WorldWideScience

Sample records for blue fluorescent protein

  1. Photophysics of the blue fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blue fluorescent protein (BFP) is a mutant of the green fluorescent protein, where the phenolic ring of the chromophore has been replaced by imidazole cycle of histidine residue. The usability of BFP as a fluorescent marker is hampered by its low fluorescence quantum yield at room temperature. The intensity of fluorescence increases by a factor of 4.5 when the temperature is decreased from 320 K down to 225 K. The fluorescence is also enhanced by hydrostatic pressure. Both effects have been explained by shift of the equilibrium between hydrogen nonbonded and hydrogen-bonded chromophores. Our semi-empirical quantum chemical calculations show that the fluorescence quantum yield of the BFP chromophore is low due to isomerization in the electronically excited state -twisting of the bridging bond by 90 deg. At this twisted geometry the potential energy surfaces of ground and excited states are situated close to each other facilitating efficient nonradiative decay

  2. Near-infrared fluorescence glucose sensing based on glucose/galactose-binding protein coupled to 651-Blue Oxazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Faaizah; Pickup, John C., E-mail: john.pickup@kcl.ac.uk

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •We showed that the NIR fluorophore, 651-Blue Oxazine, is solvatochromic (polarity sensitive). •Blue Oxazine was covalently attached to mutants of glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP). •Fluorescence intensity of GBP-Blue Oxazine increased with addition of glucose. •Fluorescence from bead-immobilised GBP-Blue Oxazine was detectable through skin in vitro. •This shows proof-of-concept for non-invasive glucose sensing using GBP-Blue Oxazine. -- Abstract: Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dyes that are environmentally sensitive or solvatochromic are useful tools for protein labelling in in vivo biosensor applications such as glucose monitoring in diabetes since their spectral properties are mostly independent of tissue autofluorescence and light scattering, and they offer potential for non-invasive analyte sensing. We showed that the fluorophore 651-Blue Oxazine is polarity-sensitive, with a marked reduction in NIR fluorescence on increasing solvent polarity. Mutants of glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP) used as the glucose receptor were site-specifically and covalently labelled with Blue Oxazine using click chemistry. Mutants H152C/A213R and H152C/A213R/L238S showed fluorescence increases of 15% and 21% on addition of saturating glucose concentrations and binding constants of 6 and 25 mM respectively. Fluorescence responses to glucose were preserved when GBP-Blue Oxazine was immobilised to agarose beads, and the beads were excited by NIR light through a mouse skin preparation studied in vitro. We conclude GBP-Blue Oxazine shows proof-of-concept as a non-invasive continuous glucose sensing system.

  3. Determination of Trace Protein by Methylene Blue-Tetraphenylborate Fluorescence Probe Using Polyethylene Glycol as Sensitizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jiaming; LI Zhiming; HUANG Xiaomei; ZENG Liqing; CHEN Xiaohua; SONG Dongqin; ZHENG Zhenzhen

    2009-01-01

    An ionic association complex of methylene blue-tetraphenyiborate ([MB]+·[B(C6H5)4]-) can emit a strong and stable fluorescence in KH2PO4-Na2HPO4 buffer solution. In the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), the fluo-rescence signal of [MB]+·[B(C6H5)4]- can be sharply quenched, which can be further quenched by using polyeth-ylene glycol (PEG) as a sensitizer where the △F (△F=F0-F, F0 and F are the fluorescence intensities of the blank reagent and the test solution, respectively) of the system with PEG is 9.1 times higher than that without PEG, showing PEG has strong sensitizing effect on the quenching of a fluorescence signal. And there is a good linear correlation between △F and the content of BSA. Thus, a new fluorescence probe for the determination of trace pro-tein has been established, with the linear range of 0.11-88.0 pg·L-1 and the detection limit of 22.0 ag·mL-1 BSA. This sensitive method has been applied to the determination of protein in human serum samples with satisfactory results. And the reaction mechanism was also discussed. Under the same condition, the new method can be used to determie not only BSA, human serum albumin (HAS), ovalbumin (OVA) and γ-globulin (γ-G), respectively, but also the total protein in serum, brain and spinal cord.

  4. Hidden photoinduced reactivity of the blue fluorescent protein mKalama1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegh, Russell B.; Bloch, Dmitry A.; Bommarius, Andreas S.;

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the photoinduced dynamics of fluorescent proteins is essential for their applications in bioimaging. Despite numerous studies on the ultrafast dynamics, the delayed response of these proteins, which often results in population of kinetically trapped dark states of various origins...... nanosecond excited-state lifetime; however, its tyrosine-based chromophore undergoes deprotonation coupled to non-radiative electronic relaxation. Such deprotonation causes distinct optical absorption changes in the broad UV-to-NIR spectral range (ca. 300–800 nm); the disappearance of the transient...

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a novel wild-type blue fluorescent protein from Vibrio vulnificus CKM-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wild type BFPvv has been crystallized for the first time in order to obtain its tertiary structure and to further understand how chromophore formation occurs via a different oxygen-independent mechanism. The use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) for non-invasive in vivo imaging is limited to aerobic systems, as chromophore formation requires oxygen. However, a novel NADPH-dependent blue fluorescent protein from Vibrio vulnificus CKM-1 (BFPvv) that emits blue fluorescence in both aerobic and anaerobic systems has recently been discovered. Wild-type BFPvv was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The resulting BFPvv crystals diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 Å and belonged to space group P3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 96.62, c = 214.511 Å. Assuming the presence of eight molecules in the unit cell, the solvent content was estimated to be ∼56.16%

  6. From Green to Blue: Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Green Fluorescent Protein to Teach Protein Structure-Function Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giron, Maria D.; Salto, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Structure-function relationship studies in proteins are essential in modern Cell Biology. Laboratory exercises that allow students to familiarize themselves with basic mutagenesis techniques are essential in all Genetic Engineering courses to teach the relevance of protein structure. We have implemented a laboratory course based on the…

  7. Why Do Proteins Glow Blue?

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Sohini; Hazra, Partha; Mandal, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Recent literatures reported blue-green emission from amyloid fibril as exclusive signature of fibril formation. This unusual visible luminescence is regularly used to monitor fibril growth. Blue-green emission has also been observed in crystalline protein and in solution. However, the origin of this emission is not known exactly. Our spectroscopic study of serum proteins reveals that the blue-green emission is a property of protein monomer. Evidences suggest that semiconductor-like band structure of proteins with the optical band-gap in the visible region is possibly the origin of this phenomenon. We show here that the band structure of proteins is primarily the result of electron delocalization through the peptide chain, rather than through the hydrogen bond network in secondary structure.

  8. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  9. Diversity and Evolution of Coral Fluorescent Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Alieva, Naila O.; Konzen, Karen A.; Field, Steven F.; Meleshkevitch, Ella A.; Hunt, Marguerite E.; Victor Beltran-Ramirez; Miller, David J.; Jörg Wiedenmann; Anya Salih; Matz, Mikhail V

    2008-01-01

    GFP-like fluorescent proteins (FPs) are the key color determinants in reef-building corals (class Anthozoa, order Scleractinia) and are of considerable interest as potential genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Here we report 40 additional members of the GFP family from corals. There are three major paralogous lineages of coral FPs. One of them is retained in all sampled coral families and is responsible for the non-fluorescent purple-blue color, while each of the other two evolved a full ...

  10. Dispensability of the major coat protein of oat blue dwarf virus in genome replication: Substitution of the open reading frame with the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oat blue dwarf virus (OBDV) is a representative marafivirus that infects monocots and a limited number of dicot species and is vectored propagatively by the leafhopper Macrosteles fascifrons.Recently, we reported the generation of clone pOBDV-2r, the first clone of a marafivirus from which infectiou...

  11. Green fluorescent protein: A perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Remington, S James

    2011-01-01

    A brief personal perspective is provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP), covering the period 1994–2011. The topics discussed are primarily those in which my research group has made a contribution and include structure and function of the GFP polypeptide, the mechanism of fluorescence emission, excited state protein transfer, the design of ratiometric fluorescent protein biosensors and an overview of the fluorescent proteins derived from coral reef animals. Structure-function relationship...

  12. Diversity and evolution of coral fluorescent proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila O Alieva

    Full Text Available GFP-like fluorescent proteins (FPs are the key color determinants in reef-building corals (class Anthozoa, order Scleractinia and are of considerable interest as potential genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Here we report 40 additional members of the GFP family from corals. There are three major paralogous lineages of coral FPs. One of them is retained in all sampled coral families and is responsible for the non-fluorescent purple-blue color, while each of the other two evolved a full complement of typical coral fluorescent colors (cyan, green, and red and underwent sorting between coral groups. Among the newly cloned proteins are a "chromo-red" color type from Echinopora forskaliana (family Faviidae and pink chromoprotein from Stylophora pistillata (Pocilloporidae, both evolving independently from the rest of coral chromoproteins. There are several cyan FPs that possess a novel kind of excitation spectrum indicating a neutral chromophore ground state, for which the residue E167 is responsible (numeration according to GFP from A. victoria. The chromoprotein from Acropora millepora is an unusual blue instead of purple, which is due to two mutations: S64C and S183T. We applied a novel probabilistic sampling approach to recreate the common ancestor of all coral FPs as well as the more derived common ancestor of three main fluorescent colors of the Faviina suborder. Both proteins were green such as found elsewhere outside class Anthozoa. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the all-coral ancestral protein had a chromohore apparently locked in a non-fluorescent neutral state, which may reflect the transitional stage that enabled rapid color diversification early in the history of coral FPs. Our results highlight the extent of convergent or parallel evolution of the color diversity in corals, provide the foundation for experimental studies of evolutionary processes that led to color diversification, and enable a comparative analysis of

  13. Blue fluorescent organic light emitting diodes with multilayered graphene anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an innovative anode for organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), we have investigated graphene films. Graphene has importance due to its huge potential in flexible OLED applications. In this work, graphene films have been catalytically grown and transferred to the glass substrate for OLED fabrications. We have successfully fabricated 2 mm × 2 mm device area blue fluorescent OLEDs with graphene anodes which showed 2.1% of external quantum efficiency at 1000 cd/m2. This is the highest value reported among fluorescent OLEDs using graphene anodes. Oxygen plasma treatment on graphene has been found to improve hole injections in low voltage regime, which has been interpreted as oxygen plasma induced work function modification. However, plasma treatment also increases the sheet resistance of graphene, limiting the maximum luminance. In summary, our works demonstrate the practical possibility of graphene as an anode material for OLEDs and suggest a processing route which can be applied to various graphene related devices.

  14. Protein requirement for Trichogaster lalius, blue variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jener Alexandre Sampaio Zuanon

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the protein requirement of juvenile Trichogaster lalius, blue variety. The experimental design was of randomised blocks (B1 = initial weight of 1.04±0.05 g and B2 = 1.36±0.02 g, with two replicates within each block and five treatments (230, 270, 310, 350 and 390 g CP/kg diet. The fish were fed to satiation, three times a day for 90 days. The study evaluated: survival rate, weight gain, final length, feed intake, feed conversion ratio, protein efficiency ratio, specific growth rate and condition factor. There was a linear effect of dietary protein levels for protein efficiency ratio, specific growth rate (positive linear effect and feed conversion ratio (negative linear effect. For weight gain, final length, feed intake and condition factor a quadratic effect of dietary protein levels was observed, with estimated values of 409.8, 366.2, 317.4 and 365.0 g CP/kg diet, to improve their performance parameters. Analysis of growth based on the length of the fish shows that 366.2 g of CP/kg diet meets the protein requirement of juvenile Trichogaster lalius, blue variety.

  15. Single-molecule spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the d

  16. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B; Bosse, Jens B; Engel, Esteban A; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; Del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W

    2015-11-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  17. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Hogue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP, fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus (PRV structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer.

  18. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B.; Bosse, Jens B.; Engel, Esteban A.; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  19. Chemiluminescence characteristics of cumarin derivatives as blue fluorescers in peroxyoxalate-hydrogen peroxide system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaichi, Mohammad Javad; Karami, Ali Reza; Shockravi, Abbas; Shamsipur, Mojtaba

    2003-04-01

    The chemiluminescence characteristics of seven different cumarin derivatives were studied in detail. The fluorescence and chemiluminescence spectra were compared; all cumarins used were found to act as blue fluorescers. The intensity and kinetic parameters for the chemiluminescent systems were evaluated from computer fitting of the resulting intensity-time plots. Among different cumarin derivatives used, 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcumarin revealed the most promising characteristics as an efficient blue fluorescent emitter.

  20. Ultraviolet fluorescence of coelenteramide and coelenteramide-containing fluorescent proteins. Experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alieva, Roza R; Tomilin, Felix N; Kuzubov, Alexander A; Ovchinnikov, Sergey G; Kudryasheva, Nadezhda S

    2016-09-01

    Coelenteramide-containing fluorescent proteins are products of bioluminescent reactions of marine coelenterates. They are called 'discharged photoproteins'. Their light-induced fluorescence spectra are variable, depending considerably on external conditions. Current work studies a dependence of light-induced fluorescence spectra of discharged photoproteins obelin, aequorin, and clytin on excitation energy. It was demonstrated that photoexcitation to the upper electron-excited states (260-300nm) of the discharged photoproteins initiates a fluorescence peak in the near UV region, in addition to the blue-green emission. To characterize the UV fluorescence, the light-induced fluorescence spectra of coelenteramide (CLM), fluorophore of the discharged photoproteins, were studied in methanol solution. Similar to photoproteins, the CLM spectra depended on photoexcitation energy; the additional peak (330nm) in the near UV region was observed in CLM fluorescence at higher excitation energy (260-300nm). Quantum chemical calculations by time depending method with B3LYP/cc-pVDZ showed that the conjugated pyrazine-phenolic fragment and benzene moiety of CLM molecule are responsible for the additional UV fluorescence peak. Quantum yields of CLM fluorescence in methanol were 0.028±0.005 at 270-340nm photoexcitation. A conclusion was made that the UV emission of CLM might contribute to the UV fluorescence of the discharged photoproteins. The study develops knowledge on internal energy transfer in biological structures - complexes of proteins with low-weight aromatic molecules. PMID:27400455

  1. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Kainz, Birgit; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Toca-Herrera, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins.

  2. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins. (paper)

  3. Evolution of a fluorinated green fluorescent protein

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Tae Hyeon; Link, A. James; Tirrell, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The fluorescence of bacterial cells expressing a variant (GFPm) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was reduced to background levels by global replacement of the leucine residues of GFPm by 5,5,5-trifluoroleucine. Eleven rounds of random mutagenesis and screening via fluorescence-activated cell sorting yielded a GFP mutant containing 20 amino acid substitutions. The mutant protein in fluorinated form showed improved folding efficiency both in vivo and in vitro, and the median fluorescence ...

  4. Highlights of the optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G H

    2011-07-01

    The development of super-resolution microscopy techniques using molecular localization, such as photoactivated localization microscopy, fluorescence photoactivated localization microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, photoactivated localization microscopy with independent running acquisition and many others, has heightened interest in molecules that will be grouped here into a category referred to as 'optical highlighter' fluorescent proteins. This review will survey many of the advances in development of fluorescent proteins for optically highlighting sub-populations of fluorescently labelled molecules.

  5. Improved monomeric red, orange and yellow fluorescent proteins derived from Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaner, Nathan C; Campbell, Robert E; Steinbach, Paul A; Giepmans, Ben N G; Palmer, Amy E; Tsien, Roger Y

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are genetically encoded, easily imaged reporters crucial in biology and biotechnology. When a protein is tagged by fusion to a fluorescent protein, interactions between fluorescent proteins can undesirably disturb targeting or function. Unfortunately, all wild-type yellow-to-red

  6. Metal-enhanced fluorescence of single green fluorescent protein (GFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) has emerged as a powerful reporter molecule for monitoring gene expression, protein localization, and protein-protein interaction. However, the detection of low concentrations of GFPs is limited by the weakness of the fluorescent signal and the low photostability. In this report, we observed the proximity of single GFPs to metallic silver nanoparticles increases its fluorescence intensity approximately 6-fold and decreases the decay time. Single protein molecules on the silvered surfaces emitted 10-fold more photons as compared to glass prior to photobleaching. The photostability of single GFP has increased to some extent. Accordingly, we observed longer duration time and suppressed blinking. The single-molecule lifetime histograms indicate the relatively heterogeneous distributions of protein mutants inside the structure

  7. Photonic reagents for concentration measurement of flu-orescent proteins with overlapping spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goun, Alexei; Bondar, Denys I.; Er, Ali O.; Quine, Zachary; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2016-05-01

    By exploiting photonic reagents (i.e., coherent control by shaped laser pulses), we employ Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) as a novel means for quantitatively characterizing mixtures of fluorescent proteins with a large spectral overlap. To illustrate ODD, we simultaneously measured concentrations of in vitro mixtures of Enhanced Blue Fluorescent Protein (EBFP) and Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP). Building on this foundational study, the ultimate goal is to exploit the capabilities of ODD for parallel monitoring of genetic and protein circuits by suppressing the spectral cross-talk among multiple fluorescent reporters.

  8. Evidence from action and fluorescence spectra that UV-induced violet-blue-green fluorescence enhances leaf photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantha, S V; Johnson, G A; Day, T A

    2001-03-01

    We assessed the contribution of UV-induced violet-blue-green leaf fluorescence to photosynthesis in Poa annua, Sorghum halepense and Nerium oleander by measuring UV-induced fluorescence spectra (280-380 nm excitation, 400-550 nm emission) from leaf surfaces and determining the monochromatic UV action spectra for leaf photosynthetic O2-evolution. Peak fluorescence emission wavelengths from leaf surfaces ranged from violet (408 nm) to blue (448 nm), while excitation peaks for these maxima ranged from 333 to 344 nm. Action spectra were developed by supplementing monochromatic radiation from 280 to 440 nm, in 20 nm increments, to a visible nonsaturating background of 500 mumol m-2 s-1 photosynthetically active radiation and measuring photosynthetic O2-evolution rates. Photosynthetic rates tended to be higher with the 340 nm supplement than with higher or lower wavelength UV supplements. Comparing photosynthetic rates with the 340 nm supplement to those with the 400 nm supplement, the percentage enhancement in photosynthetic rates at 340 nm ranged from 7.8 to 9.8%. We suspect that 340 nm UV improves photosynthetic rates via fluorescence that provides violet-blue-green photons for photosynthetic energy conversion because (1) the peak excitation wavelength (340 nm) for violet-blue-green fluorescence from leaves was also the most effective UV wavelength at enhancing photosynthetic rates, and (2) the magnitude of photosynthetic enhancements attributable to supplemental 340 nm UV was well correlated (R2 = 0.90) with the apparent intensity of 340 nm UV-induced violet-blue-green fluorescence emission from leaves.

  9. Fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the construction and characterisation of fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins used as building blocks for the fabrication of nanostructured monomolecular biocoatings on silica particles with defined fluorescence properties. The S-layer protein SgsE of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a was fused with the pH-dependant cyan, green and yellow variant of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the red fluorescent protein mRFP1. These fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins, acting as scaffold and optical sensing element simultaneously, were able to reassemble in solution and on silica particles forming 2D nanostructures with p2 lattice symmetry (a=11 ±0.5 nm, b=14 ±0.4 nm, g=80 ±1o). The pH-dependant fluorescence behaviour was studied with fluorimetry, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. These fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins can be used as pH-sensor. 50% of the fluorescence intensity decreases at their calculated pKa values (pH6 - pH5). The fluorescence intensity of the GFP variants vanished completely between pH4 and pH3 whereas the chromophore of the red protein mRFP1 was only slightly affected in acidic conditions. At the isoelectric point of the S-layer coated silica particles (pH4.6 ±0.2) an increase in particle aggregation was detected by flow cytometry. The cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins were chosen to create a bi-fluorescent S-layer tandem fusion protein with the possibility for resonance energy transfer (FRET). A transfer efficiency of 20% and a molecular distance between the donor (ECFP) and acceptor (YFP) chromophores of around 6.2 nm could be shown. This bi-fluorescent ECFP-SgsE-YFP tandem fusion protein was able to reassemble on solid surfaces. The remarkable combination of fluorescence and self-assembly and the design of bi-functional S-layer tandem fusion protein matrices makes them to a promising tool in nanobiotechnology. (author)

  10. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  11. Proteins expressed in blue-green sharpshooter leafhoppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used a metagenomics approach to identify proteins from the blue-green sharpshooter, Graphocephala atropunctata (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) which is an important vector of Pierce’s disease of grapes. The 44 proteins are being used as markers to monitor and identify current and exotic introductions o...

  12. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  13. Effects of special blue fluorescent light on hepatic mixed-function oxidase activity in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, D.R.; Yeary, R.A.; Randall, G.

    1981-01-01

    Phototherapy has been widely used in the treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Recent reports, however, have indicated that fluorescent light may be toxic and mutagenic to mammalian cells. these findings suggest possible long-term side effects with the use of phototherapy. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of phototherapy on hepatic microsomal enzyme activity. The exposure of Sprague-Dawley and Gunn rats to special blue fluorescent light at an average irradiance of 1,200 microW/cm2 resulted in no significant changes in liver microsomal enzyme activity for aniline hydroxylase, p-nitroanisole-O-demethylase, ethylmorphine-N-demethylase, cytochrome c reductase or the quantity of cytochrome P-450. A significant decrease in aniline hydroxylase and p-nitroanisole-O-demethylase activity was observed when liver microsomes were exposed in vitro to special blue fluorescent light. Photoactivated bilirubin did not effect the activity of the mixed-function oxidase enzymes measured under the conditions of this study.

  14. Synthesis and spectral characterization of a new blue fluorescent tripod for detecting metal cations and protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staneva, Desislava [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Makki, Mohammad S.I.; Sobahi, Tariq R. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Bosch, Paula [Institute of Science and Technology of Polymers, CSIC, Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006, Madrid (Spain); Abdel-Rahman, Reda M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Asiri, Abdullah [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research (CEAMR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Grabchev, Ivo, E-mail: i.grabchev@chem.uni-sofia.bg [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Sofia University “St. Kliment Ohridski”, Faculty of Medicine, 1407 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-06-15

    A new symmetrical blue fluorescent tripod containing three 1,8-naphtalimide fragments has been synthesized. Its spectral properties have been investigated in organic solvents of different polarity. Its basic photophysical characteristics depend strongly on the polarity of the organic solvents. In nonpolar solvents (diethyl ether, chloroform and toluene) the new tripod emits eximer fluorescence. The new tripod has been investigated as a ligand for detection of metal ions (Ag{sup +}, Co{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+}) in acetonitrile and acetonitrile/H{sub 2}O (1:4, v/v). The influence of protons in an ethanol–water (1:4, v/v) solution and in toluene and diethyl ether solvents on the tripod fluorescence intensity has been investigated and it has been shown that the protons destroy the excimer formations recovering the monomer fluorescence. - Highlights: • New blue fluorescent tripod containing three 1,8-naphtalimide fragments was described. • In nonpolar solvents the new tripod emits eximer fluorescence. • The new tripod has been investigated as a ligand for metal ions and protons.

  15. Transgenic rats with green, red, and blue fluorescence: powerful tools for bioimaging, cell trafficking, and differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2005-04-01

    The rat represents a perfect animal for broadening medical experiments, because its physiology has been well understood in the history of experimental animals. In addition, its larger body size takes enough advantage for surgical manipulation, compared to the mouse. Many rat models mimicking human diseases, therefore, have been used in a variety of biomedical studies including physiology, pharmacology, transplantation, and immunology. In an effort to create the specifically designed rats for biomedical research and regenerative medicine, we have developed the engineered rat system on the basis of transgenic technology and succeeded in establishing various transgenic rat strains. The transgenic rats with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were generated in the two different strains (Wistar and Lewis), in which GFP is driven under the chicken beta-actin promoter and cytomegalovirus enhancer (CAG promoter). Their GFP expression levels were different in each organ, but the Lewis line expressed GFP strongly and ubiquitously in most of the organs compared with that of Wistar. For red fluorescence, DsRed2 was transduced to the Wistar rats: one line specifically expresses DsRed2 in the liver under the mouse albumin promoter, another is designed for the Cre/LoxP system as the double reporter rat (the initial DsRed2 expression turns on GFP in the presence of Cre recombinase). LacZ-transgenic rats represent blue color, and LacZ is driven the CAG (DA) or ROSA26 promoter (Lewis). Our unique transgenic rats" system highlights the powerful performance for the elucidation of many cellular processes in regenerative medicine, leading to innovative medical treatments.

  16. Visible light communication using a blue GaN mu LED and fluorescent polymer color converter

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Hyunchae; Manousiadis, Pavlos; Rajbhandari, Sujan; Vithanage, D.A.; Faulkner, G.; Tsonev, Dobroslav; Mckendry, Jonathan J.D.; Videv, Stefan; Xie, Enyuan; Gu, Erdan; Martin D. Dawson; Haas, Harald; Turnbull, Graham; Samuel, Ifor D. W.; O'Brien, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    This letter presents a novel technique to achieve high-speed visible light communication (VLC) using white light generated by a blue GaN mu LED and a yellow fluorescent copolymer. We generated white light suitable for room illumination by optimizing the ratio between the blue electroluminescence of the mu LED and yellow photoluminescence of the copolymer color converter. Taking advantage of the components' high bandwidth, we demonstrated 1.68 Gb/s at a distance of 3 cm (at 240 lx illumination...

  17. Fluorescent Magnesium Nanocomplex in Protein Scaffold for Cell Nuclei Imaging Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Alok [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Tripathi, Apritam [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Purohit, Rahul [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Singh, Sanjay [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Nandasiri, Manjula I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Karakoti, Ajay S. [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Singh, Surinder P. [National Physical Lab., New Delhi (India); Shanker, Rishi [Ahmedabad Univ. (India)

    2015-10-27

    Here in, we report a facile strategy for the synthesis of water-soluble ultra-fine blue emitting fluorescent Magnesium nanoparticles-protein complex (MgNC). This MgNC is demonstrated to exhibit excellent photo stability and biocompatibility. It was also observed that MgNC stain cell nuclei with high specifcity.

  18. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein

    OpenAIRE

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D.; Marshall, Wallace F.; Jonathan S Weissman; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respec...

  19. Fluorescent deep-blue and hybrid white emitting devices based on a naphthalene-benzofuran compound

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui

    2013-08-01

    We report the synthesis, photophysics and electrochemical properties of naphthalene-benzofuran compound 1 and its application in organic light emitting devices. Fluorescent deep-blue emitting devices employing 1 as the emitting dopant embedded in 4-4′-bis(9-carbazolyl)-2,2′-biphenyl (CBP) host show the peak external quantum efficiency of 4.5% and Commission Internationale d\\'Énclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.15, 0.07). Hybrid white devices using fluorescent blue emitting layer with 1 and a phosphorescent orange emitting layer based on an iridium-complex show the peak external quantum efficiency above 10% and CIE coordinates of (0.31, 0.37). © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. A Guide to Fluorescent Protein FRET Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajar, Bryce T.; Wang, Emily S.; Zhang, Shu; Lin, Michael Z.; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and genetically encoded FRET biosensors provide a powerful tool for visualizing signaling molecules in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as both donor and acceptor fluorophores in FRET biosensors, especially since FPs are genetically encodable and live-cell compatible. In this review, we will provide an overview of methods to measure FRET changes in biological contexts, discuss the palette of FP FRET pairs developed and their relative strengths and weaknesses, and note important factors to consider when using FPs for FRET studies. PMID:27649177

  1. A Guide to Fluorescent Protein FRET Pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce T. Bajar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET technology and genetically encoded FRET biosensors provide a powerful tool for visualizing signaling molecules in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. Fluorescent proteins (FPs are most commonly used as both donor and acceptor fluorophores in FRET biosensors, especially since FPs are genetically encodable and live-cell compatible. In this review, we will provide an overview of methods to measure FRET changes in biological contexts, discuss the palette of FP FRET pairs developed and their relative strengths and weaknesses, and note important factors to consider when using FPs for FRET studies.

  2. Green fluorescent protein is lighting up fungal biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorang, J.M.; Tuori, R.P; Martinez, J.P; Sawyer, T.L.; Redman, R.S.; Rollins, J. A.; Wolpert, T.J.; Johnson, K.B.; Rodriguez, R.J.; Dickman, M. B.; Ciuffetti, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    Prasher (42) cloned a cDNA for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene from the jellyfishAequorea victoria in 1992. Shortly thereafter, to the amazement of many investigators, this gene or derivatives thereof were successfully expressed and conferred fluorescence to bacteria andCaenorhabditis elegans cells in culture (10,31), followed by yeast (24, 39), mammals (40), Drosophila (66),Dictyostelium(23, 30), plants (28,49), and filamentous fungi (54). The tremendous success of GFP as a reporter can be attributed to unique qualities of this 238-amino-acid, 27-kDa protein which absorbs light at maxima of 395 and 475 nm and emits light at a maximum of 508 nm. The fluorescence of GFP requires only UV or blue light and oxygen, and therefore, unlike the case with other reporters (β-glucuronidase, β-galacturonidase, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, and firefly luciferase) that rely on cofactors or substrates for activity, in vivo observation ofgfp expression is possible with individual cells, with cell populations, or in whole organisms interacting with symbionts or environments in real time. Complications caused by destructive sampling, cell permeablization for substrates, or leakage of products do not occur. Furthermore, the GFP protein is extremely stable in vivo and has been fused to the C or N terminus of many cellular and extracellular proteins without a loss of activity, thereby permitting the tagging of proteins for gene regulation analysis, protein localization, or specific organelle labeling. The mature protein resists many proteases and is stable up to 65°C and at pH 5 to 11, in 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate or 6 M guanidinium chloride (reviewed in references 17and 67), and in tissue fixed with formaldehyde, methanol, or glutaraldehyde. However, GFP loses fluorescence in methanol-acetic acid (3:1) and can be masked by autofluorescent aldehyde groups in tissue fixed with glutaraldehyde. Fluorescence is optimal at pH 7.2 to 8.0 (67).

  3. Controlling Protein Activity and Degradation Using Blue Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Anne P; Renicke, Christian; Taxis, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of protein stability is a fundamental process in eukaryotic cells and pivotal to, e.g., cell cycle progression, faithful chromosome segregation, or protein quality control. Synthetic regulation of protein stability requires conditional degradation sequences (degrons) that induce a stability switch upon a specific signal. Fusion to a selected target protein permits to influence virtually every process in a cell. Light as signal is advantageous due to its precise applicability in time, space, quality, and quantity. Light control of protein stability was achieved by fusing the LOV2 photoreceptor domain of Arabidopsis thaliana phototropin1 with a synthetic degron (cODC1) derived from the carboxy-terminal degron of ornithine decarboxylase to obtain the photosensitive degron (psd) module. The psd module can be attached to the carboxy terminus of target proteins that are localized to the cytosol or nucleus to obtain light control over their stability. Blue light induces structural changes in the LOV2 domain, which in turn lead to activation of the degron and thus proteasomal degradation of the whole fusion protein. Variants of the psd module with diverse characteristics are useful to fine-tune the stability of a selected target at permissive (darkness) and restrictive conditions (blue light). PMID:26965116

  4. Changes of the laser-induced blue, green and red fluorescence signatures during greening of etiolated leaves of wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UV-laser-induced blue, green and red fluorescence-emission spectra were used to characterize the pigment status of etiolated leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) during a 48 h greening period under white light conditions. Upon UV-light excitation (337 nm) leaves not only show a fluorescence emission in the red spectral region between 650 and 800nm (chlorophyll fluorescence with maxima near 690nm and 735 nm), but also in the blue and green regions between 400 to 570 nm with maxima or shoulders near 450 nm (blue) and 530 nm (green). During greening of etiolated leaves the chlorophyll-fluorescence ratio F690/F735 strongly correlated with the total chlorophyll content and the ratio of the chlorophylls to the carotenoids (a+b/x+c). The ratio of the blue to the green fluorescence F450/F530 was also correlated with the total chlorophyll content and the ratio of chlorophylls to total carotenoids (a+b/x+c). Consequently, there also existed a correlation between the chlorophyll-fluorescence ratio F690/F735 and the ratio of the blue to green fluorescence F450/F530. In contrast, the ratios of the blue to red fluorescences F450/F690 and F450/F735 did not show clear relations to the pigment content of the investigated plants. The particular shape of the UV-laser-induced-fluorescence emission spectra of wheat leaves as well as the dependencies of the fluorescence ratios on the pigment content are due to a partial and differential reabsorption of the emitted fluorescences by the photosynthetic pigments

  5. High-Efficiency Blue Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence from Phenoxaphosphine and Phenoxathiin Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sae Youn; Adachi, Chihaya; Yasuda, Takuma

    2016-06-01

    High-efficiency blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) molecules, consisting of phenoxaphosphine oxide and phenoxathiin dioxide as acceptor units and 9,9-dimethylacridan as a donor unit, are reported. Maximum external electroluminescence quantum efficiencies of up to 20.5% are achieved in blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by employing these materials as TADF emitters.

  6. Nuclear Import Analysis of Two Different Fluorescent Marker Proteins into Hepatocyte Cell Lines (HuH-7 Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Haryanto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of fluorescent proteins as expression markers and protein fusion partners has provedimmensely valuable for resolving the organization of biological events in living cells. EGFP and DsRed2 arecommonly fluorescent marker protein which is used for biotechnology and cell biology research. The presentstudy was designed to identify the expression vector that suitable to ligate with DNA encoding HBV coreprotein for intracellular localization study in hepatocyte cell, which were expressed as fusion proteins. We alsocompared and quantified the expressed fluorescent protein which predominantly localized in the cellcompartment. The results indicated that DsRed2 shown as less than ideal for intracellular localization study ofthan EGFP, because of its tetrameric structure of the fluorescent protein and when fused to a protein of interest,the fusion protein often forms aggregates in the living cells. In contrast, EGFP fluorescent protein shown a muchhigher proportion of cytoplasmic localization, thus being more suitable for analysis of intracellular localizationthan DsRed2 fluorescent protein. EGFP fluorescent protein is also capable to produce a strong green fluorescencewhen excited by blue light, without any exogenously added substrate or cofactor, events inside living cell canthus be visualized in a non-invasive way. Based on our present quantitative data and some reasons above shownthat EGFP is more suitable than DsRed2 as a fluorescent marker protein for intracellular localization study intoHuH-7 cell.Keywords: EGFP, DsRed2 fluorescent protein , HuH-7 cell, HBV, intracellular localization

  7. Fluorescence of Alexa Fluor dye tracks protein folding

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Lindhoud; Westphal, Adrie H.; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.; Jan Willem Borst; van Mierlo, Carlo P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluoresc...

  8. Identification and expression of a gfpK79R mutant of green fluorescent protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A mutant strain of E.coli showing strong green fluorescence is obtained during the study of cloning and expression of blue fluorescent protein gene bfp. A recombinant plasmid pHN122 has been isolated. It is demonstrated by enzyme digestion, subcloning and sequence analysis that it contains both of bfp and gfpK79R mutant genes. The results of spectrometric analysis show that GFPK79R expressed by pHN122 is the same as the wild type GFP, but its fluorescent intensity is increased 1.25~2.44-fold.

  9. Endogenous green fluorescent protein (GFP) in Amphioxus

    OpenAIRE

    Deheyn, D. D.; K. Kubokawa; McCarthy, J. K.; Murakami, A.; Porrachia, M.; Rouse, G.W.; Holland, N.D.

    2007-01-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are well known for their intensive use in cellular and molecular biology in applications that take advantage of the GFPs self-folding and built-in fluorophore characteristics as biomarker. Occurrence and function of GFPs in nature is less known. For a long time GFPs were described only from some cnidarians, and it is only recently that they were also found in copepod crustaceans. Here we describe the occurrence of a GFP from three species of amphioxus, namely...

  10. Comparative Study of Lettuce and Radish Grown Under Red and Blue LEDs and White Fluorescent Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickens, Matthew A.; Massa, Gioia; Newsham, Gerard; Wheeler, Raymond; Birmele, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Growing vegetable crops in space will be an essential part of sustaining astronauts during long-range missions. To drive photosynthesis, red and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have attracted attention because of their efficiency, longevity, small size, and safety. In efforts to optimize crop yield, there is also recent interest in analyzing the subtle effects of additional wavelengths on plant growth. For instance, since plants often look purplish gray under red and blue LEDs, the addition of green light allows easy recognition of disease and the assessment of plant health status. However, it is important to know if wavelengths outside the traditional red and blue wavebands have a direct effect on enhancing or hindering the mechanisms involved in plant growth. In this experiment, a comparative study was performed on two short cycle crops of red romaine lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv. "Outredgeous") and radish (Raphanus sativa cv. 'Cherry Bomb'), which were grown under two light treatments. The first treatment being red (630 nm) and blue (450 nm) LEDs alone, while the second treatment consisted of daylight tri-phosphor fluorescent lamps (CCT approximately 5000 K) at equal photosynthetic photon flux (PPF). The treatment effects were evaluated by measuring the fresh biomass produced, plant morphology and leaf dimensions, leaf chlorophyll content, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) within plant leaf/storage root tissues.

  11. Synthesis and intrinsic blue fluorescence study of hyperbranched poly(ester-amide-ether)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A series of hyperbranched poly(ester-amide-ether)s (H-PEAEs) were synthesized via the A2+CB3 approach by the self-transesterification of ethyl ester-amide-ethers end-capped with three hydroxyl groups and ethyl ester group at two terminals.The molecular structures were characterized with 1H NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy.The number average molecular weights were estimated by GPC analysis to possess bimodal wide distribution from 1.57 to 2.09.The strong inherent blue fluorescence was observed at 330 nm for excitation and 390 nm for emission.Moreover,the emission intensity and fluorescence quantum yield increased along with the incorporated ether chain length,as well as almost linearly with the H-PEAE concentration in an aqueous solution.For comparing the fluorescence performance,the linear poly(ester-amide-ether) (L-PEAE) and hyperbranched poly(ester-amide) (H-PEA) were synthesized.The results showed that the coexistence of ether bond and carboxyl group in the molecular chain was essential for generating the strong fluorescence.However,the compact backbone of H-PEAE would be propitious to the enhancement of fluorescence properties.

  12. Efficient fluorescent deep-blue and hybrid white emitting devices based on carbazole/benzimidazole compound

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui

    2011-07-28

    We report the synthesis, photophysics, and electrochemical characterization of carbazole/benzimidazole-based compound (Cz-2pbb) and efficient fluorescent deep-blue light emitting devices based on Cz-2pbb with the peak external quantum efficiency of 4.1% and Commission Internationale dÉnclairage coordinates of (0.16, 0.05). Efficient deep-blue emission as well as high triplet state energy of Cz-2pbb enables fabrication of hybrid white organic light emitting diodes with a single emissive layer. Hybrid white emitting devices based on Cz-2pbb show the peak external quantum efficiency exceeding 10% and power efficiency of 14.8 lm/W at a luminance of 500 cd/m2. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  13. Detection of single fluorescent proteins inside eukaryotic cells using two-photon fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Ximiao; Cheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Imaging single fluorescent proteins in a live cell is a challenging task because of the strong cellular autofluorescence. Autofluorescence can be minimized by reducing fluorescence excitation volume. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has been routinely used to reduce excitation volume and detect single protein molecules in or close to cell membrane. However, the limited penetration depth of evanescent field excludes imaging of single fluorescent proteins that reside dee...

  14. Green fluorescent protein as a reporter of prion protein folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalton Kevin

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amino terminal half of the cellular prion protein PrPc is implicated in both the binding of copper ions and the conformational changes that lead to disease but has no defined structure. However, as some structure is likely to exist we have investigated the use of an established protein refolding technology, fusion to green fluorescence protein (GFP, as a method to examine the refolding of the amino terminal domain of mouse prion protein. Results Fusion proteins of PrPc and GFP were expressed at high level in E.coli and could be purified to near homogeneity as insoluble inclusion bodies. Following denaturation, proteins were diluted into a refolding buffer whereupon GFP fluorescence recovered with time. Using several truncations of PrPc the rate of refolding was shown to depend on the prion sequence expressed. In a variation of the format, direct observation in E.coli, mutations introduced randomly in the PrPc protein sequence that affected folding could be selected directly by recovery of GFP fluorescence. Conclusion Use of GFP as a measure of refolding of PrPc fusion proteins in vitro and in vivo proved informative. Refolding in vitro suggested a local structure within the amino terminal domain while direct selection via fluorescence showed that as little as one amino acid change could significantly alter folding. These assay formats, not previously used to study PrP folding, may be generally useful for investigating PrPc structure and PrPc-ligand interaction.

  15. Variants of DsRed fluorescent protein: Development of a copper sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Eli, Pharhad; Chakrabartty, Avijit

    2006-01-01

    The fluorescence quenching of drFP583 (DsRed) protein by metal ions was investigated. CuSO4 reversibly and pH dependently quenched the red emission at 583 nm of drFP583. The copper binding constant was 15 mM. Following random mutagenesis, blue- and red-shifted mutants of drFP583 were generated, and their metal sensing properties were examined. Mutant gRF possessed properties similar to green fluorescent protein and had a 18 mM copper binding constant. Mutant Rmu162 had an extraordinary red-sh...

  16. OSL response bleaching of BeO samples, using fluorescent light and blue LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groppo, Daniela Piai; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: dpgroppo@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is widely used as a dosimetric technique for many applications. In this work, the OSL response bleaching of BeO samples was studied. The samples were irradiated using a beta radiation source ({sup 90}Sr+{sup 90}Y); the bleaching treatments (fluorescent light and blue LEDs) were performed, and the results were compared. Various optical treatment time intervals were tested until reaching the complete bleaching of the OSL response. The best combination of the time interval and bleaching type was analyzed. (author)

  17. OSL response bleaching of BeO samples, using fluorescent light and blue LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groppo, D. P.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is widely used as a dosimetric technique for many applications. In this work, the OSL response bleaching of BeO samples was studied. The samples were irradiated using a beta radiation source (90Sr+90Y); the bleaching treatments (fluorescent light and blue LEDs) were performed, and the results were compared. Various optical treatment time intervals were tested until reaching the complete bleaching of the OSL response. The best combination of the time interval and bleaching type was analyzed.

  18. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystallization Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating protein-protein interactions in under- and over-saturated crystallization solution conditions using fluorescence methods. The use of fluorescence requires fluorescent derivatives where the probe does not markedly affect the crystal packing. A number of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) derivatives have been prepared, with the probes covalently attached to one of two different sites on the protein molecule; the side chain carboxyl of ASP 101, within the active site cleft, and the N-terminal amine. The ASP 101 derivatives crystallize while the N-terminal amine derivatives do not. However, the N-terminal amine is part of the contact region between adjacent 43 helix chains, and blocking this site does would not interfere with formation of these structures in solution. Preliminary FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C, using the N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and ASP 101 bound Lucifer Yellow (LY, Ex 425 nm, Em 525 nm) probe combination. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10 (exp 5) M respectively), and all experiments were carried out at approximately Csat or lower total protein concentration. The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence yield of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is apparently more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations (reflected in the lower solubility). The estimated average distance between protein molecules at 5 x 10 (exp 6) M is approximately 70 nm, well beyond the range where any FRET can be expected. The calculated RO, where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, for the PAA-CEWL * LY-CEWL system is 3.28 nm, based upon a PAA-CEWL quantum efficiency of 0.41.

  19. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D; Marshall, Wallace F; Weissman, Jonathan S; Huang, Bo

    2016-03-18

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respectively. The small size of FP11-tags enables a cost-effective and scalable way to insert them into endogenous genomic loci via CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair. Tandem arrangement FP11-tags allows proportional enhancement of fluorescence signal in tracking intraflagellar transport particles, or reduction of photobleaching for live microtubule imaging. Finally, we show the utility of tandem GFP11-tag in scaffolding protein oligomerization. These experiments illustrate the versatility of FP11-tag as a labelling tool as well as a multimerization-control tool for both imaging and non-imaging applications.

  20. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D.; Marshall, Wallace F.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respectively. The small size of FP11-tags enables a cost-effective and scalable way to insert them into endogenous genomic loci via CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair. Tandem arrangement FP11-tags allows proportional enhancement of fluorescence signal in tracking intraflagellar transport particles, or reduction of photobleaching for live microtubule imaging. Finally, we show the utility of tandem GFP11-tag in scaffolding protein oligomerization. These experiments illustrate the versatility of FP11-tag as a labelling tool as well as a multimerization-control tool for both imaging and non-imaging applications. PMID:26988139

  1. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D; Marshall, Wallace F; Weissman, Jonathan S; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respectively. The small size of FP11-tags enables a cost-effective and scalable way to insert them into endogenous genomic loci via CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair. Tandem arrangement FP11-tags allows proportional enhancement of fluorescence signal in tracking intraflagellar transport particles, or reduction of photobleaching for live microtubule imaging. Finally, we show the utility of tandem GFP11-tag in scaffolding protein oligomerization. These experiments illustrate the versatility of FP11-tag as a labelling tool as well as a multimerization-control tool for both imaging and non-imaging applications. PMID:26988139

  2. Generation of red fluorescent protein transgenic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, So Gun; Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kang, Jung Taek; Koo, Ok Jae; Kim, Teoan; Kwon, Mo Sun; Koo, Bon Chul; Ra, Jeong Chan; Kim, Dae Yong; Ko, CheMyong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2009-05-01

    Dogs (Canis familiaris) share many common genetic diseases with humans and development of disease models using a transgenic approach has long been awaited. However, due to the technical difficulty in obtaining fertilizable eggs and the unavailability of embryonic stem cells, no transgenic dog has been generated. Canine fetal fibroblasts were stably transfected with a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene-expressing construct using retrovirus gene delivery method. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was then employed to replace the nucleus of an oocyte with the nucleus of the RFP-fibroblasts. Using this approach, we produced the first generation of transgenic dogs with four female and two male expressing RFP.

  3. Photoactivation and imaging of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, George H

    2011-07-01

    A major advance in the microscopic study of cells and tissues is the introduction of photoactivatable fluorescent proteins, which can specifically mark proteins of interest within a living cell. Fluorescent proteins are now available that allow a pool of molecules to be "turned on" by photoactivation. This unit discusses technical aspects for the general use of photoactivatable fluorescent proteins and introduces some specific applications in the concluding remarks.

  4. Evidence for covalent binding of epicocconone with proteins from synchronous fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetimes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debashis Panda; Anindya Datta

    2007-03-01

    Synchronous fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic studies that reveal the interaction of epicocconone with human serum albumin is significantly different from its interaction with surfactant assemblies. This observation, along with steady-state fluorescence data, indicates groundstate interaction between the fluorophore epicocconone and the protein. Similarity in fluorescence properties with the adduct of the fluorophore with -butylamine indicates that bonding occurs at the Nterminus of the protein.

  5. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyndby, Niclas H.; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating.

  6. Phycobiliprotein fusion proteins: versatile intensely fluorescent constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Cai, Yuping A.; Tooley, Aaron J.

    2004-06-01

    Since 1982, phycobiliproteins have served as fluorescent labels in a wide variety of cell and molecule analyses. The exceptional spectroscopic properties of these labels include very high absorbance coefficients and quantum yields, and large Stokes shifts. The spectroscopic diversity of these reagents is restricted to a subset of naturally occurring phycobiliproteins with stable assembly states in vitro, whose target specificity is generated by chemical conjugation to proteins or small molecules. The latter step generates heterogeneity. These limitations have been overcome by expressing various recombinant phycobiliprotein constructs in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Modular recombinant phycobiliprotein-based labels were constructed with some or all of the following features (a) an affinity purification tag; (b) a stable oligomerization domain (to maintain stable higher order assemblies of the phycobiliprotein monomers at very low protein concentration); (c) a biospecific recognition domain. Such phycobiliprotein constructs are readily purified from crude cell extracts by affinity chromatography and used directly as fluorescent labels. To generate constructs for intracellular in vivo labeling, the entire pathways for the biosynthesis of the His-tagged holo- α (phycocyanobilin-bearing) subunit of phycocyanin (emission max. 641 nm) and of the His-tagged holo-α (phycobiliviolin-bearing) subunit of phycoerythrocyanin (emission max. 582 nm) were reconstituted in Escherichia coli.

  7. A new approach to dual-color two-photon microscopy with fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebane Aleks

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-photon dual-color imaging of tissues and cells labeled with fluorescent proteins (FPs is challenging because most two-photon microscopes only provide one laser excitation wavelength at a time. At present, methods for two-photon dual-color imaging are limited due to the requirement of large differences in Stokes shifts between the FPs used and their low two-photon absorption (2PA efficiency. Results Here we present a new method of dual-color two-photon microscopy that uses the simultaneous excitation of the lowest-energy electronic transition of a blue fluorescent protein and a higher-energy electronic transition of a red fluorescent protein. Conclusion Our method does not require large differences in Stokes shifts and can be extended to a variety of FP pairs with larger 2PA efficiency and more optimal imaging properties.

  8. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model for Protein Crystal Growth Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agena, Sabine; Smith, Lori; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish Aequorea Victoria has become a popular marker for e.g. mutagenesis work. Its fluorescent property, which originates from a chromophore located in the center of the molecule, makes it widely applicable as a research too]. GFP clones have been produced with a variety of spectral properties, such as blue and yellow emitting species. The protein is a single chain of molecular weight 27 kDa and its structure has been determined at 1.9 Angstrom resolution. The combination of GFP's fluorescent property, the knowledge of its several crystallization conditions, and its increasing use in biophysical and biochemical studies, all led us to consider it as a model material for macromolecular crystal growth studies. Initial preparations of GFP were from E.coli with yields of approximately 5 mg/L of culture media. Current yields are now in the 50 - 120 mg/L range, and we hope to further increase this by expression of the GFP gene in the Pichia system. The results of these efforts and of preliminary crystal growth studies will be presented.

  9. Fluorescent protein engineering by in vivo site-directed mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ceballos, Melvys Valledor; Hu, Qinghua; Schiller, Paul,; Myers, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    In vivo site-directed mutagenesis by ssDNA recombineering is a facile method to change the color of fluorescent proteins without cloning. Two different starting alleles of GFP were targeted for mutagenesis: gfpmut3* residing in the E. coli genome and egfp carried by a bacterial/mammalian dual expression lentiviral plasmid vector. Fluorescent protein spectra were shifted by subtle modification of the chromophore region and residues interacting with the chromophore of the fluorescent protein. E...

  10. Painting proteins blue: β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine as a probe for studying protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Yurii S; Binder, Wolfgang; Nygren, Patrik; Caputo, Gregory A; Korendovych, Ivan V

    2013-01-18

    We demonstrated that β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine, a fluorescent pseudoisosteric analog of tryptophan, exhibits weak environmental dependence and thus allows for using weak intrinsic quenchers, such as methionines, to monitor protein-protein interactions while not perturbing them.

  11. Resonantly Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization Spectrum of the Neutral Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore

    OpenAIRE

    greenwood, jason; Miles, Jordan; De Camillis, Simone; Mulholland, Peter; Zhang, Lijuan; Parkes, Michael A.; Hailes, Helen C.; Fielding, Helen H.

    2014-01-01

    The photophysics of the green fluorescent protein is governed by the electronic structure of the chromophore at the heart of its β-barrel protein structure. We present the first two-color, resonance-enhanced, multiphoton ionization spectrum of the isolated neutral chromophore in vacuo with supporting electronic structure calculations. We find the absorption maximum to be 3.65 ± 0.05 eV (340 ± 5 nm), which is blue-shifted by 0.5 eV (55 nm) from the absorption maximum of the protein in its neut...

  12. Cell tracking using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Kohei; Tsujii, Hitomi; Omura, Tomomi

    2006-01-01

    The tracking of cell fate, shape and migration is an essential component in the study of the development of multicellular organisms. Here we report a protocol that uses the protein Kaede, which is fluorescent green after synthesis but can be photoconverted red by violet or UV light. We have used Kaede along with confocal laser scanning microscopy to track labeled cells in a pattern of interest in zebrafish embryos. This technique allows the visualization of cell movements and the tracing of neuronal shapes. We provide illustrative examples of expression by mRNA injection, mosaic expression by DNA injection, and the creation of permanent transgenic fish with the UAS-Gal4 system to visualize morphogenetic processes such as neurulation, placode formation and navigation of early commissural axons in the hindbrain. The procedure can be adapted to other photoconvertible and reversible fluorescent molecules, including KikGR and Dronpa; these molecules can be used in combination with two-photon confocal microscopy to specifically highlight cells buried in tissues. The total time needed to carry out the protocol involving transient expression of Kaede by injection of mRNA or DNA, photoconversion and imaging is 2-8 d.

  13. Fluorescent QDs-polystyrene composite nanospheres for highly efficient and rapid protein antigen detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, high-quality carboxyl-functionalized fluorescent (red, green, and blue emitting) nanospheres (46–103 nm) consisting of hydrophobic quantum dots (QDs) and polystyrene were prepared by a miniemulsion polymerization approach. This miniemulsion polymerization approach induced a homogeneous distribution and high aqueous-phase transport efficiency of fluorescent QDs in composite nanospheres, which proved the success of our encoding QDs strategy. The obtained fluorescent nanospheres exhibited high stability in aqueous solution under a wide range of pH, different salt concentrations, PBS buffer, and thermal treatment at 80 °C. Based on the red emitting composite nanosphere, we performed fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) strips for high-sensitivity and rapid alpha-fetal protein detection. The detection limit reached 0.1 ng/mL, which was 200 times higher than commercial colloidal gold-labeled LFIA strips, and it reached similar detection level in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit

  14. Fluorescent QDs-polystyrene composite nanospheres for highly efficient and rapid protein antigen detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Changhua; Mao, Mao [Henan University, Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education (China); Yuan, Hang [Tsinghua University, Life Science Division, Graduate School at Shenzhen (China); Shen, Huaibin [Henan University, Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education (China); Wu, Feng; Ma, Lan, E-mail: malan@sz.tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University, Life Science Division, Graduate School at Shenzhen (China); Li, Lin Song, E-mail: lsli@henu.edu.cn [Henan University, Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education (China)

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, high-quality carboxyl-functionalized fluorescent (red, green, and blue emitting) nanospheres (46-103 nm) consisting of hydrophobic quantum dots (QDs) and polystyrene were prepared by a miniemulsion polymerization approach. This miniemulsion polymerization approach induced a homogeneous distribution and high aqueous-phase transport efficiency of fluorescent QDs in composite nanospheres, which proved the success of our encoding QDs strategy. The obtained fluorescent nanospheres exhibited high stability in aqueous solution under a wide range of pH, different salt concentrations, PBS buffer, and thermal treatment at 80 Degree-Sign C. Based on the red emitting composite nanosphere, we performed fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) strips for high-sensitivity and rapid alpha-fetal protein detection. The detection limit reached 0.1 ng/mL, which was 200 times higher than commercial colloidal gold-labeled LFIA strips, and it reached similar detection level in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit.

  15. A green fluorescent protein with photoswitchable emission from the deep sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vogt

    Full Text Available A colorful variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs from marine invertebrates are utilized as genetically encoded markers for live cell imaging. The increased demand for advanced imaging techniques drives a continuous search for FPs with new and improved properties. Many useful FPs have been isolated from species adapted to sun-flooded habitats such as tropical coral reefs. It has yet remained unknown if species expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-like proteins also exist in the darkness of the deep sea. Using a submarine-based and -operated fluorescence detection system in the Gulf of Mexico, we discovered ceriantharians emitting bright green fluorescence in depths between 500 and 600 m and identified a GFP, named cerFP505, with bright fluorescence emission peaking at 505 nm. Spectroscopic studies showed that approximately 15% of the protein bulk feature reversible ON/OFF photoswitching that can be induced by alternating irradiation with blue und near-UV light. Despite being derived from an animal adapted to essentially complete darkness and low temperatures, cerFP505 maturation in living mammalian cells at 37 degrees C, its brightness and photostability are comparable to those of EGFP and cmFP512 from shallow water species. Therefore, our findings disclose the deep sea as a potential source of GFP-like molecular marker proteins.

  16. Protein conformation in solution by three-dimensional fluorescence spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢远; 许金钩; 陈国珍

    1996-01-01

    The conformations of bovine serum albumin (USA) and egg albumin (EA) in solution and their conformation changes under different conditions were studied by using three-dimensional fluorescence spectrometry (TDFS) such as three-dimensional fluorescence (TDF) spectra and three-dimensional fluorescence polarization (TDFP) spectra with tryptophan residues in protein molecules as an intrinsic fluorescent probe. The results show that the microenvironment of tryptophan residues of protein molecules in various solutions can be directly indicated and TDFS is an effective tool for studying protein conformation in solution. Meantime, some valuable results were obtained.

  17. Highly efficient non-doped deep blue fluorescent emitters with horizontal emitting dipoles using interconnecting units between chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwon-Hyeon; Baek, Jang Yeol; Cheon, Chan Woo; Moon, Chang-Ki; Sim, Bomi; Choi, Myeong Yong; Kim, Jang-Joo; Kim, Yun-Hi

    2016-09-21

    New deep blue fluorescent emitters composed of anthracene as an electron rich unit, a diphenyltriazine as a strong electron acceptor unit, and phenyl or xylene as interconnecting units were synthesised. The interconnecting unit between chromophores increased the singlet transition energy and the ratio of horizontal emitting dipoles. As a result, a non-doped blue fluorescent organic light-emitting diode (OLED) using a new emitter was demonstrated, with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 6.6% and Commision Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) colour coordinates of (0.145, 0.068). This device performance has been the highest EQE observed in deep blue non-doped OLEDs with CIE coordinates less than (0.145, 0.068) to date. PMID:27524501

  18. A photoactivatable green-fluorescent protein from the phylum Ctenophora

    OpenAIRE

    Steven H D Haddock; Mastroianni, Nadia; Christianson, Lynne M.

    2009-01-01

    Genes for the family of green-fluorescent proteins (GFPs) have been found in more than 100 species of animals, with some species containing six or more copies producing a variety of colours. Thus far, however, these species have all been within three phyla: Cnidaria, Arthropoda and Chordata. We have discovered GFP-type fluorescent proteins in the phylum Ctenophora, the comb jellies. The ctenophore proteins share the xYG chromophore motif of all other characterized GFP-type proteins. These pro...

