, calling attention to the very different circumstances of low mass main sequence stars like the Sun, which are active mainly early in their lives; compared with more massive stars, whose coronally active phase occurs near the end of their lives, during their brief incursion into the cool half of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram as yellow and then red giants. On the instrumental slide, I concentrate primarily on spectroscopy, in the ultraviolet and X-ray bands where coronae leave their most obvious signatures. I present an early glimpse of the type of moderate resolution spectra we can expect from the recently launched Chandra observatory, and contemporaneous HST STIS high-resolution UV measurements of the CXO calibration star Capella (alpha Aur; G8 III + G1 III). I compare STIS spectra of solar-type dwarfs-zeta Dor (F7 V), an active coronal source; and alpha Cen A (G2 V), a near twin of the Sun-to a trace obtained with the SOHO SUMER imaging UV spectrometer. I also compare STIS line profiles of the active coronal dwarf to the corresponding features in the mixed-activity "hybrid-chromosphere" bright giant alpha TrA (K2 II) and the archetype "noncoronal" red giant Arcturus (alpha Boo; K2 III). The latter shows dramatic evidence for a "cool absorber" in its outer atmosphere that is extinguishing the "hot lines" (like Si IV lambda1393 and N V lambda1238) below about 1500 A, probably through absorption in the Si I lambda1525 and C I lambda1240 photoionization continua. The disappearance of coronae across the "Linsky-Haisch" dividing line near K1 III thus apparently is promoted by a dramatic overturning in the outer atmospheric structure, namely the coronae of the red giants seem to lie beneath

  9. Preface [11. Pacific Rim conference on stellar astrophysics: Physics and chemistry of the late stages of stellar evolution, Hong Kong (China), 14-17 December 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, Sun; Leung, Kam Ching

    2016-01-01

    Stellar mass loss is now widely recognized to have a significant impact on stellar evolution. Mass loss on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) allows stars with initial masses under 8 solar masses to avoid the fate of going supernovae. Over 95% of stars in our Galaxy will evolve through the planetary nebulae phase to end up as white dwarfs instead of neutron stars or black holes. Massive stars undergo mass loss both in the blue and red phases of evolution and create new classes of stars such as Wolf-Rayet stars and luminous blue variables. The circumstellar matter ejected by these mass loss processes becomes new laboratories to study the physical and chemical processes of interstellar matter. The interaction between different phases of mass loss (with variable mass loss rates, ejection speeds, and directions) leads to spectacular morphological transformation of the circumstellar nebulae. The circumstellar nebulae are also sites of molecular and solid-state synthesis. Close to 100 molecular species and a variety of solids, including minerals and complex organics, have been detected in circumstellar envelopes. Since the dynamical time scale of the ejection puts an upper limit on the chemical time scale, we are witnessing a rapid synthesis of chemical species in an extremely low-density environment, creating new challenges to our understanding of chemical reactions. Effects of mass loss are not limited to single stars. Mass loss by one component of a binary system allows mass transfer to occur at separations beyond the Roche Lobe limit. Accreted wind materials on the surface of a degenerate star can lead to periodic outbursts through H-shell burning. When both components are losing mass, we have interesting dynamical systems such as symbiotic novae. The theme of this conference is “Physics and Chemistry of the Late Stages of Stellar Evolution”. We try to bring together experts in different fields to exchange ideas in the hope of solving the many unsolved problems in

  10. On the problem of secular variability in the stellar initial mass function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meusinger, H.

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis of secular variations in the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is studied. It is found that neither the present-day mass function of the nearby main sequence field stars nor the velocity distribution of these stars are contradictory with this hypothesis. The luminosity functions of unbiased kinematically defined age-groups of the nearby stars also provide no strong constraints. Simple evoluion models with time-dependent IMF and star formation rate enable to fit the data of blue irregular galaxies. Some problems with an universal IMF are pointed out. (author)

  11. The global and local stellar mass assembly histories of galaxies from the MaNGA survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Medel, Hétor J.; Sánchez,, Sebastián F.; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Hernández-Toledo, Héctor M., J.; González, J. Jesús; Drory, Niv; Bundy, Kevin; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Cano-Díaz, Mariana; Malanushenko, Elena; Pan, Kaike; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    By means of the fossil record method implemented through Pipe3D we reconstruct the global and radial stellar mass growth histories (MGHs) of a large sample of galaxies in the mass range 10^{8.5}M⊙-10^{11.5}M⊙ from the MaNGA survey. We find that: (1) The main driver of the global MGHs is mass, with more massive galaxies assembling their masses earlier (downsizing). (2) For most galaxies in their late evolutionary stages, the innermost regions formed earlier than the outermost ones (inside-out). This behaviour is stronger for blue/late-type galaxies.

  12. Instant BlueStacks

    CERN Document Server

    Judge, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. A fast-paced, example-based approach guide for learning BlueStacks.This book is for anyone with a Mac or PC who wants to run Android apps on their computer. Whether you want to play games that are freely available for Android but not your computer, or you want to try apps before you install them on a physical device or use it as a development tool, this book will show you how. No previous experience is needed as this is written in plain English

  13. Stellar population of NGC 1850 in the LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmozzi, Roberto; Panagia, Nino

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the globular cluster NGC 1850 taken with the HST Wide Field Camera are used to constrain the stellar population of this member of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Three exposures were obtained for each band at exposure times of 10, 100, and 1100 seconds, and the longest exposure was halved to minimize the effects of cosmic noise and the saturation of bright objects. A total of about 12,000 stars with magnitudes of 14-24 and masses of 0.8-13 solar mass are measured, and the age of NGC 1850 is given at approximately 25 million years.

  14. Blue phases as photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohley, Christian; Scharf, Toralf

    2003-12-01

    The Liquid Crystalline Blue Phases (LC BPs) and their diffraction patterns were investigated experimentally and theoretically. We stabilized Blue Phases and measured their diffraction pattern for different wavelengths of monochromatic light with the help of a conoscopic setup of a polarization microscope. Moreover, the diffraction patterns were calculated with the help of a 4x4 matrix method which allows amplitude and phase investigations.

  15. STELLAR POPULATION MODELS AND INDIVIDUAL ELEMENT ABUNDANCES. II. STELLAR SPECTRA AND INTEGRATED LIGHT MODELS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Hyun-Chul; Worthey, Guy; Dotter, Aaron; Chaboyer, Brian; Jevremovic, Darko; Baron, E.; Briley, Michael M.; Ferguson, Jason W.; Coelho, Paula; Trager, Scott C.

    2009-01-01

    The first paper in this series explored the effects of altering the chemical mixture of the stellar population on an element-by-element basis on stellar evolutionary tracks and isochrones to the end of the red giant branch. This paper extends the discussion by incorporating the fully consistent

  16. Use of the stellarator expansion to investigate plasma equilibrium in modular stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anania, G.; Johnson, J.L.; Weimer, K.E.

    1982-11-01

    A numerical code utilizing a large-aspect ratio, small-helical-distortion expansion is developed and used to investigate the effect of plasma currents on stellarator equilibrium. Application to modular stellarator configurations shows that a large rotational transform, and hence large coil deformation, is needed to achieve high-beta equilibria

  17. Stellar Death in the Nearby Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holoien, Thomas Warren-Son

    The night sky is replete with transient and variable events that help shape our universe. The violent, explosive deaths of stars represent some of the most energetic of these events, as a single star is able to outshine billions during its final moments. Aside from imparting significant energy into their host environments, stellar deaths are also responsible for seeding heavy elements into the universe, regulating star formation in their host galaxies, and affecting the evolution of supermassive black holes at the centers of their host galaxies. The large amount of energy output during these events allows them to be seen from billions of lightyears away, making them useful observational probes of physical processes important to many fields of astronomy. In this dissertation I present a series of observational studies of two classes of transients associated with the deaths of stars in the nearby universe: tidal disruption events (TDEs) and supernovae (SNe). Discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN), the objects I discuss were all bright and nearby, and were subject to extensive follow-up observational campaigns. In the first three studies, I present observational data and theoretical models of ASASSN-14ae, ASASSN-14li, and ASASSN-15oi, three TDEs discovered by ASAS-SN and three of the most well-studied TDEs ever discovered. Next I present the discovery of ASASSN-13co, an SN that does not conform to the traditional model of Type II SNe. Finally, I discuss the full sample of bright SNe discovered from 2014 May 1 through 2016 December 31, which is significantly less biased than previous nearby SN samples due to the ASAS-SN survey approach, and perform statistical analyses on this population that will be used for future studies of nearby SNe and their hosts.

  18. Black holes in binary stellar systems and galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherepashchuk, A M

    2014-01-01

    In the last 40 years, following pioneering papers by Ya B Zeldovich and E E Salpeter, in which a powerful energy release from nonspherical accretion of matter onto a black hole (BH) was predicted, many observational studies of black holes in the Universe have been carried out. To date, the masses of several dozen stellar-mass black holes (M BH =(4−20)M ⊙ ) in X-ray binary systems and of several hundred supermassive black holes (M BH =(10 6 −10 10 )M ⊙ ) in galactic nuclei have been measured. The estimated radii of these massive and compact objects do not exceed several gravitational radii. For about ten stellar-mass black holes and several dozen supermassive black holes, the values of the dimensionless angular momentum a ∗ have been estimated, which, in agreement with theoretical predictions, do not exceed the limiting value a ∗ =0.998. A new field of astrophysics, so-called black hole demography, which studies the birth and growth of black holes and their evolutionary connection to other objects in the Universe, namely stars, galaxies, etc., is rapidly developing. In addition to supermassive black holes, massive stellar clusters are observed in galactic nuclei, and their evolution is distinct from that of supermassive black holes. The evolutionary relations between supermassive black holes in galactic centers and spheroidal stellar components (bulges) of galaxies, as well as dark-matter galactic haloes are brought out. The launch into Earth's orbit of the space radio interferometer RadioAstron opened up the real possibility of finally proving that numerous discovered massive and highly compact objects with properties very similar to those of black holes make up real black holes in the sense of Albert Einstein's General Relativity. Similar proofs of the existence of black holes in the Universe can be obtained by intercontinental radio interferometry at short wavelengths λ≲1 mm (the international program, Event Horizon Telescope). (100

  19. MESA: Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Bill; Bildsten, Lars; Dotter, Aaron; Herwig, Falk; Lesaffre, Pierre; Timmes, Frank

    2010-10-01

    Stellar physics and evolution calculations enable a broad range of research in astrophysics. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) is a suite of open source libraries for a wide range of applications in computational stellar astrophysics. A newly designed 1-D stellar evolution module, MESA star, combines many of the numerical and physics modules for simulations of a wide range of stellar evolution scenarios ranging from very-low mass to massive stars, including advanced evolutionary phases. MESA star solves the fully coupled structure and composition equations simultaneously. It uses adaptive mesh refinement and sophisticated timestep controls, and supports shared memory parallelism based on OpenMP. Independently usable modules provide equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, and atmosphere boundary conditions. Each module is constructed as a separate Fortran 95 library with its own public interface. Examples include comparisons to other codes and show evolutionary tracks of very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and gas giant planets; the complete evolution of a 1 Msun star from the pre-main sequence to a cooling white dwarf; the Solar sound speed profile; the evolution of intermediate mass stars through the thermal pulses on the He-shell burning AGB phase; the interior structure of slowly pulsating B Stars and Beta Cepheids; evolutionary tracks of massive stars from the pre-main sequence to the onset of core collapse; stars undergoing Roche lobe overflow; and accretion onto a neutron star.

  20. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators. II. Numerical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstraße 1, 17491 Greifswald, Germany and Max-Planck/Princeton Research Center for Plasma Physics, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    Microinstabilities exhibit a rich variety of behavior in stellarators due to the many degrees of freedom in the magnetic geometry. It has recently been found that certain stellarators (quasi-isodynamic ones with maximum-J geometry) are partly resilient to trapped-particle instabilities, because fast-bouncing particles tend to extract energy from these modes near marginal stability. In reality, stellarators are never perfectly quasi-isodynamic, and the question thus arises whether they still benefit from enhanced stability. Here, the stability properties of Wendelstein 7-X and a more quasi-isodynamic configuration, QIPC, are investigated numerically and compared with the National Compact Stellarator Experiment and the DIII-D tokamak. In gyrokinetic simulations, performed with the gyrokinetic code GENE in the electrostatic and collisionless approximation, ion-temperature-gradient modes, trapped-electron modes, and mixed-type instabilities are studied. Wendelstein 7-X and QIPC exhibit significantly reduced growth rates for all simulations that include kinetic electrons, and the latter are indeed found to be stabilizing in the energy budget. These results suggest that imperfectly optimized stellarators can retain most of the stabilizing properties predicted for perfect maximum-J configurations.

  1. Development of code PRETOR for stellarator simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dies, J.; Fontanet, J.; Fontdecaba, J.M.; Castejon, F.; Alejandre, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Department de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear (DFEN) of the UPC has some experience in the development of the transport code PRETOR. This code has been validated with shots of DIII-D, JET and TFTR, it has also been used in the simulation of operational scenarios of ITER fast burnt termination. Recently, the association EURATOM-CIEMAT has started the operation of the TJ-II stellarator. Due to the need of validating the results given by others transport codes applied to stellarators and because all of them made some approximations, as a averaging magnitudes in each magnetic surface, it was thought suitable to adapt the PRETOR code to devices without axial symmetry, like stellarators, which is very suitable for the specific needs of the study of TJ-II. Several modifications are required in PRETOR; the main concerns to the models of: magnetic equilibrium, geometry and transport of energy and particles. In order to solve the complex magnetic equilibrium geometry the powerful numerical code VMEC has been used. This code gives the magnetic surface shape as a Fourier series in terms of the harmonics (m,n). Most of the geometric magnitudes are also obtained from the VMEC results file. The energy and particle transport models will be replaced by other phenomenological models that are better adapted to stellarator simulation. Using the proposed models, it is pretended to reproduce experimental data available from present stellarators, given especial attention to the TJ-II of the association EURATOM-CIEMAT. (Author)

  2. Review of stellarator research world wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shonet, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The world-wide effort in stellarators has evolved considerably during the past few years. Stellarator facilities are located in the Australia, Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, the Soviet Union, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States. Dimensions of stellarators range from less than 20 centimeters in major radius to more than 2 meters, and magnetic field values between 0.2 Tesla to more than 3.0 Tesla. Stellarators are made in a variety of magnetic configurations with wide ranges of toroidal aspect ratios and methods of generating the stellarator magnetic surfaces. In particular, continuous helical coils, twisted modular coils, or twisted vacuum chambers all provide different means to generate nested toroidal magnetic surfaces without the need for currents flowing in the plasma. The goal of present day experiments is to accumulate a physics data base. This is being done by increasing electron and ion temperatures with non-ohmic heating, by transport and scaling studies considering neoclassical scaling, global scaling, effects of electric fields, the bootstrap current and magnetic islands. Higher betas are being attempted by designing suitable magnetic configurations, pellet injection and/or minimizing transport losses. Plasma-wall interactions and particle control are being examined by divertor, pumped-limiter and carbonization experiments

  3. The Stellar Origins of Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyk, Schulyer

    2017-08-01

    Supernovae (SNe) have a profound effect on galaxies and have been used as precise cosmological probes, resulting in the Nobel-distinguished discovery of the accelerating Universe. They are clearly very important events deserving of intense study. Yet, even with over 10000 classified SNe, we know relatively little about the stars which give rise to these powerful explosions. The main limitation has been the lack of spatial resolution in pre-SN imaging data. However, since 1999 our team has been at the vanguard of directly identifying SN progenitor stars in HST images. From this exciting line of study, the trends from 15 detections for Type II-Plateau SNe appear to be red supergiant progenitors of relatively low mass (8 to 17 Msun) - although this upper mass limit still requires testing - and warmer, envelope-stripped supergiant progenitors for 5 Type IIb SNe. Additionally, evidence is accumulating that some Type II-narrow SNe may arise from exploding stars in a luminous blue variable phase. However, the nature of the progenitors of Type Ib/c SNe, a subset of which are associated with gamma-ray bursts, still remains ambiguous. Furthermore, we continue in the embarrassing situation that we still do not yet know which progenitor systems explode as Type Ia SNe, which are being used for precision cosmology. In Cycles 16, 17, and 20 through 24 we have had great success with our approved ToO programs. As of this proposal deadline, we have already triggered on SN 2016jbu with our Cycle 24 program. We therefore propose to continue this project in Cycles 25 and 26, to determine the identities of the progenitors of 8 SNe within about 20 Mpc through ToO observations using WFC3/UVIS.

  4. Blue moons and Martian sunsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Kurt; Chakrabarty, Rajan; Moosmüller, Hans

    2014-03-20

    The familiar yellow or orange disks of the moon and sun, especially when they are low in the sky, and brilliant red sunsets are a result of the selective extinction (scattering plus absorption) of blue light by atmospheric gas molecules and small aerosols, a phenomenon explainable using the Rayleigh scattering approximation. On rare occasions, dust or smoke aerosols can cause the extinction of red light to exceed that for blue, resulting in the disks of the sun and moon to appear as blue. Unlike Earth, the atmosphere of Mars is dominated by micron-size dust aerosols, and the sky during sunset takes on a bluish glow. Here we investigate the role of dust aerosols in the blue Martian sunsets and the occasional blue moons and suns on Earth. We use the Mie theory and the Debye series to calculate the wavelength-dependent optical properties of dust aerosols most commonly found on Mars. Our findings show that while wavelength selective extinction can cause the sun's disk to appear blue, the color of the glow surrounding the sun as observed from Mars is due to the dominance of near-forward scattering of blue light by dust particles and cannot be explained by a simple, Rayleigh-like selective extinction explanation.

  5. Spinning Like a Blue Straggler: The Population of Fast Rotating Blue Straggler Stars in ω Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucciarelli, A.; Lovisi, L.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.; Monaco, L.

    2014-12-01

    By using high-resolution spectra acquired with FLAMES-GIRAFFE at the ESO/VLT, we measured the radial and rotational velocities for 110 blue straggler stars (BSSs) in ω Centauri, the globular cluster-like stellar system harboring the largest known BSS population. According to their radial velocities, 109 BSSs are members of the system. The rotational velocity distribution is very broad, with the bulk of BSSs spinning at less than ~40 km s-1 (in agreement with the majority of such stars observed in other globular clusters) and a long tail reaching ~200 km s-1. About 40% of the sample has ve sin i > 40 km s-1 and about 20% has ve sin i > 70 km s-1. Such a large fraction is very similar to the percentage of fast rotating BSSs observed in M4. Thus, ω Centauri is the second stellar cluster, beyond M4, with a surprisingly high population of fast spinning BSSs. We found a hint of radial behavior for a fraction of fast rotating BSSs, with a mild peak within one core radius, and a possible rise in the external regions (beyond four core radii). This may suggest that recent formation episodes of mass transfer BSSs occurred preferentially in the outskirts of ω Centauri, or that braking mechanisms able to slow down these stars are least efficient in the lowest density environments. Based on observations collected at the ESO-VLT under the programs 077.D-0696(A), 081.D-0356(A), and 089.D-0298(A).

  6. Effect of finite β on stellarator transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynick, H.E.

    1984-04-01

    A theory of the modification of stellarator transport due to the presence of finite plasma pressure is developed, and applied to a range of stellarator configurations. For many configurations of interest, plasma transport can change by more than an order of magnitude in the progression from zero pressure to the equilibrium β limit of the device. Thus, a stellarator with transport-optimized vacuum fields can have poor confinement at the desired operating β. Without an external compensating field, increasing β tends to degrade confinement, unless the initial field structure is very carefully chosen. The theory permits one to correctly determine this vacuum structure, in terms of the desired structure of the field at a prescribed operating β. With a compensating external field, the deleterious effect of finite β on transport can be partially eliminated

  7. THE LOW-MASS STELLAR POPULATION IN L1641: EVIDENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Hartmann, Lee [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Allen, Lori [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Hernandez, Jesus [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomia, Apdo. Postal 264, Merida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Megeath, S. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Mosby, Gregory [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Tobin, John J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Espaillat, Catherine [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-06-10

    We present results from an optical photometric and spectroscopic survey of the young stellar population in L1641, the low-density star-forming region of the Orion A cloud south of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). Our goal is to determine whether L1641 has a large enough low-mass population to make the known lack of high-mass stars a statistically significant demonstration of environmental dependence of the upper mass stellar initial mass function (IMF). Our spectroscopic sample consists of IR-excess objects selected from the Spitzer/IRAC survey and non-excess objects selected from optical photometry. We have spectral confirmation of 864 members, with another 98 probable members; of the confirmed members, 406 have infrared excesses and 458 do not. Assuming the same ratio of stars with and without IR excesses in the highly extincted regions, L1641 may contain as many as {approx}1600 stars down to {approx}0.1 M{sub Sun }, comparable within a factor of two to the ONC. Compared to the standard models of the IMF, L1641 is deficient in O and early B stars to a 3{sigma}-4{sigma} significance level, assuming that we know of all the massive stars in L1641. With a forthcoming survey of the intermediate-mass stars, we will be in a better position to make a direct comparison with the neighboring, dense ONC, which should yield a stronger test of the dependence of the high-mass end of the stellar IMF on environment.

