WorldWideScience

Sample records for blue fluorescent cgmp

  1. Quantum dot blueing and blinking enables fluorescence nanoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Patrick; Staudt, Thorsten; Engelhardt, Johann; Hell, Stefan W

    2011-01-12

    We demonstrate superresolution fluorescence imaging of cells using bioconjugated CdSe/ZnS quantum dot markers. Fluorescence blueing of quantum dot cores facilitates separation of blinking markers residing closer than the diffraction barrier. The high number of successively emitted photons enables ground state depletion microscopy followed by individual marker return with a resolving power of the size of a single dot (∼12 nm). Nanoscale imaging is feasible with a simple webcam.

  2. Blue-green phosphor for fluorescent lighting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Alok; Comanzo, Holly; Manivannan, Venkatesan; Setlur, Anant Achyut

    2005-03-15

    A fluorescent lamp including a phosphor layer including Sr.sub.4 Al.sub.14 O.sub.25 :Eu.sup.2+ (SAE) and at least one of each of a red, green and blue emitting phosphor. The phosphor layer can optionally include an additional, deep red phosphor and a yellow emitting phosphor. The resulting lamp will exhibit a white light having a color rendering index of 90 or higher with a correlated color temperature of from 2500 to 10000 Kelvin. The use of SAE in phosphor blends of lamps results in high CRI light sources with increased stability and acceptable lumen maintenance over, the course of the lamp life.

  3. Blue fluorescent organic light emitting diodes with multilayered graphene anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Joohyun; Choi, Hong Kyw; Moon, Jaehyun; Shin, Jin-Wook; Joo, Chul Woong; Han, Jun-Han; Cho, Doo-Hee; Huh, Jin Woo; Choi, Sung-Yool; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Chu, Hye Yong

    2012-01-01

    As an innovative anode for organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), we have investigated graphene films. Graphene has importance due to its huge potential in flexible OLED applications. In this work, graphene films have been catalytically grown and transferred to the glass substrate for OLED fabrications. We have successfully fabricated 2 mm × 2 mm device area blue fluorescent OLEDs with graphene anodes which showed 2.1% of external quantum efficiency at 1000 cd/m 2 . This is the highest value reported among fluorescent OLEDs using graphene anodes. Oxygen plasma treatment on graphene has been found to improve hole injections in low voltage regime, which has been interpreted as oxygen plasma induced work function modification. However, plasma treatment also increases the sheet resistance of graphene, limiting the maximum luminance. In summary, our works demonstrate the practical possibility of graphene as an anode material for OLEDs and suggest a processing route which can be applied to various graphene related devices.

  4. Nitroreductase-triggered activation of a novel caged fluorescent probe obtained from methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jungeun; McNamara, Louis E; Nael, Manal A; Mahdi, Fakhri; Doerksen, Robert J; Bidwell, Gene L; Hammer, Nathan I; Jo, Seongbong

    2015-08-18

    A near-infrared fluorescent probe based on methylene blue (p-NBMB) was developed for the detection of nitroreductase. Conjugating methylene blue with a p-nitrobenzyl moiety enables it to be activated by nitroreductase-catalyzed 1,6-elimination, resulting in the release of an active methylene blue fluorophore.

  5. Improved blue, green, and red fluorescent protein tagging vectors for S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sidae; Lim, Wendell A; Thorn, Kurt S

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent protein fusions are a powerful tool to monitor the localization and trafficking of proteins. Such studies are particularly easy to carry out in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to the ease with which tags can be introduced into the genome by homologous recombination. However, the available yeast tagging plasmids have not kept pace with the development of new and improved fluorescent proteins. Here, we have constructed yeast optimized versions of 19 different fluorescent proteins and tested them for use as fusion tags in yeast. These include two blue, seven green, and seven red fluorescent proteins, which we have assessed for brightness, photostability and perturbation of tagged proteins. We find that EGFP remains the best performing green fluorescent protein, that TagRFP-T and mRuby2 outperform mCherry as red fluorescent proteins, and that mTagBFP2 can be used as a blue fluorescent protein tag. Together, the new tagging vectors we have constructed provide improved blue and red fluorescent proteins for yeast tagging and three color imaging.

  6. Fluorescence of reduced charge montmorillonite complexes with methylene blue: Experiments and molecular modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klika, Z.; Pustková, P.; Praus, P.; Kovář, P.; Pospíšil, M.; Malý, P.; Grygar, Tomáš; Kulhánková, L.; Čapková, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 339, č. 2 (2009), s. 416-423 ISSN 0021-9797 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : methylene blue * reduced charge montmorillonites * fluorescence Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.019, year: 2009

  7. Deep-Blue Fluorescent Particles via Microwave Heating of Polyacrylonitrile Dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Dennis; Jurásková, Alena; Hoffmann, Andreas; Kapiti, Gent; Kuehne, Alexander J C

    2017-03-01

    This study presents a new method to produce fluorescent particles. Established methods are based on the incorporation of conjugated dye molecules into dielectric polymer matrices or preparation of colloids, which are composed of fluorescent conjugated polymer. By contrast, this study presents a method where dielectric polyacrylonitrile is exposed to microwave radiation leading to an intramolecular cyclization reaction producing π-conjugated segments, which fluoresce blue. During this conversion, the particles shrink in diameter but as an ensemble they retain their monodispersity. This work investigates the optimal reaction conditions and characterizes the optical properties. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Changing blue fluorescent protein to green fluorescent protein using chemical RNA editing as a novel strategy in genetic restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Luyen T; Nguyen, Thanh T K; Alam, Shafiul; Sakamoto, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenzo; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2015-11-01

    Using the transition from cytosine of BFP (blue fluorescent protein) gene to uridine of GFP (green fluorescent protein) gene at position 199 as a model, we successfully controlled photochemical RNA editing to effect site-directed deamination of cytidine (C) to uridine (U). Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing 5'-carboxyvinyl-2'-deoxyuridine ((CV) U) were used for reversible photoligation, and single-stranded 100-nt BFP DNA and in vitro-transcribed full-length BFP mRNA were the targets. Photo-cross-linking with the responsive ODNs was performed using UV (366 nm) irradiation, which was followed by heat treatment, and the cross-linked nucleotide was cleaved through photosplitting (UV, 312 nm). The products were analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and fluorescence measurements. Western blotting and fluorescence-analysis results revealed that in vitro-translated proteins were synthesized from mRNAs after site-directed RNA editing. We detected substantial amounts of the target-base-substituted fragment using RFLP and observed highly reproducible spectra of the transition-GFP signal using fluorescence spectroscopy, which indicated protein stability. ODNc restored approximately 10% of the C-to-U transition. Thus, we successfully used non-enzymatic site-directed deamination for genetic restoration in vitro. In the near future, in vivo studies that include cultured cells and model animals will be conducted to treat genetic disorders. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Blue-Shifted Green Fluorescent Protein Homologues Are Brighter than Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein under Two-Photon Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Rosana S; Tran, Tam M; Campbell, Robert E; Lambert, Gerard G; Salih, Anya; Shaner, Nathan C; Hughes, Thomas E; Drobizhev, Mikhail

    2017-06-15

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are indispensable markers for two-photon imaging of live tissue, especially in the brains of small model organisms. The quantity of physiologically relevant data collected, however, is limited by heat-induced damage of the tissue due to the high intensities of the excitation laser. We seek to minimize this damage by developing FPs with improved brightness. Among FPs with the same chromophore structure, the spectral properties can vary widely due to differences in the local protein environment. Using a physical model that describes the spectra of FPs containing the anionic green FP (GFP) chromophore, we predict that those that are blue-shifted in one-photon absorption will have stronger peak two-photon absorption cross sections. Following this prediction, we present 12 blue-shifted GFP homologues and demonstrate that they are up to 2.5 times brighter than the commonly used enhanced GFP (EGFP).

  10. Fluorescent deep-blue and hybrid white emitting devices based on a naphthalene-benzofuran compound

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui

    2013-08-01

    We report the synthesis, photophysics and electrochemical properties of naphthalene-benzofuran compound 1 and its application in organic light emitting devices. Fluorescent deep-blue emitting devices employing 1 as the emitting dopant embedded in 4-4′-bis(9-carbazolyl)-2,2′-biphenyl (CBP) host show the peak external quantum efficiency of 4.5% and Commission Internationale d\\'Énclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.15, 0.07). Hybrid white devices using fluorescent blue emitting layer with 1 and a phosphorescent orange emitting layer based on an iridium-complex show the peak external quantum efficiency above 10% and CIE coordinates of (0.31, 0.37). © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Changes of the laser-induced blue, green and red fluorescence signatures during greening of etiolated leaves of wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stober, F.; Lichtenthaler, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    The UV-laser-induced blue, green and red fluorescence-emission spectra were used to characterize the pigment status of etiolated leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) during a 48 h greening period under white light conditions. Upon UV-light excitation (337 nm) leaves not only show a fluorescence emission in the red spectral region between 650 and 800nm (chlorophyll fluorescence with maxima near 690nm and 735 nm), but also in the blue and green regions between 400 to 570 nm with maxima or shoulders near 450 nm (blue) and 530 nm (green). During greening of etiolated leaves the chlorophyll-fluorescence ratio F690/F735 strongly correlated with the total chlorophyll content and the ratio of the chlorophylls to the carotenoids (a+b/x+c). The ratio of the blue to the green fluorescence F450/F530 was also correlated with the total chlorophyll content and the ratio of chlorophylls to total carotenoids (a+b/x+c). Consequently, there also existed a correlation between the chlorophyll-fluorescence ratio F690/F735 and the ratio of the blue to green fluorescence F450/F530. In contrast, the ratios of the blue to red fluorescences F450/F690 and F450/F735 did not show clear relations to the pigment content of the investigated plants. The particular shape of the UV-laser-induced-fluorescence emission spectra of wheat leaves as well as the dependencies of the fluorescence ratios on the pigment content are due to a partial and differential reabsorption of the emitted fluorescences by the photosynthetic pigments

  12. Near-infrared fluorescence glucose sensing based on glucose/galactose-binding protein coupled to 651-Blue Oxazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Faaizah; Pickup, John C., E-mail: john.pickup@kcl.ac.uk

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •We showed that the NIR fluorophore, 651-Blue Oxazine, is solvatochromic (polarity sensitive). •Blue Oxazine was covalently attached to mutants of glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP). •Fluorescence intensity of GBP-Blue Oxazine increased with addition of glucose. •Fluorescence from bead-immobilised GBP-Blue Oxazine was detectable through skin in vitro. •This shows proof-of-concept for non-invasive glucose sensing using GBP-Blue Oxazine. -- Abstract: Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dyes that are environmentally sensitive or solvatochromic are useful tools for protein labelling in in vivo biosensor applications such as glucose monitoring in diabetes since their spectral properties are mostly independent of tissue autofluorescence and light scattering, and they offer potential for non-invasive analyte sensing. We showed that the fluorophore 651-Blue Oxazine is polarity-sensitive, with a marked reduction in NIR fluorescence on increasing solvent polarity. Mutants of glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP) used as the glucose receptor were site-specifically and covalently labelled with Blue Oxazine using click chemistry. Mutants H152C/A213R and H152C/A213R/L238S showed fluorescence increases of 15% and 21% on addition of saturating glucose concentrations and binding constants of 6 and 25 mM respectively. Fluorescence responses to glucose were preserved when GBP-Blue Oxazine was immobilised to agarose beads, and the beads were excited by NIR light through a mouse skin preparation studied in vitro. We conclude GBP-Blue Oxazine shows proof-of-concept as a non-invasive continuous glucose sensing system.

  13. Comparative Study of Lettuce and Radish Grown Under Red and Blue LEDs and White Fluorescent Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickens, Matthew A.; Massa, Gioia; Newsham, Gerard; Wheeler, Raymond; Birmele, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Growing vegetable crops in space will be an essential part of sustaining astronauts during long-range missions. To drive photosynthesis, red and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have attracted attention because of their efficiency, longevity, small size, and safety. In efforts to optimize crop yield, there is also recent interest in analyzing the subtle effects of additional wavelengths on plant growth. For instance, since plants often look purplish gray under red and blue LEDs, the addition of green light allows easy recognition of disease and the assessment of plant health status. However, it is important to know if wavelengths outside the traditional red and blue wavebands have a direct effect on enhancing or hindering the mechanisms involved in plant growth. In this experiment, a comparative study was performed on two short cycle crops of red romaine lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv. "Outredgeous") and radish (Raphanus sativa cv. 'Cherry Bomb'), which were grown under two light treatments. The first treatment being red (630 nm) and blue (450 nm) LEDs alone, while the second treatment consisted of daylight tri-phosphor fluorescent lamps (CCT approximately 5000 K) at equal photosynthetic photon flux (PPF). The treatment effects were evaluated by measuring the fresh biomass produced, plant morphology and leaf dimensions, leaf chlorophyll content, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) within plant leaf/storage root tissues.

  14. Efficient fluorescent deep-blue and hybrid white emitting devices based on carbazole/benzimidazole compound

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui

    2011-07-28

    We report the synthesis, photophysics, and electrochemical characterization of carbazole/benzimidazole-based compound (Cz-2pbb) and efficient fluorescent deep-blue light emitting devices based on Cz-2pbb with the peak external quantum efficiency of 4.1% and Commission Internationale dÉnclairage coordinates of (0.16, 0.05). Efficient deep-blue emission as well as high triplet state energy of Cz-2pbb enables fabrication of hybrid white organic light emitting diodes with a single emissive layer. Hybrid white emitting devices based on Cz-2pbb show the peak external quantum efficiency exceeding 10% and power efficiency of 14.8 lm/W at a luminance of 500 cd/m2. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Comparison between the indocyanine green fluorescence and blue dye methods for sentinel lymph node biopsy using novel fluorescence image-guided resection equipment in different types of hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kunshan; Chi, Chongwei; Kou, Deqiang; Huang, Wenhe; Wu, Jundong; Wang, Yabing; He, Lifang; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Wang, Jiandong; Tian, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) has become a standard of care to detect axillary lymph metastasis in early-stage breast cancer patients with clinically negative axillary lymph nodes. Current SLNB detection modalities comprising a blue dye, a radioactive tracer, or a combination of both have advantages as well as disadvantages. Thus, near-infrared fluorescence imaging using indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been regarded as a novel method that has generated interest for SLNB around the world. However, the lack of appropriate fluorescence imaging systems has hindered further research and wide application of this method. Therefore, we developed novel fluorescence image-guided resection equipment (FIRE) to detect sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). Moreover, to compare the ICG fluorescence imaging method with the blue dye method and to explore the universal feasibility of the former, a different type of hospital study was conducted. Ninety-nine eligible patients participated in the study at 3 different types of hospitals. After subcutaneous ICG allergy testing, all the patients were subcutaneously injected with methylene blue and ICG into the subareolar area. Consequently, 276 SLNs (range 1-7) were identified in 98 subjects (detection rate: 99%) by using the ICG fluorescence imaging method. In contrast, the blue dye method only identified 202 SLNs (range 1-7) in 91 subjects (detection rate: 91.92%). Besides, the results of the fluorescence imaging method were similar in the 3 hospitals. Our findings indicate the universal feasibility of the ICG fluorescence imaging method for SLNB using the fluorescence image-guided resection equipment in early breast cancer detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of a new class of blue-fluorescent lipid droplet markers for live-cell imaging in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntam, Soujanya; Puskás, László G; Ayaydin, Ferhan

    2015-04-01

    The present work demonstrates the use and advantages of novel, live cell permeable, lipid droplet localizing, non toxic, blue fluorochromes for use in live plant cells. Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous components of both animal and plant cells. They consist of a core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids, glycolipids and/or sterols with embedded amphipathic proteins. Although initially considered to be simple energy depots, they have recently emerged as organelles that serve important regulatory functions. Here we report three new fluorochromes as markers for LDs in plants. These bright blue fluorochromes with their unique spectral properties can easily be combined with other green and red fluorescent reporters for multicolor fluorescence imaging. The fluorochromes are non-toxic and photo-stable. All in all, they represent a reliable tool to use, for the investigation of dynamic LD biology within living plant cells using fluorescence microscopy.

  17. Transgenic rats with green, red, and blue fluorescence: powerful tools for bioimaging, cell trafficking, and differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2005-04-01

    The rat represents a perfect animal for broadening medical experiments, because its physiology has been well understood in the history of experimental animals. In addition, its larger body size takes enough advantage for surgical manipulation, compared to the mouse. Many rat models mimicking human diseases, therefore, have been used in a variety of biomedical studies including physiology, pharmacology, transplantation, and immunology. In an effort to create the specifically designed rats for biomedical research and regenerative medicine, we have developed the engineered rat system on the basis of transgenic technology and succeeded in establishing various transgenic rat strains. The transgenic rats with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were generated in the two different strains (Wistar and Lewis), in which GFP is driven under the chicken beta-actin promoter and cytomegalovirus enhancer (CAG promoter). Their GFP expression levels were different in each organ, but the Lewis line expressed GFP strongly and ubiquitously in most of the organs compared with that of Wistar. For red fluorescence, DsRed2 was transduced to the Wistar rats: one line specifically expresses DsRed2 in the liver under the mouse albumin promoter, another is designed for the Cre/LoxP system as the double reporter rat (the initial DsRed2 expression turns on GFP in the presence of Cre recombinase). LacZ-transgenic rats represent blue color, and LacZ is driven the CAG (DA) or ROSA26 promoter (Lewis). Our unique transgenic rats" system highlights the powerful performance for the elucidation of many cellular processes in regenerative medicine, leading to innovative medical treatments.

  18. Applicability of radiocolloids, blue dyes and fluorescent indocyanine green to sentinel node biopsy in melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhara, Hisashi; Takata, Minoru; Yamazaki, Naoya

    2012-01-01

    Patients with primary cutaneous melanoma underwent sentinel node (SN) mapping and biopsy at 25 facilities in Japan by the combination of radiocolloid with gamma probe and dye. Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc)-tin colloid, 99m Tc-phytate, 2% patent blue violet (PBV) and 0.4% indigo carmine were used as tracers. In some hospitals, 0.5% fluorescent indocyanine green, which allows visualization of the SN with an infrared camera, was concomitantly used and examined. A total of 673 patients were enrolled, and 562 cases were eligible. The detection rates of SN were 95.5% (147/154) with the combination of tin colloid and PBV, 98.9% (368/372) with the combination of phytate and PBV, and 97.2% (35/36) with the combination of tin colloid or phytate and indigo carmine. SN was not detected in 12 cases by the combination method, and the primary tumor was in the head and neck in six of those 12 cases. In eight of 526 cases (1.5%), SN was detected by PBV but not by radiocolloid. There were 13 cases (2.5%) in which SN was detected by radiocolloid but not by PBV. In 18 of 36 cases (50%), SN was detected by radiocolloid but not by indigo carmine. Concomitantly used fluorescent indocyanine green detected SN in all of 67 cases. Interference with transcutaneous oximetry by PVB was observed in some cases, although it caused no clinical trouble. Allergic reactions were not reported with any of the tracers. 99m Tc-tin colloid, 99m Tc-phytate, PBV and indocyanine green are useful tracers for SN mapping. (author)

  19. Two-step excitation and blue fluorescence under continuous-wave pumping in Nd:YLF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, T. Y.; Byer, Robert L.

    1986-01-01

    Near-UV and blue fluorescence from the 4D3/2 and 4D5/2 manifolds in Nd:YLF has been observed at room temperature under CW pumping by a rhodamine 590 dye laser. Excitation to these manifolds is attributed to two-step excitation involving excited-state absorption from the 4F3/2 metastable level. A similar phenomenon has also been observed in Nd:YAG and Nd:glass. The effective excited-state absorption cross section is measured to be (2 + or - 1) x 10 to the -20th sq cm at 587.4 nm in the pi polarization, and the peak effective stimulated emission cross section is measured to be 5 x 10 to the -20th sq cm at 411.7 nm, also in the pi polarization. Estimated laser threshold at 411.7 nm for two-step pumping at 587.4 nm is 70 mW.

  20. Red-Green-Blue Trichromophoric Nanoparticles with Dual Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer: Highly Sensitive Fluorogenic Response Toward Polyanions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinjia; Takai, Atsuro; Takeuchi, Masayuki

    2016-09-05

    A red-green-blue (RGB) trichromophoric fluorescent organic nanoparticle exhibiting multi-colour emission was constructed; the blue-emitting cationic oligofluorene nanoparticle acted as an energy-donor scaffold to undergo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to a red-emitting dye embedded in the nanoparticle (interior FRET) and to a green-emitting dye adsorbed on the surface through electrostatic interactions (exterior FRET). Each FRET event occurs independently and is free from sequential FRET, thus the resultant dual-FRET system exhibits multi-colour emission, including white, in aqueous solution and film state. A characteristic white-emissive nanoparticle showed visible responses upon perturbation of the exterior FRET efficiency by acceptor displacement, leading to highly sensitive responses toward polyanions in a ratiometric manner. Specifically, our system exhibits high sensitivity toward heparin with an extremely low detection limit. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Intraoperative near infrared fluorescence guided identification of the ureters using low dose methylene blue: a first in human experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Floris P R; van der Vorst, Joost R; Schaafsma, Boudewijn E; Swijnenburg, Rutger-Jan; Gaarenstroom, Katja N; Elzevier, Henk W; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Frangioni, John V; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L

    2013-08-01

    Near infrared fluorescence imaging is a promising technique that offers real-time visual information during surgery. In this study we report the first clinical results to our knowledge of ureteral imaging using near infrared fluorescence after a simple peripheral infusion of methylene blue. Furthermore, we assessed the optimal timing and dose of methylene blue. A total of 12 patients who underwent lower abdominal surgery were included in this prospective feasibility study. Near infrared fluorescence imaging was performed using the Mini-FLARE™ imaging system. To determine optimal timing and dose, methylene blue was injected intravenously at doses of 0.25, 0.5 or 1 mg/kg after exposure of the ureters. Imaging was performed for up to 60 minutes after injection. In all patients both ureters could be clearly visualized within 10 minutes after infusion of methylene blue. The signal lasted at least up to 60 minutes after injection. The mean signal-to-background ratio of the ureter was 2.27 ± 1.22 (4), 2.61 ± 1.88 (4) and 3.58 ± 3.36 (4) for the 0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg groups, respectively. A mixed model analysis was used to compare signal-to-background ratios among dose groups and times, and to assess the relationship between dose and time. A significant difference among time points (p methylene blue for the identification of the ureters during lower abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitters for Deep Blue Organic Light Emitting Diodes: A Review of Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh-Tuân Bui

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic light-emitting diodes offer attractive perspectives for the next generation display and lighting technologies. The potential is huge and the list of potential applications is almost endless. So far, blue emitters still suffer from noticeably inferior electroluminescence performances in terms of efficiency, lifespan, color quality, and charge injection/transport when compared to that of the other colors. Emitting materials matching the NTSC standard blue of coordinates (0.14, 0.08 are extremely rare and still constitutes the focus of numerous academic and industrial researches. In this context, we review herein the recent developments on highly emissive deep-blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters that constitute the third-generation electroluminescent materials.

  3. Research on the process of introduction of prussian blue into ukiyoe prints using the RI fluorescent X-ray nondestructive analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoyama, Susumu; Matsui, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    In the Ukiyoe landscape print of Hokusai or Hiroshige which started in the 1930s, the prussian blue of imported synthetic paints was used instead of old indigo blue as a blue coloration. Research of prussian blue introduction process is connected with development of an Ukiyoe landscape print. The scientific proof and the time of introduction of prussian blue use will be clarified in this paper by means of RI fluorescent nondestructive analysis techniques. In the portrait of actors which gets a majority of an Ukiyoe works, till the first half of 1930, indigo blue was used and prussian blue was used from January in 1931. In consideration of a manufacture period, the shift term to prussian blue is presumed to be the second half of 1930. (H. Katsuta)

  4. Comparative Study of Lettuce and Radish Grown Under Red and Blue Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) and White Fluorescent Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickens, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Growing vegetable crops in space will be an essential part of sustaining astronauts during long-term missions. To drive photosynthesis, red and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have attracted attention because of their efficiency, longevity, small size, and safety. In efforts to optimize crop production, there have also been recent interests in analyzing the subtle effects of green light on plant growth, and to determine if it serves as a source of growth enhancement or suppression. A comparative study was performed on two short cycle crops of lettuce (Outredgeous) and radish (Cherry Bomb) grown under two light treatments. The first treatment being red and blue LEDs, and the second treatment consisting of white fluorescent lamps which contain a portion of green light. In addition to comparing biomass production, physiological characterizations were conducted on how the light treatments influence morphology, water use, chlorophyll content, and the production of A TP within plant tissues.

  5. Synthesis of fluorescent C2-bridged teraryls and quateraryls for blue, sky-blue, and green color light-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Atul; Sharma, Ashutosh; Rawat, Madhu; Anand, R S; Kant, Ruchir

    2014-11-21

    A series of fluorescent teraryls and quateraryls were prepared from a ketene-S,S-acetal under mild conditions. These compounds exhibited blue, sky-blue and green color emissions both in the solid state and in a solution with good quantum yields, positive solvatochromic behavior, and reversible oxidation and reduction properties. The electronic characteristics of teraryl 6a and quateraryls 9a,b were examined by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. Light-emitting devices were fabricated from teraryl 6a and quateraryls 9a,b as dyes and the configuration of ITO/PEDOT:PSS (40 nm)/NPB (20 nm)/ dye (50 nm)/BCP (7 nm)/ LiF (0.7 nm)/Al (200 nm), which exhibited electroluminescence maxima of 455, 480, and 525 nm, respectively. These devices operated at a substantially low turn-on voltage (3 and 4 V) and exhibited maximum luminance efficiencies of 0.62, 0.57, and 1.9 cd/A and brightnesses of 59, 160, and 1284 cd/m(2), respectively.

  6. Hybrid white organic light-emitting devices based on phosphorescent iridium–benzotriazole orange–red and fluorescent blue emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Zhen-Yuan; Su, Jian-Hua; Chang, Chi-Sheng; Chen, Chin H.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that high color purity or efficiency hybrid white organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) can be generated by integrating a phosphorescent orange–red emitter, bis[4-(2H-benzotriazol-2-yl)-N,N-diphenyl-aniline-N 1 ,C 3 ] iridium acetylacetonate, Ir(TBT) 2 (acac) with fluorescent blue emitters in two different emissive layers. The device based on deep blue fluorescent material diphenyl-[4-(2-[1,1′;4′,1″]terphenyl-4-yl-vinyl)-phenyl]-amine BpSAB and Ir(TBT) 2 (acac) shows pure white color with the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.33,0.30). When using sky-blue fluorescent dopant N,N′-(4,4′-(1E,1′E)-2,2′-(1,4-phenylene)bis(ethene-2,1-diyl) bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(2-ethyl-6-methyl-N-phenylaniline) (BUBD-1) and orange–red phosphor with a color-tuning phosphorescent material fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium (Ir(ppy) 3 ), it exhibits peak luminance yield and power efficiency of 17.4 cd/A and 10.7 lm/W, respectively with yellow-white color and CIE color rendering index (CRI) value of 73. - Highlights: ► An iridium-based orange–red phosphor Ir(TBT) 2 (acac) was applied in hybrid white OLEDs. ► Duel- and tri-emitter WOLEDs were achieved with either high color purity or efficiency performance. ► Peak luminance yield of tri-emitter WOLEDs was 17.4 cd/A with yellow-white color and color rendering index (CRI) value of 73.

  7. Hybrid white organic light-emitting devices based on phosphorescent iridium-benzotriazole orange-red and fluorescent blue emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Zhen-Yuan, E-mail: xiazhenyuan@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Institute of Fine Chemicals, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Su, Jian-Hua [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Institute of Fine Chemicals, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Chang, Chi-Sheng; Chen, Chin H. [Display Institute, Microelectronics and Information Systems Research Center, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan 300 (China)

    2013-03-15

    We demonstrate that high color purity or efficiency hybrid white organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) can be generated by integrating a phosphorescent orange-red emitter, bis[4-(2H-benzotriazol-2-yl)-N,N-diphenyl-aniline-N{sup 1},C{sup 3}] iridium acetylacetonate, Ir(TBT){sub 2}(acac) with fluorescent blue emitters in two different emissive layers. The device based on deep blue fluorescent material diphenyl-[4-(2-[1,1 Prime ;4 Prime ,1 Double-Prime ]terphenyl-4-yl-vinyl)-phenyl]-amine BpSAB and Ir(TBT){sub 2}(acac) shows pure white color with the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.33,0.30). When using sky-blue fluorescent dopant N,N Prime -(4,4 Prime -(1E,1 Prime E)-2,2 Prime -(1,4-phenylene)bis(ethene-2,1-diyl) bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(2-ethyl-6-methyl-N-phenylaniline) (BUBD-1) and orange-red phosphor with a color-tuning phosphorescent material fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium (Ir(ppy){sub 3} ), it exhibits peak luminance yield and power efficiency of 17.4 cd/A and 10.7 lm/W, respectively with yellow-white color and CIE color rendering index (CRI) value of 73. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An iridium-based orange-red phosphor Ir(TBT){sub 2}(acac) was applied in hybrid white OLEDs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Duel- and tri-emitter WOLEDs were achieved with either high color purity or efficiency performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peak luminance yield of tri-emitter WOLEDs was 17.4 cd/A with yellow-white color and color rendering index (CRI) value of 73.

  8. Multicolor imaging of bacterial nucleoid and division proteins with blue, orange and near-infrared fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabai eWu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the spatiotemporal protein dynamics within live bacterial cells impose a strong demand for multi-color imaging. Despite the increasingly large collection of fluorescent-protein variants engineered to date, only a few of these were successfully applied in bacteria. Here, we explore the performance of recently engineered variants with the blue (TagBFP, orange (TagRFP-T, mKO2 and far-red (mKate2 spectral colors by tagging HU, LacI, MinD, and FtsZ for visualizing the nucleoid and the cell division process. We find that, these fluorescent proteins outperformed previous versions in terms of brightness and photostability at their respective spectral range, both when expressed as cytosolic label and when fused to native proteins. As this indicates that their folding is sufficiently fast, these proteins thus successfully expand the applicable spectra for multi-color imaging in bacteria. A near-infrared protein (eqFP670 is found to be the most red-shifted protein applicable to bacteria so far, with brightness and photostability that are advantageous for cell-body imaging, such as in microfluidic devices. Despite the multiple advantages, we also report the alarming observation that TagBFP directly interacts with TagRFP-T, causing interference of localization patterns between their fusion proteins. Our application of diverse fluorescent proteins for endogenous tagging provides guidelines for future engineering of fluorescent fusions in bacteria, specifically: 1 The performance of newly developed fluorescent proteins should be quantified in vivo for their introduction into bacteria; 2 spectral crosstalk and inter-variant interactions between fluorescent proteins should be carefully examined for multi-color imaging; and 3 successful genomic fusion to the 5’-end of a gene strongly depends on the translational read-through of the inserted coding sequence.

  9. Polymerized Nile Blue derivatives for plasticizer-free fluorescent ion optode microsphere sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeontae, Wittaya; Xu, Chao; Ye, Nan; Wygladacz, Katarzyna; Aeungmaitrepirom, Wanlapa; Tuntulani, Thawatchai; Bakker, Eric

    2007-09-05

    Lipophilic H+-selective fluorophores such as Nile Blue derivatives are widely used in ISE-based pH sensors and bulk optodes, and are commonly dissolved in a plasticized matrix such as PVC. Unfortunately, leaching of the active sensing ingredients and plasticizer from the matrix dictates the lifetime of the sensors and hampers their applications in vivo, especially with miniaturized particle based sensors. We find that classical copolymerization of Nile Blue derivatives containing an acrylic side group gives rise to multiple reaction products with different spectral and H+-binding properties, making this approach unsuitable for the development of reliable sensor materials. This limitation was overcome by grafting Nile Blue to a self-plasticized poly(n-butyl acrylate) matrix via an urea or amide linkage between the Nile Blue base structure and the polymer. Optode leaching experiments into methanol confirmed the successful covalent attachment of the two chromoionophores to the polymer matrix. Both polymerized Nile Blue derivatives have satisfactory pH response and appropriate optical properties that are suitable for use in ion-selective electrodes and optodes. Plasticizer-free Na+-selective microsphere sensors using the polymerized chromoionophores were fabricated under mild conditions with an in-house sonic microparticle generator for the measurement of sodium activities at physiological pH. The measuring range for sodium was found as 10(-1)-10(-4) M and 1-10(-3) M, for Nile Blue derivatives linked via urea and amide functionalities, respectively, at physiological pH. The observed ion-exchange constants of the plasticizer-free microsphere were log K(exch) = -5.6 and log K(exch) = -6.5 for the same two systems, respectively. Compared with earlier Na+-selective bulk optodes, the fabricated optical sensing microbeads reported here have agreeable selectivity patterns, reasonably fast response times, and more appropriate measuring ranges for determination of Na+ activity

  10. 1,4-Bis(2-methylstyryl)benzene doped PMMA fibre for blue range fluorescent applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miluski, Piotr; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Zmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik

    2018-03-05

    The fluorescent dyes allow new optical applications in polymer-based optical fibre technology. The article presents highly fluorescent 1,4-Bis(2-methylstyryl)benzene doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) fibre. The multi-peak (422, 450, 488nm) fluorescence spectrum of the bulk specimen under 355nm excitation is presented. The polymerization and fibre drawing process is also shown. The fluorescent properties vs. fibre length at excitation 405nm are investigated. Significant spectrum shape changes and red shift phenomena of individual peaks are presented using one end excitation and fibre cutting method measurements for fibre length 2-90cm. Obtained attenuation level 0.69dB/m limits useful fibre length but obtained results can be useful in new polymeric fibers applications (e.g. sensors, light sources). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. 1,4-Bis(2-methylstyryl)benzene doped PMMA fibre for blue range fluorescent applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miluski, Piotr; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Zmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik

    2018-03-01

    The fluorescent dyes allow new optical applications in polymer-based optical fibre technology. The article presents highly fluorescent 1,4-Bis(2-methylstyryl)benzene doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) fibre. The multi-peak (422, 450, 488 nm) fluorescence spectrum of the bulk specimen under 355 nm excitation is presented. The polymerization and fibre drawing process is also shown. The fluorescent properties vs. fibre length at excitation 405 nm are investigated. Significant spectrum shape changes and red shift phenomena of individual peaks are presented using one end excitation and fibre cutting method measurements for fibre length 2-90 cm. Obtained attenuation level 0.69 dB/m limits useful fibre length but obtained results can be useful in new polymeric fibers applications (e.g. sensors, light sources).

  12. Real-Time Intraoperative Detection of Breast Cancer using Near-infrared Fluorescence Imaging and Methylene Blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummers, Quirijn R.J.G.; Verbeek, Floris P.R.; Schaafsma, Boudewijn E.; Boonstra, Martin C.; van der Vorst, Joost R.; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Frangioni, John V.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite recent developments in preoperative breast cancer imaging, intraoperative localization of tumor tissue can be challenging, resulting in tumor-positive resection margins during breast-conserving surgery. Based on certain physicochemical similarities between Technetium(99mTc)-sestamibi (MIBI), a SPECT radiodiagnostic with a sensitivity of 83–90% to detect breast cancer preoperatively, and the near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore Methylene Blue (MB), we hypothesized that MB might detect breast cancer intraoperatively using NIR fluorescence imaging. Methods Twenty-four patients with breast cancer, planned for surgical resection, were included. Patients were divided in 2 administration groups, which differed with respect to the timing of MB administration. N = 12 patients per group were administered 1.0 mg/kg MB intravenously either immediately or 3 h before surgery. The mini-FLARE imaging system was used to identify the NIR fluorescent signal during surgery and on post-resected specimens transferred to the pathology department. Results were confirmed by NIR fluorescence microscopy. Results 20/24 (83%) of breast tumors (carcinoma in N=21 and ductal carcinoma in situ in N=3) were identified in the resected specimen using NIR fluorescence imaging. Patients with non-detectable tumors were significantly older. No significant relation to receptor status or tumor grade was seen. Overall tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) was 2.4 ± 0.8. There was no significant difference between TBR and background signal between administration groups. In 2/4 patients with positive resection margins, breast cancer tissue identified in the wound bed during surgery would have changed surgical management. Histology confirmed the concordance of fluorescence signal and tumor tissue. Conclusions This feasibility study demonstrated an overall breast cancer identification rate using MB of 83%, with real-time intraoperative guidance having the potential to alter patient management. PMID

  13. Identification of the pigment responsible for the blue fluorescence band in the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of green plants, and the potential use of this band in remotely estimating rates of photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappelle, E.W.; McMurtrey, J.E. III; Kim, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of vegetation is being investigated in this laboratory for use as a technique for the remote detection of the effects of environmental stress upon vegetation, as well as for plant identification. The fluorescence band with a maximum at 440 nm, in conjunction with the chlorophyll bands with maxima at 685 and 740 nm, has been found to be a critical band in the development of algorithms for detecting stress, and identifying plant types. The identification of the plant constituent responsible for this band is vital to understanding the mechanism underlying its fluorescence changes in response to environmental and physiological changes. The identification was achieved as follows: The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of pure plant pigments were determined. Fluorescence bands with maxima at 420 nm, 440 nm, 490 nm, and 525 nm were observed for vitamin K 1 , reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH), beta-carotene, and riboflavin, respectively. The LIF spectra of water extracts and acetone extracts of clover leaves were also measured. It was found that the blue fluorescence band was associated with the water extract. NADPH which is a water-soluble compound, and the water extract of clover had no fluorescence after oxidation by potassium ferricyanide, while the fluorescence of water insoluble vitamin K 1 was unchanged by the oxidizing agent. It was also found that the absorption maximum of NADPH was the same as the absorption maximum of the aqueous extract of clover. The above findings indicated that the compound responsible for the blue fluorescence at 440 nm is in the reduced state and is water-soluble. It was concluded that NADPH was responsible for the blue fluorescence at 440 nm. The strong linear relationship between the fluorescence at 440 nm and the rate of photosynthesis suggests the possible use of LIF measurements in the remote estimation of photosynthetic rates. (author)

  14. Hidden photoinduced reactivity of the blue fluorescent protein mKalama1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegh, Russell B.; Bloch, Dmitry A.; Bommarius, Andreas S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the photoinduced dynamics of fluorescent proteins is essential for their applications in bioimaging. Despite numerous studies on the ultrafast dynamics, the delayed response of these proteins, which often results in population of kinetically trapped dark states of various origins...... absorption signal has a complex nature and spans the whole microsecond-to-second time scale. The mechanisms underlying the relaxation kinetics are disclosed based on the X-ray structural analysis of mKalama1 and the high-level electronic structure calculations of proposed intermediates in the photocycle. We...... of the chromophore radical cation to bulk solvent through a novel water-mediated proton-wire pathway. Our findings open up new perspectives on the dynamics of fluorescent proteins as tracked by its optical transient absorption in the time domain extending up to seconds....

  15. Synthesis and characterization of small size fluorescent LEEH caped blue emission ZnTe quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patnaik Sumanta Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We report here for the first time the synthesis of LEEH caped very small size (2 nm ZnTe quantum dots at low temperature (less than 100 °C using a simple chemical route. The effects of aging and stirring time on the absorption spectra of the quantum dots were investigated. The synthesized nanocrystal (NC was characterized by PL, TEM, XRD and the formation of very small size quantum dots having FCC structure was confirmed. Further, blue emission from the prepared sample was observed during exposure to monochromatic UV radiation. ZnTe NCs obtained in this study were found to be more stable compared to those presented in literature reports. ZnTe NCs may be considered as a new material in place of CdTe for optoelectronics devices.

  16. Benzimidazobenzothiazole-Based Bipolar Hosts to Harvest Nearly All of the Excitons from Blue Delayed Fluorescence and Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lin-Song; Kim, Jong Uk; Nomura, Hiroko; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-06-06

    Much effort has been devoted to developing highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) that function through phosphorescence or thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). However, efficient host materials for blue TADF and phosphorescent guest emitters are limited because of their requirement of high triplet energy levels. Herein, we report the rigid acceptor unit benzimidazobenzothiazole (BID-BT), which is suitable for use in bipolar hosts in blue OLEDs. The designed host materials, based on BID-BT, possess high triplet energy and bipolar carrier transport ability. Both blue TADF and phosphorescent OLEDs containing BID-BT-based derivatives exhibit external quantum efficiencies as high as 20 %, indicating that these hosts allow efficient triplet exciton confinement appropriate for blue TADF and phosphorescent guest emitters. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Physiological and Molecular Effects of the Cyclic Nucleotides cAMP and cGMP on Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera, Natalia M.

    2012-12-01

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (CNs), cAMP and cGMP, are second messengers that participate in the regulation of development, metabolism and adaptive responses. In plants, CNs are associated with the control of pathogen responses, pollen tube orientation, abiotic stress response, membrane transport regulation, stomatal movement and light perception. In this study, we hypothesize that cAMP and cGMP promote changes in the transcription level of genes related to photosynthesis, high light and membrane transport in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves and, that these changes at the molecular level can have functional biological consequences. For this reason we tested if CNs modulate the photosynthetic rate, responses to high light and root ion transport. Real time quantitative PCR was used to assess transcription levels of selected genes and infrared gas analyzers coupled to fluorescence sensors were used to measure the photosynthetic parameters. We present evidence that both cAMP and cGMP modulate foliar mRNA levels early after stimulation. The two CNs trigger different responses indicating that the signals have specificity. A comparison of proteomic and transcriptional changes suggest that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms are modulated by CNs. cGMP up-regulates the mRNA levels of components of the photosynthesis and carbon metabolism. However, neither cAMP nor cGMP trigger differences in the rate of carbon assimilation, maximum efficiency of the photosystem II (PSII), or PSII operating efficiency. It was also demonstrated that CN regulate the expression of its own targets, the cyclic nucleotide gated channels - CNGC. Further studies are needed to identify the components of the signaling transduction pathway that mediate cellular changes and their respective regulatory and/or signaling roles.

  18. Realizing Highly Efficient Solution-Processed Homojunction-Like Sky-Blue OLEDs by Using Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescent Emitters Featuring an Aggregation-Induced Emission Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kailong; Wang, Zian; Zhan, Lisi; Zhong, Cheng; Gong, Shaolong; Xie, Guohua; Yang, Chuluo

    2018-03-13

    Two new blue emitters, i.e., bis-[2-(9,9-dimethyl-9,10-dihydroacridine)-phenyl]-sulfone ( o-ACSO2) and bis-[3-(9,9-dimethyl-9,10-dihydroacridine)-phenyl]-sulfone ( m-ACSO2), with reserved fine thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) nature and simply tuned thermal and optoelectronic properties, were synthesized by isomer engineering. The meta-linking compound, i.e., m-ACSO2, obtains the highest photoluminescence quantum yield with a small singlet-triplet energy gap, a moderate delayed fluorescent lifetime, excellent solubility, and neat film homogeneity. Due to its unique aggregation-induced emission (AIE) character, neat film-based heterojunction-like organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are achievable. By inserting an excitonic inert exciton-blocking layer, the PN heterojunction-like emission accompanied by intefacial exciplex was shifted to a homojunction-like channel mainly from the AIE emitter itself, providing a new tactic to generate efficient blue color from neat films. The solution-processed nondoped sky-blue OLED employing m-ACSO2 as emitter with homojunction-like emission achieved a maximum external quantum efficiency of 17.2%. The design strategies presented herein provide practical methods to construct efficient blue TADF dyes and realize high-performance blue TADF devices.

  19. Intermingled cAMP, cGMP and calcium spatiotemporal dynamics in developing neuronal circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania eAveraimo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available cAMP critically modulates the development of neuronal connectivity. It is involved in a wide range of cellular processes that require independent regulation. However, our understanding of how this single second messenger achieves specific modulation of the signaling pathways involved remains incomplete. The subcellular compartmentalization and temporal regulation of cAMP signals have recently been identified as important coding strategies leading to specificity. Dynamic interactions of this cyclic nucleotide with other second messenger including calcium and cGMP are critically involved in the regulation of spatiotemporal control of cAMP. Recent technical improvements of fluorescent sensors facilitate cAMP monitoring, whereas optogenetic tools permit spatial and temporal control of cAMP manipulations, all of which enabled the direct investigation of spatiotemporal characteristics of cAMP modulation in developing neurons. Focusing on neuronal polarization, neurotransmitter specification, axon guidance, and refinement of neuronal connectivity, we summarize herein the recent advances in understanding the features of cAMP signals and their dynamic interactions with calcium and cGMP involved in shaping the nervous system.

  20. Effect of clay in controlling the non-fluorescence H-dimeric states of a cationic dye Nile Blue Chloride (NBC) in hybrid Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Chandan; Shil, Ashis; Hussain, S. A.; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2018-01-01

    Present communication reports the effect of amphiphilic matrices and nano-clay platelets on the aggregation properties of a water soluble cationic fluorescent dye Nile Blue Chloride (NBC) in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films. In-situ Brewster Angle Microscopic (BAM) studies showed distinct domain structures of complex and hybrid Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface. UV-vis absorption spectra showed non-fluorescent H-dimeric band in concentrated aqueous solution of NBC and in complex LB film of NBC with stearic acid. By changing various parameters, a great control over H-dimeric states has been achieved in clay incorporated hybrid LB films. These films can act as efficient fluorescence probe.

  1. Fabrication and Investigation of Two-Component Film of 2,5-Diphenyloxazole and Octafluoronaphthalene Exhibiting Tunable Blue/Bluish Violet Fluorescence Based on Low Vacuum Physical Vapor Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Zhai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic luminescent materials play an important role in the fields of light-emitting diodes and fluorescent imaging. Moreover, new synthetic approaches towards π-conjugated molecular systems with high fluorescence quantum efficiency are highly desired. Herein, different 2,5-diphenyloxazole-octafluoronaphthalene (DPO-OFN films with tunable fluorescence have been prepared by Low Vacuum Physical Vapor Deposition (LVPVD method. DPO-OFN films showed some changed properties, such as molecular vibration and fluorescence. All films exhibited blue/bluish violet fluorescence and showed blue shift, in comparison with pristine DPO. This work introduced a new method to fabricate two-component molecular materials with tunable blue/bluish violet luminescence properties and provided a new perspective to prepare organic luminescent film materials, layer film materials, cocrystal materials, and cocrystal film materials. Importantly, these materials have potential applications in the fields of next generation of photofunctional materials.

  2. Spectroscopic investigation on interaction and sonodynamic damage of Riboflavin to DNA under ultrasonic irradiation by using Methylene Blue as fluorescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dandan; Fan, Ping; Wang, Baoxin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the Riboflavin (RF) as a sonosensitizer and Methylene Blue (MB) as a fluorescent probe were used to study the interaction and sonodynamic damage to Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) by fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the RF could efficiently bind to DNA in aqueous solution and exchange with the MB through competing reaction. And then, under ultrasonic irradiation, the RF could obviously damage the DNA. In addition, the influencing factors such as ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration on the sonodynamic damage to DNA were also considered. The experimental results showed that the sonodynamic damage degree increase with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration. Perhaps, this paper may offer some important subjects for broadening the application of RF in sonodynamic therapy (SDT) technologies for tumor treatment.

  3. A blue fluorescent labeling technique utilizing micro- and nanoparticles for tracking in LIVE/DEAD® stained pathogenic biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus and Burkholderia cepacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klinger-Strobel M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mareike Klinger-Strobel,1,2,* Julia Ernst,3,* Christian Lautenschläger,4 Mathias W Pletz,1,2 Dagmar Fischer,3,5 Oliwia Makarewicz1,2 1Center for Infectious Diseases and Infection’s Control, 2Center for Sepsis Control and Care, Jena University Hospital, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, 4Department of Internal Medicine IV, Jena University Hospital, 5Jena Center for Soft Matter (JCSM, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Strategies that target and treat biofilms are widely applied to bacterial cultures using popular live/dead staining techniques with mostly red or green fluorescent markers (eg, with SYTO® 9, propidium iodide, fluorescein. Therefore, visualizing drugs or micro- and nanoparticulate delivery systems to analyze their distribution and effects in biofilms requires a third fluorescent dye that does not interfere with the properties of the live/dead markers. The present study establishes and evaluates a model for tracking polymeric particles in fluorescently stained biological material. To this end, poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA-based micro- and nanoparticles were used as well-established model systems, which, because of their favorable safety profiles, are expected to play important future roles with regard to drug delivery via inhalation. PLGA was covalently and stably labeled with 7-amino-4-methyl-3-coumarinylacetic acid (AMCA, after which blue fluorescent poly(ethylene glycol-block-PLGA (PEG-PLGA particles were prepared using a mixture of fluorescent AMCA-PLGA and PEG-PLGA. Because chitosan is known to reduce negative surface charge, blue fluorescent PEG-PLGA-particles with chitosan were also prepared. These micro- and nanoparticles were physicochemically characterized and could be clearly distinguished from live/dead stained bacteria in biofilms using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Keywords: 7-amino-4

  4. Deciphering cGMP signatures and cGMP-dependent pathways in plant defence

    OpenAIRE

    Meier, Stuart; Madeo, Laura; Ederli, Luisa; Donaldson, Lara; Pasqualini, Stefania; Gehring, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The second messenger, 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), is a critical component of many different processes in plants while guanylyl cyclases that catalyse the formation of cGMP from GTP have remained somewhat elusive in higher plants. Consequently, two major aims are the discovery of novel GCs and the identification of cGMP mediated processes. Recently, we have reported temporal signatures of ozone (O3)-induced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) generation, their effect on cGMP ...

  5. Organic anion transporter 2 (SLC22A7) is a facilitative transporter of cGMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropp, Cheryl D; Komori, Takafumi; Shima, James E; Urban, Thomas J; Yee, Sook Wah; More, Swati S; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2008-04-01

    The second messenger, cGMP, mediates a host of cellular responses to various stimuli, resulting in the regulation of many critical physiologic functions. The existence of specific cGMP transporters on the plasma membrane that participate in the regulation of cGMP levels has been suggested in a large number of studies. In this study, we identified a novel plasma membrane transporter for cGMP. In particular, we showed that hOAT2 (SLC22A7), a member of the solute carrier (SLC) superfamily, was a facilitative transporter for cGMP and other guanine nucleotides. hOAT2, which is ubiquitously expressed at high levels in many cell types, was previously thought to primarily transport organic anions. Among purine and pyrimidine nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides, hOAT2 showed the greatest preference for cGMP, which transported cGMP with a K(m) value of 88 +/- 11 muM and exhibited between 50- and 100-fold enhanced uptake over control cells. Our data revealed that hOAT2 is a bidirectional facilitative transporter that can control both intracellular and extracellular levels of cGMP. In addition, we observed that a common alternatively spliced variant of hOAT2 demonstrated a complete loss of transport function as a result of a low expression level on the plasma membrane. We conclude that hOAT2 is a highly efficient, facilitative transporter of cGMP and may be involved in cGMP signaling in many tissues. Our study suggests that hOAT2 represents a potential new drug target for regulating cGMP levels.

  6. Binding investigation on the interaction between Methylene Blue (MB)/TiO2 nanocomposites and bovine serum albumin by resonance light-scattering (RLS) technique and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuesheng; Zhang, Yue; Sun, Shaofa; Zhang, Aiqing; Liu, Yi

    2013-11-05

    The interaction between Methylene Blue (MB)/TiO2 nanocomposites and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by resonance light scattering (RLS), fluorescence, three-dimension spectra and UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy. Several factors which may influence the RLS intensity were also investigated before characterizing MB/TiO2-BSA complex. It was proved that the mechanism of MB/TiO2 nanocomposites binding to BSA was mainly a result of the formation of MB/TiO2-BSA complex. The binding constant of MB/TiO2-BSA is 0.762 × 10(-5) L mol(-1) at 298K. By calculating the binding constant at different temperature, the thermodynamic parameters ΔH, ΔG, and ΔS can be observed and deduced that the hydrophobic interactions played an important role to stabilize the complex. The distance r (3.73 nm) between donor (BSA) and acceptor (MB/TiO2) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The binding site for MB/TiO2 on BSA was mainly located in sub-domain IIA. The UV-vis absorbance, circular dichroism and three dimension fluorescence have also been used to investigate the effect of MB/TiO2 on the conformation of BSA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Solid-state deep blue and UV fluorescent dyes based on para-bis(2-thienyl)phenylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajčovič, Jozef; Kovalenko, Alexander, E-mail: kovalenko.alx@gmail.com; Heinrichová, Patricie; Vala, Martin; Weiter, Martin

    2015-11-15

    Despite the general rule of strong acceptor substituents having a tendency to quench fluorescence due to molecular stacking, it is shown how tetra-fluorination of the central phenylene unit of para-bis(2-thienyl)phenylene can augment the quantum yields of solid state fluorescent dyes. Another significant part of the present research was the study of the influence of the position of the solubilization alkyl chains position on the fluorescent properties of the abovementioned non- and tetra-fluorinated materials. Tenfold augmentation of quantum yields, depending on the position of the alkyl chains is reported. - Highlights: • Solid state luminescence was observed in para-bis(2-thienyl)phenylene molecules. • Quantum yields was augmented by polyfluorination of the central phenylene unit. • Tenfold augmentation of luminescence was observed by changing alkyls position. • Possibilities of steric hindrance and charge transfer were studied.

  8. Possibilities of increasing production and quality of strawberry fruits and several flowers by new blue fluorescent greenhouse films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemming-Hoffmann, S.; Os, van E.A.; Dieleman, J.A.; Hemming, J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Breuer, J.J.G.; Slangen, J.H.

    2005-01-01

    Within the framework of the project SPECTRAFOIL funded by the EU and Grafe Color Batch (Germany), together with the industrial partners Palrig (Israel), Sunsaver (Spain) and several growers and research partners in Israel, Cyprus, Spain and The Netherlands, new fluorescent greenhouse films for

  9. CN-Modified Host Materials for Improved Efficiency and Lifetime in Blue Phosphorescent and Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Sung Yong; Kim, Ji Han; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2017-04-19

    CN-modified host materials, 9-(2-(9-phenyl-9H-carbazol-3-yl)phenyl)-9H-carbazole-3-carbonitrile (o-CzCN) and 9-(3-(9-phenyl-9H-carbazol-3-yl)phenyl)-9H-carbazole-3-carbonitrile (m-CzCN), which can improve the external quantum efficiency and lifetime of both blue phosphorescent and thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) emitters were developed. A molecular design approach to stabilize the molecular structure and reduce the energy gap produced two high triplet energy host materials of o-CzCN and m-CzCN compatible with the phosphorescent and TADF emitters. The new host materials lowered operation voltage, increased quantum efficiency, and elongated lifetime of both phosphorescent and TADF devices.