  19. Identifying lymphatic drainage pathway of protein from subarachnoid hemorrhage rat brain using fluorescence Evans blue-labeled albumin injected into caudate-putamen%蛛网膜下腔出血大鼠脑内蛋白质经淋巴引流的荧光示踪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙保亮; 贾莉; 杨明峰; 袁慧; 张颜波; 孙田歌

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨蛛网膜下腔出血(SAH)大鼠脑实质内大分子物质经淋巴引流的变化.方法 将健康成年雄性Wistar大鼠分为生理盐水组、伊文思蓝标记白蛋白(EBA)组、SAH+EBA组.采用枕大池两次注入自体动脉血法建立SAH模型,应用改良的脑实质微量注射技术将EBA注入大鼠左侧尾壳核,生理盐水组用生理盐水代替EBA.于注射后0.5、1、2、3、5 d处死动物,观察并比较各组不同时间点EBA在脑内、颈总动脉壁、颈部淋巴结等部位的分布.结果 EBA组于注射后1 d荧光信号首先出现在左侧脑实质、侧脑室及其血管周围,并逐步到达对侧;双侧颈总动脉外膜有密集的荧光信号,颈部淋巴结可见荧光信号.2 d后脑内荧光信号明显减弱,嗅球内荧光信号逐渐增强,腹主动脉旁淋巴结内有点状荧光信号.各淋巴结内荧光均于3 d时最强.SAH后脑内EBA引流至嗅球、颈部淋巴结和腹主动脉旁淋巴结的量减少且速度减慢.于0.5、1、2、3、5 d,EBA组颈深淋巴结EBA荧光密度分别为14.5±3.2、27.5±7.4、60.3±12.3、138.0±12.0和108.1±13.4,SAH+EBA组分别为8.9±2.0、11.9±2.5、17.4±3.7、26.7±4.5和59.0±8.1,后组各时间点密度均低于前组(F=13.17、24.04、66.81、302.77、59.36,P<0.01);2、3、5 d,EBA组腹主动脉旁淋巴结EBA荧光密度分别为26.3±5.9、47.5±9.6和41.0±9.3,SAH+EBA组分别为11.0±1.5、12.5±2.8、23.6±3.2,后组各时间点均低于前组(F=38.17、72.52、19.01,P<0.01).结论 SAH可导致脑内大分子物质经淋巴系统引流的功能障碍.%Objective To investigate the pathway of lymphatic drainage of proteins from cerebral parenchyma in subarachnoid hemorrhage rat models. Methods Healthy adult male Wistar rats were divided into Saline group, Evans blue-labeled albumin (EBA) group, and SAH + EBA group. SAH models were produced by double injection of autologous arterial blood into cisterna magna. Using a modified microinjection

  20. In vivo cellular imaging using fluorescent proteins - Methods and Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Monti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and genetic engineering of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cell biology. What was previously invisible to the cell often can be made visible with the use of fluorescent proteins. With this words, Robert M. Hoffman introduces In vivo Cellular Imaging Using Fluorescent proteins, the eighteen chapters book dedicated to the description of how fluorescence proteins have changed the way to analyze cellular processes in vivo. Modern researches aim to study new and less invasive methods able to follow the behavior of different cell types in different biological contexts: for example, how cancer cells migrate or how they respond to different therapies. Also, in vivo systems can help researchers to better understand animal embryonic development so as how fluorescence proteins may be used to monitor different processes in living organisms at the molecular and cellular level.

  1. Vectors for multi-color bimolecular fluorescence complementation to investigate protein-protein interactions in living plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang Lin-Yun

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The investigation of protein-protein interactions is important for characterizing protein function. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC has recently gained interest as a relatively easy and inexpensive method to visualize protein-protein interactions in living cells. BiFC uses "split YFP" tags on proteins to detect interactions: If the tagged proteins interact, they may bring the two split fluorophore components together such that they can fold and reconstitute fluorescence. The sites of interaction can be monitored using epifluorescence or confocal microscopy. However, "conventional" BiFC can investigate interactions only between two proteins at a time. There are instances when one may wish to offer a particular "bait" protein to several "prey" proteins simultaneously. Preferential interaction of the bait protein with one of the prey proteins, or different sites of interaction between the bait protein and multiple prey proteins, may thus be observed. Results We have constructed a series of gene expression vectors, based upon the pSAT series of vectors, to facilitate the practice of multi-color BiFC. The bait protein is tagged with the C-terminal portion of CFP (cCFP, and prey proteins are tagged with the N-terminal portions of either Venus (nVenus or Cerulean (nCerulean. Interaction of cCFP-tagged proteins with nVenus-tagged proteins generates yellow fluorescence, whereas interaction of cCFP-tagged proteins with nCerulean-tagged proteins generates blue fluorescence. Additional expression of mCherry indicates transfected cells and sub-cellular structures. Using this system, we have determined in both tobacco BY-2 protoplasts and in onion epidermal cells that Agrobacterium VirE2 protein interacts with the Arabidopsis nuclear transport adapter protein importin α-1 in the cytoplasm, whereas interaction of VirE2 with a different importin α isoform, importin α-4, occurs predominantly in the nucleus. Conclusion Multi

  2. Rational design of a monomeric and photostable far-red fluorescent protein for fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan; Dong, Zhiqiang; Gustafson, William Clay; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Signor, Luca; Marzocca, Fanny; Borel, Franck; Klassen, Matthew P; Makhijani, Kalpana; Royant, Antoine; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Weiss, William A; Guo, Su; Shu, Xiaokun

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for cell and molecular biology. Here based on structural analysis, a blue-shifted mutant of a recently engineered monomeric infrared fluorescent protein (mIFP) has been rationally designed. This variant, named iBlueberry, bears a single mutation that shifts both excitation and emission spectra by approximately 40 nm. Furthermore, iBlueberry is four times more photostable than mIFP, rendering it more advantageous for imaging protein dynamics. By tagging iBlueberry to centrin, it has been demonstrated that the fusion protein labels the centrosome in the developing zebrafish embryo. Together with GFP-labeled nucleus and tdTomato-labeled plasma membrane, time-lapse imaging to visualize the dynamics of centrosomes in radial glia neural progenitors in the intact zebrafish brain has been demonstrated. It is further shown that iBlueberry can be used together with mIFP in two-color protein labeling in living cells and in two-color tumor labeling in mice.

  3. Use of mCherryOpt Fluorescent Protein in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Eric M; Weiss, David S; Ellermeier, Craig D

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe protocols for using the red fluorescent protein mCherryOpt in Clostridium difficile. The protocols can be readily adapted to similar fluorescent proteins (FPs), such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and cyan fluorescent protein (CFP). There are three critical considerations for using FPs in C. difficile. (1) Choosing the right color: Blue and (especially) red are preferred because C. difficile exhibits considerable yellow-green autofluorescence. (2) Codon optimization: Most FP genes in general circulation have a GC content of ~60 %, so they are not well expressed in low-GC bacteria. (3) Fixing anaerobically grown cells prior to exposure to O2: The FPs under consideration here are non-fluorescent when produced anaerobically because O2 is required to introduce double bonds into the chromophore. Fixation prevents C. difficile cells from becoming degraded during the several hours required for chromophore maturation after cells are exposed to air. Fixation can probably be omitted for studies in which maintaining cellular architecture is not important, such as using mCherryOpt to monitor gene expression. PMID:27507333

  4. Use of anaerobic green fluorescent protein versus green fluorescent protein as reporter in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landete, José M; Langa, Susana; Revilla, Concepción; Margolles, Abelardo; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan L

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in the production of fermented and probiotic foods. Development of molecular tools to discriminate the strains of interest from the endogenous microbiota in complex environments like food or gut is of high interest. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophores strictly requires molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which restrict the study of microorganisms in low-oxygen environments. In this work, we have developed a noninvasive cyan-green fluorescent based reporter system for real-time tracking of LAB that is functional under anoxic conditions. The evoglow-Pp1 was cloned downstream from the promoters D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase and elongation factor Tu of Lactobacillus reuteri CECT925 using pNZ8048 and downstream of the lactococcal P1 promoter using pT1NX. The classical gfp was also cloned in pT1NX. These recombinant expression vectors were electroporated into Lactococccus, Lactobacillus, and Enterococcus strains with biotechnological and/or probiotic interests to assess and compare their functionality under different conditions of oxygen and pH. The expression was analyzed by imaging and fluorometric methods as well as by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that reporter systems pNZ:TuR-aFP and pT1-aFP are two versatile molecular markers for monitoring LAB in food and fecal environments without the potential problems caused by oxygen and pH limitations, which could be exploited for in vivo studies. Production of the fluorescent protein did not disturb any important physiological properties of the parental strains, such as growth rate, reuterin, or bacteriocin production. PMID:26129953

  5. Quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by hypocrellin B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乐加昌; 庞素珍

    1997-01-01

    The hypocrellin B (HB) was used as a fluorescence quencher to study the basic physical characteris-tics of HB in membrane systems, including the diffusion speed of quencher from aqueous phase into membrane phase, the partition coefficient (P) of quencher between membrane and water, and the fluorescence quenching constant of protein (Ksv; Kq). The experimental results show that the quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by HB can be determined by the principle of dynamic quenching. The experimental process of fluorescence quenching was ob-served in detail by using the ESR technique. The signal of HB" was found to arise from an electron transfer from ex-cited trytophan to HB.

  6. Fluorescence plate reader for quantum dot-protein bioconjugation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Kilmara H G; Brasil, Aluizio G; Cabral Filho, Paulo E; Tenório, Denise P L A; de Siqueira, Ana C A; Leite, Elisa S; Fontes, Adriana; Santos, Beate S

    2014-05-01

    We present here a new and alternative method that uses a Fluorescence Plate Reader in a different approach, not to study protein-protein interactions, but to evaluate the efficiency of the protein bioconjugation to quantum dots (QDs). The method is based on the QDs' native fluorescence and was successfully tested by employing two different QDs-proteins conjugation methodologies, one by promoting covalent binding and other by inducing adsorption processes. For testing, we used bioconjugates between carboxyl coated CdTe QDs and bovine serum albumin, concanavalin A lectin and anti-A antibody. Flow cytometry and fluorescence spectroscopy studies corroborated the results found by the Fluorescence Plate Reader assay. This kind of analysis is important because poor bioconjugation efficiency leads to unsuccessful applications of the fluorescent bioconjugates. We believe that our method presents the possibility of performing semi-quantitative and simultaneous analysis of different samples with accuracy taking the advantage of the high sensitivity of optical based measurements. PMID:24734547

  7. Determination of the Electron Self-Exchange Rates of Blue Copper Proteins by Super-WEFT NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Lixin; Philipp, Else Astrid; Led, Jens J.

    2001-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis plastocyanin, blue copper proteins, electron self-exchange rates, electron transfer, super-WEFT NMR......Anabaena variabilis plastocyanin, blue copper proteins, electron self-exchange rates, electron transfer, super-WEFT NMR...

  8. Fluorescence of Alexa fluor dye tracks protein folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Lindhoud

    Full Text Available Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 488 (A488, which is commonly used as FRET donor. Here, A488 is covalently attached to Cys69 of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. Although coupling of A488 slightly destabilizes apoflavodoxin, the three-state folding of this protein, which involves a molten globule intermediate, is unaffected. Upon folding of apoflavodoxin, fluorescence emission intensity of A488 changes significantly. To illuminate the molecular sources of this alteration, we applied steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The results obtained show that tryptophans cause folding-induced changes in quenching of Alexa dye. Compared to unfolded protein, static quenching of A488 is increased in the molten globule. Upon populating the native state both static and dynamic quenching of A488 decrease considerably. We show that fluorescence quenching of Alexa Fluor dyes is a sensitive reporter of conformational changes during protein folding.

  9. Fluorescence of Alexa fluor dye tracks protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H; Visser, Antonie J W G; Borst, Jan Willem; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 488 (A488), which is commonly used as FRET donor. Here, A488 is covalently attached to Cys69 of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. Although coupling of A488 slightly destabilizes apoflavodoxin, the three-state folding of this protein, which involves a molten globule intermediate, is unaffected. Upon folding of apoflavodoxin, fluorescence emission intensity of A488 changes significantly. To illuminate the molecular sources of this alteration, we applied steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The results obtained show that tryptophans cause folding-induced changes in quenching of Alexa dye. Compared to unfolded protein, static quenching of A488 is increased in the molten globule. Upon populating the native state both static and dynamic quenching of A488 decrease considerably. We show that fluorescence quenching of Alexa Fluor dyes is a sensitive reporter of conformational changes during protein folding.

  10. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  11. Light-induced conformational changes and energy transfer in red fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reversible conformational changes have been photo-induced in the red fluorescent protein DsRed at low temperature by wavelength-selective laser irradiation. We have found two new fluorescent forms: a shifted-red (SR-) and a new green (G'-) form that absorb and emit, respectively, ∼14 nm to the red and ∼80 nm to the blue of the 'mature' red (R-) form present in an un-illuminated sample of DsRed. Further, we have identified the 0-0 transitions of the various forms by spectral hole burning and estimated their ground-state energy differences and barrier heights by means of temperature-dependent excitation and fluorescence spectroscopy between 1.6 and 295 K. We have also proven that 'downhill' energy transfer takes place between these forms within the tetrameric structure of DsRed

  12. A Laboratory Exercise for Visible Gel Filtration Chromatography Using Fluorescent Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Cao, Yibin; Xu, Lishan; Gong, Jufang; Sun, Meihao

    2015-01-01

    Gel filtration chromatography (GFC) separates molecules according to size and is one of the most widely used methods for protein purification. Here, red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), and/or their fusion proteins were prokaryotically expressed, purified,…

  13. A never ending race for new and improved fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Alexander M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bioluminescent and fluorescent proteins are now used as tools for research in all organisms. There has been massive progress over the past 15 years in creating a palette of fluorescent proteins with a wide spectrum of specific properties. One of the big challenges is to decide which variant may be best for a certain application. A recent article by Mann et al. in BMC Biotechnology describes a new orange fluorescent protein in plants. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6750/12/17

  14. A never ending race for new and improved fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent proteins are now used as tools for research in all organisms. There has been massive progress over the past 15 years in creating a palette of fluorescent proteins with a wide spectrum of specific properties. One of the big challenges is to decide which variant may be best for a certain application. A recent article by Mann et al. in BMC Biotechnology describes a new orange fluorescent protein in plants. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6750/12/17 PMID:22554191

  15. Real-time detection of dental calculus by blue-LED-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Y L; Luan, X L; Bi, L J; Lü, Z; Sheng, Y Q; Somesfalean, G; Zhou, C N; Zhang, Z G

    2007-05-25

    Successful periodontal therapy requires sensitive techniques to discriminate dental calculus from healthy teeth. The aim of the present study was to develop a fluorescence-based procedure to enable real-time detection and quantification of dental calculus. Thirty human teeth--15 teeth with sub- and supragingival calculus and 15 healthy teeth--covered with a layer of physiological saline solution or blood were illuminated by a focused blue LED light source of 405 nm. Autofluorescence spectra recorded along a randomly selected line stretching over the crown-neck-root area of each tooth were utilized to evaluate a so called calculus parameter R, which was selected to define a relationship between the integrated intensities specific for healthy teeth and for calculus in the 477-497 nm (S(A)) and 628-685 nm (S(B)) wavelength regions, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed and a cut-off threshold of R=0.2 was found to distinguish dental calculus from healthy teeth with 100% sensitivity and specificity under various experimental conditions. The results of the spectral evaluation were confirmed by clinical and histological findings. Automated real-time detection and diagnostics for clinical use were implemented by a corresponding software program written in Visual Basic language. The method enables cost-effective and reliable calculus detection, and can be further developed for imaging applications.

  16. Constitutive and Inducible Green Fluorescent Protein Expression in Bartonella henselae

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Anthea K.; Falkow, Stanley

    1998-01-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was expressed on a plasmid in B. henselae, and GFP-expressing bacteria were visualized by fluorescence microscopy. HEp-2 cells infected with GFP-expressing bacteria were separated from uninfected cells with a fluorescence activated cell sorter. Promoter fusions of B. henselae chromosomal DNA to gfp were examined by flow cytometry, and a B. henselae groEL promoter fusion which induced expression at 37°C was isolated.

  17. Blue Fluorescent Materials Composed of Anthracene-Aryl Amine-Anthracene Derivatives for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seul Bee; Song, Ji Young; Yang, Hyung Jin; Kim, Young Kwan; Yoon, Seung Soo

    2015-07-01

    Blue fluorescent emitters based on anthracene-aryl amine-anthracene derivatives were studied for efficient OLEDs. Compound 1 exhibited efficient EL propereties with luminous and power efficien- cies of 4.50 cd/A and 1.75 lm/W at 200 mA/cm2, respectively and CIE coordinates of (0.18, 0.26) at 7.0 V.

  18. Rapid synthesis of blue emitting ZnO nanoparticles for fluorescent applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jule, Leta T.; Dejene, Francis B.; Roro, Kittessa T.; Urgessa, Zelalem N.; Botha, Johannes R.

    2016-09-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs), with size ∼16-20 nm were produced using simple, cost effective and rapid synthesis method. In this method zinc salt (typically zinc acetate dehydrate) is directly annealed in air at a temperature from 200 ° C to 500 ° C for 2 h to form ZnO (NPs). This synthesis method, only requires zinc precursor to produce NPs that can emit visible emission without external doping. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirm the prepared ZnO NPs is polycrystalline structure with wurtzite phase. The observed variation in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed spherical shape of the ZnO NPs. It was found that the NPs exhibited the estimated direct bandgap (Eg) of 3.28 eV, 3.29 eV, 3.33 eV and 3.39 eV for a decomposition temperature of 500, 400, 300 and 200 ° C . Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis showed that carbon is the only impurity at lower temperature which was most likely originated from the acetate group. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of ZnO NPs showed the appearance of a blue emission, attributed to Zn interstitials, whose intensity reduces with increase in decomposition temperature and the underlying mechanism are discussed. For the samples prepared at 200 ° C and 300 °C a temperature dependent PL was studied and found out that there are about three transition lines at ∼3.01 eV, ∼3.21 eV and ∼3.33 eV, which are ascribed to zinc vacancy (Vzn), donor-acceptor pairs(DAP) and excitons bound to structural defects respectively. It is hoped that ZnO NPs produced using this method would be ideal for blue light emitting fluorescent application as it is catalyst free growth, uses simple equipment, less hazardous and easy to control particle size and morphologies by scalable temperature.

  19. Engineering and Characterization of a Superfolder Green Fluorescent Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Existing variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) often misfold when expressed as fusions with other proteins. We have generated a robustly folded version of GFP, called 'superfolder' GFP, that folds well even when fused to poorly folded polypeptides. Compared to 'folding reporter' GFP, a folding-enhanced GFP containing the 'cycle-3' mutations and the 'enhanced GFP' mutations F64L and S65T, superfolder GFP shows improved tolerance of circular permutation, greater resistance to chemical denaturants and improved folding kinetics. The fluorescence of Escherichia coli cells expressing each of eighteen proteins from Pyrobaculum aerophilum as fusions with superfolder GFP was proportional to total protein expression. In contrast, fluorescence of folding reporter GFP fusion proteins was strongly correlated with the productive folding yield of the passenger protein. X-ray crystallographic structural analyses helped explain the enhanced folding of superfolder GFP relative to folding reporter GFP

  20. Fluorescence microscopy of single autofluorescent proteins for cellular biology

    OpenAIRE

    Cognet, Laurent; Coussen, Françoise; Choquet, Daniel; Lounis, Brahim

    2002-01-01

    International audience In this paper we review the applicability of autofluorescent proteins for single-molecule imaging in biology. The photophysical characteristics of several mutants of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and those of DsRed are compared and critically discussed for their use in cellular biology. The alternative use of two-photon excitation at the single-molecule level or Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy is envisaged for the study of individual autofluorescent prote...

  1. An engineered palette of metal ion quenchable fluorescent proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Yu

    Full Text Available Many fluorescent proteins have been created to act as genetically encoded biosensors. With these sensors, changes in fluorescence report on chemical states in living cells. Transition metal ions such as copper, nickel, and zinc are crucial in many physiological and pathophysiological pathways. Here, we engineered a spectral series of optimized transition metal ion-binding fluorescent proteins that respond to metals with large changes in fluorescence intensity. These proteins can act as metal biosensors or imaging probes whose fluorescence can be tuned by metals. Each protein is uniquely modulated by four different metals (Cu2+, Ni2+, Co2+, and Zn2+. Crystallography revealed the geometry and location of metal binding to the engineered sites. When attached to the extracellular terminal of a membrane protein VAMP2, dimeric pairs of the sensors could be used in cells as ratiometric probes for transition metal ions. Thus, these engineered fluorescent proteins act as sensitive transition metal ion-responsive genetically encoded probes that span the visible spectrum.

  2. Latest methods of fluorescence-based protein crystal identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence, whether intrinsic or by using trace fluorescent labeling, can be a powerful aid in macromolecule crystallization. Its use in screening for crystals is discussed here. Successful protein crystallization screening experiments are dependent upon the experimenter being able to identify positive outcomes. The introduction of fluorescence techniques has brought a powerful and versatile tool to the aid of the crystal grower. Trace fluorescent labeling, in which a fluorescent probe is covalently bound to a subpopulation (<0.5%) of the protein, enables the use of visible fluorescence. Alternatively, one can avoid covalent modification and use UV fluorescence, exploiting the intrinsic fluorescent amino acids present in most proteins. By the use of these techniques, crystals that had previously been obscured in the crystallization drop can readily be identified and distinguished from amorphous precipitate or salt crystals. Additionally, lead conditions that may not have been obvious as such under white-light illumination can be identified. In all cases review of the screening plate is considerably accelerated, as the eye can quickly note objects of increased intensity

  3. Highly fluorescence-stable blue CdZnS/ZnS quantum dots against degradable environmental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki-Heon; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kang, Hee-Don; Han, Chang-Yeol [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Seung Muk [Kunsan National University Center For Research Facilities, Kunsan National University, Gunsan, Jeonbuk 573-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yangjin; Hwang, Jun Yeon [Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Jeonbuk 565-905 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Heesun, E-mail: hyang@hongik.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Blue-emitting CdZnS/ZnS alloy QDs exhibited the excellent fluorescent stability against a thorough purification cycle, long-term UV illumination, and hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic ligand exchange. - Highlights: • Highly efficient, color-pure blue CdZnS/ZnS QDs are synthesized. • Fluorescent properties of the QDs remain unchanged against various degradable conditions. • Closely-packed solid QD film is compared with QD solution in PL QY and emission decay dynamics. - Abstract: We report on synthesis of highly efficient, color-pure blue CdZnS/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and their excellent fluorescent stability against degradable environmental conditions. The CdZnS/ZnS QDs finely emission-tunable in the range of 440–461 nm exhibit high photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields (QYs) of 81–92% along with an exceptionally narrow spectral bandwidth of 19 nm. These QDs are subjected to various post-treatments of a thorough purification cycle, long-term UV illumination, and hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic ligand exchange, each of which is usually detrimental to QD fluorescence. As a result, no noticeable deterioration in the fluorescent properties is observed, indicative of the insensitiveness of our CdZnS/ZnS QDs to the above degradable processes. Furthermore, PL properties of a solid film of multiple QD layers are assessed and compared with those of a diluted QD solution, showing an unprecedentedly small QY reduction of solid QD film versus QD solution. The above promising results are justified mainly by emphasizing the role of a thick ZnS shell present in CdZnS/ZnS QDs.

  4. Origin of tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes. Part 2: fluorescence lifetimes origin of tryptophan in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, J R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence intensity decays of L-tryptophan in proteins dissolved in pH 7 buffer, in ethanol and in 6 M guanidine pH 7.8 and in lyophilized proteins were measured. In all protein conditions, three lifetimes were obtained along the emission spectrum (310-410 nm). The two shortest lifetimes are in the same range of those obtained for L-Trp in water or in ethanol. Thus, these two lifetimes originate from specific two sub-structures existing in the excited state and are inherent to the tryptophan structure independently of the surrounding environment (amino acids residues, solvent, etc.) In proteins, the third lifetime originates from the interactions that are occurring between tryptophan residues and neighboring amino acids. Populations of these lifetimes are independent of the excitation wavelength and thus originate from pre-defined sub structures existing in the excited state and put into evidence after tryptophan excitation. Fluorescence decay studies of different tripeptides having a tryptophan residue in second position show that the best analysis is obtained with two fluorescence lifetimes. Consequently, this result seems to exclude the possibility that peptide bond induces the third fluorescence lifetimes. Indole dissolved in water and/or in ethanol emits with two fluorescence lifetimes that are completely different from those observed for L-Trp. Absence of the third lifetime in ethanol demonstrates that indole behaves differently when compared to tryptophan. Thus, it seems not adequate to attribute fluorescence lifetime or fluorescence properties of tryptophan to indole ring and to compare tryptophan fluorescence properties in proteins to molecules having close structures such as NATA which fluoresces with one lifetime.

  5. Glucoamylase : green fluorescent protein fusions to monitor protein secretion in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, C.L.; Khalaj, V.; Ram, A.F.J.; Archer, D.B.; Brookman, J.L.; Trinci, A.P.J.; Jeenes, D.J.; Doonan, J.H.; Wells, B.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Robson, G.D.

    2000-01-01

    A glucoamylase: :green fluorescent protein fusion (GLA: :sGFP) was constructed which allows the green fluorescent protein to be used as an in vivo reporter of protein secretion in Aspergillus niger. Two secretory fusions were designed for secretion of GLA: :sGFP which employed slightly different len

  6. Phasor approaches simplify the analysis of tryptophan fluorescence data in protein denaturation studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bader, A.N.; Visser, N.V.; Amerongen, van H.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan is frequently used to investigate the structure of proteins. The analysis of tryptophan fluorescence data is challenging: fluorescence (anisotropy) decays typically have multiple lifetime (correlation time) components and fluorescence spectra are broad and ex

  7. Circular dichroism and polarized fluorescence characteristics of blue-green algal allophycocyanins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canaani, O.D.; Gantt, E.

    1980-06-24

    Allophycocyanin, the terminal pigment in the phycobiliprotein transfer sequence, isolated from dissociated phycobilisomes of Nostoc sp., was fractionated on calcium phosphate columns into four spectral forms: APC I, II, III, and B. These forms had distinctive isoelectric points of 5.15, 4.68, 4.82, and 4.98, respectively. The APC forms differed in their secondary structure as suggested by the varying percentages of their ..cap alpha.. helix and ..beta..-pleated sheets. APC II and III are short-emitting forms with a fluorescence maximum at 660 nm, while APC I and B are long-emitting forms with a maximum at 681 nm. The maximum of APC I and B at -196/sup 0/C in 0.1 M phosphate and 20% glycerol shifted to 688 nm. Fluorescence polarization spectra suggest that there are at least two groups of chromophores responsible for the absorption of APC I and similarly of APC B. In APC II and III, the fluorescence was mostly depolarized. Circular dichroism revealed extensive positive and negative ellipticity band multiplicities in the chromophore absorption region of APC I and B, but not in APC II and III. Two main CD extrema in APC B, a negative band and a positive band, are probably the result of exciton coupling of phycocyanobilin chromophores absorbing at longer wavelength. In APC I three different peaks are revealed in the absorption spectrum and four ellipticity bands in the CD spectrum at -196/sup 0/C. These can best be explained as being due to the combined interactions of the chromophore with the protein and exciton coupling between chromophores.

  8. Spectral diversity of fluorescent proteins from the anthozoan Corynactis californica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Christine E; Keenan, Robert J; McCord, Robert; Matysik, Artur; Christianson, Lynne M; Haddock, Steven H D

    2008-01-01

    Color morphs of the temperate, nonsymbiotic corallimorpharian Corynactis californica show variation in pigment pattern and coloring. We collected seven distinct color morphs of C. californica from subtidal locations in Monterey Bay, California, and found that tissue- and color-morph-specific expression of at least six different genes is responsible for this variation. Each morph contains at least three to four distinct genetic loci that code for these colors, and one morph contains at least five loci. These genes encode a subfamily of new GFP-like proteins, which fluoresce across the visible spectrum from green to red, while sharing between 75% to 89% pairwise amino-acid identity. Biophysical characterization reveals interesting spectral properties, including a bright yellow protein, an orange protein, and a red protein exhibiting a "fluorescent timer" phenotype. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the FP genes from this species evolved together but that diversification of anthozoan fluorescent proteins has taken place outside of phylogenetic constraints, especially within the Corallimorpharia. The discovery of more examples of fluorescent proteins in a non-bioluminescent, nonsymbiotic anthozoan highlights possibilities of adaptive ecological significance unrelated to light regulation for algal symbionts. The patterns and colors of fluorescent proteins in C. californica and similar species may hold meaning for organisms that possess the visual pigments to distinguish them. PMID:18330643

  9. Hue-shifted monomeric variants of Clavularia cyan fluorescent protein: identification of the molecular determinants of color and applications in fluorescence imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson Michael W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the 15 years that have passed since the cloning of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (avGFP, the expanding set of fluorescent protein (FP variants has become entrenched as an indispensable toolkit for cell biology research. One of the latest additions to the toolkit is monomeric teal FP (mTFP1, a bright and photostable FP derived from Clavularia cyan FP. To gain insight into the molecular basis for the blue-shifted fluorescence emission we undertook a mutagenesis-based study of residues in the immediate environment of the chromophore. We also employed site-directed and random mutagenesis in combination with library screening to create new hues of mTFP1-derived variants with wavelength-shifted excitation and emission spectra. Results Our results demonstrate that the protein-chromophore interactions responsible for blue-shifting the absorbance and emission maxima of mTFP1 operate independently of the chromophore structure. This conclusion is supported by the observation that the Tyr67Trp and Tyr67His mutants of mTFP1 retain a blue-shifted fluorescence emission relative to their avGFP counterparts (that is, Tyr66Trp and Tyr66His. Based on previous work with close homologs, His197 and His163 are likely to be the residues with the greatest contribution towards blue-shifting the fluorescence emission. Indeed we have identified the substitutions His163Met and Thr73Ala that abolish or disrupt the interactions of these residues with the chromophore. The mTFP1-Thr73Ala/His163Met double mutant has an emission peak that is 23 nm red-shifted from that of mTFP1 itself. Directed evolution of this double mutant resulted in the development of mWasabi, a new green fluorescing protein that offers certain advantages over enhanced avGFP (EGFP. To assess the usefulness of mTFP1 and mWasabi in live cell imaging applications, we constructed and imaged more than 20 different fusion proteins. Conclusion Based on the results of our

  10. Measuring and sorting cell populations expressing isospectral fluorescent proteins with different fluorescence lifetimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Sands

    Full Text Available Study of signal transduction in live cells benefits from the ability to visualize and quantify light emitted by fluorescent proteins (XFPs fused to different signaling proteins. However, because cell signaling proteins are often present in small numbers, and because the XFPs themselves are poor fluorophores, the amount of emitted light, and the observable signal in these studies, is often small. An XFP's fluorescence lifetime contains additional information about the immediate environment of the fluorophore that can augment the information from its weak light signal. Here, we constructed and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of Teal Fluorescent Protein (TFP and Citrine that were isospectral but had shorter fluorescence lifetimes, ∼ 1.5 ns vs ∼ 3 ns. We modified microscopic and flow cytometric instruments to measure fluorescence lifetimes in live cells. We developed digital hardware and a measure of lifetime called a "pseudophasor" that we could compute quickly enough to permit sorting by lifetime in flow. We used these abilities to sort mixtures of cells expressing TFP and the short-lifetime TFP variant into subpopulations that were respectively 97% and 94% pure. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using information about fluorescence lifetime to help quantify cell signaling in living cells at the high throughput provided by flow cytometry. Moreover, it demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and recovering subpopulations of cells with different XFP lifetimes for subsequent experimentation.

  11. Fluorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent proteins: a laboratory experiment for a biochemistry or molecular biophysics laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kathryn P; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum.

  12. Plasmon-controlled narrower and blue-shifted fluorescence emission in (Au-SiO2)SiC nanohybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescent imaging is a key tool in biology. On one hand, organic dyes are subjected to bleaching; while, on the other hand II–VI semiconductor quantum dots are photostable, but may exhibit some toxicity. Silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiC NPs) are a good alternative as SiC is chemically inert and considered as biocompatible material. However, their fluorescence quantum yield is weak. Plasmon-controlled fluorescence appears as a mean to enhance SiC NPs fluorescence. To this aim, new fluorescent nanohybrids (NHs) involving a gold colloid surrounded by a silica shell and overcoated with SiC NPs have been engineered. Au-SiO2 particles were synthesized via a sol–gel method to obtain a controlled thickness of silica around gold colloid. Then, SiC NPs were immobilized onto silica by covalent bonding. TEM was used to study the structural properties of NHs. The influence of several parameters on NHs’ fluorescence properties was investigated. It reveals that excitation wavelength must be chosen as close as possible to the gold plasmon band to avoid quenching of emission due to energy transfer between gold absorption and SiC emission. Moreover, the silica thickness is a key parameter to obtain high enhancement; for gold colloids of 20 nm in diameter overcoated by a 25 nm shell, an enhancement factor as high as 12.5 was obtained with a narrower and blue-shifted emission band. This blue-shift can be attributed to the surface chemistry modification of SiC NPs when they are covalently bonded to silica.

  13. Rational design of enhanced photoresistance in a photoswitchable fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Chenxi; Byrdin, Martin; El Khatib, Mariam; Henry, Xavier; Adam, Virgile; Bourgeois, Dominique

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins are particularly susceptible to photobleaching, the permanent loss of fluorescence emission resulting from photodestruction of the chromophore. In the case of Reversibly Switchable Fluorescent Proteins (RSFPs), which can be switched back and forth between a non-fluorescent and a fluorescent state, the achievable number of switching cycles is limited by photobleaching, a process known as photofatigue. Photofatigue has become a crucial limitation in a number of advanced applications based on repeated photoswitching of RSFPs, notably in the field of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, based on our previous structural investigation of photobleaching mechanisms in IrisFP, an RSFP also capable of green-to-red photoconversion, we present the rational design of a single-mutant IrisFP-M159A that displays considerably enhanced photostability. The results suggest that, under moderate illumination intensities, photobleaching of IrisFP-like Anthozoan fluorescent proteins such as EosFP, Dendra or Dronpa derivatives is mainly driven by an oxygen-dependent mechanism resulting in the irreversible sulfoxidation of methionine 159. The photofatigue decay profiles of IrisFP and its photoresistant mutant IrisFP-M159A were investigated in different experimental conditions, in vitro and in cellulo. Although the performance of the mutant was found to be always superior, the results showed switching behaviors strongly dependent on the nanoenvironment. Thus, in general, assessment of photostability and switching properties of RSFPs should be carried out in real experimental conditions.

  14. Rational design of enhanced photoresistance in a photoswitchable fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescent proteins are particularly susceptible to photobleaching, the permanent loss of fluorescence emission resulting from photodestruction of the chromophore. In the case of Reversibly Switchable Fluorescent Proteins (RSFPs), which can be switched back and forth between a non-fluorescent and a fluorescent state, the achievable number of switching cycles is limited by photobleaching, a process known as photofatigue. Photofatigue has become a crucial limitation in a number of advanced applications based on repeated photoswitching of RSFPs, notably in the field of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, based on our previous structural investigation of photobleaching mechanisms in IrisFP, an RSFP also capable of green-to-red photoconversion, we present the rational design of a single-mutant IrisFP-M159A that displays considerably enhanced photostability. The results suggest that, under moderate illumination intensities, photobleaching of IrisFP-like Anthozoan fluorescent proteins such as EosFP, Dendra or Dronpa derivatives is mainly driven by an oxygen-dependent mechanism resulting in the irreversible sulfoxidation of methionine 159. The photofatigue decay profiles of IrisFP and its photoresistant mutant IrisFP-M159A were investigated in different experimental conditions, in vitro and in cellulo. Although the performance of the mutant was found to be always superior, the results showed switching behaviors strongly dependent on the nanoenvironment. Thus, in general, assessment of photostability and switching properties of RSFPs should be carried out in real experimental conditions. (paper)

  15. Transgenic nude mouse with ubiquitous green fluorescent protein expression as a host for human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Reynoso, Jose; Jiang, Ping; Li, Lingna; Moossa, Abdool R; Hoffman, Robert M

    2004-12-01

    We report here the development of the transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) nude mouse with ubiquitous GFP expression. The GFP nude mouse was obtained by crossing nontransgenic nude mice with the transgenic C57/B6 mouse in which the beta-actin promoter drives GFP expression in essentially all tissues. In crosses between nu/nu GFP male mice and nu/+ GFP female mice, the embryos fluoresced green. Approximately 50% of the offspring of these mice were GFP nude mice. Newborn mice and adult mice fluoresced very bright green and could be detected with a simple blue-light-emitting diode flashlight with a central peak of 470 nm and a bypass emission filter. In the adult mice, the organs all brightly expressed GFP, including the heart, lungs, spleen, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. The following systems were dissected out and shown to have brilliant GFP fluorescence: the entire digestive system from tongue to anus; the male and female reproductive systems; brain and spinal cord; and the circulatory system, including the heart and major arteries and veins. The skinned skeleton highly expressed GFP. Pancreatic islets showed GFP fluorescence. The spleen cells were also GFP positive. Red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing human cancer cell lines, including PC-3-RFP prostate cancer, HCT-116-RFP colon cancer, MDA-MB-435-RFP breast cancer, and HT1080-RFP fibrosarcoma were transplanted to the transgenic GFP nude mice. All of these human tumors grew extensively in the transgenic GFP nude mouse. Dual-color fluorescence imaging enabled visualization of human tumor-host interaction by whole-body imaging and at the cellular level in fresh and frozen tissues. The GFP mouse model should greatly expand our knowledge of human tumor-host interaction. PMID:15574773

  16. Highly Selective Fluorescent Sensing of Proteins Based on a Fluorescent Molecularly Imprinted Nanosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A fluorescent molecularly imprinted nanosensor was obtained by grafting imprinted polymer onto the surface of multi-wall carbon nanotubes and post-imprinting treatment with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC. The fluorescence of lysozyme-imprinted polymer (Lys-MIP was quenched more strongly by Lys than that of nonimprinted polymer (NIP, which indicated that the Lys-MIP could recognize Lys. The resulted imprinted material has the ability to selectively sense a target protein, and an imprinting factor of 3.34 was achieved. The Lys-MIP also showed selective detection for Lys among other proteins such as cytochrome C (Cyt C, hemoglobin (HB and bovine serum albumin (BSA due to the imprinted sites in the Lys-MIP. This approach combines the high selectivity of surface molecular imprinting technology and fluorescence, and converts binding events into detectable signals by monitoring fluorescence spectra. Therefore, it will have further applications for Lys sensing.

  17. Looking at the photodynamics of individual fluorescent molecules and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Parajo, M.F.; Veerman, J.A.; Kuipers, L.; Hulst, van N.F.

    2001-01-01

    The photodynamics of individual molecules and fluorescent proteins has been investigated in real time. In the case of organic molecules, both the triplet state lifetime and intersystem crossing yield appear to vary in time and space. In the case of autofluorescent proteins, light-driven "on-off" flu

  18. Exploiting fluorescence for multiplex immunoassays on protein microarrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein microarray technology is becoming the method of choice for identifying protein interaction partners, detecting specific proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, or for characterizing protein interactions and serum antibodies in a massively parallel manner. Availability of the well-established instrumentation of DNA arrays and development of new fluorescent detection instruments promoted the spread of this technique. Fluorescent detection has the advantage of high sensitivity, specificity, simplicity and wide dynamic range required by most measurements. Fluorescence through specifically designed probes and an increasing variety of detection modes offers an excellent tool for such microarray platforms. Measuring for example the level of antibodies, their isotypes and/or antigen specificity simultaneously can offer more complex and comprehensive information about the investigated biological phenomenon, especially if we take into consideration that hundreds of samples can be measured in a single assay. Not only body fluids, but also cell lysates, extracted cellular components, and intact living cells can be analyzed on protein arrays for monitoring functional responses to printed samples on the surface. As a rapidly evolving area, protein microarray technology offers a great bulk of information and new depth of knowledge. These are the features that endow protein arrays with wide applicability and robust sample analyzing capability. On the whole, protein arrays are emerging new tools not just in proteomics, but glycomics, lipidomics, and are also important for immunological research. In this review we attempt to summarize the technical aspects of planar fluorescent microarray technology along with the description of its main immunological applications. (topical review)

  19. mKikGR, a monomeric photoswitchable fluorescent protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Habuchi

    Full Text Available The recent demonstration and utilization of fluorescent proteins whose fluorescence can be switched on and off has greatly expanded the toolkit of molecular and cell biology. These photoswitchable proteins have facilitated the characterization of specifically tagged molecular species in the cell and have enabled fluorescence imaging of intracellular structures with a resolution far below the classical diffraction limit of light. Applications are limited, however, by the fast photobleaching, slow photoswitching, and oligomerization typical for photoswitchable proteins currently available. Here, we report the molecular cloning and spectroscopic characterization of mKikGR, a monomeric version of the previously reported KikGR that displays high photostability and switching rates. Furthermore, we present single-molecule imaging experiments that demonstrate that individual mKikGR proteins can be localized with a precision of better than 10 nanometers, suggesting their suitability for super-resolution imaging.

  20. Advanced Fluorescence Protein-Based Synapse-Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hojin; Oh, Won Chan; Seong, Jihye; Kim, Jinhyun

    2016-01-01

    The complex information-processing capabilities of the central nervous system emerge from intricate patterns of synaptic input-output relationships among various neuronal circuit components. Understanding these capabilities thus requires a precise description of the individual synapses that comprise neural networks. Recent advances in fluorescent protein engineering, along with developments in light-favoring tissue clearing and optical imaging techniques, have rendered light microscopy (LM) a potent candidate for large-scale analyses of synapses, their properties, and their connectivity. Optically imaging newly engineered fluorescent proteins (FPs) tagged to synaptic proteins or microstructures enables the efficient, fine-resolution illumination of synaptic anatomy and function in large neural circuits. Here we review the latest progress in fluorescent protein-based molecular tools for imaging individual synapses and synaptic connectivity. We also identify associated technologies in gene delivery, tissue processing, and computational image analysis that will play a crucial role in bridging the gap between synapse- and system-level neuroscience. PMID:27445785

  1. Phosphatidic acid inhibits blue light-induced stomatal opening via inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemiya, Atsushi; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Stomata open in response to blue light under a background of red light. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits blue light-dependent stomatal opening, an effect essential for promoting stomatal closure in the daytime to prevent water loss. However, the mechanisms and molecular targets of this inhibition in the blue light signaling pathway remain unknown. Here, we report that phosphatidic acid (PA), a phospholipid second messenger produced by ABA in guard cells, inhibits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a positive regulator of blue light signaling, and PA plays a role in stimulating stomatal closure in Vicia faba. Biochemical analysis revealed that PA directly inhibited the phosphatase activity of the catalytic subunit of V. faba PP1 (PP1c) in vitro. PA inhibited blue light-dependent stomatal opening but did not affect red light- or fusicoccin-induced stomatal opening. PA also inhibited blue light-dependent H(+) pumping and phosphorylation of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. However, PA did not inhibit the autophosphorylation of phototropins, blue light receptors for stomatal opening. Furthermore, 1-butanol, a selective inhibitor of phospholipase D, which produces PA via hydrolysis of phospholipids, diminished the ABA-induced inhibition of blue light-dependent stomatal opening and H(+) pumping. We also show that hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, which are intermediates in ABA signaling, inhibited the blue light responses of stomata and that 1-butanol diminished these inhibitions. From these results, we conclude that PA inhibits blue light signaling in guard cells by PP1c inhibition, accelerating stomatal closure, and that PP1 is a cross talk point between blue light and ABA signaling pathways in guard cells.

  2. Using Superfolder Green Fluorescent Protein for Periplasmic Protein Localization Studies ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dinh, Thuy; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2011-01-01

    Studies investigating the subcellular localization of periplasmic proteins have been hampered by problems with the export of green fluorescent protein (GFP). Here we show that a superfolding variant of GFP (sfGFP) is fluorescent following Sec-mediated transport and works best when the cotranslational branch of the pathway is employed.

  3. Comparative Study of Lettuce and Radish Grown Under Red and Blue Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) and White Fluorescent Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickens, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Growing vegetable crops in space will be an essential part of sustaining astronauts during long-term missions. To drive photosynthesis, red and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have attracted attention because of their efficiency, longevity, small size, and safety. In efforts to optimize crop production, there have also been recent interests in analyzing the subtle effects of green light on plant growth, and to determine if it serves as a source of growth enhancement or suppression. A comparative study was performed on two short cycle crops of lettuce (Outredgeous) and radish (Cherry Bomb) grown under two light treatments. The first treatment being red and blue LEDs, and the second treatment consisting of white fluorescent lamps which contain a portion of green light. In addition to comparing biomass production, physiological characterizations were conducted on how the light treatments influence morphology, water use, chlorophyll content, and the production of A TP within plant tissues.

  4. Ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics of stabilized A state mutants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP): Snipping the proton wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two blue absorbing and emitting mutants (S65G/T203V/E222Q and S65T at pH 5.5) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) have been investigated through ultrafast time resolved infra-red (TRIR) and fluorescence spectroscopy. In these mutants, in which the excited state proton transfer reaction observed in wild-type GFP has been blocked, the photophysics are dominated by the neutral A state. It was found that the A* excited state lifetime is short, indicating that it is relatively less stabilised in the protein matrix than the anionic form. However, the lifetime of the A state can be increased through modifications to the protein structure. The TRIR spectra show that a large shifts in protein vibrational modes on excitation of the A state occurs in both these GFP mutants. This is ascribed to a change in H-bonding interactions between the protein matrix and the excited state

  5. Simultaneous improvement of emission color, singlet-triplet energy gap, and quantum efficiency of blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitters using a 1-carbazolylcarbazole based donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mounggon; Choi, Jeong Min; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2016-08-21

    Blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) emitters having 1-carbazolylcarbazole based donor moieties were developed to resolve the low quantum efficiency and large singlet-triplet energy splitting issues of the linker free TADF emitters. Investigation of the 1-carbazolylcarbazole derived donors as the donor units of two blue TADF emitters in comparison with 3-carbazolylcarbazole demonstrated that the 1-carbazolylcarbazole based donors increased the triplet energy, decreased the singlet-triplet energy gap, blue-shifted the emission color, and enhanced the quantum efficiency of the blue TADF devices. PMID:27443818

  6. Development of fiber optic spectroscopy for in-vitro and in-planta detection of fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Oi Wah; Chen, Jun-Wei; Asundi, Anand K.

    2001-10-01

    The objective of this project is to apply photonics technology to bio-safety management of genetically modified (GM) plants. The conventional method for screening GM plants is through selection using antibiotic resistance markers. There is public concern with such approaches and these are associated with food safety issues, escape of antibiotic resistance genes to pathogenic microorganisms and interference with antibiotic therapy. Thus, the strategy taken in this project is to replace antibiotic resistance markers with fluorescent protein markers that allow for rapid and non-invasive optical screening of genetically modified plants. In this paper, fibre optic spectroscopy was developed to detect and quantify recombinant green (EGFP) and red (DsRED) fluorescent proteins in vitro and in planta. In vitro detection was first carried out to optimize the sensitivity of the optical system. The bacterial expression vectors carrying the coding regions of EGFP and DsRED were introduced into Escherichia coli host cells and fluorescent proteins were produced following induction with IPTG. Soluble EGFP and DsRED proteins were isolated from lysed bacterial cells and serially diluted for quantitative analysis by fibre optic spectroscopy using different light sources, namely, blue LED (475 nm), tungsten halogen (350 - 1000 nm) and double frequency Nd:YAG green laser (532 nm). Fluorescence near the expected emission wavelengths could be detected up to 320X dilution for EGFP and DsRED with blue LED and 532 nm green laser, respectively, as the excitation source. Tungsten halogen was found to be unsuitable for excitation of both EGFP and DsRED. EGFP was successfully purified by size separation under non-denaturing electrophoretic conditions and quantified. The minimum concentration of EGFP detectable with blue LED excitation was 5 mg/ml. To determine the capability of spectroscopy detection in planta, transgenic potato hairy roots and whole modified plant lines expressing the

  7. Hybrid white organic light-emitting devices based on phosphorescent iridium-benzotriazole orange-red and fluorescent blue emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Zhen-Yuan, E-mail: xiazhenyuan@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Institute of Fine Chemicals, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Su, Jian-Hua [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Institute of Fine Chemicals, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Chang, Chi-Sheng; Chen, Chin H. [Display Institute, Microelectronics and Information Systems Research Center, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan 300 (China)

    2013-03-15

    We demonstrate that high color purity or efficiency hybrid white organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) can be generated by integrating a phosphorescent orange-red emitter, bis[4-(2H-benzotriazol-2-yl)-N,N-diphenyl-aniline-N{sup 1},C{sup 3}] iridium acetylacetonate, Ir(TBT){sub 2}(acac) with fluorescent blue emitters in two different emissive layers. The device based on deep blue fluorescent material diphenyl-[4-(2-[1,1 Prime ;4 Prime ,1 Double-Prime ]terphenyl-4-yl-vinyl)-phenyl]-amine BpSAB and Ir(TBT){sub 2}(acac) shows pure white color with the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.33,0.30). When using sky-blue fluorescent dopant N,N Prime -(4,4 Prime -(1E,1 Prime E)-2,2 Prime -(1,4-phenylene)bis(ethene-2,1-diyl) bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(2-ethyl-6-methyl-N-phenylaniline) (BUBD-1) and orange-red phosphor with a color-tuning phosphorescent material fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium (Ir(ppy){sub 3} ), it exhibits peak luminance yield and power efficiency of 17.4 cd/A and 10.7 lm/W, respectively with yellow-white color and CIE color rendering index (CRI) value of 73. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An iridium-based orange-red phosphor Ir(TBT){sub 2}(acac) was applied in hybrid white OLEDs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Duel- and tri-emitter WOLEDs were achieved with either high color purity or efficiency performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peak luminance yield of tri-emitter WOLEDs was 17.4 cd/A with yellow-white color and color rendering index (CRI) value of 73.

  8. On the Design of Low-Cost Fluorescent Protein Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, Leah

    , magnetic beads, nanoparticles or quantum dots designed to form covalent bonds with amino groups, sulfhydryl groups, carboxylic groups and other reactive functionalities in amino acids. It is not uncommon to conduct combinations of techniques, for example, the introduction of fluorescent labels or probes to proteins require in many cases, site-directed mutagenesis followed by covalent bonding of the fluorescent dye. Accordingly, two or more proteins can be combined to create hybrid or fusion proteins with multiple or altered functions. Indeed, research involving the green fluorescent protein and fluorescent proteins of a variety of colors has expanded by leaps and bounds in the last decade. Because these fluorescent proteins can be genetically encoded in cells, it is possible to observe various cellular processes in vivo. However, this topic has been reviewed extensively in the literature and, thus, will not be expounded on in this chapter.

  9. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  10. The coherent dynamics of photoexcited green fluorescent proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Cinelli, R A G; Pellegrini, V; Beltram, F; Cerullo, G; Zavelani-Rossi, M; De Silvestri, S; Tyagi, M; Giacca, M; Cinelli, Riccardo A. G.; Tozzini, Valentina; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Beltram, Fabio; Cerullo, Giulio; Zavelani-Rossi, Margherita; Silvestri, Sandro De; Tyagi, Mudit; Giacca, Mauro

    2001-01-01

    The coherent dynamics of vibronic wave packets in the green fluorescent protein is reported. At room temperature the non-stationary dynamics following impulsive photoexcitation displays an oscillating optical transmissivity pattern with components at 67 fs (497 cm-1) and 59 fs (593 cm-1). Our results are complemented by ab initio calculations of the vibrational spectrum of the chromophore. This analysis shows the interplay between the dynamics of the aminoacidic structure and the electronic excitation in the primary optical events of green fluorescent proteins.

  11. Green fluorescent protein nanopolygons as monodisperse supramolecular assemblies of functional proteins with defined valency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Eun; Kim, Yu-Na; Kim, Jung A.; Kim, Ho Min; Jung, Yongwon

    2015-05-01

    Supramolecular protein assemblies offer novel nanoscale architectures with molecular precision and unparalleled functional diversity. A key challenge, however, is to create precise nano-assemblies of functional proteins with both defined structures and a controlled number of protein-building blocks. Here we report a series of supramolecular green fluorescent protein oligomers that are assembled in precise polygonal geometries and prepared in a monodisperse population. Green fluorescent protein is engineered to be self-assembled in cells into oligomeric assemblies that are natively separated in a single-protein resolution by surface charge manipulation, affording monodisperse protein (nano)polygons from dimer to decamer. Several functional proteins are multivalently displayed on the oligomers with controlled orientations. Spatial arrangements of protein oligomers and displayed functional proteins are directly visualized by a transmission electron microscope. By employing our functional protein assemblies, we provide experimental insight into multivalent protein-protein interactions and tools to manipulate receptor clustering on live cell surfaces.

  12. Dendritic copper phthalocyanine with aggregation induced blue emission and solid-state fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiayi; Pan, Lin; Zhou, Xuefei; Jia, Kun; Liu, Xiaobo

    2016-09-01

    In this work, dendritic copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) showing obvious aggregation induced emission (AIE) and strong solid-state fluorescence was synthesized. It was found that synthesized CuPc can be easily solubilized in polar aprotic solvent, where no fluorescence signal was detected. Interestingly, both the CuPc aggregates in solution and solid-state powder exhibited strong fluorescence emission around 480 nm, which should be attributed to the restriction of intramolecular rotation as rationalized in aggregation induced emission framework. Meanwhile the obvious crystalline enhanced solid-state fluorescent emission is observed for CuPc powder.

  13. "Color Timer" mice: visualization of neuronal differentiation with fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanki Hiroaki

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanisms governing the differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs into neuronal progenitor cells and finally into neurons are gradually being revealed. The lack of convenient means for real-time determination of the stages of differentiation of individual neural cells, however, has been hindering progress in elucidating the mechanisms. In order to be able to easily identify the stages of differentiation of neural cells, we have been attempting to establish a mouse system that would allow progression of neuronal differentiation to be visualized based on transitions between fluorescence colors by using a combination of mouse genetics and the ever-expanding repertoire of fluorescent proteins. In this study we report the initial version of such a mouse system, which we call "Color Timer." We first generated transgenic (Tg; nestin/KOr Tg mice in which production of the fluorescent protein Kusabira-Orange (KOr is controlled by the gene regulatory elements within the 2nd intronic enhancer of the nestin gene, which is a good marker for NSCs, so that NSCs would emit orange fluorescence upon excitation. We then confirmed by immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical analyses that the KOr fluorescence closely reflected the presence of the Nestin protein. We also confirmed by a neurosphere formation assay that the intensity of the KOr fluorescence correlated with "stemness" of the cell and it was possible to readily identify NSCs in the two neurogenic regions, namely the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, in the brain of adult nestin/KOr Tg mice by the orange fluorescence they emitted. We then crossed nestin/KOr mice with doublecortin-enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein Tg mice, whose immature neurons emit green fluorescence upon excitation, and it was possible to visualize the progress of NSC-to-neuron differentiation by the transition between fluorescence colors from orange to

  14. Folding and unfolding of a non-fluorescent mutant of green fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP), from the Pacific jellyfish A. victoria, has numerous uses in biotechnology and cell and molecular biology as a protein marker because of its specific chromophore, which is spontaneously created after proper protein folding. After formation, the chromophore is very stable and it remains intact during protein unfolding, meaning that the GFP unfolding process is not the reverse of the original folding reaction; i.e., the principles of microscopic reversibility do not apply. We have generated the mutant S65T/G67A-GFP, which is unable to efficiently form the cyclic chromophore, with the goal of investigating the folding, unfolding and competing aggregation of GFP under fully reversible conditions. Our studies have been performed in the presence of guanidinium hydrochloride (GdnHCl). The GFP conformation was monitored using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, and fluorescence of 1,1'-bis(4-anilino-5-naphthalenesulphonic acid) (bis-ANS). Light scattering was used to follow GFP aggregation. We conclude from these fluorescence measurements that S65T/G67A-GFP folding is largely reversible. During equilibrium folding, the first step is the formation of a molten globule, prone to aggregation

  15. Two-photon directed evolution of green fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Barnett, Lauren M.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Hughes, Thomas E.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2015-07-01

    Directed evolution has been used extensively to improve the properties of a variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs). Evolutionary strategies, however, have not yet been used to improve the two-photon absorption (2PA) properties of a fluorescent protein, properties that are important for two-photon imaging in living tissues, including the brain. Here we demonstrate a technique for quantitatively screening the two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) efficiency and 2PA cross section of tens of thousands of mutant FPs expressed in E. coli colonies. We use this procedure to move EGFP through three rounds of two-photon directed evolution leading to new variants showing up to a 50% enhancement in peak 2PA cross section and brightness within the near-IR tissue transparency wavelength range.

  16. Solvent dependence of two-photon absorption spectra of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) chromophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Haruko; Tayama, Ryo; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-06-01

    Two-photon absorption spectra of 4‧-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone, a model chromophore of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), were measured in various solvents. The two-photon absorption band of its anionic form is markedly blue-shifted from the corresponding one-photon absorption band in all solvents. Moreover, the magnitude of the blue shift varies largely depending on the solvent, which does not accord with the assignment of the two-photon absorption band to the transitions to the vibrationally excited S1 state. Our finding is readily rationalized by considering overlapping contributions of the S1 ← S0 and S2 ← S0 transitions, suggesting the involvement of the S2 state also in two-photon fluorescence of eGFP.

  17. Fluorescence studies of beer protein uptake by silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apperson, Kathleen; Birch, David J. S.; Leiper, Kenneth; McKeown, Ian P.

    2001-05-01

    Fluorescence has been investigated with respect to new methods for monitoring protein uptake by silica, with particular attention being given to haze forming proteins and foam proteins present in beer. These are of particular interest to the brewing industry as an important aspect of the brewing process is the prevention of chill haze formation. This is necessary in order to maintain the clarity of the beer and to extend the shelf life. Chill haze, which is a result of the interaction of certain proteins with some polyphenols, can be prevented by the removal of one or both of these constituents.

  18. Fluorescence microscopy of single autofluorescent proteins for cellular biology

    CERN Document Server

    Cognet, Laurent; Choquet, Daniel; Lounis, Brahim

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we review the applicability of autofluorescent proteins for single-molecule imaging in biology. The photophysical characteristics of several mutants of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and those of DsRed are compared and critically discussed for their use in cellular biology. The alternative use of two-photon excitation at the single-molecule level or Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy is envisaged for the study of individual autofluorescent proteins. Single-molecule experiments performed in live cells using eGFP and preferably eYFP fusion proteins are reviewed. Finally, the first use at the single-molecule level of citrine, a more photostable variant of the eYFP is reported when fused to a receptor for neurotransmitter in live cells.

  19. Development of a Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Laboratory Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Patrick D.; Hartberg, Yasha

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory curriculum has been designed for an undergraduate biochemistry course that focuses on the investigation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The sequence of procedures extends from analysis of the DNA sequence through PCR amplification, recombinant plasmid DNA synthesis, bacterial transformation, expression, isolation, and…

  20. Molecular quantification of genes encoding for green-fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felske, A; Vandieken, V; Pauling, B V;

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative PCR approach is presented to analyze the amount of recombinant green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes in environmental DNA samples. The quantification assay is a combination of specific PCR amplification and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Gene quantification...... PCR strategy is a highly specific and sensitive way to monitor recombinant DNA in environments like the efflux of a biotechnological plant....