  8. Hubble's View of Little Blue Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-02-01

    The recent discovery of a new type of tiny, star-forming galaxy is the latest in a zoo of detections shedding light on our early universe. What can we learn from the unique little blue dots found in archival Hubble data?Peas, Berries, and DotsGreen pea galaxies identified by citizen scientists with Galaxy Zoo. [Richard Nowell Carolin Cardamone]As telescope capabilities improve and we develop increasingly deeper large-scale surveys of our universe, we continue to learn more about small, faraway galaxies. In recent years, increasing sensitivity first enabled the detection of green peas luminous, compact, low-mass (10 billion solar masses; compare this to the Milky Ways 1 trillion solar masses!) galaxies with high rates of star formation.Not long thereafter, we discovered galaxies that form stars similarly rapidly, but are even smaller only 330 million solar masses, spanning less than 3,000 light-years in size. These tiny powerhouses were termed blueberries for their distinctive color.Now, scientists Debra and Bruce Elmegreen (of Vassar College and IBM Research Division, respectively) report the discovery of galaxies that have even higher star formation rates and even lower masses: little blue dots.Exploring Tiny Star FactoriesThe Elmegreens discovered these unique galaxies by exploring archival Hubble data. The Hubble Frontier Fields data consist of deep images of six distant galaxy clusters and the parallel fields next to them. It was in the archival data for two Frontier Field Parallels, those for clusters Abell 2744 and MAS J0416.1-2403, that the authors noticed several galaxies that stand out as tiny, bright, blue objects that are nearly point sources.Top: a few examples of the little blue dots recently identified in two Hubble Frontier Field Parallels. Bottom: stacked images for three different groups of little blue dots. [Elmegreen Elmegreen 2017]The authors performed a search through the two Frontier Field Parallels, discovering a total of 55 little blue dots

  9. Classifying the embedded young stellar population in Perseus and Taurus and the LOMASS database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carney, M.T.; Yıldız, U.; Mottram, J.C.; Dishoeck, van E.F.; Ramchandani, J.; Jørgensen, J.K.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The classification of young stellar objects (YSOs) is typically done using the infrared spectral slope or bolometric temperature, but either can result in contamination of samples. More accurate methods to determine the evolutionary stage of YSOs will improve the reliability of statistics

  10. Overdense Plasma Operation in the WEGA Stellarator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Otte, M.; Laqua, H.P.; Marsen, S.; Podoba, Y.; Preinhaelter, Josef; Stange, T.; Urban, Jakub; Wagner, F.; Zhang, D.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 8 (2010), s. 785-789 ISSN 0863-1042. [International Stellarator/Heliotron Workshop/17th./. Princeton, 12.10.2009-16.10.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0419; GA MŠk 7G09042 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Stellarator * Bernstein waves * overdense plasma * supra -thermal electrons Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.006, year: 2010 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ctpp.200900053

  11. Optimisation of stellarator systems: Possible ways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.A.; Isaev, M.; Leneva, A.E.; Mikhailov, M.; Shafranov, V.D.; Subbotin, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    The results of our search for advanced helical (stellarator) systems with a small number of field periods over the last five years are presented. The comparison of stellarator systems with toroidal (helical or axial) and poloidal directions of the contours with B = constant on the magnetic surface as well as systems with Helias and Heliac-like orientation of the magnetic surfaces cross-sections with respect to the principal normal to the magnetic axis is undertaken. Particular attention is paid to some attractive features of the systems with constant B-lines in the poloidal direction. (author)

  12. Optimisation of stellarator systems: Possible ways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.A.; Isaev, M.Yu.; Leneva, A.E.; Mikhailov, M.I.; Sharfranov, V.D.; Subbotin, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    The results of our search for advanced helical (stellarator) systems with a small number of field periods over the last five years are presented. The comparison of stellarator systems with toroidal (helical or axial) and poloidal directions of the contours with B = constant on the magnetic surface as well as systems with Helias and Heliac-like orientation of the magnetic surfaces cross-sections with respect to the principal normal to the magnetic axis is undertaken. Particular attention is paid to some attractive features of the systems with constant B-lines in the poloidal direction. (author)

  13. Stellar compass for the Clementine Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    A CCD sensor with 42 x 28 degrees FOV and 576 x 384 pixels was built by the Advanced Technology Program (ATP) in the Physics Department at LLNL. That sensor, called the StarTracker camera, is used on the Clementine Lunar Mapping mission between January and May, 1994. Together with the Stellar Compass software, the StarTracker camera provided a way of identifying its orientation to within about 150 microradians in camera body pitch and yaw. This presentation will be an overview of basically how the Stellar Compass software works, along with showing some of its performance results.

  14. 3D radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, M

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres is reviewed with special emphasis on the atmospheres of cool stars and applications. A short review of methods in 3D radiative transfer shows that mature methods exist, both for taking into account radiation as an energy transport mechanism in 3D (magneto-) hydrodynamical simulations of stellar atmospheres and for the diagnostic problem of calculating the emergent spectrum in more detail from such models, both assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and in non-LTE. Such methods have been implemented in several codes, and examples of applications are given.

  15. 176Lu: Cosmic clock or stellar thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, R.A.; Beer, H.; Kaeppeler, F.; Wisshak, K.

    1980-12-01

    We quantitatively examine the various experimental and theoretical aspects of the stellar synthesis of the long-lived ground state of 176 Lu (3.6 x 10 10 y). We discuss the various regimes of stellar temperature and free-neutron density in which either: (i) the internal electromagnetic couplings between 176 Lusup(o) and 176 Lusup(m) (3.68 hours) are sufficiently slow that they may be treated as separate nuclei, or (ii) the internal couplings are rapidly able to establish thermal equilibrium between 176 Lusup(o) and 176 Lusup(m). (orig.)

  16. Colliding Stellar Wind Models with Orbital Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, Francis P.; O'Connor, Brendan

    2018-01-01

    We present thin-shell models for the collision between two ballistic stellar winds, including orbital motion.The stellar orbits are assumed circular, so that steady-state solutions exist in the rotating frame, where we include centrifugal and Coriolis forces. Exact solutions for the pre-shock winds are incorporated. Here we discuss 2-D model results for equal wind momentum-loss rates, although we allow for the winds to have distinct speeds and mass loss rates. For these unequal wind conditions, we obtain a clear violation of skew-symmetry, despite equal momentum loss rates, due to the Coriolis force.

  17. Something borrowed, something blue: The nature of blue metal-poor stars inferred from their colours and chemical abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Jofré, P.; Koch, A.; McWilliam, A.; Sneden, C. S.

    2017-02-01

    Blue metal-poor (BMP) stars are main sequence stars that appear bluer and more luminous than normal turnoff stars. They were originally singled out by using B-V and U-B colour cuts.Early studies found that a larger fraction of field BMP stars were binaries compared to normal halo stars. Thus, BMP stars are ideal field blue straggler candidates for investigating internal stellar evolution processes and binary interaction. In particular, the presence or depletion in lithium in their spectra is a powerful indicator of their origin. They are either old, halo blue stragglers experiencing internal mixing processes or mass transfer (Li-depletion), or intermediate-age, single stars of possibly extragalactic origin (2.2 dex halo plateau Li). However, we note that internal mixing processes can lead to an increased level of Li. Hence, this study combines photometry and spectroscopy to unveil the origin of various BMP stars. We first show how to separate binaries from young blue stars using photometry, metallicity and lithium. Using a sample of 80 BMP stars (T > 6300 K), we find that 97% of the BMP binaries have V-Ks0 chemical analysis using new high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra. Based on their radial velocities, Li, α and s- and r-process abundances we show that BPS CS22874-042 is a single star (A(Li) = 2.38 ± 0.10 dex) while with A(Li)= 2.23 ± 0.07 dex CD-48 2445 is a binary, contrary to earlier findings. Our analysis emphasises that field blue stragglers can be segregated from single metal-poor stars, using (V-Ks) colours with a fraction of single stars polluting the binary sample, but not vice versa. These two groups can only be properly separated by using information from stellar spectra, illustrating the need for accurate and precise stellar parameters and high-resolution, high-S/N spectra in order to fully understand and classify this intriguing class of stars. Our high-resolution spectrum analysis confirms the findings from the colour cuts and shows

  18. The Hβ Index and the Ages of Old Stellar Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Jin Yoon

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The Hβ and some metal line indices, such as Mg2, Fe52, Fe53 of single-age and single-metallicity populations are computed based on the method of evolutionary population synthesis, with careful consideration of the variation of the horizontal-branch morphology with metallicity and age. We find (a that while metal lines are little affected, the Hβ index is severely enhanced (up to 30% by the presence of the blue horizontal-branch stars, frustrating the current age-estimations from this index without careful consideration of these stars, and (b that there is a systematic trend in the sense that the globular clusters in giant elliptical galaxies appear to be older than those in our Galaxy by several billion years. We also calculate these indices for the stellar populations with a metallicity spread, by adopting metallicity distribution functions predicted by chemical evolution models. The comparison of the models with the observed indices of the central regions of the early-type galaxies yields the results (a that the ages of the giant elliptical galaxies would be older than the previous estimations by several billion years, and (b that there is a considerable age spread among elliptical galaxies, in the sense that the giant elliptical galaxies are older than the small ones.

  19. Detecting the Disruption of Dark-Matter Halos with Stellar Streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovy, Jo

    2016-03-25

    Narrow stellar streams in the Milky Way halo are uniquely sensitive to dark-matter subhalos, but many of these subhalos may be tidally disrupted. I calculate the interaction between stellar and dark-matter streams using analytical and N-body calculations, showing that disrupting objects can be detected as low-concentration subhalos. Through this effect, we can constrain the lumpiness of the halo as well as the orbit and present position of individual dark-matter streams. This will have profound implications for the formation of halos and for direct- and indirect-detection dark-matter searches.

  20. Photometry of faint blue stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilkenny, D.; Hill, P.W.; Brown, A.

    1977-01-01

    Photometry on the uvby system is given for 61 faint blue stars. The stars are classified by means of the Stromgren indices, using criteria described in a previous paper (Kilkenny and Hill (1975)). (author)

  1. Magnetism, dynamo action and the solar-stellar connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Allan Sacha; Browning, Matthew K.

    2017-09-01

    The Sun and other stars are magnetic: magnetism pervades their interiors and affects their evolution in a variety of ways. In the Sun, both the fields themselves and their influence on other phenomena can be uncovered in exquisite detail, but these observations sample only a moment in a single star's life. By turning to observations of other stars, and to theory and simulation, we may infer other aspects of the magnetism—e.g., its dependence on stellar age, mass, or rotation rate—that would be invisible from close study of the Sun alone. Here, we review observations and theory of magnetism in the Sun and other stars, with a partial focus on the "Solar-stellar connection": i.e., ways in which studies of other stars have influenced our understanding of the Sun and vice versa. We briefly review techniques by which magnetic fields can be measured (or their presence otherwise inferred) in stars, and then highlight some key observational findings uncovered by such measurements, focusing (in many cases) on those that offer particularly direct constraints on theories of how the fields are built and maintained. We turn then to a discussion of how the fields arise in different objects: first, we summarize some essential elements of convection and dynamo theory, including a very brief discussion of mean-field theory and related concepts. Next we turn to simulations of convection and magnetism in stellar interiors, highlighting both some peculiarities of field generation in different types of stars and some unifying physical processes that likely influence dynamo action in general. We conclude with a brief summary of what we have learned, and a sampling of issues that remain uncertain or unsolved.

  2. Clementine Star Tracker Stellar Compass: Final report part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, R.E.; Kordas, J.F.; Lewis, I.T. [and others

    1995-07-01

    The Clementine mission provided the first ever complete, systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to the near-infrared regions. More than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth and space were returned from this mission. Two star stracker stellar compasses (star tracker camera + stellar compass software) were included on the spacecraft, serving a primary function of providing angle updates to the guidance and navigation system. These cameras served a secondary function by providing a wide field of view imaging capability for lunar horizon glow and other dark-side imaging data. This 290 g camera using a 576 x 384 focal plane array and a 17 mm entrance pupil, detected and centroided stars as dim and dimmer than 4.5 m{sub v}, providing rms pointing accuracy of better than 100 {mu}rad pitch and yaw and 450 {mu}rad roll. A description of this light-weight, low power star tracker camera along with a summary of lessons learned is presented. Design goals and preliminary on-orbit performance estimates are addressed in terms of meeting the mission`s primary objective for flight qualifying the sensors for future Department of Defense flights. Documentation generated during the design, analysis, build, test and characterization of the star tracker cameras are presented. Collectively, this documentation represents a small library of information for this camera, and may be used as a framework for producing copy units by commercial enterprises, and therefore satisfies a Department of Defense and Department of Energy goal to transfer technology to industry. However, the considerable knowledge gained from the experience of the individuals involved in the system trades, design, analysis, production, testing and characterization of the star tracker stellar compass is not contained in this documentation.

  3. Galaxy evolution. Isolated compact elliptical galaxies: stellar systems that ran away.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingarian, Igor; Zolotukhin, Ivan

    2015-04-24

    Compact elliptical galaxies form a rare class of stellar system (~30 presently known) characterized by high stellar densities and small sizes and often harboring metal-rich stars. They were thought to form through tidal stripping of massive progenitors, until two isolated objects were discovered where massive galaxies performing the stripping could not be identified. By mining astronomical survey data, we have now found 195 compact elliptical galaxies in all types of environment. They all share similar dynamical and stellar population properties. Dynamical analysis for nonisolated galaxies demonstrates the feasibility of their ejection from host clusters and groups by three-body encounters, which is in agreement with numerical simulations. Hence, isolated compact elliptical and isolated quiescent dwarf galaxies are tidally stripped systems that ran away from their hosts. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Equilibrium 𝛽-limits in classical stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizu, J.; Hudson, S. R.; Nührenberg, C.; Geiger, J.; Helander, P.

    2017-12-01

    A numerical investigation is carried out to understand the equilibrium -limit in a classical stellarator. The stepped-pressure equilibrium code (Hudson et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 19 (11), 2012) is used in order to assess whether or not magnetic islands and stochastic field-lines can emerge at high . Two modes of operation are considered: a zero-net-current stellarator and a fixed-iota stellarator. Despite the fact that relaxation is allowed (Taylor, Rev. Mod. Phys., vol. 58 (3), 1986, pp. 741-763), the former is shown to maintain good flux surfaces up to the equilibrium -limit predicted by ideal-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), above which a separatrix forms. The latter, which has no ideal equilibrium -limit, is shown to develop regions of magnetic islands and chaos at sufficiently high , thereby providing a `non-ideal -limit'. Perhaps surprisingly, however, the value of at which the Shafranov shift of the axis reaches a fraction of the minor radius follows in all cases the scaling laws predicted by ideal-MHD. We compare our results to the High-Beta-Stellarator theory of Freidberg (Ideal MHD, 2014, Cambridge University Press) and derive a new prediction for the non-ideal equilibrium -limit above which chaos emerges.

  5. Benchmarking the Multidimensional Stellar Implicit Code MUSIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffrey, T.; Pratt, J.; Viallet, M.; Baraffe, I.; Popov, M. V.; Walder, R.; Folini, D.; Geroux, C.; Constantino, T.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of a numerical benchmark study for the MUltidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC) based on widely applicable two- and three-dimensional compressible hydrodynamics problems relevant to stellar interiors. MUSIC is an implicit large eddy simulation code that uses implicit time integration, implemented as a Jacobian-free Newton Krylov method. A physics based preconditioning technique which can be adjusted to target varying physics is used to improve the performance of the solver. The problems used for this benchmark study include the Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, and the decay of the Taylor-Green vortex. Additionally we show a test of hydrostatic equilibrium, in a stellar environment which is dominated by radiative effects. In this setting the flexibility of the preconditioning technique is demonstrated. This work aims to bridge the gap between the hydrodynamic test problems typically used during development of numerical methods and the complex flows of stellar interiors. A series of multidimensional tests were performed and analysed. Each of these test cases was analysed with a simple, scalar diagnostic, with the aim of enabling direct code comparisons. As the tests performed do not have analytic solutions, we verify MUSIC by comparing it to established codes including ATHENA and the PENCIL code. MUSIC is able to both reproduce behaviour from established and widely-used codes as well as results expected from theoretical predictions. This benchmarking study concludes a series of papers describing the development of the MUSIC code and provides confidence in future applications.

  6. Microlensing and the physics of stellar atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sackett, PD; Menzies, JW; Sackett, PD

    2001-01-01

    The simple physics of microlensing provides a well understood tool with which to probe the atmospheres of distant stars in the Galaxy and Local Group with high magnification and resolution. Recent results in measuring stellar surface structure through broad band photometry and spectroscopy of high

  7. Multicomponent stellar wind from hot subdwarfs stars

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votruba, Viktor; Feldmeier, A.; Krtička, J.; Kubát, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 329, 1-2 (2010), s. 159-161 ISSN 0004-640X R&D Projects: GA ČR GP205/09/P476 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : stellar wind * hot subdwarfs * decoupling Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.437, year: 2010

  8. Evolution and seismic tools for stellar astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Monteiro, Mario JPFG

    2008-01-01

    A collection of articles published by the journal "Astrophysics and Space Science, Volume 316, Number 1-4", August 2008. This work covers 10 evolution codes and 9 oscillation codes. It is suitable for researchers and research students working on the modeling of stars and on the implementation of seismic test of stellar models.

  9. Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History -- SMASH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nidever, David; Olsen, Knut; Besla, Gurtina; Gruendl, Robert; Saha, Abhijit; Gallart, Carme; Olszewski, Edward W.; Munoz, Ricardo; Monelli, Matteo; Kunder, Andrea; Kaleida, Catherine; Walker, Alistair; Stringfellow, Guy; Zaritsky, Dennis; van der Marel, Roeland; Blum, Robert; Vivas, Kathy; Chu, You-Hua; Martin, Nicolas; Conn, Blair; Noel, Noelia; Majewski, Steven; Jin, Shoko; Kim, Hwihyun; Cioni, Maria-Rosa; Bell, Eric; Monachesi, Antonela; de Boer, Thomas

    Over the last several years, various discoveries have drastically altered our view of the iconic Magellanic Clouds (MCs), the nearest interacting galaxy system. The best evidence is now that they are on first infall into the Milky Way, that their stellar populations extend much further than

  10. Stellar Spectral Classification with Locality Preserving Projections ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    type and 3 subclasses of F-type spectra from. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Lastly, the performance of LPP+SVM is compared with that of PCA+SVM in stellar spectral classification, and we found that LPP does better than PCA. Key words.

  11. Modular Stellarator Reactor conceptual design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Bathke, C.G.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual design study of the Modular Stellarator Reactor is summarized. The physics basis of the approach is elucidated with emphasis on magnetics performance optimization. Key engineering features of the fusion power core are described. Comparisons with an analogous continuous-helical-coil (torsatron) system are made as the basis of a technical and economic assessment

  12. STELLAR TRANSITS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Béky, Bence; Kocsis, Bence

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are typically surrounded by a dense stellar population in galactic nuclei. Stars crossing the line of site in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) produce a characteristic transit light curve, just like extrasolar planets do when they transit their host star. We examine the possibility of finding such AGN transits in deep optical, UV, and X-ray surveys. We calculate transit light curves using the Novikov-Thorne thin accretion disk model, including general relativistic effects. Based on the expected properties of stellar cusps, we find that around 10 6 solar mass SMBHs, transits of red giants are most common for stars on close orbits with transit durations of a few weeks and orbital periods of a few years. We find that detecting AGN transits requires repeated observations of thousands of low-mass AGNs to 1% photometric accuracy in optical, or ∼10% in UV bands or soft X-ray. It may be possible to identify stellar transits in the Pan-STARRS and LSST optical and the eROSITA X-ray surveys. Such observations could be used to constrain black hole mass, spin, inclination, and accretion rate. Transit rates and durations could give valuable information on the circumnuclear stellar clusters as well. Transit light curves could be used to image accretion disks with unprecedented resolution, allowing us to resolve the SMBH silhouette in distant AGNs.

  13. Stellar Atmospheric Modelling for the ACCESS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Matthew; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Bohlin, Ralph; Kurucz, Robert; ACCESS Team

    2018-01-01

    A goal of the ACCESS program (Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars) is to enable greater discrimination between theoretical astrophysical models and observations, where the comparison is limited by systematic errors associated with the relative flux calibration of the targets. To achieve these goals, ACCESS has been designed as a sub-orbital rocket borne payload and ground calibration program, to establish absolute flux calibration of stellar targets at high resolution spectra in addition to the HST/CALSPEC data, we have generated stellar atmosphere models for ACCESS flight candidates, as well as a selection of A and G stars from the CALSPEC database. Stellar atmosphere models were generated using Atlas 9 and Atlas 12 Kurucz stellar atmosphere software. The effective temperature, log(g), metallicity, and redenning were varied and the chi-squared statistic was minimized to obtain a best-fit model. A comparison of these models and the results from interpolation between grids of existing models will be presented. The impact of the flexibility of the Atlas 12 input parameters (e.g. solar metallicity fraction, abundances, microturbulent velocity) is being explored.