  10. cGMP modulation of ACh-stimulated exocytosis in guinea pig antral mucous cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Adel H; Shimamoto, Chikao; Nakahari, Takashi; Fujiwara, Shoko; Katsu, Ken-ichi; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2006-06-01

    In guinea pig antral mucous cells, ACh stimulates the Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis, which has a characteristics feature: an initial transient phase followed by a sustained phase. The effects of cGMP on ACh-stimulated exocytosis were studied in guinea pig antral mucous cells using video microscopy. cGMP enhanced the frequency of ACh-stimulated exocytotic events, whereas cGMP alone did not induce any exocytotic events under the ACh-unstimulated condition. cGMP did not stimulate either Ca(2+) mobilization or cAMP accumulation. The Ca(2+) dose-response studies demonstrated that cGMP shifted the dose-response curve upward with no shift to the lower concentration. This indicates that cGMP increased maximal responsiveness of the Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis, but not the Ca(2+) sensitivity. Moreover, under a condition of ATP depletion by dinitrophenol (DNP) or anoxia (N(2) bubbling), ACh evoked only a sustained phase in exocytotic events with no initial transient phase. However, ACh evoked an initial transient phase followed by a sustained phase with addition of cGMP before ATP depletion, whereas only a sustained phase was evoked in a case of cGMP addition after ATP depletion. Thus cGMP-induced enhancement in ACh-stimulated exocytotic events requires ATP, suggesting that cGMP modulates ATP-dependent priming of Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis in antral mucous cells. In conclusion, cGMP increases the number of primed granules via acceleration of the ATP-dependent priming, which enhances the Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis stimulated by ACh.

  11. Leaf Morphology, Photosynthetic Performance, Chlorophyll Fluorescence, Stomatal Development of Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) Exposed to Different Ratios of Red Light to Blue Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Lu, Wei; Tong, Yuxin; Yang, Qichang

    2016-01-01

    Red and blue light are both vital factors for plant growth and development. We examined how different ratios of red light to blue light (R/B) provided by light-emitting diodes affected photosynthetic performance by investigating parameters related to photosynthesis, including leaf morphology, photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, stomatal development, light response curve, and nitrogen content. In this study, lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L.) were exposed to 200 μmol⋅m(-2)⋅s(-1) irradiance for a 16 h⋅d(-1) photoperiod under the following six treatments: monochromatic red light (R), monochromatic blue light (B) and the mixture of R and B with different R/B ratios of 12, 8, 4, and 1. Leaf photosynthetic capacity (A max) and photosynthetic rate (P n) increased with decreasing R/B ratio until 1, associated with increased stomatal conductance, along with significant increase in stomatal density and slight decrease in stomatal size. P n and A max under B treatment had 7.6 and 11.8% reduction in comparison with those under R/B = 1 treatment, respectively. The effective quantum yield of PSII and the efficiency of excitation captured by open PSII center were also significantly lower under B treatment than those under the other treatments. However, shoot dry weight increased with increasing R/B ratio with the greatest value under R/B = 12 treatment. The increase of shoot dry weight was mainly caused by increasing leaf area and leaf number, but no significant difference was observed between R and R/B = 12 treatments. Based on the above results, we conclude that quantitative B could promote photosynthetic performance or growth by stimulating morphological and physiological responses, yet there was no positive correlation between P n and shoot dry weight accumulation.

  12. Effects of hydrazine derivatives on vascular smooth muscle contractility, blood pressure and cGMP production in rats: comparison with hydralazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, Horacio; Fernández, Gabriela; Medina, Martha; Alvarez, Ezequiel; Orallo, Francisco

    2003-01-01

    Hydralazine is a hydrazine derivative used clinically as a vasodilator and antihypertensive agent. Despite numerous studies with the drug, its mechanism of action has remained unknown; guanylate cyclase activation and release of endothelial relaxing factors are thought to be involved in its vasodilator effect. Other hydrazine derivatives are known to stimulate guanylate cyclase and could therefore share the vasodilator activity of hydralazine, although such possibility has not been assessed systematically. In the present study, hydralazine, hydrazine, phenylhydrazine, and isoniazid were evaluated for vascular smooth muscle relaxation in rat aortic rings with and without endothelium, as well as after incubation with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor methylene blue. They were also tested for enhancement of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production by cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells and for hypotension in the anesthetized rat. All hydrazines relaxed aortic rings, an action unaffected by endothelium removal and, in all cases except hydralazine, antagonized by methylene blue. Only phenylhydrazine increased cGMP production and only hydralazine markedly lowered blood pressure. It was concluded that hydralazine vascular relaxation is independent of endothelium and is not related to guanylate cyclase activation. The other hydrazines studied also elicit endothelium-independent relaxation, but the effect is related to guanylate cyclase. The marked hypotensive effect of hydralazine contrasts with its modest relaxant activity and is not shared by the other hydrazines. The fact that hydrazine and isoniazid produce methylene blue-sensitive relaxation, yet do not enhance cGMP production suggests the need for activating factors present in aortic rings but not in isolated cells.

  13. Highly Efficient White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Controllable Excitons Behavior by a Mixed Interlayer between Fluorescence Blue and Phosphorescence Yellow-Emitting Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hong Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly efficient hybrid white organic light-emitting diode (HWOLED has been demonstrated with a mixed interlayer between fluorescent blue and phosphorescent yellow-emitting layers. The device structure is simplified by using a controllable fluorescence-mixed interlayer-phosphorescence emission layer structure. The electroluminance (EL performance can be modulated easily by adjusting the ratio of the hole-predominated material to the electron-predominated material in the interlayer. It is found that the HWOLED with a ratio of 3 : 2 exhibits a current efficiency of 34 cd/A and a power efficiency of 29 lm/W at 1000 cd/m2 with warm white Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage (CIE1931 coordinates of (0.4273, 0.4439. The improved efficiency and adaptive CIE coordinates are attributed to the controllable mixed interlayer with enhanced charge carrier transport, optimized excitons distribution, and improved harvestings of singlet and triplet excitons.

  14. Ratiometric Molecular Probes Based on Dual Emission of a Blue Fluorescent Coumarin and a Red Phosphorescent Cationic Iridium(III) Complex for Intracellular Oxygen Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Toshitada; Murayama, Saori; Tobita, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Ratiometric molecular probes RP1 and RP2 consisting of a blue fluorescent coumarin and a red phosphorescent cationic iridium complex connected by a tetra- or octaproline linker, respectively, were designed and synthesized for sensing oxygen levels in living cells. These probes exhibited dual emission with good spectral separation in acetonitrile. The photorelaxation processes, including intramolecular energy transfer, were revealed by emission quantum yield and lifetime measurements. The ratios (RI=(Ip/If)) between the phosphorescence (Ip) and fluorescence (If) intensities showed excellent oxygen responses; the ratio of RI under degassed and aerated conditions (RI0/RI) was 20.3 and 19.6 for RP1 and RP2. The introduction of the cationic Ir (III) complex improved the cellular uptake efficiency compared to that of a neutral analogue with a tetraproline linker. The emission spectra of the ratiometric probes internalized into living HeLa or MCF-7 cells could be obtained using a conventional microplate reader. The complex RP2 with an octaproline linker provided ratios comparable to the ratiometric measurements obtained using a microplate reader: the ratio of the RI value of RP2 under hypoxia (2.5% O2) to that under normoxia (21% O2) was 1.5 and 1.7 for HeLa and MCF-7 cells, respectively. Thus, the intracellular oxygen levels of MCF-7 cells could be imaged by ratiometric emission measurements using the complex RP2. PMID:26066988

  15. On the mechanism of non-radiative decay of blue fluorescent protein chromophore: New insight from the excited-state molecular dynamics simulations and potential energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Liu, Jian-Yong; Zhou, Pan-Wang

    2017-11-01

    A detailed theoretical investigation based on the ab initio on-the-fly surface hopping dynamics simulations and potential energy surfaces calculations has been performed to unveil the mechanism of the photoinduced non-adiabatic relaxation process of the isolated blue fluorescent protein (BFP) chromophore in gas phase. The data analysis presents that the dominant reaction coordinate of the BFP chromophore is driven by a rotation motion around the CC double bridging bond, which is in remarkable difference with a previous result which supports a Hula-Twist rotation pattern. Such behavior is consistent with the double bond rotation pattern of the GFP neutral chromophore. In addition, the dynamics simulations give an estimated decay time of 1.1 ps for the S1 state, which is agrees well with the experimental values measured in proteins. The present work offers a straightforward understanding for the decay mechanism of the BFP chromophore and suggestions of the photochemical properties of analogous protein chromophores. We hope the current work would be helpful for further exploration of the BFP photochemical and photophysical properties in various environments, and can provide guidance and prediction for rational design of the fluorescent proteins catering for different demands.

  16. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, N.V.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra have been obtained from several variants of green fluorescent protein: blue fluorescent protein (BFP), enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), all from Aequorea victoria, and the red

  17. Filtration behavior of casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP) in an enzymatic membrane reactor: fouling control by membrane selection and threshold flux operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Jianquan; Morthensen, Sofie Thage; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    to be the most suitable membrane for this application. Low pH increased CGMP retention but produced more fouling. Higher agitation and lower CGMP concentration induced larger permeate flux and higher CGMP retention. Adsorption fouling and pore blocking by CGMP in/on membranes could be controlled by selecting...... a highly hydrophilic membrane with appropriate pore size. Operating under threshold flux could minimize the concentration polarization and cake/gel/scaling layers, but might not avoid irreversible fouling caused by adsorption and pore blocking. The effects of membrane properties, pH, agitation and CGMP...

  18. Modulation of cGMP in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerrigter, Guido; Lapp, Harald; Burnett, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common disease that continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality warranting novel therapeutic strategies. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is the second messenger of several important signaling pathways based on distinct guanylate cyclases (GCs) in the cardiovascular system. Both the nitric oxide/soluble GC (NO/sGC) as well as the natriuretic peptide/GC-A (NP/GC-A) systems are disordered in HF, providing a rationale for their therapeutic augmentation. Soluble GC activation with conventional nitrovasodilators has been used for more than a century but is associated with cGMP-independent actions and the development of tolerance, actions which novel NO-independent sGC activators now in clinical development lack. Activation of GC-A by administration of naturally occurring or designer natriuretic peptides is an emerging field, as is the inhibition of enzymes that degrade endogenous NPs. Finally, inhibition of cGMP-degrading phosphodiesterases, particularly phosphodiesterase 5 provides an additional strategy to augment cGMP-signaling. PMID:19089342

  19. cGMP in Mouse Rods: the spatiotemporal dynamics underlying single photon responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen P. Gross

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate vision begins when retinal photoreceptors transduce photons into membrane hyperpolarization, which reduces glutamate release onto second-order neurons. In rod photoreceptors, transduction of single photons is achieved by a well-understood G-protein cascade that modulates cGMP levels, and in turn, cGMP-sensitive inward current. The spatial extent and depth of the decline in cGMP during the single photon response have been major issues in phototransduction research since the discovery that single photons elicit substantial and reproducible changes in membrane current. The spatial profile of cGMP decline during the single photon response affects signal gain, and thus may contribute to reduction of trial-to-trial fluctuations in the single photon response. Here we summarize the general principles of rod phototransduction, emphasizing recent advances in resolving the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP during the single photon response.

  20. SNV, a lipophilic superactive VIP analog, acts through cGMP to promote neuronal survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashur-Fabian, O; Perl, O; Lilling, G; Fridkin, M; Gozes, I

    1999-01-01

    The current study explored whether the neuroprotective effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and its analog Stearyl-Nle17-VIP (SNV) were mediated through cGMP. SNV, was previously found to be 100-fold more potent than VIP in providing neuroprotection. Neuronal survival was assessed in rat cerebral cortical cultures. A cGMP antagonist (RP-8-pCPT-cGMPS, 10(-12)-10(-9) M) reduced the number of surviving neurons (40-60%), this decline was spared in the presence of SNV (10(-13)M). A cGMP agonist (Sp-8-pCPT-cGMPS, 10(-14)-10(-8)M) and SNV (10(-16)-10(-8)M) both provided significant neuroprotection against 10(-12) M of the cGMP antagonist. Immunoassays indicated that SNV induced increases in cGMP (two-threefold) in these cultures, whereas VIP was 1000-fold less potent. These results implicate cGMP as a second messenger for VIP/SNV-mediated effects on neuronal survival.

  1. Use of Blue-Green Fluorescence and Thermal Imaging in the Early Detection of Sunflower Infection by the Root Parasitic Weed Orobanche cumana Wallr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen M. Ortiz-Bustos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the impact of Orobanche cumana Wallr. on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. becomes evident with emergence of broomrape shoots aboveground, infection occurs early after sowing, the host physiology being altered during underground parasite stages. Genetic resistance is the most effective control method and one of the main goals of sunflower breeding programmes. Blue-green fluorescence (BGF and thermal imaging allow non-destructive monitoring of plant diseases, since they are sensitive to physiological disorders in plants. We analyzed the BGF emission by leaves of healthy sunflower plantlets, and we implemented BGF and thermal imaging in the detection of the infection by O. cumana during underground parasite development. Increases in BGF emission were observed in leaf pairs of healthy sunflowers during their development. Lower BGF was consistently detected in parasitized plants throughout leaf expansion and low pigment concentration was detected at final time, supporting the interpretation of a decrease in secondary metabolites upon infection. Parasite-induced stomatal closure and transpiration reduction were suggested by warmer leaves of inoculated sunflowers throughout the experiment. BGF imaging and thermography could be implemented for fast screening of sunflower breeding material. Both techniques are valuable approaches to assess the processes by which O. cumana alters physiology (secondary metabolism and photosynthesis of sunflower.

  2. Use of Blue-Green Fluorescence and Thermal Imaging in the Early Detection of Sunflower Infection by the Root Parasitic Weed Orobanche cumana Wallr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Bustos, Carmen M; Pérez-Bueno, María L; Barón, Matilde; Molinero-Ruiz, Leire

    2017-01-01

    Although the impact of Orobanche cumana Wallr. on sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) becomes evident with emergence of broomrape shoots aboveground, infection occurs early after sowing, the host physiology being altered during underground parasite stages. Genetic resistance is the most effective control method and one of the main goals of sunflower breeding programmes. Blue-green fluorescence (BGF) and thermal imaging allow non-destructive monitoring of plant diseases, since they are sensitive to physiological disorders in plants. We analyzed the BGF emission by leaves of healthy sunflower plantlets, and we implemented BGF and thermal imaging in the detection of the infection by O. cumana during underground parasite development. Increases in BGF emission were observed in leaf pairs of healthy sunflowers during their development. Lower BGF was consistently detected in parasitized plants throughout leaf expansion and low pigment concentration was detected at final time, supporting the interpretation of a decrease in secondary metabolites upon infection. Parasite-induced stomatal closure and transpiration reduction were suggested by warmer leaves of inoculated sunflowers throughout the experiment. BGF imaging and thermography could be implemented for fast screening of sunflower breeding material. Both techniques are valuable approaches to assess the processes by which O. cumana alters physiology (secondary metabolism and photosynthesis) of sunflower.

  3. cGMP Signaling in the Cardiovascular System—The Role of Compartmentation and Its Live Cell Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, Nadja I.; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.

    2018-01-01

    The ubiquitous second messenger 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) regulates multiple physiologic processes in the cardiovascular system. Its intracellular effects are mediated by stringently controlled subcellular microdomains. In this review, we will illustrate the current techniques available for real-time cGMP measurements with a specific focus on live cell imaging methods. We will also discuss currently accepted and emerging mechanisms of cGMP compartmentation in the cardiovascular system. PMID:29534460

  4. Ratiometric Molecular Probes Based on Dual Emission of a Blue Fluorescent Coumarin and a Red Phosphorescent Cationic Iridium(III Complex for Intracellular Oxygen Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshitada Yoshihara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ratiometric molecular probes RP1 and RP2 consisting of a blue fluorescent coumarin and a red phosphorescent cationic iridium complex connected by a tetra- or octaproline linker, respectively, were designed and synthesized for sensing oxygen levels in living cells. These probes exhibited dual emission with good spectral separation in acetonitrile. The photorelaxation processes, including intramolecular energy transfer, were revealed by emission quantum yield and lifetime measurements. The ratios (RI = (Ip /If between the phosphorescence (Ip and fluorescence (If intensities showed excellent oxygen responses; the ratio of RI under degassed and aerated conditions ( R I 0 MathType@MTEF@5@5@+= feaagKart1ev2aqatCvAUfeBSjuyZL2yd9gzLbvyNv2CaerbuLwBLn hiov2DGi1BTfMBaeXatLxBI9gBaerbd9wDYLwzYbItLDharqqtubsr 4rNCHbGeaGqiVCI8FfYJH8YrFfeuY=Hhbbf9v8qqaqFr0xc9pk0xbb a9q8WqFfeaY=biLkVcLq=JHqpepeea0=as0Fb9pgeaYRXxe9vr0=vr 0=vqpWqaaeaabiGaciaacaqabeaadaqaaqaaaOqaaabaaaaaaaaape GaamOua8aadaqhaaWcbaWdbiaadMeaa8aabaWdbiaaicdaaaaaaa@38D6@ / RI was 20.3 and 19.6 for RP1 and RP2. The introduction of the cationic Ir (III complex improved the cellular uptake efficiency compared to that of a neutral analogue with a tetraproline linker. The emission spectra of the ratiometric probes internalized into living HeLa or MCF-7 cells could be obtained using a conventional microplate reader. The complex RP2 with an octaproline linker provided ratios comparable to the ratiometric measurements obtained using a microplate reader: the ratio of the  value of RP2 under hypoxia (2.5% O2 to that under normoxia (21% O2 was 1.5 and 1.7 for HeLa and MCF-7 cells, respectively. Thus, the intracellular oxygen levels of MCF-7 cells could be imaged by ratiometric emission measurements using the complex RP2.

  5. Receptors and cGMP signalling mechanism for E. coli enterotoxin in opossum kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forte, L.R.; Krause, W.J.; Freeman, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Receptors for the heat-stable enterotoxin produced by Escherichia coli were found in the kidney and intestine of the North American opossum and in cultured renal cell lines. The enterotoxin markedly increased guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) production in slices of kidney cortex and medulla, in suspensions of intestinal mucosa, and in the opossum kidney (OK) and rat kangaroo kidney (PtK-2) cell lines. In contrast, atrial natriuretic factor elicited much smaller increases in cGMP levels of kidney, intestine, or cultured kidney cell lines. The enterotoxin receptors in OK cells had a molecular mass of approximately 120 kDa when measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of receptors crosslinked with 125 I-enterotoxin. The occurrence of receptors for the E. coli peptide in OK implies that these receptors may be involved in the regulation of renal tubular function in the opossum. E. coli enterotoxin caused a much larger increase in urine cGMP excretion than did atrial natriuretic factor when these peptides were injected intravenously into opossums. However, atrial natriuretic factor elicited a marked diuresis, natriuresis, and increased urinary excretion of calcium, phosphate, potassium, and magnesium. In contrast, the enterotoxin did not acutely influence OK fluid and electrolyte excretion. Thus the substantial increase in cGMP synthesis produced by the bacterial peptide in OK cortex and medulla in vitro and the increased renal excretion of cGMP in vivo were not associated with changes in electrolyte or water excretion. Whether cGMP represents a second messenger molecule in the kidney is an interesting question that was raised but not answered in this series of experiments

  6. Biophysical Techniques for Detection of cAMP and cGMP in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav O. Nikolaev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are ubiquitous second messengers which regulate myriads of functions in virtually all eukaryotic cells. Their intracellular effects are often mediated via discrete subcellular signaling microdomains. In this review, we will discuss state-of-the-art techniques to measure cAMP and cGMP in biological samples with a particular focus on live cell imaging approaches, which allow their detection with high temporal and spatial resolution in living cells and tissues. Finally, we will describe how these techniques can be applied to the analysis of second messenger dynamics in subcellular signaling microdomains.

  7. Spectral characterizations and photophysical properties of one-step synthesized blue fluorescent 4′-aryl substituted 2,2′:6′,2′′-terpyridine for OLEDs application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshmanan, Raja [Department of Physics, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Shivaprakash, Narayanapura Chennegowda [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Nair, Sindhu Sukumaran, E-mail: sindhunair@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in [Department of Physics, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India)

    2015-12-15

    We have synthesized a series of 4′-aryl substituted 2,2′:6′,2′′-terpyridine (terpy) derivatives, namely 4′-(4-methylphenyl)-2,2′:6′,2′′-terpyridine (C-1), 4′-(2-furyl)-2,2′:6′2′′-terpyridine (C-2), and 4′-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-2,2′:6′,2′′-terpyridine (C-3). The synthesized terpy compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, FTIR, NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C), and ESI-Mass spectrometry. Photophysical, electrochemical and thermal properties of terpy compounds were systematically studied. Maximum excitation band was observed between 240 and 330 nm using UV–visible spectra, and maximum emission peaks from PL spectra were observed at 385, 405 and 440 nm for C-1, C-2 and C-3 respectively. Fluorescence lifetime (τ) of the fluorophores was found to be 0.35 and 1.55 ns at the excitation wavelength of 406 nm for C-1 and C-2 respectively, and τ value for C-3 was found to be 0.29 ns at the excitation wavelength of 468 nm. We noticed that the calculated values of HOMO energy levels were increased from 5.96 (C-1) to 6.08 (C-3) eV, which confirms that C-3 derivative is more electrons donating in nature. The calculated electrochemical band gaps were 2.95, 2.82 and 3.02 eV for C-1, C-2 and C-3 respectively. These blue fluorescent emitter derivatives can be used as an electron transport and electroluminescent material to design the blue fluorescent organic light emitting diode (OLED) applications. - Highlights: • Facile one-step synthesized blue fluorescent emitter, 2,2′:6′,2′′-terpyridine derivatives. • The exceptionally broad emission band (365–525 nm) was achieved in the blue region. • Fast fluorescence life time and good thermal stability.

  8. Novel "hot exciton" blue fluorophores for high performance fluorescent/phosphorescent hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes with superhigh phosphorescent dopant concentration and improved efficiency roll-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xinhua; Li, Xiang-Long; Ai, Ling; Mi, Dongbo; Ge, Ziyi; Su, Shi-Jian

    2015-04-22

    Two blue fluorophores with excellent hybridized local and charge-transfer (HLCT) and "hot exciton" properties were developed as the blue emitter and the host for orange-red phosphor to achieve highly efficient fluorescent/phosphorescent (F/P) hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) in a single-emissive-layer single-dopant (SEML-SD) architecture even at a high concentration of phosphorescent dopant. In the devices, part of the triplet excitons of the blue fluorophores can be utilized to realize reverse intersystem crossing from the triplet excited states to the singlet excited states for blue emission, and the diffusion volume range of the triplet excitons is reduced significantly. When the phosphorescent dopant concentration is up to 1.0 wt %, which is ten times higher than the traditional single-EML-SD F/P hybrid WOLEDs, highly efficient white emission was still achieved with maximum total external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 23.8%, current efficiency (CE) of 56.1 cd A(-1), and power efficiency (PE) of 62.9 lm W(1-). The results will supply a novel method for obtaining high efficiency F/P hybrid WOLEDs in a SEML-SD architecture with easily controllable doping concentration.

  9. A novel crosstalk between Alk7 and cGMP signaling differentially regulates brown adipocyte function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aileen Balkow

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: We found a so far unknown crosstalk between cGMP and Alk7 signaling pathways. Tight regulation of Alk7 is required for efficient differentiation of brown adipocytes. Alk7 has differential effects on adipogenic differentiation and the development of the thermogenic program in brown adipocytes.

  10. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase 2 increases neuronal cGMP, synaptic plasticity and memory performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boess, F.G.; Hendrix, M.; Staay, van der F.J.; Erb, C.; Schreiber, R.; Staveren, W.C.G.; Vente, de J.; Prikaerts, J.; Blokland, A.; Koenig, G.

    2004-01-01

    An essential element of the signalling cascade leading to synaptic plasticity is the intracellular second messenger molecule guanosine 3¿,5¿-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). Using the novel, potent, and selective inhibitor Bay 60-7550, we show that the enzyme 3¿,5¿-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase

  11. Efficiency enhancement of fluorescence blue organic light-emitting diodes by incorporating Ag nanoparticles layers due to a localized surface plasmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Minwoo; Chung, Nak-Kwan; Shim, Seob; Yun, Ju-Young; Kim, Jin-Tae; Pyo, Sung Gyu

    2017-09-01

    Enhanced electroluminescence in blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is obtained by incorporating Ag nanoparticles (NPs) into hole injection layer of poly(3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonic acid (PEDOT:PSS). The absorption peak of the localized surface plasmons (LSPs) introduced by the 60 nm Ag NPs matches the emission wavelength of the blue OLEDs were matched at wavelength of 442 nm. In addition, to maximize their coupling and to prevent the quenching of the emission, the distance between surface plasmons (SPs) around NPs and organic fluorophores is optimized. Finally, the emission intensity and the current efficiency of diode with Ag NPs were increased by 19% and 18%, respectively.

  12. Dispensability of the major coat protein of oat blue dwarf virus in genome replication: Substitution of the open reading frame with the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oat blue dwarf virus (OBDV) is a representative marafivirus that infects monocots and a limited number of dicot species and is vectored propagatively by the leafhopper Macrosteles fascifrons.Recently, we reported the generation of clone pOBDV-2r, the first clone of a marafivirus from which infectiou...

  13. The role of cGMP hydrolysing phosphodiesterases 1 and 5 in cerebral artery dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, Christina; Rybalkin, S D; Khurana, T S

    2001-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the presence and activity of cGMP hydrolysing phosphodiesterases in guinea pig basilar arteries and the effect of selective and non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors on cerebral artery dilatation involving the nitric oxide (NO)-guanosine cyclic 3'5-monophosphate (c......GMP) pathway. Immunoreactivity to phosphodiesterases 1A, 1B and 5, but not phosphodiesterase 1C was found in fractions of homogenised cerebral arteries eluted by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both the phosphodiesterase 1 inhibitor 8-methoxymethyl-1-methyl-3-(2methylpropyl)-xanthine (8-MM......-IBMX) and the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors zaprinast and dipyridamole induced dilatation of cerebral arteries. The dilatory response to 8-MM-IBMX was reduced by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (10 microM) and endothelial removal and restored by sodium nitroprusside (0.1 microM) pretreatment, indicating...

  14. IL-4 induces cAMP and cGMP in human monocytic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dugas

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Human monocytes, preincubated with IFN-γ respond to IL-4 by a cGMP increase through activation of an inducible NO synthase. Here, IL-4 was found to induce an accumulation of cGMP (1 – 3 min and cAMP (20 – 25 min in unstimulated monocytes. This was impaired with NOS inhibitors, but also with EGTA and calcium/calmodulin inhibitors. These results suggest that: (1 IL-4 may stimulate different NOS isoforms in resting and IFN-γ activated monocytes, and (2 cAMP accumulation may be partially dependent on the NO pathway. By RT-PCR, a type III constitutive NOS mRNA was detected in U937 monocytic cells. IL-4 also increased the [Ca2+]i in these cells. Different NOS may thus be expressed in monocytic cells depending on their differentiation and the signals they receive.

  15. [Aging reduces contents of endogenous CO, cAMP and cGMP in rat penile tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wen-Bo; Wang, Shu-Qiu; Li, Ming; Kang, Yu-Ming; Gui, Shi-Liang; Chi, Bao-Jin

    2009-02-01

    To explore the relationship of aging with the changes of endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), cGMP and cAMP contents in the penile tissues of rats. Twenty-four male rats were equally divided into an 8-month, a 16-month and a 24-month group, and their penile erection was detected by injecting apomorphine, their penile cavernous body harvested, and the contents of CO, cAPM and cGMP detected by improved dual wavelength spectrophotometry. The contents of CO, cAPM and cGMP were reduced with the increase of age, with statistically significant differences between the three age groups (P < 0.01). Aging significantly decreased the contents of CO, cAMP and cGMP in the penile tissues of the rats, which suggests that aging might play an important role in erectile dysfunction.

  16. [3H]sildenafil binding to phosphodiesterase-5 is specific, kinetically heterogeneous, and stimulated by cGMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Jackie D; Blount, Mitsi A; Weeks, James L; Beasley, Alfreda; Kuhn, Karl P; Ho, Yew S J; Saidi, Layla F; Hurley, James H; Kotera, Jun; Francis, Sharron H

    2003-06-01

    Sildenafil (Viagra) potentiates penile erection by acting as a nonhydrolyzable analog of cGMP and competing with this nucleotide for catalysis by phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5), but the characteristics of direct binding of radiolabeled sildenafil to PDE5 have not been determined. [3H]Sildenafil binding to PDE5 was retained when filtered through nitrocellulose or glass-fiber membranes. Binding was inhibited by excess sildenafil, 2-(2-methylpyridin-4-yl)methyl-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-8-(pyrimidin-2-yl)methoxy-1,2-dihydro-1-oxo-2,7-naphthyridine-3-carboxylic acid methyl ester hydrochloride (T-0156), 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, EDTA, or cGMP, but not by cAMP or 5'-GMP. PDE5 was the only [3H]sildenafil binding protein detected in human lung extract. Using purified recombinant PDE5, [3H]sildenafil exchange dissociation yielded two components with t1/2 values of 1 and 14 min and corresponding calculated KD values of 12 and 0.83 nM, respectively. This implied the existence of two conformers of the PDE5 catalytic site. [3H]Sildenafil binding isotherm of PDE5 indicated KD was 8.3 to 13.3 nM, and low cGMP decreased the KD to 4.8 nM but only slightly increased Bmax to a maximum of 0.61 mol/mol-subunit. Results suggest that these effects occur via cGMP binding to the allosteric cGMP binding sites of PDE5. Results imply that by inhibiting PDE5 and thereby increasing cGMP, sildenafil accentuates its own binding affinity for PDE5, which further elevates cGMP. The data also indicate that after physiological elevation, cGMP may directly stimulate the catalytic site by binding to the allosteric cGMP-binding sites of PDE5, thus causing negative feedback on this pathway.

  17. Blue lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Caterina; Scope, Alon; Lallas, Aimilios; Zalaudek, Iris; Moscarella, Elvira; Gardini, Stefano; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    Blue color is found in a wide range of malignant and benign melanocytic and nonmelanocytic lesions and in lesions that result from penetration of exogenous materials, such as radiation or amalgam tattoo or traumatic penetration of particles. Discriminating between different diagnostic entities that display blue color relies on careful patient examination and lesion assessment. Dermoscopically, the extent, distribution, and patterns created by blue color can help diagnose lesions with specificity and differentiate between benign and malignant entities. This article provides an overview of the main diagnoses whereby blue color can be found, providing simple management rules for these lesions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An RNA-Seq Analysis of Grape Plantlets Grown in vitro Reveals Different Responses to Blue, Green, Red LED Light, and White Fluorescent Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Xia; Xu, Zhi-Gang; Dong, Rui-Qi; Chang, Sheng-Xin; Wang, Lian-Zhen; Khalil-Ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Tao, Jian-Min

    2017-01-01

    Using an RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) approach, we analyzed the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and physiological behaviors of "Manicure Finger" grape plantlets grown in vitro under white, blue, green, and red light. A total of 670, 1601, and 746 DEGs were identified in plants exposed to blue, green, and red light, respectively, compared to the control (white light). By comparing the gene expression patterns with the growth and physiological responses of the grape plantlets, we were able to link the responses of the plants to light of different spectral wavelengths and the expression of particular sets of genes. Exposure to red and green light primarily triggered responses associated with the shade-avoidance syndrome (SAS), such as enhanced elongation of stems, reduced investment in leaf growth, and decreased chlorophyll levels accompanied by the expression of genes encoding histone H3, auxin repressed protein, xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase, the ELIP protein, and microtubule proteins. Furthermore, specific light treatments were associated with the expression of a large number of genes, including those involved in the glucan metabolic pathway and the starch and sucrose metabolic pathways; these genes were up/down-regulated in ways that may explain the increase in the starch, sucrose, and total sugar contents in the plants. Moreover, the enhanced root growth and up-regulation of the expression of defense genes accompanied with SAS after exposure to red and green light may be related to the addition of 30 g/L sucrose to the culture medium of plantlets grown in vitro . In contrast, blue light induced the up-regulation of genes related to microtubules, serine carboxypeptidase, chlorophyll synthesis, and sugar degradation and the down-regulation of auxin-repressed protein as well as a large number of resistance-related genes that may promote leaf growth, improve chlorophyll synthesis and chloroplast development, increase the ratio of chlorophyll a (chla

  19. The brassinosteroid receptor BRI1 can generate cGMP enabling cGMP-dependent downstream signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Janet I.

    2017-05-08

    The brassinosteroid receptor BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1) is a member of the leucine rich repeat receptor like kinase family. The intracellular kinase domain of BRI1 is an active kinase and also encapsulates a guanylate cyclase catalytic centre. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we confirmed that the recombinant cytoplasmic domain of BRI1 generates pmol amounts of cGMP per μg protein with a preference for magnesium over manganese as a co-factor. Importantly, a functional BRI1 kinase is essential for optimal cGMP generation. Therefore, the guanylate cyclase activity of BRI1 is modulated by the kinase while cGMP, the product of the guanylate cyclase, in turn inhibits BRI1 kinase activity. Furthermore, we show using Arabidopsis root cell cultures that cGMP rapidly potentiates phosphorylation of the downstream substrate BRASSINOSTEROID SIGNALING KINASE 1 (BSK1). Taken together, our results suggest that cGMP acts as a modulator that enhances downstream signaling while dampening signal generation from the receptor. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. From Conventional Radiotracer Tc-99(m) with Blue Dye to Indocyanine Green Fluorescence: A Comparison of Methods Towards Optimization of Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping in Early Stage Cervical Cancer for a Laparoscopic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buda, Alessandro; Papadia, Andrea; Zapardiel, Ignacio; Vizza, Enrico; Ghezzi, Fabio; De Ponti, Elena; Lissoni, Andrea Alberto; Imboden, Sara; Diestro, Maria Dolores; Verri, Debora; Gasparri, Maria Luisa; Bussi, Beatrice; Di Martino, Giampaolo; de la Noval, Begoña Diaz; Mueller, Michael; Crivellaro, Cinzia

    2016-09-01

    The credibility of sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping is becoming increasingly more established in cervical cancer. We aimed to assess the sensitivity of SLN biopsy in terms of detection rate and bilateral mapping in women with cervical cancer by comparing technetium-99 radiocolloid (Tc-99(m)) and blue dye (BD) versus fluorescence mapping with indocyanine green (ICG). Data of patients with cervical cancer stage 1A2 to 1B1 from 5 European institutions were retrospectively reviewed. All centers used a laparoscopic approach with the same intracervical dye injection. Detection rate and bilateral mapping of ICG were compared, respectively, with results obtained by standard Tc-99(m) with BD. Overall, 76 (53 %) of 144 of women underwent preoperative SLN mapping with radiotracer and intraoperative BD, whereas 68 of (47 %) 144 patients underwent mapping using intraoperative ICG. The detection rate of SLN mapping was 96 % and 100 % for Tc-99(m) with BD and ICG, respectively. Bilateral mapping was achieved in 98.5 % for ICG and 76.3 % for Tc-99(m) with BD; this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). The fluorescence SLN mapping with ICG achieved a significantly higher detection rate and bilateral mapping compared to standard radiocolloid and BD technique in women with early stage cervical cancer. Nodal staging with an intracervical injection of ICG is accurate, safe, and reproducible in patients with cervical cancer. Before replacing lymphadenectomy completely, the additional value of fluorescence SLN mapping on both perioperative morbidity and survival should be explored and confirmed by ongoing controlled trials.

  1. Fluorescent properties of a blue-to green-emitting Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: kojima.yoshiyuki@nihon-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Nihon University, 1-8, Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Numazawa, Masaaki; Umegaki, Tetsuo [Department of Materials and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Nihon University, 1-8, Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor was prepared by heating (830 Degree-Sign C for 30 min) Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} codoped calcium silicate hydrate phosphor formed by liquid-phase reaction. The excitation peak wavelength of the resulting phosphor was 330 nm and the emission peak wavelengths were at 544 nm, attributed to the {sup 5}D{sub 4}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub 5} transition of Tb{sup 3+}, and at 430-470 mm, attributed to Ce{sup 3+}. The intensity ratio of the two peaks could be freely controlled by varying the Tb/Ca atomic ratio of the Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor, allowing light to be emitted over a wide range from blue to green. It was clarified that energy transfer exists from Ce{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+}. - Graphical abstract: Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} codoped calcium silicate hydrate phosphor was synthesized by liquid-phase reaction. This was heated at 830 Degree-Sign C to obtain a Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor. Under 330 nm excitation, this phosphor showed emission peaks at 430-470 nm and 542 nm. The luminescent color could be continuously changed blue to green with increasing Tb/Ca atomic ratio. It was clarified that electron transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+} is occurring.

  2. Funktionelle in vitro-Effekte CAMP/CGMP-modulierender Pharmaka am humanen Detrusormuskel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ückert St

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Die zyklischen Nukleotidmonophosphate cAMP und cGMP regulieren als intrazelluläre Second Messenger zahlreiche Gewebe- und Organfunktionen. cAMP und cGMP werden von zellulären Adenylat- und Guanylatzyklasen synthetisiert und von Phosphodiesterasen degradiert, die somit Schlüsselenzyme im Prozeß der Tonusregulation glatter Muskulatur sind. Die Markteinführung des PDE5-Inhibitors Sildenafil (Viagra hat dem Konzept der PDE-Inhibition auch in der Urologie breite Akzeptanz verschafft. Eigene Arbeiten der vergangenen Jahre beschreiben die Präsenz der PDE-Isoenzyme 1, 2, 3, 4 und 5 in der Muskulatur des humanen Detrusors und zeigen das klinische Potential des PDE1-Inhibitors Vinpocetin in der Behandlung der motorischen Dranginkontinenz. Mit dem Ziel der Charakterisierung geeigneter Substanzen für die Pharmakotherapie der Detrusorhyperaktivität haben wir die in vitro-Effekte neuer, selektiver Inhibitoren der PDE des Typs 2, 3 und 5 auf isolierte humane Detrusormuskulatur untersucht und mit denen des Diterpens Forskolin (Aktivator der Adenylatzyklase und der Stickoxid (NO-Donatoren Dihydropyridin (DHP und Na+Nitroprussid (NNP verglichen.

  3. Regulation of hippocampal cGMP levels as a candidate to treat cognitive deficits in Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Saavedra

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD patients and mouse models show learning and memory impairment associated with hippocampal dysfunction. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase/3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (nNOS/cGMP pathway is implicated in synaptic plasticity, and in learning and memory processes. Here, we examined the nNOS/cGMP pathway in the hippocampus of HD mice to determine whether it can be a good therapeutic target for cognitive improvement in HD. We analyzed hippocampal nNOS and phosphodiesterase (PDE 5 and 9 levels in R6/1 mice, and cGMP levels in the hippocampus of R6/1, R6/2 and Hdh(Q7/Q111 mice, and of HD patients. We also investigated whether sildenafil, a PDE5 inhibitor, could improve cognitive deficits in R6/1 mice. We found that hippocampal cGMP levels were 3-fold lower in 12-week-old R6/1 mice, when they show deficits in object recognition memory and in passive avoidance learning. Consistent with hippocampal cGMP levels, nNOS levels were down-regulated, while there were no changes in the levels of PDE5 and PDE9 in R6/1 mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of sildenafil (3 mg/Kg immediately after training increased cGMP levels, and improved memory in R6/1 mice, as assessed by using the novel object recognition and the passive avoidance test. Importantly, cGMP levels were also reduced in R6/2 mouse and human HD hippocampus. Therefore, the regulation of hippocampal cGMP levels can be a suitable treatment for cognitive impairment in HD.

  4. Usage of invisible near infrared light (NIR) fluorescence with indocyanine green (ICG) and methylene blue (MB) in urological oncology. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, Wojciech; Markuszewski, Marcin; Rho, Young Soo; Matuszewski, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) technology has recently garnered much interest as a tool for intraoperative image-guided surgery in various surgical sub-disciplines. In urology, although nascent, NIR technology is also fostering much enthusiasm. This review discusses the two major fluorophores, indocyanine green (ICG) and methlyene blue (MB), with NIR guidance in experimental and clinical urology. The authors aim to illustrate and analyze the currently available initial studies to better understand the potential and practicability of NIR-guided imaging in the diagnosis and surgical outcome improvement. In the first part of the study we analyzed problems associated with sentinel lymph node biopsy, NIR-guided detection and imaging of tumors. PubMed and Medline databases were searched for ICG and MB use in urological settings, along with data published in abstracts of urological conferences. Although NIR-guided ICG and MB are still in their initial phases, there have been significant developments in major domains of urology, including uro-oncological surgery: 1) sentinel lymph node biopsy, 2) detection and imaging of tumors. Much like in other fields of surgical medicine, the application of NIR technology in urology is at its early stages. Therefore, more studies are needed to assess the true potential and limitations of the technology. However, initial developments hint towards a pioneering tool that may influence various aspects of urology.

  5. cGMP and nitric oxide modulate thrombin-induced endothelial permeability : Regulation via different pathways in human aortic and umbilical vein endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draijer, R.; Atsma, D.E.; Laarse, A. van der; Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that cGMP and cAMP reduce the endothelial permeability for fluids and macromolecules when the endothelial permeability is increased by thrombin. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism by which cGMP improves the endothelial barrier function and examined

  6. Blue gods, blue oil, and blue people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, V F

    1994-09-01

    Studies of the composition of coal tar, which began in Prussia in 1834, profoundly affected the economies of Germany, Great Britain, India, and the rest of the world, as well as medicine and surgery. Such effects include the collapse of the profits of the British indigo monopoly, the growth in economic power of Germany based on coal tar chemistry, and an economic crisis in India that led to more humane tax laws and, ultimately, the independence of India and the end of the British Empire. Additional consequences were the development of antiseptic surgery and the synthesis of a wide variety of useful drugs that have eradicated infections and alleviated pain. Many of these drugs, particularly the commonly used analgesics, sulfonamides, sulfones, and local anesthetics, are derivatives of aniline, originally called "blue oil" or "kyanol." Some of these aniline derivatives, however, have also caused aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis, and methemoglobinemia (that is, "blue people"). Exposure to aniline drugs, particularly when two or three aniline drugs are taken concurrently, seems to be the commonest cause of methemoglobinemia today.

  7. Wurster's Blue-type cation radicals framed in a 5,10-dihydrobenzo[a]indolo[2,3-c]carbazole (BIC) skeleton: dual electrochromism with drastic changes in UV/Vis/NIR and fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takanori; Sakano, Yuto; Tokimizu, Yusuke; Miura, Youhei; Katoono, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kenshu; Yoshioka, Naoki; Fujii, Nobutaka; Ohno, Hiroaki

    2014-07-01

    Electron-donating dihydrobenzindolocarbazoles (BICs) 1 a-c, which adopt planar disk-shaped geometries, were prepared by gold(I)-catalyzed cyclization as a key step. Due to the presence of a 1,4-phenylenediamine (PD) moiety in the framework, they undergo reversible one-electron oxidation to the corresponding Wurster's Blue (WB)-type species that exhibits NIR absorptions up to λ=1200 nm. In the case of the N,N'-dimethyl derivative, cation radical 1 c(+.) is stable enough to be isolated as a salt and X-ray analysis indicated paraquinoid-type bond alternation in the WB core unit, whereas the bond lengths in the peripheral benzene rings are identical to those in the neutral donor. Upon electrochemical interconversion, the redox pairs of 1 a-c and 1 a-c(+.) exhibited an electrochromic response in the UV/Vis/NIR region, which was accompanied by a drastic change in the fluorescence spectrum because only neutral donors 1 a-c are highly emissive (Φ(F) : 0.7-0.8). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. [ZnPP IX and L-NAME reduce the cGMP content in the penile tissue of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong-Bin; Qin, Wen-bo; Gui, Shi-liang

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the effects of CO release inhibitor zinc protoporphyria IX (ZnPP IX) and NO release inhibitor L-NAME on the content of cGMP in the penile tissue of rats. Thirty Wistar rats were randomly divided into a normal control, a ZnPP IX, and an L-NAME group, given saline (1 ml/kg/d), ZnPP IX (45 micromol/kg/d) and L-NAME (50 mg/kg/d), respectively, for 7 days. Then all the rats were killed, homogenate made from their penile tissues and detected for the contents of NOS, NO, CO and cGMP. The contents of CO, NOS, NO and cGMP were all reduced in both the ZnPP IX and L-NAME groups as compared with the control group (P ZnPP IX and L-NAME can reduce the concentrations of CO and NO in the penile tissues of rats, and consequently the content of cGMP.

  9. Hydrogen bonding plays a significant role in the binding of coomassie brilliant blue-R to hemoglobin: FT-IR, fluorescence and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Mritunjoy; Dolui, Sandip; Maiti, Nakul C

    2015-12-14

    An analog of coomassie brilliant blue-R (CBB-R) was recently found to act as an antagonist to ATP-sensitive purinergic receptors (P2X7R) and has potential to be used in medicine. With the aim of understanding its transportation and distribution through blood, in this investigation, we measured the binding parameters of CBB-R with bovine hemoglobin (BHG). The molecule specifically bound to a single binding site of the protein with a stoichiometric ratio of 1 : 1 and the observed binding constant Ka was 3.5, 2.5, 2.0 and 1.5 × 10(5) M(-1) at 20 °C, 27 °C, 37 °C and 45 °C, respectively. The measured respective ΔG(0) values of the binding at four temperatures were -30.45, -22.44, -18.04 and -11.95 kJ mol(-1). The ΔH(0) (change in enthalpy) and ΔS(0) (change in entropy) values were -23.6 kJ mol(-1) and -70.66 J mol(-1) respectively in the binding process. The negative value of ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) indicated that the binding of the molecule was thermodynamically favorable. The best energy structure in the molecular docking analysis revealed that CBB-R preferred to be intercalated in the cavity among the α2, β1 and β2 subunits and the binding location was 7.4 Å away from Trp37 in the β2 subunit. The binding of the molecule with the protein was stabilized by hydrogen bonds involving the side chain of two amino acid residues. The residues were Lys104 and Glu101 in the β2 subunit. The binding was further stabilized via hydrogen bond formation between the amide group of the peptide backbone (residue Tyr145 of the β1 subunit) and CBB-R. A shift of the amide I (-C=O stretching) band frequency of ∼8 cm(-1) to low energy was ascribed to the hydrogen bond interaction involving the polypeptide carbonyl of the protein and the CBB-R molecule. In addition, two π-cation interactions between Lys99 of the α2 subunit and Lys104 of the β2 subunit and CBB-R contributed favorably in the binding processes. No substantial change in the soret and Q absorption bands of BHG

  10. Aging has the opposite effect on cAMP and cGMP circadian variations in rat Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Andric, Silvana A; Kostic, Tatjana S

    2017-05-01

    The Leydig cell physiology displays a circadian rhythm driven by a complex interaction of the reproductive axis hormones and circadian system. The final output of this regulatory process is circadian pattern of steroidogenic genes expression and testosterone production. Aging gradually decreases robustness of rhythmic testosterone secretion without change in pattern of LH secretion. Here, we analyzed effect of aging on circadian variation of cAMP and cGMP signaling in Leydig cells. Results showed opposite effect of aging on cAMP and cGMP daily variation. Reduced amplitude of cAMP circadian oscillation was probably associated with changed expression of genes involved in cAMP production (increased circadian pattern of Adcy7, Adcy9, Adcy10 and decreased Adcy3); cAMP degradation (increased Pde4a, decreased Pde8b, canceled rhythm of Pde4d, completely reversed circadian pattern of Pde7b and Pde8a); and circadian expression of protein kinase A subunits (Prkac/PRKAC and Prkar2a). Aging stimulates expression of genes responsible for cGMP production (Nos2, Gucy1a3 and Gucy1b3/GUCYB3) and degradation (Pde5a, Pde6a and Pde6h) but the overall net effect is elevation of cGMP circadian oscillations in Leydig cells. In addition, the expression of cGMP-dependent kinase, Prkg1/PRKG1 is up-regulated. It seems that aging potentiate cGMP- and reduce cAMP-signaling in Leydig cells. Since both signaling pathways affect testosterone production and clockwork in the cells, further insights into these signaling pathways will help to unravel disorders linked to the circadian timing system, aging and reproduction.

  11. Use of fluorescent Ca2+ dyes with green fluorescent protein and its variants: problems and solutions.

    OpenAIRE

    Bolsover, S; Ibrahim, O; O'luanaigh, N; Williams, H; Cockcroft, S

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the degree to which fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator dyes, and green fluorescent protein and its variants, can be used together. We find that the most commonly used fluorescent protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), seriously contaminates fura 2 signals. We suggest two alternative combinations for which there is no detectable contamination of the Ca(2+) indicator signal by the fluorescent protein. Blue fluorescent protein can be used with the Ca(2+) indicator Fura Red...

  12. Posthuman blues

    CERN Document Server

    Tonnies, Mac

    2013-01-01

    Posthuman Blues, Vol. I is first volume of the edited version of the popular weblog maintained by author Mac Tonnies from 2003 until his tragic death in 2009. Tonnies' blog was a pastiche of his original fiction, reflections on his day-to-day life, trenchant observations of current events, and thoughts on an eclectic range of material he culled from the Internet. What resulted was a remarkably broad portrait of a thoughtful man and the complex times in which he lived, rendered with intellige...

  13. Exercise training improves blood flow to contracting skeletal muscle of older men via enhanced cGMP signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, Peter Bergmann; Smith Jørgensen, Tue; Egelund, Jon

    2018-01-01

    -induced adaptations in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow and oxidative metabolism during exercise in aging humans. We measured leg hemodynamics and oxidative metabolism during exercise engaging the knee-extensor muscles in young (n=15, 25 ± 1 years) and older (n=15, 72 ± 1 years) subjects before and after...... group; however, these effects of PDE5 inhibition were not detected after training. These findings suggest a role for enhanced cGMP signaling in the training-induced improvement of regulation of blood flow in contracting skeletal muscle of older men.......Physical activity has the potential to offset age-related impairments in the regulation of blood flow and O2 delivery to the exercising muscles; however, the mechanisms underlying this effect of physical activity remain poorly understood. The present study examined the role of cGMP in training...

  14. cGMP-phosphodiesterase 6, transducin and Wnt5a/Frizzled-2-signaling control cGMP and Ca(2+) homeostasis in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhin, Alexandr V; Tambor, Vojtech; Dikov, Boyan; Philippov, Pavel P; Schadendorf, Dirk; Eichmüller, Stefan B

    2010-03-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive human neoplasms which develop from the malignant transformation of normal epithelial melanocytes and share the lineage with retinal cells. cGMP-phosphodiesterase 6 (PDE6) is one of the cancer-retina antigens newly identified in melanoma cells. Normally, PDE6 hydrolyzes the photoreceptor second messenger cGMP allowing the visual signal transduction in photoreceptor cells. cGMP also play an important signaling role in stimulating melanogenesis in human melanocytes. Here, we present evidence that PDE6 is a key enzyme regulating the cGMP metabolism in melanoma cells. Decrease in intracellular cGMP leads to calcium accumulation in melanoma cells. In these cells, cGMP-phosphodiesterase 6 can be activated by another cancer-retina antigen, transducin, through Wnt5a-Frizzled-2 cascade, which leads to a lowering of cGMP and an increase in intracellular calcium mobilization. Thus, the aberrant expression of PDE6 may control cGMP metabolism and calcium homeostasis in melanoma cells.

  15. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  16. The impact of cGMP compliance on consumer confidence in dietary supplement products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, Richard; FitzGerald, Libby Harvey

    2006-01-01

    The FDA estimates that US citizens spend more than $ 8.5 billion a year on dietary supplements and world wide the market is estimated at more than $ 60 billion. However, although a majority of consumers express confidence in the safety of these products, 74% believe the government should be more involved in ensuring that these products are safe and efficacious. Recent regulatory initiatives such as the imminent adoption of cGMPs for dietary supplements in the US, implementation of cGMPs in Canada and the recent EU dietary supplement initiative represent legislative and industry response to public clamor for more comprehensive oversight of dietary supplements. Regardless of mandated practices, the majority of dietary supplement manufacturers have done an excellent job of protecting the safety and quality of their products. The promulgation of these cGMPs will help ensure consumers that equal standards are followed throughout the industry. For some companies with established processes based on existing food or pharmaceutical cGMP regulations, the transition will be relatively painless while, for many, it will represent a significant increase in the level of documentation and testing. However, consumers deserve and demand that products meet standards for safety and quality and the implementation of cGMPs for these products are an important first step. Although the cGMPs are designed to ensure products are safe from a standpoint of identity, purity, quality, strength and composition, they do not address preclinical or clinical testing of ingredients for safety or efficacy. This would involve ingredients meeting the requirements of Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) status or going through the New Dietary Ingredient (NDI) process

  17. CSF concentrations of cAMP and cGMP are lower in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease but not Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Oeckl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cyclic nucleotides cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP are important second messengers and are potential biomarkers for Parkinson's disease (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we investigated by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF concentrations of cAMP and cGMP of 82 patients and evaluated their diagnostic potency as biomarkers. For comparison with a well-accepted biomarker, we measured tau concentrations in CSF of CJD and control patients. CJD patients (n = 15 had lower cAMP (-70% and cGMP (-55% concentrations in CSF compared with controls (n = 11. There was no difference in PD, PD dementia (PDD and ALS cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analyses confirmed cAMP and cGMP as valuable diagnostic markers for CJD indicated by the area under the curve (AUC of 0.86 (cAMP and 0.85 (cGMP. We calculated a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 64% for cAMP and a sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 100% for cGMP. The combination of both nucleotides increased the sensitivity to 80% and specificity to 91% for the term cAMPxcGMP (AUC 0.92 and to 93% and 100% for the ratio tau/cAMP (AUC 0.99. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the CSF determination of cAMP and cGMP may easily be included in the diagnosis of CJD and could be helpful in monitoring disease progression as well as in therapy control.