  1. Crystal structure of the fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. in both green and photoconverted red forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletneva, Nadya V; Pletnev, Sergei; Pakhomov, Alexey A; Chertkova, Rita V; Martynov, Vladimir I; Muslinkina, Liya; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Vladimir Z

    2016-08-01

    The fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. (DendFP) is a member of the Kaede-like group of photoconvertible fluorescent proteins with a His62-Tyr63-Gly64 chromophore-forming sequence. Upon irradiation with UV and blue light, the fluorescence of DendFP irreversibly changes from green (506 nm) to red (578 nm). The photoconversion is accompanied by cleavage of the peptide backbone at the C(α)-N bond of His62 and the formation of a terminal carboxamide group at the preceding Leu61. The resulting double C(α)=C(β) bond in His62 extends the conjugation of the chromophore π system to include imidazole, providing the red fluorescence. Here, the three-dimensional structures of native green and photoconverted red forms of DendFP determined at 1.81 and 2.14 Å resolution, respectively, are reported. This is the first structure of photoconverted red DendFP to be reported to date. The structure-based mutagenesis of DendFP revealed an important role of positions 142 and 193: replacement of the original Ser142 and His193 caused a moderate red shift in the fluorescence and a considerable increase in the photoconversion rate. It was demonstrated that hydrogen bonding of the chromophore to the Gln116 and Ser105 cluster is crucial for variation of the photoconversion rate. The single replacement Gln116Asn disrupts the hydrogen bonding of Gln116 to the chromophore, resulting in a 30-fold decrease in the photoconversion rate, which was partially restored by a further Ser105Asn replacement. PMID:27487823

  2. Protein immobilization and fluorescence quenching on polydopamine thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daqun; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Weihua

    2016-09-01

    Mussel inspired polydopamine (PDA) film has attracted great interest as a versatile functional coating for biomolecule immobilization in various bio-related devices. However, the details regarding the interaction between a protein and PDA film remain unclear. Particularly, there is very limited knowledge regarding the protein immobilization on PDA film, even though it is of essential importance in various fields. The situation is even more complicated if considering the fact that quite a number of approaches (e.g., different oxidizing reagent, buffer pH, grown time, grown media, etc.) have been developed to grow PDA films. In this work, protein attachment on PDA film was systematically investigated by using the real-time and label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. The kinetics of protein-PDA interaction was explored and the influence of buffer pH and deposition media on the protein attachment was studied. Fluorescent protein microarray was further printed on PDA-coated glass slides for quantitative investigations and together with SPR data, the interesting fluorescence quenching phenomenon of PDA film was revealed. This work may deepen our understanding on the PDA-protein interaction and offer a valuable guide for efficient protein attachment on PDA film in various bio-related applications. PMID:27254254

  3. Murine leukemia virus (MLV replication monitored with fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittner Alexandra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer gene therapy will benefit from vectors that are able to replicate in tumor tissue and cause a bystander effect. Replication-competent murine leukemia virus (MLV has been described to have potential as cancer therapeutics, however, MLV infection does not cause a cytopathic effect in the infected cell and viral replication can only be studied by immunostaining or measurement of reverse transcriptase activity. Results We inserted the coding sequences for green fluorescent protein (GFP into the proline-rich region (PRR of the ecotropic envelope protein (Env and were able to fluorescently label MLV. This allowed us to directly monitor viral replication and attachment to target cells by flow cytometry. We used this method to study viral replication of recombinant MLVs and split viral genomes, which were generated by replacement of the MLV env gene with the red fluorescent protein (RFP and separately cloning GFP-Env into a retroviral vector. Co-transfection of both plasmids into target cells resulted in the generation of semi-replicative vectors, and the two color labeling allowed to determine the distribution of the individual genomes in the target cells and was indicative for the occurrence of recombination events. Conclusions Fluorescently labeled MLVs are excellent tools for the study of factors that influence viral replication and can be used to optimize MLV-based replication-competent viruses or vectors for gene therapy.

  4. Local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisyan, Karen S; Bolotin, Dmitry A; Meer, Margarita V; Usmanova, Dinara R; Mishin, Alexander S; Sharonov, George V; Ivankov, Dmitry N; Bozhanova, Nina G; Baranov, Mikhail S; Soylemez, Onuralp; Bogatyreva, Natalya S; Vlasov, Peter K; Egorov, Evgeny S; Logacheva, Maria D; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Mamedov, Ilgar Z; Tawfik, Dan S; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Kondrashov, Fyodor A

    2016-05-19

    Fitness landscapes depict how genotypes manifest at the phenotypic level and form the basis of our understanding of many areas of biology, yet their properties remain elusive. Previous studies have analysed specific genes, often using their function as a proxy for fitness, experimentally assessing the effect on function of single mutations and their combinations in a specific sequence or in different sequences. However, systematic high-throughput studies of the local fitness landscape of an entire protein have not yet been reported. Here we visualize an extensive region of the local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria (avGFP) by measuring the native function (fluorescence) of tens of thousands of derivative genotypes of avGFP. We show that the fitness landscape of avGFP is narrow, with 3/4 of the derivatives with a single mutation showing reduced fluorescence and half of the derivatives with four mutations being completely non-fluorescent. The narrowness is enhanced by epistasis, which was detected in up to 30% of genotypes with multiple mutations and mostly occurred through the cumulative effect of slightly deleterious mutations causing a threshold-like decrease in protein stability and a concomitant loss of fluorescence. A model of orthologous sequence divergence spanning hundreds of millions of years predicted the extent of epistasis in our data, indicating congruence between the fitness landscape properties at the local and global scales. The characterization of the local fitness landscape of avGFP has important implications for several fields including molecular evolution, population genetics and protein design.

  5. A Practical Teaching Course in Directed Protein Evolution Using the Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruller, Roberto; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Ward, Richard John

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering is a powerful tool, which correlates protein structure with specific functions, both in applied biotechnology and in basic research. Here, we present a practical teaching course for engineering the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from "Aequorea victoria" by a random mutagenesis strategy using error-prone polymerase chain…

  6. Application of split-green fluorescent protein for topology mapping membrane proteins in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toddo, Stephen; Soderstrom, Bill; Palombo, Isolde;

    2012-01-01

    /periplasmic location of the N-terminus of a protein. Here, we show that the bimolecular split-green fluorescent protein complementation system can overcome this limitation and can be used to determine the location of both the N- and C-termini of inner membrane proteins in Escherichia coli....

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Spatial Protein-protein Proximity in Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Liu, Yi-Kuang; Eghbali, Mansoureh; Stefani, Enrico

    2009-02-01

    To quantify spatial protein-protein proximity (colocalization) in fluorescence microscopic images, cross-correlation and autocorrelation functions were decomposed into fast and slowly decaying components. The fast component results from clusters of proteins specifically labeled and the slow one from background/image heterogeneity. We show that the calculation of the protein-protein proximity index and the correlation coefficient are more reliably determined by extracting the fast-decaying component.

  8. Greenish-blue fluorescence of 6-(4-aminophenyl)-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-methoxynicotinonitrile: Synthesis, spectroscopy, crystal structure, and fluorescence property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwunwong, T.; Chantrapromma, S.; Fun, H.-K.

    2015-12-01

    The title compound, C20H17N3O2, was synthesized by the cyclization of a chalcone derivative with malononitrile, and was characterized by 1H NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy techniques. The crystal structure was determined by single crystal X-ray structure determination. In the crystal packing, the molecules are linked by N-H···N hydrogen bonds forming a two dimensional network parallel to the (1 0-2) plane. The crystal structure is further stabilized by weak C-H···π interactions. The compound exhibits greenish-blue fluorescence in acetonitrile with an emission wavelength at 476 nm when was excited at 365 nm.

  9. Food choice by Blue-gray Tanagers in relation to protein content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosque, Carlos; Calchi, Rosanna

    2003-06-01

    We tested discriminatory ability and food choice in relation to protein content of the diet in wild-caught Blue-gray Tanagers (Thraupis episcopus), a generalist tropical frugivorous bird. In two sets of experiments we offered to five individual birds in pair-wise choice trials two nearly iso-caloric experimental diets differing in their protein content only. Protein contents of the experimental diets were 4.6 vs. 1.4% in the first experiment and 3.2 and 1.5% (dry matter basis) in the second experiment. Response varied among individual tanagers, but 6 of the 10 birds showed a clear preference for the food highest in protein. Two individuals displayed a strong positional preference. When testing each treatment group, birds ate daily significantly more of the food that had higher protein content. We conclude that Blue-gray Tanagers prefer richer nitrogen foods. Our results also demonstrate that Blue-gray Tanagers have remarkable discriminatory abilities, they reacted to differences in protein content as small as 0.09% fresh matter. We show for the first time discriminatory ability and preference of wild frugivorous birds for foods richer in protein under controlled conditions. Our findings support the hypothesis that frugivorous birds can act as selective agents for fruit pulp composition. PMID:12781832

  10. Identification of the mineralization front: comparison of a modified toluidine blue stain with tetracycline fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, A R; Kujawa, M; Mathews, C H; Parfitt, A M

    A modified toluidine blue method for identification of the mineralization front at the zone of demarcation between bone and osteoid in undecalcified, plastic-embedded sections of bone is described. The intensity of staining is increased both by increasing the pH of the solution and by increasing the duration of staining. The method is reproducible, since measurements of the extent of mineralization front on two nonadjacent sections from the same biopsy in 20 cases had a correlation coefficient of 0.98. The identification of the mineralization front by toluidine blue agrees closely with identification by means of in vivo tetracycline uptake, with a correlation coefficient of 0.97 between measurements of its extent using the two methods on adjacent sections from the same biopsy. It is likely that both toluidine blue staining at pH 6.5 and tetracycline uptake depend on some property of the most recently deposited bone mineral. With either method we find low values for the extent of mineralization front as a fraction of osteoid surface in many patients with osteoporosis. The uniformly normal values for this quantity in osteoporosis reported by other investigators may reflect different criteria for distinguishing osteoid-covered from quiescent bone surfaces. PMID:6200748

  11. Using Fluorescent Protein Fusions to Study Protein Subcellular Localization and Dynamics in Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Gao, Caiji; Zhao, Qiong; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Studies of protein subcellular localization and dynamics are helpful in understanding the cellular functions of proteins in an organism. In the past decade, the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a fusion tag has dramatically extended our knowledge in this field. Transient expression and stable transformation of GFP-tagged proteins have been wildly used to study protein localization in vivo in different systems. Although GFP-based tags provide a fast and convenient way to characterize protein properties in living cells, several reports have demonstrated that GFP fusions might not accurately reflect the localization of the native protein as GFP tags may alter the protein properties. To facilitate proper usage of GFP tags in plant cell biology study, we describe detailed protocols to identify possible inhibitory effects of fluorescent tags on protein subcellular localization and to determine if a fluorescently tagged protein is localized to the correct subcellular compartment. Using Arabidopsis Endomembrane protein 12 (EMP12) as an example, we first show the possible inhibitory effect of GFP tags on proper protein localization and then describe the immunofluorescence labeling method to verify the correct localization of GFP fusion proteins. Next, a method is presented using the ImageJ program with the Pearson-Spearman correlation (PSC) colocalization plug-in for statistical quantification of colocalization ratios of two fluorophores. Finally we provide a detailed method for protein dynamics studies using spinning disk confocal microscopy in Arabidopsis cells. PMID:27515077

  12. Orange fluorescent proteins constructed from cyanobacteriochromes chromophorylated with phycoerythrobilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ya-Fang; Xu, Jin-Guo; Tang, Kun; Miao, Dan; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Zhou, Ming

    2014-05-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes are a structurally and spectrally highly diverse class of phytochrome-related photosensory biliproteins. They contain one or more GAF domains that bind phycocyanobilin (PCB) autocatalytically; some of these proteins are also capable of further modifying PCB to phycoviolobilin or rubins. We tested the chromophorylation with the non-photochromic phycoerythrobilin (PEB) of 16 cyanobacteriochrome GAFs from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120, of Slr1393 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and of Tlr0911 from Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1. Nine GAFs could be autocatalytically chromophorylated in vivo/in E. coli with PEB, resulting in highly fluorescent biliproteins with brightness comparable to that of fluorescent proteins like GFP. In several GAFs, PEB was concomitantly converted to phycourobilin (PUB) during binding. This not only shifted the spectra, but also increased the Stokes shift. The chromophorylated GAFs could be oligomerized further by attaching a GCN4 leucine zipper domain, thereby enhancing the absorbance and fluorescence of the complexes. The presence of both PEB and PUB makes these oligomeric GAF-"bundles" interesting models for energy transfer akin to the antenna complexes found in cyanobacterial phycobilisomes. The thermal and photochemical stability and their strong brightness make these constructs promising orange fluorescent biomarkers. PMID:24604419

  13. Protein-protein interactions visualized by bimolecular fluorescence complementation in tobacco protoplasts and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Regina; Schwenkert, Serena

    2014-03-09

    Many proteins interact transiently with other proteins or are integrated into multi-protein complexes to perform their biological function. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) is an in vivo method to monitor such interactions in plant cells. In the presented protocol the investigated candidate proteins are fused to complementary halves of fluorescent proteins and the respective constructs are introduced into plant cells via agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Subsequently, the proteins are transiently expressed in tobacco leaves and the restored fluorescent signals can be detected with a confocal laser scanning microscope in the intact cells. This allows not only visualization of the interaction itself, but also the subcellular localization of the protein complexes can be determined. For this purpose, marker genes containing a fluorescent tag can be coexpressed along with the BiFC constructs, thus visualizing cellular structures such as the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, the Golgi apparatus or the plasma membrane. The fluorescent signal can be monitored either directly in epidermal leaf cells or in single protoplasts, which can be easily isolated from the transformed tobacco leaves. BiFC is ideally suited to study protein-protein interactions in their natural surroundings within the living cell. However, it has to be considered that the expression has to be driven by strong promoters and that the interaction partners are modified due to fusion of the relatively large fluorescence tags, which might interfere with the interaction mechanism. Nevertheless, BiFC is an excellent complementary approach to other commonly applied methods investigating protein-protein interactions, such as coimmunoprecipitation, in vitro pull-down assays or yeast-two-hybrid experiments.

  14. Rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is presented. In the last decade, advances in instrumentation and software development have made crystallography a powerful tool in structural biology. Using this method, structural information can now be acquired from pathological crystals that would have been abandoned in earlier times. In this paper, the order–disorder (OD) structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is discussed. The structure is composed of tetramers with 222 symmetry incorporated into the lattice in two different ways, namely rotated 90° with respect to each other around the crystal c axis, with tetramer axes coincident with crystallographic twofold axes. The random distribution of alternatively oriented tetramers in the crystal creates a rotational OD structure with statistically averaged I422 symmetry, although the presence of very weak and diffuse additional reflections suggests that the randomness is only approximate

  15. Monomeric red fluorescent protein variants used for imaging studies in different species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller-Taubenberger, Annette; Vos, Michel J.; Boettger, Angelika; Lasi, Margherita; Lai, Frank P. L.; Fischer, Markus; Rottner, Klemens

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have proven to be excellent tools for live-cell imaging studies. In addition to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants, recent progress was achieved in the development of monomeric red fluorescent proteins (mRFPs) that show improved properties in respect to maturation

  16. Probabilistic mapping and image clustering for quantitative assessment of fluorescent protein localizations in Arabidopsis guard cells

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Takumi Higaki, Natsumaro Kutsuna & Seiichiro Hasezawa ### Abstract The protocol reported here describes a method to quantitatively evaluate fluorescently-tagged protein localizations from fluorescent microscopic images with a combination of probabilistic mapping and image clustering. We demonstrate the use of this protocol using kidney-shaped guard cells of plants. ### Introduction Microscopic assessment of protein localizations with fluorescent protein taggin...

  17. The Cyan Fluorescent Protein (CFP Transgenic Mouse as a Model for Imaging Pancreatic Exocrine Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hop S Tran Cao

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging has opened many new areas of research. Among the important advances in the field have been the development of transgenic mice expressing various fluorescent proteins. Objective To report whole-body and organ-specific fluorescence imaging to characterize the transgenic cyan fluorescent protein mouse. Design Mice were imaged using two devices. Brightfield images were obtained with the OV100 Small Animal Imaging System (Olympus Corp., Tokyo, Japan. Fluorescence imaging was performed under the cyan fluorescent protein filter using the iBox Small Animal Imaging System (UVP, Upland, CA, USA. Intervention All animals were sacrificed immediately before imaging. They were imaged before and throughout multiple steps of a complete necropsy. Harvested organs were also imaged with both devices. Selected organs were then frozen and processed for histology, fluorescence microscopy, and H&E staining. Fluorescence microscopy was performed with an Olympus IMT-2 inverted fluorescence microscope. Main outcome measure Determination of fluorescence intensity of different organs. Results Surprisingly, we found that there is differential enhancement of fluorescence among organs; most notably, the pancreas stands out from the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, displaying the strongest fluorescence of all organs in the mouse. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the cyan fluorescent protein fluorescence resided in the acinar cells of the pancreas and not the islet cells. Conclusions The cyan fluorescent protein mouse should lead to a deeper understanding of pancreatic function and pathology, including cancer.

  18. Identification of the pigment responsible for the blue fluorescence band in the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of green plants, and the potential use of this band in remotely estimating rates of photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of vegetation is being investigated in this laboratory for use as a technique for the remote detection of the effects of environmental stress upon vegetation, as well as for plant identification. The fluorescence band with a maximum at 440 nm, in conjunction with the chlorophyll bands with maxima at 685 and 740 nm, has been found to be a critical band in the development of algorithms for detecting stress, and identifying plant types. The identification of the plant constituent responsible for this band is vital to understanding the mechanism underlying its fluorescence changes in response to environmental and physiological changes. The identification was achieved as follows: The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of pure plant pigments were determined. Fluorescence bands with maxima at 420 nm, 440 nm, 490 nm, and 525 nm were observed for vitamin K1, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH), beta-carotene, and riboflavin, respectively. The LIF spectra of water extracts and acetone extracts of clover leaves were also measured. It was found that the blue fluorescence band was associated with the water extract. NADPH which is a water-soluble compound, and the water extract of clover had no fluorescence after oxidation by potassium ferricyanide, while the fluorescence of water insoluble vitamin K1 was unchanged by the oxidizing agent. It was also found that the absorption maximum of NADPH was the same as the absorption maximum of the aqueous extract of clover. The above findings indicated that the compound responsible for the blue fluorescence at 440 nm is in the reduced state and is water-soluble. It was concluded that NADPH was responsible for the blue fluorescence at 440 nm. The strong linear relationship between the fluorescence at 440 nm and the rate of photosynthesis suggests the possible use of LIF measurements in the remote estimation of photosynthetic rates. (author)

  19. Aptamer carbon nanodot sandwich used for fluorescent detection of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bailu; Zhao, Chuanqi; Wei, Weili; Ren, Jinsong; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki; Qu, Xiaogang

    2012-12-01

    Carbon nanodots (C-Dots) have attracted growing interest in recent years due to their low cost, ready scalability, excellent chemical stability, biocompatibility, colloidal stability, and resilience of photoluminescence. They have been employed as novel, ideal fluorescent probes for bio-imaging and smart sensing. In addition, taking advantage of their low-cytotoxicity, C-Dots have potential applications in biochemical and cell biological fields. Herein, we present the first assay with aptamer-functionalized C-Dots as a sensory platform for protein detection. The presence of thrombin can induce the aptamer-modified fluorescent C-Dots to form a sandwich structure with aptamer-functionalized silica nanoparticles through specific protein/aptamer interaction. The assay shows high specificity toward thrombin. A detection limit of 1 nM is obtained, which is significantly improved as compared to that of many previously reported fluorescence-based thrombin detection assays. Using other modified aptamers and antibodies instead of thrombin binding aptamers, this strategy may offer a suitable approach for detection of other proteins in biological, pharmaceutical and nano-mechanical applications. PMID:23050264

  20. Improved "optical highlighter" probes derived from discosoma red fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lisbeth C; Marchant, Jonathan S

    2005-02-01

    The tetrameric red fluorescent protein, DsRed, undergoes a rapid red to green color change evoked by short wavelength (lambda highlighter" probe for tracking live cells, organelles, and fusion proteins. This color change results from selective bleaching of the "mature" red-emitting species of DsRed and an enhancement of emission from the "immature" green species, likely caused by dequenching of fluorescence resonance energy transfer occurring within the protein tetramer. Here, we have examined the role of residues known to influence the rate and completeness of chromophore maturation on the cellular and biophysical properties of DsRed mutants. Surprisingly, a single amino acid mutation (N42Q) with increased basal green emission yet rapid chromophore maturation displayed a multiphoton-evoked color change that was brighter, more consistent, more vivid, and easier to evoke than DsRed, despite the larger proportion of green chromophores. Rapidly maturing mutants with more complete chromophore maturation, exhibited little color change and increased resistance to multiphoton bleaching. We describe improved optical and cell biological properties for two DsRed-derived variants which we showcase in photolabeling studies, and discuss these data in terms of implications for fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based probes.

  1. Synthesis of highly fluorescent gold nanoclusters using egg white proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Dickson; Geckeler, Kurt E

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) have gained interest during the recent years because of their low toxicity and finer size for the bioimaging and biolabeling applications in comparison to the semiconductor quantum dot analogues. Diverse materials such as sulfur compounds, peptides, dendrimers, proteins, etc., are exploited for the preparation of AuNCs. Henceforth, highly fluorescent, water-soluble, and few atom-containing gold nanoclusters are created using a rapid, straightforward, and green method. In this regard for the first time chicken egg white (CEW), one of the most unique materials, is utilized in an aqueous solution under basic conditions at physiological temperature for the preparation of AuNCs. Tyrosine and tryptophan amino acid residues are responsible for the conversion of Au ions to Au(0) under alkaline condtions. CEW contains four major proteins of which the main constituent protein, ovalbumin also leads to the formation of the AuNCs with a higher fluorescence emission compared to the CEW. The ratios between the different reaction partners are very crucial, along with temperature and time for the preparation of AuNCs with high photoluminescence emission. The limited vibrational motion of the proteins under alkaline condition and the bulkiness of the proteins help in the formation of AuNCs. PMID:24321847

  2. Aluminum Nanostructured Films as Substrates for Enhanced Fluorescence in the Ultraviolet-Blue Spectral Region

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, Krishanu; Chowdhury, Mustafa H.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2007-01-01

    Particulate aluminum films of varied thicknesses were deposited on quartz substrates by thermal evaporation. These nanostructured substrates were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). With the increase of aluminum thickness, the films progress from particulate toward smooth surfaces as observed by SEM images. To date, metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) has primarily been observed in the visible–NIR wavelength region using silver or gold island films or roughened surfaces. We now...

  3. Fluorescent biphenyl derivatives of phenylalanine suitable for protein modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shengxi; Fahmi, Nour Eddine; Bhattacharya, Chandrabali; Wang, Lin; Jin, Yuguang; Benkovic, Stephen J; Hecht, Sidney M

    2013-11-26

    In a recent study, we demonstrated that structurally compact fluorophores incorporated into the side chains of amino acids could be introduced into dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR) with minimal disruption of protein structure or function, even when the site of incorporation was within a folded region of the protein. The modified proteins could be employed for FRET measurements, providing sensitive monitors of changes in protein conformation. The very favorable results achieved in that study encouraged us to prepare additional fluorescent amino acids of potential utility for studying protein dynamics. Presently, we describe the synthesis and photophysical characterization of four positional isomers of biphenyl-phenylalanine, all of which were found to exhibit potentially useful fluorescent properties. All four phenylalanine derivatives were used to activate suppressor tRNA transcripts and incorporated into multiple positions of ecDHFR. All phenylalanine derivatives were incorporated with good efficiency into position 16 of ecDHFR and afforded modified proteins that consumed NADPH at rates up to about twice the rate measured for wild type. This phenomenon has been noted on a number of occasions previously and shown to be due to an increase in the off-rate of tetrahydrofolate from the enzyme, altering a step that is normally rate limiting. When introduced into sterically accessible position 49, the four phenylalanine derivatives afforded DHFRs having catalytic function comparable to wild type. The four phenylalanine derivatives were also introduced into position 115 of ecDHFR, which is known to be a folded region of the protein less tolerant of structural alteration. As anticipated, significant differences were noted in the catalytic efficiencies of the derived proteins. The ability of two of the sizable biphenyl-phenylalanine derivatives to be accommodated at position 115 with minimal perturbation of DHFR function is attributed to rotational

  4. An improved bimolecular fluorescence complementation tool based on superfolder green fluorescent protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Zhou; Jian Lin; Cuihong Zhou; Xiaoyan Deng; Bin Xia

    2011-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) has been widely used in the analysis of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in recent years. There are many notable advantages of BiFC such as convenience and direct visualization of PPI in cells. However, BiFC has one common limitation: the separated non-fluorescent fragments can be spontaneously self-assembled into an intact protein,which leads to false-positive results. In this study, a pair of complementary fragments (sfGFPN and sfGFPC) was constructed by splitting superfolder GFP (sfGFP) between the 214 and 215 amino acid residue, and sfGFPC was mutated by site-directed gene mutagenesis to decrease the signal of negative control. Our results showed that mutations in sfGFPC (sfGFPC(m12)) can effectively decrease the signal of negative control. Thus, we provide an improved BiFC tool for the analysis of PPI. Further,since the self-assembly problem is a common shortcoming for application of BiFC, our research provides a feasible strategy for other BiFC candidate proteins with the same problem.

  5. Multiphosphine-Oxide Hosts for Ultralow-Voltage-Driven True-Blue Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Diodes with External Quantum Efficiency beyond 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Ding, Dongxue; Wei, Ying; Han, Fuquan; Xu, Hui; Huang, Wei

    2016-01-20

    Highly efficient low-voltage-driven -true-blue thermally activated -delayed fluorescence diodes are realized through employing a tri-phosphine oxide host (2,2',4-tris(di(phenyl) -phosphoryl)-diphenylether (DPETPO)) with a record external quantum efficiency of 23.0% and the lowest onset voltage of 2.8 V to date.

  6. Structural dynamics of green fluorescent protein alone and fused with a single chain Fv protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Griep, R.A.; Borst, J.W.; Hoek, van A.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Schots, A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2000-01-01

    Structural information on intracellular fusions of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria with endogenous proteins is required as they are increasingly used in cell biology and biochemistry. We have investigated the dynamic properties of GFP alone and fused to a singl

  7. Intracellular distribution of cowpea mosaic virus movement protein as visualised by green fluorescent protein fusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gopinath, K.; Bertens, P.; Pouwels, J.; Marks, H.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Wellink, J.E.; Kammen, van A.

    2003-01-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) derivatives expressing movement protein (MP) green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions (MP:GFP) were used to study the intracellular targeting and localization of the MP in cowpea protoplasts and plants. In protoplasts, a virus coding for a wild type MP:GFP (MPfGFP) induced

  8. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  9. Blue Light Hazard and Risk Group Classification of 8 W LED Tubes, Replacing Fluorescent Tubes, through Optical Radiation Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Leccese

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors discuss the results of a measurement survey of artificial optical radiation emitted by 8 W LED tubes suitable for the substitution of 18 W fluorescent lamps used for general lighting. For both types of lamps, three different color temperatures were chosen, 3000 K, 4000 K, and 6000 K. These measurements were performed to evaluate the photobiological safety of the sources. The radiance and irradiance values have been measured in a wide range of wavelengths (180–3000 nm. The measurement results obtained for the LED tubes have been compared to those of similar measurements obtained for fluorescent lamps. The analysis has been focused on the range of wavelengths 300–700 nm, the blue light range, which turned out to be defining for the risk groups of the lamps. This classification is a function of the maximum permissible exposure time as indicated in the European Standard EN 62471 on the photobiological safety of lamps and lamp systems.

  10. A Blue Native-PAGE analysis of membrane protein complexes in Clostridium thermocellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Keqiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium thermocellum is a Gram-positive thermophilic anaerobic bacterium with the unusual capacity to convert cellulosic biomass into ethanol and hydrogen. Identification and characterization of protein complexes in C. thermocellum are important toward understanding its metabolism and physiology. Results A two dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE procedure was developed to separate membrane protein complexes of C. thermocellum. Proteins spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF Mass spectrometry. 24 proteins were identified representing 13 distinct protein complexes, including several putative intact complexes. Interestingly, subunits of both the F1-F0-ATP synthase and the V1-V0-ATP synthase were detected in the membrane sample, indicating C. thermocellum may use alternative mechanisms for ATP generation. Conclusion Two dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE was used to detect membrane protein complexes in C. thermocellum. More than a dozen putative protein complexes were identified, revealing the simultaneous expression of two sets of ATP synthase. The protocol developed in this work paves the way for further functional characterization of these protein complexes.

  11. Non-decoloured In-gel Digestion of Coomassie Blue-stained Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo-an; BAO Hui-min; FAN Hui-zhi; YANG Peng-yuan

    2003-01-01

    A simplified method is presented for tryptic digestion of Coomassie brilliant blue(CBB)-stained proteins in polyacrylamide gels. Compared with conventional methods, the proposed method does not require a removal of the dye before digestion, and is thus faster and saves a lot of labor. The resulted digest can be analyzed by either RPLC/ESIMS or MALDI MS for identification of the protein in a conventional way. Model studies with bovine serum albumin(BSA) showed that 50 ng of the protein could be routinely identified. The simplified procedure displays a tendency to produce more incompletely cleaved peptides, which is favorable for improving the sequence coverage.

  12. Fluorescence imaging of angiogenesis in green fluorescent protein-expressing tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Jin W.; Li, Lingna; Yagi, Shigeo; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2002-05-01

    The development of therapeutics for the control of tumor angiogenesis requires a simple, reliable in vivo assay for tumor-induced vascularization. For this purpose, we have adapted the orthotopic implantation model of angiogenesis by using human and rodent tumors genetically tagged with Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) for grafting into nude mice. Genetically-fluorescent tumors can be readily imaged in vivo. The non-luminous induced capillaries are clearly visible against the bright tumor fluorescence examined either intravitally or by whole-body luminance in real time. Fluorescence shadowing replaces the laborious histological techniques for determining blood vessel density. High-level GFP-expressing tumor cell lines made it possible to acquire the high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical images of angiogenesis in both primary tumors and their metastatic lesions in various human and rodent tumor models by means of a light-based imaging system. Intravital images of angiogenesis onset and development were acquired and quantified from a GFP- expressing orthotopically-growing human prostate tumor over a 19-day period. Whole-body optical imaging visualized vessel density increasing linearly over a 20-week period in orthotopically-growing, GFP-expressing human breast tumor MDA-MB-435. Vessels in an orthotopically-growing GFP- expressing Lewis lung carcinoma tumor were visualized through the chest wall via a reversible skin flap. These clinically-relevant angiogenesis mouse models can be used for real-time in vivo evaluation of agents inhibiting or promoting tumor angiogenesis in physiological micro- environments.

  13. Development of Fluorescent Protein Probes Specific for Parallel DNA and RNA G-Quadruplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Dung Thanh; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2016-01-01

    We have developed fluorescent protein probes specific for parallel G-quadruplexes by attaching cyan fluorescent protein to the G-quadruplex-binding motif of the RNA helicase RHAU. Fluorescent probes containing RHAU peptide fragments of different lengths were constructed, and their binding to G-quadruplexes was characterized. The selective recognition and discrimination of G-quadruplex topologies by the fluorescent protein probes was easily detected by the naked eye or by conventional gel imaging.

  14. Distribution and Spectroscopy of Green Fluorescent Protein and Acyl-CoA: Cholesterol Acytransferase in Sf21 Insect Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, R. C.; Mahtani, H.; Lu, X.; Chang, T. Y.; Malak, H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    blue shift from 518nm obtained in neutral aqueous solution to 505nm obtained in localized regions within the cells. This blue shift indicates change in the fluorescence coupling of the GFP moiety of GCAT. It is hypothesized that change in tertiary environment of GCAT, coincident with intracellular deposition of GCAT, follows from intracellular trafficking of GCAT leading to membrane interactions with the ACAT moiety, and/or self-assembly of GCAT, that alters the chromophore environment of the GFP moiety of GCAT. These findings introduce a new technique of biophotonic imaging to studies of intracellular protein trafficking and interactions. This technique of hyperspectral imaging could contribute to advancing the emergent field of proteomics. Because of the noninvasive nature of this technique, kinetic processes associated with intracellular protein trafficking, and interactions of proteins within cellular domains, can be considered for investigation within a single cell as well as a cell population.

  15. Effect of Fluorescently Labeling Protein Probes on Kinetics of Protein-Ligand Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Y.S.; Landry, J. P.; Fei, Y.Y.; Zhu, X.D.; Luo, J. T.; Wang, X.B.; Lam, K. S.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the effect of fluorescently labeling proteins on protein-ligand reactions. Un-labeled ligands (streptavidin-binding peptides and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) as antigen targets) are immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Unlabeled and Cy3-labeled protein probes from the same batch (streptavidin and goat antibodies) subsequently react with the surface-immobilized targets. By monitoring in situ the surface mass density change using an oblique-incidence reflectivity differ...

  16. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strategy using a new split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a modular binding partner to form stable protein complexes with a target protein is presented. The modular split GFP may open the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants. A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP β-strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10–11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1–9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10–11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1–9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization

  17. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Hau B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS D454, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Yeates, Todd O. [University of California, PO Box 951569, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov; Waldo, Geoffrey S., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    A strategy using a new split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a modular binding partner to form stable protein complexes with a target protein is presented. The modular split GFP may open the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants. A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP β-strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10–11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1–9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10–11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1–9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization.

  18. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  19. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2015-07-14

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Pulsed Blue and Ultraviolet Laser System for Fluorescence Diagnostics based on Nonlinear Frequency Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Haynes Pak Hay

    . The spatial and spectral properties of the pump source were also investigated individually, and it was concluded that a broad spectrum tapered diode pump source may be most stable and cost-effective. To generate high peak power pulsed output, Q-switched lasers were considered. In particular, synchronized Q...... was directly frequency-doubled to 404 nm using an external cavity, and was used in an animal experiment for a novel approach in estimating photosensitizer concentration using fluorescence imaging. Secondly, a frequency-tripled, 355 nm, Q-switched, DPSS laser was used in a preliminary clinical investigation...... in autofluorescence diagnostic of skin cancer. While the preliminary results are promising, the system would benefit from a 340 nm light source that tunes into the absorption peaks of endogenous fluorophores. The imaging system would also benefit from a high-peak power light source that would increase the signal...

  2. Quantitative Determination of Spatial Protein-protein Proximity in Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yong; Ou, Jimmy; Li, Min; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    To quantify spatial protein-protein proximity (colocalization) in fluorescence microscopic images, cross-correlation and autocorrelation functions were decomposed into fast and slowly decaying components. The fast component results from clusters of proteins specifically labeled and the slow one from background/image heterogeneity. We show that the calculation of the protein-protein proximity index and the correlation coefficient are more reliably determined by extracting the fast-decaying component. This new method is illustrated by analyzing colocalization in both simulated and biological images.

  3. Green fluorescent protein as a visual marker in somatic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Fuster, O; Peña, L; Duran-Vila, N; Navarro, L

    2002-04-01

    Using a transgenic citrus plant expressing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as a parent in somatic fusion experiments, we investigated the suitability of GFP as an in vivo marker to follow the processes of protoplast fusion, regeneration and selection of hybrid plants. A high level of GFP expression was detected in transgenic citrus protoplasts, hybrid callus, embryos and plants. It is demonstrated that GFP can be used for the continuous monitoring of the fusion process, localization of hybrid colonies and callus, and selection of somatic hybrid embryos and plants. PMID:12096810

  4. Anaerobic green fluorescent protein as a marker of Bifidobacterium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landete, José M; Peirotén, Ángela; Rodríguez, Eva; Margolles, Abelardo; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan L

    2014-04-01

    Some strains of Bifidobacterium are considered as probiotics and are being added as adjunct culture in food products due to their potential in maintaining a healthy intestinal microbial balance. However, despite these benefits, bifidobacteria still remain poorly understood at the genetic level compared with other microorganisms of industrial interest. In this work, we have developed a non-invasive green fluorescent based reporter system for real-time tracking of Bifidobacterium species in vivo. The reporter vector pNZ:Tu-GFPana is based on the pNZ8048 plasmid harboring a bifidobacterial promoter (elongation factor Tu from Bifidobacterium longum CECT 4551) and a fluorescent protein containing a flavin-mono-nucleotide-based cofactor (evoglow-Pp1) which is fluorescent under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. pNZ:Tu-GFPana was constructed and found to stably replicate in B. longum CECT 4551 and in the intestinal strain Bifidobacterium breve INIA P734. The subsequent analysis of these strains allowed us to assess the functionality of this plasmid. Our results demonstrate the potential of pNZ:Tu-GFPana as a real-time reporter system for Bifidobacterium in order to track the behavior of this probiotic species in complex environments like food or intestinal microbiota, and to estimate their competition and colonization potential. PMID:24495586

  5. Binding phenomena and fluorescence quenching. II: Photophysics of aromatic residues and dependence of fluorescence spectra on protein conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callis, Patrik R.

    2014-12-01

    The three amino acids with aromatic ring side chains-phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), and especially tryptophan (Trp) have played a long and productive role in helping unlock the secrets of protein behavior by optical spectroscopy (absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism, etc.) In principle, an appropriately placed Trp will undergo fluorescence wavelength and/or intensity changes upon whatever functional process a protein performs. Although perceived to be enigmatic and not well understood, Trp is arguably now better understood than many of the extrinsic probes currently in use. Basic principles of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence quenching and wavelength shifts in proteins are presented, with strong emphasis on the importance of electrostatics. The condensed description of findings from recent experiments and simulations of tryptophan fluorescence and intrinsic quenching in proteins is designed to help authors in planning and interpreting experimental results of ligand binding studies.

  6. [Preparation of procion brilliant blue-doped silica nanorods and their recognition properties for proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qiliang; Chen, Yang; Wu, Jianhua; Li, Yanli; Liu, Chunjing; Song, Weijing

    2011-09-01

    Protein enrichment and separation is one of the pivotal preliminary steps of proteomics studies, which is important to medical diagnosis and treatment. In this study, procion brilliant blue-doped silica nanorod was prepared via self-assembly sol-gel technology without any additional template. Procion brilliant blue was covalently linked to 3-aminopropyltriethyloxy silane in ethanol. Tetraethylorthosilane (TEOS) was then added into the mixture, subsequently hydrolyzed and co-condensed for 3 h under stirring. The resulted nanorods were isolated by centrifugation, re-dispersed in deionized water, and centrifuged again. This wash process was repeated three times. Finally, the nanorods were dried under vacuum. Procion brilliant blue acted simultaneously as a self-assembly template during the preparation process, and subsequently as recognition probe for proteins. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image showed that the nanotubes were 2-16 microm in length and 200-500 nm in diameter. The obtained nanorods were further characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSA), separately. All these results indicated that procion brilliant blue were successfully doped into silica nanorods. The recognition property of nanorods for bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated under static condition. The resulted nanorods showed high binding capacity (57.6 mg/g) for BSA and fast adsorption equilibrium (within 60 min). The nanorods were also evaluated with four typical proteins, hemoglobin, trypsin, lysozyme and pepsin, with different relative molecular masses and isoelectric points. The results indicated that the prepared nanorods exhibited the highest binding capacity for trypsin (87.5 mg/g) and the least binding for hemoglobin (Hb, 3.0 mg/g). This easy preparation protocol and excellent recognition property make the prepared materials a bright future in proteomics research. PMID:22233075

  7. Effect of Solvation on Electron Detachment and Excitation Energies of a Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Samik; Chakrabarty, Suman; Ghosh, Debashree

    2016-05-19

    Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is applied to the fluorinated green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore (DFHBDI) in its deprotonated form to understand the solvatochromic shifts in its vertical detachment energy (VDE) and vertical excitation energy (VEE). This variant of the GFP chromophore becomes fluorescent in an RNA environment and has a wide range of applications in biomedical and biochemical fields. From microsolvation studies, we benchmark (with respect to full QM) the accuracy of our QM/MM calculations with effective fragment potential (EFP) as the MM method of choice. We show that while the solvatochromic shift in the VEE is minimal (0.1 eV blue shift) and its polarization component is only 0.03 eV, the effect of the solvent on the VDE is quite large (3.85 eV). We also show by accurate calculations on the solvatochromic shift of the VDE that polarization accounts for ∼0.23 eV and therefore cannot be neglected. The effect of the counterions on the VDE of the deprotonated chromophore in solvation is studied in detail, and a charge-smearing scheme is suggested for charged chromophores. PMID:27116477

  8. High-power-efficiency hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes with a single emitting layer doped with blue delayed fluorescent and yellow phosphorescent emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-efficiency hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes (HWOLEDs) with a blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) emitter and a yellow phosphorescent emitter doped in a single emitting layer were developed. Exciton harvesting by the blue TADF and yellow phosphorescent emitters rendered both singlet and triplet excitons to contribute to the white emission, which leads to a high quantum efficiency of 22.4% and a power efficiency of 60.3 lm W−1 in the HWOLEDs. In addition, the electroluminescence spectra of the HWOLEDs were kept stable from 100 cd m−2 to 5, 000 cd m−2. (paper)

  9. Photodynamics of blue-light-regulated phosphodiesterase BlrP1 protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae and its photoreceptor BLUF domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, A.; Penzkofer, A.; Griese, J.; Schlichting, I.; Kirienko, Natalia V.; Gomelsky, Mark

    2008-12-01

    The BlrP1 protein from the enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae consists of a BLUF and an EAL domain and may activate c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase by blue-light. The full-length protein, BlrP1, and its BLUF domain, BlrP1_BLUF, are characterized by optical absorption and emission spectroscopy. The cofactor FAD in its oxidized redox state (FAD ox) is brought from the dark-adapted receptor state to the 10-nm red-shifted putative signalling state by violet light exposure. The recovery to the receptor state occurs with a time constant of about 1 min. The quantum yield of signalling state formation is about 0.17 for BlrP1_BLUF and about 0.08 for BlrP1. The fluorescence efficiency of the FAD ox cofactor is small due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. Prolonged light exposure converts FAD ox in the signalling state to the fully reduced hydroquinone form FAD redH - and causes low-efficient chromophore release with subsequent photo-degradation. The photo-cycle and photo-reduction dynamics in the receptor state and in the signalling state are discussed.

  10. Photodynamics of blue-light-regulated phosphodiesterase BlrP1 protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae and its photoreceptor BLUF domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Penzkofer, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)], E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de; Griese, J.; Schlichting, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer medizinische Forschung, Abteilung Biomolekulare Mechanismen, Jahnstrasse 29, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kirienko, Natalia V.; Gomelsky, Mark [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States)

    2008-12-10

    The BlrP1 protein from the enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae consists of a BLUF and an EAL domain and may activate c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase by blue-light. The full-length protein, BlrP1, and its BLUF domain, BlrP1{sub B}LUF, are characterized by optical absorption and emission spectroscopy. The cofactor FAD in its oxidized redox state (FAD{sub ox}) is brought from the dark-adapted receptor state to the 10-nm red-shifted putative signalling state by violet light exposure. The recovery to the receptor state occurs with a time constant of about 1 min. The quantum yield of signalling state formation is about 0.17 for BlrP1{sub B}LUF and about 0.08 for BlrP1. The fluorescence efficiency of the FAD{sub ox} cofactor is small due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. Prolonged light exposure converts FAD{sub ox} in the signalling state to the fully reduced hydroquinone form FAD{sub red}H{sup -} and causes low-efficient chromophore release with subsequent photo-degradation. The photo-cycle and photo-reduction dynamics in the receptor state and in the signalling state are discussed.

  11. Plasmon-enhanced emission from single fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donehue, Jessica E.; Haas, Beth L.; Wertz, Esther; Talicska, Courtney N.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we use evaporated gold nanoparticle films (GNPFs) as substrates for plasmon-enhanced imaging of two fluorescent proteins (FPs): mCherry and YFP. Through single-molecule epifluorescence microscopy, we show enhancement of single FP emission in the presence of GNPFs. The gold-coupled FPs demonstrate emission up to four times brighter and seven times longer lived, yielding order-of-magnitude enhancements in total photons detected. Ultimately, this results in increased localization accuracies for single-molecule imaging. Furthermore, we introduce preliminary results for enhancement of mCherry-labeled TcpP membrane proteins inside live Vibrio cholerae cells coupled to GNPFs. Our work indicates that plasmonic substrates are uniquely advantageous for super-resolution imaging and that plasmon-enhanced imaging is a promising technique for improving live cell single-molecule microscopy.

  12. Photoconversion of Purified Fluorescent Proteins and Dual-probe Optical Highlighting in Live Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kremers, Gert-Jan; Piston, David

    2010-01-01

    Photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (pc-FPs) are a class of fluorescent proteins with "optical highlighter" capability, meaning that the color of fluorescence can be changed by exposure to light of a specific wavelength. Optical highlighting allows noninvasive marking of a subpopulation of fluorescent molecules, and is therefore ideal for tracking single cells or organelles. Critical parameters for efficient photoconversion are the intensity and the exposure time of the photoconversion ligh...

  13. In vitro and in vivo biolasing of fluorescent proteins suspended in liquid microdroplet cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Bayraktar, Halil; Kiraz, Alper; Aas, Mehdi; Karadağ, Yasin; Manioğlu, Selen; Jonas, Alexandr; Anand, Suman; McGloin, David

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are indispensable for selective, quantitative visualization of localization, dynamics, and interactions of key molecular constituents of live cells. Incorporation of fluorescent proteins into an optical cavity can lead to a significant increase in fluorescence signal levels due to stimulated emission and light amplification in the cavity, forming a laser with biological gain medium. Utilization of lasing emission from fluorescent biological molecules can then greatly enha...

  14. Characterization of flavonoid-protein interactions using fluorescence spectroscopy: Binding of pelargonidin to dairy proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Campos-Terán, José; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; McClements, David Julian

    2016-12-15

    In this study, the interaction between the flavonoid pelargonidin and dairy proteins: β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), whey protein (WPI), and caseinate (CAS) was investigated. Fluorescence experiments demonstrated that pelargonidin quenched milk proteins fluorescence strongly. However, the protein secondary structure was not significantly affected by pelargonidin, as judged from far-UV circular dichroism. Analysis of fluorescence data indicated that pelargonidin-induced quenching does not arise from a dynamical mechanism, but instead is due to protein-ligand binding. Therefore, quenching data were analyzed using the model of independent binding sites. Both β-LG and CAS, but not WPI, showed hyperbolic binding isotherms indicating that these proteins firmly bound pelargonidin at both pH 7.0 and 3.0 (binding constants ca. 1.0×10(5) at 25.0°C). To investigate the underlying thermodynamics, binding constants were determined at 25.0, 35.0, and 45.0°C. These results pointed to binding processes that depend on the structural conformation of the milk proteins.

  15. Characterization of flavonoid-protein interactions using fluorescence spectroscopy: Binding of pelargonidin to dairy proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Campos-Terán, José; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; McClements, David Julian

    2016-12-15

    In this study, the interaction between the flavonoid pelargonidin and dairy proteins: β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), whey protein (WPI), and caseinate (CAS) was investigated. Fluorescence experiments demonstrated that pelargonidin quenched milk proteins fluorescence strongly. However, the protein secondary structure was not significantly affected by pelargonidin, as judged from far-UV circular dichroism. Analysis of fluorescence data indicated that pelargonidin-induced quenching does not arise from a dynamical mechanism, but instead is due to protein-ligand binding. Therefore, quenching data were analyzed using the model of independent binding sites. Both β-LG and CAS, but not WPI, showed hyperbolic binding isotherms indicating that these proteins firmly bound pelargonidin at both pH 7.0 and 3.0 (binding constants ca. 1.0×10(5) at 25.0°C). To investigate the underlying thermodynamics, binding constants were determined at 25.0, 35.0, and 45.0°C. These results pointed to binding processes that depend on the structural conformation of the milk proteins. PMID:27451201

  16. Fluorescent Probe Encapsulated in SNAP-Tag Protein Cavity To Eliminate Nonspecific Fluorescence and Increase Detection Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan-Syun; Gao, Ruo-Cing; Wu, Ting-Wei; Cho, Chien; Tan, Kui-Thong

    2016-08-17

    Despite the promising improvements made recently on fluorescence probes for the detection of enzymes and reactive small molecules, two fundamental problems remain: weaker fluorescence of many dyes in aqueous buffers and strong nonspecific signals in samples containing high protein levels. In this paper, we introduce a novel fluorescent probe encapsulated in protein cavity (FPEPC) concept as demonstrated by SNAP-tag protein and three environment-sensitive fluorescence probes to overcome these two problems. The probes were constructed by following the current probe design for enzymes and reactive small molecules but with an additional benzylguanine moiety for selective SNAP-tag conjugation. The SNAP-tag conjugated probes achieved quantitative nitroreductase and hydrogen sulfide detection in blood plasma, whereas analyte concentrations were overestimated up to 700-fold when bare fluorescent probes were employed for detection. Furthermore, detection sensitivity was increased dramatically, as our probes displayed 390-fold fluorescence enhancement upon SNAP-tag conjugation, in stark contrast to the weak fluorescence of the free probes in aqueous solutions. Compared with the conventional approaches where fluorescent probes are encapsulated into polymers and nanoparticles, our simple and general approach successfully overcame many key issues such as dye leakage, long preparation steps, inconsistent dye-host ratios, difficulty in constructing in situ in a complex medium, and limited application to detect only small metabolites. PMID:27463260

  17. Fluorescent detection of C-reactive protein using polyamide beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesh, Shreesha; Chen, Lu; Aitchison, Stewart

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infection causes Sepsis which is one of the leading cause of mortality in hospitals. This infection can be quantified from blood plasma using C - reactive protein (CRP). A quick diagnosis at the patient's location through Point-of- Care (POC) testing could give doctors the confidence to prescribe antibiotics. In this paper, the development and testing of a bead-based procedure for CRP quantification is described. The size of the beads enable them to be trapped in wells without the need for magnetic methods of immobilization. Large (1.5 mm diameter) Polyamide nylon beads were used as the substrate for capturing CRP from pure analyte samples. The beads captured CRP either directly through adsorption or indirectly by having specific capture antibodies on their surface. Both methods used fluorescent imaging techniques to quantify the protein. The amount of CRP needed to give a sufficient fluorescent signal through direct capture method was found suitable for identifying bacterial causes of infection. Similarly, viral infections could be quantified by the more sensitive indirect capture method. This bead-based assay can be potentially integrated as a disposable cartridge in a POC device due to its passive nature and the small quantities needed.

  18. Analysis of green fluorescent protein bioluminescence in vivo and in vitro using a glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, L.; Mandujano, L. A.; Cuevas, J.; Reyes, P. G.; Osorio-González, D.

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of fluorescent proteins has been a revolution in cell biology and related sciences because of their many applications, mainly emphasizing their use as cellular markers. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most used as it requires no cofactors to generate fluorescence and retains this property into any organism when it is expressed by recombinant DNA techniques, which is a great advantage. In this work, we analyze the emission spectra of recombinant green fluorescent protein in vivo and in vitro exposed to a glow discharge plasma of nitrogen in order to relate electron temperature to fluorescence intensity.

  19. Development of an automated fluorescence microscopy system for photomanipulation of genetically encoded photoactivatable proteins (optogenetics) in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Nobukazu; Ikeda, Yuka; Kato, Takuma; Kawai, Katsuhisa; Egami, Youhei; Miyake, Katsuya; Tsurumaki, Nobuhide; Yamaguchi, Mitsunari

    2014-06-01

    Photomanipulation of genetically encoded light-sensitive protein activity, also known as optogenetics, is one of the most innovative recent microscopy techniques in the fields of cell biology and neurobiology. Although photomanipulation is usually performed by diverting the photobleaching mode of a confocal laser microscope, photobleaching by the laser scanning unit is not always suitable for photoactivation. We have developed a simple automated wide-field fluorescence microscopy system for the photomanipulation of genetically encoded photoactivatable proteins in live cells. An electrically automated fluorescence microscope can be controlled through MetaMorph imaging software, making it possible to acquire time-lapse, multiwavelength images of live cells. Using the journal (macro recording) function of MetaMorph, we wrote a macro program to change the excitation filter for photoactivation and illumination area during the intervals of image acquisition. When this program was run on the wide-field fluorescence microscope, cells expressing genetically encoded photoactivatable Rac1, which is activated under blue light, showed morphological changes such as lamellipodial extension and cell surface ruffling in the illuminated region. Using software-based development, we successfully constructed a fully automated photoactivation microscopy system for a mercury lamp-based fluorescence microscope.

  20. Complex Assembly Behavior During the Encapsulation of Green Fluorescent Protein Analogs in Virus Derived Protein Capsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minten, Inge J.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen J.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Enzymes encapsulated in nanocontainers are a better model of the conditions inside a living cell than free enzymes in solution. In a first step toward the encapsulation of multiple enzymes inside the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was attached

  1. Total protein analysis as a reliable loading control for quantitative fluorescent Western blotting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha L Eaton

    Full Text Available Western blotting has been a key technique for determining the relative expression of proteins within complex biological samples since the first publications in 1979. Recent developments in sensitive fluorescent labels, with truly quantifiable linear ranges and greater limits of detection, have allowed biologists to probe tissue specific pathways and processes with higher resolution than ever before. However, the application of quantitative Western blotting (QWB to a range of healthy tissues and those from degenerative models has highlighted a problem with significant consequences for quantitative protein analysis: how can researchers conduct comparative expression analyses when many of the commonly used reference proteins (e.g. loading controls are differentially expressed? Here we demonstrate that common controls, including actin and tubulin, are differentially expressed in tissues from a wide range of animal models of neurodegeneration. We highlight the prevalence of such alterations through examination of published "-omics" data, and demonstrate similar responses in sensitive QWB experiments. For example, QWB analysis of spinal cord from a murine model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy using an Odyssey scanner revealed that beta-actin expression was decreased by 19.3±2% compared to healthy littermate controls. Thus, normalising QWB data to β-actin in these circumstances could result in 'skewing' of all data by ∼20%. We further demonstrate that differential expression of commonly used loading controls was not restricted to the nervous system, but was also detectable across multiple tissues, including bone, fat and internal organs. Moreover, expression of these "control" proteins was not consistent between different portions of the same tissue, highlighting the importance of careful and consistent tissue sampling for QWB experiments. Finally, having illustrated the problem of selecting appropriate single protein loading controls, we demonstrate

  2. White organic light-emitting devices based on blue fluorescent dye combined with dual sub-monolayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Huishan, E-mail: yanghuishan1697@163.com

    2013-10-15

    White organic light-emitting devices have been realized by using highly blue fluorescent dye 4,4′-Bis(2,2-diphenyl-ethen-1-yl)-4,4′-di-(tert-butyl)phenyl(p-TDPVBi) and [2-methyl-6-[2-(2, 3,6,7-tetrahydro-1H, red fluorescent dye 5H-benzo[ij] quinolizin-9-yl) ethenyl]-4H-pyran-4-ylidene] propane-dinitrile(DCM2), together with well known green fluorescent dye quinacridone (QAD). The fabrication of multilayer WOLEDs did not involve the hard-to-control doping process. The structure of the device is ITO/m-MTDATA (45 nm)/NPB(8 nm)/p-TDPVBi(15 nm)/DCM2(x nm)/Alq{sub 3} (5 nm)/QAD(y nm)/Alq{sub 3}(55 nm)/LiF(1 nm)/Al, where 4,4′,4′′-tris{N,-(3-methylphenyl)-N-phenylamine}triphenylamine (m-MTDATA) acts as a hole injection layer, N,N′-bis-(1-naphthyl)-N, N′-diphenyl-1, 1′-biph-enyl-4, 4′-diamine (NPB) acts as a hole transport layer, p-TDPVBi acts as a blue emitting layer, DCM2 acts as a red emitting layer, QAD acts as a green emitting layer, tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq{sub 3}) acts as an electron transport layer, and WOLEDs of devices A, B, C and D are different in layer thickness of DCM2 and QAD, respectively. To change the thickness of dual sub-monolayer DCM2 and QAD, the WOLEDs were obtained. When x, y=0.05, 0.1, the Commission Internationale de 1’Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the device change from (0.4458, 0.4589) at 3 V to (0.3137, 0.3455) at 12 V that are well in the white region, and the color temperature and color rendering index were 5348 K and 85 at 8 V, respectively. Its maximum luminance was 35260 cd/m{sup 2} at 12 V, and maximum current efficiency and maximum power efficiency were 13.54 cd/A at 12 V and 6.68 lm/W at 5 V, respectively. Moreover, the current efficiency is largely insensitive to the applied voltage. The electroluminescence intensity of white EL devices varied only little at deferent dual sub-monolayer. Device D exhibited relatively high color rendering index (CRI) in the range of 88–90, which was essentially

  3. Directed evolution methods for improving polypeptide folding and solubility and superfolder fluorescent proteins generated thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2007-09-18

    The current invention provides methods of improving folding of polypeptides using a poorly folding domain as a component of a fusion protein comprising the poorly folding domain and a polypeptide of interest to be improved. The invention also provides novel green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) and red fluorescent proteins that have enhanced folding properties.

  4. Attenuation-Based Dual-Fluorescent-Protein Reporter for Screening Translation Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Osterman, Ilya A.; Prokhorova, Irina V.; Sysoev, Vasily O.; Boykova, Yulia V.; Efremenkova, Olga V.; Svetlov, Maxim S.; Kolb, Vyacheslav A.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Sergiev, Petr V.; Dontsova, Olga A

    2012-01-01

    A reporter construct was created on the basis of the transcription attenuator region of the Escherichia coli tryptophan operon. Dual-fluorescent-protein genes for red fluorescent protein and cerulean fluorescent protein were used as a sensor and internal control of gene expression. The sequence of the attenuator was modified to avoid tryptophan sensitivity while preserving sensitivity to ribosome stalling. Antimicrobial compounds which cause translation arrest at the stage of elongation induc...

  5. A Diabatic Three-State Representation of Photoisomerization in the Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Seth; McKenzie, Ross H.

    2009-01-01

    We give a quantum chemical description of bridge photoisomerization reaction of green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophores using a representation over three diabatic states. Bridge photoisomerization leads to non-radiative decay, and competes with fluorescence in these systems. In the protein, this pathway is suppressed, leading to fluorescence. Understanding the electronic structure of the photoisomerization is a prerequisite to understanding how the protein suppresses this pathway and pre...

  6. Highly Fluorescent Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Analogues Made by Decorating the Imidazolone Ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Sara; Martínez-López, David; Morón, María; Sucunza, David; Sampedro, Diego; Domingo, Alberto; Salgado, Antonio; Vaquero, Juan J

    2015-12-14

    The synthesis and photophysical behavior of an unexplored family of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophore analogues is reported. The compound (Z)-4-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-1-propyl-2-(propylamino)-1H-imidazol-5(4 H)-one (p-HBDNI, 2 a) exhibits significantly enhanced fluorescence properties relative to the parent compound (Z)-5-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-2,3-dimethyl-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-one (p-HBDI, 1). p-HBDNI was considered as a model system and the photophysical properties of other novel 2-amino-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-one derivatives were evaluated. Time-dependent DFT calculations were carried out to rationalize the results. The analogue AIDNI (2 c), in which the 4-hydroxybenzyl group of p-HBDNI was replaced by an azaindole group, showed improved photophysical properties and potential for cell staining. The uptake and intracellular distribution of 2 c in living cells was investigated by confocal microscopy imaging.