  14. Modular stellarator reactor conceptual design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual design study of the Modular Stellarator Reactor is summarized. The physics basis of the approach is elucidated with emphasis on magnetics performance optimization. Key engineering features of the fusion power core are described. Comparisons with an analogous continuous-helical-coil (torsatron) system are made as the basis of a technical and economic assessment

  15. The Ancient stellar population of Leo A.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saha, Abhijit; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Tolstoy, Eline; Cole, Andrew

    The primary goal of our proposal is the characterisation of the oldest stellar populations in Leo A using the properties of ancient RR Lyrae variable stars as tracers. Well known and long established correlations exist between the periods and luminosities of RR Lyrae variable stars and their ages

  16. The resolved stellar population of Leo A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, E

    1996-01-01

    New observations of the resolved stellar population of the extremely metal-poor Magellanic dwarf irregular galaxy Leo A in Thuan-Gunn r, g, i, and narrowband Ha filters are presented. Using the recent Cepheid variable star distance determination to Leo A by Hoessel et al., we are able to create an

  17. Computational Developments for Distance Determination of Stellar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... In this paper, we consider a statistical method for distance determination of stellar groups. The method depends on the assumption that the members of the group scatter around a mean absolute magnitude in Gaussian distribution. The mean apparent magnitude of the members is then expressed by ...

  18. The Space Stellar Photometry Mission COROT: Asteroseismology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    for extrasolar planets for the COROT photometric mission are presented, and its interest in terms of stellar ... Space—photometry—asteroseismology—extrasolar planets. 1. The asteroseismology programme ... dispersive element (prism) has been included in the exoplanet field giving a little spectrum (3–4 resolution).

  19. Advanced Stellar Compass - Alenia Mars Express

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilsgaard, Søren; Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif

    1998-01-01

    This document, submitted in reply to an Alenia R.f.P., is a proposal to implement the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC) in the Mars Express mission.The Mars Express is an ESA dedicated mission to Mars scientific investigation.The ASC is a very advanced instrument designed by the Space Instrumentation...

  20. On the collapse of iron stellar cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkat, Z.; Rakavy, G.; Reiss, Y.; Wilson, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The collapse of iron stellar cores is investigated to see whether the outward shock produced by the bounce at neutron star density is sufficient to burn appreciable amounts of the envelope around the iron core. Several models were tried, and in all cases no appreciable burn took place; hence no explosion results from the collapse of these models

  1. The Space Stellar Photometry Mission COROT: Asteroseismology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    detect giant extra solar planets (detectable by spectroscopy from the ground) and determine their albedo. As COROT is devoted to stellar photometry, aiming at both a high precision and a long observation time, the search for exoplanets by the transit method can easily be integrated in the payload and in the mission profile.

  2. Measuring Stellar Rotation Periods with Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. B.; Gizon, L.; Schunker, H.

    2013-01-01

    We measure rotation periods for 12151 stars in the Kepler field, based on photometric variability caused by stellar activity. Our analysis returns stable rotation periods over at least six out of eight quarters of Kepler data. This large sample of stars enables us to study rotation periods...

  3. Summary of the Advanced Stellar Compass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC) is an improved implementation of the instrument developed for the Danish Geomagnetic Research Satellite Ørsted. The Ørsted version was successfully tested in space on the NASA sounding rocket "Thunderstorm III", that was launched September 2...

  4. The Not So Simple Globular Cluster ω Cen. I. Spatial Distribution of the Multiple Stellar Populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calamida, A.; Saha, A. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory—AURA, 950 N Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ, 85719 (United States); Strampelli, G.; Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute—AURA, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bono, G.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma—Via Frascati 33, I-00040, Monteporzio Catone, Rome (Italy); Scolnic, D. [The University of Chicago, The Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, William Eckhardt Research Center—Suite 499, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); James, D.; Smith, C.; Zenteno, A., E-mail: calamida@noao.edu [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2017-04-01

    We present a multi-band photometric catalog of ≈1.7 million cluster members for a field of view of ≈2° × 2° across ω Cen. Photometry is based on images collected with the Dark Energy Camera on the 4 m Blanco telescope and the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope . The unprecedented photometric accuracy and field coverage allowed us, for the first time, to investigate the spatial distribution of ω Cen multiple populations from the core to the tidal radius, confirming its very complex structure. We found that the frequency of blue main-sequence stars is increasing compared to red main-sequence stars starting from a distance of ≈25′ from the cluster center. Blue main-sequence stars also show a clumpy spatial distribution, with an excess in the northeast quadrant of the cluster pointing toward the direction of the Galactic center. Stars belonging to the reddest and faintest red-giant branch also show a more extended spatial distribution in the outskirts of ω Cen, a region never explored before. Both these stellar sub-populations, according to spectroscopic measurements, are more metal-rich compared to the cluster main stellar population. These findings, once confirmed, make ω Cen the only stellar system currently known where metal-rich stars have a more extended spatial distribution compared to metal-poor stars. Kinematic and chemical abundance measurements are now needed for stars in the external regions of ω Cen to better characterize the properties of these sub-populations.

  5. International, prospective haemovigilance study on methylene blue-treated plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noens, L; Vilariño, Ma D; Megalou, A; Qureshi, H

    2017-05-01

    Methylene blue is a phenothiazine dye, which in combination with visible light has virucidal and bactericidal properties, disrupting the replication of a broad range of enveloped viruses and some non-enveloped viruses. The study objective was to collect data on adverse reactions occurring with methylene blue plasma administered in a routine clinical practice environment and document their characteristics and severity. This was an open label, multicentre, non-controlled, non-randomized, non-interventional study. Patients who receive a methylene blue plasma transfusion were observed for any signs and symptoms (adverse reactions) within 24 h safter the start of the transfusion, in different hospitals for a study duration of at least 1 year. A total of 19 315 methylene blue plasma units were transfused. There were eight patients with adverse reactions recorded during the study, one of them serious. Two had more than one reaction (two and four, respectively). Three patients had previous transfusions with methylene blue plasma only. Methylene blue plasma has a very acceptable safety profile with a rate of serious adverse reactions of 0·5/10 000 units. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  6. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Bill; Bildsten, Lars; Dotter, Aaron; Herwig, Falk; Lesaffre, Pierre; Timmes, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Stellar physics and evolution calculations enable a broad range of research in astrophysics. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) is a suite of open source, robust, efficient, thread-safe libraries for a wide range of applications in computational stellar astrophysics. A one-dimensional stellar evolution module, MESAstar, combines many of the numerical and physics modules for simulations of a wide range of stellar evolution scenarios ranging from very low mass to massive stars, including advanced evolutionary phases. MESAstar solves the fully coupled structure and composition equations simultaneously. It uses adaptive mesh refinement and sophisticated timestep controls, and supports shared memory parallelism based on OpenMP. State-of-the-art modules provide equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, element diffusion data, and atmosphere boundary conditions. Each module is constructed as a separate Fortran 95 library with its own explicitly defined public interface to facilitate independent development. Several detailed examples indicate the extensive verification and testing that is continuously performed and demonstrate the wide range of capabilities that MESA possesses. These examples include evolutionary tracks of very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and gas giant planets to very old ages; the complete evolutionary track of a 1 M sun star from the pre-main sequence (PMS) to a cooling white dwarf; the solar sound speed profile; the evolution of intermediate-mass stars through the He-core burning phase and thermal pulses on the He-shell burning asymptotic giant branch phase; the interior structure of slowly pulsating B Stars and Beta Cepheids; the complete evolutionary tracks of massive stars from the PMS to the onset of core collapse; mass transfer from stars undergoing Roche lobe overflow; and the evolution of helium accretion onto a neutron star. MESA can be downloaded from the project Web site (http://mesa.sourceforge.net/).

  7. Plea for stellarator funding raps tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, M.

    1992-01-01

    The funding crunch in magnetic confinement fusion development has moved the editor of a largely technical publication to speak out on a policy issue. James A. Rome, who edits Stellarator News from the Fusion Energy Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, wrote an editorial that appeared on the front page of the May 1992 issue. It was titled open-quotes The US Stellarator Program: A Time for Renewal,close quotes and while it focused chiefly on that subject (and lamented the lack of funding for the operation of the existing ATF stellarator at Oak Ridge), it also cited some of the problems inherent in the mainline MCF approach--the tokamak--and stated that if the money can be found for further tokamak design upgrades, it should also be found for stellarators. Rome wrote, open-quotes There is growing recognition in the US, and elsewhere, that the conventional tokamak does not extrapolate to a commercially competitive energy source except with very high field coils ( 1000 MWe).close quotes He pointed up open-quotes the difficulty of simultaneously satisfying conflicting tokamak requirements for efficient current drive, high bootstrap-current fraction, complete avoidance of disruptions, adequate beta limits, and edge-plasma properties compatible with improved (H-mode) confinement and acceptable erosion of divertor plates.close quotes He then called for support for the stellarator as open-quotes the only concept that has performance comparable to that achieved in tokamaks without the plasma-current-related limitations listed above.close quotes

  8. Comparing Dark Energy Survey and HST –CLASH observations of the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431: implications for stellar mass versus dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmese, A.; Lahav, O.; Banerji, M.; Gruen, D.; Jouvel, S.; Melchior, P.; Aleksić, J.; Annis, J.; Diehl, H. T.; Hartley, W. G.; Jeltema, T.; Romer, A. K.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Seitz, S.; Suchyta, E.; Zhang, Y.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D' Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.

    2016-08-20

    We derive the stellar mass fraction in the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 observed with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) during the Science Verification period. We compare the stellar mass results from DES (five filters) with those from the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey (CLASH; 17 filters). When the cluster spectroscopic redshift is assumed, we show that stellar masses from DES can be estimated within 25 per cent of CLASH values. We compute the stellar mass contribution coming from red and blue galaxies, and study the relation between stellar mass and the underlying dark matter using weak lensing studies with DES and CLASH. An analysis of the radial profiles of the DES total and stellar mass yields a stellar-to-total fraction of f(star) = (6.8 +/- 1.7) x 10(-3) within a radius of r(200c) similar or equal to 2 Mpc. Our analysis also includes a comparison of photometric redshifts and star/galaxy separation efficiency for both data sets. We conclude that space-based small field imaging can be used to calibrate the galaxy properties in DES for the much wider field of view. The technique developed to derive the stellar mass fraction in galaxy clusters can be applied to the similar to 100 000 clusters that will be observed within this survey and yield important information about galaxy evolution.

  9. [Acute blue urticaria following subcutaneous injection of patent blue dye].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, A; Vial-Dupuy, A; Lebrun-Vignes, B; Francès, C; Soria, A; Barete, S

    2015-11-01

    Patent blue (PB) is a lymphatic vessel dye commonly used in France for sentinel lymph node detection in breast cancer, and less frequently in melanoma, and which may induce hypersensitivity reactions. We report a case of acute blue urticaria occurring within minutes of PB injection. Ten minutes after PB injection for sentinel lymph node detection during breast cancer surgery, a 49-year-old woman developed generalised acute blue urticaria and eyelid angioedema without bronchospasm or haemodynamic disturbance, but requiring discontinuation of surgery. Skin testing using PB and the anaesthetics given were run 6 weeks after the episode and confirmed PB allergy. PB was formally contra-indicated. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to PB have been reported for between 0.24 and 2.2% of procedures. Such reactions are on occasion severe, chiefly involving anaphylactic shock. Two mechanisms are probably associated: non-specific histamine release and/or an IgE-mediated mechanism. Skin tests are helpful in confirming the diagnosis of PB allergy. Blue acute urticaria is one of the clinical manifestations of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to patent blue dye. Skin tests must be performed 6 weeks after the reaction in order to confirm the diagnosis and formally contra-indicate this substance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. VELOCITY DISPERSIONS AND STELLAR POPULATIONS OF THE MOST COMPACT AND MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT ∼1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Manso, Jesus; Guzman, Rafael; Barro, Guillermo; Cardiel, Nicolas; Gallego, Jesus; Cenarro, Javier; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo; Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia; Trujillo, Ignacio; Balcells, Marc; Hempel, Angela; Prieto, Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    We present Gran-Telescopio-Canarias/OSIRIS optical spectra of four of the most compact and massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the Groth Strip Survey at redshift z ∼ 1, with effective radii R e = 0.5-2.4 kpc and photometric stellar masses M * = (1.2-4) x 10 11 M sun . We find that these galaxies have velocity dispersions σ = 156-236 km s -1 . The spectra are well fitted by single stellar population models with approximately 1 Gyr of age and solar metallicity. We find that (1) the dynamical masses of these galaxies are systematically smaller by a factor of ∼6 than the published stellar masses using BRIJK photometry, and (2) when estimating stellar masses as 0.7x M dyn , a combination of passive luminosity fading with mass/size growth due to minor mergers can plausibly evolve our objects to match the properties of the local population of ETGs.

  11. Constraining the Stellar Mass Function in the Galactic Center via Mass Loss from Stellar Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Rubin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The dense concentration of stars and high-velocity dispersions in the Galactic center imply that stellar collisions frequently occur. Stellar collisions could therefore result in significant mass loss rates. We calculate the amount of stellar mass lost due to indirect and direct stellar collisions and find its dependence on the present-day mass function of stars. We find that the total mass loss rate in the Galactic center due to stellar collisions is sensitive to the present-day mass function adopted. We use the observed diffuse X-ray luminosity in the Galactic center to preclude any present-day mass functions that result in mass loss rates >10-5M⨀yr−1 in the vicinity of ~1″. For present-day mass functions of the form, dN/dM∝M-α, we constrain the present-day mass function to have a minimum stellar mass ≲7M⨀ and a power-law slope ≳1.25. We also use this result to constrain the initial mass function in the Galactic center by considering different star formation scenarios.

  12. SDP_golofs01_3: Stellar Disk Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, G.

    2010-03-01

    n a collaboration between the HSC, P. Harvey (Mission Scientist) and the three instrument consortia we propose to apply the full power of Herschel to investigate the properties of circum-stellar disks. The versatility of Herschel allows us to address several key questions: How do the disks evolve with time? Planets clearly form out of circum-stellar disks and there is growing evidence that the time scale is short, 1 - 10 Myr, for the main accretion phase. During this time period, the stellar radiation and stellar winds clean the disks from most of their dust and gas, eventually making them transparent. However, collisions and evaporation from comet- like bodies will continue to produce dust and gas. This activity declines with time, and we will pursue this scenario by observing a sample of IR excess stars of known age, ranging from a few million years to the age of the sun. Are there analogues to our Kuiper belt around nearby stars? The Kuiper belt is a dust belt surrounding the Sun, located outside the orbit of Neptune, which has a key role in stabilizing orbits of the KE-objects and this dynamical aspect makes it particularly interesting to search for stars that may host KE-belt analogues. Herschel offers a unique sensitivity beyond 100 m and we propose an extensive survey of nearby stars seeking cold dust emission. What will a closer IR look at the "Fabulous Four" (and some other resolved disks) reveal? Several nearby MS stars with IR excesses have circumstellar dust structures that can be resolved by Herschel. Imaging these structures in the six PACS+SPIRE bands will enable us to explore the dust properties, notably the size distribution and albedo.. What is the composition of young disks? We propose a detailed spectroscopic investigation of four bright disks, including a full spectral scan with PACS, an FTS scan at full resolution and HIFI observations of selected frequencies. The aim is to constrain the properties of both the dust and gas components.

  13. Pismis 24-1: The Stellar Upper Mass Limit Preserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maíz Apellániz, J.; Walborn, Nolan R.; Morrell, N. I.; Niemela, V. S.; Nelan, E. P.

    2007-05-01

    Is there a stellar upper mass limit? Recent statistical work seems to indicate that there is and that it is in the vicinity of 150 Msolar. In this paper we use HST and ground-based data to investigate the brightest members of the cluster Pismis 24, one of which (Pismis 24-1) was previously inferred to have a mass greater than 200 Msolar, in apparent disagreement with that limit. We determine that Pismis 24-1 is composed of at least three objects, the resolved Pismis 24-1SW and the unresolved spectroscopic binary Pismis 24-1NE. The evolutionary zero-age masses of Pismis 24-1SW, the unresolved system Pismis 24-1NE, and the nearby star Pismis 24-17 are all ~100 Msolar, very large but under the stellar upper mass limit. This article is based on data gathered with three facilities: the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO), and the 2.15 m J. Sahade telescope at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO). The HST observations are associated with GO program 10602. HST is controlled from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. CASLEO is operated under agreement between CONICET, SeCyT, and the Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  14. The Carl Sagan solar and stellar observatories as remote observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucedo-Morales, J.; Loera-Gonzalez, P.

    In this work we summarize recent efforts made by the University of Sonora, with the goal of expanding the capability for remote operation of the Carl Sagan Solar and Stellar Observatories, as well as the first steps that have been taken in order to achieve autonomous robotic operation in the near future. The solar observatory was established in 2007 on the university campus by our late colleague A. Sánchez-Ibarra. It consists of four solar telescopes mounted on a single equatorial mount. On the other hand, the stellar observatory, which saw the first light on 16 February 2010, is located 21 km away from Hermosillo, Sonora at the site of the School of Agriculture of the University of Sonora. Both observatories can now be remotely controlled, and to some extent are able to operate autonomously. In this paper we discuss how this has been accomplished in terms of the use of software as well as the instruments under control. We also briefly discuss the main scientific and educational objectives, the future plans to improve the control software and to construct an autonomous observatory on a mountain site, as well as the opportunities for collaborations.

  15. LSD-based analysis of high-resolution stellar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsymbal, V.; Tkachenko, A.; Van, Reeth T.

    2014-11-01

    We present a generalization of the method of least-squares deconvolution (LSD), a powerful tool for extracting high S/N average line profiles from stellar spectra. The generalization of the method is effected by extending it towards the multiprofile LSD and by introducing the possibility to correct the line strengths from the initial mask. We illustrate the new approach by two examples: (a) the detection of astroseismic signatures from low S/N spectra of single stars, and (b) disentangling spectra of multiple stellar objects. The analysis is applied to spectra obtained with 2-m class telescopes in the course of spectroscopic ground-based support for space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler. Usually, rather high S/N is required, so smaller telescopes can only compete successfully with more advanced ones when one can apply a technique that enables a remarkable increase in the S/N of the spectra which they observe. Since the LSD profiles have a potential for reconstruction what is common in all the spectral profiles, it should have a particular practical application to faint stars observed with 2-m class telescopes and whose spectra show remarkable LPVs.

  16. Stability of anisotropic stellar filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, M. Zaeem-ul-Haq; Yousaf, Z.

    2017-12-01

    The study of perturbation of self-gravitating celestial cylindrical object have been carried out in this paper. We have designed a framework to construct the collapse equation by formulating the modified field equations with the background of f(R , T) theory as well as dynamical equations from the contracted form of Bianchi identities with anisotropic matter configuration. We have encapsulated the radial perturbations on metric and material variables of the geometry with some known static profile at Newtonian and post-Newtonian regimes. We examined a strong dependence of unstable regions on stiffness parameter which measures the rigidity of the fluid. Also, the static profile and matter variables with f(R , T) dark source terms control the instability of compact cylindrical system.

  17. Stellar Evolution in Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The main thrust of the program was to obtain UV spectroscopy of a number of massive and hot luminous (OB type) stars in the nearby galaxy called the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The objective was to analyze their atmospheres and winds so as to determine the effect of the lower abundance of the SIVIC on these parameters. Furthermore, the differences in evolution could be investigated. Additionally, the UV spectra themselves would be suitably weighted and systematically combined to provide a template for comparison to very distant galaxies formed in the early history of the Universe which also have a low abundance of elements. The spectra have been obtained and the analysis is proceeding, primarily by the groups in Munich and at STScl who are the leads for this project. Given the important role of the nearby SMC galaxy as a template of low metal abundance, I have begun to investigate the YOUNGEST phases of massive star birth, before the most massive and hottest stars become optically visible. Typically these stars form in clusters, in some cases having tens to hundreds of OB type stars. In this phase, each star is still buried in its natal cloud and visible only in the infrared (IR) from its self-heated dust and/or from radio free-free emission of the surrounding hydrogen (HII) region. Efforts to find and identify these buried clusters were conducted using a large radio telescope. A number of these were found and further analysis of the data is underway. These clusters are not visible optically, but ought to be seen in the IR, and are a likely topic for HST photometry on NICMOS. A proposal to do this will be made next semester. These objects are the precursors of the optically visible clusters that contain massive and hot luminous stars.