  18. Methylene blue modulates transendothelial migration of peripheral blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Werner

    Full Text Available Vasoplegia is a severe complication after cardiac surgery. Within the last years the administration of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor methylene blue (MB became a new therapeutic strategy. Our aim was to investigate the role of MB on transendothelial migration of circulating blood cells, the potential role of cyclic cGMP, eNOS and iNOS in this process, and the influence of MB on endothelial cell apoptosis. Human vascular endothelial cells (HuMEC-1 were treated for 30 minutes or 2 hours with different concentrations of MB. Inflammation was mimicked by LPS stimulation prior and after MB. Transmigration of PBMCs and T-Lymphocytes through the treated endothelial cells was investigated. The influence of MB upon the different subsets of PBMCs (Granulocytes, T- and B-Lymphocytes, and Monocytes was assessed after transmigration by means of flow-cytometry. The effect of MB on cell apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin-V and Propidium Iodide stainings. Analyses of the expression of cyclic cGMP, eNOS and iNOS were performed by means of RT-PCR and Western Blot. Results were analyzed using unpaired Students T-test. Analysis of endothelial cell apoptosis by MB indicated a dose-dependent increase of apoptotic cells. We observed time- and dose-dependent effects of MB on transendothelial migration of PBMCs. The prophylactic administration of MB led to an increase of transendothelial migration of PBMCs but not Jurkat cells. Furthermore, HuMEC-1 secretion of cGMP correlated with iNOS expression after MB administration but not with eNOS expression. Expression of these molecules was reduced after MB administration at protein level. This study clearly reveals that endothelial response to MB is dose- and especially time-dependent. MB shows different effects on circulating blood cell-subtypes, and modifies the release patterns of eNOS, iNOS, and cGMP. The transendothelial migration is modulated after treatment with MB. Furthermore, MB provokes apoptosis of endothelial

  19. The role of aquaporin 1 activated by cGMP in myocardial edema caused by cardiopulmonary bypass in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fang-bao; Yan, Yu-mei; Bao, Chun-rong; Huang, Jian-bing; Mei, Ju; Liu, Hao; Ma, Nan; Zhang, Jun-wen

    2013-01-01

    Most cardiac procedures involve the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), which pumps oxygenated blood to the body while the heart and lungs are isolated. CPB can cause profound alterations V in the homeostasis of physiological fluids, which often results in myocardial edema. In our study, we used sheep CPB model of in vivo and in vitro to assess the relationship between cGMP and AQP1 during CPB. ODQ, a specific inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), was used to treat the CPB animals or cardiomyocytes. Left ventricular function of each group was determined by pressure-volume system. Water content of myocardial tissue was assessed by dry-wet weight, and cardiomyocytes water permeability was also calculated. The concentration of cGMP was determined by Radioimmunoassay (RIA). mRNA and protein expression of AQP1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blot, respectively. The relative expression level of AQP1 mRNA and protein at each time point (0, 6, 12, 24 or 48 h) after CPB was significantly increased (1.18-fold at 12 h, 1.77-fold at 24 h and 2.18-fold at 48h) compared with each sham group, the protein expression of AQP1 also showed a rising trend after CPB. The degree of myocardial edema (75.1% at 12 h, 79.3% at 24 h and 81.0% at 48h) increased following the CPB surgery. The mRNA expression level of AQP1 was significantly decreased by 39.7% (psheep after CPB. Results of in vitro experiments showed the same changing trends as in vivo. cGMP pathway controls water channels and then affects water intake during CPB through an AQP1-mediated pathway. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. The Role of Aquaporin 1 Activated by cGMP in Myocardial Edema Caused by Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-bao Ding

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Most cardiac procedures involve the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, which pumps oxygenated blood to the body while the heart and lungs are isolated. CPB can cause profound alterations V in the homeostasis of physiological fluids, which often results in myocardial edema. In our study, we used sheep CPB model of in vivo and in vitro to assess the relationship between cGMP and AQP1 during CPB. Methods: ODQ, a specific inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC, was used to treat the CPB animals or cardiomyocytes. Left ventricular function of each group was determined by pressure-volume system. Water content of myocardial tissue was assessed by dry-wet weight, and cardiomyocytes water permeability was also calculated. The concentration of cGMP was determined by Radioimmunoassay (RIA. mRNA and protein expression of AQP1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blot, respectively. Results: The relative expression level of AQP1 mRNA and protein at each time point (0, 6, 12, 24 or 48 h after CPB was significantly increased (1.18-fold at 12 h, 1.77-fold at 24 h and 2.18-fold at 48h compared with each sham group, the protein expression of AQP1 also showed a rising trend after CPB. The degree of myocardial edema (75.1% at 12 h, 79.3% at 24 h and 81.0% at 48h increased following the CPB surgery. The mRNA expression level of AQP1 was significantly decreased by 39.7% (pin vitro experiments showed the same changing trends as in vivo. Conclusion: cGMP pathway controls water channels and then affects water intake during CPB through an AQP1-mediated pathway.

  1. Blue superradiance from neat semiconducting alternating copolymer films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, H.J; Krasnikov, V.V.; Hilberer, A; Hadziioannou, G

    1996-01-01

    Blue superradiant emission in thin polymer films with a low energy threshold, as reported here, offers hope for the possible development of solid-state electrically pumped polymer lasers The absorbance, emission, and fluorescence spectra of the blue-light emitting copolymer

  2. The brassinosteroid receptor BRI1 can generate cGMP enabling cGMP-dependent downstream signaling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wheeler, J

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available absorbance as a method of detection of cGMP. However, using the far more sensitive tandem mass spectrometry method and microgram amounts of a slightly longer recombinant cytoplasmic domain BRI1815– 1196 protein we unambiguously demonstrate that c... domain of the recombinant protein (BRI1865–1160) containing the kinase domain reported that GC activity could not be detected with UV absorbance (Bojar et al., 2014). As the original construct used was a fragment, it is possible that it could more readily...

  3. Raising the standard: changes to the Australian Code of Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) for human blood and blood components, human tissues and human cellular therapy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Craig; Velickovic, Zlatibor; Brown, Ross; Larsen, Stephen; Macpherson, Janet L; Gibson, John; Rasko, John E J

    2014-04-01

    In Australia, manufacture of blood, tissues and biologicals must comply with the federal laws and meet the requirements of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) Manufacturing Principles as outlined in the current Code of Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). The Therapeutic Goods Order (TGO) No. 88 was announced concurrently with the new cGMP, as a new standard for therapeutic goods. This order constitutes a minimum standard for human blood, tissues and cellular therapeutic goods aimed at minimising the risk of infectious disease transmission. The order sets out specific requirements relating to donor selection, donor testing and minimisation of infectious disease transmission from collection and manufacture of these products. The Therapeutic Goods Manufacturing Principles Determination No. 1 of 2013 references the human blood and blood components, human tissues and human cellular therapy products 2013 (2013 cGMP). The name change for the 2013 cGMP has allowed a broadening of the scope of products to include human cellular therapy products. It is difficult to directly compare versions of the code as deletion of some clauses has not changed the requirements to be met, as they are found elsewhere amongst the various guidelines provided. Many sections that were specific for blood and blood components are now less prescriptive and apply to a wider range of cellular therapies, but the general overall intent remains the same. Use of 'should' throughout the document instead of 'must' allows flexibility for alternative processes, but these systems will still require justification by relevant logical argument and validation data to be acceptable to TGA. The cGMP has seemingly evolved so that specific issues identified at audit over the last decade have now been formalised in the new version. There is a notable risk management approach applied to most areas that refer to process justification and decision making. These requirements commenced on 31 May 2013 and a 12 month

  4. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations. (paper)

  5. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-05-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations.

  6. [Anaphylaxis to blue dyes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner-Viviani, F; Chappuis, S; Bergmann, M M; Ribi, C

    2014-04-16

    In medicine, vital blue dyes are mainly used for the evaluation of sentinel lymph nodes in oncologic surgery. Perioperative anaphylaxis to blue dyes is a rare but significant complication. Allergic reactions to blue dyes are supposedly IgE-mediated and mainly caused by triarylmethanes (patent blue and isosulfane blue) and less frequently by methylene blue. These substances usually do not feature on the anesthesia record and should not be omitted from the list of suspects having caused the perioperative reaction, in the same manner as latex and chlorhexidine. The diagnosis of hypersensitivity to vital blue dyes can be established by skin test. We illustrate this topic with three clinical cases.

  7. Efficacy of Methylene Blue in an Experimental Model of Calcium Channel Blocker Induced Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, David H.; Donovan, Sean; Nelson, Lewis S.; Bania, Theodore C.; Hoffman, Robert S.; Chu, Jason

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Calcium channel blocker poisonings account for a substantial number of reported deaths from cardiovascular drugs. While supportive care is the mainstay of treatment, experimental therapies such as high dose insulin-euglycemia and lipid emulsion have been studied in animal models and used in humans. In the most severe cases even aggressive care is inadequate and deaths occur. In both experimental models and clinical cases of vasodilatory shock, methylene blue improves hemodynamic measures. Methylene blue acts as both a nitric oxide scavenger and inhibits guanylate cyclase that is responsible for the production of cGMP. Excessive cGMP production is associated with refractory vasodilatory shock in sepsis and anaphylaxis. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of methylene blue in an animal model of amlodipine-induced shock. METHODS Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, ventilated and instrumented for continuous blood pressure and heart rate monitoring. The dose of amlodipine that produced death within 60 minutes was 17 mg/kg/hour (LD50). Rats were divided into 2 groups: amlodipine followed by methylene blue or amlodipine followed by normal saline (NS) with 15 rats in each group. Rats received methylene blue at 2 mg/kg over 5 mins or an equivalent amount of NS in three intervals from the start of the protocol: Minute 5, 30, and 60. The animals were observed for a total of 2 hours after the start of the protocol. Mortality risk and survival time were analyzed using Fisher’s exact test and Kaplan Meier survival analysis with the log rank test. RESULTS Overall, 1/15 (7%) rats in the saline-treated group survived to 120 minutes compared with 5/15 (33%) rats in the methylene blue-treated group (difference −26%, 95% CI –54%, 0.3%). The median survival time for the NS group was 42 min (95% CI, 28.1,55.9) and the methylene blue group was 109 min (95% CI, 93.9,124.1). Heart rate and MAP differences between groups were analyzed until 60 minutes

  8. Hydralazine decreases sodium nitroprusside-induced rat aortic ring relaxation and increased cGMP production by rat aortic myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, Horacio; González-Romo, Pilar; Alvarez, Ezequiel; Alcaide, Carlos; Orallo, Francisco

    2005-10-28

    Association of hydralazine with nitrova-sodilators has long been known to be beneficial in the vasodilator treatment of heart failure. We previously found that hydralazine appeared to reduce the increase in cGMP induced by sodium nitroprusside in cultured rat aortic myocytes. In order to further explore this seemingly paradoxical interaction, we extended our initial observations in rat aortic myocytes and also determined the influence of hydralazine on sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation of rat aortic rings. Hydralazine produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of sodium nitroprusside stimulation of cGMP production and caused a rightward shift of concentration-relaxation curves in aortic rings. A possible mechanism of the hydralazine-nitroprusside interaction could be the interference with bioactivation of the nitro-vasodilator to release nitric oxide. Recent evidence indicates that vascular NADH oxidase, an enzyme known to be inhibited by hydralazine, could be involved in this process. Accordingly, hydralazine was found to inhibit NADH oxidase activity in rat aortic myocytes at concentrations similar to those reducing sodium nitroprusside responses. It was concluded that antagonism of sodium nitroprusside action by hydralazine could be a consequence of interference with bioactivation of the former, apparently through inhibition of vascular NADH oxidase.

  9. Close correspondence between the action spectra for the blue light responses of the guard cell and coleoptile chloroplasts, and the spectra for blue light-dependent stomatal opening and coleoptile phototropism.

    OpenAIRE

    Quiñones, M A; Lu, Z; Zeiger, E

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize blue light responses from chloroplasts of adaxial guard cells from Pima cotton (Gossypium barbadense) and coleoptile tips from corn (Zea mays). The chloroplast response to blue light was quantified by measurements of the blue light-induced enhancement of a red light-stimulated quenching of chlorophyll a fluorescence. In adaxial (upper) guard cells, low fluence rates of blue light applied under saturating fluence rates of red light enhanced th...

  10. Blue cures blue but be cautious

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Sikka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Methemoglobinemia is a disorder characterized by the presence of >1% methemoglobin (metHb in the blood. Spontaneous formation of methemoglobin is normally counteracted by protective enzyme systems, for example, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH methemoglobin reductase. Methemoglobinemia is treated with supplemental oxygen and methylene blue (1-2 mg/kg administered slow intravenously, which acts by providing an artificial electron acceptor for NADPH methemoglobin reductase. But known or suspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is a relative contraindication to the use of methylene blue because G6PD is the key enzyme in the formation of NADPH through pentose phosphate pathway and G6PD-deficient individuals generate insufficient NADPH to efficiently reduce methylene blue to leukomethylene blue, which is necessary for the activation of the NADPH-dependent methemoglobin reductase system. So, we should be careful using methylene blue in methemoglobinemia patient before G6PD levels.

  11. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall...... with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain...

  12. Blue-Green Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with hepatitis C or hepatitis B. HIV/AIDS. Research on the effects of blue-green algae in people with HIV/AIDS has been inconsistent. Some early research shows that taking 5 grams of blue-green ...

  13. Time dependent involvement of cAMP and cGMP in consolidation of object memory: studies using selective phosphodiesterase type 2, 4 and 5 inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, K.; Prickaerts, J.; Hendrix, M.; Staay, van der F.J.; Sik, A.; Blokland, A.

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated the time-dependent memory enhancing properties of three selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE-I) vardenafil (PDE5-I), rolipram (PDE4-I) and BAY 60-7550 (PDE2-I) in the object recognition task. In particular, the time-dependent involvement of cAMP and cGMP in

  14. Identification of PDE5A:E90K: a polymorphism in the canine phosphodiesterase 5A gene affecting basal cGMP concentrations of healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J A; Reina-Doreste, Y; Chdid, L; Meurs, K M

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE5A) is the target of phosphodiesterase inhibitors such as sildenafil. Polymorphisms in the PDE5A gene that may predict response to therapy with sildenafil and nitric oxide, be linked to disease progression, and aid in risk assessment have been identified in human beings. Identification of polymorphisms in PDE5A could affect the physiologic actions of PDE5A and the effects of phosphodiestrase type 5 inhibitor drugs. Functional polymorphisms exist in the canine PDE5A gene. Specific objectives were to identify PDE5A polymorphisms and evaluate their functional relevance. Seventy healthy dogs. The exonic, splice-site, 3' and 5' untranslated regions of the canine PDE5A gene were sequenced in 15 dogs and aligned with the canine reference sequence. Identified polymorphisms were evaluated in 55 additional, healthy, unrelated dogs of 20 breeds. Plasma was collected from 51 of these dogs and cGMP was measured. An unpaired t-test and one-way ANOVA with Dunnett's test of multiple comparisons were used to evaluate the effect of genotype on cGMP. A common exonic polymorphism was identified that changed glutamic acid to lysine and resulted in significantly lower cGMP concentrations in the group with polymorphism versus the wild type group (P = .014). Additionally, 6 linked single nucleotide polymorphisms in the 3' untranslated region were identified that did not alter cGMP concentrations. A polymorphism exists in the canine PDE5A gene that is associated with variable circulating cGMP concentrations in healthy dogs and warrants investigation in diseases such as pulmonary hypertension. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  15. Immortalization of human melanocytes does not alter the de novo properties of nitric oxide to induce cell detachment from extracellular matrix components via cGMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Krassimira; Lambers, Britta; van den Wijngaard, Rene; Le Poole, I Caroline; Grigorieva, Olga; Gerzer, Rupert; Das, Pranab K

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important mediator in many (patho)physiological processes including inflammation and skin cancer. A key transducer in NO signaling is the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) that catalyzes the formation of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). The basic mechanism of NO-cGMP signaling in melanocytic cells is, however, not well elucidated. A setback for such studies is the limited availability of patient-derived melanocytes. Here, we report that immortalized human normal and vitiliginous cell lines generated via cell transfection with human papilloma virus 16 genes E6 and E7 express NO synthase and guanylyl cyclase isoforms and the multidrug resistance-associated proteins 4 and 5 as selective cGMP exporters. Donors of NO (e.g., the NONOate (Z)-1-[N-(3-ammoniopropyl)-N-(n-propyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PAPA-NO) and reactive nitrogen oxygen species (RNOS) like 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1) as a donor of peroxynitrite as well as YC-1 as a NO-independent sGC stimulator increased intracellular cGMP levels in immortalized melanocytes (up to eightfold over controls), indicating the expression of functional sGC in these cells. PAPA-NO and SIN-1 also reduced the attachment of immortalized melanocytes to extracellular matrix (ECM) components like fibronectin which was dependent on cellular melanin content and cGMP. Such effects on melanoma cells were positively related to metastatic potential and were cGMP independent. Intriguingly, nonpigmented metastatic melanoma cells were more sensitive to exogenous sources of RNOS than of NO. Thus, immortalized melanocytes can be used as a tool for further research on differences in cell signaling between the different melanocytic lineages in particular towards impairment of cell-ECM adhesion by NO or RNOS, which may be important in metastasis and vitiligo pathogenesis.

  16. Constitutive Excitation by Gly90Asp Rhodopsin Rescues Rods from Degeneration Caused by Elevated Production of cGMP in the Dark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Michael L.; Olshevskaya, Elena V.; Savchenko, Andrey B.; Peshenko, Igor V.; Barrett, Ronald; Bush, Ronald A.; Sieving, Paul A.; Fain, Gordon L.; Dizhoor, Alexander M.

    2009-01-01

    Previous experiments indicate that congenital human retinal degeneration caused by genetic mutations that change the Ca2+ sensitivity of retinal guanylyl cyclase (retGC) can result from an increase in concentration of free intracellular cGMP and Ca2+ in the photoreceptors. To rescue degeneration in transgenic mouse models having either the Y99C or E155G mutations of the retGC modulator guanylyl cyclase-activating protein 1 (GCAP-1), which produce elevated cGMP synthesis in the dark, we used the G90D rhodopsin mutation, which produces constitutive stimulation of cGMP hydrolysis. The effects of the G90D transgene were evaluated by measuring retGC activity biochemically, by recording single rod and electroretinogram (ERG) responses, by intracellular free Ca2+ measurement, and by retinal morphological analysis. Although the G90D rhodopsin did not alter the abnormal Ca2+ sensitivity of retGC in the double-mutant animals, the intracellular free cGMP and Ca2+ concentrations returned close to normal levels, consistent with constitutive activation of the phosphodiesterase PDE6 cascade in darkness. G90D decreased the light sensitivity of rods but spared them from severe retinal degeneration in Y99C and E155G GCAP-1 mice. More than half of the photoreceptors remained alive, appeared morphologically normal, and produced electrical responses, at the time when their siblings lacking the G90D rhodopsin transgene lost the entire retinal outer nuclear layer and no longer responded to illumination. These experiments indicate that mutations that lead to increases in cGMP and Ca2+ can trigger photoreceptor degeneration but that constitutive activation of the transduction cascade in these animals can greatly enhance cell survival. PMID:17699662

  17. Increasing extracellular cGMP in cerebellum in vivo reduces neuroinflammation, GABAergic tone and motor in-coordination in hyperammonemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Balzano, Tiziano; Hernández-Rabaza, Vicente; Malaguarnera, Michele; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2018-03-01

    Hyperammonemia is a main contributor to cognitive impairment and motor in-coordination in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Hyperammonemia-induced neuroinflammation mediates the neurological alterations in hepatic encephalopathy. Intracerebral administration of extracellular cGMP restores some but not all types of cognitive impairment. Motor in-coordination, is mainly due to increased GABAergic tone in cerebellum. We hypothesized that extracellular cGMP would restore motor coordination in hyperammonemic rats by normalizing GABAergic tone in cerebellum and that this would be mediated by reduction of neuroinflammation. The aims of this work were to assess whether chronic intracerebral administration of cGMP to hyperammonemic rats: 1) restores motor coordination; 2) reduces neuroinflammation in cerebellum; 3) reduces extracellular GABA levels and GABAergic tone in cerebellum; and also 4) to provide some advance in the understanding on the molecular mechanisms involved. The results reported show that rats with chronic hyperammonemia show neuroinflammation in cerebellum, including microglia and astrocytes activation and increased levels of IL-1b and TNFa and increased membrane expression of the TNFa receptor. This is associated with increased glutaminase expression and extracellular glutamate, increased amount of the GABA transporter GAT-3 in activated astrocytes, increased extracellular GABA in cerebellum and motor in-coordination. Chronic intracerebral administration of extracellular cGMP to rats with chronic hyperammonemia reduces neuroinflammation, including microglia and astrocytes activation and membrane expression of the TNFa receptor. This is associated with reduced nuclear NF-κB, glutaminase expression and extracellular glutamate, reduced amount of the GABA transporter GAT-3 in activated astrocytes and reduced extracellular GABA in cerebellum and restoration of motor coordination. The data support that extracellular cGMP restores motor coordination in

  18. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  19. Fluorescence Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most powerful tools available for the study of macromolecules. For example, fluorescence can be used to study self association through methods such as anisotropy (the rotational rate of the molecule in solution), quenching (the accessibility of a bound probe to the bulk solution), and resonance energy transfer (measurement of the distance between two species). Fluorescence can also be used to study the local environment of the probe molecules, and the changes in that environment which accompany crystal nucleation and growth. However fluorescent techniques have been very much underutilized in macromolecular growth studies. One major advantage is that the fluorescent species generally must be at low concentration, typically ca 10-5 to 10-6 M. Thus one can study a very wide range of solution conditions, ranging from very high to very low protein concentration, he latter of which are not readily accessible to scattering techniques. We have prepared a number of fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL). Fluorescent probes have been attached to two different sites, ASP 101 and the N-terrninal amine, with a sought for use in different lines of study. Preliminary resonance energy transfer studies have been -carried out using pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 mn, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and cascade blue (Ex 377 run, Em 423 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. The emission of both the pyrene and cascade blue probes was followed as a function of the salt protein concentrations. The data show an increase in cascade blue and a concomitant decrease in the pyrene fluorescence as either the salt or protein concentrations are increased, suggesting that the two species are approaching each other close enough for resonance energy transfer to occur. This data can be analyzed to measure the distance between the probe molecules and, knowing their locations on the protein molecule their distances from and orientations with respect to each

  20. Approaches to blue light emitting polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    Blue-light emitting polymers are important for full colour displays. Blue- light emitting polymers, such as poly(fluorene)s have been reported, but tend to be soluble in the conjugated form. The aim of the project was to produce insoluble polymers, prepared via processible soluble precursor polymers, so that multilayer devices could be easily fabricated. Multilayer devices are often required for more efficient light emission. The target materials were derivatives of poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV), a green-yellow emitting polymer. To blue shift the emission of PPV, bulky substituents, namely chloro, phenyl and alkyl, were attached to the vinylic linkage. These bulky substituents were incorporated to introduce steric interactions between the side group and the backbone phenyl protons, to shorten the effective conjugation length and increase the HOMO-LUMO energy gap. Chloro substituents quenched the fluorescence. Phenyl substituents resulted in highly conjugated precursor polymers with low molecular weights, showing blue- green to green emission in the conjugated form. Alkyl substituted PPV derivatives, prepared via chloro or xanthate precursors, were blue-light emitting conjugated polymers, which were electroluminescent in ITO/polymer/AI devices. The PL quantum yields were found to be up to 38%. The incorporation of electron withdrawing groups into the polymers was attempted, to lower the barrier to electron injection. Chloro groups quenched fluorescence and methylsulfone substituents resulted in insoluble polymers, probably due to cross-linking. However a copolymer containing methylsulfone electron withdrawing groups could be prepared. Phenylsulfone substituents were found to give fluorescent polymers which were soluble in the precursor form. (author)

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  2. Holograms preparation using commercial fluorescent benzyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorantes-GarcIa, V; Olivares-Perez, A; Ordonez-Padilla, M J; Mejias-Brizuela, N Y, E-mail: valdoga@Hotmail.com, E-mail: olivares@inaoep.mx [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Coordinacion de Optica, Calle Luis Enrique Erro N0 1, Santa Maria Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    We have been able to make holograms with substances such as fluorescence thought of light blue laser to make transmissions holograms, using ammonium dichromate as photo-sensitizer and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as matrix. Ammonium dichromate inhibit the fluorescence properties of inks, both mixed in a (PVA) matrix, but we avoid this chemical reaction and we show the results to use the method of painting hologram with fluorescents ink and we describe how the diffraction efficiency parameter changes as a function of the ink absorbed by the emulsion recorded with the gratings, we got good results, making holographic gratings with a blue light from laser diode 470 nm. And we later were painting with fluorescent ink, integrating fluorescence characteristics to the hologram.

  3. Blue Ocean Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, Donna

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a concept called the "blue ocean thinking strategy," developed by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne, professors at INSEAD, an international graduate school of business in France. The "blue ocean" thinking strategy considers opportunities to create new markets for services, rather than focusing solely on…

  4. Potentiation of cGMP signaling increases oxygen delivery and oxidative metabolism in contracting skeletal muscle of older but not young humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Piil, Peter Bergmann; Egelund, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with progressive loss of cardiovascular and skeletal muscle function. The impairment in physical capacity with advancing age could be related to an insufficient peripheral O2 delivery to the exercising muscles. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying an impaired blood flow...... to evaluate the effect of inhibiting the main enzyme involved in cGMP degradation, phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5), on blood flow and O2 delivery in contracting skeletal muscle of young and older humans. A group of young (23 ± 1 years) and a group of older (72 ± 2 years) male human subjects performed submaximal...... in the older subjects correlated with the increase in leg O2 uptake (r (2) = 0.843). These findings suggest an insufficient O2 delivery to the contracting skeletal muscle of aged individuals and that reduced cGMP availability is a novel mechanism underlying impaired skeletal muscle perfusion with advancing age....

  5. Vascular smooth muscle relaxation by nitro compounds: reduced relaxation and cGMP elevation in tolerant vessels and reversal of tolerance by dithiothreitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, K L; Andersson, R G; Wikberg, J E

    1982-05-01

    Smooth muscle preparations obtained from bovine mesenteric artery were incubated with high concentrations of nitroglycerin (NG) or nitroprusside (NP) at elevated pH. This treatment was found to make the vessels tolerant towards both the relaxant and cGMP elevating action of a challenging dose of nitrocompounds when tested on the histamine contracted vessels. Also, some cross-tolerance between NP and NG could be found since pretreatment of the vessels with NP caused a reduction in both the relaxant and the cGMP elevating action of NG. The NG induced tolerance could be partly reversed by treatment with the disulfide reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT). These results are suggested to strengthen the evidence for cGMP as a mediator of vascular smooth muscle relaxation induced by nitrocompounds. The ability of DTT to partly reverse this tolerance indicates the existence of critical tissue sulfhydryl groups with which the nitrocompounds interact. There also seemed to exist certain differences in the mechanism of action between NG and NP since the tolerance induced against NG was much more pronounced than was the case for NP.

  6. Fluorescence Spectra of Highlighter Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; King, Damon

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra excited by laser pointers have been the subject of several papers in TPT. These papers all describe a fluorescence phenomenon in which the reflected laser light undergoes a change in color: this color change results from the combination of some partially reflected laser light and additional colors generated by fluorescent emission. Here we examine the fluorescence spectra of highlighter inks using green and violet laser pointers. We use an RSpec Explorer spectrometer to obtain spectra and compare the emission spectra of blue, green, yellow, orange, pink, and purple highlighters. The website Compound Interest details the chemical composition of highlighter inks; in addition, the site discusses how some base dye colors can be combined to produce the variety commercially available colors. Spectra obtained in this study were qualitatively consistent with the Compound Interest site. We discuss similarities and differences between various highlighter colors and conclude with the relevance of such studies to physics students.

  7. Blue ocean strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2004-10-01

    Despite a long-term decline in the circus industry, Cirque du Soleil profitably increased revenue 22-fold over the last ten years by reinventing the circus. Rather than competing within the confines of the existing industry or trying to steal customers from rivals, Cirque developed uncontested market space that made the competition irrelevant. Cirque created what the authors call a blue ocean, a previously unknown market space. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profitable and rapid. In red oceans--that is, in all the industries already existing--companies compete by grabbing for a greater share of limited demand. As the market space gets more crowded, prospects for profits and growth decline. Products turn into commodities, and increasing competition turns the water bloody. There are two ways to create blue oceans. One is to launch completely new industries, as eBay did with online auctions. But it's much more common for a blue ocean to be created from within a red ocean when a company expands the boundaries of an existing industry. In studying more than 150 blue ocean creations in over 30 industries, the authors observed that the traditional units of strategic analysis--company and industry--are of limited use in explaining how and why blue oceans are created. The most appropriate unit of analysis is the strategic move, the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market-creating business offering. Creating blue oceans builds brands. So powerful is blue ocean strategy, in fact, that a blue ocean strategic move can create brand equity that lasts for decades.

  8. Thermodynamically stable blue phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, F; Morris, S M; Terentjev, E M; Coles, H J

    2010-04-16

    We show theoretically that flexoelectricity stabilizes blue phases in chiral liquid crystals. Induced internal polarization reduces the elastic energy cost of splay and bend deformations surrounding singular lines in the director field. The energy of regions of double twist is unchanged. This in turn reduces the free energy of the blue phase with respect to that of the chiral nematic phase, leading to stability over a wider temperature range. The theory explains the discovery of large temperature range blue phases in highly flexoelectric "bimesogenic" and "bent-core" materials, and predicts how this range may be increased further.

  9. Nitric oxide participates in cold-inhibited Camellia sinensis pollen germination and tube growth partly via cGMP in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Wang

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO plays essential roles in many biotic and abiotic stresses in plant development procedures, including pollen tube growth. Here, effects of NO on cold stress inhibited pollen germination and tube growth in Camellia sinensis were investigated in vitro. The NO production, NO synthase (NOS-like activity, cGMP content and proline (Pro accumulation upon treatment with NO scavenger cPTIO, NOS inhibitor L-NNA, NO donor DEA NONOate, guanylate cyclase (GC inhibitor ODQ or phosphodiesterase (PDE inhibitor Viagra at 25°C (control or 4°C were analyzed. Exposure to 4°C for 2 h reduced pollen germination and tube growth along with increase of NOS-like activity, NO production and cGMP content in pollen tubes. DEA NONOate treatment inhibited pollen germination and tube growth in a dose-dependent manner under control and reinforced the inhibition under cold stress, during which NO production and cGMP content promoted in pollen tubes. L-NNA and cPTIO markedly reduced the generation of NO induced by cold or NO donor along with partly reverse of cold- or NO donor-inhibited pollen germination and tube growth. Furthermore, ODQ reduced the cGMP content under cold stress and NO donor treatment in pollen tubes. Meanwhile, ODQ disrupted the reinforcement of NO donor on the inhibition of pollen germination and tube growth under cold condition. Additionally, Pro accumulation of pollen tubes was reduced by ODQ compared with that receiving NO donor under cold or control condition. Effects of cPTIO and L-NNA in improving cold-treated pollen germination and pollen tube growth could be lowered by Viagra. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of cPTIO and L-NNA on Pro accumulation were partly reversed by Viagra. These data suggest that NO production from NOS-like enzyme reaction decreased the cold-responsive pollen germination, inhibited tube growth and reduced Pro accumulation, partly via cGMP signaling pathway in C. sinensis.

  10. Blue Ribbon Panel Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog by the NCI acting director thanking the cancer community for contributing to the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel report, which was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board on September 7.

  11. New York Blue

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — New York Blue is used cooperatively by the Laboratory and Stony Brook University as part of the New York Center for Computation Sciences. Ranked as the 28th fastest...

  12. The Effect of New Developed Fluorescent Greenhouse Films on the Growth of Fragaria x ananassa 'Elsanta'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemming, S.; Os, van E.A.; Hemming, J.; Dieleman, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    In order to optimise light quality and quantity for plant growth, new photoselective greenhouse covering materials were developed containing different fluorescent pigments (Blue, Red1, Red2, Red3) in different concentrations. Excitation of all fluorescent pigments took place around 365 nm. Blue

  13. Blue light inhibits proliferation of melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Anja; Distler, Elisabeth; Klapczynski, Anna; Arpino, Fabiola; Kuch, Natalia; Simon-Keller, Katja; Sticht, Carsten; van Abeelen, Frank A.; Gretz, Norbert; Oversluizen, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    Photobiomodulation with blue light is used for several treatment paradigms such as neonatal jaundice, psoriasis and back pain. However, little is known about possible side effects concerning melanoma cells in the skin. The aim of this study was to assess the safety of blue LED irradiation with respect to proliferation of melanoma cells. For that purpose we used the human malignant melanoma cell line SK-MEL28. Cell proliferation was decreased in blue light irradiated cells where the effect size depended on light irradiation dosage. Furthermore, with a repeated irradiation of the melanoma cells on two consecutive days the effect could be intensified. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting with Annexin V and Propidium iodide labeling did not show a higher number of dead cells after blue light irradiation compared to non-irradiated cells. Gene expression analysis revealed down-regulated genes in pathways connected to anti-inflammatory response, like B cell signaling and phagosome. Most prominent pathways with up-regulation of genes were cytochrome P450, steroid hormone biosynthesis. Furthermore, even though cells showed a decrease in proliferation, genes connected to the cell cycle were up-regulated after 24h. This result is concordant with XTT test 48h after irradiation, where irradiated cells showed the same proliferation as the no light negative control. In summary, proliferation of melanoma cells can be decreased using blue light irradiation. Nevertheless, the gene expression analysis has to be further evaluated and more studies, such as in-vivo experiments, are warranted to further assess the safety of blue light treatment.

  14. Systemic induction of NO-, redox- and cGMP signalling in the pumpkin extrafascicular phloem upon local leaf wounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eGaupels

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cucurbits developed the unique extrafascicular phloem (EFP as a defensive structure against herbivorous animals. Mechanical leaf injury was previously shown to induce a systemic wound response in the EFP of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima. Here, we demonstrate that the phloem antioxidant system and protein modifications by NO are strongly regulated during this process. Activities of the central antioxidant enzymes dehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase and ascorbate reductase were rapidly down-regulated at 30 min with a second minimum at 24 h after wounding. As a consequence levels of total ascorbate and glutathione also decreased with similar bi-phasic kinetics. These results hint towards a wound-induced shift in the redox status of the EFP. Nitric oxide (NO is another important player in stress-induced redox signalling in plants. Therefore, we analysed NO-dependent protein modifications in the EFP. Six to 48 h after leaf damage total S-nitrosothiol content and protein S-nitrosylation were clearly reduced, which was contrasted by a pronounced increase in protein tyrosine nitration. Collectively, these findings suggest that NO-dependent S-nitrosylation turned into peroxynitrite-mediated protein nitration upon a stress-induced redox shift probably involving the accumulation of reactive oxygen species within the EFP. Using the biotin switch assay and anti-nitrotyrosine antibodies we identified 9 candidate S-nitrosylated and 6 candidate tyrosine-nitrated phloem proteins. The wound-responsive Phloem Protein 16-1 (PP16-1 and Cyclophilin 18 (CYP18 as well as the 26.5 kD isoform of Phloem Protein 2 (PP2 were amenable to both NO modifications and could represent important redox-sensors within the cucurbit EFP. We also found that leaf injury triggered the systemic accumulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP in the EFP and discuss the possible function of this second messenger in systemic NO and redox signalling within the EFP.

  15. 'No blue' LED solution for photolithography room illumination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Corell, Dennis Dan; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    This paper explored the feasibility of using a LED-based bulb as the illumination light source for photolithography room. A no-blue LED was designed, and the prototype was fabricated. The spectral power distribution of both the LED bulb and the yellow fluorescent tube was measured. Based on that,...

  16. An operational fluorescence system for crop assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzile, Charles; Belanger, Marie-Christine; Viau, Alain A.; Chamberland, Martin; Roy, Simon

    2004-03-01

    The development of precision farming requires new tools for plant nutritional stress monitoring. An operational fluorescence system has been designed for vegetation status mapping and stress detection at plant and field scale. The instrument gives relative values of fluorescence at different wavelengths induced by the two-excitation sources. Lightinduced fluorescence has demonstrated successful crop health monitoring and plant nutritional stress detection capabilities. The spectral response of the plants has first been measured with an hyperspectral imager using laser-induced fluorescence. A tabletop imaging fluorometer based on flash lamp technology has also been designed to study the spatial distribution of fluorescence on plant leaves. For field based non-imaging system, LED technology is used as light source to induce fluorescence of the plant. The operational fluorescence system is based on ultraviolet and blue LED to induce fluorescence. Four narrow fluorescence bands centered on 440, 520, 690 and 740nm are detected. The instrument design includes a modular approach for light source and detector. It can accommodate as many as four different light sources and six bands of fluorescence detection. As part of the design for field application, the instrument is compatible with a mobile platform equipped with a GPS and data acquisition system. The current system developed by Telops/GAAP is configured for potato crops fluorescence measurement but can easily be adapted for other crops. This new instrument offers an effective and affordable solution for precision farming.

  17. Natural Blue Food Colour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roda-Serrat, Maria Cinta

    In recent years, there has been a growing tendency to avoid the use of artificial colorants and additives in food products, especially after some studies linked their consumption with behavioural changes in children. However, the incorporation of colorants from natural origin remains a challenge...... for food technologists, as these are typically less vivid and less stable than their synthetic alternatives. Regarding blue colorants, phycocyanins from cyanobacteria are currently in the spotlight as promising new natural blue colorants. Phycocyanins are proteins which blue colour results from...... the presence of the chromophore phycocyanobilin (PCB), a covalently attached linear tetrapyrrole. The applications of phycocyanins as food colorants are however limited, as they show poor stability in certain conditions of pH, light and temperature. Cleavage of PCB from the protein followed by careful product...

  18. Atrial natriuretic peptide and cGMP activate sodium transport through PKA-dependent pathway in the urinary bladder of the Japanese tree frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toshiki; Matsuda, Kouhei; Uchiyama, Minoru

    2006-03-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and cGMP on transepithelial ion transport were examined in the urinary bladder of the Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica, using Ussing chamber voltage-clamp and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. When the bladders were exposed to 4.4 x 10(-11) to 10(-6) M ANP or 10(-7) to 3 x 10(-4) M 8-Br-cGMP, both the transepithelial potential difference (PD) and the short-circuit current (Isc) were significantly increased in a concentration-response manner. The cGMP-dependent responses were inhibited in a Na+-free bath solution and in the presence of amiloride. The cGMP-dependent increases in Isc were significantly inhibited by specific PKA inhibitors (5 x 10(-7) M KT-5720 and >10(-5) M H-89), but not by a specific PKG inhibitor (5 x 10(-7) M KT-5823). ANP-dependent increases in Isc were also significantly inhibited by KT-5720. In the patch-clamp study, ANP and cGMP significantly increased in inward currents involving Na+ uptake. These results suggest that a cross-talk mechanism exists between cAMP and cGMP signaling pathways, which leads to Na+ transport in the frog urinary bladder. In addition, the cGMP-dependent increases in Isc were partially inhibited by 10(-4) M l-cis-diltiazem, a specific inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels. These results also suggest a relation between CNG channels and the cGMP-dependent increases in Na+ absorption of the frog urinary bladder.

  19. Blue-green and green phosphors for lighting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlur, Anant Achyut; Chandran, Ramachandran Gopi; Henderson, Claire Susan; Nammalwar, Pransanth Kumar; Radkov, Emil

    2012-12-11

    Embodiments of the present techniques provide a related family of phosphors that may be used in lighting systems to generate blue or blue-green light. The phosphors include systems having a general formula of: ((Sr.sub.1-zM.sub.z).sub.1-(x+w)A.sub.wCe.sub.x).sub.3(Al.sub.1-ySi.s- ub.y)O.sub.4+y+3(x-w)F.sub.1-y-3(x-w) (I), wherein 0lighting systems, such as LEDs and fluorescent tubes, among others, to produce blue and blue/green light. Further, the phosphors may be used in blends with other phosphors, or in combined lighting systems, to produce white light suitable for illumination.

  20. A Blue Lagoon Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen

    2007-01-01

    We consider a specific function of two variables whose graph surface resembles a blue lagoon. The function has a saddle point $p$, but when the function is restricted to any given straight line through $p$ it has a {\\em{strict local minimum}} along that line at $p$.......We consider a specific function of two variables whose graph surface resembles a blue lagoon. The function has a saddle point $p$, but when the function is restricted to any given straight line through $p$ it has a {\\em{strict local minimum}} along that line at $p$....

  1. Imaging of multi-color fluorescence emission from leaf tissues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nedbal, Ladislav

    2-3, č. 102 (2009), s. 169-175 ISSN 0166-8595 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Chlorophyll fluorescence * Blue-green fluorescence * Pyridine nucleotide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.303, year: 2009

  2. The "Blue Banana" Revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faludi, A.K.F.

    2015-01-01

    This essay is about the “Blue Banana”. Banana is the name given subsequently by others to a Dorsale européenne (European backbone) identified empirically by Roger Brunet. In a background study to the Communication of the European Commission ‘Europe 2000’, Klaus Kunzmann and Michael Wegener put

  3. The Blue Baby Syndrome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 10. The Blue Baby Syndrome - Nitrate Poisoning in Humans. Deepanjan Majumdar. General Article Volume 8 Issue 10 October 2003 pp 20-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Riboflavin enhanced fluorescence of highly reduced graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliut, Maria; Gabudean, Ana-Maria; Leordean, Cosmin; Simon, Timea; Teodorescu, Cristian-Mihail; Astilean, Simion

    2013-10-01

    The improvement of graphene derivates' fluorescence properties is a challenging topic and very few ways were reported up to now. In this Letter we propose an easy method to enhance the fluorescence of highly reduced graphene oxide (rGO) through non-covalent binding to a molecular fluorophore, namely the riboflavin (Rb). While the fluorescence of Rb is quenched, the Rb - decorated rGO exhibits strong blue fluorescence and significantly increased fluorescence lifetime, as compared to its pristine form. The data reported here represent a promising start towards tailoring the optical properties of rGOs, having utmost importance in optical applications.

  5. Metal enhanced fluorescence with gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Shaina LaRissa Strating

    A novel hybrid nanocomposite of Au nanoparticle-modified silicon nanowire was developed for surface enhanced fluorescence applications. The designed nanocomposite contained a silicon nanowire, gold nanoparticles and a silica layer doped with dye molecules. The hybrid nanomaterial was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), fluorescence measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the gold nanoparticles were uniformly adhered on the silicon nanowires and covered by a thin silica layer. The nanostructure exhibited strong capacity for surface enhanced fluorescence. Different enhancement factors were obtained by changing synthetic conditions. The second goal of the project was to determine if the shape of gold nanoparticles affects the extent of its fluorescence enhancement under constant external factors. Two shapes of gold nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by SEM, STEM, zeta potential and absorbance measurements. Then they were coated with fluorescent dye-doped silica and the fluorescence intensity was measured and compared to the pure fluorescent dye. Gold nanorods enhanced fluorescence more than gold nanostars and that the fluorescent dye Alexafluor 700 showed a greater fluorescence intensity change in the presence of nanoparticles than methylene blue.

  6. Ratiometric Alcohol Sensor based on a Polymeric Nile Blue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif Ibrahim

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a sterilizable ratiometric fluorescent ethanol sensor with sensitivity over a wide range (0-100% of ethanol concentration v/v. The sensor is composed of a near infra red fluorescent solvatochromic dye, nile blue methacrylamide polymerized into a polyethylene (glycol dimethacrylate matrix. The dye can typically exhibit two or more wavelength dependent shifts in the fluorescence intensities based on its different micropolar environments. Two different concentrations of the nile blue methacrylamide dye were prepared and polymerized into homogenous films. The fluorescence properties of the two different films were investigated with a view to determining their ethanol sensing capabilities. The sensor was immersed in a water-ethanol solvent mixture. Excitation of the dye was performed at 470 nm. The range of emission wavelengths was 480-800 nm. The ratio of the fluorescence intensities at 620 nm and 554 nm was obtained for ethanol concentrations varying from 0-100% and the calibration curve of the ratiometric fluorescence intensities over the entire concentration range of ethanol was plotted. A ratiometric intensity change of over 33% has been obtained for pure ethanol compared to that obtained for pure water. The sensor response was rapid (≤10 minutes. The sterilizable ethanol sensor exhibits good potential for on-line monitoring of the ethanol generated in an LB fermentation chamber.

  7. An optical method for reducing green fluorescence from urine during fluorescence-guided cystoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvold, Lars René; Hermann, Gregers G

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of bladder tumour tissue significantly improves endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer in rigid cystoscopes in the operating theatre and thus reduces tumour recurrence. PDD comprises the use of blue light, which unfortunately excites green fluorescence...... this light source also is useful for exciting autofluorescence in healthy bladder mucosa. This autofluorescence then provides a contrast to the sensitized fluorescence (PDD) of tumours in the bladder....

  8. Efficacy of methylene blue in an experimental model of calcium channel blocker-induced shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, David H; Donovan, Sean; Nelson, Lewis S; Bania, Theodore C; Hoffman, Robert S; Chu, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Calcium channel blocker poisonings account for a substantial number of reported deaths from cardiovascular drugs. Although supportive care is the mainstay of treatment, experimental therapies such as high-dose insulin-euglycemia and lipid emulsion have been studied in animal models and used in humans. In the most severe cases, even aggressive care is inadequate and deaths occur. In both experimental models and clinical cases of vasodilatory shock, methylene blue improves hemodynamic measures. It acts as a nitric oxide scavenger and inhibits guanylate cyclase that is responsible for the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Excessive cGMP production is associated with refractory vasodilatory shock in sepsis and anaphylaxis. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of methylene blue in an animal model of amlodipine-induced shock. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, ventilated, and instrumented for continuous blood pressure and pulse rate monitoring. The dose of amlodipine that produced death within 60 minutes was 17 mg/kg per hour (LD50). Rats were divided into 2 groups: amlodipine followed by methylene blue or amlodipine followed by normal saline solution, with 15 rats in each group. Rats received methylene blue at 2 mg/kg during 5 minutes or an equivalent amount of normal saline solution in 3 intervals from the start of the protocol: minutes 5, 30, and 60. The animals were observed for a total of 2 hours after the start of the protocol. Mortality risk and survival time were analyzed with Fisher's exact test and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with the log rank test. Overall, 1 of 15 rats (7%) in the saline solution-treated group survived to 120 minutes compared with 5 of 15 (33%) in the methylene blue-treated group (difference -26%; 95% confidence interval [CI] -54% to 0.3%). The median survival time for the normal saline solution group was 42 minutes (95% CI 28.1 to 55.9 minutes); for the methylene blue group, 109 minutes (95% CI 93.9 to

  9. Role of Ser102 and Ser104 as Regulators of cGMP Hydrolysis by PDE5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carøe Nordgaard, Julie; Kruse, Lars Schack; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2014-01-01

    -N-AS neuroblastoma cells as C-terminal fusions with green fluorescent protein. Transfected cells were treated with sildenafil, cilostazol, glyceryl trinitrate, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or sumatriptan. PDE5A-GFP fusion proteins were localized in fixed cells by immunofluorescence and PDE activity...

  10. [Blue light and eye health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Leilei; Dai, Jinhui

    2015-01-01

    Blue light, with the wavelength between 400 nm and 500 nm, has caused public concern because of the injury to the retinal cells. Meanwhile, it is important in circadian rhythm regulation, scotopic vision and ocular growth. Is the blue light safe? Should it be eliminated from the daily life? Here we review the effect and safety of the blue light.

  11. Fluorescence imaging of soybean flavonol isolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Edward H.; Mulchi, Charles L.; McMurtrey, James E., III; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Rowland, Randy A.

    1998-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to characterize the fluorescence emission of leaves from four soybean ('Harosoy') plants containing different concentrations of flavonols (kaempferol glycosides). The investigation utilized genetically mutated soybean flavonol isolines grown in a constant environment, thus limiting factors known to affect fluorescence emission characteristics other than different kaempferol glycosides concentrations. Flavonol isolines included OX922, OX941, OX942, OX944. The first two isolines contain kaempferol (K) glycosides; K3, K6, and K9, and the latter two did not have K3, K6, and K9. A fluorescence imaging system (FIS) was used to characterize steady state florescence images of the sample leaves measured at wavelengths centered at 450, 550, 680, and 740 nm with an excitation at 360 nm. Images taken with FIS greatly complement non-imaging fluorescence measurements by characterizing the spatial variation of fluorescence within leaves. We also acquired fluorescence emission spectra to characterize spectral features of the soybean flavonol isolines. The emission spectral shape of the fluorescence emission characteristics were not significantly different between the soybeans that contain kaempferol glycosides and the ones that do not contain kaempferol glycosides. Typical emission maxima of green vegetation in the blue, green, red, and far-red bands were noticed in all four soybean isolines. However, plants containing kaempferol glycosides, OX922 and OX941 had significantly lower intensities throughout the wavelength regions. These results imply that fluorescence emission intensities in the fluorescence emission bands studied are significantly affected by the presence and absence of kaempferol glycosides concentrations (UV radiation screening compounds). Pure kaempferol glycoside dissolved in solution show minimal fluorescence emission when excited with the absorption maximum radiation at 365 nm. However, a broad band emission can be seen in the green

  12. The discrimination of (non-denim) blue cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Ray; Hutchinson, William; Fryer, Verity

    2009-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine the degree of discrimination obtained between non-denim blue cotton fibres using visible-UV range microspectrophotometry alone. To this end, samples of fibres were taken from 100, nondenim, blue cotton, outer garments, including t-shirts, trousers and jumpers and subjected to analysis by both visible and UV range microspectrophotometry. The results obtained from the samples of each garment were compared to determine if they 'matched' or not. From an initial visual comparison of the garments it was possible to subdivide the samples into two populations consisting of 73 'dark blue' garments and 27 'mid-blue' garments. It was found that of the 73 'dark blue' garments, 22 distinct sub-populations could be distinguished using visible range MSP, this figure being increased to 43 when the analysis was extended into the UVW range. In the case of the 27 'mid-blue' garments, 9 distinct sub-populations were discriminated using visible range MSP, this figure being increased to 17 when the analysis was extended into the UV range. The discriminating power (i.e., the number of discriminated pairs divided by the number of possible pairs) of visible range microspectrophotometry was calculated as 0.89 for 'mid-blue' garments and 0.87 for 'dark blue' garments. Extending microspectrophotometry into the UV range increased discrimination by 7%, giving a discriminating power of 0.96 for both mid and dark blue cotton fibres which was similar to that reported by a previous study where this method was combined with light and fluorescence microscopy. Intra-garment variation was found to be negligible. The implications of this study for casework are discussed and a revised analytical pathway for the comparison of this fibre type/colour combination using microspectrophotometry as a primary screening tool, is proposed.

  13. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Krom, Bastiaan P; Janus, Marleen M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johannes J; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  14. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M C Volgenant

    Full Text Available Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation. Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  15. Combined "dual" absorption and fluorescence smartphone spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafat Hossain, Md; Canning, John; Ast, Sandra; Cook, Kevin; Rutledge, Peter J; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-04-15

    A combined "dual" absorption and fluorescence smartphone spectrometer is demonstrated. The optical sources used in the system are the white flash LED of the smartphone and an orthogonally positioned and interchangeable UV (λex=370  nm) and blue (λex=450  nm) LED. The dispersive element is a low-cost, nano-imprinted diffraction grating coated with Au. Detection over a 300 nm span with 0.42 nm/pixel resolution was carried out with the camera CMOS chip. By integrating the blue and UV excitation sources into the white LED circuitry, the entire system is self-contained within a 3D printed case and powered from the smartphone battery; the design can be scaled to add further excitation sources. Using a customized app, acquisition of absorption and fluorescence spectra are demonstrated using a blue-absorbing and green-emitting pH-sensitive amino-naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe and a UV-absorbing and blue-emitting Zn2+-sensitive fluoro-ionophore.

  16. Fluorescent prey traps in carnivorous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, R; Johnson, A J; Sankar, S; Hussain, A A; Sathish Kumar, C; Sabulal, B

    2013-05-01

    Carnivorous plants acquire most of their nutrients by capturing ants, insects and other arthropods through their leaf-evolved biological traps. So far, the best-known attractants in carnivorous prey traps are nectar, colour and olfactory cues. Here, fresh prey traps of 14 Nepenthes, five Sarracenia, five Drosera, two Pinguicula species/hybrids, Dionaea muscipula and Utricularia stellaris were scanned at UV 366 nm. Fluorescence emissions of major isolates of fresh Nepenthes khasiana pitcher peristomes were recorded at an excitation wavelength of 366 nm. N. khasiana field pitcher peristomes were masked by its slippery zone extract, and prey capture rates were compared with control pitchers. We found the existence of distinct blue fluorescence emissions at the capture spots of Nepenthes, Sarracenia and Dionaea prey traps at UV 366 nm. These alluring blue emissions gradually developed with the growth of the prey traps and diminished towards their death. On excitation at 366 nm, N. khasiana peristome 3:1 CHCl3–MeOH extract and its two major blue bands showed strong fluorescence emissions at 430–480 nm. Masking of blue emissions on peristomes drastically reduced prey capture in N. khasiana pitchers. We propose these molecular emissions as a critical factor attracting arthropods and other visitors to these carnivorous traps. Drosera, Pinguicula and Utricularia prey traps showed only red chlorophyll emissions at 366 nm.

  17. cGMP and NHR signaling co-regulate expression of insulin-like peptides and developmental activation of infective larvae in Strongyloides stercoralis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Stoltzfus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The infectious form of the parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis is a developmentally arrested third-stage larva (L3i, which is morphologically similar to the developmentally arrested dauer larva in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We hypothesize that the molecular pathways regulating C. elegans dauer development also control L3i arrest and activation in S. stercoralis. This study aimed to determine the factors that regulate L3i activation, with a focus on G protein-coupled receptor-mediated regulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP pathway signaling, including its modulation of the insulin/IGF-1-like signaling (IIS pathway. We found that application of the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP potently activated development of S. stercoralis L3i, as measured by resumption of feeding, with 85.1 ± 2.2% of L3i feeding in 200 µM 8-bromo-cGMP in comparison to 0.6 ± 0.3% in the buffer diluent. Utilizing RNAseq, we examined L3i stimulated with DMEM, 8-bromo-cGMP, or the DAF-12 nuclear hormone receptor (NHR ligand Δ7-dafachronic acid (DA--a signaling pathway downstream of IIS in C. elegans. L3i stimulated with 8-bromo-cGMP up-regulated transcripts of the putative agonistic insulin-like peptide (ILP -encoding genes Ss-ilp-1 (20-fold and Ss-ilp-6 (11-fold in comparison to controls without stimulation. Surprisingly, we found that Δ7-DA similarly modulated transcript levels of ILP-encoding genes. Using the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002, we demonstrated that 400 nM Δ7-DA-mediated activation (93.3 ± 1.1% L3i feeding can be blocked using this IIS inhibitor at 100 µM (7.6 ± 1.6% L3i feeding. To determine the tissues where promoters of ILP-encoding genes are active, we expressed promoter::egfp reporter constructs in transgenic S. stercoralis post-free-living larvae. Ss-ilp-1 and Ss-ilp-6 promoters are active in the hypodermis and neurons and the Ss-ilp-7 promoter is active in the

  18. The MRP4/ABCC4 gene encodes a novel apical organic anion transporter in human kidney proximal tubules: putative efflux pump for urinary cAMP and cGMP.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aubel, R.A.M.H. van; Smeets, P.H.E.; Peters, J.G.P.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2002-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP play key roles in cellular signaling and the extracellular regulation of fluid balance. In the kidney, cAMP is excreted across the apical proximal tubular membrane into urine, where it reduces phosphate reabsorption through a dipyridamole-sensitive mechanism that

  19. Microanalysis study of archaeological mural samples containing Maya blue pigment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez del Rio, M. [ESRF, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France)]. E-mail: srio@esrf.fr; Martinetto, P. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP166 F-30842 Grenoble (France); Somogyi, A. [ESRF, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Reyes-Valerio, C. [INAH, Mexico DF (Mexico); Dooryhee, E. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP166 F-30842 Grenoble (France); Peltier, N. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP166 F-30842 Grenoble (France); Alianelli, L. [INFM-OGG c/o ESRF, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Moignard, B. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Pichon, L. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Calligaro, T. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Dran, J.-C. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France)

    2004-10-08

    Elemental analysis by X-ray fluorescence and particle induced X-ray emission is applied to the study of several Mesoamerican mural samples containing blue pigments. The most characteristic blue pigment is Maya blue, a very stable organo-clay complex original from Maya culture and widely used in murals, pottery and sculptures in a vast region of Mesoamerica during the pre-hispanic time (from VIII century) and during the colonization until 1580. The mural samples come from six different archaeological sites (four pre-hispanic and two from XVI century colonial convents). The correlation between the presence of some elements and the pigment colour is discussed. From the comparative study of the elemental concentration, some conclusions are drawn on the nature of the pigments and the technology used.