  7. Photophysical studies on the interaction of amides with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution: Fluorescence quenching and protein unfolding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran, R., E-mail: kumaranwau@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600106 (India); Ramamurthy, P. [National Centre for Ultrafast Processes, University of Madras, Sekhizar Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2014-04-15

    Addition. of amides containing a H-CO(NH{sub 2}) or CH{sub 3}-CO(NH{sub 2}) framework to BSA results in a fluorescence quenching. On the contrary, fluorescence enhancement with a shift in the emission maximum towards the blue region is observed on the addition of dimethylformamide (DMF) (H-CON(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}). Fluorescence quenching accompanied initially with a shift towards the blue region and a subsequent red shift in the emission maximum of BSA is observed on the addition of formamide (H-CO(NH{sub 2})), whereas a shift in the emission maximum only towards the red region results on the addition of acetamide (CH{sub 3}-CONH{sub 2}). Steady state emission spectral studies reveal that amides that possess a free NH{sub 2} and N(CH{sub 3}){sub 2} moiety result in fluorescence quenching and enhancement of BSA respectively. The 3D contour spectral studies of BSA with formamide exhibit a shift in the emission towards the red region accompanied with fluorescence quenching, which indicates that the tryptophan residues of the BSA are exposed to a more polar environment. Circular Dichroism (CD) studies of BSA with amides resulted in a gradual decrease in the α-helical content of BSA at 208 nm, which confirms that there is a conformational change in the native structure of BSA. Time-resolved fluorescence studies illustrate that the extent of buried trytophan moieties exposed to the aqueous phase on the addition of amides follows the order DMFfluorescence methods. -- Highlights:

  8. Translocation of green fluorescent protein to cyanobacterial periplasm using ice nucleation protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chungjatupornchai, Wipa; Fa-aroonsawat, Sirirat

    2009-04-01

    The translocation of proteins to cyanobacterial cell envelope is made complex by the presence of a highly differentiated membrane system. To investigate the protein translocation in cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7942 using the truncated ice nucleation protein (InpNC) from Pseudomonas syringae KCTC 1832, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was fused in frame to the carboxyl-terminus of InpNC. The fluorescence of GFP was found almost entirely as a halo in the outer regions of cells which appeared to correspond to the periplasm as demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy, however, GFP was not displayed on the outermost cell surface. Western blotting analysis revealed that InpNC-GFP fusion protein was partially degraded. The N-terminal domain of InpNC may be susceptible to protease attack; the remaining C-terminal domain conjugated with GFP lost the ability to direct translocation across outer membrane and to act as a surface display motif. The fluorescence intensity of cells with periplasmic GFP was approximately 6-fold lower than that of cells with cytoplasmic GFP. The successful translocation of the active GFP to the periplasm may provide a potential means to study the property of cyanobacterial periplasmic substances in response to environmental changes in a non-invasive manner. PMID:19412603

  9. Development of transgenic chickens expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we demonstrated the successful production of transgenic chickens expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene. Replication-defective recombinant retroviruses produced from vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein pseudotyped retrovirus vector system were injected beneath the blastoderm of non-incubated chicken embryos (stage X). From 129 injected eggs, 13 chicks hatched after 21 days of incubation. All hatched chicks were found to express vector-encoded EGFP gene, which was under the control of the Rous sarcoma virus promoter and boosted post-transcriptionally by woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element sequence. Green fluorescent signals, indicative of the EGFP gene expression, were detected in various body parts, including head, limb, eye, toe, and several internal organs. Genomic incorporation of the transgene was also proven by Southern blot assay. Our results show the exceptional versatile effectiveness of the EGFP gene as a marker in the gene expression-related studies which therefore would be very helpful in establishing a useful transgenic chicken model system for studies on embryo development and for efficient production of transgenic chickens as bioreactors

  10. Blue copper proteins as a model for investigating electron transfer processes within polypeptide matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1994-01-01

    Intramolecular long-range electron transfer (ET) processes have been investigated in two types of blue copper proteins; the single-copper protein, azurin and the multi-copper oxidase, ascorbate oxidase. These have several advantages for investigating the parameters that control the above reactions...... resolution. (3) These proteins have no other cofactors except for the copper ions, thus the role of the polypeptide matrix can be addressed in a more straightforward manner. In azurins, the ET from the cystine (3-26) radical-ion produced by pulse-radiolytic reduction of this single disulfide bridge......, to the Cu(II) ion bound at a distance of approximately 2.6 nm has been studied, in naturally occurring and in single-site mutated azurins. The role of changing specific amino acid residues on the internal long-range electron transfer (LRET) process and its potential pathways has been investigated...

  11. From jellyfish to biosensors: the use of fluorescent proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Ute; Larrieu, Antoine; Wells, Darren M

    2013-01-01

    The milestone discovery of green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, its optimisation for efficient use in plantae, and subsequent improvements in techniques for fluorescent detection and quantification have changed plant molecular biology research dramatically. Using fluorescent protein tags allows the temporal and spatial monitoring of dynamic expression patterns at tissue, cellular and subcellular scales. Genetically-encoded fluorescence has become the basis for applications such as cell-type specific transcriptomics, monitoring cell fate and identity during development of individual organs or embryos, and visualising protein-protein interactions in vivo. In this article, we will give an overview of currently available fluorescent proteins, their applications in plant research, the techniques used to analyse them and, using the recent development of an auxin sensor as an example, discuss the design principles and prospects for the next generation of fluorescent plant biosensors. PMID:24166435

  12. Controlled expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein and hepatitis B virus precore protein in mammalian cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel tetracycline regulation expression system was used to regulate the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and hepatitis B virus precore protein in the mammalian cell lines with lipofectAMINE. Flow cytometry assays showed that application of the system resulted in about 18-fold induction of EGFP expression in CHO cell lines and 5-fold induction in SSMC-7721 cells and about 2-fold in the HEK293 cells. Furthermore, the effective use of this system for the controlled expression of HBV precore protein gene in hepatocellular carcinoma cells was tested.

  13. Preferred sites and pathways for electron transfer in blue copper proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1988-01-01

    Long-range electron transfer reactions proceed within and between metalloproteins at relatively fast rates and with marked specificities. The blue single copper proteins are well known electron carriers with their redox center being of limited accessibility to solvent and solutes. The question......, E.T. proceeds via an extended imidazole ring system, and in plastocyanin and stellacyanin via a weakly coupled pi-system. Therefore, a case emerges for suggesting that this is the common feature of the long-distance intramolecular E.T. in this class of metalloproteins. These pathways are most...

  14. Fluorescence microscopy methods in the study of protein structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Smith, Heather; Currall, Benjamin; Rossino, Danielle; Tiede, LeAnn; Nichols, Michael; Hallworth, Richard

    2009-01-01

    As more and more proteins specific to hair cells are discovered, it becomes imperative to understand their structure and how that contributes to their function. The fluorescence microscopic methods described here can be employed to provide information on protein-protein interactions, whether homomeric or heteromeric, and on protein conformation. Here, we describe two fluorescence microscopic methodologies applied to the outer hair cell-specific membrane protein prestin: the intensity and fluorescence lifetime (FLIM) variants of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer), used in the study of protein-protein interactions, and the Scanning Cysteine Accessibility Method (SCAM), used for the determination of protein conformation. The methods are readily adaptable to other proteins. PMID:18839359

  15. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation as a tool to study interactions of regulatory proteins in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Werkman, Joshua R; Yuan, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are an important aspect of the gene regulation process. The expression of a gene in response to certain stimuli, within a specific cell type or at a particular developmental stage, involves a complex network of interactions between different regulatory proteins and the cis-regulatory elements present in the promoter of the gene. A number of methods have been developed to study protein-protein interactions in vitro and in vivo in plant cells, one of which is bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). BiFC is a relatively simple technique based upon the reconstitution of a fluorescent protein. The interacting protein complex can be visualized directly in a living plant cell when two non-fluorescent fragments, of an otherwise fluorescent protein, are fused to proteins found within that complex. Interaction of tagged proteins brings the two non-fluorescent fragments into close proximity and reconstitutes the fluorescent protein. In addition, the subcellular location of an interacting protein complex in the cell can be simultaneously determined. Using this approach, we have successfully demonstrated a protein-protein interaction between a R2R3 MYB and a basic helix-loop-helix MYC transcription factor related to flavonoid biosynthetic pathway in tobacco protoplasts.

  16. Electrochemical Study on the Interaction of Protein with Bromothymol Blue and Its Analytical Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue-liang; YANG Jie; JIAO Kui

    2008-01-01

    The interaction ofbromothymol blue(BB) with human serum albumin(HSA) was studied by electrochemical techniques and a sensitive method for proteins assay was developed.When BB interacted with HSA,the voltammetric peak current value of BB decreased linearly with the concentration of HSA in a range of 1.0-40.0 mg/L,and the peak potential shifted negatively.Based on the results,a sensitive assay method for proteins,such as HSA,bovine serum albumin(BSA),and egg albumin etc.was established.This method was further applied to determining the HSA in healthy human blood samples,and the results are not significantly different from those obtained by the classic Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 spectrophotometic method.The detecting conditions of this method were optimized and the interaction mechanism was discussed.The results show that the electrochemical parameters(formal potential E0,standard rate constant of the electrode reaction ks,parameter of kinetic na) of BB have no obvious changes before and after the interaction,which indicate that BB can interact with HSA,forming an electrochemical non-active complex.The equilibrium constant(βs) and the binding ratio(m) for this complex were calculated.The m is 4 and β,is 1.41 × 1019.This method is fast,simple,highly sensitive,and has good selectivity,which can be used in clinical measurements.

  17. A Novel Fluorescent Protein-Based Biosensor for Gram-Negative Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Goh, Yan Y.; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak L.

    2002-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) based on rational computational design was performed to create a fluorescence-based biosensor for endotoxin and gram-negative bacteria. EGFP mutants (EGFPi) bearing one (G10) or two (G12) strands of endotoxin binding motifs were constructed and expressed in an Escherichia coli host. The EGFPi proteins were purified and tested for their efficacy as a novel fluorescent biosensor. After efficient removal of lipopolysaccharide...

  18. FRET-Based Localization of Fluorescent Protein Insertions Within the Ryanodine Receptor Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Raina, Shweta A.; Jeffrey Tsai; Montserrat Samsó; Fessenden, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent protein (FP) insertions have often been used to localize primary structure elements in mid-resolution 3D cryo electron microscopic (EM) maps of large protein complexes. However, little is known as to the precise spatial relationship between the location of the fused FP and its insertion site within a larger protein. To gain insights into these structural considerations, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements were used to localize green fluorescent protein (GFP) inse...

  19. Plasmon-controlled narrower and blue-shifted fluorescence emission in (Au-SiO{sub 2})SiC nanohybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui Ning; Monnier, Virginie, E-mail: virginie.monnier@ec-lyon.fr [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon-INL, UMR CNRS 5270, Site Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Universite de Lyon (France); Zakharko, Yuriy [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon-INL-UMR 5270-CNRS, Site INSA Lyon, Universite de Lyon (France); Chevolot, Yann [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon-INL, UMR CNRS 5270, Site Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Universite de Lyon (France); Alekseev, Sergei [Kiev National Taras Schevchenko University, Faculty of Chemistry (Ukraine); Bluet, Jean-Marie; Lysenko, Vladimir [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon-INL-UMR 5270-CNRS, Site INSA Lyon, Universite de Lyon (France); Souteyrand, Eliane [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon-INL, UMR CNRS 5270, Site Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Universite de Lyon (France)

    2012-08-15

    Fluorescent imaging is a key tool in biology. On one hand, organic dyes are subjected to bleaching; while, on the other hand II-VI semiconductor quantum dots are photostable, but may exhibit some toxicity. Silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiC NPs) are a good alternative as SiC is chemically inert and considered as biocompatible material. However, their fluorescence quantum yield is weak. Plasmon-controlled fluorescence appears as a mean to enhance SiC NPs fluorescence. To this aim, new fluorescent nanohybrids (NHs) involving a gold colloid surrounded by a silica shell and overcoated with SiC NPs have been engineered. Au-SiO{sub 2} particles were synthesized via a sol-gel method to obtain a controlled thickness of silica around gold colloid. Then, SiC NPs were immobilized onto silica by covalent bonding. TEM was used to study the structural properties of NHs. The influence of several parameters on NHs' fluorescence properties was investigated. It reveals that excitation wavelength must be chosen as close as possible to the gold plasmon band to avoid quenching of emission due to energy transfer between gold absorption and SiC emission. Moreover, the silica thickness is a key parameter to obtain high enhancement; for gold colloids of 20 nm in diameter overcoated by a 25 nm shell, an enhancement factor as high as 12.5 was obtained with a narrower and blue-shifted emission band. This blue-shift can be attributed to the surface chemistry modification of SiC NPs when they are covalently bonded to silica.

  20. Direct observation of resonance tryptophan-to-chromophore energy transfer in visible fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, NV; Borst, JW; Hink, MA; van Hoek, A; Visser, AJWG

    2005-01-01

    Visible fluorescent proteins from Aequorea victoria contain next to the fluorophoric group a single tryptophan residue. Both molecules form a single donor-acceptor pair for resonance energy transfer (RET) within the protein. Time-resolved fluorescence experiments using tryptophan excitation have sho

  1. Fabrication and Investigation of Two-Component Film of 2,5-Diphenyloxazole and Octafluoronaphthalene Exhibiting Tunable Blue/Bluish Violet Fluorescence Based on Low Vacuum Physical Vapor Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Zhai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic luminescent materials play an important role in the fields of light-emitting diodes and fluorescent imaging. Moreover, new synthetic approaches towards π-conjugated molecular systems with high fluorescence quantum efficiency are highly desired. Herein, different 2,5-diphenyloxazole-octafluoronaphthalene (DPO-OFN films with tunable fluorescence have been prepared by Low Vacuum Physical Vapor Deposition (LVPVD method. DPO-OFN films showed some changed properties, such as molecular vibration and fluorescence. All films exhibited blue/bluish violet fluorescence and showed blue shift, in comparison with pristine DPO. This work introduced a new method to fabricate two-component molecular materials with tunable blue/bluish violet luminescence properties and provided a new perspective to prepare organic luminescent film materials, layer film materials, cocrystal materials, and cocrystal film materials. Importantly, these materials have potential applications in the fields of next generation of photofunctional materials.

  2. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments.

  3. Localizing Proteins in Fixed Giardia lamblia and Live Cultured Mammalian Cells by Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyindodo-Ogari, Lilian; Schwartzbach, Steven D; Skalli, Omar; Estraño, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) are complementary methods for studying the intracellular localization of proteins. Confocal fluorescence microscopy provides a rapid and technically simple method to identify the organelle in which a protein localizes but only EM can identify the suborganellular compartment in which that protein is present. Confocal fluorescence microscopy, however, can provide information not obtainable by EM but required to understand the dynamics and interactions of specific proteins. In addition, confocal fluorescence microscopy of cells transfected with a construct encoding a protein of interest fused to a fluorescent protein tag allows live cell studies of the subcellular localization of that protein and the monitoring in real time of its trafficking. Immunostaining methods for confocal fluorescence microscopy are also faster and less involved than those for EM allowing rapid optimization of the antibody dilution needed and a determination of whether protein antigenicity is maintained under fixation conditions used for EM immunogold labeling. This chapter details a method to determine by confocal fluorescence microscopy the intracellular localization of a protein by transfecting the organism of interest, in this case Giardia lamblia, with the cDNA encoding the protein of interest and then processing these organisms for double label immunofluorescence staining after chemical fixation. Also presented is a method to identify the organelle targeting information in the presequence of a precursor protein, in this case the presequence of the precursor to the Euglena light harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein of photosystem II precursor (pLHCPII), using live cell imaging of mammalian COS7 cells transiently transfected with a plasmid encoding a pLHCPII presequence fluorescent protein fusion and stained with organelle-specific fluorescent dyes. PMID:27515076

  4. Crystal structure of the fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. in both green and photoconverted red forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Sergei; Pakhomov, Alexey A.; Chertkova, Rita V.; Martynov, Vladimir I.; Muslinkina, Liya; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Vladimir Z.

    2016-07-13

    The fluorescent protein fromDendronephthyasp. (DendFP) is a member of the Kaede-like group of photoconvertible fluorescent proteins with a His62-Tyr63-Gly64 chromophore-forming sequence. Upon irradiation with UV and blue light, the fluorescence of DendFP irreversibly changes from green (506 nm) to red (578 nm). The photoconversion is accompanied by cleavage of the peptide backbone at the Cα—N bond of His62 and the formation of a terminal carboxamide group at the preceding Leu61. The resulting double Cα=Cβbond in His62 extends the conjugation of the chromophore π system to include imidazole, providing the red fluorescence. Here, the three-dimensional structures of native green and photoconverted red forms of DendFP determined at 1.81 and 2.14 Å resolution, respectively, are reported. This is the first structure of photoconverted red DendFP to be reported to date. The structure-based mutagenesis of DendFP revealed an important role of positions 142 and 193: replacement of the original Ser142 and His193 caused a moderate red shift in the fluorescence and a considerable increase in the photoconversion rate. It was demonstrated that hydrogen bonding of the chromophore to the Gln116 and Ser105 cluster is crucial for variation of the photoconversion rate. The single replacement Gln116Asn disrupts the hydrogen bonding of Gln116 to the chromophore, resulting in a 30-fold decrease in the photoconversion rate, which was partially restored by a further Ser105Asn replacement.

  5. Quinoline-Substituted 10-(naphthalene-7-yl)anthracene Derivatives for Blue Fluorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chanwoo; Park, Soo Na; Lee, Seul Bee; Kim, Young Seok; Lee, Ho Won; Kim, Young Kwan; Yoon, Seung Soo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we have designed and synthesized blue emitters based on quinoline-substituted 10-(naphthalene-7-yl)anthracene. Particularly, a material exhibited highly efficient blue electroluminescence with CIE coordinates of (0.15, 0.18). PMID:27433688

  6. Determination of proteins at nanogram levels by synchronous fluorescence scan technique with a novel composite nanoparticle as a fluorescence probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lun; Chen, Hongqi; Wang, Leyu; Wang, Guangfeng; Li, Ling; Xu, Fagong

    2004-09-01

    A novel composite nanoparticle has been prepared by an in situ polymerization method and applied as a protein fluorescence probe. The nano-CdS has been prepared, then the polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) was carried out by initiator potassium persulfate (KPS) under ultrasonic irradiation. The surface of the composite nanoparticles was covered with abundant carboxylic groups (--COOH). The nanoparticles are water-soluble, stable, and biocompatible. The synchronous fluorescence intensity of the composite nanoparticles is significantly increased in the presence of trace protein at pH 6.90. Based on this, a new synchronous fluorescence scan (SFS) analysis was developed for the determination of proteins including BSA, HSA, and human gamma-IgG. When Delta lambda = 280 nm, maximum synchronous fluorescence is produced at 290 nm. Under the optimum conditions, the response is linearly proportional to the concentration of proteins. The linear range is 0.1-10 microg ml(-1) for HSA, 0.09-8.0 microg ml(-1) for BSA, and 0.08-15 microg ml(-1) for human gamma-IgG, respectively. The method has been applied to the determination of the total protein in human serum samples collected from the hospital and the results are satisfactory. PMID:15294230

  7. Mass spectrometry based approach for identification and characterisation of fluorescent proteins from marine organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna Iwona; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof;

    2011-01-01

    We present here a new analytical strategy for identification and characterisation of fluorescent proteins from marine organisms. By applying basic proteomics tools it is possible to screen large sample collections for fluorescent proteins of desired characteristics prior to gene cloning. Our...... methodology which includes isolation, spectral characterisation, stability testing, gel-based separation and mass spectrometric identification was optimised on samples collected during the Danish Galathea 3 expedition. Four corals of the Fungia, Sarcophyton and Acropora species emitting green fluorescence...... were tested. Each of the fluorescent extracts behaves differently under denaturing conditions but complete fluorescence loss was not observed. Optimised electrophoretic conditions yielded effective separation of active fluorescent proteins in both 1DE and 2DE. Mass spectrometric analysis...

  8. Mass spectrometry based approach for identification and characterisation of fluorescent proteins from marine organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof;

    2011-01-01

    We present here a new analytical strategy for identification and characterisation of fluorescent proteins from marine organisms. By applying basic proteomics tools it is possible to screen large sample collections for fluorescent proteins of desired characteristics prior to gene cloning. Our...... methodology which includes isolation, spectral characterisation, stability testing, gel-based separation and mass spectrometric identification was optimised on samples collected during the Danish Galathea 3 expedition. Four corals of the Fungia, Sarcophyton and Acropora species emitting green fluorescence...... were tested. Each of the fluorescent extracts behaves differently under denaturing conditions but complete fluorescence loss was not observed. Optimised electrophoretic conditions yielded effective separation of active fluorescent proteins in both 1DE and 2DE. Mass spectrometric analysis of the...

  9. Direct electrochemistry of blue copper proteins at boron-doped diamond electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEvoy, James P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Chemistry Research Laboratory, Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TA (United Kingdom); Foord, John S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Chemistry Research Laboratory, Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TA (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: john.foord@chem.ox.ac.uk

    2005-05-05

    Boron-doped diamond (BDD) is a promising electrode material for use in the spectro-electrochemical study of redox proteins and, in this investigation, cyclic voltammetry was used to obtain quasi-reversible electrochemical responses from two blue copper proteins, parsley plastocyanin and azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. No voltammetry was observed at the virgin electrodes, but signals were observed if the electrodes were anodised, or abraded with alumina, prior to use. Plastocyanin, which has a considerable overall negative charge and a surface acidic patch which is important in forming a productive electron transfer complex with its redox partners, gave a faradaic signal at pre-treated BDD only in the presence of neomycin, a positively charged polyamine. The voltammetry of azurin, which has a small overall charge and no surface acidic patch, was obtained identically in the presence and absence of neomycin. Investigations were also carried out into the voltammetry of two site-directed mutants of azurin, M64E azurin and M44K azurin, each of which introduce a charge into the protein's surface hydrophobic patch. The oxidizing and cleaning effects of the BDD electrode pre-treatments were studied electrochemically using two inorganic probe ions, Fe(China){sub 6} {sup 3-} and Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6} {sup 3+}, and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). All of the electrochemical results are discussed in relation to the electrostatic and hydrophobic contributions to the protein/diamond electrochemical interaction.

  10. Blue-green fluorescence and visible-infrared reflectance of corn (Zea mays L.) grain for in situ field detection of nitrogen supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensing of spectral attributes of corn (Zea mays L.) grain from site specific areas of the field during the harvest process may be useful in managing agronomic inputs and production practices on those areas of the field in subsequent growing seasons. Eight levels of nitrogen (N) fertilization were applied to field grown corn at Beltsville, Maryland. These N treatments produced a range of chlorophyll levels, biomass and physiological condition in the live plant canopies. After harvest, spectra were obtained in the laboratory on whole grain samples. Fluorescence emissions were acquired from 400 to 600 nm and percent reflectance were measured in the visible (VIS) near infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) regions from 400 nm to 2400 nm. A ultraviolet (UV) excitation band centered at 385 nm was the most effective in producing fluorescence emission differences in the blue-green region of the fluorescence spectrum with maxima centered from 430-470nm in the blue and with an intense shoulder centered at around 530-560 nm in the green region. Reflectance showed the most spectral differences in the NIR and MIR (970-2330 nm) regions

  11. Glow in the Dark: Fluorescent Proteins as Cell and Tissue-Specific Markers in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenzislava Ckurshumova; Adriana E. Caragea; Rochelle S. Goldstein; Thomas Berleth

    2011-01-01

    Since the hallmark discovery of Aequorea victoria's Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its adaptation for efficient use in plants,fluorescent protein tags marking expression profiles or genuine proteins of interest have been used to recognize plant tissues and cell types,to monitor dynamic cell fate selection processes,and to obtain cell type-specific transcriptomes.Fluorescent tagging enabled visualization in living tissues and the precise recordings of dynamic expression pattern changes.The resulting accurate recording of cell fate acquisition kinetics in space and time has strongly stimulated mathematical modeling of self-organizing feedback mechanisms.In developmental studies,the use of fluorescent proteins has become critical,where morphological markers of tissues,cell types,or differentiation stages are either not known or not easily recognizable.In this review,we focus on the use of fluorescent markers to identify and illuminate otherwise invisible cell states in plant development.

  12. Blue-Light-Independent Activity of Arabidopsis Cryptochromes in the Regulation of Steady-State Levels of Protein and mRNA Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Jun Yang; Xuan-Ming Liu; Chen-Tao Lin; Ze-Cheng Zuo; Xiao-Ying Zhao; Xu Li; John Klejnot; Yan Li; Ping Chen; Song-Ping Liang; Xu-Hong Yu

    2008-01-01

    Cryptochromes are blue-light receptors that mediate blue-light inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and bluelight stimulation of floral initiation in Arabidopsis. In addition to their blue-light-dependent functions, cryptochromes are also involved in blue-light-independent regulation of the circadian clock, cotyledon unfolding, and hypocotyl inhibition.However, the molecular mechanism associated with the blue-light-independent function of cryptochromes remains unclear. We reported here a comparative proteomics study of the light regulation of protein expression. We showed that, as expected, the protein expression of many metabolic enzymes changed in response to both blue light and red light. Surprisingly, some light-regulated protein expression changes are impaired in the cry1cry2 mutant in both blue light and red light. This result suggests that, in addition to mediating blue-light-dependent regulation of protein expression, cryptochromes are also involved in the blue-light-independent regulation of gene expression. Consistent with this hypothesis,the cry1cry2 mutant exhibited reduced changes of mRNA expression in response to not only blue light, but also red light,although the cryptochrome effects on the red-light-dependent gene expression changes are generally less pronounced.These results support a hypothesis that, in addition to their blue-light-specific functions, cryptochromes also play roles in the control of gene expression mediated by the red/far-red-light receptor phytochromes.

  13. New insights in the interpretation of tryptophan fluorescence : origin of the fluorescence lifetime and characterization of a new fluorescence parameter in proteins: the emission to excitation ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, J R

    2007-07-01

    Origin of tryptophan fluorescence is still up to these days a quiz which is not completely solved. Fluorescence emission properties of tryptophan within proteins are in general considered as the result of fluorophore interaction within its environment. For example, a low fluorescence quantum yield is supposed to be the consequence of an important fluorophore-environment interaction. However, are we sure that the fluorophore has been excited upon light absorption? What if fluorophore excitation did not occur as the result of internal conformation specific to the fluorophore environment? Are we sure that all absorbed energy is used for the excitation process? Fluorescence lifetimes of Trp residues are considered to originate from rotamers or conformers resulting from the rotation of the indole ring within the peptide bonds. However, how can we explain the fact that in most of the proteins, the two lifetimes 0.5 and 3 ns, attributed to the conformers, are also observed for free tryptophan in solution? The present work, performed on free tryptophan and tyrosine in solution and on different proteins, shows that absorption and excitation spectra overlap but their intensities at the different excitation wavelengths are not necessarily equal. Also, we found that fluorescence emission intensities recorded at different excitation wavelengths depend on the intensities at these excitation wavelengths and not on the optical densities. Thus, excitation is not equal to absorption. In our interpretation of the data, we consider that absorbed photons are not necessary used only for the excitation, part of them are used to reorganize fluorophore molecules in a new state (excited structure) and another part is used for the excitation process. A new parameter that characterizes the ratio of the number of emitted photons over the real number of photons used to excite the fluorophore can be defined. We call this parameter, the emission to excitation ratio. Since our results were

  14. Human alpha-fetal protein immunoassay using fluorescence suppression with fluorescent-bead/antibody conjugate and enzymatic reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Junhyoung; Shin, Yong-Beom; Lee, JaeJong; Kim, Min-Gon

    2015-09-15

    The aim of the study was to develop a simple and rapid immunoassay using fluorescent microbeads and enzyme-substrate reactions to measure alpha-fetal protein (AFP) concentrations. We demonstrated the functionality of the fluorescent immunosensor using antibody-conjugated fluorescent latex beads (AB-FLBs) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to catalyze a reaction, where the products would precipitate and suppress the fluorescence of AB-FLBs. First, the AB-FLBs were incubated with antigen, biotinylated antibodies (bABs), and streptavidin-HRP (SAv-HRP) to form a sandwich-type immunoreaction. The mixture was then filtered through a membrane to concentrate the beads on a small area. After washing to remove unbound bABs and SAv-HRP, a chromogenic HRP substrate and H2O2 were added to form precipitates on the FLB surface. The suppression of the fluorescence was measured with a fluorescent image analyzer system. Under optimized conditions, AFP could be measured at concentrations as low as 1 pg mL(-1) with a dynamic range up to 100 ng mL(-1).

  15. Synthesis and characterization of novel 2, 2'-bipyrimidine fluorescent derivative for protein binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padalkar Vikas S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescent dyes with biocompatible functional group and good fluorescence behavior are used as biosensor for monitoring different biological processes as well as detection of protein assay. All reported fluorophore used as sensors are having high selectivity and sensitivity but till there is more demand to synthesized new fluorophore which have improved fluorescence properties and good biocompatibility. Results Novel 4, 4'-(1, 1'-(5-(2-methoxyphenoxy-[2, 2'-bipyrimidine]-4, 6-diylbis(1H-pyrazol-3, 1-diyl dianiline fluorescent dye was synthesized by multistep synthesis from 2-phenylacetonitrile, 2-chloropyrimidine and 2-methoxyphenol. This dye has absorption at 379 nm with intense single emission at 497 nm having fairly good quantum yield (0.375 and Stokes shift. The intermediates and dye were characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and Mass spectral analysis. The pyrazole bipyrimidine based fluorescent dye possessing two amino groups suitable for binding with protein is reported. Its utility as a biocompatible conjugate was explained by conjugation with bovine serum albumin. The method is based on direct fluorescence detection of fluorophore-labelled protein before and after conjugation. Purified fluorescent conjugate was subsequently analyzed by fluorimetry. The analysis showed that the tested conjugation reaction yielded fluorescent conjugates of the dye through carbodiimide chemistry. Conclusion In summery synthesized fluorophore pyrazole-bipyrimidine has very good interaction towards protein bovine serum albumin and it acts as good candidate for protein assay.

  16. Attenuation-based dual-fluorescent-protein reporter for screening translation inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, Ilya A; Prokhorova, Irina V; Sysoev, Vasily O; Boykova, Yulia V; Efremenkova, Olga V; Svetlov, Maxim S; Kolb, Vyacheslav A; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Sergiev, Petr V; Dontsova, Olga A

    2012-04-01

    A reporter construct was created on the basis of the transcription attenuator region of the Escherichia coli tryptophan operon. Dual-fluorescent-protein genes for red fluorescent protein and cerulean fluorescent protein were used as a sensor and internal control of gene expression. The sequence of the attenuator was modified to avoid tryptophan sensitivity while preserving sensitivity to ribosome stalling. Antimicrobial compounds which cause translation arrest at the stage of elongation induce the reporter both in liquid culture and on an agar plate. This reporter could be used for high-throughput screening of translation inhibitors. PMID:22252829

  17. Spectroscopic investigation on interaction and sonodynamic damage of Riboflavin to DNA under ultrasonic irradiation by using Methylene Blue as fluorescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dandan; Fan, Ping; Wang, Baoxin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the Riboflavin (RF) as a sonosensitizer and Methylene Blue (MB) as a fluorescent probe were used to study the interaction and sonodynamic damage to Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) by fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the RF could efficiently bind to DNA in aqueous solution and exchange with the MB through competing reaction. And then, under ultrasonic irradiation, the RF could obviously damage the DNA. In addition, the influencing factors such as ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration on the sonodynamic damage to DNA were also considered. The experimental results showed that the sonodynamic damage degree increase with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration. Perhaps, this paper may offer some important subjects for broadening the application of RF in sonodynamic therapy (SDT) technologies for tumor treatment.

  18. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Assay for Direct Visualization of Protein-Protein Interaction in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hsien-Tsung; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) assay is a method used to directly visualize protein-protein interaction in vivo using live-cell imaging or fixed cells. This protocol described here is based on our recent paper describing the functional association of human chromatin adaptor and transcription cofactor Brd4 with p53 tumor suppressor protein (Wu et al., 2013). BiFC was first described by Hu et al. (2002) using two non-fluorescent protein fragments of enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP), which is an Aequorea victoria GFP variant protein, fused respectively to a Rel family protein and a bZIP family transcription factor to investigate interactions between these two family members in living cells. The YFP was later improved by introducing mutations to reduce its sensitivity to pH and chloride ions, thus generating a super-enhanced YFP, named Venus fluorescent protein, without showing diminished fluorescence at 37 °C as typically observed with EYFP (Nagai et al., 2006). The fluorescence signal is regenerated by complementation of two non-fluorescent fragments (e.g., the Venus N-terminal 1–158 amino acid residues, called Venus-N, and its C-terminal 159–239 amino acid residues, named Venus-C; see Figure 1A and Gully et al., 2012; Ding et al., 2006; Kerppola, 2006) that are brought together by interaction between their respective fusion partners (e.g., Venus-N to p53, and Venus-C to the PDID domain of human Brd4; see Figure 1B and 1C). The intensity and cellular location of the regenerated fluorescence signals can be detected by fluorescence microscope. The advantages of the proximity-based BiFC assay are: first, it allows a direct visualization of spatial and temporal interaction between two partner proteins in vivo; second, the fluorescence signal provides a sensitive readout for detecting protein-protein interaction even at a low expression level comparable to that of the endogenous proteins; third, the intensity of the fluorescence signal is

  19. [Comparison of histone-like proteins from blue-green algae with ribosomal basic proteins of alga and wheat germ histones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofshteĭn, L V; Iurina, N P; Romashkin, V I; Oparin, A I

    1975-01-01

    Histone-like proteins was found in blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans, which has no nucleus. F2b2, F2a2, F2a1 fractions were found in histone-like algae proteins and no fraction F1. Content of basic amino acids (arginine being prevailing in algae protein) is quite identical in histone-like algae proteins and in wheat germs histones, while the content of acid amino acids is considerably higher in algae. The presence in procaryotic cells of basic proteins similar in a number of properties to histones of higher organisms suggests that these proteins are evolutionary precursors of eucaryotic histones. PMID:813782

  20. Organic Fluorescent Dyes Supported on Activated Boron Nitride: A Promising Blue Light Excited Phosphors for High-Performance White Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Lin, Jing; Huang, Yang; Xu, Xuewen; Liu, Zhenya; Xue, Yanming; Ding, Xiaoxia; Luo, Han; Jin, Peng; Zhang, Jun; Zou, Jin; Tang, Chengchun

    2015-02-01

    We report an effective and rare-earth free light conversion material synthesized via a facile fabrication route, in which organic fluorescent dyes, i.e. Rhodamine B (RhB) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) are embedded into activated boron nitride (αBN) to form a composite phosphor. The composite phosphor shows highly efficient Förster resonance energy transfer and greatly improved thermal stability, and can emit at broad visible wavelengths of 500-650 nm under the 466 nm blue-light excitation. By packaging of the composite phosphors and a blue light-emitting diode (LED) chip with transparent epoxy resin, white LED with excellent thermal conductivity, current stability and optical performance can be realized, i.e. a thermal conductivity of 0.36 W/mk, a Commission Internationale de 1'Eclairage color coordinates of (0.32, 0.34), and a luminous efficiency of 21.6 lm.W-1. Our research opens the door toward to the practical long-life organic fluorescent dyes-based white LEDs.

  1. Evaluation of chemical fluorescent dyes as a protein conjugation partner for live cell imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Hayashi-Takanaka

    Full Text Available To optimize live cell fluorescence imaging, the choice of fluorescent substrate is a critical factor. Although genetically encoded fluorescent proteins have been used widely, chemical fluorescent dyes are still useful when conjugated to proteins or ligands. However, little information is available for the suitability of different fluorescent dyes for live imaging. We here systematically analyzed the property of a number of commercial fluorescent dyes when conjugated with antigen-binding (Fab fragments directed against specific histone modifications, in particular, phosphorylated H3S28 (H3S28ph and acetylated H3K9 (H3K9ac. These Fab fragments were conjugated with a fluorescent dye and loaded into living HeLa cells. H3S28ph-specific Fab fragments were expected to be enriched in condensed chromosomes, as H3S28 is phosphorylated during mitosis. However, the degree of Fab fragment enrichment on mitotic chromosomes varied depending on the conjugated dye. In general, green fluorescent dyes showed higher enrichment, compared to red and far-red fluorescent dyes, even when dye:protein conjugation ratios were similar. These differences are partly explained by an altered affinity of Fab fragment after dye-conjugation; some dyes have less effect on the affinity, while others can affect it more. Moreover, red and far-red fluorescent dyes tended to form aggregates in the cytoplasm. Similar results were observed when H3K9ac-specific Fab fragments were used, suggesting that the properties of each dye affect different Fab fragments similarly. According to our analysis, conjugation with green fluorescent dyes, like Alexa Fluor 488 and Dylight 488, has the least effect on Fab affinity and is the best for live cell imaging, although these dyes are less photostable than red fluorescent dyes. When multicolor imaging is required, we recommend the following dye combinations for optimal results: Alexa Fluor 488 (green, Cy3 (red, and Cy5 or CF640 (far-red.

  2. Bright fluorescence monitoring system utilizing Zoanthus sp. green fluorescent protein (ZsGreen for human G-protein-coupled receptor signaling in microbial yeast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Nakamura

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are currently the most important pharmaceutical targets for drug discovery because they regulate a wide variety of physiological processes. Consequently, simple and convenient detection systems for ligands that regulate the function of GPCR have attracted attention as powerful tools for new drug development. We previously developed a yeast-based fluorescence reporter ligand detection system using flow cytometry. However, using this conventional detection system, fluorescence from a cell expressing GFP and responding to a ligand is weak, making detection of these cells by fluorescence microscopy difficult. We here report improvements to the conventional yeast fluorescence reporter assay system resulting in the development of a new highly-sensitive fluorescence reporter assay system with extremely bright fluorescence and high signal-to-noise (S/N ratio. This new system allowed the easy detection of GPCR signaling in yeast using fluorescence microscopy. Somatostatin receptor and neurotensin receptor (implicated in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, respectively were chosen as human GPCR(s. The facile detection of binding to these receptors by cognate peptide ligands was demonstrated. In addition, we established a highly sensitive ligand detection system using yeast cell surface display technology that is applicable to peptide screening, and demonstrate that the display of various peptide analogs of neurotensin can activate signaling through the neurotensin receptor in yeast cells. Our system could be useful for identifying lead peptides with agonistic activity towards targeted human GPCR(s.

  3. A faster way to make GFP-based biosensors: Two new transposons for creating multicolored libraries of fluorescent fusion proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes Thomas E; Sheridan Douglas L

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background There are now several ways to generate fluorescent fusion proteins by randomly inserting DNA encoding the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) into another protein's coding sequence. These approaches can be used to map regions in a protein that are permissive for GFP insertion or to create novel biosensors. While remarkably useful, the current insertional strategies have two major limitations: (1) they only produce one kind, or color, of fluorescent fusion protein and (2) one h...

  4. Chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics, photosynthetic activity, and pigment composition of blue-shade and half-shade leaves as compared to sun and shade leaves of different trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenthaler, Hartmut K; Babani, Fatbardha; Navrátil, Martin; Buschmann, Claus

    2013-11-01

    The chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence induction kinetics, net photosynthetic CO2 fixation rates P N, and composition of photosynthetic pigments of differently light exposed leaves of several trees were comparatively measured to determine the differences in photosynthetic activity and pigment adaptation of leaves. The functional measurements were carried out with sun, half-shade and shade leaves of seven different trees species. These were: Acer platanoides L., Ginkgo biloba L., Fagus sylvatica L., Platanus x acerifolia Willd., Populus nigra L., Quercus robur L., Tilia cordata Mill. In three cases (beech, ginkgo, and oak), we compared the Chl fluorescence kinetics and photosynthetic rates of blue-shade leaves of the north tree crown receiving only blue sky light but no direct sunlight with that of sun leaves. In these cases, we also determined in detail the pigment composition of all four leaf types. In addition, we determined the quantum irradiance and spectral irradiance of direct sunlight, blue skylight as well as the irradiance in half shade and full shade. The results indicate that sun leaves possess significantly higher mean values for the net CO2 fixation rates P N (7.8-10.7 μmol CO2 m(-2) s(-1) leaf area) and the Chl fluorescence ratio R Fd (3.85-4.46) as compared to shade leaves (mean P N of 2.6-3.8 μmol CO2 m(-2) s(-1) leaf area.; mean R Fd of 1.94-2.56). Sun leaves also exhibit higher mean values for the pigment ratio Chl a/b (3.14-3.31) and considerably lower values for the weight ratio total chlorophylls to total carotenoids, (a + b)/(x + c), (4.07-4.25) as compared to shade leaves (Chl a/b 2.62-2.72) and (a + b)/(x + c) of 5.18-5.54. Blue-shade and half-shade leaves have an intermediate position between sun and shade leaves in all investigated parameters including the ratio F v/F o (maximum quantum yield of PS2 photochemistry) and are significantly different from sun and shade leaves but could not be differentiated from each other. The

  5. Fiber-optic system for monitoring fast photoactivation dynamics of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhiguo; Qin, Lingsong; Zhang, Zhihong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Huang, Zhen-Li

    2011-08-01

    Characterizing the photoactivation performance of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins is crucial to the realization of photoactivation localization microscopy. In contrast to those fluorescence-based approaches that require complex data processing and calibration procedures, here we report a simple and quantitative alternative, which relies on the measurement of small absorption spectra changes over time with a fiber-optic system. Using Dronpa as a representative highlighter protein, we have investigated the capacity of this system in monitoring the fast photoactivation process.

  6. Capillary electrophoresis coupled to fluorescence spectroscopy for protein characterisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kort, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are essential molecules in all living organisms. Their involvement in numerous biological processes has led to the development of protein-based medicines (biopharmaceuticals). For good understanding of the properties and function of endogenous proteins and biopharmaceuticals, extensive prot

  7. Shedding light on disulfide bond formation: engineering a redox switch in green fluorescent protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, H.; Henriksen, A.; Hansen, Flemming G.;

    2001-01-01

    To visualize the formation of disulfide bonds in living cells, a pair of redox-active cysteines was introduced into the yellow fluorescent variant of green fluorescent protein. Formation of a disulfide bond between the two cysteines was fully reversible and resulted in a >2-fold decrease in the i......To visualize the formation of disulfide bonds in living cells, a pair of redox-active cysteines was introduced into the yellow fluorescent variant of green fluorescent protein. Formation of a disulfide bond between the two cysteines was fully reversible and resulted in a >2-fold decrease...... as a structural reorganization of residues in the immediate chromophore environment. By combining this information with spectroscopic data, we propose a detailed mechanism accounting for the observed redox state-dependent fluorescence. The redox potential of the cysteine couple was found to be within...

  8. In Vivo Imaging of Far-red Fluorescent Proteins after DNA Electrotransfer to Muscle Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojman Pernille

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract DNA electrotransfer to muscle tissue yields long-term, high levels of gene expression; showing great promise for future gene therapy. We want to characterize the novel far-red fluorescent protein Katushka as a marker for gene expression using time domain fluorescence in vivo imaging. Highly efficient transgenic expression was observed after DNA electrotransfer with 100-fold increase in fluorescent intensity. The fluorescent signal peaked 1 week after transfection and returned to background level within 4 weeks. Katushka expression was not as stable as GFP expression, which was detectable for 8 weeks. Depth and 3D analysis proved that the expression was located in the target muscle. In vivo bio-imaging using the novel Katushka fluorescent protein enables excellent evaluation of the transfection efficacy, and spatial distribution, but lacks long-term stability.

  9. In Vivo Imaging of Far-red Fluorescent Proteins after DNA Electrotransfer to Muscle Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Eriksen, Jens; Gehl, Julie

    2009-01-01

    DNA electrotransfer to muscle tissue yields long-term, high levels of gene expression; showing great promise for future gene therapy. We want to characterize the novel far-red fluorescent protein Katushka as a marker for gene expression using time domain fluorescence in vivo imaging. Highly...... weeks. Depth and 3D analysis proved that the expression was located in the target muscle. In vivo bio-imaging using the novel Katushka fluorescent protein enables excellent evaluation of the transfection efficacy, and spatial distribution, but lacks long-term stability....

  10. Highly sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) assay using metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yi; Keegan, Gemma L., E-mail: gemmakeegan@gmail.com [Dublin City University, School of Physical Sciences, Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (Ireland); Stranik, Ondrej [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Department of NanoBiophotonics (Germany); Brennan-Fournet, Margaret E. [CMP-EMSE, MOC, Department of Bioelectronics, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines (France); McDonagh, Colette [Dublin City University, School of Physical Sciences, Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (Ireland)

    2015-07-15

    Fluorescence has been extensively employed in the area of diagnostic immunoassays. A significant enhancement of fluorescence can be achieved when noble metal nanoparticles are placed in close proximity to fluorophores. This effect, referred to as metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF), has the potential to produce immunoassays with a high sensitivity and a low limit of detection (LOD). In this study, we investigate the fluorescence enhancement effect of two different nanoparticle systems, large spherical silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gold edge-coated triangular silver nanoplates, and both systems were evaluated for MEF. The extinction properties and electric field enhancement of both systems were modeled, and the optimum system, spherical AgNPs, was used in a sandwich immunoassay for human C-reactive protein with a red fluorescent dye label. A significant enhancement in the fluorescence was observed, which corresponded to an LOD improvement of ∼19-fold compared to a control assay without AgNPs.

  11. Highly sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) assay using metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence has been extensively employed in the area of diagnostic immunoassays. A significant enhancement of fluorescence can be achieved when noble metal nanoparticles are placed in close proximity to fluorophores. This effect, referred to as metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF), has the potential to produce immunoassays with a high sensitivity and a low limit of detection (LOD). In this study, we investigate the fluorescence enhancement effect of two different nanoparticle systems, large spherical silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gold edge-coated triangular silver nanoplates, and both systems were evaluated for MEF. The extinction properties and electric field enhancement of both systems were modeled, and the optimum system, spherical AgNPs, was used in a sandwich immunoassay for human C-reactive protein with a red fluorescent dye label. A significant enhancement in the fluorescence was observed, which corresponded to an LOD improvement of ∼19-fold compared to a control assay without AgNPs

  12. A bistriphenylamine-substituted spirobifluorene derivative exhibiting excellent nonlinearity/transparency/thermal stability trade-off and strong two-photon induced blue fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Hongyao [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Xiao, Haibo, E-mail: xiaohb@shnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Ding, Lei [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Zhang, Chun; Ren, Aiming [State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Li, Bo [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China)

    2015-02-01

    A spirobifluorene-bridged donor/donor chromophore, 2,7-bis-(4-(N,N-diphenylamino)phen-1-yl)-9,9′-spirobifluorene (SPF-TP), was found to combine excellent transparency in the near UV–visible region (λ{sub cut-off} ≤ 420 nm), large two-photon absorption cross-section (4.5 × 10{sup 3}GM) and high thermal stability (T{sub d} = 501 °C). In comparison to the reported two-photon absorption molecules, SPF-TP represents the best thermal stability so far described in the literature. The main electronic factors explaining the high two-photon absorption activities of SPF-TP were analyzed by theoretical calculations. Cyclic voltammograms were employed to explore the causes of the excellent transparency of SPF-TP. It was found that the spiroconjugation effect is responsible for the excellent nonlinearity/transparency/thermal stability trade-off in SPF-TP. In addition, SPF-TP is also a good two-photon induced blue fluorescent material with high fluorescence quantum yield (Φ = 0.90, in THF). - Highlights: • We report a molecule exhibiting excellent transparency. • The two-photon absorption cross-section is as large as 4.5 × 10{sup 3}GM. • The molecule exhibits excellent thermal stability. • The molecule is a good two-photon induced blue fluorescent material. • The spiroconjugation effect explains the excellent properties.

  13. Mass spectrometry data from a quantitative analysis of protein expression in gills of immuno-challenged blue mussels (Mytilus edulis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörnaeus, K; Guillemant, J; Mi, J; Hernroth, B; Bergquist, J; Lind, S Bergström

    2016-09-01

    Here, we provide the dataset associated with our research article on the potential effects of ocean acidification on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity in the gills of Mytilus edulis, "Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)" [1]. Blue mussels were stimulated with lipopolysaccharides and samples were collected at different time points post injection. Protein extracts were prepared from the gills, digested using trypsin and a full in-depth proteome investigation was performed using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Protein identification and quantification was performed using the MaxQuant 1.5.1.2 software, "MaxQuant enables high peptide identification rates, individualized p.p.b.-range mass accuracies and proteome-wide protein quantification" [2].

  14. Mass spectrometry data from a quantitative analysis of protein expression in gills of immuno-challenged blue mussels (Mytilus edulis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörnaeus, K; Guillemant, J; Mi, J; Hernroth, B; Bergquist, J; Lind, S Bergström

    2016-09-01

    Here, we provide the dataset associated with our research article on the potential effects of ocean acidification on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity in the gills of Mytilus edulis, "Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)" [1]. Blue mussels were stimulated with lipopolysaccharides and samples were collected at different time points post injection. Protein extracts were prepared from the gills, digested using trypsin and a full in-depth proteome investigation was performed using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Protein identification and quantification was performed using the MaxQuant 1.5.1.2 software, "MaxQuant enables high peptide identification rates, individualized p.p.b.-range mass accuracies and proteome-wide protein quantification" [2]. PMID:27358907

  15. Effect of pH on the Heat-Induced Denaturation and Renaturation of Green Fluorescent Protein: A Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Rosa V.; Sola, Hilda M.; Torres, Juan C.; Torres, Rafael E.; Guzman, Ernick E.

    2013-01-01

    A fluorescence spectroscopy experiment is described where students integrated biochemistry and instrumental analysis, while characterizing the green fluorescent protein excitation and emission spectra in terms of its phenolic and phenolate chromophores. Students studied the combined effect of pH and temperature on the protein's fluorescence,…

  16. Structural characterization of the photoswitchable fluorescent protein Dronpa-C62S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photoswitching behavior of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) or GFP-like proteins is increasingly recognized as a new technique for optical marking. Recently, Ando and his colleagues developed a new green fluorescent protein Dronpa, which possesses the unique photochromic property of being photoswitchable in a non-destructive manner. To better understand this mechanism, we determined the crystal structures of a new GFP Dronpa and its mutant C62S, at 1.9 A and 1.8 A, respectively. Determination of the structures demonstrates that a unique hydrogen-bonding network and the sulfur atom of the chromophore are critical to the photoswitching property of Dronpa. Reversible photoswitching was lost in cells expressing the Dronpa-C62S upon repetitive irradiation compared to the native protein. Structural and mutational analyses reveal the chemical basis for the functional properties of photoswitchable fluorescent proteins and provide the basis for subsequent coherent engineering of this subfamily of Dronpa homolog's

  17. Luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes for sensitive fluorescent assignment of protein inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingstedt, Therése; Blechschmidt, Cristiane; Nogalska, Anna; Prokop, Stefan; Häggqvist, Bo; Danielsson, Olof; Engel, W King; Askanas, Valerie; Heppner, Frank L; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2013-03-18

    Small hydrophobic ligands identifying intracellular protein deposits are of great interest, as protein inclusion bodies are the pathological hallmark of several degenerative diseases. Here we report that fluorescent amyloid ligands, termed luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs), rapidly and with high sensitivity detect protein inclusion bodies in skeletal muscle tissue from patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). LCOs having a conjugated backbone of at least five thiophene units emitted strong fluorescence upon binding, and showed co-localization with proteins reported to accumulate in s-IBM protein inclusion bodies. Compared with conventional amyloid ligands, LCOs identified a larger fraction of immunopositive inclusion bodies. When the conjugated thiophene backbone was extended with terminal carboxyl groups, the LCO revealed striking spectral differences between distinct protein inclusion bodies. We conclude that 1) LCOs are sensitive, rapid and powerful tools for identifying protein inclusion bodies and 2) LCOs identify a wider range of protein inclusion bodies than conventional amyloid ligands.

  18. Fluorescent Ensemble Based on Bispyrene Fluorophore and Surfactant Assemblies: Sensing and Discriminating Proteins in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Junmei; Ding, Liping; Bo, Yu; Fang, Yu

    2015-10-14

    A particular bispyrene fluorophore (1) with two pyrene moieties covalently linked via a hydrophilic spacer was synthesized. Fluorescence measurements reveal that the fluorescence emission of 1 could be well modulated by a cationic surfactant, dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). Protein sensing studies illustrate that the selected ensemble based on 1/DTAB assemblies exhibits ratiometric responses to nonmetalloproteins and turn-off responses to metalloproteins, which can be used to differentiate the two types of proteins. Moreover, negatively charged nonmetalloproteins can be discriminated from the positively charged ones according to the difference in ratiometric responses. Fluorescence sensing studies with control bispyrenes indicate that the polarity of the spacer connecting two pyrene moieties plays an important role in locating bispyrene fluorophore in DTAB assemblies, which further influences its sensing behaviors to noncovalent interacting proteins. This study sheds light on the influence of the probe structure on the sensing performance of a fluorescent ensemble based on probe and surfactant assemblies.

  19. Expression and characterization of insulin growth factor-I-enhanced green fluorescent protein fused protein as a tracer for immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is an important polypeptide hormone under investigation for body metabolism study and for doping detection. Here, we describe for the first time the expression of a recombinant fusion protein of IGF-I and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The genetic fusion approach enables preparation of conjugates with 1:1 stoichiometry and homogeneous structure. The fused protein (EGFP-IGF-I) was expressed as a soluble protein in cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and its fluorescence and immunoreaction properties were thoroughly characterized. Finally, we demonstrated the utility of the EGFP-IGF-I fusion protein for the fluorescence immunoassay of IGF-1. The linear range of the assay is 1.6 x 10-8 to 2.0 x 10-6 M with a detection limit of 1.6 x 10-8 M. To our knowledge, this is the first time that EGFP has been used as a quantitative label in a fusion protein to develop a quantitative assay for IGF-I. Furthermore, the use of genetically engineered fusion proteins, which combine peptide hormones with fluorescent protein, can lead to a new labeling approach to a number of bioanalytical applications

  20. Trafficking of Na,K-ATPase fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein is mediated by protein kinase A or C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B; Birkelund, Svend; Jørgensen, PL

    2003-01-01

    . Responses of similar magnitude were seen after inhibition of protein phosphatase by okadaic acid. Reduction of the amount of Na,K-ATPase in surface plasma membranes through internalization in recycling endosomes may thus in part explain a decrease in Na,K-pump activity following protein kinase activation......Fusion of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to the C-terminal of rat Na,K-ATPase a1-subunit is introduced as a novel procedure for visualizing trafficking of Na,K-pumps in living COS-1 renal cells in response to PKA or PKC stimulation. Stable, functional expression of the fluorescent...... along the plasma membrane of COS cells. In unstimulated COS cells, Na,K-EGFP was also present in lysosomes and in vesicles en route from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane, but it was almost absent from recycling endosomes labelled with fluorescent transferrin. After activation of protein...

  1. Inhibition of blue-light-dependent binding of 14-3-3 proteins to phototropins by hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao; SHIMAZAKI Kenichiro

    2005-01-01

    @@ Phototropins, following the discovery of phytochromes[1,2] and cryptochromes[3,4], are the most recently characterized blue-light (BL) receptors in plants. The N- terminal regions of the proteins contain two light oxygen and voltage (LOV)――LOV1 and LOV2, which belong to PAS domain involved in protein-protein interaction and ligand binding, possessing non-covalent binding sites for the chromophore FMN[5]. The C-terminal regions contain Ser/Thr kinase domains[6].

  2. Phasor approaches simplify the analysis of tryptophan fluorescence data in protein denaturation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan is frequently used to investigate the structure of proteins. The analysis of tryptophan fluorescence data is challenging: fluorescence (anisotropy) decays typically have multiple lifetime (correlation time) components and fluorescence spectra are broad and exhibit only minor shifts. In this work, we show that phasor approaches can substantially simplify tryptophan fluorescence analysis. To demonstrate this, we re-analyse previously recorded datasets of the denaturant (guanidinium hydrochloride, GuHCl) induced unfolding of a single-tryptophan-containing variant of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. For three methods—(1) time-resolved fluorescence, (2) time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy and (3) steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy—we show that the phasor analysis can readily identify the presence of a folding intermediate. Moreover, the fractional contributions of protein states at various stages of unfolding and the values of the free energy difference of the unfolding process (ΔGUN0) are obtained. The outcomes are compared to the global analysis results published previously. (paper)

  3. Effect of fluorescently labeling protein probes on kinetics of protein-ligand reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y S; Landry, J P; Fei, Y Y; Zhu, X D; Luo, J T; Wang, X B; Lam, K S

    2008-12-01

    We studied the effect of fluorescently labeling proteins on protein-ligand reactions. Unlabeled ligands (streptavidin-binding peptides and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) as antigen targets) are immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Unlabeled and Cy3-labeled protein probes from the same batch (streptavidin and goat antibodies) subsequently react with the surface-immobilized targets. By monitoring in situ the surface mass density change using an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference scanning microscope (a label-free detector), we measured k(on) and k(off) for streptavidin-peptide reactions and antibody-antigen reaction. We found that (1) equilibrium dissociation constants, defined as K(D) = k(off)/k(on), for streptavidin-peptide reactions increases by a factor of 3-4 when the solution-phase streptavidin is labeled with Cy3 dye and (2) K(D) for reactions of solution-phase goat anti-rabbit antibodies with rabbit IgG targets also change significantly when the goat antibodies are labeled with Cy3 dye. PMID:18991423

  4. Metalloproteins diversified: the auracyanins are a family of cupredoxins that stretch the spectral and redox limits of blue copper proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeremy D; McIntosh, Chelsea L; Halsey, Christopher M; Lada, Bryan M; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Cooley, Jason W; Blankenship, Robert E

    2013-11-19

    The metal sites of electron transfer proteins are tuned for function. The type 1 copper site is one of the most utilized metal sites in electron transfer reactions. This site can be tuned by the protein environment from +80 mV to +680 mV in typical type 1 sites. Accompanying this huge variation in midpoint potentials are large changes in electronic structure, resulting in proteins that are blue, green, or even red. Here, we report a family of blue copper proteins, the auracyanins, from the filamentous anoxygenic phototroph Chloroflexus aurantiacus that display the entire known spectral and redox variations known in the type 1 copper site. C. aurantiacus encodes four auracyanins, labeled A-D. The midpoint potentials vary from +83 mV (auracyanin D) to +423 mV (auracyanin C). The electronic structures vary from classical blue copper UV-vis absorption spectra (auracyanin B) to highly perturbed spectra (auracyanins C and D). The spectrum of auracyanin C is temperature-dependent. The expansion and divergent nature of the auracyanins is a previously unseen phenomenon.

  5. Solid-state deep blue and UV fluorescent dyes based on para-bis(2-thienyl)phenylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajčovič, Jozef; Kovalenko, Alexander, E-mail: kovalenko.alx@gmail.com; Heinrichová, Patricie; Vala, Martin; Weiter, Martin

    2015-11-15

    Despite the general rule of strong acceptor substituents having a tendency to quench fluorescence due to molecular stacking, it is shown how tetra-fluorination of the central phenylene unit of para-bis(2-thienyl)phenylene can augment the quantum yields of solid state fluorescent dyes. Another significant part of the present research was the study of the influence of the position of the solubilization alkyl chains position on the fluorescent properties of the abovementioned non- and tetra-fluorinated materials. Tenfold augmentation of quantum yields, depending on the position of the alkyl chains is reported. - Highlights: • Solid state luminescence was observed in para-bis(2-thienyl)phenylene molecules. • Quantum yields was augmented by polyfluorination of the central phenylene unit. • Tenfold augmentation of luminescence was observed by changing alkyls position. • Possibilities of steric hindrance and charge transfer were studied.