  18. MULTIPLE OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Bosov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The development of complicated techniques of production and management processes, information systems, computer science, applied objects of systems theory and others requires improvement of mathematical methods, new approaches for researches of application systems. And the variety and diversity of subject systems makes necessary the development of a model that generalizes the classical sets and their development – sets of sets. Multiple objects unlike sets are constructed by multiple structures and represented by the structure and content. The aim of the work is the analysis of multiple structures, generating multiple objects, the further development of operations on these objects in application systems. Methodology. To achieve the objectives of the researches, the structure of multiple objects represents as constructive trio, consisting of media, signatures and axiomatic. Multiple object is determined by the structure and content, as well as represented by hybrid superposition, composed of sets, multi-sets, ordered sets (lists and heterogeneous sets (sequences, corteges. Findings. In this paper we study the properties and characteristics of the components of hybrid multiple objects of complex systems, proposed assessments of their complexity, shown the rules of internal and external operations on objects of implementation. We introduce the relation of arbitrary order over multiple objects, we define the description of functions and display on objects of multiple structures. Originality.In this paper we consider the development of multiple structures, generating multiple objects.Practical value. The transition from the abstract to the subject of multiple structures requires the transformation of the system and multiple objects. Transformation involves three successive stages: specification (binding to the domain, interpretation (multiple sites and particularization (goals. The proposed describe systems approach based on hybrid sets

  19. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF BLUE STRAGGLERS IN 47 TUCANAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parada, Javiera; Richer, Harvey; Heyl, Jeremy; Goldsbury, Ryan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kalirai, Jason, E-mail: jparada@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: heyl@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: richer@astro.ubc.ca, E-mail: jkalirai@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    Blue stragglers (BSS) are stars whose position in the color–magnitude diagram (CMD) places them above the main sequence (MS) turn-off (TO) point of a star cluster. Using data from the core of 47 Tuc in the ultraviolet (UV), we have identified various stellar populations in the CMD, and used their radial distributions to study the evolution and origin of BSS, and obtain a dynamical estimate of the mass of BSS systems. When we separate the BSS into two samples by their magnitude, we find that the bright BSS show a much more centrally concentrated radial distribution and thus higher mass estimate (over twice the TO mass for these BSS systems), suggesting an origin involving triple or multiple stellar systems. In contrast, the faint BSS are less concentrated, with a radial distribution similar to the MS binaries, pointing to the MS binaries as the likely progenitors of these BSS. Putting our data together with available photometric data in the visible and using MESA evolutionary models, we calculate the expected number of stars in each evolutionary stage for the normal evolution of stars and the number of stars coming from the evolution of BSS. The results indicate that BSS have a post-MS evolution comparable to that of a normal star of the same mass and a MS BSS lifetime of about 200–300 Myr. We also find that the excess population of asymptotic giant branch stars in 47 Tuc is due to evolved BSS.

  20. Performance Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    mathematics program. Ir this study he measured mathenatics skills, mathematics application, ard student attitudes. Ne used the Stanford Achievement...34most vague" (5). Means and variances were computed for each Item on the questionnaire, Correlations were then ccinputed between and among the...between subjects’ ratings of objectives with direct objects and objectives containing "x" and "y." This is reflected in tests computed separately for

  1. Viability of the Fricke dosemeter doped with methylene blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, V.L.B.; Santos, C.D.A.; Rodrigues, K.R.G.; Cunha, M.S.; Figueiredo, M.D.C.; Melo, R.T.

    2009-01-01

    This work aims to find the possible utilization of the Fricke dosemeter doped with methylene blue (FMB) for the dosimetry of photodynamic therapy. The FMB was irradiated wit X rays and light emitted diodes demonstrating positive answers to the stimulus, being probably to be used for dosimetric objectives

  2. Sequential serotonin and noradrenalin associated processes involved in postpartum blues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doornbos, B.; Fekkes, D.; Tanke, M.A.; de Jonge, P.; Korf, J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether postpartum blues was related to changes in parameters of noradrenergic and serotonergic functioning. Methods: From 26 healthy pregnant women blood was collected at the End of pregnancy and 5 days and 6 weeks postpartum. Serotonergic parameters were: platelet

  3. Stellar Streams Discovered in the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipp, N.; et al.

    2018-01-09

    We perform a search for stellar streams around the Milky Way using the first three years of multi-band optical imaging data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We use DES data covering $\\sim 5000$ sq. deg. to a depth of $g > 23.5$ with a relative photometric calibration uncertainty of $< 1 \\%$. This data set yields unprecedented sensitivity to the stellar density field in the southern celestial hemisphere, enabling the detection of faint stellar streams to a heliocentric distance of $\\sim 50$ kpc. We search for stellar streams using a matched-filter in color-magnitude space derived from a synthetic isochrone of an old, metal-poor stellar population. Our detection technique recovers four previously known thin stellar streams: Phoenix, ATLAS, Tucana III, and a possible extension of Molonglo. In addition, we report the discovery of eleven new stellar streams. In general, the new streams detected by DES are fainter, more distant, and lower surface brightness than streams detected by similar techniques in previous photometric surveys. As a by-product of our stellar stream search, we find evidence for extra-tidal stellar structure associated with four globular clusters: NGC 288, NGC 1261, NGC 1851, and NGC 1904. The ever-growing sample of stellar streams will provide insight into the formation of the Galactic stellar halo, the Milky Way gravitational potential, as well as the large- and small-scale distribution of dark matter around the Milky Way.

  4. Mapping Milky Way Dust in 3D with Stellar Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Gregory Maurice

    -dimensional reddening map presented here to find a wide range of uses, among them correcting for reddening and extinction for objects embedded in the plane of the Galaxy, studies of Galactic structure, calibration of future emission-based dust maps and determining distances to objects of known reddening. The method we present is not limited to the passbands of the Pan-STARRS 1 and 2MASS surveys, but may be extended to incorporate photometry from other optical and near-infrared surveys, such as WISE, Spitzer GLIMPSE, UKIDSS, SDSS (where available), and in the future, LSST and Gaia. The method can also be naturally extended to stellar kinematic data, such as that soon to be released by Gaia .

  5. Ballots and Blue Helmets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bertel Teilfeldt

    This paper provides an answer to the question of why early post-conflict elections have been so frequent in the post-Cold War era, when they are widely believed to be prone to result in renewed violence. I show that their popularity stems from their utility as an exit strategy for peacekeeping...... missions. Using original data on UN resolutions, I argue that as the objectives of peacekeeping become increasingly broad and difficult to evaluate, elections provide the UN with a uniquely concrete event that signals the completion of their task. I test this by using newly released data on monthly troop...

  6. Blue-emitting laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, K.; Ishibashi, A.

    This paper reviews the recent results of blue-emitting laser diodes. These devices are based on ZnMgSSe alloy II-VI semiconductors. Recently we have achieved room temperature continuous-wave operation of ZnMgSSe blue lasers for the first time. ZnMgSSe alloys offer a wide range of band-gap energy from 2.8 to 4.5 eV, while maintaining lattice matching to GaAs substrates. These characteristics make ZnMgSSe suitable for cladding layers of blue lasers. In this article, the feasibilities of ZnMgSSe will be reviewed. The laser structures and characteristics will be also mentioned.

  7. Probing the Dusty Stellar Populations of the Local Volume Galaxies with JWST /MIRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Olivia C.; Meixner, Margaret [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD, 21218 (United States); Justtanont, Kay [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Glasse, Alistair [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-20

    The Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) for the James Webb Space Telescope ( JWST ) will revolutionize our understanding of infrared stellar populations in the Local Volume. Using the rich Spitzer -IRS spectroscopic data set and spectral classifications from the Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE)–Spectroscopic survey of more than 1000 objects in the Magellanic Clouds, the Grid of Red Supergiant and Asymptotic Giant Branch Star Model (grams), and the grid of YSO models by Robitaille et al., we calculate the expected flux densities and colors in the MIRI broadband filters for prominent infrared stellar populations. We use these fluxes to explore the JWST /MIRI colors and magnitudes for composite stellar population studies of Local Volume galaxies. MIRI color classification schemes are presented; these diagrams provide a powerful means of identifying young stellar objects, evolved stars, and extragalactic background galaxies in Local Volume galaxies with a high degree of confidence. Finally, we examine which filter combinations are best for selecting populations of sources based on their JWST colors.

  8. Objective lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak, Eugene G. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An objective lens and a method for using same. The objective lens has a first end, a second end, and a plurality of optical elements. The optical elements are positioned between the first end and the second end and are at least substantially symmetric about a plane centered between the first end and the second end.

  9. Agile Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Senta; Harris, Jim

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue that the art-historical canon, however it is construed, has little relevance to the selection of objects for museum-based teaching. Their contention is that all objects are fundamentally agile and capable of interrogation from any number of disciplinary standpoints, and that the canon of museum education,…

  10. Core collapse supernovae from blue supergiant progenitors : The evolutionary history of SN 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Athira

    2015-08-01

    SN 1987A is historically one of the most remarkable supernova explosions to be seen from Earth. Due to the proximity of its location in the LMC, it remains the most well-studied object outside the solar system. It was also the only supernova whose progenitor was observed prior to its explosion.SN 1987A however, was a unique and enigmatic core collapse supernova. It was the first Type II supernova to have been observed to have exploded while its progenitor was a blue supergiant (BSG). Until then Type II supernovae were expected to originate from explosions of red supergiants (RSGs). A spectacular triple-ring nebula structure, rich in helium and nitrogen, was observed around the remnant, indicating a recent RSG phase before becoming a BSG. Even today it is not entirely understood what the evolutionary history may have been to cause a BSG to explode. The most commonly accepted hypothesis for its origin is the merger of a massive binary star system.An evolutionary scenario for such a binary system, was proposed by Podsiadlowski (1992) (P92). Through SPH simulations of the merger and the stellar evolution of the post-merger remnant, Ivanova & Podsiadlowski (2002) and (2003) (I&M) could successfully obtain the RSG to BSG transition of the progenitor.The aim of the present work is to produce the evolutionary history of the progenitor of SN 1987A and its explosion. We construct our models based on the results of P92 and I&M. Here, the secondary (less massive) star is accreted on the primary, while being simultaneously mixed in its envelope over a period of 100 years. The merged star is evolved until the onset of core collapse. For this work we use the 1-dimensional, implicit, hydrodynamical stellar evolution code, KEPLER. A large parameter space is explored, consisting of primary (16-20 Ms) and secondary masses (5-8 Ms), mixing boundaries, and accreting timescales. Those models whose end states match the observed properties of the progenitor of SN 1987A are exploded. The

  11. The quest for blue supergiants : The evolution of the progenitor of SN 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Athira; Heger, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    SN 1987A is historically one of the most remarkable supernova explosions to be seen from Earth. Due to the proximity of its location in the LMC, it remains the most well-studied object outside the solar system. It was also the only supernova whose progenitor was observed prior to its explosion.SN 1987A however, was a unique and enigmatic core collapse supernova. It was the first Type II supernova to have been observed to have exploded while its progenitor was a blue supergiant (BSG). Until then Type II supernovae were expected to originate from explosions of red supergiants (RSGs). A spectacular triple-ring nebula structure, rich in helium and nitrogen, was observed around the remnant, indicating a recent RSG phase before becoming a BSG. Even today it is not entirely understood what the evolutionary history may have been to cause a BSG to explode. The most commonly accepted hypothesis for its origin is the merger of a massive binary star system.An evolutionary scenario for such a binary system, was proposed by Podsiadlowski (1992) (P92). Through SPH simulations of the merger and the stellar evolution of the post-merger remnant, Ivanova & Podsiadlowski (2002) and (2003) (I&M) could successfully obtain the RSG to BSG transition of the progenitor.The aim of the present work is to produce the evolutionary history of the progenitor of SN 1987A and its explosion. We construct our models based on the results of P92 and I&M. Here, the secondary (less massive) star is accreted on the primary, while being simultaneously mixed in its envelope over a period of 100 years. The merged star is evolved until the onset of core collapse. For this work we use the 1-dimensional, implicit, hydrodynamical stellar evolution code, KEPLER. A large parameter space is explored, consisting of primary (16-20 Ms) and secondary masses (5-8 Ms), mixing boundaries, and accreting timescales. Those models whose end states match the observed properties of the progenitor of SN 1987A are exploded. The

  12. Time variations of stellar water masers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, G.G.; Parker, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    The 22-GHz H 2 O spectra of the stars RS Vir, RT Vir, R Aql, W Hya, U Her, S Cr B, Rx Boo, R Crt and VY CMa have been observed at intervals during the period 1974 September -1977 May. Optical and infrared measurements have also been made. New components have been observed in the H 2 O spectra of most of the stars, and the flux density of W Hya reached 2000 Jy near Jd 2442700. The intensities of the three main groups of components in VY CMa varied in phase consistent with a central pump source. In several stars the intensities were very different from those found by earlier observers, showing that stellar H 2 O masers are often not stable for more than a few cycles of the stellar luminosity. For part of the time the H 2 O and infrared intensities of R Aql and RS Vir were anticorrelated. (author)

  13. Energetic Particle Estimates for Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Allison; Chamberlin, Phil; Woods, Tom

    2018-01-01

    In the heliosphere, energetic particles are accelerated away from the Sun during solar flares and/or coronal mass ejections where they frequently impact the Earth and other solar system bodies. Solar (or stellar) energetic particles (SEPs) not only affect technological assets, but also influence mass loss and chemistry in planetary atmospheres (e.g., depletion of ozone). SEPs are increasingly recognized as an important factor in assessing exoplanet habitability, but we do not yet have constraints on SEP emission from any stars other than the Sun. Until indirect measurements are available, we must assume solar-like particle production and apply correlations between solar flares and SEPs detected near Earth to stellar flares. We present improved scaling relations between solar far-UV flare flux and >10 MeV proton flux near Earth. We apply these solar scaling relations to far-UV flares from exoplanet host stars and discuss the implications for modeling chemistry and mass loss in exoplanet atmospheres.

  14. Excitation of solar and stellar oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    In this report for an Accreditation to Supervise Research (HDR), and after an introduction which outlines the potential of helio-seismology, the author addresses the problem of excitation and amplitude of stellar oscillations with respect to their most important aspects, i.e. the theoretical framework of the present understanding of excitation mechanisms, and instrumental influences on measurements which are used to assess excitation rates, the difficulty to perform these measurements, and their analysis in some various cases. Thus, the author addresses excitation mechanisms of stellar oscillation (stochastic excitation, opacity- related excitation, and other excitation mechanisms), the excitation of solar modes (observation and theoretical predictions, influence of magnetic phenomena, solar g modes), and the excitation of modes in other stars (solar-type pulsators, red giants, and not so conventional pulsators such as HD180642 and Be stars like HD49330)

  15. Isotope ratio in stellar atmospheres and nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbuy, B.L.S.

    1987-01-01

    The determination of isotopic ratios in stellar atmospheres is studied. The isotopic shift of atomic and molecular lines of different species of a certain element is examined. CH and MgH lines are observed in order to obtain the 12 C: 13 C and 24 Mg: 25 Mg: 26 Mg isotpic ratios. The formation of lines in stellar atmospheres is computed and the resulting synthetic spectra are employed to determine the isotopic abundances. The results obtained for the isotopic ratios are compared to predictions of nucleosynthesis theories. Finally, the concept of primary and secondary element is discussed, and these definitions are applied to the observed variations in the abundance of elements as a function of metallicity. (author) [pt

  16. Modular Stellarator Fusion Reactor (MSR) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    A preliminary conceptual study has been made of the Modulator Stellarator Reactor (MSR) as a stedy-state, ignited, DT-fueled, magnetic fusion reactor. The MSR concept combines the physics of classic stellarator confinement with an innovative, modular-coil design. Parametric tradeoff calculations are described, leading to the selection of an interim design point for a 4.8-GWt plant based on Alcator transport scaling and an average beta value of 0.04 in an l = 2 system with a plasma aspect ratio of 11. Neither an economic analysis nor a detailed conceptual engineering design is presented here, as the primary intent of this scoping study is the elucidation of key physics tradeoffs, constraints, and uncertainties for the ultimate power-reactor embodiment

  17. Onion-peeling inversion of stellarator images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, K. C.; Diaz-Pacheco, R. R.; Kornbluth, Y.; Volpe, F. A.; Wei, Y.

    2016-11-01

    An onion-peeling technique is developed for inferring the emissivity profile of a stellarator plasma from a two-dimensional image acquired through a CCD or CMOS camera. Each pixel in the image is treated as an integral of emission along a particular line-of-sight. Additionally, the flux surfaces in the plasma are partitioned into discrete layers, each of which is assumed to have uniform emissivity. If the topology of the flux surfaces is known, this construction permits the development of a system of linear equations that can be solved for the emissivity of each layer. We present initial results of this method applied to wide-angle visible images of the Columbia Neutral Torus (CNT) stellarator plasma.

  18. Diffuse Stellar Substructure in Virgo Ellipticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihos, Chris; Janowiecki, S.; Harding, P.; Feldmeier, J.; Rudick, C.; Morrison, H.

    2010-01-01

    As part of our deep wide-field imaging survey of the Virgo Cluster, we have studied in detail the extended stellar halos of the five bright Virgo ellipticals M49, M87, M86, M84, and M89. We examine substructure in these halos by fitting and subtracting elliptical isophotal models out to large radius and low surface brightness (r>100 kpc and muV 28). After subtraction of these isophotal models, these elliptical galaxies show a variety of diffuse structures, from extended stellar streams to complex systems of shells and loops. These features give insight into the accretion history of these galaxies and their dynamical history in the Virgo Cluster. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation.

  19. 78 FR 19413 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Reactive Blue 246 and Reactive Blue 247...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... the dockets to read background documents or objections received, go to http://www.regulations.gov and insert the docket numbers, found in brackets in the heading of this document, into the ``Search'' box and... petitioner. This study demonstrated that there was no detectable migration of C.I. Reactive Blue 246 at the...

  20. A comprehensive comparison between APOGEE and LAMOST: Radial velocities and atmosphere stellar parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguiano, Borja; APOGEE team

    2018-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galaxy Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution (R ˜ 22,500), high-signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopy survey. The latest data release, APOGEE DR14, comprises spectra for 263,444 stars, together with main stellar parameters and individual abundances up to 20 species. The Large sky Area Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) is a low- resolution (R ˜ 1800) optical spectroscopy survey. LAMOST DR3 totally published 3,177,995 stars in this catalog. APOGEE-N and LAMOST are both Northern hemisphere spectroscopy stellar surveys. Using a comparison of positions on the celestial sphere, we find a total of 42,420 stars in common between APOGEE DR14 and LAMOST DR3. The histogram of discrepancies between APOGEE and LAMOST radial velocities (RVs) shows a clear offset of 4.5 ± 5.8 km/s. We find no clear systematic trends between the RVs discrepancies and the stellar parameters, there is a weak trend where the amplitude is just 1 km/s appears as a function of . For the stellar parameters, we observe a small offset in the surface temperature of about 13 K, with a scatter of 155 K. We also observe a small offset in [Fe/H] of about 0.06 dex together with a scatter of 0.13 dex. We notice that the largest offset between both surveys occurs in the surface gravities, where a deviation of 0.14 dex is observed with a substantial scatter of 0.25 dex. The Kiel diagram from APOGEE DR14 and LAMOST DR3 stellar parameters, color-coded by [Fe/H] and overplotted with 5 Gyr isochrones at three different metallicities shows a generally good agreement between the theoretical stellar tracks and the data-sets from both surveys.

  1. Blue light emitting thiogallate phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C.; Smith, David C.; King, Christopher N.; Tuenge, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    A crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor of the formula RGa.sub.2 S.sub.4 :Ce.sub.x where R is selected from the group consisting of calcium, strontium, barium and zinc, and x is from about 1 to 10 atomic percent, the phosphor characterized as having a crystalline microstructure on the size order of from about 100 .ANG. to about 10,000 .ANG. is provided together with a process of preparing a crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor by depositing on a substrate by CVD and resultant thin film electroluminescent devices including a layer of such deposited phosphor on an ordinary glass substrate.

  2. CU Virginis - The First Stellar Pulsar

    OpenAIRE

    Kellett, Barry J.; Graffagnino, Vito; Bingham, Robert; Muxlow, Tom W. B.; Gunn, Alastair G.

    2007-01-01

    CU Virginis is one of the brightest radio emitting members of the magnetic chemically peculiar (MCP) stars and also one of the fastest rotating. We have now discovered that CU Vir is unique among stellar radio sources in generating a persistent, highly collimated, beam of coherent, 100% polarised, radiation from one of its magnetic poles that sweeps across the Earth every time the star rotates. This makes the star strikingly similar to a pulsar. This similarity is further strengthened by the ...

  3. Computational Developments for Distance Determination of Stellar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we consider a statistical method for distance determination of stellar groups. The method depends on the assumption that the members of the group ... The variance–covariance matrix Var(ˆc) of the unbiased estimators ˆc is given by: Var(ˆc) = ˜σ2G. −1 . (3). • The average squared distance between ˆc and c is:.

  4. Drift Wave Simulations with Reduced Stellarator Equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    1999-01-01

    A three-field model to study drift-resistive, low-frequency waves in low-beta, non-axisymmetric plasmas [J.L.V. Lewandowski, Phys. Plasmas, 4 (11) 4023 (1997)] is used to analyze the effect of the inhomogeneities in the stellarator magnetic field on the fastest (linear) growth rate, gamma. Extensive numerical calculations for a toroidal heliac show that not all Fourier components in the representation of the equilibrium configuration are important as far as gamma is concerned

  5. Stellarator approach to toroidal plasma confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    An overview is presented of the development and current status of the stellarator approach to controlled thermonuclear confinement. Recent experimental, theoretical, and systems developments have made this concept a viable option for the evolution of the toroidal confinement program. Some experimental study of specific problems associated with departure from two-dimensional symmetry must be undertaken before the full advantages and opportunities of steady-state, net-current-free operation can be realized

  6. Solar and stellar flare observations using WATCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Rao, A. R.

    1988-01-01

    The Danish experiment WATCH (Wide Angle Telescope for Cosmic Hard X-rays) is to be flown on board the Soviet satellite GRANAT in middle of 1989. The performance characteristics of the WATCH instrument is described. It is estimated that WATCH can detect about 100 solar hard X-ray bursts per day....... WATCH can also detect about 40 energetic stellar soft X-ray flares, similar to the fast transient X-ray emissions detected by the Ariel V satellite....

