WorldWideScience

Sample records for blue galaxies disks

  1. The Evolution of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies: Disks or Spheroids?

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, D J; Garland, C A; Guzman, R; Castander, F J; Perez-Gallego, J

    2011-01-01

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) are a diverse class of galaxies characterized by high luminosity, blue color, and high surface brightness that sit at the critical juncture of galaxies evolving from the blue to the red sequence. As part of our multi-wavelength survey of local LCBGs, we have been studying the HI content of these galaxies using both single-dish telescopes and interferometers. Our goals are to determine if single-dish HI observations represent a true measure of the dynamical mass of LCBGs and to look for signatures of recent interactions that may be triggering star formation in LCBGs. Our data show that while some LCBGs are undergoing interactions, many appear isolated. While all LCBGs contain HI and show signatures of rotation, the population does not lie on the Tully-Fisher relation nor can it evolve onto it. Furthermore, the HI maps of many LCBGs show signatures of dynamically hot components, suggesting that we are seeing the formation of a thick disk or spheroid in at least some LCBGs....

  2. The Evolution of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies: Disks or Spheroids?

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, D J; Rabidoux, K; Wolfe, S; Guzman, R; Perez-Gallego, J; Castander, F J

    2009-01-01

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) are a diverse class of galaxies characterized by high luminosities, blue colors, and high surface brightnesses. Residing at the high luminosity, high mass end of the blue sequence, LCBGs sit at the critical juncture of galaxies that are evolving from the blue to the red sequence. Yet we do not understand what drives the evolution of LCBGs, nor how they will evolve. Based on single-dish HI observations, we know that they have a diverse range of properties. LCBGs are HI-rich with M(HI)=10^{9-10.5} M(sun), have moderate M(dyn)=10^{10-12} M(sun), and 80% have gas depletion timescales less than 3 Gyr. These properties are consistent with LCBGs evolving into low-mass spirals or high mass dwarf ellipticals or dwarf irregulars. However, LCBGs do not follow the Tully-Fisher relation, nor can most evolve onto it, implying that many LCBGs are not smoothly rotating, virialized systems. GMRT and VLA HI maps confirm this conclusion revealing signatures of recent interactions and dynam...

  3. Disk Galaxies and Galaxy Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Funes, J G

    2000-01-01

    The conference Galaxy Disks and Disk Galaxies, sponsored by the Vatican Observatory, was held in June 12-16, 2000 at the Pontifical Gregorian University, in Rome (Italy). The meeting hosted about 230 participants coming from 30 countries. The very full program consisted of 29 review papers, 34 invited talks, and more than 180 posters. The meeting covered topics regarding the structure, formation and evolution of galaxies with disks. Particular attention was dedicated to the stellar and gaseous disk of the Milky Way, the global characteristics of galaxy disks, their structure, morphology and dynamics, the gaseous components, star formation, and chemical evolution, the interactions, accretion, mergers and starbursts, the dark and luminous matter, the establishment of the scaling laws, and the formation and evolution of disk galaxies from a theoretical and observational point of view.

  4. Evolution of blue E/S0 galaxies from z ~ 1: merger remnants or disk-rebuilding galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Company, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Tresse, L.; Bolzonella, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Maier, C.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Studying outliers from the bimodal distribution of galaxies in the color-mass space, such as morphological early-type galaxies residing in the blue cloud (blue E/S0s), can help for better understanding the physical mechanisms that lead galaxy migrations in this space. Aims: In this paper we try to bring new clues to studying the evolution of the properties of a significant sample of blue E/S0 galaxies in the COSMOS field. Methods: We define blue E/S0 galaxies as objects having a clear early-type morphology on the HST/ACS images (according to our automated classification scheme galSVM) but with a blue rest-frame color (defined by using the SED best-fit template on the COSMOS primary photometric catalogs). Combining these two measurements with spectroscopic redshifts from the zCOSMOS 10k release, we isolated 210 IAB 1010 in three redshift bins (0.2 late type populations (bimodality mass) indicating that the abundance of blue E/S0 is another measure of the downsizing effect in the build-up of the red sequence. There seems to be a turn-over mass in the nature of blue E/S0 galaxies. Above log (M_*/M_⊙) ~ 10.8 blue E/S0 resemble to merger remnants probably migrating to the red sequence on a time scale of ˜3 Gyr. Below this mass, they seem to be closer to normal late-type galaxies, as if they were the result of minor mergers that triggered the central star formation and built a central bulge component or were (re)building a disk from the surrounding gas in a much longer time scale, suggesting that they are moving back or staying in the blue cloud. This turn-over mass does not seem to evolve significantly from z ~ 1 in contrast to the threshold mass and therefore does not seem to be linked with the relative abundance of blue E/S0s.

  5. Resolved H I observations of local analogs to z ~ 1 luminous compact blue galaxies: evidence for rotation-supported disks

    CERN Document Server

    Rabidoux, Katie; Garland, C A; Guzman, Rafael; Castander, Francisco J; Wolfe, Spencer

    2014-01-01

    While bright, blue, compact galaxies are common at $\\rm z \\sim 1$, they are relatively rare in the local universe, and their evolutionary paths are uncertain. We have obtained resolved H I observations of nine $\\rm z \\sim 0$ luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Very Large Array in order to measure their kinematic and dynamical properties and better constrain their evolutionary possibilities. We find that the LCBGs in our sample are rotating galaxies that tend to have nearby companions, relatively high central velocity dispersions, and can have disturbed velocity fields. We compare our measurements to those previously made with single dishes and find that single dish measurements tend to overestimate LCBGs' rotation velocities and H I masses. We also compare the ratio of LCBGs' rotation velocities to their velocity dispersions to those of other types of galaxies and find that LCBGs are strongly rotationally supported at large radii, similar to other types of disk...

  6. Galaxy Disks are Submaximal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bershady, Matthew A.; Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Andersen, David R.; Swaters, Rob A.

    2011-01-01

    We measure the contribution of galaxy disks to the overall gravitational potential of 30 nearly face-on intermediate-to-late-type spirals from the DiskMass Survey. The central vertical velocity dispersion of the disk stars (sigma(disk)(z,R=0)) is related to the maximum rotation speed (V-max) as sigm

  7. The Frequency of Field Blue-Straggler Stars in the Thick Disk and Halo System of the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Santucci, Rafael M; Rossi, Silvia; Beers, Timothy C; Reggiani, Henrique M; Lee, Young Sun; Xue, Xiang-Xiang; Carollo, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of a new, large sample of field blue-straggler stars (BSSs) in the thick disk and halo system of the Galaxy, based on stellar spectra obtained during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). Using estimates of stellar atmospheric parameters obtained from application of the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline, we obtain a sample of some 8000 BSSs, which are considered along with a previously selected sample of some 4800 blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars. We derive the ratio of BSSs to BHB stars, F$_{\\rm BSS/BHB}$, as a function of Galactocentric distance and distance from the Galactic plane. The maximum value found for F$_{\\rm BSS/BHB}$ is $\\sim~$4.0 in the thick disk (at 3 kpc $<$ $|$Z$|$ $<$ 4 kpc), declining to on the order of $\\sim~1.5-2.0$ in the inner-halo region; this ratio continues to decline to $\\sim~$1.0 in the outer-halo region. We associate a minority of field BSSs with a likely extragalactic origin; ...

  8. Galaxy Disks are Submaximal

    CERN Document Server

    Bershady, Matthew A; Verheijen, Marc A W; Westfall, Kyle B; Andersen, David R; Swaters, Rob A

    2011-01-01

    We measure the contribution of galaxy disks to the overall gravitational potential of 30 nearly face-on intermediate-to-late-type spirals from the DiskMass Survey. The central vertical velocity dispersion of the disk stars, sigma(z,R=0), is related to the maximum rotation speed (Vmax) as sigma(z,R=0) ~ 0.26 Vmax, consistent with previous measurements for edge-on disk galaxies and a mean stellar velocity ellipsoid axial ratio sigma(z) / sigma(R) = 0.6. For reasonable values of disk oblateness, this relation implies these galaxy disks are submaximal. We find disks in our sample contribute only 15% to 30% of the dynamical mass within 2.2 disk scale-lengths (hR), with percentages increasing systematically with luminosity, rotation speed and redder color. These trends indicate the mass ratio of disk-to-total matter remains at or below 50% at 2.2 hR even for the most extreme, fast-rotating disks (Vmax > 300 km/s), of the reddest rest-frame, face-on color (B-K ~ 4 mag), and highest luminosity (M(K)<-26.5 mag). Th...

  9. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sellwood, J A

    2013-01-01

    Disk galaxies evolve over time through processes that may rearrange both the radial mass profile and the metallicity distribution within the disk. This review of such slow changes is largely, though not entirely, restricted to internally-driven processes that can be distinguished from evolution driven by galaxy interactions. It both describes our current understanding of disk evolution, and identifies areas where more work is needed. Stellar disks are heated through spiral scattering, which increases random motion components in the plane, while molecular clouds redirect some fraction of the random energy into vertical motion. The recently discovered process of radial migration at the corotation resonance of a transient spiral mode does not alter the underlying structure of the disk, since it neither heats the disk nor causes it to spread, but it does have a profound effect on the expected distribution of metallicities among the disk stars. Bars in disks are believed to be major drivers of secular evolution th...

  10. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-10-01

    Self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable via the evolution processes that are available to them. They do this by spreading -- the inner parts shrink while the outer parts expand -- provided that some physical process efficiently transports energy or angular momentum outward. The reason is that self-gravitating systems have negative specific heats. As a result, the evolution of stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks and galaxy disks are fundamentally similar. How evolution proceeds then depends on the evolution processes that are available to each kind of self-gravitating system. These processes and their consequences for galaxy disks are the subjects of my lectures and of this Canary Islands Winter School. I begin with a review of the formation, growth and death of bars. Then I review the slow (`secular') rearrangement of energy, angular momentum, and mass that results from interactions between stars or gas clouds and collective phenomena such as bars, oval disks, spiral structure and triaxial dark haloes. The `existence-proof' phase of this work is largely over: we have a good heuristic understanding of how nonaxisymmetric structures rearrange disk gas into outer rings, inner rings and stuff dumped onto the centre. The results of simulations correspond closely to the morphology of barred and oval galaxies. Gas that is transported to small radii reaches high densities. Observations confirm that many barred and oval galaxies have dense central concentrations of gas and star formation. The result is to grow, on timescales of a few Gyr, dense central components that are frequently mistaken for classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges but that were grown slowly out of the disk (not made rapidly by major mergers). The resulting picture of secular galaxy evolution accounts for the richness observed in galaxy structure. We can distinguish between classical and pseudo

  11. ECO and RESOLVE: Galaxy Disk Growth in Environmental Context

    CERN Document Server

    Moffett, Amanda J; Berlind, Andreas A; Eckert, Kathleen D; Stark, David V; Hendel, David; Norris, Mark A; Grogin, Norman A

    2015-01-01

    We study the relationships between galaxy environments and galaxy properties related to disk (re)growth, considering two highly complete samples that are approximately baryonic mass limited into the high-mass dwarf galaxy regime, the Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog (data release herein) and the B-semester region of the REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey. We quantify galaxy environments using both group identification and smoothed galaxy density field methods. We use by-eye and quantitative morphological classifications plus atomic gas content measurements and estimates. We find that blue early-type (E/S0) galaxies, gas-dominated galaxies, and UV-bright disk host galaxies all become distinctly more common below group halo mass ~10^11.5 Msun, implying that this low group halo mass regime may be a preferred regime for significant disk growth activity. We also find that blue early-type and blue late-type galaxies inhabit environments of similar group halo mass at fixed baryonic mass, con...

  12. When did round disk galaxies form?

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi, Tomoe M.; Ohta, Kouji; Yuma, Suraphong; Yabe, Kiyoto

    2015-01-01

    When and how galaxy morphology such as disk and bulge seen in the present-day universe emerged is still not clear. In the universe at $z\\gtrsim 2$, galaxies with various morphology are seen, and star-forming galaxies at $z\\sim2$ show an intrinsic shape of bar-like structure. Then, when did round disk structure form? Here we take a simple and straightforward approach to see the epoch when a round disk galaxy population emerged by constraining the intrinsic shape statistically based on apparent...

  13. Counterrotating Stars in Simulated Galaxy Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Algorry, David G; Abadi, Mario G; Sales, Laura V; Steinmetz, Matthias; Piontek, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Counterrotating stars in disk galaxies are a puzzling dynamical feature whose origin has been ascribed to either satellite accretion events or to disk instabilities triggered by deviations from axisymmetry. We use a cosmological simulation of the formation of a disk galaxy to show that counterrotating stellar disk components may arise naturally in hierarchically-clustering scenarios even in the absence of merging. The simulated disk galaxy consists of two coplanar, overlapping stellar components with opposite spins: an inner counterrotating bar-like structure made up mostly of old stars surrounded by an extended, rotationally-supported disk of younger stars. The opposite-spin components originate from material accreted from two distinct filamentary structures which at turn around, when their net spin is acquired, intersect delineating a "V"-like structure. Each filament torques the other in opposite directions; the filament that first drains into the galaxy forms the inner counterrotating bar, while material ...

  14. The Red and Featureless Outer Disks of Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Aaron E.; Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul

    2016-07-01

    We present results from deep, wide-field surface photometry of three nearby (D = 4-7 Mpc) spiral galaxies: M94 (NGC 4736), M64 (NGC 4826), and M106 (NGC 4258). Our imaging reaches a limiting surface brightness of {μ }B ˜ 28-30 mag arcsec-2 and probes colors down to {μ }B ˜ 27.5 mag arcsec-2. We compare our broadband optical data to available ultraviolet and high column density H i data to better constrain the star-forming history and stellar populations of the outermost parts of each galaxy’s disk. Each galaxy has a well-defined radius beyond which little star formation occurs and the disk light appears both azimuthally smooth and red in color, suggestive of old, well-mixed stellar populations. Given the lack of ongoing star formation or blue stellar populations in these galaxies’ outer disks, the most likely mechanisms for their formation are dynamical processes such as disk heating or radial migration, rather than inside-out growth of the disks. This is also implied by the similarity in outer disk properties despite each galaxy showing distinct levels of environmental influence, from a purely isolated galaxy (M94) to one experiencing weak tidal perturbations from its satellite galaxies (M106) to a galaxy recovering from a recent merger (M64), suggesting that a variety of evolutionary histories can yield similar outer disk structure. While this suggests a common secular mechanism for outer disk formation, the large extent of these smooth, red stellar populations—which reach several disk scale lengths beyond the galaxies’ spiral structure—may challenge models of radial migration given the lack of any nonaxisymmetric forcing at such large radii.

  15. The Red and Featureless Outer Disks of Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Watkins, Aaron E; Harding, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We present results from deep, wide-field surface photometry of three nearby (D=4--7 Mpc) spiral galaxies: M94 (NGC 4736), M64 (NGC 4826), and M106 (NGC 4258). Our imaging reaches limiting surface brightnesses of $\\mu_{B} \\sim$ 28 -- 30 mag arcsec$^{-2}$ and probes colors down to $\\mu_{B} \\sim$ 27.5 mag arcsec$^{-2}$. We compare our broadband optical data to available ultraviolet and high column-density HI data to better constrain the star forming history and stellar populations of the outermost parts of each galaxy's disk. Each galaxy has a well-defined radius beyond which little star formation occurs and the disk light appears both azimuthally smooth and red in color, suggestive of old, well-mixed stellar populations. Given the lack of ongoing star formation or blue stellar populations in these galaxies' outer disks, the most likely mechanisms for their formation are dynamical processes such as disk heating or radial migration, rather than inside-out growth of the disks. This is also implied by the similarit...

  16. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the Stellar Mass Budget of Galaxy Spheroids and Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Moffett, Amanda J; Driver, Simon P; Robotham, Aaron S G; Kelvin, Lee S; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Andrews, Stephen K; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Cluver, Michelle E; Colless, Matthew; Davies, Luke J M; Holwerda, Benne W; Hopkins, Andrew M; Kafle, Prajwal R; Liske, Jochen; Meyer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We build on a recent photometric decomposition analysis of 7506 Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey galaxies to derive stellar mass function fits to individual spheroid and disk component populations down to a lower mass limit of log(M_*/M_sun)= 8. We find that the spheroid/disk mass distributions for individual galaxy morphological types are well described by single Schechter function forms. We derive estimates of the total stellar mass densities in spheroids (rho_spheroid = 1.24+/-0.49 * 10^8 M_sun Mpc^-3 h_0.7) and disks (rho_disk = 1.20+/-0.45 * 10^8 M_sun Mpc^-3 h_0.7), which translates to approximately 50% of the local stellar mass density in spheroids and 48% in disks. The remaining stellar mass is found in the dwarf "little blue spheroid" class, which is not obviously similar in structure to either classical spheroid or disk populations. We also examine the variation of component mass ratios across galaxy mass and group halo mass regimes, finding the transition from spheroid to disk mass dominance ...

  17. Vertical dynamics of disk galaxies in MOND

    OpenAIRE

    Nipoti, Carlo; Londrillo, Pasquale; Zhao, HongSheng; Ciotti, Luca

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of discriminating between Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) and Newtonian gravity with dark matter, by studying the vertical dynamics of disk galaxies. We consider models with the same circular velocity in the equatorial plane (purely baryonic disks in MOND and the same disks in Newtonian gravity embedded in spherical dark matter haloes), and we construct their intrinsic and projected kinematical fields by solving the Jeans equations under the assumption of a t...

  18. Dynamical Stability and Galaxy Evolution in LSB Disk Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Mihos,C; McGaugh, S. S.; Blok, E.

    1996-01-01

    Published in: AIP Conf. Proc. 393 (1997) , pp.311 citations recorded in [Science Citation Index] Abstract: We demonstrate that, due to their low surface mass density and large dark matter content, LSB disks are quite stable against the growth of global bar modes. However, they may be only marginally stable against local disk instabilities. We simulate a collision between an LSB and HSB galaxy and find that, while the HSB galaxy forms a strong bar, the response of the LSB disk is milder, in th...

  19. On the galactic spin of barred disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cervantes-Sodi, Bernardo; Park, Changbom; Wang, Lixin

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of the connection between the galactic spin parameter $\\lambda_{d}$ and the bar fraction in a volume-limited sample of 10,674 disk galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. The galaxies in our sample are visually classified into galaxies hosting strong or weak bars, and non-barred galaxies. We find that the spin distributions of these three classes are statistically different, with galaxies hosting strong bars with the lowest $\\lambda_{d}$ values, followed by non-barred galaxies, while galaxies with weak bars present typically high spin parameters. The bar fraction presents its maximum at low to intermediate $\\lambda_{d}$ values for the case of strong bars, while the maximum for weak bars is at high $\\lambda_{d}$. This bi-modality is in good agreement with previous studies finding stronger bars hosted by luminous, massive, red galaxies with low content of cold gas, while weak bars are found in low luminosity, low mass, blue galaxies, usually gas rich. In addition, the...

  20. Kinematics of luminous blue compact galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östlin, Göran; Amram, Philippe; Boulesteix, Jaques; Bergvall, Nils; Masegosa, Josefa; Márquez, Isabel

    We present results from a Fabry-Perot study of the Hα velocity fields and morphologies of a sample of luminous blue compact galaxies. We estimate masses from photometry and kinematics and show that many of these BCGs are not rotationally supported. Mergers or strong interactions appear to be the triggering mechanism of the extreme starbursts seen in these galaxies.

  1. Extended HI disks in nearby spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bosma, A

    2016-01-01

    In this short write-up, I will concentrate on a few topics of interest. In the 1970s I found very extended HI disks in galaxies such as NGC 5055 and NGC 2841, out to 2 - 2.5 times the Holmberg radius. Since these galaxies are warped, a "tilted ring model" allows rotation curves to be derived, and evidence for dark matter to be found. The evaluation of the amount of dark matter is hampered by a disk-halo degeneracy, which can possibly be broken by observations of velocity dispersions in both the MgI region and the CaII region.

  2. Blue lobes in the Hydra A cluster central galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnamara, Brian R.

    1995-01-01

    We present new U- and I-band images of the centrally dominant galaxy in the Hydra A cluster, obtained with the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope at La Palma. The galaxy is centered in a poor, X-ray-luminous cluster whose gaseous intracluster medium is apparently cooling at a rate of m-dot(sub CF) approximately 3000 solar masses/yr. The galaxy's structure is that of a normal giant elliptical galaxy, apart from the central approximately 8 x 6 arcsec (approximately 12 x 9 kpc) region which contains an unusually blue, lobelike structure that is spatially coincident with a luminous emission-line nebula in rotation about the nucleus. Based on near spatial coincidence of the central continuum structure and the emission-line nebula, we suggest that the blue continuum is due to a warm stellar population in a central disk. In order to isolate and study the structure of the disk, we have subtracted a smooth galactic background model from the U-band image. The disk's surface brightness profiles along its major and minor axes decline roughly exponentially with radius. The disk's axial ratio is consistent with a nearly edge-on thick disk or a thin disk that is inclined with respect to the line of sight. The bluest regions, located a few arcsec on either side of the nucleus (giving the lobelike appearance), may be due to locally enhanced star formation or a seeing-blurred ring of young stars embedded in the disk observed nearly edge-on. If star-formation is occurring with the local initial mass function, the central color, surface brightness, and dynamical mass would be consistent with models for star formation at a rate of less than and approximately 1 solar masses/yr which has persisted for the past approximately 10(exp 9) yr, a short burst (10(exp 7) yr) of star formation at a rate of approximately 30 solar masses/yr which occurred less than and approximately 10(exp 8) yr ago, or an instantaneous burst of star formation which occurred approximately 5 x 10(exp 7) yr ago. While the

  3. When did round disk galaxies form?

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Tomoe M; Yuma, Suraphong; Yabe, Kiyoto

    2015-01-01

    When and how galaxy morphology such as disk and bulge seen in the present-day universe emerged is still not clear. In the universe at $z\\gtrsim 2$, galaxies with various morphology are seen, and star-forming galaxies at $z\\sim2$ show an intrinsic shape of bar-like structure. Then, when did round disk structure form? Here we take a simple and straightforward approach to see the epoch when a round disk galaxy population emerged by constraining the intrinsic shape statistically based on apparent axial ratio distribution of galaxies. We derived the distributions of the apparent axial ratios in the rest-frame optical light ($\\sim 5000$ \\AA) of star-forming main sequence galaxies at $2.5>z>1.4$, $1.4>z>0.85$, and $0.85>z>0.5$, and found that the apparent axial ratios of them show peaky distributions at $z\\gtrsim0.85$, while a rather flat distribution at the lower redshift. By using a tri-axial model ($A>B>C$) for the intrinsic shape, we found the best-fit models give the peaks of the $B/A$ distribution of $0.81\\pm0...

  4. POLAR DISK GALAXY FOUND IN WALL BETWEEN VOIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanonik, K.; Platen, E.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.; van Gorkom, J. H.; van de Weygaert, R.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Peebles, P. J. E.

    2009-01-01

    We have found an isolated polar disk galaxy in what appears to be a cosmological wall situated between two voids. This void galaxy is unique as its polar disk was discovered serendipitously in an Hi survey of SDSS void galaxies, with no optical counterpart to the Hi polar disk. Yet the Hi mass in th

  5. Galaxy Zoo Hubble: First results of the redshift evolution of disk fraction in the red sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Melanie; Willett, Kyle; Fortson, Lucy; Scarlata, Claudia; Beck, Melanie; Masters, Karen; Melvin, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The transition of galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence is commonly linked to a morphological transformation from disk to elliptical structure. However, the correlation between color and morphology is not one-to-one, as evidenced by the existence of a significant population of red disks. As this stage in a galaxy's evolution is likely to be transitory, the mechanism by which red disks are formed offers insight to the processes that trigger quenching of star formation and the galaxy's position on the star-forming sequence. To study the population of disk galaxies in the red sequence as a function of cosmic time, we utilize data from the Galaxy Zoo: Hubble project, which uses crowdsourced visual classifications of images of galaxies selected from the AEGIS, COSMOS, GEMS, and GOODS surveys. We construct a large sample of over 10,000 disk galaxies spanning a wide (0 < z < 1.0) redshift range. We use this sample to examine the change in the fraction of disks in the red sequence with respect to all disks from z˜1 to the present day. Preliminary results confirm that the fraction of disks in the red sequence decreases as the Universe evolves. We discuss the quenching processes which may explain this trend, and which morphological transformations are most affected by it.

  6. When did Round Disk Galaxies Form?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T. M.; Ohta, K.; Yuma, S.; Yabe, K.

    2015-03-01

    When and how galaxy morphology, such as the disk and bulge seen in the present-day universe, emerged is still not clear. In the universe at z >~ 2, galaxies with various morphologies are seen, and star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2 show the intrinsic shape of bar-like structures. Then, when did the round disk structure form? Here we take a simple and straightforward approach to see the epoch when a round disk galaxy population emerged by constraining the intrinsic shape statistically based on the apparent axial ratio distribution of galaxies. We derived the distributions of the apparent axial ratios in the rest-frame optical light (~5000 Å) of star-forming main-sequence galaxies at 2.5 > z > 1.4, 1.4 > z > 0.85, and 0.85 > z > 0.5, and found that their apparent axial ratios show peaky distributions at z >~ 0.85, while a rather flat distribution at the lower redshift. By using a tri-axial model (A > B > C) for the intrinsic shape, we found that the best-fit models give the peaks of the B/A distribution of 0.81 ± 0.04, 0.84 ± 0.04, and 0.92 ± 0.05 at 2.5 > z > 1.4, 1.4 > z > 0.85, and 0.85 > z > 0.5, respectively. The last value is close to the local value of 0.95. Thickness (C/A) is ~0.25 at all the redshifts and is close to the local value (0.21). The results indicate that the shape of the star-forming galaxies in the main sequence changes gradually, and that the round disk is established at around z ~ 0.9. The establishment of the round disk may be due to the cessation of a violent interaction between galaxies or the growth of a bulge and/or a supermassive black hole residing at the center of a galaxy that dissolves the bar structure.

  7. Possible Local Spiral Counterparts to Compact Blue Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, E J; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Zee, Liese van

    2001-01-01

    We identify nearby disk galaxies with optical structural parameters similar to those of intermediate-redshift compact blue galaxies. By comparing HI and optical emission-line widths, we show that the optical widths substantially underestimate the true kinematic widths of the local galaxies. By analogy, optical emission-line widths may underrepresent the masses of intermediate-z compact objects. For the nearby galaxies, the compact blue morphology is the result of tidally-triggered central star formation: we argue that interactions and minor mergers may cause apparently compact morphology at higher redshift.

  8. Cold Gas in Blue-Sequence E/S0s: Galaxies in Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Lisa H; Vogel, Stuart N; Baker, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    We examine the HI+H_2 content of blue-sequence E/S0s -- a recently identified population of galaxies that are morphologically early type, but reside alongside spiral galaxies in color vs. stellar mass space. We test the idea that the majority of low-to-intermediate mass blue-sequence E/S0s may be settled products of past mergers evolving toward later-type morphology via disk regrowth. We find that blue-sequence E/S0s with stellar masses 1.0, comparable to those of spiral galaxies. Preliminary CO(1-0) maps reveal disk-like rotation of molecular gas in the inner regions of several of our blue-sequence E/S0s, which suggests that they may have gas disks suitable for stellar disk regrowth. At the current rate of star formation, many of our blue-sequence E/S0s will exhaust their atomic gas reservoirs in <~ 3 Gyr. Over the same time period, most of these galaxies are capable of substantial growth in the stellar component. Star formation in blue-sequence E/S0s appears to be bursty, and likely involves inflow trig...

  9. Anomalous Blue Colors in Extremely Isolated Early-Type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Christopher R.

    2009-01-01

    Highly isolated systems provide a baseline for assessing the role of interactions within galaxy evolution. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 1 - 5 to identify extremely isolated early-type galaxies (IEGs) in the nearby universe. Redshifts derived from the SDSS spectra permit a robust three-dimensional assessment of the local environment surrounding candidate IEGs. Isolated galaxies are chosen utilizing a projected physical separation of 2.5 Mpc from any neighboring non-dwarf galaxy brighter than M$_{V}$ = $-$16.5. A minimum redshift separation of 350 km s$^{-1}$ between a candidate galaxy and a neighboring was imposed to further insure the candidate's isolation. The IEG sample contains 33 galaxies that exhibit a number of unexpected features. Through the use of a bulge/disk decomposition technique using standard surface photometry, brightness profiles and model-subtracted images were created. Radial profiles of eccentricity, position angle, and surface brightness were employed with the model images to constrain the merger and interaction histories of the IEGs. The presence of shell and fan structures, signatures of recent mergers, were detected in approximately 12% of the sample. Dominant features of the IEG sample are blue colors and active star formation, atypical of normal early-type galaxies. The IEGs would require a substantial reservoir of neutral gas to fuel the levels of on-going star formation observed. We speculate that some of the IEGs may be the remains of a coalesced group of gas-rich dwarf galaxies. Three sample galaxies have red colors and undisturbed morphologies expected of a pristine isolated early-type galaxy formed early in cosmic time. We acknowledge support from NASA's Astrophysical Data Program; grant #NNG05C53G, the GALEX Guest Investigator program, and a Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowship.

  10. The 2X-HI disks of spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Koribalski, B S

    2016-01-01

    The outskirts of galaxies - especially the very extended HI disks of galaxies - are strongly affected by their local environment. I highlight the giant 2X-HI disks of nearby galaxies (M 83, NGC 3621, and NGC 1512), studied as part of the Local Volume HI Survey (LVHIS), their kinematics and relation to XUV disks, signatures of tidal interactions and accretion events, the MHI - DHI relation as well as the formation of tidal dwarf galaxies. - Using multi-wavelength data, I create 3D visualisations of the gas and stars in galaxies, with the shape of their warped disks obtained through kinematic modelling of their HI velocity fields.

  11. IN-SPIRALING CLUMPS IN BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Zhang Hongxin; Hunter, Deidre A., E-mail: bge@watson.ibm.com [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    Giant star formation clumps in dwarf irregular galaxies can have masses exceeding a few percent of the galaxy mass enclosed inside their orbital radii. They can produce sufficient torques on dark matter halo particles, halo stars, and the surrounding disk to lose their angular momentum and spiral into the central region in 1 Gyr. Pairs of giant clumps with similarly large relative masses can interact and exchange angular momentum to the same degree. The result of this angular momentum loss is a growing central concentration of old stars, gas, and star formation that can produce a long-lived starburst in the inner region, identified with the blue compact dwarf (BCD) phase. This central concentration is proposed to be analogous to the bulge in a young spiral galaxy. Observations of star complexes in five local BCDs confirm the relatively large clump masses that are expected for this process. The observed clumps also seem to contain old field stars, even after background light subtraction, in which case the clumps may be long-lived. The two examples with clumps closest to the center have the largest relative clump masses and the greatest contributions from old stars. An additional indication that the dense central regions of BCDs are like bulges is the high ratio of the inner disk scale height to the scale length, which is comparable to 1 for four of the galaxies.

  12. The Neutral ISM in Nearby Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, C A; Williams, J P; Guzmán, R; Castander, F J

    2003-01-01

    We observed 20 nearby Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) in HI and CO(J=2-1) with the GBT and JCMT. These ~L^star galaxies are blue, high surface brightness, starbursting, high metallicity galaxies with an underlying older stellar population. They are common at z~1, but rare in the local Universe. It has been proposed that intermediate redshift LCBGs may be the progenitors of local dwarf ellipticals or low luminosity spirals, or that they may be more massive disks forming from the center outward to become L^star galaxies. To discriminate among various possible evolutionary scenarios, we have measured the dynamical masses and gas depletion time scales of this sample of nearby LCBGs. We find that local LCBGs span a wide range of dynamical masses, from 4 x 10^9 to 1 x 10^11 M_solar (measured within R_25). Molecular gas in local LCBGs is depleted quite quickly, in 30 to 200 million years. The molecular plus atomic gas is depleted in 30 million to 10 billion years; however, ~80% of the local LCBGs deplete thei...

  13. The Stellar Structures around Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Drozdovsky, I; Aparicio, A; Gallart, C; Monelli, M; Hidalgo, S; Bernard, E J; Galazutdinova, O

    2016-01-01

    We present a brief summary of our current results on the stellar distribution and population gradients of the resolved stars in the surroundings of ~50 nearby disk galaxies, observed with space- (Hubble & Spitzer) and ground-based telescopes (Subaru, VLT, BTA, Palomar, CFHT & INT). We examine the radial (in-plane) and vertical (extraplanar) distributions of resolved stars as a function of stellar age and metallicity by tracking changes in the color-magnitude diagram of face-on and edge-on galaxies. Our data show, that the scale length and height of a stellar population increases with age, with the oldest detected stellar populations identified at a large galactocentric radius or extraplanar height, out to typically a few kpc. In the most massive of the studied galaxies there is evidence for a break in number density and color gradients of evolved stars, which plausibly correspond to the thick disk and halo components of the galaxies. The ratio of intermediate-age to old stars in the outermost fields c...

  14. Extended Light in E/S0 Galaxies and Implications for Disk Rebirth

    CERN Document Server

    Moffett, Amanda J; Laine, Seppo; Wei, Lisa H; Baker, Andrew J; Impey, Chris D

    2009-01-01

    The recent discovery of extended ultraviolet (XUV) disks around a large fraction of late-type galaxies provides evidence for unexpectedly large-scale disk building at recent epochs. Combining GALEX UV observations with deep optical and Spitzer IR imaging, we search for XUV disks in a sample of nearby low-to-intermediate mass E/S0 galaxies to explore evidence for disk rebuilding after mergers. Preliminary visual classification yields ten XUV-disk candidates from the full sample of 30, intriguingly similar to the ~30% frequency for late-type galaxies. These XUV candidates occur at a wide range of masses and on both the red and blue sequences in color vs. stellar mass, indicating a possible association with processes like gas accretion and/or galaxy interactions that would affect the galaxy population broadly. We go on to apply the quantitative Type 1 and Type 2 XUV-disk definitions to a nine-galaxy subsample analyzed in detail. For this subsample, six of the nine are Type 1 XUVs, i.e., galaxies with UV structur...

  15. What are the Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, D J; Guzmán, R; Gallego, J Perez; Castander, F J; Gruel, N

    2007-01-01

    Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) are common at z~1, contributing significantly to the total star formation rate density. By z~0, they are a factor of ten rarer. While we know that LCBGs evolve rapidly, we do not know what drives their evolution nor into what types of galaxies they evolve. We present the results of a single-dish HI survey of local LCBGs undertaken to address these questions. Our results indicate that LCBGs have M(HI) and M(DYN) consistent with low-mass spirals, but typically exhaust their gas reservoirs in less than 2 Gyr. Overall, the properties of LCBGs are consistent with them evolving into high-mass dwarf elliptical or dwarf irregular galaxies or low-mass, late-type spiral galaxies.

  16. Star Formation Modes in Low-Mass Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, J S

    2001-01-01

    Low-mass disk galaxies with well-organized structures are relatively common in low density regions of the nearby Universe. They display a wide range in levels of star formation activity, extending from sluggishly evolving `superthin' disk systems to nearby starbursts. Investigations of this class of galaxy therefore provides opportunities to test and define models of galactic star formation processes. In this paper we briefly explore characteristics of examples of quiescent and starbursting low-mass disk galaxies.

  17. The Green Valley is a Red Herring: Different Evolutionary Pathways for Spheroidal and Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urry, C. M.; Schawinski, K.; Simmons, B. D.; Fortson, L.; Kaviraj, S.; Keel, W. C.; Lintott, C.; Masters, K.; Nichol, R.; Sarzi, M.; Skibba, R. A.; Treister, E.; Willett, K.; Wong, O.; Yi, S.; Zoo Citizen Scientists, Galaxy

    2014-01-01

    Using SDSS+GALEX+Galaxy Zoo data, we show that the green valley in the color-mass diagram (between the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies and the red sequence of quiescent galaxies) is not a single transitional state through which most blue galaxies evolve into red galaxies. Rather, an analysis that takes morphology and UV colors into account makes clear that only a small population of blue galaxies moves rapidly across the green valley, after star formation is abruptly quenched and the morphology is transformed from disk to spheroid. In contrast, the majority of blue star-forming galaxies retain significant disks as their star formation rates decline very slowly. We detail a range of observations that lead to these conclusions, including UV-optical colors and halo masses, which both show a striking dependence on morphological type. We interpret these results in terms of how much gas is available for star formation. We conclude that disky galaxies are consistent with a scenario where the cosmic supply of gas is shut off, perhaps at a critical halo mass, followed by a slow exhaustion of the remaining gas over several Gigayears, driven by secular and/or environmental processes. In contrast, spheroidal galaxies require the gas supply and gas reservoir to be destroyed virtually instantaneously, with rapid quenching accompanied by a morphological transformation from disk to spheroid. This gas reservoir destruction could be the consequence of a major merger, and mergers could play a role in inducing black hole accretion and possibly AGN feedback in this minority of galaxies.

  18. Do low surface brightness galaxies have dense disks?

    CERN Document Server

    Saburova, A S

    2010-01-01

    The disk masses of four low surface brightness galaxies (LSB) were estimated using marginal gravitational stability criterion and the stellar velocity dispersion data which were taken from Pizzella et al., 2008 [1]. The constructed mass models appear to be close to the models of maximal disk. The results show that the disks of LSB galaxies may be significantly more massive than it is usually accepted from their brightnesses. In this case their surface densities and masses appear to be rather typical for normal spirals. Otherwise, unlike the disks of many spiral galaxies, the LSB disks are dynamically overheated.

  19. Bulge formation in disk galaxies with MOND

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    2014-01-01

    The formation of galaxies and their various components can be stringent tests of dark matter models and of gravity theories. In the standard cold dark matter (CDM) model, spheroids are formed through mergers in a strongly hierarchical scenario, and also in the early universe through dynamical friction in clumpy galaxies. More secularly, pseudo-bulges are formed by the inner vertical resonance with bars. The high efficiency of bulge formation is in tension with observations in the local universe of a large amount of bulge-less spiral galaxies. In the present work, the formation of bulges in very gas-rich galaxies, as those in the early universe, is studied in the Milgrom's MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND), through multi-grid simulations of the non-linear gravity, including the gas dissipation, star formation and feedback. Clumpy disks are rapidly formed, as in their Newtonian equivalent systems. However, the dynamical friction is not as efficient, in the absence of dark matter halos, and the clumps have no t...

  20. Chemical Evolution of Blue Compact Galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Shi; Xu Kong; Fu-Zhen Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Based on a sample of 72 Blue Compact Galaxies (BCGs) observed with the 2.16 m telescope of the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) and about 4000 strong emission line galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey,we analyzed their chemical evolution history using the revised chemical evolution model of Larsen et al. Our sample covers a much larger metallicity range (7.2<12+log(O/H) <9.0). We found that, in order to reproduce the observed abundance pattern and gas fraction over the whole metallicity range, a relatively continuous star formation history is needed for high metallicity galaxies, while assuming a series of instantaneous bursts with long quiescent periods (some Gyrs) for low metallicity galaxies. Model calculations also show that only the closed-box model is capable of reproducing the observational data over the whole metallicity range. Models that consider the ordinary winds and/or inflow can only fit the observations in the low metallicity range, and a model with enriched wind cannot fit the data in the whole metallicity range. This implies that the current adopted simple wind and inflow models are not applicable to massive galaxies, where the underlying physics of galactic winds or inflow could be more complicated.

  1. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND RADIAL MIGRATIONS IN VIRGO DISK GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roediger, Joel C.; Courteau, Stephane [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia [Deptartamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); McDonald, Michael, E-mail: jroediger@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: courteau@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: p.sanchezblazquez@uam.es, E-mail: mcdonald@space.mit.edu [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-10-10

    We present new stellar age profiles, derived from well-resolved optical and near-infrared images of 64 Virgo cluster disk galaxies, whose analysis poses a challenge for current disk galaxy formation models. Our ability to break the age-metallicity degeneracy and the significant size of our sample represent key improvements over complementary studies of field disk galaxies. Our results can be summarized as follows: first, and contrary to observations of disk galaxies in the field, these cluster galaxies are distributed almost equally amongst the three main types of disk galaxy luminosity profiles (I/II/III), indicating that the formation and/or survival of Type II breaks is suppressed within the cluster environment. Second, we find examples of statistically significant inversions ({sup U}-shapes{sup )} in the age profiles of all three disk galaxy types, reminiscent of predictions from high-resolution simulations of classically truncated Type II disks in the field. These features characterize the age profiles for only about a third ({<=}36%) of each disk galaxy type in our sample. An even smaller fraction of cluster disks ({approx}11% of the total sample) exhibit age profiles that decrease outward (i.e., negative age gradients). Instead, flat and/or positive age gradients prevail ({>=}50%) within our Type I, II, and III subsamples. These observations thus suggest that while stellar migrations and inside-out growth can play a significant role in the evolution of all disk galaxy types, other factors contributing to the evolution of galaxies can overwhelm the predicted signatures of these processes. We interpret our observations through a scenario whereby Virgo cluster disk galaxies formed initially like their brethren in the field but which, upon falling into the cluster, were transformed into their present state through external processes linked to the environment (e.g., ram-pressure stripping and harassment). Current disk galaxy formation models, which have largely

  2. Outer Disk Star Formation in HI selected Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Meurer, Gerhardt

    2016-01-01

    The HI in galaxies often extends past their conventionally defined optical extent. I report results from our team which has been probing low intensity star formation in outer disks using imaging in H-alpha and ultraviolet. Using a sample of hundreds of HI selected galaxies, we confirm that outer disk HII regions and extended UV disks are common. Hence outer disks are not dormant but are dimly forming stars. Although the ultraviolet light in galaxies is more centrally concentrated than the HI, the UV/HI ratio (the Star Formation Efficiency) is nearly constant, with a slight dependency on surface brightness. This result is well accounted for in a model where disks maintain a constant stability parameter Q. This model also accounts for how the ISM and star formation are distributed in the bright parts of galaxies, and how HI appears to trace the distribution of dark matter in galaxy outskirts.

  3. Mass Distribution and Bar Formation in Growing Disk Galaxy Models

    CERN Document Server

    Berrier, Joel C

    2016-01-01

    We report idealized simulations that mimic the growth of galaxy disks embedded in responsive halos and bulges. The disks manifested an almost overwhelming tendency to form strong bars that we found very difficult to prevent. We found that fresh bars formed in growing disks after we had destroyed the original, indicating that bar formation also afflicts continued galaxy evolution, and not just the early stages of disk formation. This behavior raises still more insistently the previously unsolved question of how some galaxies avoid bars. Since our simulations included only collisionless star and halo particles, our findings may apply to gas-poor galaxies only; however the conundrum persists for the substantial unbarred fraction of those galaxies. Our original objective was to study how internal dynamics rearranged the distribution of mass in the disk as a generalization of our earlier study with rigid spherical components. With difficulty, we were able to construct some models that were not strongly influenced ...

  4. FROM BLUE STAR-FORMING TO RED PASSIVE: GALAXIES IN TRANSITION IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vulcani, Benedetta [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Poggianti, Bianca M.; Fasano, Giovanni; Moretti, Alessia [INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Fritz, Jacopo [Sterrenkundig Observatorium Vakgroep Fysica en Sterrenkunde Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, S9 B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Calvi, Rosa; Paccagnella, Angela [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universitá degli Studi di Padova, vicolo Osservatorio 2, I-35122 Padova (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting a mass-complete (M {sub *} > 10{sup 10.25} M {sub ☉}) sample at 0.03 Galaxy Group Catalog, we use the (U – B) {sub rf} color and morphologies to characterize galaxies, in particular those that show signs of an ongoing or recent transformation of their star-formation activity and/or morphology: green galaxies, red passive late types, and blue star-forming early types. Color fractions depend on mass and only for M {sub *} < 10{sup 10.7} M {sub ☉} on environment. The incidence of red galaxies increases with increasing mass, and, for M {sub *} < 10{sup 10.7} M {sub ☉}, decreases toward the group outskirts and in binary and single galaxies. The relative abundance of green and blue galaxies is independent of environment and increases monotonically with galaxy mass. We also inspect galaxy structural parameters, star-formation properties, histories, and ages and propose an evolutionary scenario for the different subpopulations. Color transformations are due to a reduction and suppression of the star-formation rate in both bulges and disks that does not noticeably affect galaxy structure. Morphological transitions are linked to an enhanced bulge-to-disk ratio that is due to the removal of the disk, not to an increase of the bulge. Our modeling suggests that green colors might be due to star-formation histories declining with long timescales, as an alternative scenario to the classical ''quenching'' processes. Our results suggest that galaxy transformations in star-formation activity and morphology depend neither on the environment nor on being a satellite or the most massive galaxy of a halo. The only environmental dependence we find is the higher fast quenching efficiency in groups giving origin to poststarburst signatures.

  5. Are dusty galaxies blue? Insights on UV attenuation from dust-selected galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, C. M.; Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Scoville, N. Z. [California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sanders, D. B.; Lee, N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai' i, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Finkelstein, S. L. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Capak, P. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); De Zotti, G. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 2, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Fu, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Le Floc' h, E. [CEA-Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, bât. 709, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Ilbert, O. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de marseille, UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Ivison, R. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Takeuchi, T. T. [Nagoya University, Division of Particle and Astrophysical Science, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2014-12-01

    Galaxies' rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) properties are often used to directly infer the degree to which dust obscuration affects the measurement of star formation rates (SFRs). While much recent work has focused on calibrating dust attenuation in galaxies selected at rest-frame ultraviolet wavelengths, locally and at high-z, here we investigate attenuation in dusty, star forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected at far-infrared wavelengths. By combining multiwavelength coverage across 0.15-500 μm in the COSMOS field, in particular making use of Herschel imaging, and a rich data set on local galaxies, we find an empirical variation in the relationship between the rest-frame UV slope (β) and the ratio of infrared-to-ultraviolet emission (L {sub IR}/L {sub UV} ≡ IRX) as a function of infrared luminosity, or total SFR. Both locally and at high-z, galaxies above SFR ≳ 50 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} deviate from the nominal IRX-β relation toward bluer colors by a factor proportional to their increasing IR luminosity. We also estimate contamination rates of DSFGs on high-z dropout searches of <<1% at z ≲ 4-10, providing independent verification that contamination from very dusty foreground galaxies is low in Lyman-break galaxy searches. Overall, our results are consistent with the physical interpretation that DSFGs, e.g., galaxies with >50 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, are dominated at all epochs by short-lived, extreme burst events, producing many young O and B stars that are primarily, yet not entirely, enshrouded in thick dust cocoons. The blue rest-frame UV slopes of DSFGs are inconsistent with the suggestion that most DSFGs at z ∼ 2 exhibit steady-state star formation in secular disks.

  6. Near-Infrared Bulge-Disk Correlations of Lenticular Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barway, Sudhanshu; Kembhavi, Ajit K; Mayya, Y D

    2008-01-01

    We consider the luminosity and environmental dependence of structural parameters of lenticular galaxies in the near-infrared K band. Using a two-dimensional galaxy image decomposition technique, we extract bulge and disk structural parameters for a sample of 36 lenticular galaxies observed by us in the K band. By combining data from the literature for field and cluster lenticulars with our data, we study correlations between parameters that characterise the bulge and the disk as a function of luminosity and environment. We find that scaling relations such as the Kormendy relation, photometric plane and other correlations involving bulge and disk parameters show a luminosity dependence. This dependence can be explained in terms of galaxy formation models in which faint lenticulars (M_T > -24.5) formed via secular formation processes that likely formed the pseudobulges of late-type disk galaxies, while brighter lenticulars (M_T < -24.5) formed through a different formation mechanism most likely involving maj...

  7. The Orientation of Accretion Disks Relative to Dust Disks in Radio Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt, H R

    2002-01-01

    We study the orientation of accretion disks, traced by the position angle of the jet, relative to the dust disk major axis in a sample of 20 nearby Radio Galaxies. We find that the observed distribution of angles between the jet and dust disk major axis is consistent with jets homogeneously distributed over a polar cap of 77 degrees.

  8. Molecular Disk Properties in Early-Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, X; Walker, C

    2010-01-01

    We study the simulated CO emission from elliptical galaxies formed in the mergers of gas-rich disk galaxies. The cold gas not consumed in the merger-driven starburst quickly resettles into a disk-like configuration. By analyzing a variety of arbitrary merger orbits that produce a range of fast to slow-rotating remnants, we find that molecular disk formation is a fairly common consequence of gas-rich galaxy mergers. Hence, if a molecular disk is observed in an early-type merger remnant, it is likely the result of a "wet merger" rather than a "dry merger". We compare the physical properties from our simulated disks (e.g. size and mass) and find reasonably good agreement with recent observations. Finally, we discuss the detectability of these disks as an aid to future observations.

  9. Bulges and disks in the local Universe. Linking the galaxy structure to star formation activity

    CERN Document Server

    Morselli, L; Erfanianfar, G; Concas, A

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy morphology and star formation activity are strictly linked, in the way that bulge-dominated galaxies are in general quiescent, while disk dominated galaxies are actively star-forming. In this paper, we study the properties of bulges and disks as a function of the position of galaxies in the star formation rate (SFR) - stellar mass ($M_{\\star}$) plane. Our sample is built on the SDSS DR7 catalogue, and the bulge-disk decomposition is the one of Simard et al. (2011). We find that at a given stellar mass the Main Sequence (MS) is populated by galaxies with the lowest B/T ratios. The B/T on the MS increases with increasing stellar mass, thus confirming previous results in literature. In the upper envelop of the MS, the average B/T is higher than that of MS counterparts at fixed stellar mass. This indicates that starburst galaxies have a significant bulge component. In addition, bulges above the MS are characterised by blue colours, whereas, if on the MS or below it, they are mostly red and dead. The disks ...

  10. Stellar and Gas Phase Metallicity of Low Surface Brighness Galaxies: Implication on Star Formation Process within Young Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hoon

    2015-08-01

    Low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies, whose central surface brightness, μB, is fainter than 23 mag/arcsec2 in the B-band, have been one of the most intriguing galaxy populations. Their unique characteristics, such as blue colors in optical and near-infrared light, low metallicity, low stellar and gas surface densities, low dust content, and high gas mass fraction (up to 90%), resemble physical conditions of young galaxies of the early Universe whose interstellar medium (ISM) has not been enriched before major star formation activities initiated and should provide a testbed for star formation process at the exremly low surface density regime. Given that their star formation histories are still poorly constrained, LSB galaxies are known to have large specific star formation rates (sSFRs) with large gas fractions. There is also a correlation between their sSFRs and gas fractions. One of plausible scenarios is that the star formation efficiency may be an increasing funtion of time, perhaps due in part to the slow build up of metals and dust. Moreover, it is suspected that, being located in low number density area in terms of galaxy environment, LSB galaxies may receive additional gas to fuel their star formation activity via sporadic cold gas accretion, especially toward their outskirt regions analogous to extended ultraviolet disks. Due to their relatively isolated nature without having endured much interactions, LSB galaxies can mimic star formation processes of disk galaxies of the early Universe within their interstellar media (ISM). We present preliminary results based on stellar and gas phase metallicity of LSB galaxies along with their environment parameters to show how star-forming ISM of young disk galaxies before metal enrichment.

  11. The dark matter density problem in massive disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Weiner, B J

    2003-01-01

    I discuss measurements of disk mass from non-circular streaming motions of gas in the barred galaxies NGC 3095 and NGC 4123. In these galaxies with strong shocks and non-circular motions, the inner regions must be disk-dominated to reproduce the shocks. This requires dark matter halos of low central density and low concentration, compared to LCDM halo predictions. In addition, the baryonic collapse to a disk should have compressed the halo and increased the dark matter density, which sharpens the disagreement. One possible resolution is a substantial amount of angular momentum transfer from disk to halo, but this is not particularly attractive nor elegant.

  12. Metallicity Gradients in Disks: Do Galaxies Form Inside-Out?

    CERN Document Server

    Pilkington, K; Gibson, B K; Calura, F; Michel-Dansac, L; Thacker, R J; Molla, M; Matteucci, F; Rahimi, A; Kawata, D; Kobayashi, C; Brook, C B; Stinson, G S; Couchman, H M P; Bailin, J; Wadsley, J

    2012-01-01

    We examine radial and vertical metallicity gradients using a suite of disk galaxy simulations, supplemented with two classic chemical evolution approaches. We determine the rate of change of gradient and reconcile differences between extant models and observations within the `inside-out' disk growth paradigm. A sample of 25 disks is used, consisting of 19 from our RaDES (Ramses Disk Environment Study) sample, realised with the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. Four disks are selected from the MUGS (McMaster Unbiased Galaxy Simulations) sample, generated with the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code GASOLINE, alongside disks from Rahimi et al. (GCD+) and Kobayashi & Nakasato (GRAPE-SPH). Two chemical evolution models of inside-out disk growth were employed to contrast the temporal evolution of their radial gradients with those of the simulations. We find that systematic differences exist between the predicted evolution of radial abundance gradients in the RaDES and chemical evolution models, comp...

  13. Galaxy Zoo: CANDELS Barred Disks and Bar Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Simmons, B D; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L; Willett, Kyle W; Keel, William C; Smethurst, R J; Cheung, Edmond; Nichol, Robert C; Schawinski, Kevin; Rutkowski, Michael; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S; Bell, Eric F; Casteels, Kevin R V; Conselice, Christopher J; Almaini, Omar; Ferguson, Henry C; Fortson, Lucy; Hartley, William; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M; McIntosh, Daniel H; Mortlock, Alice; Newman, Jeffrey A; Ownsworth, Jamie; Bamford, Steven; Dahlen, Tomas; Faber, Sandra M; Finkelstein, Steven L; Fontana, Adriano; Galametz, Audrey; Grogin, N A; Grutzbauch, Ruth; Guo, Yicheng; Haussler, Boris; Jek, Kian J; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lucas, Ray A; Peth, Michael; Salvato, Mara; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-01-01

    The formation of bars in disk galaxies is a tracer of the dynamical maturity of the population. Previous studies have found that the incidence of bars in disks decreases from the local Universe to z ~ 1, and by z > 1 simulations predict that bar features in dynamically mature disks should be extremely rare. Here we report the discovery of strong barred structures in massive disk galaxies at z ~ 1.5 in deep rest-frame optical images from CANDELS. From within a sample of 876 disk galaxies identified by visual classification in Galaxy Zoo, we identify 123 barred galaxies. Selecting a sub-sample within the same region of the evolving galaxy luminosity function (brighter than L*), we find that the bar fraction across the redshift range 0.5< z < 2 (f_bar = 10.7 +6.3 -3.5% after correcting for incompleteness) does not significantly evolve. We discuss the implications of this discovery in the context of existing simulations and our current understanding of the way disk galaxies have evolved over the last 11 bil...

  14. On the Global Mass Distribution in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Courteau, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    We present a summary of recent assessments of the mass distribution in disk galaxies. Of issue in order to characterize galaxy formation models is to determine the relative fraction of baryons and dark matter at all radii in galaxies. For disk galaxies, various measurements of the mass distribution in galaxies based on vertical kinematics, strong lensing, residuals of scaling relations, fluid dynamical modeling, bar strength and pattern speed, warps, and others, have called for either a maximal or sub-maximal contribution of the baryons in the inner parts of the disk. We propose a global picture whereby all galaxies are typically baryon-dominated (maximal) at the center and dark-matter dominated (sub-maximal) in their outskirts. Using as a fiducial radius the peak of the rotation curve of a pure baryonic exponential disk at R_2.2=2.2 Rd, where Rd is the disk scale length, the transition from maximal to sub-maximal baryons occurs within or near R_2.2 for low-mass disk galaxies (with V_tot < 200 km/s) and be...

  15. The effect of environment on the structure of disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pranger, Florian; Kelvin, Lee S; Cebrián, María

    2016-01-01

    We study the influence of environment on the structure of disk galaxies, using IMFIT to measure the g- and r-band parameters of the surface-brightness profiles for ~200 low-redshift (z<0.051) cluster and field disk-galaxies with intermediate stellar mass (10^10 M_sol < M_star < 4 x 10^10 M_sol) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, DR7. Based on this measurement, we assign each galaxy to a surface-brightness profile type (Type I single-exponential, Type II truncated, Type III anti-truncated). In addition, we measure (g-r) restframe colour for disk regions separated by the truncation radius. Cluster disk galaxies (at the same stellar mass) have redder (g-r) colour by ~0.2 mag than field galaxies. This reddening is the same inside and outside the break radius. Cluster disk galaxies are also more compact than field disks by 10%. This change is reflected in the outer scalelengths, which increase by ~10% in the cluster environment compared to the field. Finally, Type I galaxies are 3 times more frequent in t...

  16. First Evidence of Circumstellar Disks around Blue Straggler Stars

    CERN Document Server

    De Marco, O; Ouellette, J A; Zurek, D R; Shara, M M; Marco, Orsola De; Lanz, Thierry; Ouellette, John A.; Zurek, David; Shara, Michael M.

    2004-01-01

    We present an analysis of optical HST/STIS and HST/FOS spectroscopy of 6 blue stragglers found in the globular clusters M3, NGC6752 and NGC6397. These stars are a subsample of a set of ~50 blue stragglers and stars above the main sequence turn-off in four globular clusters which will be presented in an forthcoming paper. All but the 6 stars presented here can be well fitted with non-LTE model atmospheres. The 6 misfits, on the other hand, possess Balmer jumps which are too large for the effective temperatures implied by their Paschen continua. We find that our data for these stars are consistent with models only if we account for extra absorption of stellar Balmer photons by an ionized circumstellar disk. Column densities of HI and CaII are derived as are the the disks' thicknesses. This is the first time that a circumstellar disk is detected around blue stragglers. The presence of magnetically-locked disks attached to the stars has been suggested as a mechanism to lose the large angular momentum imparted by ...

  17. GAMA: Stellar Mass Assembly in Galaxy Bulges and Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Driver, Simon P.; Lange, Rebecca; Robotham, Aaron; Kelvin, Lee; GAMA Team

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey has to date obtained spectra, redshifts, and 21-band multi-facility photometry for over 200,000 galaxies in five survey regions that total nearly 300 square degrees on sky. We consider here a low-redshift (zteam. In order to quantify the separate bulge and disk properties of these galaxies, we apply a large-scale automated procedure for fitting images with 2D, multi-component structure models, including evaluation of fit convergence using a grid of input parameter values for each galaxy. From this analysis, we calculate the total bulge and disk contributions to the local galaxy stellar mass budget and derive mass-size relations for both pure spheroid/disk systems and the separate bulge/disk components of multi-component galaxies. We further examine the fraction of total stellar mass assembled in spheroid and disk structures as a function of galaxy environment, where environment is quantified on multiple scales from membership in large-scale filaments to groups/clusters and down to local pairings. We then discuss the effect of environmental conditions on the mechanisms of stellar mass assembly, including the implied balance between merger accumulation and in situ mass growth in different environment regimes.

  18. Simulations of magnetic fields in isolated disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pakmor, R

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic fields are known to be dynamically important in the interstellar medium of our own Galaxy, and they are ubiquitously observed in diffuse gas in the halos of galaxies and galaxy clusters. Yet, magnetic fields have typically been neglected in studies of the formation of galaxies, leaving their global influence on galaxy formation largely unclear. We extend our MHD implementation in the moving-mesh code Arepo to cosmological problems which include radiative cooling and the formation of stars. In particular, we replace our previously employed divergence cleaning approach with a Powell 8-wave scheme, which turns out to be significantly more stable, even in very dynamic environments. We verify the improved accuracy through simulations of the MRI in accretion disks, that reproduce its correct linear growth rate. Using this new MHD code, we simulate the formation of isolated disk galaxies similar to the Milky Way using idealized initial conditions with and without magnetic fields. We find that the magnetic f...

  19. The Morphology of Low Surface Brightness Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, S.; Schombert, J.; Bothun, G.

    1994-01-01

    Images of a sample of low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies are presented. These galaxies are generally late types; however, they are not dwarfs, being intrinsically large and luminous. The morphology of LSB galaxies is discussed in terms of the physical interpretation of the Hubble sequence, the stages of which are found to be nonlinear in the sense that smaller physical differences separate mid to early type spirals than late types.

  20. The luminosity-diameter relation for disk galaxies in different environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girardi, M.; Biviano, A.; Giuricin, G.; Mardirossian, F.; Mezzetti, M. (Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, Trieste (Italy) Trieste Universita (Italy) Centro Interuniversitario Regionale di Astrofisica e Cosmologia, Trieste (Italy))

    1991-01-01

    Several samples of disk galaxies have been collected in order to study, in each of them, the relation between the blue total corrected absolute magnitude and the absolute corrected isophotal diameter. These luminosity-diameter relations have been compared to detect a possible dependence on the density of the galaxy environment. No significant differences have been found among the several relations, especially if selection criteria relative to the various samples are taken into account. This result is in disagreement with several previous claims. 61 refs.

  1. Scale Length of Disk Galaxies in the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Fathi, Kambiz

    2011-01-01

    Disk scale length and central surface brightness for a sample of about 29955 bright disk galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey have been analysed. Cross correlation of the SDSS sample with the LEDA catalogue allowed us to investigate the variation of the scale lengths for different types of disk/spiral galaxies and present distributions and typical trends of scale lengths all the SDSS bands with linear relations that indicate the relation that connect scale lengths in one passband to another. We use the volume corrected results in the r-band and revisit the relation between these parameters and the galaxy morphology. The derived scale lengths presented here are representative for a typical galaxy mass of 10^10.8 solarmasses, and the RMS dispersion is larger for more massive galaxies. We analyse the scale-length-central disk brightness plane and further investigate the Freeman Law and confirm that it indeed defines an upper limit for disk central surface brightness in bright disks (r 6) have fainter centr...

  2. Bulge growth through disk instabilities in high-redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bournaud, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The role of disk instabilities, such as bars and spiral arms, and the associated resonances, in growing bulges in the inner regions of disk galaxies have long been studied in the low-redshift nearby Universe. There it has long been probed observationally, in particular through peanut-shaped bulges. This secular growth of bulges in modern disk galaxies is driven by weak, non-axisymmetric instabilities: it mostly produces pseudo-bulges at slow rates and with long star-formation timescales. Disk instabilities at high redshift (z>1) in moderate-mass to massive galaxies (10^10 to a few 10^11 Msun of stars) are very different from those found in modern spiral galaxies. High-redshift disks are globally unstable and fragment into giant clumps containing 10^8-10^9 Msun of gas and stars each, which results in highly irregular galaxy morphologies. The clumps and other features associated to the violent instability drive disk evolution and bulge growth through various mechanisms, on short timescales. The giant clumps can...

  3. Mass Modeling of Disk Galaxies: Constraints and Adiabatic Contraction

    CERN Document Server

    Dutton, A A; Carignan, C; De Jong, R; Dutton, Aaron A.; Courteau, Stephane; Carignan, Claude; Jong, Roelof de

    2003-01-01

    We present a comprehensive mass modeling technique for disk galaxies with resolved rotation curves. Our models allow for a stellar disk of variable thickness and mass-to-light ratio, a gaseous disk, halo profiles with a range of inner density profile slopes (-ALPHA), oblate halos, adiabatic contraction of the halo, and fixed minimum rotation curve error values. We test our technique with data from the literature consisting of high quality HI and Halpha rotation curves for galaxies with available photometry. These galaxies consist of dwarf, low surface brightness (LSB), and high surface brightness (HSB) galaxies. We apply constraints on the disk, and halo parameters in an attempt to break the degeneracies that exist between the disk and halo and between the halo parameters themselves. With our full set of constraints we find that ALPHA=0 halos provide the best fits for 6 out of 7 galaxies; in agreement with the literature; the exception, NGC 2403 an HSB galaxy, is best fit with ALPHA~1, though ALPHA=0 still pr...

  4. Shrinking galaxy disks with fountain-driven accretion from the halo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Struck, Curtis [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Hunter, Deidre A., E-mail: bge@watson.ibm.com, E-mail: curt@iastate.edu, E-mail: dah@lowell.edu [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Star formation in most galaxies requires cosmic gas accretion because the gas consumption time is short compared to the Hubble time. This accretion presumably comes from a combination of infalling satellite debris, cold flows, and condensation of hot halo gas at the cool disk interface, perhaps aided by a galactic fountain. In general, the accretion will have a different specific angular momentum than the part of the disk that receives it, even if the gas comes from the nearby halo. The gas disk then expands or shrinks over time. Here we show that condensation of halo gas at a rate proportional to the star formation rate in the fountain model will preserve an initial shape, such as an exponential, with a shrinking scale length, leaving behind a stellar disk with a slightly steeper profile of younger stars near the center. This process is slow for most galaxies, producing imperceptible radial speeds, and it may be dominated by other torques, but it could be important for blue compact dwarfs, which tend to have large, irregular gas reservoirs and steep blue profiles in their inner stellar disks.

  5. Tidally Induced Offset Disks in Magellanic Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardy, Stephen A.; D'Onghia, Elena; Athanassoula, E.; Wilcots, Eric M.; Sheth, Kartik

    2016-08-01

    Magellanic spiral galaxies are a class of one-armed systems that often exhibit an offset stellar bar and are rarely found around massive spiral galaxies. Using a set of N-body and hydrodynamic simulations, we consider a dwarf-dwarf galaxy interaction as the driving mechanism for the formation of this peculiar class of systems. We investigate here the relation between the dynamical, stellar, and gaseous disk center and the bar. In all our simulations the bar center always coincides with the dynamical center, while the stellar disk becomes highly asymmetric during the encounter, causing the photometric center of the Magellanic galaxy disk to become mismatched with both the bar and the dynamical center. The disk asymmetries persist for almost 2 Gyr, the time that it takes for the disk to be recentered with the bar, and well after the companion has passed. This explains the nature of the offset bar found in many Magellanic-type galaxies, including the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and NGC 3906. In particular, these results, once applied to the LMC, suggest that the dynamical center should reside in the bar center instead of the H i center as previously assumed, pointing to a variation in the current estimate of the north component of the LMC proper motion.