  6. Short-chain fluorescent tryptophan tags for on-line detection of functional recombinant proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siepert Eva-Maria

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional fluorescent proteins, such as GFP, its derivatives and flavin mononucleotide based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs are often used as fusion tags for detecting recombinant proteins during cultivation. These reporter tags are state-of-the-art; however, they have some drawbacks, which can make on-line monitoring challenging. It is discussed in the literature that the large molecular size of proteins of the GFP family may stress the host cell metabolism during production. In addition, fluorophore formation of GFP derivatives is oxygen-dependent resulting in a lag-time between expression and fluorescence detection and the maturation of the protein is suppressed under oxygen-limited conditions. On the contrary, FbFPs are also applicable in an oxygen-limited or even anaerobic environment but are still quite large (58% of the size of GFP. Results As an alternative to common fluorescent tags we developed five novel tags based on clustered tryptophan residues, called W-tags. They are only 5-11% of the size of GFP. Based on the property of tryptophan to fluoresce in absence of oxygen it is reasonable to assume that the functionality of our W-tags is also given under anaerobic conditions. We fused these W-tags to a recombinant protein model, the anti-CD30 receptor single-chain fragment variable antibody (scFv Ki-4(scFv and the anti-MucI single-chain fragment variable M12(scFv. During cultivation in Microtiter plates, the overall tryptophan fluorescence intensity of all cultures was measured on-line for monitoring product formation via the different W-tags. After correlation of the scattered light signal representing biomass concentration and tryptophan fluorescence for the uninduced cultures, the fluorescence originating from the biomass was subtracted from the overall tryptophan signal. The resulting signal, thus, represents the product fluorescence of the tagged and untagged antibody fragments. The product fluorescence signal

  7. Photoconversion of purified fluorescent proteins and dual-probe optical highlighting in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremers, Gert-Jan; Piston, David

    2010-01-01

    Photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (pc-FPs) are a class of fluorescent proteins with "optical highlighter" capability, meaning that the color of fluorescence can be changed by exposure to light of a specific wavelength. Optical highlighting allows noninvasive marking of a subpopulation of fluorescent molecules, and is therefore ideal for tracking single cells or organelles. Critical parameters for efficient photoconversion are the intensity and the exposure time of the photoconversion light. If the intensity is too low, photoconversion will be slow or not occur at all. On the other hand, too much intensity or too long exposure can photobleach the protein and thereby reduce the efficiency of photoconversion. This protocol describes a general approach how to set up a confocal laser scanning microscope for pc-FP photoconversion applications. First, we describe a procedure for preparing purified protein droplet samples. This sample format is very convenient for studying the photophysical behavior of fluorescent proteins under the microscope. Second, we will use the protein droplet sample to show how to configure the microscope for photoconversion. And finally, we will show how to perform optical highlighting in live cells, including dual-probe optical highlighting with mOrange2 and Dronpa. PMID:20613710

  8. Photoconversion of purified fluorescent proteins and dual-probe optical highlighting in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremers, Gert-Jan; Piston, David

    2010-06-26

    Photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (pc-FPs) are a class of fluorescent proteins with "optical highlighter" capability, meaning that the color of fluorescence can be changed by exposure to light of a specific wavelength. Optical highlighting allows noninvasive marking of a subpopulation of fluorescent molecules, and is therefore ideal for tracking single cells or organelles. Critical parameters for efficient photoconversion are the intensity and the exposure time of the photoconversion light. If the intensity is too low, photoconversion will be slow or not occur at all. On the other hand, too much intensity or too long exposure can photobleach the protein and thereby reduce the efficiency of photoconversion. This protocol describes a general approach how to set up a confocal laser scanning microscope for pc-FP photoconversion applications. First, we describe a procedure for preparing purified protein droplet samples. This sample format is very convenient for studying the photophysical behavior of fluorescent proteins under the microscope. Second, we will use the protein droplet sample to show how to configure the microscope for photoconversion. And finally, we will show how to perform optical highlighting in live cells, including dual-probe optical highlighting with mOrange2 and Dronpa.

  9. Strengths and Weaknesses of Recently Engineered Red Fluorescent Proteins Evaluated in Live Cells Using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Amanda P.; Baird, Michelle A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Day, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    The scientific community is still looking for a bright, stable red fluorescent protein (FP) as functional as the current best derivatives of green fluorescent protein (GFP). The red FPs exploit the reduced background of cells imaged in the red region of the visible spectrum, but photophysical short comings have limited their use for some spectroscopic approaches. Introduced nearly a decade ago, mCherry remains the most often used red FP for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and other single molecule techniques, despite the advent of many newer red FPs. All red FPs suffer from complex photophysics involving reversible conversions to a dark state (flickering), a property that results in fairly low red FP quantum yields and potential interference with spectroscopic analyses including FCS. The current report describes assays developed to determine the best working conditions for, and to uncover the shortcoming of, four recently engineered red FPs for use in FCS and other diffusion and spectroscopic studies. All five red FPs assayed had potential shortcomings leading to the conclusion that the current best red FP for FCS is still mCherry. The assays developed here aim to enable the rapid evaluation of new red FPs and their smooth adaptation to live cell spectroscopic microscopy and nanoscopy. PMID:24129172

  10. Fluorescence from Multiple Chromophore Hydrogen-Bonding States in the Far-Red Protein TagRFP675.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konold, Patrick E; Yoon, Eunjin; Lee, Junghwa; Allen, Samantha L; Chapagain, Prem P; Gerstman, Bernard S; Regmi, Chola K; Piatkevich, Kiryl D; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Joo, Taiha; Jimenez, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    Far-red fluorescent proteins are critical for in vivo imaging applications, but the relative importance of structure versus dynamics in generating large Stokes-shifted emission is unclear. The unusually red-shifted emission of TagRFP675, a derivative of mKate, has been attributed to the multiple hydrogen bonds with the chromophore N-acylimine carbonyl. We characterized TagRFP675 and point mutants designed to perturb these hydrogen bonds with spectrally resolved transient grating and time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) spectroscopies supported by molecular dynamics simulations. TRF results for TagRFP675 and the mKate/M41Q variant show picosecond time scale red-shifts followed by nanosecond time blue-shifts. Global analysis of the TRF spectra reveals spectrally distinct emitting states that do not interconvert during the S1 lifetime. These dynamics originate from photoexcitation of a mixed ground-state population of acylimine hydrogen bond conformers. Strategically tuning the chromophore environment in TagRFP675 might stabilize the most red-shifted conformation and result in a variant with a larger Stokes shift. PMID:27447848

  11. Steady-State Fluorescence Anisotropy to Investigate Flavonoids Binding to Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christine M.; Strollo, Christen M.

    2007-01-01

    The steady-state fluorescence anisotropy is employed to study the binding of protein of a model protein, human serum albumin, to a commonly used flavonoid, quercetin. The experiment describes the thermodynamics, as well as the biochemical interactions of such binding effectively.

  12. Serum Protein Profile Study of Clinical Samples Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Laser Induced Fluorescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Ukendt, Sujatha; Rai, Lavanya;

    2009-01-01

    The serum protein profiles of normal subjects, patients diagnosed with cervical cancer, and oral cancer were recorded using High Performance Liquid Chromatography combined with Laser Induced Fluorescence detection (HPLC-LIF). Serum protein profiles of the above three classes were tested...

  13. Rise-time of FRET-acceptor fluorescence tracks protein folding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindhoud, S.; Westphal, A.H.; Van Mierlo, C.P.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Borst, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Uniform labeling of proteins with fluorescent donor and acceptor dyes with an equimolar ratio is paramount for accurate determination of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiencies. In practice, however, the labeled protein population contains donor-labeled molecules that have no correspon

  14. A polarizable embedding DFT study of one-photon absorption in fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beerepoot, Maarten; Steindal, Arnfinn H.; Kongsted, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical study of the one-photon absorption of five fluorescent proteins (FPs) is presented. The absorption properties are calculated using a polarizable embedding approach combined with density functional theory (PE-DFT) on the wild-type green fluorescent protein (wtGFP) and several of its...... optimization of the chromophores within a frozen protein environment is needed in order to reproduce the experimental trends. Explicit account of polarization in the force field is not needed to yield the correct trend between the different FPs, but is necessary for reproducing the experimentally observed red...

  15. Preparation of multi-coloured different sized fluorescent gold clusters from blue to NIR, structural analysis of the blue emitting Au7 cluster, and cell-imaging by the NIR gold cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhasish; Baral, Abhishek; Bhattacharjee, Rameswar; Jana, Batakrishna; Datta, Ayan; Ghosh, Surajit; Banerjee, Arindam

    2015-01-01

    Blue, green, orange-red, red and NIR emitting gold quantum clusters have been prepared in aqueous media by using a bioactive peptide glutathione (reduced) at physiological pH. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analyses show that the core structure sizes of the five different gold clusters are Au7 (blue), Au16 (green), Au19 (orange-red), Au21 (red) and Au22 (NIR). The photo-stability and pH-stability of these quantum clusters have been measured, and these are photo-stable against continuous UV irradiation for a few hours. They also exhibit moderate to good pH-stability within the pH range of 5-12.5. A computational study reveals the organisation of gold atoms in the thiolate-protected blue quantum cluster and its several structural parameters, including the mode of interaction of ligand molecules with Au atoms in the Au7 cluster. Interestingly, it has been found that NIR emitting gold quantum cluster can easily be internalized into the adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial cell line (A549 cell line). Moreover, a MTT assay indicates that our NIR emitting gold quantum cluster show very low cytotoxicy to A549 cancer cells.Blue, green, orange-red, red and NIR emitting gold quantum clusters have been prepared in aqueous media by using a bioactive peptide glutathione (reduced) at physiological pH. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analyses show that the core structure sizes of the five different gold clusters are Au7 (blue), Au16 (green), Au19 (orange-red), Au21 (red) and Au22 (NIR). The photo-stability and pH-stability of these quantum clusters have been measured, and these are photo-stable against continuous UV irradiation for a few hours. They also exhibit moderate to good pH-stability within the pH range of 5-12.5. A computational study reveals the organisation of gold atoms in the thiolate-protected blue quantum cluster and its several

  16. Possibilities of increasing production and quality of strawberry fruits and several flowers by new blue fluorescent greenhouse films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemming-Hoffmann, S.; Os, van E.A.; Dieleman, J.A.; Hemming, J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Breuer, J.J.G.; Slangen, J.H.

    2005-01-01

    Within the framework of the project SPECTRAFOIL funded by the EU and Grafe Color Batch (Germany), together with the industrial partners Palrig (Israel), Sunsaver (Spain) and several growers and research partners in Israel, Cyprus, Spain and The Netherlands, new fluorescent greenhouse films for sever

  17. Very bright orange fluorescent plants: endoplasmic reticulum targeting of orange fluorescent proteins as visual reporters in transgenic plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann David GJ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of fluorescent protein (FP genes as real-time visual markers, both transiently and stably, has revolutionized plant biotechnology. A palette of colors of FPs is now available for use, but the diversity has generally been underutilized in plant biotechnology. Because of the green and far-red autofluorescent properties of many plant tissues and the FPs themselves, red and orange FPs (RFPs, and OFPs, respectfully appear to be the colors with maximum utility in plant biotechnology. Within the color palette OFPs have emerged as the brightest FP markers in the visible spectra. This study compares several native, near-native and modified OFPs for their “brightness” and fluorescence, therefore, their usability as marker genes in transgenic plant tissues. Results The OFPs DsRed2, tdTomato, mOrange and pporRFP were all expressed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in agroinfiltration-mediated transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana. Each of these, as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER-targeted versions, were stably expressed in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis thaliana. Congruent results were observed between transient and stable assays. Our results demonstrated that there are several adequate OFP genes available for plant transformation, including the new pporRFP, an unaltered tetramer from the hard coral Porites porites. When the tandem dimer tdTomato and the monomeric mOrange were targeted to the ER, dramatic, ca. 3-fold, increase in plant fluorescence was observed. Conclusions From our empirical data, and a search of the literature, it appears that tdTomato-ER and mOrange-ER are the two highest fluorescing FPs available as reporters for transgenic plants. The pporRFP is a brightly fluorescing tetramer, but all tetramer FPs are far less bright than the ER-targeted monomers we report here.

  18. Photo-convertible fluorescent proteins as tools for fresh insights on subcellular interactions in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, N; Jaipargas, E-A; Wozny, M R; Barton, K A; Mathur, N; Delfosse, K; Mathur, J

    2016-08-01

    Optical highlighters comprise photo-activatable, photo-switchable and photo-convertible fluorescent proteins and are relatively recent additions to the toolbox utilized for live cell imaging research. Here, we provide an overview of four photo-convertible fluorescent proteins (pcFP) that are being used in plant cell research: Eos, Kaede, Maple and Dendra2. Each of these proteins has a significant advantage over other optical highlighters since their green fluorescent nonconverted forms and red fluorescent converted forms are generally clearly visible at expression levels that do not appear to interfere with subcellular dynamics and plant development. These proteins have become increasingly useful for understanding the role of transient and sustained interactions between similar organelles. Tracking of single organelles after green-to-red conversion has provided novel insights on plastids and their stroma-filled extensions and on the formation of mega-mitochondria. Similarly colour recovery after photo-conversion has permitted the estimation of nuclear endo-reduplication events and is being developed further to image protein trafficking within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. We have also applied photo-convertible proteins to create colour-differentiation between similar cell types to follow their development. Both the green and red fluorescent forms of these proteins are compatible with other commonly used single coloured FPs. This has allowed us to develop simultaneous visualization schemes for up to five types of organelles and investigate organelle interactivity. The advantages and caveats associated with the use of photo-convertible fluorescent proteins are discussed. PMID:26820914

  19. Photo-convertible fluorescent proteins as tools for fresh insights on subcellular interactions in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, N; Jaipargas, E-A; Wozny, M R; Barton, K A; Mathur, N; Delfosse, K; Mathur, J

    2016-08-01

    Optical highlighters comprise photo-activatable, photo-switchable and photo-convertible fluorescent proteins and are relatively recent additions to the toolbox utilized for live cell imaging research. Here, we provide an overview of four photo-convertible fluorescent proteins (pcFP) that are being used in plant cell research: Eos, Kaede, Maple and Dendra2. Each of these proteins has a significant advantage over other optical highlighters since their green fluorescent nonconverted forms and red fluorescent converted forms are generally clearly visible at expression levels that do not appear to interfere with subcellular dynamics and plant development. These proteins have become increasingly useful for understanding the role of transient and sustained interactions between similar organelles. Tracking of single organelles after green-to-red conversion has provided novel insights on plastids and their stroma-filled extensions and on the formation of mega-mitochondria. Similarly colour recovery after photo-conversion has permitted the estimation of nuclear endo-reduplication events and is being developed further to image protein trafficking within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. We have also applied photo-convertible proteins to create colour-differentiation between similar cell types to follow their development. Both the green and red fluorescent forms of these proteins are compatible with other commonly used single coloured FPs. This has allowed us to develop simultaneous visualization schemes for up to five types of organelles and investigate organelle interactivity. The advantages and caveats associated with the use of photo-convertible fluorescent proteins are discussed.

  20. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay for C-Reactive Protein Using Colloidal Semiconducting Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Hänninen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Besides the typical short-lived fluorescence with decay times in the nanosecond range, colloidal II/VI semiconductor nanoparticles dispersed in buffer also possess a long-lived fluorescence component with decay times in the microsecond range. Here, the signal intensity of the long-lived luminescence at microsecond range is shown to increase 1,000-fold for CdTe nanoparticles in PBS buffer. This long-lived fluorescence can be conveniently employed for time-gated fluorescence detection, which allows for improved signal-to-noise ratio and thus the use of low concentrations of nanoparticles. The detection principle is demonstrated with a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP using CdSe-ZnS nanoparticles and green light excitation.

  1. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions and Assessment of Subcellular Localization in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Evan P S; Owens, Jake L; Hockerman, Gregory H; Hu, Chang-Deng

    2016-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) is a fluorescence imaging technique used to visualize protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in live cells and animals. One unique application of BiFC is to reveal subcellular localization of PPIs. The superior signal-to-noise ratio of BiFC in comparison with fluorescence resonance energy transfer or bioluminescence resonance energy transfer enables its wide applications. Here, we describe how confocal microscopy can be used to detect and quantify PPIs and their subcellular localization. We use basic leucine zipper transcription factor proteins as an example to provide a step-by-step BiFC protocol using a Nikon A1 confocal microscope and NIS-Elements imaging software. The protocol given below can be readily adapted for use with other confocal microscopes or imaging software. PMID:27515079

  2. Human cytomegaloviruses expressing yellow fluorescent fusion proteins--characterization and use in antiviral screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Straschewski

    Full Text Available Recombinant viruses labelled with fluorescent proteins are useful tools in molecular virology with multiple applications (e.g., studies on intracellular trafficking, protein localization, or gene activity. We generated by homologous recombination three recombinant cytomegaloviruses carrying the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP fused with the viral proteins IE-2, ppUL32 (pp150, and ppUL83 (pp65. In growth kinetics, the three viruses behaved all like wild type, even at low multiplicity of infection (MOI. The expression of all three fusion proteins was detected, and their respective localizations were the same as for the unmodified proteins in wild-type virus-infected cells. We established the in vivo measurement of fluorescence intensity and used the recombinant viruses to measure inhibition of viral replication by neutralizing antibodies or antiviral substances. The use of these viruses in a pilot screen based on fluorescence intensity and high-content analysis identified cellular kinase inhibitors that block viral replication. In summary, these viruses with individually EYFP-tagged proteins will be useful to study antiviral substances and the dynamics of viral infection in cell culture.

  3. Red fluorescent proteins for imaging Zymoseptoria tritici during invasion of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, M; Kilaru, S; Guo, M; Sommerauer, M; Lin, C; Steinberg, G

    2015-06-01

    The use of fluorescent proteins (FPs) in plant pathogenic fungi provides valuable insight into their intracellular dynamics, cell organization and invasion mechanisms. Compared with green-fluorescent proteins, their red-fluorescent "cousins" show generally lower fluorescent signal intensity and increased photo-bleaching. However, the combined usage of red and green fluorescent proteins allows powerful insight in co-localization studies. Efficient signal detection requires a bright red-fluorescent protein (RFP), combined with a suitable corresponding filter set. We provide a set of four vectors, suitable for yeast recombination-based cloning that carries mRFP, TagRFP, mCherry and tdTomato. These vectors confer carboxin resistance after targeted single-copy integration into the sdi1 locus of Zymoseptoria tritici. Expression of the RFPs does not affect virulence of this wheat pathogen. We tested all four RFPs in combination with four epi-fluorescence filter sets and in confocal laser scanning microscopy, both in and ex planta. Our data reveal that mCherry is the RFP of choice for investigation in Z. tritici, showing highest signal intensity in epi-fluorescence, when used with a Cy3 filter set, and laser scanning confocal microscopy. However, mCherry bleached significantly faster than mRFP, which favors this red tag in long-term observation experiments. Finally, we used dual-color imaging of eGFP and mCherry expressing wild-type strains in planta and show that pycnidia are formed by single strains. This demonstrates the strength of this method in tracking the course of Z. tritici infection in wheat. PMID:26092800

  4. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    OpenAIRE

    Jia-Xing Yue; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluo...

  5. Predictive and Interpretive Simulation of Green Fluorescent Protein Expression in Reporter Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Leveau, Johan H. J.; Lindow, Steven E.

    2001-01-01

    We have formulated a numerical model that simulates the accumulation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in bacterial cells from a generic promoter-gfp fusion. The model takes into account the activity of the promoter, the time it takes GFP to mature into its fluorescent form, the susceptibility of GFP to proteolytic degradation, and the growth rate of the bacteria. From the model, we derived a simple formula with which promoter activity can be inferred easily and quantitatively from actual me...

  6. Expression Screening of Integral Membrane Proteins by Fusion to Fluorescent Reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Louise E; Nettleship, Joanne E; Järvinen, Valtteri; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Owens, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    The production of recombinant integral membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to their relatively low levels of expression. To address this problem, screening strategies have been developed to identify the optimal membrane sequence and expression host for protein production. A common approach is to genetically fuse the membrane protein to a fluorescent reporter, typically Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) enabling expression levels, localization and detergent solubilisation to be assessed. Initially developed for screening the heterologous expression of bacterial membrane proteins in Escherichia coli, the method has been extended to eukaryotic hosts, including insect and mammalian cells. Overall, GFP-based expression screening has made a major impact on the number of membrane protein structures that have been determined in the last few years. PMID:27553231

  7. Dual-color fluorescence-burst analysis to study pore formation and protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaart, Geert; Kusters, Ilja; Velasquez, Jeanette; Mika, Jacek T.; Krasnikov, Victor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Poolman, Bert

    2008-01-01

    Dual-color fluorescence-burst analysis (DCBFA) enables to study leakage of fluorescently labeled (macro)molecules from liposomes that are labeled with a second, spectrally non-overlapping fluorophore. The fluorescent bursts that reside from the liposomes diffusing through the focal volume of a confo

  8. Fluorescent properties of a blue-to green-emitting Ce3+, Tb3+ codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ce3+, Tb3+ codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor was prepared by heating (830 °C for 30 min) Ce3+, Tb3+ codoped calcium silicate hydrate phosphor formed by liquid-phase reaction. The excitation peak wavelength of the resulting phosphor was 330 nm and the emission peak wavelengths were at 544 nm, attributed to the 5D4→7F5 transition of Tb3+, and at 430–470 mm, attributed to Ce3+. The intensity ratio of the two peaks could be freely controlled by varying the Tb/Ca atomic ratio of the Ce3+, Tb3+ codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor, allowing light to be emitted over a wide range from blue to green. It was clarified that energy transfer exists from Ce3+ to Tb3+. - Graphical abstract: Ce3+, Tb3+ codoped calcium silicate hydrate phosphor was synthesized by liquid-phase reaction. This was heated at 830 °C to obtain a Ce3+, Tb3+ codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor. Under 330 nm excitation, this phosphor showed emission peaks at 430–470 nm and 542 nm. The luminescent color could be continuously changed blue to green with increasing Tb/Ca atomic ratio. It was clarified that electron transfer from Ce3+ to Tb3+ is occurring.

  9. Using tryptophan fluorescence to measure the stability of membrane proteins folded in liposomes

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, C. Preston; Fleming, Karen G.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the thermodynamic stability of folded membrane proteins require methods for monitoring their conformation that are free of experimental artifacts. For tryptophan fluorescence emission experiments with membrane proteins folded into liposomes, there are two significant sources of artifacts: the first is light scattering by the liposomes; the second is the nonlinear relationship of some tryptophan spectral parameters with changes in protein conformation. Both of these so...

  10. Simultaneous time resolution of the emission spectra of fluorescent proteins and zooxanthellar chlorophyll in reef-building corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Adam M; Larkum, Anthony W D; Salih, Anya; Itoh, Shigeru; Shibata, Yutaka; Bena, Chiaki; Yamasaki, Hideo; Papina, Marina; Van Woesik, Robert

    2003-05-01

    Light is absorbed by photosynthetic algal symbionts (i.e. zooxanthellae) and by chromophoric fluorescent proteins (FP) in reef-building coral tissue. We used a streak-camera spectrograph equipped with a pulsed, blue laser diode (50 ps, 405 nm) to simultaneously resolve the fluorescence spectra and kinetics for both the FP and the zooxanthellae. Shallow water (corals showed rapidly decaying species and reciprocal rises in greener emission components indicating Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between FP populations. The energy transfer modes were around 250 ps, and the main decay modes of the acceptor FP were typically 1900-2800 ps. All zooxanthellae emitted similar spectra and kinetics with peak emission (approximately 683 nm) mainly from photosystem II (PSII) chlorophyll (chl) a. Compared with the FP, the PSII emission exhibited similar rise times but much faster decay times, typically around 640-760 ps. The fluorescence kinetics and excitation versus emission mapping indicated that the FP emission played only a minor role, if any, in chl excitation. We thus suggest the FP could only indirectly act to absorb, screen and scatter light to protect PSII and underlying and surrounding animal tissue from excess visible and UV light. We conclude that our time-resolved spectral analysis and simulation revealed new FP emission components that would not be easily resolved at steady state because of their relatively rapid decays due to efficient FRET. We believe the methods show promise for future studies of coral bleaching and for potentially identifying FP species for use as genetic markers and FRET partners, like the related green FP from Aequorea spp. PMID:12812294

  11. Improving the sensitivity of protein microarray by evanescent-field-induced fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-qiang; LU Zu-kang

    2005-01-01

    To improve the sensitivity of protein microarray, a prism surface replaces the surface of the common microscope slide.The protein targets arrayed on the surface are hybridized and labelled by fluorescent probes. Evanescent excitation occurs when the convergent laser reaches the surface, and a photomultiplier tube detects the emitted fluorescent signal. A two-dimensional actuator scans the whole surface to achieve planar laser excitation and fluorescence collection. The penetration depth of the evanescent field into the protein targets is only some hundred nanometers and can be controlled by different incident angle of the laser beam, so the undesired background signals are reduced dramatically and the detection sensitivity is improved by a factor of 50 to 100 comparing to confocal excitation. This approach can detect low abundance analytes without signal amplification.

  12. A Diabatic Three-State Representation of Photoisomerization in the Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Seth

    2009-01-01

    We give a quantum chemical description of bridge photoisomerization reaction of green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophores using a representation over three diabatic states. Bridge photoisomerization leads to non-radiative decay, and competes with fluorescence in these systems. In the protein, this pathway is suppressed, leading to fluorescence. Understanding the electronic structure of the photoisomerization is a prerequisite to understanding how the protein suppresses this pathway and preserves the emitting state of the chromophore. We present a solution to the state-averaged complete active space problem, which is spanned at convergence by three fragment-localized orbitals. We generate the diabatic-state representation by applying a block diagonalization transformation to the Hamiltonian calculated for the anionic chromophore model HBDI with multi-reference, multi-state perturbation theory. The diabatic states that emerge are charge-localized structures with a natural valence-bond interpretation. At plan...

  13. Fluorescence imaging for a noninvasive in vivo toxicity-test using a transgenic silkworm expressing green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Ishii, Masaki; Uchino, Keiro; Sezutsu, Hideki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2015-06-10

    In drug development, the toxicity of candidate chemicals must be carefully examined in an animal model. Here we developed a live imaging technique using silkworms for a noninvasive toxicity test applicable for drug screening. Injection of carbon tetrachloride, a tissue-injuring chemical, into transgenic silkworms expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) induced leakage of GFP from the tissues into the hemolymph. The leakage of GFP was suppressed by pre-administration of either cimetidine, a cytochrome P450 inhibitor, or N-acetyl cysteine, a free-radical scavenger. The transgenic silkworm was made transparent by feeding a diet containing chemicals that inhibit uric acid deposition in the epithelial cells. In the transparent silkworms, GFP fluorescence in the fat body could be observed from outside the body. Injection of salicylic acid or iron sulfate, tissue-injuring chemicals, into the transparent silkworms decreased the fluorescence intensity of the GFP in the fat body. These findings suggest that the transparent GFP-expressing silkworm model is useful for evaluating the toxicity of chemicals that induce tissue injury.

  14. Fluorescently labeled pulmonary surfactant protein C in spread phospholipid monolayers.

    OpenAIRE

    Nag, K.; Perez-Gil, J.; Cruz, A; Keough, K M

    1996-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex, secreted into the fluid lining of lungs prevents alveolar collapse at low lung volumes. Pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C), an acylated, hydrophobic, alpha-helical peptide, enhances the surface activity of pulmonary surfactant lipids. Fluorescein-labeled SP-C (F-SP-C) (3, 6, 12 wt%) in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and DPPC:dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) [DPPC:DPPG 7:3 mol/mol] in spread monolayers was studied by epifluorescen...

  15. Binding of fluorescent lanthanides to rat liver mitochondrial membranes and calcium ion-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, R B; Wallach, D F

    1976-05-21

    (1) Tb3+ binding to mitochondrial membranes can be monitored by enhanced ion fluorescence at 545 nm with excitation at 285 nm. At low protein concentrations (less than 30 mug/ml) no inner filter effects are observed. (2) This binding is localized at the external surface of the inner membrane and is unaffected by inhibitors of respiration or oxidative phosphorylation. (3) A soluble Ca2+ binding protein isolated according to Lehninger, A.L. ((1971) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 42, 312-317) also binds Tb3+ with enhanced ion fluorescence upon excitation at 285 nm. The excitation spectrum of the isolated protein and of the intact mitochondria are indicative of an aromatic amino acid at the cation binding site. (4) Further characterization of the Tb3+-protein interaction revealed that there is more than one binding site per protein molecule and that these sites are clustered (less than 20 A). Neuraminidase treatment or organic solvent extraction of the protein did not affect fluorescent Tb3+ binding. (5) pH dependency studies of Tb3+ binding to the isolated protein or intact mitochondria demonstrated the importance of an ionizable group of pK greater than 6. At pH less than 7.5 the amount of Tb3+ bound to the isolated protein decreased with increase in pH as monitored by Tb3+ fluorescence. With intact mitochondria the opposite occurred with a large increase in Tb3+ fluorescence at higher pH. This increase was not observed when the mitochondria were preincubated with antimycin A and rotenone. PMID:6061

  16. A bright cyan-excitable orange fluorescent protein facilitates dual-emission microscopy and enhances bioluminescence imaging in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jun; Oh, Younghee; Sens, Alex; Ataie, Niloufar; Dana, Hod; Macklin, John J; Laviv, Tal; Welf, Erik S; Dean, Kevin M; Zhang, Feijie; Kim, Benjamin B; Tang, Clement Tran; Hu, Michelle; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Kay, Mark A; Fiolka, Reto; Yasuda, Ryohei; Kim, Douglas S; Ng, Ho-Leung; Lin, Michael Z

    2016-07-01

    Orange-red fluorescent proteins (FPs) are widely used in biomedical research for multiplexed epifluorescence microscopy with GFP-based probes, but their different excitation requirements make multiplexing with new advanced microscopy methods difficult. Separately, orange-red FPs are useful for deep-tissue imaging in mammals owing to the relative tissue transmissibility of orange-red light, but their dependence on illumination limits their sensitivity as reporters in deep tissues. Here we describe CyOFP1, a bright, engineered, orange-red FP that is excitable by cyan light. We show that CyOFP1 enables single-excitation multiplexed imaging with GFP-based probes in single-photon and two-photon microscopy, including time-lapse imaging in light-sheet systems. CyOFP1 also serves as an efficient acceptor for resonance energy transfer from the highly catalytic blue-emitting luciferase NanoLuc. An optimized fusion of CyOFP1 and NanoLuc, called Antares, functions as a highly sensitive bioluminescent reporter in vivo, producing substantially brighter signals from deep tissues than firefly luciferase and other bioluminescent proteins. PMID:27240196

  17. FRET-based localization of fluorescent protein insertions within the ryanodine receptor type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta A Raina

    Full Text Available Fluorescent protein (FP insertions have often been used to localize primary structure elements in mid-resolution 3D cryo electron microscopic (EM maps of large protein complexes. However, little is known as to the precise spatial relationship between the location of the fused FP and its insertion site within a larger protein. To gain insights into these structural considerations, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements were used to localize green fluorescent protein (GFP insertions within the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1, a large intracellular Ca(2+ release channel that plays a key role in skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling. A series of full-length His-tagged GFP-RyR1 fusion constructs were created, expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK-293T cells and then complexed with Cy3NTA, a His-tag specific FRET acceptor. FRET efficiency values measured from each GFP donor to Cy3NTA bound to each His tag acceptor site were converted into intermolecular distances and the positions of each inserted GFP were then triangulated relative to a previously published X-ray crystal structure of a 559 amino acid RyR1 fragment. We observed that the chromophoric centers of fluorescent proteins inserted into RyR1 can be located as far as 45 Å from their insertion sites and that the fused proteins can also be located in internal cavities within RyR1. These findings should prove useful in interpreting structural results obtained in cryo EM maps using fusions of small fluorescent proteins. More accurate point-to-point distance information may be obtained using complementary orthogonal labeling systems that rely on fluorescent probes that bind directly to amino acid side chains.

  18. Quantitative single-molecule detection of protein based on DNA tetrahedron fluorescent nanolabels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yongshun; Liu, Xingti; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2014-07-01

    A highly sensitive method for single-molecule quantitative detection of human IgG is presented by the employment of a new fluorescent nanolabel. In this method, fluorescent nanolabels were assembled by inserting SYBR Green I into DNA tetrahedron nanostructure. The bio-nanolabels were attached to the streptavidin-antihuman antibody by a specific reaction between biotin and streptavidin. The antibody was combined with the target antigen, human IgG, which was immobilized on the silanized glass subtrate surface. Finally, epi-fluorescence microscopy (EFM) coupled with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device was employed for fluorescence imaging. The fluorescent spots corresponding to single protein molecule on images were counted and further used for the quantitative detection. It was found that the new nanolabel shows good photostability, biocompatiblity and exhibits no blinking compared to traditional labels like fluorescence dyes and quantum dot (QDs). In addition, the number of fluorescence spots on the images has a linear relationship with the concentration of human IgG in the range of 3.0×10(-14) to 1.0×10(-12)mol L(-1). What is more, this method showed an excellent specificity and a low matrix effect.

  19. Resolving environmental microheterogeneity and dielectric relaxation in fluorescence kinetics of protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolinski, Olaf J.; McLaughlin, Damien; Birch, David J. S.; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav

    2016-09-01

    The fluorescence intensity decay of protein is easily measurable and reports on the intrinsic fluorophore-local environment interactions on the sub-nm spatial and sub-ns temporal scales, which are consistent with protein activity in numerous biomedical and industrial processes. This makes time-resolved fluorescence a perfect tool for understanding, monitoring and controlling these processes at the molecular level, but the complexity of the decay, which has been traditionally fitted to multi-exponential functions, has hampered the development of this technique over the last few decades. Using the example of tryptophan in HSA we present the alternative to the conventional approach to modelling intrinsic florescence intensity decay in protein where the key factors determining fluorescence decay, i.e. the excited-state depopulation and the dielectric relaxation (Toptygin and Brand 2000 Chem. Phys. Lett. 322 496-502), are represented by the individual relaxation functions. This allows quantification of both effects separately by determining their parameters from the global analysis of a series of fluorescence intensity decays measured at different detection wavelengths. Moreover, certain pairs of the recovered parameters of tryptophan were found to be correlated, indicating the influence of the dielectric relaxation on the transient rate of the electronic transitions. In this context the potential for the dual excited state depopulation /dielectric relaxation fluorescence lifetime sensing is discussed.

  20. Multiplexed fluorescent microarray for human salivary protein analysis using polymer microspheres and fiber-optic bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shuai; Benito-Peña, Elena; Zhang, Huaibin; Wu, Yue; Walt, David R

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe a protocol for simultaneously measuring six proteins in saliva using a fiber-optic microsphere-based antibody array. The immuno-array technology employed combines the advantages of microsphere-based suspension array fabrication with the use of fluorescence microscopy. As described in the video protocol, commercially available 4.5 μm polymer microspheres were encoded into seven different types, differentiated by the concentration of two fluorescent dyes physically trapped inside the microspheres. The encoded microspheres containing surface carboxyl groups were modified with monoclonal capture antibodies through EDC/NHS coupling chemistry. To assemble the protein microarray, the different types of encoded and functionalized microspheres were mixed and randomly deposited in 4.5 μm microwells, which were chemically etched at the proximal end of a fiber-optic bundle. The fiber-optic bundle was used as both a carrier and for imaging the microspheres. Once assembled, the microarray was used to capture proteins in the saliva supernatant collected from the clinic. The detection was based on a sandwich immunoassay using a mixture of biotinylated detection antibodies for different analytes with a streptavidin-conjugated fluorescent probe, R-phycoerythrin. The microarray was imaged by fluorescence microscopy in three different channels, two for microsphere registration and one for the assay signal. The fluorescence micrographs were then decoded and analyzed using a homemade algorithm in MATLAB. PMID:24145242

  1. Resolving environmental microheterogeneity and dielectric relaxation in fluorescence kinetics of protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolinski, Olaf J.; McLaughlin, Damien; Birch, David J. S.; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav

    2016-09-01

    The fluorescence intensity decay of protein is easily measurable and reports on the intrinsic fluorophore-local environment interactions on the sub-nm spatial and sub-ns temporal scales, which are consistent with protein activity in numerous biomedical and industrial processes. This makes time-resolved fluorescence a perfect tool for understanding, monitoring and controlling these processes at the molecular level, but the complexity of the decay, which has been traditionally fitted to multi-exponential functions, has hampered the development of this technique over the last few decades. Using the example of tryptophan in HSA we present the alternative to the conventional approach to modelling intrinsic florescence intensity decay in protein where the key factors determining fluorescence decay, i.e. the excited-state depopulation and the dielectric relaxation (Toptygin and Brand 2000 Chem. Phys. Lett. 322 496–502), are represented by the individual relaxation functions. This allows quantification of both effects separately by determining their parameters from the global analysis of a series of fluorescence intensity decays measured at different detection wavelengths. Moreover, certain pairs of the recovered parameters of tryptophan were found to be correlated, indicating the influence of the dielectric relaxation on the transient rate of the electronic transitions. In this context the potential for the dual excited state depopulation /dielectric relaxation fluorescence lifetime sensing is discussed.

  2. β2 Adrenergic Receptor Fluorescent Protein Fusions Traffic to the Plasma Membrane and Retain Functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubnell, Jaclyn; Pfister, Patrick; Sapar, Maria L.; Rogers, Matthew E.; Feinstein, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has proven useful for the study of protein interactions and dynamics for the last twenty years. A variety of new fluorescent proteins have been developed that expand the use of available excitation spectra. We have undertaken an analysis of seven of the most useful fluorescent proteins (XFPs), Cerulean (and mCerulean3), Teal, GFP, Venus, mCherry and TagRFP657, as fusions to the archetypal G-protein coupled receptor, the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR). We have characterized these β2AR::XFP fusions in respect to membrane trafficking and G-protein activation. We noticed that in the mouse neural cell line, OP 6, that membrane bound β2AR::XFP fusions robustly localized in the filopodia identical to gap::XFP fusions. All β2AR::XFP fusions show responses indistinguishable from each other and the non-fused form after isoprenaline exposure. Our results provide a platform by which G-protein coupled receptors can be dissected for their functionality. PMID:24086401

  3. Sensitive detection of p65 homodimers using red-shifted and fluorescent protein-based FRET couples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Goedhart

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET between the green fluorescent protein (GFP variants CFP and YFP is widely used for the detection of protein-protein interactions. Nowadays, several monomeric red-shifted fluorescent proteins are available that potentially improve the efficiency of FRET. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To allow side-by-side comparison of several fluorescent protein combinations for detection of FRET, yellow or orange fluorescent proteins were directly fused to red fluorescent proteins. FRET from yellow fluorescent proteins to red fluorescent proteins was detected by both FLIM and donor dequenching upon acceptor photobleaching, showing that mCherry and mStrawberry were more efficient acceptors than mRFP1. Circular permutated yellow fluorescent protein variants revealed that in the tandem constructs the orientation of the transition dipole moment influences the FRET efficiency. In addition, it was demonstrated that the orange fluorescent proteins mKO and mOrange are both suitable as donor for FRET studies. The most favorable orange-red FRET pair was mKO-mCherry, which was used to detect homodimerization of the NF-kappaB subunit p65 in single living cells, with a threefold higher lifetime contrast and a twofold higher FRET efficiency than for CFP-YFP. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The observed high FRET efficiency of red-shifted couples is in accordance with increased Förster radii of up to 64 A, being significantly higher than the Förster radius of the commonly used CFP-YFP pair. Thus, red-shifted FRET pairs are preferable for detecting protein-protein interactions by donor-based FRET methods in single living cells.

  4. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair for fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2010-08-17

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  5. IR-FEL-induced green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene transfer into plant cell

    CERN Document Server

    Awazu, K; Tamiya, E

    2002-01-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) holds potential for various biotechnological applications due to its characteristics such as flexible wavelength tunability, short pulse and high peak power. We could successfully introduce the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene into tobacco BY2 cells by IR-FEL laser irradiation. The irradiated area of the solution containing BY2 cells and plasmid was about 0.1 mm sup 2. FEL irradiation at a wavelength of 5.75 and 6.1 mu m, targeting absorption by the ester bond of the lipid and the amide I bond of the protein, respectively, was shown to cause the introduction of the fluorescent dye into the cell. On the other hand, transient expression of the GFP fluorescence was only observed after irradiation at 5.75 mu m. The maximum transfer efficiency was about 0.5%.

  6. IR-FEL-induced green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene transfer into plant cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) holds potential for various biotechnological applications due to its characteristics such as flexible wavelength tunability, short pulse and high peak power. We could successfully introduce the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene into tobacco BY2 cells by IR-FEL laser irradiation. The irradiated area of the solution containing BY2 cells and plasmid was about 0.1 mm2. FEL irradiation at a wavelength of 5.75 and 6.1 μm, targeting absorption by the ester bond of the lipid and the amide I bond of the protein, respectively, was shown to cause the introduction of the fluorescent dye into the cell. On the other hand, transient expression of the GFP fluorescence was only observed after irradiation at 5.75 μm. The maximum transfer efficiency was about 0.5%

  7. IR-FEL-induced green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene transfer into plant cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awazu, Kunio; Kinpara, Takeshi; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2002-05-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) holds potential for various biotechnological applications due to its characteristics such as flexible wavelength tunability, short pulse and high peak power. We could successfully introduce the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene into tobacco BY2 cells by IR-FEL laser irradiation. The irradiated area of the solution containing BY2 cells and plasmid was about 0.1 mm 2. FEL irradiation at a wavelength of 5.75 and 6.1 μm, targeting absorption by the ester bond of the lipid and the amide I bond of the protein, respectively, was shown to cause the introduction of the fluorescent dye into the cell. On the other hand, transient expression of the GFP fluorescence was only observed after irradiation at 5.75 μm. The maximum transfer efficiency was about 0.5%.

  8. Recombination-stable multimeric green fluorescent protein for characterization of weak promoter outputs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Knuf, Christoph; Förster, Jochen;

    2015-01-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are widely used for visualization of proteins to track localization and expression dynamics. However, phenotypically important processes can operate at too low expression levels for routine detection, i.e. be overshadowed by autofluorescence noise. While GFP...... functions well in translational fusions, the use of tandem GFPs to amplify fluorescence signals is currently avoided in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and many other microorganisms due to the risk of loop-out by direct-repeat recombination. We increased GFP fluorescence by translationally fusing three different...... GFP variants, yeast-enhanced GFP, GFP+ and superfolder GFP to yield a sequence-diverged triple GFP molecule 3vGFP with 74–84% internal repeat identity. Unlike a single GFP, the brightness of 3vGFP allowed characterization of a weak promoter in S. cerevisiae. Utilizing 3vGFP, we further engineered...

  9. Stability of some Cactaceae proteins based on fluorescence, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorinstein, S; Zemser, M; Vargas-Albores, F; Ochoa, J L; Paredes-Lopez, O; Scheler, C; Aksu, S; Salnikow, J

    1999-02-01

    Characterization of three cactus proteins (native and denatured) from Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria), Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo), and Cholla opuntia (Cholla), was based on electrophoretic, fluorescence, CD (circular dichroism), DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), and FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) measurements. The obtained results of intrinsic fluorescence, DSC, and CD were dissimilar for the three species of cactus, providing evidence of differences in secondary and tertiary structures. Cactus proteins may be situated in the following order corresponding to their relative stability: Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria) > Cholla opuntia (Cholla) > Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo). Thermodynamic properties of proteins and their changes upon denaturation (temperature of denaturation, enthalphy, and the number of ruptured hydrogen bonds) were correlated with the secondary structure of proteins and disappearance of alpha-helix. PMID:10333299

  10. Protein A Detection Based on Quantum Dots-Antibody Bioprobe Using Fluorescence Coupled Capillary Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Qiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, fluorescence detection coupled capillary electrophoresis (CE-FL was used to detect Protein A. Antibody was first labeled with Cy5 and then mixed with quantum dots (QDs to form QDs-antibody bioprobe. Further, we observed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET from QDs donor to Cy5 acceptor. The bioprobe was formed and brought QDs and Cy5 close enough to allow FRET to occur. After adding protein A, the FRET system was broken and caused the FRET signal to decrease. Thus, a new method for the determination of protein A was proposed based on the FRET signal changes. This study provides a new trail of thought for the detection of protein.

  11. Stability of some Cactaceae proteins based on fluorescence, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorinstein, S; Zemser, M; Vargas-Albores, F; Ochoa, J L; Paredes-Lopez, O; Scheler, C; Aksu, S; Salnikow, J

    1999-02-01

    Characterization of three cactus proteins (native and denatured) from Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria), Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo), and Cholla opuntia (Cholla), was based on electrophoretic, fluorescence, CD (circular dichroism), DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), and FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) measurements. The obtained results of intrinsic fluorescence, DSC, and CD were dissimilar for the three species of cactus, providing evidence of differences in secondary and tertiary structures. Cactus proteins may be situated in the following order corresponding to their relative stability: Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria) > Cholla opuntia (Cholla) > Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo). Thermodynamic properties of proteins and their changes upon denaturation (temperature of denaturation, enthalphy, and the number of ruptured hydrogen bonds) were correlated with the secondary structure of proteins and disappearance of alpha-helix.

  12. Secretion of human interleukin-2 fused with green fluorescent protein in recombinant Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyung Joon; Dalal, Nimish N; Bentley, William E

    2005-07-01

    Methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris is convenient for the expression of eukaryotic foreign proteins owing to its potential for posttranslational modifications, protein folding, and facile culturing. In this work, human interleukin (hIL)-2 was successfully produced as a secreted fusion form in recombinant P. pastoris. By employing green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a monitoring fusion partner, clear identification of fusion protein expression and quantification of intracellular hIL-2 were possible even though there was no correlation between culture supernatant fluorescence and secreted hIL-2 owing to high media interference. Importantly, by the addition of casamino acids in basal medium, we were able to enhance threefold amount of secreted hIL-2, which was present both as a fusion and as a clipped fragment. PMID:16014994

  13. Fluorescence imaging-based high-throughput screening of fast- and slow-cycling LOV proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuun Kawano

    Full Text Available Light-oxygen-voltage (LOV domains function as blue light-inducible molecular switches. The photosensory LOV domains derived from plants and fungi have provided an indispensable tool for optogenetics. Here we develop a high-throughput screening system to efficiently improve switch-off kinetics of LOV domains. The present system is based on fluorescence imaging of thermal reversion of a flavin cofactor bound to LOV domains. We conducted multi site-directed random mutagenesis of seven amino acid residues surrounding the flavin cofactor of the second LOV domain derived from Avena sativa phototropin 1 (AsLOV2. The gene library was introduced into Escherichia coli cells. Then thermal reversion of AsLOV2 variants, respectively expressed in different bacterial colonies on agar plate, was imaged with a stereoscopic fluorescence microscope. Based on the mutagenesis and imaging-based screening, we isolated 12 different variants showing substantially faster thermal reversion kinetics than wild-type AsLOV2. Among them, AsLOV2-V416T exhibited thermal reversion with a time constant of 2.6 s, 21-fold faster than wild-type AsLOV2. With a slight modification of the present approach, we also have efficiently isolated 8 different decelerated variants, represented by AsLOV2-V416L that exhibited thermal reversion with a time constant of 4.3 × 10(3 s (78-fold slower than wild-type AsLOV2. The present approach based on fluorescence imaging of the thermal reversion of the flavin cofactor is generally applicable to a variety of blue light-inducible molecular switches and may provide a new opportunity for the development of molecular tools for emerging optogenetics.

  14. Mechanism of fluorescent cocoon sex identification for silkworms Bombyx mori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    By using silkworms,Bombyx mori, fluorescent cocoon sex identification (FCSI) as an experimental material, direct fluorescence spectrometry of the cocoon surface indicates that the fluorescent color of silkworm cocoons is made up of two peaks of yellow and blue-purple fluorescence emission. The fluorescent difference between male and female cocoons is attributed to the differential absorption of yellow fluorescent substances by the midgut tissue of 5th instar female silkworms. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) and fluorescent spectra indicate that blue-purple fluorescent substances are composed of at least five blue-purple fluorescent pigments, and yellow fluorescent substances are made up of at least three. UV spectra and AlCl3 color reaction show that the three fluorescent yellow pigments are flavonoids or their glycosides. Silkworm FCSI is due to selective absorption or accumulation of the yellow fluorescent pigments by the posterior midgut cells of female 5th instar larvae. The cells of the FCSI silkworm midgut, especially the cylinder intestinal cells of the posterior midgut have a component which is a yellow fluorescent pigment-specific binding protein that may be vigorously expressed in the 5th instar larvae.

  15. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar B. T. Ghisaidoobe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available F resonance energy transfer (FRET occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (\\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{ex}}\\sim\\ nm, \\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{em}}\\sim\\ 350 nm, in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the proteinlocal environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic F resonance energy transfer (iFRET, a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins.

  16. Fluorescence Enhancement of Fluorescein Isothiocyanate-Labeled Protein A Caused by Affinity Binding with Immunoglobulin G in Bovine Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyotaka Sakai

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence enhancement of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled protein A (FITC-protein A caused by the binding with immunoglobulin G (IgG in bovine plasma was studied. FITC-protein A was immobilized onto a glass surface by covalent bonds. An increase in fluorescence intensity was dependent on IgG concentration ranging from 20 to 78 μg/mL in both phosphate buffer saline and bovine plasma. This method requires no separation procedure, and the reaction time is less than 15 min. A fluorescence enhancement assay by the affinity binding of fluorescence-labeled reagent is thus available for the rapid determination of biomolecules in plasma.

  17. Erratum: Colorectal Cancer Cell Surface Protein Profiling Using an Antibody Microarray and Fluorescence Multiplexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The author's email has been corrected in the publication of Colorectal Cancer Cell Surface Protein Profiling Using an Antibody Microarray and Fluorescence Multiplexing. There was an error with the author, Jerry Zhou's, email. The author's email has been updated to: j.zhou@uws.edu.au from: jzho7551@mail.usyd.edu.au. PMID:26167960

  18. Ab initio study of the optical properties of green fluorescent protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaccheddu, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    In the present we focus on the optical properties of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are modelled using the state-of-the-art computational tools availeable up to date: the Density Functional Theory (DFT) in the Hybrid QM/MM approach is employed to access the ground state configuration of

  19. A subnanomolar fluorescent probe for protein kinase CK2 interaction studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enkvist, Erki; Viht, Kaido; Bischoff, Nils;

    2012-01-01

    assay that used thin layer chromatography for the measurement of the rate of phosphorylation of fluorescently labelled peptide 5-TAMRA-RADDSDDDDD. The most potent inhibitor, ARC-1502 (K(i) = 0.5 nM), revealed high selectivity for CK2α in a panel of 140 protein kinases. Labelling of ARC-1502 with PromoFluor...

  20. Fluorescent protein aided insights on plastids and their extensions: A critical appraisal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen eDelfosse

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-coloured fluorescent proteins targeted to plastids have provided new insights on the dynamic behaviour of these organelles and their interactions with other cytoplasmic components and compartments. Sub-plastidic components such as thylakoids, stroma, the inner and outer membranes of the plastid envelope, nucleoids, plastoglobuli and starch grains have been efficiently highlighted in living plant cells. In addition, stroma filled membrane extensions called stromules have drawn attention to the dynamic nature of the plastid and its interactions with the rest of the cell. Use of dual and triple fluorescent protein combinations has begun to reveal plastid interactions with mitochondria, the nucleus, the endoplasmic reticulum and F-actin and suggests integral roles of plastids in retrograde signalling, cell to cell communication as well as plant-pathogen interactions. While the rapid advances and insights achieved through fluorescent protein based research on plastids are commendable it is necessary to endorse meaningful observations but subject others to closer scrutiny. Here, in order to develop a better and more comprehensive understanding of plastids and their extensions we provide a critical appraisal of recent information that has been acquired using targeted fluorescent protein probes.

  1. Study of the glucoamylase promoter in Aspergillus niger using green fluorescent protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santerre Henriksen, A.L.; Even, S.; Müller, C.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Nielsen, J.

    1999-01-01

    An Aspergillus niger strain expressing a red-shifted green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the cytoplasm under the control of the glucoamylase promoter (PglaA) was characterized with respect to its physiology and morphology. Although xylose acted as a repressor carbon source during batch cultivations,

  2. Absorption tuning of the green fluorescent protein chromophore: synthesis and studies of model compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted Nielsen, Mogens; Andersen, Lars Henrik; Rinza, Tomás Rocha

    2011-01-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore is a heterocyclic compound containing a p-hydroxybenzylidine attached to an imidazol-5(4H)-one ring. This review covers the synthesis of a variety of model systems for elucidating the intrinsic optical properties of the chromophore in the gas phase...

  3. Preparation of fluorescence quenched libraries containing interchain disulphide bonds for studies of protein disulphide isomerases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spetzler, J C; Westphal, V; Winther, Jakob R.;

    1998-01-01

    the quenching chromophore (Tyr(NO2)) and Cys(pNpys) activated for reaction with a second thiol. The formation and cleavage of the interchain disulphide bonds in the library were monitored under a fluorescence microscope. Substrates to investigate the properties of protein disulphide isomerase in solution were...

  4. Modeling structure and spectra of the kindling fluorescent protein asFP595

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jack R.; Topol, Igor A.; Savitsky, Alexander P.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2011-03-01

    Modern computational approaches based on quantum mechanical methods to characterize structures and optical spectra of biological chromophores in proteins are intensively used to gain knowledge of events occurring upon of their photoexcitation. Primary attention is paid to the species from the family of the green fluorescent protein applied as biomarkers in living cells. We apply quantum chemical approaches for accurate calculations of the structures of the chromophore binding pockets and to estimate spectral bands corresponding to the S0-S1 optical transitions of the intriguing kindling protein asFP595. Its precursor, the chromoprotein asCP from the sea anemony Anemonia sulcata is characterized by distinctive spectral properties: at low light intensities the wild-type protein is weakly fluorescent with the very low quantum yield, however, high intensity irradiation with green light leads to a drastic increase of quantum yield. This phenomenon is now termed "kindling". In simulations, the model system is designed as a molecular cluster constructed on the basis of available crystal structures of the related protein. The equilibrium geometry of the cluster is optimized using density functional theory approximations. The vertical excitation energies corresponding to the S0-S1 transitions are computed by using the semiempirical ZINDO technique. A special attention is paid to evaluate effects of point mutations in the vicinity of the chromophore group. Theoretical data provide important information on the chromophore properties aiming to interpret the results of experimental studies and applications of this fluorescent protein.

  5. Structural Determinants of Improved Fluorescence in a Family of Bacteriophytochrome-Based Infrared Fluorescent Proteins: Insights from Continuum Electrostatic Calculations and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliks, Mikolaj; Lafaye, Céline; Shu, Xiaokun; Royant, Antoine; Field, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Using X-ray crystallography, continuum electrostatic calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the structure, protonation behavior, and dynamics of the biliverdin chromophore and its molecular environment in a series of genetically engineered infrared fluorescent proteins (IFPs) based on the chromophore-binding domain of the Deinococcus radiodurans bacteriophytochrome. Our study suggests that the experimentally observed enhancement of fluorescent properties results from the improved rigidity and planarity of the biliverdin chromophore, in particular of the first two pyrrole rings neighboring the covalent linkage to the protein. We propose that the increases in the levels of both motion and bending of the chromophore out of planarity favor the decrease in fluorescence. The chromophore-binding pocket in some of the studied proteins, in particular the weakly fluorescent parent protein, is shown to be readily accessible to water molecules from the solvent. These waters entering the chromophore region form hydrogen bond networks that affect the otherwise planar conformation of the first three rings of the chromophore. On the basis of our simulations, the enhancement of fluorescence in IFPs can be achieved either by reducing the mobility of water molecules in the vicinity of the chromophore or by limiting the interactions of the nearby protein residues with the chromophore. Finally, simulations performed at both low and neutral pH values highlight differences in the dynamics of the chromophore and shed light on the mechanism of fluorescence loss at low pH. PMID:27471775

  6. Investigation on Molecular Non-covalent Interaction in the Sodium Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonatepolychrome Blue B-protein Replacement Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO,Hong-Wen(郜洪文); WU,Ji-Rong(邬继荣); SHEN,Rong(沈荣)

    2004-01-01

    The molecular non-covalent interaction often originates from the electrostatic attraction and accords with the Langmuir isothermal adsorption. The sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS)-polychrome blue B (PCB)-protein [bovine serum albumin (BSA), ovalbumin (OVA) and myoglobin (MB)] ternary reaction has been investigated at Ph 3.88. Protein to replace PCB from the PCB-SDBS binding product was used to characterize the assembly of an invisible-spectral compound, SDBS, on proteins by measuring the variation of PCB light-absorption by the microsurface adsorption-spectral correction (MSASC) technique. The effect of ionic strength and temperature on the aggregation was studied. Results showed that the aggregates SDBS92·BSA, SDBS58·OVA and SDBS15·MB at 30 ℃ and SDBS83·BSA, SDBS39·OVA and SDBS10·MB at 50 ℃ are formed.

  7. Aptamer-mediated indirect quantum dot labeling and fluorescent imaging of target proteins in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein labeling for dynamic living cell imaging plays a significant role in basic biological research, as well as in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. We have developed a novel strategy in which the dynamic visualization of proteins within living cells is achieved by using aptamers as mediators for indirect protein labeling of quantum dots (QDs). With this strategy, the target protein angiogenin was successfully labeled with fluorescent QDs in a minor intactness model, which was mediated by the aptamer AL6-B. Subsequent living cell imaging analyses indicated that the QDs nanoprobes were selectively bound to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, gradually internalized into the cytoplasm, and mostly localized in the lysosome organelle, indicating that the labeled protein retained high activity. Compared with traditional direct protein labeling methods, the proposed aptamer-mediated strategy is simple, inexpensive, and provides a highly selective, stable, and intact labeling platform that has shown great promise for future biomedical labeling and intracellular protein dynamic analyses. (paper)

  8. Experimental Evolution of a Green Fluorescent Protein Composed of 19 Unique Amino Acids without Tryptophan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara-Kobayashi, Akio; Hitotsuyanagi, Mitsuhiro; Amikura, Kazuaki; Kiga, Daisuke

    2014-04-01

    At some stage of evolution, genes of organisms may have encoded proteins that were synthesized using fewer than 20 unique amino acids. Similar to evolution of the natural 19-amino-acid proteins GroEL/ES, proteins composed of 19 unique amino acids would have been able to evolve by accumulating beneficial mutations within the 19-amino-acid repertoire encoded in an ancestral genetic code. Because Trp is thought to be the last amino acid included in the canonical 20-amino-acid repertoire, this late stage of protein evolution could be mimicked by experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without tryptophan (Trp). To further understand the evolution of proteins, we tried to mimic the evolution of a 19-amino-acid protein involving the accumulation of beneficial mutations using directed evolution by random mutagenesis on the whole targeted gene sequence. We created active 19-amino-acid green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) without Trp from a poorly fluorescent 19-amino-acid mutant, S1-W57F, by using directed evolution with two rounds of mutagenesis and selection. The N105I and S205T mutations showed beneficial effects on the S1-W57F mutant. When these two mutations were combined on S1-W57F, we observed an additive effect on the fluorescence intensity. In contrast, these mutations showed no clear improvement individually or in combination on GFPS1, which is the parental GFP mutant composed of 20 amino acids. Our results provide an additional example for the experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without Trp, and would help understand the mechanisms underlying the evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins. (236 words)

  9. In vivo cell biology of cancer cells visualized with fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    This chapter describes a new cell biology where the behavior of individual cells can be visualized in the living animal. Previously it has been demonstrated that fluorescent proteins can be used for whole-body imaging of metastatic tumor growth, bacterial infection, and gene expression. An example of the new cell biology is dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing transgenic mice. These models show with great clarity the details of tumor-stroma interactions and especially tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts, and macrophages. Another example is the color coding of cells with RFP or GFP such that both cell types can be simultaneously visualized in vivo. Stem cells can also be visualized and tracked in vivo. Mice in which the regulatory elements of the stem cell marker nestin drive GFP expression enable nascent vasculature to be visualized interacting with transplanted RFP-expressing cancer cells. Nestin-driven GFP expression can also be used to visualize hair follicle stem cells. Dual-color cells expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm enable real-time visualization of nuclear-cytoplasm dynamics including cell cycle events and apoptosis. Highly elongated cancer cells in capillaries in living mice were observed within skin flaps. The migration velocities of the cancer cells in the capillaries were measured by capturing images of the dual-color fluorescent cells over time. The cells in the capillaries elongated to fit the width of these vessels. The use of the dual-color cancer cells differentially labeled in the cytoplasm and nucleus and associated fluorescent imaging provide a powerful tool to understand the mechanism of cancer cell migration and deformation in small vessels.