  7. Solar Twins and Stellar Maunder Minima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey C.

    2012-05-01

    In 1966, Olin C. Wilson undertook an answer to the question “Does the chromospheric activity of main-sequence stars vary with time, and if so, how?”, initiating the so-called HK Project at Mount Wilson Observatory, which resulted in a magnificent 43-year data set and which has spawned a number of complementary synoptic programs in both hemispheres. Subsequent developments, in particular the realization that activity controls angular momentum evolution in the stars and Sun, that solar activity modulates irradiance, and that there was a pronounced response of terrestrial climate to the Maunder Minimum, spurred efforts to identify solar twins, stars that Giusa Cayrel de Strobel required to possess “fundamental physical parameters very similar, if not identical to those of the Sun.” Non-cycling states appear to occur in the Mount Wilson stars and in other synoptic data with about the same frequency that the Sun’s grand minima occur in the long-term proxy record, suggesting that stellar analogs of the Maunder Minimum may be used to guide understanding of the Sun’s state in the late seventeenth century and, as appears possible given the extended Cycle 23/24 minimum, in the near future. However, the magnitude limits of the existing surveys have kept the sample of solar twins small and long-term monitoring programs have only recently begun to accumulate good time-domain data beyond the canonical HK-index. Addressing these and other issues toward understanding prolonged stellar minima is therefore a key area of inquiry in solar-stellar connection work for the next decade. I will summarize the state of the field and the most promising lines of work for the immediate future. I and my colleagues Wes Lockwood and Brian Skiff sincerely appreciate the National Science Foundation’s long-time support of stellar cycles work at Lowell Observatory.

  8. Clustering in the stellar abundance space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesso, R.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.

    2018-03-01

    We have studied the chemical enrichment history of the interstellar medium through an analysis of the n-dimensional stellar abundance space. This work is a non-parametric analysis of the stellar chemical abundance space. The main goal is to study the stars from their organization within this abundance space. Within this space, we seek to find clusters (in a statistical sense), that is, stars likely to share similar chemo-evolutionary history, using two methods: the hierarchical clustering and the principal component analysis. We analysed some selected abundance surveys available in the literature. For each sample, we labelled the group of stars according to its average abundance curve. In all samples, we identify the existence of a main enrichment pattern of the stars, which we call chemical enrichment flow. This flow is set by the structured and well-defined mean rate at which the abundances of the interstellar medium increase, resulting from the mixture of the material ejected from the stars and stellar mass-loss and interstellar medium gas. One of the main results of our analysis is the identification of subgroups of stars with peculiar chemistry. These stars are situated in regions outside of the enrichment flow in the abundance space. These peculiar stars show a mismatch in the enrichment rate of a few elements, such as Mg, Si, Sc and V, when compared to the mean enrichment rate of the other elements of the same stars. We believe that the existence of these groups of stars with peculiar chemistry may be related to the accretion of planetary material on to stellar surfaces or may be due to production of the same chemical element by different nucleosynthetic sites.

  9. Future prospects for stellar intensity interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, R.J.W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The technique of Stellar Intensity lnterferometry (SII) was first successfully demonstrated by Hanbury-Brown in 1956 at Jodrell Bank. SII uses the correlation in intensity fluctuations of starlight as a function of observational baseline to determine angular diameters and other gross features of main sequence stars. In 1962 an observatory was established by Hanbury-Brown in Narrabri NSW. Between 1965 and 1972 the angular diameters of 32 stars covering the spectral range O to F were measured. Orbital parameters of several unresolved binary stars were also determined and attempts were made by the author to directly measure the limb darkening of Sirius and the rotational distortion of Altair. Following the success of the Narrabri SII the Australian Federal Government provided a grant to Sydney University to develop a Very Large SII capable of making observational measurements on about a thousand stars. The development of this VLSII was however shelved in preference to the development of a potentially more sensitive long baseline Michelson Stellar Interferometer. This latter instrument known as SUSI (Sydney University Stellar Interferometer) has been in operation at Narrabri since 1995. Encouraged by the early results of SUSI and their own efforts in the use of active optics to reduce the effects of atmospheric scintillation a number of international observatories are now active in the development of long baseline or large aperture Michelson Stellar Interferometers. However SII while sacrificing sensitivity has a number of technical advantages over MSI as SII is far less sensitive to atmospheric effects and can be readily developed to work over very long baselines. This paper through technical review and theoretical modeling examines how a modern VLSII could be constructed and operated and addresses the limitations to its sensitivity. In particular it examines how existing Australian industry could contribute to the development of a VLSII with sufficient

  10. Calculations of neoclassical impurity transport in stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollén, Albert; Smith, Håkan M.; Langenberg, Andreas; Turkin, Yuriy; Beidler, Craig D.; Helander, Per; Landreman, Matt; Newton, Sarah L.; García-Regaña, José M.; Nunami, Masanori

    2017-10-01

    The new stellarator Wendelstein 7-X has finished the first operational campaign and is restarting operation in the summer 2017. To demonstrate that the stellarator concept is a viable candidate for a fusion reactor and to allow for long pulse lengths of 30 min, i.e. ``quasi-stationary'' operation, it will be important to avoid central impurity accumulation typically governed by the radial neoclassical transport. The SFINCS code has been developed to calculate neoclassical quantities such as the radial collisional transport and the ambipolar radial electric field in 3D magnetic configurations. SFINCS is a cutting-edge numerical tool which combines several important features: the ability to model an arbitrary number of kinetic plasma species, the full linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator for all species, and the ability to calculate and account for the variation of the electrostatic potential on flux surfaces. In the present work we use SFINCS to study neoclassical impurity transport in stellarators. We explore how flux-surface potential variations affect the radial particle transport, and how the radial electric field is modified by non-trace impurities and flux-surface potential variations.

  11. STELLAR: fast and exact local alignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weese David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale comparison of genomic sequences requires reliable tools for the search of local alignments. Practical local aligners are in general fast, but heuristic, and hence sometimes miss significant matches. Results We present here the local pairwise aligner STELLAR that has full sensitivity for ε-alignments, i.e. guarantees to report all local alignments of a given minimal length and maximal error rate. The aligner is composed of two steps, filtering and verification. We apply the SWIFT algorithm for lossless filtering, and have developed a new verification strategy that we prove to be exact. Our results on simulated and real genomic data confirm and quantify the conjecture that heuristic tools like BLAST or BLAT miss a large percentage of significant local alignments. Conclusions STELLAR is very practical and fast on very long sequences which makes it a suitable new tool for finding local alignments between genomic sequences under the edit distance model. Binaries are freely available for Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X at http://www.seqan.de/projects/stellar. The source code is freely distributed with the SeqAn C++ library version 1.3 and later at http://www.seqan.de.

  12. On the Dispersal of Young Stellar Hierarchies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2018-01-01

    Hierarchical structure in young star fields has been demonstrated in a variety of ways, including two-point correlation functions (TPCFs) that are power laws for spatial scales up to at least several hundred parsecs. As the stars age, this power law decreases in slope until it becomes nearly flat at ∼100 Myr, at which point the hierarchical structure has disappeared. The fact that the TPCF remains nearly a power law during this time implies that the dispersal mechanism is somewhat independent of scale. This rules out dispersal by random stellar motions at either the local gas turbulent speed or a constant speed, because in both cases the hierarchy would disappear at small scales first, causing the TPCF to bend over. Destruction by shear has the right property, as the shear rate in a galaxy is independent of scale for kiloparsec-size regions, but shear converts the hierarchy into an azimuthal stream, which still has a power-law TPCF. What does explain the observation is the overlapping of several independent hierarchies from successive generations of star formation in the same region. If stellar age is determined from magnitude intervals on the main sequence of a color–magnitude diagram, or if cluster ages are grouped together logarithmically into bins, then multiple generations will overlap more and more as the grouped populations age, and this overlap will lower the spatial correlations between group members. Models of these processes illustrate their relative roles in removing the appearance of young stellar hierarchies.

  13. The role of a blue ocean strategy on performance evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Tabari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a balanced scorecard (BSC in order to prepare a comprehensive tool for performance evaluation. In this way, an experimental test is conducted in the Resorts of Ramsar Green City located in the north of Iran, in which the factors of a blue ocean strategy influence on the dimensions of the BSC. The sample number of this study consists of 90 managers and experts of the employees who work for Resorts of Ramsar Green City. The acquired data are analyzed with using the t-test. The obtained results show that the blue ocean strategy changes in the objects and the scales of the BSC.

  14. Analyzing the Effects of Stellar Evolution on White Dwarf Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Adam; Von Hippel, Ted, Dr.

    2018-01-01

    White dwarfs are among the oldest objects in our Galaxy, thus if we can determine their ages, we can derive the star formation history of our Galaxy. As part of a larger project that will use Gaia parallaxes to derive the ages of tens of thousands of white dwarfs, we explore the impact on the total white dwarf age of various modern models of main sequence and red giant branch stellar evolution, as well as uncertainties in progenitor metallicity. In addition, we study the effect on white dwarf ages caused by uncertainties in the Initial Final Mass Relation, which is the mapping between zero age main sequence and white dwarf masses. We find that for old and high mass white dwarfs, uncertainties in these factors have little effect on the total white dwarf age.

  15. Portrait of a Dramatic Stellar Crib

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    A new, stunning image of the cosmic spider, the Tarantula Nebula and its surroundings, finally pays tribute to this amazing, vast and intricately sculpted web of stars and gas. The newly released image, made with ESO's Wide Field Imager on the 2.2-m ESO/MPG Telescope at La Silla, covers 1 square degree on the sky and could therefore contain four times the full Moon. ESO PR Photo 50a/06 ESO PR Photo 50a/06 The Tarantula Nebula (WFI/2.2m) Known as the Tarantula Nebula for its spidery appearance, the 30 Doradus complex is a monstrous stellar factory. It is the largest emission nebula in the sky, and can be seen far down in the southern sky at a distance of about 170,000 light-years, in the southern constellation Dorado (The Swordfish or the Goldfish). It is part of one of the Milky Way's neighbouring galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud. The Tarantula Nebula is thought to contain more than half a million times the mass of the Sun in gas and this vast, blazing labyrinth hosts some of the most massive stars known. The nebula owes its name to the arrangement of its brightest patches of nebulosity, that somewhat resemble the legs of a spider. They extend from a central 'body' where a cluster of hot stars (designated 'R136') illuminates and shapes the nebula. This name, of the biggest spiders on the Earth, is also very fitting in view of the gigantic proportions of the celestial nebula - it measures nearly 1,000 light-years across and extends over more than one third of a degree: almost, but not quite, the size of the full Moon. If it were in our own Galaxy, at the distance of another stellar nursery, the Orion Nebula (1,500 light-years away), it would cover one quarter of the sky and even be visible in daylight. Because astronomers believe that most of the stars in the Universe were formed in large and hectic nurseries such as the 30 Doradus region, its study is fundamental. Early this year, astronomers took a new, wide look at the spider and its web of filaments, using

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Stellarator and Heliotron Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, John L.

    1999-02-01

    Stellarators and tokamaks are the most advanced devices that have been developed for magnetic fusion applications. The two approaches have much in common; tokamaks have received the most attention because their axisymmetry justifies the use of simpler models and provides a more forgiving geometry. However, recent advances in treating more complicated three dimensional systems have made it possible to design stellarators that are not susceptible to disruptions and do not need plasma current control. This has excited interest recently. The two largest new magnetic experiments in the world are the LHD device, which commenced operation in Toki, Japan, in 1998 and W7-X, which should become operational in Greifswald, Germany, in 2004. Other recently commissioned stellarators, including H-1 in Canberra, Australia, TJ-II in Madrid, Spain, and IMS in Madison, Wisconsin, have joined these in rejuvenating the stellarator programme. Thus, it is most appropriate that the author has made the lecture material that he presents to his students in the Graduate School of Energy Science at Kyoto University available to everyone. Stellarator and Heliotron Devices provides an excellent treatment of stellarator theory. It is aimed at graduate students who have a good understanding of classical mechanics and mathematical techniques. It contains good descriptions and derivations of essentially every aspect of fusion theory. The author provides an excellent qualitative introduction to each subject, pointing out the strengths and weaknesses of the models that are being used and describing our present understanding. He judiciously uses simple models which illustrate the similarities and differences between stellarators and tokamaks. To some extent the treatment is uneven, rigorous derivations starting with basic principles being given in some cases and relations and equations taken from the original papers being used as a starting point in others. This technique provides an excellent training

  17. Auto-consistent test of Galaxy star formation histories derived from resolved stellar population and integral spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M.; Patricio, V.; Rothberg, B.; Sanchez-Janssen, R.; Vale Asari, N.

    We present the first results of our observational project 'Starfish' (STellar Population From Integrated Spectrum). The goal of this project is to calibrate, for the first time, the properties of stellar populations derived from integrated spectra with the same properties derived from direct imaging of stellar populations in the same set of galaxies. These properties include the star-formation history (SFH), stellar mass, age, and metallicity. To date, such calibrations have been demonstrated only in star clusters, globular clusters with single stellar populations, not in complex and composite objects such as galaxies. We are currently constructing a library of integrated spectra obtained from a sample of 38 nearby dwarf galaxies obtained with GEMINI/GMOS-N&S (25h) and VLT/VIMOS-IFU (43h). These are to be compared with color magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of the same galaxies constructed from archival HST imaging sensitive to at least 1.5 magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch. From this comparison we will assess the systematics and uncertainties from integrated spectral techniques. The spectra library will be made publicly available to the community via a dedicated web-page and Vizier database. This dataset will provide a unique benchmark for testing fitting procedures and stellar population models for both nearby and distant galaxies. http://www.sc.eso.org/˜marodrig/Starfish/

  18. Trusted Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.; PIERSON,LYNDON G.; WITZKE,EDWARD L.

    1999-10-27

    In the world of computers a trusted object is a collection of possibly-sensitive data and programs that can be allowed to reside and execute on a computer, even on an adversary's machine. Beyond the scope of one computer we believe that network-based agents in high-consequence and highly reliable applications will depend on this approach, and that the basis for such objects is what we call ''faithful execution.''

  19. Study of Methylene Blue Ototoxicity in the Guinea Pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhassen, Sarah; Alzahrani, Musaed; Nader, Marc-Elie; Gaboury, Louis; Saliba, Issam

    2017-11-01

    Methylene blue is widely used in the medical field, especially as a blue dye for staining. It is also used as a photosensitizing agent in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy, which once photoactivated is effective for the eradication of several multi-resistant bacteria. The objective of this study was to investigate the ototoxic potential of methylene blue and precise its use in otology. It was a prospective animal study performed on guinea pigs in our tertiary medical center. We divided the animals into two groups: an experimental group and a control group, who underwent a series of three intratympanic (IT) injections. In the control group (n = 10), they received injections of gentamicin in one ear (positive control) and normal saline in the contralateral ear (negative control). The experimental group (n = 10) received injections of methylene blue in one ear, compared to injections of normal saline in the contralateral ear. We conducted auditory-evoked brainstem response (ABR) before and 1 week after the injection series. Once this is completed, the cochlea was dissected and caspase-3 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The mean difference of hearing loss in the methylene blue group compared to normal saline was 1.50 dB, and it was not shown to be statistically significant (P = 0.688). For the positive control group, which received IT injections of gentamicin, the mean threshold of hearing loss difference for all the frequencies combined was 66.25 dB (P methylene blue. In light of our results, IT injections of methylene blue did not demonstrate an ototoxic potential. We recommend further studies to precise its use in the otologic field.

  20. The Blue Revolution in Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponte, Stefano; Kelling, Ingrid; Jespersen, Karen Sau

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we examine the upgrading trajectories of selected aquaculture value chains in four Asian countries and the links between upgrading and three factors of value chain governance: coordination mechanisms; types of drivers; and domestic regulation. We find instances of improving produ...... of upgrading the "blue revolution" in Asia...

  1. Blue Ocean vs. Five Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Burke (Andrew); A.J. van Stel (André); A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe article reports on the authors' research in the Netherlands which focused on a profit model in Dutch retail stores and a so-called blue-ocean approach which requires a new market that attracts consumers and increases profits. Topics include the competitive strategy approach to

  2. Mobilizing investors for blue growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, van den Sander W.K.; Stuiver, Marian; Bolman, Bas C.; Wijnen, Roland; Selnes, Trond; Dalton, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    The European Union's Blue Growth Strategy is a long term strategy to support sustainable growth in the marine and maritime sectors, aiming to contribute to innovation and economic growth (European Commission, 2012). The EU sees the financial sector as a key partner to bring about transition to

  3. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations. (paper)

  4. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-05-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations.

  5. Estimating precise metallicity and stellar mass evolution of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of galaxies can be conveniently broken down into the evolution of their contents. The changing dust, gas, and stellar content in addition to the changing dark matter potential and periodic feedback from a super-massive blackhole are some of the key ingredients. We focus on the stellar content that can be observed, as the stars reflect information about the galaxy when they were formed. We approximate the stellar content and star formation histories of unresolved galaxies using stellar population modeling. Though simplistic, this approach allows us to reconstruct the star formation histories of galaxies that can be used to test models of galaxy formation and evolution. These models, however, suffer from degeneracies at large lookback times (t > 1 Gyr) as red, low luminosity stars begin to dominate a galaxy’s spectrum. Additionally, degeneracies between stellar populations at different ages and metallicities often make stellar population modeling less precise. The machine learning technique diffusion k-means has been shown to increase the precision in stellar population modeling using a mono-metallicity basis set. However, as galaxies evolve, we expect the metallicity of stellar populations to vary. We use diffusion k-means to generate a multi-metallicity basis set to estimate the stellar mass and chemical evolution of unresolved galaxies. Two basis sets are formed from the Bruzual & Charlot 2003 and MILES stellar population models. We then compare the accuracy and precision of these models in recovering complete (stellar mass and metallicity) histories of mock data. Similarities in the groupings of stellar population spectra in the diffusion maps for each metallicity hint at fundamental age transitions common to both basis sets that can be used to identify stellar populations in a given age range.

  6. Stellarator Research Opportunities: A report of the National Stellarator Coordinating Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, David A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Anderson, David [University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2017-06-01

    This document is the product of a stellarator community workshop, organized by the National Stellarator Coordinating Committee and referred to as Stellcon, that was held in Cambridge, Massachusetts in February 2016, hosted by MIT. The workshop was widely advertised, and was attended by 40 scientists from 12 different institutions including national labs, universities and private industry, as well as a representative from the Department of Energy. The final section of this document describes areas of community wide consensus that were developed as a result of the discussions held at that workshop. Areas where further study would be helpful to generate a consensus path forward for the US stellarator program are also discussed. The program outlined in this document is directly responsive to many of the strategic priorities of FES as articulated in “Fusion Energy Sciences: A Ten-Year Perspective (2015-2025)” [2]. The natural disruption immunity of the stellarator directly addresses “Elimination of transient events that can be deleterious to toroidal fusion plasma confinement devices” an area of critical importance for the U.S. fusion energy sciences enterprise over the next decade. Another critical area of research “Strengthening our partnerships with international research facilities,” is being significantly advanced on the W7-X stellarator in Germany and serves as a test-bed for development of successful international collaboration on ITER. This report also outlines how materials science as it relates to plasma and fusion sciences, another critical research area, can be carried out effectively in a stellarator. Additionally, significant advances along two of the Research Directions outlined in the report; “Burning Plasma Science: Foundations - Next-generation research capabilities”, and “Burning Plasma Science: Long pulse - Sustainment of Long-Pulse Plasma Equilibria” are proposed.

  7. Little Blue Dots in the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields: Precursors to Globular Clusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2017-12-01

    Galaxies with stellar masses {10}-7.4 yr‑1 were examined on images of the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Field Parallels for Abell 2744 and MACS J0416.1-02403. They appear as unresolved “Little Blue Dots” (LBDs). They are less massive and have higher specific star formation rates (sSFRs) than “blueberries” studied by Yang et al. and higher sSFRs than “Blue Nuggets” studied by Tacchella et al. We divided the LBDs into three redshift bins and, for each, stacked the B435, V606, and I814 images convolved to the same stellar point-spread function (PSF). Their radii were determined from PSF deconvolution to be ∼80 to ∼180 pc. The high sSFRs suggest that their entire stellar mass has formed in only 1% of the local age of the universe. The sSFRs at similar epochs in local dwarf galaxies are lower by a factor of ∼100. Assuming that the star formation rate is {ε }{ff}{M}{gas}/{t}{ff} for efficiency {ε }{ff}, gas mass M gas, and free-fall time, t ff, the gas mass and gas-to-star mass ratio are determined. This ratio exceeds 1 for reasonable efficiencies, and is likely to be ∼5 even with a high {ε }{ff} of 0.1. We consider whether these regions are forming today’s globular clusters. With their observed stellar masses, the maximum likely cluster mass is ∼ {10}5 {M}ȯ , but if star formation continues at the current rate for ∼ 10{t}{ff}∼ 50 {Myr} before feedback and gas exhaustion stop it, then the maximum cluster mass could become ∼ {10}6 {M}ȯ .