  20. Microanalysis study of archaeological mural samples containing Maya blue pigment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez del Rio, M.; Martinetto, P.; Somogyi, A.; Reyes-Valerio, C.; Dooryhee, E.; Peltier, N.; Alianelli, L.; Moignard, B.; Pichon, L.; Calligaro, T.; Dran, J.-C.

    2004-01-01

    Elemental analysis by X-ray fluorescence and particle induced X-ray emission is applied to the study of several Mesoamerican mural samples containing blue pigments. The most characteristic blue pigment is Maya blue, a very stable organo-clay complex original from Maya culture and widely used in murals, pottery and sculptures in a vast region of Mesoamerica during the pre-hispanic time (from VIII century) and during the colonization until 1580. The mural samples come from six different archaeological sites (four pre-hispanic and two from XVI century colonial convents). The correlation between the presence of some elements and the pigment colour is discussed. From the comparative study of the elemental concentration, some conclusions are drawn on the nature of the pigments and the technology used

  1. Neuronal nitric oxide contributes to neuroplasticity-associated protein expression through cGMP, protein kinase G, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Eduardo F; Iadecola, Costantino

    2011-05-11

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesized by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) has long been implicated in brain plasticity. However, it is unclear how this short-lived mediator contributes to the long-term molecular changes underlying neuroplasticity, which typically require activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway and gene expression. To address this issue, we used a neuroplasticity model based on treatment of neuronal cultures with bicuculline and a model of experience-dependent plasticity in the barrel cortex. In neuronal cultures, NOS inhibition attenuated the bicuculline-induced activation of ERK and the expression of c-Fos, Egr-1, Arc, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), proteins essential for neuroplasticity. Furthermore, inhibition of the NO target soluble guanylyl cyclase or of the cGMP effector kinase protein kinase G (PKG) reduced both ERK activation and plasticity-related protein expression. NOS inhibition did not affect phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a well-established ERK nuclear target, but it attenuated the nuclear accumulation of the CREB coactivator TORC1 and suppressed the activation of Elk-1, another transcription factor target of ERK. Consistent with these in vitro observations, induction of c-Fos, Egr-1, and BDNF was attenuated in the D1 cortical barrel of nNOS(-/-) mice subjected to single whisker experience. These results establish nNOS-derived NO as a key factor in the expression of proteins involved in neuroplasticity, an effect mediated through cGMP, PKG, and ERK signaling. These actions of NO do not depend on CREB phosphorylation but may involve TORC1 and Elk-1. Our data unveil a previously unrecognized link between neuronal NO and the molecular machinery responsible for the sustained synaptic changes underlying neuroplasticity.

  2. Frog atrial natriuretic peptide and cGMP activate amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels in urinary bladder cells of Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toshiki; Konno, Norifumi; Matsuda, Kouhei; Uchiyama, Minoru

    2007-07-01

    In our previous study, it was suggested that ANP and cGMP may increase Na(+) absorption in the urinary bladder of the Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica. Thus, Na(+) transport activated by ANP was investigated electrophysiologically by using a cell-attached patch-clamp technique in freshly isolated cells from the urinary bladder. A predominant channel expressed was a low conductance Na(+) channel in the epithelial cells. The channel exhibited conductance for inward currents of 4.9 +/- 0.2 pS, long open and closed times (c.a. 190 ms), and positive reversal potential. The channel activity was decreased under the pipette solution including 10(-6) M amiloride. These characteristics were similar to those of amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels (ENaC). Addition of 10(-9) M ANP activated and significantly increased the ENaC activity from 0.58 +/- 0.09 to 1.47 +/- 0.34. On the other hand, mean amplitudes and conductance of single channel did not change significantly after the addition of ANP. Addition of 10(-5) M 8-Br-cGMP also activated the ENaC and significantly increased the channel activity from 0.56 +/- 0.10 to 2.00 +/- 0.33. The addition of ANP failed to activate the ENaC in the presence of 10(-6) M amiloride. These results suggested that ANP and cGMP activate Na(+) transport via ENaC in the epithelial cells of frog urinary bladder.

  3. SERCA Cys674 sulphonylation and inhibition of L-type Ca2+ influx contribute to cardiac dysfunction in endotoxemic mice, independent of cGMP synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, Ion A; Buys, Emmanuel S; Morse, Justin C; Edgecomb, Jessica; Weiss, Eric H; Armoundas, Antonis A; Hou, Xiuyun; Khandelwal, Alok R; Siwik, Deborah A; Brouckaert, Peter; Cohen, Richard A; Colucci, Wilson S

    2013-10-15

    The goal of this study was to identify the cellular mechanisms responsible for cardiac dysfunction in endotoxemic mice. We aimed to differentiate the roles of cGMP [produced by soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)] versus oxidative posttranslational modifications of Ca(2+) transporters. C57BL/6 mice [wild-type (WT) mice] were administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 25 μg/g ip) and euthanized 12 h later. Cardiomyocyte sarcomere shortening and Ca(2+) transients (ΔCai) were depressed in LPS-challenged mice versus baseline. The time constant of Ca(2+) decay (τCa) was prolonged, and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) load (CaSR) was depressed in LPS-challenged mice (vs. baseline), indicating decreased activity of sarco(endo)plasmic Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA). L-type Ca(2+) channel current (ICa,L) was also decreased after LPS challenge, whereas Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange activity, ryanodine receptors leak flux, or myofilament sensitivity for Ca(2+) were unchanged. All Ca(2+)-handling abnormalities induced by LPS (the decrease in sarcomere shortening, ΔCai, CaSR, ICa,L, and τCa prolongation) were more pronounced in mice deficient in the sGC main isoform (sGCα1(-/-) mice) versus WT mice. LPS did not alter the protein expression of SERCA and phospholamban in either genotype. After LPS, phospholamban phosphorylation at Ser(16) and Thr(17) was unchanged in WT mice and was increased in sGCα1(-/-) mice. LPS caused sulphonylation of SERCA Cys(674) (as measured immunohistochemically and supported by iodoacetamide labeling), which was greater in sGCα1(-/-) versus WT mice. Taken together, these results suggest that cardiac Ca(2+) dysregulation in endotoxemic mice is mediated by a decrease in L-type Ca(2+) channel function and oxidative posttranslational modifications of SERCA Cys(674), with the latter (at least) being opposed by sGC-released cGMP.

  4. Blue ocean leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2014-05-01

    Ten years ago, two INSEAD professors broke ground by introducing "blue ocean strategy," a new model for discovering uncontested markets that are ripe for growth. In this article, they apply their concepts and tools to what is perhaps the greatest challenge of leadership: closing the gulf between the potential and the realized talent and energy of employees. Research indicates that this gulf is vast: According to Gallup, 70% of workers are disengaged from their jobs. If companies could find a way to convert them into engaged employees, the results could be transformative. The trouble is, managers lack a clear understanding of what changes they could make to bring out the best in everyone. Here, Kim and Mauborgne offer a solution to that problem: a systematic approach to uncovering, at each level of the organization, which leadership acts and activities will inspire employees to give their all, and a process for getting managers throughout the company to start doing them. Blue ocean leadership works because the managers' "customers"-that is, the people managers oversee and report to-are involved in identifying what's effective and what isn't. Moreover, the approach doesn't require leaders to alter who they are, just to undertake a different set of tasks. And that kind of change is much easier to implement and track than changes to values and mind-sets.

  5. Energy transfer from carotenoids to chlorophyll in blue-green, red and green algae and greening bean leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedheer, J.C.

    1969-01-01

    From fluorescence action spectra, fluorescence spectra and absorption spectra measured at room temperature and at 77 °K of light petroleum (b.p. 40–60°)-treated and normal chloroplasts, it is concluded that: 1. 1. In blue-green and red algae energy transfer from β-carotene to chlorophyll occurs

  6. Instant BlueStacks

    CERN Document Server

    Judge, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. A fast-paced, example-based approach guide for learning BlueStacks.This book is for anyone with a Mac or PC who wants to run Android apps on their computer. Whether you want to play games that are freely available for Android but not your computer, or you want to try apps before you install them on a physical device or use it as a development tool, this book will show you how. No previous experience is needed as this is written in plain English

  7. Green-light supplementation for enhanced lettuce growth under red- and blue-light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeon-Hye; Goins, Gregory D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Sager, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Plants will be an important component of future long-term space missions. Lighting systems for growing plants will need to be lightweight, reliable, and durable, and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have these characteristics. Previous studies demonstrated that the combination of red and blue light was an effective light source for several crops. Yet the appearance of plants under red and blue lighting is purplish gray making visual assessment of any problems difficult. The addition of green light would make the plant leave appear green and normal similar to a natural setting under white light and may also offer a psychological benefit to the crew. Green supplemental lighting could also offer benefits, since green light can better penetrate the plant canopy and potentially increase plant growth by increasing photosynthesis from the leaves in the lower canopy. In this study, four light sources were tested: 1) red and blue LEDs (RB), 2) red and blue LEDs with green fluorescent lamps (RGB), 3) green fluorescent lamps (GF), and 4) cool-white fluorescent lamps (CWF), that provided 0%, 24%, 86%, and 51% of the total PPF in the green region of the spectrum, respectively. The addition of 24% green light (500 to 600 nm) to red and blue LEDs (RGB treatment) enhanced plant growth. The RGB treatment plants produced more biomass than the plants grown under the cool-white fluorescent lamps (CWF treatment), a commonly tested light source used as a broad-spectrum control.

  8. Blue phases as photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohley, Christian; Scharf, Toralf

    2003-12-01

    The Liquid Crystalline Blue Phases (LC BPs) and their diffraction patterns were investigated experimentally and theoretically. We stabilized Blue Phases and measured their diffraction pattern for different wavelengths of monochromatic light with the help of a conoscopic setup of a polarization microscope. Moreover, the diffraction patterns were calculated with the help of a 4x4 matrix method which allows amplitude and phase investigations.

  9. Enhanced ALA-induced fluorescence in hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosst, Ruediger L; Schroeter, Lioba; Gahlen, Johannes

    2005-04-04

    Intraoperative localization of parathyroid glands can be challenging especially in minimally invasive surgery. Fluorescence diagnosis using the photosensitizer aminolevulinic acid (ALA) has been described to identify normal parathyroid glands during experimental bilateral neck exploration. The present study evaluated fluorescence differences between hyperplastic and normal parathyroid glands as a precondition for a clinical application of the technique. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) rats with hyperparathyroidism due to hyperplastic parathyroid glands and Wistar rats with normal parathyroid glands were photosensitized by peritoneal lavage with ALA solution. After surgical exposure of thyroid and parathyroid glands the operative site was observed under blue light conditions using the d-light system to assess fluorescence characteristics of each tissue. Fluorescence intensities of parathyroid glands and surrounding thyroid tissue were measured by spectrometry. Parathyroid hormone in serum of the rats was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Observation of the exposed thyroid site showed a subjectively stronger red fluorescence of the parathyroid glands in the PKD rats in comparison to the Wistar rats, whereas thyroid tissue appeared equally fluorescent. In the PKD animals, spectrometric fluorescence intensity was 10 times higher in the parathyroid glands than in the thyroid gland, whereas in the Wistar rats the ratio was 3.2:1. Fluorescence intensity in the parathyroid glands was more than twice in the PKD rats than in the Wistar rats, however slightly lower in the thyroid tissue. ELISA confirmed the pathophysiological change of a hyperparathyroidism with significantly increased serum levels of parathyroid hormone in the PKD rats. Hyperparathyroidism enhances ALA-induced fluorescence of the parathyroid glands. A combined surgical fluorescence strategy may justify a unilateral, minimally invasive approach in selected patients and serve to improve

  10. Blue moons and Martian sunsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Kurt; Chakrabarty, Rajan; Moosmüller, Hans

    2014-03-20

    The familiar yellow or orange disks of the moon and sun, especially when they are low in the sky, and brilliant red sunsets are a result of the selective extinction (scattering plus absorption) of blue light by atmospheric gas molecules and small aerosols, a phenomenon explainable using the Rayleigh scattering approximation. On rare occasions, dust or smoke aerosols can cause the extinction of red light to exceed that for blue, resulting in the disks of the sun and moon to appear as blue. Unlike Earth, the atmosphere of Mars is dominated by micron-size dust aerosols, and the sky during sunset takes on a bluish glow. Here we investigate the role of dust aerosols in the blue Martian sunsets and the occasional blue moons and suns on Earth. We use the Mie theory and the Debye series to calculate the wavelength-dependent optical properties of dust aerosols most commonly found on Mars. Our findings show that while wavelength selective extinction can cause the sun's disk to appear blue, the color of the glow surrounding the sun as observed from Mars is due to the dominance of near-forward scattering of blue light by dust particles and cannot be explained by a simple, Rayleigh-like selective extinction explanation.

  11. Effects of Biotin Supplementation in the Diet on Adipose Tissue cGMP Concentrations, AMPK Activation, Lipolysis, and Serum-Free Fatty Acid Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone-Villa, Daniel; Aguilera-Méndez, Asdrubal; Miranda-Cervantes, Adriana; Fernandez-Mejia, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have shown that pharmacological concentrations of biotin decrease hyperlipidemia. The molecular mechanisms by which pharmacological concentrations of biotin modify lipid metabolism are largely unknown. Adipose tissue plays a central role in lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of biotin supplementation in adipose tissue on signaling pathways and critical proteins that regulate lipid metabolism, as well as on lipolysis. In addition, we assessed serum fatty acid concentrations. Male BALB/cAnN Hsd mice were fed a control or a biotin-supplemented diet (control: 1.76 mg biotin/kg; supplemented: 97.7 mg biotin/kg diet) over 8 weeks postweaning. Compared with the control group, biotin-supplemented mice showed an increase in the levels of adipose guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) (control: 30.3±3.27 pmol/g wet tissue; supplemented: 49.5±3.44 pmol/g wet tissue) and of phosphorylated forms of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK; 65.2%±1.06%), acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA), carboxylase-1 (196%±68%), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase-2 (78.1%±18%). Serum fatty acid concentrations were decreased (control: 1.12±0.04 mM; supplemented: 0.91±0.03 mM), and no change in lipolysis was found (control: 0.29±0.05 μmol/mL; supplemented: 0.33±0.08 μmol/mL). In conclusion, 8 weeks of dietary biotin supplementation increased adipose tissue cGMP content and protein expression of the active form of AMPK and of the inactive forms of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase-2. Serum fatty acid levels fell, and no change in lipolysis was observed. These findings provide insight into the effects of biotin supplementation on adipose tissue and support its use in the treatment of dyslipidemia.

  12. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics

  13. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics.

  14. IR-stimulated visible fluorescence in pink and brown diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, K S; Luiten, A N; Chapman, J G

    2014-01-01

    Irradiation of natural pink and brown diamond by middle-ultraviolet light (photon energy ϵ ≥ 4.1 eV ) is seen to induce anomalous fluorescence phenomena at N3 defect centres (structure N 3 −V). When diamonds primed in this fashion are subsequently exposed to infrared light (even with a delay of many hours), a transient burst of blue N3 fluorescence is observed. The dependence of this IR-triggered fluorescence on pump wavelength and intensity suggest that this fluorescence phenomena is intrinsically related to pink diamond photochromism. An energy transfer process between N3 defects and other defect species can account for both the UV-induced fluorescence intensity changes, and the apparent optical upconversion of IR light. From this standpoint, we consider the implications of this N3 fluorescence behaviour for the current understanding of pink diamond photochromism kinetics. (paper)

  15. Photometry of faint blue stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilkenny, D.; Hill, P.W.; Brown, A.

    1977-01-01

    Photometry on the uvby system is given for 61 faint blue stars. The stars are classified by means of the Stromgren indices, using criteria described in a previous paper (Kilkenny and Hill (1975)). (author)

  16. Ecology of blue straggler stars

    CERN Document Server

    Carraro, Giovanni; Beccari, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    The existence of blue straggler stars, which appear younger, hotter, and more massive than their siblings, is at odds with a simple picture of stellar evolution. Such stars should have exhausted their nuclear fuel and evolved long ago to become cooling white dwarfs. They are found to exist in globular clusters, open clusters, dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group, OB associations and as field stars. This book summarises the many advances in observational and theoretical work dedicated to blue straggler stars. Carefully edited extended contributions by well-known experts in the field cover all the relevant aspects of blue straggler stars research: Observations of blue straggler stars in their various environments; Binary stars and formation channels; Dynamics of globular clusters; Interpretation of observational data and comparison with models. The book also offers an introductory chapter on stellar evolution written by the editors of the book.

  17. Contribution of cGMP but not peroxynitrite to negative feedback regulation of penile erection elicited by nitric oxide in the hippocampal formation of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, J Y H; Chan, S H H; Chang, A Y W

    2004-01-01

    We established previously that nitric oxide (NO) in the hippocampal formation (HF) participates actively in negative feedback regulation of penile erection. This study further evaluated whether this process engaged soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP cascade or peroxynitrite in the HF. Intracavernous pressure (ICP) recorded from the penis in adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats anesthetized with chloral hydrate was employed as our experimental index for penile erection. Microinjection bilaterally of a NO-independent sGC activator, YC-1 (0.1 or 1 nmol) or a cGMP analog, 8-Bromo-cGMP (0.1 or 1 nmol), into the HF elicited a significant reduction in baseline ICP. Bilateral application into the HF of equimolar doses (0.5 or 1 nmol) of a sGC inhibitor, LY83583 or a NO-sensitive sGC inhibitor, ODQ significantly antagonized the decrease in baseline ICP induced by co-administration of the NO precursor, L-arginine (5 nmol), along with significant enhancement of the magnitude of papaverine-induced elevation in ICP. In contrast, a peroxynitrite scavenger, L-cysteine (50 or 100 pmol), or an active peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(N-methyl-4'-pyridyl)-porphyrinato iron (III) (10 or 50 pmol), was ineffective in both events. These results suggest that NO may participate in negative feedback regulation of penile erection by activating the sGC/cGMP cascade in the HF selectively.

  18. Interpretation of the fluorescence signatures from vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, C.

    Vegetation emits fluorescence as part of the energy taken up by absorption %of solar radiation from UV to the visible. This fluorescence consists of light with low intensity (only few percents of the reflected light) emitted from the leaves. The fluorescence emission of a green leaf is characterized by four bands with maxima in the blue (440 nm), green (520 nm), red (690 nm) and far red (740 nm) spectral region. The intensity of fluorescence in the maxima of the emission spectrum varies depending on the following six basic parameters which must be taken into account for the interpretation of fluorescence signatures from vegetation: (a) content of the fluorophores (ferulic acid, chlorophyll a), (b) temperature of the leaf, (c) penetration of excitation light into the leaf, (d) emission of fluorescence from the leaf (re-absorption inside the leaf tissue), (e) photosynthetic activity of the leaf, (f) non-radiative decay (heat production) parallel to the fluorescence The ratios between the intensities of the maxima (F440/F690, F440/F520, F690/F740) are used as characteristic fluorescence parameter. The wide range of changes of these ratios caused by differences in the leaf tissue (aerial interspaces, variegated/homogeneous green leaves), various types of stress (UV, photoinhibition, sun exposure, heat, water deficiency, N-deficiency) and chemicals (inhibitors, fertilizers) can be explained by changes of the six basic parameters. It will be shown that the interpretation of the fluorescence signatures, in most cases, must be based on a complex consideration of more than one of the basic parameters.

  19. Temperature dependent analysis of three classes of fluorescence spectra from p-6P nanofiber films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, F.; Pogantsch, Alexander; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2009-01-01

    Discontinuous nanofiber films of para-hexaphenylene molecules can be routinely fabricated via vacuum deposition on muscovite mica. The fibers emit upon UV illumination blue fluorescence with excitonic spectral peaks. Their intense fluorescence makes them very attractive for the use in photonic...

  20. Diversity and evolution of coral fluorescent proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila O Alieva

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available GFP-like fluorescent proteins (FPs are the key color determinants in reef-building corals (class Anthozoa, order Scleractinia and are of considerable interest as potential genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Here we report 40 additional members of the GFP family from corals. There are three major paralogous lineages of coral FPs. One of them is retained in all sampled coral families and is responsible for the non-fluorescent purple-blue color, while each of the other two evolved a full complement of typical coral fluorescent colors (cyan, green, and red and underwent sorting between coral groups. Among the newly cloned proteins are a "chromo-red" color type from Echinopora forskaliana (family Faviidae and pink chromoprotein from Stylophora pistillata (Pocilloporidae, both evolving independently from the rest of coral chromoproteins. There are several cyan FPs that possess a novel kind of excitation spectrum indicating a neutral chromophore ground state, for which the residue E167 is responsible (numeration according to GFP from A. victoria. The chromoprotein from Acropora millepora is an unusual blue instead of purple, which is due to two mutations: S64C and S183T. We applied a novel probabilistic sampling approach to recreate the common ancestor of all coral FPs as well as the more derived common ancestor of three main fluorescent colors of the Faviina suborder. Both proteins were green such as found elsewhere outside class Anthozoa. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the all-coral ancestral protein had a chromohore apparently locked in a non-fluorescent neutral state, which may reflect the transitional stage that enabled rapid color diversification early in the history of coral FPs. Our results highlight the extent of convergent or parallel evolution of the color diversity in corals, provide the foundation for experimental studies of evolutionary processes that led to color diversification, and enable a comparative analysis of

  1. Plasmon enhanced silver quantum cluster fluorescence for biochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernard, S.; Kutter, Jörg P.; Mogensen, K. B.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of individual silver quantum clusters on the surface of silver nanoparticles reveals strong photoactivated emission under blue light excitation [1-4]. In this work, silver nanoparticles are produced by annealing silver thin films deposited on a glass substrate and silver...

  2. Plasmon enhanced silver quantum cluster fluorescence for biochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernard, S.; Kutter, J.P.; Mogensen, Klaus Bo

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of individual silver quantum clusters on the surface of silver nanoparticles reveals strong photoactivated emission under blue light excitation [1-4]. In this work, silver nanoparticles are produced by annealing silver thin films deposited on a glass substrate and silver q...

  3. Blue light does not impair wound healing in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson-Meyers, Daniela Santos; Bumah, Violet Vakunseh; Enwemeka, Chukuka Samuel

    2016-07-01

    Irradiation with red or near infrared light promotes tissue repair, while treatment with blue light is known to be antimicrobial. Consequently, it is thought that infected wounds could benefit more from combined blue and red/infrared light therapy; but there is a concern that blue light may slow healing. We investigated the effect of blue 470nm light on wound healing, in terms of wound closure, total protein and collagen synthesis, growth factor and cytokines expression, in an in vitro scratch wound model. Human dermal fibroblasts were cultured for 48h until confluent. Then a linear scratch wound was created and irradiated with 3, 5, 10 or 55J/cm(2). Control plates were not irradiated. Following 24h of incubation, cells were fixed and stained for migration and fluorescence analyses and the supernatant collected for quantification of total protein, hydroxyproline, bFGF, IL-6 and IL-10. The results showed that wound closure was similar for groups treated with 3, 5 and 10J/cm(2), with a slight improvement with the 5J/cm(2) dose, and slower closure with 55J/cm(2) pblue light at low fluence does not impair in vitro wound healing. The significant decrease in IL-6 suggests that 470nm light is anti-inflammatory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxidation states of Fe and Ti in blue sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wongrawang, P; Wongkokua, W; Monarumit, N; Thammajak, N; Wathanakul, P

    2016-01-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) can be used to study the oxidation state of a dilute system such as transition metal defects in solid-state samples. In blue sapphire, Fe and Ti are defects that cause the blue color. Inter-valence charge transfer (IVCT) between Fe 2+ and Ti 4+ has been proposed to describe the optical color’s origin. However, the existence of divalent iron cations has not been thoroughly investigated. Fluorescent XANES is therefore employed to study K-edge absorptions of Fe and Ti cations in various blue sapphire samples including natural, synthetic, diffused and heat-treated sapphires. All the samples showed an Fe absorption edge at 7124 eV, corresponding to the Fe 3+ state; and Ti at 4984 eV, corresponding to Ti 4+ . From these results, we propose Fe 3+ -Ti 4+ mixed acceptor states located at 1.75 eV and 2.14 eV above the valence band of corundum, that correspond to 710 nm and 580 nm bands of UV–vis absorption spectra, to describe the cause of the color of blue sapphire. (paper)

  5. The fluorescence in the diagnosis of dental tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puron, E.; Homs, R.; Paya, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental method for obtaining fluorescence of the dental tissue is described. A comparative analysis for the behaviour of the tissue fluorescence, both, healthy or intact enamel and carious samples is presented; the comparison of the obtained results with the ones described in the literature is done. Optical methods for the detection of carious lesions have the advantage of being minimally invasive. For this reason, induced fluorescence with a blue light to detect the presence of the Streptococcus in the oral cavity is proposed as an identifier method for find initial caries in dentistry in our country. (Author)

  6. Cell wall staining with Trypan Blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eLiesche

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain Calcofluor White. Trypan Blue staining facilitated quantification of cell size and cell wall volume when utilizing the optical sectioning capacity of a confocal microscope. This enabled the quantification of morphological changes during growth under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of chemicals, demonstrating the potential of this approach for morphological investigations or screening assays.

  7. Hole-Size Increasing PCFs for Blue-Extended Supercontinuum Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper; Jakobsen, C.

    2013-01-01

    Supercontinuum (SC) sources with spectra extending into the deep-blue region below 400 nm are highly desirable in areas such as fluorescent microscopy [1]. Tapering of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) with high air-fill fractions has proven an effective way of extending the spectra into the deep-bl...

  8. Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue by C 3 N 4 /ZnO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The photocatalytic activities of prepared samples were investigated under the illumination of blacklight and fluorescent lamps as the low wattage light source. The C 3 N 4 /ZnO showed a better photocatalytic activity than ZnO to degrade a methylene blue (MB) dye solution using blacklight lamps, but there is no significant ...

  9. [Acute blue urticaria following subcutaneous injection of patent blue dye].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, A; Vial-Dupuy, A; Lebrun-Vignes, B; Francès, C; Soria, A; Barete, S

    2015-11-01

    Patent blue (PB) is a lymphatic vessel dye commonly used in France for sentinel lymph node detection in breast cancer, and less frequently in melanoma, and which may induce hypersensitivity reactions. We report a case of acute blue urticaria occurring within minutes of PB injection. Ten minutes after PB injection for sentinel lymph node detection during breast cancer surgery, a 49-year-old woman developed generalised acute blue urticaria and eyelid angioedema without bronchospasm or haemodynamic disturbance, but requiring discontinuation of surgery. Skin testing using PB and the anaesthetics given were run 6 weeks after the episode and confirmed PB allergy. PB was formally contra-indicated. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to PB have been reported for between 0.24 and 2.2% of procedures. Such reactions are on occasion severe, chiefly involving anaphylactic shock. Two mechanisms are probably associated: non-specific histamine release and/or an IgE-mediated mechanism. Skin tests are helpful in confirming the diagnosis of PB allergy. Blue acute urticaria is one of the clinical manifestations of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to patent blue dye. Skin tests must be performed 6 weeks after the reaction in order to confirm the diagnosis and formally contra-indicate this substance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Protoporphyrin-IX fluorescence guided surgical resection in high-grade gliomas: The potential impact of human colour perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petterssen, Max; Eljamel, Sarah; Eljamel, Sam

    2014-09-01

    Protoporphyrin-IX (Pp-IX) fluorescence had been used frequently in recent years to guide microsurgical resection of high-grade gliomas (HGG), particularly following the publication of a randomized controlled trial demonstrating its advantages. However, Pp-IX fluorescence is dependent upon the surgeons' eyes' perception of red fluorescent colour. This study was designed to evaluate human eye fluorescence perception and establish a fluorescence scale. 20 of 108 pre-recorded images from intraoperative fluorescence of HGG were used to construct an 8-panel visual analogue fluorescence scale. The scale was validated by testing 56 participants with normal colour vision and three red-green colour-blind participants. For intra-rater agreement ten participants were tested twice and for inter-observer reliability the whole cohort were tested. The intra- and inter-observer reliability of the scale in normal colour vision participants was excellent. The scale was less reliable in the violet-blue panels of the scale. Colour-blind participants were not able to distinguish between red fluorescence and blue-violet colours. The 8-panel fluorescence scale is valid in differentiating red, pink and blue colours in a fluorescence surgical field among participants with normal colour perception and potentially useful to standardize fluorescence-guided surgery. However, colourblind surgeons should not use fluorescence-guided surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Blue Light Rescues Mice from Potentially Fatal Pseudomonas aeruginosa Burn Infection: Efficacy, Safety, and Mechanism of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tianhong; Gupta, Asheesh; Huang, Ying-Ying; Yin, Rui; Murray, Clinton K.; Vrahas, Mark S.; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Tegos, George P.

    2013-01-01

    Blue light has attracted increasing attention due to its intrinsic antimicrobial effect without the addition of exogenous photosensitizers. However, the use of blue light for wound infections has not been established yet. In this study, we demonstrated the efficacy of blue light at 415 nm for the treatment of acute, potentially lethal Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn infections in mice. Our in vitro studies demonstrated that the inactivation rate of P. aeruginosa cells by blue light was approximately 35-fold higher than that of keratinocytes (P = 0.0014). Transmission electron microscopy revealed blue light-mediated intracellular damage to P. aeruginosa cells. Fluorescence spectroscopy suggested that coproporphyrin III and/or uroporphyrin III are possibly the intracellular photosensitive chromophores associated with the blue light inactivation of P. aeruginosa. In vivo studies using an in vivo bioluminescence imaging technique and an area-under-the-bioluminescence-time-curve (AUBC) analysis showed that a single exposure of blue light at 55.8 J/cm2, applied 30 min after bacterial inoculation to the infected mouse burns, reduced the AUBC by approximately 100-fold in comparison with untreated and infected mouse burns (P blue light at the effective antimicrobial dose. Survival analyses revealed that blue light increased the survival rate of the infected mice from 18.2% to 100% (P blue light therapy might offer an effective and safe alternative to conventional antimicrobial therapy for P. aeruginosa burn infections. PMID:23262998

  12. Rapid assessment of different oxygenic phototrophs and single-cell photosynthesis with multicolour variable chlorophyll fluorescence imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trampe, Erik Christian Løvbjerg; Kolbowski, J.; Schreiber, U.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new system for microscopic multicolour variable chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of aquatic phototrophs. The system is compact and portable and enables microscopic imaging of photosynthetic performance of individual cells and chloroplasts using different combinations of blue, green, ...

  13. Acquired lipidosis of marrow macrophages: birefringent blue crystals and Gaucher-like cells, sea-blue histiocytes, and grey-green crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayhoe, F G; Flemans, R J; Cowling, D C

    1979-01-01

    Three varieties of compound lipid inclusions occurring as a secondary phenomenon in marrow macrophages are detectable and distinguishable by Romanowsky staining, ultraviolet fluorescence, and polarised light. Birefringent blue crystals and Gaucher-like cells form one variety, sea-blue granules another, and grey-green crystals a third. All occur chiefly in myeloid leukaemias, either acute or chronic. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:89122

  14. Blue-emitting laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, K.; Ishibashi, A.

    This paper reviews the recent results of blue-emitting laser diodes. These devices are based on ZnMgSSe alloy II-VI semiconductors. Recently we have achieved room temperature continuous-wave operation of ZnMgSSe blue lasers for the first time. ZnMgSSe alloys offer a wide range of band-gap energy from 2.8 to 4.5 eV, while maintaining lattice matching to GaAs substrates. These characteristics make ZnMgSSe suitable for cladding layers of blue lasers. In this article, the feasibilities of ZnMgSSe will be reviewed. The laser structures and characteristics will be also mentioned.

  15. Cellular and Molecular Actions of Methylene Blue in the Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Murat; Lorke, Dietrich E.; Hasan, Mohammed; Petroianu, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Methylene Blue (MB), following its introduction to biology in the 19th century by Ehrlich, has found uses in various areas of medicine and biology. At present, MB is the first line of treatment in methemoglobinemias, is used frequently in the treatment of ifosfamide-induced encephalopathy, and is routinely employed as a diagnostic tool in surgical procedures. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that MB has beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease and memory improvement. Although the modulation of the cGMP pathway is considered the most significant effect of MB, mediating its pharmacological actions, recent studies indicate that it has multiple cellular and molecular targets. In the majority of cases, biological effects and clinical applications of MB are dictated by its unique physicochemical properties including its planar structure, redox chemistry, ionic charges, and light spectrum characteristics. In this review article, these physicochemical features and the actions of MB on multiple cellular and molecular targets are discussed with regard to their relevance to the nervous system. PMID:19760660

  16. Twenty years of vasoplegic syndrome treatment in heart surgery. Methylene blue revised

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Barbosa Evora

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to reassess the concepts established over the past 20 years, in particular in the last 5 years, about the use of methylene blue in the treatment of vasoplegic syndrome in cardiac surgery. Methods: A wide literature review was carried out using the data extracted from: MEDLINE, SCOPUS and ISI WEB OF SCIENCE. Results: The reassessed and reaffirmed concepts were 1 MB is safe in the recommended doses (the lethal dose is 40 mg/kg; 2 MB does not cause endothelial dysfunction; 3 The MB effect appears in cases of NO up-regulation; 4 MB is not a vasoconstrictor, by blocking the cGMP pathway it releases the cAMP pathway, facilitating the norepinephrine vasoconstrictor effect; 5 The most used dosage is 2 mg/kg as IV bolus, followed by the same continuous infusion because plasma concentrations sharply decrease in the first 40 minutes; and 6 There is a possible "window of opportunity" for MB's effectiveness. In the last five years, major challenges were: 1 Observations about side effects; 2 The need for prophylactic and therapeutic guidelines, and; 3 The need for the establishment of the MB therapeutic window in humans. Conclusion: MB action to treat vasoplegic syndrome is time-dependent. Therefore, the great challenge is the need, for the establishment the MB therapeutic window in humans. This would be the first step towards a systematic guideline to be followed by possible multicenter studies.

  17. Blue light emitting thiogallate phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C.; Smith, David C.; King, Christopher N.; Tuenge, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    A crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor of the formula RGa.sub.2 S.sub.4 :Ce.sub.x where R is selected from the group consisting of calcium, strontium, barium and zinc, and x is from about 1 to 10 atomic percent, the phosphor characterized as having a crystalline microstructure on the size order of from about 100 .ANG. to about 10,000 .ANG. is provided together with a process of preparing a crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor by depositing on a substrate by CVD and resultant thin film electroluminescent devices including a layer of such deposited phosphor on an ordinary glass substrate.

  18. Fluorescence diagnosis of upper respiratory tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Kate C.; Inada, Natalia M.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    The pharyngitis and laryngitis are respiratory tract infections highly common. Pharyngitis can be accompanied by fever, especially if caused by a systemic infection. Laryngitis is an inflammation of your voice box (larynx) from irritation or infection. The conventional treatment is the antibiotics administration, which may be responsible by an increase of identification of bacterial strains resistant to drug. This fact associated to high incidence of these infections become important to develop new technologies for diagnosis. This study aims to evaluate the use of widefield fluorescence imaging for the characterization of oropharynx infections, in order to diagnose the bacteria colonization. The imaging system for wide field fluorescence visualization is Evince® (MMOptics, São Carlos, SP, Brazil) coupled to an Apple iPhone® cell phone device. The system consists of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) operating in the violet blue region centered at green-red spectrum 450 nm and optical filters that allow viewing of fluorescence. A tongue depressor was adapted to Evince® for mouth opening. The same images were captured with white light and fluorescence with an optical system. The red fluorescence may be a bacterial marker for physiological monitoring of oropharynx infection processes. The bacterial biofilm on tissue were assigned to the presence of protoporphyrin IX. This work indicates that the autofluorescence of the tissue may be used as a non-invasive technique to aid in the oropharynx infection diagnostic.

  19. Is the flower fluorescence relevant in biocommunication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriel, Analía; Lagorio, María Gabriela

    2010-10-01

    Flower fluorescence has been previously proposed as a potential visual signal to attract pollinators. In this work, this point was addressed by quantitatively measuring the fluorescence quantum yield ( Φ f) for flowers of Bellis perennis (white, yellow, pink, and purple), Ornithogalum thyrsoides (petals and ovaries), Limonium sinuatum (white and yellow), Lampranthus productus (yellow), Petunia nyctaginiflora (white), Bougainvillea spectabilis (white and yellow), Antirrhinum majus (white and yellow), Eustoma grandiflorum (white and blue), Citrus aurantium (petals and stigma), and Portulaca grandiflora (yellow). The highest values were obtained for the ovaries of O. thyrsoides ( Φ f = 0.030) and for Citrus aurantium petals ( Φ f = 0.014) and stigma ( Φ f = 0.013). Emitted photons as fluorescence were compared with reflected photons. It was concluded that the fluorescence emission is negligible compared to the reflected light, even for the most fluorescent samples, and it may not be considered as an optical signal in biocommunication. The work was complemented with the calculation of quantum catches for each studied flower species to describe the visual sensitization of eye photoreceptors.

  20. Protoporphyrin IX fluorescence as potential indicator of psoriasis severity and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Xu, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Li; Zheng, Jie; Sroka, Ronald; Wang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiu-Li

    2017-09-01

    In psoriatic lesions, fluorescence diagnosis with blue light can detect protoporphyrin IX accumulation, especially after topical 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) application. However, variable fluorescence distributions, interpersonal variations and long incubation time limit its wide application in clinic. This study is aimed to identify a consistent and convenient method to facilitate diagnosis and evaluation of psoriatic lesions. 104 psoriatic lesions from 30 patients were evaluated. Single lesion PSI scoring and fluorescence by macrospectrofluorometry were recorded on each lesion before and after treatment with narrow-band UVB. Punctate red fluorescence, emitted mainly by protoporphyrin IX, is observed in some psoriatic lesions. According to psoriasis severity index, fluorescence-positive lesions are more severe than lesions without fluorescence. We found a significant positive correlation between psoriasis severity and fluorescence intensity from protoporphyrin IX. Protoporphyrin IX-induced red fluorescence can be used as a novel and convenient approach for psoriasis diagnosis and progression evaluation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  2. Stink Bug Feeding Induces Fluorescence in Developing Cotton Bolls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toews Michael D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stink bugs (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae comprise a critically important insect pest complex affecting 12 major crops worldwide including cotton. In the US, stink bug damage to developing cotton bolls causes boll abscission, lint staining, reduced fiber quality, and reduced yields with estimated losses ranging from 10 to 60 million dollars annually. Unfortunately, scouting for stink bug damage in the field is laborious and excessively time consuming. To improve scouting accuracy and efficiency, we investigated fluorescence changes in cotton boll tissues as a result of stink bug feeding. Results Fluorescent imaging under long-wave ultraviolet light showed that stink bug-damaged lint, the inner carpal wall, and the outside of the boll emitted strong blue-green fluorescence in a circular region near the puncture wound, whereas undamaged tissue emissions occurred at different wavelengths; the much weaker emission of undamaged tissue was dominated by chlorophyll fluorescence. We further characterized the optimum emission and excitation spectra to distinguish between stink bug damaged bolls from undamaged bolls. Conclusions The observed characteristic fluorescence peaks associated with stink bug damage give rise to a fluorescence-based method to rapidly distinguish between undamaged and stink bug damaged cotton bolls. Based on the fluorescent fingerprint, we envision a fluorescence reflectance imaging or a fluorescence ratiometric device to assist pest management professionals with rapidly determining the extent of stink bug damage in a cotton field.

  3. The Blue Revolution in Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponte, Stefano; Kelling, Ingrid; Jespersen, Karen Sau

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we examine the upgrading trajectories of selected aquaculture value chains in four Asian countries and the links between upgrading and three factors of value chain governance: coordination mechanisms; types of drivers; and domestic regulation. We find instances of improving produ...... of upgrading the "blue revolution" in Asia...

  4. Blue Ocean vs. Five Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Burke (Andrew); A.J. van Stel (André); A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe article reports on the authors' research in the Netherlands which focused on a profit model in Dutch retail stores and a so-called blue-ocean approach which requires a new market that attracts consumers and increases profits. Topics include the competitive strategy approach to

  5. Mobilizing investors for blue growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, van den Sander W.K.; Stuiver, Marian; Bolman, Bas C.; Wijnen, Roland; Selnes, Trond; Dalton, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    The European Union's Blue Growth Strategy is a long term strategy to support sustainable growth in the marine and maritime sectors, aiming to contribute to innovation and economic growth (European Commission, 2012). The EU sees the financial sector as a key partner to bring about transition to

  6. An optical method for reducing green fluorescence from urine during fluorescence-guided cystoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvold, Lars R.; Hermann, Gregers G.

    2016-12-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of bladder tumour tissue significantly improves endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer in rigid cystoscopes in the operating theatre and thus reduces tumour recurrence. PDD comprises the use of blue light, which unfortunately excites green fluorescence from urine. As this green fluorescence confounds the desired red fluorescence of the PDD, methods for avoiding this situation particularly in cystoscopy using flexible cystoscopes are desirable. In this paper we demonstrate how a tailor made high power LED light source at 525 nm can be used for fluorescence assisted tumour detection using both a flexible and rigid cystoscope used in the outpatient department (OPD) and operating room (OR) respectively. It is demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo how this light source can significantly reduce the green fluorescence problem with urine. At the same time this light source also is useful for exciting autofluorescence in healthy bladder mucosa. This autofluorescence then provides a contrast to the sensitized fluorescence (PDD) of tumours in the bladder.

  7. Coral monitoring with fluorescence imaging lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasano, Masahiko; Kiriya, Nobuo; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Akira; Hitomi, Kazuo; Tamura, Kenkichi

    2011-06-01

    It has been pointed out that globally hermatypic corals in coral reefs have been seriously damaged in recent years, and it is predicted that such damages will expand in area in the future. It is important to monitor corals globally, in detail, and over long-term periods, for preservation of the marine environment and biodiversity. The spot-check method, one of the major coral monitoring methods, is operated by snorkelers or divers, and therefore, its operation is limited by the seastate, and its monitoring areas are often for specific observation points. On the other hand, the satellite remote sensing, another major coral monitoring methods, can cover composite coral reef areas, but the image resolution is a few meters, and it is not possible to monitor small size coral colonies and deep sea areas. The boat-based fluorescence imaging lidar system has been developed to complement these coral monitoring methods. This system obtains linear coral observation data along the boat track, and makes it possible to build a cooperative coral monitoring network. Since most hermatypic corals have fluorescent proteins, living tissues can be monitored using the blue-to-green fluorescence from UV excitation. It is possible to observe the UV-excited fluorescence images from live coral even in the daytime, by the UV excited fluorescence imaging lidar. Additionally, laser bathymetry is also possible by time-of-flight measurement. We have succeeded in observing the pseudo-coral fluorescent images and depths down to 30 m depth at the testing basin. Secondly, we have succeeded in observing the live coral fluorescent images and their depths by the lidar system using a glass-bottom-boat at Taketomi island, Okinawa, Japan. The system summary and observed data are reported in this paper.

  8. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  9. Reviews in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2010-01-01

    This volume serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence spectroscopy. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications as well as includes authoritative analytical reviews.

  10. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Verveer, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the

  11. Investigations of riboflavin photolysis via coloured light in the nitro blue tetrazolium assay for superoxide dismutase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chien-Wei; Chen, Liang-Yü; Chou, Chan-Wei; Liang, Ji-Yuan

    2015-07-01

    Determination of the superoxide dismutase activity is an important issue in the fields of biochemistry and the medical sciences. In the riboflavin/nitro blue tetrazolium (B2/NBT) method, the light sources used for generating superoxide anion radicals from light-excited riboflavin are normally fluorescent lamps. However, the conditions of B2/NBT experiments vary. This study investigated the effect of the light source on the light-excitation of riboflavin. The effectiveness of the photolysis was controlled by the wavelength of the light source. The spectra of fluorescent lamps are composed of multiple colour lights, and the emission spectra of fluorescent lamps made by different manufacturers may vary. Blue light was determined to be the most efficient for the photochemical reaction of riboflavin in visible region. The quality of the blue light in fluorescent lamps is critical to the photo-decomposition of riboflavin. A blue light is better than a fluorescent lamp for the photo-decomposition of riboflavin. The performance of the B2/NBT method is thereby optimized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. When cheese gets the blues: Pseudomonas fluorescens as the causative agent of cheese spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, N H; Murphy, S C; Ralyea, R D; Wiedmann, M; Boor, K J

    2011-06-01

    A bacterial contamination of fresh, low-acid cheese that resulted in production of a blue fluorescent pigment on the surface of the cheese was determined to be caused by Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar IV, a gram-negative bacteria that produces a blue, nondiffusible pigment as well as the soluble pigment pyoverdin, which fluoresces under UV light. Ten isolates collected from contaminated cheese and environmental samples were initially identified as P. fluorescens using 16S rDNA sequencing, but only 8 of the isolates produced blue pigment and fluoresced under UV light when re-inoculated onto fresh, low-acid cheese. The Biolog Metabolic Fingerprint system (Biolog Inc., Hayward, CA) and the Analytical Profile Index (BioMerieux Vitek Inc., Hazelwood, MO) for nonenteric gram-negative species as well as EcoRI ribotyping did not differentiate between the isolates that produced blue color and those that did not. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis with the enzyme XbaI was able to distinguish between the isolates that produced pigment and those that did not and allowed for identification of a specific environmental site (i.e., an overhead cheese vat agitator system) as the likely source of product contamination. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intracerebral Administration of S-Adenosylhomocysteine or S-Adenosylmethionine Attenuates the Increases in the Cortical Extracellular Levels of Dimethylarginines Without Affecting cGMP Level in Rats with Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna; Milewski, Krzysztof; Jaźwiec, Radosław; Zielińska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in brain nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP synthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). An increased asymmetrically dimethylated derivative of L-arginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of NO synthases, was observed in plasma of HE patients and animal models. It is not clear whether changes in brain ADMA reflect its increased local synthesis therefore affecting NO/cGMP pathway, or are a consequence of its increased peripheral blood content. We measured extracellular concentration of ADMA and symmetrically dimethylated isoform (SDMA) in the prefrontal cortex of control and thioacetamide (TAA)-induced HE rats. A contribution of locally synthesized dimethylarginines (DMAs) in their extracellular level in the brain was studied after direct infusion of the inhibitor of DMAs synthesizing enzymes (PRMTs), S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy, 2 mM), or the methyl donor, S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet, 2 mM), via a microdialysis probe. Next, we analyzed whether locally synthesized ADMA attains physiological significance by determination of extracellular cGMP. The expression of PRMT-1 was also examined. Concentration of ADMA and SDMA, detected by positive mode electrospray LC-DMS-MS/MS, was greatly enhanced in TAA rats and was decreased (by 30 %) after AdoHcy and AdoMet infusion. TAA-induced increase (by 40 %) in cGMP was unaffected after AdoHcy administration. The expression of PRMT-1 in TAA rat brain was unaltered. The results suggest that (i) the TAA-induced increase in extracellular DMAs may result from their effective synthesis in the brain, and (ii) the excess of extracellular ADMA does not translate into changes in the extracellular cGMP concentration and implicate a minor role in brain NO/cGMP pathway control.

  14. 21 CFR 133.106 - Blue cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blue cheese. 133.106 Section 133.106 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.106 Blue cheese. (a) Description. (1) Blue cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set...

  15. Blue light reduces organ injury from ischemia and reperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Du; Collage, Richard D.; Huang, Hai; Zhang, Xianghong; Kautza, Benjamin C.; Lewis, Anthony J.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Tsung, Allan; Angus, Derek C.; Rosengart, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that light and circadian rhythms profoundly influence the physiologic capacity with which an organism responds to stress. However, the ramifications of light spectrum on the course of critical illness remain to be determined. Here, we show that acute exposure to bright blue spectrum light reduces organ injury by comparison with bright red spectrum or ambient white fluorescent light in two murine models of sterile insult: warm liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and unilateral renal I/R. Exposure to bright blue light before I/R reduced hepatocellular injury and necrosis and reduced acute kidney injury and necrosis. In both models, blue light reduced neutrophil influx, as evidenced by reduced myeloperoxidase (MPO) within each organ, and reduced the release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a neutrophil chemotactant and key mediator in the pathogenesis of I/R injury. The protective mechanism appeared to involve an optic pathway and was mediated, in part, by a sympathetic (β3 adrenergic) pathway that functioned independent of significant alterations in melatonin or corticosterone concentrations to regulate neutrophil recruitment. These data suggest that modifying the spectrum of light may offer therapeutic utility in sterile forms of cellular injury. PMID:27114521

  16. 75 FR 65525 - Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,327] Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division of Wellpoint, Inc., Green Bay, WI; Notice... former workers of Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division...

  17. Importance of 'blue' photon levels for lettuce seedlings grown under red-light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenecke, M. E.; Bula, R. J.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with high-intensity output are being studied as a photosynthetic light source for plants. High-output LEDs have peak emission at approximately 660 nm concentrated in a waveband of +/- 30 nm. Lettuce (Lactuca sativa Grand Rapids') seedlings developed extended hypocotyls and elongated cotyledons when grown under these LEDs as a sole source of irradiance. This extension and elongation was prevented when the red LED radiation was supplemented with more than 15 micromoles m-2 s-1 of 400- to 500-nm photons from blue fluorescent lamps. Blue radiation effects were independent of the photon level of the red radiation.

  18. Cell-based and in vivo spectral analysis of fluorescent proteins for multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomonnson, Emma; Mihalko, Laura Anne; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2012-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy of cells and subcellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins is the state-of-the-art technology for longitudinal imaging studies in tissues and living animals. Successful analysis of separate cell populations or signaling events by intravital microscopy requires optimal pairing of multiphoton excitation wavelengths with spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins. While prior studies have analyzed two photon absorption properties of isolated fluorescent proteins, there is limited information about two photon excitation and fluorescence emission profiles of fluorescent proteins expressed in living cells and intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy was used to analyze fluorescence outputs of multiple blue, green, and red fluorescent proteins in cultured cells and orthotopic tumor xenografts of human breast cancer cells. It is shown that commonly used orange and red fluorescent proteins are excited efficiently by 750 to 760 nm laser light in living cells, enabling dual color imaging studies with blue or cyan proteins without changing excitation wavelength. It is also shown that small incremental changes in excitation wavelength significantly affect emission intensities from fluorescent proteins, which can be used to optimize multi-color imaging using a single laser wavelength. These data will direct optimal selection of fluorescent proteins for multispectral two photon microscopy.

  19. The Physics of the Blues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J. Murray

    2009-03-01

    In looking at the commonalities between music and science, one sees that the musician's palette is based on the principles of physics. The pitch of a musical note is determined by the frequency of the sound wave. The scales that musicians use to create and play music can be viewed as a set of rules. What makes music interesting is how musicians develop those rules and create ambiguity with them. I will discuss the evolution of western musical scales in this context. As a particular example, ``Blue'' notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale. The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting. Live keyboard demonstrations will be used. Beyond any redeeming entertainment value the talk will emphasize the serious connections between science and art in music. Nevertheless tips will be accepted.

  20. Thermoluminescence (TL) of Egyptian Blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schvoerer, M.; Delavergne, M.-C.; Chapoulie, R.

    1988-01-01

    Egyptian Blue is a synthesized crystalline pictorial pigment with formula CaCuSi/sub 4/O/sub 10/. It has been used in Egypt and Mesopotamia from the 3rd millenium B.C. A preliminary experiment on a recently synthesized sample showed that this pigment is thermoluminescent after ..beta.. irradiation (/sup 90/Sr). As the signal intensity grows linearly with the administered dose within the temperature range commonly used in TL dating, we have been looking for this phenomenon from archaeological pigments. It was encountered with two samples found in excavation. From its intensity and stability we concluded that Egyptian Blue can be dated using TL. This first and positive result encouraged us to extend the method to other types of mineral pigments synthesized by early man, and to suggest that it may be used for direct dating of ancient murals.

  1. Blue breath holding is benign.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephenson, J B

    1991-01-01

    In their recent publication in this journal, Southall et al described typical cyanotic breath holding spells, both in otherwise healthy children and in those with brainstem lesions and other malformations. Their suggestions regarding possible autonomic disturbances may require further study, but they have adduced no scientific evidence to contradict the accepted view that in the intact child blue breath holding spells are benign. Those families in which an infant suffers an 'apparently life t...

  2. Galaxies on the Blue Edge

    OpenAIRE

    Cabanela, J. E.; Dickey, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    We have successfully constructed a catalog of HI-rich galaxies selected from the Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner Catalog of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS I) based solely on optical criteria. We identify HI-rich candidates by selecting the bluest galaxies at a given apparent magnitude, those galaxies on the "blue edge" of POSS I color-magnitude parameter space. Subsequent 21-cm observations on the upgraded Arecibo 305m dish detected over 50% of the observed candidates. The detecte...

  3. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Gruber

    Full Text Available We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs. Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp., two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II. We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein's fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment.

  4. Blue light regulated shade avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuskamp, Diederik H; Keller, Mercedes M; Ballaré, Carlos L; Pierik, Ronald

    2012-04-01

    Most plants grow in dense vegetation with the risk of being out-competed by neighboring plants. These neighbors can be detected not only through the depletion in light quantity that they cause, but also through the change in light quality, which plants perceive using specific photoreceptors. Both the reduction of the red:far-red ratio and the depletion of blue light are signals that induce a set of phenotypic traits, such as shoot elongation and leaf hyponasty, which increase the likelihood of light capture in dense plant stands. This set of phenotypic responses are part of the so called shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). This addendum discusses recent findings on the regulation of the SAS of Arabidopsis thaliana upon blue light depletion. Keller et al. and Keuskamp et al. show that the low blue light attenuation induced shade avoidance response of seedling and rosette-stage A. thaliana plants differ in their hormonal regulation. These studies also show there is a regulatory overlap with the R:FR-regulated SAS.

  5. Quenched carbonaceous composite - Fluorescence spectrum compared to the extended red emission observed in reflection nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Akira; Wada, Setsuko; Narisawa, Takatoshi; Asano, Yoichi; Iijima, Yutaka; Onaka, Takashi; Tokunaga, Alan T.

    1992-01-01

    The photoluminescence (fluorescence) of a film of the laboratory-synthesized quenched carbonaceous composite (filmy QCC) is shown to have a single broad emission feature with a peak wavelength that varies from 670 to 725 nm, and coincides with that of the extended red emission observed in reflection nebulae. The rapid decay of the filmy QCC red fluorescence in air and of the stable blue fluorescence of the filmy QCC dissolved in liquid Freon suggests that the red fluorescence originates from the interaction of active chemical species and aromatic components in the filmy QCC. A material similar in nature to that of the filmy QCC may be a major component of interstellar dust.

  6. Plasmon enhanced silver quantum cluster fluorescence for biochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernard, S.; Kutter, Jörg P.; Mogensen, K. B.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of individual silver quantum clusters on the surface of silver nanoparticles reveals strong photoactivated emission under blue light excitation [1-4]. In this work, silver nanoparticles are produced by annealing silver thin films deposited on a glass substrate and silver...... quantum clusters are subsequently synthesized at the surface of the nanoparticles by photoactivation in presence of Ag+ cations in solution. The photogeneration of these silver quantum clusters leads to a great increase in the fluorescent signal. This photoactivated surface can then be used for sensing...... purposes. It was found, that in presence of a strong nucleophile (such as CN-), silver quantum clusters are dissolved into non-fluorescing AgCN complexes, resulting in a fast and observable decrease of the fluorescent signal....