  10. Visualizing repetitive diffusion activity of double-strand RNA binding proteins by single molecule fluorescence assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hye Ran; Wang, Xinlei; Myong, Sua

    2016-08-01

    TRBP, one of double strand RNA binding proteins (dsRBPs), is an essential cofactor of Dicer in the RNA interference pathway. Previously we reported that TRBP exhibits repetitive diffusion activity on double strand (ds)RNA in an ATP independent manner. In the TRBP-Dicer complex, the diffusion mobility of TRBP facilitates Dicer-mediated RNA cleavage. Such repetitive diffusion of dsRBPs on a nucleic acid at the nanometer scale can be appropriately captured by several single molecule detection techniques. Here, we provide a step-by-step guide to four different single molecule fluorescence assays by which the diffusion activity of dsRBPs on dsRNA can be detected. One color assay, termed protein induced fluorescence enhancement enables detection of unlabeled protein binding and diffusion on a singly labeled RNA. Two-color Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in which labeled dsRBPs is applied to labeled RNA, allows for probing the motion of protein along the RNA axis. Three color FRET reports on the diffusion movement of dsRBPs from one to the other end of RNA. The single molecule pull down assay provides an opportunity to collect dsRBPs from mammalian cells and examine the protein-RNA interaction at single molecule platform. PMID:27012177

  11. Postcolumn derivatization of proteins in capillary sieving electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneta, Takashi; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Imasaka, Totaro

    2009-11-01

    The separation methods for proteins with high resolution and sensitivity are absolutely important in the field of biological sciences. Capillary sieving electrophoresis (CSE) is an excellent separation technique for DNA and proteins with high resolution, while LIF permits the most sensitive detection in CSE. Therefore, proteins have to be labeled with fluorescent or fluorogenic reagent to produce fluorescent derivatives. Both precolumn and oncolumn derivatization have been employed for the labeling of proteins in CSE. However, there is no report on the postcolumn derivatization due to the limitation in the use of a standard migration buffer, despite it being a promising method for sensitive detection of proteins. Here, we show a novel postcolumn derivatization method for protein separation by CSE, using a tertiary amine as a buffer component in the running buffer. Tris, which is commonly used as a base in CSE separation buffers, was substituted by tertiary amines, 2-(diethylamino)ethanol and triethanolamine. A buffer solution containing 2-(diethylamino)ethanol or triethanolamine can be used for the CSE separation followed by the postcolumn derivatization of proteins, since both reagents are unreactive toward a fluorogenic labeling reagent, naphthalene-2,3-dicarbaldehyde. Thus, LIF detection using the postcolumn derivatization permits significant reduction in the LOD (by a factor of 2.4-28) of proteins, compared with conventional absorbance detection. PMID:19862753

  12. New environment-sensitive multichannel DNA fluorescent label for investigation of the protein-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Vorobjev, Yuri N; Barthes, Nicolas P F; Michel, Benoît Y; Burger, Alain; Fedorova, Olga S

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the study of a new multichannel DNA fluorescent base analogue 3-hydroxychromone (3HC) to evaluate its suitability as a fluorescent reporter probe of structural transitions during protein-DNA interactions and its comparison with the current commercially available 2-aminopurine (aPu), pyrrolocytosine (Cpy) and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO). For this purpose, fluorescent base analogues were incorporated into DNA helix on the opposite or on the 5'-side of the damaged nucleoside 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU), which is specifically recognized and removed by Endonuclease VIII. These fluorophores demonstrated different sensitivities to the DNA helix conformational changes. The highest sensitivity and the most detailed information about the conformational changes of DNA induced by protein binding and processing were obtained using the 3HC probe. The application of this new artificial fluorescent DNA base is a very useful tool for the studies of complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Using 3HC biosensor, the kinetic mechanism of Endonuclease VIII action was specified. PMID:24925085

  13. New environment-sensitive multichannel DNA fluorescent label for investigation of the protein-DNA interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A Kuznetsova

    Full Text Available Here, we report the study of a new multichannel DNA fluorescent base analogue 3-hydroxychromone (3HC to evaluate its suitability as a fluorescent reporter probe of structural transitions during protein-DNA interactions and its comparison with the current commercially available 2-aminopurine (aPu, pyrrolocytosine (Cpy and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO. For this purpose, fluorescent base analogues were incorporated into DNA helix on the opposite or on the 5'-side of the damaged nucleoside 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU, which is specifically recognized and removed by Endonuclease VIII. These fluorophores demonstrated different sensitivities to the DNA helix conformational changes. The highest sensitivity and the most detailed information about the conformational changes of DNA induced by protein binding and processing were obtained using the 3HC probe. The application of this new artificial fluorescent DNA base is a very useful tool for the studies of complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Using 3HC biosensor, the kinetic mechanism of Endonuclease VIII action was specified.

  14. New unstable variants of green fluorescent protein for studies of transient gene expression in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Bo; Sternberg, Claus; Poulsen, Lars K.;

    1998-01-01

    Use of the green fluorescent protein (Gfp) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria ia is a powerful method for nondestructive in situ monitoring, since expression of green fluorescence does not require any substrate addition. To expand the use of Gfp as a reporter protein, new variants have been...... constructed by the addition of short peptide sequences to the C-terminal end of intact Gfp. This rendered the Gfp susceptible to the action of indigenous housekeeping proteases, resulting in protein variants with half-lives ranging from 40 min to a few hours when synthesized in Escherichia coli...... and Pseudomonas putida. The new Gfp variants should be useful for in situ studies of temporal gene expression....

  15. Effect of secretory pathway gene overexpression on secretion of a fluorescent reporter protein in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin; Anyaogu, Diana Chinyere; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg;

    2016-01-01

    . The background strain was a fluorescent reporter secreting mRFP. The overall effect of the overexpressions could thus be easily monitored through fluorescence measurements, while the effects on physiology were determined in batch cultivations and surface growth studies. Results: Fourteen protein secretion...... pathway related genes were overexpressed with a tet-ON promoter in the RFP-secreting reporter strain and macromorphology, physiology and protein secretion were monitored when the secretory genes were induced. Overexpression of several of the chosen genes was shown to cause anomalies on growth, micro...... results indicate that increased expression may be a way for the cell to slow down secretion in order to cope with the increased protein load. By constructing a secretion reporter strain, the study demonstrates a robust way to study the secretion pathway in filamentous fungi....

  16. Broadband photon pair generation in green fluorescent proteins through spontaneous four-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Siyuan; Thomas, Abu; Corzo, Neil V.; Kumar, Prem; Huang, Yuping; Lee, Kim Fook

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies in quantum biology suggest that quantum mechanics help us to explore quantum processes in biological system. Here, we demonstrate generation of photon pairs through spontaneous four-wave mixing process in naturally occurring fluorescent proteins. We develop a general empirical method for analyzing the relative strength of nonlinear optical interaction processes in five different organic fluorophores. Our results indicate that the generation of photon pairs in green fluorescent proteins is subject to less background noises than in other fluorophores, leading to a coincidence-to-accidental ratio ~145. As such proteins can be genetically engineered and fused to many biological cells, our experiment enables a new platform for quantum information processing in a biological environment such as biomimetic quantum networks and quantum sensors.

  17. Primary Role of the Chromophore Bond Length Alternation in Reversible Photoconversion of Red Fluorescence Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E.; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Wnuk, Pawel; O'Donnell, Kieran; Scott, J. Nathan; Callis, Patrik R.; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Dokken, Leslie; Rebane, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Rapid photobleaching of fluorescent proteins can limit their use in imaging applications. The underlying kinetics is multi-exponential and strongly depends on the local chromophore environment. The first, reversible, step may be attributed to a rotation around one of the two exocyclic C-C bonds bridging phenol and imidazolinone groups in the chromophore. However it is not clear how the protein environment controls this motion - either by steric hindrances or by modulating the electronic structure of the chromophore through electrostatic interactions. Here we study the first step of the photobleaching kinetics in 13 red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with different chromophore environment and show that the associated rate strongly correlates with the bond length alternation (BLA) of the two bridge bonds. The sign of the BLA appears to determine which rotation is activated. Our results present experimental evidence for the dominance of electronic effects in the conformational dynamics of the RFP chromophore. PMID:23008753

  18. Primary Role of the Chromophore Bond Length Alternation in Reversible Photoconversion of Red Fluorescence Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E.; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Wnuk, Pawel; O'Donnell, Kieran; Scott, J. Nathan; Callis, Patrik R.; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Dokken, Leslie; Rebane, Aleksander

    2012-09-01

    Rapid photobleaching of fluorescent proteins can limit their use in imaging applications. The underlying kinetics is multi-exponential and strongly depends on the local chromophore environment. The first, reversible, step may be attributed to a rotation around one of the two exocyclic C-C bonds bridging phenol and imidazolinone groups in the chromophore. However it is not clear how the protein environment controls this motion - either by steric hindrances or by modulating the electronic structure of the chromophore through electrostatic interactions. Here we study the first step of the photobleaching kinetics in 13 red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with different chromophore environment and show that the associated rate strongly correlates with the bond length alternation (BLA) of the two bridge bonds. The sign of the BLA appears to determine which rotation is activated. Our results present experimental evidence for the dominance of electronic effects in the conformational dynamics of the RFP chromophore.

  19. Fluorescent Reporters and Biosensors for Probing the Dynamic Behavior of Protein Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. González-Vera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Probing the dynamic activities of protein kinases in real-time in living cells constitutes a major challenge that requires specific and sensitive tools tailored to meet the particular demands associated with cellular imaging. The development of genetically-encoded and synthetic fluorescent biosensors has provided means of monitoring protein kinase activities in a non-invasive fashion in their native cellular environment with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we review existing technologies to probe different dynamic features of protein kinases and discuss limitations where new developments are required to implement more performant tools, in particular with respect to infrared and near-infrared fluorescent probes and strategies which enable improved signal-to-noise ratio and controlled activation of probes.

  20. Application of green fluorescent protein for monitoring phenol-degrading strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Milena Valderrama F.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Several methods have been developed for detecting microorganisms in environmental samples. Some systems for incorporating reporter genes, such as lux or the green fluorescent protein (GFP gene, have been developed recently This study describes gfp gene marking of a phenol degrading strain, its evaluation and monitoring in a bioreactor containing refinery sour water. Tagged strains were obtained having the same physiological and metabolic characteristics as the parent strain. Fluorescent expression was kept stable with no selection for more than 50 consecutive generations and tagged strains were recovered from the bioreactor after forty-five days of phenol-degradation treatment. 

  1. A straightforward and quantitative approach for characterizing the photoactivation performance of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Pei, Zhiguo; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Zhihong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Huang, Zhen-Li

    2010-11-01

    Characterizing the photoactivation performance of highlighter fluorescence proteins (FPs) is crucial for screening better highlighter FPs and optimizing the photoactivation efficiency of a certain highlighter FP. Currently, photoactivation contrast and half-time values of photoactivation and photobleaching processes are used for such purpose. However, the relations among these parameters are not clear, and little guidance for practical experiments could be obtained from the half-time values. Here, we show that light dose dependent fluorescence curve, which is calculated from activation-intensity-dependent photoactivation and photobleaching rates, is capable of quantifying the photoactivation performance straightforwardly. Moreover, the photoactivation contrast is easily obtained from the curve.

  2. Catena-dichloro(4,4?-dimethyl-2,2?-bipyridine) Cadmium(II), a New One-dimensional Chain with Blue Fluorescent Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gui-Ling; LI Yan-Tuan; LUO Xu-Qiang; WU Zhi-Yong

    2008-01-01

    A new μ-chloro-bridged one-dimensional coordination polymer [Cd(dmbpy)Cl2]n (dmbpy = 4,4?-dimethyl-2,2?-bipyridine) has been synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV spectra and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group C2/c with a = 17.745(4), b = 10.326(2), c = 7.3382(15) ?, β = 106.85(3)o, V = 1286.9(4) ?3, Z = 4, C12H12N2Cl2Cd, Mr = 367.54, Dc = 1.897 g/cm3, F(000) = 720, λ(MoK() = 0.71073 ?, ( = 2.089 mm-1, R = 0.0368 and wR = 0.1048 for 1041 observed reflections (I > 2σ(I)). Cadmium(II) adopts a distorted octahedral coordination geometry and adjacent coordination chains are intercalated in a zipper-like fashion into 2D layers through the π-π stacking interactions between dmbpy. Fluorescent analyses show that it exhibits intense blue photoluminescence in both DMF and DMSO solutions at room temperature.

  3. A Transgenic Mouse Line Expressing the Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato in GABAergic Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Besser

    Full Text Available GABAergic inhibitory neurons are a large population of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS of mammals and crucially contribute to the function of the circuitry of the brain. To identify specific cell types and investigate their functions labelling of cell populations by transgenic expression of fluorescent proteins is a powerful approach. While a number of mouse lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP in different subpopulations of GABAergic cells are available, GFP expressing mouse lines are not suitable for either crossbreeding to other mouse lines expressing GFP in other cell types or for Ca2+-imaging using the superior green Ca2+-indicator dyes. Therefore, we have generated a novel transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in GABAergic neurons using a bacterial artificial chromosome based strategy and inserting the tdTomato open reading frame at the start codon within exon 1 of the GAD2 gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65. TdTomato expression was observed in all expected brain regions; however, the fluorescence intensity was highest in the olfactory bulb and the striatum. Robust expression was also observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, amacrine cells in the retina as well as in cells migrating along the rostral migratory stream. In cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and brainstem, 80% to 90% of neurons expressing endogenous GAD65 also expressed the fluorescent protein. Moreover, almost all tdTomato-expressing cells coexpressed GAD65, indicating that indeed only GABAergic neurons are labelled by tdTomato expression. This mouse line with its unique spectral properties for labelling GABAergic neurons will therefore be a valuable new tool for research addressing this fascinating cell type.

  4. Preparation and Observation of Fresh-frozen Sections of the Green Fluorescent Protein Transgenic Mouse Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hard tissue decalcification can cause variation in the constituent protein characteristics. This paper describes a method of preparating of frozen mouse head sections so as to clearly observe the nature of the constituent proteins. Frozen sections of various green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mouse heads were prepared using the film method developed by Kawamoto and Shimizu. This method made specimen dissection without decalcification possible, wherein GFP was clearly observed in an undamaged state. Conversely, using the same method with decalcification made GFP observation in the transgenic mouse head difficult. This new method is suitable for observing GFP marked cells, enabling us to follow the transplanted GFP marked cells within frozen head sections

  5. Activity Detection of GalNAc Transferases by Protein-Based Fluorescence Sensors In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lina; Bachert, Collin; Linstedt, Adam D

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation occurring in the Golgi apparatus is an important protein posttranslational modification initiated by up to 20 GalNAc-transferase isozymes with largely distinct substrate specificities. Regulation of this enzyme family affects a vast array of proteins transiting the secretory pathway and misregulation causes human diseases. Here we describe the use of protein-based fluorescence sensors that traffic in the secretory pathway to monitor GalNAc-transferase activity in living cells. The sensors can either be "pan" or isozyme specific. PMID:27632006

  6. Activity Detection of GalNAc Transferases by Protein-Based Fluorescence Sensors In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lina; Bachert, Collin; Linstedt, Adam D

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation occurring in the Golgi apparatus is an important protein posttranslational modification initiated by up to 20 GalNAc-transferase isozymes with largely distinct substrate specificities. Regulation of this enzyme family affects a vast array of proteins transiting the secretory pathway and misregulation causes human diseases. Here we describe the use of protein-based fluorescence sensors that traffic in the secretory pathway to monitor GalNAc-transferase activity in living cells. The sensors can either be "pan" or isozyme specific.

  7. Silicon biochips for dual label-free and fluorescence detection: Application to protein microarray development

    OpenAIRE

    Cretich M.; Reddington A.; Monroe M.; Bagnati M.; Damin F.; Sola L.; Unlu M.S.; Chiari M.

    2011-01-01

    A new silicon chip for protein microarray development, fabrication and validation is proposed. The chip is made of two areas with oxide layers of different thicknesses: an area with a 500 nm SiO2 layer dedicated to interferometric label-free detection and quantification of proteins and an area with 100 nm SiO2 providing enhanced fluorescence. The chip allows, within a single experiment performed on the same surface, label-free imaging of arrayed protein probes coupled with high sensitivity fl...

  8. Potential pitfalls and solutions for use of fluorescent fusion proteins to study the lysosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Huang

    Full Text Available Use of fusion protein tags to investigate lysosomal proteins can be complicated by the acidic, protease-rich environment of the lysosome. Potential artifacts include degradation or release of the tag and acid quenching of fluorescence. Tagging can also affect protein folding, glycosylation and/or trafficking. To specifically investigate the use of fluorescent tags to reveal lysosomal localization, we tested mCherry derivatives as C-terminal tags for Niemann-Pick disease type C protein 2 (NPC2, a luminal lysosomal protein. Full-length mCherry was released from the NPC2 chimera while deletion of the 11 N-terminal residues of mCherry generated a cleavage-resistant (cr fluorescent variant. Insertion of proline linkers between NPC2 and crmCherry had little effect while Gly-Ser linkers promoted cleavage. The NPC2-crmCherry fusion was targeted to the lysosome and restored function in NPC2-deficient cells. Fusion of crmCherry to known and candidate lysosomal proteins revealed that the linkers had different effects on lysosomal localization. Direct fusion of crmCherry impaired mannose 6-phosphorylation and lysosomal targeting of the lysosomal protease tripeptidyl peptidase I (TPP1, while insertion of linkers corrected the defects. Molecular modeling suggested structural bases for the effects of different linkers on NPC2 and TPP1 fusion proteins. While mCherry fusion proteins can be useful tools for studying the lysosome and related organelles, our findings underscore the potential artifacts associated with such applications.

  9. Production of transgenic mice carrying green fluorescence protein gene by a lentiviral vector-mediated approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jingzhi; GUO Xinbing; XIE Shuyang; ZHU Yiwen; HUANG Ying; WANG Shu; REN Zhaorui

    2006-01-01

    A pseudo-lentivirus, which carries green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing cassette, was injected into the perivitelline space of murine fertilized oocytes before transplanting into the oviducts of the foster mothers. The GFP transgenic pups were then obtained. By PCR amplification, fluorescent microscopy and flow assisted cytometry sorting analysis, we found that the integration rate of the transgene was estimated at above 40%. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that the copy number of the integrated GFP cassette was around 40. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that the integration pattern was random but inheritable. The transgenic mice with multi-integration sites and various expression levels possessed a great value in practice as well as research. The approach reported herein provides an efficient way to generate and screen the transgenic mouse strains.

  10. Formation of fluorescent proteins by the attachment of phycoerythrobilin to R-phycoerythrin alpha and beta apo-subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isailovic, Dragan; Sultana, Ishrat; Phillips, Gregory J; Yeung, Edward S

    2006-11-01

    Formation of fluorescent proteins was explored after incubation of recombinant apo-subunits of phycobiliprotein R-phycoerythrin with phycoerythrobilin chromophore. Alpha and beta apo-subunit genes of R-phycoerythrin from red algae Polisiphonia boldii were cloned in plasmid pET-21d(+). Hexahistidine-tagged alpha and beta apo-subunits were expressed in Escherichia coli. Although expressed apo-subunits formed inclusion bodies, fluorescent holo-subunits were constituted after incubation of E. coli cells with phycoerythrobilin. Holo-subunits contained both phycoerythrobilin and urobilin chromophores. Fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscopy showed polar location of holo-subunit inclusion bodies in bacterial cells. Cells containing fluorescent holo-subunits were several times brighter than control cells as found by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The addition of phycoerythrobilin to cells did not show cytotoxic effects, in contrast to expression of proteins in inclusion bodies. In an attempt to improve solubility, R-phycoerythrin apo-subunits were fused to maltose-binding protein and incubated with phycoerythrobilin both in vitro and in vivo. Highly fluorescent soluble fusion proteins containing phycoerythrobilin as the sole chromophore were formed. Fusion proteins were localized by fluorescence microscopy either throughout E. coli cells or at cell poles. Flow cytometry showed that cells containing fluorescent fusion proteins were up to 10 times brighter than control cells. Results indicate that fluorescent proteins formed by attachment of phycoerythrobilin to expressed apo-subunits of phycobiliproteins can be used as fluorescent probes for analysis of cells by microscopy and flow cytometry. A unique property of these fluorescent reporters is their utility in both properly folded (soluble) subunits and subunits aggregated in inclusion bodies.

  11. Yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (Phialidium): structure and structure-based mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (λemmax ≃ 537 nm) with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The latter fluorescent protein is one of only two known cases of naturally occurring proteins that exhibit emission spectra in the yellow–orange range (535–555 nm). Here, the crystal structure of phiYFPv has been determined at 2.05 Å resolution. The ‘yellow’ chromophore formed from the sequence triad Thr65-Tyr66-Gly67 adopts the bicyclic structure typical of fluorophores emitting in the green spectral range. It was demonstrated that perfect antiparallel π-stacking of chromophore Tyr66 and the proximal Tyr203, as well as Val205, facing the chromophore phenolic ring are chiefly responsible for the observed yellow emission of phiYFPv at 537 nm. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis has been used to identify the key functional residues in the chromophore environment. The obtained results have been utilized to improve the properties of phiYFPv and its homologous monomeric biomarker tagYFP

  12. Use of liposomal amplifiers in total internal reflection fluorescence fiber-optic biosensors for protein detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Feng; Fu, Chen; Chen, Yi-Ting; Fang-Ju Jou, Amily; Chen, Chii-Chang; Chou, Chien; Annie Ho, Ja-An

    2016-03-15

    Evanescent-wave excited fluorescence technology has been demonstrated to enhance sensitivity and reduce matrix effects, making it suitable for biosensor development. In this study, we developed a liposome-based, total internal reflection fluorescence, fiber-optic biosensor (TIRF-FOB) for protein detection, which integrates a liposomal amplifier and sandwich immunoassay format with TIRF-FOB. In addition, the antibody-tagged and fluorophore-entrapped liposomes for heterogeneous detection of target molecules were designed and synthesized. This biosensor successfully detected the target protein (model analyzed here is IgG) with a limit of detection (LOD) of 2.0 attomoles for the target protein (equivalent to 2.0 pg/mL of protein presented in 150 μL of sample solution). The features of this ultra-sensitive liposomal TIRF-FOB are (i) fluorescence is excited via evanescent waves and amplified via liposomes; (ii) the use of two polyclonal antibodies in the sandwich assay format increases the specificity and lowers the cost of our assay. Based on the exceptional detection sensitivity and cost-effectiveness, we believe that the proposed biosensor has great potential as a practical, clinical diagnostic tool in the near future. PMID:26595485

  13. Fluorescence Microspectroscopy for Testing the Dimerization Hypothesis of BACE1 Protein in Cultured HEK293 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardeen, Spencer; Johnson, Joseph L.; Heikal, Ahmed A.

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that results from the formation of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain that trigger the known symptoms of memory loss in AD patients. The beta-amyloid plaques are formed by the proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the proteases BACE1 and gamma-secretase. These enzyme-facilitated cleavages lead to the production of beta-amyloid fragments that aggregate to form plaques, which ultimately lead to neuronal cell death. Recent detergent protein extraction studies suggest that BACE1 protein forms a dimer that has significantly higher catalytic activity than its monomeric counterpart. In this contribution, we examine the dimerization hypothesis of BACE1 in cultured HEK293 cells using complementary fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy methods. Cells were transfected with a BACE1-EGFP fusion protein construct and imaged using confocal, and differential interference contrast to monitor the localization and distribution of intracellular BACE1. Complementary fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy measurements enabled us to examine the conformational and environmental changes of BACE1 as a function of substrate binding. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we also quantified the diffusion coefficient of BACE1-EGFP on the plasma membrane as a means to test the dimerization hypothesis as a fucntion of substrate-analog inhibitition. Our results represent an important first towards examining the substrate-mediated dimerization hypothesis of BACE1 in live cells.

  14. Highly photostable, reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein with high contrast ratio for live-cell superresolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Li, Dong; He, Wenting; Peng, Jianxin; Betzig, Eric; Xu, Pingyong

    2016-09-13

    Two long-standing problems for superresolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy are high illumination intensity and long acquisition time, which significantly hamper its application for live-cell imaging. Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) have made it possible to dramatically lower the illumination intensities in saturated depletion-based SR techniques, such as saturated depletion nonlinear structured illumination microscopy (NL-SIM) and reversible saturable optical fluorescence transition microscopy. The characteristics of RSFPs most critical for SR live-cell imaging include, first, the integrated fluorescence signal across each switching cycle, which depends upon the absorption cross-section, effective quantum yield, and characteristic switching time from the fluorescent "on" to "off" state; second, the fluorescence contrast ratio of on/off states; and third, the photostability under excitation and depletion. Up to now, the RSFPs of the Dronpa and rsEGFP (reversibly switchable EGFP) families have been exploited for SR imaging. However, their limited number of switching cycles, relatively low fluorescence signal, and poor contrast ratio under physiological conditions ultimately restrict their utility in time-lapse live-cell imaging and their ability to reach the desired resolution at a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we present a truly monomeric RSFP, Skylan-NS, whose properties are optimized for the recently developed patterned activation NL-SIM, which enables low-intensity (∼100 W/cm(2)) live-cell SR imaging at ∼60-nm resolution at subsecond acquisition times for tens of time points over broad field of view. PMID:27562163

  15. Circularly permuted monomeric red fluorescent proteins with new termini in the beta-sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Haley J; Cotton, Darrel W; Campbell, Robert E

    2010-08-01

    Circularly permuted fluorescent proteins (FPs) have a growing number of uses in live cell fluorescence biosensing applications. Most notably, they enable the construction of single fluorescent protein-based biosensors for Ca(2+) and other analytes of interest. Circularly permuted FPs are also of great utility in the optimization of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors by providing a means for varying the critical dipole-dipole orientation. We have previously reported on our efforts to create circularly permuted variants of a monomeric red FP (RFP) known as mCherry. In our previous work, we had identified six distinct locations within mCherry that tolerated the insertion of a short peptide sequence. Creation of circularly permuted variants with new termini at the locations corresponding to the sites of insertion led to the discovery of three permuted variants that retained no more than 18% of the brightness of mCherry. We now report the extensive directed evolution of the variant with new termini at position 193 of the protein sequence for improved fluorescent brightness. The resulting variant, known as cp193g7, has 61% of the intrinsic brightness of mCherry and was found to be highly tolerant of circular permutation at other locations within the sequence. We have exploited this property to engineer an expanded series of circularly permuted variants with new termini located along the length of the 10th beta-strand of mCherry. These new variants may ultimately prove useful for the creation of single FP-based Ca(2+) biosensors. PMID:20521333

  16. Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for directly detecting nucleic acids and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Fang, Xueen; Cao, Hongmei; Kong, Jilie

    2016-06-15

    Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay (FRET) is gaining great interest in detecting macro-biological molecule. It is difficult to achieve conveniently and fast detection for macro-biological molecule. Herein, a graphene oxide (GO)-based paper chip (glass fiber) integrated with fluorescence labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) for fast, inexpensive and direct detection of biological macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids) has been developed. In this paper, we employed the Cy3/FAM-labeled ssDNA as the reporter and the GO as quencher and the original glass fiber paper as data acquisition substrates. The chip which was designed and fabricated by a cutting machine is a miniature biosensor that monitors fluorescence recovery from resonance energy transfer. The hybridization assays and fluorescence detection were all simplified, and the surface of the chip did not require immobilization or washing. A Nikon Eclipse was employed as excited resource and a commercial digital camera was employed for capturing digital images. This paper-based microfluidics chip has been applied in the detection of proteins and nucleic acids. The biosensing capability meets many potential requirements for disease diagnosis and biological analysis. PMID:26807518

  17. Recombination-stable multimeric green fluorescent protein for characterization of weak promoter outputs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Knuf, Christoph; Förster, Jochen; Sommer, Morten O A

    2015-12-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are widely used for visualization of proteins to track localization and expression dynamics. However, phenotypically important processes can operate at too low expression levels for routine detection, i.e. be overshadowed by autofluorescence noise. While GFP functions well in translational fusions, the use of tandem GFPs to amplify fluorescence signals is currently avoided in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and many other microorganisms due to the risk of loop-out by direct-repeat recombination. We increased GFP fluorescence by translationally fusing three different GFP variants, yeast-enhanced GFP, GFP+ and superfolder GFP to yield a sequence-diverged triple GFP molecule 3vGFP with 74-84% internal repeat identity. Unlike a single GFP, the brightness of 3vGFP allowed characterization of a weak promoter in S. cerevisiae. Utilizing 3vGFP, we further engineered a less leaky Cu(2+)-inducible promoter based on CUP1. The basal expression level of the new promoter was approximately 61% below the wild-type CUP1 promoter, thus expanding the absolute range of Cu(2+)-based gene control. The stability of 3vGFP towards direct-repeat recombination was assayed in S. cerevisiae cultured for 25 generations under strong and slightly toxic expression after which only limited reduction in fluorescence was detectable. Such non-recombinogenic GFPs can help quantify intracellular responses operating a low copy number in recombination-prone organisms.

  18. High-throughput kinase assays with protein substrates using fluorescent polymer superquenching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weatherford Wendy

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput screening is used by the pharmaceutical industry for identifying lead compounds that interact with targets of pharmacological interest. Because of the key role that aberrant regulation of protein phosphorylation plays in diseases such as cancer, diabetes and hypertension, kinases have become one of the main drug targets. With the exception of antibody-based assays, methods to screen for specific kinase activity are generally restricted to the use of small synthetic peptides as substrates. However, the use of natural protein substrates has the advantage that potential inhibitors can be detected that affect enzyme activity by binding to a site other than the catalytic site. We have previously reported a non-radioactive and non-antibody-based fluorescence quench assay for detection of phosphorylation or dephosphorylation using synthetic peptide substrates. The aim of this work is to develop an assay for detection of phosphorylation of chemically unmodified proteins based on this polymer superquenching platform. Results Using a modified QTL Lightspeed™ assay, phosphorylation of native protein was quantified by the interaction of the phosphorylated proteins with metal-ion coordinating groups co-located with fluorescent polymer deposited onto microspheres. The binding of phospho-protein inhibits a dye-labeled "tracer" peptide from associating to the phosphate-binding sites present on the fluorescent microspheres. The resulting inhibition of quench generates a "turn on" assay, in which the signal correlates with the phosphorylation of the substrate. The assay was tested on three different proteins: Myelin Basic Protein (MBP, Histone H1 and Phosphorylated heat- and acid-stable protein (PHAS-1. Phosphorylation of the proteins was detected by Protein Kinase Cα (PKCα and by the Interleukin -1 Receptor-associated Kinase 4 (IRAK4. Enzyme inhibition yielded IC50 values that were comparable to those obtained using

  19. Improved method to raise polyclonal antibody using enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianke Ren; Long Wang; Guoxiang Liu; Wen Zhang; Zhejin Sheng; Zhugang Wang; Jian Fei

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant fusion protein is widely used as an antigen to raise antibodies against the epitope of a target protein. However, the concomitant anticarrier antibody in resulting antiserum reduces the production of the desired antibody and brings about unwanted non-specific immune reactions. It is proposed that the carrier protein transgenic animal could be used to solve this problem. To validate this hypothesis, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgenic mice were produced. By immunizing the mice with fusion protein His6HAtag-EGFP, we showed that the antiserum from the transgenic mice had higher titer antibody against His6HA tag and lower titer antibody against EGFP compared with that from wild-type mice. Therefore, this report describes an improved method to raise high titer antipeptide polyclonal antibody using EGFP transgenic mice that could have application potential in antibodypreparation.

  20. Intracellular distribution of an integral nuclear pore membrane protein fused to green fluorescent protein--localization of a targeting domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderqvist, H; Imreh, G; Kihlmark, M; Linnman, C; Ringertz, N; Hallberg, E

    1997-12-15

    The 121-kDa pore membrane protein (POM121) is a bitopic integral membrane protein specifically located in the pore membrane domain of the nuclear envelope with its short N-terminal tail exposed on the luminal side and its major C-terminal portion adjoining the nuclear pore complex. In order to locate a signal for targeting of POM121 to the nuclear pores, we overexpressed selected regions of POM121 alone or fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transiently transfected COS-1 cells or in a stably transfected neuroblastoma cell line. Microscopic analysis of the GFP fluorescence or immunostaining was used to determine the intracellular distribution of the overexpressed proteins. The endofluorescent GFP tag had no effect on the distribution of POM121, since the chimerical POM121-GFP fusion protein was correctly targeted to the nuclear pores of both COS-1 cells and neuroblastoma cells. Based on the differentiated intracellular sorting of the POM121 variants, we conclude that the first 128 amino acids of POM121 contains signals for targeting to the continuous endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope membrane system but not specifically to the nuclear pores and that a specific nuclear pore targeting signal is located between amino acids 129 and 618 in the endoplasmically exposed portion of POM121. PMID:9461306

  1. Mini-Tn7 transposons for site-specific tagging of bacteria with fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, L.; Sternberg, Claus; Molin, Søren

    2004-01-01

    The mini-Tn7 transposon system is a convenient tool for site-specific tagging of bacteria in which the tagging DNA is inserted at a unique and neutral chromosomal site. We have expanded the panel of mini-Tn7 delivery plasmids expressing different fluorescent proteins (stable and unstable) from...... the Escherichia coli lac derived promoter, P-A1/04/03, or from the growth-rate-dependent Escherichia coli promoter P-rrnB P1. The mini-Tn7 transposons were inserted and tested in the soil bacterium, Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Successful and site-specific tagging was verified by Southern blots as well as by PCR....... Furthermore, the effect of fluorescent protein expression on the cellular growth rate was tested by growth competition assays....

  2. Use of green fluorescent protein to monitor Lactobacillus plantarum in the gastrointestinal tract of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xufeng; Wang, Lei; Li, Wei; Li, Bibo; Yang, Yuxin; Yan, Hailong; Qu, Lei; Chen, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The experiment aimed to specifically monitor the passage of lactobacilli in vivo after oral administration. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was cloned downstream from the constitutive p32 promoter from L. lactis subsp. cremoris Wg2. The recombinant expression vector, pLEM415-gfp-p32, was electroporated into Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) isolated from goat. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was successfully expressed in L. plantarum. After 2 h post-administration, transformed Lactobacillus could be detectable in all luminal contents. In the rumen, bacteria concentration initially decreased, reached the minimum at 42 h post-oral administration and then increased. However, this concentration decreased constantly in the duodenum. This result indicated that L. plantarum could colonize in the rumen but not in the duodenum.

  3. Use of green fluorescent protein to monitor Lactobacillus plantarum in the gastrointestinal tract of goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xufeng Han

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The experiment aimed to specifically monitor the passage of lactobacilli in vivo after oral administration. The green fluorescent protein (GFP gene was cloned downstream from the constitutive p32 promoter from L. lactis subsp. cremoris Wg2. The recombinant expression vector, pLEM415-gfp-p32, was electroporated into Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum isolated from goat. Green fluorescent protein (GFP was successfully expressed in L. plantarum. After 2 h post-administration, transformed Lactobacillus could be detectable in all luminal contents. In the rumen, bacteria concentration initially decreased, reached the minimum at 42 h post-oral administration and then increased. However, this concentration decreased constantly in the duodenum. This result indicated that L. plantarum could colonize in the rumen but not in the duodenum.

  4. Simulations on the kindling mechanism of the asFP595 fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, Bella L.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.; Savitsky, Alexander P.

    2008-02-01

    We report the results of quantum mechanical - molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations aiming to elucidate the mechanism of kindling of the initially non-fluorescent protein asFP595, which is a mutated variant of the chromoprotein asCP from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata. asFP595 becomes brightly fluorescent (kindles) with emission at 595 nm in response to intense light irradiation at 568 nm. In simulations, we use the flexible effective fragment QM/MM method with the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wavefunctions in the quantum part and the AMBER force field parameters in the molecular mechanical part. We analyze the computed scans over potential energy surfaces of the ground and excited electronic states and consider details of the working hypothesis that the trans-cis isomerization of the chromophore group inside the protein is responsible for kindling.

  5. Heterologous overexpression of sfCherry fluorescent protein in Nannochloropsis salina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Kyu Kang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oleaginous microalgae of the Nannochloropsis genus are considered excellent candidates for biofuels and value-added products owing to their high biomass productivity and lipid content. Here, we report the first overexpression and detection of a heterologous sfCherry fluorescent protein in Nannochloropsis salina in order to develop a transformation toolbox for future genetic improvements. Particle bombardment was employed for transformation, and expression of Shble under the control of TUB and UEP promoters, cloned from N. salina, was used to confer resistance to Zeocin antibiotics, resulting in 5.9 and 4.7 transformants per 108 cells, respectively. Stable integration of the markers into the genome was confirmed using a restriction enzyme site-directed amplification (RESDA PCR. The expression of sfCherry fluorescent protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy. These results suggest new possibilities of efficient genetic engineering of Nannochloropsis for the production of biofuels and other biochemicals.

  6. Determination of Protein by Fluorescence Enhancement of Curcumin in Lanthanum-Curcumin-Sodium Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonate-Protein System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng [Zaozhuang University, People' s Republic of China; Huang, Wei [Zaozhuang University, People' s Republic of China; Zhang, Yunfeng [Zaozhuang University, People' s Republic of China; Wang, Mingyin [Zaozhuang University, People' s Republic of China; Sun, Lina [Zaozhuang University, People' s Republic of China; Tang, Bo [Shandong University, Jinan, China; Wang, Wei [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    We found that the fluorescence intensity of the lanthanum (La(3+))-curcumin (CU) complex can be highly enhanced by proteins in the presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulphonate (SDBS). Based on this finding, a new fluorimetric method for the determination of protein was developed. Under optimized conditions, the enhanced intensities of fluorescence are quantitatively in proportion to the concentrations of proteins in the range 0.0080-20.0 g mL(-1) for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 0.00080-20.0 g mL(-1) for human serum albumin (HSA) with excitation of 425 nm, and 0.00020-20.0 g mL(-1) for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 0.00080-20.0 g mL(-1)for human serum albumin (HSA) with excitation of 280 nm, while corresponding qualitative detection limits (S/N 3) are as low as 5.368, 0.573, 0.049, 0.562 g mL(-1), respectively. Study on reaction mechanism reveals that proteins can bind with La(3+), CU and SDBS through self-assembling function with electrostatic attraction, hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interaction and van der Waals forces, etc. The proteins form a supermolecular association with multilayer structure, in which La(3+)-CU is clamped between BSA and SDBS. The unique high fluorescence enhancement of CU is resulted through synergic effects of favorable hydrophobic microenvironment provided by BSA and SDBS, and efficient intermolecular energy transfer among BSA, SDBS and CU. In energy transfer process, La(3+) plays a crucial role because it not only shortens the distance between SDBS and CU, but also acts as a "bridge" for transferring the energy from BSA to CU.

  7. Superresolution imaging in live Caulobacter crescentus cells using photoswitchable enhanced yellow fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biteen, Julie S.; Thompson, Michael A.; Tselentis, Nicole K.; Shapiro, Lucy; Moerner, W. E.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, photoactivation and photoswitching were used to control single-molecule fluorescent labels and produce images of cellular structures beyond the optical diffraction limit (e.g., PALM, FPALM, and STORM). While previous live-cell studies relied on sophisticated photoactivatable fluorescent proteins, we show in the present work that superresolution imaging can be performed with fusions to the commonly used fluorescent protein EYFP. Rather than being photoactivated, however, EYFP can be reactivated with violet light after apparent photobleaching. In each cycle after initial imaging, only a sparse subset fluorophores is reactivated and localized, and the final image is then generated from the measured single-molecule positions. Because these methods are based on the imaging nanometer-sized single-molecule emitters and on the use of an active control mechanism to produce sparse sub-ensembles, we suggest the phrase "Single-Molecule Active-Control Microscopy" (SMACM) as an inclusive term for this general imaging strategy. In this paper, we address limitations arising from physiologically imposed upper boundaries on the fluorophore concentration by employing dark time-lapse periods to allow single-molecule motions to fill in filamentous structures, increasing the effective labeling concentration while localizing each emitter at most once per resolution-limited spot. We image cell-cycle-dependent superstructures of the bacterial actin protein MreB in live Caulobacter crescentus cells with sub-40-nm resolution for the first time. Furthermore, we quantify the reactivation quantum yield of EYFP, and find this to be 1.6 x 10-6, on par with conventional photoswitchable fluorescent proteins like Dronpa. These studies show that EYFP is a useful emitter for in vivo superresolution imaging of intracellular structures in bacterial cells.

  8. Preparation of North American Type II PRRSV Infectious Clone Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Liyue Wang; Kao Zhang; Hongyu Lin; Wenyan Li; Jiexia Wen; Jianlou Zhang; Yonghong Zhang; Xiujin Li; Fei Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is still one of the most important infectious diseases threatening the swine industry. To construct North American type II PRRSV infectious clone containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, we amplify gfp gene, flanked by PRRSV Nsp2 gene fragments upstream and downstream, using overlap PCR method from pcDNA-EF1-GFP plasmid and FL12 plasmid containing PRRSV infectious genome as the templates. The Nsp2 fragment-flanked gfp gene wa...

  9. Post-mortem re-cloning of a transgenic red fluorescent protein dog

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, So Gun; Koo, Ok Jae; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Geon-A; Park, Eun Jung; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the world's first transgenic dogs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, cellular senescence is a major limiting factor for producing more advanced transgenic dogs. To overcome this obstacle, we rejuvenated transgenic cells using a re-cloning technique. Fibroblasts from post-mortem red fluorescent protein (RFP) dog were reconstructed with in vivo matured oocytes and transferred into 10 surrogate dogs. One puppy was produced and confirmed as a re-cloned dog. Althoug...

  10. Induction of cell stress in neurons from transgenic mice expressing yellow fluorescent protein: implications for neurodegeneration research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura H Comley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mice expressing fluorescent proteins in neurons are one of the most powerful tools in modern neuroscience research and are increasingly being used for in vivo studies of neurodegeneration. However, these mice are often used under the assumption that the fluorescent proteins present are biologically inert. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that thy1-driven expression of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP in neurons triggers multiple cell stress responses at both the mRNA and protein levels in vivo. The presence of YFP in neurons also subtly altered neuronal morphology and modified the time-course of dying-back neurodegeneration in experimental axonopathy, but not in Wallerian degeneration triggered by nerve injury. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that fluorescent protein expressed in thy1-YFP mice is not biologically inert, modifies molecular and cellular characteristics of neurons in vivo, and has diverse and unpredictable effects on neurodegeneration pathways.

  11. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blues The postpartum blues E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. Please enter a ... blues: Talk to your partner or a good friend about how you feel Get plenty of rest ...

  12. LanFP10-A, first functional fluorescent protein whose chromophore contains the elusive mutation G67A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Salgado, Abigail; Sánchez-Barreto, Celidee; Gaytán, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Since Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was first successfully expressed in heterologous systems in 1994, many genes encoding other natural autofluorescent proteins (AFPs) have been cloned and subsequently modified by protein engineering to improve their physicochemical properties. Throughout this twenty-two-year period, glycine 67 (Gly67) has been regarded as the only amino acid in the entire protein family that is essential for the formation of the different reported chromophores. In this work, we demonstrate that a synthetic gene encoding LanFP10-A, a natural protein encoded in the genome of the lancelet Branchiostoma floridae containing the G67A mutation, produces a heterologous, functional yellow fluorescent protein when expressed in E. coli. In contrast to LanFP10-A, LanFP6-A, a second GFP-like protein found in the lancelet genome that also contains the natural G67A mutation, was non-fluorescent.

  13. A sulfhydryl-reactive ruthenium (II complex and its conjugation to protein G as a universal reagent for fluorescent immunoassays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Tang Lin

    Full Text Available To develop a fluorescent ruthenium complex for biosensing, we synthesized a novel sulfhydryl-reactive compound, 4-bromophenanthroline bis-2,2'-dipyridine Ruthenium bis (hexafluorophosphate. The synthesized Ru(II complex was crosslinked with thiol-modified protein G to form a universal reagent for fluorescent immunoassays. The resulting Ru(II-protein G conjugates were identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. The emission peak wavelength of the Ru(II-protein G conjugate was 602 nm at the excitation of 452 nm which is similar to the spectra of the Ru(II complex, indicating that Ru(II-protein G conjugates still remain the same fluorescence after conjugation. To test the usefulness of the conjugate for biosensing, immunoglobulin G (IgG binding assay was conducted. The result showed that Ru(II-protein G conjugates were capable of binding IgG and the more cross-linkers to modify protein G, the higher conjugation efficiency. To demonstrate the feasibility of Ru(II-protein G conjugates for fluorescent immunoassays, the detection of recombinant histidine-tagged protein using the conjugates and anti-histidine antibody was developed. The results showed that the histidine-tagged protein was successfully detected with dose-response, indicating that Ru(II-protein G conjugate is a useful universal fluorescent reagent for quantitative immunoassays.

  14. C-terminal fluorescent labeling impairs functionality of DNA mismatch repair proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Brieger

    Full Text Available The human DNA mismatch repair (MMR process is crucial to maintain the integrity of the genome and requires many different proteins which interact perfectly and coordinated. Germline mutations in MMR genes are responsible for the development of the hereditary form of colorectal cancer called Lynch syndrome. Various mutations mainly in two MMR proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, have been identified so far, whereas 55% are detected within MLH1, the essential component of the heterodimer MutLα (MLH1 and PMS2. Most of those MLH1 variants are pathogenic but the relevance of missense mutations often remains unclear. Many different recombinant systems are applied to filter out disease-associated proteins whereby fluorescent tagged proteins are frequently used. However, dye labeling might have deleterious effects on MutLα's functionality. Therefore, we analyzed the consequences of N- and C-terminal fluorescent labeling on expression level, cellular localization and MMR activity of MutLα. Besides significant influence of GFP- or Red-fusion on protein expression we detected incorrect shuttling of single expressed C-terminal GFP-tagged PMS2 into the nucleus and found that C-terminal dye labeling impaired MMR function of MutLα. In contrast, N-terminal tagged MutLαs retained correct functionality and can be recommended both for the analysis of cellular localization and MMR efficiency.

  15. Scanning protein analysis of electrofocusing gels using X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Akihiro; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Iida, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yoshinari; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Shimura, Mari

    2013-05-01

    Recently, "metallomics," in addition to genomics and proteomics, has become a focus as a novel approach to identify sensitive fluctuations in homeostasis that accompany metabolic processes, such as stress responses, differentiation, and proliferation. Cellular elements and associated protein behavior provide important clues for understanding cellular and disease mechanism(s). It is important to develop a system for measuring the native status of the protein. In this study, we developed an original freeze-dried electrofocusing native gel over polyimide film (native-gel film) for scanning protein analysis using synchrotron radiation excited X-ray fluorescence (SPAX). To our knowledge, this is the first report detailing the successful mapping of metal-associated proteins of electrofocusing gels using X-ray fluorescence. SPAX can provide detection sensitivity equivalent to that of LA-ICP-MS. In addition to this increased sensitivity, SPAX has the potential to be combined with other X-ray spectroscopies. Our system is useful for further applications in proteomics investigating cellular element-associated protein behaviors and disease mechanisms.

  16. Monochromatic multicomponent fluorescence sedimentation velocity for the study of high-affinity protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huaying; Fu, Yan; Glasser, Carla; Andrade Alba, Eric J; Mayer, Mark L; Patterson, George; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of multi-protein complexes underlies fundamental processes in cell biology. A mechanistic understanding of assemblies requires accurate measurement of their stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity, and frequently consideration of multiple co-existing complexes. Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with fluorescence detection (FDS-SV) allows the characterization of protein complexes free in solution with high size resolution, at concentrations in the nanomolar and picomolar range. Here, we extend the capabilities of FDS-SV with a single excitation wavelength from single-component to multi-component detection using photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (psFPs). We exploit their characteristic quantum yield of photo-switching to imprint spatio-temporal modulations onto the sedimentation signal that reveal different psFP-tagged protein components in the mixture. This novel approach facilitates studies of heterogeneous multi-protein complexes at orders of magnitude lower concentrations and for higher-affinity systems than previously possible. Using this technique we studied high-affinity interactions between the amino-terminal domains of GluA2 and GluA3 AMPA receptors. PMID:27436096

  17. Visualization of protein interactions in living Drosophila embryos by the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merabet Samir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein interactions control the regulatory networks underlying developmental processes. The understanding of developmental complexity will, therefore, require the characterization of protein interactions within their proper environment. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC technology offers this possibility as it enables the direct visualization of protein interactions in living cells. However, its potential has rarely been applied in embryos of animal model organisms and was only performed under transient protein expression levels. Results Using a Hox protein partnership as a test case, we investigated the suitability of BiFC for the study of protein interactions in the living Drosophila embryo. Importantly, all BiFC parameters were established with constructs that were stably expressed under the control of endogenous promoters. Under these physiological conditions, we showed that BiFC is specific and sensitive enough to analyse dynamic protein interactions. We next used BiFC in a candidate interaction screen, which led to the identification of several Hox protein partners. Conclusion Our results establish the general suitability of BiFC for revealing and studying protein interactions in their physiological context during the rapid course of Drosophila embryonic development.

  18. Identification of a functional nuclear export signal in the green fluorescent protein asFP499

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) asFP499 from Anemonia sulcata is a distant homologue of the GFP from Aequorea victoria. We cloned the asFP499 gene into a mammalian expression vector and showed that this protein was expressed in the human lymphoblast cell line Ramos RA1 and in the embryonic kidney 293T cell line (HEK 293T). In HEK 293T cells, asFP499 was localized mainly in the cytoplasm, suggesting that the protein was excluded from the nucleus. We identified 194LRMEKLNI201 as a candidate nuclear export signal in asFP499 and mutated the isoleucine at position 201 to an alanine. Unlike the wildtype form, the mutant protein was distributed throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus. This is First report of a GFP that contains a functional NES

  19. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall......Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective...... with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain...

  20. An improved Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB R-250) staining to proteins in gels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An improved CBB staining with higher sensitivity than that of the typical CBB staining was reported. The main improvement was using a fixing step of 25% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) before CBB staining. For most proteins studied, the sensitivity of the improved CBB staining was about twice as high as that of the typical method. For basic and low molecular weight proteins such as ribosomal proteins, the sensitivity of this improved staining method was about 3.5-28 times that of the typical method. It was speculated that the improved procedure would be suitable for exact quantitative analysis of proteins fractionated by SDS-PAGE, especially for basic and low molecular weight proteins. On the other hand, this new modified method might be also applied to multidisciplinary studies, such as biological researches and nuclear sciences.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime dynamics of eGFP in protein aggregates with expanded polyQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Hsu, Chih-Chun; Liu, Chia-Rung; Kao, Fu-Jen; Cheng, Tzu-Hao

    2009-02-01

    Expanding a polyglutamine (polyQ) stretch at the N-terminus of huntingtin protein is the main cause of the neurodegenerative disorder Huntington's disease (HD). Expansion of polyQ above 39 residues has an inherent propensity to form amyloid-like fibrils and aggregation of the mutant protein is found to be a critical component for abnormal pathology of HD. Using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we have observed a decrease in fluorescence lifetime of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) fused to 97 successive glutamine residues (97Q). Compared to the sample expressing evenly distributed eGFP, the 97Q-eGFP fusion proteins show the formation of grain-like particles and the reduction of eGFP lifetime by ~250 ps as measured by time-correlated single-photon counting technique (TCSPC). More importantly, this phenomenon does not appear in Hsp104-deficient cells. The gene product of HSP104 is required for the formation of polyQ aggregates in yeast cells; therefore, the cellular 97Q-eGFP become soluble and evenly distributive in the absence of Hsp104. Under this condition, the lifetime value of 97Q-eGFP is close to the one exhibited by eGFP alone. The independence of the effect of the environmental parameters, such as pH and refraction index is demonstrated. These data indicate that the fluorescence lifetime dynamics of eGFP is linked to the process of polyQ protein aggregation per se.

  2. Elucidation of the new generation fluorescent protein tdTomato for space related radiobiological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chishti, Arif Ali; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    Astronauts in space are exposed to a potentially harmful radiation field, which does not exist in its quality and quantity on earth. Radiation exposure in space can lead to delayed or acute health effects. A successful long-term space mission requires better risk estimation and development of appropriate countermeasures, therefore study of the cellular radiation response is necessary. Ionizing radiation can provoke active cellular responses (cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis or other forms of cell type). Exposure to ionizing radiation also activates various signaling pathways in human cells. In the cellular radiation-response, two pivotal signal transduction pathways have to be comprehensively studied i.e. the p53-pathway and NF-κB-pathway. Discovery of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized biological research by making it possible to carry out functional studies in living cells and understanding complex signaling pathways. Previously the green fluorescent proteins EGFP and d2EGFP were used for signaling pathway studies. In this work the new red fluorescent protein tdTomato will be used for comprehensive investigation of NF-κB and other transcription factor activation after exposure of human cells to ionizing radiation (X-rays, heavy ions; space conditions). tdTomato has many advantages over EGFP because of its high fluorescence signals and a better signal/noise ratio in human cells. The previously constructed reporter system with d2EGFP was used to evaluate NF-kB activation after exposure to heavy ion particles of different biological effectiveness. The sensitivity threshold of this system was determined to be 2 particle traversals per cell nucleus. In the current study a more sensitive reporter assay will be constructed using a GAL4-VP16 turbo system that comprises a receptor plasmid and a reporter plasmid. This reporter assay will be designed and constructed with tdTomato and evaluation will be done with different molecular techniques.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to quantify protein-protein interactions inside cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, R R

    2006-11-01

    Recent developments in cellular imaging spectroscopy now permit the minimally invasive study of protein dynamics inside living cells. These advances are of interest to cell biologists, as proteins rarely act in isolation, but rather in concert with others in forming cellular machinery. Until recently, all protein interactions had to be determined in vitro using biochemical approaches: this biochemical legacy has provided cell biologists with the basis to test defined protein-protein interactions not only inside cells, but now also with high spatial resolution. These techniques can detect and quantify protein behaviours down to the single-molecule level, all inside living cells. More recent developments in TCSPC (time-correlated single-photon counting) imaging are now also driving towards being able to determine protein interaction rates with similar spatial resolution, and together, these experimental advances allow investigators to perform biochemical experiments inside living cells. PMID:17052173

  4. Significance of the expression of green fluorescent protein on detection of glioma invasion in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the invasion and metastasis of gliomain vivo by xenotransplanted tumor established by implanting C6 glioma cells transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene in vitro into the brain of SD rats. Methods: C6 cells were transfected with a plasmid vector (pEGEP-N3) containing the GFP gene. Stable GFP-expressing clones were isolated and performed examination by flow cytometry and electron microscope. GFP-expressing cells were stereotactically injected into the brain parenchyma of SD rats to establish xenotransplanted tumor. Four weeks later rats were killed and continuous brain sections respectively were examined by HE staining, immunohistochemistry method and fluorescence microscopy for detection of tumor cell invasion. Xenotransplanted tumor was primarily cultured to determine the storage of exotic GFP gene in vivo. Results: There were not obvious changes in cell cycle and ultrastructure for the cells transfected with GFP gene. C6 cells transfected with GFP gene maintained stable high-level GFP expression in the central nervous system during their growth in vivo. GFP fluorescence clearly demarcated the primary tumor margin and readily allowed for the detection of distant invasion on the single-cell level, which was evidently superior to HE and immunohistochemistry staining. There was not GFP gene loss of transfected cells in vivo. Conclusions: It is suggested that C6 cells transfected with GFP gene can be visualized by fluorescent microscopy after intracranial implantation. This model is an excellent experimental animal model in research on invasion of glioma.

  5. High-performance fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads as microfluidic protein chip supports for AFP detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoqun; Yan, Huan; Yang, Jiumin; Wu, Yudong; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Yingyi; Liu, Ping; Wang, Huiquan; Hu, Zhidong; Chang, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads (FEMMs), with the fluorescence encoding ability of quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic enrichment and separation functions of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, have been widely used for multiple biomolecular detection as microfluidic protein chip supports. However, the preparation of FEMMs with long-term fluorescent encoding and immunodetection stability is still a challenge. In this work, we designed a novel high-temperature chemical swelling strategy. The QDs and Fe3O4 nanoparticles were effectively packaged into microbeads via the thermal motion of the polymer chains and the hydrophobic interaction between the nanoparticles and microbeads. The FEMMs obtained a highly uniform fluorescent property and long-term encoding and immunodetection stability and could be quickly magnetically separated and enriched. Then, the QD-encoded magnetic microbeads were applied to alpha fetoprotein (AFP) detection via sandwich immunoreaction. The properties of the encoded microspheres were characterized using a self-designed detecting apparatus, and the target molecular concentration in the sample was also quantified. The results suggested that the high-performance FEMMs have great potential in the field of biomolecular detection. PMID:27639146

  6. Gene transfer and expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein in variant HT-29c cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Lars Boenicke; Bradley D. Howard; Ilka Vogel; Hoiger Kalthoff

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene in retrovirally transduced variant HT29 cells.METHODS: The retroviral vector prkat EGFP/neo was constructed and transfected into the 293T cell using a standard calcium phosphate precipitation method. HT-29c cells (selected from HT-29 cells) were transduced by a retroviral vector encoding the GEFP gene. The fluorescence intensity of colorectal carcinoma HT-29c cells after transduced with the EGFP bearing retrovirus was visualized using fluorescence microscope and fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Multiple biological behaviors of transduced cells such as the proliferating potential and the expression of various antigens were comparatively analyzed between untransduced and transduced cells in vitro. EGFP expression of the fresh tumor tissue was assessed in vivo.RESULTS: After transduced, HT-29c cells displayed a stable and long-term EGFP expression under the nonselective conditionsin vitro. After cells were successively cultured to passage 50 in vitro, EGFP expression was still at a high level. Their biological behaviors, such as expression of tumor antigens, proliferation rate and aggregation capability were not different compared to untransduced parental cells in vitro. In subcutaneous tumors, EGFP was stable and highly expressed.CONCLUSION: An EGFP expressing retroviral vector was used to transduce HT-29c cells. The transduced cells show a stable and long-term EGFP expression in vitro and in vivo.These cells with EGFP are a valuable tool forin vivo research of tumor metastatic spread.

  7. High-performance fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads as microfluidic protein chip supports for AFP detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoqun; Yan, Huan; Yang, Jiumin; Wu, Yudong; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Yingyi; Liu, Ping; Wang, Huiquan; Hu, Zhidong; Chang, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads (FEMMs), with the fluorescence encoding ability of quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic enrichment and separation functions of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, have been widely used for multiple biomolecular detection as microfluidic protein chip supports. However, the preparation of FEMMs with long-term fluorescent encoding and immunodetection stability is still a challenge. In this work, we designed a novel high-temperature chemical swelling strategy. The QDs and Fe3O4 nanoparticles were effectively packaged into microbeads via the thermal motion of the polymer chains and the hydrophobic interaction between the nanoparticles and microbeads. The FEMMs obtained a highly uniform fluorescent property and long-term encoding and immunodetection stability and could be quickly magnetically separated and enriched. Then, the QD-encoded magnetic microbeads were applied to alpha fetoprotein (AFP) detection via sandwich immunoreaction. The properties of the encoded microspheres were characterized using a self-designed detecting apparatus, and the target molecular concentration in the sample was also quantified. The results suggested that the high-performance FEMMs have great potential in the field of biomolecular detection.

  8. Spectroscopy detection of green and red fluorescent proteins in genetically modified plants using a fiber optics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Oi Wah; Asundi, Anand K.; Chen, Jun-Wei; Chew, Yiwen; Yu, Shangjuan; Yeo, Gare H.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, fiber optic spectroscopy is developed to detect and quantify recombinant green (EGFP) and red (DsRED) fluorescent proteins in vitro and in vivo. The bacterial expression vectors carrying the coding regions of EGFP and DsRED were introduced into Escherichia coli host cells and fluorescent proteins were produced following induction with IPTG. Soluble EGFP and DsRED proteins were isolated from lysed bacterial cells and serially diluted for quantitative analysis by fiber optic spectroscopy. Fluorescence at the appropriate emission wavelengths could be detected up to 64X dilution for EGFP and 40X dilution for DsRED. To determine the capability of spectroscopy detection in vivo, transgenic potato hairy roots expressing EGFP and DsRED were regenerated. This was achieved by cloning the EGFP and DsRED genes into the plant binary vector, pTMV35S, to create the recombinant vectors pGLOWGreen and pGLOWRed. These latter binary vectors were introduced into Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain A4T. Infection of potato cells with transformed agrobacteria was used to insert the fluorescent protein genes into the potato genome. Genetically modified potato cells were then regenerated into hairy roots. A panel of transformed hairy roots expressing varying levels of fluorescent proteins was selected by fluorescence microscopy. We are now assessing the capability of spectroscopic detection system for in vivo quantification of green and red fluorescence levels in transformed roots.