  6. Tidally-Induced Offset Disks in Magellanic Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pardy, Stephen A; Athanassoula, E; Wilcots, Eric M; Sheth, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    Magellanic spiral galaxies are a class of one-armed systems that often exhibit an offset stellar bar, and are rarely found around massive spiral galaxies. Using a set of N-body and hydrodynamic simulations we consider a dwarf-dwarf galaxy interaction as the driving mechanism for the formation of this peculiar class of systems. We investigate here the relation between the dynamical, stellar and gaseous disk center and the bar. In all our simulations the bar center always coincides with the dynamical center, while the stellar disk becomes highly asymmetric during the encounter causing the photometric center of the Magellanic galaxy disk to become mismatched with both the bar and the dynamical center. The disk asymmetries persist for almost 2 Gyrs, the time that it takes for the disk to be re-centered with the bar, and well after the companion has passed. This explains the nature of the offset bar found in many Magellanic-type galaxies, including the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and NGC 3906. In particular, thes...

  7. Radio Continuum and HI study of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Ramya, S.; Kantharia, N. G.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2010-01-01

    The multifrequency radio continuum and 21cm HI observations of five blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies, Mrk 104, Mrk 108, Mrk 1039, Mrk 1069 and I Zw 97 using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) are presented here. Radio continuum emission at 610 MHz and 325 MHz is detected from all the observed galaxies whereas only a few are detected at 240 MHz. In our sample, three galaxies are members of groups and two galaxies (Mrk 1069 and I Zw 97) are isolated galaxies. The radio emission from Mr...

  8. Metallicity evolution in mergers of disk galaxies with black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, Antti; Johansson, Peter H.

    2016-10-01

    We use the TreeSPH simulation code Gadget-3 including a recently improved smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) module, a detailed metallicity evolution model and sophisticated subresolution feedback models for supernovae and supermassive black holes in order to study the metallicity evolution in disk galaxy mergers. In addition, we examine the simulated morphology, star formation histories, metallicity gradients and kinematic properties of merging galaxies and merger remnants. We will compare our simulation results with observations of the early-type Centaurus A galaxy and the currently colliding Antennae galaxies.

  9. The stellar mass distribution of S$^{4}$G disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-García, Simón; Laurikainen, Eija

    2016-01-01

    We use 3.6 $\\mu$m imaging from the S$^{4}$G survey to characterize the typical stellar density profiles ($\\Sigma_{\\ast}$) and bars as a function of fundamental galaxy parameters (e.g. the total stellar mass $M_{\\ast}$), providing observational constraints for galaxy simulation models to be compared with. We rescale galaxy images to a common frame determined by the size in physical units, by their disk scalelength, or by their bar size and orientation. We stack the resized images to obtain statistically representative average stellar disks and bars. For a given $M_{\\ast}$ bin ($\\ge 10^{9}M_{\\odot}$), we find a significant difference in the stellar density profiles of barred and non-barred systems that gives evidence for bar-induced secular evolution of disk galaxies: (i) disks in barred galaxies show larger scalelengths and fainter extrapolated central surface brightnesses, (ii) the mean surface brightness profiles of barred and non-barred galaxies intersect each other slightly beyond the mean bar length, most...

  10. Connecting Galaxy Disk and Extended Halo Gas Kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Kacprzak, G G; Steidel, C C; Ceverino, D; Klypin, A A; Murphy, M T

    2007-01-01

    We have explored the galaxy disk/extended halo gas kinematic relationship using rotation curves (Keck/ESI) of ten intermediate redshift galaxies which were selected by MgII halo gas absorption observed in quasar spectra. Previous results of six edge-on galaxies, probed along their major axis, suggest that observed halo gas velocities are consistent with extended disk-like halo rotation at galactocentric distances of 25-72 kpc. Using our new sample, we demonstrate that the gas velocities are by and large not consistent with being directly coupled to the galaxy kinematics. Thus, mechanisms other than co-rotation dynamics (i.e., gas inflow, feedback, galaxy-galaxy interactions, etc.) must be invoked to account for the overall observed kinematics of the halo gas. In order to better understand the dynamic interaction of the galaxy/halo/cosmic web environment, we performed similar mock observations of galaxies and gaseous halos in Lambda-CDM cosmological simulations. We discuss an example case of a z=0.92 galaxy wi...

  11. The formation of disks in massive spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, F; Flores, H

    2009-01-01

    The flatness of the rotation curve inside spiral galaxies is interpreted as the imprint of a halo of invisible matter. Using the deepest observations of distant galaxies, we have investigated how large disks could have been formed. Observations include spatially resolved kinematics, detailed morphologies and photometry from UV to mid-IR. Six Giga-years ago, half of the present-day spirals had anomalous kinematics and morphologies that considerably affect the scatter of the Tully Fisher relation. All anomalous galaxies can be modelled through gas-rich, major mergers that lead to a rebuilt of a new disk. The spiral-rebuilding scenario is proposed as a new channel to form large disks in present-day spirals and it accounts for all the observed evolutions since the last 6 Giga-years. A large fraction of the star formation is linked to merging events during their whole durations.

  12. GAS MASS FRACTIONS AND STAR FORMATION IN BLUE-SEQUENCE E/S0 GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent work has identified a population of low-redshift E/S0 galaxies that lie on the blue sequence in color versus stellar mass parameter space, where spiral galaxies typically reside. While high-mass blue-sequence E/S0s often resemble young merger or interaction remnants likely to fade to the red sequence, we focus on blue-sequence E/S0s with lower stellar masses (M*10 Msun), which are characterized by fairly regular morphologies and low-density field environments where fresh gas infall is possible. This population may provide an evolutionary link between early-type galaxies and spirals through disk regrowth. Focusing on atomic gas reservoirs, we present new GBT H I data for 27 E/S0s on both sequences as well as a complete tabulation of archival H I data for other galaxies in the Nearby Field Galaxy Survey. Normalized to stellar mass, the atomic gas masses for 12 of the 14 blue-sequence E/S0s range from 0.1 to >1.0, demonstrating that morphological transformation is possible if the detected gas can be converted into stars. These gas-to-stellar mass ratios are comparable to those of spiral and irregular galaxies and have a similar dependence on stellar mass. Assuming that the H I is accessible for star formation, we find that many of our blue-sequence E/S0s can increase in stellar mass by 10%-60% in 3 Gyr in both of two limiting scenarios, exponentially declining star formation (i.e., closed box) and constant star formation (i.e., allowing gas infall). In a constant star formation scenario, about half of the blue-sequence E/S0s require fresh gas infall on a timescale of ∼<3 Gyr to avoid exhausting their atomic gas reservoirs and evolving to the red sequence. We present evidence that star formation in these galaxies is bursty and likely involves externally triggered gas inflows. Our analysis suggests that most blue-sequence E/S0s are indeed capable of substantial stellar disk growth on relatively short timescales.

  13. Theory of bending waves with applications to disk galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theory of bending waves is surveyed which provides an explanation for the required amplification of the warp in the Milky Way. It also provides for self-generated warps in isolated external galaxies. The shape of observed warps and partly their existence in isolated galaxies are indicative of substantial spheroidal components. The theory also provides a plausible explanation for the bending of the inner disk (<2 kpc) of the Milky Way

  14. Theory of bending waves with applications to disk galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory of bending waves is surveyed which provides an explanation for the required amplification of the warp in the Milky Way. It also provides for self-generated warps in isolated external galaxies. The shape of observed warps and partly their existence in isolated galaxies are indicative of substantial spheroidal components. The theory also provides a plausible explanation for the bending of the inner disk (<2 kpc) of the Milky Way.

  15. Counter-Rotation in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, E M

    2014-01-01

    Counter-rotating galaxies host two components rotating in opposite directions with respect to each other. The kinematic and morphological properties of lenticulars and spirals hosting counter-rotating components are reviewed. Statistics of the counter-rotating galaxies and analysis of their stellar populations provide constraints on the formation scenarios which include both environmental and internal processes.

  16. Young star clusters in the outer disks of LITTLE THINGS dwarf irregular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, Deidre A; Gehret, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    We examine FUV images of the LITTLE THINGS sample of nearby dwarf irregular (dIrr) and Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies to identify distinct young regions in their far outer disks. We use these data, obtained with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite, to determine the furthest radius at which in situ star formation can currently be identified. The FUV knots are found at distances from the center of the galaxies of 1 to 8 disk scale lengths and have ages of <20 Myrs and masses of 20 to 1E5 Msolar. The presence of young clusters and OB associations in the outer disks of dwarf galaxies shows that dIrrs do have star formation taking place there in spite of the extreme nature of the environment. Most regions are found where the HI surface density is ~1 Msolar per pc2, although both the HI and dispersed old stars go out much further. This limiting density suggests a cutoff in the ability to form distinct OB associations and perhaps even stars. We compare the star formation rates in the FUV regions to the ave...

  17. A UNIVERSAL NEUTRAL GAS PROFILE FOR NEARBY DISK GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on sensitive CO measurements from HERACLES and H I data from THINGS, we show that the azimuthally averaged radial distribution of the neutral gas surface density (ΣHI+ ΣH2) in 33 nearby spiral galaxies exhibits a well-constrained universal exponential distribution beyond 0.2 × r25 (inside of which the scatter is large) with less than a factor of two scatter out to two optical radii r25. Scaling the radius to r25 and the total gas surface density to the surface density at the transition radius, i.e., where ΣHI and ΣH2 are equal, as well as removing galaxies that are interacting with their environment, yields a tightly constrained exponential fit with average scale length 0.61 ± 0.06 r25. In this case, the scatter reduces to less than 40% across the optical disks (and remains below a factor of two at larger radii). We show that the tight exponential distribution of neutral gas implies that the total neutral gas mass of nearby disk galaxies depends primarily on the size of the stellar disk (influenced to some degree by the great variability of ΣH2 inside 0.2 × r25). The derived prescription predicts the total gas mass in our sub-sample of 17 non-interacting disk galaxies to within a factor of two. Given the short timescale over which star formation depletes the H2 content of these galaxies and the large range of r25 in our sample, there appears to be some mechanism leading to these largely self-similar radial gas distributions in nearby disk galaxies.

  18. STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISK OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Cote, Stephanie [Canadian Gemini Office, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria (Canada); Schade, David, E-mail: barneskl@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: Stephanie.Cote@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: David.Schade@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria (Canada)

    2012-09-20

    We combine new deep and wide field of view H{alpha} imaging of a sample of eight nearby (d Almost-Equal-To 17 Mpc) spiral galaxies with new and archival H I and CO imaging to study the star formation and the star formation regulation in the outer disk. We find that, in agreement with previous studies, star formation in the outer disk has low covering fractions, and star formation is typically organized into spiral arms. The star formation in the outer disk is at extremely low levels, with typical star formation rate surface densities of {approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. We find that the ratio of the radial extent of detected H II regions to the radius of the H I disk is typically {approx}>85%. This implies that in order to further our understanding of the implications of extended star formation, we must further our understanding of the formation of extended H I disks. We measure the gravitational stability of the gas disk, and find that the outer gaseous disk is typically a factor of {approx}2 times more stable than the inner star-forming disk. We measure the surface density of outer disk H I arms, and find that the disk is closer to gravitational instability along these arms. Therefore, it seems that spiral arms are a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for star formation in the outer disk. We use an estimation of the flaring of the outer gas disk to illustrate the effect of flaring on the Schmidt power-law index; we find that including flaring increases the agreement between the power-law indices of the inner and outer disks.

  19. Gas and Metal Distributions within Simulated Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, B K; Cunnama, D; Molla, M

    2012-01-01

    We highlight two research strands related to our ongoing chemodynamical Galactic Archaeology efforts: (i) the spatio-temporal infall rate of gas onto the disk, drawing analogies with the infall behaviour imposed by classical galactic chemical evolution models of inside-out disk growth; (ii) the radial age gradient predicted by spectrophometric models of disk galaxies. In relation to (i), at low-redshift, we find that half of the infall onto the disk is gas associated with the corona, while half can be associated with cooler gas streams; we also find that gas enters the disk preferentially orthogonal to the system, rather than in-plane. In relation to (ii), we recover age gradient troughs/inflections consistent with those observed in nature, without recourse to radial migrations.

  20. Hydrodynamical Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Brad K; Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia; Teyssier, Romain; House, Elisa L; Brook, Chris B; Kawata, Daisuke

    2008-01-01

    To date, fully cosmological hydrodynamic disk simulations to redshift zero have only been undertaken with particle-based codes, such as GADGET, Gasoline, or GCD+. In light of the (supposed) limitations of traditional implementations of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), or at the very least, their respective idiosyncrasies, it is important to explore complementary approaches to the SPH paradigm to galaxy formation. We present the first high-resolution cosmological disk simulations to redshift zero using an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR)-based hydrodynamical code, in this case, RAMSES. We analyse the temporal and spatial evolution of the simulated stellar disks' vertical heating, velocity ellipsoids, stellar populations, vertical and radial abundance gradients (gas and stars), assembly/infall histories, warps/lopsideness, disk edges/truncations (gas and stars), ISM physics implementations, and compare and contrast these properties with our sample of cosmological SPH disks, generated with GCD+. These prelim...

  1. Understanding the Structure and Evolution of Nearby Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the structure and evolution of disk galaxies, we studied the stellar and gaseous components as well as the star formation rate in nearby disk galaxies. We used PS1 medium deep survey images to derive five-band (grizy) surface brightness profiles down to 30 ABmag/arcsec^2 for about 700 galaxies. From these stellar mass and mass-to-light ratio radial profiles are derived. The stellar mass radial profiles tend to bend-up at large radii, this often traces an extended old stellar population. The mass-to-light ratio profiles tend to rise outside the r25 radii. We also find a larger fraction of up-bending surface brightness profiles than Polen & Trujillo (2006). This may be because their sample is biased towards low surface brightness galaxies. We used HIPASS data as well as VLA HI 21cm data to study the gas component and dynamics of disk galaxies. We used the GALEX UV images to study the star formation of a HI-selected star-forming sample of about 400 galaxies, compiling a database of FUV and NUV radial profiles and related parameters. We used this to study the star forming efficiency (SFE, star formation rate per unit area divided by gas surface mass density) of the sample galaxies. We found that the UV based SFE has a tighter relationship with HI mass than an H_alpha based SFE as typically used in previous studies and the UV SFE is flat across wide range of stellar mass. We constructed a simple model to predict the distribution of interstellar medium and star formation rate in an equilibrium disk with constant two-fluid Toomre Q. This model can reproduces the SFE relations we derived.

  2. Stochastic 2-D Models of Galaxy Disk Evolution. The Galaxy M33

    OpenAIRE

    Mineikis, Tadas; Vansevičius, Vladas

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a fast numerical 2-D model of galaxy disk evolution (resolved along the galaxy radius and azimuth) by adopting a scheme of parameterized stochastic self-propagating star formation. We explore the parameter space of the model and demonstrate its capability to reproduce 1-D radial profiles of the galaxy M33: gas surface density, surface brightness in the i and GALEX FUV passbands, and metallicity.

  3. Angular Momentum in the Formation of Disk Galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhi-Jian; SHU Cheng-Gang

    2004-01-01

    @@ Within the current framework of disk galaxy formation, we discuss the resulted surface-density profiles according to the theoretical angular momentum distributions (AMDs) presented by Bullock et al. [Astrophys. J.555 (2001) 240(B01)] for the ACDM cosmology in both spherical and cylindric coordinates. It is found that the derived surface density distribution of a disk in the outer region is in general similar to an exponential disk for both the theoretical AMDs. In the central region, the results from both the theoretical AMDs are inconsistent with observations whatever the disk bar-instability is taken into account or not. The cylindric form of the theoretical AMD leads to the bar-instability more easily for a give galaxy than that for spherical AMD, which could result in a more massive bulge. After comparing the model predictions with our Milky Way galaxy, we find that the theoretical AMDs predict larger mass fractions of baryons with low angular momentum than the observed ones, which would lead to the disk sizes to be smaller. Two possible processes which could solve the angular momentum problem are discussed.

  4. The Origin of Disks and Spheroids in Simulated Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sales, Laura V; Theuns, Tom; Schaye, Joop; White, Simon D M; Frenk, Carlos S; Crain, Robert A; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla

    2011-01-01

    In the simplest scenario, disk galaxies form predominantly in halos with high angular momentum and quiet recent assembly history, whereas spheroids are the slowly-rotating remnants of repeated merging events. We explore these assumptions using one hundred systems with halo masses similar to that of the Milky Way, identified in a series of cosmological gasdynamical simulations GIMIC. At z=0, the simulated galaxies exhibit a wide variety of morphologies, from dispersion-dominated spheroids to pure disk galaxies. Surprisingly, these morphological features are very poorly correlated with their halo properties: disks form in halos with high and low net spin, and mergers play a negligible role in the formation of spheroid stars, most of which form in-situ. More important to morphology is the coherent alignment of the angular momentum of baryons that accrete over time to form a galaxy. Spheroids tend to form when the spin of newly-accreted gas is misaligned with that of the extant galaxy, leading to the episodic for...

  5. Self-Perpetuating Spiral Arms in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    D'Onghia, Elena; Hernquist, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The precise nature of spiral structure in galaxies remains uncertain. Recent studies suggest that spiral arms result from interactions between disks and satellite galaxies. Instead, leaving aside the grand bisymmetric spirals, here we consider the possibility that the multi-armed spiral features originate from density inhomogeneities orbiting within disks. Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we follow the motions of stars under the influence of gravity, and show that mass concentrations with properties similar to those of giant molecular clouds can induce the development of spiral arms through a process termed swing amplification. However, unlike in earlier work, we demonstrate that the eventual response of the disk can be highly non-linear, significantly modifying the formation and longevity of the resulting patterns. Contrary to expectations, ragged spiral structures can survive at least in a statistical sense long after the original perturbing influence has been removed. Our findings thus motivate a ...

  6. On Formation of Disk Galaxies from Spherical Primordial Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Avila-Reese, V; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Firmani, Claudio

    1996-01-01

    The spherical gravitational collapse and virialization of arbitrary density fluctuations in an expanding universe is studied. In the context of the standard cosmological model and the peak $ansatz$, disk galaxies are supposed to be the product of "extended" gravitational collapses of regions surrounding local-maxima of the density fluctuation field. The substructure over the main profile (merging) is considered as a second-order phenomenon. The range and distribution of possible mass growth histories or accretion regimes for a given present-day mass are estimated and used as the initial condition for galaxy formation. Considering the effect of dark halo contraction due to disk formation, the final rotation curves are calculated. If the structural properties of dark halos are important in establishing the Hubble sequence's properties of visible galaxies, then this sequence is defined not only by the mass, but among other possible parameters, by the accretion regime.

  7. The different star-formation histories of blue and red spiral and elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tojeiro, Rita; Richards, Joshua; Percival, Will J; Bamford, Steven P; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C; Skibba, Ramin; Thomas, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    [Abridged] We study the spectral properties of intermediate mass galaxies as a function of colour and morphology. We use Galaxy Zoo to define three morphological classes of galaxies, namely early-types (ellipticals), late-type (disk-dominated) face-on spirals and early-type (bulge-dominated) face-on spirals. We classify these galaxies as blue or red according to their SDSS g-r colour and use the spectral fitting code VESPA to calculate time-resolved star-formation histories, metallicity and total starlight dust extinction from their SDSS fibre spectra. We find that red late-type spirals show less star-formation in the last 500 Myr than blue late-type spirals by up to a factor of three, but share similar star-formation histories at earlier times. This decline in recent star-formation explains their redder colour: their chemical and dust content are the same. We postulate that red late-type spirals are recent descendants of blue late-type spirals, with their star-formation curtailed in the last 500 Myrs. The re...

  8. Forming Double-barred Galaxies From Dynamically Cool Inner Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Min; Debattista, Victor P

    2015-01-01

    About one third of early-type barred galaxies host small-scale secondary bars. The formation and evolution of such double-barred galaxies remain far from being well understood. In order to understand the formation of such systems, we explore a large parameter space of isolated pure-disk simulations. We show that a dynamically cool inner disk embedded in a hotter outer disk can naturally generate a steady secondary bar while the outer disk forms a large-scale primary bar. The independent bar instabilities of inner and outer disks result in long-lived double-barred structures whose dynamical properties are comparable with observations. This formation scenario indicates that the secondary bar might form from the general bar instability, the same as the primary bar. Under some circumstances, the interaction of the bars and the disk leads to the two bars aligning or single, nuclear, bars only. Simulations that are cool enough of the center to experience clump instabilities may also generate steady double-barred ga...

  9. Spatial Orientation of Spin Vectors of Blue-shifted Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yadav, S N; Saurer, W

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of the spin vector orientation of 5$\\,$987 SDSS galaxies having negative redshift from $-$87.6 to $-$0.3 km$\\,$s$^{-1}$. Two dimensional observed parameters are used to compute three dimensional galaxy rotation axes by applying `position angle--inclination' method. We aim to examine the non-random effects in the spatial orientation of blue-shifted galaxies. We generate 5$\\times$10$^6$ virtual galaxies to find expected isotropic distributions by performing numerical simulations. We have written MATLAB program to facilitate the simulation process and eliminate the manual errors in the process. Chi-square, auto-correlation, and the Fourier tests are used to examine non-random effects in the polar and azimuthal angle distributions of the galaxy rotation axes. In general, blue-shifted galaxies show no preferred alignments of galaxy rotation axes. Our results support Hierarchy model, which suggests a random orientation of angular momentum vectors of galaxies. However, local effects are noted...

  10. The opacity of spiral galaxy disks. IV. Radial extinction profiles from counts of distant galaxies seen through foreground disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, BW; Gonzalez, RA; Allen, RJ; van der Kruit, PC

    2005-01-01

    Dust extinction can be determined from the number of distant field galaxies seen through a spiral disk. To calibrate this number for the crowding and confusion introduced by the foreground image, Gonzalez et al. and Holwerda et al. developed the Synthetic Field Method (SFM), which analyzes synthetic

  11. Internal and environmental secular evolution of disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John

    2015-03-01

    This Special Session is devoted to the secular evolution of disk galaxies. Here `secular' means `slow' i.e., evolution on time scales that are generally much longer than the galaxy crossing or rotation time. Internal and environmentally driven evolution both are covered. I am indebted to Albert Bosma for reminding me at the 2011 Canary Islands Winter School on Secular Evolution that our subject first appeared in print in a comment made by Ivan King (1977) in his introductory talk at the Yale University meeting on The Evolution of Galaxies and Stellar Populations: `John Kormendy would like us to consider the possibility that a galaxy can interact with itself.. . . I'm not at all convinced, but John can show you some interesting pictures.' Two of the earliest papers that followed were Kormendy (1979a, b); the first discusses the interaction of galaxy components with each other, and the second studies these phenomena in the context of a morphological survey of barred galaxies. The earliest modeling paper that we still use regularly is Combes & Sanders (1981), which introduces the now well known idea that box-shaped bulges in edge-on galaxies are side-on, vertically thickened bars. It is gratifying to see how this subject has grown since that time. Hundreds of papers have been written, and the topic features prominently at many meetings (e.g., Block et al. 2004; Falcoń-Barroso & Knapen 2012, and this Special Session). My talk here introduces both internal and environmental secular evolution; a brief abstract follows. My Canary Islands Winter School review covers both subjects in more detail (Kormendy 2012). Kormendy & Kennicutt (2004) is a comprehensive review of internal secular evolution, and Kormendy & Bender (2012) covers environmental evolution. Both of these subject make significant progress at this meeting. Secular evolution happens because self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable by the evolution processes

  12. Exponential Galaxy Disks from Stellar Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2013-01-01

    Stellar scattering off of orbiting or transient clumps is shown to lead to the formation of exponential profiles in both surface density and velocity dispersion in a two-dimensional non-self gravitating stellar disk with a fixed halo potential. The exponential forms for both nearly-flat rotation curves and near-solid body rotation curves. The exponential does not depend on initial conditions, spiral arms, bars, viscosity, star formation, or strong shear. After a rapid initial development, the exponential saturates to an approximately fixed scale length. The inner exponential in a two-component profile has a break radius comparable to the initial disk radius; the outer exponential is primarily scattered stars.

  13. Stellar nuclei and inner polar disks in lenticular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sil'chenko, Olga K

    2016-01-01

    I analyze statistics of the stellar population properties for stellar nuclei and bulges of nearby lenticular galaxies in different environments by using panoramic spectral data of the integral-field spectrograph SAURON retrieved from the open archive of Isaac Newton Group. I estimate also the fraction of nearby lenticular galaxies having inner polar gaseous disks by exploring the volume-limited sample of early-type galaxies of the ATLAS-3D survey. By inspecting the two-dimensional velocity fields of the stellar and gaseous components with running tilted-ring technique, I have found 7 new cases of the inner polar disks. Together with those, the frequency of inner polar disks in nearby S0 galaxies reaches 10% that is much higher than the frequency of large-scale polar rings. Interestingly, the properties of the nuclear stellar populations in the inner polar ring hosts are statistically the same as those in the whole S0 sample implying similar histories of multiple gas accretion events from various directions.

  14. The universal rotation curve of dwarf disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Karukes, Ekaterina V

    2016-01-01

    We use the concept of the spiral rotation curves universality (see Parsic et al. 1996) to investigate the luminous and dark matter properties of the dwarf disk galaxies in the local volume (size $\\sim11$ Mpc). Our sample includes 36 objects with rotation curves carefully selected from the literature. We find that, despite the large variations of our sample in luminosities ($\\sim$ 2 of dex), the rotation curves in specifically normalized units, look all alike and lead to the lower-mass version of the universal rotation curve of spiral galaxies found in Parsic et al. 1996. We mass model $V(R/R_{opt})/V_{opt}$, the double normalized universal rotation curve of dwarf disk galaxies: the results show that these systems are totally dominated by dark matter whose density shows a core size between 2 and 3 stellar disk scale lengths. Similar to galaxies of different Hubble types and luminosities, the core radius $r_0$ and the central density $\\rho_0$ of the dark matter halo of these objects are related by $ \\rho_0 r_0 ...

  15. Stellar Nuclei and Inner Polar Disks in Lenticular Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil'chenko, Olga K.

    2016-09-01

    I analyze statistics of the stellar population properties for stellar nuclei and bulges of nearby lenticular galaxies in different environments by using panoramic spectral data of the integral-field spectrograph SAURON retrieved from the open archive of the Isaac Newton Group. I also estimate the fraction of nearby lenticular galaxies having inner polar gaseous disks by exploring the volume-limited sample of early-type galaxies of the ATLAS-3D survey. By inspecting the two-dimensional velocity fields of the stellar and gaseous components with the running tilted-ring technique, I have found seven new cases of inner polar disks. Together with those, the frequency of inner polar disks in nearby S0 galaxies reaches 10%, which is much higher than the frequency of large-scale polar rings. Interestingly, the properties of the nuclear stellar populations in the inner polar ring hosts are statistically the same as those in the whole S0 sample, implying similar histories of multiple gas-accretion events from various directions.

  16. Disk galaxies with broken luminosity profiles from cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Serrano, Francisco J; Doménech-Moral, Mariola; Domínguez-Tenreiro, Rosa

    2009-01-01

    We simulate the cosmological formation of three disk galaxies using the zoom-in technique and including a detailed treatment of chemical evolution and cooling. The resulting galaxies have a rather high disk-to-total ratio for a cosmological simulation and thin stellar disks. They present a break in the luminosity profile at 3.0 +- 0.5 disk scale lengths, while showing an exponential mass profile without any apparent breaks, in line with recent observational results. Since the stellar mass profile is exponential, only differences in the stellar populations can be the cause of the luminosity break. Although we find a cutoff for the star formation rate imposed by a density threshold in our star formation model, it does not coincide with the luminosity break and is located at 4.3 +- 0.4 disk scale lengths, with star formation going on between both radii. The color profiles and the age profiles are "U-shaped", with the minimum for both profiles located approximately at the break radius. The SFR to stellar mass rat...

  17. Disk heating and bending instability in galaxies with counterrotation

    CERN Document Server

    Khoperskov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    With the help of high-resolution long-slit and integral-field spectroscopy observations, the number of confirmed cases of galaxies with counterrotation is increasing rapidly. The evolution of such counterrotating galaxies remains far from being well understood. In this paper we study the dynamics of counterrotating collisionless stellar disks by means of $N$-body simulations. We show that, in the presence of counterrotation, an otherwise gravitationally stable disk can naturally generate bending waves accompanied by strong disk heating across the disk plane, that is in the vertical direction. Such conclusion is found to hold even for dynamically warm systems with typical values of the initial vertical-to-radial velocity dispersion ratio $\\sigma_{\\rm R}/\\sigma_{\\rm z} \\approx 0.5$, for which the role of pressure anisotropy should be unimportant. We note that, during evolution, the $\\sigma_{\\rm R}/\\sigma_{\\rm z}$ ratio tends to rise up to values close to unity in the case of locally Jeans-stable disks, whereas ...

  18. Dynamical Stability and Galaxy Evolution in LSB Disk Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihos, C.; McGaugh, S. S.; Blok, E. de

    1996-01-01

    Published in: AIP Conf. Proc. 393 (1997) , pp.311 citations recorded in [Science Citation Index] Abstract: We demonstrate that, due to their low surface mass density and large dark matter content, LSB disks are quite stable against the growth of global bar modes. However, they may be only marginally

  19. Properties of Disk Galaxies in a Hierarchical Formation Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Firmani, Claudio

    2000-04-01

    We used galaxy evolutionary models in a hierarchical inside-out disk formation scenario to study the origin of the main local and global properties of disk galaxies as well as their correlations. We found that most of these properties and correlations are the result of three (cosmological) initial factors and their dispersions: the virial mass, the halo mass aggregation history (MAH), and the angular momentum given through the spin parameter lambda. The MAH determines mainly the halo structure and the integral color indexes while Lambda determines mainly the surface brightness and the bulge-to-disk ratio. We calculated star formation (SF) using a gravitational instability criterion and a self-regulation mechanism in the disk turbulent ISM. The efficiency of SF in this model is almost independent from the mass. We show that the luminosity- dependent dust absorption empirically determined by Wang & Heckman explains the observed color-magnitude and color Tully-Fisher (TF) relations without the necessity of introducing a mass-dependent SF efficiency. The disks in centrifugal equilibrium form within growing cold dark matter halos with a gas accretion rate proportional to the rate of the MAH. The disks present exponential surface density and brightness profiles, negative radial color index gradients, and nearly flat rotation curves. We also calculated the secular formation of a bulge due to gravitational instabilities in the stellar disk. The intensive properties of our models agree with the observational data and the trends of the Hubble sequence are reproduced. The predicted infrared TF and luminosity-radius relations also agree with observations. The main shortcomings of our inside-out hierarchical models are the excessive radial color gradients and the dark halo dominion in the rotation curve decompositions.

  20. A new spin on disks of satellite galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cautun, Marius; Frenk, Carlos S; Sawala, Till

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the angular and kinematic distributions of satellite galaxies around a large sample of bright isolated primaries in the spectroscopic and photometric catalogues of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We detect significant anisotropy in the spatial distribution of satellites. To test whether this anisotropy could be related to the rotating disks of satellites recently found by Ibata et al. in a sample of SDSS galaxies, we repeat and extend their analysis. Ibata et al. found an excess of satellites on opposite sides of their primaries having anticorrelated radial velocities. We find that this excess is sensitive to small changes in the sample selection criteria which can greatly reduce its significance. In addition, we find no evidence for correspondingly correlated velocities for satellites observed on the same side of their primaries, which would be expected for rotating disks of satellites. We conclude that the detection of coherent rotation in the satellite population in current observationa...

  1. Properties of disk galaxies in a hierarchical formation scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Avila-Reese, V

    2000-01-01

    We used galaxy evolutionary models in a hierarchical inside-out formation scenario to study the origin of the main properties and correlations of disk galaxies. We found that most of these properties and correlations are the result of three (cosmological) initial factors and their dispersions: the virial mass, the halo mass aggregation history (MAH), and the angular momentum given through the spin parameter \\lambda. The MAH determines mainly the halo structure and the color indexes while \\lambda determines mainly the surface brightness and the bulge-to-disk ratio. We calculated star formation (SF) using a gravitational instability criterion and a self-regulation mechanism in the turbulent ISM. The efficiency of SF in this model is almost independent from the mass. We show that the luminosity-dependent dust absorption empirically determined by Wang & Heckman explains the observed color-magnitude and color Tully-Fisher (TF) relations without the necessity of introducing a mass-dependent SF efficiency. The d...

  2. Prominent spiral arms in the gaseous outer galaxy disks

    CERN Document Server

    Bertin, G

    2009-01-01

    Context: Several spiral galaxies, as beautifully exhibited by the case of NGC 6946, display a prominent large-scale spiral structure in their gaseous outer disk. Such structure is often thought to pose a dynamical puzzle, because grand-design spiral structure is traditionally interpreted as the result of density waves carried mostly in the stellar disk. Aims. Here we argue that the outer spiral arms in the cold gas outside the bright optical disk actually have a natural interpretation as the manifestation of the mechanism that excites grand-design spiral structure in the main, star-dominated body of the disk: the excitation is driven by angular momentum transport to the outer regions, through trailing density waves outside the corotation circle that can penetrate beyond the Outer Lindblad Resonance in the gaseous component of the disk. Methods: Because of conservation of the density wave action, these outgoing waves are likely to become more prominent in the outer disk and eventually reach non-linear amplitud...

  3. Radio Continuum and HI study of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ramya, S; Prabhu, T P

    2010-01-01

    The multifrequency radio continuum and 21cm HI observations of five blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies, Mrk 104, Mrk 108, Mrk 1039, Mrk 1069 and I Zw 97 using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) are presented here. Radio continuum emission at 610 MHz and 325 MHz is detected from all the observed galaxies whereas only a few are detected at 240 MHz. In our sample, three galaxies are members of groups and two galaxies (Mrk 1069 and I Zw 97) are isolated galaxies. The radio emission from Mrk 104 and Mrk 108 is seen to encompass the entire optical galaxy whereas the radio emission from Mrk 1039, Mrk 1069, I Zw 97 is confined to massive HII regions. This, we suggest, indicates that the star formation in the latter group of galaxies has recently been triggered and that the environment in which the galaxy is evolving plays a role. Star formation rates (SFR) calculated from 610 MHz emission is in the range 0.01-0.1 M_sun/yr; this is similar to the SFR obtained for individual star forming regions in BCDs. The int...

  4. Star formation in gravitationally unstable disk galaxies: From clouds to disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbaum, Nathan J.

    In Part I, I examine the dynamics of giant molecular clouds through simplified semianalytic models. I focus on the growth of clouds as they accrete gas. Our model clouds reproduce the scaling relations observed in both galactic and extragalactic clouds: clouds attain virial equilibrium and grow maintaining roughly constant surface densities, Sigma ≃ 50--200 M[special character omitted]pc-2 and that clouds grow along the well-known linewidth-size relation. We compare our models to observations of giant molecular clouds and associated young star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud, finding good agreement between our models and the relationship between H ii regions, young star clusters, and giant molecular clouds. The role of gravitational-instability driven turbulence in determining the structure and evolution of disk galaxies, and the extent to which gravity rather than feed- back can explain galaxy properties, remains an open question. To address it, in Part II I present high resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of Milky Way-like isolated disk galaxies, including realistic heating and cooling rates and a physically motivated prescription for star formation. The simulations resolve densities typical of the transition from atomic to molecular hydrogen, capturing the formation of gravitationally bound clouds. We present simulations both with and without stellar feedback from Type II supernova blast waves. We find gravitational instability alone can drive substantial turbulence in galactic disks and reproduce some properties of nearby star forming galaxies: Qtotal [special character omitted] 1, ceff ˜ 10 km/s, without stellar feedback. Including feedback produces an ISM with a structure similar to observed disks, with the bulk of the gas in the warm or cold atomic phase, and the remainder locked up in short-lived gravitationally bound clouds. We investigate radial flows of gas and find that radial migration of gas due to gravitational instability can

  5. Modeling Noncircular Motions in Disk Galaxies: Application to NGC 2976

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spekkens, Kristine; Sellwood, J. A.

    2007-07-01

    We present a new procedure to fit nonaxisymmetric flow patterns to two-dimensional velocity maps of spiral galaxies. We concentrate on flows caused by barlike or oval distortions to the total potential, which may arise either from a non-axially symmetric halo or a bar in the luminous disk. We apply our method to high-quality CO and Hα data for the nearby, low-mass spiral NGC 2976, previously obtained by Simon et al., and find that a barlike model fits the data at least as well as their model with large radial flows. We find supporting evidence for the existence of a bar in the baryonic disk. Our model suggests that the azimuthally averaged central attraction in the inner part of this galaxy is larger than estimated by these authors. It is likely that the disk is also more massive, which will limit the increase to the allowed dark halo density. Allowance for barlike distortions in other galaxies may either increase or decrease the estimated central attraction.

  6. Misaligned Disks as Obscurers in Active Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, A.; Elvis, M.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2010-06-02

    We review critically the evidence concerning the fraction of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) which appear as Type 2 AGN, carefully distinguishing strict Type 2 AGN from both more lightly reddened Type 1 AGN, and from low excitation narrow line AGN, which may represent a different mode of activity. Low excitation AGN occur predominantly at low luminosities; after removing these, true Type 2 AGN represent 58{-+}5% of all AGN, and lightly reddened Type 1 AGN a further {approx}15%. Radio, IR, and volume-limited samples all agree in showing no change of Type 2 fraction with luminosity. X-ray samples do show a change with luminosity; we discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy. We test a very simple picture which produces this Type 2 fraction with minimal assumptions. In this picture, infall from large scales occurs in random directions, but must eventually align with the inner accretion flow, producing a severely warped disk on parsec scales. If the re-alignment is dominated by tilt, with minimal twist, a wide range of covering factors is predicted in individual objects, but with an expected mean fraction of Type 2 AGN of exactly 50%. This 'tilted disc' picture predicts reasonable alignment of observed nuclear structures on average, but with distinct misalignments in individual cases. Initial case studies of the few well resolved objects show that such misalignments are indeed present.

  7. The Relative Orientation of Nuclear Accretion and Galaxy Stellar Disks in Seyfert Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nagar, N M

    1999-01-01

    We use the difference (delta) between the position angles of the nuclear radio emission and the host galaxy major axis to investigate the distribution of the angle (beta) between the axes of the nuclear accretion disk and the host galaxy disk in Seyfert galaxies. We provide a critical appraisal of the quality of all measurements, and find that the data are limited by observational uncertainties and biases, such as the well known deficiency of Seyfert galaxies of high inclination. There is weak evidence that the distribution of delta for Seyfert 2 galaxies may be different (at the 90% confidence level) from a uniform distribution, while the Seyfert 1 delta distribution is not significantly different from a uniform distribution or from the Seyfert 2 delta distribution. The cause of the possible non-uniformity in the distribution of delta for Seyfert 2 galaxies is discussed. Seyfert nuclei in late-type spiral galaxies may favor large values of delta (at the ~96% confidence level), while those in early-type galax...

  8. Stellar metallicity of the extended disk and distance of the spiral galaxy NGC 3621

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio; Hosek, Matthew W. Jr. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Przybilla, Norbert, E-mail: kud@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: bresolin@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: mwhosek@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: Miguel.Urbaneja-Perez@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: Norbert.Przybilla@uibk.ac.at [Institute for Astro- and Particle Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25/8, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-06-10

    Low resolution (∼4.5 Å) ESO VLT/FORS spectra of blue supergiant stars are analyzed to determine stellar metallicities (based on elements such as iron, titanium, and magnesium) in the extended disk of the spiral galaxy, NGC 3621. Mildly subsolar metallicity (–0.30 dex) is found for the outer objects beyond 7 kpc, independent of galactocentric radius and compatible with the absence of a metallicity gradient, confirming the results of a recent investigation of interstellar medium H II region gas oxygen abundances. The stellar metallicities are slightly higher than those from the H II regions when based on measurements of the weak forbidden auroral oxygen line at 4363 Å but lower than the ones obtained with the R {sub 23} strong line method. It is shown that the present level of metallicity in the extended disk cannot be the result of chemical evolution over the age of the disk with the present rate of in situ star formation. Additional mechanisms must be involved. In addition to metallicity, stellar effective temperatures, gravities, interstellar reddening, and bolometric magnitudes are determined. After the application of individual reddening corrections for each target, the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship of blue supergiant stars is used to obtain a distance modulus of 29.07 ± 0.09 mag (distance D = 6.52 ± 0.28 Mpc). This new distance is discussed in relation to Cepheid and the tip of the red giant branch distances.

  9. Dynamics of Non-steady Spiral Arms in Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Junichi; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Wada, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms underlying non-steady stellar spiral arms in disk galaxies, we analyzed the growing and damping phases of their spiral arms using three-dimensional N-body simulations. We confirmed that the spiral arms are formed due to a swing amplification mechanism that reinforces density enhancement as a seeded wake. In the damping phase, the Coriolis force exerted on a portion of the arm surpasses the gravitational force that acts to shrink the portion. Consequently, the stars in the portion escape from the arm, and subsequently they form a new arm at a different location. The time-dependent nature of the spiral arms originates in the continual repetition of this nonlinear phenomenon. Since a spiral arm does not rigidly rotate, but follows the galactic differential rotation, the stars in the arm rotate at almost the same rate as the arm. In other words, every single position in the arm can be regarded as the corotation point. Due to interaction with their host arms, the energy and angular momentum of the stars change, thereby causing radial migration of the stars. During this process, the kinetic energy of random motion (random energy) of the stars does not significantly increase, and the disk remains dynamically cold. Owing to this low degree of disk heating, short-lived spiral arms can recurrently develop over many rotational periods. The resultant structure of the spiral arms in the N-body simulations is consistent with the observational nature of spiral galaxies. We conclude that the formation and structure of spiral arms in isolated disk galaxies can be reasonably understood by nonlinear interactions between a spiral arm and its constituent stars.

  10. DYNAMICS OF NON-STEADY SPIRAL ARMS IN DISK GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms underlying non-steady stellar spiral arms in disk galaxies, we analyzed the growing and damping phases of their spiral arms using three-dimensional N-body simulations. We confirmed that the spiral arms are formed due to a swing amplification mechanism that reinforces density enhancement as a seeded wake. In the damping phase, the Coriolis force exerted on a portion of the arm surpasses the gravitational force that acts to shrink the portion. Consequently, the stars in the portion escape from the arm, and subsequently they form a new arm at a different location. The time-dependent nature of the spiral arms originates in the continual repetition of this nonlinear phenomenon. Since a spiral arm does not rigidly rotate, but follows the galactic differential rotation, the stars in the arm rotate at almost the same rate as the arm. In other words, every single position in the arm can be regarded as the corotation point. Due to interaction with their host arms, the energy and angular momentum of the stars change, thereby causing radial migration of the stars. During this process, the kinetic energy of random motion (random energy) of the stars does not significantly increase, and the disk remains dynamically cold. Owing to this low degree of disk heating, short-lived spiral arms can recurrently develop over many rotational periods. The resultant structure of the spiral arms in the N-body simulations is consistent with the observational nature of spiral galaxies. We conclude that the formation and structure of spiral arms in isolated disk galaxies can be reasonably understood by nonlinear interactions between a spiral arm and its constituent stars.

  11. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies: Pseudobulge Growth and the Formation of Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kormendy, John

    2008-01-01

    Updating Kormendy & Kennicutt (2004, ARAA, 42, 603), we review internal secular evolution of galaxy disks. One consequence is the growth of pseudobulges that often are mistaken for true (merger-built) bulges. Many pseudobulges are recognizable as cold, rapidly rotating, disky structures. Bulges have Sersic function brightness profiles with index n > 2; most pseudobulges have n 150 km/s show no evidence for a classical bulge, while only 7 are ellipticals or have classical bulges. It is hard to understand how bulgeless galaxies could form as the quiescent tail of a distribution of merger histories. Our second theme is environmental secular evolution. We confirm that spheroidal galaxies have fundamental plane (FP) correlations that are almost perpendicular to those for bulges and ellipticals. Spheroidals are not dwarf ellipticals. Rather, their structural parameters are similar to those of late-type galaxies. We suggest that spheroidals are defunct late-type galaxies transformed by internal processes such a...

  12. The BlueTides Simulation: First Galaxies and Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Yu; Croft, Rupert A; Bird, Simeon; Battaglia, Nicholas; Wilkins, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the BlueTides simulation and report initial results for the luminosity functions of the first galaxies and AGN, and their contribution to reionization. BlueTides was run on the BlueWaters cluster at NCSA from $z=99$ to $z=8.0$ and includes 2$\\times$7040$^3$ particles in a $400$Mpc/h per side box, making it the largest hydrodynamic simulation ever performed at high redshift. BlueTides includes a pressure-entropy formulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics, gas cooling, star formation (including molecular hydrogen), black hole growth and models for stellar and AGN feedback processes. The star formation rate density in the simulation is a good match to current observational data at $z\\sim 8-10$. We find good agreement between observations and the predicted galaxy luminosity function in the currently observable range $-18\\le M_{\\mathrm UV} \\le -22.5$ with some dust extinction required to match the abundance of brighter objects. BlueTides implements a patchy reionization model that produces a fluct...

  13. Super Star Clusters in the Blue Dwarf Galaxy UM 462

    OpenAIRE

    Vanzi, Leonardo

    2003-01-01

    I present optical observations of the Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy UM 462. The images of this galaxy show several bright compact sources. A careful study of these sources has revealed their nature of young Super Star Clusters. The ages determined from the analysis of the stellar continuum and $H\\alpha$ are between few and few tens Myr. The total star formation taking place into the clusters is about 0.05 $\\mathrm{M_{\\odot}/yr}$. The clusters seem to be located at the edges of two large round-lik...

  14. The effect of disk inclination on the Main Sequence of star forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Morselli, L; Popesso, P; Erfanianfar, G

    2016-01-01

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database to explore the effect of the disk inclination angle on the derived star formation rate (SFR), hence on the slope and width of the Main Sequence (MS) relation for star-forming galaxies. We find that SFRs for nearly edge-on disks are underestimated by factors ranging from $\\sim$ 0.2 dex for low mass galaxies up to $\\sim$ 0.4 dex for high mass galaxies. This results in a substantially flatter MS relation for high-inclination disks compared to that for less inclined ones, though the global effect over the whole sample of star-forming galaxies is relatively minor, given the small fraction of high-inclination disks. However, we also find that galaxies with high-inclination disks represent a non negligible fraction of galaxies populating the so-called green valley, with derived SFRs intermediate between the MS and those of quenched, passively evolving galaxies.

  15. The Milky Way as a High Redshift Galaxy: The Importance of Thick Disk Formation in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lehnert, Matthew D; Haywood, Misha; Snaith, Owain N

    2014-01-01

    We compare the star-formation history and dynamics of the Milky Way (MW) with the properties of distant disk galaxies. During the first ~4 Gyr of its evolution, the MW formed stars with a high star-formation intensity (SFI), Sigma_SFR~0.6 Msun/yr/kpc2 and as a result, generated outflows and high turbulence in its interstellar medium. This intense phase of star formation corresponds to the formation of the thick disk. The formation of the thick disk is a crucial phase which enables the MW to have formed approximately half of its total stellar mass by z~1 which is similar to "MW progenitor galaxies" selected by abundance matching. This agreement suggests that the formation of the thick disk may be a generic evolutionary phase in disk galaxies. Using a simple energy injection-kinetic energy relationship between the 1-D velocity dispersion and SFI, we can reproduce the average perpendicular dispersion in stellar velocities of the MW with age. This relationship, its inferred evolution, and required efficiency are ...

  16. Gas-Rich Mergers in LCDM: Disk Survivability and the Baryonic Assembly of Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Maller, Ariyeh H.; /New York City Coll. Tech.

    2009-08-03

    We use N-body simulations and observationally-normalized relations between dark matter halo mass, stellar mass, and cold gas mass to derive robust expectations about the baryonic content of major mergers out to redshift z {approx} 2. First, we find that the majority of major mergers (m/M > 0.3) experienced by Milky Way size dark matter halos should have been gas-rich, and that gas-rich mergers are increasingly common at high redshift. Though the frequency of major mergers into galaxy halos in our simulations greatly exceeds the observed late-type galaxy fraction, the frequency of gas-poor major mergers is consistent with the observed fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies across the halo mass range M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11} - 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}}. These results lend support to the conjecture that mergers with high baryonic gas fractions play an important role in building and/or preserving disk galaxies in the universe. Secondly, we find that there is a transition mass below which a galaxy's past major mergers were primarily gas-rich and above which they were gas poor. The associated stellar mass scale corresponds closely to that marking the observed bimodal division between blue, star-forming, disk-dominated systems and red, bulge-dominated systems with old populations. Finally, we find that the overall fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons deposited directly via major mergers is substantial. Approximately 30% of the cold baryonic material in M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}) galaxies is accreted as cold gas in major mergers. For more massive galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}} the fraction of baryons amassed in mergers is even higher, {approx} 50%, but most of these accreted baryons are delivered directly in the form of stars. This baryonic mass deposition is almost unavoidable, and provides a

  17. Low Angular Momentum in Clumpy, Turbulent Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Obreschkow, Danail; Bassett, Robert; Fisher, David B; Abraham, Roberto G; Wisnioski, Emily; Green, Andrew W; McGregor, Peter J; Damjanov, Ivana; Popping, Attila; Jorgensen, Inger

    2015-01-01

    We measure the stellar specific angular momentum jstar=Jstar/Mstar in four nearby (redshift z~0.1) disk galaxies that have stellar masses Mstar near the break M* of the galaxy mass function, but look like typical star-forming disks at z~2 in terms of their low stability (Q~1), clumpiness, high ionized gas dispersion (40-50 km/s), high molecular gas fraction (20-30%) and rapid star formation (~20 Msun/yr). Combining high-resolution (Keck-OSIRIS) and large-radius (Gemini-GMOS) spectroscopic maps, only available at low z, we discover that these targets have ~3 times less stellar angular momentum than typical local spiral galaxies of equal stellar mass and bulge fraction. Theoretical considerations show that this deficiency in angular momentum is the main cause of their low stability, while the high gas fraction plays a complementary role. Interestingly, the low jstar values of our targets are similar to those expected in the M*-population at higher z from the approximate theoretical scaling jstar~(1+z)^(-1/2) at...

  18. Search for Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies During Quiescence

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, J Sanchez; Amorin, R; Aguerri, J A; Sanchez-Janssen, R; Tenorio-Tagle, G

    2008-01-01

    Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies are metal poor systems going through a major starburst that cannot last for long. We have identified galaxies which may be BCDs during quiescence (QBCD), i.e., before the characteristic starburst sets in or when it has faded away. These QBCD galaxies are assumed to be like the BCD host galaxies. The SDSS/DR6 database provides ~21500 QBCD candidates. We also select from SDSS/DR6 a complete sample of BCD galaxies to serve as reference. The properties of these two galaxy sets have been computed and compared. The QBCD candidates are thirty times more abundant than the BCDs, with their luminosity functions being very similar except for the scaling factor, and the expected luminosity dimming associated with the end of the starburst. QBCDs are redder than BCDs, and they have larger HII region based oxygen abundance. QBCDs also have lower surface brightness. The BCD candidates turn out to be the QBCD candidates with the largest specific star formation rate (actually, with the largest...

  19. Self-perpetuating Spiral Arms in Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onghia, Elena; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2013-03-01

    The causes of spiral structure in galaxies remain uncertain. Leaving aside the grand bisymmetric spirals with their own well-known complications, here we consider the possibility that multi-armed spiral features originate from density inhomogeneities orbiting within disks. Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we follow the motions of stars under the influence of gravity, and show that mass concentrations with properties similar to those of giant molecular clouds can induce the development of spiral arms through a process termed swing amplification. However, unlike in earlier work, we demonstrate that the eventual response of the disk can be highly non-linear, significantly modifying the formation and longevity of the resulting patterns. Contrary to expectations, ragged spiral structures can thus survive at least in a statistical sense long after the original perturbing influence has been removed.

  20. Asymmetric mass models of disk galaxies - I. Messier 99

    CERN Document Server

    Chemin, Laurent; Soubiran, Caroline; Zibetti, Stefano; Charlot, Stephane; Kawata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Mass models of galactic disks traditionnally rely on axisymmetric density and rotation curves, paradoxically acting as if their most remarkable asymmetric features, like e.g. lopsidedness or spiral arms, were not important. In this article, we relax the axisymmetry approximation and introduce a methodology that derives 3D gravitational potentials of disk-like objects and robustly estimates the impacts of asymmetries on circular velocities in the disk mid-plane. Mass distribution models can then be directly fitted to asymmetric line-of-sight velocity fields. Applied to the grand-design spiral M99, the new strategy shows that circular velocities are highly non-uniform, particularly in the inner disk of the galaxy, as a natural response to the perturbed gravitational potential of luminous matter. A cuspy inner density profile of dark matter is found in M99, in the usual case where luminous and dark matter share the same centre. The impact of the velocity non-uniformity is to make the inner profile less steep, th...

  1. Constraints on Accretion Disk Physics in Low Luminosity Radio Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Stefi; Noel-Storr, Jacob; O'Dea, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    It is currently believed that essentially all galaxies harbor a massive black hole in their nuclei. If this is true, then it becomes hard to understand why we do not see the luminosity released by the inevitable accretion of the galaxy ISM onto the black hole in all galaxies. The differences in AGN output between the two classes of narrow-line radio galaxies (FRI and FRII) may hold the vital clue. High radio luminosity FRIIs generally show strong high-excitation narrow lines and are believed to be the obscured counterparts of radio loud quasars. Low radio luminosity FRIs by contrast have weaker, low-ionization lines and low ratios of optical to radio luminosities. A large difference in accretion rate and radiative efficiency between FRI and FRIIs would explain the difference in the optical properties and also provide a new unification between different classes of active galaxies in which the dominant parameter is accretion rate. Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations already exist for most of a well defined sample of FRIs. However, the previously observed objects are the 'famous' ones, e.g., M87, M84, NGC315, 3C264, 3C31. Thus, the existing datasets are highly selected. Here we propose a very small request to complete the sample. We propose IRAC observations in all 4 bands, and MIPS photometry at 24 and 70 microns of 8, and 7 sources, respectively, for a total request of 1.7 hrs. These observations will complete the sample at very little cost in observing time. The large amount of existing complmentary data at multiple wavebands will greatly enhance the legacy value of the proposed observations. By completing the sample, the proposed IRAC and MIPS observations will produce a well defined and very well studied sample of nearby low luminosity radio galaxies. We will use the completed sample to investigate the properties of the accretion disk radiation, and the circumnuclear obscuring material.

  2. Extragalactic SETI: The Tully-Fisher relation as probe of Dysonian astroengineering in disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zackrisson, E; Asadi, S; Nyholm, A

    2015-01-01

    If advanced extraterrestrial civilizations choose to construct vast numbers of Dyson spheres to harvest radiation energy, this could affect the characteristics of their host galaxies. Potential signatures of such astroengineering projects include reduced optical luminosity, boosted infrared luminosity and morphological anomalies. Here, we apply a technique pioneered by Annis (1999) to search for Kardashev type III civilizations in disk galaxies, based on the predicted offset of these galaxies from the optical Tully-Fisher relation. By analyzing a sample of 1359 disk galaxies, we are able to set a conservative upper limit at 3% on the fraction of local disks subject to Dysonian astroengineering on galaxy-wide scales. However, the available data suggests that a small subset of disk galaxies actually may be underluminous with respect to the Tully-Fisher relation in the way expected for Kardashev type III objects. Based on the optical morphologies and infrared-to-optical luminosity ratios of such galaxies in our ...

  3. Revealing the nature of star forming blue early-type galaxies at low redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Koshy; Zingade, Kshama

    2015-11-01

    Context. Star forming early-type galaxies with blue optical colours at low redshift can be used to test our current understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Aims: We want to reveal the fuel and triggering mechanism for star formation in these otherwise passively evolving red and dead stellar systems. Methods: We undertook an optical and ultraviolet study of 55 star forming blue early-type galaxies, searching for signatures of recent interactions that could be driving the molecular gas into the galaxy and potentially triggering the star formation. Results: We report here our results on star forming blue early-type galaxies with tidal trails and in close proximity to neighbouring galaxies that are evidence of ongoing or recent interactions between galaxies. There are 12 galaxies with close companions with similar redshifts, among which two galaxies are having ongoing interactions that potentially trigger the star formation. Two galaxies show a jet feature that could be due to the complete tidal disruption of the companion galaxy. The interacting galaxies have high star formation rates and very blue optical colours. Galaxies with no companion could have undergone a minor merger in the recent past. Conclusions: The recent or ongoing interaction with a gas-rich neighbouring galaxy could be responsible for bringing cold gas to an otherwise passively evolving early-type galaxy. The sudden gas supply could trigger the star formation, eventually creating a blue early-type galaxy. The galaxies with ongoing tidal interaction are blue and star forming, thereby implying that blue early-type galaxies can exist even when the companion is on flyby so does not end up in a merger. Based on data compiled from Galaxy Zoo project, and the volunteers contribution are acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx

  4. Revealing the nature of star forming blue early-type galaxies at low redshift

    CERN Document Server

    George, Koshy

    2015-01-01

    Context: Star forming early-type galaxies with blue optical colours at low redshift can be used to test our current understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Aims: We want to reveal the fuel and triggering mechanism for star formation in these otherwise passively evolving red and dead stellar systems. Methods: We undertook an optical and ultraviolet study of 55 star forming blue early-type galaxies, searching for signatures of recent interactions that could be driving the molecular gas into the galaxy and potentially triggering the star formation. Results: We report here our results on star forming blue early-type galaxies with tidal trails and in close proximity to neighbouring galaxies that are evidence of ongoing or recent interactions between galaxies. There are 12 galaxies with close companions with similar redshifts, among which two galaxies are having ongoing interactions that potentially trigger the star formation. Two galaxies show a jet feature that could be due to the complete tidal disrupti...

  5. Hot Dust Obscured Galaxies with Excess Blue Light: Dual AGN or Single AGN Under Extreme Conditions?

    CERN Document Server

    Assef, R J; Brightman, M; Stern, D; Alexander, D; Bauer, F; Blain, A W; Diaz-Santos, T; Eisenhardt, P R M; Finkelstein, S L; Hickox, R C; Tsai, C -W; Wu, J W

    2015-01-01

    Hot Dust-Obscured Galaxies (Hot DOGs) are a population of hyper-luminous infrared galaxies identified by the WISE mission from their very red mid-IR colors, and characterized by hot dust temperatures ($T>60~\\rm K$). Several studies have shown clear evidence that the IR emission in these objects is powered by a highly dust-obscured AGN that shows close to Compton-thick absorption at X-ray wavelengths. Thanks to the high AGN obscuration, the host galaxy is easily observable, and has UV/optical colors usually consistent with those of a normal galaxy. Here we discuss a sub-population of 8 Hot DOGs that show enhanced rest-frame UV/optical emission. We discuss three scenarios that might explain the excess UV emission: (i) unobscured light leaked from the AGN by reflection over the dust or by partial coverage of the accretion disk; (ii) a second unobscured AGN in the system; or (iii) a luminous young starburst. X-ray observations can help discriminate between these scenarios. We study in detail the blue excess Hot D...

  6. The effects of storm fronts over galaxy disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel C.; Struck, C.

    2014-01-01

    The existence of partially ionized, diffuse gas and dust clouds at kiloparsec scale distances above the central planes of edge-on, galaxy disks was an unexpected discovery about 25 years ago. Observations showed that this extended or extraplanar diffuse interstellar gas (EDIG) has rotation velocities approximately 10-20% lower than those in the central plane, and has been hard to account for. In a previous publication we presented results of hydrodynamic models, with radiative cooling and heating from star formation. In models with star formation generated stochastically across the disk, we found an extraplanar gas layer is generated as long as the star formation is sufficiently strong but no difference in rotational velocities between the midplane gas and the extra planar gas. We found models that incorporate spiral or bar waves also generate EDIG layers, but only over the wave regions. This partial coverage caused radial as well as vertical motion in the EDIG resulting in the kinematic anomalies observed in galaxies with an EDIG component. In this paper, we present a comparison of this model to recent observations as well as other models that have been proposed to explain the rotational differences.

  7. Thick Disks, and an Outflow, of Dense Gas in the Nuclei of Nearby Seyfert Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Ming-Yi; Burtscher, L; Contursi, A; Genzel, R; González-Alfonso, E; Graciá-Carpio, J; Janssen, A; Lutz, D; de Xivry, G Orban; Rosario, D; Schnorr-Müller, A; Sternberg, A; Sturm, E; Tacconi, L

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the dense molecular gas in central regions of nearby Seyfert galaxies, and report new arcsec resolution observations of HCN(1-0) and HCO$^+$(1-0) for 3 objects. In NGC 3079 the lines show complex profiles as a result of self-absorption and saturated continuum absorption. H$^{13}$CN reveals the continuum absorption profile, with a peak close to the galaxy's systemic velocity that traces disk rotation, and a second feature with a blue wing extending to $-350$km s$^{-1}$ that most likely traces a nuclear outflow. The morphological and spectral properties of the emission lines allow us to constrain the dense gas dynamics. We combine our kinematic analysis for these 3 objects, as well as another with archival data, with a previous comparable analysis of 4 other objects, to create a sample of 8 Seyferts. In 7 of these, the emission line kinematics imply thick disk structures on radial scales of $\\sim$100pc, suggesting such structures are a common occurrence. We find a relation between the circumnuclear L...

  8. Counter-rotating disks in galaxies: dissecting kinematics and stellar populations with 3D spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Coccato, Lodovico; Pizzella, Alessandro; Corsini, Enrico Maria; Bonta', Elena Dalla; Fabricius, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    We present a spectral decomposition technique that separates the contribution of different kinematic components in galaxies from the observed spectrum. This allows to study the kinematics and properties of the stellar populations of the individual components (e.g., bulge, disk, counter-rotating cores, orthogonal structures). Here, we discuss the results of this technique for galaxies that host counter-rotating stellar disks of comparable size. In all the studied cases, the counter-rotating stellar disk is the less massive, the youngest and has different chemical content (metallicity and alpha-elements abundance ratio) than the main galaxy disk. Further applications of the spectral decomposition technique are also discussed.

  9. Star formation and turbulent dissipation in models of disk galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Avila-Reese, V; Vázquez-Semadeni, E

    2003-01-01

    The kinetic energy dissipation rate in the turbulent ISM of disk galaxies is a key ingredient in galaxy evolution models since it determines the effectiveness of large-scale star formation (SF) feedback. Using magneto-hydro-dynamic simulations, we find that the ISM dissipates efficiently the turbulent kinetic energy injected by sources of stellar nature. Thus, the SF process may be self-regulated by an energy balance only at the level of the disk ISM. The use of the self-regulation SF mechanism in galaxy evolutionary models, where disks form inside growing Cold Dark Matter halos, allows to predict the SF history of disk galaxies, including the Milky Way and the solar neighborhood, as well as the contribution of the whole population of disk galaxies to the cosmic SF history. The results are encouraging.

  10. The Inner Regions of Disk Galaxies: A Constant Baryonic Fraction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available For disk galaxies (spirals and irregulars, the inner circular-velocity gradient dRV0 (inner steepness of the rotation curve correlates with the central surface brightness ∑*,0 with a slope of ~0.5. This implies that the central dynamical mass density scales almost linearly with the central baryonic density. Here I show that this empirical relation is consistent with a simple model where the central baryonic fraction ƒbar,0 is fixed to 1 (no dark matter and the observed scatter is due to differences in the baryonic mass-to-light ratio Mbar / LR (ranging from 1 to 3 in the R-band and in the characteristic thickness of the central stellar component Δz (ranging from 100 to 500 pc. Models with lower baryonic fractions are possible, although they require some fine-tuning in the values of Mbar/LR and Δz. Regardless of the actual value of ƒbar,0, the fact that different types of galaxies do not show strong variations in ƒbar,0 is surprising, and may represent a challenge for models of galaxy formation in a Λ Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM cosmology.

  11. Dissecting simulated disk galaxies II: the age-velocity relation

    CERN Document Server

    Martig, Marie; Flynn, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We study the relation between stellar ages and vertical velocity dispersion (the age-velocity relation, or AVR) in a sample of seven simulated disk galaxies. In our simulations, the shape of the AVR for stars younger than 9 Gyr depends strongly on the merger history at low redshift, with even 1:10 - 1:15 mergers being able to create jumps in the AVR (although these jumps might not be detectable if the errors on stellar ages are on the order of 30%). For galaxies with a quiescent history at low redshift, we find that the vertical velocity dispersion rises smoothly for ages up to 8-9 Gyr, following a power law with a slope of ~0.5, similar to what is observed in the solar neighbourhood by the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey. For these galaxies, we show that the slope of the AVR is not imprinted at birth, but is the result of subsequent heating. By contrast, in all our simulations, the oldest stars form a significantly different population, with a high velocity dispersion. These stars are usually born kinematically hot...

  12. Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Nearby Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, Adam K; Sandstrom, Karin; Schruba, Andreas; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Bigiel, Frank; Bolatto, Alberto; Brinks, Elias; de Blok, W J G; Meidt, Sharon; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schinnerer, Eva; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; Usero, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We compare molecular gas traced by 12CO(2-1) maps from the HERACLES survey, with tracers of the recent star formation rate (SFR) across 30 nearby disk galaxies. We demonstrate a first-order linear correspondence between Sig_mol and Sig_SFR but also find important second-order systematic variations in the apparent molecular gas depletion time, t_dep^mol = Sig_mol / Sig_SFR. At our 1 kpc common resolution, CO correlates closely with many tracers of the recent SFR. Weighting each line of sight equally and using a fixed, Milky Way alpha_CO, our data yield a molecular gas depletion time, t_dep^mol=Sig_mol/Sig_SFR ~ 2.2 Gyr with 0.3 dex scatter, in good agreement with literature data. We apply a forward-modeling approach to constrain the power-law index, N, that relates the SFR surface density and the molecular gas surface density and find N=1+/-0.15 for our full data set with some variation from galaxy to galaxy. However, we caution that a power law treatment oversimplifies the topic given that we observe correlat...