  8. Fashion Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjørn Schiermer

    2009-01-01

    This article attempts to create a framework for understanding modern fashion phenomena on the basis of Durkheim's sociology of religion. It focuses on Durkheim's conception of the relation between the cult and the sacred object, on his notion of 'exteriorisation', and on his theory of the social...... symbol in an attempt to describe the peculiar attraction of the fashion object and its social constitution. However, Durkheim's notions of cult and ritual must undergo profound changes if they are to be used in an analysis of fashion. The article tries to expand the Durkheimian cult, radically enlarging...... it without totally dispersing it; depicting it as held together exclusively by the sheer 'force' of the sacred object. Firstly, the article introduces the themes and problems surrounding Durkheim's conception of the sacred. Next, it briefly sketches an outline of fashion phenomena in Durkheimian categories...

  9. Fashion Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjørn Schiermer

    2009-01-01

    This article attempts to create a framework for understanding modern fashion phenomena on the basis of Durkheim's sociology of religion. It focuses on Durkheim's conception of the relation between the cult and the sacred object, on his notion of 'exteriorisation', and on his theory of the social...... symbol in an attempt to describe the peculiar attraction of the fashion object and its social constitution. However, Durkheim's notions of cult and ritual must undergo profound changes if they are to be used in an analysis of fashion. The article tries to expand the Durkheimian cult, radically enlarging...... of the enlargement of the cult into individual behaviour....

  10. Recollimation boundary layers as X-ray sources in young stellar jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günther, Hans Moritz [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Li, Zhi-Yun [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Schneider, P. C., E-mail: hguenther@cfa.harvard.edu [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    Young stars accrete mass from circumstellar disks and, in many cases, the accretion coincides with a phase of massive outflows, which can be highly collimated. Those jets emit predominantly in the optical and IR wavelength range. However, in several cases, X-ray and UV observations reveal a weak but highly energetic component in those jets. X-rays are observed both from stationary regions close to the star and from knots in the jet several hundred AU from the star. In this article, we show semianalytically that a fast stellar wind that is recollimated by the pressure from a slower, more massive disk wind can have the right properties to power stationary X-ray emission. The size of the shocked regions is compatible with observational constraints. Our calculations support a wind-wind interaction scenario for the high-energy emission near the base of young stellar object jets. For the specific case of DG Tau, a stellar wind with a mass-loss rate of 5 × 10{sup –10} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and a wind speed of 800 km s{sup –1} reproduces the observed X-ray spectrum. We conclude that a stellar wind recollimation shock is a viable scenario to power stationary X-ray emission close to the jet launching point.

  11. Near-term directions in the world stellarator program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.

    1989-10-01

    Interest in stellarators has increased because of the progress being made in the development of this concept and the inherent advantages of stellarators as candidates for an attractive, steady-state fusion reactor. Three new stellarator experiments started operation in 1988, and three more are scheduled to start in the next few years. In addition, design studies have started on large next-generation stellarator experiments for the mid-1990s. These devices are designed to test four basic approaches to stellarator configuration optimization. This report describes how these devices complement each other in exploring the potential of the stellarator concept and what main issues they will address during the next decade. 31 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  12. 21 CFR 133.106 - Blue cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blue cheese. 133.106 Section 133.106 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.106 Blue cheese. (a) Description. (1) Blue cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set...

  13. Comparing Low-Redshift Compact Dwarf Starbursts in the RESOLVE Survey with High-Redshift Blue Nuggets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Michael Louis; Kannappan, Sheila; Snyder, Elaine; Eckert, Kathleen; Norman, Dara; Fraga, Luciano; Quint, Bruno; Amram, Philippe; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; RESOLVE Team

    2018-01-01

    We identify and characterize a population of compact dwarf starburst galaxies in the RESOLVE survey, a volume-limited census of galaxies in the local universe, to probe the possibility that these galaxies are related to “blue nuggets,” a class of intensely star-forming and compact galaxies previously identified at high redshift. Blue nuggets are thought to form as the result of intense compaction events that drive fresh gas to their centers. They are expected to display prolate morphology and rotation along their minor axes. We report IFU observations of three of our compact dwarf starburst galaxies, from which we construct high-resolution velocity fields, examining the evidence for minor axis or otherwise misaligned rotation. We find multiple cases of double nuclei in our sample, which may be indicative of a merger origin as in some blue nugget formation scenarios. We compare the masses, radii, gas-to-stellar mass ratios, star formation rates, stellar surface mass densities, and environmental contexts of our sample to expectations for blue nuggets.

  14. 75 FR 65525 - Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,327] Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division of Wellpoint, Inc., Green Bay, WI; Notice... former workers of Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division...

  15. Advanced Stellar Compass, SAC-C, Interface Control Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Betto, Maurizio; Riis, Troels

    Interface Control Document for the Advanced Stellar Compass for the SAC-C satellite. The SAC-C is Argentine, Danish and NASA satellite. On the SAC-C satellite there are a simplified version of the Ørsted instrumentation platform. The Advanced Stellar Compass is a improved version of the Ørsted Star...... Imager. This document descibes the interface between the Advanced Stellar Compass and OBDH, the size of the DPU and the Camera etc....

  16. Stellarator turbulence at electron gyroradius scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenko, F.; Kendl, A.

    2002-06-01

    Electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations of electron-temperature-gradient-driven modes on electron gyroradius scales are performed in the geometry of an advanced stellarator fusion experiment, Wendelstein 7-AS. Based on linear simulations, a critical electron-temperature-gradient formula is established which happens to agree quite well with a previously derived formula for tokamaks in the appropriate limit. Nonlinear simulations are used to study the turbulence and transport characteristics which are dominated by the presence of high-amplitude radially elongated vortices or `streamers'. The role of Debye shielding effects is also examined.

  17. Biological Effects of Stellar Collapse Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collar, J. I.

    1996-02-01

    Massive stars in their final stages of collapse radiate most of their binding energy in the form of MeV neutrinos. The recoil atoms that they produce in elastic scattering off nuclei in organic tissue create radiation damage which is highly effective in the production of irreparable DNA harm, leading to cellular mutation, neoplasia, and oncogenesis. Using a conventional model of the galaxy and of the collapse mechanism, the periodicity of nearby stellar collapses and the radiation dose are calculated. The possible contribution of this process to the paleontological record of mass extinctions is examined.

  18. ECR heating in L-2M stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenshchikov, S.E.; Batanov, G.M.; Fedyanin, O.I.

    1995-01-01

    The first results of ECH experiments in the L-2M stellarator are presented. The main goal of the experiments is to investigate the physics of ECH and plasma confinement at very high values of the volume heating power density. A current free plasma is produced and heated by extraordinary waves at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. The experimental results are compared with the numerical simulations of plasma confinement and heating processes based on neoclassical theory using the full matrix of transport coefficients and with LHD-scaling. 4 refs., 2 figs

  19. Stellar black holes in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Hut, Piet; Mcmillan, Steve

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of large populations of millisec pulsars associated with neutron stars in globular clusters indicates that several hundred stellar black holes of about 10 solar masses each can form within a typical cluster. While, in clusters of high central density, the rapid dynamical evolution of the black-hole population leads to an ejection of nearly all holes on a short timescale, systems of intermediate density may involve a normal star's capture by one of the surviving holes to form a low-mass X-ray binary. One or more such binaries may be found in the globular clusters surrounding our galaxy.

  20. Stellarator optimization under several criteria using metaheuristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castejón, F; Gómez-Iglesias, A; Vega-Rodríguez, M A; Jiménez, J A; Velasco, J L; Romero, J A

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm based on metaheuristics has been developed to perform stellarator optimization. This algorithm, which is inspired by the behaviour of bees and is called distributed asynchronous bees, has been used for the optimization under three criteria: minimization of B × grad(B) drift, Mercier and ballooning stability. This algorithm is tested by partially optimizing TJ-II and, afterwards, a three-period optimized configuration is found by performing a full optimization that starts from a three-period heliac. (paper)

  1. A large stellarator based on modular coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamberger, S.M.; Sharp, L.E.; Petersen, L.F.

    1979-06-01

    Although stellarators offer some considerable advantages over tokamaks, difficulties arise in designing large devices due, for instance, to poor plasma access as well as to constructional electromechanical and maintenance problems associated with continous helical windings. This paper describes a design for a fairly large device (major radius 2.1m), based on a set of discrete coil modules arranged in a toroidal configuration to provide the required closed magnetic surfaces, having gaps for unobstructed access to the plasma for diagnostics, etc, and allowing for easy removal for maintenance

  2. Measuring the mass distribution in stellar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremaine, Scott

    2018-03-01

    One of the fundamental tasks of dynamical astronomy is to infer the distribution of mass in a stellar system from a snapshot of the positions and velocities of its stars. The usual approach to this task (e.g., Schwarzschild's method) involves fitting parametrized forms of the gravitational potential and the phase-space distribution to the data. We review the practical and conceptual difficulties in this approach and describe a novel statistical method for determining the mass distribution that does not require determining the phase-space distribution of the stars. We show that this new estimator out-performs other distribution-free estimators for the harmonic and Kepler potentials.

  3. Stars and singularities: Stellar phenomena near a massive black hole

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Tal

    2002-01-01

    This is a pedagogical review of recent results on the interactions of central massive black holes with stars very near them, focused on the black hole in the center of the Milky Way. Table of contents: [1] Introduction [2] Stellar dynamics near a black hole [2.1] Physical scales [2.2] A relaxed stellar system around a MBH [3] The stellar collider in the Galactic Center [3.1] The case for a dense stellar cusp in the Galactic Center [3.2] Tidal spin-up [3.3] Tidal scattering [4] The gravitation...

  4. Stellar halos: a rosetta stone for galaxy formation and cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis Read, Justin

    2015-08-01

    Stellar halos make up about a percent of the total stellar mass in galaxies. Yet their old age and long phase mixing times make them living fossil records of galactic history. In this talk, I review the latest simulations of structure formation in our standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmology. I discuss the latest predictions for stellar halos and the relationship between the stellar halo light and the underlying dark matter. Finally, I discuss how these simulations compare to observations of the Milky Way and Andromeda and, ultimately, what this means for our cosmological model and the formation history of the Galaxy.

  5. Numerical Relativity Simulations of Compact Binary Populations in Dense Stellar Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, Derek Ray; Huerta, Eliu; Allen, Gabrielle; Haas, Roland; Seidel, Edward; NCSA Gravity Group

    2018-01-01

    We present a catalog of numerical relativity simulations that describe binary black hole mergers on eccentric orbits. These simulations have been obtained with the open source, Einstein Toolkit numerical relativity software, using the Blue Waters supercomputer. We use this catalog to quantify observables, such as the mass and spin of black holes formed by binary black hole mergers, as a function of eccentricity. This study is the first of its kind in the literature to quantify these astrophysical observables for binary black hole mergers with mass-ratios q<6, and eccentricities e<0.2. This study is an important step in understanding the properties of eccentric binary black hole mergers, and informs the use of gravitational wave observations to confirm or rule out the existence of compact binary populations in dense stellar environments.

  6. An updated MILES stellar library and stellar population models (Research Note)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcon-Barroso, J.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Vazdekis, A.; Ricciardelli, E.; Cardiel, N.; Cenarro, A. J.; Gorgas, J.; Peletier, R. F.

    Aims: We present a number of improvements to the MILES library and stellar population models. We correct some small errors in the radial velocities of the stars, measure the spectral resolution of the library and models more accurately, and give a better absolute flux calibration of the models.

  7. Single stellar populations in the near-infrared. I. Preparation of the IRTF spectral stellar library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meneses-Goytia, S.; Peletier, R. F.; Trager, S. C.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Koleva, M.; Vazdekis, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the stars of the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF) spectral library to understand its full extent and reliability for use with stellar population (SP) modeling. The library consist of 210 stars, with a total of 292 spectra, covering the wavelength range of 0.94

  8. The Stellar Imager (SI) - A Mission to Resolve Stellar Surfaces, Interiors, and Magnetic Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Carpenter, Kenneth G; Schrijver, Carolus J; Karovska, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a space-based, UV/Optical Interferometer (UVOI) designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and of the Universe in general. It will also probe via asteroseismology flows and structures in stellar interiors. SI will enable the development and testing of a predictive dynamo model for the Sun, by observing patterns of surface activity and imaging of the structure and differential rotation of stellar interiors in a population study of Sun-like stars to determine the dependence of dynamo action on mass, internal structure and flows, and time. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe and will revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. SI is a 'Landmark/Discovery Mission' in the 2005 Heliophysics Roadmap, an implementation of the UVOI in the 2006 Astrophysics Strategic Plan, and a NASA Vision Mission ('NASA Space Science Vision Missions' (2008), ed. M. Allen). We present here the science goals of the SI Mission, a mission architecture that could meet those goals, and the technology development needed to enable this mission. Additional information on SI can be found at: http://hires.gsfc.nasa.gov/si/.

  9. Dynamic collapses of relativistic degenerate stellar cores and radiation pressure dominated stellar interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chun-Hui; Lou, Yu-Qing

    2018-04-01

    We investigate and explore self-similar dynamic radial collapses of relativistic degenerate stellar cores (RDSCs) and radiation pressure dominated stellar interiors (RPDSIs) of spherical symmetry by invoking a conventional polytropic (CP) equation of state (EoS) with a constant polytropic index γ = 4 / 3 and by allowing free-fall non-zero RDSC or RPDSI surface mass density and pressure due to their sustained physical contact with the outer surrounding stellar envelopes also in contraction. Irrespective of the physical triggering mechanisms (including, e.g., photodissociation, electron-positron pair instability, general relativistic instability etc.) for initiating such a self-similar dynamically collapsing RDSC or RPDSI embedded within a massive star, a very massive star (VMS) or a supermassive star (SMS) in contraction and by comparing with the Schwarzschild radii associated with their corresponding RDSC/RPDSI masses, the emergence of central black holes in a wide mass range appears inevitable during such RDSC/RPDSI dynamic collapses inside massive stars, VMSs, and SMSs, respectively. Radial pulsations of progenitor cores or during a stellar core collapse may well leave imprints onto collapsing RDSCs/RPDSIs towards their self-similar dynamic evolution. Massive neutron stars may form during dynamic collapses of RDSC inside massive stars in contraction under proper conditions.

  10. The Physics of the Blues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J. Murray

    2009-03-01

    In looking at the commonalities between music and science, one sees that the musician's palette is based on the principles of physics. The pitch of a musical note is determined by the frequency of the sound wave. The scales that musicians use to create and play music can be viewed as a set of rules. What makes music interesting is how musicians develop those rules and create ambiguity with them. I will discuss the evolution of western musical scales in this context. As a particular example, ``Blue'' notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale. The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting. Live keyboard demonstrations will be used. Beyond any redeeming entertainment value the talk will emphasize the serious connections between science and art in music. Nevertheless tips will be accepted.

  11. Thermoluminescence (TL) of Egyptian Blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schvoerer, M.; Delavergne, M.-C.; Chapoulie, R.

    1988-01-01

    Egyptian Blue is a synthesized crystalline pictorial pigment with formula CaCuSi/sub 4/O/sub 10/. It has been used in Egypt and Mesopotamia from the 3rd millenium B.C. A preliminary experiment on a recently synthesized sample showed that this pigment is thermoluminescent after ..beta.. irradiation (/sup 90/Sr). As the signal intensity grows linearly with the administered dose within the temperature range commonly used in TL dating, we have been looking for this phenomenon from archaeological pigments. It was encountered with two samples found in excavation. From its intensity and stability we concluded that Egyptian Blue can be dated using TL. This first and positive result encouraged us to extend the method to other types of mineral pigments synthesized by early man, and to suggest that it may be used for direct dating of ancient murals.

  12. Blue breath holding is benign.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephenson, J B

    1991-01-01

    In their recent publication in this journal, Southall et al described typical cyanotic breath holding spells, both in otherwise healthy children and in those with brainstem lesions and other malformations. Their suggestions regarding possible autonomic disturbances may require further study, but they have adduced no scientific evidence to contradict the accepted view that in the intact child blue breath holding spells are benign. Those families in which an infant suffers an 'apparently life t...

  13. Galaxies on the Blue Edge

    OpenAIRE

    Cabanela, J. E.; Dickey, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    We have successfully constructed a catalog of HI-rich galaxies selected from the Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner Catalog of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS I) based solely on optical criteria. We identify HI-rich candidates by selecting the bluest galaxies at a given apparent magnitude, those galaxies on the "blue edge" of POSS I color-magnitude parameter space. Subsequent 21-cm observations on the upgraded Arecibo 305m dish detected over 50% of the observed candidates. The detecte...

  14. Blue light regulated shade avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuskamp, Diederik H; Keller, Mercedes M; Ballaré, Carlos L; Pierik, Ronald

    2012-04-01

    Most plants grow in dense vegetation with the risk of being out-competed by neighboring plants. These neighbors can be detected not only through the depletion in light quantity that they cause, but also through the change in light quality, which plants perceive using specific photoreceptors. Both the reduction of the red:far-red ratio and the depletion of blue light are signals that induce a set of phenotypic traits, such as shoot elongation and leaf hyponasty, which increase the likelihood of light capture in dense plant stands. This set of phenotypic responses are part of the so called shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). This addendum discusses recent findings on the regulation of the SAS of Arabidopsis thaliana upon blue light depletion. Keller et al. and Keuskamp et al. show that the low blue light attenuation induced shade avoidance response of seedling and rosette-stage A. thaliana plants differ in their hormonal regulation. These studies also show there is a regulatory overlap with the R:FR-regulated SAS.

  15. SUB-STELLAR COMPANIONS AND STELLAR MULTIPLICITY IN THE TAURUS STAR-FORMING REGION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daemgen, Sebastian; Bonavita, Mariangela; Jayawardhana, Ray; Lafrenière, David; Janson, Markus

    2015-01-01

    We present results from a large, high-spatial-resolution near-infrared imaging search for stellar and sub-stellar companions in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. The sample covers 64 stars with masses between those of the most massive Taurus members at ∼3 M ☉ and low-mass stars at ∼0.2 M ☉ . We detected 74 companion candidates, 34 of these reported for the first time. Twenty-five companions are likely physically bound, partly confirmed by follow-up observations. Four candidate companions are likely unrelated field stars. Assuming physical association with their host star, estimated companion masses are as low as ∼2 M Jup . The inferred multiplicity frequency within our sensitivity limits between ∼10-1500 AU is 26.3 −4.9 +6.6 %. Applying a completeness correction, 62% ± 14% of all Taurus stars between 0.7 and 1.4 M ☉ appear to be multiple. Higher order multiples were found in 1.8 −1.5 +4.2 % of the cases, in agreement with previous observations of the field. We estimate a sub-stellar companion frequency of ∼3.5%-8.8% within our sensitivity limits from the discovery of two likely bound and three other tentative very low-mass companions. This frequency appears to be in agreement with what is expected from the tail of the stellar companion mass ratio distribution, suggesting that stellar and brown dwarf companions share the same dominant formation mechanism. Further, we find evidence for possible evolution of binary parameters between two identified sub-populations in Taurus with ages of ∼2 Myr and ∼20 Myr, respectively

  16. SUB-STELLAR COMPANIONS AND STELLAR MULTIPLICITY IN THE TAURUS STAR-FORMING REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daemgen, Sebastian [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5H 3H4 (Canada); Bonavita, Mariangela [The University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Jayawardhana, Ray [Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, Ontario L3T 3R1 (Canada); Lafrenière, David [Department of Physics, University of Montréal, Montréal, QC (Canada); Janson, Markus, E-mail: daemgen@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-02-01

    We present results from a large, high-spatial-resolution near-infrared imaging search for stellar and sub-stellar companions in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. The sample covers 64 stars with masses between those of the most massive Taurus members at ∼3 M {sub ☉} and low-mass stars at ∼0.2 M {sub ☉}. We detected 74 companion candidates, 34 of these reported for the first time. Twenty-five companions are likely physically bound, partly confirmed by follow-up observations. Four candidate companions are likely unrelated field stars. Assuming physical association with their host star, estimated companion masses are as low as ∼2 M {sub Jup}. The inferred multiplicity frequency within our sensitivity limits between ∼10-1500 AU is 26.3{sub −4.9}{sup +6.6}%. Applying a completeness correction, 62% ± 14% of all Taurus stars between 0.7 and 1.4 M {sub ☉} appear to be multiple. Higher order multiples were found in 1.8{sub −1.5}{sup +4.2}% of the cases, in agreement with previous observations of the field. We estimate a sub-stellar companion frequency of ∼3.5%-8.8% within our sensitivity limits from the discovery of two likely bound and three other tentative very low-mass companions. This frequency appears to be in agreement with what is expected from the tail of the stellar companion mass ratio distribution, suggesting that stellar and brown dwarf companions share the same dominant formation mechanism. Further, we find evidence for possible evolution of binary parameters between two identified sub-populations in Taurus with ages of ∼2 Myr and ∼20 Myr, respectively.

  17. The Magellanic Analog Dwarf Companions and Stellar Halos (MADCASH) Survey: Near-Field Cosmology with Resolved Stellar Populations Around Local Volume LMC Stellar-Mass Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Sand, David J.; Willman, Beth; Brodie, Jean P.; Crnojevic, Denija; Peter, Annika; Price, Paul A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Spekkens, Kristine; Strader, Jay

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the first results of our observational program to comprehensively map nearly the entire virial volumes of roughly LMC stellar mass galaxies at distances of ~2-4 Mpc. The MADCASH (Magellanic Analog Dwarf Companions And Stellar Halos) survey will deliver the first census of the dwarf satellite populations and stellar halo properties within LMC-like environments in the Local Volume. These will inform our understanding of the recent DES discoveries of dwarf satellites tentatively affiliated with the LMC/SMC system. We will detail our discovery of the faintest known dwarf galaxy satellite of an LMC stellar-mass host beyond the Local Group, based on deep Subaru+HyperSuprimeCam imaging reaching ~2 magnitudes below its TRGB. We will summarize the survey results and status to date, highlighting some challenges encountered and lessons learned as we process the data for this program through a prototype LSST pipeline. Our program will examine whether LMC stellar mass dwarfs have extended stellar halos, allowing us to assess the relative contributions of in-situ stars vs. merger debris to their stellar populations and halo density profiles. We outline the constraints on galaxy formation models that will be provided by our observations of low-mass galaxy halos and their satellites.