  9. Conformational detection of prion protein with biarsenical labeling and FlAsH fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prion diseases are associated with the misfolding of the host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrPC) into a disease associated form (PrPSc). Recombinant PrP can be refolded into either an α-helical rich conformation (α-PrP) resembling PrPC or a β-sheet rich, protease resistant form similar to PrPSc. Here, we generated tetracysteine tagged recombinant PrP, folded this into α- or β-PrP and determined the levels of FlAsH fluorescence. Insertion of the tetracysteine tag at three different sites within the 91-111 epitope readily distinguished β-PrP from α-PrP upon FlAsH labeling. Labelling of tetracysteine tagged PrP in the α-helical form showed minimal fluorescence, whereas labeling of tagged PrP in the β-sheet form showed high fluorescence indicating that this region is exposed upon conversion. This highlights a region of PrP that can be implicated in the development of diagnostics and is a novel, protease free mechanism for distinguishing PrPSc from PrPC. This technique may also be applied to any protein that undergoes conformational change and/or misfolding such as those involved in other neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases.

  10. Protein-Coupled Fluorescent Probe To Visualize Potassium Ion Transition on Cellular Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Tomoya; Terai, Takuya; Yamamura, Hisao; Shimonishi, Manabu; Komatsu, Toru; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Imaizumi, Yuji; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2016-03-01

    K(+) is the most abundant metal ion in cells, and changes of [K(+)] around cell membranes play important roles in physiological events. However, there is no practical method to selectively visualize [K(+)] at the surface of cells. To address this issue, we have developed a protein-coupled fluorescent probe for K(+), TLSHalo. TLSHalo is responsive to [K(+)] in the physiological range, with good selectivity over Na(+) and retains its K(+)-sensing properties after covalent conjugation with HaloTag protein. By using cells expressing HaloTag on the plasma membrane, we successfully directed TLSHalo specifically to the outer surface of target cells. This enabled us to visualize localized extracellular [K(+)] change with TLSHalo under a fluorescence microscope in real time. To confirm the experimental value of this system, we used TLSHalo to monitor extracellular [K(+)] change induced by K(+) ionophores or by activation of a native Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channel (BK channel). Further, we show that K(+) efflux via BK channel induced by electrical stimulation at the bottom surface of the cells can be visualized with TLSHalo by means of total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM) imaging. Our methodology should be useful to analyze physiological K(+) dynamics with high spatiotemporal resolution. PMID:26894407

  11. The preparation and use of fluorescent-protein conjugates for microvascular research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, P F; Williams, S K

    1984-01-01

    A procedure is described for making large quantities (100 ml) of fluorochrome-labeled albumin. Chromatographic techniques are described for the purification of commercial albumin (BSA) and the purification of albumin from serum. We report experimentally determined optimal conditions for the covalent attachment of fluorescent dyes (rhodamine isothiocyanate (RITC) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC] to albumin. Subsequent removal of all unreacted fluorescent material (UFM) was achieved using charcoal adsorption. We observed no loss of protein following charcoal treatment. The final protein conjugate was analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel chromatography, and isoelectric focusing. The conjugates were determined to be free of UFM and homogeneous with respect to molecular weight. However, FITC conjugation lowered the average isoelectric point of albumin by 0.1 to 0.3 pH units. Illustrations of combining fluorescence microscopy with FITC-BSA and RITC-BSA to view microvascular phenomena in skeletal muscle and the heart are given. Knowledge of the biochemical characteristics of the fluorochrome employed is important for proper interpretation of experimental results using this technique.

  12. A far-red fluorescent protein evolved from a cyanobacterial phycobiliprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Erik A; Tran, Geraldine N; Gross, Larry A; Crisp, Jessica L; Shu, Xiaokun; Lin, John Y; Tsien, Roger Y

    2016-09-01

    Far-red fluorescent proteins (FPs) are desirable for in vivo imaging because with these molecules less light is scattered, absorbed, or re-emitted by endogenous biomolecules compared with cyan, green, yellow, and orange FPs. We developed a new class of FP from an allophycocyanin α-subunit (APCα). Native APC requires a lyase to incorporate phycocyanobilin. The evolved FP, which we named small ultra-red FP (smURFP), covalently attaches a biliverdin (BV) chromophore without a lyase, and has 642/670-nm excitation-emission peaks, a large extinction coefficient (180,000 M(-1)cm(-1)) and quantum yield (18%), and photostability comparable to that of eGFP. smURFP has significantly greater BV incorporation rate and protein stability than the bacteriophytochrome (BPH) FPs. Moreover, BV supply is limited by membrane permeability, and smURFPs (but not BPH FPs) can incorporate a more membrane-permeant BV analog, making smURFP fluorescence comparable to that of FPs from jellyfish or coral. A far-red and near-infrared fluorescent cell cycle indicator was created with smURFP and a BPH FP. PMID:27479328

  13. Amaltheys: A fluorescence-based analyzer to assess cheese milk denatured whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacotte, Pierre; Gomez, Franck; Bardeau, Floriane; Muller, Sabine; Acharid, Abdelhaq; Quervel, Xavier; Trossat, Philippe; Birlouez-Aragon, Inès

    2015-10-01

    The cheese industry faces many challenges to optimize cheese yield and quality. A very precise standardization of the cheese milk is needed, which is achieved by a fine control of the process and milk composition. Thorough analysis of protein composition is important to determine the amount of protein that will be retained in the curd or lost in the whey. The fluorescence-based Amaltheys analyzer (Spectralys Innovation, Romainville, France) was developed to assess pH 4.6-soluble heat-sensitive whey proteins (sWP*) in 5 min. These proteins are those that can be denatured upon heat-treatment and further retained in the curd after coagulation. Monitoring of sWP* in milk and subsequent adaptation of the process is a reliable solution to achieve stable cheese yield and quality. Performance of the method was evaluated by an accredited laboratory on a 0 to 7 g/L range. Accuracy compared with the reference Kjeldahl method is also provided with a standard error of 0.25 g/L. Finally, a 4-mo industrial trial in a cheese plant is described, where Amaltheys was used as a process analytical technology to monitor sWP* content in ingredients and final cheese milk. Calibration models over quality parameters of final cheese were also built from near-infrared and fluorescence spectroscopic data. The Amaltheys analyzer was found to be a rapid, compact, and accurate device to help implementation of standardization procedures in the dairy industry.

  14. Dynamic in vivo imaging and cell tracking using a histone fluorescent protein fusion in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaioannou Virginia E

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in optical imaging modalities and the continued evolution of genetically-encoded fluorescent proteins are coming together to facilitate the study of cell behavior at high resolution in living organisms. As a result, imaging using autofluorescent protein reporters is gaining popularity in mouse transgenic and targeted mutagenesis applications. Results We have used embryonic stem cell-mediated transgenesis to label cells at sub-cellular resolution in vivo, and to evaluate fusion of a human histone protein to green fluorescent protein for ubiquitous fluorescent labeling of nucleosomes in mice. To this end we have generated embryonic stem cells and a corresponding strain of mice that is viable and fertile and exhibits widespread chromatin-localized reporter expression. High levels of transgene expression are maintained in a constitutive manner. Viability and fertility of homozygous transgenic animals demonstrates that this reporter is developmentally neutral and does not interfere with mitosis or meiosis. Conclusions Using various optical imaging modalities including wide-field, spinning disc confocal, and laser scanning confocal and multiphoton excitation microscopy, we can identify cells in various stages of the cell cycle. We can identify cells in interphase, cells undergoing mitosis or cell death. We demonstrate that this histone fusion reporter allows the direct visualization of active chromatin in situ. Since this reporter segments three-dimensional space, it permits the visualization of individual cells within a population, and so facilitates tracking cell position over time. It is therefore attractive for use in multidimensional studies of in vivo cell behavior and cell fate.

  15. Non-adiabatic dynamics of isolated green fluorescent protein chromophore anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On-the-fly ab initio molecular dynamics calculations have been performed to investigate the relaxation mechanism of green fluorescent protein chromophore anion under vacuum. The CASSCF surface hopping simulation method based on Zhu-Nakamura theory is applied to present the real-time conformational changes of the target molecule. The static calculations and dynamics simulation results suggest that not only the twisting motion around bridging bonds between imidazolinone and phenoxy groups but the strength mode of C=O and pyramidalization character of bridging atom are major factors on the ultrafast fluorescence quenching process of the isolated chromophore anion. The abovementioned factors bring the molecule to the vicinity of conical intersections on its potential energy surface and to finish the internal conversion process. A Hula-like twisting pattern is displayed during the relaxation process and the entire decay process disfavors a photoswitching pattern which corresponds to cis-trans photoisomerization

  16. Non-adiabatic dynamics of isolated green fluorescent protein chromophore anion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Zhou, Pan-Wang; Li, Bin; Gao, Ai-Hua; Han, Ke-Li

    2014-12-01

    On-the-fly ab initio molecular dynamics calculations have been performed to investigate the relaxation mechanism of green fluorescent protein chromophore anion under vacuum. The CASSCF surface hopping simulation method based on Zhu-Nakamura theory is applied to present the real-time conformational changes of the target molecule. The static calculations and dynamics simulation results suggest that not only the twisting motion around bridging bonds between imidazolinone and phenoxy groups but the strength mode of C=O and pyramidalization character of bridging atom are major factors on the ultrafast fluorescence quenching process of the isolated chromophore anion. The abovementioned factors bring the molecule to the vicinity of conical intersections on its potential energy surface and to finish the internal conversion process. A Hula-like twisting pattern is displayed during the relaxation process and the entire decay process disfavors a photoswitching pattern which corresponds to cis-trans photoisomerization.

  17. Non-adiabatic dynamics of isolated green fluorescent protein chromophore anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Li, E-mail: zhaoli282@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: pwzhou@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: libinsnet@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: aihuagao@dicp.ac.cn; Gao, Ai-Hua, E-mail: zhaoli282@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: pwzhou@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: libinsnet@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: aihuagao@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, Pan-Wang, E-mail: zhaoli282@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: pwzhou@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: libinsnet@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: aihuagao@dicp.ac.cn; Li, Bin, E-mail: zhaoli282@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: pwzhou@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: libinsnet@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: aihuagao@dicp.ac.cn; Han, Ke-Li, E-mail: klhan@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2014-12-21

    On-the-fly ab initio molecular dynamics calculations have been performed to investigate the relaxation mechanism of green fluorescent protein chromophore anion under vacuum. The CASSCF surface hopping simulation method based on Zhu-Nakamura theory is applied to present the real-time conformational changes of the target molecule. The static calculations and dynamics simulation results suggest that not only the twisting motion around bridging bonds between imidazolinone and phenoxy groups but the strength mode of C=O and pyramidalization character of bridging atom are major factors on the ultrafast fluorescence quenching process of the isolated chromophore anion. The abovementioned factors bring the molecule to the vicinity of conical intersections on its potential energy surface and to finish the internal conversion process. A Hula-like twisting pattern is displayed during the relaxation process and the entire decay process disfavors a photoswitching pattern which corresponds to cis-trans photoisomerization.

  18. Determination of the topology of endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins using redox-sensitive green-fluorescence protein fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsachaki, Maria; Birk, Julia; Egert, Aurélie; Odermatt, Alex

    2015-07-01

    Membrane proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are involved in a wide array of essential cellular functions. Identification of the topology of membrane proteins can provide significant insight into their mechanisms of action and biological roles. This is particularly important for membrane enzymes, since their topology determines the subcellular site where a biochemical reaction takes place and the dependence on luminal or cytosolic co-factor pools and substrates. The methods currently available for the determination of topology of proteins are rather laborious and require post-lysis or post-fixation manipulation of cells. In this work, we have developed a simple method for defining intracellular localization and topology of ER membrane proteins in living cells, based on the fusion of the respective protein with redox-sensitive green-fluorescent protein (roGFP). We validated the method and demonstrated that roGFP fusion proteins constitute a reliable tool for the study of ER membrane protein topology, using as control microsomal 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) proteins whose topology has been resolved, and comparing with an independent approach. We then implemented this method to determine the membrane topology of six microsomal members of the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) family. The results revealed a luminal orientation of the catalytic site for three enzymes, i.e. 17β-HSD6, 7 and 12. Knowledge of the intracellular location of the catalytic site of these enzymes will enable future studies on their biological functions and on the role of the luminal co-factor pool.

  19. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahito; Kobayashi, Mirina; Nagaya, Masaki; Matsunari, Hitomi; Nakano, Kazuaki; Maehara, Miki; Hayashida, Gota; Takayanagi, Shuko; Sakai, Rieko; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Onodera, Masafumi; Nagashima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36-37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum.

  20. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum

    Science.gov (United States)

    WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAGAYA, Masaki; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; NAKANO, Kazuaki; MAEHARA, Miki; HAYASHIDA, Gota; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; SAKAI, Rieko; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36–37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum. PMID:25739316

  1. Thermal stability of chemically denatured green fluorescent protein (GFP) A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a light emitter in the bioluminescence reaction of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. The protein consist of 238 amino acids and produces green fluorescent light (λmax=508 nm), when irradiated with near ultraviolet light. The fluorescence is due to the presence of chromophore consisting of an imidazolone ring, formed by a post-translational modification of the tripeptide -Ser65-Tyr66-Gly67-, which buried into β-barrel. GFP is extremely compact and heat stable molecule. In this work, we present data for the effect of chemical denaturing agent on the thermal stability of GFP. When denaturing agent is applied, global thermal stability and the melting point of the molecule is decreases, that can be monitored with differential scanning calorimetry. The results indicate, that in 1-6 M range of GuHCl the melting temperature is decreasing continuously from 83 to 38 deg. C. Interesting finding, that the calculated calorimetric enthalpy decreases with GuHCl concentration up to 3 M (5.6-0.2 kJ mol-1), but at 4 M it jumps to 8.4 and at greater concentration it is falling down to 1.1 kJ mol-1. First phenomena, i.e. the decrease of melting point with increasing GuHCl concentration can be easily explained by the effect of the extended chemical denaturation, when less and less amount of heat required to diminish the remaining hydrogen bonds in β-barrel. The surprising increase of calorimetric enthalpy at 4 M concentration of GuHCl could be the consequence of a dimerization or a formation of stable complex between GFP and denaturing agent as well as a precipitation at an extreme GuHCl concentration. We are planning further experiments to elucidate fluorescent consequence of these processes

  2. Quantitative fluorescence loss in photobleaching for analysis of protein transport and aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wüstner Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP is a widely used imaging technique, which provides information about protein dynamics in various cellular regions. In FLIP, a small cellular region is repeatedly illuminated by an intense laser pulse, while images are taken with reduced laser power with a time lag between the bleaches. Despite its popularity, tools are lacking for quantitative analysis of FLIP experiments. Typically, the user defines regions of interest (ROIs for further analysis which is subjective and does not allow for comparing different cells and experimental settings. Results We present two complementary methods to detect and quantify protein transport and aggregation in living cells from FLIP image series. In the first approach, a stretched exponential (StrExp function is fitted to fluorescence loss (FL inside and outside the bleached region. We show by reaction–diffusion simulations, that the StrExp function can describe both, binding/barrier–limited and diffusion-limited FL kinetics. By pixel-wise regression of that function to FL kinetics of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP, we determined in a user-unbiased manner from which cellular regions eGFP can be replenished in the bleached area. Spatial variation in the parameters calculated from the StrExp function allow for detecting diffusion barriers for eGFP in the nucleus and cytoplasm of living cells. Polyglutamine (polyQ disease proteins like mutant huntingtin (mtHtt can form large aggregates called inclusion bodies (IB’s. The second method combines single particle tracking with multi-compartment modelling of FL kinetics in moving IB’s to determine exchange rates of eGFP-tagged mtHtt protein (eGFP-mtHtt between aggregates and the cytoplasm. This method is self-calibrating since it relates the FL inside and outside the bleached regions. It makes it therefore possible to compare release kinetics of eGFP-mtHtt between different cells and

  3. A new way to rapidly create functional, fluorescent fusion proteins: random insertion of GFP with an in vitro transposition reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobsdottir Klara B

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP can be inserted into the middle of another protein to produce a functional, fluorescent fusion protein. Finding permissive sites for insertion, however, can be difficult. Here we describe a transposon-based approach for rapidly creating libraries of GFP fusion proteins. Results We tested our approach on the glutamate receptor subunit, GluR1, and the G protein subunit, αs. All of the in-frame GFP insertions produced a fluorescent protein, consistent with the idea that GFP will fold and form a fluorophore when inserted into virtually any domain of another protein. Some of the proteins retained their signaling function, and the random nature of the transposition process revealed permissive sites for insertion that would not have been predicted on the basis of structural or functional models of how that protein works. Conclusion This technique should greatly speed the discovery of functional fusion proteins, genetically encodable sensors, and optimized fluorescence resonance energy transfer pairs.

  4. Development of a Novel Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Binding Assay to Study the Association of Plakins with Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Bertrand; Begré, Nadja; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Borradori, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are fundamental for most biological processes, such as the formation of cellular structures and enzymatic complexes or in signaling pathways. The identification and characterization of protein-protein interactions are therefore essential for understanding the mechanisms and regulation of biological systems. The organization and dynamics of the cytoskeleton, as well as its anchorage to specific sites in the plasma membrane and organelles, are regulated by the plakins. These structurally related proteins anchor different cytoskeletal networks to each other and/or to other cellular structures. The association of several plakins with intermediate filaments (IFs) is critical for maintenance of the cytoarchitecture. Pathogenic mutations in the genes encoding different plakins can lead to dramatic manifestations, occurring principally in the skin, striated muscle, and/or nervous system, due to cytoskeletal disorganization resulting in abnormal cell fragility. Nevertheless, it is still unclear how plakins bind to IFs, although some general rules are slowly emerging. We here describe in detail a recently developed protein-protein fluorescence binding assay, based on the production of recombinant proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and their use as fluid-phase fluorescent ligands on immobilized IF proteins. Using this method, we have been able to assess the ability of C-terminal regions of GFP-tagged plakin proteins to bind to distinct IF proteins and IF domains. This simple and sensitive technique, which is expected to facilitate further studies in this area, can also be potentially employed for any kind of protein-protein interaction studies.

  5. Improvement of the Fluorescence Intensity during a Flow Cytometric Analysis for Rice Protoplasts by Localization of a Green Fluorescent Protein into Chloroplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Kyoung You

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Protoplasts have been a useful unicellular system for various molecular biological analyses based on transient expression and single cell analysis using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS, widely used as a powerful method in functional genomics. Despite the versatility of these methods, some limits based on low fluorescence intensity of a flow cytometric analysis (FCA using protoplasts have been reported. In this study, the chloroplast targeting of fluorescent proteins (FPs led to an eight-fold increase in fluorescence intensity and a 4.5-fold increase of transfection ratio from 14.7% to 65.7% as compared with their targeting into the cytoplasm. Moreover, the plot data of FCA shows that 83.3% of the K-sGFP population is under the threshold level, regarded as a non-transgenic population with background signals, while 65.7% of the K-sGFP population is spread on overall intervals. To investigate the reason underlying this finding, mRNA/protein levels and transfection efficiency were analyzed, and results suggest that mRNA/protein levels and transfection ratio are not much different between K-sGFP and KR-sGFP. From those results, we hypothesized that the difference of fluorescence intensity is not only derived from cellular events such as molecular level or transfection efficiency. Taken together, we suggest that the translocation of FPs into chloroplasts contributes to the improvement of fluorescence intensity in FCA and, apparently, plays an important role in minimizing the loss of the transfected population. Our study could be usefully applicable for highly sensitive FACS and FCA-investigations of green tissue.

  6. First molecular identification of the transgene red fluorescent protein (RFP in transgenic ornamental zebrafish (Danio rerio introduced in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Scotto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the transgenic fluorescent red, orange and pink zebra fish (Danio rerio, found in local aquariums in Peru, were identified using the PCR technique to amplify the transgene RFP sea anemone belonging to Discosoma spp. The gene expression of the red fluorescent protein (RFP transgene was found to determine different gradients-of-bioluminescence (shades in color in each GMO fish analyzed. We performed sequence analysis of the two variants of the RFP along with six variants of the existing fluorescent protein GFP from the Genbank, this could help identify quickly if they are new genes or variants thereof as these novel fluorescent proteins may be introduced in aquatic GMO in the future. Thus, developing and improving biosecurity measures through its timely detection at the molecular genetic level.

  7. A double-emulsion microfluidic platform for in vitro green fluorescent protein expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfluidic droplet technology has gained popularity due to the advantages over conventional emulsion techniques and capabilities for a wide range of applications. In this paper, the development of a simple microfluidic-based double-emulsion system is reported. Such a system could be potentially used for in vitro protein synthesis. The system involves a two-step process to make water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsions. A PMMA microchip is used for the formation of water-in-oil (W/O) single-emulsion droplets. Then, the single-emulsion droplets are transported to a PDMS/glass microchip to make the W/O/W double-emulsion droplets. The system was first characterized by detecting fluorescein sodium salt as a model dye in the internal aqueous droplets using laser-induced fluorescence. The effect of the flow rates of the internal aqueous phase and outer continuous aqueous phase on the formation of the double-emulsion droplets is investigated to provide information for system optimization. On-chip storage of double-emulsion droplets is also investigated to allow for protein synthesis from a PCR-generated DNA template using either commercial in vitro transcription and translation kits or crude Escherichia coli S30 extracts. In vitro expression of the green fluorescent protein is successfully demonstrated in this system

  8. Correlative imaging of fluorescent proteins in resin-embedded plant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Karen; Mitchell, Steve; Paultre, Danae; Posch, Markus; Oparka, Karl

    2013-04-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) were developed for live-cell imaging and have revolutionized cell biology. However, not all plant tissues are accessible to live imaging using confocal microscopy, necessitating alternative approaches for protein localization. An example is the phloem, a tissue embedded deep within plant organs and sensitive to damage. To facilitate accurate localization of FPs within recalcitrant tissues, we developed a simple method for retaining FPs after resin embedding. This method is based on low-temperature fixation and dehydration, followed by embedding in London Resin White, and avoids the need for cryosections. We show that a palette of FPs can be localized in plant tissues while retaining good structural cell preservation, and that the polymerized block face can be counterstained with cell wall probes. Using this method we have been able to image green fluorescent protein-labeled plasmodesmata to a depth of more than 40 μm beneath the resin surface. Using correlative light and electron microscopy of the phloem, we were able to locate the same FP-labeled sieve elements in semithin and ultrathin sections. Sections were amenable to antibody labeling, and allowed a combination of confocal and superresolution imaging (three-dimensional-structured illumination microscopy) on the same cells. These correlative imaging methods should find several uses in plant cell biology.

  9. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana; Shibayama, Naoya; Happo, Naohisa; Kimura, Koji; Okabe, Takahiro; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Park, Sam-Yong; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2016-06-01

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α2β2 tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm3) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules.

  10. Semi-rational engineering of a coral fluorescent protein into an efficient highlighter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Hidekazu; Karasawa, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hideaki; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2005-03-01

    Kaede is a natural photoconvertible fluorescent protein found in the coral Trachyphyllia geoffroyi. It contains a tripeptide, His 62-Tyr 63-Gly 64, which acts as a green chromophore that is photoconvertible to red following (ultra-) violet irradiation. Here, we report the molecular cloning and crystal structure determination of a new fluorescent protein, KikG, from the coral Favia favus, and its in vitro evolution conferring green-to-red photoconvertibility. Substitution of the His 62-Tyr 63-Gly 64 sequence into the native protein provided only negligible photoconversion. On the basis of the crystal structure, semi-rational mutagenesis of the amino acids surrounding the chromophore was performed, leading to the generation of an efficient highlighter, KikGR. Within mammalian cells, KikGR is more efficiently photoconverted and is several-fold brighter in both the green and red states than Kaede. In addition, KikGR was successfully photoconverted using two-photon excitation microscopy at 760 nm, ensuring optical cell labelling with better spatial discrimination in thick and highly scattering tissues.

  11. Identification of intermediate species in protein-folding by quantitative analysis of amplitudes in time-domain fluorescence spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anoop M Saxena; G Krishnamoorthy; Jayant B Udgaonkar; N Periasamy

    2007-03-01

    In protein-folding studies it is often required to differentiate a system with only two-states, namely the native (N) and unfolded (U) forms of the protein present at any condition of the solvent, from a situation wherein intermediate state(s) could also be present. This differentiation of a two-state from a multi-state structural transition is non-trivial when studied by the several steady-state spectroscopic methods that are popular in protein-folding studies. In contrast to the steady-state methods, time-resolved fluorescence has the capability to reveal the presence of heterogeneity of structural forms due to the `fingerprint’ nature of fluorescence lifetimes of various forms. In this work, we establish this method by quantitative analysis of amplitudes associated with fluorescence lifetimes in multiexponential decays. First, we show that we can estimate, accurately, the relative population of species from two-component mixtures of non-interacting molecules such as fluorescent dyes, peptides and proteins. Subsequently, we demonstrate, by analysing the amplitudes of fluorescence lifetimes which are controlled by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), that the equilibrium folding-unfolding transition of the small singledomain protein barstar is not a two-step process.

  12. A fluorescent cassette-based strategy for engineering multiple domain fusion proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorchid Ahmad

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The engineering of fusion proteins has become increasingly important and most recently has formed the basis of many biosensors, protein purification systems, and classes of new drugs. Currently, most fusion proteins consist of three or fewer domains, however, more sophisticated designs could easily involve three or more domains. Using traditional subcloning strategies, this requires micromanagement of restriction enzymes sites that results in complex workaround solutions, if any at all. Results Therefore, to aid in the efficient construction of fusion proteins involving multiple domains, we have created a new expression vector that allows us to rapidly generate a library of cassettes. Cassettes have a standard vector structure based on four specific restriction endonuclease sites and using a subtle property of blunt or compatible cohesive end restriction enzymes, they can be fused in any order and number of times. Furthermore, the insertion of PCR products into our expression vector or the recombination of cassettes can be dramatically simplified by screening for the presence or absence of fluorescence. Conclusions Finally, the utility of this new strategy was demonstrated by the creation of basic cassettes for protein targeting to subcellular organelles and for protein purification using multiple affinity tags.

  13. Multi-state lasing in self-assembled ring-shaped green fluorescent protein microcavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate highly efficient lasing from multiple photonic states in microcavities filled with self-assembled rings of recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in its solid state form. The lasing regime is achieved at very low excitation energies of 13 nJ and occurs from cavity modes dispersed in both energy and momentum. We attribute the momentum distribution to very efficient scattering of incident light at the surface of the eGFP rings. The distribution of lasing states in energy is induced by the large spectral width of the gain spectrum of recombinant eGFP (FWHM ≅ 25 nm)

  14. Multi-state lasing in self-assembled ring-shaped green fluorescent protein microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Christof P.; Höfling, Sven; Gather, Malte C.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate highly efficient lasing from multiple photonic states in microcavities filled with self-assembled rings of recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in its solid state form. The lasing regime is achieved at very low excitation energies of 13 nJ and occurs from cavity modes dispersed in both energy and momentum. We attribute the momentum distribution to very efficient scattering of incident light at the surface of the eGFP rings. The distribution of lasing states in energy is induced by the large spectral width of the gain spectrum of recombinant eGFP (FWHM ≅ 25 nm).

  15. Multi-state lasing in self-assembled ring-shaped green fluorescent protein microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Christof P., E-mail: cpd3@st-andrews.ac.uk; Höfling, Sven; Gather, Malte C., E-mail: mcg6@st-andrews.ac.uk [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-08

    We demonstrate highly efficient lasing from multiple photonic states in microcavities filled with self-assembled rings of recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in its solid state form. The lasing regime is achieved at very low excitation energies of 13 nJ and occurs from cavity modes dispersed in both energy and momentum. We attribute the momentum distribution to very efficient scattering of incident light at the surface of the eGFP rings. The distribution of lasing states in energy is induced by the large spectral width of the gain spectrum of recombinant eGFP (FWHM ≅ 25 nm)

  16. A Dark Excited State of Fluorescent Protein Chromophores, Considered as Brooker Dyes

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Seth

    2010-01-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore is an asymmetric monomethine dye system. In the resonance color theory of dyes, a strong optical excitation arises from interactions of two valence-bond structures with a third, higher structure. We use correlated quantum chemistry to show that the anionic chromophore is a resonant Brooker dye, and that the third structure corresponds to a higher stationary electronic state of this species. The excitation energy of this state should be just below the first excitation energy of the neutral form. This has implications for excited state mechanism in GFPs, which we discuss.

  17. Post-mortem re-cloning of a transgenic red fluorescent protein dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, So Gun; Koo, Ok Jae; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Geon-A; Park, Eun Jung; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong-Chun

    2011-12-01

    Recently, the world's first transgenic dogs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, cellular senescence is a major limiting factor for producing more advanced transgenic dogs. To overcome this obstacle, we rejuvenated transgenic cells using a re-cloning technique. Fibroblasts from post-mortem red fluorescent protein (RFP) dog were reconstructed with in vivo matured oocytes and transferred into 10 surrogate dogs. One puppy was produced and confirmed as a re-cloned dog. Although the puppy was lost during birth, we successfully established a rejuvenated fibroblast cell line from this animal. The cell line was found to stably express RFP and is ready for additional genetic modification.

  18. A faster way to make GFP-based biosensors: Two new transposons for creating multicolored libraries of fluorescent fusion proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Thomas E

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are now several ways to generate fluorescent fusion proteins by randomly inserting DNA encoding the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP into another protein's coding sequence. These approaches can be used to map regions in a protein that are permissive for GFP insertion or to create novel biosensors. While remarkably useful, the current insertional strategies have two major limitations: (1 they only produce one kind, or color, of fluorescent fusion protein and (2 one half of all GFP insertions within the target coding sequence are in the wrong orientation. Results We have overcome these limitations by incorporating two different fluorescent proteins coding sequences in a single transposon, either in tandem or antiparallel. Our initial tests targeted two mammalian integral membrane proteins: the voltage sensitive motor, Prestin, and an ER ligand gated Ca2+ channel (IP3R. Conclusions These new designs increase the efficiency of random fusion protein generation in one of two ways: (1 by creating two different fusion proteins from each insertion or (2 by being independent of orientation.

  19. Determining the ice-binding planes of antifreeze proteins by fluorescence-based ice plane affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Koli; Garnham, Christopher P; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter

    2014-01-15

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are expressed in a variety of cold-hardy organisms to prevent or slow internal ice growth. AFPs bind to specific planes of ice through their ice-binding surfaces. Fluorescence-based ice plane affinity (FIPA) analysis is a modified technique used to determine the ice planes to which the AFPs bind. FIPA is based on the original ice-etching method for determining AFP-bound ice-planes. It produces clearer images in a shortened experimental time. In FIPA analysis, AFPs are fluorescently labeled with a chimeric tag or a covalent dye then slowly incorporated into a macroscopic single ice crystal, which has been preformed into a hemisphere and oriented to determine the a- and c-axes. The AFP-bound ice hemisphere is imaged under UV light to visualize AFP-bound planes using filters to block out nonspecific light. Fluorescent labeling of the AFPs allows real-time monitoring of AFP adsorption into ice. The labels have been found not to influence the planes to which AFPs bind. FIPA analysis also introduces the option to bind more than one differently tagged AFP on the same single ice crystal to help differentiate their binding planes. These applications of FIPA are helping to advance our understanding of how AFPs bind to ice to halt its growth and why many AFP-producing organisms express multiple AFP isoforms.

  20. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-06-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians.

  1. Green fluorescent protein: new light to visualize metastasis and angiogenesis in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Chishima, Takashi; Baranov, Eugene; Shimada, Hiroshi; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    1999-07-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing cell-lines have been established by our laboratory that permit the visualization and imaging of primary tumors and micrometastases in live tissue and live animals. Hamster and human cancer cell-lines were transfected with vectors containing the humanized GFP cDNA. Stable high-level expression of GFP was maintained in subcutaneously and orthotopically growing tumors in nude or SCID mice. Subsequent micro-metastases were visualized by GFP fluorescence in live tissue of systematic organs down to the single-cell level. GFP-expressing lung and prostate cancer were visualized to metastasize widely throughout the skeleton when implanted orthotopically in nude mice. With these GFP-cell lines, we have developed models that closely mimic the clinic situation. We have now developed a mean to visualize the onset and progression of angiogenesis of growing and spreading tumors by injecting a fluorescent rhodamine dye to the GFP-tumor-bearing mice indicate that the onset and extent of tumor angiogenesis depends on the site and type of tumor growing in the animal. These models are ideal for studying the mechanisms of cancer metastasis and for discovery of angiogenesis and metastasis inhibitors.

  2. Fluorescent proteins function as a prey attractant: experimental evidence from the hydromedusa Olindias formosus and other marine organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven H. D. Haddock

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although proteins in the green fluorescent protein family (GFPs have been discovered in a wide array of taxa, their ecological functions in these organisms remain unclear. Many hypothesized roles are related to modifying bioluminescence spectra or modulating the light regime for algal symbionts, but these do not explain the presence of GFPs in animals that are non-luminous and non-symbiotic. Other hypothesized functions are unrelated to the visual signals themselves, including stress responses and antioxidant roles, but these cannot explain the localization of fluorescence in particular structures on the animals. Here we tested the hypothesis that fluorescence might serve to attract prey. In laboratory experiments, the predator was the hydromedusa Olindias formosus (previously known as O. formosa, which has fluorescent and pigmented patches on the tips of its tentacles. The prey, juvenile rockfishes in the genus Sebastes, were significantly more attracted (P<1×10−5 to the medusa's tentacles under lighting conditions where fluorescence was excited and tentacle tips were visible above the background. The fish did not respond significantly when treatments did not include fluorescent structures or took place under yellow or white lights, which did not generate fluorescence visible above the ambient light. Furthermore, underwater observations of the behavior of fishes when presented with a brightly illuminated point showed a strong attraction to this visual stimulus. In situ observations also provided evidence for fluorescent lures as supernormal stimuli in several other marine animals, including the siphonophore Rhizophysa eysenhardti. Our results support the idea that fluorescent structures can serve as prey attractants, thus providing a potential function for GFPs and other fluorescent proteins in a diverse range of organisms.

  3. A ubiquitin-10 promoter-based vector set for fluorescent protein tagging facilitates temporal stability and native protein distribution in transient and stable expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefen, Christopher; Donald, Naomi; Hashimoto, Kenji; Kudla, Jörg; Schumacher, Karin; Blatt, Michael R

    2010-10-01

    Fluorescent tagging of proteins and confocal imaging techniques have become methods of choice in analysing the distributions and dynamic characteristics of proteins at the subcellular level. In common use are a number of strategies for transient expression that greatly reduce the preparation time in advance of imaging, but their applications are limited in success outside a few tractable species and tissues. We previously developed a simple method to transiently express fluorescently-tagged proteins in Arabidopsis root epidermis and root hairs. We describe here a set of Gateway-compatable vectors with fluorescent tags incorporating the ubiqutin-10 gene promoter (P(UBQ10) ) of Arabidopsis that gives prolonged expression of the fluorescently-tagged proteins, both in tobacco and Arabidopsis tissues, after transient transformation, and is equally useful in generating stably transformed lines. As a proof of principle, we carried out transformations with fluorescent markers for the integral plasma membrane protein SYP121, a member of the SNARE family of vesicle-trafficking proteins, and for DHAR1, a cytosolic protein that facilitates the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. We also carried out transformations with SYP121 and its interacting partner, the KC1 K(+) channel, to demonstrate the utility of the methods in bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). Transient transformations of Arabidopsis using Agrobacterium co-cultivation methods yielded expression in all epidermal cells, including root hairs and guard cells. Comparative studies showed that the P(UBQ10) promoter gives similar levels of expression to that driven by the native SYP121 promoter, faithfully reproducing the characteristics of protein distributions at the subcellular level. Unlike the 35S-driven construct, expression under the P(UBQ10) promoter remained elevated for periods in excess of 2 weeks after transient transformation. This toolbox of vectors and fluorescent tags promises significant

  4. Enhanced detection of single-cell-secreted proteins using a fluorescent immunoassay on the protein-G-terminated glass substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Y

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Yoon Jeong,1,2 Kwan Hong Lee,1,2 Hansoo Park,3 Jonghoon Choi1,2 1Department of Bionano Technology, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul, 2Department of Bionano Engineering, Hanyang University ERICA, Ansan, 3School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: We present an evaluation of protein-G-terminated glass slides that may contain a suitable substrate for aligning the orientation of antibodies to obtain better binding moiety to the target antigen. The results of the protein-G-terminated slides were compared with those obtained with epoxy-based slides to evaluate signal enhancement for human immunoglobulin G (IgG targets, and an increase in the average fluorescence intensity was observed for the lowest measurable amount of IgG target in the assay using protein-G-terminated slides. Applying this strategy for signal amplification to single-cell assays improves the limits of detection for human IgG protein and cytokines (interleukin-2 and interferon-γ captured from hybridomas. Our data indicate that protein-G-terminated slides have a higher binding capacity for antigens and have better spot-to-spot consistency than that of traditional epoxy-based slides. These properties would be beneficial in the detection of fine amounts of single-cell-secreted proteins, which may provide key insights into cell–cell communication and immune responses. Keywords: microwell array, antibody’s orientation, single cell analysis, secreted cytokine, protein-G-terminated surface

  5. Predictive and interpretive simulation of green fluorescent protein expression in reporter bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveau, J H; Lindow, S E

    2001-12-01

    We have formulated a numerical model that simulates the accumulation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in bacterial cells from a generic promoter-gfp fusion. The model takes into account the activity of the promoter, the time it takes GFP to mature into its fluorescent form, the susceptibility of GFP to proteolytic degradation, and the growth rate of the bacteria. From the model, we derived a simple formula with which promoter activity can be inferred easily and quantitatively from actual measurements of GFP fluorescence in growing bacterial cultures. To test the usefulness of the formula, we determined the activity of the LacI-repressible promoter P(A1/O4/O3) in response to increasing concentrations of the inducer IPTG (isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside) and were able to predict cooperativity between the LacI repressors on each of the two operator sites within P(A1/O4/O3). Aided by the model, we also quantified the proteolytic degradation of GFP[AAV], GFP[ASV], and GFP[LVA], which are popular variants of GFP with reduced stability in bacteria. Best described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the rate at which these variants were degraded was a function of the activity of the promoter that drives their synthesis: a weak promoter yielded proportionally less GFP fluorescence than a strong one. The degree of disproportionality is species dependent: the effect was more pronounced in Erwinia herbicola than in Escherichia coli. This phenomenon has important implications for the interpretation of fluorescence from bacterial reporters based on these GFP variants. The model furthermore predicted a significant effect of growth rate on the GFP content of individual bacteria, which if not accounted for might lead to misinterpretation of GFP data. In practice, our model will be helpful for prior testing of different combinations of promoter-gfp fusions that best fit the application of a particular bacterial reporter strain, and also for the interpretation of actual GFP

  6. Fluorescent fusion proteins of soluble guanylyl cyclase indicate proximity of the heme nitric oxide domain and catalytic domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Haase

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine the structural organisation of heterodimeric soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET was measured between fluorescent proteins fused to the amino- and carboxy-terminal ends of the sGC beta1 and alpha subunits. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was used as FRET donor and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP as FRET acceptor. After generation of recombinant baculovirus, fluorescent-tagged sGC subunits were co-expressed in Sf9 cells. Fluorescent variants of sGC were analyzed in vitro in cytosolic fractions by sensitized emission FRET. Co-expression of the amino-terminally tagged alpha subunits with the carboxy-terminally tagged beta1 subunit resulted in an enzyme complex that showed a FRET efficiency of 10% similar to fluorescent proteins separated by a helix of only 48 amino acids. Because these findings indicated that the amino-terminus of the alpha subunits is close to the carboxy-terminus of the beta1 subunit we constructed fusion proteins where both subunits are connected by a fluorescent protein. The resulting constructs were not only fluorescent, they also showed preserved enzyme activity and regulation by NO. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the ability of an amino-terminal fragment of the beta1 subunit to inhibit activity of an heterodimer consisting only of the catalytic domains (alphacatbetacat, Winger and Marletta (Biochemistry 2005, 44:4083-90 have proposed a direct interaction of the amino-terminal region of beta1 with the catalytic domains. In support of such a concept of "trans" regulation of sGC activity by the H-NOX domains our results indicate that the domains within sGC are organized in a way that allows for direct interaction of the amino-terminal regulatory domains with the carboxy-terminal catalytic region. In addition, we constructed "fluorescent-conjoined" sGC's by fusion of the alpha amino-terminus to the beta1 carboxy-terminus leading to a

  7. Labeling embryonic stem cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein on the hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕路; 孟国良; 刑阳; 尚克刚; 王小珂; 顾军

    2003-01-01

    Objective To label embryonic stem (ES) cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGF P) on the hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene locus for t he first time to provide a convenient and efficient way for cell tracking and ma nipulation in the studies of transplantation and stem cell therapy.Methods Homologous fragments were obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), from whic h the gene targeting vector pHPRT-EGFP was constructed. The linearized vector was introduced into ES cells by electroporation. The G418r6TGr cell clones were obtained after selection with G418 and 6TG media. The integration patterns of these resistant cell clones were identified with Southern blotting.Results EGFP expressing ES cells on the locus of HPRT were successfu lly generated. They have normal properties, such as karyotype, viability and di fferentiation ability. The green fluorescence of EGFP expressing cells was main tained in propagation of the ES cells for more than 30 passages and in different iated cells. Cultured in suspension, the "green" ES cells aggregated and forme d embryoid bodies, retaining the green fluorescence at varying developmental sta ges. The "green" embryoid bodies could expand and differentiate into various t ypes of cells, exhibiting ubiquitous green fluorescence. Conclusions This generation of "green" targeted ES cells is described in an efficient proto col for obtaining the homologous fragments by PCR. Introducing the marker gene in the genome of ES cells, we should be able to manipulate them in vitro and use them as vehicles in cell-replacement therapy as well as for other biomedical a nd research purposes.

  8. Simulation of Far-Field Superresolution Fluorescence Imaging with Two-Color One-Photon Excitation of Reversible Photoactivatable Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chen; QIAO Ling-Ling; MAO Zheng-Le

    2011-01-01

    We propose to achieve far-field super-resolution imaging by using offset two-color one-photon (2C1P) excitation of reversible photoactivatable fluorescence proteins. Due to the distinctive photoswitching performance of the proteins, such as dronpa, the fluorescence emission will only come from the overlapped region of activation beam and excitation beam. The analysis solution of rate equation shows that the resolution of offset 2C1P microscope is "engineered" by laser power of excitation and activation beams and the power ratio between them. Superior lateral and transverse resolution is theoretically demonstrated compared with conventional fluorescence scanning microscopy.%@@ We propose to achieve far-field super-resolution imaging by using offset two-color one-photon(2C1P) excitation of reversible photoactivatable fluorescence proteins.Due to the distinctive photoswitching performance of the proteins,such as dronpa,the fluorescence emission will only come from the overlapped region of activation beam and excitation beam.The analysis solution of rate equation shows that the resolution of offset 2C1P microscope is "engineered" by laser power of excitation and activation beams and the power ratio between them.Superior lateral and transverse resolution is theoretically demonstrated compared with conventional fluorescence scanning microscopy.

  9. Benchmarking Various Green Fluorescent Protein Variants in Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Lactococcus lactis for Live Cell Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overkamp, W.; Beilharz, K.; Detert Oude Weme, R.; Solopova, A.; Karsens, H.; Kovács, A.T.; Kok, J.; Kuipers, O.P; Veening, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) offers efficient ways of visualizing promoter activity and protein localization in vivo, and many different variants are currently available to study bacterial cell biology. Which of these variants is best suited for a certain bacterial strain, goal, or experimental c

  10. Highly sensitive rapid fluorescence detection of protein residues on surgical instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalev, Valeri I [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Bartona, James S [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Richardson, Patricia R [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom); Jones, Anita C [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    There is a risk of contamination of surgical instruments by infectious protein residues, in particular, prions which are the agents for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in humans. They are exceptionally resistant to conventional sterilization, therefore it is important to detect their presence as contaminants so that alternative cleaning procedures can be applied. We describe the development of an optimized detection system for fluorescently labelled protein, suitable for in-hospital use. We show that under optimum conditions the technique can detect {approx}10 attomole/cm{sup 2} with a scan speed of {approx}3-10 cm{sup 2}/s of the test instrument's surface. A theoretical analysis and experimental measurements will be discussed.

  11. Ultraviolet photodissociation enhances top-down mass spectrometry as demonstrated on green fluorescent protein variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Xibei; Young, Nicolas L

    2014-05-01

    Ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) is a compelling fragmentation technique with great potential to enhance proteomics generally and top-down MS specifically. In this issue, Cannon et al. (Proteomics 2014, 14, XXXX-XXXX) use UVPD to perform top-down MS on several sequence variants of green fluorescent protein and compare the results to CID, higher energy collision induced dissociation, and electron transfer dissociation. As compared to the other techniques UVPD produces a wider variety of fragment ion types that are relatively evenly distributed across the protein sequences. Overall, their results demonstrate enhanced sequence coverage and higher confidence in sequence assignment via UVPD MS. Based on these and other recent results UVPD is certain to become an increasingly widespread and valuable tool for top-down proteomics. PMID:24723542

  12. Identification of the minimal region in lipase ABC transporter recognition domain of Pseudomonas fluorescens for secretion and fluorescence of green fluorescent protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Yeonwoo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TliA is a thermostable lipase secreted by the type 1 secretion system (T1SS of Pseudomonas fluorescens. The secretion is promoted by its secretion/chaperone domain located near the C-terminus, which is composed mainly of four Repeat-in-Toxin (RTX repeats. In order to identify the minimal region of TliA responsible for its secretion, five different copies of the secretion/chaperone domain, each involving truncated N-terminal residues and a common C-terminus, were acquired and named as lipase ABC transporter recognition domains (LARDs. Each LARD was fused to epidermal growth factor (EGF or green fluorescent protein (GFP, and the secretion of EGF-LARD or GFP-LARD fusion proteins was assessed in Escherichia coli with ABC transporter. Results Among the fusion proteins, GFP or EGF with 105-residue LARD3 was most efficiently secreted. In addition, GFP-LARD3 emitted wild type GFP fluorescence. Structurally, LARD3 had the 4 RTX repeats exposed at the N-terminus, while other LARDs had additional residues prior to them or missed some of the RTX repeats. LARD3 was both necessary and sufficient for efficient secretion and maintenance of GFP fluorescence in E. coli, which was also confirmed in P. fluorescens and P. fluorescens ▵tliA, a knock-out mutant of tliA. Conclusion LARD3 was a potent secretion signal in T1SS for its fusion flanking RTX motif, which enhanced secretion and preserved the fluorescence of GFP. LARD3-mediated secretion in E. coli or P. fluorescens will enable the development of enhanced protein manufacturing factory and recombinant microbe secreting protein of interest in situ.

  13. Fluorescence enhancement of single-phase red-blue emit-ting Ba_3MgSi_2O_8:Eu~(2+),Mn~(2+) phosphors via Dy~(3+) addition for plant cultivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘凌云; 王达健; 毛智勇; 刘艳华; 李雪征; 陆启飞

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence enhancement of red and blue concurrently emitting Ba3MgSi2O8:Eu2+,Mn2+ phosphors for plant cultivation has been investigated by Dy3+ addition.The Ba3MgSi2O8:Eu2+,Mn2+,Dy3+(BMS-EMD) phosphors have two-color emissions at the wavelength peak values of 437 nm and 620 nm at the excitation of 350 nm.The two emission bands are coincident with the absorption spectrum for photosynthesis of plants.An obvious enhancement effect has been observed upon addition of Dy3+ with amount of 0.03 mol%,in which the ...

  14. Interaction of Human Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein 1 (CLIC1) with Lipid Bilayers: A Fluorescence Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Joanna E; Goodchild, Sophia C; Breit, Samuel N; Curmi, Paul M G; Brown, Louise J

    2016-07-12

    Chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) is very unusual as it adopts a soluble glutathione S-transferase-like canonical fold but can also autoinsert into lipid bilayers to form an ion channel. The conversion between these forms involves a large, but reversible, structural rearrangement of the CLIC1 module. The only identified environmental triggers controlling the metamorphic transition of CLIC1 are pH and oxidation. Until now, there have been no high-resolution structural data available for the CLIC1 integral membrane state, and consequently, a limited understanding of how CLIC1 unfolds and refolds across the bilayer to form a membrane protein with ion channel activity exists. Here we show that fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to establish the interaction and position of CLIC1 in a lipid bilayer. Our method employs a fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) approach between CLIC1 and a dansyl-labeled lipid analogue to probe the CLIC1-lipid interface. Under oxidizing conditions, a strong FRET signal between the single tryptophan residue of CLIC1 (Trp35) and the dansyl-lipid analogue was detected. When considering the proportion of CLIC1 interacting with the lipid bilayer, as estimated by fluorescence quenching experiments, the FRET distance between Trp35 and the dansyl moiety on the membrane surface was determined to be ∼15 Å. This FRET-detected interaction provides direct structural evidence that CLIC1 associates with membranes. The results presented support the current model of an oxidation-driven interaction of CLIC1 with lipid bilayers and also propose a membrane anchoring role for Trp35. PMID:27299171

  15. Functional incorporation of green fluorescent protein into hepatitis B virus envelope particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The envelope of hepatitis B virus (HBV), containing the L, M, and S proteins, is essential for virus entry and maturation. For direct visualization of HBV, we determined whether envelope assembly could accommodate the green fluorescent protein (GFP). While the C-terminal addition of GFP to S trans-dominant negatively inhibited empty envelope particle secretion, the N-terminal GFP fusion to S (GFP.S) was co-integrated into the envelope, giving rise to fluorescent particles. Microscopy and topogenesis analyses demonstrated that the proper intracellular distribution and folding of GFP.S, required for particle export were rescued by interprotein interactions with wild-type S. Thereby, a dual location of GFP, inside and outside the envelope, was observed. GFP.S was also efficiently packaged into the viral envelope, and these GFP-tagged virions retained the capacity for attachment to HBV receptor-positive cells in vitro. Together, GFP-tagged virions should be suitable to monitor HBV uptake and egress in live hepatocytes

  16. Expression of pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseyko, N.; Feldman, L. J.

    2001-01-01

    This is the first report on using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a pH reporter in plants. Proton fluxes and pH regulation play important roles in plant cellular activity and therefore, it would be extremely helpful to have a plant gene reporter system for rapid, non-invasive visualization of intracellular pH changes. In order to develop such a system, we constructed three vectors for transient and stable transformation of plant cells with a pH-sensitive derivative of green fluorescent protein. Using these vectors, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco plants were produced. Here the application of pH-sensitive GFP technology in plants is described and, for the first time, the visualization of pH gradients between different developmental compartments in intact whole-root tissues of A. thaliana is reported. The utility of pH-sensitive GFP in revealing rapid, environmentally induced changes in cytoplasmic pH in roots is also demonstrated.

  17. Recovery of red fluorescent protein chromophore maturation deficiency through rational design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M Moore

    Full Text Available Red fluorescent proteins (RFPs derived from organisms in the class Anthozoa have found widespread application as imaging tools in biological research. For most imaging experiments, RFPs that mature quickly to the red chromophore and produce little or no green chromophore are most useful. In this study, we used rational design to convert a yellow fluorescent mPlum mutant to a red-emitting RFP without reverting any of the mutations causing the maturation deficiency and without altering the red chromophore's covalent structure. We also created an optimized mPlum mutant (mPlum-E16P that matures almost exclusively to the red chromophore. Analysis of the structure/function relationships in these proteins revealed two structural characteristics that are important for efficient red chromophore maturation in DsRed-derived RFPs. The first is the presence of a lysine residue at position 70 that is able to interact directly with the chromophore. The second is an absence of non-bonding interactions limiting the conformational flexibility at the peptide backbone that is oxidized during red chromophore formation. Satisfying or improving these structural features in other maturation-deficient RFPs may result in RFPs with faster and more complete maturation to the red chromophore.

  18. Highly sensitive immunoassay of protein molecules based on single nanoparticle fluorescence detection in a nanowell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Hee; Kim, Hee-Joo; Lakshmana, Sudheendra; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2011-03-01

    A nanoarray based-single molecule detection system was developed for detecting proteins with extremely high sensitivity. The nanoarray was able to effectively trap nanoparticles conjugated with biological sample into nanowells by integrating with an electrophoretic particle entrapment system (EPES). The nanoarray/EPES is superior to other biosensor using immunoassays in terms of saving the amounts of biological solution and enhancing kinetics of antibody binding due to reduced steric hindrance from the neighboring biological molecules. The nanoarray patterned onto a layer of PMMA and LOL on conductive and transparent indium tin oxide (ITO)-glass slide by using e-beam lithography. The suspension of 500 nm-fluorescent (green emission)-carboxylated polystyrene (PS) particles coated with protein-A followed by BDE 47 polyclonal antibody was added to the chip that was connected to the positive voltage. The droplet was covered by another ITO-coated-glass slide and connected to a ground terminal. After trapping the particles into the nanowells, the solution of different concentrations of anti-rabbit- IgG labeled with Alexa 532 was added for an immunoassay. A single molecule detection system could quantify the anti-rabbit IgG down to atto-mole level by counting photons emitted from the fluorescent dye bound to a single nanoparticle in a nanowell.

  19. High accuracy of mesoscopic epi-fluorescence tomography for non-invasive quantitative volume determination of fluorescent protein-expressing tumours in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare mesoscopic epi-fluorescence tomography (MEFT) and EPRI-illumination reflectance imaging (EPRI) for quantitative tumour size assessment in mice. Tumour xenografts of green/red fluorescent protein (GFP/RFP)-expressing colon cancer cells were measured using MEFT, EPRI, ultrasound (US) and micro computed tomography (μCT) at day 14 post-injection (n = 6). Results from MEFT and EPRI were correlated with each other and with US and μCT (reference methods). Tumour volumes were measured ex vivo by GFP and RFP fluorescence imaging on cryoslices and compared with the in vivo measurements. High correlation and congruency were observed between MEFT, US and μCT (MEFT/US: GFP: r 2 = 0.96; RFP: r 2 = 0.97, both P 2 = 0.93; RFP: r 2 = 0.90; both P 2 = 0.96; RFP: r 2 = 0.99; both P 2 = 0.95; RFP: r 2 = 0.94; both P 2 = 0.86; RFP: r 2 = 0.86; both P < 0.05). Fluorescence distribution reconstruction using MEFT affords highly accurate three-dimensional (3D) tumour volume data showing superior accuracy compared to EPRI. Thus, MEFT is a very suitable technique for quantitatively assessing fluorescence distribution in superficial tumours at high spatial resolution. (orig.)

  20. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Quality Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is team science? More than 75 years of solving problems ... delivery cause the postpartum blues. How can you manage the baby blues? The American College of Obstetricians ...

  1. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with this condition are happy most of the time. But compared to how she usually feels, the ... the "blues" usually lessens and goes away over time. What causes the baby blues? Medical experts believe ...

  2. Postpartum Blues

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    Full Text Available ... Postpartum care > The postpartum blues The postpartum blues E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. Please enter a valid e-mail address. Your information: Your recipient's information: Your ...

  3. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can you manage the baby blues? The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that women do ... can you manage the baby blues? The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that women do ...

  4. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Feels sad Feels confused The postpartum blues peak three to five days after delivery. They usually end ... Feels sad Feels confused The postpartum blues peak three to five days after delivery. They usually end ...

  5. Postpartum Blues

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    Full Text Available ... postpartum blues The postpartum blues E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. Please enter ... hear about breakthroughs for babies and families. Ask a question Our health experts can answer questions about ...

  6. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medical experts believe that changes in the woman's hormones after delivery cause the postpartum blues. How can ... Medical experts believe that changes in the woman's hormones after delivery cause the postpartum blues. How can ...

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopy and principal component analysis of soy protein hydrolysate fractions and the potential to assess their antioxidant capacity characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranamukhaarachchi, Sahan A; Peiris, Ramila H; Moresoli, Christine

    2017-02-15

    The potential of intrinsic fluorescence and principal component analysis (PCA) to characterize the antioxidant capacity of soy protein hydrolysates (SPH) during sequential ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF) was evaluated. SPH was obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of soy protein isolate. Antioxidant capacity was measured by Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) and Folin Ciocalteau Reagent (FCR) assays together with fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEM). PCA of the fluorescence EEMs revealed two principal components (PC1-tryptophan, PC2-tyrosine) that captured significant variance in the fluorescence spectra. Regression models between antioxidant capacity and PC1 and PC2 displayed strong linear correlations for NF fractions and a weak linear correlation for UF fractions. Clustering of UF and NF fractions according to ORACFPCA and FCRFPCA was observed. The ability of this method to extract information on contributions by tryptophan and tyrosine amino acid residues to the antioxidant capacity of SPH fractions was demonstrated. PMID:27664660

  8. Multicolor Fluorescence Nanoscopy by Photobleaching : Concept Verification and its Application to Resolve Selective Storage of Proteins in Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Rönnlund, Daniel; Xu, Lei; Perols, Anna; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie; Auer, Gert; Widengren, Jerker

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence nanoscopy provides means to discernthe finer details of protein localization and interaction in cells by offeringan order of magnitude higher resolution than conventional optical imagingtechniques. However, these super resolution techniques put higher demands onthe optical system as well as on the fluorescent probes, making multicolorfluorescence nanoscopy a challenging task. Here we present a new and simpleprocedure which exploits the photostability and excitation spectra of dye...

  9. An improved respiratory syncytial virus neutralization assay based on the detection of green fluorescent protein expression and automated plaque counting

    OpenAIRE

    van Remmerden Yvonne; Xu Fang; van Eldik Mandy; Heldens Jacco GM; Huisman Willem; Widjojoatmodjo Myra N

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Virus neutralizing antibodies against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are considered important correlates of protection for vaccine evaluation. The established plaque reduction assay is time consuming, labor intensive and highly variable. Methods Here, a neutralization assay based on a modified RSV strain expressing the green fluorescent protein in combination with automated detection and quantification of plaques is described. Results The fluorescence plaque reduction a...

  10. Plasmonic Non-linear Conversion of Continuous Wave Light by Gold Nanoparticle Clusters withFluorescent Protein Loaded Gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Salakhutdinov, Ildar; Abak, Musa Kurtulus; Turkpence, Deniz; Piantanida, Luca; Fruk, Ljiljana; Tasgin, Mehmet Emre; Lazzarino, Marco; Bek, Alpan

    2014-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a method which is feasible for deterministic activation of few molecules. Our method relies on non-linear optical excitation of few enhanced yellow fluorescent protein molecules that are sandwiched between gaps of asymmetrically constructed plasmonic gold nanoparticle clusters. We observe that as infrared photons, which cannot get absorbed by fluorescent molecules, are converted through efficient second harmonic generation activity of gold nanoparticles to visible photons, the molecules absorb them and fluoresce. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that observation of SHG with cw laser becomes possible owing to the cooperative action of conversion enhancement through Fano resonance, hybridization in the plasmon absorption spectrum and the size asymmetry of nanoparticle dimers.