  13. The Mid-Infrared Properties of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yanling Wu; Houck, J R; Bernasrd-Salas, J; Lebouteiller, V

    2008-01-01

    The unprecedented sensitivity of the Spitzer Space Telescope has enabled us for the first time to detect a large sample of Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies (BCDs), which are intrinsically faint in the infrared. In the present paper we present a summary of our findings which providing essential information on the presence/absence of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon features in metal-poor environments. In addition, using Spitzer/IRS high-resolution spectroscopy, we study the elemental abundances of neon and sulfur in BCDs and compare with the results from optical studies. Finally, we present an analysis of the mid- and far-infrared to radio correlation in low luminosity low metallicity galaxies.

  14. The environment of nearby Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R; van Eymeren, Janine; Esteban, Cesar; Popping, Attila; Hibbard, John

    2009-01-01

    We are obtaining deep multiwavelength data of a sample of nearby blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDGs) combining broad-band optical/NIR and H$\\alpha$ photometry, optical spectroscopy and 21-cm radio observations. Here we present HI results obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array for some BCDGs, all showing evident interaction features in their neutral gas component despite the environment in which they reside. Our analysis strongly suggests that interactions with or between low-luminosity dwarf galaxies or HI clouds are the main trigger mechanism of the star-forming bursts in BCDGs; however these dwarf objects are only detected when deep optical images and complementary HI observations are performed. Are therefore BCDGs real isolated systems?

  15. The Fate of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies: An Environmental Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, S M; Glenn, A; Hössel, J G

    2004-01-01

    Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) are a heterogeneous class which dominate an intermediate phase of galaxy evolution. These sources account for the majority of the star formation between 0.3

  16. What will blue compact dwarf galaxies evolve into?

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Hagen T; Janz, Joachim; Papaderos, Polychronis

    2013-01-01

    We present and analyse the photometric properties of a nearly complete sample of blue compact dwarf (BCD) and irregular galaxies in the Virgo cluster from multi-band SDSS images. Our study intends to shed light on the ongoing debate of whether a structural evolution from present-day star-forming dwarf galaxies in a cluster environment into ordinary early-type dwarf galaxies is possible based on the structural properties. For this purpose, we decompose the surface brightness profiles of the BCDs into the luminosity contribution of the starburst component and that of their underlying low surface brightness (LSB) host. The latter dominates the stellar mass of the BCD. We find that the LSB-components of the Virgo BCDs are structurally compatible with the more compact half of the Virgo early-type dwarfs, except for a few extreme BCDs. Thus, after termination of starburst activity, the BCDs will presumably fade into galaxies that are structurally similar to ordinary early-type dwarfs. In contrast, the irregulars ar...

  17. Modeling the Newtonian Dynamics for Rotation Curve Analysis of Thin-Disk Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, James Q.; Gallo, C. F.

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient, robust computational method for modeling the Newtonian dynamics for rotation curve analysis of thin-disk galaxies. For a disk galaxy with a typical flat rotation curve, our modeling results show that the surface mass density monotonically decreases from the galactic center toward periphery, according to Newtonian dynamics. In a large portion of the galaxy, the surface mass density follows an approximately exponential law of decay with respect to the galactic radial co...

  18. HOT DUST OBSCURED GALAXIES WITH EXCESS BLUE LIGHT: DUAL AGN OR SINGLE AGN UNDER EXTREME CONDITIONS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assef, R. J.; Diaz-Santos, T. [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Walton, D. J.; Brightman, M. [Space Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, D.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Tsai, C.-W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 169-236, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Alexander, D. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Bauer, F. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Blain, A. W. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, 1 University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Finkelstein, S. L. [The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hickox, R. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Wu, J. W., E-mail: roberto.assef@mail.udp.cl [UCLA Astronomy, P.O. Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    Hot dust-obscured galaxies (Hot DOGs) are a population of hyper-luminous infrared galaxies identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission from their very red mid-IR colors, and characterized by hot dust temperatures (T > 60 K). Several studies have shown clear evidence that the IR emission in these objects is powered by a highly dust-obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) that shows close to Compton-thick absorption at X-ray wavelengths. Thanks to the high AGN obscuration, the host galaxy is easily observable, and has UV/optical colors usually consistent with those of a normal galaxy. Here we discuss a sub-population of eight Hot DOGs that show enhanced rest-frame UV/optical emission. We discuss three scenarios that might explain the excess UV emission: (i) unobscured light leaked from the AGN by reflection over the dust or by partial coverage of the accretion disk; (ii) a second unobscured AGN in the system; or (iii) a luminous young starburst. X-ray observations can help discriminate between these scenarios. We study in detail the blue excess Hot DOG WISE J020446.13–050640.8, which was serendipitously observed by Chandra/ACIS-I for 174.5 ks. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with a single, hyper-luminous, highly absorbed AGN, and is strongly inconsistent with the presence of a secondary unobscured AGN. Based on this, we argue that the excess blue emission in this object is most likely either due to reflection or a co-eval starburst. We favor the reflection scenario as the unobscured star formation rate needed to power the UV/optical emission would be ≳1000 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. Deep polarimetry observations could confirm the reflection hypothesis.

  19. Hot Dust Obscured Galaxies with Excess Blue Light: Dual AGN or Single AGN Under Extreme Conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assef, R. J.; Walton, D. J.; Brightman, M.; Stern, D.; Alexander, D.; Bauer, F.; Blain, A. W.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Hickox, R. C.; Tsai, C.-W.; Wu, J. W.

    2016-03-01

    Hot dust-obscured galaxies (Hot DOGs) are a population of hyper-luminous infrared galaxies identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission from their very red mid-IR colors, and characterized by hot dust temperatures (T > 60 K). Several studies have shown clear evidence that the IR emission in these objects is powered by a highly dust-obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) that shows close to Compton-thick absorption at X-ray wavelengths. Thanks to the high AGN obscuration, the host galaxy is easily observable, and has UV/optical colors usually consistent with those of a normal galaxy. Here we discuss a sub-population of eight Hot DOGs that show enhanced rest-frame UV/optical emission. We discuss three scenarios that might explain the excess UV emission: (i) unobscured light leaked from the AGN by reflection over the dust or by partial coverage of the accretion disk; (ii) a second unobscured AGN in the system; or (iii) a luminous young starburst. X-ray observations can help discriminate between these scenarios. We study in detail the blue excess Hot DOG WISE J020446.13-050640.8, which was serendipitously observed by Chandra/ACIS-I for 174.5 ks. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with a single, hyper-luminous, highly absorbed AGN, and is strongly inconsistent with the presence of a secondary unobscured AGN. Based on this, we argue that the excess blue emission in this object is most likely either due to reflection or a co-eval starburst. We favor the reflection scenario as the unobscured star formation rate needed to power the UV/optical emission would be ≳1000 M⊙ yr-1. Deep polarimetry observations could confirm the reflection hypothesis.

  20. Investigating the Disk-Corona Relation in a Blue AGN Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jie-Ying

    2009-01-01

    We compile a blue AGN sample from SDSS and investigate the ratio of hard X-ray to bolometric luminosity in dependence on Eddington ratio and black hole mass. Our sample comprises 240 radio-quiet Seyfert 1 galaxies and QSOs. We find that the fraction of hard X-ray luminosity (log$(L_{\\rm 2-10 kev}/L_{\\rm bol})$) decreases with the increase of Eddington ratio. We also find that the fraction of hard X-ray luminosity is independent on the black hole mass for the radio-quiet AGNs. The relation of log$(L_{\\rm 2-10 kev}/L_{\\rm bol})$ decreasing with increasing Eddington ratio indicates that X-ray bolometric correction is not a constant, from a larger sample supporting the results of Vasudevan & Fabian (2007). We interpret our results by the disk corona evaporation/condensation model (Meyer et al. \\cite{me200}; Liu et al. 2002a; Liu et al. 2007). In the frame of this model, the Compton cooling becomes efficient in cooling of the corona at high accretion rate (in units of Eddington rate), leading to condensation o...

  1. Critical take on "Mass models of disk galaxies from the DiskMass Survey in MOND''

    CERN Document Server

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2015-01-01

    Angus et al.(2015) have recently faulted MOND as follows: Studying thirty disc galaxies from the DiskMass survey, they derive the profiles of velocity dispersion perpendicular to the discs as predicted by MOND, call them $\\sigma_M(r)$. These are then compared with the dispersion profiles, $\\sigma(r)$, measured as part of the DiskMass project. This is a (theory dependent) test of MOND, different from rotation-curve analysis. A nontrivial accomplishment of MOND -- not discussed by Angus et al. -- is that $\\eta(r)\\equiv\\sigma_M(r)/\\sigma(r)$ is well consistent with being $r$-independent (while $\\sigma$ and $\\sigma_M$ are strongly $r$ dependent). The fault found with MOND was that $\\eta$ is systematically above 1 (with an average of about 1.4). I have suggested to Angus et al. that the fault may lie with the DiskMass dispersions, which may well be $\\sim 30\\%$ too low for the purpose at hand: Being based on population-integrated line profiles, they may be overweighed by younger populations, known to have much smal...

  2. In-spiraling Clumps in Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G; Hunter, Deidre

    2012-01-01

    Giant star-formation clumps in dwarf irregular galaxies can have masses exceeding a few percent of the galaxy mass enclosed inside their orbital radii. They can produce sufficient torques on dark matter halo particles, halo stars, and the surrounding disk to lose their angular momentum and spiral into the central region in 1 Gyr. Pairs of giant clumps with similarly large relative masses can interact and exchange angular momentum to the same degree. The result of this angular momentum loss is a growing central concentration of old stars, gas, and star formation that can produce a long-lived starburst in the inner region, identified with the BCD phase. This central concentration is proposed to be analogous to the bulge in a young spiral galaxy. Observations of star complexes in five local BCDs confirm the relatively large clump masses that are expected for this process. The observed clumps also seem to contain old field stars, even after background light subtraction, in which case the clumps may be long-lived....

  3. Properties of Disks and Bulges of Spiral and Lenticular Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Oohama, N; Fukugita, M; Yasuda, N; Nakamura, O

    2009-01-01

    A bulge-disk decomposition is made for 737 spiral and lenticular galaxies drawn from a SDSS galaxy sample for which morphological types are estimated. We carry out the bulge-disk decomposition using the growth curve fitting method. It is found that bulge properties, effective radius, effective surface brightness, and also absolute magnitude, change systematically with the morphological sequence; from early to late types, the size becomes somewhat larger, and surface brightness and luminosity fainter. In contrast disks are nearly universal, their properties remaining similar among disk galaxies irrespective of detailed morphologies from S0 to Sc. While these tendencies were often discussed in previous studies, the present study confirms them based on a large homogeneous magnitude-limited field galaxy sample with morphological types estimated. The systematic change of bulge-to-total luminosity ratio, $B/T$, along the morphological sequence is therefore not caused by disks but mostly by bulges. It is also shown ...

  4. FORMATION OF ULTRA-COMPACT BLUE DWARF GALAXIES AND THEIR EVOLUTION INTO NUCLEATED DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, The University of Western Australia 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley Western Australia, 6009 (Australia)

    2015-10-10

    We propose that there is an evolutionary link between ultra-compact blue dwarf galaxies (UCBDs) with active star formation and nucleated dwarfs based on the results of numerical simulations of dwarf–dwarf merging. We consider the observational fact that low-mass dwarfs can be very gas-rich, and thereby investigate the dynamical and chemical evolution of very gas-rich, dissipative dwarf–dwarf mergers. We find that the remnants of dwarf–dwarf mergers can be dominated by new stellar populations formed from the triggered starbursts and consequently can have blue colors and higher metallicities (Z ∼ [0.2–1]Z{sub ⊙}). We also find that the remnants of these mergers can have rather high mass densities (10{sup 4} M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −3}) within the central 10 pc and small half-light radii (40−100 pc). The radial stellar structures of some merger remnants are similar to those of nucleated dwarfs. Star formation can continue in nuclear gas disks (R < 100 pc) surrounding stellar galactic nuclei (SGNs) so that the SGNs can finally have multiple stellar populations with different ages and metallicities. These very compact blue remnants can be identified as UCBDs soon after merging and as nucleated dwarfs after the young stars fade. We discuss these results in the context of the origins of metal-rich ultra-compact dwarfs and SGNs.

  5. Comparing the Evolution of the Galaxy Disk Sizes with CDM Models The Hubble Deep Field

    CERN Document Server

    Giallongo, E; Poli, F; D'Odorico, S; Fontana, A

    2000-01-01

    The intrinsic sizes of the field galaxies with I-19) galaxies is skewed with respect to the CDM predictions and an excess of small-size disks (R_d<2 kpc) is already present at z~ 0.5. The excess persists up to z~3 and involves brighter galaxies . Such an excess may be reduced if luminosity-dependent effects, like starburst activity in interacting galaxies, are included in the physical mechanisms governing the star formation history in CDM models.

  6. A High-Velocity Collision With Our Galaxy's Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    What caused the newly discovered supershell in the outskirts of our galaxy? A new study finds evidence that a high-velocity cloud may have smashed into the Milky Ways disk millions of years ago.Mysterious Gas ShellsA single velocity-channel map of the supershell GS040.2+00.670, with red contours marking the high-velocity cloud at its center. [Adapted from Park et al. 2016]The neutral hydrogen gas that fills interstellar space is organized into structures like filaments, loops, and shells. Supershells are enormous shells of hydrogen gas that can have radii of a thousand light-years or more; weve spotted about 20 of these in our own galaxy, and more in nearby dwarfs and spiral galaxies.How do these structures form? One theory is that they result from several supernovae explosions occurring in the same area. But the energy needed to create a supershell is more than 3 x 1052 erg, which corresponds to over 30 supernovae quite a lot to have exploding in the same region.Theres an interesting alternative scenario: the supershells might instead be caused by the impacts of high-velocity clouds that fall into the galactic disk.Velocity data for the compact high-velocity cloud CHVC040. The cloud is moving fast enough to create the supershell observed. [Adapted from Park et al. 2016]The Milky Ways Speeding CloudsHigh-velocity clouds are clouds of mostly hydrogen that speed through the Milky Way with radial velocities that are very different from the material in the galactic disk. The origins of these clouds are unknown, but its proposed that they come from outside the galaxy they might be fragments of a nearby, disrupting galaxy, or they might have originated from flows of accreting gas in the space in between galaxies.Though high-velocity clouds have long been on the list of things that might cause supershells, weve yet to find conclusive evidence of this. But that might have just changed, with a recent discovery by a team of scientists led by Geumsook Park (Seoul National

  7. Bulge-Disk Decompositions and Structural Bimodality of Ursa Major Cluster Spiral Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Michael; Courteau, Stephane; Tully, R. Brent

    2008-01-01

    We present bulge and disk (B/D) decompositions of existing K'-band surface brightness profiles for 65 Ursa Major cluster spiral galaxies. This improves upon the disk-only fits of Tully et al. (1996). The 1996 disk fits were used by Tully & Verheijen (1997) for their discovery of the bimodality of structural parameters in the UMa cluster galaxies. It is shown that our new 1D B/D decompositions yield disk structural parameters that differ only slightly from the basic fits of Tully et al. and ev...

  8. Bars in Disk-Dominated and Bulge-Dominated Galaxies at z~0: New Insights from ~3600 SDSS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barazza, Fabio D; Marinova, Irina

    2007-01-01

    We present a study of large-scale bars in the local Universe, based on a large sample of ~3692 galaxies, with -18.5 60^{\\circ}$) systems, we find the following results. (1) The optical r-band fraction (f_opt-r) of barred galaxies, when averaged over the whole sample, is ~48%-52%. (2)~When galaxies are separated according to half light radius (r_e), or normalized r_e/R_24, which is a measure of the bulge-to-disk (B/D) ratio, a remarkable result is seen: f_opt-r rises sharply, from ~40% in galaxies that have small r_e/R_24 and visually appear to host prominent bulges, to ~70% for galaxies that have large r_e/R_24 and appear disk-dominated. (3)~f_opt-r rises for galaxies with bluer colors, lower masses, or fainter luminosities. (4) While hierarchical $\\Lambda$CDM models of galaxy evolution models fail to produce galaxies without classical bulges, our study finds that ~20% of disk galaxies appear to be ``quasi-bulgeless''. (5) After applying the same cutoffs in magnitude (M_V= 1.5 kpc), and bar ellipticity (e_bar...

  9. Near-infrared structure of fast and slow-rotating disk galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A., E-mail: andrew@astro.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK {sub s}-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s{sup –1} disk structure. Of the fast-rotating (V {sub rot} > 150 km s{sup –1}) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with h{sub z} ≲ 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ∼5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ∼25% of the total K {sub s}-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{sub K{sub s}}/f{sub 60} {sub μm}≤0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J – K {sub s}) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heating—or cooling—is a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  10. MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN NEARBY DISK GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, Adam K.; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Walter, Fabian; Sandstrom, Karin; Meidt, Sharon; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva [Max Planck Institute fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schruba, Andreas [California Institute for Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bigiel, Frank [Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bolatto, Alberto [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Brinks, Elias [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); De Blok, W. J. G. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Rosolowsky, Erik [University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Schuster, Karl-Friedrich [IRAM, 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406 St. Martin d' Heres (France); Usero, Antonio [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, C/ Alfonso XII, 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-08-01

    We compare molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO (2-1) maps from the HERACLES survey, with tracers of the recent star formation rate (SFR) across 30 nearby disk galaxies. We demonstrate a first-order linear correspondence between {Sigma}{sub mol} and {Sigma}{sub SFR} but also find important second-order systematic variations in the apparent molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}. At the 1 kpc common resolution of HERACLES, CO emission correlates closely with many tracers of the recent SFR. Weighting each line of sight equally, using a fixed {alpha}{sub CO} equivalent to the Milky Way value, our data yield a molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}{approx}2.2 Gyr with 0.3 dex 1{sigma} scatter, in very good agreement with recent literature data. We apply a forward-modeling approach to constrain the power-law index, N, that relates the SFR surface density and the molecular gas surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub mol}{sup N}. We find N = 1 {+-} 0.15 for our full data set with some scatter from galaxy to galaxy. This also agrees with recent work, but we caution that a power-law treatment oversimplifies the topic given that we observe correlations between {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and other local and global quantities. The strongest of these are a decreased {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} in low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies and a correlation of the kpc-scale {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} with dust-to-gas ratio, D/G. These correlations can be explained by a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor ({alpha}{sub CO}) that depends on dust shielding, and thus D/G, in the theoretically expected way. This is not a unique interpretation, but external evidence of conversion factor variations makes this the most conservative explanation of the strongest observed {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} trends. After applying a D/G-dependent {alpha}{sub CO}, some weak correlations between {tau}{sub dep

  11. Significant enhancement of ${\\rm H_2}$ formation in disk galaxies under strong ram pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We show, for the first time, that ${\\rm H_2}$ formation on dust grains can be enhanced in disk galaxies under strong ram-pressure (RP). We numerically investigate how the time evolution, of ${\\rm H}$ {\\sc i} and ${\\rm H_2}$ components in disk galaxies orbiting a group/cluster of galaxies, can be influenced by hydrodynamical interaction between the gaseous components of the galaxies and the hot intra-cluster medium (ICM). We find that compression of ${\\rm H}$ {\\sc i} caused by RP increases ${\\rm H_2}$ formation in disk galaxies, before RP rapidly strips ${\\rm H}$ {\\sc i}, cutting off the fuel supply and causing a drop in ${\\rm H_2}$ density. We also find that the level of this ${\\rm H_2}$ formation enhancement in a disk galaxy under RP depends on the mass of its host cluster dark matter (DM) halo, initial positions and velocities of the disk galaxy, and disk inclination angle with respect to the orbital plane. We demonstrate that dust growth is a key factor in the evolution of the ${\\rm H}$ {\\sc i} and ${\\rm H...

  12. Supermassive black holes do not correlate with galaxy disks or pseudobulges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John; Bender, R; Cornell, M E

    2011-01-20

    The masses of supermassive black holes are known to correlate with the properties of the bulge components of their host galaxies. In contrast, they seem not to correlate with galaxy disks. Disk-grown 'pseudobulges' are intermediate in properties between bulges and disks; it has been unclear whether they do or do not correlate with black holes in the same way that bulges do. At stake in this issue are conclusions about which parts of galaxies coevolve with black holes, possibly by being regulated by energy feedback from black holes. Here we report pseudobulge classifications for galaxies with dynamically detected black holes and combine them with recent measurements of velocity dispersions in the biggest bulgeless galaxies. These data confirm that black holes do not correlate with disks and show that they correlate little or not at all with pseudobulges. We suggest that there are two different modes of black-hole feeding. Black holes in bulges grow rapidly to high masses when mergers drive gas infall that feeds quasar-like events. In contrast, small black holes in bulgeless galaxies and in galaxies with pseudobulges grow as low-level Seyfert galaxies. Growth of the former is driven by global processes, so the biggest black holes coevolve with bulges, but growth of the latter is driven locally and stochastically, and they do not coevolve with disks and pseudobulges.

  13. Extragalactic SETI: The Tully-Fisher Relation as a Probe of Dysonian Astroengineering in Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zackrisson, Erik; Calissendorff, Per; Asadi, Saghar; Nyholm, Anders

    2015-09-01

    If advanced extraterrestrial civilizations choose to construct vast numbers of Dyson spheres to harvest radiation energy, this could affect the characteristics of their host galaxies. Potential signatures of such astroengineering projects include reduced optical luminosity, boosted infrared luminosity, and morphological anomalies. Here, we apply a technique pioneered by Annis to search for Kardashev type III civilizations in disk galaxies, based on the predicted offset of these galaxies from the optical Tully-Fisher (TF) relation. By analyzing a sample of 1359 disk galaxies, we are able to set a conservative upper limit of ≲ 3% on the fraction of local disks subject to Dysonian astroengineering on galaxy-wide scales. However, the available data suggests that a small subset of disk galaxies actually may be underluminous with respect to the TF relation in the way expected for Kardashev type III objects. Based on the optical morphologies and infrared-to-optical luminosity ratios of such galaxies in our sample, we conclude that none of them stand out as strong Kardashev type III candidates and that their inferred properties likely have mundane explanations. This allows us to set a tentative upper limit at ≲ 0.3% on the fraction of Karashev type III disk galaxies in the local universe.

  14. BLUE LUMINOUS STARS IN NEARBY GALAXIES-UIT 005: A POSSIBLE LINK TO THE LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE STAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed study of the blue supergiant UIT 005 (B2-2.5Ia+) in M 33 is presented. The results of our quantitative spectral analysis indicate that the star is a very luminous (log L/Lsun ∼ 5.9 dex) and massive (M ∼ 50 Msun) object, showing a very high nitrogen-to-oxygen ratio in its surface (N/O∼8, by mass). Based on the derived Mg and Si abundances, we argue that this high N/O ratio cannot be the result of an initial low O content due to its location on the disk of M 33, a galaxy known to present a steep metallicity gradient. In combination with the He abundance, the most plausible interpretation is that UIT 005 is in an advanced stage of evolution, showing in its surface N enrichment and O depletion resulting from mixing with CNO processed material from the stellar interior. A comparison with the predictions of current stellar evolutionary models indicates that there are significant discrepancies, in particular with regard to the degree of chemical processing, with the models predicting a much lower degree of O depletion than observed. At the same time, the mass-loss rate derived in our analysis is an order of magnitude lower than the values considered in the evolutionary calculations. Based on a study of the surrounding stellar population and the nearby cluster, NGC 588, using Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 photometry, we suggest that UIT 005 could be in fact a runaway star from this cluster. Regardless of its origin, the derived parameters place the star in a region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram where luminous blue variables (LBVs) are usually found, but we find no evidence supporting photometric or spectroscopic variability, except for small Hα changes, otherwise observed in Galactic B-type supergiants. Whether UIT 005 is an LBV in a dormant state or a regular blue supergiant could not be discerned in this study. Subsequent monitoring would help us to improve our knowledge of the more massive stars, bridging the gap between regular and more exotic

  15. HALO ORBITS IN COSMOLOGICAL DISK GALAXIES: TRACERS OF FORMATION HISTORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valluri, Monica [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Debattista, Victor P. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Stinson, Gregory S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bailin, Jeremy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0324 (United States); Quinn, Thomas R. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Couchman, H. M. P.; Wadsley, James, E-mail: mvalluri@umich.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2013-04-10

    We analyze the orbits of stars and dark matter particles in the halo of a disk galaxy formed in a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation. The halo is oblate within the inner {approx}20 kpc and triaxial beyond this radius. About 43% of orbits are short axis tubes-the rest belong to orbit families that characterize triaxial potentials (boxes, long-axis tubes and chaotic orbits), but their shapes are close to axisymmetric. We find no evidence that the self-consistent distribution function of the nearly oblate inner halo is comprised primarily of axisymmetric short-axis tube orbits. Orbits of all families and both types of particles are highly eccentric, with mean eccentricity {approx}> 0.6. We find that randomly selected samples of halo stars show no substructure in 'integrals of motion' space. However, individual accretion events can clearly be identified in plots of metallicity versus formation time. Dynamically young tidal debris is found primarily on a single type of orbit. However, stars associated with older satellites become chaotically mixed during the formation process (possibly due to scattering by the central bulge and disk, and baryonic processes), and appear on all four types of orbits. We find that the tidal debris in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations experiences significantly more chaotic evolution than in collisionless simulations, making it much harder to identify individual progenitors using phase space coordinates alone. However, by combining information on stellar ages and chemical abundances with the orbital properties of halo stars in the underlying self-consistent potential, the identification of progenitors is likely to be possible.

  16. MCMC Analysis of biases in the interpretation of disk galaxy kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino-Ortíz, E.; Valenzuela, O.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Sánchez-Sánchez, S. F.; Hernández-Toledo, H.

    2016-06-01

    The new generation of galaxy surveys like SAMI, CALIFA and MaNGA opens up the possibility of studying simultaneously properties of galaxies such as spiral arms, bars, disk geometry and orientation, stellar and gas mass distribution, 2D kinematics, etc. The previous task involves exploring a complicated multi-dimensional parameter space. Puglielli et al. (2010) introduced Bayesian statistics and MCMC (Monte Carlo Markov Chain) techniques to construct dynamical models of spiral galaxies. In our study we used synthetic velocity fields that include non-circular motions and assume different disk orientations in order to produce mock observations. We apply popular reconstruction techniques in order to estimate the geometrical disk parameters, systemic velocities, rotation curve shape and maximum circular velocity which are crucial to construct the scaling relations. We conclude that a detailed analysis of kinematics in galaxies using MCMC technique will be reflected in accurate estimations of galaxy properties and more robust scalings relations, otherwise physical conclusions may be importantly biased.

  17. Stellar mass functions of galaxies, disks and spheroids at z~0.1

    CERN Document Server

    Thanjavur, Karun; Bluck, Asa F L; Mendel, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    We present the stellar mass functions (SMF) and mass densities of galaxies, and their spheroid and disk components in the local (z~0.1) universe over the range 8.9 <= log(M/M_solar) <= 12 from spheroid+disk decompositions and corresponding stellar masses of a sample of over 600,000 galaxies in the SDSS-DR7 spectroscopic sample. The galaxy SMF is well represented by a single Schechter function (M* = 11.116+/-0.011, alpha = -1.145+/-0.008), though with a hint of a steeper faint end slope. The corresponding stellar mass densities are (2.670+/-0.110), (1.687+/-0.063) and (0.910+/-0.029)x10^8 M_solar Mpc^-3 for galaxies, spheroids and disks respectively. We identify a crossover stellar mass of log(M/M_solar) = 10.3+/-0.030 at which the spheroid and disk SMFs are equal. Relative contributions of four distinct spheroid/disk dominated sub-populations to the overall galaxy SMF are also presented. The mean disk-to-spheroid stellar mass ratio shows a five fold disk dominance at the low mass end, decreasing monoton...

  18. Discovery of Giant X-Ray Disk Sheds Light on Elliptical Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    Ohio University astronomers have discovered the largest disk of hot, X-ray emitting gas ever observed in the universe: At 90,000 light years in diameter, it's about 100,000 times the size of any comparable object. The disk, spinning through a distant galaxy, is more than just an interstellar oddity, the researchers say. The object could offer new information about the way certain galaxies form and evolve. About 20 percent of all galaxies are elliptical, the largest of the three types of galaxies in the universe. They differ from spiral galaxies like the Milky Way, as they lack new stars and spiral "arms." Scientists once believed that elliptical galaxies were ancient, simple systems that contained only old stars and formed in the early days of the universe. But new research suggests elliptical galaxies are more complex and dynamic. "It used to be thought that galaxies form and then sit there and age quietly over time. But now we understand that galaxies live, in the sense that there's an interplay of gas and stars," said Thomas Statler, an associate professor of physics and astronomy and lead author of the study, published in the Dec. 20 issue of the Astrophysical Journal. The newly discovered X-ray disk offers more evidence for that argument. Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, an orbiting spacecraft that houses the most powerful X-ray telescope in existence, the astronomers discovered the disk while analyzing data collected from NGC 1700, a young elliptical galaxy about 160 million light years from Earth. Giant in size and about 8 million degrees in temperature, the disk was an unexpected find for Statler and colleague Brian McNamara. But while its gargantuan scale is striking, the disk also yielded another surprise: The hot gas is not in calm balance with the gravitational forces as expected, but spinning through the galaxy. In fact, the giant, rotating X-ray disk suggests that this elliptical galaxy and perhaps others like it wasn't created by the merger of

  19. WITNESSING THE DIFFERENTIAL EVOLUTION OF DISK GALAXIES IN LUMINOSITY AND SIZE VIA GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandara, Kaushala; Crampton, David; Peng, Chien; Simard, Luc [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2013-11-01

    We take advantage of the magnification in size and flux of a galaxy provided by gravitational lensing to analyze the properties of 62 strongly lensed galaxies from the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey. The sample of lensed galaxies spans a redshift range of 0.20 ≤ z ≤ 1.20 with a median redshift of z = 0.61. We use the lens modeling code LENSFIT to derive the luminosities, sizes, and Sérsic indices of the lensed galaxies. The measured properties of the lensed galaxies show a primarily compact, {sup d}isk{sup -}like population with the peaks of the size and Sérsic index distributions corresponding to ∼1.50 kpc and n ∼ 1, respectively. Comparison of the SLACS galaxies to a non-lensing, broadband imaging survey shows that a lensing survey allows us to probe a galaxy population that reaches ∼2 mag fainter. Our analysis allows us to compare the (z) = 0.61 disk galaxy sample (n ≤ 2.5) to an unprecedented local galaxy sample of ∼670, 000 SDSS galaxies at z ∼ 0.1; this analysis indicates that the evolution of the luminosity-size relation since z ∼ 1 may not be fully explained by a pure-size or pure-luminosity evolution but may instead require a combination of both. Our observations are also in agreement with recent numerical simulations of disk galaxies that show evidence of a mass-dependent evolution since z ∼ 1, where high-mass disk galaxies (M{sub *} > 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}) evolve more in size and low-mass disk galaxies (M{sub *} ≤ 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}) evolve more in luminosity.

  20. The opacity of spiral galaxy disks. III. Automating the synthetic field method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, BW; Gonzalez, RA; Allen, RJ; van der Kruit, PC

    2005-01-01

    Dust extinction in spiral disks can be estimated from the counts of background field galaxies, provided the deleterious effects of confusion introduced by structure in the image of the foreground spiral disk can be calibrated. Gonzalez et al. developed a method for this calibration, the Synthetic Fi

  1. Stellar disk truncations at high z : Probing inside-out galaxy formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trujillo, [No Value; Pohlen, M

    2005-01-01

    We have conducted a systematic search for stellar disk truncations in disklike galaxies at intermediate redshift (z <1.1) using the Hubble Ultra Deep Field data. We use the position of the truncation as a direct estimator of the size of the stellar disk. After accounting for the surface brightness e

  2. Dynamics of Non-Steady Spiral Arms in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Baba, Junichi; Wada, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms underlying non-steady stellar spiral arms in disk galaxies, we analyzed the growing and damping phases of their spiral arms using three-dimensional $N$-body simulations. We confirmed that the spiral arms are formed due to a swing amplification mechanism that reinforces density enhancement as a seeded wake. In the damping phase, the Coriolis force exerted on a portion of the arm surpasses the gravitational force that acts to shrink the portion. Consequently, the stars in the portion escape from the arm, and subsequently they form a new arm at a different location. The time-dependent nature of the spiral arms are originated in the continual repetition of this non-linear phenomenon. Since a spiral arm does not rigidly rotate, but follows the galactic differential rotation, the stars in the arm rotate at almost the same rate as the arm. In other words, every single position in the arm can be regarded as the co-rotation point. Due to interaction with their host arms, ...

  3. Formation of ultra-compact blue dwarf galaxies and their evolution into nucleated dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We propose that there is an evolutionary link between ultra-compact blue dwarf galaxies (UCBDs) with active star formation and nucleated dwarfs based on the results of numerical simulations of dwarf-dwarf merging. We consider the observational fact that low-mass dwarfs can be very gas-rich, and thereby investigate the dynamical and chemical evolution of very gas-rich, dissipative dwarf-dwarf mergers. We find that the remnants of dwarf-dwarf mergers can be dominated by new stellar populations formed from the triggered starbursts and consequently can have blue colors and higher metallicities (Z~[0.2-1]Z_sun). We also find that the remnants of these mergers can have rather high mass-densities (10^4 M_sun pc^-3) within the central 10 pc and small half-light radii (40-100 pc). The radial stellar structures of some merger remnants are similar to those of nucleated dwarfs. Star formation can continue in nuclear gas disks (R<100 pc) surrounding stellar galactic nuclei (SGNs) so that the SGNs can finally have multi...

  4. Detection of Prominent Stellar Disks in the Progenitors of Present-day Massive Elliptical Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Davari, Roozbeh H; Mobasher, Bahram; Canalizo, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Massive galaxies at higher redshifts ($\\emph{z}$ $>$ 2) show different characteristics from their local counterparts: They are compact and most likely have a disk. In this study, we trace the evolution of local massive galaxies by performing a detailed morphological analysis, namely, fitting single S\\'{e}rsic profiles and performing bulge+disk decompositions. We analyze $\\sim$ 250 massive galaxies selected from all CANDELS fields (COSMOS, UDS, EGS, GOODS-South and GOODS-North). We confirm that both star-forming and quiescent galaxies increase their sizes significantly from $\\emph{z}$ $\\approx$ 2.5 to the present day. The global S\\'{e}rsic index of quiescent galaxies increases over time (from $n$ $\\approx$ 2.5 to $n$ $>$ 4), while that of star-forming galaxies remains roughly constant ($n$ $\\approx$ 2.5). By decomposing galaxy profiles into bulge+disk components, we find that massive galaxies at high redshift have prominent stellar disks, which are also evident from visual inspection of the images. By $z$ $\\ap...

  5. The opacity of spiral galaxy disks : IX. Dust and gas surface densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Allen, R. J.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Bouchard, A.; Gonzalez-Lopezlira, R. A.; van der Kruit, P. C.; Leroy, A.

    2013-01-01

    Our aim is to explore the relation between gas, atomic and molecular, and dust in spiral galaxies. Gas surface densities are from atomic hydrogen and CO line emission maps. To estimate the dust content, we use the disk opacity as inferred from the number of distant galaxies identified in twelve HST/

  6. Deep multiband surface photometry on star forming galaxies: I. A sample of 24 blue compact galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Micheva, Genoveva; Bergvall, Nils; Zackrisson, Erik; Masegosa, Josefa; Marquez, Isabel; Marquart, Thomas; Durret, Florence

    2012-01-01

    [Abridged] We present deep optical and near-infrared UBVRIHKs imaging data for 24 blue compact galaxies (BCGs). The sample contains luminous dwarf and intermediate-mass BCGs which are predominantly metal-poor, although a few have near-solar metallicities. We have analyzed isophotal and elliptical integration surface brightness and color profiles, extremely deep (mu_B<29 mag arcsec^{-2}) contour maps and RGB images for each galaxy in the sample. The colors are compared to different spectral evolutionary models. We detect extremely extended low surface brightness (LSB) components dominant beyond the Holmberg radius as well as optical bridges between companion galaxies at the mu_V~28th mag arcsec^{-2} isophotal level. The central surface brightness mu_0 and scale length h_r are derived from two radial ranges typically assumed to be dominated by the underlying host galaxy. We find that mu_0 and h_r of the BCGs host deviate from those of dwarf ellipticals (dE) and dwarf irregulars (dI) solely due to a strong bu...

  7. Our Milky Way as a Pure-Disk Galaxy -- A Challenge for Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Juntai; Kormendy, John; Howard, Christian D; De Propris, Roberto; Kunder, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Bulges are commonly believed to form in the dynamical violence of galaxy collisions and mergers. Here we model the stellar kinematics of the Bulge Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA), and find no sign that the Milky Way contains a classical bulge formed by scrambling pre-existing disks of stars in major mergers. Rather, the bulge appears to be a bar, seen somewhat end-on, as hinted from its asymmetric boxy shape. We construct a simple but realistic N-body model of the Galaxy that self-consistently develops a bar. The bar immediately buckles and thickens in the vertical direction. As seen from the Sun, the result resembles the boxy bulge of our Galaxy. The model fits the BRAVA stellar kinematic data covering the whole bulge strikingly well with no need for a merger-made classical bulge. The bar in our best fit model has a half-length of ~ 4kpc and extends 20 degrees from the Sun-Galactic Center line. We use the new kinematic constraints to show that any classical bulge contribution cannot be larger than ~ 8% of the ...

  8. The Extraordinary ``Superthin'' Spiral Galaxy UGC 7321. II. The Vertical Disk Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, L. D.

    2000-10-01

    We explore the vertical light distribution as a function of galactocentric radius in the edge-on (i=88deg) Sd ``superthin'' galaxy UGC 7321. UGC 7321 is a low-luminosity spiral (MB,i=-17.0) with a diffuse, low surface brightness stellar disk and no discernible bulge component. Within ~0.25‧ (~725 pc) of the disk center the global luminosity profile of UGC 7321 can be reasonably characterized by an exponential function with a scale height hz~2.9" (~140 pc) in H and hz~3.1" (~150 pc) in R, making this among the thinnest galaxy disks known. Near the disk center we derive a ratio of disk scale length to global disk scale height hr/hz~14 in both H and R; near the edge of the disk, hr/hz~10. At intermediate galactocentric radii (0.25‧Matthews, Gallagher, & van Driel, suggest that UGC 7321 has multiple disk subcomponents comprised of stellar populations with different ages and velocity dispersions. Thus even examples of the thinnest pure disk galaxies exhibit complex structure and signatures of dynamical heating.

  9. Musings concerning the possible significance of surface brightness variations in disk galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implications of the surface-brightness (SB) distribution of observed disk galaxies are explored, reviewing the results of recent investigations. Topics addressed include the SBs of catalog galaxies, proper measurements of SB, searches for new low-SB objects, and the importance of low-SB galaxies rich in H I for theoretical models of star formation. Key theoretical questions are listed, and tentative answers are given along with recommendations for further observations. 30 references

  10. Disk Thicknesses and Some Parameters of 108 Non-Edge-On Spiral Galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We present disk thicknesses, some other parameters and their statistics of 108 non-edge-on spiral galaxies. The method for determining the disk thickness is based on solving Poisson's equation for a disturbance of matter density in three-dimensional spiral galaxies.From the spiral arms found we could obtain the pitch angles, the inclination of the galactic disk, and the position of the innermost point (the forbidden region with radius r0 to the galactic center) of the spiral arm, and finally the thickness.

  11. Physical Properties of Tidal Features of Interacting Disk Galaxies: Three-dimensional Self-consistent Models

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Sang Hoon; Kim, Woong-Tae; Lee, Hyung Mok

    2015-01-01

    Using self-consistent three-dimensional (3D) N-body simulations, we investigate the physical properties of non-axisymmetric features in a disk galaxy created by a tidal interaction with its companion. The primary galaxy consists of a stellar disk, a bugle, and a live halo, corresponding to Milky-Way type galaxies, while the companion is represented by a halo alone. We vary the companion mass and the pericenter distance to explore situations with differing tidal strength parameterized by eithe...

  12. Retrieving Bulge and Disk Parameters and Asymptotic Magnitudes from the Growth Curves of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Okamura, S; Shimasaku, K; Yagi, M; Weinberg, D H; Okamura, Sadanori; Yasuda, Naoki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Yagi, Masafumi; Weinberg, David H.

    1998-01-01

    We show that the growth curves of galaxies can be used to determine their bulge and disk parameters and bulge-to-total luminosity ratios, in addition to their conventional asymptotic magnitudes, provided that the point spread function is accurately known and signal-to-noise ratio is modest (S/N$\\gtrsim30$). The growth curve is a fundamental quantity that most future large galaxy imaging surveys will measure. Bulge and disk parameters retrieved from the growth curve will enable us to perform statistical studies of luminosity structure for a large number of galaxies.

  13. The role of interactions in triggering bars, spiral arms and AGN in disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Preethi; Ellison, Sara L.; Patton, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The role of secular structures like bars, rings and spiral arms in triggering star formation and AGN activity in disk galaxies are not well understood. In addition, the mechanisms which create and destroy these structures are not well characterized. Mergers are considered to be one of the main mechanisms which can trigger bars in massive disk galaxies. Using a sample of ~8000 close pair galaxies at 0.02 MaNGA will help to place stronger constraints on the role of these structures in triggering star formation and AGN.

  14. GHOSTS | Bulges, Halos, and the Resolved Stellar Outskirts of Massive Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, R. S.; Radburn-Smith, D. J.; Sick, J. N.

    2008-10-01

    In hierarchical galaxy formation the stellar halos of galaxies are formed by the accretion of minor satellites and therefore contain valuable information about the (early) assembly process of galaxies. Our GHOSTS survey measures the stellar envelope properties of 14 nearby disk galaxies by imaging their resolved stellar populations with HST/ACS and WFPC2. Most of the massive galaxies in the sample (V_{rot}>200 km s^{-1}) have very extended stellar envelopes with μ(r) ˜ r^{-2.5} power law profiles in the outer regions. For these massive galaxies there is some evidence that the stellar surface density of the profiles correlates with Hubble type and bulge-to-disk ratio, begging the question whether these envelopes are more related to bulges than to a Milky Way-type stellar halo. Smaller galaxies (V_{rot}˜100 km s^{-1}) have much smaller stellar envelopes, but depending on geometry, they could still be more luminous than expected from satellite remnants in hierarchical galaxy formation models. Alternatively, they could be created by disk heating through the bombardment of small dark matter sub-halos. We find that galaxies show varying amounts of halo substructure.

  15. High-Redshift Galaxy Kinematics: Constraints on Models of Disk Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, Brant E

    2008-01-01

    Integral field spectroscopy of galaxies at redshift z~2 has revealed a population of early-forming, rotationally-supported disks. These high-redshift systems provide a potentially important clue to the formation processes that build disk galaxies in the universe. A particularly well-studied example is the z=2.38 galaxy BzK-15504, which was shown by Genzel et al. (2006) to be a rotationally supported disk despite the fact that its high star formation rate and short gas consumption timescale require a very rapid acquisition of mass. Previous kinematical analyses have suggested that z~2 disk galaxies like BzK-15504 did not form through mergers because their line-of-sight velocity fields display low levels of asymmetry. We perform the same kinematical analysis on a set of simulated disk galaxies formed in gas-rich mergers of the type that may be common at high redshift, and show that the remnant disks display low velocity field asymmetry and satisfy the criteria that have been used to classify high-redshift galax...

  16. Survival of pure disk galaxies over the last 8 billion years

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdeva, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    Pure disk galaxies without any bulge component, i.e., neither classical nor pseudo, seem to have escaped the affects of merger activity inherent to hierarchical galaxy formation models as well as strong internal secular evolution. We discover that a significant fraction (15 - 18 %) of disk galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field (0.4 < z < 1.0) as well as in the local Universe (0.02 < z < 0.05) are such pure disk systems (hereafter, PDS). The spatial distribution of light in these PDS is well described by a single exponential function from the outskirts to the centre and appears to have remained intact over the last 8 billion years keeping the mean central surface brightness and scale-length nearly constant. These two disk parameters of PDS are brighter and shorter, respectively, than of those disks which are part of disk galaxies with bulges. Since the fraction of PDS as well as their profile defining parameters do not change, it indicates that these galaxies have not witnessed either major mergers or ...

  17. Red galaxies with pseudo-bulges in the SDSS: closer to disk galaxies or to classical bulges?

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, B; Antón, S; Gomes, J M; Papaderos, P

    2015-01-01

    Pseudo-bulges are expected to markedly differ from classical, quasi-monolithically forming bulges in their star formation history (SFH) and chemical abundance patterns. To test this simple expectation, we carry out a comparative structural and spectral synthesis analysis of 106 red, massive galaxies issued from the SDSS, subdivided into bulgeless, pseudo-bulge and classical bulge galaxies according to their photometric characteristics, and further obeying a specific selection to minimize uncertainties in the analysis and ensure an unbiased derivation and comparison of SFHs. Our 2D photometry analysis suggests that disks underlying pseudo-bulges typically have larger exponential scale lengths than bulgeless galaxies, despite similar integral disk luminosities. Spectral synthesis models of the stellar emission within the 3" SDSS fiber aperture reveal a clear segregation of bulgeless and pseudo-bulge galaxies from classical bulges on the luminosity-weighted planes of age-metallicity and mass-metallicity, though ...

  18. Bulge-Disk Decompositions and Structural Bimodality of Ursa Major Cluster Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Michael; Tully, R Brent

    2008-01-01

    We present bulge and disk (B/D) decompositions of existing K'-band surface brightness profiles for 65 Ursa Major cluster spiral galaxies. This improves upon the disk-only fits of Tully et al. (1996). The 1996 disk fits were used by Tully & Verheijen (1997) for their discovery of the bimodality of structural parameters in the UMa cluster galaxies. It is shown that our new 1D B/D decompositions yield disk structural parameters that differ only slightly from the basic fits of Tully et al. and evidence for structural bimodality of UMa galaxies is maintained. Our B/D software for the decomposition of 1D surface brightness profiles of galaxies uses a non-linear minimization scheme to recover the best fitting Sersic bulge and exponential disk while accounting for the possible presence of a compact nucleus and spiral arms and for the effects of seeing and disk truncations. In agreement with Tully & Verheijen, we find that the distribution of near-infrared disk central surface brightnesses is bimodal with an F...

  19. Modeling the Newtonian Dynamics for Rotation Curve Analysis of Thin-Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, James Q

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient, robust computational method for modeling the Newtonian dynamics for rotation curve analysis of thin-disk galaxies. For a disk galaxy with a typical flat rotation curve, our modeling results show that the surface mass density monotonically decreases from the galactic center toward periphery, according to Newtonian dynamics. In a large portion of the galaxy, the surface mass density follows an approximately exponential law of decay with respect to the galactic radial coordinate. Yet the radial scale length for the surface mass density seems to be generally larger than that of the measured brightness distribution, suggesting an increasing mass-to-light ratio with the radial distance in a disk galaxy. In a nondimensionalized form, our mathematical system contains a dimensionless parameter $A$ which we call the "galactic rotation number" that represents the ratio of centrifugal force and gravitational force. The value of this galactic rotation number is determined as part of the numerical ...

  20. EXTREME GAS FRACTIONS IN CLUMPY, TURBULENT DISK GALAXIES AT z ∼ 0.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, David B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Bassett, Robert [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Bolatto, Alberto [Laboratory of Millimeter Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 29742 (United States); Obreschkow, Danail [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), 44 Rosehill Street, Redfern, NSW 2016 (Australia); Cooper, Erin Mentuch [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Wisnioski, Emily [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Abraham, Roberto G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Damjanov, Ivana [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Green, Andy [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 970, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); McGregor, Peter, E-mail: dfisher@swin.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2014-08-01

    In this Letter, we report the discovery of CO fluxes, suggesting very high gas fractions in three disk galaxies seen in the nearby universe (z ∼ 0.1). These galaxies were investigated as part of the DYnamics of Newly Assembled Massive Objects (DYNAMO) survey. High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging of these objects reveals the presence of large star forming clumps in the bodies of the galaxies, while spatially resolved spectroscopy of redshifted Hα reveals the presence of high dispersion rotating disks. The internal dynamical state of these galaxies resembles that of disk systems seen at much higher redshifts (1 < z < 3). Using CO(1-0) observations made with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, we find gas fractions of 20%-30% and depletion times of t {sub dep} ∼ 0.5 Gyr (assuming a Milky-Way-like α{sub CO}). These properties are unlike those expected for low-redshift galaxies of comparable specific star formation rate, but they are normal for their high-z counterparts. DYNAMO galaxies break the degeneracy between gas fraction and redshift, and we show that the depletion time per specific star formation rate for galaxies is closely tied to gas fraction, independent of redshift. We also show that the gas dynamics of two of our local targets corresponds to those expected from unstable disks, again resembling the dynamics of high-z disks. These results provide evidence that DYNAMO galaxies are local analogs to the clumpy, turbulent disks, which are often found at high redshift.

  1. Outer Spiral Disks as Clues to Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Vlajić, Marija

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of outer spiral disks have given rise to an abundance of new results. We discuss the observational and theoretical advances that have spurred the interest in disk outskirts, as well as where we currently stand in terms of our understanding of outer disk structure, ages and metallicities.

  2. Noncircular Outer Disks in Unbarred S0 Galaxies: NGC 502 and NGC 5485

    CERN Document Server

    Sil'chenko, Olga K

    2016-01-01

    Strongly noncircular outer stellar disks have been found in two unbarred SA0 galaxies by analyzing spectroscopic data on the rotation of stars and photometric data on the shape and orientation of the isophotes. In NGC 502, the oval distortion of the disk is manifested as two elliptical rings, the inner and the outer ones, covering wide radial zones between the bulge and the disk and at the outer edge of the stellar disk. Such a structure may be a consequence of the so-called "dry" minor merger - multiple accretion of gas-free satellites. In NGC 5485, the kinematical major axis does not coincide with the orientation of isophotes in the disk-dominated region, and for this galaxy the conclusion about its global triaxial structure is unavoidable.

  3. Synthetic HI observations of spiral structure in the outer disk in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoperskov, Sergey A.; Bertin, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    > By means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations, in a separate paper we have discussed the properties of non-axisymmetric density wave trains in the outermost regions of galaxy disks, based on the picture that self-excited global spiral modes in the bright optical stellar disk are accompanied by low-amplitude short trailing wave signals outside corotation; in the gas, such wave trains can penetrate through the outer Lindblad resonance and propagate outwards, forming prominent spiral patterns. In this paper we present the synthetic 21 cm velocity maps expected from simulated models of the outer gaseous disk, focusing on the case when the disk is dominated by a two-armed spiral pattern, but considering also other more complex situations. We discuss some aspects of the spiral pattern in the gaseous periphery of galaxy disks noted in our simulations that might be interesting to compare with specific observed cases.

  4. Synthetic HI observations of spiral structure in the outer disk in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Khoperskov, S A

    2015-01-01

    By means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations, in a separate paper we have discussed the properties of non-axisymmetric density wave trains in the outermost regions of galaxy disks, based on the picture that self-excited global spiral modes in the bright optical stellar disk are accompanied by low-amplitude short trailing wave signals outside corotation; in the gas, such wave trains can penetrate through the outer Lindblad resonance and propagate outwards, forming prominent spiral patterns. In this paper we present the synthetic 21~cm velocity maps expected from simulated models of the outer gaseous disk, focusing on the case when the disk is dominated by a two-armed spiral pattern, but considering also other more complex situations. We discuss some aspects of the spiral pattern in the gaseous periphery of galaxy disks noted in our simulations that might be interesting to compare with specific observed cases.

  5. FUSE observations of the Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy Mrk 59

    CERN Document Server

    Thuan, T X; Izotov, Yu I

    2001-01-01

    New FUSE far-UV spectroscopy of the nearby metal-deficient (Zsun/8) cometary Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxy Markarian (Mrk) 59 is discussed. The data are used to investigate element abundances in its interstellar medium. The H I absorption lines are characterized by narrow cores which are interstellar in origin and by broad wings which are stellar in origin. The mean interstellar H I column density is ~ 7x10E20 cm-2 in Mrk 59. No H2 lines are seen and N(H2) is < 10E15 cm-2 at the 10 sigma level. The lack of diffuse H2 is due to the combined effect of a strong UV radiation field which destroys the H2 molecules and a low metallicity which leads to a scarcity of dust grains necessary for H2 formation. P-Cygni profiles of the S VI 933.4, 944.5 A and O VI 1031.9, 1037.6 A lines are seen, indicating the presence of very hot O stars and a stellar wind terminal velocity of ~ 1000 km/s. By fitting the line profiles with multiple components having each a velocity dispersion b = 7 km/s and spanning a radial velocity...

  6. Photographic photometry of 16000 galaxies on ESO blue and red survey plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauberts, A.; Valentijn, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    An ongoing photometric survey of 16,000 galaxies on ESO red and blue plates is described. The galaxies of the ESO/Uppsala Catalog (Lauberts, 1982) are being PDS scanned, and the results are combined with existing photometry and supplementary observational data obtained at the 1-m ESO telescope to fo

  7. The DiskMass Survey. X. Radio synthesis imaging of spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Martinsson, Thomas P K; Bershady, Matthew A; Westfall, Kyle B; Andersen, David R; Swaters, Rob A

    2016-01-01

    We present results from 21 cm radio synthesis imaging of 28 spiral galaxies from the DiskMass Survey obtained with the VLA, WSRT, and GMRT facilities. We detail the observations and data reduction procedures and present a brief analysis of the radio data. We construct 21 cm continuum images, global HI emission-line profiles, column-density maps, velocity fields, and position-velocity diagrams. From these we determine star formation rates (SFRs), HI line widths, total HI masses, rotation curves, and azimuthally-averaged radial HI column-density profiles. All galaxies have an HI disk that extends beyond the readily observable stellar disk, with an average ratio and scatter of R_{HI}/R_{25}=1.35+/-0.22, and a majority of the galaxies appear to have a warped HI disk. A tight correlation exists between total HI mass and HI diameter, with the largest disks having a slightly lower average column density. Galaxies with relatively large HI disks tend to exhibit an enhanced stellar velocity dispersion at larger radii, ...

  8. Formation of Disk Galaxies On the Angular Momentum Problem, the Tully-Fisher Relation and Magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sommer-Larsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Two ways of possibly solving the angular momentum problem plaguing cold darkmatter (CDM) ab initio simulations of disk galaxy formation are discussed: 1)Stellar feedback processes and 2) Warm dark matter (WDM) rather than CDM. In relation to the chemical evolution of disk galaxies our simulationsindicate that in case 1) the first generation of disk stars formed in diskgalaxies like the Milky Way should have an abundance about two dex below solar,in fairly good agreement with the lowest observed abundance of the metal-weaktail of the Galactic thick disk. For the second case no such statements can bemade without further assumptions about the star-formation history of thegalaxies. We find that the I-band Tully-Fisher relation can be matched by WDM diskgalaxy formation simulations provided (M/L_I) is about 0.8 for disk galaxies,which Sommer-Larsen & Dolgov (1999) argue is a reasonable value. Finally it is discussed how the magnetic field strengths observed in galacticdisks can be obtained through disk galaxy ...

  9. The Majority of Compact Massive Galaxies at z~2 are Disk Dominated

    CERN Document Server

    van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn; McGrath, Elizabeth J; Koekemoer, Anton M; Bell, Eric F; Holden, Bradford P; Robaina, Aday R; McIntosh, Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the stellar structure of massive, quiescent galaxies at z~2, based on HST/WFC3 imaging from the Early Release Science program. Our sample of 14 galaxies has stellar masses of M* > 10^{10.8} Msol and photometric redshifts of 1.5 < z < 2.5. In agreement with previous work, their half-light radii are <2 kpc, much smaller than equally massive galaxies in the present-day universe. A significant subset of the sample appear highly flattened in projection, which implies, considering viewing angle statistics, that a significant fraction of the galaxies in our sample have pronounced disks. This is corroborated by two-dimensional surface brightness profile fits. We estimate that 65% +/- 15% of the population of massive, quiescent z~2 galaxies are disk-dominated. The median disk scale length is 1.5 kpc, substantially smaller than the disks of equally massive galaxies in the present-day universe. Our results provide strong observational evidence that the much-discussed ultra-dense high-redshift gal...

  10. Caught in the act the identification of the galaxies responsible for the faint blue excess

    CERN Document Server

    Driver, S P; Griffiths, R E; Driver, Simon P; Windhorst, Rogier A; Griffiths, Richard E

    1995-01-01

    We summarise recent Hubble Space Telescope results on the morphology of faint field galaxies. Our two principle results are: (1) the galaxies responsible for the faint blue excess have late-type/irregular morphology and (2) the number counts of normal galaxies, ellipticals and early-type spirals, are well fit by standard no-evolution models implying that the giant population was in place and mature by a redshift of \\ge 0.7.

  11. Baryonic inflow and outflow histories in disk galaxies as revealed from observations of distant star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyouchi, Daisuke; Chiba, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    Gas inflow and outflow are the most important processes, which determine the structural and chemical evolution of a disk galaxy like the Milky Way. In order to get new insights into these baryonic processes in Milky Way like galaxies (MWLGs), we consider the data of distant star-forming galaxies and investigate the evolution of the radial density profile of their stellar components and the associated total amount of gaseous inflow and outflow. For this purpose, we analyze the redshift evolution of their stellar mass distribution, combined with the scaling relations between the mass of baryonic components, star formation rate and chemical abundance for both high- and low-z star-forming galaxies. As a result, we find the new relations between star formation rate and inflow/outflow rate as deduced from these distant galaxies, which will provide fundamental information for understanding the structural and chemical evolution of MWLGs.

  12. The power spectra of non-circular motions in disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Kyle; Laws, Anna S. E.; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the first year of the SDSS-IV/MaNGA survey, we present a preliminary study of the amplitude of non-circular motions in a sample of disk galaxies. We select galaxies that have either a visual classification as a spiral galaxy by the Galaxy Zoo project (Lintott et al. 2011) and/or a measured Sersic index of less than 2.5 from the NASA-Sloan Atlas (nsatlas.org). We also remove high-inclination systems by selecting galaxies with isophotal ellipticity measurements of less than 0.6, implying an inclination of less than 65 degrees. For each galaxy, we fit a tilted-disk model to the observed line-of-sight velocities (Andersen & Bershady 2013). The geometric projection of the circularly rotating disk is simultaneously fit to both the ionized-gas (H-alpha) and stellar kinematics, whereas the rotation curves of the two dynamical tracers are allowed to be independent. We deproject the residuals of the velocity-field fit to the disk-plane polar coordinates and select a radial region that is fully covered in aziumuth, yet not undersampled by the on-sky spaxel. Similar to the approach taken by Bovy et al. (2015) for the Milky Way, we then compute the two-dimensional power spectrum of this velocity-residual map, which provides the amplitude of non-circular motions at all modes probed by the data. Our preliminary analysis reveals disk-plane non-circular motions in both the stars and ionized-gas with typical peak amplitudes of approximately 20 km/s. Additionally, our initial findings appear to demonstrate that non-circular motions in barred galaxies are stronger in the ionized gas than in the stars, a trend not seen in unbarred galaxies.

  13. Mapping the inner regions of the polar disk galaxy NGC 4650A with MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iodice, E.; Coccato, L.; Combes, F.; de Zeeuw, T.; Arnaboldi, M.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Bacon, R.; Kuntschner, H.; Spavone, M.

    2015-11-01

    The polar disk galaxy NGC 4650A was observed during the commissioning of the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) at the ESO Very Large Telescope to obtain the first 2D map of the velocity and velocity dispersion for both stars and gas. The new MUSE data allow the analysis of the structure and kinematics towards the central regions of NGC 4650A, where the two components co-exist. These regions were unexplored by the previous long-slit literature data available for this galaxy. The stellar velocity field shows that there are two main directions of rotation, one along the host galaxy major axis (PA = 67 deg) and the other along the polar disk (PA = 160 deg). The host galaxy has, on average, the typical pattern of a rotating disk, with receding velocities on the SW side and approaching velocities on the NE side, and a velocity dispersion that remains constant at all radii (σstar ~ 50-60 km s-1). The polar disk shows a large amount of differential rotation from the centre up to the outer regions, reaching V ~ 100-120 km s-1 at R ~ 75 arcsec ~ 16 kpc. Inside the host galaxy, a velocity gradient is measured along the photometric minor axis. Close to the centre, for R ≤ 2 arcsec the velocity profile of the gas suggests a decoupled component and the velocity dispersion increases up to ~110 km s-1, while at larger distances it remains almost constant (σgas ~ 30-40 km s-1). The extended view of NGC 4650A given by the MUSE data is a galaxy made of two perpendicular disks that remain distinct and drive the kinematics right into the very centre of this object. In order to match this observed structure for NGC 4650A, we constructed a multicomponent mass model made by the combined projection of two disks. By comparing the observations with the 2D kinematics derived from the model, we found that the modelled mass distribution in these two disks can, on average, account for the complex kinematics revealed by the MUSE data, also in the central regions of the galaxy where the

  14. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): deconstructing bimodality - I. Red ones and blue ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Edward N.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brown, Michael J. I.; Colless, Matthew; Driver, Simon; Norberg, Peder; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Brough, Sarah; Cluver, Michelle E.; Gunawardhana, Madusha; Kelvin, Lee S.; Liske, Jochen; Conselice, Christopher J.; Croom, Scott; Foster, Caroline; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Lara-Lopez, Maritza; Loveday, Jon

    2015-01-01

    We measure the mass functions for generically red and blue galaxies, using a z 8.7 field galaxies from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. Our motivation is that, as we show, the dominant uncertainty in existing measurements stems from how `red' and `blue' galaxies have been selected/defined. Accordingly, we model our data as two naturally overlapping populations, each with their own mass function and colour-mass relation, which enables us characterize the two populations without having to specify a priori which galaxies are `red' and `blue'. Our results then provide the means to derive objective operational definitions for the terms `red' and `blue', which are based on the phenomenology of the colour-mass diagrams. Informed by this descriptive modelling, we show that (1) after accounting for dust, the stellar colours of `blue' galaxies do not depend strongly on mass; (2) the tight, flat `dead sequence' does not extend much below log M* ˜ 10.5; instead, (3) the stellar colours of `red' galaxies vary rather strongly with mass, such that lower mass `red' galaxies have bluer stellar populations; (4) below log M* ˜ 9.3, the `red' population dissolves into obscurity, and it becomes problematic to talk about two distinct populations; as a consequence, (5) it is hard to meaningfully constrain the shape, including the existence of an upturn, of the `red' galaxy mass function below log M* ˜ 9.3. Points 1-4 provide meaningful targets for models of galaxy formation and evolution to aim for.

  15. The imprint of radial migration on the vertical structure of galaxy disks

    CERN Document Server

    Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Navarro, Julio F

    2016-01-01

    We use numerical simulations to examine the effects of radial migration on the vertical structure of galaxy disks. The simulations follow three exponential disks of different mass but similar circular velocity, radial scalelength, and (constant) scale height. The disks develop different non-axisymmetric patterns, ranging from feeble, long-lived multiple arms to strong, rapidly-evolving few-armed spirals. These fluctuations induce radial migration through secular changes in the angular momentum of disk particles, mixing the disk radially and blurring pre-existing gradients. Migration affects primarily stars with small vertical excursions, regardless of spiral pattern. This "provenance bias" largely determines the vertical structure of migrating stars: inward migrators thin down as they move in, whereas outward migrators do not thicken up but rather preserve the disk scale height at destination. Migrators of equal birth radius thus develop a strong scale-height gradient, not by flaring out as commonly assumed, ...

  16. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. XI. THE REMARKABLY UNDISTURBED NGC 2403 DISK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present detailed analysis of color-magnitude diagrams of NGC 2403, obtained from a deep (m ∼–6 M☉ yr–1 kpc–2). Furthermore, we find that the cumulative stellar mass of the disk was formed at similar times at all radii. We compare these characteristics of NGC 2403 to those of its ''morphological twins'', NGC 300 and M 33, showing that the structure and age distributions of the NGC 2403 disk are more similar to those of the relatively isolated system NGC 300 than to those of the Local Group analog M 33. We also discuss the environments and HI morphologies of these three nearby galaxies, comparing them to integrated light studies of larger samples of more distant galaxy disks. Taken together, the physical properties and evolutionary history of NGC 2403 suggest that the galaxy has had no close encounters with other M 81 group members and may be falling into the group for the first time.

  17. Simulating disk galaxies and interactions in Milgromian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Thies, Ingo; Famaey, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Since its publication 1983, Milgromian dynamics (aka MOND) has been very successful in modeling the gravitational potential of galaxies from baryonic matter alone. However, the dynamical modeling has long been an unsolved issue. In particular, the setup of a stable galaxy for Milgromian N-body calculations has been a major challenge. Here, I will show a way to set up disc galaxies in MOND for calculations in the PHANTOM OF RAMSES (PoR) code by L\\"ughausen (2015) and Teyssier (2002). The method is done by solving the QUMOND Poisson equations based on a baryonic and a phantom dark matter component. The resulting galaxy models are stable after a brief settling period for a large mass and size range. Simulations of single galaxies as well as colliding galaxies are shown.