  7. Presence of Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticles in Baked Lamb: Their Properties and Potential Application for Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Xie, Yisha; Liu, Shan; Cong, Shuang; Song, Yukun; Xu, Xianbing; Tan, Mingqian

    2017-08-30

    The presence of nanoparticles in food has drawn much attention in recent years. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles are a new class of nanostructures; however, the distribution and physicochemical properties of such nanoparticles in food remain unclear. Herein, the presence of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles in baked lamb was confirmed, and their physicochemical properties were investigated. The fluorescent carbon nanoparticles from baked lamb emit strong blue fluorescence under ultraviolet light with a 10% fluorescent quantum yield. The nanoparticles are roughly spherical in appearance with a diameter of around 2.0 nm. Hydroxyl, amino, and carboxyl groups exist on the surface of nanoparticles. In addition, the nanoparticles could serve as a fluorescence sensor for glucose detection through an oxidation-reduction reaction. This work is the first report on fluorescent carbon nanoparticles present in baked lamb, which provides valuable insight into the physicochemical properties of such nanoparticles and their potential application in sensors.

  8. Origins of fluorescence in evolved bacteriophytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Shyamosree; Auldridge, Michele E; Lehtivuori, Heli; Ihalainen, Janne A; Forest, Katrina T

    2014-11-14

    Use of fluorescent proteins to study in vivo processes in mammals requires near-infrared (NIR) biomarkers that exploit the ability of light in this range to penetrate tissue. Bacteriophytochromes (BphPs) are photoreceptors that couple absorbance of NIR light to photoisomerization, protein conformational changes, and signal transduction. BphPs have been engineered to form NIR fluorophores, including IFP1.4, Wi-Phy, and the iRFP series, initially by replacement of Asp-207 by His. This position was suggestive because its main chain carbonyl is within hydrogen-bonding distance to pyrrole ring nitrogens of the biliverdin chromophore, thus potentially functioning as a crucial transient proton sink during photoconversion. To explain the origin of fluorescence in these phytofluors, we solved the crystal structures of IFP1.4 and a comparison non-fluorescent monomeric phytochrome DrCBDmon. Met-186 and Val-288 in IFP1.4 are responsible for the formation of a tightly packed hydrophobic hub around the biliverdin D ring. Met-186 is also largely responsible for the blue-shifted IFP1.4 excitation maximum relative to the parent BphP. The structure of IFP1.4 revealed decreased structural heterogeneity and a contraction of two surface regions as direct consequences of side chain substitutions. Unexpectedly, IFP1.4 with Asp-207 reinstalled (IFPrev) has a higher fluorescence quantum yield (∼9%) than most NIR phytofluors published to date. In agreement, fluorescence lifetime measurements confirm the exceptionally long excited state lifetimes, up to 815 ps, in IFP1.4 and IFPrev. Our research helps delineate the origin of fluorescence in engineered BphPs and will facilitate the wide-spread adoption of phytofluors as biomarkers. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. High efficiency fluorescent tubes. An efficient solution for the economical lighting of industrial and tertiary buildings; Les tubes fluorescents haut rendement. Une solution performante pour l'eclairage economique des locaux indutriels et tertiaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Fluorescent lamps are low pressure mercury vapor lamps (discharge lamps). The high efficiency fluorescent tubes have a greater lighting efficiency thanks to the integration of tri-chromatic powders emitting in the three fundamental colors (red, green, blue). Their useful lifetime is exceptionally long (90% of their initial flux after 12000 hours of use), and they require a lower maintenance with respect to the traditional fluorescent tubes. This document presents the characteristics and advantages of high efficiency fluorescent tubes for professional use and their cost and performance with respect to standard fluorescent tubes. (J.S.)

  10. Stomatal limitation to carbon gain in Paphiopedilum sp. (Orchidaceae) and its reversal by blue light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiger, E.; Grivet, C.; Assmann, S.M.; Dietzer, G.F.; Hannegan, M.W.

    1985-02-01

    Leaves from Paphiopedilum sp. (Orchidaceae) having achlorophyllous stomata, show reduced levels of stomatal conductance when irradiated with red light, as compared with either the related, chlorophyllous genus Phragmipedium or with their response to blue light. These reduced levels of stomatal conductance, and the failure of isolated Paphiopedilum stomata to open under red irradiation indicates that the small stomatal response measured in the intact leaf under red light is indirect. The overall low levels of stomatal conductance observed in Paphiopedilum leaves under most growing conditions and their capacity to increase stomatal conductance in response to blue light suggested that growth and carbon gain in Paphiopedilum could be enhanced in a blue light-enriched environment. To test that hypothesis, plants of Paphiopedilum acmodontum were grown in controlled growth chambers under daylight fluorescent light, with or without blue light supplementation. Blue light enrichment resulted in significantly higher growth rates over a 3 to 4 week growing period, with all evidence indicating that the blue light effect was a stomatal response. Manipulations of stomatal properties aimed at long-term carbon gains could have agronomic applications.

  11. Effect of phototherapy with turquoise vs. blue LED light of equal irradiance in jaundiced neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbesen, Finn; Vandborg, Pernille K; Madsen, Poul H; Trydal, Torleif; Jakobsen, Lasse H; Vreman, Hendrik J

    2016-02-01

    Blue light with peak emission around 460 nm is the preferred treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. However, studies using fluorescent light tubes have suggested that turquoise light with peak emission at 490 nm may be more efficient. At present, the predominant light source for phototherapy is light emitting diodes (LEDs). Hence, the aim of this study was to compare the bilirubin-reducing effect in jaundiced neonates treated either with turquoise or with blue LED light with peak emission at 497 or 459 nm, respectively, with equal irradiance on the infants. Infants with gestational age ≥33 wk and uncomplicated hyperbilirubinemia were randomized to either turquoise or blue LED light and were treated for 24 h. The mean irradiance footprint at skin level was 5.2 × 10(15) and 5.1 × 10(15) photons/cm(2)/s, respectively. Forty-six infants received turquoise light and 45 received blue light. The median (95% confidence interval) decrease of total serum bilirubin was 35.3% (32.5; 37.3) and 33.1% (27.1; 36.8) for infants treated with turquoise and blue lights, respectively. The difference was nonsignificant (P = 0.53). The decrease was positively correlated to postnatal age and negatively to birth weight. Using LED light of equal irradiance, turquoise and blue lights had equal bilirubin-reducing effect on hyperbilirubinemia of neonates.

  12. Adsorption of Methylene Blue, Bromophenol Blue, and Coomassie Brilliant Blue by α-chitin nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solairaj Dhananasekaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Expelling of dyestuff into water resource system causes major thread to the environment. Adsorption is the cost effective and potential method to remove the dyes from the effluents. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the adsorption of dyestuff (Methylene Blue (MB, Bromophenol Blue (BPB and Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB by α-chitin nanoparticles (CNP prepared from Penaeus monodon (Fabricius, 1798 shell waste. On contrary to the most recognizable adsorption studies using chitin, this is the first study using unique nanoparticles of ⩽50 nm used for the dye adsorption process. The results showed that the adsorption process increased with increase in the concentration of CNP, contact time and temperature with the dyestuff, whereas the adsorption process decreased with increase in the initial dye concentration and strong acidic pH. The results from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that the interaction between dyestuff and CNP involved physical adsorption. The adsorption process obeys Langmuir isotherm (R2 values were 0.992, 0.999 and 0.992 for MB, BPB and CBB, and RL value lies between 0 and 1 for all the three dyes and pseudo second order kinetics (R2 values were 0.996, 0.999 and 0.996 for MB, BPB and CBB more effectively. The isotherm and kinetic models confirmed that CNP can be used as a suitable adsorbent material for the removal of dyestuff from effluents.

  13. Variation of Spectral Characteristics of Coelenteramide-Containing Fluorescent Protein from Obelia Longissima Exposed to Dimethyl Sulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, A. S.; Alieva, R. R.; Belogurova, N. V.; Tirranen, L. S.; Kudryasheva, N. S.

    2016-08-01

    Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a widespread biomedical agent, on spectral-luminescent characteristics of coelenteramide-containing fluorescent protein - discharged obelin - is investigated. Contributions of violet and blue-green spectral components to fluorescence of discharged obelin are elucidated and characterized at different photoexcitation energies. Dependences of these contributions on the DMSO concentration are presented. Spectral changes are related to the destructive effect of DMSO on fluorescent protein and decreasing efficiency of proton transfer to electronically excited states of fluorophore.

  14. Fluorescence self-quenching of tetraphenylporphyrin in liquid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Mihir [Integrated Science Education and Research Centre, Siksha-Bhavana, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Nath, Sukhendu [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Hajra, Alakananda [Department of Chemistry, Siksha-Bhavana, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Sinha, Subrata, E-mail: subratasinha67@rediffmail.com [Integrated Science Education and Research Centre, Siksha-Bhavana, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India)

    2013-09-15

    Self-quenching of the fluorescence emission of tetraphenylporphyrin at high concentrations in toluene at the ambient temperature (300 K) is discussed in detail based on steady state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The fluorescence self-quenching is mainly attributed to re-absorption effect and the Förster type resonance energy transfer process (homotransfer). The re-absorption effect is found to deform the fluorescence emission spectra significantly in energy positions as well as relative intensities of different peaks at high concentrations. Nearly ideal fluorescence emission spectra are observed at a concentration ∼10{sup −7} mol/L. Moreover, there is an apparent enhancement of the fluorescence lifetime value of tetraphenylporphyrin in toluene at high concentrations, especially on the blue side of the fluorescence emission spectra. To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first detail report on the fluorescence self-quenching of porphyrins in liquid medium. This finding carries great importance in view of the widespread research on porphyrins in the fields of solar light harvesting, artificial photosynthesis, photodynamic therapy, etc. -- Highlights: • The effect of concentration on the fluorescence emission spectra of tetraphenylporphyrin (TPhP) in toluene at 300 K is investigated by using steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. • Both re-absorption effect and the Förster type resonance energy transfer are found to be responsible for the observed fluorescence self-quenching at high concentrations. • These investigations are extremely important in view of the extensive applications of porphyrins in the fabrication of molecular electronic devices, especially for solar and artificial photosynthetic devices, where highly concentrated porphyrins are often used for efficient light harvesting.

  15. Fluorescence dye tagging scheme for mercury quantification and speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Hong; Catterall, Hannah

    2015-09-22

    A fluorescent dye or fluorophore capable of forming complexes with mercury comprises 6,8-difluoro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxylate amide, wherein the amide is formed by reacting the succinimidyl ester (Pacific Blue.TM.) with an amino acid containing a thiol group, such as cysteine or glutathione. Mercury complexes of the fluorophore fluoresce when excited by a UV or violet laser diode, and the detected intensity can be calibrated to quantify the concentration of mercury in a sample reacted with the fluorophore.

  16. Proximal Sensing of Plant-Pathogen Interactions in Spring Barley with Three Fluorescence Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Leufen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last years fluorescence spectroscopy has come to be viewed as an essential approach in key research fields of applied plant sciences. However, the quantity and particularly the quality of information produced by different equipment might vary considerably. In this study we investigate the potential of three optical devices for the proximal sensing of plant-pathogen interactions in four genotypes of spring barley. For this purpose, the fluorescence lifetime, the image-resolved multispectral fluorescence and selected indices of a portable multiparametric fluorescence device were recorded at 3, 6, and 9 days after inoculation (dai from healthy leaves as well as from leaves inoculated with powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis or leaf rust (Puccinia hordei. Genotype-specific responses to pathogen infections were revealed already at 3 dai by higher fluorescence mean lifetimes in the spectral range from 410 to 560 nm in the less susceptible varieties. Noticeable pathogen-induced modifications were also revealed by the ‘Blue-to-Far-Red Fluorescence Ratio’ and the ‘Simple Fluorescence Ratio’. Particularly in the susceptible varieties the differences became more evident in the time-course of the experiment i.e., following the pathogen development. The relevance of the blue and green fluorescence to exploit the plant-pathogen interaction was demonstrated by the multispectral fluorescence imaging system. As shown, mildewed leaves were characterized by exceptionally high blue fluorescence, contrasting the values observed in rust inoculated leaves. Further, we confirm that the intensity of green fluorescence depends on the pathogen infection and the stage of disease development; this information might allow a differentiation of both diseases. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the detection area might influence the quality of the information, although it had a minor impact only in the current study. Finally, we highlight the relevance of

  17. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  18. Dual-emission of a fluorescent graphene oxide-quantum dot nanohybrid for sensitive and selective visual sensor applications based on ratiometric fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Houjuan; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Kui; Wang, Suhua

    2012-08-10

    A novel nanohybrid ratiometric fluorescence probe comprised of fluorescent graphene oxide and quantum dots (QDs) has been prepared by bringing CdTe QDs of red fluorescence and fluorescent graphene oxide (FGO) of blue fluorescence together through electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bonding interaction between their surface functional groups including carboxyl and amine groups. The nanohybrid ratiometric fluorescence probe exhibits dual emissions at 450 and 650 nm under a single excitation wavelength and shows high sensitivity for the detection of ferrous ions in the presence of H₂O₂. Ferrous ions reacts with H₂O₂ to generate very reactive hydroxyl radicals which possess a strong oxidizing nature and easily capture the electrons from the surfaces of the CdTe QDs, leading to fluorescence quenching of the QDs and no effect on the fluorescence of the graphene oxide, which hence results in a great change of the fluorescence ratio. Moreover, the ratiometric fluorescence probe is not only extremely sensitive to ferrous ions, but is also selective over other biologically relevant metal cations. The changes of fluorescence colour ratios can be used for visual sensing applications for ferrous ions in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, and can also be used for the indication of the existence of hydrogen peroxide.

  19. Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhturova, N.F.; Yudelevich, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry, a comparatively new method for the analysis of trace quantities, has developed rapidly in the past ten years. Theoretical and experimental studies by many workers have shown that atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS) is capable of achieving a better limit than atomic absorption for a large number of elements. The present review examines briefly the principles of atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry and the types of fluorescent transition. The excitation sources, flame and nonflame atomizers, used in AFS are described. The limits of detection achieved up to the present, using flame and nonflame methods of atomization are given

  20. Clinical results of a new high-phototherapeutic-efficiency blue-green lamp for the management of hyperbilirubinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzelli, Gian Paolo; Pratesi, Simone; Agati, Giovanni; Fusi, Franco; Pratesi, Riccardo

    1996-01-01

    We report a preliminary study on the introduction of a new, blue-green fluorescent lamp with high phototherapeutic efficiency in the treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The lamp (New Lamp) has an emission spectrum, peaked at 490 nm and about 40 nm wide, that was not previously investigated in clinical trials. Our study demonstrates the significantly greater efficacy of the New Lamp in decreasing the bilirubin serum level, in comparison with the most commonly used blue fluorescent lamp. The rate of decline of bilirubin concentration with the New Lamp was twice that with Philips/BB light. The success of the blue-green PT is mainly due to the combined effects of the (1) increase from blue to green of the quantum yield for lumirubin, that is the bilirubin photoproduct rapidly excreted from the organism; (2) corresponding decrease of the configurational photoisomer, formed with high concentration but not excreted from the organism; (3) filtering effect of the skin, which attenuates more blue than green light. Our results represent the first significant improvement of phototherapy efficiency following the development and introduction of the special-blue lamp by Sisson in 1970. The phototherapy exposure time has now been reduced to less than 1-day in preterm infants, ensuring less stress to the infant and less interference with nursing care.

  1. Blue breath holding is benign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, J B

    1991-01-01

    In their recent publication in this journal, Southall et al described typical cyanotic breath holding spells, both in otherwise healthy children and in those with brainstem lesions and other malformations. Their suggestions regarding possible autonomic disturbances may require further study, but they have adduced no scientific evidence to contradict the accepted view that in the intact child blue breath holding spells are benign. Those families in which an infant suffers an 'apparently life threatening event' deserve immense understanding and help, and it behoves investigators to exercise extreme care and self criticism in the presentation of new knowledge which may bear upon their management and their morale. PMID:2001115

  2. Characterization, diagnosis and ablation of human teeth using blue laser at 457 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sherif, Ashraf F.; Gomaa, Walid; El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.

    2014-02-01

    The light interaction with tissue is governed by the specific wavelength of the laser used and the optical properties of target tissue. Absorption, scattering and fluorescence together can probably be used as the basis of quantitative diagnostic methods for teeth caries. The absorption coefficient of human teeth was determined from detached wet teeth (incisors and premolars). Laser absorption of these teeth was measured using compact blue laser source at wavelength of 457 nm and a high resolution spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere. The average absorption coefficient of abnormal caries tissue of human teeth is observed to be higher than the normal ones. Detection and diagnosis of caries tissues were monitored by high resolution translational scanning of human teeth. We have a powerful tool to diagnosis a caries region of human teeth using blue laser at 457 nm. Ablations of caries region are investigated using higher power of blue laser at 457 nm.

  3. An Exciplex Host for Deep-Blue Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyoungcheol; Shin, Hyun; Kim, Kwon-Hyeon; Yoo, Seung-Jun; Huh, Jin-Suk; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2017-11-01

    The use of exciplex hosts is attractive for high-performance phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs) and thermally activated delayed fluorescence OLEDs, which have high external quantum efficiency, low driving voltage, and low efficiency roll-off. However, exciplex hosts for deep-blue OLEDs have not yet been reported because of the difficulties in identifying suitable molecules. Here, we report a deep-blue-emitting exciplex system with an exciplex energy of 3.0 eV. It is composed of a carbazole-based hole-transporting material (mCP) and a phosphine-oxide-based electron-transporting material (BM-A10). The blue PhOLEDs exhibited maximum external quantum efficiency of 24% with CIE coordinates of (0.15, 0.21) and longer lifetime than the single host devices.

  4. Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue by C3N4/ZnO: the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to degrade a methylene blue (MB) dye solution using blacklight lamps, but there is no significant difference in pho- tocatalytic activities between ZnO and prepared C3N4/ZnO under visible light by the fluorescent lamps. However, the prepared C3N4/ZnO can well function under illumination by Xe lamp as the high power ...

  5. Investigations on the fluorescence of urinary stones: how to assist the MD (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Eisel, Max; Pongratz, Thomas; Ulaganathan, Keerthanan; Strittmatter, Frank

    2017-02-01

    Urinary stones harvested from patients were under in-vitro investigation. Fluorescence measurements were performed either by taking images under blue light excitation light as well as measuring excitation-emission-matrixes. Ho:YAG-laser assisted fragmentation was performed in an aquarium set-up to derived fragmentation/dusting rates. FTIR-spectroscopy was used to identify the composition of the stone. Blue light fluorescence excitation resulted in fluorescence emission in different spectral regions spectroscopically proven by EEM-measurement. A correlation with FTIR-spectroscopy is performed. Fragmentation experiments resulted in a dependency to the applied energy/pulse and repetition rate. Using photonic techniques urinary stones could be categorized by their composition. The impact of fluorescence guidance during endoscopic laser lithotripsy will be discussed.

  6. Electronic properties of blue phosphorene/graphene and blue phosphorene/graphene-like gallium nitride heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Minglei; Chou, Jyh-Pin; Yu, Jin; Tang, Wencheng

    2017-07-05

    Blue phosphorene (BlueP) is a graphene-like phosphorus nanosheet which was synthesized very recently for the first time [Nano Lett., 2016, 16, 4903-4908]. The combination of electronic properties of two different two-dimensional materials in an ultrathin van der Waals (vdW) vertical heterostructure has been proved to be an effective approach to the design of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices. Therefore, we used density functional theory to investigate the structural and electronic properties of two BlueP-based heterostructures - BlueP/graphene (BlueP/G) and BlueP/graphene-like gallium nitride (BlueP/g-GaN). Our results showed that the semiconducting nature of BlueP and the Dirac cone of G are well preserved in the BlueP/G vdW heterostructure. Moreover, by applying a perpendicular electric field, it is possible to tune the position of the Dirac cone of G with respect to the band edge of BlueP, resulting in the ability to control the Schottky barrier height. For the BlueP/g-GaN vdW heterostructure, BlueP forms an interface with g-GaN with a type-II band alignment, which is a promising feature for unipolar electronic device applications. Furthermore, we discovered that both G and g-GaN can be used as an active layer for BlueP to facilitate charge injection and enhance the device performance.

  7. Blue-light-activated phototropin2 trafficking from the cytoplasm to Golgi/post-Golgi vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Chhavi; Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Kasprowicz-Maluśki, Anna; Borghetti, Carolina; Labuz, Justyna; Dobrucki, Jerzy; Gabryś, Halina

    2014-07-01

    Phototropins are plasma membrane-localized UVA/blue light photoreceptors which mediate phototropism, inhibition of primary hypocotyl elongation, leaf positioning, chloroplast movements, and stomatal opening. Blue light irradiation activates the C-terminal serine/threonine kinase domain of phototropin which autophosphorylates the receptor. Arabidopsis thaliana encodes two phototropins, phot1 and phot2. In response to blue light, phot1 moves from the plasma membrane into the cytosol and phot2 translocates to the Golgi complex. In this study the molecular mechanism and route of blue-light-induced phot2 trafficking are demonstrated. It is shown that Atphot2 behaves in a similar manner when expressed transiently under 35S or its native promoter. The phot2 kinase domain but not blue-light-mediated autophosphorylation is required for the receptor translocation. Using co-localization and western blotting, the receptor was shown to move from the cytoplasm to the Golgi complex, and then to the post-Golgi structures. The results were confirmed by brefeldin A (an inhibitor of the secretory pathway) which disrupted phot2 trafficking. An association was observed between phot2 and the light chain2 of clathrin via bimolecular fluorescence complementation. The fluorescence was observed at the plasma membrane. The results were confirmed using co-immunoprecipitation. However, tyrphostin23 (an inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis) and wortmannin (a suppressor of receptor endocytosis) were not able to block phot2 trafficking, indicating no involvement of receptor endocytosis in the formation of phot2 punctuate structures. Protein turnover studies indicated that the receptor was continuously degraded in both darkness and blue light. The degradation of phot2 proceeded via a transport route different from translocation to the Golgi complex. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. The effects of visual fluorescence marking induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid for endoscopic diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniltchenko, Dmitri I.; Koenig, Frank; Schnorr, Dietmar; Valdman, Alexander; Al-Shukri, Salman; Loening, Stefan A.

    2003-10-01

    During cystoscopy procedure, fluorescence diagnostics induced by 5-ALA improves visual detection of the bladder cancer. Macroscopic ALA-fluorescence allows visualizing of small flat tumors, carcinoma in situ, true neoplasm margins and dysplasias of the bladder. Following ALA instillation, cystoscopy has been performed under both standard and blue light illumination. Totally, 153 biopsies have been carried out at 53 patients with suspicion of bladder cancer. The results were compared to ALA-fluorescence data. In 13% of the patients, bladder cancer and dysplasia were found out in addition, due to red fluorescence. The sensitivity and specificity of ALA-fluorescence technique aggregated 96% and 52% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of 5-ALA-fluorescent detection exceeded standard endoscopy under white light on 20%. The new method does not exclude a false positive and a false negative fluorescent luminescence. The ALA-based fluorescence detection system enhances the diagnosis of malignant/dysplastic bladder lesions significantly.

  9. Dataset of the absorption, emission and excitation spectra and fluorescence intensity graphs of fluorescent cyanine dyes for the quantification of low amounts of dsDNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijns, Brigitte Bibiche; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    This article describes data related to a research article entitled “Fluorescent cyanine dyes for the quantification of low amounts of dsDNA” (B. Bruijns, R. Tiggelaar, J. Gardeniers, 2016) [1]. Six cyanine dsDNA dyes - EvaGreen, SYBR Green, PicoGreen, AccuClear, AccuBlue NextGen and YOYO-1 – are

  10. EARLY DOWNHOME BLUES IN AMERICAN CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Muhni, Djuhertati Imam

    2012-01-01

    People's traditional music and the way people behave when performing it are symbolic expressions of broad cultural pattern and social organization . In other words music is a part of men's learned heritage . Hence this study is about music in a given culture, specifically blues in American culture . Allen Trachtenberg stated that blues songs are inheritance from the American past for negotiating black people's lives as Americans . In the experience of blues the African-Americans find themselv...

  11. The Red-Blue Transportation Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Vancroonenburg, Wim; Della Croce, Federico; Goossens, Dries; Spieksma, Frits

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the Red-Blue Transportation Problem (Red-Blue TP), a generalization of the transportation problem where supply nodes are partitioned into two sets and so-called exclusionary constraints are imposed. We encountered a special case of this problem in a hospital context, where patients need to be assigned to rooms. We establish the problem's complexity, and we compare two integer programming formulations. Furthermore, a maximization variant of Red-Blue TP is presented, for...

  12. Investigation of the molecular mechanism of the blue-light-specific excitation energy quenching in the plant antenna complex LHCII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruszecki, Wieslaw I; Zubik, Monika; Luchowski, Rafal; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Gospodarek, Malgorzata; Szurkowski, Janusz; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2011-03-15

    Excitation of the major photosynthetic antenna complex of plants, LHCII, with blue light (470nm) provides an advantage to plants, as it gives rise to chlorophyll a fluorescence lifetimes shorter than with excitation with red light (635nm). This difference is particularly pronounced in fluorescence emission wavelengths longer than 715nm. Illumination of LHCII preparation with blue light additionally induces fluorescence quenching, which develops on a minute timescale. This effect is much less efficient when induced by red light, despite the equalized energy absorbed in both the spectral regions. Simultaneous analysis of the fluorescence and photoacoustic signals in LHCII demonstrated that the light-driven fluorescence quenching is not associated with an increase in heat emission. Instead, a reversible light-induced conformational transformation of the protein takes place, as demonstrated by the FTIR technique. These findings are discussed in terms of the blue-light-specific excitation energy quenching in LHCII, which may have photoprotective applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Variable blue straggler stars in NGC 5466

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, H.C.; Mateo, M.; Olszewski, E.W.; Nemec, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Nine variable blue stragglers have been found in the globular cluster NGC 5466. The six dwarf Cepheids in this cluster coexist in the instability strip with other nonvariable stars. The three eclipsing binaries are among the hottest of the blue stragglers. The hypothesis is discussed that all blue stragglers in this cluster have undergone mass transfer in close binaries. Under this hypothesis, rotation and spin-down play important roles in controlling the evolution of blue stragglers in old clusters and in affecting some of their observational properties. 14 refs

  14. Morphological responses of wheat to blue light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C.; Bugbee, B.

    1992-01-01

    Blue light significantly increased tillering in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants grown at the same photosynthetic photon flux (PPF). Plants were grown under two levels of blue light (400-500 nm) in a controlled environment with continuous irradiation. Plants received either 50 micromoles m-2 s-1 of blue light or 2 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light from filtered metal halide lamps at a total irradiance of 200 micromoles m-2 s-1 PPF (400-700 nm). Plants tillered an average of 25% more under the higher level of blue light. Blue light also caused a small, but consistent, increase in main culm development, measured as Haun stage. Leaf length was reduced by higher levels of blue light, while plant dry-mass was not significantly affected by blue light. Applying the principle of equivalent light action, the results suggest that tillering and leaf elongation are mediated by the blue-UV light receptor(s) because phytochrome photoequilibrium for each treatment were nearly identical.

  15. Why Blue-Collar Blacks Help Less

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Sandra Susan; Young, Kara Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Why are blue-collar blacks less likely to help jobseekers than jobholders from other ethnoracial groups or even than more affluent blacks? Drawing from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 97 black and Latino workers at one large, public sector employer, we find that blue-collar black workers both helped less proactively and rejected more requests for assistance than did blue-collar Latino and white-collar black workers. We attribute blue-collar blacks’ more passive engagement to their...

  16. Multimodal fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopel, Martijn H W; Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod; Engelborghs, Yves; Visser, Anthonie J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal fluorescence imaging is a versatile method that has a wide application range from biological studies to materials science. Typical observables in multimodal fluorescence imaging are intensity, lifetime, excitation, and emission spectra which are recorded at chosen locations at the sample.

  17. Fluorescent in situ hybridization employing the conventional NBT/BCIP chromogenic stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Le A; McCutchen, Marshall D; Bonner-Fraser, Marianne; Fraser, Scott E; Bumm, Lloyd A; McCauley, David W

    2007-06-01

    In situ hybridization techniques typically employ chromogenic staining by enzymatic amplification to detect domains of gene expression. We demonstrate the previously unreported near infrared (NIR) fluorescence of the dark purple stain formed from the commonly used chromogens, nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate (BCIP). The solid reaction product has significant fluorescence that enables the use of confocal microscopy to generate high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of gene expression.

  18. Fluorescence live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Andreas; Wittmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein (FP) tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate FP constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluorescence diagnostics of head and neck cancer utilizing oral administration of delta-amino levulinic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanberg, Katarina; Wang-Nordman, Ingrid; Rydell, R.; Elner, A.; Wennerberg, J.; Pais Clemente, Laudelina C.; Cardosa, E.; Pratas, R.; Pais Clemente, Manuel P.; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Svanberg, Sune

    1995-03-01

    Tissue fluorescence measurements utilizing a point monitoring fluorosensor and a multi-color fluorescence imaging system were performed in patients with various malignant tumors in the head and neck region. Also precancerous lesions were investigated and characterized by means of laser-induced fluorescence. Oral administration of low-dose (delta) -amino levulinic acid was used for the induction of protoporphyrin IX, which exhibits a strong fluorescence in the red wavelength region. The blue-green fluorescence emitted from the tissue natural chromophores was also utilized for tumor demarcation. By incorporating both Protoporphyrin IX and natural fluorescence in a tumor demarcation criterion a tumor demarcation with a tumor-to-normal-surrounding-tissue of about 5 - 10:1 contrast was achieved. Hypertrophic tissue did not exhibit tumor specific signals.

  20. Prehistory of the Little Blue River Valley, Western Missouri: Archaeological Investigations at Blue Springs Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Lake project. The report discusses the geomorphology and vegetation of the Little Blue River valley, Late Quaternary bioclimatic change in Western...54 Aquatic Communities ............................... 58 IV. LATE QUATERNARY BIOCLIMATIC CHANGE IN WESTERN MISSOURI by Rolfe D...City District is presently constructing Blue Springs Lake on the East Fork of the Little Blue River in Jackson County, Missouri. The location of the

  1. Novel fluorescence adjustable photonic crystal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cheng; Liu, Xiaoxia; Ni, Yaru; Fang, Jiaojiao; Fang, Liang; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi

    2017-11-01

    Novel photonic crystal materials (PCMs) with adjustable fluorescence were fabricated by distributing organic fluorescent powders of Yb0.2Er0.4Tm0.4(TTA)3Phen into the opal structures of self-assembled silica photonic crystals (PCs). Via removing the silica solution in a constant speed, PCs with controllable thicknesses and different periodic sizes were obtained on glass slides. Yb0.2Er0.4Tm0.4(TTA)3Phen powders were subsequently distributed into the opal structures. The structures and optical properties of the prepared PCMs were investigated. Finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) calculation was used to further analyze the electric field distributions in PCs with different periodic sizes while the relation between periodic sizes and fluorescent spectra of PCMs was discussed. The results showed that the emission color of the PCMs under irradiation of 980 nm laser can be easily adjusted from green to blue by increasing the periodic size from 250 to 450 nm.

  2. Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Daleth

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The blue rubber nevus syndrome consists of multiple venous malformations in the skin and gastrointestinal tract associated with intestinal hemorrhage and iron deficiency anemia. Other organs may be involved. The causes of this syndrome are unknown. Its most common presentation is in the form of sporadic cases, but dominant autosomal inheritance has been described. It is a condition that affects both sexes equally, and its occurrence is rare in the black race. We present a case of this syndrome diagnosed in a 11-year-old patient. He had severe anemia and a venous swelling on the trunk. Similar lesions were found in the stomach, bowel, and on his foot. We emphasize the main clinical aspects: intestine, eyes, nasopharynx, parotids, lungs, liver, spleen, heart, brain, pleura, peritoneum, pericardium, skeletal muscles, bladder, and penis lesions, systemic complications that may occur to these patients which are thrombosis and calcification, as well as consumptive coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia that may occur within the nevi.

  3. Blue light requirements for crop plants used in bioregenerative life support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorio, N C; Wheeler, R M; Goins, G D; Sanwo-Lewandowski, M M; Mackowiak, C L; Brown, C S; Sager, J C; Stutte, G W

    1998-01-01

    As part of NASA's Advanced Life Support Program, the Breadboard Project at Kennedy Space Center is investigating the feasibility of using crop plants in bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS) for long-duration space missions. Several types of electric lamps have been tested to provide radiant energy for plants in a BLSS. These lamps vary greatly in terms of spectral quality resulting in differences in growth and morphology of the plants tested. Broad spectrum or "white" light sources (e.g., metal halide and fluorescent lamps) provide an adequate spectrum for normal growth and morphology; however, they are not as electrically efficient as are low-pressure sodium (LPS) or high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps. Although LPS and HPS, as well as the newly tested red light-emitting diodes (LEDs), have good photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) efficiencies, they are deficient in blue light. Results with several of the crops tested for BLSS (wheat, potato, soybean, lettuce, and radish) have shown a minimum amount of blue light (approximately 30 micromoles m-2 s-1) is necessary for normal growth and development. For example, the lack of sufficient blue light in these lamps has resulted in increased stem elongation and significant reductions in photosynthesis and yield. To avoid problems with blue-deficient lamps and maximize yield, sufficient intensity of HPS or blue light supplementation with red LEDs or LPS lamps is required to meet spectral requirements of crops for BLSS.

  4. Blue enhanced light sources: opportunities and risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    Natural daylight is characterized by high proportions of blue light. By proof of a third type of photoreceptor in the human eye which is only sensitive in this spectral region and by subsequent studies it has become obvious that these blue proportions are essential for human health and well being. In various studies beneficial effects of indoor lighting with higher blue spectral proportions have been proven. On the other hand with increasing use of light sources having enhanced blue light for indoor illumination questions are arising about potential health risks attributed to blue light. Especially LED are showing distinct emission characteristics in the blue. Recently the French agency for food, environmental and occupational health & safety ANSES have raised the question on health issues related to LED light sources and have claimed to avoid use of LED for lighting in schools. In this paper parameters which are relevant for potential health risks will be shown and their contribution to risk factors will quantitatively be discussed. It will be shown how to differentiate between photometric parameters for assessment of beneficial as well as hazardous effects. Guidelines will be discussed how blue enhanced light sources can be used in applications to optimally support human health and well being and simultaneously avoid any risks attributed to blue light by a proper design of lighting parameters. In the conclusion it will be shown that no inherent health risks are related to LED lighting with a proper lighting design.

  5. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available. Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of…

  6. Blue jay attacks and consumes cedar waxwing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Saenz; Joshua B. Pierce

    2009-01-01

    Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) are known to be common predators on bird nests (Wilcove 1985, Picman and Schriml 1994). In addition to predation on eggs and nestlings, Blue Jays occasionally prey on fledgling and adult birds (Johnson and Johnson 1976, Dubowy 1985). A majority of reports involve predation on House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) and other small birds (...

  7. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  8. Sensitivity of Seven Diverse Species to Blue and Green Light: Interactions with Photon Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, M. Chase; Cope, Kevin R.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the effects of spectral quality on plant growth, and development are not well understood. Much of our current understanding comes from studies with daily integrated light levels that are less than 10% of summer sunlight thus making it difficult to characterize interactions between light quality and quantity. Several studies have reported that growth is increased under fluorescent lamps compared to mixtures of wavelengths from LEDs. Conclusions regarding the effect of green light fraction range from detrimental to beneficial. Here we report the effects of eight blue and green light fractions at two photosynthetic photon fluxes (PPF; 200 and 500 μmol m-2 s-1; with a daily light integral of 11.5 and 29 mol m-2 d-1) on growth (dry mass), leaf expansion, stem and petiole elongation, and whole-plant net assimilation of seven diverse plant species. The treatments included cool, neutral, and warm white LEDs, and combinations of blue, green and/or red LEDs. At the higher PPF (500), increasing blue light in increments from 11 to 28% reduced growth in tomato, cucumber, and pepper by 22, 26, and 14% respectively, but there was no statistically significant effect on radish, soybean, lettuce or wheat. At the lower PPF (200), increasing blue light reduced growth only in tomato (41%). The effects of blue light on growth were mediated by changes in leaf area and radiation capture, with minimal effects on whole-plant net-assimilation. In contrast to the significant effects of blue light, increasing green light in increments from 0 to 30% had a relatively small effect on growth, leaf area and net assimilation at either low or high PPF. Surprisingly, growth of three of the seven species was not reduced by a treatment with 93% green light compared to the broad spectrum treatments. Collectively, these results are consistent with a shade avoidance response associated with either low blue or high green light fractions. PMID:27706176

  9. Sensitivity of Seven Diverse Species to Blue and Green Light: Interactions with Photon Flux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Chase Snowden

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research, the effects of spectral quality on plant growth, and development are not well understood. Much of our current understanding comes from studies with daily integrated light levels that are less than 10% of summer sunlight thus making it difficult to characterize interactions between light quality and quantity. Several studies have reported that growth is increased under fluorescent lamps compared to mixtures of wavelengths from LEDs. Conclusions regarding the effect of green light fraction range from detrimental to beneficial. Here we report the effects of eight blue and green light fractions at two photosynthetic photon fluxes (PPF; 200 and 500 μmol m-2 s-1; with a daily light integral of 11.5 and 29 mol m-2 d-1 on growth (dry mass, leaf expansion, stem and petiole elongation, and whole-plant net assimilation of seven diverse plant species. The treatments included cool, neutral, and warm white LEDs, and combinations of blue, green and/or red LEDs. At the higher PPF (500, increasing blue light in increments from 11 to 28% reduced growth in tomato, cucumber, and pepper by 22, 26, and 14% respectively, but there was no statistically significant effect on radish, soybean, lettuce or wheat. At the lower PPF (200, increasing blue light reduced growth only in tomato (41%. The effects of blue light on growth were mediated by changes in leaf area and radiation capture, with minimal effects on whole-plant net-assimilation. In contrast to the significant effects of blue light, increasing green light in increments from 0 to 30% had a relatively small effect on growth, leaf area and net assimilation at either low or high PPF. Surprisingly, growth of three of the seven species was not reduced by a treatment with 93% green light compared to the broad spectrum treatments. Collectively, these results are consistent with a shade avoidance response associated with either low blue or high green light fractions.

  10. Sensitivity of Seven Diverse Species to Blue and Green Light: Interactions with Photon Flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, M Chase; Cope, Kevin R; Bugbee, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the effects of spectral quality on plant growth, and development are not well understood. Much of our current understanding comes from studies with daily integrated light levels that are less than 10% of summer sunlight thus making it difficult to characterize interactions between light quality and quantity. Several studies have reported that growth is increased under fluorescent lamps compared to mixtures of wavelengths from LEDs. Conclusions regarding the effect of green light fraction range from detrimental to beneficial. Here we report the effects of eight blue and green light fractions at two photosynthetic photon fluxes (PPF; 200 and 500 μmol m-2 s-1; with a daily light integral of 11.5 and 29 mol m-2 d-1) on growth (dry mass), leaf expansion, stem and petiole elongation, and whole-plant net assimilation of seven diverse plant species. The treatments included cool, neutral, and warm white LEDs, and combinations of blue, green and/or red LEDs. At the higher PPF (500), increasing blue light in increments from 11 to 28% reduced growth in tomato, cucumber, and pepper by 22, 26, and 14% respectively, but there was no statistically significant effect on radish, soybean, lettuce or wheat. At the lower PPF (200), increasing blue light reduced growth only in tomato (41%). The effects of blue light on growth were mediated by changes in leaf area and radiation capture, with minimal effects on whole-plant net-assimilation. In contrast to the significant effects of blue light, increasing green light in increments from 0 to 30% had a relatively small effect on growth, leaf area and net assimilation at either low or high PPF. Surprisingly, growth of three of the seven species was not reduced by a treatment with 93% green light compared to the broad spectrum treatments. Collectively, these results are consistent with a shade avoidance response associated with either low blue or high green light fractions.

  11. Advances in Fluorescence Sensing Systems for the Remote Assessment of Nitrogen Supply in Field Corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corp, L. A.; Chappelle, E. W.; McMurtrey, J. E.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Kim, M. S.

    2000-01-01

    The studies described herein were conducted to better define changes in fluorescence properties of leaves from field grown corn (Zea mays L.) as they relate to varying levels of nitrogen (N) fertilization. This research was directed toward: 1) providing a remote non-destructive sensing technique to aid in the determination of optimal rates of N fertilization in corn crops and, 2) defining parameters for further development of fluorescence instrumentation to be operated remotely at field canopy levels. Fluorescence imaging bands centered in the blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), red (680 nm), and far-red (740 nm) and ratios of these bands were compared with the following plant parameters: rates of photosynthesis, N:C ratio, pigment concentrations, and grain yields. Both the fluorescence and physiological measures exhibited similar curvilinear responses to N fertilization level while significant linear correlations were obtained among fluorescence bands and band ratios to certain physiological measures of plant productivity. The red / blue, red / green, far-red / blue, far-red /green fluorescence ratios are well suited for remote observation and provided high correlations to grain yield, LAI, N:C, and chlorophyll contents. The results from this investigation indicate that fluorescence technology could aid in the determination of N fertilization requirements for corn. This discussion will also address design concepts and preliminary field trials of a mobile field-based Laser Induced Fluorescence Imaging System (LIFIS) capable of simultaneously acquiring images of four fluorescence emission bands from areas of plant canopies equaling 1 sq m and greater without interference of ambient solar radiation.

  12. Real-Time Visualization of Lysosome Destruction Using a Photosensitive Toluidine Blue Nanogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiqi; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2018-02-09

    Breaking the lysosome helps its sequestered payloads access their molecular targets in cells and thus enhances the intracellular drug delivery. Current strategies for lysosomal escape involve direct physical interactions with the lipid membrane. These interactions pose a systemic toxicity and uncontrolled membrane rupture risk. Here, we report a light-detonated lysosome disruption using a hyaluronan (HA) nanogel packed with toludine blue (TB). The HA/TB nanogel is concentrated within the lysosomes. The applied light assists TB in generating reactive oxygen species and destroying the lysosome in situ, both in cells and isolated lysosomes. Real time fluorescent tracking reveals that quenched TB fluorescence recovers along with lysosome explosion, relocates to the nucleus, and is presented as a fluorescent sparkling in cells. This HA/TB, composed of all clinically approved materials, represents a biocompatible and facile strategy to "bomb" lysosomes in a spatiotemporally controlled fashion. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Portable plant chlorophyll fluorimeter based on blue LED rapid induced technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yibo; Mi, Ting; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Fluorimeter is an effective device for detecting chlorophyll a content in plants. In order to realize real-time nondestructive detection of plant blades, a camera based fluorescence instrument based on two color mirrors has been developed. The blue light LED is used as the excitation light source, and the lens is used for shaping and focusing the excitation light to ensure the excitation intensity and uniform illumination of the light source. The device uses a 45 degree two color mirror to separate the chlorophyll a excited light path and the fluorescence receiving light path. Finally, the fluorescent signal is collected by the silicon photocell, and the signal is processed by the circuit to transmit the digital information to the display. Through the analysis of the experimental data, the device has the advantages of small size, easy to carry, fast induction, etc., and can be widely applied in outdoor teaching and field investigation.

  14. Enhanced blue light emission in transparent ZnO:PVA nanocomposite free standing polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, B; Pandiyarajan, T; Mangalaraja, R V

    2016-01-05

    ZnO:PVA nanocomposite films were prepared and their fluorescence and time resolved photoluminescence properties were discussed. X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy results confirmed the ZnO:PVA interaction. Optical absorption spectra showed two bands at 280 and 367nm which were ascribed to PVA and excitonic absorption band, respectively. Fluorescence spectra showed that the blue emission of ZnO was enhanced about tenfold through chemical interface electron transfer. The electron transfer from ZnO to PVA and its decay dynamics were experimentally analyzed through time resolved fluorescence measurements. The study revealed that the excited electrons found pathway through PVA to ground state which was slower than the pure ZnO nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Reviews in fluorescence 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Lakowicz, Joseph R; Geddes, Chris D

    2009-01-01

    This fourth volume in the Springer series summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough for professional researchers, yet also appealing to a wider audience of scientists in related fields.

  16. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  17. Fluorescence action spectra of algae and bean leaves at room and at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedheer, J.C.

    1965-01-01

    Fluorescence action spectra were determined, both at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature, with various blue-green, red and green algae, and greening bean leaves. The action spectra of algae were established with samples of low light absorption as well as dense

  18. Enhanced fluorescence of selected cationic dyes adsorbed on reduced-charge montmorillonite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pustková, P.; Klika, Z.; Preclíková, J.; Matys Grygar, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2011), s. 93-103 ISSN 0009-8558 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : cationic dye * crystal violet * Nile blue * rhodamine B * reduced-charge montmorillonite * visible spectrophotometry * fluorescence Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 1.053, year: 2011

  19. Tapered photonic crystal fibers for blue-enhanced supercontinuum generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Uffe; Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper

    2012-01-01

    Tapering of photonic crystal fibers is an effective way of shifting the blue edge of a supercontinuum spectrum down in the deep-blue. We discuss the optimum taper profile for enhancing the power in the blue edge....

  20. Blue and Red LED Illumination Improves Growth and Bioactive Compounds Contents in Acyanic and Cyanic Ocimum basilicum L. Microgreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobiuc, Andrei; Vasilache, Viorica; Pintilie, Olga; Stoleru, Toma; Burducea, Marian; Oroian, Mircea; Zamfirache, Maria-Magdalena

    2017-11-30

    Microgreens are an excellent source of health-maintaining compounds, and the accumulation of these compounds in plant tissues may be stimulated by exogenous stimuli. While light quality effects on green basil microgreens are known, the present paper aims at improving the quality of acyanic (green) and cyanic (red) basil microgreens with different ratios of LED blue and red illumination. Growth, assimilatory and anthocyanin pigments, chlorophyll fluorescence, total phenolic, flavonoids, selected phenolic acid contents and antioxidant activity were assessed in microgreens grown for 17 days. Growth of microgreens was enhanced with predominantly blue illumination, larger cotyledon area and higher fresh mass. The same treatment elevated chlorophyll a and anthocyanin pigments contents. Colored light treatments decreased chlorophyll fluorescence ΦPSII values significantly in the green cultivar. Stimulation of phenolic synthesis and free radical scavenging activity were improved by predominantly red light in the green cultivar (up to 1.87 fold) and by predominantly blue light in the red cultivar (up to 1.73 fold). Rosmarinic and gallic acid synthesis was higher (up to 15- and 4-fold, respectively, compared to white treatment) in predominantly blue illumination. Red and blue LED ratios can be tailored to induce superior growth and phenolic contents in both red and green basil microgreens, as a convenient tool for producing higher quality foods.

  1. Blue and Red LED Illumination Improves Growth and Bioactive Compounds Contents in Acyanic and Cyanic Ocimum basilicum L. Microgreens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Lobiuc

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Microgreens are an excellent source of health-maintaining compounds, and the accumulation of these compounds in plant tissues may be stimulated by exogenous stimuli. While light quality effects on green basil microgreens are known, the present paper aims at improving the quality of acyanic (green and cyanic (red basil microgreens with different ratios of LED blue and red illumination. Growth, assimilatory and anthocyanin pigments, chlorophyll fluorescence, total phenolic, flavonoids, selected phenolic acid contents and antioxidant activity were assessed in microgreens grown for 17 days. Growth of microgreens was enhanced with predominantly blue illumination, larger cotyledon area and higher fresh mass. The same treatment elevated chlorophyll a and anthocyanin pigments contents. Colored light treatments decreased chlorophyll fluorescence ΦPSII values significantly in the green cultivar. Stimulation of phenolic synthesis and free radical scavenging activity were improved by predominantly red light in the green cultivar (up to 1.87 fold and by predominantly blue light in the red cultivar (up to 1.73 fold. Rosmarinic and gallic acid synthesis was higher (up to 15- and 4-fold, respectively, compared to white treatment in predominantly blue illumination. Red and blue LED ratios can be tailored to induce superior growth and phenolic contents in both red and green basil microgreens, as a convenient tool for producing higher quality foods.

  2. Fluorescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G for high fluence excitation laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, J; Olaizola, A M

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectral changes of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol and glycerol solutions and deposited as a film on a silica surface have been studied using a wide range of pumping field fluence at 532 nm at room temperature. Blue shift of the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quenching of the dye molecule in solution are observed at high excitation fluence values. Such effects are not reported for the film sample. The effects are interpreted as the result of population redistribution in the solute-solvent molecular system induced by the high fluence field and the fluence dependence of the radiationless decay mechanism.

  3. Phytotoxicity of methylene blue to rice seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.Z. Yu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Methylene blue is widely used in various industrial branches. Due to insufficient treatment, its occurrence in wastewater is frequently detected, which may result in serious environment problems to aquatic organisms. Hydroponic experiments were conducted with rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L. cv. XZX 45 exposed to methylene blue to determine the effective concentration using relative growth rate and water use efficiency as response endpoints. Results showed that acute toxicity of methylene blue to rice seedlings was evident. Although a linear decrease in relative growth rate and water use efficiency was observed in rice seedlings with increasing methylene blue concentrations, relative growth rate of rice seedlings was more sensitive to change of methylene blue than water use efficiency. Using non-linear regression, EC-48 h values for 10%, 20% and 50% inhibition of the relative growth rate were estimated to be 1.54, 3.22 and 10.13 mg MB/L for rice seedlings exposed to methylene blue, respectively, while smaller EC were obtained for 96 h exposure. In conclusion, the toxic response of young rice seedlings to methylene blue is obvious and inhibitory effects are highly dependent on response endpoints and the duration of exposure period.

  4. Can greening of aquaculture sequester blue carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nesar; Bunting, Stuart W; Glaser, Marion; Flaherty, Mark S; Diana, James S

    2017-05-01

    Globally, blue carbon (i.e., carbon in coastal and marine ecosystems) emissions have been seriously augmented due to the devastating effects of anthropogenic pressures on coastal ecosystems including mangrove swamps, salt marshes, and seagrass meadows. The greening of aquaculture, however, including an ecosystem approach to Integrated Aquaculture-Agriculture (IAA) and Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) could play a significant role in reversing this trend, enhancing coastal ecosystems, and sequestering blue carbon. Ponds within IAA farming systems sequester more carbon per unit area than conventional fish ponds, natural lakes, and inland seas. The translocation of shrimp culture from mangrove swamps to offshore IMTA could reduce mangrove loss, reverse blue carbon emissions, and in turn increase storage of blue carbon through restoration of mangroves. Moreover, offshore IMTA may create a barrier to trawl fishing which in turn could help restore seagrasses and further enhance blue carbon sequestration. Seaweed and shellfish culture within IMTA could also help to sequester more blue carbon. The greening of aquaculture could face several challenges that need to be addressed in order to realize substantial benefits from enhanced blue carbon sequestration and eventually contribute to global climate change mitigation.

  5. Infiltrating giant cellular blue naevus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, A L; Monteiro, D A; De Pretto, O J

    2007-01-01

    Cellular blue naevi (CBN) measure 1-2 cm in diameter and affect the dermis, occasionally extending into the subcutaneous fat. The case of a 14-year-old boy with a giant CBN (GCBN) involving the right half of the face, the jugal mucosa and the lower eyelid with a tumour that had infiltrated the bone and the maxillary and ethmoidal sinuses is reported. Biopsies were taken from the skin, jugal mucosa and maxillary sinus. The following markers were used in the immunohistochemical evaluation: CD34, CD56, HMB-45, anti-S100, A-103, Melan A and MIB-1. The biopsy specimens showed a biphasic pattern affecting the lower dermis, subcutaneous fat, skeletal muscle, bone, jugal mucosa and maxillary sinus, but there was no histological evidence of malignancy. The tumour cells were CD34-, CD56-, HMB45+, anti-S100+ and A-103+. Melan A was focally expressed. No positive MIB-1 cells were identified. The present case shows that GCBN may infiltrate deeply, with no evidence of malignancy.

  6. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyndby, Niclas H.; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating.

  7. Dual-Color Fluorescence Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Live Cancer Cells Using Conjugated Polymer Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Minjie; Sun, Bin; Liu, Yun; Shen, Qun-Dong; Jiang, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth in biological applications of nanomaterials brings about pressing needs for exploring nanomaterial-cell interactions. Cationic blue-emissive and anionic green-emissive conjugated polymers are applied as dual-color fluorescence probes to the surface of negatively charged magnetic nanoparticles through sequentially electrostatic adsorption. These conjugated polymers have large extinction coefficients and high fluorescence quantum yield (82% for PFN and 62% for ThPFS). Thereby, one can visualize trace amount (2.7 μg/mL) of fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles within cancer cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Fluorescence labeling by the conjugated polymers is also validated for quantitative determination of the internalized nanoparticles in each individual cell by flow cytometry analysis. Extensive overlap of blue and green fluorescence signals in the cytoplasm indicates that both conjugated polymer probes tightly bind to the surface of the nanoparticles during cellular internalization. The highly charged and fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles non-specifically bind to the cell membranes, followed by cellular uptake through endocytosis. The nanoparticles form aggregates inside endosomes, which yields a punctuated staining pattern. Cellular internalization of the nanoparticles is dependent on the dosage and time. Uptake efficiency can be enhanced three-fold by application of an external magnetic field. The nanoparticles are low cytotoxicity and suitable for simultaneously noninvasive fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging application. PMID:26931282

  8. Green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfie, M

    1995-10-01

    Several bioluminescent coelenterates use a secondary fluorescent protein, the green fluorescent protein (GFP), in an energy transfer reaction to produce green light. The most studied of these proteins have been the GFPs from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria and the sea pansy Renilla reniformis. Although the proteins from these organisms are not identical, they are thought to have the same chromophore, which is derived from the primary amino acid sequence of GFP. The differences are thought to be due to changes in the protein environment of the chromophore. Recent interest in these molecules has arisen from the cloning of the Aequorea gfp cDNA and the demonstration that its expression in the absence of other Aequorea proteins results in a fluorescent product. This demonstration indicated that GFP could be used as a marker of gene expression and protein localization in living and fixed tissues. Bacterial, plant and animal (including mammalian) cells all express GFP. The heterologous expression of the gfp cDNA has also meant that it could be mutated to produce proteins with different fluorescent properties. Variants with more intense fluorescence or alterations in the excitation and emission spectra have been produced.

  9. Ultraviolet emission and excitation fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of DMBA-treated Swiss Albino mice skin carcinogenesis for measuring tissue transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruna, Prakasa R.; Hemamalini, Srinivasan; Ebenezar, Jeyasingh; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2002-05-01

    The ultraviolet fluorescence emission spectra of skin tissues under different pathological conditions were measured at 280nm excitation. At this excitation wavelength, the normal skin showed a primary peak emission at 352nm and this primary peak emission from neoplastic skin shows a blue shift with respect to normal tissue. This blue shift increases as the stage of abnormality increases and it is maximum (19nm) for well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. This alteration is further confirmed from fluorescence excitation spectra of the tissues for 340nm emission. The study concludes that the change in the emission of tryptophan around 340nm may be due to partial unfolding of protein.