  18. Electromagnetic simulations of tokamaks and stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Michael; Mishchenko, Alexey [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    A practical fusion reactor will require a plasma β of around 5%. In this range Alfvenic effects become important. Since a practical reactor will also produce energetic alpha particles, the interaction between Alfvenic instabilities and fast ions is of particular interest. We have developed a fluid electron, kinetic ion hybrid model that can be used to study this problem. Compared to fully gyrokinetic electromagnetic codes, hybrid codes offer faster running times and greater flexibility, at the cost of reduced completeness. The model has been successfully verified against the worldwide ITPA Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) benchmark, and the ideal MHD code CKA for the internal kink mode in a tokamak. Use of the model can now be turned toward cases of practical relevance. Current work focuses on simulating fishbones in a tokamak geometry, which may be of relevance to ITER, and producing the first non-perturbative self-consistent simulations of TAE in a stellarator, which may be of relevance both to Wendelstein 7-X and any future stellarator reactor. Preliminary results of these studies are presented.

  19. A multi-institutional Stellarator Configuration Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, David

    2017-10-01

    A multi-institutional study aimed at mapping the space of quasi-axisymmetric stellarators has begun. The goal is to gain improved understanding of the dependence of important physics and engineering parameters (e.g. bootstrap current, stability, coil complexity, etc.) on plasma shape (average elongation, aspect ratio, number of periods). In addition, the stellarator optimization code STELLOPT will be upgraded with new capabilities such as improved coil design algorithms such as COILOPT + + and REGCOIL, divertor optimization options, equilibria with islands using the SPEC code, and improved bootstrap current calculations with the SFINCS code. An effort is underway to develop metrics for divertor optimization. STELLOPT has also had numerous improvements to numerical algorithms and parallelization capabilities. Simultaneously, we also are pursuing the optimization of turbulent transport according to the method of proxy functions. Progress made to date includes an elongation scan on quasi-axisymmetric equilibria and an initial comparison between the SFINCS code and the BOOTSJ calculation of bootstrap current currently available in STELLOPT. Further progress on shape scans and subsequent physics analysis will be reported. The status of the STELLOPT upgrades will be described. The eventual goal of this exercise is to identify attractive configurations for future US experimental facilities.. This work is supported by US DoE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Color superconductivity in compact stellar hybrid configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranea-Sandoval, Ignacio F.; Orsaria, Milva G.; Han, Sophia; Weber, Fridolin; Spinella, William M.

    2017-12-01

    The discovery of pulsars PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348+0432 with masses of around 2 M⊙ imposes strong constraints on the equations of state of cold, ultradense matter. If a phase transition from hadronic matter to quark matter were to occur in the inner cores of such massive neutron stars, the energetically favorable state of quark matter would be a color superconductor. In this study, we analyze the stability and maximum mass of such neutron stars. The hadronic phase is described by nonlinear relativistic mean-field models, and the local Nambu-Jona Lasinio model is used to describe quark matter in the 2SC+s quark phase. The phase transition is treated as a Maxwell transition, assuming a sharp hadron-quark interface, and the "constant-sound-speed" (CSS) parametrization is employed to discuss the existence of stellar twin configurations. We find that massive neutron stars such as J1614-2230 and J0348+0432 can only exist on the connected stellar branch but not on the disconnected twin-star branch. The latter can only support stars with masses that are strictly below 2 M⊙ .

  1. Mean colors of stellar flare continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullan, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Shmeleva and Syrovatskii have shown that under certain circumstances the temperature structure in the hotter regions (T>2 x 10 4 K) of a solar flare is characterized by two universal functions: one for constant density conditions, the second for constant pressure conditions. Here we show that the U--B, B--V colors of optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung emitted by both of these temperature structures are consistent with the mean colors of stellar flares near maximum light and also with the observed evolution of flare light in the two-color diagram during flare cooling. We suggest that the transition which occurs in the character of stellar flare light from mostly continuum emission near flare maximum to mostly line emission later in the flare is related to the transition which must occur from the constant density regime to the constant pressure regime on a time scale of order 1--2 minutes. The two types of flares (spike flares and slow flares) identified by Moffett are ascribed to these two different regimes. The flare light-curve model described here resembles in some respects a model previously proposed by Andrews, but there are differences in detail

  2. Some aspects of modular stellarator reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmeyer, E.; Kisslinger, J.; Rau, F.; Wobig, H.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Stellarator (AS) configuration and a helical axis stellarator with modular coils have been extrapolated to reactor dimensions with the condition of 1.8 m distance between plasma and modular coils. For five-field periods, this leads to reactor dimensions of Rsub(omicron)=25 m and an averaged plasma radius of 1.6 m, Bsub(omicron)=5.3 T(ASR). In a burn experiment with 1.2 m space between plasma and coils the dimensions are: Rsub(omicron)=15 m; a-bar=0.9 m; Bsub(omicron)=7 T(ASB). Force and stress in the ASR were analysed assuming a ring-type support structure. Maximum reference stresses of 80 MPa were found. With a simple neoclassical transport model, ignition conditions are calculated. A minimum heating power of 30 MW is necessary for the startup phase. An AS-type power reactor requires a β-bar-value of 5%, with a thermal output of 3.6 GW. In ASB, the necessary β-bar-value is 2-2.5% and the output power is 0.4 GW. The same startup power of 30 MW is needed. (author)

  3. Code Blue Emergencies: A Team Task Analysis and Educational Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Price

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to identify factors that have a positive or negative influence on resuscitation team performance during emergencies in the operating room (OR and post-operative recovery unit (PAR at a major Canadian teaching hospital. This information was then used to implement a team training program for code blue emergencies. Methods: In 2009/10, all OR and PAR nurses and 19 anesthesiologists at Vancouver General Hospital (VGH were invited to complete an anonymous, 10 minute written questionnaire regarding their code blue experience. Survey questions were devised by 10 recovery room and operation room nurses as well as 5 anesthesiologists representing 4 different hospitals in British Columbia. Three iterations of the survey were reviewed by a pilot group of nurses and anesthesiologists and their feedback was integrated into the final version of the survey. Results: Both nursing staff (n = 49 and anesthesiologists (n = 19 supported code blue training and believed that team training would improve patient outcome. Nurses noted that it was often difficult to identify the leader of the resuscitation team. Both nursing staff and anesthesiologists strongly agreed that too many people attending the code blue with no assigned role hindered team performance. Conclusion: Identifiable leadership and clear communication of roles were identified as keys to resuscitation team functioning. Decreasing the number of people attending code blue emergencies with no specific role, increased access to mock code blue training, and debriefing after crises were all identified as areas requiring improvement. Initial team training exercises have been well received by staff.

  4. Adsorption of Methylene Blue, Bromophenol Blue, and Coomassie Brilliant Blue by α-chitin nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solairaj Dhananasekaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Expelling of dyestuff into water resource system causes major thread to the environment. Adsorption is the cost effective and potential method to remove the dyes from the effluents. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the adsorption of dyestuff (Methylene Blue (MB, Bromophenol Blue (BPB and Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB by α-chitin nanoparticles (CNP prepared from Penaeus monodon (Fabricius, 1798 shell waste. On contrary to the most recognizable adsorption studies using chitin, this is the first study using unique nanoparticles of ⩽50 nm used for the dye adsorption process. The results showed that the adsorption process increased with increase in the concentration of CNP, contact time and temperature with the dyestuff, whereas the adsorption process decreased with increase in the initial dye concentration and strong acidic pH. The results from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that the interaction between dyestuff and CNP involved physical adsorption. The adsorption process obeys Langmuir isotherm (R2 values were 0.992, 0.999 and 0.992 for MB, BPB and CBB, and RL value lies between 0 and 1 for all the three dyes and pseudo second order kinetics (R2 values were 0.996, 0.999 and 0.996 for MB, BPB and CBB more effectively. The isotherm and kinetic models confirmed that CNP can be used as a suitable adsorbent material for the removal of dyestuff from effluents.

  5. Constraining scalar fields with stellar kinematics and collisional dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Barranco, Juan; Bernal, Argelia; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2010-01-01

    The existence and detection of scalar fields could provide solutions to long-standing puzzles about the nature of dark matter, the dark compact objects at the centre of most galaxies, and other phenomena. Yet, self-interacting scalar fields are very poorly constrained by astronomical observations, leading to great uncertainties in estimates of the mass m φ and the self-interacting coupling constant λ of these fields. To counter this, we have systematically employed available astronomical observations to develop new constraints, considerably restricting this parameter space. In particular, by exploiting precise observations of stellar dynamics at the centre of our Galaxy and assuming that these dynamics can be explained by a single boson star, we determine an upper limit for the boson star compactness and impose significant limits on the values of the properties of possible scalar fields. Requiring the scalar field particle to follow a collisional dark matter model further narrows these constraints. Most importantly, we find that if a scalar dark matter particle does exist, then it cannot account for both the dark-matter halos and the existence of dark compact objects in galactic nuclei

  6. Stellar and Extragalactic Radiation at the Earth's Surface Jean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ipi × dex (−0.4 mi). (7). We will use these formulae in estimating the stellar and extragalactic contributions. 3. Stellar radiation. We have used the data given by the CDS, Strasbourg for N = 2,552,323 stars. The data are available in tables grouping stars in magnitude intervals of m = 0.25, either in BT or VT magnitudes.

  7. Analytical Solution for Stellar Density in Globular Clusters MA Sharaf ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Caloi 2008). In contrast with galaxies, it was known since the last twenty years that globular clusters represent unique laboratories for learning about two-body relax- ation, mass segregation from equipartition of energy (Spitzer 1987), stellar collisions. (Binney & Tremaine 1987), stellar mergers, and core collapse. 371 ...

  8. Some dynamical properties of anisotropic collisionless stellar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertin, G.; Pegoraro, F.

    1989-01-01

    The linear stability analysis of collisionless anisotropic spherical stellar systems presents many unresolved issues. Planning to study the stability of a simple and astrophysically interesting equilibrium seuence ∞ for such stellar systems, we describe here some analytical characterizations of the ∞-distribution functions, formulate the linearized equations for stability, and discuss the relevant boundary conditions. (author). 19 refs.; 1 tab

  9. Estimate of stellar masses from their QPO frequencies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Kilohertz quasiperiodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) are observed in binary stellar systems. For such a system, the stellar radius is very close to the marginally stable orbit Rms as predicted by. Einstein's general relativity. Many models have been proposed to explain the origin of the kHz QPO features in the binaries.

  10. Recent advances in non-LTE stellar atmosphere models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Andreas A. C.

    2017-11-01

    In the last decades, stellar atmosphere models have become a key tool in understanding massive stars. Applied for spectroscopic analysis, these models provide quantitative information on stellar wind properties as well as fundamental stellar parameters. The intricate non-LTE conditions in stellar winds dictate the development of adequate sophisticated model atmosphere codes. The increase in both, the computational power and our understanding of physical processes in stellar atmospheres, led to an increasing complexity in the models. As a result, codes emerged that can tackle a wide range of stellar and wind parameters. After a brief address of the fundamentals of stellar atmosphere modeling, the current stage of clumped and line-blanketed model atmospheres will be discussed. Finally, the path for the next generation of stellar atmosphere models will be outlined. Apart from discussing multi-dimensional approaches, I will emphasize on the coupling of hydrodynamics with a sophisticated treatment of the radiative transfer. This next generation of models will be able to predict wind parameters from first principles, which could open new doors for our understanding of the various facets of massive star physics, evolution, and death.

  11. Proton Testing of Advanced Stellar Compass Digital Processing Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Gøsta; Denver, Troelz; Jørgensen, Finn E

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Stellar Compass Digital Processing Unit was radiation tested with 300 MeV protons at Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF), Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland.......The Advanced Stellar Compass Digital Processing Unit was radiation tested with 300 MeV protons at Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF), Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland....

  12. Statistical exponential distribution function as distance indicator to stellar groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Rahman, H.; Sabry, M. A.; Issa, I. A.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, statistical distribution functions are developed for distance determination of stellar groups. This method depends on the assumption that, absolute magnitudes and apparent magnitudes follow an exponential distribution function. The developed approaches have been implemented to determine distances of some clusters and stellar associations. The comparison with the distances derived by different authors revealed good agreement.

  13. White Dwarf Pulsational Constraints on Stellar Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Bart H.; Clemens, J. Christopher; O'Brien, Patrick C.; Hermes, J. J.; Fuchs, Joshua T.

    2017-01-01

    The complex processes that convert a protostellar cloud into a carbon/oxygen-core white dwarf star are distilled and modeled in state of the art stellar evolution codes. Many of these processes are well-constrained, but several are uncertain or must be parameterized in the models because a complete treatment would be computationally prohibitive—turbulent motions such as convective overshoot cannot, for example, be modeled in 1D. Various free parameters in the models must therefore be calibrated. We will discuss how white dwarf pulsations can inform such calibrations. The results of all prior evolution are cemented into the interiors of white dwarf stars and, so, hidden from view. However, during certain phases of their cooling, pulsations translate the star's evolutionary history into observable surface phenomena. Because the periods of a pulsating white dwarf star depend on an internal structure assembled as it evolved to its final state, white dwarf pulsation periods can be viewed as observable endpoints of stellar evolution. For example, the thickness of the helium layer in a white dwarf directly affects its pulsations; the observed periods are, therefore, a function of the number of thermal pulses during which the star converts helium into core material on the asymptotic giant branch. Because they are also a function of several other significant evolutionary processes, several pulsation modes are necessary to tease all of these apart. Unfortunately, white dwarf pulsators typically do not display enough oscillation modes to constrain stellar evolution. To avoid this limitation, we consider the pulsations of the entire collection of hot pulsating hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarf stars (DAVs). Though any one star may not have sufficient information to place interesting constraints on its evolutionary history, taken together, the stars show a pattern of modes that allows us to test evolutionary models. For an example set of published evolutionary models, we show a

  14. Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, G.G.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Simon, A.; Fueloep, Zs.; Somorjai, E.

    2008-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Modern p process studies require large reaction networks, often including hundreds and thousands of nuclei and their respective reactions with light particles. Astrophysical reaction rates employed in reaction network calculations are determined either directly from cross sections or from the rate for the inverse reaction by applying detailed balance. The cross sections are known from experiment or predicted by theory. However, even when a reaction is experimentally accessible, often astrophysical rates cannot be directly measured. Excited states are thermally populated in an astrophysical plasma whereas only reactions on the ground state of the target can be investigated in the laboratory. A measure of the influence of the excited target states is given by the stellar enhancement factor f = r stellar /r g.s. , defined by the ratio of the stellar rate to the ground state rate. The enhancement factor f rev for the reverse reaction B(b,a)A (defined by having negative reaction Q value) is usually larger than the enhancement f forw of the forward reaction A(a,b)B (being the one with positive Q value) because more excited states are energetically accessible in nucleus B than in nucleus A. Therefore, it was assumed so far that more astrophysically relevant transitions are neglected when experimentally studying a reaction with negative Q value. However, there are cases for which f rev forw due to Coulomb suppression of a part of the energetically allowed transitions. This effect will be most pronounced in reactions with a charged particle in one and a neutral particle in the other channel, e.g. (n,p), but it can also appear when the entrance channel and exit channel have Coulomb barriers of different height, e.g. (p,α). Transitions from excited states to the same state in a compound nucleus are proceeding at smaller relative energy and are stronger suppressed by the Coulomb barrier. Thus, a prerequisite is that /Q/ is low compared to

  15. Action Replay of Powerful Stellar Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Astronomers have made the best ever determination of the power of a supernova explosion that was visible from Earth long ago. By observing the remnant of a supernova and a light echo from the initial outburst, they have established the validity of a powerful new method for studying supernovas. Using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, ESA's XMM-Newton Observatory, and the Gemini Observatory, two teams of researchers studied the supernova remnant and the supernova light echo that are located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a small galaxy about 160,000 light years from Earth. They concluded that the supernova occurred about 400 years ago (in Earth’s time frame), and was unusually bright and energetic. X-ray Image of SNR 0509-67.5 X-ray Image of SNR 0509-67.5 This result is the first time two methods - X-ray observations of a supernova remnant and optical observations of the expanding light echoes from the explosion - have both been used to estimate the energy of a supernova explosion. Up until now, scientists had only made such an estimate using the light seen soon after a star exploded, or using remnants that are several hundred years old, but not from both. "People didn't have advanced telescopes to study supernovas when they went off hundreds of years ago," said Armin Rest of Harvard University, who led the light echo observations using Gemini. "But we've done the next best thing by looking around the site of the explosion and constructing an action replay of it." People Who Read This Also Read... Milky Way's Super-efficient Particle Accelerators Caught in The Act Oldest Known Objects Are Surprisingly Immature Discovery of Most Recent Supernova in Our Galaxy NASA Unveils Cosmic Images Book in Braille for Blind Readers In 2004, scientists used Chandra to determine that a supernova remnant, known as SNR 0509-67.5 in the LMC, was a so-called Type Ia supernova, caused by a white dwarf star in a binary system that reaches a critical mass and explodes. In

  16. Probing star formation and feedback in dwarf galaxies. Integral field view of the blue compact galaxy Tololo 1937-423

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairós, L. M.; González-Pérez, J. N.

    2017-12-01

    Context. Blue compact galaxies (BCG) are gas-rich, low-mass, small systems that form stars at unusually high rates. This makes them excellent laboratories for investigating the process of star-formation (SF) at galactic scales and the effects of massive stellar feedback on the interstellar (and intergalactic) medium. Aims: We analyzed the BCG Tololo 1937-423 using optical integral field spectroscopy to probe its morphology, stellar content, nebular excitation and ionization properties, and the kinematics of its warm ionized gas. Methods: Tololo 1937-423 was observed with the Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. We took data in the wavelength range 4150-7400 Å, covering a field of view of 27″× 27″ on the sky with a spatial sampling of 0.̋67. From these data we built maps in the continuum and brighter emission lines, diagnostic line ratio maps, and velocity dispersion fields. We also generated the integrated spectrum of the main H II regions and young stellar clusters to determine reliable physical parameters and oxygen abundances. Results: We found that Tololo 1937-423 is currently undergoing an extended starburst. In the Hα maps we identified nine major clumps, aligned mostly northeast-southwest, and stretching to galactocentric distances ≥2 kpc. The galaxy presents a single continuum peak that is not cospatial with any knot in emission lines, indicating at least two relatively recent episodes of SF. The inhomogeneous dust distribution reachs its maximum (E(B-V) 0.97) roughly at the position of the continuum peak. We found shocked regions in the galaxy outer regions and at the edges of the SF knots. The oxygen abundance, 12 + log(O/H) 8.20 ± 0.1, is similar in all the SF regions, suggesting a chemically homogeneous ionized interstellar medium over spatial scales of several kpc. The ionized gas kinematics displays an overall regular rotation around a northwest-southeast axis, with a maximum velocity of 70 ± 7 km s-1. Conclusions

  17. Radio observations confirm young stellar populations in local analogues to z ˜ 5 Lyman break galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greis, Stephanie M. L.; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Levan, Andrew J.; Davies, Luke J. M.; Eldridge, J. J.

    2017-09-01

    We present radio observations at 1.5 GHz of 32 local objects selected to reproduce the physical properties of z ˜ 5 star-forming galaxies. We also report non-detections of five such sources in the sub-millimetre. We find a radio-derived star formation rate that is typically half than that derived from H α emission for the same objects. These observations support previous indications that we are observing galaxies with a young dominant stellar population, which has not yet established a strong supernova-driven synchrotron continuum. We stress caution when applying star formation rate calibrations to stellar populations younger than 100 Myr. We calibrate the conversions for younger galaxies, which are dominated by a thermal radio emission component. We improve the size constraints for these sources, compared to previous unresolved ground-based optical observations. Their physical size limits indicate very high star formation rate surface densities, several orders of magnitude higher than the local galaxy population. In typical nearby galaxies, this would imply the presence of galaxy-wide winds. Given the young stellar populations, it is unclear whether a mechanism exists in our sources that can deposit sufficient kinetic energy into the interstellar medium to drive such outflows.