  18. A Blue Tilt in the Globular Cluster System of the Milky Way-like Galaxy NGC 5170

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Duncan; Harris, William; Bailin, Jeremy; Strader, Jay; Brodie, Jean; Larsen, Soeren

    2009-01-01

    Here we present HST/ACS imaging, in the B and I bands, of the edge-on Sb/Sc galaxy NGC 5170. Excluding the central disk region region, we detect a 142 objects with colours and sizes typical of globular clusters (GCs). Our main result is the discovery of a `blue tilt' (a mass-metallicity relation), at the 3sigma level, in the metal-poor GC subpopulation of this Milky Way like galaxy. The tilt is consistent with that seen in massive elliptical galaxies and with the self enrichment model of Bailin & Harris. For a linear mass-metallicity relation, the tilt has the form Z ~ L^{0.42 +/- 0.13}. We derive a total GC system population of 600 +/- 100, making it much richer than the Milky Way. However when this number is normalised by the host galaxy luminosity or stellar mass it is similar to that of M31. Finally, we report the presence of a potential Ultra Compact Dwarf of size ~ 6 pc and luminosity M_I ~ -12.5, assuming it is physically associated with NGC 5170.

  19. Downsizing among disk galaxies and the role of the environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gavazzi, G

    2009-01-01

    The study of PopI and PopII indicators in galaxies has a profound impact on our understanding of galaxy evolution. Their present (z=0) ratio suggests that the star formation history of galaxies was primarily dictated by their global mass. Since 1989 Luis Carrasco and I spent most of our sleepless nights gathering H_alpha and near infrared surface photometry of galaxies in the local Universe and focused most of our scientific career on these two indicators trying to convince the community that...

  20. Downsizing among disk galaxies and the role of the environment

    CERN Document Server

    Gavazzi, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    The study of PopI and PopII indicators in galaxies has a profound impact on our understanding of galaxy evolution. Their present (z=0) ratio suggests that the star formation history of galaxies was primarily dictated by their global mass. Since 1989 Luis Carrasco and I spent most of our sleepless nights gathering H_alpha and near infrared surface photometry of galaxies in the local Universe and focused most of our scientific career on these two indicators trying to convince the community that the mass was the key parameter to their evolution. We were unsuccessful, until in 2004 the Sloan team rediscovered this phenomenon and named it "downsizing"

  1. Disk and Bulge Morphology of WFPC2 galaxies The HST Medium Deep Survey database

    CERN Document Server

    Ratnatunga, K U; Ostrander, E J; Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Ostrander, Eric J.

    1999-01-01

    Quantitative morphological and structural parameters are estimated for galaxies detected in HST observations of WFPC2 survey fields. A modeling approach based on maximum likelihood has been developed for two-dimensional decomposition of faint under-sampled galaxy images into components of disk and bulge morphology. Decomposition can be achieved for images down to F814W (I) hour. We discuss details of the fitting procedure, and present the observed distributions of magnitude, color, effective half-light radius, disk and bulge axis ratios, bulge/(disk+bulge) flux ratio, bulge/disk half-light radius ratio and surface brightness. We also discuss the various selection limits on the measured parameters. The Medium Deep Survey catalogs and images of random pure parallel fields and other similar archival primary WFPC2 fields have been made available via the Internet with a searchable browser interface to the database at http://archive.stsci.edu/mds/

  2. Evidence of nuclear disks in starburst galaxies from their radial distribution of supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Illana, R.; Pérez-Torres, M. Á.; Alberdi, A.

    2012-04-01

    Galaxy-galaxy interactions are expected to be responsible for triggering massive star formation and possibly accretion onto a supermassive black hole, by providing large amounts of dense molecular gas down to the central kiloparsec region. Several scenarios to drive the gas further down to the central ~100 pc, have been proposed, including the formation of a nuclear disk around the black hole, where massive stars would produce supernovae. Here, we probe the radial distribution of supernovae and supernova remnants in the nuclear regions of the starburst galaxies M 82, Arp 299-A, and Arp 220, by using high-angular resolution (≲ 0.''1) radio observations published in the literature (for M 82 and Arp 220), or obtained by ourselves from the European VLBI Network (Arp 299-A). Our main goal was to characterize the nuclear starbursts in those galaxies and thus test scenarios that propose that nuclear disks of sizes ~100 pc form in the central regions of starburst galaxies. We obtained the radial distribution of supernovae (SNe) in the nuclear starbursts of M 82, Arp 299-A, and Arp 220, and derived scale-length values for the putative nuclear disks powering the bursts in those central regions. The scale lengths for the (exponential) disks range from ~20-30 pc for Arp 299-A and Arp 220, up to ~140 pc for M 82. The radial distribution of SNe for the nuclear disks in Arp 299-A and Arp 220 is also consistent with a power-law surface density profile of exponent γ = 1, as expected from detailed hydrodynamical simulations of nuclear disks. Our results support scenarios where a nuclear disk of size ~100 pc is formed in (U)LIRGs, and sustained by gas pressure, in which case the accretion onto the black hole could be lowered by supernova feedback. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. LoCuSS: Exploring the selection of faint blue background galaxies for cluster weak-lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziparo, Felicia; Smith, Graham P.; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Haines, Chris P.; Pereira, Maria J.; Egami, Eiichi

    2016-10-01

    Cosmological constraints from galaxy clusters rely on accurate measurements of the mass and internal structure of clusters. An important source of systematic uncertainty in cluster mass and structure measurements is the secure selection of background galaxies that are gravitationally lensed by clusters. This issue has been shown to be particular severe for faint blue galaxies. We therefore explore the selection of faint blue background galaxies, by reference to photometric redshift catalogues derived from the COSMOS survey and our own observations of massive galaxy clusters at z ≃ 0.2. We show that methods relying on photometric redshifts of galaxies in/behind clusters based on observations through five filters, and on deep 30-band COSMOS photometric redshifts are both inadequate to safely identify faint blue background galaxies with the same 1 per cent contamination level that we have achieved with red galaxies. This is due to the small number of filters used by the former, and absence of massive galaxy clusters at redshifts of interest in the latter. Nevertheless, our least contaminated blue galaxy sample yields stacked weak-lensing results consistent with our previously published results based on red galaxies, and we show that the stacked clustercentric number density profile of these faint blue galaxies is consistent with expectations from consideration of the lens magnification signal of the clusters. Indeed, the observed number density of blue background galaxies changes by ˜10 - 30 per cent across the radial range over which other surveys assume it to be flat.

  4. The Difference between the α-disks of Seyfert 1 Galaxies and Quasars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Hao Bian; Hong Dong; Yong-Heng Zhao

    2004-01-01

    In a previous paper, it was suggested that contamination of the nuclear luminosity by the host galaxy plays an important role in determining the parameters of the standard α disk of AGNs. Using the nuclear absolute B band magnitude instead of the total absolute B band magnitude, we have recalculated the central black hole masses, accretion rates and disk inclinations for 20 Seyfert 1 galaxies and 17 Palomar-Green (PG) quasars. It is found that a small value of α is needed for the Seyfert 1 galaxies than for the PG quasars. This difference in α possibly leads to the different properties of Seyfert 1 galaxies and quasars. Furthermore, we find most of the objects in this sample are not accreting at super-Eddington rates if we adopt the nuclear optical luminosity in our calculation.

  5. 2.1-MU-M IMAGES OF THE EVOLVED STELLAR DISK AND THE MORPHOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BLOCK, DL; BERTIN, G; STOCKTON, A; GROSBOL, P; MOORWOOD, AFM; PELETIER, RF

    1994-01-01

    Near-infrared images confirm that the Hubble classification of spiral galaxies does not constrain the morphology of their stellar Population H disk, since galaxies on opposite ends of the spiral sequence can display remarkably similar evolved disk morphologies. Thus, the gas dominated Population I c

  6. A new study on the thick disk population component of the Galaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The newly-raised problem as to whether our Galaxy may contain a thick disk population component has aroused great interest. But up until now no conclusion has been reached unanimously for lack of observed data. Here this problem is discussed based on seven Basel field data calibrated recently and strong evidence is provided. New results on the values of structural parameters, luminosity functions and metal structure of the thick disk are also presented.

  7. GHOSTS | Bulges, Halos, and the Resolved Stellar Outskirts of Massive Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    de Jong, Roelof S; Sick, Jonathan N

    2007-01-01

    In hierarchical galaxy formation the stellar halos of galaxies are formed by the accretion of minor satellites and therefore contain valuable information about the (early) assembly process of galaxies. Our GHOSTS survey measures the stellar envelope properties of 14 nearby disk galaxies by imaging their resolved stellar populations with HST/ACS&WFPC2. Most of the massive galaxies in the sample (Vrot>200 km/s) have very extended stellar envelopes with mu(r) ~ r^{-2.5} power law profiles in the outer regions. For these massive galaxies there is some evidence that the stellar surface density of the profiles correlates with Hubble type and bulge-to-disk ratio, begging the question whether these envelopes are more related to bulges than to a Milky Way-type stellar halo. Smaller galaxies (Vrot 100 km/s) have much smaller stellar envelopes, but depending on geometry, they could still be more luminous than expected from satellite remnants in hierarchical galaxy formation models. Alternatively, they could be creat...

  8. The Formation of a Milky Way-size Disk Galaxy 1. A Comparison of Numerical Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Qirong; Li, Yuexing

    2016-01-01

    The long-standing challenge of creating a Milky Way-like disk galaxy from cosmological simulations has motivated significant developments in both numerical methods and physical models in recent years. We investigate these two fundamental aspects in a new comparison project using a set of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of the formation and evolution of a Milky Way-size galaxy. In this study, we focus on the comparison of two particle-based hydrodynamics methods: the improved smoothed pa...

  9. Forming disk galaxies in wet major mergers. I. Three fiducial examples

    CERN Document Server

    Athanassoula, E; Peschken, N; Lambert, J C

    2016-01-01

    Using three fiducial Nbody+SPH simulations, we follow the merging of two disk galaxies with a hot gaseous halo component each, and examine whether the merger remnant can be a spiral galaxy. The stellar progenitor disks are destroyed by violent relaxation during the merging and most of their stars form a classical bulge, while the remaining form a thick disk and its bar. A new stellar disk forms subsequently and gradually in the remnant from the gas accreted mainly from the halo. It is vertically thin and well extended in its equatorial plane. A bar starts forming before the disk is fully in place, contrary to what is assumed in idealised simulations of isolated bar-forming galaxies. It has morphological features such as ansae and boxy/peanut bulges. Stars of different ages populate different parts of the box/peanut. A disky pseudobulge forms also, so that by the end of the simulation, all three types of bulges coexist. The oldest stars are found in the classical bulge, followed by those of the thick disk, the...

  10. Mass Transport and Turbulence in Gravitationally Unstable Disk Galaxies. II: The Effects of Star Formation Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Forbes, John C.

    2016-08-01

    Self-gravity and stellar feedback are capable of driving turbulence and transporting mass and angular momentum in disk galaxies, but the balance between them is not well understood. In the previous paper in this series, we showed that gravity alone can drive turbulence in galactic disks, regulate their Toomre Q parameters to ∼1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to fuel star formation in the centers of present-day galaxies. In this paper we extend our models to include the effects of star formation feedback. We show that feedback suppresses galaxies’ star formation rates by a factor of ∼5 and leads to the formation of a multi-phase atomic and molecular interstellar medium. Both the star formation rate and the phase balance produced in our simulations agree well with observations of nearby spirals. After our galaxies reach steady state, we find that the inclusion of feedback actually lowers the gas velocity dispersion slightly compared to the case of pure self-gravity, and also slightly reduces the rate of inward mass transport. Nevertheless, we find that, even with feedback included, our galactic disks self-regulate to Q ∼ 1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to supply a substantial fraction of the inner disk star formation. We argue that gravitational instability is therefore likely to be the dominant source of turbulence and transport in galactic disks, and that it is responsible for fueling star formation in the inner parts of galactic disks over cosmological times.

  11. Bulges of disk galaxies at intermediate redshifts. I. Samples with and without bulges in the Groth Strip Survey

    OpenAIRE

    L. Domínguez Palmero; M. Balcells; Erwin, P; Prieto, M.; Cristóbal Hornillos, D.; Eliche Moral, María del Carmen; Guzmán, R.

    2008-01-01

    Context. Analysis of bulges to redshifts of up to z∽1 have provided ambiguous results as to whether bulges as a class are old structures akin to elliptical galaxies or younger products of the evolution of their host disks. Aims. We aim to define a sample of intermediate-z disk galaxies harbouring central bulges, and a complementary sample of disk galaxies without measurable bulges. We intend to provide colour profiles for both samples, as well as measurements of nuclear, disk, and global colo...

  12. Bulges versus disks: the evolution of angular momentum in cosmological simulations of galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Zavala, J; Frenk, Carlos S

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of angular momentum in simulations of galaxy formation in a cold dark matter universe. We analyse two model galaxies produced in the N-body/hydrodynamic simulations of Okamoto et al. Starting from identical initial conditions, but using different assumptions for the baryonic physics, one of the simulations produced a bulge-dominated galaxy and the other one a disk-dominated galaxy. The main difference is the treatment of star formation and feedback, both of which were designed to be more efficient in the disk-dominated object. We find that the specific angular momentum of the disk-dominated galaxy tracks the evolution of the angular momentum of the dark matter halo very closely: the angular momentum grows as predicted by linear theory until the epoch of maximum expansion and remains constant thereafter. By contrast, the evolution of the angular momentum of the bulge-dominated galaxy resembles that of the central, most bound halo material: it also grows at first according to linear...

  13. Extreme gas fractions in clumpy, turbulent disk galaxies at z~0.1

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, David B; Bolatto, Alberto; Obreschkow, Danail; Mentuch-Cooper, Erin; Wisnioski, Emily; BAssett, Robert; Abraham, Roberto G; Damjanov, Ivana; Green, Andy; McGregor, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In this letter we report the discovery of CO fluxes, suggesting very high gas fractions in three disk galaxies seen in the nearby Universe (z ~ 0.1). These galaxies were investigated as part of the DYnamics of Newly Assembled Massive Objects (DYNAMO) survey. High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging of these objects reveals the presence of large star forming clumps in the bodies of the galaxies, while spatially resolved spectroscopy of redshifted Halpha reveals the presence of high dispersion rotating disks. The internal dynamical state of these galaxies resembles that of disk systems seen at much higher redshifts (1 < z < 3). Using CO(1-0) observations made with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, we find gas fractions of 20-30% and depletion times of tdep ~ 0.5 Gyr (assuming a Milky Way-like CO conversion factor). These properties are unlike those expected for low- redshift galaxies of comparable specific star formation rate, but they are normal for their high-z counterparts. DYNAMO galaxies brea...

  14. Radio continuum detection in blue early-type weak emission line galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Paswan, A.; Omar, A.

    2016-01-01

    The star formation rates (SFRs) in weak emission line (WEL) galaxies in a volume-limited ($0.02 < z < 0.05$) sample of blue early-type galaxies (ETGs) identified from SDSS, are constrained here using 1.4 GHz radio continuum emission. The direct detection of 1.4 GHz radio continuum emission is made in 8 WEL galaxies and a median stacking is performed on 57 WEL galaxies using VLA FIRST images. The median stacked 1.4 GHz flux density and luminosity are estimated as 79 $\\pm$ 19 $\\mu$Jy and 0.20 $...

  15. Wind from the black-hole accretion disk driving a molecular outflow in an active galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F; Meléndez, M; Veilleux, S; Reeves, J N; González-Alfonso, E; Reynolds, C S

    2015-03-26

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei are often thought to affect the evolution of both supermassive black holes and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the close relationship between black holes and galaxies. Recent observations of large-scale molecular outflows in ultraluminous infrared galaxies support this quasar-feedback idea, because they directly trace the gas from which stars form. Theoretical models suggest that these outflows originate as energy-conserving flows driven by fast accretion-disk winds. Proposed connections between large-scale molecular outflows and accretion-disk activity in ultraluminous galaxies were incomplete because no accretion-disk wind had been detected. Conversely, studies of powerful accretion-disk winds have until now focused only on X-ray observations of local Seyfert galaxies and a few higher-redshift quasars. Here we report observations of a powerful accretion-disk wind with a mildly relativistic velocity (a quarter that of light) in the X-ray spectrum of IRAS F11119+3257, a nearby (redshift 0.189) optically classified type 1 ultraluminous infrared galaxy hosting a powerful molecular outflow. The active galactic nucleus is responsible for about 80 per cent of the emission, with a quasar-like luminosity of 1.5 × 10(46) ergs per second. The energetics of these two types of wide-angle outflows is consistent with the energy-conserving mechanism that is the basis of the quasar feedback in active galactic nuclei that lack powerful radio jets (such jets are an alternative way to drive molecular outflows). PMID:25810204

  16. Simulating disk galaxies and interactions in Milgromian dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Thies, Ingo; Kroupa, Pavel; Famaey, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Since its publication 1983, Milgromian dynamics (aka MOND) has been very successful in modeling the gravitational potential of galaxies from baryonic matter alone. However, the dynamical modeling has long been an unsolved issue. In particular, the setup of a stable galaxy for Milgromian N-body calculations has been a major challenge. Here, we show a way to set up disc galaxies in MOND for calculations in the PHANTOM OF RAMSES (PoR) code by L\\"ughausen (2015) and Teyssier (2002). The method is...

  17. Far-reaching Dust Distribution in Galaxy Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Matthew W. L.; Eales, Stephen A.; De Looze, Ilse; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J; Bianchi, Simone; Boquien, Médéric; Boselli, Alessandro; Buat, Veronique; Ciesla, Laure; Clemens, Marcel; Clements, David L.; Cooray, Asantha R.; Cortese, Luca; Davies, Jonathan I.

    2016-01-01

    In most studies of dust in galaxies, dust is only detected from its emission to approximately the optical radius of the galaxy. By combining the signal of 110 spiral galaxies observed as part of the Herschel Reference Survey, we are able to improve our sensitivity by an order-of-magnitude over that for a single object. Here we report the direct detection of dust from its emission that extends out to at least twice the optical radius. We find that the distribution of dust is consistent with an...

  18. Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of the star formation-stellar mass relation on spiral disk morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Willett, Kyle W; Simmons, Brooke D; Masters, Karen L; Skibba, Ramin A; Kaviraj, Sugata; Melvin, Thomas; Wong, O Ivy; Nichol, Robert C; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris J; Fortson, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    We measure the stellar mass-star formation rate relation in star-forming disk galaxies at z1. Of the galaxies lying significantly above the M-SFR relation in the local Universe, more than 50% are mergers. We interpret this as evidence that the spiral arms, which are imperfect reflections of the galaxy's current gravitational potential, are either fully independent of the various quenching mechanisms or are completely overwhelmed by the combination of outflows and feedback. The arrangement of the star formation can be changed, but the system as a whole regulates itself even in the presence of strong dynamical forcing.

  19. DOWNSIZING AMONG DISK GALAXIES AND THE ROLE OF THE ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gavazzi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of PopI and PopII indicators in galaxies has a profound impact on our understanding of galaxy evolution. Their present (z = 0 ratio suggests that the star formation history of galaxies was primarily dictated by their global mass. Since 1989 Luis Carrasco and I spent most of our sleepless nights gathering H and near infrared surface photometry of galaxies in the local Universe and focused most of our scienti c career on these two indicators trying to convince the community that the mass was the key parameter to their evolution. We were unsuccessful, until in 2004 the Sloan team rediscovered this phenomenon and named it \\downsizing".

  20. Radio continuum detection in blue early-type weak emission line galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Paswan, A

    2016-01-01

    The star formation rates (SFRs) in weak emission line (WEL) galaxies in a volume-limited ($0.02 < z < 0.05$) sample of blue early-type galaxies (ETGs) identified from SDSS, are constrained here using 1.4 GHz radio continuum emission. The direct detection of 1.4 GHz radio continuum emission is made in 8 WEL galaxies and a median stacking is performed on 57 WEL galaxies using VLA FIRST images. The median stacked 1.4 GHz flux density and luminosity are estimated as 79 $\\pm$ 19 $\\mu$Jy and 0.20 $\\pm$ 0.05 $\\times$ 10$^{21}$ W Hz$^{-1}$ respectively. The radio far-infrared correlation in 4 WEL galaxies suggests that the radio continuum emission from WEL galaxies is most likely due to star formation activities. The median SFR for WEL galaxies is estimated as 0.23 $\\pm$ 0.06 M$_{\\odot}$yr$^{-1}$, which is much less compared to SFRs ($0.5 - 50$ M$_{\\odot}$yr$^{-1}$) in purely star forming blue ETGs. The SFRs in blue ETGs are found to be correlated with their stellar velocity dispersions ($\\sigma$) and decreasin...

  1. The Incidence of Active Galactic Nuclei in Pure Disk Galaxies: The Spitzer View

    CERN Document Server

    Satyapal, S; Mcalpine, W; Gliozzi, M; Abel, N P; Heckman, T

    2009-01-01

    We have conducted a high-resolution spectroscopic study using Spitzer of 18 bulgeless (Sd/Sdm) galaxies that show no definitive signatures of nuclear activity in their optical spectra. This is the first systematic mid-IR search for weak or hidden AGNs in a statistically significant sample of bulgeless disk galaxies. Based on the detection of the high-ionization [NeV] line, we report the discovery of an AGN in one out of the 18 galaxies in the sample. This galaxy, NGC 4178, is a nearby edge-on Sd galaxy, which likely hosts a prominent nuclear star cluster (NSC). The bolometric luminosity of the AGN inferred from the [NeV] luminosity is ~ 8e41 ergs/s. This is almost two orders of magnitude greater than the luminosity of the AGN in NGC 4395, the best studied AGN in a bulgeless disk galaxy. Assuming that the AGN in NGC 4178 is radiating below the Eddington limit, the lower mass limit for the black hole is ~ 6e3M_sun. The fact that none of the other galaxies in the sample shows any evidence for an AGN demonstrates...

  2. Ionized gas disks in Elliptical and S0 galaxies at $z<1$

    CERN Document Server

    Jaffe, Yara L; Ziegler, Bodo; Kuntschner, Harald; Zaritsky, Dennis; Rudnick, Gregory; Poggianti, Bianca M; Hoyos, Carlos; Halliday, Claire; Demarco, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the extended, ionized-gas emission of 24 early-type galaxies (ETGs) at $0galaxies have disturbed gas kinematics, while 14 have rotating gas disks. In addition, 15 galaxies are in the field, while 9 are in the infall regions of clusters. This implies that, if the gas has an internal origin, this is likely stripped as the galaxies get closer to the cluster centre. If the gas instead comes from an external source, then our results suggest that this is more likely acquired outside the cluster environment, where galaxy-galaxy interactions more commonly take place. We analyse the Tully-Fisher relation of the ETGs with gas disks, and compare them to EDisCS spirals. Taking a matched range of redshifts, $M_{B}<-20$, and excluding galaxies with large velocity uncertainties, we find that, at fixed rotational velocity, ETGs ar...

  3. Megamaser Disks Reveal a Broad Distribution of Black Hole Mass in Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, J. E.; Seth, A.; Kim, M.; Läsker, R.; Goulding, A.; Gao, F.; Braatz, J. A.; Henkel, C.; Condon, J.; Lo, K. Y.; Zhao, W.

    2016-08-01

    We use new precision measurements of black hole (BH) masses from water megamaser disks to investigate scaling relations between macroscopic galaxy properties and supermassive BH mass. The megamaser-derived BH masses span 106-108 {M}⊙ , while all the galaxy properties that we examine (including total stellar mass, central mass density, and central velocity dispersion) lie within a narrower range. Thus, no galaxy property correlates tightly with {M}{BH} in ˜L* spiral galaxies as traced by megamaser disks. Of them all, stellar velocity dispersion provides the tightest relation, but at fixed {σ }* the mean megamaser {M}{BH} are offset by -0.6 ± 0.1 dex relative to early-type galaxies. Spiral galaxies with non-maser dynamical BH masses do not appear to show this offset. At low mass, we do not yet know the full distribution of BH mass at fixed galaxy property; the non-maser dynamical measurements may miss the low-mass end of the BH distribution due to an inability to resolve their spheres of influence and/or megamasers may preferentially occur in lower-mass BHs.

  4. Properties of Dark Matter Halos in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    De Jong, R S; Bell, E F; Courteau, S; Jong, Roelof S. de; Kassin, Susan; Bell, Eric F.; Courteau, Stephane

    2003-01-01

    We present a simple technique to estimate mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of stellar populations based on two broadband photometry measurements, i.e. a color-M/L relation. We apply the color-M/L relation to galaxy rotation curves, using a large set of galaxies that span a great range in Hubble type, luminosity and scale size and that have accurately measured HI and/or Halpha rotation curves. Using the color-M/L relation, we construct stellar mass models of the galaxies and derive the dark matter contribution to the rotation curves. We compare our dark matter rotation curves with adiabatically contracted Navarro, Frenk, & White (1997, NFW hereafter) dark matter halos. We find that before adiabatic contraction most high surface brightness galaxies and some low surface brightness galaxies are well fit by a NFW dark matter profile. However, after adiabatic contraction, most galaxies are poorly fit in the central few kpc. The observed angular momentum distribution in the baryonic component is poorly matched by Lamb...

  5. M82 as a Galaxy: Morphology and Stellar Content of the Disk and Halo

    CERN Document Server

    Mayya, Y Divakara

    2009-01-01

    For decades, the nuclear starburst has taken all the limelight in M82 with very little discussion on M82 as a galaxy. The situation is changing over the last decade, with the publication of some important results on the morphology and stellar content of its disk and halo. In this review, we discuss these recent findings in the framework of M82 as a galaxy. It is known for almost half a century that M82 as a galaxy doesn't follow the trends expected for normal galaxies that had prompted the morphologists to introduce a separate morphological type under the name Irr II or amorphous. It is now being understood that the main reasons behind its apparently distinct morphological appearance are its peculiar star formation history, radial distribution of gas density and the form of the rotation curve. The disk formed almost all of its stars through a burst mode around 500 Myr ago, with the disk star formation completely quenched around 100 Myr ago. The fossil record of the disk-wide burst lies in the form of hundreds...

  6. The Stars and Gas in Outer Parts of Galaxy Disks : Extended or Truncated, Flat or Warped?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kruit, P. C.; Funes, JG; Corsini, EM

    2008-01-01

    I review observations of truncations of stellar disks and models for their origin, compare observations of truncations in moderately inclined galaxies to those in edge-on systems and discuss the relation between truncations and H I-warps and their systematics and origin. Truncations are a common fea

  7. The growth of disks and bulges during hierarchical galaxy formation. I: fast evolution vs secular processes

    CERN Document Server

    Tonini, Chiara; Croton, Darren J; Wyithe, J Stuart B

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical model for the evolution of mass, angular momentum and size of galaxy disks and bulges, and we implement it into the semi-analytic galaxy formation code SAGE. The model follows both secular and violent evolutionary channels, including smooth accretion, disk instabilities, minor and major mergers. We find that the combination of our recipe with hierarchical clustering produces two distinct populations of bulges: merger-driven bulges, akin to classical bulges and ellipticals, and instability-driven bulges, akin to secular (or pseudo-)bulges. The model can successfully reproduce the mass-size relation of gaseous and stellar disks, the evolution of the mass-size relation of ellipticals, the Faber-Jackson relation, and the magnitude-colour diagram of classical and secular bulges. The model predicts only a small overlap of merger-driven and instability-driven components in the same galaxy, and predicts different bulge types as a function of galaxy mass and disk fraction. Bulge type also affe...

  8. The Formation of a Realistic Disk Galaxy in Lambda Dominated Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Governato, F; Wadsley, J; Gardner, J P; Willman, B; Hayashi, E; Quinn, T; Stadel, J; Lake, G

    2002-01-01

    We present the first simulation of the formation of a realistic disk dominated galaxy in a hierarchical scenario and study its internal properties to the present epoch. We use a set of extremely high resolution SPH simulations that include cooling, star formation, SN (I&II) feedback and a UV background. We compare results from a LambdaCDM simulation with a LambdaWDM (2keV) simulation that forms significantly less small scale structure. Higher resolution and a correct treatment of cooling play a major role in solving the angular momentum catastrophe claimed from previous simulations of galaxy formation. Hence, a large disk forms without the need of strong energy injection, the z = 0 galaxies lie on the I--band Tully--Fisher relation, and the stellar material in the disk component conserves 40% and 90% of the original angular momentum in the CDM and WDM models respectively. The disk is dynamically cold when formed but gets heated by subsequent bar instabilities. The LambdaCDM galaxy has an overabundance of ...

  9. Clues to the Formation of Lenticular Galaxies Using Spectroscopic Bulge-Disk Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Evelyn J; Merrifield, Michael R; Bedregal, Alejandro G

    2013-01-01

    Lenticular galaxies have long been thought of as evolved spirals, but the processes involved to quench the star formation are still unclear. By studying the individual star formation histories of the bulges and disks of lenticulars, it is possible to look for clues to the processes that triggered their transformation from spirals. To accomplish this feat, we present a new method for spectroscopic bulge-disk decomposition, in which a long-slit spectrum is decomposed into two one-dimensional spectra representing purely the bulge and disk light. We present preliminary results from applying this method to lenticular galaxies in the Virgo and Fornax Clusters, in which we show that the most recent star formation activity in these galaxies occurred within the bulges. We also find that the star formation timescales of the bulges are longer than the disks, and that more massive galaxies take longer to lose their gas during the transformation. These results point towards slow processes, such as ram-pressure stripping o...

  10. Galactic Winds Driven by Isotropic and Anisotropic Cosmic-Ray Diffusion in Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakmor, R.; Pfrommer, C.; Simpson, C. M.; Springel, V.

    2016-06-01

    The physics of cosmic rays (CRs) is a promising candidate for explaining the driving of galactic winds and outflows. Recent galaxy formation simulations have demonstrated the need for active CR transport either in the form of diffusion or streaming to successfully launch winds in galaxies. However, due to computational limitations, most previous simulations have modeled CR transport isotropically. Here, we discuss high-resolution simulations of isolated disk galaxies in a 1011 M ⊙ halo with the moving-mesh code Arepo that include injection of CRs from supernovae, advective transport, CR cooling, and CR transport through isotropic or anisotropic diffusion. We show that either mode of diffusion leads to the formation of strong bipolar outflows. However, they develop significantly later in the simulation with anisotropic diffusion compared to the simulation with isotropic diffusion. Moreover, we find that isotropic diffusion allows most of the CRs to quickly diffuse out of the disk, while in the simulation with anisotropic diffusion, most CRs remain in the disk once the magnetic field becomes dominated by its azimuthal component, which occurs after ∼300 Myr. This has important consequences for the gas dynamics in the disk. In particular, we show that isotropic diffusion strongly suppresses the amplification of the magnetic field in the disk compared to anisotropic or no diffusion models. We therefore conclude that reliable simulations which include CR transport inevitably need to account for anisotropic diffusion.

  11. A Spectroscopic Study of Blue Supergiant Stars in the Sculptor Galaxy NGC 55: Chemical Evolution and Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudritzki, R. P.; Castro, N.; Urbaneja, M. A.; Ho, I.-T.; Bresolin, F.; Gieren, W.; Pietrzyński, G.; Przybilla, N.

    2016-10-01

    Low-resolution (4.5-5 Å) spectra of 58 blue supergiant stars distributed over the disk of the Magellanic spiral galaxy NGC 55 in the Sculptor group are analyzed by means of non-LTE techniques to determine stellar temperatures, gravities, and metallicities (from iron peak and α-elements). A metallicity gradient of -0.22 ± 0.06 dex/R 25 is detected. The central metallicity on a logarithmic scale relative to the Sun is [Z] = -0.37 ± 0.03. A chemical evolution model using the observed distribution of column densities of the stellar and interstellar medium gas mass reproduces the observed metallicity distribution well and reveals a recent history of strong galactic mass accretion and wind outflows with accretion and mass-loss rates of the order of the star formation rate. There is an indication of spatial inhomogeneity in metallicity. In addition, the relatively high central metallicity of the disk confirms that two extraplanar metal-poor H ii regions detected in previous work 1.13 to 2.22 kpc above the galactic plane are ionized by massive stars formed in situ outside the disk. For a subsample of supergiants, for which Hubble Space Telescope photometry is available, the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship is used to determine a distance modulus of 26.85 ± 0.10 mag.

  12. The AGORA High-Resolution Galaxy Simulations Comparison Project. II: Isolated Disk Test

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Teyssier, Romain; Butler, Michael J; Ceverino, Daniel; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Feldmann, Robert; Keller, Ben W; Lupi, Alessandro; Quinn, Thomas; Revaz, Yves; Wallace, Spencer; Gnedin, Nickolay Y; Leitner, Samuel N; Shen, Sijing; Smith, Britton D; Thompson, Robert; Turk, Matthew J; Abel, Tom; Arraki, Kenza S; Benincasa, Samantha M; Chakrabarti, Sukanya; DeGraf, Colin; Dekel, Avishai; Goldbaum, Nathan J; Hopkins, Philip F; Hummels, Cameron B; Klypin, Anatoly; Li, Hui; Madau, Piero; Mandelker, Nir; Mayer, Lucio; Nagamine, Kentaro; Nickerson, Sarah; O'Shea, Brian W; Primack, Joel R; Roca-Fàbrega, Santi; Semenov, Vadim; Shimizu, Ikkoh; Simpson, Christine M; Todoroki, Keita; Wadsley, James W; Wise, John H

    2016-01-01

    Using an isolated Milky Way-mass galaxy simulation, we compare results from 9 state-of-the-art gravito-hydrodynamics codes widely used in the numerical community. We utilize the infrastructure we have built for the AGORA High-resolution Galaxy Simulations Comparison Project. This includes the common disk initial conditions, common physics models (e.g., radiative cooling and UV background by the standardized package Grackle) and common analysis toolkit yt, all of which are publicly available. Subgrid physics models such as Jeans pressure floor, star formation, supernova feedback energy, and metal production are carefully constrained across code platforms. With numerical accuracy that resolves the disk scale height, we find that the codes overall agree well with one another in many dimensions including: gas and stellar surface densities, rotation curves, velocity dispersions, density and temperature distribution functions, disk vertical heights, stellar clumps, star formation rates, and Kennicutt-Schmidt relati...

  13. Near-infrared and optical broadband surface photometry of 86 face-on disk dominated galaxies .3. The statistics of the disk and bulge parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deJong, RS

    1996-01-01

    The statistics of the fundamental bulge and disk parameters of galaxies and their relation to the Hubble sequence were investigated by an analysis of optical and near-infrared observations of 86 face-on spiral galaxies. The availability of near-infrared K passband data made it possible for the first

  14. The WHIQII Survey: Metallicities and Spectroscopic Properties of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tollerud, Erik J; van Zee, Liese; Cooke, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    As part of the WIYN High Image Quality Indiana Irvine (WHIQII) survey, we present 123 spectra of emission-line galaxies, selected on intermediate redshift (.4galaxies with blue colors that appear physically compact. The sample includes 15 true Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) and an additional 27 slightly less extreme emission-line systems. These galaxies represent a highly evolving class that may play an important role in the decline of star formation since z~1, but their exact nature and evolutionary pathways remain a mystery. Here, we use emission lines to determine metallicities and ionization parameters, constraining their intrinsic properties and state of star formation. Some LCBG metallicities are consistent with a "bursting dwarf" scenario, while a substantial fraction of others are not, further confirming that LCBGs are a highly heterogeneous population but are broadly consistent with the intermediate redshift field. In agreement with previous studies, we observe overall evolution ...

  15. Investigating the Disk-Corona Relation in a Blue AGN Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jie-Ying; Liu, B.F.

    2009-01-01

    We compile a blue AGN sample from SDSS and investigate the ratio of hard X-ray to bolometric luminosity in dependence on Eddington ratio and black hole mass. Our sample comprises 240 radio-quiet Seyfert 1 galaxies and QSOs. We find that the fraction of hard X-ray luminosity (log$(L_{\\rm 2-10 kev}/L_{\\rm bol})$) decreases with the increase of Eddington ratio. We also find that the fraction of hard X-ray luminosity is independent on the black hole mass for the radio-quiet AGNs. The relation of ...

  16. Galactic winds driven by isotropic and anisotropic cosmic ray diffusion in disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pakmor, Ruediger; Simpson, Christine M; Springel, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The physics of cosmic rays (CR) is a promising candidate for explaining the driving of galactic winds and outflows. Recent galaxy formation simulations have demonstrated the need for active CR transport either in the form of diffusion or streaming to successfully launch winds in galaxies. However, due to computational limitations, most previous simulations have modeled CR transport isotropically. Here, we discuss high resolution simulations of isolated disk galaxies in a $10^{11}\\rm{M_\\odot}$ halo with the moving mesh code {\\sc Arepo} that include injection of CRs from supernovae, advective transport, CR cooling, and CR transport through isotropic or anisotropic diffusion. We show that either mode of diffusion leads to the formation of strong bipolar outflows. However, they develop significantly later in the simulation with anisotropic diffusion compared to the simulation with isotropic diffusion. Moreover, we find that isotropic diffusion allows most of the CRs to quickly diffuse out of the disk, while in th...

  17. The Formation of a Milky Way-size Disk Galaxy 1. A Comparison of Numerical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    The long-standing challenge of creating a Milky Way-like disk galaxy from cosmological simulations has motivated significant developments in both numerical methods and physical models in recent years. We investigate these two fundamental aspects in a new comparison project using a set of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of the formation and evolution of a Milky Way-size galaxy. In this study, we focus on the comparison of two particle-based hydrodynamics methods: the improved smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code Gadget, and the Lagrangian Meshless Finite-Mass (MFM) code GIZMO. All the simulations in this paper use the same initial conditions and physical models, which include physics of both dark matter and baryons, star formation, "energy-driven" outflow, metal-dependent cooling, stellar evolution and metal enrichment from supernovae. We find that both numerical schemes produce a late-type galaxy with extended gaseous and stellar disks. However, notable differences are present in a wide range of g...

  18. Formation of Nuclear Disks and Supermassive Black Hole Binaries in Multi-Scale Hydrodynamical Galaxy Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, Lucio; Escala, Andres

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged) We review the results of the first multi-scale, hydrodynamical simulations of mergers between galaxies with central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) to investigate the formation of SMBH binaries in galactic nuclei. We demonstrate that strong gas inflows produce nuclear disks at the centers of merger remnants whose properties depend sensitively on the details of gas thermodynamics. In numerical simulations with parsec-scale spatial resolution in the gas component and an effective equation of state appropriate for a starburst galaxy, we show that a SMBH binary forms very rapidly, less than a million years after the merger of the two galaxies. Binary formation is significantly suppressed in the presence of a strong heating source such as radiative feedback by the accreting SMBHs. We also present preliminary results of numerical simulations with ultra-high spatial resolution of 0.1 pc in the gas component. These simulations resolve the internal structure of the resulting nuclear disk down to parsec sca...

  19. 3D Spectroscopy of Local Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies: Kinematic Maps of a Sample of 22 Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Gallego, J; Castillo-Morales, A; Gallego, J; Castander, F J; Garland, C A; Gruel, N; Pisano, D J; Zamorano, J

    2011-01-01

    We use three dimensional optical spectroscopy observations of a sample of 22 local Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) to create kinematic maps. By means of these, we classify the kinematics of these galaxies into three different classes: rotating disk (RD), perturbed rotation (PR), and complex kinematics (CK). We find 48% are RDs, 28% are PRs, and 24% are CKs. RDs show rotational velocities that range between $\\sim50$ and $\\sim200 km s^{-1}$, and dynamical masses that range between $\\sim1\\times10^{9}$ and $\\sim3\\times10^{10} M_{\\odot}$. We also address the following two fundamental questions through the study of the kinematic maps: \\emph{(i) What processes are triggering the current starbust in LCBGs?} We search our maps of the galaxy velocity fields for signatures of recent interactions and close companions that may be responsible for the enhanced star formation in our sample. We find 5% of objects show evidence of a recent major merger, 10% of a minor merger, and 45% of a companion. This argues in favor...

  20. LoCuSS: Exploring the selection of faint blue background galaxies for cluster weak-lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Ziparo, Felicia; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Haines, Chris P; Pereira, Maria J; Egami, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological constraints from galaxy clusters rely on accurate measurements of the mass and internal structure of clusters. An important source of systematic uncertainty in cluster mass and structure measurements is the secure selection of background galaxies that are gravitationally lensed by clusters. This issue has been shown to be particular severe for faint blue galaxies. We therefore explore the selection of faint blue background galaxies, by reference to photometric redshift catalogs derived from the COSMOS survey and our own observations of massive galaxy clusters at z~0.2. We show that methods relying on photometric redshifts of galaxies in/behind clusters based on observations through five filters, and on deep 30-band COSMOS photometric redshifts are both inadequate to identify safely faint blue background galaxies. This is due to the small number of filters used by the former, and absence of massive galaxy clusters at redshifts of interest in the latter. We therefore develop a pragmatic method to c...

  1. From blue star-forming to red passive: galaxies in transition in different environments

    CERN Document Server

    Vulcani, Benedetta; Fritz, Jacopo; Fasano, Giovanni; Moretti, Alessia; Calvi, Rosa; Paccagnella, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Exploiting a mass complete (M_*>10^(10.25)M_sun) sample at 0.03Galaxy Group Catalog (PM2GC), we use the (U-B)_rf color and morphologies to characterize galaxies, in particular those that show signs of an ongoing or recent transformation of their star formation activity and/or morphology - green galaxies, red passive late types, and blue star-forming early types. Color fractions depend on mass and only for M_*<10^(10.7)M_sun on environment. The incidence of red galaxies increases with increasing mass, and, for M_*<10^(10.7)M_sun, decreases toward the group outskirts and in binary and single galaxies. The relative abundance of green and blue galaxies is independent of environment, and increases monotonically with galaxy mass. We also inspect galaxy structural parameters, star-formation properties, histories and ages and propose an evolutionary scenario for the different subpopulations. Color transformations are due to a reduction and suppression of SFR in bot...

  2. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. XI. THE REMARKABLY UNDISTURBED NGC 2403 DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Stilp, Adrienne; Radburn-Smith, David [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Skillman, Evan D., E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: adrienne@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: dolphin@raytheon.com, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    We present detailed analysis of color-magnitude diagrams of NGC 2403, obtained from a deep (m {approx}< 28) Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 observation of the outer disk of NGC 2403, supplemented by several shallow (m {approx}< 26) HST Advanced Camera for Surveys fields. We derive the spatially resolved star formation history of NGC 2403 out to 11 disk scale lengths. In the inner portions of the galaxy, we compare the recent star formation rates (SFRs) we derive from the resolved stars with those measured using GALEX FUV + Spitzer 24{mu} fluxes, finding excellent agreement between the methods. Our measurements also show that the radial gradient in recent SFR mirrors the disk exponential profile to 11 scale lengths with no break, extending to SFR densities a factor of {approx}100 lower than those that can be measured with GALEX and Spitzer ({approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}). Furthermore, we find that the cumulative stellar mass of the disk was formed at similar times at all radii. We compare these characteristics of NGC 2403 to those of its ''morphological twins'', NGC 300 and M 33, showing that the structure and age distributions of the NGC 2403 disk are more similar to those of the relatively isolated system NGC 300 than to those of the Local Group analog M 33. We also discuss the environments and HI morphologies of these three nearby galaxies, comparing them to integrated light studies of larger samples of more distant galaxy disks. Taken together, the physical properties and evolutionary history of NGC 2403 suggest that the galaxy has had no close encounters with other M 81 group members and may be falling into the group for the first time.

  3. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury VI. The Ancient Star Forming disk of NGC 404

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Benjamin F; Gilbert, Karoline M; Stilp, Adrienne; Dolphin, Andrew; Seth, Anil C; Weisz, Daniel; Skillman, Evan

    2010-01-01

    We present HST/WFPC2 observations across the disk of the nearby isolated dwarf S0 galaxy NGC 404, which hosts an extended gas disk. Our deepest field reaches the red clump and main-sequence stars with ages 10 Gyr) population. Detailed modeling of the color-magnitude diagram suggests that ~70% of the stellar mass in the NGC 404 disk formed by z~2 (10 Gyr ago) and at least ~90% formed prior to z~1 (8 Gyr ago). These results indicate that the stellar populations of the NGC 404 disk are on average significantly older than those of other nearby disk galaxies, suggesting that early and late type disks may have different long-term evolutionary histories, not simply differences in their recent star formation rates. Comparisons of the spatial distribution of the young stellar mass and FUV emission in GALEX images show that the brightest FUV regions contain the youngest stars, but that some young stars (<160 Myr) lie outside of these regions. FUV luminosity appears to be strongly affected by both age and stellar mas...

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Disk GalaxyFormation: the Magnetization of The Cold and Warm Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2007-12-18

    Using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) adaptive mesh refinement simulations, we study the formation and early evolution of disk galaxies with a magnetized interstellar medium. For a 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} halo with initial NFW dark matter and gas profiles, we impose a uniform 10{sup -9} G magnetic field and follow its collapse, disk formation and evolution up to 1 Gyr. Comparing to a purely hydrodynamic simulation with the same initial condition, we find that a protogalactic field of this strength does not significantly influence the global disk properties. At the same time, the initial magnetic fields are quickly amplified by the differentially rotating turbulent disk. After the initial rapid amplification lasting {approx} 500 Myr, subsequent field amplification appears self-regulated. As a result, highly magnetized material begin to form above and below the disk. Interestingly, the field strengths in the self-regulated regime agrees well with the observed fields in the Milky Way galaxy both in the warm and the cold HI phase and do not change appreciably with time. Most of the cold phase shows a dispersion of order ten in the magnetic field strength. The global azimuthal magnetic fields reverse at different radii and the amplitude declines as a function of radius of the disk. By comparing the estimated star formation rate (SFR) in hydrodynamic and MHD simulations, we find that after the magnetic field strength saturates, magnetic forces provide further support in the cold gas and lead to a decline of the SFR.

  5. The Catalog of Edge-on Disk Galaxies from SDSS. Part I: the catalog and the Structural Parameters of Stellar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Bizyaev, D V; Mosenkov, A V; Reshetnikov, V P; Sotnikova, N Ya; Yablokova, N V; Hillyer, R W

    2014-01-01

    We present a catalog of true edge-on disk galaxies automatically selected from the Seventh Data Release (DR7) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A visual inspection of the $g$, $r$ and $i$ images of about 15000 galaxies allowed us to split the initial sample of edge-on galaxy candidates into 4768 (31.8% of the initial sample) genuine edge-on galaxies, 8350 (55.7%) non-edge-ons, and 1865 (12.5%) edge-on galaxies not suitable for simple automatic analysis because these objects show signs of interaction, warps, or nearby bright stars project on it. We added more candidate galaxies from RFGC, EFIGI, RC3, and Galaxy Zoo catalogs found in the SDSS footprints. Our final sample consists of 5747 genuine edge-on galaxies. We estimate the structural parameters of the stellar disks (the stellar disk thickness, radial scale length, and central surface brightness) in the galaxies by analyzing photometric profiles in each of the g, r, and i images. We also perform simplified 3-D modeling of the light distribution in the stell...

  6. The Dynamical Properties of Virgo Cluster Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ouellette, Nathalie N Q; Holtzman, Jon A; Dalcanton, Julianne J; McDonald, Michael; Zhu, Yucong

    2013-01-01

    By virtue of its proximity, the Virgo Cluster is an ideal laboratory for testing our understanding structure formation in the Universe. In this spirit, we present a dynamical study Virgo galaxies as part of the Spectroscopic and H-band Imaging of Virgo (SHIVir) survey. H$\\alpha$ rotation curves (RC) for our gas-rich galaxies were modelled with a multi-parameter fit function from which various velocity measurements were inferred. Our study takes advantage of archival and our own new data as we aim to compile the largest Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) for a cluster to date. Extended velocity dispersion profiles (VDP) are integrated over varying aperture sizes to extract representative velocity dispersions (VDs) for gas-poor galaxies. Considering the lack of a common standard for the measurement of a fiducial galaxy VD in the literature, we rectify this situation by determining the radius at which the measured VD yields the tightest Fundamental Plane (FP). We found that radius to be at least 1 $R_{\\rm e}$, which ex...

  7. Mass Transport and Turbulence in Gravitationally Unstable Disk Galaxies. I: The Case of Pure Self-Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Goldbaum, Nathan J; Forbes, John C

    2015-01-01

    The role of gravitational instability-driven turbulence in determining the structure and evolution of disk galaxies, and the extent to which gravity rather than feedback can explain galaxy properties, remains an open question. To address it, we present high resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of Milky Way-like isolated disk galaxies, including realistic heating and cooling rates and a physically motivated prescription for star formation, but no form of star formation feedback. After an initial transient, our galaxies reach a state of fully-nonlinear gravitational instability. In this state, gravity drives turbulence and radial inflow. Despite the lack of feedback, the gas in our galaxy models shows substantial turbulent velocity dispersions, indicating that gravitational instability alone may be able to power the velocity dispersions observed in nearby disk galaxies on 100 pc scales. Moreover, the rate of mass transport produced by this turbulence approaches $\\sim 1$ $M_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ for Milky ...

  8. Circumnuclear molecular gas in megamaser disk galaxies NGC 4388 and NGC 1194

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Seth, Anil [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Lyubenova, Mariya; Van de Ven, Glenn; Läsker, Ronald [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Walsh, Jonelle [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    We explore the warm molecular and ionized gas in the centers of two megamaser disk galaxies using K-band spectroscopy. Our ultimate goal is to determine how gas is funneled onto the accretion disk, here traced by megamaser spots on sub-parsec scales. We present NIR IFU data with a resolution of ∼50 pc for two galaxies: NGC 4388 with VLT/SINFONI and NGC 1194 with Keck/OSIRIS+AO. The high spatial resolution and rich spectral diagnostics allow us to study both the stellar and gas kinematics as well as gas excitation on scales only an order of magnitude larger than the maser disk. We find a drop in the stellar velocity dispersion in the inner ∼100 pc of NGC 4388, a common signature of a dynamically cold central component seen in many active nuclei. We also see evidence for noncircular gas motions in the molecular hydrogen on similar scales, with the gas kinematics on 100 parsec scales aligned with the megamaser disk. In contrast, the high ionization lines and Brγ trace outflow along the 100 parsec-scale jet. In NGC 1194, the continuum from the accreting black hole is very strong, making it difficult to measure robust two-dimensional kinematics, but the spatial distribution and line ratios of the molecular hydrogen and Brγ have consistent properties between the two galaxies.

  9. Evidence of Nuclear Disks from the Radial Distribution of CCSNe in Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Illana, Rubén; Pérez-Torres, Miguel Ángel; Alberdi, Antxon

    Galaxy-galaxy interactions are expected to be responsible for triggering massive star formation and possibly accretion onto a supermassive black hole, by providing large amounts of dense molecular gas down to the central kiloparsec region. Several scenarios to drive the gas further down to the central ˜ 100 pc, have been proposed, including the formation of a nuclear disk around the black hole, where massive stars would produce supernovae. Here, we probe the radial distribution of supernovae and supernova remnants in the nuclear regions of the starburst galaxies M82, Arp 299-A, and Arp 220, by using high-angular resolution (≲ 0.'1) radio observations. We derived scale-length values for the putative nuclear disks, which range from ˜ 20-30 pc for Arp 299-A and Arp 220, up to ˜ 140 pc for M82. The radial distribution of SNe for the nuclear disks in Arp 299-A and Arp 220 is also consistent with a power-law surface density profile of exponent γ = 1, as expected from detailed hydrodynamical simulations of nuclear disks. This study is detailed in Herrero-Illana, Perez-Torres, and Alberdi [11].

  10. Mapping the inner regions of the polar disk galaxy NGC4650A with MUSE

    CERN Document Server

    Iodice, E; Combes, F; de Zeeuw, T; Arnaboldi, M; Weilbacher, P M; Bacon, R; Kuntschner, H; Spavone, M

    2015-01-01

    [abridged] The polar disk galaxy NGC4650A was observed during the commissioning of the MUSE at the ESO VLT to obtain the first 2D map of the velocity and velocity dispersion for both stars and gas. The new MUSE data allow the analysis of the structure and kinematics towards the central regions of NGC4650A, where the two components co-exist. These regions were unexplored by the previous long-slit literature data available for this galaxy. The extended view of NGC~4650A given by the MUSE data is a galaxy made of two perpendicular disks that remain distinct and drive the kinematics right into the very centre of this object. In order to match this observed structure for NGC4650A, we constructed a multicomponent mass model made by the combined projection of two disks. By comparing the observations with the 2D kinematics derived from the model, we found that the modelled mass distribution in these two disks can, on average, account for the complex kinematics revealed by the MUSE data, also in the central regions of...

  11. WHICH GALAXIES HOST BARS AND DISKS? A STUDY OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a study of the bar fraction in the Coma Cluster galaxies based on a sample of ∼190 galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 and observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Survey (ACS). The unprecedented resolution of the HST-ACS images allows us to explore the presence of bars, detected by visual classification, throughout a luminosity range of 9 mag (-23 ∼r ∼r ∼9∼*/Modot∼11). This result holds when compared with a sample of bright/massive field galaxies. In addition, we find that the bar fraction does not vary significantly when going from the center to the cluster outskirts, implying that cluster environment plays a second-order role in bar formation/evolution. The shape of the bar fraction distribution with respect to both luminosity and mass is well matched by the luminosity distribution of disk galaxies in Coma, indicating that bars are good tracers of cold stellar disks. We discuss the implications of our results for the formation and evolution scenarios of bars and disks.

  12. The Relation between Stellar and Dynamical Surface Densities in the Central Regions of Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Federico; McGaugh, Stacy S.; Schombert, James M.; Pawlowski, Marcel S.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Spitzer Photometry and Accurate Rotation Curves database to study the relation between the central surface density of stars {{{Σ }}}\\star (0) and dynamical mass {{{Σ }}}{{dyn}}(0) in 135 disk galaxies (S0 to dIrr). We find that {{{Σ }}}{{dyn}}(0) correlates tightly with {{{Σ }}}\\star (0) over 4 dex. This central density relation can be described by a double power law. High surface brightness galaxies are consistent with a 1:1 relation, suggesting that they are self-gravitating and baryon dominated in the inner parts. Low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies systematically deviate from the 1:1 line, indicating that the dark matter contribution progressively increases but remains tightly coupled to the stellar one. The observed scatter is small (˜0.2 dex) and largely driven by observational uncertainties. The residuals show no correlations with other galaxy properties like stellar mass, size, or gas fraction.

  13. The Relation between Stellar and Dynamical Surface Densities in the Central Regions of Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lelli, Federico; Schombert, James M; Pawlowski, Marcel S

    2016-01-01

    We use the SPARC (Spitzer Photometry & Accurate Rotation Curves) database to study the relation between the central surface density of stars Sstar and dynamical mass Sdyn in 135 disk galaxies (S0 to dIrr). We find that Sdyn correlates tightly with Sstar over 4 dex. This central density relation can be described by a double power law. High surface brightness galaxies are consistent with a 1:1 relation, suggesting that they are self-gravitating and baryon dominated in the inner parts. Low surface brightness galaxies systematically deviate from the 1:1 line, indicating that the dark matter contribution progressively increases but remains tightly coupled to the stellar one. The observed scatter is small (~0.2 dex) and largely driven by observational uncertainties. The residuals show no correlations with other galaxy properties like stellar mass, size, or gas fraction.

  14. M82 AS A GALAXY: MORPHOLOGY AND STELLAR CONTENT OF THE DISK AND HALO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. D. Mayya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For decades, the nuclear starburst has taken all the limelight in M82 with very little discussion on M82 as a galaxy. The situation is changing over the last decade, with the publication of some important results on the morphology and stellar content of its disk and halo. In this review, we discuss these recent ndings in the framework of M82 as a galaxy. It is known for almost half a century that M82 as a galaxy doesn't follow the trends expected for normal galaxies that had prompted the morphologists to introduce a separate morphological type under the name Irr II or amorphous. It is now being understood that the main reasons behind its apparently distinct morphological appearance are its peculiar star formation history, radial distribution of gas density and the form of the rotation curve. The disk formed almost all of its stars through a burst mode around 500 Myr ago, with the disk star formation completely quenched around 100 Myr ago. The fossil record of the disk-wide burst lies in the form of hundreds of compact star clusters, similar in mass to that of the globular clusters in the Milky Way, but an order of magnitude younger. The present star formation is restricted entirely to the central 500 pc zone, that contains more than 200 young compact star clusters. The disk contains a non-star-forming spiral arm, hidden from the optical view by a combination of extinction and high inclination to the line of sight. The halo of M82 is also unusual in its stellar content, with evidence for star formation, albeit at low levels, occurring continuously for over a gigayear. We carefully examine each of the observed abnormality to investigate the overall e ect of interaction on the evolution of M82.

  15. Precision Velocity Fields in Spiral Galaxies. I. Noncircular Motions and rms Noise in Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Charles; Bothun, G.

    1999-11-01

    Investigation of the symmetry of the major- and minor-axis rotation curves reveals strong evidence of nonconcentric gas orbits with the maximum center shift of ~300 pc. Comparisons between kinematic and photometric structure (e.g., position angles, inclinations, centers) show considerable noise on small scales. Although large-scale averages are in agreement, this noise is a matter of some concern in the application of the Tully-Fisher method to disk galaxies. Moreover, cases of significant misalignment in position angle between the inner and outer disks are seen in two of the sample galaxies and may indicate the transition between luminous and dark-matter-dominated regions (i.e., where the maximum-disk hypothesis begins to fail). The kinematic disk models are used to find the residual velocity fields, and typical residuals are found to be 10-15 km s-1 over regions 0.5-1.5 kpc in diameter. Correlations are shown to exist between the residual velocity fields and both the Hα intensity and the velocity dispersion images. This suggests that kinematic feedback to the gas from star formation is an important source of noncircular motion. However, the relative quiescence of the large-scale velocity field indicates that the effect does not cause a significant deviation from circular symmetry, kinematically indicating that star formation is not a hidden parameter in the Tully-Fisher relation. Finally, the residual velocity fields are examined for signs of noncircular orbits by looking for azimuthal angular harmonics that would be present if disk galaxies are embedded in a triaxial dark matter potential. For our sample we find the ellipticity of the gas orbits to be round. This is consistent with disks being maximal.

  16. Modeling the Newtonian dynamics for rotation curve analysis of thin-disk galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James Q. Feng; C. F. Gallo

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient,robust computational method for modeling the Newtonian dynamics for rotation curve analysis of thin-disk galaxies.With appropriate mathematical treatments,the apparent numerical difficulties associated with singularities in computing elliptic integrals are completely removed.Using a boundary element discretization procedure,the governing equations are transformed into a linear algebra matrix equation that can be solved by straightforward Gauss elimination in one step without further iterations.The numerical code implemented according to our algorithm can accurately determine the surface mass density distribution in a disk galaxy from a measured rotation curve (or vice versa).For a disk galaxy with a typical fiat rotation curve,our modeling results show that the surface mass density monotonically decreases from the galactic center toward the periphery,according to Newtonian dynamics.In a large portion of the galaxy,the surface mass density follows an approximately exponential law of decay with respect to the galactic radial coordinate.Yet the radial scale length for the surface mass density seems to be generally larger than that of the measured brightness distribution,suggesting an increasing mass-to- light ratio with the radial distance in a disk galaxy.In a nondimensionalized form,our mathematical system contains a dimensionless parameter which we call the “galactic rotation number” that represents the gross ratio of centrifugal force and gravitational force.The value of this galactic rotation number is determined as part of the numerical solution.Through a systematic computational analysis,we have illustrated that the galactic rotation number remains within ±10% of 1.70 for a wide variety of rotation curves.This implies that the total mass in a disk galaxy is proportional to V(0)2 Rg,with V(0) denoting the characteristic rotation velocity (such as the “fiat” value in a typical rotation curve) and Rg the radius of the galactic

  17. Star formation and accretion in the circumnuclear disks of active galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wutschik, Stephanie; Palmer, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    We explore the evolution of supermassive black holes (SMBH) centered in a circumnuclear disk (CND) as a function of the mass supply from the host galaxy and considering different star formation laws, which may give rise to a self-regulation via the injection of supernova-driven turbulence. A system of equations describing star formation, black hole accretion and angular momentum transport was solved for an axisymmetric disk in which the gravitational potential includes contributions from the black hole, the disk and the hosting galaxy. Our model extends the framework provided by Kawakatu et al. (2008) by separately considering the inner and outer part of the disk, and by introducing a potentially non-linear dependence of the star formation rate on the gas surface density and the turbulent velocity. The star formation recipes are calibrated using observational data for NGC 1097, while the accretion model is based on turbulent viscosity as a source of angular momentum transport in a thin viscous accretion disk....

  18. Dark filaments in the galaxy NGC 253: A boiling galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki; Wakamatsu, Ken-Ichi; Malin, David F.

    1994-12-01

    We study the morphology of dark lanes and filaments in the dust-rich galaxy NGC 253 using an unsharp-masked B-band optical photograph. Dust features are classified as 'arcs,' which have heights and scale radius of about 100 to 300 pc, connecting two or more dark clouds, and 'loops' and 'bubbles,' which are developed forms of arcs, expanding into the disk-halo interface. These have diameters of a few hundred pc to approximately 1 kpc. Among the bubbles, we notice a peculiar round-shaped bubble above the nucleus, which could be a large-diameter (approximately 300 pc) supernova remnant exploded in the halo over the nucleus. We also find 'vertical dust streamers,' which comprise bunches of narrow filaments with a thickness of a few tens of pc and are almost perpendicular to the galactic plane, extending coherently for 1 to 2 kpc toward the halo. Finally, we note 'short vertical dust filaments' (or spicules) are found in the central region. We interpret these features as due to three-dimensional structures of gas extending from the disk into the halo. We propose a 'boiling disk' model where the filamentary features are produced by star-forming activity in the disk as well as the influence of magnetic fluxes. We discuss the implication of the model for the chemical evolution of the interstellar medium (ISM) in a galaxy disk.

  19. Far-reaching Dust Distribution in Galaxy Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Matthew W L; De Looze, Ilse; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J; Bianchi, Simone; Boquien, Médéric; Boselli, Alessandro; Buat, Veronique; Ciesla, Laure; Clemens, Marcel; Clements, David L; Cooray, Asantha R; Cortese, Luca; Davies, Jonathan I; Fritz, Jacopo; Gomez, Haley L; Hughes, Thomas M; Karczewski, Oskar Ł; Lu, Nanyao; Oliver, Seb J; Remy-Ruyer, Aurélie; Spinoglio, Luigi; Viaene, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    In most studies of dust in galaxies, dust is only detected from its emission to approximately the optical radius of the galaxy. By combining the signal of 110 spiral galaxies observed as part of the Herschel Reference Survey, we are able to improve our sensitivity by an order-of-magnitude over that for a single object. Here we report the direct detection of dust from its emission that extends out to at least twice the optical radius. We find that the distribution of dust is consistent with an exponential at all radii with a gradient of ~-1.7 dex R$_{25}^{-1}$. Our dust temperature declines linearly from ~25 K in the centre to 15 K at R$_{25}$ from where it remains constant out to ~2.0 R$_{25}$. The surface-density of dust declines with radius at a similar rate to the surface-density of stars but more slowly than the surface-density of the star-formation rate. Studies based on dust extinction and reddening of high-redshift quasars have concluded that there are substantial amounts of dust in intergalactic space...

  20. Radio continuum detection in blue early-type weak-emission-line galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paswan, A.; Omar, A.

    2016-06-01

    The star formation rates (SFRs) in weak-emission-line (WEL) galaxies in a volume-limited (0.02 Hz-1, respectively. The radio far-infrared correlation in four WEL galaxies suggests that the radio continuum emission from WEL galaxies is most likely a result of star formation activities. The median SFR for WEL galaxies is estimated as 0.23 ± 0.06 M⊙ yr-1, which is much less than SFRs (0.5-50 M⊙ yr-1) in purely star-forming blue ETGs. The SFRs in blue ETGs are found to be correlated with their stellar velocity dispersions (σ) and decreasing gradually beyond σ of ˜100 km s-1. This effect is most likely linked to the growth of a black hole and the suppression of star formation via active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. The colour differences between star-forming and WEL subtypes of blue ETGs appear to be driven to a large extent by the level of current star formation activities. In a likely scenario of an evolutionary sequence between subtypes, the observed colour distribution in blue ETGs can be explained best in terms of fast evolution through AGN feedback.

  1. The Distribution of Young Stars and Metals in Simulated Cosmological Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pilkington, K; Jones, D H

    2012-01-01

    We examine the distribution of young stars associated with the spiral arms of a simulated L* cosmological disk galaxy. We find age patterns orthogonal to the arms which are not inconsistent with the predictions of classical density wave theory, a view further supported by recent observations of face-on Grand Design spirals such as M51. The distribution of metals within a simulated ~0.1L* disk is presented, reinforcing the link between star formation, the age-metallicity relation, and the metallicity distribution function.

  2. Evidence for an Untruncated Accretion Disk in the Broad-Line Radio Galaxy 4C+74.26

    CERN Document Server

    Ballantyne, D R

    2005-01-01

    We present evidence for a broad, ionized Fe K line in the XMM-Newton spectrum of the broad-line radio galaxy (BLRG) 4C+74.26. This is the first indication that the innermost regions of the accretion flow in BLRGs contain thin, radiatively efficient disks. Analysis of the 35 ks XMM-Newton observation finds a broad line with an inner radius close to the innermost stable circular orbit for a maximally spinning black hole. The outer radius of the relativistic line is also found to be within 10 gravitational radii. The Fe K line profile gives an inclination angle of ~40 degrees, consistent with the radio limit. There are two narrow components to the Fe K complex: one at 6.4 keV from neutral Fe, and one at 6.2 keV. These may form the blue and red horns of a diskline from farther out on the disk, but a longer observation is required to confirm this hypothesis. We discuss the implications of this observation for models of jet production, and suggest that BLRGs and radio-loud quasars will have larger than average blac...