  10. The Biology of blue-green algae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carr, Nicholas G; Whitton, B. A

    1973-01-01

    .... Their important environmental roles, their part in nitrogen fixation and the biochemistry of phototrophic metabolism are some of the attractions of blue-geen algae to an increasing number of biologists...

  11. Random lasing in blue phase liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Jau, Hung-Chang; Wang, Chun-Ta; Lee, Chun-Hong; Khoo, I C; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2012-10-08

    Random lasing actions have been observed in optically isotropic pure blue-phase and polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystals containing laser dyes. Scattering, interferences and recurrent multiple scatterings arising from disordered platelet texture as well as index mismatch between polymer and mesogen in these materials provide the optical feedbacks for lasing action. In polymer stabilized blue-phase liquid crystals, coherent random lasing could occur in the ordered blue phase with an extended temperature interval as well as in the isotropic liquid state. The dependence of lasing wavelength range, mode characteristics, excitation threshold and other pertinent properties on temperature and detailed make-up of the crystals platelets were obtained. Specifically, lasing wavelengths and mode-stability were found to be determined by platelet size, which can be set by controlling the cooling rate; lasing thresholds and emission spectrum are highly dependent on, and therefore can be tuned by temperature.

  12. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Protonation of Patented Blue V ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    XTreme.ws

    SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. Protonation of Patented Blue V in aqueous solutions: Theoretical and experimental studies. KATERYNA BEVZIUKa, ALEXANDER CHEBOTAREVa, MAKSYM FIZERb,. ANASTASIIA KLOCHKOVAa, KONSTANTIN PLIUTAa and DENYS SNIGURa*. aDepartment of Analytical Chemistry, ...

  13. Light Quality Affects Chloroplast Electron Transport Rates Estimated from Chl Fluorescence Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John R; Morgan, Patrick B; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2017-10-01

    Chl fluorescence has been used widely to calculate photosynthetic electron transport rates. Portable photosynthesis instruments allow for combined measurements of gas exchange and Chl fluorescence. We analyzed the influence of spectral quality of actinic light on Chl fluorescence and the calculated electron transport rate, and compared this with photosynthetic rates measured by gas exchange in the absence of photorespiration. In blue actinic light, the electron transport rate calculated from Chl fluorescence overestimated the true rate by nearly a factor of two, whereas there was closer agreement under red light. This was consistent with the prediction made with a multilayer leaf model using profiles of light absorption and photosynthetic capacity. Caution is needed when interpreting combined measurements of Chl fluorescence and gas exchange, such as the calculation of CO2 partial pressure in leaf chloroplasts. © Crown copyright 2017.

  14. Substantial Research Secures the Blue Future for our Blue Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Abdel Maksoud

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Earth, the blue planet, is our home, and seas and oceans cover more than 70% of its surface. As the earth’s population rapidly increases and available resources decrease, seas and oceans can play a key role in assuring the long-term survival of humankind. Renewable maritime energy has huge potential to provide a considerable part of the earth’s population with decarbonised electricity generation systems. Renewable maritime energy is very flexible and can be harvested above the water’s free surface by using offshore wind turbines, on the water’s surface by using wave energy converters or below the water’s surface by using current or tidal turbines. The supposed conflict between environmental protection measures and economic interests is neither viable nor reasonable. Renewable maritime energy can be the motor for considerable substantial economic growth for many maritime regions and therefore for society at large. The fastest growing sector of renewable maritime energy is offshore wind. The annual report of the European Wind Energy Association from the year 2015 confirms the growing relevance of the offshore wind industry. In 2015, the total installed and grid-connected capacity of wind power was 12,800 MW in the EU and 6,013.4 MW in Germany. 38% of the 2015 annual installation in Germany was offshore, accounting for a capacity of 2,282.4 MW. However, there are a limited number of available installation sites in shallow water, meaning that there is an urgent need to develop new offshore structures for water depths greater than 50m. The persistent trend towards deeper waters has encouraged the offshore wind industry to look for floating wind turbine structures and larger turbines. Floating wind turbine technologies are at an early stage of development and many technical and economic challenges will still need to be faced. Nonetheless, intensive research activities and the employment of advanced technologies are the key factors in

  15. Blue emitting organic semiconductors under high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knaapila, Matti; Guha, Suchismita

    2016-01-01

    This review describes essential optical and emerging structural experiments that use high GPa range hydrostatic pressure to probe physical phenomena in blue-emitting organic semiconductors including π-conjugated polyfluorene and related compounds. The work emphasizes molecular structure and inter......This review describes essential optical and emerging structural experiments that use high GPa range hydrostatic pressure to probe physical phenomena in blue-emitting organic semiconductors including π-conjugated polyfluorene and related compounds. The work emphasizes molecular structure...

  16. Blue Flag: a Symbol of Environmental Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Petroman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Blue Flag is a high standard symbol of environmental protection and it is awarded to the beaches and agreement ports by the Foundation of Education for the Environment. The beaches having been awarded this distinction warrant particular protection for their visitors, which is a particular point of tourism attractiveness: the result, they are preferred by tourists and, therefore, by tour operators selling tourism packages for the littoral. In 2009, Romanian beaches were not awarded any Blue Flags.

  17. Electric field effects on fluorescence of the green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Kinjo, Masataka; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2008-05-01

    External electric field effects on state energy and photoexcitation dynamics have been examined for a mutant of UV-excited green fluorescent protein (GFPuv5) in a PVA film. The electrofluorescence spectrum of GFPuv5 is reproduced by a linear combination between the fluorescence spectrum and its second derivative spectrum, indicating the field-induced fluorescence quenching and the difference in electric dipole moment between the fluorescent state and the ground state. The direct measurements of the field-induced change in fluorescence decay show that the field-induced quenching results from the field-induced increase in the rate of the non-radiative process from the fluorescent state.

  18. Clinical application of fluorescence in situ hybridization for prenatal diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-fang JIANG

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish and optimize the procedures of fluorescence in situ hybridization(FISH), and evaluate its clinical value in rapid prenatal diagnosis of fetal numerical abnormality of chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X, Y. Methods Amniotic fluid or fetal blood was sampled by routine invasive procedures. After the amniotic fluid cells or fetal blood cells were separated and sequentially processed with hypotonic solution, fixation solution, smear and high temperature, they were hybridized in situ with two panels of specific fluorescence probes to detect numerical abnormality of chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X, Y. All the samples were also cultured and analyzed for their karyotype by conventional methods. Results When it was used as a diagnostic criterion of chromosomal number that the fluorescence signals were observed in ≥90% cells, GLP 13/GLP 21 probe panel showed 2 green/2 red fluorescence signals and CSP18/CSP X/CSP Y probe panel showed 2 blue/2 yellow (female or 2 blue/1 yellow/1 red fluorescence signals (male under normal condition. The test reports of all 196 cases were sent out in 72-96 hours, and 7 cases of Down syndrome, 2 cases of trisomy 18 and 1 case of sex chromosomal numerical abnormality were detected, which were accordant with karyotype analysis results reported one month later. Conclusions FISH has potential for clinical application, and is applicable to rapid prenatal diagnosis of fetal numerical abnormality of chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X, Y. The rapid FISH, together with conventional karyotyping, offer a valuable means for prenatal diagnosis of fetal aneuploidies.

  19. Concentrators using fluorescent substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashibara, M.; Tsukamoto, M. (Hitachi Seisakusho K.K., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    In luminescent concentrators - plates of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or other transparent material with a fluorescent compound dispersed within them - incident light is trapped and concentrated by internal reflection, and shifted to a longer wavelength, as it interacts with fluorescent particles. Experience with the use of luminescent concentrators for electricity generation in conjunction with solar cells, in solar heaters, in amplifiers for light intensity, in long-wave converters and in display panels is discussed. Solar energy conversion efficiencies of 4-5% have been obtained in generating systems combining concentrators containing Fluorol 555 or Rhodamin 6G with GaAs solar cells. (author).

  20. Fluorescence uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.; Crus Castillo, F. de la; Barrera Pinero, R.

    1960-01-01

    An equipment for analysis of uranium by fluorescence was developed in order to determine it at such a low concentration that it can not be determined by the most sensible analytical methods. this new fluorimeter was adapted to measure the fluorescence emitted by the phosphorus sodium fluoride-sodium carbonate-potasium carbonate-uranyl, being excited by ultraviolet light of 3,650 A the intensity of the light emitted was measure with a photomultiplicator RCA 5819 and the adequate electronic equipment. (Author) 19 refs

  1. Wavelength Mutations and Posttranslational Autoxidation of Green Fluorescent Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Roger; Prasher, Douglas C.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    1994-12-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is an unusual protein with strong visible absorbance and fluorescence from a p-hydroxybenzylidene-imidazolidinone chromophore, which is generated by cyclization and oxidation of the protein's own Ser-Tyr-Gly sequence at positions 65-67. Cloning of the cDNA and heterologous expression of fluorescent protein in a wide variety of organisms indicate that this unique posttranslational modification must be either spontaneous or dependent only on ubiquitous enzymes and reactants. We report that formation of the final fluorophore requires molecular oxygen and proceeds with a time constant (≈4 hr at 22^circC and atmospheric pO_2) independent of dilution, implying that the oxidation does not require enzymes or cofactors. GFP was mutagenized and screened for variants with altered spectra. The most striking mutant fluoresced blue and contained histidine in place of Tyr-66. The availability of two visibly distinct colors should significantly extend the usefulness of GFP in molecular and cell biology by enabling in vivo visualization of differential gene expression and protein localization and measurement of protein association by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

  2. Assay of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase using radiolabeled and fluorescent substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kincaid, R.L.; Manganiello, V.C.

    1988-01-01

    There are four major classes of phosphodiesterase with different specificities for cAMP and cGMP and different allosteric regulators. Type I phosphodiesterase is activated by calmodulin plus Ca/sup 2+/ and has a higher affinity for cGMP than cAMP. Type II phosphodiesterase likewise has a higher affinity for cGMP than cAMP, but the activity toward one substrate is markedly stimulated by low (micromolar) concentrations of the other nucleotide. Type III phosphodiesterase has a higher affinity for cAMP than cGMP; its activity is increased in responsive cells by certain hormones, e.g., insulin, isoproterenol. Type IV phosphodiesterase is the cGMP-specific enzyme, which also has an allosteric binding site for cGMP. An example of this class of enzyme is the one from retinal rod outer segments, which is activated by light via rhodopsin and the guanine nucleotide-binding protein transducin. There appears to be little structural relatedness among these enzymes based on immunologic analysis, consistent with the possibility that divergent forms evolved from an ancestral enzyme. Determination of the amount of a specific form of phosphodiesterase in crude material is often difficult. Modification of assay conditions by judicious choice of substrate and/or inhibitor concentrations may selectively favor (or reduce) the activity of a particular form; in many instances, however, some fractionation of enzymes may be necessary. This is discussed more fully in the final section of this chapter

  3. Comparison of Alcian Blue, Trypan Blue, and Toluidine Blue for Visualization of the Primo Vascular System Floating in Lymph Ducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Un Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primo vascular system (PVS, floating in lymph ducts, was too transparent to be observed by using a stereomicroscope. It was only detectable with the aid of staining dyes, for instance, Alcian blue, which was injected into the lymph nodes. Some dyes were absorbed preferentially by the PVS than the lymph wall. It remains a standing problem to know what dyes are absorbed better by the PVS than the lymph walls. Such information would be useful to unravel the biochemical properties of the PVS that are badly in need for obtaining large amount of PVS specimens. In the current work we tried two other familiar dyes which were used in PVS research before. We found that Trypan blue and toluidine blue did not visualize the PVS. Trypan blue was cleared by the natural washing. Toluidine blue did not stain the PVS, but it did leave stained spots in the lymph wall and its surrounding tissues, and it leaked out of the lymph wall to stain surrounding connective tissues. These completely different behaviors of the three dyes were found for the first time in the current work and provide valuable information to elucidate the mechanism through which some special dyes stained the PVS preferentially compared to the lymphatic wall.

  4. Color transitions in coral's fluorescent proteins by site-directed mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukyanov Sergey A

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP cloned from jellyfish Aequorea victoria and its homologs from corals Anthozoa have a great practical significance as in vivo markers of gene expression. Also, they are an interesting puzzle of protein science due to an unusual mechanism of chromophore formation and diversity of fluorescent colors. Fluorescent proteins can be subdivided into cyan (~ 485 nm, green (~ 505 nm, yellow (~ 540 nm, and red (>580 nm emitters. Results Here we applied site-directed mutagenesis in order to investigate the structural background of color variety and possibility of shifting between different types of fluorescence. First, a blue-shifted mutant of cyan amFP486 was generated. Second, it was established that cyan and green emitters can be modified so as to produce an intermediate spectrum of fluorescence. Third, the relationship between green and yellow fluorescence was inspected on closely homologous green zFP506 and yellow zFP538 proteins. The following transitions of colors were performed: yellow to green; yellow to dual color (green and yellow; and green to yellow. Fourth, we generated a mutant of cyan emitter dsFP483 that demonstrated dual color (cyan and red fluorescence. Conclusions Several amino acid substitutions were found to strongly affect fluorescence maxima. Some positions primarily found by sequence comparison were proved to be crucial for fluorescence of particular color. These results are the first step towards predicting the color of natural GFP-like proteins corresponding to newly identified cDNAs from corals.

  5. Noninvasive murine glioma detection improved following photobleaching of skin PpIX fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L.; Davis, Scott C.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2008-02-01

    Aminolevulinic Acid (ALA) is a prodrug which can be administered to cells, animals or patients after which it is transformed via the Heme synthesis pathway into the fluorescent molecule Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). PpIX has been shown to be useful as both a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and as a fluorescence imaging contrast agent. The ALA-PpIX system not only provides contrast for fluorescence imaging but also gives information about the metabolic activity of the imaged tissue and thus could be useful for monitoring cancer therapy. In the current study skin photobleaching was examined to determine if PpIX fluorescence contrast in malignant brain tumors could be better visualized noninvasively. Red light photobleaching decreased skin PpIX fluorescence and increased the ability to noninvasively quantify PpIX fluorescence in murine gliomas, as in vivo measurements of mean PpIX fluorescence more closely matched ex vivo quantification following skin photobleaching. Three doses of blue light photobleaching (4 J/cm2, 8 J/cm2 and 12 J/cm2) were tested and determined to give similar levels of skin photobleaching as well as a similar window of decreased skin PpIX fluorescence for noninvasive fluorescence imaging following the photobleaching dose administration.

  6. Chair-side detection of Prevotella Intermedia in mature dental plaque by its fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yoshiaki; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Okamoto, Masaaki; Sogabe, Kaoru; Okada, Ayako; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2017-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens is one of the well-known pathogens causing periodontal diseases, and the red florescence excited by the visible blue light caused by the protoporphyrin IX in the bacterial cells could be useful for the chair-side detection. The aim of this study was to evaluated levels of periodontal pathogen, especially P. intermedia in clinical samples of red fluorescent dental plaque. Thirty two supra gingival plaque samples from six individuals were measured its fluorescence at 640nm wavelength excited by 409nm. Periodontopathic bacteria were counted by the Invader PLUS PCR assay. Co-relations the fluorescence intensity and bacterial counts were analyzed by Person's correlation coefficient and simple and multiple regression analysis. Positive and negative predictive values of the fluorescence intensities for with or without P. intermedia in supragingival plaque was calculated. When relative fluorescence unit (RFU) were logarithmic transformed, statistically significant linear relations between RFU and bacterial counts were obtained for P. intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia. By the multiple regression analysis, only P. intermedia had statistically significant co-relation with fluorescence intensities. All of the fluorescent dental plaque contained P. intermedia m. In contrast, 28% of non-fluorescent plaques contained P. intermedia. To check the fluorescence dental plaque in the oral cavity could be the simple chair-side screening of the mature dental plaque before examining the periodontal pathogens especially P. intermedia by the PCR method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence spectrosc......Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...... spectroscopy approaches provide very valuable structurally and dynamically related information on membranes, they generally produce mean parameters from data collected on bulk solutions of many vesicles and lack direct information on the spatial organization at the level of single membranes, a quality that can...... be provided by microscopy-related techniques. In this chapter, I will attempt to summarize representative examples concerning how microscopy (which provides information on membrane lateral organization by direct visualization) and spectroscopy techniques (which provides information about molecular interaction...

  8. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  9. Blue light hazards for ocular lesions; Risques oculaires du rayonnement bleu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarini, J.P. [INSERM, Fondation Ophtalmologique A. de Rothschild, 75 - Paris (France); CES, Agents physique, AFSSET (France)

    2009-10-15

    The blue light range (400-500 nm) of visible radiation stimulates specifically cones and rods of the retina. The carried energy by these wavelengths is absorbed and transferred to specific pigments. Their energy is sufficient to produce free radicals and singlet form of oxygen. Intense sources, rich in blue light radiation, may induce, in the retina, photo-toxic lesions either limited or short-lived or photothermal lesions more or less definitive. Repeated photo-toxic lesions should be the root for the age-related maculo-pathy (A.R.M.) also called late macular degeneration (A.M.D.). As a consequence, the attention should be drawn on the potential risk linked to modern lighting as 'daylight' lamp, compact fluorescent lamps, energy saving (C.F.L.) and light-emitting diodes (L.E.D.) for which a specific vigilance should be enforced. (author)

  10. Facile synthesis of blue-emitting carbon dots@mesoporous silica composite spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ziying; Zhu, Zhenpeng; Zhang, Xinguo; Chen, Yibo

    2018-02-01

    This paper reported a facile and effective approach towards high-efficient composite luminophores by embedding blue-emitting N-doped carbon dots into spherical SiO2 matrix (CDs@SiO2). Mesoporous silica microspheres (r-CDs@MSN) with strong luminescence were synthesized by removing CTAB templates in CDs@SiO2 using reflux with acetone. The r-CDs@MSN possess a spherical morphology with smooth surface and a diameter of 130 nm, while it exhibits an excitation-independent blue emission peak at 440 nm with an internal quantum yield of 21.5%. BET result shows that the corresponding surface area and adsorption total pore volume are 156.27 m2/g and 0.682 cm3/g, which is suitable for the drugs loading and release. The results indicate that r-CDs@MSN might act as a potential fluorescent drug carrier.

  11. Red fluorescence in reef fish: A novel signalling mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebeck Ulrike E

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At depths below 10 m, reefs are dominated by blue-green light because seawater selectively absorbs the longer, 'red' wavelengths beyond 600 nm from the downwelling sunlight. Consequently, the visual pigments of many reef fish are matched to shorter wavelengths, which are transmitted better by water. Combining the typically poor long-wavelength sensitivity of fish eyes with the presumed lack of ambient red light, red light is currently considered irrelevant for reef fish. However, previous studies ignore the fact that several marine organisms, including deep sea fish, produce their own red luminescence and are capable of seeing it. Results We here report that at least 32 reef fishes from 16 genera and 5 families show pronounced red fluorescence under natural, daytime conditions at depths where downwelling red light is virtually absent. Fluorescence was confirmed by extensive spectrometry in the laboratory. In most cases peak emission was around 600 nm and fluorescence was associated with guanine crystals, which thus far were known for their light reflecting properties only. Our data indicate that red fluorescence may function in a context of intraspecific communication. Fluorescence patterns were typically associated with the eyes or the head, varying substantially even between species of the same genus. Moreover red fluorescence was particularly strong in fins that are involved in intraspecific signalling. Finally, microspectrometry in one fluorescent goby, Eviota pellucida, showed a long-wave sensitivity that overlapped with its own red fluorescence, indicating that this species is capable of seeing its own fluorescence. Conclusion We show that red fluorescence is widespread among marine fishes. Many features indicate that it is used as a private communication mechanism in small, benthic, pair- or group-living fishes. Many of these species show quite cryptic colouration in other parts of the visible spectrum. High inter

  12. Red fluorescence in reef fish: a novel signalling mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, Nico K; Anthes, Nils; Hart, Nathan S; Herler, Jürgen; Meixner, Alfred J; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Schulte, Gregor; Siebeck, Ulrike E; Sprenger, Dennis; Wucherer, Matthias F

    2008-09-16

    At depths below 10 m, reefs are dominated by blue-green light because seawater selectively absorbs the longer, 'red' wavelengths beyond 600 nm from the downwelling sunlight. Consequently, the visual pigments of many reef fish are matched to shorter wavelengths, which are transmitted better by water. Combining the typically poor long-wavelength sensitivity of fish eyes with the presumed lack of ambient red light, red light is currently considered irrelevant for reef fish. However, previous studies ignore the fact that several marine organisms, including deep sea fish, produce their own red luminescence and are capable of seeing it. We here report that at least 32 reef fishes from 16 genera and 5 families show pronounced red fluorescence under natural, daytime conditions at depths where downwelling red light is virtually absent. Fluorescence was confirmed by extensive spectrometry in the laboratory. In most cases peak emission was around 600 nm and fluorescence was associated with guanine crystals, which thus far were known for their light reflecting properties only. Our data indicate that red fluorescence may function in a context of intraspecific communication. Fluorescence patterns were typically associated with the eyes or the head, varying substantially even between species of the same genus. Moreover red fluorescence was particularly strong in fins that are involved in intraspecific signalling. Finally, microspectrometry in one fluorescent goby, Eviota pellucida, showed a long-wave sensitivity that overlapped with its own red fluorescence, indicating that this species is capable of seeing its own fluorescence. We show that red fluorescence is widespread among marine fishes. Many features indicate that it is used as a private communication mechanism in small, benthic, pair- or group-living fishes. Many of these species show quite cryptic colouration in other parts of the visible spectrum. High inter-specific variation in red fluorescence and its association with

  13. Variations on the "Blue-Bottle" Demonstration Using Food Items That Contain FD&C Blue #1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Felicia A.; Peterson, Joshua P.; Campbell, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    Erioglaucine dye (FD&C Blue #1) can be used instead of methylene blue in the classic "blue-bottle" demonstration. Food items containing FD&C Blue #1 and reducing species such as sugars can therefore be used at the heart of this demonstration, which simply requires the addition of strong base such as sodium hydroxide lye.

  14. 21 CFR 133.184 - Roquefort cheese, sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roquefort cheese, sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk. 133.184 Section 133.184 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION..., sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk. (a) Description. (1) Roquefort cheese...

  15. Monolithic PDMS passband filters for fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobera, Andreu; Demming, Stefanie; Joensson, Haakan N; Vila-Planas, J; Andersson-Svahn, Helene; Büttgenbach, Stephanus

    2010-08-07

    We present the fabrication and characteristics of monolithically integrated ink dyed poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) filters for optical sensing in disposable lab-on-a-chip. This represents a migration of auxillary functions onto the disposable chip with the goal of producing truly portable systems. Filters made from commercially available ink (Pelikan) directly mixed into PDMS oligomer without the use of any additional solvents were patterned with standard soft lithography technologies. Furthermore, a fabrication process based on capillary forces is presented allowing PDMS coloration of arbitrary shapes. Different filters of varying thickness fabricated using red, green and blue ink in four different concentrations were characterized. The optimal performance was found with filter thicknesses of 250 microm and ink to PDMS ratios of 0.1 (mL ink : mL PDMS oligomer) resulting in a transmittance ranging from -15.1 dB to -12.3 dB in the stopband and from -4.0 dB to -2.5 dB in the passband. Additionally, we demonstrate the robustness of this approach as the ink dyed PDMS filters do not exhibit temporal ageing due to diffusion or autofluorescence. We also show that such filters can easily be integrated in fluorescence systems, with stopbands efficient enough to allow fluorescence measurements under non-optimal conditions (broadband excitation, 180 degrees configuration). Integrated ink dyed PDMS filters add robust optical functionalities to disposable microdevices at a low cost and will enable the use of these devices for a wide range of fluorescence and absorbance based biological and chemical analysis.

  16. Statistical filtering in fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin

    Roč. 406 , č. 20 (2014), s. 4797-4813 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Filtered fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Fluorescent Derivatives of Lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lori; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most versatile and powerful tools for the study of macromolecules. However, its use in macromolecular crystal growth studies is hampered by the necessity of preparing fluorescent derivatives where the probe does not markedly affect the crystal packing. Alternatively, one can prepare derivatives of limited utility if it is known that they will not affect the specific goals of a given study. We have prepared a number of fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme, covalently attaching fluorescent probes to two different sites on the protein molecule. The first site is the side chain carboxyl group of ASP 101. Amine containing probes such as lucifer yellow, cascade blue, and 5- (2-aminoethyl) aminonapthalene-l-sulfonic acid (EDANS) have been attached using a carbodiimide coupling procedure. ASP 101 lies within the active site cleft, and it is believed that the probes are "buried" within that cleft. This is supported by the fact that all such derivatives have been found to crystallize, with the crystals being fluorescent. Tetragonal crystals of the lucifer yellow derivative have been found to diffract to at least 1.9 A resolution. X-ray diffraction data has been acquired and we are now working on the structure of this derivative. The second group of derivatives is to the N-terminal amine group. The derivatization reaction is performed by using a succinimidyl ester of the probe to be attached. Fluorescent probes such as pyrene acetic acid, 5-carboxyfluorescein, and Oregon green have been attached to this site. We have had little success in crystallizing these derivatives, probably because this site is part of the contact region between the 43 helix chains. However, these sites do not interfere with formation of the 43 helices and the derivatives are suitable for study of their formation in solution. The derivatives are being characterized by steady state and lifetime fluorescence methods, and the presentation will discuss these

  18. "Blue-Collar Blues" uurib töösuhteid uutes oludes / Janar Ala

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ala, Janar, 1979-

    2009-01-01

    Tööproblemaatikat käsitlev näitus "Blue-Collar Blues" Tallinna Kunstihoones ja Tallinna Kunstihoone galeriis 31. jaanuarini 2010, kuraator Anders Härm. Lähemalt belgia-mehhiko kunstniku Francis Alys'e videost, austria kunstniku Oliver Ressleri ning venetsueela-saksa politoloogi Dario Azzelini videost "Viis tehast. Tööliste kontroll Venezuelas"

  19. Who's who in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's sixth Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working lives. This is a unique reference.

  20. Dyes adsorption blue vegetable and blue watercolor by natural zeolites modified with surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardon S, C. C.; Olguin G, M. T.; Diaz N, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    In this work was carried out the dyes removal blue vegetable and blue watercolor of aqueous solutions, to 20 C, at different times and using a zeolite mineral of Parral (Chihuahua, Mexico) modified with hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide or dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide. The zeolite was characterized before and after of its adaptation with NaCl and later with HDTMABr and DTMABr. For the materials characterization were used the scanning electron microscopy of high vacuum; elementary microanalysis by X-ray spectroscopy of dispersed energy and X-ray diffraction techniques. It was found that the surfactant type absorbed in the zeolite material influences on the adsorption process of the blue dye. Likewise, the chemical structure between the vegetable blue dye and the blue watercolor, determines the efficiency of the color removal of the water, by the zeolites modified with the surfactants. (Author)

  1. Dataset of the absorption, emission and excitation spectra and fluorescence intensity graphs of fluorescent cyanine dyes for the quantification of low amounts of dsDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijns, Brigitte; Tiggelaar, Roald; Gardeniers, Han

    2017-02-01

    This article describes data related to a research article entitled "Fluorescent cyanine dyes for the quantification of low amounts of dsDNA" (B. Bruijns, R. Tiggelaar, J. Gardeniers, 2016) [1]. Six cyanine dsDNA dyes - EvaGreen, SYBR Green, PicoGreen, AccuClear, AccuBlue NextGen and YOYO-1 - are investigated and in this article the absorption spectra, as well as excitation and emission spectra, for all six researched cyanine dyes are given, all recorded under exactly identical experimental conditions. The intensity graphs, with the relative fluorescence in the presence of low amounts of dsDNA, are also provided.

  2. Improving spinach, radish, and lettuce growth under red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with blue light supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorio, N. C.; Goins, G. D.; Kagie, H. R.; Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.

    2001-01-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherriette), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Waldmann's Green), and spinach (Spinacea oleracea L. cv. Nordic IV) plants were grown under 660-nm red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and were compared at equal photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) with either plants grown under cool-white fluorescent lamps (CWF) or red LEDs supplemented with 10% (30 micromoles m-2 s-1) blue light (400-500 nm) from blue fluorescent (BF) lamps. At 21 days after planting (DAP), leaf photosynthetic rates and stomatal conductance were greater for plants grown under CWF light than for those grown under red LEDs, with or without supplemental blue light. At harvest (21 DAP), total dry-weight accumulation was significantly lower for all species tested when grown under red LEDs alone than when grown under CWF light or red LEDs + 10% BF light. Moreover, total dry weight for radish and spinach was significantly lower under red LEDs + 10% BF than under CWF light, suggesting that addition of blue light to the red LEDs was still insufficient for achieving maximal growth for these crops.

  3. Mechanochemical synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots from cellulose powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Ari; Ram Choi, Bo; Choi, Yujin; Jo, Seongho; Kang, Eun Bi; Lee, Hyukjin; Park, Sung Young; In, Insik

    2018-04-01

    A novel mechanochemical method was firstly developed to synthesize carbon nanodots (CNDs) or carbon nano-onions (CNOs) through high-pressure homogenization of cellulose powders as naturally abundant resource depending on the treatment times. While CNDs (less than 5 nm in size) showed spherical and amorphous morphology, CNOs (10-50 nm in size) presented polyhedral shape, and onion-like outer lattice structure, graphene-like interlattice spacing of 0.36 nm. CNOs showed blue emissions, moderate dispersibility in aqueous media, and high cell viability, which enables efficient fluorescence imaging of cellular media.

  4. Bioaccumulation of stentorin, the probable causative agent for discolored (“purple”) eggs and ovaries in blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) from Eufaula Lake, Oklahoma, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Robert W.; Papoulias, Diana M.; Schmitt, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Observations of reddish to “purple” discolored eggs in the ovaries of adult female blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) from the northern arm of Eufaula Lake, a eutrophic multiuse impoundment in east-central Oklahoma, were first reported in 2006. Blue catfish eggs are normally cream to light yellow. Reports peaked in 2007–2008 and declined through 2009–2010; purple eggs have not been reported between 2010 and 2014. In the laboratory, all tissues and fluids of affected fish were strongly orange-red fluorescent under UV illumination, with the fluorescence most apparent in the lipid-rich ovaries and eggs. The causative agent was isolated chromatographically and confirmed by mass spectrometry as stentorin (1,3,4,6,8,10,11,13-octahydroxy-2,5-diisopropyl-phenanthro[1,10,9,8,o,p,q,r,a]perylene-7,14-dione), the fluorescent, lipophilic pigment associated with the photoreceptor protein of the ciliated protozoan Stentor coeruleus (Heterotrichea; Stentoridae). Larval medaka (Orizias latipes) readily consumed S. coeruleus in the laboratory and were observed to fluoresce in the same manner as the affected blue catfish. Potential deleterious effects of stentorin bioaccumulation remain to be determined, as do the geographic extent and the identities of other fluorescent compounds isolated from catfish eggs and ovaries.

  5. Bioaccumulation of Stentorin, the Probable Causative Agent for Discolored ("Purple") Eggs and Ovaries in Blue Catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) from Eufaula Lake, Oklahoma, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Robert W; Papoulias, Diana M; Schmitt, Christopher J

    2015-08-18

    Observations of reddish to "purple" discolored eggs in the ovaries of adult female blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) from the northern arm of Eufaula Lake, a eutrophic multiuse impoundment in east-central Oklahoma, were first reported in 2006. Blue catfish eggs are normally cream to light yellow. Reports peaked in 2007-2008 and declined through 2009-2010; purple eggs have not been reported between 2010 and 2014. In the laboratory, all tissues and fluids of affected fish were strongly orange-red fluorescent under UV illumination, with the fluorescence most apparent in the lipid-rich ovaries and eggs. The causative agent was isolated chromatographically and confirmed by mass spectrometry as stentorin (1,3,4,6,8,10,11,13-octahydroxy-2,5-diisopropyl-phenanthro[1,10,9,8,o,p,q,r,a]perylene-7,14-dione), the fluorescent, lipophilic pigment associated with the photoreceptor protein of the ciliated protozoan Stentor coeruleus (Heterotrichea; Stentoridae). Larval medaka (Orizias latipes) readily consumed S. coeruleus in the laboratory and were observed to fluoresce in the same manner as the affected blue catfish. Potential deleterious effects of stentorin bioaccumulation remain to be determined, as do the geographic extent and the identities of other fluorescent compounds isolated from catfish eggs and ovaries.

  6. Reporter system for the detection of in vivo gene conversion: changing colors from blue to green using GFP variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Jeffrey R; Alderson, Jon; Laible, Goetz; Petters, Robert M

    2006-06-01

    We have devised a system for the study of in vivo gene correction based on the detection of color variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. The intensity and spectra of the fluorescence emitted by the blue (BFP) and red-shifted (EGFP) variants of GFP differ from each other. We modified one nucleotide from an EGFP expression vector that we predicted would yield a blue variant (TAC-CAC, Tyr(66)-His(66)). Cells that were either transiently or stably transfected with the reporter system were used to test the functionality and feasibility of the detection of in vivo gene correction. A thio-protected single-stranded oligonucleotide designed to convert the genotype of the blue variant to that of the EGFP variant by the correction of a single base pair was delivered to the reporter cells using a variety of methodologies and strategies.Conversion events were easily observed using fluorescent microscopy because of the enhanced emission intensity and different spectra of the EGFP variant.

  7. Who's who in fluorescence 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's third Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, photographs, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working livesThe directory provides company contact details with a brief list of fluorescence-related products.

  8. Image calibration in fluorescence microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, J.M.; van Rooij, G.J.; Hofstraat, J.W.; Brakenhoff, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    A fluorescence image calibration method is presented based on the use of standardized uniformly fluorescing reference layers. It is demonstrated to be effective for the correction of non-uniform imaging characteristics across the image (shading correction) as well as for relating fluorescence

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmutov, D; Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  10. Teknologi penyamakan kulit wet blue buaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Oetojo

    1992-08-01

    Full Text Available For this study it was used 12 pieces of grain salted crocodile skin of 11 up to 14 inch width. All of the crocodile skin were process up to pickling with the same way. Furthermore pickled crocodile skins were process up to pickling with the same way. Furthermore pickled crocodile skins and was done twice. The wet blue output from the research was visual investigated for the coulor using staning scale method. For comparition it was used pickled crocodile skins. Statistical analysis pints out that there is unsignify difference (P<0.05 the influence of the used of basic chrome sulphate to the colour of wet blue crocodile skins. Practical meaning of the research is, for tanning of crocodile skins to the wet blue, it is used 1.5% basic chromium sulphate.

  11. Intraoral blue (Jadassohn-Tieche) nevus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, C D; Zoutendam, G L; Gombas, O F

    1978-05-01

    Blue nevus of the oral mucosa is a distinctly uncommon clincial entity. Careful review of the literature yielded thirty-one previously reported cases. The present article reports the occurrence of a blue nevus of the hard palate in a 58-year-old man. It is of interest since it is the smallest (1 by 1 mm.) intraoral blue nevus to be reported. A clinicopathologic study of the previous thirty-one cases and of our case suggests that this lesion has no age or sex predilection. The most common site of occurrence was the hard palate. There appears to be no tendency toward recurrence. A brief review of the historical background, clinical features, theories of possible origin, and differential diagnosis is presented. Excisional biopsy of localized areas of oral pibmentation, together with histopathologic study, is indicated to rule out melanoma.

  12. Fluorescent quantification of melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Bruno Pacheco; Matamá, Maria Teresa; Guimarães, Diana Isabel Pereira; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Melanin quantification is reportedly performed by absorption spectroscopy, commonly at 405 nm. Here, we propose the implementation of fluorescence spectroscopy for melanin assessment. In a typical in vitro assay to assess melanin production in response to an external stimulus, absorption spectroscopy clearly overvalues melanin content. This method is also incapable of distinguishing non-melanotic/amelanotic control cells from those that are actually capable of performing melanogenesis. Theref...

  13. Selective blue emission from an HPBO-Li{sup +} complex in alkaline media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obare, S.O.; Murphy, C.J. [South Carolina Univ., Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Graduate Science Research Center, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Li{sup +} sensors are currently in demand for monitoring Li{sup +} transport in Li{sup +} batteries. Fluorescent receptors specific for metal ions are desirable since they allow both direct and real-time detection. Here we show that 2-(2-Hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole(HPBO) exhibits enhanced fluorescence and specificity for Li{sup +} compared to Na{sup +} and K{sup +}, in an alkaline medium. The selectivity was observed in several organic solvents in the presence of bases such as pyridine, triethylamine and trimethyl-amine. HPBO-Li{sup +} complex formation results in an intense blue emission readily observed by the naked eye under UV light. Spectroscopic titrations suggest that the structure of the complex is one in which two HPBO anionic ligands coordinate to one Li{sup +}, with a second Li{sup +} as a counter-ion. (authors)

  14. Antimicrobial blue light therapy for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection in a mouse burn model: implications for prophylaxis and treatment of combat-related wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunsong; Zhu, Yingbo; Gupta, Asheesh; Huang, Yingying; Murray, Clinton K; Vrahas, Mark S; Sherwood, Margaret E; Baer, David G; Hamblin, Michael R; Dai, Tianhong

    2014-06-15

    In this study, we investigated the utility of antimicrobial blue light therapy for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection in a mouse burn model. A bioluminescent clinical isolate of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii was obtained. The susceptibility of A. baumannii to blue light (415 nm)-inactivation was compared in vitro to that of human keratinocytes. Repeated cycles of sublethal inactivation of bacterial by blue light were performed to investigate the potential resistance development of A. baumannii to blue light. A mouse model of third degree burn infected with A. baumannii was developed. A single exposure of blue light was initiated 30 minutes after bacterial inoculation to inactivate A. baumannii in mouse burns. It was found that the multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strain was significantly more susceptible than keratinocytes to blue light inactivation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed blue light-induced ultrastructural damage in A. baumannii cells. Fluorescence spectroscopy suggested that endogenous porphyrins exist in A. baumannii cells. Blue light at an exposure of 55.8 J/cm(2) significantly reduced the bacterial burden in mouse burns. No resistance development to blue light inactivation was observed in A. baumannii after 10 cycles of sublethal inactivation of bacteria. No significant DNA damage was detected in mouse skin by means of a skin TUNEL assay after a blue light exposure of 195 J/cm(2). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Naturally occurring fluorescence in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Carlos; Brunetti, Andrés E; Pedron, Federico N; Carnevale Neto, Fausto; Estrin, Darío A; Bari, Sara E; Chemes, Lucía B; Peporine Lopes, Norberto; Lagorio, María G; Faivovich, Julián

    2017-04-04

    Fluorescence, the absorption of short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation reemitted at longer wavelengths, has been suggested to play several biological roles in metazoans. This phenomenon is uncommon in tetrapods, being restricted mostly to parrots and marine turtles. We report fluorescence in amphibians, in the tree frog Hypsiboas punctatus, showing that fluorescence in living frogs is produced by a combination of lymph and glandular emission, with pigmentary cell filtering in the skin. The chemical origin of fluorescence was traced to a class of fluorescent compounds derived from dihydroisoquinolinone, here named hyloins. We show that fluorescence contributes 18-29% of the total emerging light under twilight and nocturnal scenarios, largely enhancing brightness of the individuals and matching the sensitivity of night vision in amphibians. These results introduce an unprecedented source of pigmentation in amphibians and highlight the potential relevance of fluorescence in visual perception in terrestrial environments.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging for monitoring nitrogen fertilizing treatments of wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisel, Francine; Sowinska, Malgorzata; Khalili, Elisabeth; Eckert, Caroline; Miehe, Joseph-Albert; Lichtenthaler, Hartmut K.

    1997-07-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence imaging system allows the recording of spectrally selected fluorescence images of the whole leaves or plants which is better and in contrast to the so far applied spot spectrofluorometer measurements. The fluorescence images of leaves of winter wheat (Soissons variety, Alsace) have been recorded at the four characteristic emission bands (440, 520, 690 and 740 nm) with a high resolution imaging device consisting of a frequency triplet or doubled Nd:YAG source for 355 nm or 532 nm excitation and of an intensified and gated CCD digitized camera. The effect of four different nitrogen treatments (0, 100, 140 and 180 kg/ha) on the fluorescence parameters (intensities F440, F520, F690, F740 and ratios F440/F520, F440/F690, F440/F740 and F690/F740) obtained by image processing has been analyzed by statistical treatment, in a randomized blocks experiment. The measurements have been carried out on two leaf storeys weekly gathered during two months (May and June 1996). For 355 nm excitation, a significant decrease of the fluorescence ratios F440/F690 and F440/F740 was observed for increasing nitrogen concentration: the blue and green mean fluorescence intensities remained much the same, while the red and far-red chlorophyll fluorescence emissions were enhanced by the fertilization. The fluorescence results are in excellent correlation with the crop yields.

  17. Fluorescence Enhancement from Self-Assembled Aggregates II: Factors Influencing Florescence Color from Azobenzene Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mina

    2013-09-01

    We have chosen two types of azobenzene derivatives to elucidate the correlation between molecular structure and fluorescence color of light-driven azobenzene-based aggregates. The fluorescence color from azobenzene molecules (1 and 2), adopting a planar structure, was obviously red-shifted from that of the corresponding twisted ortho-alkylated azobenzene 3. The steric hindrance resulting from bulky alkyl groups at the ortho position of the azo linkage was considered to lessen the intermolecular π - π stacking between aromatic rings, leading to the relatively smaller spectral shift in fluorescence from the absorption band of the initial azobenzene solution. The substitution of electron-withdrawing groups into the azobenzene core gave rise to a blue-shift in fluorescence wavelength. That is, the extended π-conjugated system consisting of a planar azobenzene core as well as the electronic properties of the substituents are key factors influencing the fluorescence color from the light-driven azobenzene aggregates. Moreover, we could prepare fluorescent polymer films by mixing fluorescent azobenzene aggregates with polymers. The fluorescence colors from the polymer films were comparable to those from the azobenzene aggregates.

  18. Adaptation to Blue Light in MarineSynechococcusRequires MpeU, an Enzyme with Similarity to Phycoerythrobilin Lyase Isomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Rania M; Sanfilippo, Joseph E; Nguyen, Adam A; Strnat, Johann A; Partensky, Frédéric; Garczarek, Laurence; Abo El Kassem, Nabil; Kehoe, David M; Schluchter, Wendy M

    2017-01-01

    Marine Synechococcus has successfully adapted to environments with different light colors, which likely contributes to this genus being the second most abundant group of microorganisms worldwide. Populations of Synechococcus that grow in deep, blue ocean waters contain large amounts of the blue-light absorbing chromophore phycourobilin (PUB) in their light harvesting complexes (phycobilisomes). Here, we show that all Synechococcus strains adapted to blue light possess a gene called mpeU . MpeU is structurally similar to phycobilin lyases, enzymes that ligate chromophores to phycobiliproteins. Interruption of mpeU caused a reduction in PUB content, impaired phycobilisome assembly and reduced growth rate more strongly in blue than green light. When mpeU was reintroduced in the mpeU mutant background, the mpeU- less phenotype was complemented in terms of PUB content and phycobilisome content. Fluorescence spectra of mpeU mutant cells and purified phycobilisomes revealed red-shifted phycoerythrin emission peaks, likely indicating a defect in chromophore ligation to phycoerythrin-I (PE-I) or phycoerythrin-II (PE-II). Our results suggest that MpeU is a lyase-isomerase that attaches a phycoerythrobilin to a PEI or PEII subunit and isomerizes it to PUB. MpeU is therefore an important determinant in adaptation of Synechococcus spp. to capture photons in blue light environments throughout the world's oceans.

  19. A study of the fluorescent properties of spin-coated sodium salicylate thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kuhaili, M.F. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: kuhaili@kfupm.edu.sa

    2006-04-15

    Thin films of sodium salicylate were deposited by spin coating from a solution prepared by dissolving sodium salicylate in methanol. The films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy and spectrofluorometry. The films were crystalline with a strong blue fluorescence peak at an emission wavelength of 419.3 nm. The influence of solution concentration, spin speed and annealing temperature on the fluorescence intensity was studied. Optimum results were obtained with a solution whose concentration was 2.5 M. It was found that lower spin speed resulted in higher fluorescence intensity. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity decreased as the annealing temperature was increased. The durability of the films over a period of 30 days was also investigated, and films annealed at higher temperatures were found to be less degraded with time.

  20. Fluorescent detection of single tracks of alpha particles using lithium fluoride crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilski, P., E-mail: pawel.bilski@ifj.edu.pl; Marczewska, B.

    2017-02-01

    Lithium fluoride single crystals were successfully used for fluorescent imaging of single tracks of alpha particles. This was realized with a standard wide-field fluorescent microscope equipped with a 100× objective. Alpha particles create F{sub 2} and F{sub 3}{sup +} color centers in LiF crystals. The subsequent illumination with the blue light (wavelength around 445 nm), excites these centers and produces fluorescence with a broad band peaked at 670 nm. The observed tracks of alpha particles have diameter of about 500 nm. Focusing of the microscope at different depths in a LiF crystal, enables imaging changes of shape and position of tracks, allowing for visualization of their paths. These encouraging results are the first step towards practical application of LiF as fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

  1. Fluorescent QDs-polystyrene composite nanospheres for highly efficient and rapid protein antigen detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Changhua; Mao, Mao [Henan University, Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education (China); Yuan, Hang [Tsinghua University, Life Science Division, Graduate School at Shenzhen (China); Shen, Huaibin [Henan University, Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education (China); Wu, Feng; Ma, Lan, E-mail: malan@sz.tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University, Life Science Division, Graduate School at Shenzhen (China); Li, Lin Song, E-mail: lsli@henu.edu.cn [Henan University, Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education (China)

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, high-quality carboxyl-functionalized fluorescent (red, green, and blue emitting) nanospheres (46-103 nm) consisting of hydrophobic quantum dots (QDs) and polystyrene were prepared by a miniemulsion polymerization approach. This miniemulsion polymerization approach induced a homogeneous distribution and high aqueous-phase transport efficiency of fluorescent QDs in composite nanospheres, which proved the success of our encoding QDs strategy. The obtained fluorescent nanospheres exhibited high stability in aqueous solution under a wide range of pH, different salt concentrations, PBS buffer, and thermal treatment at 80 Degree-Sign C. Based on the red emitting composite nanosphere, we performed fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) strips for high-sensitivity and rapid alpha-fetal protein detection. The detection limit reached 0.1 ng/mL, which was 200 times higher than commercial colloidal gold-labeled LFIA strips, and it reached similar detection level in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit.

  2. Fluorescent QDs-polystyrene composite nanospheres for highly efficient and rapid protein antigen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changhua; Mao, Mao; Yuan, Hang; Shen, Huaibin; Wu, Feng; Ma, Lan; Li, Lin Song

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, high-quality carboxyl-functionalized fluorescent (red, green, and blue emitting) nanospheres (46-103 nm) consisting of hydrophobic quantum dots (QDs) and polystyrene were prepared by a miniemulsion polymerization approach. This miniemulsion polymerization approach induced a homogeneous distribution and high aqueous-phase transport efficiency of fluorescent QDs in composite nanospheres, which proved the success of our encoding QDs strategy. The obtained fluorescent nanospheres exhibited high stability in aqueous solution under a wide range of pH, different salt concentrations, PBS buffer, and thermal treatment at 80 °C. Based on the red emitting composite nanosphere, we performed fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) strips for high-sensitivity and rapid alpha-fetal protein detection. The detection limit reached 0.1 ng/mL, which was 200 times higher than commercial colloidal gold-labeled LFIA strips, and it reached similar detection level in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit.

  3. Ultraminiature optical design for multispectral fluorescence imaging endoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Tyler H; Keenan, Molly; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer K

    2017-03-01

    A miniature wide-field multispectral endoscopic imaging system was developed enabling reflectance and fluorescence imaging over a broad wavelength range. At 0.8-mm diameter, the endoscope can be utilized for natural orifice imaging in small lumens such as the fallopian tubes. Five lasers from 250 to 642 nm are coupled into a 125 - ? m diameter multimode fiber and transmitted to the endoscope distal tip for illumination. Ultraviolet and blue wavelengths excite endogenous fluorophores, which can provide differential fluorescence emission images for health and disease. Visible wavelengths provide reflectance images that can be combined for pseudo-white-light imaging and navigation. Imaging is performed by a 300 - ? m diameter three-element lens system connected to a 3000-element fiber. The lens system was designed for a 70-deg full field of view, working distance from 3 mm to infinity, and 40% contrast at the Nyquist cutoff of the fiber bundle. Measured performance characteristics are near design goals. The endoscope was utilized to obtain example monochromatic, pseudo-white-light, and composite fluorescence images of phantoms and porcine reproductive tract. This work shows the feasibility of packaging a highly capable multispectral fluorescence imaging system into a miniature endoscopic system that may have applications in early detection of cancer.

  4. Detection of vegetation stress from laser-induced fluorescence signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhash, N.

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signatures of UV irradiated Salvia splendens plants were measured using an Optical Multichannel Analyser (OMA) system with Nitrogen laser excitation. The LIF spectra which consisted of the blue-green and the red chlorophyll bands were analysed with a non-linear interactive procedure using Gaussian spectral functions. The fluorescence intensity ratios of the various bands obtained from curve fitted parameters were found to be more sensitive to changes in the photosynthetic activity of the plant. The variation in the intensity ratio for the chlorophyll bands for nutrient stressed sunflower, cotton and groundnut plants as well as the nutrient and water stressed rice plants are also presented. It is observed that vegetation stress not only changes the fluorescence intensity ratios and the vitality index of the plant but also changes the peak position of the emission bands, in some cases. It is also seen that analysis of the fluorescence spectra in vegetation remote sensing applications would require a deconvolution procedure to evaluate the exact contribution of each band in the total spectra. (author). 23 refs, 8 figs, 5 tabs

  5. Biodecolorization and biodegradation of Reactive Blue by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspergillus sp. effectively decolorized Reactive Blue and other structurally different synthetic dyes. Agitation was found to be an important parameter, while glucose (99%), sucrose (97%) and mannitol (98%) were the best carbon sources for the decolorization. Decolorization was effective in an acidic environment (pH 3).

  6. Geographical Study of American Blues Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Music is not often utilized in teaching geography, despite the fact that many scholars orient their research around analyzing both the historical and spatial dimensions of musical expression. This article reports on the use of a teaching module that utilizes blues culture as a lens to understand the geographical history of the United States. The…

  7. Nanotubes based on monolayer blue phosphorus

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-07-08

    We demonstrate structural stability of monolayer zigzag and armchair blue phosphorus nanotubes by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational spectrum and electronic band structure are determined and analyzed as functions of the tube diameter and axial strain. The nanotubes are found to be semiconductors with a sensitive indirect band gap that allows flexible tuning.

  8. Blue whales respond to anthropogenic noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana L Melcón

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic noise may significantly impact exposed marine mammals. This work studied the vocalization response of endangered blue whales to anthropogenic noise sources in the mid-frequency range using passive acoustic monitoring in the Southern California Bight. Blue whales were less likely to produce calls when mid-frequency active sonar was present. This reduction was more pronounced when the sonar source was closer to the animal, at higher sound levels. The animals were equally likely to stop calling at any time of day, showing no diel pattern in their sensitivity to sonar. Conversely, the likelihood of whales emitting calls increased when ship sounds were nearby. Whales did not show a differential response to ship noise as a function of the time of the day either. These results demonstrate that anthropogenic noise, even at frequencies well above the blue whales' sound production range, has a strong probability of eliciting changes in vocal behavior. The long-term implications of disruption in call production to blue whale foraging and other behaviors are currently not well understood.

  9. Prussian Blue Analogues of Reduced Dimensionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gengler, Regis Y. N.; Toma, Luminita M.; Pardo, Emilio; Lloret, Francesc; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-valence polycyanides (Prussian Blue analogues) possess a rich palette of properties spanning from room-temperature ferromagnetism to zero thermal expansion, which can be tuned by chemical modifications or the application of external stimuli (temperature, pressure, light irradiation). While

  10. African Retentions in Blues and Jazz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Eddie S.

    1979-01-01

    The perseverance of African musical characteristics among American Blacks is an historic reality. African retentions have been recorded in Black music of the antebellum period. Various African scales and rhythms permeate Black American music today as evidenced in the retentions found in blues and jazz. (RLV)

  11. A Discography of the Real Blues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Dean

    1972-01-01

    A short account of the rise and decline of the Blues and a discussion of the artists who performed it is followed by an annotated bibliography of periodicals, books, records and tapes related to this form of Black" music. (184 references) (NH)

  12. Blue laser phase change recording system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Holger; Dambach, S.Soeren; Richter, Hartmut

    2002-01-01

    The migration paths from DVD phase change recording with red laser to the next generation optical disk formats with blue laser and high NA optics are discussed with respect to optical aberration margins and disc capacities. A test system for the evaluation of phase change disks with more than 20 GB capacity is presented and first results of the recording performance are shown

  13. The Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy IZw18

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musella, I.; Marconi, M.; Fiorentino, G.; Clementini, G.; Aloisi, A.; Annibali, F.; Contreras, R.; Saha, A.; Tosi, M.; van der Marel, R. P.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results obtained for the Blue compact galaxy IZw18 on the basis of ACS HST data obtained from our group. In particular, we discuss the stellar population and the variable stars content of this galaxy to get information about its star formation history and distance.

  14. [The dangers of blue light: True story!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, G; Leid, J

    2016-05-01

    The dangers of the blue light are the object of numerous publications, for both the scientific community and the general public. The new prolific development of light sources emitting potentially toxic blue light (415-455nm) ranges from LED (Light Emitting Diodes) lamps for interior lighting to television screens, computers, digital tablets and smartphones using OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) or AMOLED (Active-Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode) technology. First we will review some technical terms and the main characteristics of light perceived by the human eye. Then we will discuss scientific proof of the toxicity of blue light to the eye, which may cause cataract or macular degeneration. Analysis of the light spectra of several light sources, from natural light to LED lamps, will allow us to specify even better the dangers related to each light source. LED lamps, whether used as components for interior lighting or screens, are of concern if they are used for extended viewing times and at short distance. While we can protect ourselves from natural blue light by wearing colored glasses which filter out, on both front and back surfaces, the toxic wavelengths, it is more difficult to protect oneself from LED lamps in internal lighting, the use of which should be restricted to "white warmth" lamps (2700K). As far as OLED or AMOLED screens are concerned, the only effective protection consists of using them occasionally and only for a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Biodecolorization and biodegradation of Reactive Blue by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-06-18

    Jun 18, 2007 ... Aspergillus sp. effectively decolorized Reactive Blue and other structurally different synthetic dyes. Agitation was found to be an important ... Few chemically different dyes such as Reactive Black (75%), Reactive Yellow (70%),. Reactive Red (33%) and ..... Degradation of azo dyes by the lignin degrading ...