  18. Blue breath holding is benign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, J B

    1991-01-01

    In their recent publication in this journal, Southall et al described typical cyanotic breath holding spells, both in otherwise healthy children and in those with brainstem lesions and other malformations. Their suggestions regarding possible autonomic disturbances may require further study, but they have adduced no scientific evidence to contradict the accepted view that in the intact child blue breath holding spells are benign. Those families in which an infant suffers an 'apparently life threatening event' deserve immense understanding and help, and it behoves investigators to exercise extreme care and self criticism in the presentation of new knowledge which may bear upon their management and their morale. PMID:2001115

  19. Spectrum of ballooning instabilities in a stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.A.; Singleton, D.B.; Dewar, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    The recent revival of interest in the application of the 'ballooning formalism' to low-frequency plasma instabilities has prompted a comparison of the Wentzel-Brillouin-Kramers (WKB) ballooning approximation with an (in principle) exact normal mode calculation for a three-dimensional plasma equilibrium. Semiclassical quantization, using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ballooning eigenvalue to provide a local dispersion relation, is applied to a ten-field period stellarator test case. Excellent qualitative agreement, and good quantitative agreement is found with predictions from the TERPSICHORE code for toroidal mode numbers from 1 to 14 and radial mode numbers from 0 to 2. The continuum bands predicted from three-dimensional WKB theory are too narrow to resolve. (author) 3 figs., 24 refs

  20. Spotting Stellar Activity Cycles in Gaia Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brett M.; Agol, Eric; Davenport, James R. A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    2018-03-01

    Astrometry from Gaia will measure the positions of stellar photometric centroids to unprecedented precision. We show that the precision of Gaia astrometry is sufficient to detect starspot-induced centroid jitter for nearby stars in the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) sample with magnetic activity similar to the young G-star KIC 7174505 or the active M4 dwarf GJ 1243, but is insufficient to measure centroid jitter for stars with Sun-like spot distributions. We simulate Gaia observations of stars with 10 year activity cycles to search for evidence of activity cycles, and find that Gaia astrometry alone likely can not detect activity cycles for stars in the TGAS sample, even if they have spot distributions like KIC 7174505. We review the activity of the nearby low-mass stars in the TGAS sample for which we anticipate significant detections of spot-induced jitter.

  1. Comparison between stellarator and tokamak divertor transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Y.; Lunt, T.; Kobayashi, M.; Reiter, D.

    2010-11-01

    The paper compares the essential divertor transport features of the poloidal divertor, which is well-developed for tokamaks, and the non-axisymmetric divertors currently investigated on helical devices. It aims at surveying the fundamental similarities and differences in divertor concept and geometry, and their consequences for how the divertor functions. In particular, the importance of various transport terms governing axisymmetric and helical scrape-off-layers (SOLs) is examined, with special attention being paid to energy, momentum and impurity transport. Tokamak and stellarator SOLs are compared by identifying key geometric parameters through which the governing physics can be illustrated by simple models and estimates. More quantitative assessments rely nevertheless on the modeling using EMC3-EIRENE code. Most of the theoretical results are discussed in conjunction with experimental observations. (author)

  2. Advanced Stellar Compass - ROCSAT 2 - Proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels; Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif

    1998-01-01

    System Integration is supposed to take place at NSPO facilities.The ASC is a highly advanced and autonomous Stellar Reference Unit designed, developed and produced by the Space Instrumentation Group of the Department of Automation of the Technical University of Denmark.The document is structured...... and in section 7 the mechanical and electrical interfaces are given. In section 8 and 9 we address issues like manufacturing, transportation and storage and to conclude in section 10 the requirements imposed by the ASC on the system are given....... as follows. First we present the ASC - heritage, system description, performance - then we address more specifically the environmental properties, like the EMC compatibility and thermal characteristics, and the design and reliability issues. Section 6 deals with the testing and the calibration procedures...

  3. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannotti, Maurizio [Barry Univ., Miami Shores, FL (United States). Physical Sciences; Irastorza, Igor [Zaragoza Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; Redondo, Javier [Zaragoza Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Ringwald, Andreas [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2015-12-15

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a preference for a mild non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP represents the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO.

  4. Formation of molecular lines in stellar atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, K. H.; Lambert, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Statistical equilibrium of electronic states of diatomic molecules in stellar atmospheres is examined. Atmospheres discussed are representative of the sun, Arcturus (K-giant) and Betelgeuse (M-supergiant). A comparison of the relative collisional and radiative contributions to the equilibrium of the ground electronic state shows that this state is collisionally controlled and that the line source function for vibration-rotation transitions within this state is equivalent to the Planck function. Examination of the equilibrium for excited electronic states demonstrates that the exchange between these states and the ground electronic state is most probably determined by radiative excitation. This result implies that scattering rather than pure absorption is the appropriate mechanism for the formation of lines belonging to these electronic transitions. The scattering hypothesis is given a preliminary check against solar observations. Areas for future investigations are outlined.

  5. Presupernova neutrinos: realistic emissivities from stellar evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Kelly; Lunardini, Cecilia; Farmer, Rob; Timmes, Frank

    2017-01-01

    We present a calculation of neutrino emissivities and energy spectra from a presupernova, a massive star going through the advanced stages of nuclear burning before becoming a supernova. Neutrinos produced from beta decay and electron capture, as well as pair annihilation, plasmon decay, and the photoneutrino process are included. We use the state of the art stellar evolution code MESA to obtain realistic conditions for temperature, density, electron fraction, and nuclear isotopic composition. We have found that beta processes contribute significantly to the neutrino flux at potentially detectable energies of a few MeV. Estimates for the number of events at several current and future detectors are presented for the last few hours before collapse.

  6. Status of the US stellarator reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Gulec, K.; Miller, R.L.; El-Guebaly, L.

    1994-01-01

    Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors. This scoping study, which uses an integrated cost-minimization code that incorporates costing and reactor component models self-consistently with a 1-D energy transport calculation, shows that a torsatron reactor could also be competitive with a tokamak reactor. The projected cost of electricity (COE) estimated using the ARIES costing algorithms is 62.5 mill/kW(e)h in constant 1992 dollars for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor reference case. The COE is relatively insensitive (< 10% variation) over a wide range of assumptions including variations in the maximum field allowed on the coils, the coil elongation, the shape of the density profile, the beta limit, the confinement multiplier, and the presence of a large loss region for alpha particles. The largest variations in the COE occur for variations in the electrical power output demanded and the plasma-coil separation ratio

  7. Physics issues of compact drift optimized stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spong, D.A.; Hirshman, S.; Berry, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    Physics issues are discussed for compact stellarator configurations which achieve good confinement by the fact that the magnetic field modulus, vertical bar B vertical bar, in magnetic coordinates is dominated by poloidally symmetric components. Two distinct configuration types are considered: (1) those which achieve their drift optimization and rotational transform at low β and low bootstrap current by appropriate plasma shaping; and (2) those which have a greater reliance on plasma β and bootstrap currents for supplying the transform and obtaining quasi poloidal symmetry. Stability analysis of the latter group of devices against ballooning, kink and vertical displacement modes has indicated that stable 's on the order of 15% are possible. The first class of devices is being considered for a low β near-term experiment that could explore some of the confinement features of the high beta configurations. (author)

  8. Free-boundary stability of straight stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.C.; Cary, J.R.

    1984-02-01

    The sharp-boundary model is used to investigate the stability of straight stellarators to free-boundary, long-wavelength modes. To correctly analyze the heliac configuration, previous theory is generalized to the case of arbitrary helical aspect ratio (ratio of plasma radius to periodicity lengths). A simple low-β criterion involving the vacuum field and the normalized axial current is derived and used to investigate a large variety of configurations. The predictions of this low-β theory are verified by numerical minimization of deltaW at arbitrary β. The heliac configuration is found to be remarkably stable, with a critical β of over 15% determined by the lack of equilibrium rather than the onset of instability. In addition, other previously studied systems are found to be stabilized by net axial plasma current

  9. Recent progress in stellarator reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Stellarator/Torsatron/Heliotron (S/T/H) class of toroidal magnetic fusion reactor designs continues to offer a distinct and in several ways superior approach to eventual commercial competitiveness. Although no major, integrated conceptual reactor design activity is presently underway, a number of international research efforts suggest avenues for the substantial improvement of the S/T/H reactor embodiment, which derive from recent experimental and theoretical progress and are responsive to current trends in fusion-reactor projection to set the stage for a third generation of designs. Recent S/T/H reactor design activity is reviewed and the impact of the changing technical and programmatic context on the direction of future S/T/H reactor design studies is outlined

  10. Constraints on stellar evolution from pulsations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration of the many types of intrinsic variable stars, that is, those that pulsate, reveals that perhaps a dozen classes can indicate some constraints that affect the results of stellar evolution calculations, or some interpretations of observations. Many of these constraints are not very strong or may not even be well defined yet. The author discusses the case for six classes: classical Cepheids with their measured Wesselink radii, the observed surface effective temperatures of the known eleven double-mode Cepheids, the pulsation periods and measured surface effective temperatures of three R CrB variables, the delta Scuti variable VZ Cnc with a very large ratio of its two observed periods, the nonradial oscillations of the Sun, and the period ratios of the newly discovered double-mode RR Lyrae variables. (Auth.)

  11. Blue Marble: Remote Characterization of Habitable Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Neville; Lewis, Brian; Chartres, James; Genova, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The study of the nature and distribution of habitable environments beyond the Solar System is a key area for Astrobiology research. At the present time, our Earth is the only habitable planet that can be characterized in the same way that we might characterize planets beyond the Solar System. Due to limitations in our current and near-future technology, it is likely that extra-solar planets will be observed as single-pixel objects. To understand this data, we must develop skills in analyzing and interpreting the radiation obtained from a single pixel. These skills must include the study of the time variation of the radiation, and the range of its photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric properties. In addition, to understand whether we are properly analyzing the single pixel data, we need to compare it with a ground truth of modest resolution images in key spectral bands. This paper discusses the concept for a mission called Blue Marble that would obtain data of the Earth using a combination of spectropolarimetry, spectrophotometry, and selected band imaging. To obtain imagery of the proper resolution, it is desirable to place the Blue Marble spacecraft no closer than the outer region of cis-lunar space. This paper explores a conceptual mission design that takes advantage of low-cost launchers, bus designs and mission elements to provide a cost effective observing platform located at one of the stable Earth-moon Lagrangian points (L4, L5). The mission design allows for the development and use of novel technologies, such as a spinning moon sensor for attitude control, and leverages lessons-learned from previous low-cost spacecraft such as Lunar Prospector to yield a low-risk mission concept.

  12. Bright hot impacts by erupted fragments falling back on the Sun: a template for stellar accretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, Fabio; Orlando, Salvatore; Testa, Paola; Peres, Giovanni; Landi, Enrico; Schrijver, Carolus J

    2013-07-19

    Impacts of falling fragments observed after the eruption of a filament in a solar flare on 7 June 2011 are similar to those inferred for accretion flows on young stellar objects. As imaged in the ultraviolet (UV)-extreme UV range by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many impacts of dark, dense matter display uncommonly intense, compact brightenings. High-resolution hydrodynamic simulations show that such bright spots, with plasma temperatures increasing from ~10(4) to ~10(6) kelvin, occur when high-density plasma (>10(10) particles per cubic centimeter) hits the solar surface at several hundred kilometers per second, producing high-energy emission as in stellar accretion. The high-energy emission comes from the original fragment material and is heavily absorbed by optically thick plasma, possibly explaining the lower mass accretion rates inferred from x-rays relative to UV-optical-near infrared observations of young stars.

  13. LAMOST DR1: Stellar Parameters and Chemical Abundances with SP_Ace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeche, C.; Smith, M. C.; Grebel, E. K.; Zhong, J.; Hou, J. L.; Chen, L.; Stello, D.

    2018-04-01

    We present a new analysis of the LAMOST DR1 survey spectral database performed with the code SP_Ace, which provides the derived stellar parameters {T}{{eff}}, {log}g, [Fe/H], and [α/H] for 1,097,231 stellar objects. We tested the reliability of our results by comparing them to reference results from high spectral resolution surveys. The expected errors can be summarized as ∼120 K in {T}{{eff}}, ∼0.2 in {log}g, ∼0.15 dex in [Fe/H], and ∼0.1 dex in [α/Fe] for spectra with S/N > 40, with some differences between dwarf and giant stars. SP_Ace provides error estimations consistent with the discrepancies observed between derived and reference parameters. Some systematic errors are identified and discussed. The resulting catalog is publicly available at the LAMOST and CDS websites.

  14. Final integration, commissioning and start of the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, H.-S.; Brakel, R.; Braeuer, T.; Bykov, V.; van Eeten, P.; Feist, J.-H.; Füllenbach, F.; Gasparotto, M.; Grote, H.; Klinger, T.; Laqua, H.; Nagel, M.; Naujoks, D.; Otte, M.; Risse, K.; Rummel, T.; Schacht, J.; Spring, A.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Vilbrandt, R.; Wegener, L.; Werner, A.; Wolf, R. C.; Baldzuhn, J.; Biedermann, C.; Braune, H.; Burhenn, R.; Hirsch, M.; Höfel, U.; Knauer, J.; Kornejew, P.; Marsen, S.; Stange, T.; Trimino Mora, H.; W7-X Team

    2017-11-01

    The main objective of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator is to demonstrate the integrated reactor potential of the optimized stellarator line. An important element of this mission is the achievement of high heating-power and high confinement in steady-state operation. Such an integrated plasma operation has not yet been demonstrated and represents the major scientific goal of W7-X. The way towards this goal is staged. In the first phase, called OP 1.1, December 2015-March 2016, a limiter configuration was used. In this paper, the preparation of the first operation phase as well as lessons learned during the first commissioning and the operation phase are discussed, while the physics results from OP 1.1 are reported elsewhere (Wolf et al 2017 Nucl. Fusion 57 102020).

  15. Making Sense of Atmospheric Models and Fundamental Stellar Properties at the Bottom of the Main Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Sergio; Henry, Todd; Jao, W.-C.; Washington, Robert; Silverstein, Michele; Winters, J.; RECONS

    2018-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison of atmospheric model predictions and photometric observations for late M and L dwarfs. We discuss which wavelength regions are best for determining the fundamental properties of these cool stellar and substellar atmospheres and use this analysis to refine the HR diagram for the hydrogen burning limit first presented in 2014. We also add several new objects to the HR diagram and find little qualitative difference in the HR diagram's overall morphology when compared to our 2014 results. The L2 dwarf 2MASS 0523-1403 remains the smallest hydrogen burning star for which we calculated a radius, thus likely indicating the end of the stellar main sequence. This work is supported by the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship program through grant AST-1400680.

  16. Assessment of global stellarator confinement: Status of the international stellarator confinement scaling data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinklage, A.; Beidler, C.D.; Dose, V.; Geiger, J.; Kus, A.; Preuss, R.; Ascasibar, E.; Tribaldos, V.; Harris, J.H.; Murakami, S.; Sano, F.; Okamura, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Yamada, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Stroth, U.; Talmadge, J.

    2005-01-01

    Different stellarator/heliotron devices along with their respective flexibility cover a large magnetic configuration space. Since the ultimate goal of stellarator research aims at an alternative fusion reactor concept, the exploration of the most promising configurations requires a comparative assessment of the plasma performance and how different aspects of a 3D configuration influence it. Therefore, the International Stellarator Confinement Database (ISCDB) has been re- initiated in 2004 and the ISS95 database has been extended to roughly 3000 discharges from eight different devices. Further data-sets are continuously added. A revision of a data set restricted to comparable scenarios lead to the ISS04 scaling law which confirmed ISS95 but also revealed clearly the necessity to incorporate configuration descriptive parameters. In other words, an extension beyond the set of regression parameters used for ISS95/ISS04 appears to be necessary and candidates, such as the elongation are investigated. Since grouping of data is a key-issue for deriving ISS04, basic assumptions are revised, e.g. the dependence on the heating scheme. Moreover, an assessment of statistical approaches is investigated with respect to their impact on the scaling. A crucial issue is the weighting of data groups which is discussed in terms of error-in-variable techniques and Bayesian model comparison. The latter is employed for testing scaling ansatzes depending on scaling invariance principles hence allowing the assessment of applicability of theory-based scaling laws on stellarator confinement. 1. ISCDB resources are jointly hosted by NIFS and IPP, see http://iscdb.nifs.ac.jp and http://www.ipp.mpg.de/ISS. (author)

  17. A stellar interferometer on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porro, Irene

    a list of the main reviews which deal with the scientific objectives of space and lunar interferometry. In Appendix A I present an introduction to the principles of optical stellar interferometry. This part is mainly derived by the study and re-elaboration of the contents of the following works: Armstrong et al. (1995), Shao and Colavita (1992), and Born and Wolf (1980). In this section I present the work I specifically developed within the IOTA project. This work allowed me to, directly or indirectly, acquire the theoretical and technical knowledge I then applied in the study on the lunar interferometer. After having identified some of the main sources of systematic error for an interferometer, I examined: the problem of the telescope alignment, the beamsplitter behaviour, the effects that thermal variations cause on the optics and their support structures. The results obtained in these analyses and the evaluations performed on the performances of other subsystems of the instrument, allowed me to proceed in the evaluation of the instrumental visibility loss for IOTA. In the first chapter (I) I present a general description of the IOTA instrument, avoiding a detailed description of each subsystem. When it is necessary, this is given in its appropriate context. The second chapter (II) is the result of the largest part of my work done on IOTA: the analisys of the alignment of each telescope of the interferometer. A non-perfect alignment of the telescope optics causes a distortion of the wavefront coming from the observed object. The distortions affecting the wavefront are responsible for the corruption of the interference fringes produced by the instrument, and eventually of the astrophysics information derived from their analysis. In order to study the effect of the optics misalignment on the performances of IOTA, I wrote a program to simulate some misalignment conditions and to evaluate the wavefront aberration they cause. For each case considered, an interferogram

  18. The ATLAS3D Project - XXX. Star formation histories and stellar population scaling relations of early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermid, Richard M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2015-04-01

    We present the stellar population content of early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D survey. Using spectra integrated within apertures covering up to one effective radius, we apply two methods: one based on measuring line-strength indices and applying single stellar population (SSP) models to derive SSP-equivalent values of stellar age, metallicity, and alpha enhancement; and one based on spectral fitting to derive non-parametric star formation histories, mass-weighted average values of age, metallicity, and half-mass formation time-scales. Using homogeneously derived effective radii and dynamically determined galaxy masses, we present the distribution of stellar population parameters on the Mass Plane (MJAM, σe, R^maj_e), showing that at fixed mass, compact early-type galaxies are on average older, more metal-rich, and more alpha-enhanced than their larger counterparts. From non-parametric star formation histories, we find that the duration of star formation is systematically more extended in lower mass objects. Assuming that our sample represents most of the stellar content of today's local Universe, approximately 50 per cent of all stars formed within the first 2 Gyr following the big bang. Most of these stars reside today in the most massive galaxies (>1010.5 M⊙), which themselves formed 90 per cent of their stars by z ˜ 2. The lower mass objects, in contrast, have formed barely half their stars in this time interval. Stellar population properties are independent of environment over two orders of magnitude in local density, varying only with galaxy mass. In the highest density regions of our volume (dominated by the Virgo cluster), galaxies are older, alpha-enhanced, and have shorter star formation histories with respect to lower density regions.

  19. Stripping a debris disk by close stellar encounters in an open stellar cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestrade, J.-F.; Morey, E.; Lassus, A.; Phou, N.

    2011-08-01

    A debris disk is a constituent of any planetary system surrounding a main sequence star. We study whether close stellar encounters can disrupt and strip a debris disk of its planetesimals in the expanding open cluster of its birth with a decreasing star number density over 100 Myr. Such stripping would affect the dust production and hence detectability of the disk. We tabulated the fractions of planetesimals stripped off during stellar flybys of miss distances between 100 and 1000 AU and for several mass ratios of the central to passing stars. We then estimated the numbers of close stellar encounters over the lifetime of several expanding open clusters characterized by their initial star densities. We found that a standard disk, with inner and outer radii of 40 and 100 AU, suffers no loss of planetesimals over 100 Myr around a star born in a common embedded cluster with star density ≤1000 pc-3. In contrast, we found that such a disk is severely depleted of its planetesimals around a star born in an Orion-type cluster where the star density is >20 000 pc-3. In this environment, a disk loses >97% of its planetesimals around an M-dwarf, >63% around a solar-type star, and >42% around an A-dwarf, over 100 Myr. We roughly estimate that two-thirds of the stars may be born in such high star density clusters. This might explain in part why fewer debris disks are observed around lower mass stars.

  20. Electronic properties of blue phosphorene/graphene and blue phosphorene/graphene-like gallium nitride heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Minglei; Chou, Jyh-Pin; Yu, Jin; Tang, Wencheng

    2017-07-05

    Blue phosphorene (BlueP) is a graphene-like phosphorus nanosheet which was synthesized very recently for the first time [Nano Lett., 2016, 16, 4903-4908]. The combination of electronic properties of two different two-dimensional materials in an ultrathin van der Waals (vdW) vertical heterostructure has been proved to be an effective approach to the design of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices. Therefore, we used density functional theory to investigate the structural and electronic properties of two BlueP-based heterostructures - BlueP/graphene (BlueP/G) and BlueP/graphene-like gallium nitride (BlueP/g-GaN). Our results showed that the semiconducting nature of BlueP and the Dirac cone of G are well preserved in the BlueP/G vdW heterostructure. Moreover, by applying a perpendicular electric field, it is possible to tune the position of the Dirac cone of G with respect to the band edge of BlueP, resulting in the ability to control the Schottky barrier height. For the BlueP/g-GaN vdW heterostructure, BlueP forms an interface with g-GaN with a type-II band alignment, which is a promising feature for unipolar electronic device applications. Furthermore, we discovered that both G and g-GaN can be used as an active layer for BlueP to facilitate charge injection and enhance the device performance.