  3. NoSOCS in SDSS - V. Red disc and blue bulge galaxies across different environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, P. A. A.; Rembold, S. B.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Nascimento, R. S.; Vajgel, B.

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the typical environment and physical properties of `red discs' and `blue bulges', comparing those to the `normal' objects in the blue cloud and red sequence. Our sample is composed of cluster members and field galaxies at z ≤ 0.1, so that we can assess the impact of the local and global environment. We find that disc galaxies display a strong dependence on environment, becoming redder for higher densities. This effect is more pronounced for objects within the virial radius, being also strong related to the stellar mass. We find that local and global environment affect galaxy properties, but the most effective parameter is stellar mass. We find evidence for a scenario where `blue discs' are transformed into `red discs' as they grow in mass and move to the inner parts of clusters. From the metallicity differences of red and blue discs, and the analysis of their star formation histories, we suggest the quenching process is slow. We estimate a quenching time-scale of ˜2-3 Gyr. We also find from the sSFR-M* plane that `red discs' gradually change as they move into clusters. The `blue bulges' have many similar properties than `blue discs', but some of the former show strong signs of asymmetry. The high asymmetry `blue bulges' display enhanced recent star formation compared to their regular counterparts. That indicates some of these systems may have increased their star formation due to mergers. None the less, there may not be a single evolutionary path for these blue early-type objects.

  4. Evidence of nuclear disks in starburst galaxies from their radial distribution of supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Herrero-Illana, R; Alberdi, A

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy-galaxy interactions are expected to be responsible for triggering massive star formation and possibly accretion onto a supermassive black hole, by providing large amounts of dense molecular gas down to the central kiloparsec region. Several scenarios to drive the gas further down to the central ~100 pc, have been proposed, including the formation of a nuclear disk around the black hole, where massive stars would produce supernovae. Here, we probe the radial distribution of supernovae and supernova remnants in the nuclear regions of the starburst galaxies M82, Arp 299-A, and Arp 220, by using high-angular resolution (< 0."1) radio observations published in the literature (for M82 and Arp 220), or obtained by ourselves from the European VLBI Network (Arp 299-A). Our main goal was to characterize the nuclear starbursts in those galaxies and thus test scenarios that propose that nuclear disks of sizes ~100 pc form in the central regions of starburst galaxies. We obtained the radial distribution of super...

  5. Determination of the Thickness of Non-Edge-on Disk Galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-He Zhao; Qiu-He Peng; Lan Wang

    2004-01-01

    We propose a method to determine the thickness of non-edge-on disk galaxies from their observed structure of spiral arms, based on the solution of the truly three-dimensional Poisson's equation for a logarithmic disturbance of density and under the condition where the self-consistency of the density wave theory is no longer valid. From their measured number of arms, pitch angle and location of the innermost point of the spiral arms, we derive and present the thicknesses of 34spiral galaxies.

  6. Megamaser Disks Reveal a Broad Distribution of Black Hole Mass in Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, Jenny E; Kim, Minjin; Laesker, Ronald; Goulding, Andy D; Gao, Feng; Braatz, James A; Henkel, Christian; Condon, James; Lo, Fred K Y; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We use new precision measurements of black hole masses from water megamaser disks to investigate scaling relations between macroscopic galaxy properties and supermassive black hole (BH) mass. The megamaser-derived BH masses span 10^6-10^8 M_sun, while all the galaxy properties that we examine (including stellar mass, central mass density, central velocity dispersion) lie within a narrow range. Thus, no galaxy property correlates tightly with M_BH in ~L* spiral galaxies. Of them all, stellar velocity dispersion provides the tightest relation, but at fixed sigma* the mean megamaser M_BH are offset by -0.6+/-0.1 dex relative to early-type galaxies. Spiral galaxies with non-maser dynamical BH masses do not show this offset. At low mass, we do not yet know the full distribution of BH mass at fixed galaxy property; the non-maser dynamical measurements may miss the low-mass end of the BH distribution due to inability to resolve the spheres of influence and/or megamasers may preferentially occur in lower-mass BHs.

  7. The blue host galaxy of the red GRB 000418

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorosabel, J.; Klose, S.; Christensen, L.;

    2003-01-01

    We report on multi-band (UBVRIZJ(s)K(s)) observations of the host galaxy of the April 18, 2000 gamma-ray burst. The Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) is analysed by fitting empirical and synthetic spectral templates. We find that: (i) the best SED fit is obtained with a starburst template, (ii) ...

  8. Neutrino masses from clustering of red and blue galaxies: a test of astrophysical uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, Molly E C; Lahav, Ofer

    2010-01-01

    Combining measurements of the galaxy power spectrum and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a powerful means of constraining the summed mass of neutrino species sum(m_nu), but is subject to systematic uncertainties due to non-linear structure formation, redshift-space distortions and galaxy bias. We empirically test the robustness of neutrino mass results to these effects by separately analyzing power spectra of red and blue galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-II) Data Release 7 (DR7), combined with the CMB five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP5) data. We consider fitting for a range of maximum wavenumber k using twelve different galaxy bias models. For example, using a new model based on perturbation theory and including redshift space distortions (Saito et al. 2009), the all-galaxy power spectrum combined with WMAP5 for a wavenumber range of k<0.2 Mpc/h yields 95% CL sum(m_nu)<0.46 eV. The red and blue galaxy power spectra give 0.41 and 0.63 eV respectively for this mo...

  9. The X-ray halo of an extremely luminous LSB disk galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2004-01-01

    We are continuing to refine our upper limit on emission from halo gas in Malin 2. The upper limit is, of course, below the detected flux, but is made more difficult to quantify by the disk and possible AGN sources. We are also exploring spectral and spatial-size constraints to help separate the sources of emission. On the theory side, more recent work on the X-ray halo luminosity from halo gas leftover from galaxy formation has lowered the prediction for disk galaxies (e.g. Toft et al. 2002, MNRAS, 335, 799). While our upper limit is well below the original prediction, refinements in model have moved the theoretical goalposts, so that the observation may be consistent with newer models. A recent theoretical development, which our observations of Malin 2 appear to support, is that a substantial amount of mass can be accreted onto galaxies without being heated at a virial shock. The previous standard theory was that gas accreting into a halo hits a virial shock and is heated to high temperatures, which could produce X-ray halos in massive galaxies. Recent models show that "smooth accretion" of matter bypasses the virial shocking (Murali e t al. 2002, ApJ, 571, 1; Birnboim & Dekel 2003, MNRAS, 345, 349). Additionally, new hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy mergers by UCSC graduate student T. J. Cox show that hot gas halos can be created by gas blown out from the merger, taking up orbital energy of the merging galaxies (Cox et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, L87). If mergers rather than virial shocking are the origin of hot gas halos, the existence of an X-ray halo should depend more on past merger activity than halo mass. Then it makes sense that elliptical galaxies and poor groups with ellipticals, which are probably formed in mergers, have X-ray gas halos; while a giant, quiescent LSB disk galaxy like Malin 2, which has never suffered a major merger, does not have an X-ray halo. While both the observational expectations and theoretical models have changed since we began this

  10. Massive blue early-type galaxies in the SDSS. I. A new population of recently quenched elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Daniel H; Cooper, Andrew; Bell, Eric F; Keres, Dusan; Bosch, Frank C van den; Gallazzi, Anna; Haines, Tim; Mann, Justin; Pasquali, Anna; Christian, Allison M

    2013-01-01

    We use the SDSS to explore early-type galaxies (ETGs) that are plausibly in transition between the red sequence and the blue cloud. Through careful morphological inspection, we identify 1500 unusually blue elliptical galaxies among a larger sample of blue ETGs with 0.011e10 h^{-2} M_sun. Blue ellipticals comprise 3.7% of all ETGs with 1e1050% of the expected quiescent growth at z~0 assuming this phase lasts 0.5Gyr. Based on color, stellar M/L ratios and metallicity estimates, we argue that RQEs have recent SFHs that differ from rejuvenated ETGs. Yet, a significant but small incidence (5%) of RQEs with E+A spectra implies that the quenching of most RQEs did not involve a large starburst. Most (90%) RQEs reside at the centers of 3x10^{12}h^{-1} M_sun groups, which agrees well with the `small group scale' in which spiral merging onto the halo center is maximally efficient. The preferred RQE environment rules out satellite-specific quenching processes for most. Under the assumption that most RQEs were quenched by...

  11. Disk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boncz, P.A.; Liu, L.; Özsu, M. Tamer

    2008-01-01

    In disk storage, data is recorded on planar, round and rotating surfaces (disks, discs, or platters). A disk drive is a peripheral device of a computer system, connected by some communication medium to a disk controller. The disk controller is a chip, typically connected to the CPU of the computer b

  12. STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISKS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES: ULTRAVIOLET AND H{alpha} PHOTOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Skillman, Evan D., E-mail: barneskl@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2011-12-20

    We present an analysis of ultradeep UV and H{alpha} imaging of five nearby spiral galaxies to study the recent star formation in the outer disk. Using azimuthally averaged ellipse photometry as well as aperture photometry of individual young stellar complexes, we measure how star formation rates (SFRs) and UV and H{alpha} colors vary with radius. We detect azimuthally averaged UV flux to {approx}1.2-1.4 R{sub 25} in most galaxies; at the edge of the detected UV disk, the surface brightnesses are 28-29 mag arcsec{sup -2}, corresponding to SFR surface densities of {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. Additionally, we detect between 120 and 410 young stellar complexes per galaxy, with a significant number of detections out to {approx}1.5 R{sub 25}. We measure radial FUV-NUV profiles, and find that the dispersion in the UV colors of individual young stellar complexes increases with radius. We investigate how radial variations in the frequency of star formation episodes can create color gradients and increasing dispersion in the UV colors of star-forming regions, like those observed in our study. Specifically, we use recently published, high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of {Sigma}{sub SFR} throughout the disk of M33 to estimate the frequency of star formation episodes throughout the disk of a typical spiral galaxy. We use stellar synthesis models of these star formation histories (SFHs) to measure the variations in UV colors and find that we can replicate large dispersions in UV colors based on episodic SFHs.

  13. Bardeen-Petterson effect and the disk structure of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068

    CERN Document Server

    Caproni, A; Cuesta, H J M; Caproni, Anderson; Abraham, Zulema; Cuesta, Herman J. Mosquera

    2006-01-01

    VLBA high spatial resolution observations of the disk structure of the active galactic nucleus NGC 1068 has recently revealed that the kinematics and geometry of this AGN is well characterized by an outer disk of H2O maser emission having a compact milliarcsecond (parsec) scale structure, which is encircling a thin rotating inner disk surrounding a ~10^7 M$_\\sun$ compact mass, likely a black hole. A curious feature in this source is the occurrence of a misalignment between the inner and outer parts of the disk, with the galaxy's radio jet being orthogonal to the inner disk. We interpret this peculiar configuration as due to the Bardeen-Petterson effect, a general relativistic effect that warps an initially inclined (to the black hole equator) viscous disk, and drives the angular momentum vector of its inner part into alignment with the rotating black hole spin. We estimate the time-scale for both angular momenta to get aligned as a function the spin parameter of the Kerr black hole. We also reproduce the shap...

  14. The Orientation of Jets Relative to Dust Disks in Radio Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt, H R; Clarke, C J; Kinney, A L

    2002-01-01

    We use HST broad band images, VLA and VLBI continuum data to study the three dimensional orientation of jets relative to nuclear dust disks in 20 radio galaxies. The comparison between the position angles of the jets with those of the dust disks major axes shows a wide distribution, suggesting that they are not aligned preferentially perpendicular to each other. We use a statistical technique to determine the 3 dimensional distribution of angles between jets and dust disks rotation axes. This analysis shows that the observations are consistent with jets homogeneously distributed over a large region, extending over polar caps of 55 degrees to 77 degrees, but seem to avoid lying close to the plane of the dust disks. We argue that the lack of close alignment between jets and dust disks axes is not likely to be caused by feeding the nucleus with gas from mergers originated from random directions. We suggest that the misalignment can be due by a warping mechanism in the accretion disk, like self-irradiation instab...

  15. A spectroscopic study of blue supergiant stars in the Sculptor galaxy NGC 55: chemical evolution and distance

    CERN Document Server

    Kudritzki, Rolf; Castro, Norberto; Ho, I-Ting; Bresolin, Fabio; Gieren, Wolfgang; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Przybilla, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Low resolution (4.5 to 5 Angstroem) spectra of 58 blue supergiant stars distributed over the disk of the Magellanic spiral galaxy NGC 55 in the Sculptor group are analyzed by means of non-LTE techniques to determine stellar temperatures, gravities and metallicities (from iron peak and alpha-elements). A metallicity gradient of -0.22 +/- 0.06$ dex/R_25 is detected. The central metallicity on a logarithmic scale relative to the Sun is [Z] = -0.37 +\\- 0.03. A chemical evolution model using the observed distribution of stellar and interstellar medium gas mass column densities reproduces the observed metallicity distribution well and reveals a recent history of strong galactic mass accretion and wind outflows with accretion and mass-loss rates of the order of the star formation rate. There is an indication of spatial inhomogeneity in metallicity. In addition, the relatively high central metallicity of the disk confirms that two extra-planar metal poor HII regions detected in previous work 1.13 to 2.22 kpc above th...

  16. Wind from black hole accretion disk as the driver of a molecular outflow in a galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Tombesi, F; Veilleux, S; Reeves, J N; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E; Reynolds, C S

    2015-01-01

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are often invoked to play a fundamental role in the evolution of both supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the tight SMBH-galaxy relations. Recent observations of large-scale molecular outflows in ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) have provided the evidence to support these studies, as they directly trace the gas out of which stars form. Theoretical models suggest an origin of these outflows as energy-conserving flows driven by fast AGN accretion disk winds. Previous claims of a connection between large-scale molecular outflows and AGN activity in ULIRGs were incomplete because they were lacking the detection of the putative inner wind. Conversely, studies of powerful AGN accretion disk winds to date have focused only on X-ray observations of local Seyferts and a few higher redshift quasars. Here we show the clear detection of a powerful AGN accretion disk wind with a mildly relativistic ...

  17. Modeling Non-Circular Motions in Disk Galaxies: Application to NGC 2976

    CERN Document Server

    Spekkens, K; Spekkens, Kristine

    2007-01-01

    We present a new procedure to fit non-axisymmetric flow patterns to 2-D velocity maps of spiral galaxies. We concentrate on flows caused by bar-like or oval distortions to the total potential that may arise either from a non-axially symmetric halo or a bar in the luminous disk. We apply our method to high-quality CO and Halpha data for the nearby, low-mass spiral NGC 2976 previously obtained by Simon et al., and find that a bar-like model fits the data at least as well as their model with large radial flows. We find supporting evidence for the existence of a bar in the baryonic disk. Our model suggests that the azimuthally averaged central attraction in the inner part of this galaxy is larger than estimated by these authors. It is likely that the disk is also more massive, which will limit the increase to the allowed dark halo density. Allowance for bar-like distortions in other galaxies may either increase or decrease the estimated central attraction.

  18. The flaring HI disk of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2683

    CERN Document Server

    Vollmer, B; Ibata, R

    2015-01-01

    New deep VLA D array HI observations of the highly inclined nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2683 are presented. Archival C array data were processed and added to the new observations. To investigate the 3D structure of the atomic gas disk, we made different 3D models for which we produced model HI data cubes. The main ingredients of our best-fit model are (i) a thin disk inclined by 80 degrees; (ii) a crude approximation of a spiral and/or bar structure by an elliptical surface density distribution of the gas disk; (iii) a slight warp in inclination; (iv) an exponential flare; and (v) a low surface-density gas ring. The slope of NGC 2683's flare is comparable, but somewhat steeper than those of other spiral galaxies. NGC 2683's maximum height of the flare is also comparable to those of other galaxies. On the other hand, a saturation of the flare is only observed in NGC 2683. Based on the comparison between the high resolution model and observations, we exclude the existence of an extended atomic gas halo around the ...

  19. Triggering Active Galactic Nuclei in Hierarchical Galaxy Formation: Disk instability vs. Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Menci, N; Fiore, F; Lamastra, A

    2014-01-01

    Using a semi analytic model for galaxy formation we investigate the effects of Black Hole accretion triggered by disk instabilities (DI) in isolated galaxies on the evolution of AGN. Specifically, we took on, developed and expanded the Hopkins & Quataert (2011) model for the mass inflow following disk perturbations, and compare the corresponding evolution of the AGN population with that arising in a scenario where galaxy interactions trigger AGN (IT mode). We extended and developed the DI model by including different disk surface density profiles, to study the maximal contribution of DI to the evolution of the AGN population. We obtained the following results: i) for luminosities corresponding to $M_{1450}\\gtrsim -26$ the DI mode can provide the BH accretion needed to match the observed AGN luminosity functions up to $z \\approx 4.5$; in such a luminosity range and redshift, it can compete with the IT scenario as the main driver of cosmological evolution of AGN; ii) The DI scenario cannot provide the obser...

  20. Structural properties of disk galaxies I. The intrinsic ellipticity of bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Mendez-Abreu, J; Corsini, E M; Simonneau, E

    2007-01-01

    (Abridged) A variety of formation scenarios was proposed to explain the diversity of properties observed in bulges. Studying their intrinsic shape can help in constraining the dominant mechanism at the epochs of their assembly. The structural parameters of a magnitude-limited sample of 148 unbarred S0--Sb galaxies were derived in order to study the correlations between bulges and disks as well as the probability distribution function (PDF) of the intrinsic equatorial ellipticity of bulges. It is presented a new fitting algorithm (GASP2D) to perform the two-dimensional photometric decomposition of galaxy surface-brightness distribution. This was assumed to be the sum of the contribution of a bulge and disk component characterized by elliptical and concentric isophotes with constant (but possibly different) ellipticity and position angles. Bulge and disk parameters of the sample galaxies were derived from the J-band images which were available in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. The PDF of the equatorial elliptic...

  1. Cannibals in the thick disk: the young $\\alpha-$rich stars as evolved blue stragglers

    CERN Document Server

    Jofre, P; Izzard, R G; Van Eck, S; Hawkins, K; Jorissen, A; Gilmore, G; Paladini, C

    2016-01-01

    Spectro-seismic measurements of red giant stars enabled the recent discovery of giant stars in the thick disk that are more massive than 1.4 M_sun (Martig et al 2015, Chiappini et al 2015). While it has been claimed that most of these stars are younger than the rest of the typical thick disk stars, we show evidence that they might be products of mass transfer in binary evolution, notably evolved blue stragglers. We took new measurements of the radial velocities in a sample of 26 stars from APOKASC, including 13 of the "young" stars of Martig et al (2015) and 13 "old" stars with similar stellar parameters but with masses below 1 M_sun and found that some stars are in binary systems, contrary to what has been claimed before. Furthermore, with a population synthesis of only low-mass stars but including binary evolution and mass transfer, we can reproduce the masses and the [C/N] ratios of the 26 stars. Our study shows how asteroseismology of solar-type red giants provides us with a unique opportunity to study th...

  2. Kinematic Constraints on Evolutionary Scenarios for Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies I. Neutral Gas Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Zee, L; Skillman, E D; Zee, Liese van; Salzer, John J.; Skillman, Evan D.

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of high spatial resolution HI synthesis observations of six blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies. Optically, the selected galaxies have smooth, symmetric isophotes, and thus are the most likely of the BCD class to fade into an object morphologically similar to a dwarf elliptical when the current starburst ends. The neutral gas in all six galaxies appears to be rotationally supported, however, indicating that true morphological transformation from a BCD to a dE will require significant loss of angular momentum. Based on the observed neutral gas dynamics of these and other BCDs, it is unlikely that present-day BCDs will evolve directly into dwarf ellipticals after a starburst phase. We discuss alternative evolutionary scenarios for BCDs and place them within the larger context of galaxy formation and evolution models.

  3. GREEN GALAXIES IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Zhizheng; Kong, Xu; Fan, Lulu, E-mail: panzz@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xkong@ustc.edu.cn [Center of Astrophysics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2013-10-10

    We present research on the morphologies, spectra, and environments of ≈2350 'green valley' galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the COSMOS field. The bimodality of dust-corrected NUV–r {sup +} color is used to define 'green valley'; it removes dusty star-forming galaxies from galaxies that are truly transitioning between the blue cloud and the red sequence. Morphological parameters of green galaxies are intermediate between those of blue and red galaxy populations, both on the Gini-asymmetry and the Gini-M{sub 20} planes. Approximately 60%-70% of green disk galaxies have intermediate or big bulges, and only 5%-10% are pure disk systems, based on morphological classification using the Zurich Estimator of Structural Types. The obtained average spectra of green galaxies are intermediate between blue and red ones in terms of [O II], Hα, and Hβ emission lines. Stellar population synthesis on the average spectra shows that green galaxies are on average older than blue galaxies but younger than red galaxies. Green galaxies and blue galaxies have similar projected galaxy density (Σ{sub 10}) distributions at z > 0.7. At z < 0.7, the fractions of M{sub *} < 10{sup 10.0} M{sub ☉} green galaxies located in a dense environment are found to be significantly larger than those of blue galaxies. The morphological and spectral properties of green galaxies are consistent with the transitioning population between the blue cloud and the red sequence. The possible mechanisms for quenching star formation activities in green galaxies are discussed. The importance of active galactic nucleus feedback cannot be well constrained in our study. Finally, our findings suggest that environmental conditions, most likely starvation and harassment, significantly affect the transformation of M{sub *} < 10{sup 10.0} M{sub ☉} blue galaxies into red galaxies, especially at z < 0.5.

  4. Analytic and numerical realisations of a disk galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Stringer, M J; Benson, A J; Governato, F

    2010-01-01

    Recent focus on the importance of cold, unshocked gas accretion in galaxy formation -- not explicitly included in semi-analytic studies -- motivates the following detailed comparison between two inherently different modelling techniques: direct hydrodynamical simulation and semi-analytic modelling. By analysing the physical assumptions built into the Gasoline simulation, formulae for the emergent behaviour are derived which allow immediate and accurate translation of these assumptions to the Galform semi-analytic model. The simulated halo merger history is then extracted and evolved using these equivalent equations, predicting a strikingly similar galactic system. This exercise demonstrates that it is the initial conditions and physical assumptions which are responsible for the predicted evolution, not the choice of modelling technique. On this level playing field, a previously published Galform model is applied (including additional physics such as chemical enrichment and feedback from active galactic nuclei...

  5. The Link Between Light and Mass in Late-type Spiral Galaxy Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Swaters, Robert A; Martinsson, Thomas P K; Westfall, Kyle B; Andersen, David R; Verheijen, Marc A W

    2014-01-01

    We present the correlation between the extrapolated central disk surface brightness (mu) and extrapolated central surface mass density (Sigma) for galaxies in the DiskMass sample. This mu-Sigma-relation has a small scatter of 30% at the high-surface-brightness (HSB) end. At the low surface brightness (LSB) end, galaxies fall above the mu-Sigma-relation, which we attribute to their higher dark matter content. After correcting for the dark matter, as well as for the contribution of gas and the effects of radial gradients in the disk, the LSB end falls back on the linear mu-Sigma-relation. The resulting scatter about the corrected mu-Sigma-relation is 25% at the HSB end, and about 50% at the LSB end. The intrinsic scatter in the mu-Sigma-relation is estimated to be 10% to 20%. Thus, if the surface brightness is known, the stellar surface mass density is known to within 10-20% (random error). Assuming disks have an exponential vertical distribution of mass, the average (M_L)_K is 0.24 Msun/Lsun, with an intrinsic...

  6. Star Formation and Metallicity Gradients in Semi-analytic Models of Disk Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Jian; Huang, Meiling; Yates, Robert M; Moran, Sean; Heckman, Timothy M; Davé, Romeel; Guo, Qi

    2013-01-01

    We updated our radially-resolved SAMs of galaxy formation to track the radial distribution of stars, metals, atomic and molecular gas in galactic disks. The models are run on both MS and MS II using the recipes outlined in Fu et al. (2010) and Guo et al. (2011), with 3 main changes: (1) We adopt a simple star formation law where \\Sigma_SFR \\propto \\Sigma_H2. (2) We inject the heavy elements produced by SNe directly into the halo, instead of first mixing them with the disk cold gas. (3) We include radial gas inflows in disks using a model of the form v_inflow=alpha r. The average \\Sigma_H2 profiles in L_* galaxies strongly constrains the inflow velocities, favoring models where v_inflow ~ 7 km/s at r=10 kpc. The radial inflow model has little influence on the gas and stellar metallicity gradients in the outer disks. Gas metallicity gradients are affected much more strongly by the fraction of metals that are directly injected into the halo gas, rather than mixed with the interstellar cold gas. Metals ejected ou...

  7. The Flying Spaghetti Monster: Impact of magnetic fields on ram pressure stripping in disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ruszkowski, M; Lee, D; Shin, M -S

    2012-01-01

    Ram pressure stripping can remove significant amounts of gas from galaxies in clusters, and thus has a large impact on the evolution of cluster galaxies. Recent observations have shown that key properties of ram-pressure stripped tails of galaxies, such as their width and structure, are in conflict with predictions by simulations. To increase the realism of existing simulations, we simulated for the first time a disk galaxy exposed face-on to a uniformly magnetized wind including radiative cooling and self-gravity of the gas. We find that magnetic fields have a strong effect on the morphology of the gas in the tail of the galaxy. While in the purely hydrodynamical case the tail is very clumpy, the MHD case shows very filamentary structures in the tail. The filaments can be strongly supported by magnetic pressure and, wherever this is the case, the magnetic fields vectors tend to be aligned with the filaments. Interestingly, we observe the formation of two dominant magnetized density tails behind the galaxy re...

  8. Shape Evolution of Massive Early-Type Galaxies: Confirmation of Increased Disk Prevalence at z>1

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Yu-Yen; Rix, Hans-Walter; Wuyts, Stijn; Zibetti, Stefano; Ramkumar, Balasubramanian; Holden, Bradford P

    2012-01-01

    We use high-resolution K-band VLT/HAWK-I imaging over 0.25 square degrees to study the structural evolution of massive early-type galaxies since z~1. Mass-selected samples, complete down to log(M/M_sun)~10.7 such that `typical' L* galaxies are included at all redshifts, are drawn from pre-existing photometric redshift surveys. We then separated the samples into different redshift slices and classify them as late- or early-type galaxies on the basis of their specific star-formation rate. Axis-ratio measurements for the ~400 early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0.61 are, on average, flatter than at z11.3) are the roundest, with a pronounced lack among them of galaxies that are flat in projection. Merging is a plausible mechanism that can explain both results: at all epochs merging is required for early-type galaxies to grow beyond log(M/M_sun)~11.3, and all early types over time gradually and partially loose their disk-like characteristics.

  9. Simulating the formation of disk galaxies: The impact of Jets from Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Okamoto, Takashi; Bower, Richard G

    2007-01-01

    Recent semi-analytic models have highlighted the role of AGN jets in regulating the formation of galaxies. In this paper, we present a new implementation of feedback due to active galactic nuclei (AGN) in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation in which AGN feedback is assumed to heat the halo gas through the production of jets. Combining a theoretical model of mass accretion onto black holes with a multiphase description of star-forming gas, we self-consistently follow evolution of both galaxies and their central black holes. The novelty in our model is that we consider the two distinct accretion modes: standard radiatively efficient thin accretion disks and radiatively inefficient accretion flows which we will generically refer to as RIAFs; motivated by the theoretical modelsfor jet production in accretion disks, we assume that only the RIAF is responsible for the production of powerful jets. The focus of this paper is to investigate the interplay between galaxies and their central black h...

  10. Mass Transport and Turbulence in Gravitationally Unstable Disk Galaxies II: The Effects of Star Formation Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Goldbaum, Nathan J; Forbes, John C

    2016-01-01

    Self-gravity and stellar feedback are capable of driving turbulence and transporting mass and angular momentum in disk galaxies, but the balance between them is not well understood. In the previous paper in this series, we showed that gravity alone can drive turbulence in galactic disks, regulate their Toomre $Q$ parameters to $\\sim$ 1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to fuel star formation in the centers of present-day galaxies. In this paper we extend our models to include the effects of star formation feedback. We show that feedback suppresses galaxies' star formation rates by a factor of $\\sim$ 5 and leads to the formation of a multi-phase atomic and molecular ISM. Both the star formation rate and the phase balance produced in our simulations agree well with observations of nearby spirals. After our galaxies reach steady state, we find that the inclusion of feedback actually lowers the gas velocity dispersion slightly compared to the case of pure self-gravity, and also slightly reduces the...

  11. How well can we Measure the Intrinsic Velocity Dispersion of Distant Disk Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, R; Cresci, G; Genzel, R; Bouche, N; Burkert, A; Buschkamp, P; Genel, S; Hicks, E; Kurk, J; Lutz, D; Newman, S; Shapiro, K; Sternberg, A; Tacconi, L J; Wuyts, S

    2011-01-01

    The kinematics of distant galaxies, from z=0.1 to z>2, play a key role in our understanding of galaxy evolution from early times to the present. One of the important parameters is the intrinsic, or local, velocity dispersion of a galaxy, which allows one to quantify the degree of non-circular motions such as pressure support. However, this is difficult to measure because the observed dispersion includes the effects of (often severe) beam smearing on the velocity gradient. Here we investigate four methods of measuring the dispersion that have been used in the literature, to assess their effectiveness at recovering the intrinsic dispersion. We discuss the biasses inherent in each method, and apply them to model disk galaxies in order to determine which methods yield meaningful quantities, and under what conditions. All the mean weighted dispersion estimators are affected by (residual) beam smearing. In contrast, the dispersion recovered by fitting a spatially and spectrally convolved disk model to the data is u...

  12. Seeking large-scale magnetic fields in a pure-disk dwarf galaxy NGC 2976

    CERN Document Server

    Drzazga, R T; Heald, G H; Elstner, D; Gallagher, J S

    2016-01-01

    It is still unknown how magnetic field-generation mechanisms could operate in low-mass dwarf galaxies. Here, we present a detailed study of a nearby pure-disk dwarf galaxy NGC 2976. Unlike previously observed dwarf objects, this galaxy possesses a clearly defined disk. For the purpose of our studies, we performed deep multi-frequency polarimetric observations of NGC 2976 with the VLA and Effelsberg radio telescopes. Additionally, we supplement them with re-imaged data from the WSRT-SINGS survey. The magnetic field morphology discovered in NGC 2976 consists of a southern polarized ridge. This structure does not seem to be due to just a pure large-scale dynamo process (possibly cosmic-ray driven) at work in this object, as indicated by the RM data and dynamo number calculations. Instead, the field of NGC 2976 is modified by past gravitational interactions and possibly also by ram pressure inside the M 81 galaxy group environment. The estimates of total (7 muG) and ordered (3 muG) magnetic field strengths, as we...

  13. Evolution in the Disks and Bulges of Group Galaxies since z=0.4

    CERN Document Server

    McGee, Sean L; Henderson, Robert D E; Wilman, David J; Bower, Richard G; Mulchaey, John S; Oemler, Augustus

    2008-01-01

    We present quantitative morphology measurements of a sample of optically selected group galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.55 using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the GIM2D surface brightness--fitting software package. The group sample is derived from the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Redshift survey (CNOC2) and follow-up Magellan spectroscopy. We compare these measurements to a similarly selected group sample from the Millennium Galaxy Catalogue (MGC) at 0.05 < z < 0.12. We find that, at both epochs, the group and field fractional bulge luminosity (B/T) distributions differ significantly, with the dominant difference being a deficit of disk--dominated (B/T < 0.2) galaxies in the group samples. At fixed luminosity, z=0.4 groups have ~ 5.5 +/- 2 % fewer disk--dominated galaxies than the field, while by z=0.1 this difference has increased to ~ 19 +/- 6 %. Despite the morphological evolution we see no evidence that the group environment is actively...

  14. NoSOCS in SDSS. V. Red Disc and Blue Bulge Galaxies Across Different Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, P A A; Ribeiro, A L B; Nascimento, R S; Vajgel, B

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the typical environment and physical properties of "red discs" and "blue bulges", comparing those to the "normal" objects in the blue cloud and red sequence. Our sample is composed of cluster members and field galaxies at $z \\le 0.1$, so that we can assess the impact of the local and global environment. We find that disc galaxies display a strong dependence on environment, becoming redder for higher densities. This effect is more pronounced for objects within the virial radius, being also strong related to the stellar mass. We find that local and global environment affect galaxy properties, but the most effective parameter is stellar mass. We find evidence for a scenario where "blue discs" are transformed into "red discs" as they grow in mass and move to the inner parts of clusters. From the metallicity differences of red and blue discs, and the analysis of their star formation histories, we suggest the quenching process is slow. We estimate a quenching time scale of $\\sim $ 2$-$3 Gyr. We also...

  15. Kinematic classifications of local interacting galaxies: implications for the merger/disk classifications at high-z

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Yuan, Tiantian; Larson, Kirsten L; Casey, Caitlin M; Smith, Howard A; Sanders, D B; Kewley, Lisa J; Hayward, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    The classification of galaxy mergers and isolated disks is key for understanding the relative importance of galaxy interactions and secular evolution during the assembly of galaxies. The kinematic properties of galaxies as traced by emission lines have been used to suggest the existence of a significant population of high-z star-forming galaxies consistent with isolated rotating disks. However, recent studies have cautioned that post-coalescence mergers may also display disk-like kinematics. To further investigate the robustness of merger/disk classifications based on kinematic properties, we carry out a systematic classification of 24 local (U)LIRGs spanning a range of galaxy morphologies: from isolated spiral galaxies, ongoing interacting systems, to fully merged remnants. We artificially redshift the WiFeS observations of these local (U)LIRGs to z=1.5 to make a realistic comparison with observations at high-z, and also to ensure that all galaxies have the same spatial sampling of ~900 pc. Using both kineme...

  16. Ab initio Simulations of a Supernova Driven Galactic Dynamo in an Isolated Disk Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Butsky, Iryna; Kim, Ji-hoon; Yang, Hung-I; Abel, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We study the magnetic field evolution of an isolated spiral galaxy, using isolated Milky Way-mass galaxy formation simulations and a novel prescription for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) supernova feedback. Our main result is that a galactic dynamo can be seeded and driven by supernova explosions, resulting in magnetic fields whose strength and morphology is consistent with observations. In our model, supernovae supply thermal energy, and a low level magnetic field along with their ejecta. The thermal expansion drives turbulence, which serves a dual role by efficiently mixing the magnetic field into the interstellar medium, and amplifying it by means of turbulent dynamo. The computational prescription for MHD supernova feedback has been implemented within the publicly available ENZO code, and is fully described in this paper. This improves upon ENZO's existing modules for hydrodynamic feedback from stars and active galaxies. We find that the field attains $\\mu G$-levels over Gyr-time scales throughout the disk. Th...

  17. Chemical Evolution of Irregular and Blue Compact Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    L. Carigi; Colin, P.; Peimbert, M.; Sarmiento, A

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the chemical evolution of metal poor galaxies and conclude that their oxygen deficiency is not due to: the production of black holes by massive stars or a varying slope of the Initial Mass Function, IMF, at the high-mass end. A varying IMF at the low-mass end alone or in combination with: (a) an outflow of oxygen-rich material, (b) an outflow of well-mixed material, and (c) the presence of dark matter that does not participate in the chemical evolution process, is needed to explain...

  18. The red extended structure of IC10, the nearest blue compact galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbrandt, Stephanie A N; Irwin, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The Local Group starburst galaxy IC10 is the closest example of a blue compact galaxy. Here, we use optical gi imaging from CFHT/MegaCam and near infra-red JHK imaging from UKIRT/WFCAM to conduct a comprehensive survey of the structure of IC10. We examine the spatial distribution of its resolved young, intermediate and old stellar populations to large radius and low effective surface brightness levels. Akin to other dwarfs with multiple populations of different ages, stellar populations of decreasing average age are increasingly concentrated in this galaxy. We find that the young, star-bursting population, and the AGB population, are both offset from the geometric center of the older RGB population by a few hundred parsecs, implying that the younger star formation occurred significantly away from the center of the galaxy. The RGB population traces an extended structure that is typical of blue compact galaxies, with an effective radius of ~5.75 arcmins (~1.25 kpc). These measurements show that IC10 is much mor...

  19. The Nature of Nearby Counterparts to Intermediate Redshift Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies II. CO Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, C A; Pisano, D J; Guzmán, R; Castander, F J; Brinkmann, J

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of a single-dish beam-matched survey of the three lowest rotational transitions of CO in a sample of 20 local (D < 70 Mpc) Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs). These ~L*, blue, high surface brightness, starbursting galaxies were selected with the same criteria used to define LCBGs at higher redshifts. Our detection rate was 70%, with those galaxies having Lblue<7e9 Lsun no detected. We find the H2 masses of local LCBGs range from 6.6e6 to 2.7e9 Msun, assuming a Galactic CO-to-H2 conversion factor. Combining these results with our earlier HI survey of the same sample, we find that the ratio of molecular to atomic gas mass is low, typically 5-10%. Using a Large Velocity Gradient model, we find that the average gas conditions of the entire ISM in local LCBGs are similar to those found in the centers of star forming regions in our Galaxy, and nuclear regions of other galaxies. Star formation rates, determined from IRAS fluxes, are a few solar masses per year, much higher per unit d...

  20. Seeking large-scale magnetic fields in a pure-disk dwarf galaxy NGC 2976

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzazga, R. T.; Chyży, K. T.; Heald, G. H.; Elstner, D.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: It is still unknown how magnetic field-generation mechanisms could operate in low-mass dwarf galaxies. Here, we present a detailed study of a nearby pure-disk dwarf galaxy NGC 2976. Unlike previously observed dwarf objects, this galaxy possesses a clearly defined disk. We also discuss whether NGC 2976 could serve as a potential source of the intergalactic magnetic field. Methods: For the purpose of our studies, we performed deep multi-frequency polarimetric observations of NGC 2976 with the VLA and Effelsberg radio telescopes. Additionally, we supplement them with re-imaged data from the WSRT-SINGS survey for which a rotation measure (RM) synthesis was performed. A new weighting scheme for the RM synthesis algorithm, consisting of including information about the quality of data in individual frequency channels, was proposed and investigated. Application of this new weighting to the simulated data, as well as to the observed data, results in an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio in the Faraday depth space. Results: The magnetic field morphology discovered in NGC 2976 consists of a southern polarized ridge. This structure does not seem to be due to just a pure large-scale dynamo process (possibly cosmic-ray driven) at work in this object, as indicated by the RM data and dynamo number calculations. Instead, the field of NGC 2976 is modified by past gravitational interactions and possibly also by ram pressure inside the M 81 galaxy group environment. The estimates of total (7 μG) and ordered (3 μG) magnetic field strengths, as well as degree of field order (0.46), which is similar to those observed in spirals, suggest that tidally generated magnetized gas flows can further enhance dynamo action in the object. NGC 2976 is apparently a good candidate for the efficient magnetization of its neighbourhood. It is able to provide an ordered (perhaps also regular) magnetic field into the intergalactic space up to a distance of about 5 kpc. Conclusions: Tidal

  1. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: The evolution of the blue fraction in groups and the field

    CERN Document Server

    Gerke, B F; Faber, S M; Cooper, M C; Croton, D J; Davis, M; Willmer, C N A; Yan, R; Coil, A L; Guhathakurta, P; Koo, D C; Weiner, B J; Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Croton, Darren J.; Davis, Marc; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the behavior of the blue galaxy fraction over the redshift range 0.75 <= z <= 1.3 in the DEEP2 Survey, both for field galaxies and for galaxies in groups. The primary aim is to determine the role that groups play in driving the evolution of galaxy colour at high z. The colour segregation observed between local group and field samples is already in place at z ~ 1: DEEP2 groups have a significantly lower blue fraction than the field. At fixed z, there is also a correlation between blue fraction and galaxy magnitude, such that brighter galaxies are more likely to be red, both in groups and in the field. In addition, there is a negative correlation between blue fraction and group richness. In terms of evolution, the blue fraction in groups and the field remains roughly constant from z=0.75 to z ~ 1, but beyond this redshift the blue fraction in groups rises rapidly with z, and the group and field blue fractions become indistinguishable at z ~ 1.3. Careful tests indicate that this effect does not ...

  2. Erratum: Precision Velocity Fields in Spiral Galaxies. I. Noncircular Motions and rms Noise in Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Charles; Bothun, G.

    2000-05-01

    In the paper ``Precision Velocity Fields in Spiral Galaxies. I. Noncircular Motions and rms Noise in Disks'' by Charles Beauvais and G. Bothun (ApJS, 125, 99) the abstract was incorrect. The corrected abstract is as follows: Imaging Fabry-Perot data have been acquired for a sample of spiral galaxies from which two-dimensional velocity fields have been constructed on a subkiloparsec resolution scale. These velocity fields are then examined for evidence of noncircular motions. Individual spectra are extracted and the resultant line profiles are fitted with Voigt, Gaussian, and Lorentzian functions. Gaussians are shown to provide a better model for simultaneously fitting a large number of line profiles, successfully fitting a higher fraction. The kinematic disk (i.e., tilted ring) modeling procedure is studied in detail and is shown to accurately recover the underlying rotational structure of galactic disks. The process of obtaining rotation curves from full two-dimensional velocity data is examined. Small-scale ``bumps and wiggles'' on the rotation curves are shown to be due to the inclusion of noncircular motions. Use of the rotation curve estimate returned by the modeling procedure rather than deprojection of the velocity field is recommended to avoid their inclusion. Investigation of the symmetry of the major- and minor-axis rotation curves reveal strong evidence of nonconcentric gas orbits with the maximum center shift of ~300 pc. Comparisons between kinematic and photometric structure (e.g., position angles, inclinations, centers) show considerable noise on small scales. Although large-scale averages are in agreement, this noise is a matter of some concern in the application of the Tully-Fisher method to disk galaxies. Moreover, cases of significant misalignment in position angle between the inner and outer disks are seen in two of the sample galaxies and may indicate the transition between luminous and dark-matter-dominated regions (i.e., where the maximum disk

  3. The Link between Light and Mass in Late-type Spiral Galaxy Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaters, Robert A.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Andersen, David R.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.

    2014-12-01

    We present the correlation between the extrapolated central disk surface brightness (μ) and extrapolated central surface mass density (Σ) for galaxies in the DiskMass sample. This μ-Σ relation has a small scatter of 30% at the high surface brightness (HSB) end. At the low surface brightness (LSB) end, galaxies fall above the μ-Σ relation, which we attribute to their higher dark matter content. After correcting for the dark matter as well as for the contribution of gas and the effects of radial gradients in the disk, the LSB end falls back on the linear μ-Σ relation. The resulting scatter around the corrected μ-Σ relation is 25% at the HSB end and about 50% at the LSB end. The intrinsic scatter in the μ-Σ relation is estimated to be 10%-20%. Thus, if μ K, 0 is known, the stellar surface mass density is known to within 10%-20% (random error). Assuming disks have an exponential vertical distribution of mass, the average \\Upsilon _\\ast ^K is 0.24 M ⊙/L ⊙, with an intrinsic scatter around the mean of at most 0.05 M ⊙/L ⊙. This value for \\Upsilon _\\ast ^K is 20% smaller than we found in Martinsson et al., mainly due to the correction for dark matter applied here. This small scatter means that among the galaxies in our sample, variations in scale height, vertical density profile shape, and/or the ratio of vertical over radial velocity dispersion must be small.

  4. THE LINK BETWEEN LIGHT AND MASS IN LATE-TYPE SPIRAL GALAXY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaters, Robert A. [National Optical Astronomical Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Martinsson, Thomas P. K. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Westfall, Kyle B. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Andersen, David R. [NRC Herzberg Programs in Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Verheijen, Marc A. W., E-mail: rob@swaters.net [University of Groningen, Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Landleven 12, 9747-AD Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-12-20

    We present the correlation between the extrapolated central disk surface brightness (μ) and extrapolated central surface mass density (Σ) for galaxies in the DiskMass sample. This μ-Σ relation has a small scatter of 30% at the high surface brightness (HSB) end. At the low surface brightness (LSB) end, galaxies fall above the μ-Σ relation, which we attribute to their higher dark matter content. After correcting for the dark matter as well as for the contribution of gas and the effects of radial gradients in the disk, the LSB end falls back on the linear μ-Σ relation. The resulting scatter around the corrected μ-Σ relation is 25% at the HSB end and about 50% at the LSB end. The intrinsic scatter in the μ-Σ relation is estimated to be 10%-20%. Thus, if μ {sub K,} {sub 0} is known, the stellar surface mass density is known to within 10%-20% (random error). Assuming disks have an exponential vertical distribution of mass, the average Υ{sub ∗}{sup K} is 0.24 M {sub ☉}/L {sub ☉}, with an intrinsic scatter around the mean of at most 0.05 M {sub ☉}/L {sub ☉}. This value for Υ{sub ∗}{sup K} is 20% smaller than we found in Martinsson et al., mainly due to the correction for dark matter applied here. This small scatter means that among the galaxies in our sample, variations in scale height, vertical density profile shape, and/or the ratio of vertical over radial velocity dispersion must be small.

  5. Chemo-Dynamical Evolution of Disk Galaxies, Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczik, P.

    In this paper I present, the new Chemo-Dynamical code, incorporated to the standard Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (CD-SPH). This code used to modelling the complex evolution of disk galaxy systems. The more detailed description of SPH code and the Star Formation (SF) and Super Novae (SN) algorithms you can find in our earlier work Berczik P. & Kravchuk S.G., 1996, ApSpSci, 245, 27. The galaxy presented via tree component system. The Dark Matter Halo described as an external gravitational potential with distribution of Dark Matter density (Burkert A. 1995, ApJ, 447, L25): ρDM (r) = frac ρ0 (1 + r / r0) cdot (1 + r / r0)2. The total mass of Dark Matter Halo is 1012 Modot. The second component is a hot coronal gas, with Thot ~106 K. This component presented as a uniformly distributed SPH gas with initial solid body rotation and with additisional random velocity component Δ V ~100 km/sec. The total mass of this component is 5 cdot 1010 Modot. The last component is a cold gas (Tcold ~104 K). This component presented also as a uniformly distributed SPH gas with initial solid body rotation and with additional random velocity component Δ V ~10 km/sec. The total mass of this component also is 5 cdot 1010 Modot. In the paper presented a more complex and may be more realistic incorporation of SF & SN in the SPH code. The presented calculation is clearly show, what the some interestiong and important properties of isolated disk galaxies we can explain using this simple, tree component "collapsing" model. In the frame of this approach we are able to reproduce the presently observed kinematics of star and gaseous components as well as their distributions and heavy element abundances. The developed model provide the realystic description of dynamics and chemical evolution of typical disk galaxies over the Hubble timescale.

  6. Models for the 3-D axisymmetric gravitational potential of the Milky Way Galaxy - A detailed modelling of the Galactic disk

    CERN Document Server

    Barros, D A; Dias, W S

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Galaxy mass models based on simple and analytical functions for the density and potential pairs have been widely proposed in the literature. Disk models constrained by kinematic data alone give information on the global disk structure only very near the Galactic plane. We attempt to circumvent this issue by constructing disk mass models whose three-dimensional structures are constrained by a recent Galactic star counts model in the near-infrared and also by observations of the hydrogen distribution in the disk. Our main aim is to provide models for the gravitational potential of the Galaxy that are fully analytical but also with a more realistic description of the density distribution in the disk component. Methods. From the disk model directly based on the observations (here divided into the thin and thick stellar disks and the HI and H$_2$ disks subcomponents), we produce fitted mass models by combining three Miyamoto-Nagai disk profiles of any "model order" (1, 2, or 3) for each disk subcomponent. Th...

  7. The GHOSTS survey. II. The diversity of Halo Color and Metallicity Profiles of Massive Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Monachesi, Antonela; Radburn-Smith, David; Bailin, Jeremy; de Jong, Roelof S; Holwerda, Benne; Streich, David; Silverstein, Grace

    2015-01-01

    We study the stellar halo color properties of six nearby massive highly inclined disk galaxies using Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3 observations in both F606W and F814W filters from the GHOSTS survey. The observed fields, placed both along the minor and major axis of each galaxy, probe the stellar outskirts out to projected distances of ~ 70 kpc from their galactic centre along the minor axis. The 50% completeness levels of the color magnitude diagrams are typically at two mag below the tip of the red giant branch. We find that all galaxies have extended stellar halos out to ~ 70 kpc. We determined the halo color distribution and color profile for each galaxy using the median colors of stars in the top ~ 0.7 mag of the RGB phase, where the data are at least 70% complete. Within each galaxy we find variations in the median colors as a function of radius which likely indicates population variations, reflecting that their outskirts were built from several small accrete...

  8. The role of bars in AGN fueling in disk galaxies over the last seven billion years

    CERN Document Server

    Cisternas, Mauricio; Salvato, Mara; Knapen, Johan H; Civano, Francesca; Santini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    We present empirical constraints on the influence of stellar bars on the fueling of active galactic nuclei (AGN) out to z=0.84 using a sample of X-ray-selected AGN hosted in luminous face-on disk galaxies from the Chandra COSMOS survey. Using high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging to identify bars, we find that the fraction of barred active galaxies displays a similar behavior as that of inactive spirals, declining with redshift from 71% at z~0.3, to 35% at z~0.8. With active galaxies being typically massive, we compare them against a mass-matched sample of inactive spirals and find that the AGN bar fraction is higher, with this enhancement being marginal at z>0.4, but becoming more pronounced at low redshift. The presence of a bar has no influence on the AGN strength, with barred and unbarred active galaxies showing equivalent X-ray luminosity distributions, though barred galaxies on average seem to show higher levels of central star formation. From our results, we conclude that the role of bars is r...

  9. Mass Distribution in Rotating Thin-Disk Galaxies According to Newtonian Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Q. Feng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An accurate computational method is presented for determining the mass distribution in a mature spiral galaxy from a given rotation curve by applying Newtonian dynamics for an axisymmetrically rotating thin disk of finite size with or without a central spherical bulge. The governing integral equation for mass distribution is transformed via a boundary-element method into a linear algebra matrix equation that can be solved numerically for rotation curves with a wide range of shapes. To illustrate the effectiveness of this computational method, mass distributions in several mature spiral galaxies are determined from their measured rotation curves. All the surface mass density profiles predicted by our model exhibit approximately a common exponential law of decay, quantitatively consistent with the observed surface brightness distributions. When a central spherical bulge is present, the mass distribution in the galaxy is altered in such a way that the periphery mass density is reduced, while more mass appears toward the galactic center. By extending the computational domain beyond the galactic edge, we can determine the rotation velocity outside the cut-off radius, which appears to continuously decrease and to gradually approach the Keplerian rotation velocity out over twice the cut-off radius. An examination of circular orbit stability suggests that galaxies with flat or rising rotation velocities are more stable than those with declining rotation velocities especially in the region near the galactic edge. Our results demonstrate the fact that Newtonian dynamics can be adequate for describing the observed rotation behavior of mature spiral galaxies.

  10. The History of Star Formation in Galaxy Disks in the Local Volume as Measured by the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Benjamin F; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Johnson, L C; Weisz, Daniel R.; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Skillman, Evan; Rosema, Keith; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Holtzman, Jon; De Jong, Roelof S.

    2011-01-01

    We present a measurement of the age distribution of stars residing in spiral disks and dwarf galaxies. We derive a complete star formation history of the ~140 Mpc^3 covered by the volume-limited sample of galaxies in the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST). The total star formation rate density history is dominated by the large spirals in the volume, although the sample consists mainly of dwarf galaxies. Our measurement shows a factor of ~3 drop at z~2, in ...

  11. Discovery of a red and blue shifted iron disk line in the galactic jet source GRO J1655-40

    CERN Document Server

    Balucinska-Church, M

    1999-01-01

    We report the discovery of emission features in the X-ray spectrum of GRO J1655-40 obtained with RXTE during the observation of 1997, Feb 26. We have fitted the features firstly by two Gaussian lines which in four spectra analysed have average energies of 5.85 +/- 0.08 keV and 7.32 +/- 0.13 keV, strongly suggestive that these are the red and blue shifted wings of an iron disk line. These energies imply a velocity of ~0.33 c. The blue wing is less bright than in the calculated profiles of disk lines near a black hole subject to Doppler boosting, however known Fe absorption lines in GRO J1655-40 at energies between ~7 and 8 keV can reduce the apparent brightness of the blue wing. Secondly, we have fitted the spectra using the disk line model of Laor based on a full relativistic treatment plus an absorption line, and show that good fits are obtained. This gives a restframe energy of the disk line between 6.4 and 6.8 keV indicating that the line is iron K_alpha emission probably of significantly ionized material....

  12. Physical Properties of Tidal Features of Interacting Disk Galaxies: Three-dimensional Self-consistent Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang Hoon; Kim, Woong-Tae; Lee, Hyung Mok

    2015-07-01

    Using self-consistent three-dimensional (3D) N-body simulations, we investigate the physical properties of nonaxisymmetric features in a disk galaxy created by a tidal interaction with its companion. The primary galaxy consists of a stellar disk, a bulge, and a live halo, corresponding to Milky-Way-type galaxies, while the companion is represented by a halo alone. We vary the companion mass and the pericenter distance to explore situations with differing tidal strength parameterized by either the relative tidal force P or the relative imparted momentum S. We find that the formation of a tidal tail in the outer parts requires P≳ 0.05 or S≳ 0.07. A stronger interaction results in a stronger, less wound tail that forms earlier. Similarly, a stronger tidal forcing produces stronger, more loosely wound spiral arms in the inner parts. The arms are approximately logarithmic in shape, with both amplitude and pitch angle decaying with time. The derived pattern speed decreases with radius and is close to the {{Ω }}-κ /2 curve at late time, with Ω and κ denoting the angular and epicycle frequencies, respectively. This suggests that the tidally induced spiral arms are most likely kinematic density waves weakly modified by self-gravity. Compared to the razor-thin counterparts, arms in the 3D models are weaker, have a smaller pitch angle, and wind and decay more rapidly. The 3D density structure of the arms is well described by the concentrated and sinusoidal models when the arms are in the nonlinear and linear regimes, respectively. We demonstrate that dynamical friction between interacting galaxies transfers the orbital angular momentum of one galaxy to the spin angular momentum of the companion halo.

  13. AGN-driven outflows without quenching in simulations of high-redshift disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gabor, Jared M

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed nuclear outflows in high-redshift, star forming galaxies. We study outflows driven by Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) using high- resolution simulations of idealized z=2 isolated disk galaxies. Episodic accretion events lead to outflows with velocities >1000 km/s and mass outflow rates up to the star formation rate (several tens of Msun/yr). Outflowing winds escape perpendicular to the disk with wide opening angles, and are typically asymmetric (i.e. unipolar) because dense gas above or below the AGN in the resolved disk inhibits outflow. Owing to rapid variability in the accretion rates, outflowing gas may be detectable even when the AGN is effectively "off." The highest velocity outflows are concentrated within 2-3 kpc of the galactic center during the peak accretion. With our purely thermal AGN feedback model -- standard in previous literature -- the outflowing material is mostly hot (10^6 K) and diffuse (nH<10^(-2) cm-3), but includes a cold component entrained in the ho...

  14. Gas Dynamics in the LINER Galaxy NGC 5005 Episodic Fueling of a Nuclear Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, K; Scoville, N Z; Sakamoto, Kazushi; Baker, Andrew J.; Scoville, Nick Z.

    1999-01-01

    We report high-resolution CO(1-0) observations in the central 6 kpc of the LINER galaxy NGC 5005 with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory millimeter array. Molecular gas is distributed in three components - a ring at a radius of about 3 kpc, a strong central condensation, and a stream to the northwest of the nucleus but inside the 3 kpc ring. The central condensation is a disk of about 1 kpc radius with a molecular gas mass of 2 x 10^9 M_sun. The stream between the 3 kpc ring and the nuclear disk lies on a straight dust lane seen in the optical. If this material moves in the plane of the galaxy, it has a velocity offset by up to ~ 150 km/s from galactic rotation. We suggest that an optically inconspicuous stellar bar lying within the 3 kpc ring can explain the observed gas dynamics. This bar is expected to connect the nuclear disk and the ring along the position angle of the northwest stream. A position-velocity cut in this direction reveals features which match the characteristic motions of gas in a barred po...

  15. Formation and evolution of molecular hydrogen in disk galaxies with different masses and Hubble types

    CERN Document Server

    Bekki, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the physical properties of molecular hydrogen (H2) in isolated and interacting disk galaxies with different masses and Hubble types by using chemodynamical simulations with H2 formation on dust grains and dust growth and destruction in interstellar medium (ISM). We particularly focus on the dependences of H2 gas mass fractions (f_H2), spatial distributions of HI and H2, and local H2-scaling relations on initial halo masses (M_h), baryonic fractions (f_bary), gas mass fractions (f_g), and Hubble types. The principal results are as follows. The final f_H2 can be larger in disk galaxies with higher M_h, f_bary, and f_g. Some low-mass disk models with M_h smaller than 10^10 M_sun show extremely low f_H2 and thus no/little star formation, even if initial f_g is quite large (>0.9). Big galactic bulges can severely suppress the formation of H2 from HI on dust grains whereas strong stellar bars can not only enhance f_H2 but also be responsible for the formation of H2-dominated central rings. The projec...

  16. The flaring Hi disk of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2683

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, B.; Nehlig, F.; Ibata, R.

    2016-02-01

    New deep VLA D array Hi observations of the highly inclined nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2683 are presented. Archival C array data were processed and added to the new observations. To investigate the 3D structure of the atomic gas disk, we made different 3D models for which we produced model Hi data cubes. The main ingredients of our best-fit model are (i) a thin disk inclined by 80°; (ii) a crude approximation of a spiral and/or bar structure by an elliptical surface density distribution of the gas disk; (iii) a slight warp in inclination between 10 kpc ≤ R ≤ 20 kpc (decreasing by 10°); (iv) an exponential flare that rises from 0.5 kpc at R = 9 kpc to 4 kpc at R = 15 kpc, stays constant until R = 22 kpc, and decreases its height for R> 22 kpc; and (v) a low surface-density gas ring with a vertical offset of 1.3 kpc. The slope of NGC 2683's flare is comparable, but somewhat steeper than those of other spiral galaxies. NGC 2683's maximum height of the flare is also comparable to those of other galaxies. On the other hand, a saturation of the flare is only observed in NGC 2683. Based on the comparison between the high resolution model and observations, we exclude the existence of an extended atomic gas halo around the optical and thin gas disk. Under the assumption of vertical hydrostatic equilibrium we derive the vertical velocity dispersion of the gas. The high turbulent velocity dispersion in the flare can be explained by energy injection by (i) supernovae; (ii) magneto-rotational instabilities; (iii) interstellar medium stirring by dark matter substructure; or (iv) external gas accretion. The existence of the complex large-scale warping and asymmetries favors external gas accretion as one of the major energy sources that drives turbulence in the outer gas disk. We propose a scenario where this external accretion leads to turbulent adiabatic compression that enhances the turbulent velocity dispersion and might quench star formation in the outer gas disk of NGC

  17. Physical Properties of Tidal Features of Interacting Disk Galaxies: Three-dimensional Self-consistent Models

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hyung Mok

    2015-01-01

    Using self-consistent three-dimensional (3D) N-body simulations, we investigate the physical properties of non-axisymmetric features in a disk galaxy created by a tidal interaction with its companion. The primary galaxy consists of a stellar disk, a bugle, and a live halo, corresponding to Milky-Way type galaxies, while the companion is represented by a halo alone. We vary the companion mass and the pericenter distance to explore situations with differing tidal strength parameterized by either the relative tidal force P or the relative imparted momentum S. We find that the formation of a tidal tail in the outer parts requires P > 0.05 or S > 0.07. A stronger interaction results in a stronger, less wound tail that forms earlier. Similarly, a stronger tidal forcing produces stronger, more loosely wound spiral arms in the inner parts. The arms are approximately logarithmic in shape, with both amplitude and pitch angle decaying with time. The derived pattern speed decreases with radius and is close to the Omega-k...

  18. Physical Properties of Tidal Features of Interacting Disk Galaxies: Three-dimensional Self-consistent Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang Hoon; Kim, Woong-Tae; Lee, Hyung Mok

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the physical properties of non-axisymmetric features in a disk of a Milky-Way type galaxy created by a tidal interaction with its companion using self-consistent three-dimensional N-body simulations. By varying the companion mass and the pericenter distance, we explore various situations with different tidal strength parameterized by the relative tidal force P or the relative imparted momentum S. A stronger interaction results in a stronger but less wound tail that forms earlier. We find that formation of a stellar tidal tail in the outer part of the disk requires P ≳ 0.05 or S ≳ 0.07. Similarly, a strong tidal forcing produces stronger, more loosely wound spiral arms in the inner parts. The arms are approximately logarithmic in shape, with their amplitude and pitch angle decaying with time. The pattern speed of the arms decreases with radius and is close to the Ω-κ/2 curve, with Ω and κ denoting the angular and epicyclic frequencies, respectively, suggesting that the tidally-induced spiral arms are most likely kinematic density waves weakly modified by self-gravity. The three-dimensional density structure of the arms in non-linear regime is well described by the concentrated model while the arms in linear regime the sinusoidal model fits well. We also demonstrate that dynamical friction between interacting galaxies transfers the orbital angular momentum of one galaxy to the spin angular momentum of the companion’s halo.

  19. The Bulgeless Seyfert/LINER Galaxy NGC 3367: Disk, Bar, Lopsidedness and Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-Toledo, H M; Valenzuela, O; Puerari, I; García-Barreto, J A; Moreno-Díaz, E; Bravo-Alfaro, H

    2011-01-01

    NGC3367 is a nearby isolated active galaxy that shows a radio jet, a strong bar and evidence of lopsidedness. We present a quantitative analysis of the stellar and gaseous structure of the galaxy disk and a search for evidence of recent interaction based on new UBVRI Halpha and JHK images and on archival Halpha Fabry-Perot and HI VLA data. From a coupled 1D/2D GALFIT bulge/bar/disk decomposition an (B/D ~ 0.07-0.1) exponential pseudobulge is inferred in all the observed bands. A NIR estimate of the bar strength = 0.44 places NGC 3367 bar among the strongest ones. The asymmetry properties were studied using (1) optical and NIR CAS indexes (2) the stellar (NIR) and gaseous (Halpha, HI) A_1 Fourier mode amplitudes and (3) the HI integrated profile and HI mean intensity distribution. While the average stellar component shows asymmetry values close to the average found in the Local Universe for isolated galaxies, the young stellar component and gas values are largely decoupled showing significantly larger A_1 mod...

  20. Growth and Destruction of Disks: Combined H I and H II View

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bershady, Matthew; Verheijen, Marc; Crawford, Steven

    2008-01-01

    How large disk galaxies have evolved in, and out of, the blue cloud of actively star-forming galaxies as a function of environment and time is an outstanding question. Some of the largest disks become systems like M31, M33 and the Milky Way today. In denser environments, it appears they transform on

  1. A 21-cm line study of NGC 5963, an SC galaxy with a low-surface brightness disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosma, A.; Athanassoula, E.; van der Hulst, J. M.

    1988-06-01

    Results are presented from a detailed 21-cm line study of the Sc galaxy NGC 5963. The extent of the H I emission is found to be roughly coincident with the optical image, the latter being of much lower surface brightness than normal for Sc galaxies. The velocity field shows little deviation from axial symmetry, and the derived rotation curve is typical for Sc galaxies about twice as bright as NGC 5963. A composite mass model is presented using the observed light distribution to calculate a rotation curve for the luminous part of the galaxy (assuming a constant M/L-ratio with radius); this calculated rotation curve is compared to the observed one to derive a rotation law for a dark halo. Comparison with Sc galaxies having normal disk surface brightnesses suggests that the halo in NGC 5963 is more concentrated than in normal Scs with similar rotation curves. The origin of the low surface brightness of the disk is discussed.

  2. Radio--Far infrared correlation in "blue cloud" galaxies with 0

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Aritra; Beelen, Alexandre; Singh, Veeresh; Archana, K N; Sirothia, Sandeep; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2015-01-01

    We study the radio--far infrared (FIR) correlation in "blue cloud" galaxies chosen from the PRism MUltiobject Survey (PRIMUS) up to redshift ($z$) of 1.2 in the XMM-LSS field. We use rest-frame emission at 1.4 GHz in the radio and both monochromatic (at 70$\\mu$m) and bolometric (between $8-1000~\\mu$m) emission in the FIR. To probe the nature of the correlation up to $z\\sim1.2$, where direct detection of blue star-forming galaxies is impossible with current technology, we employ the technique of image stacking at 0.325 and 1.4 GHz in the radio and in six infrared bands, viz. 24, 70, 160, 250, 350 and $500~\\mu$m. For comparison, we also study the correlation for more luminous galaxies that are directly detected. The stacking analysis allows us to probe the radio--FIR correlation for galaxies that are up to 2 orders of magnitude fainter than the ones detected directly. The $k-$correction in the infrared wavebands is obtained by fitting the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) with a composite mid-IR power...

  3. Statistical analysis of galaxy surveys - III: The non-linear clustering of red and blue galaxies in the 2dFGRS

    CERN Document Server

    Croton, D J; Gaztañaga, E; Baugh, C M; Croton, Darren J.; Norberg, Peder; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Baugh, Carlton M.

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements of the higher-order clustering of red and blue galaxies as a function of scale and luminosity made from the two-degree field galaxy redshift survey (2dFGRS). We use a counts-in-cells analysis to estimate the volume averaged correlation functions, xi_p, as a function of scale up to order p=5, and also the reduced void probability function. Hierarchical amplitudes are constructed using the estimates of the correlation functions: S_p=(xi_p/xi_2)^(p-1). We find that: 1) Red galaxies display stronger clustering than blue galaxies at all orders measured. 2) Red galaxies show values of S_p that are strongly dependent on luminosity, whereas blue galaxies show no segregation in S_p within the errors; this is remarkable given the segregation in the variance. 3) The linear relative bias shows the opposite trend to the hierarchical amplitudes, with little segregation for the red sequence and some segregation for the blue. 4) Faint red galaxies deviate significantly from the "universal" negative bi...