  16. Pulse electrodeposition of Prussian Blue thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafisayar, P.; Bahrololoom, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of pulse electrodeposition parameters like peak current density and frequency on the electrochemical properties of Prussian Blue thin films were investigated. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry and Chronoamperometry tests were carried out on Prussian Blue thin films which were pulse electrodeposited on Indium Tin Oxide coated glass substrates. The results showed that increase in the peak current densities and using higher pulsating frequencies during electrodeposition decreases the charge transfer resistance of the thin films while the diffusion coefficient of electroactive species in the films is increased as a consequence of using the same pulsating parameters. In addition, pulse electrodeposition technique does not alter deposition mechanism and morphology of the Prussian Blue thin films. - Highlights: • Prussian Blue thin films were pulse electrodeposited onto the ITO coated glass. • Pulse current condition affected thin films' electrochemical properties. • High pulsating current and frequency lower thin films' charge transfer resistance. • High pulsating current and frequency increase diffusion coefficient in thin films

  17. Characterization of dough baked via blue laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blutinger, Jonathan David; Meijers, Yorán; Chen, Peter Yichen; Zheng, Changxi; Grinspun, Eitan; Lipson, Hod

    2018-01-01

    Depth of heat penetration and temperature must be precisely controlled to optimize nutritional value, appearance, and taste of food products. These objectives can be achieved with the use of a high-resolution blue diode laser—which operates at 445 nm—by adjusting the water content of the dough and

  18. Blue LED irradiation to hydration of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Requena, Michelle B.; Lizarelli, Rosane F., Z.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Blue LED system irradiation shows many important properties on skin as: bacterial decontamination, degradation of endogenous skin chromophores and biostimulation. In this clinical study we prove that the blue light improves the skin hydration. In the literature none authors reports this biological property on skin. Then this study aims to discuss the role of blue light in the skin hydration. Twenty patients were selected to this study with age between 25-35 years old and phototype I, II and III. A defined area from forearm was pre determined (A = 4.0 cm2). The study was randomized in two treatment groups using one blue light device (power of 5.3mW and irradiance of 10.8mW/cm2). The first treatment group was irradiated with 3J/cm2 (277seconds) and the second with 6J/cm2 (555 seconds). The skin hydration evaluations were done using a corneometer. The measurements were collected in 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, during the treatment. Statistical test of ANOVA, Tukey and T-Student were applied considering 5% of significance. In conclusion, both doses were able to improve the skin hydration; however, 6J/cm2 has kept this hydration for 30 days.

  19. KINETICS AND MECHANISM OF PRUSSIAN BLUE FORMATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    This intense blue colored pigment is used in the preparation of paints, printing inks, laundry dye, etc. [1]. The micro-porous character of PB and its analogues find ... industrial applications such as in removal of heavy metal ions in wine production [4], electrochemical application as battery building [5], electronic switching and ...

  20. Statistical thermodynamics of supercapacitors and blue engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roij, R.H.H.G.

    2013-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics of electrode-electrolyte systems, for instance supercapacitors filled with an ionic liquid or blue-energy devices filled with river- or sea water. By a suitable mapping of thermodynamic variables, we identify a strong analogy with classical heat engines. We introduce

  1. The Biology of blue-green algae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carr, Nicholas G; Whitton, B. A

    1973-01-01

    .... This book, extensively illustrated and thoroughly referenced, will provide the source material for students, and experienced as well as new research workers should find it of great value. A series of short appendices summarize details of culture collections, media and some specialized aspects of growing blue-green algae.

  2. METHYLENE BLUE ADSORPTION FROM GLYCEROL SOLUTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT. The mechanism of methylene blue adsorption onto the surface of synthetic acicular habit of α- goethite from glycerol solution has been studied through batch experiment at 25, 30 and 35 0C in a glass cell of minimal dead volume. To describe the adsorption results, an attempt was made to fit the data to the ...

  3. The 1993-1994 Blue Ribbon Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Christine M.

    1994-01-01

    This year's 276 Blue Ribbon schools, including 220 public and 56 private schools, are in 45 states and the District of Columbia, with a Department of Defense school in Honshu, Japan. About 70% are headed by women principals. In 89 schools, students from low-income families comprise at least a quarter of the enrollment. Schools are listed by state.…

  4. Complexing Methylene Blue with Phosphorus Dendrimers to Increase Photodynamic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrzalska, Monika; Janaszewska, Anna; Zablocka, Maria; Mignani, Serge; Majoral, Jean Pierre; Klajnert-Maculewicz, Barbara

    2017-02-23

    The efficiency of photodynamic therapy is limited mainly due to low selectivity, unfavorable biodistribution of photosensitizers, and long-lasting skin sensitivity to light. However, drug delivery systems based on nanoparticles may overcome the limitations mentioned above. Among others, dendrimers are particularly attractive as carriers, because of their globular architecture and high loading capacity. The goal of the study was to check whether an anionic phosphorus dendrimer is suitable as a carrier of a photosensitizer-methylene blue (MB). As a biological model, basal cell carcinoma cell lines were used. We checked the influence of the MB complexation on its singlet oxygen production ability using a commercial fluorescence probe. Next, cellular uptake, phototoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and cell death were investigated. The MB-anionic dendrimer complex (MB-1an) was found to generate less singlet oxygen; however, the complex showed higher cellular uptake and phototoxicity against basal cell carcinoma cell lines, which was accompanied with enhanced ROS production. Owing to the obtained results, we conclude that the photodynamic activity of MB complexed with an anionic dendrimer is higher than free MB against basal cell carcinoma cell lines.

  5. Complexing Methylene Blue with Phosphorus Dendrimers to Increase Photodynamic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Dabrzalska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of photodynamic therapy is limited mainly due to low selectivity, unfavorable biodistribution of photosensitizers, and long-lasting skin sensitivity to light. However, drug delivery systems based on nanoparticles may overcome the limitations mentioned above. Among others, dendrimers are particularly attractive as carriers, because of their globular architecture and high loading capacity. The goal of the study was to check whether an anionic phosphorus dendrimer is suitable as a carrier of a photosensitizer—methylene blue (MB. As a biological model, basal cell carcinoma cell lines were used. We checked the influence of the MB complexation on its singlet oxygen production ability using a commercial fluorescence probe. Next, cellular uptake, phototoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and cell death were investigated. The MB-anionic dendrimer complex (MB-1an was found to generate less singlet oxygen; however, the complex showed higher cellular uptake and phototoxicity against basal cell carcinoma cell lines, which was accompanied with enhanced ROS production. Owing to the obtained results, we conclude that the photodynamic activity of MB complexed with an anionic dendrimer is higher than free MB against basal cell carcinoma cell lines.

  6. Blue light differentially represses mesophyll conductance in high vs low latitude genotypes of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momayyezi, Mina; Guy, Robert D

    2017-06-01

    To explore what role chloroplast positioning might have in relation to latitudinal variation in mesophyll conductance (g m ) of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray (black cottonwood), we examined photosynthetic response to different blue light treatments in six representative genotypes (three northern and three southern). The proportion of blue (B) to red light was varied from 0:100, 10:90, 20:80, 40:60, and 60:40 while keeping the total photosynthetic photon flux density constant. Mesophyll conductance was estimated by monitoring chlorophyll fluorescence in combination with gas exchange. Compared to the control (10% B), g m was significantly lower with increasing blue light. Consistent with a change in chloroplast positioning, there was a simultaneous but reversible decrease in chlorophyll content index (CCI), as measured by foliar greenness, while the extracted, actual chlorophyll content (ACC) remained unchanged. Blue-light-induced decreases in g m and CCI were greater in northern genotypes than in southern genotypes, both absolutely and proportionally, consistent with their inherently higher photosynthetic rate. Treatment of leaves with cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin-based chloroplast motility, reduced both CCI and ACC but had no effect on the CCI/ACC ratio and fully blocked any effect of blue light on CCI. Cytochalasin D reduced g m by ∼56% under 10% B, but did not block the effect of 60% B on g m , which was reduced a further 20%. These results suggest that the effect of high blue light on g m is at least partially independent of chloroplast repositioning. High blue light reduced carbonic anhydrase activity by 20% (P<0.05), consistent with a possible reduction in protein-mediated facilitation of CO 2 diffusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Pulsed Blue and Ultraviolet Laser System for Fluorescence Diagnostics based on Nonlinear Frequency Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Haynes Pak Hay

    , which translates into a 79% temporal overlap when compared to the zero-delay scenario. The minimum timing jitter between the two pulses was 9 ns, which is one-standard deviation of the delay measurements. This is comparable to previously published results for an actively synchronized system if either...... a four-sigma or six-sigma definition was used. Detailed investigation into the relative timing jitter between the two synchronized pulses was also carried out, where it was found that the lower limit on the relative jitter, determined by pump power fluctuations and amplified spontaneous emission, was 6...

  8. Development of the spectrometric imaging apparatus of laser induced fluorescence from plants and estimation of chlorophyll contents of rice leaves; Laser reiki keiko sokutei sochi no kaihatsu to inehanai no chlorophyll ganryo no suitei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaya, K.; Shoji, K.; Hanyu, H.

    1999-05-01

    Photosynthetic activity of plants is an important factor to assess the micrometeorological effect of plant canopy or to estimate the influence of circumstances such as water stress. Light illumination induces fluorescence from a leaf or suspension of chloroplasts. The red chlorophyll fluorescence had been used to determine the process of the electron transportation in photosynthetic reaction. The fluorescence source other than chlorophyll is not announced sufficiently, but is supposed to be useful to determine the contents of the substance corresponding to physiological response of plants. We developed a fluorescence imaging apparatus to observe spectrum and distribution of laser induced fluorescence from a leaf. Pulsed UV-laser (Nd:YAG) induced blue-green fluorescence and red chlorophyll fluorescence from a green leaf. The pulse modulated measuring light and CCD with image-intensifier (ICCD) enable to detect the fluorescence from plants under illumination. The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra were investigated to estimate the chlorophyll contents in leaves of rice. During the greening course of dark grown etiolated rice leaves, chlorophyll contents were determined using the extraction of leaves and steady state LIF spectra were measured. As a result, the ratio of fluorescent intensity between blue-green and red peaks (F460/F740 and F510/F740) decreased in proportion to alteration of chlorophyll contents respectively. These fluorescence intensity ratios perform more precise estimation of higher chlorophyll contents of leaves than reported red chlorophyll fluorescence intensity ratio (F690/E740). (author)

  9. Pianure Blues: From the Dialect of the Plains to the English of the Blues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Nadiani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors describe a joint performance project called Pianure Blues, in which poems in Romagnolo dialect are transposed into English and performed as blues songs, and in which songs from the Anglo-American blues/roots/folk tradition are transposed and performed as poems in Romagnolo dialect – a process they have called ‘trans-staging’. A process in which they are writers and performers and, especially, translators; translators of each other’s voices, stories, landscapes, rhythms and sounds as they look for the bond between places, languages and traditions that seem very distant from each other but which find a common mood and poetic language, a common aesthetic, in their performances. The authors reflect on the creative process involved and on the significance of establishing an intersemiotic dialogue between a ‘minority’ dialect such as Romagnolo and a ‘global’ language such as English, and the blues, have become.

  10. Hubble's View of Little Blue Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-02-01

    The recent discovery of a new type of tiny, star-forming galaxy is the latest in a zoo of detections shedding light on our early universe. What can we learn from the unique little blue dots found in archival Hubble data?Peas, Berries, and DotsGreen pea galaxies identified by citizen scientists with Galaxy Zoo. [Richard Nowell Carolin Cardamone]As telescope capabilities improve and we develop increasingly deeper large-scale surveys of our universe, we continue to learn more about small, faraway galaxies. In recent years, increasing sensitivity first enabled the detection of green peas luminous, compact, low-mass (10 billion solar masses; compare this to the Milky Ways 1 trillion solar masses!) galaxies with high rates of star formation.Not long thereafter, we discovered galaxies that form stars similarly rapidly, but are even smaller only 330 million solar masses, spanning less than 3,000 light-years in size. These tiny powerhouses were termed blueberries for their distinctive color.Now, scientists Debra and Bruce Elmegreen (of Vassar College and IBM Research Division, respectively) report the discovery of galaxies that have even higher star formation rates and even lower masses: little blue dots.Exploring Tiny Star FactoriesThe Elmegreens discovered these unique galaxies by exploring archival Hubble data. The Hubble Frontier Fields data consist of deep images of six distant galaxy clusters and the parallel fields next to them. It was in the archival data for two Frontier Field Parallels, those for clusters Abell 2744 and MAS J0416.1-2403, that the authors noticed several galaxies that stand out as tiny, bright, blue objects that are nearly point sources.Top: a few examples of the little blue dots recently identified in two Hubble Frontier Field Parallels. Bottom: stacked images for three different groups of little blue dots. [Elmegreen Elmegreen 2017]The authors performed a search through the two Frontier Field Parallels, discovering a total of 55 little blue dots

  11. Green-fluorescent protein as a new vital marker in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, J; Hwang, S; Niwa, Y; Kobayashi, H; Galbraith, D W

    1995-11-01

    The green-fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish Aequorea victoria has been used as a convenient new vital marker in various heterologous systems. However, it has been problematic to express GFP in higher eukaryotes, especially in higher plants. This paper reports that either a strong constitutive or a heat-shock promoter can direct the expression of GFP which is easily detectable in maize mesophyll protoplasts. In this single-cell system, bright green fluorescence emitted from GFP is visible when excited with UV or blue light even in the presence of blue fluorescence from the vacuole or the red chlorophyll autofluorescence from chloroplasts using a fluorescence microscope. No exogenous substrate, co-factor, or other gene product is required. GFP is very stable in plant cells and shows little photobleaching. Viable cells can be obtained after fluorescence-activated cell sorting based on GFP. The paper further reports that GFP can be detected in intact tissues after delivering the constructs into Arabidopsis leaf and root by microprojectile bombardment. The successful detection of GFP in plant cells relies on the use of a universal transcription enhancer from maize or the translation enhancer from tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to boost the expression. This new reporter could be used to monitor gene expression, signal transduction, co-transfection, transformation, protein trafficking and localization, protein-protein interaction, cell separation and purification, and cell lineage in higher plants.

  12. Spectral effects of light-emitting diodes on plant growth and development: The importance of green and blue light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, K. R.; Bugbee, B.

    2011-12-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are an emerging technology for plant growth lighting. Due to their narrow spectral output, colored LEDs provide many options for studying the spectral effects of light on plants. Early on, efficient red LEDs were the primary focus of photobiological research; however, subsequent studies have shown that normal plant growth and development cannot be achieved under red light without blue light supplementation. More recent studies have shown that red and blue (RB) LEDs supplemented with green light increase plant dry mass. This is because green light transmits more effectively through the leaf canopy than red and blue light, thus illuminating lower plant leaves and increasing whole-plant photosynthesis. Red, green and blue (RGB) light can be provided by either a conventional white light source (such as fluorescent lights), a combination of RGB LEDs, or from recently developed white LEDs. White LEDs exceed the efficiency of fluorescent lights and have a comparable broad spectrum. As such, they have the potential to replace fluorescent lighting for growth-chamber-based crop production both on Earth and in space. Here we report the results of studies on the effects of three white LED types (warm, neutral and cool) on plant growth and development compared to combinations of RB and RGB LEDs. Plants were grown under two constant light intensities (200 and 500 μmol m-2 s-1). Temperature, environmental conditions and root-zone environment were uniformly maintained across treatments. Phytochrome photoequilbria and red/far-red ratios were similar among treatments and were comparable to conventional fluorescent lights. Blue light had a significant effect on both plant growth (dry mass gain) and development (dry mass partitioning). An increase in the absolute amount (μmol m-2 s-1) of blue light from 0-80 μmol m-2 s-1 resulted in a decrease in stem elongation, independent of the light intensity. However, an increase in the relative amount (%) of blue

  13. The Blue Coma: The Role of Methylene Blue in Unexplained Coma After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Enrico Antonio; Winterton, Dario; Nardelli, Pasquale; Pasin, Laura; Calabrò, Maria Grazia; Bove, Tiziana; Fanelli, Giovanna; Zangrillo, Alberto; Landoni, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Methylene blue commonly is used as a dye or an antidote, but also can be used off label as a vasopressor. Serotonin toxicity is a potentially lethal and often misdiagnosed condition that can result from drug interaction. Mild serotonin toxicity previously was reported in settings in which methylene blue was used as a dye. The authors report 3 cases of life-threatening serotonin toxicity in patients undergoing chronic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) therapy who also underwent cardiac surgery and received methylene blue to treat vasoplegic syndrome. An observational study. A cardiothoracic intensive care unit (ICU) in a teaching hospital. Three patients who received methylene blue after cardiac surgery, later discovered to be undergoing chronic SSRI therapy. None. All 3 patients received high doses of fentanyl during general anesthesia. They all developed vasoplegic syndrome and consequently were given methylene blue in the ICU. All 3 patients developed serotonin toxicity, including coma, after this administration and diagnostic tests were negative for acute intracranial pathology. Coma lasted between 1 and 5 days. Two patients were discharged from the ICU shortly after awakening, whereas the third patient experienced a complicated postoperative course for concomitant refractory low-cardiac-output syndrome. Patients undergoing chronic SSRI therapy should not be administered methylene blue to treat vasoplegic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Unraveling the Mystery of the Blue Fog: Structure, Properties, and Applications of Amorphous Blue Phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Sahil Sandesh; Chien, Liang-Chy

    2017-12-01

    The amorphous blue phase III of cholesteric liquid crystals, also known as the "blue fog," are among the rising stars in materials science that can potentially be used to develop next-generation displays with the ability to compete toe-to-toe with disruptive technologies like organic light-emitting diodes. The structure and properties of the practically unobservable blue phase III have eluded scientists for more than a century since it was discovered. This progress report reviews the developments in this field from both fundamental and applied research perspectives. The first part of this progress report gives an overview of the 130-years-long scientific tour-de-force that very recently resulted in the revelation of the mysterious structure of blue phase III. The second part reviews progress made in the past decade in developing electrooptical, optical, and photonic devices based on blue phase III. The strong and weak aspects of the development of these devices are underlined and criticized, respectively. The third- and-final part proposes ideas for further improvement in blue phase III technology to make it feasible for commercialization and widespread use. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Hue-shifted monomeric variants of Clavularia cyan fluorescent protein: identification of the molecular determinants of color and applications in fluorescence imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson Michael W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the 15 years that have passed since the cloning of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (avGFP, the expanding set of fluorescent protein (FP variants has become entrenched as an indispensable toolkit for cell biology research. One of the latest additions to the toolkit is monomeric teal FP (mTFP1, a bright and photostable FP derived from Clavularia cyan FP. To gain insight into the molecular basis for the blue-shifted fluorescence emission we undertook a mutagenesis-based study of residues in the immediate environment of the chromophore. We also employed site-directed and random mutagenesis in combination with library screening to create new hues of mTFP1-derived variants with wavelength-shifted excitation and emission spectra. Results Our results demonstrate that the protein-chromophore interactions responsible for blue-shifting the absorbance and emission maxima of mTFP1 operate independently of the chromophore structure. This conclusion is supported by the observation that the Tyr67Trp and Tyr67His mutants of mTFP1 retain a blue-shifted fluorescence emission relative to their avGFP counterparts (that is, Tyr66Trp and Tyr66His. Based on previous work with close homologs, His197 and His163 are likely to be the residues with the greatest contribution towards blue-shifting the fluorescence emission. Indeed we have identified the substitutions His163Met and Thr73Ala that abolish or disrupt the interactions of these residues with the chromophore. The mTFP1-Thr73Ala/His163Met double mutant has an emission peak that is 23 nm red-shifted from that of mTFP1 itself. Directed evolution of this double mutant resulted in the development of mWasabi, a new green fluorescing protein that offers certain advantages over enhanced avGFP (EGFP. To assess the usefulness of mTFP1 and mWasabi in live cell imaging applications, we constructed and imaged more than 20 different fusion proteins. Conclusion Based on the results of our

  16. Spectroscopic parameters of the cuticle and ethanol extracts of the fluorescent cave isopod Mesoniscusgraniger (Isopoda, Oniscidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurginca, Andrei; Šustr, Vladimír; Tajovský, Karel; Giurginca, Maria; Matei, Iulia

    2015-01-01

    The body surface of the terrestrial isopod Mesoniscusgraniger (Frivaldsky, 1863) showed blue autofluorescence under UV light (330-385 nm), using epifluorescence microscopy and also in living individuals under a UV lamp with excitation light of 365 nm. Some morphological cuticular structures expressed a more intense autofluorescence than other body parts. For this reason, only the cuticle was analyzed. The parameters of autofluorescence were investigated using spectroscopic methods (molecular spectroscopy in infrared, ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy) in samples of two subspecies of Mesoniscusgraniger preserved in ethanol. Samples excited by UV light (from 350 to 380 nm) emitted blue light of wavelengths 419, 420, 441, 470 and 505 nm (solid phase) and 420, 435 and 463 (ethanol extract). The results showed that the autofluorescence observed from living individuals may be due to some β-carboline or coumarin derivatives, some crosslinking structures, dityrosine, or due to other compounds showing similar excitation-emission characteristics.

  17. Effect of PAF on polyrnorphonuclear leucocyte plasma membrane polarity: a fluorescence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kantar

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of PAF on the plasma membrane polarity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs was investigated by measuring the steady-state fluorescence emission spectra of 2-dimethylamino(6-1auroyl naphthalene (Laurdan, which is known to be incorporated at the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface of the bilayer, displaying spectral sensitivity to the polarity of its surrounding. Laurdan shows a marked steady-state emission blue-shift in non-polar solvents, with respect to polar solvents. Our results demonstrate that PAF (10−7 M induces a blue shift of the fluorescence emission spectra of Laurdan. These changes are blocked in the presence of the PAF antagonist, L-659,989. Our data indicate that the interaction between PAF and PMNs is accompanied by a decrease in polarity in the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface of the plasma membrane.

  18. A highly sensitive sensor for ethyl acetate by changing fluorescent colour of lanthanide complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina

    2017-09-01

    A lanthanide complex, namely, [La 2 (L-DBTA) 3 (CH 3 OH) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ]∙2H2O has been synthesized using a simple reaction of L-O,O´-dibenzoyl tartaric acid with LaCl 3 ∙6H 2 O under ambient temperature. The luminescence spectrum in the solid state at room temperature revealed that the complex exhibited blue-light emission that originated from ligand. In addition, the lanthanide complex is developed as a fluorescent probe for sensing small molecules. Luminescence studies reveal that the lanthanide complex could detect ethyl acetate sensitively through fluorescence colour change from blue to yellow. Furthermore, the complex exhibited appealing features including high sensitivity and an ultrafast response. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. [Characterization and photoluminescence properties of a blue-light-emitting material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liu-qing; Liu, Xu-guang; Xu, Hui-xia; Wang, Hua; Xu, Bing-she

    2009-05-01

    Tris (2-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (AlMeq3) was synthesized and purified by vacuum sublimation. The structure of the complex was characterized by 1H NMR, FTIR spectra and elemental analysis techniques. AlMeq3 consists of three 2-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline ligands and one aluminum atom. Its thermal stability was studied by TG and DSC analysis and the result shows that AlMeq3 is a thermally stable material, with decomposition and crystalline transition temperature being 357 and 158 degrees C, respectively. Energy band structure was investigated by UV-Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence emission spectra. Experimental results show that its UV absorption bands were at about 246 and 390 nm, and the absorption band at about 246 nm can be assigned to pi--pi* of phenyl ring. AlMeq2 displays 8-hydroxyquinoline-oriented photophysical properties. The optical gap of AlMeq3: was about 2.85 eV, as determined by intrinsic absorption band edge of the complex in ethanol solution. Under UV excitation at 365 nm, the complex in ethanol solution emitted intensive blue fluorescence with the maximum emission peak at 479 nm, while the effective energy-transfer from the ligand to the central AlP+ ion occurred in the complex. AlMeq3 with bright blue photoluminescence can be applied as luminescent material in OLEDs.

  20. The mysterious case of the C. elegans gut granule: death fluorescence, anthranilic acid and the kynurenine pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eGems

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research on the nematode C. elegans, it still contains many hidden secrets. One such is the function of the prominent organelles known as gut granules, which are numerous in the intestinal cells of nematodes throughout the suborder Rhabditina. A striking feature of gut granules is the blue fluorescence that they emit under ultraviolet light. Clues to gut granule function include their acidic interior and capacity for endocytosis, both lysosome-like features (though gut granules are much bigger than normal lysosomes. This and the fluorescent material within identify gut granules as lysosome-like organelles (LROs, akin to pigment-containing melanosomes in mammals and eye pigment granules in Drosophila. Thus, the identity of the blue fluorescent substance could provide a key to understanding gut granule function.

  1. Antimicrobial photodynamic activity and cytocompatibility of Au25(Capt)18clusters photoexcited by blue LED light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Saori; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Kawasaki, Hideya; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nishida, Erika; Takita, Hiroko; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Ushijima, Natsumi; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Sugaya, Tsutomu

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has beneficial effects in dental treatment. We applied captopril-protected gold (Au 25 (Capt) 18 ) clusters as a novel photosensitizer for aPDT. Photoexcited Au clusters under light irradiation generated singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ). Accordingly, the antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of Au 25 (Capt) 18 clusters under dental blue light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation were evaluated. 1 O 2 generation of Au 25 (Capt) 18 clusters under blue LED irradiation (420-460 nm) was detected by a methotrexate (MTX) probe. The antimicrobial effects of photoexcited Au clusters (0, 5, 50, and 500 μg/mL) on oral bacterial cells, such as Streptococcus mutans, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans , and Porphyromonas gingivalis , were assessed by morphological observations and bacterial growth experiments. Cytotoxicity testing of Au clusters and blue LED irradiation was then performed against NIH3T3 and MC3T3-E1 cells. In addition, the biological performance of Au clusters (500 μg/mL) was compared to an organic dye photosensitizer, methylene blue (MB; 10 and 100 μg/mL). We confirmed the 1 O 2 generation ability of Au 25 (Capt) 18 clusters through the fluorescence spectra of oxidized MTX. Successful application of photoexcited Au clusters to aPDT was demonstrated by dose-dependent decreases in the turbidity of oral bacterial cells. Morphological observation revealed that application of Au clusters stimulated destruction of bacterial cell walls and inhibited biofilm formation. Aggregation of Au clusters around bacterial cells was fluorescently observed. However, photoexcited Au clusters did not negatively affect the adhesion, spreading, and proliferation of mammalian cells, particularly at lower doses. In addition, application of Au clusters demonstrated significantly better cytocompatibility compared to MB. We found that a combination of Au 25 (Capt) 18 clusters and blue LED irradiation exhibited good antimicrobial effects through 1 O 2

  2. Fluorescent Silicon Clusters and Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    von Haeften, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The fluorescence of silicon clusters is reviewed. Atomic clusters of silicon have been at the focus of research for several decades because of the relevance of size effects for material properties, the importance of silicon in electronics and the potential applications in bio-medicine. To date numerous examples of nanostructured forms of fluorescent silicon have been reported. This article introduces the principles and underlying concepts relevant for fluorescence of nanostructured silicon su...

  3. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ''fluorescent cryocooler'' could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance

  4. 77 FR 55895 - Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of permanent closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ). SUMMARY: The... Cincinnati advising that on August 29, 2012, it was permanently closing Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ...

  5. Aspen biology, community classification, and management in the Blue Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    David K. Swanson; Craig L. Schmitt; Diane M. Shirley; Vicky Erickson; Kenneth J. Schuetz; Michael L. Tatum; David C. Powell

    2010-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is a valuable species that is declining in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon. This publication is a compilation of over 20 years of aspen management experience by USDA Forest Service workers in the Blue Mountains. It includes a summary of aspen biology and occurrence in the Blue Mountains, and a...

  6. Alcian blue-stained particles in a eutrophic lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, J.; Søndergaard, Morten

    1998-01-01

    We used a neutral solution of Alcian Blue to stain transparent particles in eutrophic Lake Frederiksborg Slotss0, Denmark. Alcian Blue-stained particles (ABSP) appeared to be similar to the so-called transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) identified with an acidic solution of Alcian Blue. Our...

  7. 49 CFR 173.216 - Asbestos, blue, brown or white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Asbestos, blue, brown or white. 173.216 Section... Class 7 § 173.216 Asbestos, blue, brown or white. (a) Asbestos, blue, brown or white, includes each of the following hydrated mineral silicates: chrysolite, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite asbestos...

  8. A rapid-screening approach to detect and quantify microplastics based on fluorescent tagging with Nile Red

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Thomas; Jessop, Rebecca; Wellner, Nikolaus; Haupt, Karsten; Mayes, Andrew G.

    2017-03-01

    A new approach is presented for analysis of microplastics in environmental samples, based on selective fluorescent staining using Nile Red (NR), followed by density-based extraction and filtration. The dye adsorbs onto plastic surfaces and renders them fluorescent when irradiated with blue light. Fluorescence emission is detected using simple photography through an orange filter. Image-analysis allows fluorescent particles to be identified and counted. Magnified images can be recorded and tiled to cover the whole filter area, allowing particles down to a few micrometres to be detected. The solvatochromic nature of Nile Red also offers the possibility of plastic categorisation based on surface polarity characteristics of identified particles. This article details the development of this staining method and its initial cross-validation by comparison with infrared (IR) microscopy. Microplastics of different sizes could be detected and counted in marine sediment samples. The fluorescence staining identified the same particles as those found by scanning a filter area with IR-microscopy.

  9. Characterization of Fluorescent Proteins for Three- and Four-Color Live-Cell Imaging in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi-Sanabria, Ryo; Garcia, Enrique J; Tomoiaga, Delia; Munteanu, Emilia L; Feinstein, Paul; Pon, Liza A

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae are widely used for imaging fluorescently tagged protein fusions. Fluorescent proteins can easily be inserted into yeast genes at their chromosomal locus, by homologous recombination, for expression of tagged proteins at endogenous levels. This is especially useful for incorporation of multiple fluorescent protein fusions into a single strain, which can be challenging in organisms where genetic manipulation is more complex. However, the availability of optimal fluorescent protein combinations for 3-color imaging is limited. Here, we have characterized a combination of fluorescent proteins, mTFP1/mCitrine/mCherry for multicolor live cell imaging in S. cerevisiae. This combination can be used with conventional blue dyes, such as DAPI, for potential four-color live cell imaging.

  10. Poporodní blues – česká adaptace dotazníku „Maternity blues questionnaire“

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Takács, L.; Smolík, Filip; Mlíková Seidlerová, J.; Čepický, P.; Hoskovcová, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 5 (2016), s. 355-368 ISSN 1210-7832 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : EPDS postpartum mood * Maternity Blues Questionnaire * postnatal depression * postpartum blues * postpartum depression Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  11. Photoelectric Properties of DSSCs Sensitized by Phloxine B and Bromophenol Blue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penghui Ren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phloxine B and bromophenol blue as the sensitizers of dye-sensitized solar cells were investigated via UV-Vis spectra, FT-IR spectra, fluorescence spectra, and current-voltage characteristics. The frontier molecular orbital, vibration analysis, and the first hyperpolarizability were calculated with DFT/6-31G(d. The dipole moment, light harvesting efficiency (LHE, and larger absolute value of driving force of electron injection (ΔGinject were also discussed. The calculated results were compared with the experimental results of phloxine B and bromophenol blue. It was found that, compared with bromophenol blue, bigger dipole moment of phloxine B results in larger open circuit voltage (Voc according to the correlation between dipole moment and Voc. At the same time, for configuration of phloxine B, it has higher LHE and ΔGinject, which are helpful to enhance the abilities of absorbing sunlight and electron injection. Therefore, higher LHE and ΔGinject for phloxine B produced a larger value of Jsc.

  12. Ultralow-threshold laser and blue shift cooperative luminescence in a Yb3+ doped silica microsphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yantang Huang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation on ultralow threshold laser and blue shift cooperative luminescence (CL in a Yb3+ doped silica microsphere (YDSM with continuous-wave 976 nm laser diode pumping is reported. The experimental results show that the YDSM emits laser oscillation with ultralow threshold of 2.62 μW, and the laser spectrum is modulated by the microsphere morphology characteristics. In addition, blue emission of YDSM is also observed with the increase of pump power, which is supposed to be generated by CL of excited Yb ion-pairs with the absorption of 976 nm photons and Si-O vibration phonons, and the process is explained with an energy level diagram. This property of the blue shift CL with phonons absorption in the Yb3+doped microcavity makes it attractive for the application of laser cooling based on anti-Stokes fluorescence emission, if the Yb3+doped microcavity made from with low phonon energy host materials.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide and resolution of acute inflammation: A comparative study utilizing a novel fluorescent probe

    OpenAIRE

    Dufton, Neil; Natividad, Jane; Verdu, Elena F.; Wallace, John L.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an essential gasotransmitter associated with numerous pathologies. We assert that hydrogen sulfide plays an important role in regulating macrophage function in response to subsequent inflammatory stimuli, promoting clearance of leukocyte infiltrate and reducing TNF-α levels in vivo following zymosan-challenge. We describe two distinct methods of measuring leukocyte hydrogen sulfide synthesis; methylene blue formation following zinc acetate capture and a novel fluorescent s...

  14. Blue-Detuned Magneto-Optical Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, K. N.; Devlin, J. A.; Wall, T. E.; Sauer, B. E.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2018-02-01

    We present the properties and advantages of a new magneto-optical trap (MOT) where blue-detuned light drives "type-II" transitions that have dark ground states. Using 87Rb, we reach a radiation-pressure-limited density exceeding 1 011 cm-3 and a temperature below 30 μ K . The phase-space density is higher than in normal atomic MOTs and a million times higher than comparable red-detuned type-II MOTs, making the blue-detuned MOT particularly attractive for molecular MOTs, which rely on type-II transitions. The loss of atoms from the trap is dominated by ultracold collisions between Rb atoms. For typical trapping conditions, we measure a loss rate of 1.8 (4 )×10-10 cm3 s-1 .

  15. Blue green component and integrated urban design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Srđan M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to demonstrate the hidden potential of blue green components, in a synergetic network, not as separate systems, like used in past. The innovative methodology of the project Blue Green Dream is presented through examples of good practice. A new approach in the project initiate thoughtful planning and remodeling of the settlement for the modern man. Professional and scientific public is looking for way to create more healthy and stimulating place for living. However, offered integrative solutions still remain out of urban and architectural practice. Tested technologies in current projects confirmed measurability of innovative approaches and lessons learned. Scientific and professional contributions are summarized in master's and doctoral theses that have been completed or are in process of writing.

  16. 76 FR 22923 - Wellpoint, Inc. D/B/A/Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield Enterprise Provider Data Management Team...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    .../B/A/Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield Enterprise Provider Data Management Team Including On-Site... & Blue Shield, Enterprise Provider Data Management Team, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Kelly... Of Kentucky, Enterprise Provider Data Management Team, Louisville, Kentucky TA-W-74,895B Wellpoint...

  17. Measuring Blue Space Visibility and ‘Blue Recreation’ in the Everyday Lives of Children in a Capital City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Amber L.; Bottomley, Ross; Chambers, Tim; Thornton, Lukar; Stanley, James; Smith, Moira; Barr, Michelle; Signal, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Blue spaces (water bodies) may promote positive mental and physical health through opportunities for relaxation, recreation, and social connections. However, we know little about the nature and extent of everyday exposure to blue spaces, particularly in settings outside the home or among children, nor whether exposure varies by individual or household characteristics. Wearable cameras offer a novel, reliable method for blue space exposure measurement. In this study, we used images from cameras worn over two days by 166 children in Wellington, New Zealand, and conducted content and blue space quantification analysis on each image (n = 749,389). Blue space was identified in 24,721 images (3.6%), with a total of 23 blue recreation events. Visual exposure and participation in blue recreation did not differ by ethnicity, weight status, household deprivation, or residential proximity to the coastline. Significant differences in both visual exposure to blue space and participation in blue recreation were observed, whereby children from the most deprived schools had significantly higher rates of blue space exposure than children from low deprivation schools. Schools may be important settings to promote equitable blue space exposures. Childhood exposures to blue space may not follow the expected income inequality trends observed among adults. PMID:28587134

  18. Measuring Blue Space Visibility and 'Blue Recreation' in the Everyday Lives of Children in a Capital City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Amber L; Bottomley, Ross; Chambers, Tim; Thornton, Lukar; Stanley, James; Smith, Moira; Barr, Michelle; Signal, Louise

    2017-05-26

    Blue spaces (water bodies) may promote positive mental and physical health through opportunities for relaxation, recreation, and social connections. However, we know little about the nature and extent of everyday exposure to blue spaces, particularly in settings outside the home or among children, nor whether exposure varies by individual or household characteristics. Wearable cameras offer a novel, reliable method for blue space exposure measurement. In this study, we used images from cameras worn over two days by 166 children in Wellington, New Zealand, and conducted content and blue space quantification analysis on each image ( n = 749,389). Blue space was identified in 24,721 images (3.6%), with a total of 23 blue recreation events. Visual exposure and participation in blue recreation did not differ by ethnicity, weight status, household deprivation, or residential proximity to the coastline. Significant differences in both visual exposure to blue space and participation in blue recreation were observed, whereby children from the most deprived schools had significantly higher rates of blue space exposure than children from low deprivation schools. Schools may be important settings to promote equitable blue space exposures. Childhood exposures to blue space may not follow the expected income inequality trends observed among adults.

  19. Facile and Scalable Preparation of Fluorescent Carbon Dots for Multifunctional Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of fluorescent nanomaterials has received considerable attention due to the great potential of these materials for a wide range of applications, from chemical sensing through bioimaging to optoelectronics. Herein, we report a facile and scalable approach to prepare fluorescent carbon dots (FCDs via a one-pot reaction of citric acid with ethylenediamine at 150 °C under ambient air pressure. The resultant FCDs possess an optical bandgap of 3.4 eV and exhibit strong excitation-wavelength-independent blue emission (λEm = 450 nm under either one- or two-photon excitation. Owing to their low cytotoxicity and long fluorescence lifetime, these FCDs were successfully used as internalized fluorescent probes in human cancer cell lines (HeLa cells for two-photon excited imaging of cells by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy with a high-contrast resolution. They were also homogenously mixed with commercial inks and used to draw fluorescent patterns on normal papers and on many other substrates (e.g., certain flexible plastic films, textiles, and clothes. Thus, these nanomaterials are promising for use in solid-state fluorescent sensing, security labeling, and wearable optoelectronics.

  20. Measurement of the fluorescence of crop residues: A tool for controlling soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Chappelle, E. W.; Hunter, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    Management of crop residues, the portion of a crop left in the field after harvest, is an important conservation practice for minimizing soil erosion and for improving water quality. Quantification of crop residue cover is required to evaluate the effectiveness of conservation tillage practices. Methods are needed to quantify residue cover that are rapid, accurate, and objective. The fluorescence of crop residue was found to be a broadband phenomenon with emission maxima at 420 to 495 nm for excitations of 350 to 420 nm. Soils had low intensity broadband emissions over the 400 to 690 nm region for excitations of 300 to 600 nm. The range of relative fluorescence intensities for the crop residues was much greater than the fluorescence observed of the soils. As the crop residues decompose their blue fluorescence values approach the fluorescence of the soil. Fluorescence techniques are concluded to be less ambiguous and better suited for discriminating crop residues and soils than reflectance methods. If properly implemented, fluorescence techniques can be used to quantify, not only crop residue cover, but also photosynthetic efficiency in the field.

  1. Pathological diagnosis of bladder cancer by image analysis of hypericin induced fluorescence cystoscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kah, James C. Y.; Olivo, Malini C.; Lau, Weber K. O.; Sheppard, Colin J. R.

    2005-08-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis of bladder carcinoma based on hypericin fluorescence cystoscopy has shown to have a higher degree of sensitivity for the detection of flat bladder carcinoma compared to white light cystoscopy. The potential of the photosensitizer hypericin-induced fluorescence in performing non-invasive optical biopsy to grade bladder cancer in vivo using fluorescence cystoscopic image analysis without surgical resection for tissue biopsy is investigated in this study. The correlation between tissue fluorescence and histopathology of diseased tissue was explored and a diagnostic algorithm based on fluorescence image analysis was developed to classify the bladder cancer without surgical resection for tissue biopsy. Preliminary results suggest a correlation between tissue fluorescence and bladder cancer grade. By combining both the red-to-blue and red-to-green intensity ratios into a 2D scatter plot yields an average sensitivity and specificity of around 70% and 85% respectively for pathological cancer grading of the three different grades of bladder cancer. Therefore, the diagnostic algorithm based on colorimetric intensity ratio analysis of hypericin fluorescence cystoscopic images developed in this preliminary study shows promising potential to optically diagnose and grade bladder cancer in vivo.

  2. New algorithm for MODIS chlorophyll fluorescence height retrieval: performance and comparison with the current product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, I.; Zhou, J.; Gilerson, A.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.; Ahmed, S.

    2009-09-01

    Our previous studies showed that the Fluorescence Line Height (FLH) product, which uses 3 NIR bands at 667, 678, and 746 nm on the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor, and similar bands on MERIS sensor, is not reliable in coastal waters because of a peak in the elastic reflectance spectra which occurs due to the confluence of chlorophyll and water absorption spectra and which overlaps spectrally the chlorophyll fluorescence. This combination of two overlapping peaks makes fluorescence signal retrieval inaccurate. As a consequence, the present FLH algorithm significantly underestimates fluorescence magnitudes in coastal waters. To overcome this problem, we introduce a new and more accurate approach for the retrieval of FLH in turbid waters by the MODIS sensor, which exploits the correlation between the blue-green and red bands reflectance ratios. We show that by making use of the combined remote sensing reflectance's (Rrs) at 488nm, 547nm, 667nm and 678nm we can retrieve fluorescence accurately in case 2 waters even for low fluorescence quantum yield when fluorescence magnitudes are low. The derivation and validation of our algorithm was performed using extensive synthetic datasets which cover a large variability of parameters typical of coastal waters: with CDOM absorption at 400nm 0-2 m-1, mineral concentration 0-5g/m3 and chlorophyll concentration of 0.5-100 mg/m3. In addition, we applied this proposed algorithm to MODIS satellite data and compared it with the traditional FLH algorithm.

  3. Improved murine glioma detection following modified diet and photobleaching of skin PpIX fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Summer L.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pogue, Brian W.

    2007-02-01

    The Aminolevulinic Acid (ALA) - Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) system is unique in the world of photosensitizers in that the prodrug ALA is enzymatically transformed via the tissue of interest into fluorescently detectable levels of PpIX. This system can be used to monitor cellular metabolism of tumor tissue for applications such as therapy monitoring. Detecting PpIX fluorescence noninvasively has proven difficult due to the high levels of PpIX produced in the skin compared to other tissue both with and without ALA administration. In the current study, methods to decrease skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration have been examined. Use of a purified diet is found to decrease both skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration, while addition of a broad spectrum antibiotic to the water shows little effect. Following ALA administration, improved brain tumor detection is seen when skin PpIX fluorescence is photobleached via blue light prior to transmission spectroscopic measurements of tumor bearing and control animals. Both of these methods to decrease skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration are shown to have a large effect on the ability to detect tumor tissue PpIX fluorescence noninvasively in vivo.

  4. A capillary-based probe for in situ detection of enhanced fluorescence signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, F.; Xiao, R.; Zhu, A. N.; Shi, H. C.; Wang, S. Q.

    2013-07-01

    A simple, compact, and high sensitivity capillary-based probe for the in situ detection of fluorescence signals with high sensitivity is demonstrated. A home-made single-multi-mode fiber coupler that is coaxially aligned with the capillary-based probe provides for the transmission of excitation light and the collection and transmission of fluorescence. We propose a conceptually straightforward theoretical model to optimize the factors affecting the fluorescence-capture capability of the capillary-based probe. The fluorescence signal detected by fiber-optic spectroscopy non-linearly increases with the length of the capillary-based probe. In addition, the thicker the capillary tube wall is, the less the fluorescence signals determined are. The performance of the proposed probe is evaluated experimentally by measuring the fluorescence spectra of Cy5.5 dye and blue-green algae. The experimental results show that the proposed probe provides more than a ten-fold increase in fluorescence signal compared with direct measurements by a flat-tipped multi-mode fiber probe. The advantages of the capillary-based probe, which include its simple and compact structure, excellent light collection efficiency, requirement of small sample volume, and recoverability of samples, allow its wide application to in situ detection in the medical, forensic, biological, geological, and environmental fields with high sensitivity.

  5. Fluorescence identification of parathyroid glands by aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei Wei; Li, Chun Qiao; Guo, Zhu Ming; Li, Hao; Zhang, Quan; Yang, An Kui

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we investigate the feasibility of the use of aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride (5-ALA)-induced fluorescence in the detection of parathyroid glands in rats. The intraoperative identification of parathyroid glands is difficult, which is one of the main reasons for postoperative hypoparathyroidism. An animal experiment was designed. Ten Sprague-Dawley (S-D) adult rats were injected intraperitoneally with a 300 mg/kg dosage of 5-ALA. Anesthesia and surgical dissection were performed to expose the thyroid gland 1 h later. Blue light with a wavelength of 405±3 nm was used to light the trachea bilaterally in order to detect parathyroid fluorescence by direct vision. Histology of the fluorescent tissue was performed to confirm parathyroid identification. Parathyroid gland fluorescence was visualized in all 10 S-D rats. The red fluorescence of the parathyroid glands was located on the posterolateral thyroid glands and could be seen with the naked eye. Histology of the fluorescent tissue confirmed the identification of parathyroid glands under light microscopy. 5-ALA induced fluorescence of parathyroid glands can clearly differentiate them from the surrounding tissue by direct vision alone. This method could be used intraoperatively and has potential clinical value.

  6. Nature's palette: the search for natural blue colorants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Andrew G; Culver, Catherine A; van Breemen, Richard B

    2014-07-16

    The food and beverage industry is seeking to broaden the palette of naturally derived colorants. Although considerable effort has been devoted to the search for new blue colorants in fruits and vegetables, less attention has been directed toward blue compounds from other sources such as bacteria and fungi. The current work reviews known organic blue compounds from natural plant, animal, fungal, and microbial sources. The scarcity of blue-colored metabolites in the natural world relative to metabolites of other colors is discussed, and structural trends common among natural blue compounds are identified. These compounds are grouped into seven structural classes and evaluated for their potential as new color additives.

  7. Blue light does not inhibit nodulation in Sesbania rostrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Aya; Arima, Susumu; Hayashi, Makoto; Maymon, Maskit; Hirsch, Ann M; Suzuki, Akihiro

    2017-01-02

    Earlier, we reported that root nodulation was inhibited by blue light irradiation of Lotus japonicus. Because some legumes do not establish nodules exclusively on underground roots, we investigated whether nodule formation in Sesbania rostrata, which forms both root and "stem" nodules following inoculation with Azorhizobium caulinodans, is inhibited by blue light as are L. japonicus nodules. We found that neither S. rostrata nodulation nor nitrogen fixation was inhibited by blue light exposure. Moreover, although A. caulinodans proliferation was not affected by blue light irradiation, bacterial survival was decreased. Therefore, blue light appears to impose different responses depending on the legume-rhizobial symbiosis.

  8. FROM CIRCULAR ECONOMY TO BLUE ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iustin-Emanuel, ALEXANDRU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Addressing the subject of this essay is based on the background ideas generated by a new branch of science - Biomimicry. According to European Commissioner for the Environment, "Nature is the perfect model of circular economy". Therefore, by imitating nature, we are witnessing a process of cycle redesign: production-consumption-recycling. The authors present some reflections on the European Commission's decision to adopt after July 1, 2014 new measures concerning the development of more circular economies. Starting from the principles of Ecolonomy, which is based on the whole living paradigm, this paper argues for the development within each economy of entrepreneurial policies related to the Blue economy. In its turn, Blue economy is based on scientific analyses that identify the best solutions in a business. Thus, formation of social capital will lead to healthier and cheaper products, which will stimulate entrepreneurship. Blue economy is another way of thinking economic practice and is a new model of business design. It is a healthy, sustainable business, designed for people. In fact, it is the core of the whole living paradigm through which, towards 2020, circular economy will grow more and more.

  9. 'Blue Whale Challenge': A Game or Crime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhra, Richa; Baryah, Neha; Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj

    2017-11-11

    A bewildering range of games are emerging every other day with newer elements of fun and entertainment to woo youngsters. Games are meant to reduce stress and enhance the cognitive development of children as well as adults. Teenagers are always curious to indulge in newer games; and e-gaming is one such platform providing an easy access and quicker means of entertainment. The particular game challenge which has taken the world by storm is the dangerous "Blue Whale Challenge" often involving vulnerable teenagers. The Blue Whale Challenge is neither an application nor internet based game but the users get a link through social media chat groups to enter this "deadly" challenge game. This probably is the only game where the participant has to end his/her life to complete the game. The innocent teenagers are being targeted based on their depressed psychology and are coercively isolated from their social milieux on the pretext of keeping the challenges confidential. To add to the woes, no option is offered to quit the challenge even if the contender is unable to complete the challenge. Blue Whale Challenge in its sheer form could be seen as an illegal, unethical and inhumane endeavor in our present society. The present communication discusses the severe effects of the game on teenagers, the ethical concerns involved and the preventive measures necessary to curb it.

  10. Synchrotron powder diffraction on Aztec blue pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez del Rio, M.; Gutierrez-Leon, A.; Castro, G.R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Solis, C.; Sanchez-Hernandez, R.; Robles-Camacho, J.; Rojas-Gaytan, J.

    2008-01-01

    Some samples of raw blue pigments coming from an archaeological rescue mission in downtown Mexico City have been characterized using different techniques. The samples, some recovered as a part of a ritual offering, could be assigned to the late Aztec period (XVth century). The striking characteristic of these samples is that they seem to be raw pigments prior to any use in artworks, and it was possible to collect a few μg of pigment after manual grain selection under a microscopy monitoring. All pigments are made of indigo, an organic colorant locally known as anil or xiuhquilitl. The colorant is always found in combination with an inorganic matrix, studied by powder diffraction. In one case the mineral base is palygorskite, a rare clay mineral featuring micro-channels in its structure, well known as the main ingredient of the Maya blue pigment. However, other samples present the minerals sepiolite (a clay mineral of the palygorskite family) and calcite. Another sample contains barite, a mineral never reported in prehispanic paints. We present the results of characterization using high resolution powder diffraction recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM25A, SpLine beamline) complemented with other techniques. All of them gave consistent results on the composition. A chemical test on resistance to acids was done, showing a high resistance for the palygorskite and eventually sepiolite compounds, in good agreement with the excellent resistance of the Maya blue. (orig.)

  11. LED-Induced fluorescence and image analysis to detect stink bug damage in cotton bolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafic, Adnan; Roberts, Erin E; Toews, Michael D; Haidekker, Mark A

    2013-02-20

    Stink bugs represent a major agricultural pest complex attacking more than 200 wild and cultivated plants, including cotton in the southeastern US. Stink bug feeding on developing cotton bolls will cause boll abortion or lint staining and thus reduced yield and lint value. Current methods for stink bug detection involve manual harvesting and cracking open of a sizable number of immature cotton bolls for visual inspection. This process is cumbersome, time consuming, and requires a moderate level of experience to obtain accurate estimates. To improve detection of stink bug feeding, we present here a method based on fluorescent imaging and subsequent image analyses to determine the likelihood of stink bug damage in cotton bolls. Damage to different structures of cotton bolls including lint and carpal wall can be observed under blue LED-induced fluorescence. Generally speaking, damaged regions fluoresce green, whereas non-damaged regions with chlorophyll fluoresce red. However, similar fluorescence emission is also observable on cotton bolls that have not been fed upon by stink bugs. Criteria based on fluorescent intensity and the size of the fluorescent spot allow to differentiate between true positives (fluorescent regions associated with stink bug feeding) and false positives (fluorescent regions due to other causes). We found a detection rates with two combined criteria of 87% for true-positive marks and of 8% for false-positive marks. The imaging technique presented herein gives rise to a possible detection apparatus where a cotton boll is imaged in the field and images processed by software. The unique fluorescent signature left by stink bugs can be used to determine with high probability if a cotton boll has been punctured by a stink bug. We believe this technique, when integrated in a suitable device, could be used for more accurate detection in the field and allow for more optimized application of pest control.

  12. LED-Induced fluorescence and image analysis to detect stink bug damage in cotton bolls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Stink bugs represent a major agricultural pest complex attacking more than 200 wild and cultivated plants, including cotton in the southeastern US. Stink bug feeding on developing cotton bolls will cause boll abortion or lint staining and thus reduced yield and lint value. Current methods for stink bug detection involve manual harvesting and cracking open of a sizable number of immature cotton bolls for visual inspection. This process is cumbersome, time consuming, and requires a moderate level of experience to obtain accurate estimates. To improve detection of stink bug feeding, we present here a method based on fluorescent imaging and subsequent image analyses to determine the likelihood of stink bug damage in cotton bolls. Results Damage to different structures of cotton bolls including lint and carpal wall can be observed under blue LED-induced fluorescence. Generally speaking, damaged regions fluoresce green, whereas non-damaged regions with chlorophyll fluoresce red. However, similar fluorescence emission is also observable on cotton bolls that have not been fed upon by stink bugs. Criteria based on fluorescent intensity and the size of the fluorescent spot allow to differentiate between true positives (fluorescent regions associated with stink bug feeding) and false positives (fluorescent regions due to other causes). We found a detection rates with two combined criteria of 87% for true-positive marks and of 8% for false-positive marks. Conclusions The imaging technique presented herein gives rise to a possible detection apparatus where a cotton boll is imaged in the field and images processed by software. The unique fluorescent signature left by stink bugs can be used to determine with high probability if a cotton boll has been punctured by a stink bug. We believe this technique, when integrated in a suitable device, could be used for more accurate detection in the field and allow for more optimized application of pest control. PMID:23421982

  13. Fluorescence properties of doxorubicin in PBS buffer and PVA films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sunil; Chandra, Anjali; Kaur, Amanjot; Sabnis, Nirupama; Lacko, Andras; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Fudala, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2017-05-01

    We studied steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence properties of an anticancer drug Doxorubicin in a saline buffer and poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) film. Absorption of Doxorubicin, located at blue-green spectral region, allows a convenient excitation with visible light emitting diodes or laser diodes. Emission of Doxorubicin with maximum near 600nm can be easily detected with photomultipliers and CCD cameras. Both, absorption and fluorescence spectra in polymeric matrix show more pronounced vibronic structures than in solution. Also, the steady-state anisotropy in the polymer film is significantly higher than in the saline solution. In PVA film the fluorescence anisotropy is about 0.30 whereas in the saline buffer only 0.07. Quantum efficiencies of Doxorubicin were compared to a known standard Rhodamine 101 which has fluorescence emission in a similar spectral region. The quantum yield of Doxorubicin in PVA film is more than 10% and about twice higher than in the saline solution. Similarly, the lifetime of doxorubicin in PVA film is about 2ns whereas in the saline solution only about 1ns. The fluorescence anisotropy decays show that Doxorubicin molecules are freely rotating in the saline buffer with a correlation time of about 290ps, and are almost completely immobilized in the PVA film. The spectroscopic investigations presented in this manuscript are important, as they provide answers to changes in molecular properties of Doxorubicin depending changes in the local environment, which is useful when synthesizing nanoparticles for Doxorubicin entrapment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Blue Light Protects Against Temporal Frequency Sensitive Refractive Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Frances; Britton, Stephanie; Spatcher, Molly; Hanowsky, Stephan

    2015-09-01

    Time spent outdoors is protective against myopia. The outdoors allows exposure to short-wavelength (blue light) rich sunlight, while indoor illuminants can be deficient at short-wavelengths. In the current experiment, we investigate the role of blue light, and temporal sensitivity, in the emmetropization response. Five-day-old chicks were exposed to sinusoidal luminance modulation of white light (with blue; N = 82) or yellow light (without blue; N = 83) at 80% contrast, at one of six temporal frequencies: 0, 0.2, 1, 2, 5, 10 Hz daily for 3 days. Mean illumination was 680 lux. Changes in ocular components and corneal curvature were measured. Refraction, eye length, and choroidal changes were dependent on the presence of blue light (P blue light, refraction did not change across frequencies (mean change -0.24 [diopters] D), while in the absence of blue light, we observed a hyperopic shift (>1 D) at high frequencies, and a myopic shift (>-0.6 D) at low frequencies. With blue light there was little difference in eye growth across frequencies (77 μm), while in the absence of blue light, eyes grew more at low temporal frequencies and less at high temporal frequencies (10 vs. 0.2 Hz: 145 μm; P blue light. Illuminants rich in blue light can protect against myopic eye growth when the eye is exposed to slow changes in luminance contrast as might occur with near work.