  11. Pressure-sensitive reaction yield of the TePixD blue-light sensor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroi, Kunisato; Okajima, Koji; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Tokutomi, Satoru; Kamiyama, Tadashi; Terazima, Masahide

    2015-02-19

    The effect of pressure on the dissociation reaction of the TePixD decamer was investigated by high-pressure transient grating (TG). The TG signal intensity representing the dissociation reaction of the TePixD decamer significantly decreased by applying a relatively small pressure. On the other hand, the reaction rate increased with increasing pressure. The equilibrium between the pentamer and the decamer was investigated by high-pressure dynamic light scattering. The results indicated that the fraction of the decamer slightly increased in the high-pressure region. From these measurements, it was concluded that the pressure-dependent signal intensity originated from the decrease of the quantum yield of the dissociation reaction of the decamer, indicating that this reaction efficiency is very sensitive to pressure. Using densimetry at high pressures, the compressibility was found to be pressure dependent even in a relatively low pressure range. We attributed the origin of the pressure-sensitive reaction yield to the decrease of compressibility at high pressure. Because the compressibility is related to the volume fluctuation, this observation suggests that the driving force for this reaction is fluctuation of the protein. The relationship between the cavities at the interfaces of the monomer units and the reactivity is also discussed.

  12. Efficient and dynamic nuclear localization of green fluorescent protein via RNA binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences have been used for artificial localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus as a positioning marker or for measurement of the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling rate in living cells. However, the detailed mechanism of nuclear retention of GFP-NLS remains unclear. Here, we show that a candidate mechanism for the strong nuclear retention of GFP-NLS is via the RNA-binding ability of the NLS sequence. GFP tagged with a classical NLS derived from Simian virus 40 (GFP-NLSSV40) localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus, the nuclear subdomain in which ribosome biogenesis takes place. GFP-NLSSV40 in the nucleolus was mobile, and intriguingly, the diffusion coefficient, which indicates the speed of diffusing molecules, was 1.5-fold slower than in the nucleoplasm. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis showed that GFP-NLSSV40 formed oligomers via RNA binding, the estimated molecular weight of which was larger than the limit for passive nuclear export into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that the nuclear localization of GFP-NLSSV40 likely results from oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. The analytical technique used here can be applied for elucidating the details of other nuclear localization mechanisms, including those of several types of nuclear proteins. In addition, GFP-NLSSV40 can be used as an excellent marker for studying both the nucleoplasm and nucleolus in living cells. - Highlights: • Nuclear localization signal-tagged GFP (GFP-NLS) showed clear nuclear localization. • The GFP-NLS dynamically localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus. • The nuclear localization of GFP-NLS results from transient oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. • Our NLS-tagging procedure is ideal for use in artificial sequestration of proteins in the nucleus

  13. Efficient and dynamic nuclear localization of green fluorescent protein via RNA binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Akira; Nakayama, Yusaku; Kinjo, Masataka, E-mail: kinjo@sci.hokudai.ac.jp

    2015-07-31

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences have been used for artificial localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus as a positioning marker or for measurement of the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling rate in living cells. However, the detailed mechanism of nuclear retention of GFP-NLS remains unclear. Here, we show that a candidate mechanism for the strong nuclear retention of GFP-NLS is via the RNA-binding ability of the NLS sequence. GFP tagged with a classical NLS derived from Simian virus 40 (GFP-NLS{sup SV40}) localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus, the nuclear subdomain in which ribosome biogenesis takes place. GFP-NLS{sup SV40} in the nucleolus was mobile, and intriguingly, the diffusion coefficient, which indicates the speed of diffusing molecules, was 1.5-fold slower than in the nucleoplasm. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis showed that GFP-NLS{sup SV40} formed oligomers via RNA binding, the estimated molecular weight of which was larger than the limit for passive nuclear export into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that the nuclear localization of GFP-NLS{sup SV40} likely results from oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. The analytical technique used here can be applied for elucidating the details of other nuclear localization mechanisms, including those of several types of nuclear proteins. In addition, GFP-NLS{sup SV40} can be used as an excellent marker for studying both the nucleoplasm and nucleolus in living cells. - Highlights: • Nuclear localization signal-tagged GFP (GFP-NLS) showed clear nuclear localization. • The GFP-NLS dynamically localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus. • The nuclear localization of GFP-NLS results from transient oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. • Our NLS-tagging procedure is ideal for use in artificial sequestration of proteins in the nucleus.

  14. Transformation of Sclerotinia Sclerotiorum with the Green Fluorescent Protein Gene and Fluorescence of Hyphae in Four Inoculated Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is an important pathogen of a wide variety of crops. To obtain a genetic marker to observe and study the interaction of the pathogen with its hosts, isolates ND30 and ND21 were transformed using pCT74 and gGFP constructs both containing genes for the green fluorescent protei...

  15. ApcD, ApcF and ApcE are not required for the Orange Carotenoid Protein related phycobilisome fluorescence quenching in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallet, Denis; Gwizdala, Michal; Kirilovsky, Diana

    2012-08-01

    In cyanobacteria, strong blue-green light induces a photoprotective mechanism involving an increase of energy thermal dissipation at the level of phycobilisome (PB), the cyanobacterial antenna. This leads to a decrease of the energy arriving to the reaction centers. The photoactive Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP) has an essential role in this mechanism. The binding of the red photoactivated OCP to the core of the PB triggers energy and PB fluorescence quenching. The core of PBs is constituted of allophycocyanin trimers emitting at 660 or 680nm. ApcD, ApcF and ApcE are the responsible of the 680nm emission. In this work, the role of these terminal emitters in the photoprotective mechanism was studied. Single and double Synechocystis PCC 6803 mutants, in which the apcD or/and apcF genes were absent, were constructed. The Cys190 of ApcE which binds the phycocyanobilin was replaced by a Ser. The mutated ApcE attached an unusual chromophore emitting at 710nm. The activated OCP was able to induce the photoprotective mechanism in all the mutants. Moreover, in vitro reconstitution experiments showed similar amplitude and rates of fluorescence quenching. Our results demonstrated that ApcD, ApcF and ApcE are not required for the OCP-related fluorescence quenching and they strongly suggested that the site of quenching is one of the APC trimers emitting at 660nm. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial. PMID:22172739

  16. Multicolor fluorescence nanoscopy by photobleaching: concept, verification, and its application to resolve selective storage of proteins in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnlund, Daniel; Xu, Lei; Perols, Anna; Gad, Annica K B; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie; Auer, Gert; Widengren, Jerker

    2014-05-27

    Fluorescence nanoscopy provides means to discern the finer details of protein localization and interaction in cells by offering an order of magnitude higher resolution than conventional optical imaging techniques. However, these super resolution techniques put higher demands on the optical system and the fluorescent probes, making multicolor fluorescence nanoscopy a challenging task. Here we present a new and simple procedure, which exploits the photostability and excitation spectra of dyes to increase the number of simultaneous recordable targets in STED nanoscopy. We use this procedure to demonstrate four-color STED imaging of platelets with ≤40 nm resolution and low crosstalk. Platelets can selectively store, sequester, and release a multitude of different proteins, in a manner specific for different physiological and disease states. By applying multicolor nanoscopy to study platelets, we can achieve spatial mapping of the protein organization with a high resolution for multiple proteins at the same time and in the same cell. This provides a means to identify specific platelet activation states for diagnostic purposes and to understand the underlying protein storage and release mechanisms. We studied the organization of the pro- and antiangiogenic proteins VEGF and PF-4, together with fibrinogen and filamentous actin, and found distinct features in their respective protein localization. Further, colocalization analysis revealed only minor overlap between the proteins VEGF and PF-4 indicating that they have separate storage and release mechanisms, corresponding well with their opposite roles as pro- and antiangiogenic proteins, respectively. PMID:24730587

  17. Two-dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE analysis of whole cell lysate protein complexes of rice in response to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Amenehsadat; Gharechahi, Javad; Nematzadeh, Ghorbanali; Shekari, Faezeh; Hosseini, Seyed Abdollah; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2016-08-01

    To understand the biology of a plant in response to stress, insight into protein-protein interactions, which almost define cell behavior, is thought to be crucial. Here, we provide a comparative complexomics analysis of leaf whole cell lysate of two rice genotypes with contrasting responses to salt using two-dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE (2D-BN/SDS-PAGE). We aimed to identify changes in subunit composition and stoichiometry of protein complexes elicited by salt. Using mild detergent for protein complex solubilization, we were able to identify 9 protein assemblies as hetero-oligomeric and 30 as homo-oligomeric complexes. A total of 20 proteins were identified as monomers in the 2D-BN/SDS-PAGE gels. In addition to identifying known protein complexes that confirm the technical validity of our analysis, we were also able to discover novel protein-protein interactions. Interestingly, an interaction was detected for glycolytic enzymes enolase (ENO1) and triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) and also for a chlorophyll a-b binding protein and RuBisCo small subunit. To show changes in subunit composition and stoichiometry of protein assemblies during salt stress, the differential abundance of interacting proteins was compared between salt-treated and control plants. A detailed exploration of some of the protein complexes provided novel insight into the function, composition, stoichiometry and dynamics of known and previously uncharacterized protein complexes in response to salt stress. PMID:27362847

  18. Use of fluorescent proteins and color-coded imaging to visualize cancer cells with different genetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins are very bright and available in spectrally-distinct colors, enable the imaging of color-coded cancer cells growing in vivo and therefore the distinction of cancer cells with different genetic properties. Non-invasive and intravital imaging of cancer cells with fluorescent proteins allows the visualization of distinct genetic variants of cancer cells down to the cellular level in vivo. Cancer cells with increased or decreased ability to metastasize can be distinguished in vivo. Gene exchange in vivo which enables low metastatic cancer cells to convert to high metastatic can be color-coded imaged in vivo. Cancer stem-like and non-stem cells can be distinguished in vivo by color-coded imaging. These properties also demonstrate the vast superiority of imaging cancer cells in vivo with fluorescent proteins over photon counting of luciferase-labeled cancer cells.

  19. Structure of a fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria bearing the obligate-monomer mutation A206K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first structure of a fluorescent protein derived from A. victoria green fluorescent protein bearing the obligate-monomer mutation A206K is presented and shows no significant structural change in the vicinity of the fluorescent chromophore. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequoria victoria has been shown to dimerize at high concentrations, which could lead to artefacts in imaging experiments. To ensure a truly monomeric state, an A206K mutation has been introduced into most of its widely used variants, with minimal effect on the spectroscopic properties. Here, the first structure of one of these variants, the cyan fluorescent protein mTurquoise, is presented and compared with that of its dimeric version mTurquoise-K206A. No significant structural change is detected in the chromophore cavity, reinforcing the notion that this mutation is spectroscopically silent and validating that the structural analysis performed on dimeric mutants also applies to monomeric versions. Finally, it is explained why cyan versions of GFP containing the Y66W and N146I mutations do not require the A206K mutation to prevent dimerization at high concentrations

  20. Subunits of highly Fluorescent Protein R-Phycoerythrin as Probes for Cell Imaging and Single-Molecule Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isailovic, Dragan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To characterize subunits of highly fluorescent protein R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE) and check their suitability for single-molecule detection (SMD) and cell imaging, (2) To extend the use of R-PE subunits through design of similar proteins that will be used as probes for microscopy and spectral imaging in a single cell, and (3) To demonstrate a high-throughput spectral imaging method that will rival spectral flow cytometry in the analysis of individual cells. We first demonstrated that R-PE subunits have spectroscopic and structural characteristics that make them suitable for SMD. Subunits were isolated from R-PE by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and detected as single molecules by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). In addition, R-PE subunits and their enzymatic digests were characterized by several separation and detection methods including HPLC, capillary electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and HPLC-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Favorable absorption and fluorescence of the R-PE subunits and digest peptides originate from phycoerythrobilin (PEB) and phycourobilin (PUB) chromophores that are covalently attached to cysteine residues. High absorption coefficients and strong fluorescence (even under denaturing conditions), broad excitation and emission fluorescence spectra in the visible region of electromagnetic spectrum, and relatively low molecular weights make these molecules suitable for use as fluorescence labels of biomolecules and cells. We further designed fluorescent proteins both in vitro and in vivo (in Escherichia coli) based on the highly specific attachment of PEB chromophore to genetically expressed apo-subunits of R-PE. In one example, apo-alpha and apo-beta R-PE subunits were cloned from red algae Polisiphonia boldii (P. boldii), and expressed in E. coli. Although expressed apo-subunits formed inclusion

  1. Rescue and Preliminary Application of a Recombinant Newcastle Disease Virus Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-lin HU; Qin SUN; Qu-zhi WANG; Yul-iang LIU; Yan-tao WU; Xiu-fan LIU

    2007-01-01

    Based on the complete genome sequence of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) ZJI strain,seven pairs of primers were designed to amplify a cDNA fragment for constructing the plasmid pNDV/ZJI,which contained the full-length cDNA of the NDV ZJI strain.The pNDV/ZJI,with three helper plasmids,pCIneoNP,pCIneoP and pCIneoL,were then cotransfected into BSR-T7/5 cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase.After inoculation of the transfected cell culture supernatant into embryonated chicken eggs from specific-pathogen-free (SPF) flock,an infectious NDV ZJI strain was successfully rescued.Green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was amplified and inserted into the NDV full-length cDNA to generate a GFP-tagged recombinant plasmid pNDV/ZJIGFP.After cotransfection of the resultant plasmid and the three support plasmids into BSR-T7/5 cells,the recombinant NDV,NDV/ZJIGFP,was rescued.Specific green fluorescence was observed in BSR-T7/5 and chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells 48h post-infection,indicating that the GFP gene was expressed at a relatively high level.NDV/ZJIGFP was inoculated into 10-day-old SPF chickens by oculonasal route.Four days post-infection,strong green fluorescence could be detected in the kidneys and tracheae,indicating that the recombinant GFP-tagged NDV could be a very useful tool for analysis of NDV dissemination and pathogenesis.

  2. Laser-assisted cryosurgery in ex vivo mice hepatic tissue: viability assays using green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Suástegui, L; Duperray, B; Godinez, F; Guillén, G; Slade, A; Aguilar, G

    2011-02-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out to develop a novel approach to cryosurgery, where laser heating counteracts tissue freezing to better confine damage to the targeted cancerous tissue within a lethal low-temperature isothermal boundary-an approach we refer to as laser-assisted cryosurgery (LAC). The advantage of this procedure relative to conventional cryosurgery assisted with urethral warmers or cryoheaters is that laser heating provides volumetric rather than superficial heating, which leads to deeper penetration, more homogeneous tissue protection and better demarcation of the destructive freezing effect to a well-defined targeted volume. Tissue viability assays are performed using green fluorescence protein (GFP) as a viability marker and correlated with temperature history after performing LAC procedures on ex vivo mice hepatic tissue. The limit for cell denaturation at the irradiated surface predicted by GFP analysis is further confirmed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, the correlation between GFP fluorescence and cell viability and loss of GFP fluorescence in non-viable cells has been tested and validated by histological analysis using a standard cell viability measuring method (hematoxylin and eosin staining). Analysis of our experimental measurements show that reproducible thermal gradients (of 236 °C/cm) and predictable tissue necrosis can be reliably produced by LAC without exceeding temperature thresholds for cell denaturation (of T (surf) ≈ 48 °C) beyond preset tissue boundaries (with resolution of 0.1 °C/mm). The results have shown the feasibility of controlling temperatures at specified tissue locations to prevent hyperthermal or freezing damage. PMID:20963494

  3. Characterization of a Mutant Listeria monocytogenes Strain Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Li JIANG; Hou-Hui SONG; Xue-Yan CHEN; Chun-Lin KE; Jing-Jing XU; Ning CHEN; Wei-Huan FANG

    2005-01-01

    To construct a recombinant strain of Listeria monocytogenes for the expression of heterologous genes, homologous recombination was utilized for insertional mutation, targeting its listeriolysin O gene(hly). The gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used as the indicator of heterologous gene expression. The gene gfp was inserted into hly downstream from its promoter and signal sequence by an overlapping extension polymerase chain reaction, and was then cloned into the shuttle plasmid pKSV7 for allelic exchange with the L. monocytogenes chromosome. Homologous recombination was achieved by growing the electro-transformed L. monocytogenes cells on chloramphenicol plates at a non-permissive temperature.Sequencing analysis indicated correct insertion of the target gene in-frame with the signal sequence. The recombinant strain expressed GFP constitutively as revealed by fluorescence microscopy. The mutant strain L. monocytogenes hly-gfp lost its hemolytic activity as visualized on the blood agar or when analyzed with the culture supernatant samples. Such insertional mutation resulted in a reduced virulence of about 2 logs less than its parent strain L. monocytogenes 10403s as shown by the 50%-lethal-dose assays in the mouse and embryonated chicken egg models. These results thus demonstrate that mutated L. monocytogenes could be a potential carrier for the expression of heterologous passenger genes or could act as an indicator organism in the food industry.

  4. Fluorescence monitoring of the effect of oxidized lipids on the process of protein fibrillization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vus, Kateryna; Sood, Rohit; Gorbenko, Galyna; Kinnunen, Paavo

    2016-09-01

    The kinetics of lysozyme and insulin amyloid formation in the presence of the oxidized phospholipids (oxPLs) was investigated using Thioflavin T fluorescence assay. The kinetic parameters of fibrillization process (lag time and apparent rate constant) have been determined upon varying the following experimental parameters: the type of lipid assemblies (premicellar aggregates and lipid bilayer vesicles), pH, temperature and lipid-to-protein molar ratio. It was found that oxPLs premicellar aggregates induced the more pronounced increase of the maximum Thioflavin T fluorescence, which is proportional to the extent of fibril formation, compared to the vesicles composed of the oxidized and unoxidized lipids. In contrast, the oxPLs, used as dispersions or included into vesicles, inhibited fibril nucleation and elongation under near-physiological conditions in vitro compared to liposomes containing unoxidized lipids. The results obtained provide deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms of the oxidative stress-modulated conformational diseases, and could be employed for the anti-amyloid drug development.

  5. Using computational chemistry to understand proton transfer in Green Fluorescent Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskin, Christa; Champion, Paul; Sage, Timothy; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Demidov, Alexander; Salna, Bridget

    2012-02-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein has been studied experimentally by the scientific community for years yet frustratingly little is known about the underlying proton transfer process that produces the green fluorescence. We are trying to elucidate more about this process using Density Functional Theory to prepare and run various calculations on GFP that we compare with kinetics data, Raman and vibrational coherence spectra. I am building a model of wild type GFP that is realistically sized for our computational power, yet still contains key residues that might affect the proton transport process. I will compare my results to those of the E222D GFP mutant. This comparison will allow us to see any differences in energy and normal modes that give insights regarding the proton transfer process. For example, how does it depend on a variety of factors such as temperature, buffer, pH, mutations, etc.? We also plan to examine if the proton transfer propagates through the three donor-acceptor pairs of the ``proton wire'' consecutively versus the three protons on the wire transferring simultaneously. Finally, we will consider how quantum tunneling may be involved in the proton transfer.

  6. THE ENHANCED GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN AS A MARKER FOR HUMAN TUMOR CELLS LABELLED BY RETROVIRAL TRANSDUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅建新; 王玮; 白霞; 卢大儒; 阮长耿; 陈子兴

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of marking the human tumor cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in vitro. Methods: The retroviral vector LGSN encoding EGFP was constructed and three human tumor cell lines were infected with LGSN amphotropic virus. Tumor cell lines that stably express EGFP were selected with G418. The integration and expression of EGFP gene were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry (FCM). Results: After gene transfection and ping-pong transduction, amphotropic producer line Am12/LGSN was generated with a stable green fluorescence signal readily detectable by FCM in up to 97% of examined cells. The viral titer in the supernatants was up to 8.2×105CFU/ml. After transduction and selection, G418-resistant leukemia K562, mammary carcinoma MCF-7, and bladder cancer 5637 cells were developed, in which the integration of both EGFP and neomycin resistance gene was confirmed by DNA amplification. In comparison with uninfected cells, FCM analysis revealed EGFP expression in up to 90% (range 85.5%~90.0%) of tumor cells containing LGSN provirus. Conclusion: The retroviral vector LGSN can effectively mark the human tumor cells with a stably EGFP expression which may be in studying tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis.

  7. Toxicity Biosensor for Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Using Immobilized Green Fluorescent Protein Expressing Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Ooi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Green fluorescent protein (GFP is suitable as a toxicity sensor due to its ability to work alone without cofactors or substrates. Its reaction with toxicants can be determined with fluorometric approaches. GFP mutant gene (C48S/S147C/Q204C/S65T/Q80R is used because it has higher sensitivity compared to others GFP variants. A novel sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS toxicity detection biosensor was built by immobilizing GFP expressing Escherichia coli in k-Carrageenan matrix. Cytotoxicity effect took place in the toxicity biosensor which leads to the decrease in the fluorescence intensity. The fabricated E. coli GFP toxicity biosensor has a wide dynamic range of 4–100 ppm, with LOD of 1.7 ppm. Besides, it possesses short response time (0.98, and long-term stability (46 days. E. coli GFP toxicity biosensor has been applied to detect toxicity induced by SDS in tap water, river water, and drinking water. High recovery levels of SDS indicated the applicability of E. coli GFP toxicity biosensor in real water samples toxicity evaluation.

  8. Chromosomal manipulation by site-specific recombinases and fluorescent protein-based vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munehiro Uemura

    Full Text Available Feasibility of chromosomal manipulation in mammalian cells was first reported 15 years ago. Although this technique is useful for precise understanding of gene regulation in the chromosomal context, a limited number of laboratories have used it in actual practice because of associated technical difficulties. To overcome the practical hurdles, we developed a Cre-mediated chromosomal recombination system using fluorescent proteins and various site-specific recombinases. These techniques enabled quick construction of targeting vectors, easy identification of chromosome-rearranged cells, and rearrangement leaving minimum artificial elements at junctions. Applying this system to a human cell line, we successfully recapitulated two types of pathogenic chromosomal translocations in human diseases: MYC/IgH and BCR/ABL1. By inducing recombination between two loxP sites targeted into the same chromosome, we could mark cells harboring deletion or duplication of the inter-loxP segments with different colors of fluorescence. In addition, we demonstrated that the intrachromosomal recombination frequency is inversely proportional to the distance between two recombination sites, implicating a future application of this frequency as a proximity sensor. Our method of chromosomal manipulation can be employed for particular cell types in which gene targeting is possible (e.g. embryonic stem cells. Experimental use of this system would open up new horizons in genome biology, including the establishment of cellular and animal models of diseases caused by translocations and copy-number variations.

  9. Dexamethasone-Inducible Green Fluorescent Protein Gene Expression in Transgenic Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Tang; Hilary Collver; Katherine Kinken

    2004-01-01

    Genomic research has made a large number of sequences of novel genes or expressed sequence tags available. To investigate functions of these genes, a system for conditional control of gene expression would be a useful tool. Inducible transgene expression that uses green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) as a reporter gene has been investigated in transgenic cell lines of cotton (COT; Gossypium hirsutum L.), Fraser fir [FRA; Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir], Nordmann fir (NOR; Abies nordmanniana Lk.), and rice (RIC; Oryza sativa L. Cv. Radon). Transgenic cell lines were used to test the function of the chemical inducer dexamethasone. Inducible transgene expression was observed with fluorescence and confocal microscopy, and was confirmed by northern blot analyses. Dexamethasone at 5 mg/L induced gfp expression to the nearly highest level 48 h after treatment in COT, FRA, NOR, and RIC. Dexamethasone at 10 mg/L inhibited the growth of transgenic cells in FRA and NOR, but not COT and RIC. These results demonstrated that concentrations of inducer for optimum inducible gene expression system varied among transgenic cell lines. The inducible gene expression system described here was very effective and could be valuable in evaluating the function of novel gene.

  10. Establishment of Stable High Expression Cell Line with Green Fluorescent Protein and Resistance Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shengtao; LIU Wenli; HE Peigen; GONG Feili; YANG Dongliang

    2006-01-01

    In order to establish stable high expression cell lines, the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2EGFP and recombinant plasmid pIRES2EGFP-TIM-3 were transfected into mammalian cells CHO by Lipofectamine. The transfected cells were cultivated under selective growth medium including G418 and green fluorescent protein (GFP) positive cells were sorted by FACS. Simultaneously, growing transfectants were selected only by G418 in the medium. The GFP expression in stably transfected cells was detected by FACS. Under selective growth conditions with G418, the percentage of GFP positive cells was reduced rapidly and GFP induction was low. In contrast, the percentages of GFP positive cells were increased gradually after FACS. By 3 rounds of GFP selection, the stable high expression cell lines were established. Furthermore, using FACS analysis GFP and the target protein TIM-3 co-expression in the stable transfectants cultured in nonselective medium was detected. Theses results demonstrated that the stably transfected cell lines that express high titer of recombinant protein can be simply and fleetly obtained by using GFP and selective growth medium.

  11. Effects of L1-ORF2 fragments on green fluorescent protein gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Fang Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The retrotransposon known as long interspersed nuclear element-1 (L1 is 6 kb long, although most L1s in mammalian and other eukaryotic cells are truncated. L1 contains two open reading frames, ORF1 and ORF2, that code for an RNA-binding protein and a protein with endonuclease and reverse transcriptase activities, respectively. In this work, we examined the effects of full length L1-ORF2 and ORF2 fragments on green fluorescent protein gene (GFP expression when inserted into the pEGFP-C1 vector downstream of GFP. All of the ORF2 fragments in sense orientation inhibited GFP expression more than when in antisense orientation, which suggests that small ORF2 fragments contribute to the distinct inhibitory effects of this ORF on gene expression. These results provide the first evidence that different 280-bp fragments have distinct effects on the termination of gene transcription, and that when inserted in the antisense direction, fragment 280-9 (the 3' end fragment of ORF2 induces premature termination of transcription that is consistent with the effect of ORF2.

  12. Analysis of the papillomavirus E2 and bromodomain protein Brd4 interaction using bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Helfer

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines effectively protect against new infections of up to four HPV subtypes. However, these vaccines are not protective against many other clinically relevant HPV subtypes and are ineffective at treating established HPV infections. There is therefore a significant need for antiviral treatments for persistent HPV infections. A promising anti-HPV drug target is the interaction between the HPV E2 protein and cellular bromodomain-containing protein 4 (Brd4 since this protein complex mediates several processes important for the viral life cycle including viral genome maintenance, replication, and transcription. Using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC technology, we demonstrate the E2 and Brd4 interaction on both interphase chromatin and mitotic chromosomes throughout mitosis. The E2-Brd4 BiFC was significantly diminished by mutating the Brd4 binding sites in E2 or by a dominant negative inhibitor of the E2-Brd4 interaction, demonstrating the potential of BiFC for identifying inhibitors of this important virus-host interaction. Importantly, when Brd4 was released from chromatin using the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1(+, the E2-Brd4 interacting complex relocated into foci that no longer associate with mitotic chromosomes, pointing to JQ1(+ as a promising antiviral inhibitor of HPV genome maintenance during HPV persistent infection.

  13. Probing intra-molecular mechanics of single circularly permuted green fluorescent protein with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the mechanical unfolding of single circularly permuted green fluorescent protein (cpGFP) with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The molecule was stretched from its N- and C-termini by an external force causing an elongation of the polypeptide chain up to its full length. The features of the force-extension (F-E) curves were found to depend on the stretching speed. At fast speeds, we detected one peak in the F-E curves before final rupture of the extended molecule, which we interpreted as the unfolding of two terminal halves within cpGFP. We observed several more force peaks in a sawtooth pattern at much slower speeds, and explained the appearance of such force peaks as cooperative unfolding of the hidden sub-structures inside each terminal half

  14. Efficient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) mediated by a chimeric promoter in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To improve the expression efficiency of exogenous genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a high efficient expression vector was constructed. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was expressed in C. Reinhardtii under the control of promoters: RBCS2 and HSP70A-RBCS2. Efficiency of transformation and expression were compared between two transgenic algae: RBCS2 mediated strain Tran-I and HSP70A-RBCS2 mediated strain Tran-II. Results show that HSP70A-RBCS2 could improve greatly the transformation efficiency by approximately eightfold of RBCS2, and the expression efficiency of GFP in Tran-II was at least double of that in Tran-I. In addition, a threefold increase of GFP in Tran-II was induced by heat shock at 40°C. All of the results demonstrated that HSP70A-RBCS2 was more efficient than RBCS2 in expressing exogenous gene in C. Reinhardtii.

  15. Fluorescence microscopy studies of the hyperactive antifreeze protein from an insect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertaya, N.; di Prinzio, C. L.; Wilen, L.; Thomson, E.; Wettlaufer, J. S.; Marshall, C. B.; Davies, P. L.; Braslavsky, I.

    2006-03-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) protect animals from freezing by binding to extracellular ice and inhibiting its growth. Since the initial discovery of AFPs in fish, non-homologous types have been found in insects, plants, bacteria, fungi, and vertebrates. Different AFP types have diverse structures and varied activities. For example, AFPs produced by insects are much more active in inhibiting ice crystal growth compared to most AFPs found in fish or plants. By putting a fluorescent tag on an insect AFP we were able to visualize AFP binding to ice, to determine the ice crystal surfaces to which the AFP adheres, and to follow the kinetics of AFP binding to ice. We expect this approach will contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of AFP activity and in particular the hyperactivity of insect AFPs.

  16. An exciton-polariton laser based on biologically produced fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Christof P.; Steude, Anja; Tropf, Laura; Schubert, Marcel; Kronenberg, Nils M.; Ostermann, Kai; Höfling, Sven; Gather, Malte C.

    2016-01-01

    Under adequate conditions, cavity polaritons form a macroscopic coherent quantum state, known as polariton condensate. Compared to Wannier-Mott excitons in inorganic semiconductors, the localized Frenkel excitons in organic emitter materials show weaker interaction with each other but stronger coupling to light, which recently enabled the first realization of a polariton condensate at room temperature. However, this required ultrafast optical pumping, which limits the applications of organic polariton condensates. We demonstrate room temperature polariton condensates of cavity polaritons in simple laminated microcavities filled with biologically produced enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). The unique molecular structure of eGFP prevents exciton annihilation even at high excitation densities, thus facilitating polariton condensation under conventional nanosecond pumping. Condensation is clearly evidenced by a distinct threshold, an interaction-induced blueshift of the condensate, long-range coherence, and the presence of a second threshold at higher excitation density that is associated with the onset of photon lasing. PMID:27551686

  17. An exciton-polariton laser based on biologically produced fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Christof P; Steude, Anja; Tropf, Laura; Schubert, Marcel; Kronenberg, Nils M; Ostermann, Kai; Höfling, Sven; Gather, Malte C

    2016-08-01

    Under adequate conditions, cavity polaritons form a macroscopic coherent quantum state, known as polariton condensate. Compared to Wannier-Mott excitons in inorganic semiconductors, the localized Frenkel excitons in organic emitter materials show weaker interaction with each other but stronger coupling to light, which recently enabled the first realization of a polariton condensate at room temperature. However, this required ultrafast optical pumping, which limits the applications of organic polariton condensates. We demonstrate room temperature polariton condensates of cavity polaritons in simple laminated microcavities filled with biologically produced enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). The unique molecular structure of eGFP prevents exciton annihilation even at high excitation densities, thus facilitating polariton condensation under conventional nanosecond pumping. Condensation is clearly evidenced by a distinct threshold, an interaction-induced blueshift of the condensate, long-range coherence, and the presence of a second threshold at higher excitation density that is associated with the onset of photon lasing. PMID:27551686

  18. Efficient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) mediated by a chimeric promoter in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinxia; Hu, Zhangli; Wang, Chaogang; Li, Shuangfei; Lei, Anping

    2008-08-01

    To improve the expression efficiency of exogenous genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a high efficient expression vector was constructed. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was expressed in C. reinhardtii under the control of promoters: RBCS2 and HSP70A-RBCS2. Efficiency of transformation and expression were compared between two transgenic algae: RBCS2 mediated strain Tran-I and HSP70A-RBCS2 mediated strain Tran-II. Results show that HSP70A-RBCS2 could improve greatly the transformation efficiency by approximately eightfold of RBCS2, and the expression efficiency of GFP in Tran-II was at least double of that in Tran-I. In addition, a threefold increase of GFP in Tran-II was induced by heat shock at 40°C. All of the results demonstrated that HSP70A-RBCS2 was more efficient than RBCS2 in expressing exogenous gene in C. reinhardtii.

  19. A signal sequence is sufficient for green fluorescent protein to be routed to regulated secretory granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Meskini, R; Jin, L; Marx, R; Bruzzaniti, A; Lee, J; Emeson, R; Mains, R

    2001-02-01

    To investigate trafficking in neuroendocrine cells, green fluorescent protein (GFP) tags were fused to various portions of the preproneuropeptide Y (NPY) precursor. Two neuroendocrine cell lines, AtT-20 corticotrope tumor cells and PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells, along with primary anterior pituitary cells, were examined. Expression of chimeric constructs did not disrupt trafficking or regulated secretion of endogenous ACTH and prohormone convertase 1 in AtT-20 cells. Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses demonstrated that the chimeric constructs remained intact, as long as the Lys-Arg cleavage site within preproNPY was deleted. GFP was stored in, and released from, regulated granules in cells expressing half of the NPY precursor fused to GFP, and also in cells in which only the signal sequence of preproNPY was fused to GFP. Thus, in neuroendocrine cells, entering the lumen of the secretory pathway is sufficient to target GFP to regulated secretory granules. PMID:11159860

  20. Design, Synthesis, and Dynamics of a Green Fluorescent Protein Fluorophore Mimic with an Ultrafast Switching Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolino, Marco; Gueye, Moussa; Pieri, Elisa; Manathunga, Madushanka; Fusi, Stefania; Cappelli, Andrea; Latterini, Loredana; Pannacci, Danilo; Filatov, Michael; Léonard, Jérémie; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-08-10

    While rotary molecular switches based on neutral and cationic organic π-systems have been reported, structurally homologous anionic switches providing complementary properties have not been prepared so far. Here we report the design and preparation of a molecular switch mimicking the anionic p-HBDI chromophore of the green fluorescent protein. The investigation of the mechanism and dynamics of the E/Z switching function is carried out both computationally and experimentally. The data consistently support axial rotary motion occurring on a sub-picosecond time scale. Transient spectroscopy and trajectory simulations show that the nonadiabatic decay process occurs in the vicinity of a conical intersection (CInt) between a charge transfer state and a covalent/diradical state. Comparison of our anionic p-HBDI-like switch with the previously reported cationic N-alkyl indanylidene pyrrolinium switch mimicking visual pigments reveals that these similar systems translocate, upon vertical excitation, a similar net charge in the same axial direction. PMID:27322488

  1. A Novel Reporter Rat Strain That Conditionally Expresses the Bright Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Igarashi

    Full Text Available Despite the strength of the Cre/loxP recombination system in animal models, its application in rats trails that in mice because of the lack of relevant reporter strains. Here, we generated a floxed STOP tdTomato rat that conditionally expresses a red fluorescent protein variant (tdTomato in the presence of exogenous Cre recombinase. The tdTomato signal vividly visualizes neurons including their projection fibers and spines without any histological enhancement. In addition, a transgenic rat line (FLAME that ubiquitously expresses tdTomato was successfully established by injecting intracytoplasmic Cre mRNA into fertilized ova. Our rat reporter system will facilitate connectome studies as well as the visualization of the fine structures of genetically identified cells for long periods both in vivo and ex vivo. Furthermore, FLAME is an ideal model for organ transplantation research owing to improved traceability of cells/tissues.

  2. A Novel Reporter Rat Strain That Conditionally Expresses the Bright Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Kyo; Kaneko, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Keiko; Egawa, Ryo; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi; Onimaru, Hiroshi; Ishizuka, Toru; Yawo, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Despite the strength of the Cre/loxP recombination system in animal models, its application in rats trails that in mice because of the lack of relevant reporter strains. Here, we generated a floxed STOP tdTomato rat that conditionally expresses a red fluorescent protein variant (tdTomato) in the presence of exogenous Cre recombinase. The tdTomato signal vividly visualizes neurons including their projection fibers and spines without any histological enhancement. In addition, a transgenic rat line (FLAME) that ubiquitously expresses tdTomato was successfully established by injecting intracytoplasmic Cre mRNA into fertilized ova. Our rat reporter system will facilitate connectome studies as well as the visualization of the fine structures of genetically identified cells for long periods both in vivo and ex vivo. Furthermore, FLAME is an ideal model for organ transplantation research owing to improved traceability of cells/tissues. PMID:27195805

  3. High sensitivity analysis of water-soluble, cyanine dye labeled proteins by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao Xiaoqiang [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Wang Li [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, 158 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116012 (China); Ma Junfeng [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Deng Qiliang; Liang Zhen [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Zhang Lihua, E-mail: lihuazhang@dicp.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Peng Xiaojun [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, 158 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116012 (China); Zhang Yukui [CAS Key Laboratory of Separation Science for Analytical Chemistry, National Chromatographic Research and Analysis Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2009-04-27

    A water-soluble sulfo-3H-indocyanine dye, the active N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of 3H-Indolium,1-[(4-carboxyphenyl)methyl]-2-[3-[1-[(4-carboxyphenyl)methyl] -1,3-dihydro-3,3-dimethyl-5-sulfo-2H-indol-2-ylidene]-1-propenyl] -3,3-dimethyl-5-sulfo-(9CI) (sb-cy3-NHS), containing two p-carboxybenzyl groups on nitrogen atoms, previously developed by our laboratory, was for the first time used for protein derivatization, followed by HPLC separation and fluorescence detection. With bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein, effects of various experimental conditions, including denaturant concentration, reaction time and temperature, the pH value of buffer, and the molar ratio of fluorescence reagent to protein, on protein derivatization efficiency were systematically investigated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for derivatized BSA was decreased to 12.8 nM, about 100-fold lower than that by UV and fluorescence detection with commercial fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) as labeling reagent. For HPLC analysis, an on-column excess fluorescence reagent depletion technique was developed based on the hydrophilicity of sb-cy3-NHS, which could avoid the interference on the analysis of target compounds. In addition, sb-cy3-NHS was applied for the derivatization of a three-protein mixture and egg white proteins. Compared to the results labeled by FITC, more proteins with low concentrations could be labeled by sb-cy3-NHS, resulting in improved detection sensitivity for protein analysis. All these results demonstrated that sb-cy3-NHS might be promising in detecting low abundance proteins, especially in the quantitative analysis of proteins.

  4. High sensitivity analysis of water-soluble, cyanine dye labeled proteins by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A water-soluble sulfo-3H-indocyanine dye, the active N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of 3H-Indolium,1-[(4-carboxyphenyl)methyl]-2-[3-[1-[(4-carboxyphenyl)methyl] -1,3-dihydro-3,3-dimethyl-5-sulfo-2H-indol-2-ylidene]-1-propenyl] -3,3-dimethyl-5-sulfo-(9CI) (sb-cy3-NHS), containing two p-carboxybenzyl groups on nitrogen atoms, previously developed by our laboratory, was for the first time used for protein derivatization, followed by HPLC separation and fluorescence detection. With bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein, effects of various experimental conditions, including denaturant concentration, reaction time and temperature, the pH value of buffer, and the molar ratio of fluorescence reagent to protein, on protein derivatization efficiency were systematically investigated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for derivatized BSA was decreased to 12.8 nM, about 100-fold lower than that by UV and fluorescence detection with commercial fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) as labeling reagent. For HPLC analysis, an on-column excess fluorescence reagent depletion technique was developed based on the hydrophilicity of sb-cy3-NHS, which could avoid the interference on the analysis of target compounds. In addition, sb-cy3-NHS was applied for the derivatization of a three-protein mixture and egg white proteins. Compared to the results labeled by FITC, more proteins with low concentrations could be labeled by sb-cy3-NHS, resulting in improved detection sensitivity for protein analysis. All these results demonstrated that sb-cy3-NHS might be promising in detecting low abundance proteins, especially in the quantitative analysis of proteins.

  5. Staining Proteins in Gels

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Sean; Chakavarti, Deb

    2008-01-01

    Following separation by electrophoretic methods, proteins in a gel can be detected by several staining methods. This unit describes protocols for detecting proteins by four popular methods. Coomassie blue staining is an easy and rapid method. Silver staining, while more time consuming, is considerably more sensitive and can thus be used to detect smaller amounts of protein. Fluorescent staining is a popular alternative to traditional staining procedures, mainly because it is more sensitive th...

  6. Mapping of fluorescent protein-expressing neurons and axon pathways in adult and developing Thy1-eYFP-H transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrero, Cesar; Rubio-Garrido, Pablo; Avendaño, Carlos; Clascá, Francisco

    2010-07-23

    Transgenic mouse lines in which a fluorescent protein is constitutively expressed under the Thy1 gene promoter have become important models in cell biology and pathology studies of specific neuronal populations. As a result of positional insertion and/or copy number effects on the transgene, the populations expressing the fluorescent protein (eYFP+) vary markedly among the different mice lines. However, identification of the eYFP+ subpopulations has remained sketchy and fragmentary even for the most widely used lines such as Thy1-eYFP-H mice (Feng, G., Mellor, R.H., Bernstein, M., Keller-Peck, C., Nguyen, Q.T., Wallace, M., Nerbonne, J.M., Lichtman and J.W., Sanes. J.R. 2000. Imaging neuronal subsets in transgenic mice expressing multiple spectral variants of GFP. Neuron 28, 41-51). Here, we provide a comprehensive mapping of labeled cell types throughout the central nervous system in adult and postnatal (P0-P30) Thy1-eYFP-H mice. Cell type identification was based on somatodendritic morphology, axon trajectories, and, for cortical cells, retrograde labeling with Fast Blue to distinguish between subpopulations with different axonal targets. In the neocortex, eYFP+ cells are layers 5 and 6 pyramidal neurons, whose abundance and sublaminar distribution varies markedly between areas. Labeling is particularly prevalent in the corticospinal cells; as a result, the pyramidal pathway axons are conspicuously labeled down to the spinal cord. Large populations of hippocampal, subicular and amygdaloid projection neurons are eYFP+ as well. Additional eYFP+ cell groups are located in specific brainstem nuclei. Present results provide a comprehensive reference dataset for adult and developmental studies using the Thy1-eYFP-H mice strain, and show that this animal model may be particularly suitable for studies on the cell biology of corticospinal neurons.

  7. Fluorescence enhancement and multiple protein detection in ZnO nanostructure microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Chen-Hsiang; Chou, Shu-Jen; Pan, F M; Sheu, Jeng-Tzong

    2016-01-15

    In this study, different morphological ZnO nanostructures, those of sharp nanowires (NWs), rod NWs, and hexahedral-puncheon nanostructures, were grown in microfluidic channels on the same glass substrate. Characterizations of correspondent biomolecule binding properties were simulated and demonstrated. The surface was modified using 3-ammineopropyl-triethoxysilane (3-APTES) and biotin-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (NHS-biotin). Different concentrations (4.17pM to 41.7nM) of dye-conjugated streptavidin were simultaneously infused through the second microfluidic channels, which lie 90° from the first microfluidic channels. The florescent intensity at the crossover areas showed good agreement with simulations, with sharp ZnO NWs exhibiting the largest dynamic range and the highest fluorescent intensity. We further characterize correspondent protein detection using sharp ZnO NWs. The surfaces of these ZnO NWs were modified with mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG), infused through the second microfluidic channels with dye-conjugated (Alexa 546) anti-mouse IgG in different concentrations. Concentrations ranging from 417fM to 41.7nM can be resolved using sharp ZnO NWs. Finally, multiple protein detection was demonstrated using a five-by-eight microfluidic channel array. Fluorescence images present clear multiple detections at the crossover areas when using the sharp ZnO NWs for simultaneous dye-conjugated anti-mouse IgG and dye-conjugated anti-rabbit IgG (Alexa 647) detection. PMID:26322591

  8. RNA and DNA binding properties of HIV-1 Vif protein: a fluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacchi, Serena; Henriet, Simon; Dumas, Philippe; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2007-09-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) is a small basic protein essential for viral fitness and pathogenicity. Some "non-permissive" cell lines cannot sustain replication of Vif(-) HIV-1 virions. In these cells, Vif counteracts the natural antiretroviral activity of the DNA-editing enzymes APOBEC3G/3F. Moreover, Vif is packaged into viral particles through a strong interaction with genomic RNA in viral nucleoprotein complexes. To gain insights into determinants of this binding process, we performed the first characterization of Vif/nucleic acid interactions using Vif intrinsic fluorescence. We determined the affinity of Vif for RNA fragments corresponding to various regions of the HIV-1 genome. Our results demonstrated preferential and moderately cooperative binding for RNAs corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region of HIV-1 (5'-untranslated region) and gag (cooperativity parameter omega approximately 65-80, and K(d) = 45-55 nM). In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy allowed us to point out the TAR apical loop and a short region in gag as primary strong affinity binding sites (K(d) = 9.5-14 nM). Interestingly, beside its RNA binding properties, the Vif protein can also bind the corresponding DNA oligonucleotides and their complementary counterparts with an affinity similar to the one observed for the RNA sequences, while other DNA sequences displayed reduced affinity. Taken together, our results suggest that Vif binding to RNA and DNA offers several non-exclusive ways to counteract APOBEC3G/3F factors, in addition to the well documented Vif-induced degradation by the proteasome and to the Vif-mediated repression of translation of these antiviral factors. PMID:17609216

  9. Engineering fluorescent proteins towards ultimate performances: lessons from the newly developed cyan variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérola, Fabienne; Erard, Marie; Fredj, Asma; Pasquier, Hélène

    2016-03-01

    New fluorescent proteins (FPs) are constantly discovered from natural sources, and submitted to intensive engineering based on random mutagenesis and directed evolution. However, most of these newly developed FPs fail to achieve all the performances required for their bioimaging applications. The design of highly optimised FP-based reporters, simultaneously displaying appropriate colour, multimeric state, chromophore maturation, brightness, photostability and environmental sensitivity will require a better understanding of the structural and dynamic determinants of FP photophysics. The recent development of cyan fluorescent proteins (CFPs) like mCerulean3, mTurquoise2 and Aquamarine brings a different view on these questions, as in this particular case, a step by step evaluation of critical mutations has been performed within a family of spectrally identical and evolutionary close variants. These efforts have led to CFPs with quantum yields close to unity, near single exponential emission decays, high photostability and complete insensitivity to pH, making them ideal choices as energy transfer donors in FRET and FLIM imaging applications. During this process, it was found that a proper amino-acid choice at only two positions (148 and 65) is sufficient to transform the performances of CFPs: with the help of structural and theoretical investigations, we rationalise here how these two positions critically control the CFP photophysics, in the context of FPs derived from the Aequorea victoria species. Today, these results provide a useful toolbox for upgrading the different CFP donors carried by FRET biosensors. They also trace the route towards the de novo design of FP-based optogenetic devices that will be perfectly tailored to dedicated imaging and sensing applications.

  10. Truncated forms of viral VP2 proteins fused to EGFP assemble into fluorescent parvovirus-like particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuento Matti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS monitors random movements of fluorescent molecules in solution, giving information about the number and the size of for example nano-particles. The canine parvovirus VP2 structural protein as well as N-terminal deletion mutants of VP2 (-14, -23, and -40 amino acids were fused to the C-terminus of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The proteins were produced in insect cells, purified, and analyzed by western blotting, confocal and electron microscopy as well as FCS. The non-truncated form, EGFP-VP2, diffused with a hydrodynamic radius of 17 nm, whereas the fluorescent mutants truncated by 14, 23 and 40 amino acids showed hydrodynamic radii of 7, 20 and 14 nm, respectively. These results show that the non-truncated EGFP-VP2 fusion protein and the EGFP-VP2 constructs truncated by 23 and by as much as 40 amino acids were able to form virus-like particles (VLPs. The fluorescent VLP, harbouring VP2 truncated by 23 amino acids, showed a somewhat larger hydrodynamic radius compared to the non-truncated EGFP-VP2. In contrast, the construct containing EGFP-VP2 truncated by 14 amino acids was not able to assemble into VLP-resembling structures. Formation of capsid structures was confirmed by confocal and electron microscopy. The number of fluorescent fusion protein molecules present within the different VLPs was determined by FCS. In conclusion, FCS provides a novel strategy to analyze virus assembly and gives valuable structural information for strategic development of parvovirus-like particles.

  11. Rational Design of Analyte Channels of the Green Fluorescent Protein for Biosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natta Tansila, Tanawut Tantimongcolwat, Chartchalerm Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chanin Nantasenamat, Virapong Prachayasittikul

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel solvent-exposed analyte channel, generated by F165G substitution, on the surface of green fluorescent protein (designated His6GFPuv/F165G was successfully discovered by the aid of molecular modeling software (PyMOL in conjunction with site-directed mutagenesis. Regarding the high predictive performance of PyMOL, two pore-containing mutants namely His6GFPuv/H148G and His6GFPuv/H148G/F165G were also revealed. The pore sizes of F165G, H148G, and the double mutant H148G/F165G were in the order of 4, 4.5 and 5.5 Å, respectively. These mutants were subjected to further investigation on the effect of small analytes (e.g. metal ions and hydrogen peroxide as elucidated by fluorescence quenching experiments. Results revealed that the F165G mutant exhibited the highest metal sensitivity at physiological pH. Meanwhile, the other 2 mutants lacking histidine at position 148 had lower sensitivity against Zn2+ and Cu2+ than those of the template protein (His6GFPuv. Hence, a significant role of this histidine residue in mediating metal transfer toward the GFP chromophore was proposed and evidently demonstrated by testing in acidic condition. Results revealed that at pH 6.5 the order of metal sensitivity was found to be inverted whereby the H148G/F165G became the most sensitive mutant. The dissociation constants (Kd to metal ions were in the order of 4.88×10-6 M, 16.67×10-6 M, 25×10-6 M, and 33.33×10-6 M for His6GFPuv/F165G, His6GFPuv, His6GFPuv/H148G/F165G and His6GFPuv/H148G, respectively. Sensitivity against hydrogen peroxide was in the order of H148G/F165G > H148G > F165G indicating the crucial role of pore diameters. However, it should be mentioned that H148G substitution caused a markedly decrease in pH- and thermo-stability. Taken together, our findings rendered the novel pore of GFP as formed by F165G substitution to be a high impact channel without adversely affecting the intrinsic fluorescent properties. This opens up a great potential of

  12. Fluorescence lifetimes of tyrosine residues in cytochrome c'' as local probes to study protein unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Melinda; Santos, Raquel; Paci, Emanuele; Santos, Helena; Maçanita, António L

    2009-04-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to show that multiple tyrosine residues of a protein can serve as localized probes of structural changes during thermal unfolding. Cytochrome c'' from Methylophilus methylotrophus, which has four tyrosine residues, was chosen as a model protein. The procedure involved, first, the assignment of the experimental decay times to the tyrosine residues, followed by the interpretation of the changes in the decay times and pre-exponential coefficients with temperature. We found that the fluorescence decays of cytochrome c'' are double-exponential from 23 to 80 degrees C, with decay times much shorter than those of the parent compound N-acetyl-tyrosinamide; this quenching was ascribed to dipole-dipole energy transfer from the tyrosine residues to the heme. The tyrosine-heme distances (R) and theoretical decay times, tau(comp), were estimated for each tyrosine residue. The analysis of the simulated decay generated with tau(comp), showed that a double-exponential fit is sufficient to describe the four decay times with two pre-exponential coefficients close to values observed from the experimental decay. Therefore, the decay times at 23 degrees C could be assigned to the individual tyrosine residues as tau(1) to Tyr-10 and Tyr-23 (at 20.3 A) and tau(2) to Tyr-12 and Tyr-115 (at 12-14 A). On the basis of this assignment and MD simulations, the temperature dependence of the decay times and pre-exponential coefficients suggest that upon unfolding, Tyr-12 is displaced from the heme, with loss of the structure of alpha-helix I. Moreover, Tyr-115 remains close to the heme and the structure in this region of the protein is not altered significantly. Altogether the data support the view that the protein core, comprising the heme and the four alpha-helices II to V, is clearly more stable than the remaining region that includes alpha-helix I and the loop between residues 19-27.

  13. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of protein tyrosine kinase-7 by gold nanoparticles and methylene blue assisted signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiangmin; Li, Zongbing; Zhu, Aihua; Feng, Zhaozhong; Tian, Jun; Peng, Xue

    2016-09-15

    We present here an ultrasensitive and simple strategy for protein tyrosine kinase-7 (PTK7) detection based on the recognition-induced structure change of sgc8 aptamer, and the signal change of methylene blue (MB) that interacted with sandwiched DNA complex. To construct such a sensor, an homogeneous nano-surface was formed firstly on the glass carbon electrode (GCE) by using negatively charged Nafion (Nf) as the inner layer and positively charged gold nanoparticles ((+)AuNPs) as the outer layer, followed by the immobilization of sgc8 aptamer based on Au-S bond. In the presence of helper probe (HP), sandwiched DNA complex was formed between the sgc8 aptamer and the DNA modified gold nanoparticle probe (DNA-AuNPs). Then, a strong current signal was produced due to the capture of abundant MB molecules by both the sandwiched DNA complex and the multiple DNAs that modified on AuNPs surface. However, the specific binding of sgc8 aptamer with PNK7 would trigger a structure transition of it, and directly prevented the following formation of sandwiched structure and the capture of MB. Thus, PTK7 detection could be realized based on monitoring the signal reduction of MB upon incubation of sgc8 aptamer with PTK7. Under optimal conditions, a low detection limit of 372 fM was obtained for PNK7 detection. Due to the employment of sgc8 aptamer, the proposed biosensor exhibited high selectivity to PNK7. Moreover, satisfactory results were obtained when the proposed method was applied for PNK7 detection in cellular debris. PMID:27101533

  14. Noninvasive Optical Tracking of Red Fluorescent Protein-Expressing Cancer Cells in a Model of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Winnard, Jr.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We have evaluated the use of the Xenogen IVIS 200 imaging system for real-time fluorescence protein- based optical imaging of metastatic progression in live animals. We found that green fluorescent protein- expressing cells (100 × 106 were not detectable in a mouse cadaver phantom experiment. However, a 10-fold lower number of tdTomato-expressing cells were easily detected. Mammary fat pad xenografts of stable MDA-MB-231-tdTomato cells were generated for the imaging of metastatic progression. At 2 weeks postinjection, barely palpable tumor burdens were easily detected at the sites of injection. At 8 weeks, a small contralateral mammary fat pad metastasis was imaged and, by 13 weeks, metastases to lymph nodes were detectable. Metastases with nodular composition were detectable within the rib cage region at 15 weeks. 3-D image reconstructions indicated that the detection of fluorescence extended to approximately 1 cm below the surface. A combination of intense tdTomato fluorescence, imaging at ≥ 620 nm (where autofluorescence is minimized, the sensitivity of the Xenogen imager made this possible. This study demonstrates the utility of the noninvasive optical tracking of cancer cells during metastatic progression with endogenously expressed fluorescence protein reporters using detection wavelengths of ≥ 620 nm.

  15. In vitro observation of the stage conversion of transgenic Toxoplasma gondii RH strain expressing dual fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qijun; Sun, Ximeng; Ji, Yongsheng; Yan, Xinlei; Zou, Jun; Zhao, Shiyun; Suo, Xun; Zhu, Xingquan; Liu, Xianyong

    2016-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii converts from tachyzoites to bradyzoites after acute infection and thus survives the attack of the host immune responses. In this study, we observed the conversion of tachyzoites to bradyzoites in cell cultures using a transgenic T. gondii RH strain. The transgenic parasites continuously express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) but only express red fluorescent protein (RFP) at the bradyzoite stage. Red fluorescent bradyzoite-containing cysts were found in transgenic parasite infected cells cultured with atmospheric CO2 supply, indicating the successful induction of the stage conversion. In cell culture with alkalic medium (pH 8.1) and atmospheric CO2 supply, only part of the YFP-expressing parasites in a cyst express RFP marker, suggesting the asynchronous development of T. gondii in vitro. This study provides a possibility for further studies of the gene expression profile during stage conversion and the genes involved. PMID:27447207

  16. Structural Basis of X-ray-Induced Transient Photo-bleaching in a Photoactivatable Green Fluorescent Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed the photoactivatable fluorescent protein IrisFP in a transient dark state with near-atomic resolution. This dark state is assigned to a radical species that either relaxes to the ground state or evolves into a permanently bleached chromophore. We took advantage of X-rays to populate the radical, which presumably forms under illumination with visible light by an electron-transfer reaction in the triplet state. The combined X-ray diffraction and in crystallo UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, and Raman data reveal that radical formation in IrisFP involves pronounced but reversible distortion of the chromophore, suggesting a transient loss of π conjugation. These results reveal that the methylene bridge of the chromophore is the Achilles' heel of fluorescent proteins and help unravel the mechanisms of blinking and photo-bleaching in FPs, which are of importance in the rational design of photo-stable variants. and is also partly reversible. (authors)

  17. pH of the Cytoplasm and Periplasm of Escherichia coli: Rapid Measurement by Green Fluorescent Protein Fluorimetry▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wilks, Jessica C; Slonczewski, Joan L.

    2007-01-01

    Cytoplasmic pH and periplasmic pH of Escherichia coli cells in suspension were observed with 4-s time resolution using fluorimetry of TorA-green fluorescent protein mutant 3* (TorA-GFPmut3*) and TetR-yellow fluorescent protein. Fluorescence intensity was correlated with pH using cell suspensions containing 20 mM benzoate, which equalizes the cytoplasmic pH with the external pH. When the external pH was lowered from pH 7.5 to 5.5, the cytoplasmic pH fell within 10 to 20 s to pH 5.6 to 6.5. Rap...

  18. Multiplexed detection of protein cancer markers on Au/Ag-barcoded nanorods using fluorescent-conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weiming; He, Lin

    2010-07-01

    Integration of fluorescent-conjugated polymers as detection moiety with metallic striped nanorods for multiplexed detection of clinically important cancer marker proteins in an immunoassay format was demonstrated in this report. Specifically, cationic conjugated polymers were introduced to protein complexes through electrostatic binding to negatively charged double-stranded DNA, which was tagged on detection antibodies prior to antigen recognition. The intense fluorescence emission of conjugated polymers resulted in highly sensitive detection of cancer marker proteins wherein an undiluted bovine serum sample as low as approximately 25 target molecules captured on each particle was detectable. Meanwhile, the use of polymer molecules as the detection probe did not obscure the optical pattern of underlying nanorods, i.e., the encoding capability of barcoded nanorods was preserved, which allowed simultaneous detection of three cancer marker proteins with good specificity.

  19. The use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to probe mitochondrial mobility and intramatrix protein diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.H.G.M. Willems; H.G. Swarts; M.A. Hink; W.J.H. Koopman

    2009-01-01

    Within cells, functional changes in mitochondrial metabolic state are associated with alterations in organelle mobility, shape, and configuration of the mitochondrial matrix. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a technique that measures intensity fluctuations caused by single fluorescent

  20. Study on the proteins-luminol binding by use of luminol as a fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xili; Song, Zhenghua

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, a new mathematical equation of lg(F0 - F)/F = 1/nlg[P] + 1/nlgKa, which was used to obtain interaction parameters (the binding constant Ka and the number of binding sites n) between the protein and the small molecule ligand by using the ligand as a fluorescence (FL) probe, was constructed for the first time. The interaction parameters between myoglobin, catalase, lysozyme, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and luminol were obtained by this equation with luminol used as a FL probe, showing that the binding constants Ka were 8.78 × 105, 4.47 × 105, 4.21 × 104 and 3.95 × 104 respectively, and the number of binding sites n approximately equaled to 1.0 for myoglobin, catalase, and 2.0 for lysozyme, BSA. The interactions of ferritin, ovalbumin, aldolase, chymotrypsinogen and ribonuclease with luminol were also studied by this method. The binding constants Ka were at 104-105 level, and the number of binding sites n mostly approximately equaled to 2.0. The binding ability of luminol to the studied proteins followed the pattern: myoglobin > aldolase > ferritin > ovalbumin > catalase > ribonuclease > lysozyme > BSA > chymotrypsinoge.