  4. STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF STELLAR DISKS FROM TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY IMAGES OF EDGE-ON GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results of an analysis of the J, H, and Ks Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) images of 139 spiral edge-on galaxies selected from the Revised Flat Galaxies Catalog. The basic structural parameters scale length (h), scale height (z 0), and central surface brightness of the stellar disks (μ0) are determined for all selected galaxies in the near-infrared (NIR) bands. The mean relative ratios of the scale heights of the thin stellar disks in the J:H:Ks bands are 1.16:1.08:1.00, respectively. Comparing the scale heights obtained from the NIR bands for the same objects, we estimate the scale heights of the thin stellar disks corrected for the internal extinction. We find that the extinction-corrected scale height is, on average, 11% smaller than that in the K band. Using the extinction-corrected structural parameters, we find that the dark-to-luminous mass ratio is, on average, 1.3 for the galaxies in our sample within the framework of a simplified galactic model. The relative thicknesses of the stellar disks z 0/h correlates with their face-on central surface brightnesses obtained from the 2MASS images. We also find that the scale height of the stellar disks shows no systematic growth with radius in most of our galaxies.

  5. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury XI. The Remarkably Undisturbed NGC 2403 Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Benjamin F; Stilp, Adrienne; Dolphin, Andrew; Skillman, Evan D; Radburn-Smith, David

    2013-01-01

    We present detailed analysis of color-magnitude diagrams of NGC2403, obtained from a deep (m<28) Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 observation of the outer disk of NGC2403, supplemented by several shallow (m<26) HST Advanced Camera for Surveys fields. We derive the spatially resolved star formation history of NGC2403 out to 11 disk scale lengths. In the inner portions of the galaxy, we compare the recent star formation rates (SFRs) we derive from the resolved stars with those measured using GALEX FUV + Spitzer 24-micron fluxes, finding excellent agreement between the methods. Our measurements also show that the radial gradient in recent SFR mirror s the disk exponential profile to 11 scale lengths with no break, extending to SFR densities a factor of 100 lower than those that can be measured with GALEX and Spitzer (2x10^{-6} M_{\\sun} yr^{-1} kpc^{-2}). Furthermore, we find that the cumulative stellar mass of the disk was formed at similar times at all radii. We compare these cha...

  6. What Kinds of Accretion Disks Are There in the Nuclei of Radio Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Kaburaki, Osamu; Tamura, Naoya; Wajima, Kiyoaki

    2010-01-01

    It seems to be a widely accepted opinion that the types of accretion disks (or flows) generally realized in the nuclei of radio galaxies and in further lower mass-accretion rate nuclei are inner, hot, optically thin, radiatively inefficient accretion flows (RIAFs) surrounded by outer, cool, optically thick, standard type accretion disks. However, observational evidence for the existence of such outer cool disks in these nuclei is rather poor. Instead, recent observations sometimes suggest the existence of inner cool disks of non-standard type, which develop in the region very close to their central black holes. Taking NGC 4261 as a typical example of such light eating nuclei, for which both flux data ranging from radio to X-ray and data for the counterjet occultation are available, we examine the plausibility of such a picture for the accretion states as mentioned above, based on model predictions. It is shown that the explanation of the gap seen in the counterjet emission in terms of the free-free absorption...

  7. Dark Filaments in the Galaxy NGC 253 - a Boiling Galactic Disk -

    OpenAIRE

    Sofue, Yoshiaki; Wakamatsu, Ken-ichi; Malin, David F.

    1994-01-01

    We study the morphology of dark lanes and filaments in the dust-rich galaxy NGC 253 using an unsharp-masked $B$-band optical photograph. Dust features are classified as `arcs', which have heights and scale radius of about 100 to 300 pc, connecting two or more dark clouds, and `loops' and `bubbles', which are developed forms of arcs, expanding into the disk-halo interface. These have diameters of a few hundred pc to $\\sim 1$ kpc. Among the bubbles, we notice a peculiar round-shaped bubble abov...

  8. Evolution of the Blue Luminosity-to-Baryon Mass Ratio of Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shimasaku, K

    2000-01-01

    We derive the ratio of total blue luminosity to total baryon mass, LB/Mb, for massive (Mgas at the Abell radius is \\ge 1 \\times 10^{13} h^{-2.5} \\Msolar) clusters of galaxies up to z \\simeq 1 from the literature. Twenty-two clusters in our sample are at z > 0.1. Assuming that the relative mix of hot gas and galaxies in clusters does not change during cluster evolution, we use LB/Mb to probe the star formation history of the galaxy population as a whole in clusters. We find that LB/Mb of clusters increases with redshift from LB/Mb=0.024 (solar units) at z = 0 to \\simeq 0.06 at z=1, indicating a factor of 2-3 brightening (we assume H0=70 km/s/Mpc). This amount of brightening is almost identical to the brightening of the M/LB ratio of early-type galaxies in clusters at 0.02 \\le z \\le 0.83 reported by van Dokkum et al. (1998). We compare the observed brightening of LB/Mb with luminosity evolution models for the galaxy population as a whole, changing the e-folding time of star formation brightening, while models w...

  9. Astrochemistry and star formation in nearby galaxies: from galaxy disks to hot nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, S.

    2016-05-01

    Studying the molecular phase of the interstellar medium in galaxies is fundamental for the understanding of the onset and evolution of compact and extended star formation, and of the growth of supermassive black holes. Molecular line emission is an excellent tracer of chemical, physical and dynamical conditions in the cold neutral gas. Key molecules in extragalactic studies are e.g. HCN, HCO+, HC3N, SiO, CH3OH, H2O. Furthermore, we can use IR excited molecular emission to probe the very inner regions of luminous infrared galaxies allowing us to get past the optically thick dust barrier of the compact obscured nuclei where lines of CO, HCN and HCO+ in their vibrational ground state (ν=0) may be self-absorbed. Finally, molecular outflows and their chemistry are briefly discussed - including new ALMA results on for example the outflow of the lenticular galaxy NGC1377 and a study of the chemistry of the outflow of the quasar Mrk231.

  10. No more active galactic nuclei in clumpy disks than in smooth galaxies at z ∼ 2 in CANDELS/3D-HST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Luo, Bin; Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Barro, Guillermo; Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Juneau, Stéphanie [Irfu/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA-Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel B.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Dekel, Avishai [Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Hopkins, Philip F. [California Institute of Technology, MC 105-24, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kocevski, Dale D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); McIntosh, Daniel H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Momcheva, Ivelina [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    We use CANDELS imaging, 3D-HST spectroscopy, and Chandra X-ray data to investigate if active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially fueled by violent disk instabilities funneling gas into galaxy centers at 1.3 < z < 2.4. We select galaxies undergoing gravitational instabilities using the number of clumps and degree of patchiness as proxies. The CANDELS visual classification system is used to identify 44 clumpy disk galaxies, along with mass-matched comparison samples of smooth and intermediate morphology galaxies. We note that despite being mass-matched and having similar star formation rates, the smoother galaxies tend to be smaller disks with more prominent bulges compared to the clumpy galaxies. The lack of smooth extended disks is probably a general feature of the z ∼ 2 galaxy population, and means we cannot directly compare with the clumpy and smooth extended disks observed at lower redshift. We find that z ∼ 2 clumpy galaxies have slightly enhanced AGN fractions selected by integrated line ratios (in the mass-excitation method), but the spatially resolved line ratios indicate this is likely due to extended phenomena rather than nuclear AGNs. Meanwhile, the X-ray data show that clumpy, smooth, and intermediate galaxies have nearly indistinguishable AGN fractions derived from both individual detections and stacked non-detections. The data demonstrate that AGN fueling modes at z ∼ 1.85—whether violent disk instabilities or secular processes—are as efficient in smooth galaxies as they are in clumpy galaxies.

  11. A new model for the gravitational potential perturbations in disks of spiral galaxies. An application to our Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Junqueira, T C; Braga, C A S; Barros, D A

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new, more realistic, description of the perturbed gravitational potential of spiral galaxies, with spiral arms having Gaussian-shaped groove profiles. We investigate the stable stellar orbits in galactic disks, using the new perturbed potential. The influence of the bulge mass on the stellar orbits in the inner regions of a disk is also investigated. The new description offers the advantage of easy control of the parameters of the Gaussian profile of its potential. We find a range of values for the perturbation amplitude from 400 to 800 km^2 s^{-2} kpc^{-1} which implies a maximum ratio of the tangential force to the axisymmetric force between 3% and 6%, approximately. Good self-consistency of arm shapes is obtained between the Inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) and the 4:1 resonance. Near the 4:1 resonance the response density starts to deviate from the imposed logarithmic spiral form. This creates bifurcations that appear as short arms. Therefore the deviation from a perfect logarithmic spiral in g...

  12. Bulges of disk galaxies at intermediate redshifts. I. Samples with and without bulges in the Groth Strip Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez-Palmero, L; Erwin, P; Prieto, M; Cristobal-Hornillos, D; Eliche-Moral, M C; Guzmán, R

    2008-01-01

    We aim to define a sample of intermediate-z disk galaxies harbouring central bulges, and a complementary sample of disk galaxies without measurable bulges. We intend to provide colour profiles for both samples, as well as measurements of nuclear, disk, and global colours, which may be used to constrain the relative ages of bulges and disks. We select a diameter-limited sample of galaxies in images from the HST/WFPC2 Groth Strip survey, which is divided into two subsamples of higher and lower inclination to assess the role of dust in the measures quantities. Mergers are visually identified and excluded. We take special care to control the pollution by ellipticals. The bulge sample is defined with a criterion based on nuclear surface brightness excess over the inward extrapolation of the exponential law fitted to the outer regions of the galaxies. We extract colour profiles on the semi-minor axis least affected by dust in the disk, and measure nuclear colours at 0.85 kpc from the centre over those profiles. Dis...

  13. Dissecting simulated disk galaxies I: the structure of mono-age populations

    CERN Document Server

    Martig, Marie; Flynn, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We study seven simulated disk galaxies, three with a quiescent merger history, and four with mergers in their last 9 Gyr of evolution. We compare their structure at z=0 by decomposing them into "mono-age populations" (MAPs) of stars within 500 Myr age bins. All studied galaxies undergo a phase of merging activity at high redshift, so that stars older than 9 Gyr are found in a centrally concentrated component, while younger stars are mostly found in disks. We find that most MAPs have simple exponential radial and vertical density profiles, with a scale-height that typically increases with age. Because a large range of merger histories can create populations with simple structures, this suggests that the simplicity of the structure of mono-abundance populations observed in the Milky Way by Bovy et al. (2012b,c) is not necessarily a direct indicator of a quiescent history for the Milky Way. Similarly, the anti-correlation between scale-length and scale-height does not necessarily imply a merger-free history. How...

  14. Kiloparsec-scale dust disks in high-redshift luminous submillimeter galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hodge, J A; Simpson, J M; Smail, I; Walter, F; Alexander, D M; Bertoldi, F; Biggs, A D; Brandt, W N; Chapman, S C; Chen, C C; Coppin, K E K; Cox, P; Edge, A C; Greve, T R; Ivison, R J; Karim, A; Knudsen, K K; Menten, K M; Rix, H -W; Schinnerer, E; Wardlow, J L; Weiss, A; van der Werf, P

    2016-01-01

    We present high-resolution (0.16$"$) 870um Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) imaging of 16 luminous (L_IR ~ 4 x 10^12 L_sun) submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) from the ALESS survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. This dust imaging traces the dust-obscured star formation in these z~2.5 galaxies on ~1.3 kpc scales. The emission has a median effective radius of $R_e=0.24" \\pm 0.02"$, corresponding to a typical physical size of $R_{e}=1.8\\pm$0.2 kpc. We derive a median S\\'ersic index of $n=0.9\\pm0.2$, implying that the dust emission is remarkably disk-like at the current resolution and sensitivity. We use different weighting schemes with the visibilities to search for clumps on 0.12$"$ (~1.0 kpc) scales, but we find no significant evidence for clumping in the majority of cases. Indeed, we demonstrate using simulations that the observed morphologies are generally consistent with smooth exponential disks, suggesting that caution should be exercised when identifying candidate clumps in even m...

  15. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury I. The Star Formation History of the M81 Outer Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Benjamin F; Seth, Anil C; Weisz, Daniel; Dolphin, Andrew; Skillman, Evan; Harris, Jason; Holtzman, Jon; Girardi, Leo; de Jong, Roelof S; Olsen, Knut; Cole, Andrew; Gallart, Carme; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Hidalgo, Sebastian L; Mateo, Mario; Rosema, Keith; Stetson, Peter B; Quinn, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) is a large Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) treasury program to obtain resolved stellar photometry for a volume-limited sample of galaxies out to 4 Mpc. As part of this program, we have obtained deep ACS imaging of a field in the outer disk of the large spiral galaxy M81. The field contains the outskirts of a spiral arm as well as an area containing no current star formation. Our imaging results in a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaching to F814W = 28.8 and F606W = 29.5, one magnitude fainter than the red clump. Through detailed modeling of the full CMD, we quantify the age and metallicity distribution of the stellar populations contained in the field. The mean metallicity in the field is -1~100 Myr. We discuss the measured evolution of the M81 disk in the context of surveys of high-redshift disk galaxies and deep stellar photometry of other nearby galaxies. All of these indicate that massive spiral disks are mostly formed by z~1 and...

  16. The stellar mass distribution of S$^4$G disk galaxies and the signatures of bar-induced secular evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-García, Simón; Laurikainen, Eija

    2016-01-01

    We use 3.6 $\\mu$m photometry from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S$^{4}$G) to trace the stellar distribution in nearby disk galaxies ($z\\approx0$) with total stellar masses $10^{8.5}\\lesssim M_{\\ast}/M_{\\odot}\\lesssim10^{11}$ and mid-IR Hubble types $-3 \\le T \\le 10$, and to provide observational constraints for galaxy formation models to be checked against. For 1154 galaxies with disk inclinations lower than $65^{\\circ}$, we Fourier decompose and rescale their images to a common frame determined (i) by the size in physical units, (ii) by their disk scalelength, and for 748 barred galaxies (iii) by both the length and orientation of their bars. We stack the resized density profiles and images to obtain statistically representative average stellar disks and bars in bins of $M_{\\ast}$ and $T$. We also calculate the mean stellar contribution to the circular velocity. We infer the gravitational potentials from the synthetic bars to obtain the tangential-to-radial force ratio ($Q_{\\rm T}$) an...

  17. Extragalactic archeology with the GHOSTS Survey I. - Age-resolved disk structure of nearby low-mass galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Streich, David; Bailin, Jeremy; Bell, Eric F; Holwerda, Benne W; Minchev, Ivan; Monachesi, Antonela; Radburn-Smith, David J

    2016-01-01

    We study the individual evolution histories of three nearby low-mass edge-on galaxies (IC 5052, NGC4244, and NGC5023). Using resolved stellar populations, we constructed star count density maps for populations of different ages and analyzed the change of structural parameters with stellar age within each galaxy. We do not detect a separate thick disk in any of the three galaxies, even though our observations cover a wider range in equivalent surface brightness than any integrated light study. While scale heights increase with age, each population can be well described by a single disk. Two of the galaxies contain a very weak additional component, which we identify as the faint halo. The mass of these faint halos is lower than 1% of the mass of the disk. The three galaxies show low vertical heating rates, which are much lower than the heating rate of the Milky Way. This indicates that heating agents, such as giant molecular clouds and spiral structure, are weak in low-mass galaxies. All populations in the thre...

  18. On the axis ratio of the stellar velocity ellipsoid in disks of spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Kruit, P C

    1999-01-01

    The spatial distribution of stars in a disk of a galaxy can be described by a radial scale length and a vertical scale height. The ratio of these two scale parameters contains information on the axis ratio of the velocity ellipsoid, i.e. the ratio of the vertical to radial stellar velocity dispersions of the stars, at least at some fiducial distance from the center. The radial velocity dispersion correlates well with the amplitude of the rotation curve and with the disk integrated magnitude, as was found by Bottema (1993). These relations can be understood as the result of the stellar disk being (marginally) stable against local instabilities at all length scales. This is expressed by Toomre's well-known criterion, which relates the sheer in the rotation to a minimum value that the radial stellar velocity dispersion should have for stability for a given surface density. Via the Tully-Fisher (1977) relation, the velocity dispersion then becomes related to the integrated magnitude and hence to the scale length....

  19. Indications of M-Dwarf Deficits in the Halo and Thick Disk of the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Mihoko; Shibai, Hiroshi; Sumi, Takahiro; Fukagawa, Misato; Matsuo, Taro; Samland, Matthias S.; Yamamoto, Kodai; Sudo, Jun; Itoh, Yoichi; Arimoto, Nobuo; Kajisawa, Masaru; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E.; Feldt, Marcus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Oliver; Hashimoto, Jun; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; McElwain, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    We compared the number of faint stars detected in deep survey fields with the current stellar distribution model of the Galaxy and found that the detected number in the H band is significantly smaller than the predicted number. This indicates that M-dwarfs, the major component, are fewer in the halo and the thick disk. We used archived data of several surveys in both the north and south field of GOODS (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey), MODS in GOODS-N, and ERS and CANDELS in GOODS-S. The number density of M-dwarfs in the halo has to be 20+/-13% relative to that in the solar vicinity, in order for the detected number of stars fainter than 20.5 mag in the H band to match with the predicted value from the model. In the thick disk, the number density of M-dwarfs must be reduced (52+/-13%) or the scale height must be decreased ( approx. 600 pc). Alternatively, overall fractions of the halo and thick disks can be significantly reduced to achieve the same effect, because our sample mainly consists of faint M-dwarfs. Our results imply that the M-dwarf population in regions distant from the Galactic plane is significantly smaller than previously thought. We then discussed the implications this has on the suitability of the model predictions for the prediction of non-companion faint stars in direct imaging extrasolar planet surveys by using the best-fit number densities.

  20. Indications of M-dwarf Deficits in the Halo and Thick Disk of the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Konishi, Mihoko; Sumi, Takahiro; Fukagawa, Misato; Matsuo, Taro; Samland, Matthias S; Yamamoto, Kodai; Sudo, Jun; Itoh, Yoichi; Arimoto, Nobuo; Kajisawa, Masaru; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A; Guyon, Olivier; Hashimoto, Jun; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Kwon, Jungmi; McElwain, Michael W; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martín, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H; Takami, Hideki; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Tomono, Daigo; Turner, Edwin L; Usuda, Tomonori; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John P; Yamada, Toru; Tamura, Motohide

    2014-01-01

    We compared the number of faint stars detected in deep survey fields with the current stellar distribution model of the Galaxy and found that the detected number in the H band is significantly smaller than the predicted number. This indicates that M-dwarfs, the major component, are fewer in the halo and the thick disk. We used archived data of several surveys in both the north and south field of GOODS (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey), MODS in GOODS-N, and ERS and CANDELS in GOODS-S. The number density of M-dwarfs in the halo has to be 20+/-13% relative to that in the solar vicinity, in order for the detected number of stars fainter than 20.5 mag in the H band to match with the predicted value from the model. In the thick disk, the number density of M-dwarfs must be reduced (52+/-13%) or the scale height must be decreased (~600 pc). Alternatively, overall fractions of the halo and thick disks can be significantly reduced to achieve the same effect, because our sample mainly consists of faint M-dwarfs....

  1. The dusty torus in the Circinus galaxy: a dense disk and the torus funnel

    CERN Document Server

    Tristram, K R W; Jaffe, W; Meisenheimer, K; Hönig, S F; Kishimoto, M; Schartmann, M; Weigelt, G

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) With infrared interferometry it is possible to resolve the nuclear dust distributions that are commonly associated with the dusty torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN). The Circinus galaxy hosts the closest Seyfert 2 nucleus and previous interferometric observations have shown that its nuclear dust emission is well resolved. To better constrain the dust morphology in this active nucleus, extensive new observations were carried out with MIDI at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer. The emission is distributed in two distinct components: a disk-like emission component with a size of ~ 0.2 $\\times$ 1.1 pc and an extended component with a size of ~ 0.8 $\\times$ 1.9 pc. The disk-like component is elongated along PA ~ 46{\\deg} and oriented perpendicular to the ionisation cone and outflow. The extended component is elongated along PA ~ 107{\\deg}, roughly perpendicular to the disk component and thus in polar direction. It is interpreted as emission from the inner funnel of an extended dust distribution ...

  2. The Host in Blue Compact Galaxies: Structural Properties and Scaling Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Amorín, Ricardo; Muñoz-Tuñón, C; Cairós, L M

    2009-01-01

    We have characterized the underlying stellar host in a sample of 28 blue compact galaxies (BCGs), by fitting their 2D light distributions. Their structural parameters were related with galaxy properties such as colours and gas content. These properties were also compared with those of other galaxy types. All the BCG hosts but one show low Sersic indexes (0.5 =1.11$\\pm$0.74 kpc, and mean surface brightness = 22.59$\\pm$0.68 mag arcsec$^{-2}$. Host effective radii scale linearly with their luminosity, while n and $\\mu_{\\rm e}$ do not. In addition, host colours and structural parameters are not linearly correlated. Overall,the flux enhancement caused by the starburst is about 0.8 mag while their B-R colours decrease by about 0.2 mag. Galaxies with more luminous and extended hosts show larger and luminous starburst components. BCG hosts show B-R=0.95$\\pm$0.26 in median. Overall, BCG hosts are more compact (by a factor ~2) and have higher central surface brightnesses (by about ~2 mag) than dIs and most dEs. BCG ho...

  3. The tidally disturbed luminous compact blue galaxy Mkn 1087 and its surroundings

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Sanchez, A R; Rodríguez, M; Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R.; Esteban, Cesar; Rodriguez, Monica

    2004-01-01

    We present new broad-band optical and near-infrared CCD imaging together with deep optical intermediate-resolution spectroscopy of Mkn 1087 and its surrounding objects. We analyze the morphology and colors of the stellar populations of the brightest objects, some of them star-formation areas, as well as the kinematics, physical conditions and chemical composition of the ionized gas associated with them. Mkn 1087 does not host an Active Galactic Nucleus, but it could be a Luminous Compact Blue Galaxy. Although it was classified as a suspected Wolf-Rayet galaxy, we do not detect the spectral features of these sort of massive stars. Mkn 1087 shows morphological and kinematical features that can be explained assuming that it is in interaction with two nearby galaxies: the bright KPG 103a and a dwarf ($M_B\\sim-18$) star-forming companion. We argue that this dwarf companion is not a tidal object but an external galaxy because of its low metallicity [12+log(O/H) = 8.24] with respect to the one derived for Mkn 1087 [...

  4. Spectroscopy of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies in Distant Clusters. I. Spectroscopic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Steven M.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Hon, Kimo

    2011-11-01

    We used the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II Telescope to obtain spectra of galaxies in the fields of five distant, rich galaxy clusters over the redshift range 0.5 reported in the literature, except for 11 targets which we believe were previously in error. Within our sample, we confirm the presence of 53 LCBGs in the five galaxy clusters. The clusters all stand out as distinct peaks in the redshift distribution of LCBGs with the average number density of LCBGs ranging from 1.65 ± 0.25 Mpc-3 at z = 0.55 to 3.13 ± 0.65 Mpc-3 at z = 0.8. The number density of LCBGs in clusters exceeds the field density by a factor of 749 ± 116 at z = 0.55; at z = 0.8, the corresponding ratio is E = 416 ± 95. At z = 0.55, this enhancement is well above that seen for blue galaxies or the overall cluster population, indicating that LCBGs are preferentially triggered in high-density environments at intermediate redshifts. Based in part on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  5. The HI content of extremely metal-deficient blue compact dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Thuan, T X; Hibbard, J E; Izotov, Y I; Hunt, L K

    2016-01-01

    We have obtained new HI observations with the 100m Green Bank Telescope (GBT) for a sample of 29 extremely metal-deficient star-forming Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectral data base to be extremely metal-deficient (12+logO/H<7.6). Neutral hydrogen was detected in 28 galaxies, a 97% detection rate. Combining the HI data with SDSS optical spectra for the BCD sample and adding complementary galaxy samples from the literature to extend the metallicity and mass ranges, we have studied how the HI content of a galaxy varies with various global galaxian properties. There is a clear trend of increasing gas mass fraction with decreasing metallicity, mass and luminosity. We obtain the relation M(HI)/L(g)~L(g)^{-0.3}, in agreement with previous studies based on samples with a smaller luminosity range. The median gas mass fraction f(gas) for the GBT sample is equal to 0.94 while the mean gas mass fraction is 0.90+/-0.15, with a lower limit of ~0.65. The HI depletion ti...

  6. The Nature of Blue Early-Type Galaxies in the Goods Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J H; Hwang, H S; Lee, Joon Hyeop; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the nature of the blue early-type galaxies (BEGs) in the GOODS north and south fields using the GOODS HST/ACS archival data. Using visual inspection, we have selected 58 BEGs and 113 normal red early-type galaxies (REGs) in the sample of 1,949 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We find that the BEGs are generally bluer, fainter, and less-massive than the REGs, although a few BEGs are exceptionally bright and massive. The number fraction of the BEGs to total early-type galaxies is almost constant ($\\sim0.3$) at $z \\le 1.1$. In addition, we find that the size of the BEGs in given redshift bin decrease as redshift decreases. The BEGs look similar to the REGs in the images and surface brightness profiles. However, at least 27 BEGs show traces of tidal disturbances in their fine structures: elongated cores, off-centered cores, asymmetric internal color distributions, tidally distorted outer structures, collisional rings, or very nearby companions. Twenty-one BEGs are detected in the X-ray...

  7. Metallicity and Age of the Stellar Stream Around the Disk Galaxy NGC 5907

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, Seppo; Capak, Peter; Arendt, Richard G; Romanowsky, Aaron J; Martinez-Delgado, David; Ashby, Matthew L N; Davies, James E; Majewski, Stephen R; Brodie, Jean P; GaBany, R Jay; Arnold, Jacob A

    2016-01-01

    Stellar streams have become central to studies of the interaction histories of nearby galaxies. To characterize the most prominent parts of the stellar stream around the well-known nearby (d = 17 Mpc) edge-on disk galaxy NGC 5907, we have obtained and analyzed new, deep gri Subaru/Suprime-Cam and 3.6 micron Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations. Combining the near-infrared 3.6 micron data with visible-light images allows us to use a long wavelength baseline to estimate the metallicity and age of the stellar population along a ~60 kpc long segment of the stream. We have fitted the stellar spectral energy distribution (SED) with a single-burst stellar population synthesis model and we use it to distinguish between the proposed satellite accretion and minor/major merger formation models of the stellar stream around this galaxy. We conclude that a massive minor merger (stellar mass ratio of at least 1:8) can best account for the metallicity of -0.3 inferred along the brightest parts of the stream.

  8. The correlation between radio and far-infrared emission for disk galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theory is proposed for the correlation of the nonthermal radio continuum emission with the far infrared (FIR) emission from disk galaxies. The spatially integrated emission from each galaxy is considered. Assuming that the source strengths for relativistic electrons and energetic (ionising) photons, respectively responsible for the radio synchrotron and the FIR emission, are both proportional to the supernova rate, it is supposed that the energy source for the FIR emission is essentially instantaneously communicating to the radiating dust grains. The radiating energetic electrons, however, have a much longer life-time. Yet over the volumina surrounding the electron sources within which those particles, whose energies correspond to the observed synchrotron frequency, lose their energy due to combined inverse Compton and synchrotron loss, the galaxies act as a calorimeter for these particles. The calorimeter function a fortiori pertains to all higher energy electrons. Assuming the integral observation to encompass this volume, the radio luminosity is calculated approximately. Taking the electron spectra to be due to diffusive shock acceleration at supernova remnant shocks, the net dependence of the radio emission on the spatial average of the magnetic field strength B is rather weak

  9. Bulge-forming galaxies with an extended rotating disk at z~2

    CERN Document Server

    Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Kodama, Tadayuki; Wuyts, Stijn; Wisnioski, Emily; Schreiber, Natascha M Förster; Burkert, Andreas; Lang, Philipp; Tacconi, Linda J; Lutz, Dieter; Belli, Sirio; Davies, Richard I; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hayashi, Masao; Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Ikarashi, Soh; Inoue, Shigeki; Kohno, Kotaro; Koyama, Yusei; Mendel, J Trevor; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Shimakawa, Rhythm; Suzuki, Tomoko L; Tamura, Yoichi; Tanaka, Ichi; Übler, Hannah; Wilman, Dave J

    2016-01-01

    We present 0".2-resolution Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array observations at 870 um for 25 Halpha-seleced star-forming galaxies (SFGs) around the main-sequence at z=2.2-2.5. We detect significant 870 um continuum emission in 16 (64%) of these SFGs. The high-resolution maps reveal that the dust emission is mostly radiated from a single region close to the galaxy center. Exploiting the visibility data taken over a wide $uv$ distance range, we measure the half-light radii of the rest-frame far-infrared emission for the best sample of 12 SFGs. We find nine galaxies to be associated with extremely compact dust emission with R_{1/2,870um}1e10 Msol/kpc^2 in several hundred Myr, i.e. by z~2. Moreover, ionized gas kinematics reveal that they are rotation-supported with an angular momentum as large as that of typical SFGs at z=1-3. Our results suggest bulges are commonly formed in extended rotating disks by internal processes, not involving major mergers.

  10. On the effective oxygen yield in the disks of spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zasov, A; Abramova, O

    2015-01-01

    The factors influencing chemical evolution of galaxies are poorly understood. Both gas inflow and gas outflow reduce a gas-phase abundance of heavy elements (metallicity) whereas the ongoing star formation continuously increases it. To exclude the stellar nucleosynthesis from consideration, we analyze for the sample of 14 spiral galaxies the radial distribution of the effective yield of oxygen $y_{eff}$, which would be identical to the true stellar yield (per stellar generation) $y_o$ if the evolution followed the closed box model. As the initial data for gas-phase abundance we used the O/H radial profiles from Moustakas, Kennicutt, Tremonti et al. (2010), based on two different calibrations (Pilyugin & Thuan 2005 (PT2005) and Kobulnicky & Kewley 2004 (KK2004) methods). In most of galaxies with the PT2005 calibration, which we consider as a preferred one, the yield $y_{eff}$ in the main disk ($R \\ge 0.2~R_{25}$, where $R_{25}$ is the optical radius) increases with radius, remaining lower than the empi...

  11. Halo Gas and Galaxy Disk Kinematics of a Volume-Limited Sample of MgII Absorption-Selected Galaxies at z~0.1

    CERN Document Server

    Kacprzak, G G; Barton, E J; Cooke, J

    2011-01-01

    We have directly compared MgII halo gas kinematics to the rotation velocities derived from emission/absorption lines of the associated host galaxies. Our 0.096galaxies, with impact parameters of 12-90 kpc from background quasars sight-lines, associated with 11 MgII absorption systems with MgII equivalent widths 0.3< W_r(2796)<2.3A. For only 5/13 galaxies, the absorption resides to one side of the galaxy systemic velocity and trends to align with one side of the galaxy rotation curve. The remainder have absorption that spans both sides of the galaxy systemic velocity. These results differ from those at z~0.5, where 74% of the galaxies have absorption residing to one side of the galaxy systemic velocity. For all the z~0.1 systems, simple extended disk-like rotation models fail to reproduce the full MgII velocity spread, implying other dynamical processes contribute to the MgII kinematics. In fact 55% of the galaxies are "counter-rotating" with respect ...

  12. The VVV Survey reveals classical Cepheids tracing a young and thin stellar disk across the Galaxy's bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Dékány, I; Majaess, D; Zoccali, M; Hajdu, G; Alonso-García, J; Catelan, M; Gieren, W; Borissova, J

    2015-01-01

    Solid insight into the physics of the inner Milky Way is key to understanding our Galaxy's evolution, but extreme dust obscuration has historically hindered efforts to map the area along the Galactic mid-plane. New comprehensive near-infrared time-series photometry from the VVV Survey has revealed 35 classical Cepheids, tracing a previously unobserved component of the inner Galaxy, namely a ubiquitous inner thin disk of young stars along the Galactic mid-plane, traversing across the bulge. The discovered period (age) spread of these classical Cepheids implies a continuous supply of newly formed stars in the central region of the Galaxy over the last 100 million years.

  13. The DiskMass Survey : VI. Gas and stellar kinematics in spiral galaxies from PPak integral-field spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Andersen, David R.; Swaters, Rob A.

    2013-01-01

    We present ionized-gas ([OIII]lambda 5007 angstrom) and stellar kinematics (velocities and velocity dispersions) for 30 nearly face-on spiral galaxies out to as many as three K-band disk scale lengths (h(R)). These data have been derived from PPak integral-field-unit spectroscopy from 4980-5370 angs

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Disk galaxies at 0.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, A.; Ziegler, B. L.

    2016-06-01

    Redshifts, maximum rotation velocities, (Johnson) B-band absolute magnitudes and sizes are presented for a sample of 124 disk galaxies covering redshifts 0.1flat cosmology with H0=70km/s/Mpc, Omegamatter=0.3 and Omegalambda=0.7. (1 data file).

  15. Constraints on jets and accretion disks in low luminosity radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilak, Avanti

    Multiwavelength data has greatly advanced our understanding of AGN and their environments. I study a sample of 21 nearby low luminosity radio galaxies, selected on the basis of distance, radio luminosity, size and Hubble type from the Uppsala Galactic Catalog. I present 1 new and 12 archival Chandra datasets. X-ray imaging of all sources shows nuclear X-ray emission from the AGN. 11 out of these 13 sources also show diffuse emission associated with the host galaxy. I discovered three new X-ray jets. In conjunction with the six known X-ray jets, nine out of the thirteen galaxies exhibit X-ray jet emission. Thus X-ray jets are fairly ubiquitous in low luminosity radio galaxies. The nuclear X-ray spectra are best described by a combination of hot gas and powerlaw models. The nuclear flux and luminosity densities seem well-correlated with their optical and radio counterparts. The correlation is stronger if the contribution from the powerlaw component to the X-ray emission is isolated. Thus the powerlaw component may be the true description of emission from the central region (either from the accretion disk or parsec-scale jet). I investigate the nature of core emission by fitting synchrotron models as well as by comparing disk models with broad-band spectral energy distributions of the AGN. In general, the core emission seems consistent with a synchrotron-jet model. I present VLBA imaging and polarization data for 10 sources in our sample. All 10 sources show corejet morphology, consistent with relativistic jet velocities on parsec scales. The jets are expected to decelerate on scales similar to the extent of the X-ray jets. Assuming synchrotron emission, it is possible that some fraction of the bulk kinetic energy of the jets is being channeled for reacceleration of electrons within the jet, necessary to produce the observed X-ray emission. In the VLBA data, 5 out of 10 sources show polarization. The polarization observations are broadly consistent with unification

  16. Disk galaxy scaling relations at intermediate redshifts - I. The Tully-Fisher and velocity-size relations

    CERN Document Server

    Boehm, Asmus

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy scaling relations such as the Tully-Fisher relation (between maximum rotation velocity Vmax and luminosity) and the velocity-size relation (between Vmax and disk scale length) are powerful tools to quantify the evolution of disk galaxies with cosmic time. We took spatially resolved slit spectra of 261 field disk galaxies at redshifts up to z~1 using the FORS instruments of the ESO Very Large Telescope. The targets were selected from the FORS Deep Field and William Herschel Deep Field. Our spectroscopy was complemented with HST/ACS imaging in the F814W filter. We analyzed the ionized gas kinematics by extracting rotation curves from the 2-D spectra. Taking into account all geometrical, observational and instrumental effects, these rotation curves were used to derive the intrinsic Vmax. Neglecting galaxies with disturbed kinematics or insufficient spatial rotation curve extent, Vmax could be determined for 137 galaxies covering redshifts 0.05

  17. Luminosity-Metallicity Relations for Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies in the Optical and Near-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yinghe; Gu, Qiusheng

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present systematic studies on the B-, R- and $K_s$-band luminosity-metallicity (L-Z) relations for a set of metal poor, blue compact dwarf galaxies. Metallicity is derived by using both the empirical N2 and the direct $T_e$ methods. Our work reconciles contradictory results obtained by different authors and shows that the L-Z relationship does also hold for blue compact dwarf galaxies. The empirical N2-based slope of the L-Z relation, for each photometric band, is consistent with the $T_e$-based one. We confirm that the slope of the L-Z relation is shallower in the near-infrared than that in the optical. Our investigations on the correlations between the $L_B$-Z relation residuals and different galactic parameters show that the star formation activities could be a cause of the large scatter in the optical L-Z relationships, whereas the internal-absorption might be another possible contributing factor.

  18. Modelling resonances and orbital chaos in disk galaxies. Application to a Milky Way spiral model

    CERN Document Server

    Michtchenko, Tatiana A; Barros, Douglas A; Lépine, Jacques R D

    2016-01-01

    Context: Resonances in the stellar orbital motion under perturbations from spiral arms structure play an important role in the evolution of the disks of spiral galaxies. The epicyclic approximation allows the determination of the corresponding resonant radii on the equatorial plane (for nearly circular orbits), but is not suitable in general. Aims: To expand the study of resonant orbits by analysing stellar motions perturbed by spiral arms with Gaussian-shaped profiles, without any restriction on the stellar orbital configurations, and expand the concept of Lindblad (epicyclic) resonances for orbits with large radial excursions. Methods: We define a representative plane of initial conditions, which covers the whole phase space of the system. Dynamical maps on representative planes are constructed numerically, in order to characterize the phase-space structure and identify the precise location of the resonances. The study is complemented by the construction of dynamical power spectra, which provide the identif...

  19. An Observational Guide to Identifying Pseudobulges and Classical Bulges in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, David B

    2015-01-01

    In this review our aim is to summarize the observed properties of pseudobulges and classical bulges. We utilize an empirical approach to studying the properties of bulges in disk galaxies, and restrict our analysis to statistical proper- ties. A clear bimodality is observed in a number of properties including morphology, structural properties, star formation, gas content & stellar population, and kinematics. As well as summarizing known methods to identify pseudobulges and classical bulges we also show new results, including absorption line indices that can be used to identify different bulge types. We conclude by summarizing those properties that isolate pseudobulges from classical bulges. Our intention is to describe a practical, easy to use, list of criteria for identifying bulge types.

  20. Snap, Crackle, Pop: sub-grid supernova feedback in AMR simulations of disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rosdahl, Joakim; Dubois, Yohan; Kimm, Taysun; Teyssier, Romain

    2016-01-01

    We compare 5 sub-grid models for supernova (SN) feedback in adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations of isolated dwarf and L-star disk galaxies with 20-40 pc resolution. The models are thermal dump, stochastic thermal, 'mechanical' (injecting energy or momentum depending on the resolution), kinetic, and delayed cooling feedback. We focus on the ability of each model to suppress star formation and generate outflows. Our highest-resolution runs marginally resolve the adiabatic phase of the feedback events, which correspond to 40 SN explosions, and the first three models yield nearly identical results, possibly indicating that kinetic and delayed cooling feedback converge to wrong results. At lower resolution all models differ, with thermal dump feedback becoming inefficient. Thermal dump, stochastic, and mechanical feedback generate multiphase outflows with mass loading factors $\\beta \\ll 1$, which is much lower than observed. For the case of stochastic feedback we compare to published SPH simulations, and fi...

  1. The Rise and Fall of Star Formation Histories of Blue Galaxies at Redshifts 0.2 < z < 1.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Camilla; Kassin, Susan A.; Weiner, Benjamin; Charlot, Stephane; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    Popular cosmological scenarios predict that galaxies form hierarchically from the merger of many progenitor, each with their own unique star formation history (SFH). We use the approach recently developed by Pacifici et al. to constrain the SFHs of 4517 blue (presumably star-forming) galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range O.2 star formation and chemical enrichment histories, stellar population synthesis, nebular emission and attenuation by dust. We constrain the SFH of each galaxy in our sample by comparing the observed fluxes in the B, R,l and K(sub s) bands and rest-frame optical emission-line luminosities with those of one million model spectral energy distributions. We explore the dependence of the resulting SFH on galaxy stellar mass and redshift. We find that the average SFHs of high-mass galaxies rise and fall in a roughly symmetric bell-shaped manner, while those of low-mass galaxies rise progressively in time, consistent with the typically stronger activity of star formation in low-mass compared to high-mass galaxies. For galaxies of all masses, the star formation activity rises more rapidly at high than at low redshift. These findings imply that the standard approximation of exponentially declining SFHs wIdely used to interpret observed galaxy spectral energy distributions is not appropriate to constrain the physical parameters of star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts.

  2. The Stellar Population and Star Formation Properties of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yinghe; Gao, Yu

    2010-01-01

    We study the stellar populations, star formation histories and star formation properties for a sample of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) selected by cross-correlating the Gil de Paz et al. (2003) sample with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6). The sample includes 31 BCDs, which span a large range in galactic parameters. Using a stellar population synthesis method, we derive the stellar populations and reconstruct the star formation histories for these BCDs. Our studies confirm that BCDs are not young systems experiencing their first star formation but old systems undergoing a starburst activity. The stellar mass-weighted ages can be as old as 10 Gyr while the luminosity-weighted ages might be up to $\\sim 3$ orders of magnitude younger ($\\sim 10$ Myr) for most galaxies. Based on multi-wavelength data, we also study the integrated star formation properties. The SFR for our sample galaxies spans nearly 3 orders of magnitude, from a few $10^{-3}$ to $\\sim1\\,M_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, with the medi...

  3. THE STELLAR POPULATION AND STAR FORMATION PROPERTIES OF BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study stellar populations, star formation histories (SFHs), and star formation properties for a sample of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) selected by cross-correlating the Gil de Paz et al. sample with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6. The sample includes 31 BCDs, which span a large range of galactic parameters. Using a stellar population synthesis method, we derive stellar populations and reconstruct SFHs for these BCDs. Our studies confirm that BCDs are not young systems experiencing their first star formation, but old systems undergoing a starburst activity. The stellar mass-weighted ages can be up to 10 Gyr, while the luminosity-weighted ages might be up to approximately three orders of magnitude younger (∼10 Myr) for most galaxies. Based on multiwavelength data, we also study the integrated star formation properties. The star formation rate (SFR) for our sample galaxies spans nearly three orders of magnitude, from a few 10-3 to ∼1 Msun yr-1, with a median value of ∼0.1 Msun yr-1. We find that about 90% of BCDs in our sample have their birthrate parameter (the ratio of the current SFR to the averaged past SFR) b>2-3. We further discuss correlations of the current SFR with the integrated galactic stellar mass and explore the connection between SFR and metallicity.

  4. AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF SDSS-SELECTED BLUE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A near-infrared (NIR; 2.5-4.5 μm) spectroscopic survey of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-selected blue early-type galaxies (BEGs) has been conducted using the AKARI. The NIR spectra of 36 BEGs are secured, which are well balanced in their star formation (SF)/Seyfert/LINER-type composition. For high signal-to-noise ratio, we stack the BEG spectra in its entirety and in bins of several properties: color, specific star formation rate, and optically determined spectral type. We estimate the NIR continuum slope and the equivalent width of 3.29 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission. In the comparison between the estimated NIR spectral features of the BEGs and those of model galaxies, the BEGs seem to be old-SSP(simple stellar population)-dominated metal-rich galaxies with moderate dust attenuation. The dust attenuation in the BEGs may originate from recent SF or active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity and the BEGs have a clear feature of PAH emission, evidence of current SF. BEGs show NIR features different from those of ULIRGs from which we do not find any clear relationship between BEGs and ULIRGs. We find that Seyfert BEGs have more active SF than LINER BEGs, in spite of the fact that Seyferts show stronger AGN activity than LINERs. One possible scenario satisfying both our results and the AGN feedback is that SF, Seyfert, and LINER BEGs form an evolutionary sequence: SF → Seyfert → LINER.

  5. AKARI Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of SDSS-Selected Blue Early-Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Joon Hyeop; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lee, Jong Chul; Matsuhara, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    A near-infrared (NIR; 2.5 - 4.5 micron) spectroscopic survey of SDSS(Sloan Digital Sky Survey)-selected blue early-type galaxies (BEGs) has been conducted using the AKARI. The NIR spectra of 36 BEGs are secured, which are well balanced in their star-formation(SF)/Seyfert/LINER type composition. For high signal-to-noise ratio, we stack the BEG spectra all and in bins of several properties: color, specific star formation rate and optically-determined spectral type. We estimate the NIR continuum slope and the equivalent width of 3.29 micron PAH emission. In the comparison between the estimated NIR spectral features of the BEGs and those of model galaxies, the BEGs seem to be old-SSP(Simple Stellar Population)-dominated metal-rich galaxies with moderate dust attenuation. The dust attenuation in the BEGs may originate from recent star formation or AGN activity and the BEGs have a clear feature of PAH emission, the evidence of current SF. BEGs show NIR features different from those of ULIRGs, from which we do not f...

  6. The Lyman alpha reference sample. VI. Lyman alpha escape from the edge-on disk galaxy Mrk 1486

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Florent; Östlin, Göran; Hayes, Matthew; Zackrisson, Erik; Verhamme, Anne; Orlitova, Ivana; Adamo, Angela; Guaita, Lucia; Melinder, Jens; Cannon, John M.; Laursen, Peter; Rivera-Thorsen, Thoger; Herenz, E. Christian; Gruyters, Pieter; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Kunth, Daniel; Sandberg, Andreas; Schaerer, Daniel; Månsson, Tore

    2016-03-01

    Context. Recent numerical simulations suggest that the strength of the Lyman alpha (Lyα) line of star-forming disk galaxies strongly depends on the inclination at which they are observed: from edge-on to face-on, we expect to see a change from a strongly attenuated Lyα line to a strong Lyα emission line. Aims: We aim to understand how a strong Lyα emission line is able to escape from the low-redshift highly inclined (edge-on) disk galaxy Mrk 1486 (z ~ 0.0338). To our knowledge, this work is the first observational study of Lyα transport inside an edge-on disk galaxy. Methods: Using a large set of HST imaging and spectroscopic data, we investigated the interstellar medium (ISM) structure and the dominant source of Lyα radiation inside Mrk 1486. Moreover, using a 3D Monte Carlo Lyα radiation transfer code, we studied the radiative transfer of Lyα and UV continuum photons inside a 3D geometry of neutral hydrogen (HI) and dust that models the ISM structure at the galaxy center. Our numerical simulations predicted the Lyα line profile that we then compared to the one observed in the HST/COS spectrum of Mrk 1486. Results: While a pronounced Lyα absorption line emerges from the disk of Mrk 1486, very extended Lyα structures are observed at large radii from the galaxy center: a large Lyα-halo and two very bright Lyα regions located slightly above and below the disk plane. The analysis of IFU Hα spectroscopic data of Mrk 1486 indicates the presence of two bipolar outflowing halos of HI gas at the same location as these two bright Lyα regions. Comparing different diagnostic diagrams (such as [OIII]5007/Hβ versus [OI]6300/Hα) to photo- and shock-ionization models, we find that the Lyα production of Mrk 1486 is dominated by photoionization inside the galaxy disk. From this perspective, our numerical simulations succeed in reproducing the strength and shape of the observed Lyα emission line of Mrk 1486 by assuming a scenario in which the Lyα photons are

  7. The M-sigma relation in simulations of isolated and merging disk galaxies with kinetic or thermal AGN feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Barai, Paramita; Murante, Giuseppe; Gaspari, Massimo; Borgani, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) We investigate two modes of coupling the feedback energy from a central AGN to the neighboring gas in galaxy simulations: kinetic - velocity boost, and thermal - heating. We formulate kinetic feedback models for energy-driven wind (EDW) and momentum-driven wind (MDW), using two free parameters: feedback efficiency epsilon_f, and AGN wind velocity v_w. A novel numerical algorithm is implemented in the SPH code GADGET-3, to prevent the expansion of a hole in the gas distribution around the BH. We perform simulations of isolated evolution and merger of disk galaxies, of Milky-Way mass as well as lower and higher masses. We find that in the isolated galaxy BH kinetic feedback generates intermittent bipolar jet-like gas outflows. We infer that current prescriptions for BH subgrid physics in galaxy simulations can grow the BH to observed values even in an isolated disk galaxy. The BH growth is enhanced in a galaxy merger. Comparing the [M_BH - sigma_star] relation obtained in our simulations with observa...

  8. A novel method to bracket the corotation radius in galaxy disks: vertex deviation maps

    CERN Document Server

    Roca-Fàbrega, Santi; Figueras, Francesca; Valenzuela, Octavio; Romero-Gómez, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    We map the kinematics of stars in simulated galaxy disks with spiral arms using the vertex deviation of the velocity ellipsoid. We use test particle simulations including, for the first time, fully self-consistent and high resolution N-body models. We compare our maps with the analytical predictions of the Tight-Winding Approximation (TWA) model. We see that, independently of the model, when the spiral arms are non-corotant the vertex deviation parameter values are related with the position of density peaks of overdense and underdense regions. We also find that if the spiral arms do not corotate with the disk, the sign of the vertex deviation changes from negative to positive when crossing the spiral arms in the direction of rotation, in the places where the spiral arms are in between corotation and the Outer Lindblad Resonance (OLR). By contrast, when they are inside the corotation radius and outside the Outer Lindblad Resonance, l$_v$ changes from negative to positive. We propose that measurements of the ve...

  9. The violent interstellar medium in Milky-Way like disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoline Walch, Stefanie

    2015-08-01

    Molecular clouds are cold, dense, and turbulent filamentary structures that condense out of the multi-phase interstellar medium. They are also the sites of star formation. The minority of new-born stars is massive, but these stars are particularly important for the fate of their parental molecular clouds as their feedback drives turbulence and regulates star formation.I will present results from the SILCC project (SImulating the Life Cycle of molecular Clouds), in which we study the formation and dispersal of molecular clouds within the multi-phase ISM using high-performance, three-dimensional simulations of representative pieces of disk galaxies. Apart from stellar feedback, self-gravity, an external stellar potential, and magnetic fields, we employ an accurate description of gas heating and cooling as well as a small chemical network including molecule formation and (self-)shielding from the interstellar radiation field. We study the impact of the supernova rate and the positioning of the supernova explosions with respect to the molecular gas in a well defined set of simulations. This allows us to draw conclusions on structure of the multi-phase ISM, the amount of molecular gas formed, and the onset of galactic outflows. Furthermore, we show how important stellar wind feedback is for regulating star formation in these disks.

  10. Formation of disk galaxies in preheated media: a preventative feedback model

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Yu; Wechsler, Risa H

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a semi-analytic galaxy formation model implementing a self-consistent treatment for the hot halo gas configuration and the assembly of central disks. Using the model, we explore a preventative feedback model, in which the circum-halo medium is assumed to be preheated up to a certain entropy level by early starbursts or other processes, and compare it with an ejective feedback model, in which baryons are first accreted into dark matter halos and subsequently ejected out by feedback. The model demonstrates that when the medium is preheated to an entropy comparable to the halo virial entropy the baryon accretion can be largely reduced and delayed. In addition, the preheated medium can establish an extended low density gaseous halo when it accretes into the dark matter halos, and result in a specific angular momentum of the cooling gas large enough to form central disks as extended as those observed. Combined with simulated halo assembly histories, the preventative feedback model can reproduce remark...

  11. Inclination-Independent Galaxy Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Bailin, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    We present a new method to classify galaxies from large surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using inclination-corrected concentration, inclination-corrected location on the color-magnitude diagram, and apparent axis ratio. Explicitly accounting for inclination tightens the distribution of each of these parameters and enables simple boundaries to be drawn that delineate three different galaxy populations: Early-type galaxies, which are red, highly concentrated, and round; Late-type galaxies, which are blue, have low concentrations, and are disk dominated; and Intermediate-type galaxies, which are red, have intermediate concentrations, and have disks. We have validated our method by comparing to visual classifications of high-quality imaging data from the Millennium Galaxy Catalogue. The inclination correction is crucial to unveiling the previously unrecognized Intermediate class. Intermediate-type galaxies, roughly corresponding to lenticulars and early spirals, lie on the red sequence. The red sequence ...

  12. Classifying orbits of low and high energy stars in axisymmetric disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    The ordered or chaotic character of orbits of stars moving in the meridional $(R,z)$ plane of an analytic axisymmetric time-independent disk galaxy model with an additional spherically symmetric central nucleus is investigated. Our aim is to determine how the total energy influences the orbital structure of the galaxy. For this purpose we monitor how the percentage of chaotic orbits as well as the rates of orbits composing the main regular families evolve as a function of the value of the energy. In order to distinguish with certainty between chaotic and ordered motion we use the SALI method in extensive sets of initial conditions of orbits. Moreover, a spectral method is applied for identifying the various regular families and also for recognizing the secondary resonances that bifurcate from them. Our numerical computations suggest that for low energy levels the observed amount of chaos is high and the orbital content is rather poor, while for high energy levels, corresponding to global motion, regular motio...

  13. SPARC: Mass Models for 175 Disk Galaxies with Spitzer Photometry and Accurate Rotation Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Lelli, Federico; Schombert, James M

    2016-01-01

    We introduce SPARC (Spitzer Photometry & Accurate Rotation Curves): a sample of 175 nearby galaxies with new surface photometry at 3.6 um and high-quality rotation curves from previous HI/Halpha studies. SPARC spans a broad range of morphologies (S0 to Irr), luminosities (~5 dex), and surface brightnesses (~4 dex). We derive [3.6] surface photometry and study structural relations of stellar and gas disks. We find that both the stellar mass-HI mass relation and the stellar radius-HI radius relation have significant intrinsic scatter, while the HI mass-radius relation is extremely tight. We build detailed mass models and quantify the ratio of baryonic-to-observed velocity (Vbar/Vobs) for different characteristic radii and values of the stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) at [3.6]. Assuming M/L=0.5 Msun/Lsun (as suggested by stellar population models) we find that (i) the gas fraction linearly correlates with total luminosity, (ii) the transition from star-dominated to gas-dominated galaxies roughly correspond...

  14. The Megamaser Cosmology Project. III. Accurate Masses of Seven Supermassive Black Holes in Active Galaxies with Circumnuclear Megamaser Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C. Y.; Braatz, J. A.; Condon, J. J.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Lo, K. Y.; Zaw, I.; Schenker, M.; Henkel, C.; Reid, M. J.; Greene, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of H2O masers from circumnuclear disks in active galaxies for the Megamaser Cosmology Project (MCP) allow accurate measurement of the mass of supermassive black holes (BH) in these galaxies. We present the Very Long Baseline Interferometry images and kinematics of water maser emission in six active galaxies: NGC 1194, NGC 2273, NGC 2960 (Mrk 1419), NGC 4388, NGC 6264 and NGC 6323. We use the Keplerian rotation curves of these six megamaser galaxies, plus a seventh previously published, to determine accurate enclosed masses within the central ~0.3 pc of these galaxies, smaller than the radius of the sphere of influence of the central mass in all cases. We also set lower limits to the central mass densities of between 0.12 × 1010 and 61 × 1010 M sun pc-3. For six of the seven disks, the high central densities rule out clusters of stars or stellar remnants as the central objects, and this result further supports our assumption that the enclosed mass can be attributed predominantly to a supermassive BH. The seven BHs have masses ranging between 0.75 × 107 and 6.5 × 107 M sun, with the mass errors dominated by the uncertainty of the Hubble constant. We compare the megamaser BH mass determination with BH mass measured from the virial estimation method. The virial estimation BH mass in four galaxies is consistent with the megamaser BH mass, but the virial mass uncertainty is much greater. Circumnuclear megamaser disks allow the best mass determination of the central BH mass in external galaxies and significantly improve the observational basis at the low-mass end of the M-σsstarf relation. The M-σsstarf relation may not be a single, low-scatter power law as originally proposed. MCP observations continue and we expect to obtain more maser BH masses in the future.

  15. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. VIII. BARRED DISK GALAXIES IN THE CORE OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinova, Irina; Jogee, Shardha; Weinzirl, Tim [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States); Erwin, Peter [Max-Planck-Insitut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Trentham, Neil [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hammer, Derek [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Kleijn, Gijs V. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Graham, Alister W. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn (Australia); Carter, David; Mouhcine, Mustapha [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Birkenhead (United Kingdom); Balcells, Marc [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Peng, Eric W., E-mail: marinova@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: sj@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-02-20

    We use high-resolution ({approx}0.''1) F814W Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images from the Hubble Space Telescope ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z {approx} 0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), as well as low-mass dwarf galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster, the densest environment in the nearby universe. Our study helps to constrain the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments and provides a comparison point for studies in lower density environments and at higher redshifts. Our results are: (1) we characterize the fraction and properties of bars in a sample of 32 bright (M{sub V} {approx}< -18, M{sub *} > 10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun }) S0 galaxies, which dominate the population of massive disk galaxies in the Coma core. We find that the measurement of a bar fraction among S0 galaxies must be handled with special care due to the difficulty in separating unbarred S0s from ellipticals, and the potential dilution of the bar signature by light from a relatively large, bright bulge. The results depend sensitively on the method used: the bar fraction for bright S0s in the Coma core is 50% {+-} 11%, 65% {+-} 11%, and 60% {+-} 11% based on three methods of bar detection, namely, strict ellipse fit criteria, relaxed ellipse fit criteria, and visual classification. (2) We compare the S0 bar fraction across different environments (the Coma core, A901/902, and Virgo) adopting the critical step of using matched samples and matched methods in order to ensure robust comparisons. We find that the bar fraction among bright S0 galaxies does not show a statistically significant variation (within the error bars of {+-}11%) across environments which span two orders of magnitude in galaxy number density (n {approx} 300-10,000 galaxies Mpc{sup -3}) and include rich and poor clusters, such as the core of Coma, the A901/902 cluster, and Virgo. We speculate that the bar fraction among S0s is not significantly enhanced in rich clusters compared to

  16. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. VIII. BARRED DISK GALAXIES IN THE CORE OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use high-resolution (∼0.''1) F814W Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images from the Hubble Space Telescope ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z ∼ 0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), as well as low-mass dwarf galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster, the densest environment in the nearby universe. Our study helps to constrain the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments and provides a comparison point for studies in lower density environments and at higher redshifts. Our results are: (1) we characterize the fraction and properties of bars in a sample of 32 bright (MV ∼* > 109.5 M☉) S0 galaxies, which dominate the population of massive disk galaxies in the Coma core. We find that the measurement of a bar fraction among S0 galaxies must be handled with special care due to the difficulty in separating unbarred S0s from ellipticals, and the potential dilution of the bar signature by light from a relatively large, bright bulge. The results depend sensitively on the method used: the bar fraction for bright S0s in the Coma core is 50% ± 11%, 65% ± 11%, and 60% ± 11% based on three methods of bar detection, namely, strict ellipse fit criteria, relaxed ellipse fit criteria, and visual classification. (2) We compare the S0 bar fraction across different environments (the Coma core, A901/902, and Virgo) adopting the critical step of using matched samples and matched methods in order to ensure robust comparisons. We find that the bar fraction among bright S0 galaxies does not show a statistically significant variation (within the error bars of ±11%) across environments which span two orders of magnitude in galaxy number density (n ∼ 300-10,000 galaxies Mpc–3) and include rich and poor clusters, such as the core of Coma, the A901/902 cluster, and Virgo. We speculate that the bar fraction among S0s is not significantly enhanced in rich clusters compared to low-density environments for two reasons. First, S0s in rich clusters are

  17. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: Cosmological neutrino mass constraint from blue high-redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Riemer--Sørensen, Signe; Parkinson, David; Davis, Tamara M; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Contreras, Carlos; Couch, Warrick; Croom, Scott; Croton, Darren; Drinkwater, Michael J; Forster, Karl; Gilbank, David; Gladders, Mike; Glazebrook, Karl; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J; Li, I-hui; Madore, Barry; Martin, D Christopher; Pimbblet, Kevin; Poole, Gregory B; Pracy, Michael; Sharp, Rob; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David; Wyder, Ted K; Yee, H K C

    2011-01-01

    The absolute neutrino mass scale is currently unknown, but can be constrained from cosmology. The WiggleZ high redshift star-forming blue galaxy sample is less sensitive to systematics from non-linear structure formation, redshift-space distortions and galaxy bias than previous surveys. We obtain a upper limit on the sum of neutrino masses of 0.60eV (95% confidence) for WiggleZ+Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. Combining with priors on the Hubble Parameter and the baryon acoustic oscillation scale gives an upper limit of 0.29eV, which is the strongest neutrino mass constraint derived from spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys.

  18. The H I content of extremely metal-deficient blue compact dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuan, T. X.; Goehring, K. M.; Hibbard, J. E.; Izotov, Y. I.; Hunt, L. K.

    2016-09-01

    We have obtained new H I observations with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope (GBT) for a sample of 29 extremely metal-deficient star-forming Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectral data base to be extremely metal-deficient (12 + log O/H ≤ 7.6). Neutral hydrogen was detected in 28 galaxies, a 97% detection rate. Combining the H I data with SDSS optical spectra for the BCD sample and adding complementary galaxy samples from the literature to extend the metallicity and mass ranges, we have studied how the H I content of a galaxy varies with various global galaxian properties. There is a clear trend of increasing gas mass fraction with decreasing metallicity, mass and luminosity. We obtain the relation M(H I)/Lg∝ L_g^{-0.3}, in agreement with previous studies based on samples with a smaller luminosity range. The median gas mass fraction fgas for the GBT sample is equal to 0.94 while the mean gas mass fraction is 0.90±0.15, with a lower limit of ˜0.65. The H I depletion time is independent of metallicity, with a large scatter around the median value of 3.4 Gyr. The ratio of the baryonic mass to the dynamical mass of the metal-deficient BCDs varies from 0.05 to 0.80, with a median value of ˜0.2. About 65% of the BCDs in our sample have an effective yield larger than the true yield, implying that the neutral gas envelope in BCDs is more metal-deficient by a factor of 1.5-20, as compared to the ionized gas.

  19. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: Direct constraints on blue galaxy intrinsic alignments at intermediate redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Bridle, Sarah; Abdalla, Filipe B; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick; Croom, Scott; Davis, Tamara; Drinkwater, Michael J; Forster, Karl; Glazebrook, Karl; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J; Li, Tornado; Madore, Barry; Martin, Chris; Pimbblet, Kevin; Poole, Gregory B; Pracy, Michael; Sharp, Rob; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David; Wyder, Ted

    2009-01-01

    Correlations between the intrinsic shapes of galaxy pairs, and between the intrinsic shapes of galaxies and the large-scale density field, may be induced by tidal fields. These correlations, which have been detected at low redshifts (z<0.35) for bright red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and for which upper limits exist for blue galaxies at z~0.1, provide a window into galaxy formation and evolution, and are also an important contaminant for current and future weak lensing surveys. Measurements of these alignments at intermediate redshifts (z~0.6) that are more relevant for cosmic shear observations are very important for understanding the origin and redshift evolution of these alignments, and for minimising their impact on weak lensing measurements. We present the first such intermediate-redshift measurement for blue galaxies, using galaxy shape measurements from SDSS and spectroscopic redshifts from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. Our null detection allows us to place upper limits on the...

  20. Halo Gas and Galaxy Disk Kinematics Derived from Observations and LCDM Simulations of MgII Absorption Selected Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Kacprzak, G G; Ceverino, D; Steidel, C C; Klypin, A; Murphy, M T

    2009-01-01

    We obtained ESI/Keck rotation curves of 10 MgII absorption selected galaxies (0.3 < z < 1.0) for which we have WFPC-2/HST images and high resolution HIRES/Keck and UVES/VLT quasar spectra of the MgII absorption profiles. We perform a kinematic comparison of these galaxies and their associated halo MgII absorption. For all 10 galaxies, the majority of the absorption velocities lie in the range of the observed galaxy rotation velocities. In 7/10 cases, the absorption velocities reside fully to one side of the galaxy systemic velocity and usually align with one arm of the rotation curve. In all cases, a constant rotating thick-disk model poorly reproduces the full spread of observed MgII absorption velocities when reasonably realistic parameters are employed. In 2/10 cases, the galaxy kinematics, star formation surface densities, and absorption kinematics have a resemblance to those of high redshift galaxies showing strong outflows. We find that MgII absorption velocity spread and optical depth distributio...

  1. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. VIII. Barred Disk Galaxies in the Core of the Coma Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Marinova, Irina; Weinzirl, Tim; Erwin, Peter; Trentham, Neil; Ferguson, Henry C; Hammer, Derek; Brok, Mark den; Graham, Alister W; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Goudfrooij, Paul; Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Peletier, Reynier F; Peng, Eric; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes

    2012-01-01

    (ABRIDGED) We use high resolution (~0.1") F814W ACS images from the HST ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z~0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), and in dwarf galaxies in the Coma core. Our study helps constrain the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments and provides a comparison point for studies in lower density environments and at higher redshifts. (1) We characterize the fraction and properties of bars in a sample of 32 bright (M_V 10^9.5 M_sun) S0 galaxies, which dominate the population of massive disk galaxies in the Coma core. Measuring the S0 bar fraction must be handled carefully, as the results depend on the method used: the bar fraction for bright S0s in the Coma core is 50%+/-11%, 65%+/-11%, and 60%+/-11% for three methods of bar detection: strict ellipse fit criteria, relaxed ellipse fit criteria, and visual classification. (2) We compare the S0 bar fraction across different environments (Coma core, A901/902, Virgo). We find that the bar fraction among bright S0 ...

  2. The Lyman alpha Reference Sample VI: Lyman alpha escape from the edge-on disk galaxy Mrk1486

    CERN Document Server

    Duval, Florent; Hayes, Matthew; Zackrisson, Erik; Verhamme, Anne; Orlitova, Ivana; Adamo, Angela; Guaita, Lucia; Melinder, Jens; Cannon, John M; Laursen, Peter; Rivera-Thorsen, Thoger; Herenz, E Christian; Gruyters, Pieter; Mas-Hesse, J Miguel; Kunth, Daniel; Sandberg, Andreas; Schaerer, Daniel; Mansson, Tore

    2015-01-01

    While numerical simulations suggest that the strength of the Lyman alpha (Lya) line of star-forming disk galaxies strongly depends on the inclination at which they are observed (i.e. from edge-on to face-on, we expect to see a change from an attenuated Lya line to a strong Lya emission line), recent observations with the Hubble space telescope (HST) have highlighted few low-redshift highly inclined (edge-on) disk galaxies that breaks this trend. We aim to understand how a strong Lya emission line is able to escape from one of those inclined disk galaxies, named Mrk1486 (z=0.0338). For that purpose we used a large set of HST imaging and spectroscopic data to investigate both the ISM structure and the dominant source of Lya radiation inside Mrk1486. Moreover, we used a 3D Monte Carlo Lya radiation transfer code to study the radiative transfer of Lya and UV continuum photons inside a 3D geometry of neutral hydrogen (HI) and dust that models the ISM structure at the galaxy center. The analysis of IFU Halpha spect...

  3. Dark matter in disk galaxies I: a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method and application to DDO 154

    CERN Document Server

    Hague, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method to constrain the dark matter halo density profiles of disk galaxies. Our algorithm employs a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach to explore the parameter space of a general family of dark matter profiles. We improve upon previous analyses by considering a wider range of halo profiles and by explicitly identifying cases in which the data are insufficient to break the degeneracies between the model parameters. We demonstrate the robustness of our algorithm using artificial data sets and show that reliable estimates of the halo density profile can be obtained from data of comparable quality to those currently available for low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. We present our results in terms of physical quantities which are constrained by the data, and find that the logarithmic slope of the halo density profile at the radius of the innermost data point of a measured rotation curve can be strongly constrained in LSB galaxies. High surface brightness galaxies require additional inform...

  4. Origins of the thick disk of the galaxy as traced by metal-poor stars selected from RAVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchti G.R.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Models of the formation of the thick disk of the Milky Way Galaxy make specific predictions about the chemical abundance properties of the metal-weak (and oldest stellar population in the thick disk. We have undertaken the study of the elemental abundances and kinematic properties of a sample of 319 candidate metal-poor thick-disk stars selected from the RAVE spectroscopic survey of bright stars. Our aim is to differentiate among the present scenarios of the formation of the thick disk. In this study, we measured the abundances of several alpha-elements and found that the thick-disk [alpha/Fe] ratios are enhanced, implying that enrichment proceeded by purely core-collapse supernovae. Further, the sample probes distances ranging out to about 2 kpc from the Sun, allowing for the investigation of the gradients in the thick disk. I will discuss the results from these investigations and how they compare to the predictions made by present models of the formation of the thick disk.

  5. Monsters in the Dark: Predictions for Luminous Galaxies in the Early Universe from the BlueTides Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Waters, Dacen; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Feng, Yu; Croft, Ruper; Nagai, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Using deep Hubble and Spitzer observations Oesch et al. (2016) have identified a bright ($M_{\\rm UV}\\approx -22$) star forming galaxy candidate at $z \\approx 11$. The presence of GN-$z11$ implies a number density $\\sim 10^{-6}\\,{\\rm Mpc^{-3}}$, roughly an order of magnitude higher than the expected value based on extrapolations from lower redshift. Using the unprecedented volume and high resolution of the BlueTides cosmological hydrodynamical simulation, we study the population of luminous rare objects at $z > 10$. The luminosity function in BlueTides implies an enhanced number of massive galaxies, consistent with the observation of GN-$z11$. We find about 30 galaxies at $M_{\\rm UV}\\approx -22$ at $z = 11$ in the BlueTides volume, including a few objects about 1.5 magnitudes brighter. The probability of observing GN-$z11$ in the volume probed by Oesch et al. (2016) is $\\sim 13$ per cent. The predicted properties of the rare bright galaxies at $z = 11$ in BlueTides closely match those inferred from the observa...

  6. Amazing Andromeda Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The many 'personalities' of our great galactic neighbor, the Andromeda galaxy, are exposed in this new composite image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Spitzer Space Telescope. The wide, ultraviolet eyes of Galaxy Evolution Explorer reveal Andromeda's 'fiery' nature -- hotter regions brimming with young and old stars. In contrast, Spitzer's super-sensitive infrared eyes show Andromeda's relatively 'cool' side, which includes embryonic stars hidden in their dusty cocoons. Galaxy Evolution Explorer detected young, hot, high-mass stars, which are represented in blue, while populations of relatively older stars are shown as green dots. The bright yellow spot at the galaxy's center depicts a particularly dense population of old stars. Swaths of red in the galaxy's disk indicate areas where Spitzer found cool, dusty regions where stars are forming. These stars are still shrouded by the cosmic clouds of dust and gas that collapsed to form them. Together, Galaxy Evolution Explorer and Spitzer complete the picture of Andromeda's swirling spiral arms. Hints of pinkish purple depict regions where the galaxy's populations of hot, high-mass stars and cooler, dust-enshrouded stars co-exist. Located 2.5 million light-years away, the Andromeda is our largest nearby galactic neighbor. The galaxy's entire disk spans about 260,000 light-years, which means that a light beam would take 260,000 years to travel from one end of the galaxy to the other. By comparison, our Milky Way galaxy's disk is about 100,000 light-years across. This image is a false color composite comprised of data from Galaxy Evolution Explorer's far-ultraviolet detector (blue), near-ultraviolet detector (green), and Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer at 24 microns (red).

  7. The HI and Ionized Gas Disk of the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1144 = Arp 118 A Violently Interacting Galaxy with Peculiar Kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Bransford, M A; McCain, C F; Freeman, K C

    1999-01-01

    We present observations of the distribution and kinematics of neutral and ionized gas in NGC 1144, a galaxy that forms part of the Arp 118 system. Ionized gas is present over a huge spread in velocity (1100 km/s) in the disk of NGC 1144, but HI emission is detected over only 1/3 of this velocity range, in an area that corresponds to the NW half of the disk. In the nuclear region of NGC 1144, a jump in velocity in the ionized gas component of 600 km/s is observed. Faint, narrow HI absorption lines are also detected against radio sources in the SE part of the disk of NGC 1144, which includes regions of massive star formation and a Seyfert nucleus. The peculiar HI distribution, which is concentrated in the NW disk, seems to be the inverse of the molecular distribution which is concentrated in the SE disk. Although this may partly be the result of the destruction of HI clouds in the SE disk, there is circumstantial evidence that the entire HI emission spectrum of NGC 1144 is affected by a deep nuclear absorption ...

  8. Resonance Type Instabilities in the Gaseous Disks of the Flat Galaxies 2 The stability of solitary vortex sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Bezborodov, C M

    1998-01-01

    Linear stability analysis of the axisymmetric interface of velocity and density discontinuity in rotating gaseous disk has been performed numerically and analytically. Physical mechanisms leading to development of centrifugal and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the kink has been analysed in detail. In the incompressible limit it has been shown in the first time such areas in the parameter space that Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is stabilized by the density kink. This effect is caused by both specifical angular momentum conservation and buoyancy. The possibility of application of obtained results to the stability analysis of the gaseous disks of the real flat galaxies is discussed.

  9. Resonance Type Instabilities in the Gaseous Disks of the Flat Galaxies 3 the gyroscopical resonance type instability

    CERN Document Server

    Bezborodov, C M; Mustsevoy, V V

    1998-01-01

    The stability of thin homogeneous gaseous disk with step discontinuity of velocity and density profile has been investigated analytically in the limitary case of large compressibility and numerically at spatially separated velocity and density kinks. The expressions for reflection and transmission coefficients at the axisymmetrical vortex sheet are derived. The possibility of gyroscopical resonance type instability development in addition to Kelvin--Helmholtz and centrifugal instabilities is shown and its physical mechanism is clarified. It has been discussed the possibility of application of obtained results to the stability analysis of the gaseous disks of the real flat galaxies.

  10. No More Active Galactic Nuclei in Clumpy Disks Than in Smooth Galaxies at z~2 in CANDELS / 3D-HST

    CERN Document Server

    Trump, Jonathan R; Juneau, Stephanie; Weiner, Benjamin J; Luo, Bin; Brammer, Gabriel B; Bell, Eric F; Brandt, W Niel; Dekel, Avishai; Guo, Yicheng; Hopkins, Philip F; Koo, David C; Kocevski, Dale D; McIntosh, Daniel H; Momcheva, Ivelina; Faber, S M; Ferguson, Henry C; Grogin, Norman A; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Koekemoer, Anton M; Lotz, Jennifer; Maseda, Michael; Mozena, Mark; Nandra, Kirpal; Rosario, David J; Zeimann, Gregory R

    2014-01-01

    We use CANDELS imaging, 3D-HST spectroscopy, and Chandra X-ray data to investigate if active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially fueled by violent disk instabilities funneling gas into galaxy centers at 1.3galaxies undergoing gravitational instabilities using the number of clumps and degree of patchiness as proxies. The CANDELS visual classification system is used to identify 44 clumpy disk galaxies, along with mass-matched comparison samples of smooth and intermediate morphology galaxies. We note that, despite being being mass-matched and having similar star formation rates, the smoother galaxies tend to be smaller disks with more prominent bulges compared to the clumpy galaxies. The lack of smooth extended disks is probably a general feature of the z~2 galaxy population, and means we cannot directly compare with the clumpy and smooth extended disks observed at lower redshift. We find that z~2 clumpy galaxies have slightly enhanced AGN fractions selected by integrated line ratio...

  11. LUMINOSITY-METALLICITY RELATIONS FOR BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES IN THE OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present systematic studies on the B-, R- and Ks -band luminosity-metallicity (L-Z) relations for a set of metal-poor, blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs). Metallicity is derived by using both the empirical N2 and the direct Te methods. Our work reconciles contradictory results obtained by different authors and shows that the L-Z relationship does also hold for BCDs. The empirical N2-based slope of the L-Z relation, for each photometric band, is consistent with the Te -based one. We confirm that the slope of the L-Z relation is shallower in the near-infrared than that in the optical. Our investigations on the correlations between the LB -Z relation residuals and different galactic parameters show that the star formation activities could be a cause of the large scatter in the optical L-Z relationships, whereas the internal absorption might be another possible contributing factor.

  12. The Megamaser Cosmology Project. III. Accurate Masses of Seven Supermassive Black Holes in Active Galaxies with Circumnuclear Megamaser Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, C Y; Condon, J J; Impellizzeri, C M V; Lo, K Y; Zaw, I; Schenker, M; Henkel, C; Reid, M J; Greene, J E

    2010-01-01

    Observations of H$_2$O masers from circumnuclear disks in active galaxies for the Megamaser Cosmology Project allow accurate measurement of the mass of supermassive black holes (BH) in these galaxies. We present the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) images and kinematics of water maser emission in six active galaxies: NGC~1194, NGC~2273, NGC~2960 (Mrk~1419), NGC~4388, NGC~6264 and NGC~6323. We use the Keplerian rotation curves of these six megamaser galaxies, plus a seventh previously published, to determine accurate enclosed masses within the central $\\sim0.3$ pc of these galaxies, smaller than the radius of the sphere of influence of the central mass in all cases. We also set lower limits to the central mass densities of between 0.12 and 60 $\\times 10^{10} M_{\\odot}$~pc$^{-3}$. For six of the seven disks, the high central densities rule out clusters of stars or stellar remnants as the central objects, and this result further supports our assumption that the enclosed mass can be attributed predominant...

  13. The Near-infrared S0 Survey III: Morphology of 15 Southern Early-type Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Laurikainen, E; Buta, R; Knapen, J; Speltincx, T; Block, D

    2006-01-01

    Structural analysis has been performed for a sample of 15 Southern early-type disk galaxies, mainly S0s, using high resolution $K_s$-band images. The galaxies are mostly barred and many of them show multiple structures including bars and ovals, typical for S0s. The new images are of sufficient quality to reveal new detail on the morphology of the galaxies. For example, we report a hitherto undetected nuclear ring in NGC 1387, a nuclear bar in NGC 1326, and in the residual image also a weak primary bar in NGC 1317. For the galaxies we (1) measure the radial profiles of the orientation parameters derived from the elliptical isophotes, (2) apply Fourier methods for calculating tangential forces, and particularly, (3) apply structural decomposition methods. For galaxies with multiple structures a 2-dimensional method is found to be superior to a 1-dimensional method, but only if in addition to the bulge and the disk, at least one other component is taken into account. {\\it We find strong evidence of pseudo-bulges...

  14. Tracing the star formation history of three Blue Compact galaxies through the analysis of their star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Adamo, Angela; Zackrisson, Erik; Hayes, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a study of the compact star cluster populations in three local luminous blue compact galaxies: ESO 185-IG 013, ESO 350-IG 038 (a.k.a. Haro 11), and MRK 930. These systems show peculiar morphologies and the presence of hundreds of SCs that have been produced by the past, recent, and/or current starburst phases. We use a complete set of HST images ranging from the UV to IR for each galaxy. Deep images in V (WFPC2/f606w) and I (WFPC2/f814w) are used to capture most of the star cluster candidates up to the old ones (fainter) which have had, in the past, less possibility to be detected. The other bands are used in the SED fitting technique for constraining ages and masses. Our goals are to investigate the evolution of these three blue compact galaxies and the star cluster formation impact on their star formation history.

  15. Long-Term Evolution of and X-ray Emission from a Recoiling Supermassive Black Hole in a Disk Galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    Recent numerical relativity simulations have shown that the emission of gravitational waves at the merger of two black holes gives a recoil kick to the final black hole. We follow the orbits of a recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) in a fixed background potential of a disk galaxy including the effect of dynamical friction. If the recoil velocity of the SMBH is smaller than the escape velocity of the galaxy, the SMBH moves around in the potential along a complex trajectory before it spira...

  16. The growth of disks and bulges during hierarchical galaxy formation. II: metallicity, stellar populations and dynamical evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Tonini, Chiara; Wyithe, J Stuart B; Croton, Darren J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the stellar populations of model galaxies, using the new semi-analytic model presented in Tonini et al. (2016a). This new model follows the angular momentum evolution of gas and stars, providing the base for a new star formation recipe, and treatment of the effects of mergers that depends on the central galaxy dynamical structure. We find that the new recipes have the effect of boosting the efficiency of the baryonic cycle in producing and recycling metals, as well as preventing minor mergers from diluting the metallicity of bulges and ellipticals. The model reproduces the stellar mass - stellar metallicity relation for galaxies above 1e10 solar masses, including Brightest Cluster Galaxies. Model disks, galaxies dominated by instability-driven components, and merger-driven objects each stem from different evolutionary channels. These model galaxies therefore occupy different loci in the galaxy mass - size relation, which we find to be in accord with the Atlas 3D classification...

  17. 3D Spectroscopy of Local Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies: Kinematics of NGC 7673

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Gallego, J; Castillo-Morales, A; Castander, F J; Gallego, J; Garland, C A; Gruel, N; Pisano, D J; Sánchez, S F; Zamorano, J

    2009-01-01

    The kinematic properties of the ionized gas of local Luminous Compact Blue Galaxy (LCBG) NGC 7673 are presented using three dimensional data taken with the PPAK integral field unit at the 3.5-m telescope in the Centro Astron\\'omico Hispano Alem\\'an. Our data reveal an asymmetric rotating velocity field with a peak to peak difference of 60 km s$^{-1}$. The kinematic centre is found to be at the position of a central velocity width maximum ($\\sigma=54\\pm1$ km s$^{-1}$), which is consistent with the position of the luminosity-weighted centroid of the entire galaxy. The position angle of the minor rotation axis is 168$^{\\circ}$ as measured from the orientation of the velocity field contours. At least two decoupled kinematic components are found. The first one is compact and coincides with the position of the second most active star formation region (clump B). The second one is extended and does not have a clear optical counterpart. No evidence of active galactic nuclei activity or supernovae galactic winds poweri...

  18. VII Zw 403: HI Structure in a Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, Caroline E; Nordgren, Tyler E; Brinks, Elias; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Ashley, Trisha; Lynds, Roger; McIntyre, Vince J; O'Neil, Earl J; Östlin, Göran; Westpfahl, David J; Wilcots, Eric M

    2011-01-01

    We present optical (UBVJ), ultraviolet (FUV, NUV), and high resolution atomic hydrogen (HI) observations of the nearby blue compact dwarf (BCD), VII Zw 403. We find that VII Zw 403 has a relatively high HI mass-to-light ratio for a BCD. The rotation velocity is nominally 10-15 km/s, but rises to ~20 km/s after correction for the ~8-10 km/s random motions present in the gas. The velocity field is complex; including a variation in the position angle of the major axis going from the NE to the SW parts of the galaxy. Our high resolution HI maps reveal structure in the central gas, including a large, low-density HI depression or hole between the southern and northern halves of the galaxy, coincident with an unresolved x-ray source. Although interactions have been proposed as the triggering mechanism for the vigorous star formation occurring in BCDs, VII Zw 403 does not seem to have been tidally triggered by an external interaction, as we have found no nearby possible perturbers. It also doesn't appear to fall in t...

  19. The History of Star Formation in Galaxy Disks in the Local Volume as Measured by the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Benjamin F; Johnson, L C; Weisz, Daniel R; Seth, Anil C; Dolphin, Andrew; Gilbert, Karoline M; Skillman, Evan; Rosema, Keith; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Holtzman, Jon; de Jong, Roelof S

    2011-01-01

    We present a measurement of the age distribution of stars residing in spiral disks and dwarf galaxies. We derive a complete star formation history of the ~140 Mpc^3 covered by the volume-limited sample of galaxies in the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST). The total star formation rate density history is dominated by the large spirals in the volume, although the sample consists mainly of dwarf galaxies. Our measurement shows a factor of ~3 drop at z~2, in approximate agreement with results from other measurement techniques. While our results show that the overall star formation rate density has decreased since z~1, the measured rates during this epoch are higher than those obtained from other measurement techniques. This enhanced recent star formation rate appears to be largely due to an increase in the fraction of star formation contained in low-mass disks at recent times. Finally, our results indicate that despite the differences at recent times, the epoch of formation o...

  20. Variations in the Star Formation Efficiency of the Dense Molecular Gas across the Disks of Star-forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usero, Antonio; Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Schruba, Andreas; García-Burillo, Santiago; Sandstrom, Karin; Bigiel, Frank; Brinks, Elias; Kramer, Carsten; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; de Blok, W. J. G.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new survey of HCN(1–0) emission, a tracer of dense molecular gas, focused on the little-explored regime of normal star-forming galaxy disks. Combining HCN, CO, and infrared (IR) emission, we investigate the role of dense gas in star formation, finding systematic variations in both the apparent dense gas fraction (traced by the HCN-to-CO ratio) and the apparent star formation efficiency of dense gas (traced by the IR-to-HCN ratio). The latter may be unexpected, given the recent popularity of gas density threshold models to explain star formation scaling relations. Our survey used the IRAM 30 m telescope to observe HCN(1–0), CO(1–0), and several other emission lines across 29 nearby disk galaxies whose CO(2–1) emission has previously been mapped by the HERACLES survey. We detected HCN in 48 out of 62 observed positions. Because our observations achieve a typical resolution of ∼1.5 kpc and span a range of galaxies and galactocentric radii (56% lie at {r}{gal}\\gt 1 kpc), we are able to investigate the properties of the dense gas as a function of local conditions in a galaxy disk. We focus on how the ratios IR-to-CO, HCN-to-CO, and IR-to-HCN (observational cognates of the star formation efficiency, dense gas fraction, and dense gas star formation efficiency) depend on the stellar surface density, {{{Σ }}}{star}, and the molecular-to-atomic gas ratio, {{{Σ }}}{mol}/{{{Σ }}}{atom}. The HCN-to-CO ratio is low, often ∼1/30, and correlates tightly with both the molecular-to-atomic ratio and the stellar mass surface density across a range of 2.1 dex (factor of ≈125) in both parameters. Thus for the assumption of fixed CO-to-H2 and HCN-to-dense gas conversion factors, the dense gas fraction depends strongly on location in the disk, being higher in the high surface density, highly molecular parts of galaxies. At the same time, the IR-to-HCN ratio (closely related to the star formation efficiency of dense molecular gas) decreases systematically

  1. Chandra survey of nearby highly inclined disk galaxies -- IV: New insights into the working of stellar feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Q Daniel; Jiang, Xiaochuan; Fang, Taotao

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy evolution is regulated by the interplay between galactic disks and their surrounding medium. We study this interplay by examining how the galactic coronal emission efficiency of stellar feedback depends on the (surface and specific) star formation rates (SFRs) and other parameters for a sample of 52 Chandra-observed nearby highly inclined disk galaxies. We first measure the star forming galactic disk sizes, as well as the SFRs of these galaxies, using data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, and then show that 1) the specific 0.5-2~keV luminosity of the coronal emission correlates with the specific SFR in a {\\sl sub-linear} fashion: on average, $L_X/L_K \\propto (SFR/M_*)^{\\Gamma}$ with $\\Gamma =0.29\\pm0.12$; 2) the efficiency of the emission $ L_X/SFR$ decreases with increasing surface SFR ($I_{SFR}$; $\\Gamma = -0.44\\pm0.12$); and 3) the characteristic temperature of the X-ray-emitting plasma weakly correlates with $I_{SFR}$ ($\\Gamma = 0.08\\pm0.04$). These results, somewhat surprising and ant...

  2. The Atomic to Molecular Transition and its Relation to the Scaling Properties of Galaxy Disks in the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Jian; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Krumholz, Mark R

    2010-01-01

    We extend existing semi-analytic models of galaxy formation to track atomic and molecular gas in disk galaxies. Simple recipes for processes such as cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, and chemical enrichment of the stars and gas are grafted on to dark matter halo merger trees derived from the Millennium Simulation. Each galactic disk is represented by a series of concentric rings. We assume that surface density profile of infalling gas in a dark matter halo is exponential, with scale radius r_d that is proportional to the virial radius of the halo times its spin parameter $\\lambda$. As the dark matter haloes grow through mergers and accretion, disk galaxies assemble from the inside out. We include two simple prescriptions for molecular gas formation processes in our models: one is based on the analytic calculations by Krumholz, McKee & Tumlinson (2008), and the other is a prescription where the H_2 fraction is determined by the kinematic pressure of the ISM. Motivated by the observational result...

  3. The ACS LCID project VII: the blue stragglers population in the isolated dSph galaxies Cetus and Tucana

    CERN Document Server

    Monelli, M; Mapelli, M; Bernard, E J; Aparicio, A; Skillman, E D; Stetson, P B; Gallart, C; Hidalgo, S L; Mayer, L; Tolstoy, E

    2011-01-01

    We present the first investigation of the Blue Straggler star (BSS) population in two isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group, Cetus and Tucana. Deep HST/ACS photometry allowed us to identify samples of 940 and 1214 candidates, respectively. The analysis of the star formation histories of the two galaxies suggests that both host a population of BSSs. Specifically, if the BSS candidates are interpreted as young main sequence stars, they do not conform to their galaxy's age-metallicity relationship. The analysis of the luminosity function and the radial distributions support this conclusion, and suggest a non-collisional mechanism for the BSS formation, from the evolution of primordial binaries. This scenario is also supported by the results of new dynamical simulations presented here. Both galaxies coincide with the relationship between the BSS frequency and the absolute visual magnitude Mv found by Momany et al (2007). If this relationship is confirmed by larger sample, then it could be a valuab...

  4. Disk galaxy scaling relations at intermediate redshifts. I. The Tully-Fisher and velocity-size relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Asmus; Ziegler, Bodo L.

    2016-07-01

    Aims: Galaxy scaling relations such as the Tully-Fisher relation (between the maximum rotation velocity Vmax and luminosity) and the velocity-size relation (between Vmax and the disk scale length) are powerful tools to quantify the evolution of disk galaxies with cosmic time. Methods: We took spatially resolved slit spectra of 261 field disk galaxies at redshifts up to z ≈ 1 using the FORS instruments of the ESO Very Large Telescope. The targets were selected from the FORS Deep Field and William Herschel Deep Field. Our spectroscopy was complemented with HST/ACS imaging in the F814W filter. We analyzed the ionized gas kinematics by extracting rotation curves from the two-dimensional spectra. Taking into account all geometrical, observational, and instrumental effects, these rotation curves were used to derive the intrinsic Vmax. Results: Neglecting galaxies with disturbed kinematics or insufficient spatial rotation curve extent, Vmax was reliably determined for 124 galaxies covering redshifts 0.05 < z < 0.97. This is one of the largest kinematic samples of distant disk galaxies to date. We compared this data set to the local B-band Tully-Fisher relation and the local velocity-size relation. The scatter in both scaling relations is a factor of ~2 larger at z ≈ 0.5 than at z ≈ 0. The deviations of individual distant galaxies from the local Tully-Fisher relation are systematic in the sense that the galaxies are increasingly overluminous toward higher redshifts, corresponding to an overluminosity ΔMB = -(1.2 ± 0.5) mag at z = 1. This luminosity evolution at given Vmax is probably driven by younger stellar populations of distant galaxies with respect to their local counterparts, potentially combined with modest changes in dark matter mass fractions. The analysis of the velocity-size relation reveals that disk galaxies of a given Vmax have grown in size by a factor of ~1.5 over the past ~8 Gyr, most likely through accretion of cold gas and/or small satellites

  5. Star Formation in Disk Galaxies. I. Formation and Evolution of Giant Molecular Clouds via Gravitational Instability and Cloud Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Tasker, Elizabeth J

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in a Milky-Way-like disk galaxy with a flat rotation curve. We perform a series of 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) numerical simulations that follow both the global evolution on scales of ~20kpc and resolve down to scales ~=100cm^-3 and track the evolution of individual clouds as they orbit through the galaxy from their birth to their eventual destruction via merger or via destructive collision with another cloud. After ~140Myr a large fraction of the gas in the disk has fragmented in clouds, with typical masses ~10^6Msun, similar to Galactic GMCs. The disk settles into a quasi steady state in which gravitational scattering of clouds keeps the disk near the threshold of global gravitational instability. The cloud collision time is found to be a small fraction, ~1/5, of the orbital time, and this is an efficient mechanism to inject turbulence into the clouds. This keeps the clouds only moderately gravitationally bound, with virial pa...

  6. The red and blue galaxy populations in the GOODS field: evidence for an excess of red dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Salimbeni, S; Menci, N; Castellano, M; Fontana, A; Grazian, A; Pentericci, L; Trevese, D; Cristiani, S; Nonino, M; Vanzella, E

    2007-01-01

    We study the evolution of the galaxy population up to z\\sim3 as a function of its colour properties. In particular, luminosity functions and luminosity densities have been derived as a function of redshift for the blue/late and red/early populations. We use data from the GOODS-MUSIC catalogue which have typical magnitude limits z<26 and Ks<23.5 for most of the sample. About 8% of the galaxies have spectroscopic redshifts; the remaining have well calibrated photometric redshifts derived from the extremely wide multi-wavelength coverage in 14 bands (from the U band to the Spitzer 8 \\mu m band). We have derived a catalogue of galaxies complete in rest-frame B-band, which has been divided in two subsamples according to their rest-frame U-V colour (or derived specific star formation rate, SSFR) properties. We confirm a bimodality in the U-V colour and SSFR of the galaxy sample up to z\\sim 3. This bimodality is used to compute the LFs of the blue/late and red/early subsamples. The LFs of the blue/late and tot...

  7. Dark filaments in the galaxy NGC 253 - a boiling galactic disk -

    CERN Document Server

    Sofue, Y; David, F; Yoshiaki Sofue; Ken-ichi Wakamatsu

    1994-01-01

    Abstract We study the morphology of dark lanes and filaments in the dust-rich galaxy NGC 253 using an unsharp-masked B-band optical photograph. Dust features are classified as `arcs', which have heights and scale radius of about 100 to 300 pc, connecting two or more dark clouds, and `loops' and `bubbles', which are developed forms of arcs, expanding into the disk-halo interface. These have diameters of a few hundred pc to \\sim 1 kpc. Among the bubbles, we notice a peculiar round-shaped bubble above the nucleus, which could be a large-diameter (\\sim 300 pc) supernova remnant exploded in the halo over the nucleus. We also find `vertical dust streamers', which comprise bunches of narrow filaments with a thickness of a few tens of pc and are almost perpendicular to the galactic plane, extending coherently for 1 to 2 kpc toward the halo. Finally, we note `short vertical dust filaments' (or spicules) are found in the central region. We interpret these features as due to three-dimensional structures of gas extending...

  8. The DiskMass Survey. IV. The Dark-Matter-Dominated Galaxy UGC 463

    CERN Document Server

    Westfall, Kyle B; Verheijen, Marc A W; Andersen, David R; Martinsson, Thomas P K; Swaters, Robert A; Schechtman-Rook, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed and unique mass budget for the high-surface-brightness galaxy UGC 463, showing it is dominated by dark matter (DM) at radii beyond one scale length (h_R) and has a baryonic-to-DM mass ratio of approximately 1:3 within 4.2 h_R. Assuming a constant scale height (h_z, calculated via an empirical oblateness relation), we calculate dynamical disk mass surface densities from stellar kinematics, which provide vertical velocity dispersions after correcting for the shape of the stellar velocity ellipsoid (measured to have sigma_theta/sigma_R=1.04 +/- 0.22 and sigma_z/sigma_R=0.48 +/- 0.09). We isolate the stellar mass surface density by accounting for all gas mass components and find an average K-band mass-to-light ratio of 0.22 +/- 0.09 (ran) ^{+0.16}_{-0.15} (sys) M_{sun}/L_{sun}^{K}; Zibetti et al. and Bell et al. predict, respectively, 0.56 and 3.6 times our dynamical value based on stellar-population-synthesis modeling. The baryonic matter is submaximal by a factor of ~3 in mass and the bary...

  9. Chemical composition of red horizontal branch stars in the thick disk of the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Tautvaisiene, G; Tuominen, I; Ilyin, I V

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of 13 core helium-burning stars in the thick disk of the Galaxy have been obtained with the SOFIN spectrograph on the Nordic Optical Telescope to investigate abundances of up to 22 chemical elements. Abundances of carbon were studied using the C_2 Swan (0,1) band head at 5635.5 A. The wavelength interval 7980-8130 A with strong CN features was analysed in order to determine nitrogen abundances and 12C/13C isotope ratios. The oxygen abundances were determined from the O I line at 6300 A. Abundances in the investigated stars suggest that carbon is depleted by about 0.3 dex, nitrogen is enhanced by more than 0.4 dex and oxygen is unaltered. The 12C/13C ratios are lowered and lie between values 3 and 7 which is in agreement with "cool bottom processing" predictions (Boothroyd & Sackmann 1999). The C/N ratios in the investigated stars are lowered to values between 0.7 and 1.2 which is less than present day theoretical predictions and call for further studies of stellar mixing processes....

  10. The Morphologies of Massive Galaxies at 1Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, V A; Cirasuolo, M; McLure, R J; Targett, T A; Bell, E F; Croton, D J; Dekel, A; Faber, S M; Ferguson, H C; Grogin, N A; Kocevski, D D; Koekemoer, A M; Koo, D C; Lai, K; Lotz, J M; McGrath, E J; Newman, J A; van der Wel, A

    2012-01-01

    We have used deep, HST, near-IR imaging to study the morphological properties of the most massive galaxies at high z, modelling the WFC3/IR H-band images of the ~200 galaxies in the CANDELS-UDS field with 1 10^11 M_sun. We have used both single-Sersic and bulge+disk models, have investigated the errors/biases introduced by uncertainties in the background and the PSF, and have obtained formally-acceptable model fits to >90% of the galaxies. Our results indicate that these massive galaxies at 1 2 the compact bulges display effective radii a factor ~4 smaller than local ellipticals of comparable mass. These trends appear to extend to the bulge components of disk-dominated galaxies, and vice versa. We also find that, while such massive galaxies at low z are bulge-dominated, at 1 2 they are mostly disk-dominated. The majority of the disk-dominated galaxies are actively forming stars, but this is also true for many of the bulge-dominated systems. Interestingly, however, while most of the quiescent galaxies are b...

  11. The B-Band Luminosity Function of Red and Blue Galaxies up to z=3.5

    CERN Document Server

    Giallongo, E; Menci, N; Zamorani, G; Fontana, A; Dickinson, M; Cristiani, S; Pozzetti, L

    2004-01-01

    We have explored the redshift evolution of the luminosity function of red and blue galaxies up to $z=3.5$. This was possible joining a deep I band composite galaxy sample, which includes the spectroscopic K20 sample and the HDFs samples, with the deep $H_{AB}=26$ and $K_{AB}=25$ samples derived from the deep NIR images of the Hubble Deep Fields North and South, respectively. About 30% of the sample has spectroscopic redshifts and the remaining fraction well-calibrated photometric redshifts. This allowed to select and measure galaxies in the rest-frame blue magnitude up to $z\\sim 3$ and to derive the redshift evolution of the B-band luminosity function of galaxies separated by their rest-frame $U-V$ color or specific (i.e. per unit mass) star-formation rate. The class separation was derived from passive evolutionary tracks or from their observed bimodal distributions. Both distributions appear bimodal at least up to $z\\sim 2$ and the locus of red/early galaxies is clearly identified up to these high redshifts....

  12. Aperture corrections for disk galaxy properties derived from the CALIFA survey. Balmer emission lines in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Iglesias-Páramo, J; Galbany, L; Sánchez, S F; Rosales-Ortega, F F; Mast, D; García-Benito, R; Husemann, B; Aguerri, J A L; Alves, J; Bekeraité, S; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Catalán-Torrecilla, C; de Amorim, A L; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A; Ellis, S; Falcón-Barroso, J; Flores, H; Florido, E; Gallazzi, A; Gomes, J M; Delgado, R M González; Haines, T; Hernández-Fernández, J D; Kehrig, C; López-Sánchez, A R; Lyubenova, M; Marino, R A; Mollá, M; Monreal-Ibero, A; Mourão, A; Papaderos, P; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; Spekkens, K; Stanishev, V; van de Ven, G; Walcher, C J; Wisotzki, L; Zibetti, S; Ziegler, B

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates the effect of the aperture size on derived galaxy properties for which we have spatially-resolved optical spectra. We focus on some indicators of star formation activity and dust attenuation for spiral galaxies that have been widely used in previous work on galaxy evolution. We have used 104 spiral galaxies from the CALIFA survey for which 2D spectroscopy with complete spatial coverage is available. From the 3D cubes we have derived growth curves of the most conspicuous Balmer emission lines (Halpha, Hbeta) for circular apertures of different radii centered at the galaxy's nucleus after removing the underlying stellar continuum. We find that the Halpha flux (f(Halpha)) growth curve follows a well defined sequence with aperture radius showing low dispersion around the median value. From this analysis, we derive aperture corrections for galaxies in different magnitude and redshift intervals. Once stellar absorption is properly accounted for, the f(Halpha)/f(Hbeta) ratio growth curve shows...

  13. THE PHOTOMETRIC AND KINEMATIC STRUCTURE OF FACE-ON DISK GALAXIES. III. KINEMATIC INCLINATIONS FROM H{alpha} VELOCITY FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, David R. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 W Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Bershady, Matthew A., E-mail: david.andersen@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: mab@astro.wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Using the integral field unit DensePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope we have obtained H{alpha} velocity fields of 39 nearly face-on disks at echelle resolutions. High-quality, uniform kinematic data and a new modeling technique enabled us to derive accurate and precise kinematic inclinations with mean i{sub kin} = 23 Degree-Sign for 90% of these galaxies. Modeling the kinematic data as single, inclined disks in circular rotation improves upon the traditional tilted-ring method. We measure kinematic inclinations with a precision in sin i of 25% at 20 Degree-Sign and 6% at 30 Degree-Sign . Kinematic inclinations are consistent with photometric and inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations when the sample is culled of galaxies with kinematic asymmetries, for which we give two specific prescriptions. Kinematic inclinations can therefore be used in statistical ''face-on'' Tully-Fisher studies. A weighted combination of multiple, independent inclination measurements yield the most precise and accurate inclination. Combining inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations with kinematic inclinations yields joint probability inclinations with a precision in sin i of 10% at 15 Degree-Sign and 5% at 30 Degree-Sign . This level of precision makes accurate mass decompositions of galaxies possible even at low inclination. We find scaling relations between rotation speed and disk-scale length identical to results from more inclined samples. We also observe the trend of more steeply rising rotation curves with increased rotation speed and light concentration. This trend appears to be uncorrelated with disk surface brightness.

  14. Star formation and the interstellar medium in low surface brightness galaxies III. Why they are blue, thin and poor in molecular gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, JPE; de Blok, WJG

    1999-01-01

    We present N-body simulations of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies and their Interstellar Medium to investigate the cause for their low star formation rates (SFR). Due to their massive halos, stellar disks of LSB galaxies are very stable and thin. Lack of dust makes the projected edge-on surface

  15. Simulating the Growth of a Disk Galaxy and its Supermassive Black Hole in a Cosmological Simulating the Growth of a Disk Galaxy and its Supermassive Black Hole in a Cosmological Context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, Robyn Deborah; /JILA, Boulder

    2008-07-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are ubiquitous in the centers of galaxies. Their formation and subsequent evolution is inextricably linked to that of their host galaxies, and the study of galaxy formation is incomplete without the inclusion of SMBHs. The present work seeks to understand the growth and evolution of SMBHs through their interaction with the host galaxy and its environment. In the first part of the thesis (Chap. 2 and 3), we combine a simple semi-analytic model of outflows from active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a simulated dark matter density distribution to study the impact of SMBH feedback on cosmological scales. We find that constraints can be placed on the kinetic efficiency of such feedback using observations of the filling fraction of the Ly{alpha} forest. We also find that AGN feedback is energetic enough to redistribute baryons over cosmological distances, having potentially significant effects on the interpretation of cosmological data which are sensitive to the total matter density distribution (e.g. weak lensing). However, truly assessing the impact of AGN feedback in the universe necessitates large-dynamic range simulations with extensive treatment of baryonic physics to first model the fueling of SMBHs. In the second part of the thesis (Chap. 4-6) we use a hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulation to follow the growth and evolution of a typical disk galaxy hosting a SMBH, in a cosmological context. The simulation covers a dynamical range of 10 million allowing us to study the transport of matter and angular momentum from super-galactic scales all the way down to the outer edge of the accretion disk around the SMBH. Focusing our attention on the central few hundred parsecs of the galaxy, we find the presence of a cold, self-gravitating, molecular gas disk which is globally unstable. The global instabilities drive super-sonic turbulence, which maintains local stability and allows gas to fuel a SMBH without first fragmenting

  16. Simulating the Growth of a Disk Galaxy and its Supermassive Black Hole in a Cosmological Simulating the Growth of a Disk Galaxy and its Supermassive Black Hole in a Cosmological Context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, Robyn Deborah [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are ubiquitous in the centers of galaxies. Their formation and subsequent evolution is inextricably linked to that of their host galaxies, and the study of galaxy formation is incomplete without the inclusion of SMBHs. The present work seeks to understand the growth and evolution of SMBHs through their interaction with the host galaxy and its environment. In the first part of the thesis (Chap. 2 and 3), we combine a simple semi-analytic model of outflows from active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a simulated dark matter density distribution to study the impact of SMBH feedback on cosmological scales. We find that constraints can be placed on the kinetic efficiency of such feedback using observations of the filling fraction of the Lyα forest. We also find that AGN feedback is energetic enough to redistribute baryons over cosmological distances, having potentially significant effects on the interpretation of cosmological data which are sensitive to the total matter density distribution (e.g. weak lensing). However, truly assessing the impact of AGN feedback in the universe necessitates large-dynamic range simulations with extensive treatment of baryonic physics to first model the fueling of SMBHs. In the second part of the thesis (Chap. 4-6) we use a hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulation to follow the growth and evolution of a typical disk galaxy hosting a SMBH, in a cosmological context. The simulation covers a dynamical range of 10 million allowing us to study the transport of matter and angular momentum from super-galactic scales all the way down to the outer edge of the accretion disk around the SMBH. Focusing our attention on the central few hundred parsecs of the galaxy, we find the presence of a cold, self-gravitating, molecular gas disk which is globally unstable. The global instabilities drive super-sonic turbulence, which maintains local stability and allows gas to fuel a SMBH without first fragmenting completely

  17. The properties of the Malin 1 galaxy giant disk. A panchromatic view from the NGVS and GUViCS surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Ferrarese, L.; Côté, P.; Roehlly, Y.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Roediger, J.; Koda, J.; Muños Mateos, J. C.; Gil de Paz, A.; Madore, B. F.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) represent a significant percentage of local galaxies but their formation and evolution remain elusive. They may hold crucial information for our understanding of many key issues (i.e., census of baryonic and dark matter, star formation in the low density regime, mass function). The most massive examples - the so called giant LSBGs - can be as massive as the Milky Way, but with this mass being distributed in a much larger disk. Aims: Malin 1 is an iconic giant LSBG - perhaps the largest disk galaxy known. We attempt to bring new insights on its structure and evolution on the basis of new images covering a wide range in wavelength. Methods: We have computed surface brightness profiles (and average surface brightnesses in 16 regions of interest), in six photometric bands (FUV, NUV, u, g, i, z). We compared these data to various models, testing a variety of assumptions concerning the formation and evolution of Malin 1. Results: We find that the surface brightness and color profiles can be reproduced by a long and quiet star-formation history due to the low surface density; no significant event, such as a collision, is necessary. Such quiet star formation across the giant disk is obtained in a disk model calibrated for the Milky Way, but with an angular momentum approximately 20 times larger. Signs of small variations of the star-formation history are indicated by the diversity of ages found when different regions within the galaxy are intercompared. Conclusions: For the first time, panchromatic images of Malin 1 are used to constrain the stellar populations and the history of this iconic example among giant LSBGs. Based on our model, the extreme disk of Malin 1 is found to have a long history of relatively low star formation (about 2 M⊙ yr-1). Our model allows us to make predictions on its stellar mass and metallicity. The Appendix images (FITS files) are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  18. Probing the Disk-Jet Connection of the Radio Galaxy 3C120 Observed With Suzaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Jun; Reeves, James N.; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Markowitz, Alex G.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Arimoto, Makoto; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tsubuku, Yoshihiro; Ushio, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Shin; Gallo, Luigi C.; Madejski, Greg M.; Terashima, Yuichi; Isobe, Naoki; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Kohmura, Takayoshi; /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /NASA, Goddard /Garching, Max Planck

    2007-01-03

    Broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) are a rare type of radio-loud AGN, in which the broad optical permitted emission lines have been detected in addition to the extended jet emission. Here we report on deep (40ksec x 4) observations of the bright BLRG 3C 120 using Suzaku. The observations were spaced a week apart, and sample a range of continuum fluxes. An excellent broadband spectrum was obtained over two decades of frequency (0.6 to 50 keV) within each 40 ksec exposure. We clearly resolved the iron K emission line complex, finding that it consists of a narrow K{sub {alpha}} core ({sigma} {approx_equal} 110 eV or an EW of 60 eV), a 6.9 keV line, and an underlying broad iron line. Our confirmation of the broad line contrasts with the XMM-Newton observation in 2003, where the broad line was not required. The most natural interpretation of the broad line is iron K line emission from a face-on accretion disk which is truncated at {approx} 10 r{sub g}. Above 10 keV, a relatively weak Compton hump was detected (reflection fraction of R {approx_equal} 0.6), superposed on the primary X-ray continuum of {Lambda} {approx_equal} 1.75. Thanks to the good photon statistics and low background of the Suzaku data, we clearly confirm the spectral evolution of 3C 120, whereby the variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy. More strikingly, we discovered that the variability is caused by a steep power-law component of {Lambda} {approx_equal} 2.7, possibly related to the non-thermal jet emission. We discuss our findings in the context of similarities and differences between radio-loud/quiet objects.

  19. The metallicity evolution of blue compact dwarf galaxies from the intermediate redshift to the local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jianhui; Fang, Guanwen; Ye, Chengyun; Kong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    We present oxygen abundance measurements for 74 blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies in the redshift range in [0.2, 0.5] using the strong-line method. The spectra of these objects are taken using Hectospec on the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT). More than half of these BCDs had dust attenuation corrected using the Balmer decrement method. For comparison, we also selected a sample of 2023 local BCDs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database. Based on the local and intermediate-z BCD samples, we investigated the cosmic evo- lution of the metallicity, star-formation rate (SFR), and Dn (4000) index. Com- pared with local BCDs, the intermediate-z BCDs had a systematically higher R23 ratio but similar O32 ratio. Interestingly, no significant deviation in the mass-metallicity (MZ) relation was found between the intermediate-z and lo- cal BCDs. Besides the metallicity, the intermediate-z BCDs also exhibited an SFR distribution that was consistent with local BCDs, suggesting a weak de- pendence on redshift. The i...

  20. A Study on the Chemical Properties of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yinghe; Gu, Qiusheng

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report our studies on the gaseous and chemical properties of a relatively large sample (53 members) of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs). The results of correlations among the oxygen abundance, stellar mass, gas mass, baryonic mass, and gas fraction are present both for E- and I-type BCDs, which are classified according to Loose & Thuan (1985) and show elliptical and irregular outer haloes, respectively. These correlations of I-type BCDs show similar slopes to those of E-type ones. However, in general, E-type BCDs are more gas-poor and metal-rich than I-type ones at a given baryonic mass. Based on these results, we suggest that E-type BCDs, at least a part of them, and I-type ones might be likely at different evolutionary phases and/or having different progenitors. Our investigation of the correlation between oxygen abundance and gas fraction shows that BCDs appear to have not evolved as isolated systems, but to have experienced some gas flows and/or mergers.

  1. A STUDY ON THE CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report our studies on the gaseous and chemical properties of a relatively large sample (53 members) of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs). The results of correlations among the oxygen abundance, stellar mass, gas mass, baryonic mass, and gas fraction are present both for E- and I-type BCDs, which are classified according to Loose and Thuan and show elliptical and irregular outer haloes, respectively. These correlations of I-type BCDs show slopes similar to those of E-type ones. However, in general, E-type BCDs are more gas-poor and metal-rich than I-type ones at a given baryonic mass. Based on these results, we suggest that E-type BCDs, at least a part of them, and I-type ones might be likely at different evolutionary phases and/or having different progenitors. Our investigation of the correlation between oxygen abundance and gas fraction shows that BCDs appear to have not evolved as isolated systems, but to have experienced some gas flows and/or mergers.

  2. Long-Term Evolution of and X-ray Emission from a Recoiling Supermassive Black Hole in a Disk Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    Recent numerical relativity simulations have shown that the emission of gravitational waves at the merger of two black holes gives a recoil kick to the final black hole. We follow the orbits of a recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) in a fixed background potential of a disk galaxy including the effect of dynamical friction. If the recoil velocity of the SMBH is smaller than the escape velocity of the galaxy, the SMBH moves around in the potential along a complex trajectory before it spirals into the galactic center through dynamical friction. We consider the accretion of gas onto the SMBH from the surrounding ISM and estimate the X-ray luminosity of the SMBH. We find that it can be larger than 3x 10^39 erg^-1 or the typical X-ray luminosity of ultra-luminous X-ray sources, when the SMBH passes the galactic disk. In particular, the luminosity could exceed ~10^46 erg s^-1, if the SMBH is ejected into the galactic disk. The average luminosity gradually increases as the SMBH spirals into the galactic center. ...

  3. HST observations of nuclear stellar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Krajnovic, D; Krajnovic, Davor; Jaffe, Walter

    2004-01-01

    We present observations of four nearby early-type galaxies with previously known nuclear stellar disks using two instruments on-board the Hubble Space Telescope. We observed NGC4128, NGC4612, and NGC5308 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, and the same three galaxies, plus NGC4570, with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. We have detected a red nucleus in NGC4128, a blue nucleus in NGC4621, and a blue disk in NGC5308. Additionally, we have discovered a blue disk-like feature with position angle ~15 degrees from the major axis in NGC4621. In NGC5308 there is evidence for a blue region along the minor axis. We discovered a blue transient on the images of NGC4128 at position 0.14" west and 0.32" north from the nucleus. The extracted kinematic profiles belong to two groups: fast (NGC4570 and NGC5308) and kinematically disturbed rotators (NGC4128 and NGC4621). We report the discovery of a kinematically decoupled core in NGC4128. Galaxies have mostly old (10-14 Gyr) stellar populations with large spread i...

  4. The properties of the Malin 1 galaxy giant disk: A panchromatic view from the NGVS and GUViCS surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Boissier, S; Ferrarese, L; Cote, P; Roehlly, Y; Gwyn, S D J; Cuillandre, J -C; Roediger, J; Koda, J; Mateos, J C Munos; de Paz, A Gil; Madore, B F

    2016-01-01

    Low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) represent a significant percentage of local galaxies but their formation and evolution remain elusive. They may hold crucial information for our understanding of many key issues (i.e., census of baryonic and dark matter, star formation in the low density regime, mass function). The most massive examples - the so called giant LSBGs - can be as massive as the Milky Way, but with this mass being distributed in a much larger disk. Malin 1 is an iconic giant LSBG, perhaps the largest disk galaxy known. We attempt to bring new insights on its structure and evolution on the basis of new images covering a wide range in wavelength. We have computed surface brightness profiles (and average surface brightnesses in 16 regions of interest), in six photometric bands (FUV, NUV, u, g, i, z). We compared these data to various models, testing a variety of assumptions concerning the formation and evolution of Malin 1. We find that the surface brightness and color profiles can be reproduce...

  5. On the Influence of Minor Mergers on the Radial Abundance Gradient in Disks of Milky Way-like Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zinchenko, Igor A; Grebel, Eva K; Pilyugin, Leonid S; Just, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the influence of stellar migration caused by minor mergers (mass ratio from 1:70 to 1:8) on the radial distribution of chemical abundances in the disks of Milky Way-like galaxies during the last four Gyr. A GPU-based pure N-body tree-code model without hydrodynamics and star formation was used. We computed a large set of mergers with different initial satellite masses, positions, and orbital velocities. We find that there is no significant metallicity change at any radius of the primary galaxy in the case of accretion of a low-mass satellite of 10$^9$ M$_{\\odot}$ (mass ratio 1:70) except for the special case of prograde satellite motion in the disk plane of the host galaxy. The accretion of a satellite of a mass $\\gtrsim3\\times10^9$ M$_{\\odot}$ (mass ratio 1:23) results in an appreciable increase of the chemical abundances at galactocentric distances larger than $\\sim10$ kpc. The radial abundance gradient flattens in the range of galactocentric distances from 5 to 15 kpc in the case of a merger...

  6. New insights into the photometric structure of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies from a deep Near-Infrared study

    CERN Document Server

    Noeske, K G; Cairos, L M; Fricke, K J

    2003-01-01

    We present deep Near-Infrared (NIR) imaging of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies (BCDs), allowing for the first time to derive and systematize the NIR structural properties of their stellar low-surface brightness (LSB) host galaxies. Compared to optical data, NIR images, being less contamined by the extended stellar and ionized gas emission from the starburst, permit to study the LSB host galaxy closer to its center. We find that radial surface brightness profiles (SBPs) of the LSB hosts show at large radii a mostly exponential intensity distribution, in agreement with previous optical studies. At small to intermediate radii, however, the NIR data reveal an inwards flattening with respect to the outer exponential slope ("type V SBPs", Binggeli & Cameron 1991) in the LSB component of more than one half of the sample BCDs. This result may constitute an important observational constraint to the dynamics and evolution of BCDs. We apply a modified exponential fitting function (Papaderos et al. 1996a) to parametrize ...

  7. Constraints on Disks Models of The Big Blue Bump from UV/Optical/IR Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Antonucci, R

    1998-01-01

    Optical/UV observations provide many constraints on accretion disk models of AGN which aren't always appreciated by modelers of the X-ray emission (or sometimes even of the optical/UV emission). The spectral behavior at the Ly edge, the polarization, the continuum slopes and breaks, and the variability timescales and phasing all conflict with simple models and strongly constrain the more Baroque ones. Partial-covering absorbers and microlensing data suggest that the radiation is not released simply according to where the potential drop (modified by standard viscous transport) takes place. On the other hand, the orientation-based unified model is in accord with the K-\\alpha inclination distributions for the AGN spectral classes, basing the latter on the limited existing data and theoretical understanding.

  8. The dark and visible matter content of low surface brightness disk galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, W. J. G. de; McGaugh, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract: We present mass models of a sample of 19 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies and compare the properties of their constituent mass components with those of a sample of high surface brightness (HSB) galaxies.We find that LSB galaxies are dark matter dominated. Their halo parameters are onl

  9. SCALE-LENGTH DETERMINATIONS OF EXPONENTIAL DISKS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES - A COMPARISON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KNAPEN, JH; VANDERKRUIT, PC

    1991-01-01

    Values for the scale lengths h of the exponential discs of spiral galaxies, as found by different authors, have been compared. For a given galaxy, two published values for h may show a discrepancy of almost a factor two. The average value of the discrepancy for more than 120 galaxies is 23%, with a

  10. The Structure and Dynamical Evolution of the Stellar Disk of a Simulated Milky Way-Mass Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Xiangcheng; Wetzel, Andrew R; Kirby, Evan N; Angles-Alcazar, Daniel; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Keres, Dusan; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-01-01

    We study the structure, age and metallicity gradients, and dynamical evolution using a cosmological zoom-in simulation of a Milky Way-mass galaxy from the Feedback in Realistic Environments project. In the simulation, stars older than 6 Gyr were formed in a chaotic, bursty mode and have the largest vertical scale heights (1.5-2.5 kpc) by z=0, while stars younger than 6 Gyr were formed in a relatively calm, stable disk. The vertical scale height increases with stellar age at all radii, because (1) stars that formed earlier were thicker "at birth", and (2) stars were kinematically heated to an even thicker distribution after formation. Stars of the same age are thicker in the outer disk than in the inner disk (flaring). These lead to positive vertical age gradients and negative radial age gradients. The radial metallicity gradient is neg- ative at the mid-plane, flattens at larger disk height |Z|, and turns positive above |Z|~1.5kpc. The vertical metallicity gradient is negative at all radii, but is steeper at ...

  11. Three-Dimensional Distribution of the ISM in the Milky Way Galaxy: III. The Total Neutral Gas Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Nakanishi, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We present newly obtained three-dimensional gaseous maps of the Milky Way Galaxy; HI, H$_2$ and total-gas (HI plus H$_2$) maps, which were derived from the HI and $^{12}$CO($J=1$--0) survey data and rotation curves based on the kinematic distance. The HI and H$_2$ face-on maps show that the HI disk is extended to the radius of 15--20 kpc and its outskirt is asymmetric to the Galactic center, while most of the H$_2$ gas is distributed inside the solar circle. The total gas mass within radius 30 kpc amounts to $8.0\\times 10^9$ M$_\\odot$, 89\\% and 11\\% of which are HI and H$_2$, {respectively}. The vertical slices show that the outer HI disk is strongly warped and the inner HI and H$_2$ disks are corrugated. The total gas map is advantageous to trace spiral structure from the inner to outer disk. Spiral structures such as the Norma-Cygnus, the Perseus, the Sagittarius-Carina, the Scutum-Crux, and the Orion arms are more clearly traced in the total gas map than ever. All the spiral arms are well explained with lo...

  12. ACCRETION-INHIBITED STAR FORMATION IN THE WARM MOLECULAR DISK OF THE GREEN-VALLEY ELLIPTICAL GALAXY NGC 3226?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present archival Spitzer photometry and spectroscopy and Herschel photometry of the peculiar ''Green Valley'' elliptical galaxy NGC 3226. The galaxy, which contains a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN), forms a pair with NGC 3227 and is shown to lie in a complex web of stellar and H I filaments. Imaging at 8 and 16 μm reveals a curved plume structure 3 kpc in extent, embedded within the core of the galaxy and coincident with the termination of a 30 kpc long H I tail. In situ star formation associated with the infrared (IR) plume is identified from narrowband Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging. The end of the IR plume coincides with a warm molecular hydrogen disk and dusty ring containing 0.7-1.1 × 107 M ☉ detected within the central kiloparsec. Sensitive upper limits to the detection of cold molecular gas may indicate that a large fraction of the H2 is in a warm state. Photometry derived from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-IR shows evidence for a low star-formation rate of ∼0.04 M ☉ yr–1 averaged over the last 100 Myr. A mid-IR component to the spectral energy distribution (SED) contributes ∼20% of the IR luminosity of the galaxy, and is consistent with emission associated with the AGN. The current measured star formation rate is insufficient to explain NGC 3226's global UV-optical ''green'' colors via the resurgence of star formation in a ''red and dead'' galaxy. This form of ''cold accretion'' from a tidal stream would appear to be an inefficient way to rejuvenate early-type galaxies and may actually inhibit star formation

  13. Chandra survey of nearby highly inclined disk galaxies - IV. New insights into the working of stellar feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; Li, Jiangtao; Jiang, Xiaochuan; Fang, Taotao

    2016-04-01

    Galaxy evolution is regulated by the interplay between galactic discs and their surrounding medium. We study this interplay by examining how the galactic coronal emission efficiency of stellar feedback depends on the (surface and specific) star formation rates (SFRs) and other parameters for a sample of 52 Chandra-observed nearby highly inclined disc galaxies. We first measure the star-forming galactic disc sizes, as well as the SFRs of these galaxies, using data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, and then show that (1) the specific 0.5-2 keV luminosity of the coronal emission correlates with the specific SFR in a sub-linear fashion: on average, LX/LK∝(SFR/M*)Γ with Γ = 0.29 ± 0.12; (2) the efficiency of the emission LX/SFR decreases with increasing surface SFR (ISFR; Γ = -0.44 ± 0.12); and (3) the characteristic temperature of the X-ray-emitting plasma weakly correlates with ISFR (Γ = 0.08 ± 0.04). These results, somewhat surprising and anti-intuitive, suggest that (i) the linear correlation between LX and SFR, as commonly presented, is largely due to the correlation of these two parameters with galaxy mass; (ii) much of the mechanical energy from stellar feedback likely drives global outflows with little X-ray cooling and with a mass-loading efficiency decreasing fast with increasing ISFR (Γ ≲ -0.5); (iii) these outflows heat and inflate the medium around the galactic disks of massive galaxies, reducing its radiative cooling rate, whereas for relatively low-mass galaxies, the energy in the outflows is probably dissipated in regions far away from the galactic discs.

  14. ACCRETION-INHIBITED STAR FORMATION IN THE WARM MOLECULAR DISK OF THE GREEN-VALLEY ELLIPTICAL GALAXY NGC 3226?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleton, P. N.; Bitsakis, T.; Alatalo, K. [NASAHerschel Science Center, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Caltech, 770S Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mundell, C. [Astrophysics Research Institute, John Moores University, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Lacy, M. [NRAO, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Armus, L. [Spitzer NASAHerschel Science Center, 1200 East California Boulevard, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Charmandaris, V. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Duc, P.-A. [Service d' Astrophysique, Laboratoire AIM, CEA-Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, Bat 709, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Lisenfeld, U. [Dept. Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, University of Granada, Edifica Mecenas, Granada (Spain); Ogle, P., E-mail: apple@ipac.caltech.edu [NASA Extragalactic Database, IPAC, Caltech, 1200 East California Boulevard, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We present archival Spitzer photometry and spectroscopy and Herschel photometry of the peculiar ''Green Valley'' elliptical galaxy NGC 3226. The galaxy, which contains a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN), forms a pair with NGC 3227 and is shown to lie in a complex web of stellar and H I filaments. Imaging at 8 and 16 μm reveals a curved plume structure 3 kpc in extent, embedded within the core of the galaxy and coincident with the termination of a 30 kpc long H I tail. In situ star formation associated with the infrared (IR) plume is identified from narrowband Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging. The end of the IR plume coincides with a warm molecular hydrogen disk and dusty ring containing 0.7-1.1 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} detected within the central kiloparsec. Sensitive upper limits to the detection of cold molecular gas may indicate that a large fraction of the H{sub 2} is in a warm state. Photometry derived from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-IR shows evidence for a low star-formation rate of ∼0.04 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} averaged over the last 100 Myr. A mid-IR component to the spectral energy distribution (SED) contributes ∼20% of the IR luminosity of the galaxy, and is consistent with emission associated with the AGN. The current measured star formation rate is insufficient to explain NGC 3226's global UV-optical ''green'' colors via the resurgence of star formation in a ''red and dead'' galaxy. This form of ''cold accretion'' from a tidal stream would appear to be an inefficient way to rejuvenate early-type galaxies and may actually inhibit star formation.

  15. The formation of Milky Way-mass disk galaxies in the first 500 million years of a cold dark matter universe

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Yu; Croft, Rupert; Tenneti, Ananth; Bird, Simeon; Battaglia, Nicholas; Wilkins, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    In current cosmological models, galaxies form from the gravitational collapse of small perturbations in the matter distribution. This process involves both a hierarchy of merging structures and smooth accretion, so that early galaxies are predicted to be morphologically irregular, clumpy, and compact. This is supported by recent observational data on samples of galaxies at redshift $z=8$ and beyond. The volumes accessible to these studies, both computational and observational are however thousands of times smaller than those that will be probed by upcoming telescopes, such as WFIRST. As a result, studies so far have never been able to reach the realm of massive galaxies. Whether among the myriad tiny proto-galaxies there exists a population with similarities to present day galaxies is an open question. Here we show, using BlueTides, the first hydrodynamic simulation large enough to resolve the relevant scales, that the first massive galaxies to form are in fact predicted to have extensive rotationally-support...

  16. THE ACS LCID PROJECT. VII. THE BLUE STRAGGLERS POPULATION IN THE ISOLATED dSph GALAXIES CETUS AND TUCANA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first investigation of the Blue Straggler star (BSS) population in two isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group, Cetus and Tucana. Deep Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys photometry allowed us to identify samples of 940 and 1214 candidates, respectively. The analysis of the star formation histories of the two galaxies suggests that both host a population of BSSs. Specifically, if the BSS candidates are interpreted as young main sequence stars, they do not conform to their galaxy's age-metallicity relationship. The analysis of the luminosity function and the radial distributions supports this conclusion, and suggests a non-collisional mechanism for the BSS formation, from the evolution of primordial binaries. This scenario is also supported by the results of new dynamical simulations presented here. Both galaxies coincide with the relationship between the BSS frequency and the absolute visual magnitude MV found by Momany et al. If this relationship is confirmed by larger sample, then it could be a valuable tool to discriminate between the presence of BSSs and galaxies hosting truly young populations.

  17. ESO 603-G21: A strange polar-ring galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Reshetnikov, V. P.; Faundez-Abans, M.; Oliveira-Abans, M.

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of B, V, R surface photometry of ESO603-G21 - a galaxy with a possible polar ring. The morphological and photometric features of this galaxy are discussed. The central round object of the galaxy is rather red and presents a nearly exponential surface brightness distribution. This central structure is surrounded by a blue warped ring or disk. The totality of the observed characteristics (optical and NIR colors, strong color gradients, HI and H_2 content, FIR luminosity a...

  18. The nature of the red disk-like galaxies at high redshift: dust attenuation and intrinsically red stellar populations

    CERN Document Server

    Pierini, D; Gordon, K D; Witt, A N

    2005-01-01

    We investigate which conditions of dust attenuation and stellar populations allow models of dusty, continuously star-forming, bulge-less disk galaxies at 0.85.3, Ic-K>4, J-K>2.3). As a main novelty, we use stellar population models that include the thermally pulsating Asymptotic Giant Branch (TP-AGB) phase of stellar evolution. The star formation rate of the models declines exponentially as a function of time, the e-folding time being longer than 3 Gyr. In addition, we use calculations of radiative transfer of the stellar and scattered radiation through different dusty interstellar media in order to explore the wide parameter space of dust attenuation. We find that synthetic disks can exhibit red optical/near-infrared colours because of reddening by dust, but only if they have been forming stars for at least about 1 Gyr. Extremely few models barely exhibit Rc-K>5.3, if the inclination i=90 deg and if the opacity 2*tauV>6. Hence, Rc-K-selected galaxies at 10.5. This explains the large fraction of observed, edg...

  19. Variations in the Star Formation Efficiency of the Dense Molecular Gas across the Disks of Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Usero, Antonio; Walter, Fabian; Schruba, Andreas; García-Burillo, Santiago; Sandstrom, Karin; Bigiel, Frank; Brinks, Elias; Kramer, Carsten; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; de Blok, W J G

    2015-01-01

    We present a new survey of HCN(1-0) emission, a tracer of dense molecular gas, focused on the little-explored regime of normal star-forming galaxy disks. Combining HCN, CO, and infrared (IR) emission, we investigate the role of dense gas in Star Formation (SF), finding systematic variations in both the apparent dense gas fraction and the apparent SF efficiency (SFE) of dense gas. The latter may be unexpected, given the popularity of gas density threshold models to explain SF scaling relations. We used the IRAM 30-m telescope to observe HCN(1-0) across 29 nearby disk galaxies whose CO(2-1) emission has previously been mapped by the HERACLES survey. Because our observations span a range of galactocentric radii, we are able to investigate the properties of the dense gas as a function of local conditions. We focus on how the IR/CO, HCN/CO, and IR/HCN ratios (observational cognates of the SFE, dense gas fraction, and dense gas SFE) depend on the stellar surface density and the molecular/atomic ratio. The HCN/CO ra...

  20. A Catalog of Bulge+Disk Decompositions and Updated Photometry for 1.12 Million Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Simard, Luc; Patton, David R; Ellison, Sara L; McConnachie, Alan W

    2011-01-01

    We perform two-dimensional, Point-Spread-Function-convolved, bulge+disk decompositions in the $g$ and $r$ bandpasses on a sample of 1,123,718 galaxies from the Legacy area of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven. Four different decomposition procedures are investigated which make improvements to sky background determinations and object deblending over the standard SDSS procedures that lead to more robust structural parameters and integrated galaxy magnitudes and colors, especially in crowded environments. We use a set of science-based quality assurance metrics namely the disk luminosity-size relation, the galaxy color-magnitude diagram and the galaxy central (fiber) colors to show the robustness of our structural parameters. The best procedure utilizes simultaneous, two-bandpass decompositions. Bulge and disk photometric errors remain below 0.1 mag down to bulge and disk magnitudes of $g \\simeq 19$ and $r \\simeq 18.5$. We also use and compare three different galaxy fitting models: a pure Sersic mod...

  1. A Study in Blue: The Baryon Content of Isolated Low Mass Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bradford, Jeremy D; Blanton, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    We study the baryon content of low mass galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR8), focusing on galaxies in isolated environments where the complicating physics of galaxy-galaxy interactions are minimized. We measure neutral hydrogen (HI) gas masses and line-widths for 148 isolated galaxies with stellar mass between $10^7$ and $10^{9.5} M_{\\odot}$. We compare isolated low mass galaxies to more massive galaxies and galaxies in denser environments by remeasuring HI emission lines from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey 40% data release. All isolated low mass galaxies either have large atomic gas fractions or large atomic gas fractions cannot be ruled out via their upper limits. We measure a median atomic gas fraction of $f_{\\rm gas} = 0.82 \\pm 0.13$ for our isolated low mass sample with no systems below 0.30. At all stellar masses, the correlations between galaxy radius, baryonic mass and velocity width are not significantly affected by environment. Finally, we estimate a median b...

  2. Inside Out and Upside Down: Tracing the Assembly of a Simulated Disk Galaxy Using Mono-Age Stellar Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, Jonathan C; Weinberg, David H; Guedes, Javiera; Callegari, Simone; Mayer, Lucio; Madau, Piero

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the present-day structure and assembly history of a high resolution hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of a Milky Way (MW)-like disk galaxy, from the "Eris" simulation suite, dissecting it into cohorts of stars formed at different epochs of cosmic history. At z=0, stars with t_form 3 are quickly scattered into rounded, kinematically hot configurations. The oldest disk cohorts form in structures that are radially compact and relatively thick, while subsequent cohorts form in progressively larger, thinner, colder configurations from gas with increasing levels of rotational support. The disk thus forms "inside-out" in a radial sense and "upside-down" in a vertical sense. Secular heating and radial migration influence the final state of each age cohort, but the changes they produce are small compared to the trends established at formation. The predicted correlations of stellar age with spatial and kinematic structure are in good qualitative agreement with the correlations observed for mono-abunda...

  3. Inside out and Upside down: Tracing the Assembly of a Simulated Disk Galaxy Using Mono-age Stellar Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Jonathan C.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Weinberg, David H.; Guedes, Javiera; Callegari, Simone; Mayer, Lucio; Madau, Piero

    2013-08-01

    We analyze the present day structure and assembly history of a high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of a Milky-Way-(MW)-like disk galaxy, from the "Eris" simulation suite, dissecting it into cohorts of stars formed at different epochs of cosmic history. At z = 0, stars with t form 3 are quickly scattered into rounded, kinematically hot configurations. The oldest disk cohorts form in structures that are radially compact and relatively thick, while subsequent cohorts form in progressively larger, thinner, colder configurations from gas with increasing levels of rotational support. The disk thus forms "inside out" in a radial sense and "upside down" in a vertical sense. Secular heating and radial migration influence the final state of each age cohort, but the changes they produce are small compared to the trends established at formation. The predicted correlations of stellar age with spatial and kinematic structure are in good qualitative agreement with the correlations observed for mono-abundance stellar populations in the MW.

  4. Herschel's "Cold Debris Disks": Background Galaxies or Quiescent Rims of Planetary Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivov, A. V.; Eiroa, C.; Loehne, T.; Marshall, J. P.; Montesinos, B.; DelBurgo, C.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D.; Augereau, J.-C.; Bayo, A.; Bryden, G.; Danchi, W.; Ertel, S.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Mora, A.; Mustill, A. J.; Mutschke, H.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Roberge, A.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Thebault, Ph.; Vitense, Ch.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared excesses associated with debris disk host stars detected so far peak at wavelengths around approx, 100 micron or shorter. However, 6 out of 31 excess sources studied in the Herschel Open Time Key Programme, DUNES, have been seen to show significant-and in some cases extended-excess emission at 160 micron, which is larger than the 100 micron excess. This excess emission has been attributed to circumstellar dust and has been suggested to stem from debris disks colder than those known previously. Since the excess emission of the cold disk candidates is extremely weak, challenging even the unrivaled sensitivity of Herschel, it is prudent to carefully consider whether some or even all of them may represent unrelated galactic or extragalactic emission, or even instrumental noise. We re-address these issues using several distinct methods and conclude that it is highly unlikely that none of the candidates represents a true circumstellar disk. For true disks, both the dust temperatures inferred from the spectral energy distributions and the disk radii estimated from the images suggest that the dust is nearly as cold as a blackbody. This requires the grains to be larger than approx. 100 micron, even if they are rich in ices or are composed of any other material with a low absorption in the visible. The dearth of small grains is puzzling, since collisional models of debris disks predict that grains of all sizes down to several times the radiation pressure blowout limit should be present. We explore several conceivable scenarios: transport-dominated disks, disks of low dynamical excitation, and disks of unstirred primordial macroscopic grains. Our qualitative analysis and collisional simulations rule out the first two of these scenarios, but show the feasibility of the third one. We show that such disks can indeed survive for gigayears, largely preserving the primordial size distribution. They should be composed of macroscopic solids larger than millimeters, but

  5. DARK MATTER HALOS AND EVOLUTION OF BARS IN DISK GALAXIES: COLLISIONLESS MODELS REVISITED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We construct and evolve three one-parameter families and one two-parameter family of steady-state models of stellar disks embedded in live dark matter (DM) halos in order to study the dynamical and secular phases of bar evolution. These models are tested against those published in the literature in order to extend them and to include the gaseous component in the follow-up paper. Specifically, we are interested in the angular momentum, J, redistribution in the disk-halo system during these two evolutionary phases without distinguishing between the resonant and non-resonant effects. We confirm the previous results and quantify for the first time the dual role that the DM halos play in the bar evolution: more centrally concentrated halos dilute the dynamical processes of the initial bar growth, such as the spontaneous bar instability and the vertical buckling instability, and slow down the J transfer, while facilitating it in the secular phase. The rate of J transfer in the disk and the halo is followed up in order to identify sites and times of peak activity in J emission and absorption. Within the corotation radius, R cr, the disk J remains nearly constant in time, as long as R cr stays within the disk-a sign that the lost angular momentum to the outer disk and the halo is being compensated by an influx of fresh J due to the outward motion of R cr. We demonstrate that this is feasible as long as the bar slowdown dominates the loss of J inside R cr. Next, we find that in some models the bar pattern speed stalls for prolonged time periods, i.e., the bar exhibits a constant rate of tumbling when R cr is located outside the disk. This phenomenon appears concurrent with the near absence of J transfer between the disk and the halo, and is associated with the halo emitting J at the corotation resonance and absorbing it at the inner Lindblad resonance. Furthermore, we confirm that stellar bars generally display the corotation-to-bar size ratios in the range of ∼1-1.4, but

  6. The evolution of the galaxy luminosity function in the rest frame blue band up to z=3.5

    CERN Document Server

    Poli, F; Fontana, A; Menci, N; Zamorani, G; Nonino, M; Saracco, P; Vanzella, E; Donnarumma, I; Salimbeni, S; Cimatti, A; Cristiani, S; Daddi, E; D'Odorico, S; Mignoli, M; Pozzetti, L; Renzini, A

    2003-01-01

    We present an estimate of the cosmological evolution of the field galaxy luminosity function (LF) in the rest frame 4400 Angstrom B -band up to redshift z=3.5. To this purpose, we use a composite sample of 1541 I--selected galaxies selected down to I_(AB)=27.2 and 138 galaxies selected down to K_(AB)=25 from ground-based and HST multicolor surveys, most notably the new deep JHK images in the Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) taken with the ISAAC instrument at the ESO-VLT telescope. About 21% of the sample has spectroscopic redshifts, and the remaining fraction well calibrated photometric redshifts. The resulting blue LF shows little density evolution at the faint end with respect to the local values, while at the bright end (M_B(AB)<-20) a brightening increasing with redshift is apparent with respect to the local LF. Hierarchical CDM models overpredict the number of faint galaxies by about a factor 3 at z=1. At the bright end the predicted LFs are in reasonable agreement only at low and intermediate redshift...

  7. The Properties of the Circumgalactic Medium in Red and Blue Galaxies: Results from the COS-GASS+COS-Halos Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Tumlinson, Jason; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Catinella, Barbara; Schiminovich, David; Dave, Romeel; Moran, Sean M; Saintonge, Amelie

    2016-01-01

    We use the combined data from the COS-GASS and COS-Halos surveys to characterize the Circum-Galactic Medium (CGM) surrounding typical low-redshift galaxies in the mass range $\\rm~M_*\\sim~10^{9.5-11.5}~M_{\\odot} $, and over a range of impact parameters extending to just beyond the halo virial radius ($\\rm~R_{vir}$). We find the radial scale length of the distributions of the equivalent widths of the Lyman~$\\alpha$ and Si III absorbers to be 0.9 and 0.4 $\\rm~R_{vir}$, respectively. The radial distribution of equivalent widths is relatively uniform for the blue galaxies, but highly patchy (low covering fraction) for the red galaxies. We also find that the Lyman~$\\alpha$ and Si III equivalent widths show significant positive correlations with the specific star-formation rate (sSFR) of the galaxy. We find a surprising lack of correlations between the halo mass (virial velocity) and either the velocity dispersions or velocity offsets of the Lyman~$\\alpha$ lines. The ratio of the velocity offset to the velocity disp...

  8. The Stellar Masses of Disk Galaxies and the Calibration of Color-Mass to Light Ratio Relations

    CERN Document Server

    McGaugh, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    We present new Spitzer 3.6 micron observations of a sample of disk galaxies spanning over 10 magnitudes in luminosity and ranging in gas fraction from ~10% to over 90%. We use these data to test population synthesis prescriptions for computing stellar mass. Many commonly employed models fail to provide self-consistent stellar masses in the sense that the stellar mass estimated from the optical luminosity typically exceeds that estimated from the near-infrared (NIR) luminosity. This problem is present in models both with and without TP-AGB stars, but is more severe in the former. Self-consistency can be achieved if NIR mass-to-light ratios are approximately constant with a mean value near 0.5 Msun/Lsun at 3.6 microns. We use the Baryonic Tully-Fisher relation calibrated by gas rich galaxies to provide an independent estimate of the color-mass to light ratio relation. This approach also suggests that the typical 3.6 micron mass-to-light ratio is 0.5 (0.65 in the K band) for rotationally supported galaxies. Thes...

  9. Accretion-Inhibited Star Formation in the Warm Molecular Disk of the Green-valley Elliptical Galaxy NGC 3226

    CERN Document Server

    Appleton, P N; Bitsakis, T; Lacy, M; Alatalo, K; Armus, L; Charmandaris, V; Duc, P -A; Lisenfeld, U; Ogle, P

    2014-01-01

    We present archival Spitzer photometry and spectroscopy, and Herschel photometry, of the peculiar "Green Valley" elliptical galaxy NGC~3226. The galaxy, which contains a low-luminosity AGN, forms a pair with NGC~3227, and is shown to lie in a complex web of stellar and HI filaments. Imaging at 8 and 16$\\mu$m reveals a curved plume structure 3 kpc in extent, embedded within the core of the galaxy, and coincident with the termination of a 30 kpc-long HI tail. In-situ star formation associated with the IR plume is identified from narrow-band HST imaging. The end of the IR-plume coincides with a warm molecular hydrogen disk and dusty ring, containing 0.7-1.1 $\\times$ 10$^7$ M$_{\\odot}$ detected within the central kpc. Sensitive upper limits to the detection of cold molecular gas may indicate that a large fraction of the H$_2$ is in a warm state. Photometry, derived from the UV to the far-IR, shows evidence for a low star formation rate of $\\sim$0.04 M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ averaged over the last 100 Myrs. A mid-IR ...

  10. Galactic Disk Warps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijken, K.; García, I.

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: This review addresses recent developments in the field of disk galaxy warps. Both results from a new HI survey of edgeon disk galaxies, and of simulations of the interaction between a disk+halo and an orbiting satelite, will be discussed.

  11. Galactic Disk Warps

    CERN Document Server

    Kuijken, K; Kuijken, Konrad; Garcia, Inigo

    2000-01-01

    This review addresses recent developments in the field of disk galaxy warps. Both results from a new HI survey of edgeon disk galaxies, and of simulations of the interaction between a disk+halo and an orbiting satelite, will be discussed.

  12. Galaxy Zoo: Passive Red Spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Masters, Karen L; Romer, A Kathy; Nichol, Robert C; Bamford, Steven P; Schawinski, Kevin; Lintott, Chris J; Andreescu, Dan; Campbell, Heather C; Crowcroft, Ben; Doyle, Isabelle; Edmondson, Edward M; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M Jordan; Slosar, Anze; Szalay, Alexander S; Vandenberg, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We study the spectroscopic properties and environments of red spiral galaxies found by the Galaxy Zoo project. By carefully selecting face-on, disk dominated spirals we construct a sample of truly passive disks (not dust reddened, nor dominated by old stellar populations in a bulge). As such, our red spirals represent an interesting set of possible transition objects between normal blue spirals and red early types. We use SDSS data to investigate the physical processes which could have turned these objects red without disturbing their morphology. Red spirals prefer intermediate density regimes, however there are no obvious correlations between red spiral properties and environment - environment alone is not sufficient to determine if a galaxy will become a red spiral. Red spirals are a small fraction of spirals at low masses, but dominate at large stellar masses - massive galaxies are red independent of morphology. We confirm that red spirals have older stellar populations and less recent star formation than ...

  13. INSIDE OUT AND UPSIDE DOWN: TRACING THE ASSEMBLY OF A SIMULATED DISK GALAXY USING MONO-AGE STELLAR POPULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, Jonathan C.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Weinberg, David H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Guedes, Javiera [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zuerich, Wolgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Callegari, Simone [Anthropology Institute and Museum, University of Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Mayer, Lucio [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Madau, Piero [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    We analyze the present day structure and assembly history of a high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of a Milky-Way-(MW)-like disk galaxy, from the ''Eris'' simulation suite, dissecting it into cohorts of stars formed at different epochs of cosmic history. At z = 0, stars with t{sub form} < 2 Gyr mainly occupy the stellar spheroid, with the oldest (earliest forming) stars having more centrally concentrated profiles. The younger age cohorts populate disks of progressively longer radial scale lengths and shorter vertical scale heights. At a given radius, the vertical density profiles and velocity dispersions of stars vary smoothly as a function of age, and the superposition of old, vertically extended and young, vertically compact cohorts gives rise to a double-exponential profile like that observed in the MW. Turning to formation history, we find that the trends of spatial structure and kinematics with stellar age are largely imprinted at birth, or immediately thereafter. Stars that form during the active merger phase at z > 3 are quickly scattered into rounded, kinematically hot configurations. The oldest disk cohorts form in structures that are radially compact and relatively thick, while subsequent cohorts form in progressively larger, thinner, colder configurations from gas with increasing levels of rotational support. The disk thus forms ''inside out'' in a radial sense and ''upside down'' in a vertical sense. Secular heating and radial migration influence the final state of each age cohort, but the changes they produce are small compared to the trends established at formation. The predicted correlations of stellar age with spatial and kinematic structure are in good qualitative agreement with the correlations observed for mono-abundance stellar populations in the MW.

  14. Three-dimensional distribution of the ISM in the Milky Way galaxy. III. The total neutral gas disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2016-02-01

    We present newly obtained three-dimensional gaseous maps of the Milky Way Galaxy: H I, H2, and total-gas (H I plus H2) maps, which were derived from the H I and 12CO(J = 1-0) survey data and rotation curves based on the kinematic distance. The H I and H2 face-on maps show that the H I disk is extended to a radius of 15-20 kpc and its outskirts are asymmetric to the Galactic center, while most of the H2 gas is distributed inside the solar circle. The total gas mass within a radius of 30 kpc amounts to 8.0 × 109 M⊙, 89% and 11% of which are H I and H2, respectively. The vertical slices show that the outer H I disk is strongly warped and the inner H I and H2 disks are corrugated. The total gas map is advantageous for tracing spiral structures from the inner to outer disk. Spiral structures such as the Norma-Cygnus, the Perseus, the Sagittarius-Carina, the Scutum-Crux, and the Orion arms are more clearly traced in the total gas map than ever. All the spiral arms are well explained by logarithmic spiral arms with pitch angles of 11°-15°. The molecular fraction of the total gas is high near the Galactic center and decreases with Galactocentric distance. The molecular fraction is also locally enhanced at the spiral arms compared with the inter-arm regions.

  15. PLAYING WITH POSITIVE FEEDBACK: EXTERNAL PRESSURE-TRIGGERING OF A STAR-FORMING DISK GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieri, Rebekka; Dubois, Yohan; Silk, Joseph; Mamon, Gary A., E-mail: bieri@iap.fr [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris (UMR 7095: CNRS and UPMC—Sorbonne Universités), 98 bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2015-10-20

    In massive galaxies, the currently favored method for quenching star formation is via active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback, which ejects gas from the galaxy using a central supermassive black hole. At high redshifts however, explanation of the huge rates of star formation often found in galaxies containing AGNs may require a more vigorous mode of star formation than is attainable by simply enriching the gas content of galaxies in the usual gravitationally driven mode that is associated with the nearby universe. Using idealized hydrodynamical simulations, we show that AGN-pressure-driven star formation potentially provides the positive feedback that may be required to generate the accelerated star formation rates observed in the distant universe.

  16. The SWELLS survey. II. Breaking the disk-halo degeneracy in the spiral galaxy gravitational lens SDSS J2141-0001

    CERN Document Server

    Dutton, A A; Marshall, P J; Auger, M W; Treu, T; Koo, D C; Bolton, A S; Holden, B P; Koopmans, L V E

    2011-01-01

    The degeneracy among the disk, bulge and halo contributions to galaxy rotation curves prevents an understanding of the distribution of baryons and dark matter in disk galaxies. In an attempt to break this degeneracy, we present an analysis of the spiral galaxy strong gravitational lens SDSS J2141-0001, discovered as part of the SLACS survey. We present new Hubble Space Telescope multicolor imaging, gas and stellar kinematics data derived from long-slit spectroscopy, and K-band LGS adaptive optics imaging, both from the Keck telescopes. We model the galaxy as a sum of concentric axisymmetric bulge, disk and halo components and infer the contribution of each component, using information from gravitational lensing and gas kinematics. This analysis yields a best-fitting total (disk plus bulge) stellar mass of log_{10}(Mstar/Msun)=10.99(+0.11,-0.25). The photometric data combined with stellar population synthesis models yield log_{10}(Mstar/Msun)=10.97\\pm0.07, and 11.21\\pm0.07 for the Chabrier and Salpeter IMFs, r...

  17. Herschel's "Cold Debris Disks": Background Galaxies or Quiescent Rims of Planetary Systems?

    CERN Document Server

    Krivov, A V; Löhne, T; Marshall, J P; Montesinos, B; del Burgo, C; Absil, O; Ardila, D; Augereau, J -C; Bayo, A; Bryden, G; Danchi, W; Ertel, S; Lebreton, J; Liseau, R; Mora, A; Mustill, A J; Mutschke, H; Neuhäuser, R; Pilbratt, G L; Roberge, A; Schmidt, T O B; Stapelfeldt, K R; Thébault, Ph; Vitense, Ch; White, G J; Wolf, S

    2013-01-01

    (abridged) Infrared excesses associated with debris disk host stars detected so far peak at wavelengths around ~100{\\mu}m or shorter. However, six out of 31 excess sources in the Herschel OTKP DUNES have been seen to show significant - and in some cases extended - excess emission at 160{\\mu}m, which is larger than the 100{\\mu}m excess. This excess emission has been suggested to stem from debris disks colder than those known previously. Using several methods, we re-consider whether some or even all of the candidates may be associated with unrelated galactic or extragalactic emission and conclude that it is highly unlikely that none of the candidates represents a true circumstellar disk. For true disks, both the dust temperatures inferred from the SEDs and the disk radii estimated from the images suggest that the dust is nearly as cold as a blackbody. This requires the grains to be larger than ~100{\\mu}m, regardless of their material composition. To explain the dearth of small grains, we explore several conceiv...

  18. Gas surface density, star formation rate surface density, and the maximum mass of young star clusters in a disk galaxy. II. The grand-design galaxy M51

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass, and surface densities of total gas (Sigma_gas), molecular gas (Sigma_H_2), neutral gas (Sigma_HI) and star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) in the grand design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. We find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M_3rd, the median of the 5 most massive clusters, is proportional to Sigma_HI^0.4. There is no correlation with Sigma_gas, Sigma_H2, or Sigma_SFR. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_HI^0.6, M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_gas^0.5; there is no correlation with either Sigma_H_2 or Sigma_SFR. The results could hardly be more different than those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_g...

  19. The Structure and Stellar Content of the Outer Disks of Galaxies: A New View from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Z; Heckman, T; Meurer, G; Burgett, W; Chambers, K; Huber, M; Kaiser, N; Magnier, E; Metcalfe, N; Price, P; Tonry, J; Wainscoat, R; Waters, C

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey multi-band (g,r,i,z,y) images of a sample of 698 low-redshift disk galaxies that span broad ranges in stellar mass, star-formation rate, and bulge/disk ratio. We use population synthesis SED fitting techniques to explore the radial distribution of the light, color, surface mass density, mass/light ratio, and age of the stellar populations. We characterize the structure and stellar content of the galaxy disks out to radii of about twice Petrosian r90, beyond which the halo light becomes significant. We measure normalized radial profiles for sub-samples of galaxies in three bins each of stellar mass and concentration. We also fit radial profiles to each galaxy. The majority of galaxies have down-bending radial surface brightness profiles in the bluer bands with a break radius at roughly r90. However, they typically show single unbroken exponentials in the reddest bands and in the stellar surface mass density. We find that the mass/light rat...

  20. The role of major gas-rich mergers on the evolution of galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Rui; Xia, X Y; Mao, Shude; Shi, Yong

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of exploring the fast evolutionary path from the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies to the red sequence of quiescent galaxies in the local universe, we select a local advanced merging infrared luminous and ultraluminous galaxy (adv-merger (U)LIRGs) sample and perform careful dust extinction corrections to investigate their positions in the SFR-$M_{\\ast}$, u-r and NUV-r color-mass diagrams. The sample consists of 89 (U)LIRGs at the late merger stage, obtained from cross-correlating the IRAS Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey and 1 Jy ULIRGs samples with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 database. Our results show that $74\\%\\pm 5\\%$ of adv-merger (U)LIRGs are localized above the $1\\, \\sigma$ line of the local star-forming galaxy main sequence. We also find that all adv-merger (U)LIRGs are more massive than and as blue as the blue cloud galaxies after corrections of Galactic and internal dust extinctions, with $95\\%\\pm 2\\%$ and $81\\%\\pm 4\\%$ of them outside the blue cloud on the u-r and NUV-r colo...

  1. Dissecting the Assembly Histories of Spheroidal Post-merger and Unusually Blue Elliptical Galaxies from the SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Daniel H.; Haines, Tim; Sanchez, Sebastian; Tremonti, Christina A.; Rudnick, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The modern merger hypothesis predicts the formation of new elliptical galaxies (Es) through the merging of two equal-mass, gas-rich spirals. Under the right conditions, simulations predict that such mergers produce a strong, central burst of star formation (SF) in the remnant. If merger-induced SF is subsequently quenched, this scenario offers an attractive blue-to-red migration channel to explain the buildup of massive quiescent galaxies over cosmic time. To test this prediction, we study 12 high-mass (Mstar>1e10 Msun), nearby (z1 R50, dust-reddened core colors, and inner morphological features (rings, dust). These galaxies are the best candidates for a "frosting" of young stars a top an older population, and their properties are consistent with a recent accretion of a gas-rich satellite. The remaining 5 Es are inconsistent with the merger hypothesis. They have quiescent-like indices, strong radial index gradients suggesting older core stars, and 80% exhibit broad LSB asymmetries at large radii that are consistent with being remnants of recent gas-poor (dry) merging.

  2. Properties of free-free, dust, and CO emissions in the starbursts of blue compact dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    The central star-forming regions in three blue compact dwarf galaxies (He 2-10, NGC 5253, and II Zw 40) were observed in the 340 GHz (880 micron) band at 5 arcsec resolution with the Submillimetre Array (SMA). Continuum emission associated with the central star-forming complex was detected in all these galaxies. The SMA 880 micron flux is decomposed into free-free emission and dust emission by using centimetre-wavelength data in the literature. We find that free-free emission contributes half or more of the SMA 880 micron flux in the central starbursts in those three galaxies. In spite of the dominance of free-free emission at 880 micron, the radio-to-far infrared (FIR) ratios in the central star-forming regions are not significantly higher than those of the entire systems, showing the robustness of radio-FIR relation. Based on the robustness of the radio-FIR relation, we argue that the free--free fraction in the 880 micron emission is regulated by the dust temperature. We also analyze the CO (J = 3--2) emiss...

  3. A Connection Between Bulge Properties and the Bimodality of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Drory, Niv

    2007-01-01

    The global colors of galaxies have recently been shown to follow bimodal distributions. Galaxies separate into a ``red sequence'', populated prototypically by early-type galaxies, and a ``blue cloud'', whose typical objects are late-type disk galaxies. Intermediate-type (Sa-Sbc) galaxies populate both regions. It has been suggested that this bimodality reflects the two-component nature of disk-bulge galaxies. However, it has now been established that there are two types of bulges: ``classical bulges'' that are dynamically hot systems resembling (little) ellipticals, and ``pseudobulges'', dynamically cold, flattened, disk-like structures that could not have formed via violent relaxation. Therefore thee question is whether at types Sa-Sbc, where both bulge types are found, the red-blue dichotomy separates galaxies at some value of disk-to-bulge ratio, $B/T$, or, whether it separates galaxies of different bulge type, irrespective of their $B/T$. We identify classical bulges and pseudobulges morphologically with ...

  4. Dynamical stability and environmental influences in low surface brightness disk galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihos, C.; McGaugh, S. S.; Blok, E. de

    1997-01-01

    Using analytic stability criteria we demonstrate that, because of their low surface mass density and large dark matter content, low surface brightness (LSB) disks are quite stable against the growth of global nonaxisymmetric modes such as bars. However, depending on their (poorly constrained) stella

  5. Steady Outflows in Giant Clumps of High-z Disk Galaxies during Migration and Growth by Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Dekel, Avishai

    2013-01-01

    We predict the evolution of giant clumps undergoing star-driven outflows in high-z gravitationally unstable disk galaxies. We find that the mass loss is expected to occur through a steady wind over many tens of free-fall times (t_ff ~ 10 Myr) rather than by an explosive disruption in one or a few t_ff. Our analysis is based on the finding from simulations that radiation trapping is negligible because it destabilizes the wind (Krumholz & Thompson 2012, 2013). Each photon can therefore contribute to the wind momentum only once, so the radiative force is limited to L/c. When combining radiation, protostellar and main-sequence winds, and supernovae, we estimate the total direct injection rate of momentum into the outflow to be 2.5 L/c. The adiabatic phase of supernovae and main-sequence winds can double this rate. The resulting outflow mass-loading factor is of order unity, and if the clumps were to deplete their gas the timescale would have been a few disk orbital times, to end with half the original clump m...

  6. VIMOS mosaic integral-field spectroscopy of the bulge and disk of the early-type galaxy NGC 4697

    CERN Document Server

    Spiniello, C; Coccato, L; Pota, V; Romanowsky, A J; Tortora, C; Covone, G; Capaccioli, M

    2015-01-01

    We present an integral field study of the internal structure, kinematics and stellar population of the almost edge-on, intermediate luminosity ($L_ {*}$) elliptical galaxy NGC~4697. We build extended 2-dimensional (2D) maps of the stellar kinematics and line-strengths of the galaxy up to $\\sim 0.7 $ effective radii (R$_{eff}$) using a mosaic of 8 VIMOS (VIsible Multi-Objects Spectrograph on the VLT) integral-field unit pointings. We find clear evidence for a rotation-supported structure along the major axis from the 2D kinematical maps, confirming the previous classification of this system as a `fast-rotator'. We study the correlations between the third and fourth Gauss-Hermite moments of the line-of-sight velocity distribution (LOSVD) $h_3$ and $h_4$ with the rotation parameter ($V/\\sigma$), and compare our findings to hydrodynamical simulations. We find remarkable similarities to predictions from gas-rich mergers. Based on photometry, we perform a bulge/disk decomposition and study the stellar population pr...

  7. Compact stellar systems in the polar ring galaxies NGC 4650A and NGC 3808B: Clues to polar disk formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Puzia, Thomas H; Goudfrooij, Paul; Arnaboldi, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Polar ring galaxies (PRGs) are composed of two kinematically distinct and nearly orthogonal components, a host galaxy (HG) and a polar ring/disk (PR). The HG usually contains an older stellar population than the PR. The suggested formation channel of PRGs is still poorly constrained. Suggested options are merger, gas accretion, tidal interaction, or a combination of both. To constrain the formation scenario of PRGs, we study the compact stellar systems (CSSs) in two PRGs at different evolutionary stages: NGC 4650A with well-defined PR, and NGC 3808B, which is in the process of PR formation. We use archival HST/WFPC2 imaging. PSF-fitting techniques, and color selection criteria are used to select cluster candidates. Photometric analysis of the CSSs was performed to determine their ages and masses using stellar population models at a fixed metallicity. Both PRGs contain young CSSs ($< 1$ Gyr) with masses of up to 5$\\times$10$^6$M$_\\odot$, mostly located in the PR and along the tidal debris. The most massive ...

  8. The Role of Major Gas-rich Mergers on the Evolution of Galaxies from the Blue Cloud to the Red Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Hao, Cai-Na; Xia, X. Y.; Mao, Shude; Shi, Yong

    2016-07-01

    With the aim of exploring the fast evolutionary path from the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies to the red sequence of quiescent galaxies in the local universe, we select a local advanced merging infrared luminous and ultraluminous galaxy (adv-merger (U)LIRGs) sample and perform careful dust extinction corrections to investigate their positions in the star formation rate-M *, u - r, and NUV - r color-mass diagrams. The sample consists of 89 (U)LIRGs at the late merger stage, obtained from cross-correlating the Infrared Astronomical Satellite Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey and 1 Jy ULIRGs samples with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 database. Our results show that 74 % +/- 5 % of adv-merger (U)LIRGs are localized above the 1σ line of the local star-forming galaxy main sequence. We also find that all adv-merger (U)LIRGs are more massive than and as blue as the blue cloud galaxies after corrections for Galactic and internal dust extinctions, with 95 % +/- 2 % and 81 % +/- 4 % of them outside the blue cloud on the u - r and NUV - r color-mass diagrams, respectively. These results, combined with the short timescale for exhausting the molecular gas reservoir in adv-merger (U)LIRGs (3× {10}7 to 3× {10}8 years), imply that the adv-merger (U)LIRGs are likely at the starting point of the fast evolutionary track previously proposed by several groups. While the number density of adv-merger (U)LIRGs is only ˜ 0.1 % of the blue cloud star-forming galaxies in the local universe, this evolutionary track may play a more important role at high redshift.

  9. LEDA 074886: A remarkable rectangular-looking galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Alister W; Forbes, Duncan A; Lisker, Thorsten; Moore, Ben; Janz, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of an interesting and rare, rectangular-shaped galaxy. At a distance of 21 Mpc, the dwarf galaxy LEDA 074886 has an absolute R-band magnitude of -17.3 mag. Adding to this galaxy's intrigue is the presence of an embedded, edge-on stellar disk (of extent 2R_{e,disk} = 12 arcsec = 1.2 kpc) for which Forbes et al. reported V_rot/sigma ~ 1.4. We speculate that this galaxy may be the remnant of two (nearly edge-one) merged disk galaxies in which the initial gas was driven inward and subsequently formed the inner disk, while the stars at larger radii effectively experienced a dissipationless merger event resulting in this `emerald cut galaxy' having very boxy isophotes with a_4/a = -0.05 to -0.08 from 3 to 5 kpc. This galaxy suggests that knowledge from simulations of both `wet' and `dry' galaxy mergers may need to be combined to properly understand the various paths that galaxy evolution can take, with a particular relevance to blue elliptical galaxies.

  10. Bar Diagnostics in Edge-On Spiral Galaxies. III. N-Body Simulations of Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Bureau, M

    2004-01-01

    Present in over 45% of local spirals, boxy and peanut-shaped bulges are generally interpreted as edge-on bars and may represent a key phase in the evolution of bulges. Aiming to test such claims, the kinematic properties of self-consistent 3D N-body simulations of bar-unstable disks are studied. Using Gauss-Hermite polynomials to describe the stellar kinematics, a number of characteristic bar signatures are identified in edge-on disks: 1) a major-axis light profile with a quasi-exponential central peak and a plateau at moderate radii (Freeman Type II profile); 2) a ``double-hump'' rotation curve; 3) a sometime flat central velocity dispersion peak with a plateau at moderate radii and occasional local central minimum and secondary peak; 4) an h3-V correlation over the projected bar length. All those kinematic features are spatially correlated and can easily be understood from the orbital structure of barred disks. They thus provide a reliable and easy-to-use tool to identify edge-on bars. Interestingly, they a...

  11. The Distribution of Metals in Cosmological Hydrodynamical Simulations of Dwarf Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pilkington, K; Brook, C B; Calura, F; Stinson, G S; Thacker, R J; Michel-Dansac, L; Bailin, J; Couchman, H M P; Wadsley, J; Quinn, T R; Maccio, A

    2012-01-01

    We examine the chemical properties of 5 cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of an M33-like disc galaxy which have been shown to be consistent with the morphological characteristics and bulk scaling relations expected of late-type spirals. These simulations are part of the Making Galaxies In a Cosmological Context (MaGICC) Project, in which stellar feedback is tuned to match the stellar mass -- halo mass relationship. Each realisation employed identical initial conditions and assembly histories, but differed from one another in their underlying baryonic physics prescriptions, including (a) the efficiency with which each supernova energy couples to the ISM, (b) the impact of feedback associated with massive star radiation pressure, (c) the role of the minimum shut-off time for radiative cooling of Type II SNe remnants, (d) the treatment of metal diffusion, and (e) varying the IMF. Our analysis focusses on the resulting stellar metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in each simulated (analogous) `solar ne...

  12. Mass and metal ejection efficiency in disk galaxies driven by young stellar clusters of nuclear starburst

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A; Raga, A C; Colin, P

    2011-01-01

    We present results from models of galactic winds driven by energy injected by nuclear starbursts. The total energy of the starburst is provided by young central stellar clusters and parts of the galactic interstellar medium are pushed out as part of the galactic wind (in some cases the galactic wind contains an important part of the metals produced in the new generation of stars). We have performed adiabatic and radiative 3D N-Body/Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations of galactic winds using the GADGET-2 code. The numerical models cover a wide range of starburst (from $\\sim10^2$ to $\\sim10^7$ M$_\\odot$) and galactic gas masses (from $\\sim6\\times10^6$ to $\\sim10^{11}$ M$_\\odot$). The concentrated central starburst regions are an efficient engine for producing of the mass and metal loss in galaxies, and also for driving the metal redistribution in the galaxies.

  13. NO EVIDENCE FOR CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS AND A NEW DWARF GALAXY BEHIND THE GALACTIC DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrukowicz, P.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; Kozłowski, S. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-11-10

    Based on data from the ongoing OGLE Galaxy Variability Survey (OGLE GVS), we have verified observed properties of stars detected by the near-infrared VVV survey in a direction near the Galactic plane at longitude l ≈ −27° and recently tentatively classified as classical Cepheids belonging to, hence claimed, a dwarf galaxy at a distance of about 90 kpc from the Galactic Center. Three of four stars are detected in the OGLE GVS I-band images. We show that two of the objects are not variable at all, and the third one with a period of 5.695 days and a nearly sinusoidal light curve of an amplitude of 0.5 mag cannot be a classical Cepheid and is very likely a spotted object. These results together with a very unusual shape of the K{sub s}-band light curve of the fourth star indicate that it is very likely that none of them is a Cepheid and, thus there is no evidence for a background dwarf galaxy. Our observations show that great care must be taken when classifying objects by their low-amplitude close-to-sinusoidal near-infrared light curves, especially with a small number of measurements. We also provide a sample of high-amplitude spotted stars with periods of a few days that can mimic pulsations and even eclipses.

  14. The Nature of Nearby Counterparts to Intermediate Redshift Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies I. Optical/H I Properties and Dynamical Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, C A; Williams, J P; Guzmán, R; Castander, F J

    2004-01-01

    We present single-dish H I spectra obtained with the Green Bank Telescope, along with optical photometric properties from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, of 20 nearby (D < 70 Mpc) Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs). These ~L*, blue, high surface brightness, starbursting galaxies were selected with the same criteria used to define LCBGs at higher redshifts. We find these galaxies are gas-rich, with M(HI) ranging from 5*10^8 to 8*10^9 M_sun, and M(HI)/L_B ranging from 0.2 to 2 M_sun/L_sun, consistent with a variety of morphological types of galaxies. We find the dynamical masses (measured within R_25) span a wide range, from 3*10^9 to 1*10^11 M_sun. However, at least half have dynamical mass-to-light ratios smaller than nearby galaxies of all Hubble types, as found for LCBGs at intermediate redshifts. By comparing line widths and effective radii with local galaxy populations, we find that LCBGs are consistent with the dynamical mass properties of Magellanic (low luminosity) spirals, and the more massive ir...

  15. Surface brightness profiles of blue compact dwarf galaxies in the GOODS-N and GOODS-S field

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jianhui; Jiang, Ning; Yan, Wei; Gao, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the structural properties of the underlying hosts of 34 blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies with deep near-infrared (NIR) photometry. The BCD sample is selected from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey in the Great observatories origins Deep Survey North and South fields. We extract the surface brightness profile (SBP) in the optical F 435W and NIR F 160W bands. The SBPs of BCDs in the H band reach 26 mag arcsec^-2 at the 3\\sigma level, which is so far the deepest NIR imaging of BCDs. Then we fit the SBPs with one- and two- component Sersic models. About half of the BCDs favour the two-component model which significantly improves the fit quality. The effective radii of the underlying hosts of BCDs in the B band are smaller than those of early-type dwarfs (dEs) and dwarf irregulars at a fixed luminosity. This discrepancy is similar to findings in many previous works. However, the difference in structural parameters between BCDs and other dwarf galaxies seems to be less sig...

  16. An imaging and spectroscopic study of the very metal-deficient blue compact dwarf galaxy Tol 1214--277

    CERN Document Server

    Fricke, K J; Papaderos, P; Guseva, N G; Thuan, T X

    2001-01-01

    We present a spectrophotometric study based on VLT/FORS I observations of one of the most metal-deficient blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies known, Tol 1214-277 (Z ~ Zsun/25). The data show that roughly half of the total luminosity of the BCD originates from a bright and compact starburst region located at the northeastern tip of a faint dwarf galaxy with cometary appearance. The starburst has ignited less than 4 Myr ago and its emission is powered by several thousands O7V stars and ~ 170 late-type nitrogen Wolf-Rayet stars located within a compact region with < 500 pc in diameter. For the first time in a BCD, a relatively strong [Fe V] 4227 emission line is seen which together with intense He II 4686 emission indicates the presence of a very hard radiation field in Tol 1214-277. We argue that this extraordinarily hard radiation originates from both Wolf--Rayet stars and radiative shocks in the starburst region. The structural properties of the low-surface-brightness (LSB) component underlying the starburst...

  17. The Relationship between the Dense Neutral and Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Thick Disks of Two Edge-on Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueff, Katherine M.; Howk, J. Christopher; Pitterle, Marissa; Hirschauer, Alec S.; Fox, Andrew J.; Savage, Blair D.

    2013-03-01

    We present high-resolution, optical images (BVI + Hα) of the multiphase interstellar medium (ISM) in the thick disks of the edge-on spiral galaxies NGC 4013 and NGC 4302. Our images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Large Binocular Telescope, and WIYN 3.5 m telescope reveal an extensive population of filamentary dust absorption seen to z ~2-2.5 kpc. Many of these dusty thick disk structures have characteristics reminiscent of molecular clouds found in the Milky Way disk. Our Hα images show that the extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in these galaxies is dominated by a smooth, diffuse component. The strongly filamentary morphologies of the dust absorption have no counterpart in the smoothly distributed Hα emission. We argue that the thick disk DIG and dust-bearing filaments trace physically distinct phases of the thick disk ISM, the latter tracing a dense, warm or cold neutral medium. The dense, dusty matter in the thick disks of spiral galaxies is largely tracing matter ejected from the thin disk via energetic feedback from massive stars. The high densities of the gas may be a result of converging gas flows. This dense material fuels some thick disk star formation, as evidenced by the presence of thick disk H II regions. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope operated at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Also, based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the US, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are the University of Arizona, on behalf of the Arizona University System; Instituto Nazionale do Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute of Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; Ohio State University, and the Research Corporation, on

  18. GALAXY DISKS DO NOT NEED TO SURVIVE IN THE {Lambda}CDM PARADIGM: THE GALAXY MERGER RATE OUT TO z {approx} 1.5 FROM MORPHO-KINEMATIC DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puech, M.; Hammer, F.; Flores, H.; Rodrigues, M.; Wang, J. L.; Yang, Y. B. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS-UMR8111, University of Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France); Hopkins, P. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Athanassoula, E. [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Observatoire Astronomique de Marseille Provence, Technopole de l' Etoile-Site de Chateau-Gombert, 38 rue Frdric Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France)

    2012-07-10

    About two-thirds of present-day, large galaxies are spirals such as the Milky Way or Andromeda, but the way their thin rotating disks formed remains uncertain. Observations have revealed that half of their progenitors, six billion years ago, had peculiar morphologies and/or kinematics, which exclude them from the Hubble sequence. Major mergers, i.e., fusions between galaxies of similar mass, are found to be the likeliest driver for such strong peculiarities. However, thin disks are fragile and easily destroyed by such violent collisions, which creates a critical tension between the observed fraction of thin disks and their survival within the {Lambda}CDM paradigm. Here, we show that the observed high occurrence of mergers among their progenitors is only apparent and is resolved when using morpho-kinematic observations that are sensitive to all the phases of the merging process. This provides an original way of narrowing down observational estimates of the galaxy merger rate and leads to a perfect match with predictions by state-of-the-art {Lambda}CDM semi-empirical models with no particular fine-tuning needed. These results imply that half of local thin disks do not survive but are actually rebuilt after a gas-rich major merger occurring in the past nine billion years, i.e., two-thirds of the lifetime of the universe. This emphasizes the need to study how thin disks can form in halos with a more active merger history than previously considered and to investigate what is the origin of the gas reservoir from which local disks would reform.

  19. Small-scale properties of atomic gas in extended disks of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Momjian, Emmanuel [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); York, Donald G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bowen, David V. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Yun, Min S.; Tripp, Todd M., E-mail: sanch@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We present high-resolution H I 21 cm observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array for three H I rich galaxies in absorption against radio quasars. Our sample contains six sightlines with impact parameters from 2.6 to 32.4 kpc. We detected a narrow H I absorber of FWHM 1.1 km s{sup –1} at 444.5 km s{sup –1} toward SDSS J122106.854+454852.16 probing the dwarf galaxy UCG 7408 at an impact parameter of 2.8 kpc. The absorption feature was barely resolved and its width corresponds to a maximum kinetic temperature, T{sub k} ≈ 26 K. We estimate a limiting peak optical depth of 1.37 and a column density of 6 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –2}. The physical extent of the absorber is 0.04 kpc{sup 2} and covers ∼25%-30% of the background source. A comparison between the emission and absorption strengths suggests the cold-to-total H I column density in the absorber is ∼30%. Folding in the covering fraction, the cold-to-total H I mass is ∼10%. This suggest that condensation of warm H I (T{sub s} ∼ 1000 K) to cold phase (T{sub s} < 100 K) is suppressed in UGC 7408. The unusually low temperature of the H I absorber also indicates inefficiency in condensation of atomic gas into molecular gas. The suppression in condensation is likely to be the result of low metal content in this galaxy. The same process might explain the low efficiency of star formation in dwarf galaxies despite their huge gas reservoirs. We report the non-detection of H I in absorption in five other sightlines. This indicates that either the cold gas distribution is highly patchy or the gas is much warmer (T{sub s} > 1000 K) toward these sightlines.

  20. Exploring the Interstellar Media of Optically Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Most, Hans P; Salzer, John J; Rosenberg, Jessica J; Engstrom, Eric; Fliss, Palmer

    2013-01-01

    We present new Very Large Array HI spectral line, archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and archival Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of eight star-forming blue compact dwarf galaxies that were selected to be optically compact (optical radii less than 1 kpc). These systems have faint blue absolute magnitudes (M_B >= -17), ongoing star formation (based on emission-line selection by the H alpha or [OIII] lines), and are nearby (mean velocity = 3315 km/s = 45 Mpc). One galaxy in the sample, ADBS 113845+2008, is found to have an HI halo that extends 58 r-band scale lengths from its stellar body. In contrast, the rest of the sample galaxies have HI radii to optical-scale-length ratios ranging from 9.3 to 26. The size of the HI disk in the "giant disk" dwarf galaxy ADBS 113845+2008 appears to be unusual as compared to similarly compact stellar populations.

  1. Chemo -- dynamical, multi -- fragmented SPH code for evolution of star forming disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczik, P.

    The problem of chemical and dynamical evolution of galaxies is one of the most attracting and complex problems of modern astrophysics. Within the framework of the given paper the standard dynamic Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code (Monaghan J.J. 1992, ARAA, 30, 543) is noticeably expanded. Our work concernes with the changes and incorporation of new ideas into the algorithmic inclusion of Star Formation (SF) and Super Novae (SN) explosions in SPH (Berczik P. & Kravchuk S.G., 1996, ApSpSci, 245, 27). The proposed energy criterion for definition of a place and efficiency of SF results in the successfully explain Star Formation History (SFH) in isolated galaxies of different types. On the base of original ideas we expand a code in a more realistic way of the description of effects of return of a hot, chemical enriched gas in Interstellar Matter (ISM). In addition to the account of SNII, we offer the self-agreed account of SNIa and PN. This allows to describe not only the ISM content of O^16 but also the content of Fe^56 . This model will allow to investigate adequately also a well known G - dwarf problem.

  2. Strong Evidence for the Density-wave Theory of Spiral Structure in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pour-Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Julia; Davis, Benjamin L; Shields, Douglas W; Abdeen, Mohamed Shameer

    2016-01-01

    The density-wave theory of galactic spiral-arm structure makes a striking prediction that the pitch angle of spiral arms should vary with the wavelength of the galaxy's image. The reason is that stars are born in the density wave but move out of it as they age. They move ahead of the density wave inside the co-rotation radius, and fall behind outside of it, resulting in a tighter pitch angle at wavelengths that image stars (optical and near-infrared) than those that are associated with star formation (far-infrared and ultraviolet). In this study we combined large sample size with wide range of wavelengths, from the ultraviolet to the infrared to investigate this issue. For each galaxy we used an optical wavelength image (B-band: 445 nm) and images from the Spitzer Space Telescope at two infrared wavelengths (infrared: 3.6 and 8.0 {\\mu}m) and we measured the pitch angle with the 2DFFT and Spirality codes. We find that the B-band and 3.6 {\\mu}m images have smaller pitch angles than the infrared 8.0 {\\mu}m image...

  3. An Intermittent Star Formation History in a "Normal" Disk Galaxy: The Milky Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Pinto; Scalo; Maciel; Flynn

    2000-03-10

    The star formation rate history of the Milky Way is derived using the chromospheric age distribution for 552 stars in the solar neighborhood. The stars' sample birth sites are distributed over a very large range of distances because of orbital diffusion and so give an estimate of the global star formation rate history. The derivation incorporates the metallicity dependence of chromospheric emission at a given age and corrections to account for incompleteness, scale height-age correlations, and stellar evolutionary effects. We find fluctuations in the global star formation rate with amplitudes greater than a factor of 2-3 on timescales less than 0.2-1 Gyr. The actual history is likely to be more bursty than found here because of the smearing effect of age uncertainties. There is some evidence for a slow secular increase in the star formation rate, perhaps a record of the accumulation history of our Galaxy. A smooth, nearly constant star formation rate history is strongly ruled out, confirming the result first discovered by Barry using a smaller sample and a different age calibration. This result suggests that galaxies can fluctuate coherently on large scales.

  4. Strong Evidence for the Density-wave Theory of Spiral Structure in Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour-Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Davis, Benjamin L.; Shields, Douglas W.; Shameer Abdeen, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    The density-wave theory of galactic spiral-arm structure makes a striking prediction that the pitch angle of spiral arms should vary with the wavelength of the galaxy’s image. The reason is that stars are born in the density wave but move out of it as they age. They move ahead of the density wave inside the co-rotation radius, and fall behind outside of it, resulting in a tighter pitch angle at wavelengths that image stars (optical and near-infrared) than those that are associated with star formation (far-infrared and ultraviolet). In this study we combined large sample size with wide range of wavelengths, from the ultraviolet to the infrared to investigate this issue. For each galaxy we used an optical wavelength image (B-band: 445 nm) and images from the Spitzer Space Telescope at two infrared wavelengths (infrared: 3.6 and 8.0 μm) and we measured the pitch angle with the 2DFFT and Spirality codes. We find that the B-band and 3.6 μm images have smaller pitch angles than the infrared 8.0 μm image in all cases, in agreement with the prediction of density-wave theory. We also used images in the ultraviolet from Galaxy Evolution Explorer, whose pitch angles agreed with the measurements made at 8 μm.

  5. Small-scale Properties of Atomic Gas in Extended Disks of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Heckman, Timothy M; York, Donald G; Bowen, David V; Yun, Min S; Tripp, Todd M

    2014-01-01

    We present high-resolution HI 21 cm observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) for three HI rich galaxies in absorption against radio quasars. Our sample contains six sightlines with impact parameters from 2.6 to 32.4 kpc. We detected a narrow HI absorber of FWHM 1.1 km/s at 444.5 km/s towards J122106.854+454852.16 probing the dwarf galaxy UCG 7408 at an impact parameter of 2.8 kpc. The absorption feature was barely resolved and its width corresponds to a maximum kinetic temperature, $\\rm T_k \\approx 26~K$. We estimate a limiting peak optical depth of 1.37 and a column density of $\\rm 6\\times 10^{19}~cm^{-2}$. The physical extent of the absorber is $\\rm 0.04~kpc^2$ and covers $\\sim$25-30\\% of the background source. A comparison between the emission and absorption strengths suggests the cold-to-total HI column density in the absorber is ~30%. Folding in the covering fraction, the cold-to-total HI mass is ~10%. This suggest that condensation of warm HI ($\\rm T_s\\sim 1000~K$) to cold phase ($\\rm...

  6. The Century Survey Galactic Halo Project III: A Complete 4300 deg^2 Survey of Blue Horizontal Branch Stars in the Metal-Weak Thick Disk and Inner Halo

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Warren R; Wilhelm, Ronald; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Geller, Margaret J; Kenyon, Scott J; Kurtz, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    We present a complete spectroscopic survey of 2414 2MASS-selected blue horizontal branch (BHB) candidates selected over 4300 deg^2 of the sky. We identify 655 BHB stars in this non-kinematically selected sample. We calculate the luminosity function of field BHB stars and find evidence for very few hot BHB stars in the field. The BHB stars located at a distance from the Galactic plane |Z|<4 kpc trace what is clearly a metal-weak thick disk population, with a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]= -1.7, a rotation velocity gradient of dv_{rot}/d|Z|= -28+-3.4 km/s in the region |Z|<6 kpc, and a density scale height of h_Z= 1.26+-0.1 kpc. The BHB stars located at 5<|Z|<9 kpc are a predominantly inner-halo population, with a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]= -2.0 and a mean Galactic rotation of -4+-31 km/s. We infer the density of halo and thick disk BHB stars is 104+-37 kpc^-3 near the Sun, and the relative normalization of halo to thick-disk BHB stars is 4+-1% near the Sun.

  7. On the asymptotic behavior of the super sonic interstellar gas flow which is made by spiral density wave, propagating in rapidly rotating galaxy disk

    OpenAIRE

    Liverts, E. V.

    1998-01-01

    Nonlinear solutions for the large-scale flow of interstellar gas in the presence of a spiral gravitational field have received considerable attention because this model allows to explain a lot of observations for galaxy disks. However this investigations were forced to limit by numerable analysis of the problem because of its nonlinearity. In this paper we wish to carry out the analytical expression which allows us to describe the super sonic nonlinear interstellar gas flow in rapidly rotatin...

  8. Star Formation Rates in Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickering, T. E.; Impey, C. D.; van Gorkom, J.; Bothun, G. D.

    1994-01-01

    The low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies found in recent surveys (e.g.,\\ Schombert et al. 1992, AJ, 103, 1107) tend to be blue and gas rich. These properties along with their low mean surface luminosity and H i densities imply an inefficient mode of star formation. The Hα images that we presen

  9. FIR extended emission from cold gas and dust in Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies: the anomalous cases of POX 186 and UM 461

    CERN Document Server

    Doublier, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    FIR observation of BCD galaxies with Herschel has revealed a wealth of new insights in these objects which are thought to resemble high-redshift forming galaxies. Dust and cold gas showed to be colder, in more or less quantities than expected and of uncertain origin. However, not unlike in the local universe, not all the dust or the cold gas is accounted for, making it more challenging. SPICA and its factor 10 to 100 in sensitivity will allow to image the faint extended cold gas/dusty disks in BCDGs in addition to detect faint C and O lines only marginally or not at all detected by Herschel/

  10. Star Formation in Disk Galaxies. III. Does stellar feedback result in cloud death?

    CERN Document Server

    Tasker, Elizabeth J; Pudritz, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Stellar feedback, star formation and gravitational interactions are major controlling forces in the evolution of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs). To explore their relative roles, we examine the properties and evolution of GMCs forming in an isolated galactic disk simulation that includes both localised thermal feedback and photoelectric heating. The results are compared with the three previous simulations in this series which consists of a model with no star formation, star formation but no form of feedback and star formation with photoelectric heating in a set with steadily increasing physical effects. We find that the addition of localised thermal feedback greatly suppresses star formation but does not destroy the surrounding GMC, giving cloud properties closely resembling the run in which no stellar physics is included. The outflows from the feedback reduce the mass of the cloud but do not destroy it, allowing the cloud to survive its stellar children. This suggests that weak thermal feedback such as the low...

  11. Interplay between Dark Matter and Galactic Structure in Disk and Oblate Elliptical Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Euaggelos E. Zotos; Nicolaos D. Caranicolas

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the regular or chaotic nature of orbits in galaxies is undoubtedly an issue of great importance. We determine the character of orbits of stars moving in the meridional plane (, ) of an axially symmetric time-independent galactic model with a spherical central nucleus, and a flat biaxial oblate dark matter halo component. In particular, we try to reveal the influence of the fractional portion of dark matter on the structure and also on the different families of orbits of the galaxy, by monitoring how the percentage of chaotic orbits, as well as the percentages of orbits of the main regular resonant families evolve when the ratio of dark matter to luminous mass varies. The smaller alignment index (SALI) was computed by numerically integrating the equations of motion as well as the variational equations to extensive samples of orbits in order to distinguish between ordered and chaotic motion. In addition, a method based on the concept of spectral dynamics that utilizes the Fourier transform of the time series of each coordinate is used to identify the various families of regular orbits and also to recognize the secondary resonances that bifurcate from them. The investigation is carried out both in the physical (, ) and the phase (, $\\dot{R}$) space for a better understanding of the orbital properties of the system. The numerical computations reveal that in both cases, the fractional portion of dark matter influences more or less, the overall orbital structure of the system. It was observed however, that the evolution of the percentages of all types of orbits as a function of the fractional portion of dark matter strongly depends on the particular type of space (physical or phase) in which the initial conditions of orbits are launched. The results are compared with the similar earlier work.

  12. Transition between order and chaos in a composite disk galaxy model with a massive nucleus and a dark matter halo

    CERN Document Server

    Caranicolas, Nicolaos D

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the transition from regular to chaotic motion in a composite galaxy model with a disk-halo, a massive dense nucleus and a dark halo component. We obtain relationships connecting the critical value of the mass of the nucleus or the critical value of the angular momentum, with the mass of the dark halo, where the transition from regular motion to chaos occurs. We also present 3D diagrams connecting the mass of nucleus the energy and the percentage of stars that can show chaotic motion. The fraction of the chaotic orbits observed in the phase plane, as a function of the mass of the dark halo is also computed. We use a semi-numerical method, that is a combination of theoretical and numerical procedure. The theoretical results obtained using the version 8.0 of the Mathematica package, while all the numerical calculations were made using a Bulirsch-Stoer FORTRAN routine in double precision. The results can be obtained in semi-numerical or numerical form and give good description for the connection of...

  13. THE GALEX/S{sup 4}G UV–IR COLOR–COLOR DIAGRAM: CATCHING SPIRAL GALAXIES AWAY FROM THE BLUE SEQUENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouquin, Alexandre Y. K.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Gallego, Jesús [Departamento de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Boissier, Samuel [Aix Marseille Université, CNGRS, LAM (Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Sheth, Kartik [National Radio Astronomy Observatory/NAASC, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Laine, Jarkko [Astronomy Division, Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Peletier, Reynier F. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Postbus 800, NL-9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Röck, Benjamin R.; Knapen, Johan H., E-mail: abouquin@fis.ucm.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea, S/N, E-38205 La Laguna (Spain)

    2015-02-10

    We obtained GALEX FUV, NUV, and Spitzer/IRAC 3.6 μm photometry for >2000 galaxies, available for 90% of the S{sup 4}G sample. We find a very tight GALEX blue sequence (GBS) in the (FUV–NUV) versus (NUV–[3.6]) color–color diagram, which is populated by irregular and spiral galaxies, and is mainly driven by changes in the formation timescale (τ) and a degeneracy between τ and dust reddening. The tightness of the GBS provides an unprecedented way of identifying star-forming galaxies and objects that are just evolving to (or from) what we call the GALEX green valley (GGV). At the red end of the GBS, at (NUV–[3.6]) > 5, we find a wider GALEX red sequence (GRS) mostly populated by E/S0 galaxies that has a perpendicular slope to that of the GBS and of the optical red sequence. We find no such dichotomy in terms of stellar mass (measured by M{sub [3.6]}) since both massive (M{sub ⋆}>10{sup 11}M{sub ⊙}) blue- and red-sequence galaxies are identified. The type that is proportionally more often found in the GGV is the S0-Sa’s, and most of these are located in high-density environments. We discuss evolutionary models of galaxies that show a rapid transition from the blue to the red sequence on a timescale of 10{sup 8} yr.

  14. CARMA Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies (STING) II: Molecular Gas Star Formation Law and Depletion Time Across the Blue Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, Nurur; Xue, Rui; Wong, Tony; Leroy, Adam K; Walter, Fabian; Bigiel, Frank; Rosolowsky, Erik; Fisher, David B; Vogel, Stuart N; Blitz, Leo; West, Andrew A; Ott, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between molecular gas and current star formation rate surface density at sub-kpc and kpc scales in a sample of 14 nearby star-forming galaxies. Measuring the relationship in the bright, high molecular gas surface density ($\\Shtwo\\gtrsim$20 \\msunpc) regions of the disks to minimize the contribution from diffuse extended emission, we find an approximately linear relation between molecular gas and star formation rate surface density, $\

  15. Galaxy disks do not need to survive in the L-CDM paradigm: the galaxy merger rate out to z\\sim1.5 from morpho-kinematic data

    CERN Document Server

    Puech, M; Hopkins, P F; Athanassoula, E; Flores, H; Rodrigues, M; Wang, J L; Yang, Y B

    2012-01-01

    About two-thirds of present-day, large galaxies are spirals such as the Milky Way or Andromeda, but the way their thin rotating disks formed remains uncertain. Observations have revealed that half of their progenitors, six billion years ago, had peculiar morphologies and/or kinematics, which exclude them from the Hubble sequence. Major mergers, i.e., fusions between galaxies of similar mass, are found to be the likeliest driver for such strong peculiarities. However, thin disks are fragile and easily destroyed by such violent collisions, which creates a critical tension between the observed fraction of thin disks and their survival within the L-CDM paradigm. Here we show that the observed high occurrence of mergers amongst their progenitors is only apparent and is resolved when using morpho-kinematic observations which are sensitive to all the phases of the merging process. This provides an original way of narrowing down observational estimates of the galaxy merger rate and leads to a perfect match with predi...

  16. VLT/X-shooter observations of blue compact galaxies Haro 11 and ESO 338-IG 004

    CERN Document Server

    Guseva, N G; Fricke, K J; Henkel, C

    2012-01-01

    (abridged) Strongly star-forming galaxies of subsolar metallicities are typical of the high-redshift universe. Here we therefore provide accurate data for two low-z analogs, the well-known low-metallicity emission-line galaxies Haro 11 and ESO 338-IG 004. On the basis of Very Large Telescope/X-shooter spectroscopic observations in the wavelength range 3000-24000\\AA, we use standard direct methods to derive physical conditions and element abundances. Furthermore, we use X-shooter data together with Spitzer observations in the mid-infrared range to attempt to find hidden star formation. We derive interstellar oxygen abundances of 12 + log O/H = 8.33+/-0.01, 8.10+/-0.04, and 7.89+/-0.01 in the two HII regions B and C of Haro 11 and in ESO 338-IG 004, respectively. The observed fluxes of the hydrogen lines correspond to the theoretical recombination values after correction for extinction with a single value of the extinction coefficient C(Hbeta) across the entire wavelength range from the near-ultraviolet to the ...

  17. Kiloparsec-Scale Simulations of Magnetised Molecular Clouds in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Van Loo, Sven; Tan, Jonathan C; Falle, Sam A E G

    2012-01-01

    We present simulations of the evolution of self-gravitating dense gas on kiloparsec-size scales in a galactic disk, designed to study dense clump formation from giant molecular clouds (GMCs). These dense clumps are expected to be the precursors to star clusters and this process may be the rate limiting step controling star formation rates in galactic systems as described by the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. The evolution of these simulated GMCs and clumps is determined by self-gravity balanced by turbulent pressure support and the large scale galactic shear. While the cloud structures and densities significantly change during their evolution, they remain roughly in virial equilibrium for time scales exceeding the free-fall time of GMCs, indicating that energy from the galactic shear continuously cascades down. We implement star formation at a slow, inefficient rate of 2% per local free-fall time, but this yields global star formation rates that are more than ~two orders of magnitude larger than the observed Ken...

  18. The Green Valley is a Red Herring: Galaxy Zoo reveals two evolutionary pathways towards quenching of star formation in early- and late-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D; Fortson, Lucy; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C; Lintott, Chris J; Masters, Karen L; Nichol, Robert C; Sarzi, Marc; Ramin,; Skibba,; Treister, Ezequiel; Willett, Kyle W; Wong, O Ivy; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2014-01-01

    We use SDSS+\\textit{GALEX}+Galaxy Zoo data to study the quenching of star formation in low-redshift galaxies. We show that the green valley between the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies and the red sequence of quiescent galaxies in the colour-mass diagram is not a single transitional state through which most blue galaxies evolve into red galaxies. Rather, an analysis that takes morphology into account makes clear that only a small population of blue early-type galaxies move rapidly across the green valley after the morphologies are transformed from disk to spheroid and star formation is quenched rapidly. In contrast, the majority of blue star-forming galaxies have significant disks, and they retain their late-type morphologies as their star formation rates decline very slowly. We summarize a range of observations that lead to these conclusions, including UV-optical colours and halo masses, which both show a striking dependence on morphological type. We interpret these results in terms of the evolution of co...

  19. An Intermittent Star Formation History in a "Normal" Disk Galaxy The Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha-Pinto, H J; Maciel, W J; Flynn, C; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J.; Scalo, John; Maciel, Walter; Flynn, Chris

    1999-01-01

    The star formation rate history of the Milky Way is derived using the chromospheric age distribution for 552 stars in the solar neighborhood. The stars sample birthsites distributed over a very large range of distances because of orbital diffusion, and so give an estimate of the global star formation rate history. The derivation incorporates the metallicity dependence of chromospheric emission at a given age, and corrections to account for incompleteness, scale height-age correlations, and stellar evolutionary effects. The results show that the Milky Way has undergone fluctuations in the global star formation rate with amplitudes greater than a factor of 2-3 on timescales less than 0.2-1 Gyr. The actual history is likely to be more bursty than found here because of the smearing effect of age uncertainties. There is some evidence for a slow secular increase in the star formation rate, perhaps a record of the accumulation history of our galaxy. A smooth nearly-constant star formation rate history is strongly ru...

  20. The impact of galactic fountains on the global evolution of galaxy disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraternali, F.

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of the Milky Way, and its thin disc in particular, is a history of continuous accretion of fresh gas from the surrounding environment. Evidence for this accretion taking place include high-velocity clouds (HVCs) that appear to be raining down from the halo. I present a model that explains the formation of the prototypical HVC Complex C as gas cooling of the Galactic corona triggered by the explosion of a superbubble in the Outer arm occurred 150 Myr ago. This result is obtained with a new galactic fountain model combined with high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations. The material ejected by the superbubble has triggered the condensation of a large portion of the circumgalactic medium and caused its subsequent accretion on to the disc. This is a local manifestation of fountain-driven cooling of the lower Galactic corona that can contribute significantly in brining fresh low-metallicity gas to the disc of our Galaxy. The same model also reproduces the global-scale kinematics of the extraplanar gas and predicts a gas accretion that evolves inside-out.