  15. Blue Light Protects Against Temporal Frequency Sensitive Refractive Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Frances; Britton, Stephanie; Spatcher, Molly; Hanowsky, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Time spent outdoors is protective against myopia. The outdoors allows exposure to short-wavelength (blue light) rich sunlight, while indoor illuminants can be deficient at short-wavelengths. In the current experiment, we investigate the role of blue light, and temporal sensitivity, in the emmetropization response. Methods Five-day-old chicks were exposed to sinusoidal luminance modulation of white light (with blue; N = 82) or yellow light (without blue; N = 83) at 80% contrast, at one of six temporal frequencies: 0, 0.2, 1, 2, 5, 10 Hz daily for 3 days. Mean illumination was 680 lux. Changes in ocular components and corneal curvature were measured. Results Refraction, eye length, and choroidal changes were dependent on the presence of blue light (P blue light, refraction did not change across frequencies (mean change −0.24 [diopters] D), while in the absence of blue light, we observed a hyperopic shift (>1 D) at high frequencies, and a myopic shift (>−0.6 D) at low frequencies. With blue light there was little difference in eye growth across frequencies (77 μm), while in the absence of blue light, eyes grew more at low temporal frequencies and less at high temporal frequencies (10 vs. 0.2 Hz: 145 μm; P blue light. Conclusions Illuminants rich in blue light can protect against myopic eye growth when the eye is exposed to slow changes in luminance contrast as might occur with near work. PMID:26393671

  16. Fluorescence Spectra of Highlighter Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; King, Damon

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra excited by laser pointers have been the subject of several papers in "TPT". These papers all describe a fluorescence phenomenon in which the reflected laser light undergoes a change in color: this color change results from the combination of some partially reflected laser light and additional colors generated by…

  17. ANTAGONISTIC POTENTIAL OF FLUORESCENT Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth performance of Lycopersicon esculentum in Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani infested soil. Biochemical characteristics of fluorescent Pseudomonas showed that all ten isolates were positive ...

  18. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  19. Blue-Green Solutions in Urban Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Caroline; Kalantari, Zahra

    2017-04-01

    With the ongoing urbanisation and increasing pressure for new housing and infrastructure, the nexus of developing compact, energy-efficient and yet liveable and sustainable cities is urgent to address. In this context, blue-green spaces and related ecosystem services (ES) are critical resources that need to be integrated in policy and planning of urban. Among the ES provided by blue-green spaces, regulating ES such as water retention and purification are particularly important in urban areas, affecting water supply and quality, related cultural ES and biodiversity, as well as cities potential to adapt to climate change. Blue-green infrastructure management is considered a sustainable way to reducing negative effects of urbanisation, such as decreasing flood risks, as well as adapting to climate change for example by controlling increasing flood and drought risks. Blue-green infrastructure management can for example create multifunctional surfaces with valuable environmental and social functions and generally handle greenways and ecological networks as important ecosystem service components, for example for stormwater regulation in a sustainable urban drainage system. The Norrström drainage basin (22,000 km2) is a large demonstrator for Blue-green infrastructure management. Both urbanisation and agriculture are extensive within this basin, which includes the Swedish capital Stockholm and is part of the fertile Swedish belt. Together, the relatively high population density combined with agricultural and industrial activities in this region imply large eutrophication and pollution pressures, not least transferred through storm runoff to both inland surface waters and the coastal waters of the Baltic Sea. The ecosystems of this basin provide highly valued but also threatened services. For example, Lake Mälaren is the single main freshwater supply for the Swedish capital Stockholm, as well as a key nutrient retention system that strongly mitigates waterborne nutrient

  20. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  1. Two-photon-like microscopy with orders-of-magnitude lower illumination intensity via two-step fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingaramo, Maria; York, Andrew G; Andrade, Eric J; Rainey, Kristin; Patterson, George H

    2015-09-03

    We describe two-step fluorescence microscopy, a new approach to non-linear imaging based on positive reversible photoswitchable fluorescent probes. The protein Padron approximates ideal two-step fluorescent behaviour: it equilibrates to an inactive state, converts to an active state under blue light, and blue light also excites this active state to fluoresce. Both activation and excitation are linear processes, but the total fluorescent signal is quadratic, proportional to the square of the illumination dose. Here, we use Padron's quadratic non-linearity to demonstrate the principle of two-step microscopy, similar in principle to two-photon microscopy but with orders-of-magnitude better cross-section. As with two-photon, quadratic non-linearity from two-step fluorescence improves resolution and reduces unwanted out-of-focus excitation, and is compatible with structured illumination microscopy. We also show two-step and two-photon imaging can be combined to give quartic non-linearity, further improving imaging in challenging samples. With further improvements, two-step fluorophores could replace conventional fluorophores for many imaging applications.

  2. THE FLUORESCENCE SPECTRA OF RED ALGAE AND THE TRANSFER OF ENERGY FROM PHYCOERYTHRIN TO PHYCOCYANIN AND CHLOROPHYLL

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, C. S.; Young, Violet K.

    1952-01-01

    1. The fluorescence spectra of the alga Porphyridium have been recorded as energy distribution curves for eleven different incident wave lengths of monochromatic incident light between wave lengths 405 and 546 mµ. 2. In these spectra chlorophyll fluorescence predominates when the incident light is in the blue part of the spectrum which is strongly absorbed by chlorophyll. 3. For blue-green and green light the spectrum excited in Porphyridium contains in addition to chlorophyll fluorescence, the fluorescence bands characteristic of phycoerythrin and of phycocyanin. 4. From these spectra the approximate curves for the fluorescence of the individual pigments phycoerythrin, phycocyanin, and chlorophyll in the living material have been derived and the relative intensity of each of them has been obtained for each of the eleven incident wave lengths. 5. The effectiveness spectrum for the excitation of the fluorescence of these three pigments in vivo has been plotted. 6. From comparisons of the effectiveness spectrum for the excitation of each of these pigments it appears that both phycocyanin and chlorophyll receive energy from light which is absorbed by phycoerythrin. 7. It is suggested that phycocyanin may be an intermediate in the resonance transfer of energy from phycoerythrin to chlorophyll. 8. Since phycoerythrin and phycocyanin transfer energy to chlorophyll, it appears probable that chlorophyll plays a specific chemical role in photosynthesis in addition to acting as a light absorber. PMID:14938526

  3. A single, low dose of a cGMP recombinant BCG vaccine elicits protective T cell immunity against the human respiratory syncytial virus infection and prevents lung pathology in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, Pablo F; Rey-Jurado, Emma; Espinoza, Janyra A; Rivera, Claudia A; Canedo-Marroquín, Gisela; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-02-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is a major health burden worldwide, causing the majority of hospitalizations in children under two years old due to bronchiolitis and pneumonia. HRSV causes year-to-year outbreaks of disease, which also affects the elderly and immunocompromised adults. Furthermore, both hRSV morbidity and epidemics are explained by a consistently high rate of re-infections that take place throughout the patient life. Although significant efforts have been invested worldwide, currently there are no licensed vaccines to prevent hRSV infection. Here, we describe that a recombinant Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine expressing the nucleoprotein (N) of hRSV formulated under current good manufacture practices (cGMP rBCG-N-hRSV) confers protective immunity to the virus in mice. Our results show that a single dose of the GMP rBCG-N-hRSV vaccine retains its capacity to protect mice against a challenge with a disease-causing infection of 1×10 7 plaque-forming units (PFUs) of the hRSV A2 clinical strain 13018-8. Compared to unimmunized infected controls, vaccinated mice displayed reduced weight loss and less infiltration of neutrophils within the airways, as well as reduced viral loads in bronchoalveolar lavages, parameters that are characteristic of hRSV infection in mice. Also, ex vivo re-stimulation of splenic T cells at 28days post-immunization activated a repertoire of T cells secreting IFN-γ and IL-17, which further suggest that the rBCG-N-hRSV vaccine induced a mixed, CD8 + and CD4 + T cell response capable of both restraining viral spread and preventing damage of the lungs. All these features support the notion that rBCG-N-hRSV is a promising candidate vaccine to be used in humans to prevent the disease caused by hRSV in the susceptible population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Shedding Some Light on Fluorescent Bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Nicholas R.

    1996-01-01

    Explores some of the principles behind the working of fluorescent bulbs using a specially prepared fluorescent bulb with the white inner fluorescent coating applied along only half its length. Discusses the spectrum, the bulb plasma, and light production. (JRH)

  5. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  6. Green synthesis, structure and fluorescence spectra of new azacyanine dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enchev, Venelin; Gadjev, Nikolai; Angelov, Ivan; Minkovska, Stela; Kurutos, Atanas; Markova, Nadezhda; Deligeorgiev, Todor

    2017-11-01

    A series of symmetric and unsymmetric monomethine azacyanine dyes (monomethine azacyanine and merocyanine sulfobetaines) were synthesized with moderate to high yields via a novel method using microwave irradiation. The compounds are derived from a condensation reaction between 2-thiomethylbenzotiazolium salts and 2-imino-3-methylbenzothiazolines proceeded under microwave irradiation. The synthetic approach involves the use of green solvent and absence of basic reagent. TD-DFT calculations were performed to simulate absorption and fluorescent spectra of synthesized dyes. Absorption maxima, λmax, of the studied dyes were found in the range 364-394 nm. Molar absorbtivities were evaluated in between 40300 and 59200 mol-1 dm3 cm-1. Fluorescence maxima, λfl, were registered around 418-448 nm upon excitation at 350 nm. A slight displacements of theoretically estimated absorption maxima according to experimental ones is observed. The differences are most probably due to the fact that the DFT calculations were carried out without taking into account the solvent effect. In addition, the merocyanine sulfobetaines also fluorescence in blue optical range (420-480 nm) at excitation in red range (630-650 nm).

  7. Raman analysis of cobalt blue pigment in blue and white porcelain: A reassessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaochenyang; Ma, Yanying; Chen, Yue; Li, Yuanqiu; Ma, Qinglin; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Wang, Changsui; Yang, Yimin

    2018-02-01

    Cobalt blue is a famous pigment in human history. In the past decade it is widely reported that the cobalt aluminate has been detected in ancient ceramics as blue colorant in glaze, yet the acquired Raman spectra are incredibly different from that of synthesised references, necessitating a reassessment of such contradictory scenario with more accurate analytic strategies. In this study, micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in association with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were performed on under-glaze cobalt pigments from one submerged blue and white porcelain shard dated from Wanli reign (1573-1620 CE) of Ming dynasty (1365-1644 CE) excavated at Nan'ao I shipwreck off the southern coast of China. The micro-structural inspection reveals that the pigment particles have characteristics of small account, tiny size, heterogeneously distribution, and more importantly, been completely enwrapped by well-developed anorthite crystals in the glaze, indicating that the signals recorded in previous publications are probably not from cobalt pigments themselves but from outside thickset anorthite shell. The further spectromicroscopic analyses confirm this presumption when the accurate spectra of cobalt aluminate pigment and surrounding anorthite were obtained separately with precise optical positioning. Accordingly, we reassess and clarify the previous Raman studies dedicated to cobalt blue pigment in ancient ceramics, e.g. cobalt blue in celadon glaze, and in turn demonstrate the superiority and necessity of coupling spectroscopic analysis with corresponding structure observation, especially in the characterization of pigments from complicated physico-chemical environment like antiquities. Thus, this study promotes a better understanding of Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt blue pigments in art and archaeology field.

  8. Comparison of aminolevulinic acid and hexylester aminolevulinate induced protoporphyrin IX fluorescence for the detection of ovarian carcinoma metastases: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascencio, Manuel; Regis, Claudia; Mordon, Serge; Collinet, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    The present study aimed at comparing the photo detection of peritoneal micrometastases in an ovarian cancer model following administration of two precursors of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX): aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and hexylester aminolevulinate (He-ALA). ALA or He-ALA (100mg/kg) was injected in the peritoneum cavity of 16 rats with induced peritoneal metastases of ovarian cancer. Two hours later, the tumours were visualized laparoscopically using both white light for standard exploration and blue light for fluorescence (D-light, Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany). Peritoneal micrometastases were counted. The distribution of PpIX through the peritoneum was studied on frozen biopsies using fluorescence microscopy and correlated with pathological findings. The number of micrometastases detected by the fluorescence blue mode was significantly higher (p<0.05) than with standard white light for both ALA (235 versus 198) and He-ALA application (248 versus 199). The mean fluorescence intensity ratio between tumor and normal surrounding tissue was significantly (p< 0.05) higher for He-ALA (1.6+/-0.1) compared to ALA (1.4+/-0.1). Fluorescence microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence remained limited to cancer cells. Macroscopically fluorescing nodules were histopathology confirmed as malignant. In conclusion, He-ALA is an excellent precursor for PpIX synthesis giving the highest PpIX fluorescence contrast between normal and tumoral peritoneum. Imaging with He-ALA improves the detection of peritoneal metastases comparing to ALA.

  9. 1.8 Å bright-state structure of the reversibly switchable fluorescent protein Dronpa guides the generation of fast switching variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, Andre C.; Trowitzsch, Simon; Weber, Gert; Andresen, Martin; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; Jakobs, Stefan; Wahl, Markus C.

    2006-01-01

    RSFPs (reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins) may be repeatedly converted between a fluorescent and a non-fluorescent state by irradiation and have attracted widespread interest for many new applications. The RSFP Dronpa may be switched with blue light from a fluorescent state into a non-fluorescent state, and back again with UV light. To obtain insight into the underlying molecular mechanism of this switching, we have determined the crystal structure of the fluorescent equilibrium state of Dronpa. Its bicyclic chromophore is formed spontaneously from the Cys62–Tyr63–Gly64 tripeptide. In the fluorescent state, it adopts a slightly non-coplanar cis conformation within the interior of a typical GFP (green fluorescent protein) β-can fold. Dronpa shares some structural features with asFP595, another RSFP whose chromophore has previously been demonstrated to undergo a cis–trans isomerization upon photoswitching. Based on the structural comparison with asFP595, we have generated new Dronpa variants with an up to more than 1000-fold accelerated switching behaviour. The mutations which were introduced at position Val157 or Met159 apparently reduce the steric hindrance for a cis–trans isomerization of the chromophore, thus lowering the energy barrier for the blue light-driven on-to-off transition. The findings reported in the present study support the view that a cis–trans isomerization is one of the key events common to the switching mechanism in RSFPs. PMID:17117927

  10. 1.8 A bright-state structure of the reversibly switchable fluorescent protein Dronpa guides the generation of fast switching variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, Andre C; Trowitzsch, Simon; Weber, Gert; Andresen, Martin; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan; Wahl, Markus C

    2007-02-15

    RSFPs (reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins) may be repeatedly converted between a fluorescent and a non-fluorescent state by irradiation and have attracted widespread interest for many new applications. The RSFP Dronpa may be switched with blue light from a fluorescent state into a non-fluorescent state, and back again with UV light. To obtain insight into the underlying molecular mechanism of this switching, we have determined the crystal structure of the fluorescent equilibrium state of Dronpa. Its bicyclic chromophore is formed spontaneously from the Cys62-Tyr63-Gly64 tripeptide. In the fluorescent state, it adopts a slightly non-coplanar cis conformation within the interior of a typical GFP (green fluorescent protein) b-can fold. Dronpa shares some structural features with asFP595, another RSFP whose chromophore has previously been demonstrated to undergo a cis-trans isomerization upon photoswitching. Based on the structural comparison with asFP595, we have generated new Dronpa variants with an up to more than 1000-fold accelerated switching behaviour. The mutations which were introduced at position Val157 or Met159 apparently reduce the steric hindrance for a cis-trans isomerization of the chromophore, thus lowering the energy barrier for the blue light-driven on-to-off transition. The findings reported in the present study support the view that a cis-trans isomerization is one of the key events common to the switching mechanism in RSFPs.

  11. Fluorescent standards for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belko, N.; Kavalenka, S.; Samtsov, M.

    2016-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is an evolving technique for treatment of various oncological diseases. This method employs photosensitizers - species that lead to death of tumor cells after the photoactivation. For further development and novel applications of photodynamic therapy new photosensitizers are required. After synthesis of a new photosensitizer it is important to know its concentration in different biological tissues after its administration and distribution. The concentration is frequently measured by the extraction method, which has some disadvantages, e.g. it requires many biological test subjects that are euthanized during the measurement. We propose to measure the photosensitizer concentration in tissue by its fluorescence. For this purpose fluorescent standards were developed. The standards are robust and simple to produce; their fluorescence signal does not change with time. The fluorescence intensity of fluorescent standards seems to depend linearly on the dye concentration. A set of standards thus allow the calibration of a spectrometer. Finally, the photosensitizer concentration can be determined by the fluorescence intensity after comparing the corresponding spectrum with spectra of the set of fluorescent standards. A biological test subject is not euthanized during this kind of experiment. We hope this more humane technique can be used in future instead of the extraction method.

  12. Novel blue emitters based on {pi}-conjugated block copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, L.O. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo - Campus Diadema, Rua Prof. Artur Riedel, 275, Cep 09972-270 - Jd Eldorado - Diadema - SP (Brazil)], E-mail: laura_peres@hotmail.com; Wang, S.H. [Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais, Escola Politecnica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes 2463, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: wangshui@usp.br; Wery, J.; Froyer, G. [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel, 2 Rue de la Houssiniere, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 03 (France); Faulques, E. [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel, 2 Rue de la Houssiniere, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 03 (France)], E-mail: eric.faulques@cnrs-imn.fr

    2009-03-01

    A series of new phenyl-based conjugated copolymers has been synthesized and investigated by vibrational and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The materials are: poly(1,4-phenylene-alt-3,6-pyridazine) (COP-PIR), poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-co-quaterphenylene (COP-PPP) and poly[(1,4-phenylene-alt-3,6-pyridazine)-co-(1,4-phenylene-alt-9, 9-dioctylfluorene)] (COP-PIR-FLUOR), with 3.5% of fluorene. COP-PPP and COP-PIR-FLUOR have high fluorescence quantum yields in solution. Infrared and Raman spectra were used to check the chemical structure of the compounds. The copolymers exhibit blue emission ranging from 2.8 to 3.6 eV when excited at E{sub exc} = 4.13 eV. Stokes-shift values were estimated on pristine samples in their condensed state from steady-state PL-emission and PL-excitation spectra. They suggest a difference in the torsional angle between the molecular configuration of the polymer blocks at the absorption and PL transitions and also in the photoexcitation diffusion. Additionally, the time-resolved PL of these materials has been investigated by using 100 fs laser pulses at E{sub exc} = 4.64 eV and a streak camera. Results show very fast biexponential kinetics for the two fluorene-based polymers with decay times below 300 ps indicating both intramolecular, fast radiative recombination and migration of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. By contrast, the PL of COP-PIR is less intense and longer lived, indicating that excitons are confined to the chains in this polymer.

  13. Highly Sensitive Fluorescent Sensor for Cartap Based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Between Gold Nanoparticles and Rhodamine B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liang; Hou, Changjun; Fa, Huanbao; Yang, Mei; Wu, Huixiang; Zhang, Liang; Huo, Danqun

    2018-04-01

    Cartap residue poses a great threat to human health and its derivatives would remain in soils, natural waters and other environmental domains for a long time. Herein, a simple, rapid and ultrasensitive analytical method for the determination of cartap based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) and rhodamine B (RB) is first described. With the presence of citrate-stabilized AuNPs, the fluorescence of RB was remarkably quenched by AuNPs via FRET. The fluorescence of the AuNPs-RB system was recovered upon addition of cartap, cartap can be adsorbed on the surface of AuNPs due to its amino group that has good affinity with gold, which could induce the aggregation of AuNPs accompanying color change from red to blue. Thus, the FRET between AuNPs and RB was weakened and the PL intensity of RB was recovered accordingly. A good linear correlation for detection of RB was exhibited from 1 nM to 180 nM, and the detection limit reached 0.88 nM, which was much lower than the safety limit required by USA, UK and China. To the best of our knowledge, it has been the lowest detection ever without the aid of costly instrumentation. This method was successfully carried out for the assessment of cartap in real samples with satisfactory results, which revealed many advantages such as high sensitivity, low cost and non-time-consuming compared with traditional methods.

  14. Anomalous Cepheids and population II blue stragglers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, James M.

    Recent studies of anomalous Cepheids (ACs) and population II blue stragglers (BSs), including photometrically variable BSs (VBSs), are reviewed. The VBSs represent about 25 percent of the BSs, the majority of which are SX Phe short-period variables in the Cepheid instability strip. Mass estimates derived using various techniques suggest that both ACs and BSs are relatively massive (about 1.0-1.6 solar mass). The recent discovery that two BSs in the globular cluster NGC 5466 are contact binaries, and the earlier discovery that one of the BSs in Omega Cen is an eclipsing binary, provide direct evidence that at least some BSs are binary systems.

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: blue whale [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available blue whale Balaenoptera musculus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Cetacea Balaenoptera..._musculus_L.png Balaenoptera_musculus_NL.png Balaenoptera_musculus_S.png Balaenoptera_musculu...s_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Balaenoptera+musculus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/...taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Balaenoptera+musculus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxon...omy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Balaenoptera+musculus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Balaenoptera+musculus&t=NS ...

  16. Non-invasive in situ Examination of Colour Changes of Blue Paints in Danish Golden Age Paintings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buti, David; Vila, Anna; Filtenborg, Troels Folke

    A non-invasive study of some paintings containing areas of paint with a Prussian blue component has been conducted at the Statens Museum for Kunst. The in situ campaign has been carried out with a range of different spectroscopic portable techniques, provided by the MOLAB transnational access...... within the IPERION-CH European Infrastructure (http://www.iperionch.eu/). Visual examination of the paintings, highlights of the Danish Golden Age collection, revealed a significant degree of fading of the blue paint in areas exposed to the light, when compared with those protected by the rebate...... impermanence and behaviour following light exposure [1, 2]. Several papers have been published investigating this phenomenon [2, 3] on laboratory paint models. By means of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis-NIR reflectance spectroscopy and digital microscopy...

  17. Primary photophysics of the FMN binding LOV2 domain of the plant blue light receptor phototropin of Avena sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüttrigkeit, Tanja A.; Kompa, Christian K.; Salomon, Michael; Rüdiger, Wolfhart; Michel-Beyerle, Maria E.

    2003-11-01

    The temporal evolution of the initially excited singlet state of flavine mononucleotide, which is the cofactor in the LOV2 domain of the blue photoreceptor phototropin, has been studied in picosecond time-resolved fluorescence and femtosecond time-resolved absorption experiments. In the LOV2-WT protein of Avena sativa singlet-triplet intersystem crossing proceeding within 2.3 ns is the primary process which increases the triplet yield by a factor of 1.23 as compared to a mutant where cysteine 39 is replaced by alanine. This flavin triplet state is responsible for the formation of a cysteinyl-flavin adduct which triggers the unique photocycle of the LOV2 domain and thus the sensoric function of the blue light receptor phototropin.

  18. A new approach to dual-color two-photon microscopy with fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebane Aleks

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-photon dual-color imaging of tissues and cells labeled with fluorescent proteins (FPs is challenging because most two-photon microscopes only provide one laser excitation wavelength at a time. At present, methods for two-photon dual-color imaging are limited due to the requirement of large differences in Stokes shifts between the FPs used and their low two-photon absorption (2PA efficiency. Results Here we present a new method of dual-color two-photon microscopy that uses the simultaneous excitation of the lowest-energy electronic transition of a blue fluorescent protein and a higher-energy electronic transition of a red fluorescent protein. Conclusion Our method does not require large differences in Stokes shifts and can be extended to a variety of FP pairs with larger 2PA efficiency and more optimal imaging properties.

  19. Enhancement of growth and lipid production from microalgae using fluorescent paint under the solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Cho, Changsoon; Lee, Jung-Yong; Han, Jong-In

    2014-12-01

    Solar radiation has intensity that is too high to inhibit microalgae activity and is composed of wide light spectrum including ultraviolet (UV) range which cannot be utilized for microalgae. For these reasons, the modification of solar radiation is required for effective microalgae cultivation, and to do that, fluorescent paint was used for not only blocking excessive solar energy but also converting UV to visible light. With fluorescent aqueous layer, microalgae was protected from photoinhibition and could grow well, but there was difference in growth and lipid accumulation efficiencies depending on the color; maximum dry weight of 1.7 g/L was achieved in red paint, whereas best lipid content of 30% was obtained in blue one. This phenomenon was due to the different light spectrum made by colors. With simple process using fluorescent paint, modification of light was successfully done and allowing microalgae to grow under strong radiation such as solar radiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of functionalized nanodiamond fluorescence detection platform: Analysis the specific promoter regulated by p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Diansyue; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Chuang, Hung; Lu, Yu-Ning; Ho, Li-Ping; Li, Hsing-Yuan; Hsu, Ming-Hua; Chang, Chia-Ching

    2014-03-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) is one of the biocompatible nanomaterials with large tunable surface for chemical modification. It possesses unique mechanical, spectroscopy, and thermal properties. It is an excellent molecular vehicle to deliver specific molecules in biological system. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a protein that emits strong green fluorescence when it is excited by ultra-violet to blue light. It makes GFP a good indicator. By combining ND-GFP, a visible biocompatible delivery system will be developed. p53 is a tumor suppressor protein encoded by the TP53 gene. P53 plays an important role in apoptosis, genomic stability, and inhibition of angiogenesis by interacting with specific DNA sequence of promoter of related genes. In this study, a p53 functionalized ND-GFP will be developed. This complex can recognize the specific DNA sequence of promoter and the intermolecular interactions can be monitored directly by fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy both in vivo and in vitro.

  1. Thiophene-derivatized Fluorescent Benzamides as Possible Probes for Histone Deacetylases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Young Jun

    2013-01-01

    We have synthesized a series of novel fluorescent benzamides inhibitors possessing intrinsic fluorescence properties. Most of these benzamide fluorophores exhibit high quantum yields, making them suitable for use in imaging studies, with colors ranging from blue to green; a couple of them were also water-soluble. Notably, TB1 and TB2 display a high quantum yield and TB1 exhibits high binding affinity to HDAC enzymes. We believe that these new fluorescent benzamide inhibitors might be useful diagnostic tools for in vitro studies of HDACs. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are crucial gene regulating enzymes that control the expression of histones-epigenetic targets in research related to developing new therapies for cancer, central nervous system disorders, and heart disease. The deacetylation of histones is a vital repression process in transcriptional gene expression; it also affects apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, and angiogenesis

  2. Thiophene-derivatized Fluorescent Benzamides as Possible Probes for Histone Deacetylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Young Jun [Chonbuk National Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    We have synthesized a series of novel fluorescent benzamides inhibitors possessing intrinsic fluorescence properties. Most of these benzamide fluorophores exhibit high quantum yields, making them suitable for use in imaging studies, with colors ranging from blue to green; a couple of them were also water-soluble. Notably, TB1 and TB2 display a high quantum yield and TB1 exhibits high binding affinity to HDAC enzymes. We believe that these new fluorescent benzamide inhibitors might be useful diagnostic tools for in vitro studies of HDACs. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are crucial gene regulating enzymes that control the expression of histones-epigenetic targets in research related to developing new therapies for cancer, central nervous system disorders, and heart disease. The deacetylation of histones is a vital repression process in transcriptional gene expression; it also affects apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, and angiogenesis.

  3. Effects of ozone and relative humidity on fluorescence spectra of octapeptide bioaerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Hill, Steven C.; Williamson, Chatt C.; Coleman, Mark; Bare, Christopher; Kinahan, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ozone and relative humidity (RH) at common atmospheric levels on the properties of single octapeptide bioaerosol particles were studied using an improved rotating reaction chamber, an aerosol generator, an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS), an improved single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS), and equipments to generate, monitor and control the ozone and RH. Aerosol particles (mean diameter 2 μm) were generated from a slurry of octapeptide in phosphate buffered saline, injected into the rotating chamber, and kept airborne for hours. Bioaerosols were sampled from the chamber hourly for the measurements of particle-size distribution, concentration, total fluorescence excited at 355-nm, and single particle fluorescence spectra excited at 266-nm and 351-nm under different controlled RH (20%, 50%, or 80%) and ozone concentration (0 or 150 ppb). The results show that: (1) Particle size, concentration, and the 263-nm-excited fluorescence intensity decrease at different rates under different combinations of the RH and ozone concentrations used. (2) The 263-nm-excited UV fluorescence (280-400 nm) decreased more rapidly than the 263-nm-excited visible fluorescence (400-560 nm), and decreased most rapidly when ozone is present and RH is high. (3) The UV fluorescence peak near 340 nm slightly shifts to the shorter wavelength (blue-shift), consistent with a more rapid oxidation of tryptophan than tyrosine. (4) The 351/355-nm-excited fluorescence (430-580 nm/380-700 nm) increases when ozone is present, especially when the RH is high. (5) The 351/355-nm-excited fluorescence increase that occurs as the tryptophan emission in the UV decreases, and the observation that these changes occur more rapidly at higher RH with the present of ozone, are consistent with the oxidation of tryptophan by ozone and the conversion of the resulting ozonides to N-formyl kynurenine and kynurenine.

  4. An anion channel in Arabidopsis hypocotyls activated by blue light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M. H.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A rapid, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane in seedling stems is one of the earliest effects of blue light detected in plants. It appears to play a role in transducing blue light into inhibition of hypocotyl (stem) elongation, and perhaps other responses. The possibility that activation of a Cl- conductance is part of the depolarization mechanism was raised previously and addressed here. By patch clamping hypocotyl cells isolated from dark-grown (etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings, blue light was found to activate an anion channel residing at the plasma membrane. An anion-channel blocker commonly known as NPPB 15-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid] potently and reversibly blocked this anion channel. NPPB also blocked the blue-light-induced depolarization in vivo and decreased the inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation. These results indicate that activation of this anion channel plays a role in transducing blue light into growth inhibition.

  5. Fuzzy logic color detection: Blue areas in melanoma dermoscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingala, Mounika; Stanley, R Joe; Rader, Ryan K; Hagerty, Jason; Rabinovitz, Harold S; Oliviero, Margaret; Choudhry, Iqra; Stoecker, William V

    2014-07-01

    Fuzzy logic image analysis techniques were used to analyze three shades of blue (lavender blue, light blue, and dark blue) in dermoscopic images for melanoma detection. A logistic regression model provided up to 82.7% accuracy for melanoma discrimination for 866 images. With a support vector machines (SVM) classifier, lower accuracy was obtained for individual shades (79.9-80.1%) compared with up to 81.4% accuracy with multiple shades. All fuzzy blue logic alpha cuts scored higher than the crisp case. Fuzzy logic techniques applied to multiple shades of blue can assist in melanoma detection. These vector-based fuzzy logic techniques can be extended to other image analysis problems involving multiple colors or color shades. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Interactions of hemin with bovine serum albumin and human hemoglobin: A fluorescence quenching study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2018-03-01

    The binding interactions between hemin (Hmi) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) or human hemoglobin (HHb), respectively, have been examined in aqueous solution at pH = 7.4, applying UV-vis absorption, as well as steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques. Representative results received for both BSA and HHb intrinsic fluorescence proceeding from the interactions with hemin suggest the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes in both the Hmi-BSA and Hmi-HHb systems, with highly possible concurrent formation of a coordinate bond between a group on the protein surface and the metal in Hmi molecule. All the values of calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants point to the involvement of static quenching in both the systems studied. The blue shift in the synchronous fluorescence spectra imply the participation of both tryptophan and tyrosine residues in quenching of BSA and HHb intrinsic fluorescence. Depicted outcomes suggest that hemin is supposedly able to influence the physiological functions of BSA and HHb, the most important blood proteins, particularly in case of its overuse.

  7. Foliar Reflectance and Fluorescence Responses for Corn and Soybean Plants Under Nitrogen Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, E. M.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Corp, L. A.; Butcher, L. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    We are investigating the use of spectral indices derived from actively induced fluorescence spectra and passive optical spectra. We examined the influence of photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content on the spectral fluorescence and passive optical property characteristics of mature, upper leaves from plants provided different N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of recommended N levels. A suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves from field grown corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean plants (Glycine max L.) grown in pots (greenhouse + ambient sunlight. Steady state laser-induced fluorescence emission spectra (5 nm resolution) were obtained from adaxial and abaxial surfaces resulting from excitation at single wavelengths (280, 380 or 360, and 532 nm). For emission spectra produced by each of these excitation wavelengths, ratios of emission peaks were calculated, including the red far-red chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) ratio (F685/F740) and the far-red/green (F740/F525) ratio. High resolution (treatment groups was possible with specific fluorescence band ratios (e.g., F740/F525 obtained with 380 nm excitation). Higher ChlF and blue-green emissions were measured from the abaxial leaf surfaces. Abaxial surfaces also produced higher reflectances, in general, in the 400-800 nm spectrum.

  8. Ratiometric Matryoshka biosensors from a nested cassette of green- and orange-emitting fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ast, Cindy; Foret, Jessica; Oltrogge, Luke M; De Michele, Roberto; Kleist, Thomas J; Ho, Cheng-Hsun; Frommer, Wolf B

    2017-09-05

    Sensitivity, dynamic and detection range as well as exclusion of expression and instrumental artifacts are critical for the quantitation of data obtained with fluorescent protein (FP)-based biosensors in vivo. Current biosensors designs are, in general, unable to simultaneously meet all these criteria. Here, we describe a generalizable platform to create dual-FP biosensors with large dynamic ranges by employing a single FP-cassette, named GO-(Green-Orange) Matryoshka. The cassette nests a stable reference FP (large Stokes shift LSSmOrange) within a reporter FP (circularly permuted green FP). GO- Matryoshka yields green and orange fluorescence upon blue excitation. As proof of concept, we converted existing, single-emission biosensors into a series of ratiometric calcium sensors (MatryoshCaMP6s) and ammonium transport activity sensors (AmTryoshka1;3). We additionally identified the internal acid-base equilibrium as a key determinant of the GCaMP dynamic range. Matryoshka technology promises flexibility in the design of a wide spectrum of ratiometric biosensors and expanded in vivo applications.Single fluorescent protein biosensors are susceptible to expression and instrumental artifacts. Here Ast et al. describe a dual fluorescent protein design whereby a reference fluorescent protein is nested within a reporter fluorescent protein to control for such artifacts while preserving sensitivity and dynamic range.

  9. Demonstration of plant fluorescence by imaging technique and Intelligent FluoroSensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Sándor; Gádoros, Patrik; Kocsányi, László; Barócsi, Attila

    2015-10-01

    Photosynthesis is a process that converts carbon-dioxide into organic compounds, especially into sugars, using the energy of sunlight. The absorbed light energy is used mainly for photosynthesis initiated at the reaction centers of chlorophyll-protein complexes, but part of it is lost as heat and chlorophyll fluorescence. Therefore, the measurement of the latter can be used to estimate the photosynthetic activity. The basic method, when illuminating intact leaves with strong light after a dark adaptation of at least 20 minutes resulting in a transient change of fluorescence emission of the fluorophore chlorophyll-a called `Kautsky effect', is demonstrated by an imaging setup. The experimental kit includes a high radiant blue LED and a CCD camera (or a human eye) equipped with a red transmittance filter to detect the changing fluorescence radiation. However, for the measurement of several fluorescence parameters, describing the plant physiological processes in detail, the variation of several excitation light sources and an adequate detection method are needed. Several fluorescence induction protocols (e.g. traditional Kautsky, pulse amplitude modulated and excitation kinetic), are realized in the Intelligent FluoroSensor instrument. Using it, students are able to measure different plant fluorescence induction curves, quantitatively determine characteristic parameters and qualitatively interpret the measured signals.

  10. Foliar Reflectance and Fluorescence Responses for Plants Under Nitrogen Stress Determined with Active and Passive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, E. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Corp, L. A.; Butcher, L. M.; Chappelle, E. W.

    2003-01-01

    Vegetation productivity is driven by nitrogen (N) availability in soils. Both excessive and low soil N induce physiological changes in plant foliage. In 2001, we examined the use of spectral fluorescence and reflectance measurements to discriminate among plants provided different N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of optimal N levels. A suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves from field grown corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean plants (Glycine max L.) grown in pots (greenhouse + ambient sunlight daily). Three types of steady state laser-induced fluorescence measurements were made on adaxial and abaxial surfaces: 1) fluorescence images in four 10 nm bands (blue, green, red, far-red) resulting from broad irradiance excitation; 2) emission spectra (5 nm resolution) produced by excitation at single wavelengths (280,380 or 360, and 532 nm); and 3) excitation spectra (2 nm resolution), with emission wavelengths fixed at wavelengths centered on selected solar Fraunhofer lines (532,607,677 and 745 nm). Two complementary sets of high resolution (less than 2 nm) optical spectra were acquired for both adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces: 1) optical properties (350-2500 nm) for reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance; and 2) reflectance spectra (500-1000 nm) acquired with and without a short pass filter at 665 nm to determine the fluorescence contribution to apparent reflectance in the 650-750 spectrum, especially at the 685 and 740 nm chlorophyll fluorescence (ChIF) peaks. The strongest relationships between foliar chemistry and optical properties were demonstrated for C/N content and two optical parameters associated with the red edge inflection point. Select optical properties and ChIF parameters were highly correlated for both species. A significant contribution of ChIF to apparent reflectance was observed, averaging 10-25% at 685 nm and 2 - 6% at 740 nm over all N treatments. Discrimination of N treatment

  11. Fluorescence diagnosis in tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Vitória H.; Ferreira, Juliana; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2009-06-01

    Background and Objectives: The paper aim was to evaluate the efficacy of the fluorescence spectroscopy in the detection of UV-induced skin change of Wistar rats. Study Design/ Materials and Methods: In a group male Wistar rats, the skin damage was produced by an UV-C lamp, periodically monitored using the laser-induced fluorescence, until complete healing process. After determining a characteristic emission band present in the fluorescence spectra of the induced injuries, the amplitude band monitoring allowed the follow up on the injury and the recovery. Results: We observed the appearance of two new emission bands more evident at the injury spectra when compared to the spectrums from normal non-exposed tissue. Following such spectral bands was possible to observe the establishment and recovery. Conclusions: The fluorescence spectroscopy is a promising technique in distinguishing between normal and UV induced skin change helping the evaluation of changes which are irreversible cancer tissue characteristics.

  12. Instructive for disposal of fluorescent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar Vargas, Gerlin

    2014-01-01

    An instructive is established for the management system of waste fluorescent lamps, ensuring the storage, collection, transportation, and final disposal. The lamp is changed by an official of the Seccion de Matenimiento Construccion of the Oficina de Servicios Generales or is produced with the support of an official of the unit. The fluorescent should be deposited in stock of materials of the building maintenance section or unit specified with the help of a staff and in appropriate conditions. The fluorescent lamp is transported according to the guidelines in the manual. A responsible company is contracted by la Vicerrectoria de Administracion of the Universidad de Costa Rica dedicated to the transport and proper handling of fluorescent lamps [es

  13. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles derived from natural materials of mango fruit for bio-imaging probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chan Jin; Roy, Arup Kumer; Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Jung-Eun; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2014-11-01

    Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials.Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04805a

  14. Clinical trial of combined radio- and fluorescence-guided sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, Boudewijn E.; Verbeek, Floris P.R.; Rietbergen, Daphne D.D.; van der Hiel, Bernies; van der Vorst, Joost R.; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; Frangioni, John V.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; van Leeuwen, Fijs W.B.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Combining radioactive colloids and a near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore permit preoperative planning and intraoperative localization of deeply located sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) with direct optical guidance by a single lymphatic tracer. The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate and optimize a hybrid NIR fluorescence and radioactive tracer for SLN detection in breast cancer patients. Method Patients with breast cancer undergoing SLN biopsy were enrolled. The day before surgery, indocyanine green (ICG)-99mTc-Nanocolloid was injected periareolarly and a lymphoscintigram was acquired. Directly before surgery, blue dye was injected. Intraoperative SLN localization was performed by a gamma probe and the Mini-FLARETM NIR fluorescence imaging system. Patients were divided into two dose groups, with one group receiving twice the particle density of ICG and nanocolloid, but the same dose of radioactive 99mTechnetium. Results Thirty-two patients were enrolled in the trial. At least one SLN was identified pre- and intraoperatively. All 48 axillary SLNs could be detected by gamma tracing and NIR fluorescence imaging, but only 42 of them stained blue. NIR fluorescence permitted detection of lymphatic vessels draining to the SLN up to 29 hours after injection. Increasing the particle density by two-fold did not yield a difference in fluorescence intensity, median 255 (range 98 – 542) vs. median 284 (90 – 921; P = 0.590), or signal- to- background ratio, median 5.4 (range 3.0 – 15.4) vs. median 4.9 (3.5 – 16.3; P = 1.000), of the SLN. Conclusion The hybrid NIR fluorescence and radioactive tracer ICG-99mTc-Nanocolloid permitted accurate pre- and intraoperative detection of the SLNs in patients with breast cancer. PMID:23696463

  15. Strategic blue-green communication filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, W. J.

    1984-04-01

    The project began as an effort to construct narrowband, wide-field-of-view, large-aperture, plastic, birefringent filters suitable for blue-green communications. During the course of the study we investigated the use of crystalline materials in addition to plastic films, and we studied filter design theory in order to find designs more suitable to the blue-green system requirements. In addition, we constructed a quartz, 2A filter for the 1981 SLCAIR experiment. In this report we have included an introduction to the principles of narrowband, wide-field-of-view, birefringent filters. This section is included since the subject matter is not readily available except piecemeal in technical journals. Section 3 is a discussion of the materials which were considered during this study. It contains subsections devoted to crystals, plastics and analog element, respectively. A class of new lossless filter designs is described in Section 4. These designs are expected to provide a basis for high-transmission filters in the future. The operational SLCAIR-81 filter is described in Section 5. It was part of the successful experiment which demonstrated communication to the USN Dolphin, a research submarine. Finally, in Section 6 we describe the non-vignetting filter design which was discovered during this study. It represents a significant throughput advantage for crystal filters used in non-imaging applications.

  16. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications.

  17. Manajemen Strategi Pengembangan Pariwisata dengan Pendekatan Blue Ocean Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Muzha, Vianda Kushardianti

    2015-01-01

    Persaingan industri pariwisata di Indonesia saat ini sangatlah ketat, setiap daerah berlomba untuk menonjolkan keunikannya tersendiri. Dengan adanya persaingan yang sangat ketat tersebut, Kota Batu berusaha keluar dari persaingan (red ocean) dengan menciptkan inovasi baru melalui konsep Blue Ocean Strategy. Blue Ocean Strategy adalah istilah dalam ilmu manajemen strategi yang merujuk pada siasat untuk menciptakan pasar baru yang belum dipenuhi persaingan yang ketat. Blue Ocean Strategy pada d...

  18. A Survey of Blue-Noise Sampling and Its Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Yan, Dongming

    2015-05-05

    In this paper, we survey recent approaches to blue-noise sampling and discuss their beneficial applications. We discuss the sampling algorithms that use points as sampling primitives and classify the sampling algorithms based on various aspects, e.g., the sampling domain and the type of algorithm. We demonstrate several well-known applications that can be improved by recent blue-noise sampling techniques, as well as some new applications such as dynamic sampling and blue-noise remeshing.

  19. Large Scale Density Estimation of Blue and Fin Whales (LSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Large Scale Density Estimation of Blue and Fin Whales ...sensors, or both. The goal of this research is to develop and implement a new method for estimating blue and fin whale density that is effective over...develop and implement a density estimation methodology for quantifying blue and fin whale abundance from passive acoustic data recorded on sparse

  20. Sr2ZnS3: Crystal Structure and Fluorescent Properties of a New Eu(II)-Activated Yellow Emission Phosphor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrykin, Valery; Okube, Maki; Yamane, H.; Sasaki, S.; Kakihana, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 21 (2010), s. 5800-5802 ISSN 0897-4756 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Blue light * Chemical compositions * Fluorescent property Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.400, year: 2010

  1. Secondary vestibulocerebellar projections to the flocculus and uvulo-nodular lobule of the rabbit: a study using HRP and double fluorescent tracer techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Epema; N.M. Gerrits (N.); J. Voogd (Jan)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe distribution of vestibular neurons projecting to the flocculus and the nodulus and uvula of the caudal vermis (Larsell's lobules X and IX) was investigated with retrograde axonal transport of horseradish peroxidase and the fluorescent tracers Fast Blue, Nuclear Yellow and Diamidino

  2. Fluorescence axial nanotomography with plasmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, Nicholas I; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O; Krasavin, Alexey V; Ng, Tony; Richards, David

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel imaging technique with super-resolution axial sensitivity, exploiting the changes in fluorescence lifetime above a plasmonic substrate. Using conventional confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging, we show that it is possible to deliver down to 6 nm axial position sensitivity of fluorophores in whole biological cell imaging. We employ this technique to map the topography of the cellular membrane, and demonstrate its application in an investigation of receptor-mediated endocytosis in carcinoma cells.

  3. The Return of the Blue Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Anabela

    2014-05-01

    The Return of the Blue Butterfly The English writer Charles Dickens once wrote: "I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free". But are they really? The work that I performed with a group of students from 8th grade, had a starting point of climate change and the implications it has on ecosystems. Joining the passion I have for butterflies, I realized that they are also in danger of extinction due to these climatic effects. Thus, it was easy to seduce my students wanting to know more. Luckily I found Dr. Paula Seixas Arnaldo, a researcher at the University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, who has worked on butterflies and precisely investigated this issue. Portugal is the southern limit of butterfly-blue (Phengaris alcon), and has been many years in the red book of endangered species. Butterfly-blue is very demanding of their habitat, and disappears very easily if ideal conditions are not satisfied. Increased fragmentation of landscapes and degradation of suitable habitats, are considered the greatest challenges of the conservation of Phengaris butterfly in Portugal. In recent decades, climate change has also changed butterfly-blue spatial distribution with a movement of the species northward to colder locations, and dispersion in latitude. Butterflies of Europe must escape to the North because of the heat. Dr. Paula Seixas Arnaldo and her research team began a project, completed in December 2013, wanted to preserve and restore priority habitats recognized by the European Union to help species in danger of disappearing with increasing temperature. The blue butterfly is extremely important because it is a key indicator of the quality of these habitats. In the field, the butterflies are monitored to collect all possible data in order to identify the key species. Butterflies start flying in early July and cease in late August. Mating takes about an hour and occurs in the first days of life. The gentian-peat (Gentiana pneumonanthe) serves as the host plant for

  4. Fluorescence Indices for the Proximal Sensing of Powdery Mildew, Nitrogen Supply and Water Deficit in Sugar Beet Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Leufen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Using potted sugar beet plants we aimed to investigate the suitability of four fluorescence indices to detect and differentiate the impact of nitrogen supply, water deficit and powdery mildew in two sugar beet cultivars (Beta vulgaris L.. Plants were grown inside a polytunnel under two nitrogen levels combined with water deficit or full irrigation. Changes in plant physiology were recorded at two physiological stages with a multiparametric handheld fluorescence sensor and a fluorescence imaging system. The analysis of chlorophyll content and osmotic potential served as reference. Based on our results, the fluorescence indices “Nitrogen Balance Index” and “Simple Fluorescence Ratio” responded quite sensitively to drought stress and mildew infection. Moreover, the blue-to-far-red fluorescence ratio revealed significant stress-induced alterations in the plant physiology. In all, fluorescence indices might be used as single or combined indices for successful stress sensing. However, a robust stress differentiation by using only one fluorescence ratio could not be accomplished.

  5. Phototherapy with blue and green mixed-light is as effective against unconjugated jaundice as blue light and reduces oxidative stress in the Gunn rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yumiko; Morimoto, Yukihiro; Uchiike, Takao; Kamamoto, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Tamaki; Arai, Ikuyo; Nishikubo, Toshiya; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2015-07-01

    Phototherapy using blue light-emitting diodes (LED) is effective against neonatal jaundice. However, green light phototherapy also reduces unconjugated jaundice. We aimed to determine whether mixed blue and green light can relieve jaundice with minimal oxidative stress as effectively as either blue or green light alone in a rat model. Gunn rats were exposed to phototherapy with blue (420-520 nm), filtered blue (FB; 440-520 nm without 1.00), respectively. Blue plus green phototherapy is as effective as blue phototherapy and it attenuates irradiation-induced oxidative stress. Combined blue and green spectra might be effective against neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Primary orbital melanoma in association with cellular blue nevus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sawy, Tarek; Bakhoum, Mathieu F; Tetzlaff, Michael; Nasser, Qasiem J; Prieto, Victor G; Ivan, Doina; Sniegowski, Matthew C; Yin, Vivian T; Pan, Caroline; Durairaj, Vikram; Esmaeli, Bita

    2014-01-01

    To describe 3 cases of primary orbital melanoma associated with either known or subsequently discovered cellular blue nevus. The clinical records and surgical specimens of 3 patients who underwent orbital exenteration for primary orbital melanoma and who had a cellular blue nevus diagnosed before or after detection of the melanoma were retrospectively reviewed. All 3 patients presented with signs and symptoms of an orbital mass. Subsequent biopsy revealed invasive melanoma. One patient had a known history of congenital cellular blue nevus of the eyelid from which the orbital melanoma originated. The other 2 patients had no known history of cutaneous pigmentation or blue nevus. In these 2 patients, the cellular blue nevus was detected on pathologic review of the orbital exenteration specimen (1 patient) or surgical biopsy specimen (1 patient). All 3 patients underwent total body positron emission tomography/computed tomography, and in all 3 results were negative for other sites of disease involvement. In the 2 patients without a previously known nevus a total body skin check was negative for other primary melanoma lesions. All 3 patients underwent orbital exenteration followed by postoperative radiation therapy. Thorough evaluation of biopsy specimens of "primary" orbital melanoma is warranted to ensure identification of any associated blue nevus because blue nevi are precursor lesions for orbital melanoma, and the presence of a blue nevus would support a primary orbital melanoma rather than a metastatic lesion. Patients with a known blue nevus of the periocular skin and ocular adnexa should be monitored closely for signs of malignant transformation.

  7. Tooth whitening evaluation of blue covarine containing toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Danying; Smith, Richard N; Zhang, Qiong; Sun, Jianing N; Philpotts, Carole J; Ricketts, Stephen R; Naeeni, Mojgan; Joiner, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    To measure the tooth whitening effects delivered immediately after brushing with silica-based toothpastes containing blue covarine in vitro and in vivo. Salivary pellicle coated human extracted teeth were brushed with either a slurry of a toothpaste containing blue covarine (BC), a formulation containing an increased level of blue covarine (BC+) or a negative control toothpaste containing no blue covarine. The colour of the specimens were measured in vitro using either a Minolta chromameter or a VITA Easyshade spectrophotometer, before and after brushing and changes in CIELAB values and tooth Whiteness Index (WIO) values calculated. In a double-blind cross-over clinical study, subjects brushed with either BC or BC+ toothpaste and tooth colour changes were measured with a digital image analysis system. The in vitro studies demonstrated that toothpastes containing blue covarine gave a significantly (pbrushing with the BC+ toothpaste than with the BC toothpaste (WIO p=0.006; b* p=0.013). Toothpastes containing blue covarine gave a statistically significant reduction in tooth yellowness and improvement in tooth whiteness immediately after brushing in both in vitro and clinical studies. In addition, the higher concentration blue covarine toothpaste gave statistically significant greater tooth whitening benefits than the lower concentration blue covarine toothpaste. The silica-based toothpastes containing blue covarine evaluated in the current study gave tooth whitening benefits immediately after one brush. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Graphitic Nitrogen Triggers Red Fluorescence in Carbon Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holá, Kateřina; Sudolská, Mária; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Nachtigallová, Dana; Rogach, Andrey L; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2017-12-26

    Carbon dots (CDs) are a stable and highly biocompatible fluorescent material offering great application potential in cell labeling, optical imaging, LED diodes, and optoelectronic technologies. Because their emission wavelengths provide the best tissue penetration, red-emitting CDs are of particular interest for applications in biomedical technologies. Current synthetic strategies enabling red-shifted emission include increasing the CD particle size (sp 2 domain) by a proper synthetic strategy and tuning the surface chemistry of CDs with suitable functional groups (e.g., carboxyl). Here we present an elegant route for preparing full-color CDs with well-controllable fluorescence at blue, green, yellow, or red wavelengths. The two-step procedure involves the synthesis of a full-color-emitting mixture of CDs from citric acid and urea in formamide followed by separation of the individual fluorescent fractions by column chromatography based on differences in CD charge. Red-emitting CDs, which had the most negative charge, were separated as the last fraction. The trend in the separation, surface charge, and red-shift of photoluminescence was caused by increasing amount of graphitic nitrogen in the CD structure, as was clearly proved by XPS, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, and DFT calculations. Importantly, graphitic nitrogen generates midgap states within the HOMO-LUMO gap of the undoped systems, resulting in significantly red-shifted light absorption that in turn gives rise to fluorescence at the low-energy end of the visible spectrum. The presented findings identify graphitic nitrogen as another crucial factor that can red-shift the CD photoluminescence.

  9. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    We have postulated that, in the case of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme, crystal growth occurs by the addition of pre-critical nuclei sized n-mers that form in the bulk solution, and that the n-mer growth units were multiples of the tetrameric 4(sub 3) helical structure. These have the strongest intermolecular bonds in the crystal and are therefore likely to be the first species formed. High resolution AFM studies provide strong supporting evidence for this model, but the data also suggest that the actual species in solution may not be identical in structure to that found in the crystal. We are using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the initial solution phase self-assembly process, using covalent fluorescent derivatives which crystallize in the characteristic P4(sub 3)2(sub 1)2(sub 1) space group. FRET studies are being carried out between the cascade blue (CB-lys, donor, Ex(sub max) 366 nm, Em 420 nm) and lucifer yellow (LY-lys, acceptor, Ex(sub max) 430 nm, Em 528 nm) asp101 derivatives. The estimated R(sub 0) for this probe pair, the distance where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, is approx. 1.2 nm, compared to 2.2 nm between the side chain carboxyls of adjacent asp101's in the crystalline 4(sub 3) helix. The short donor lifetime of 2.80 ns (chi(sup 2) = 0.644), coupled with the large average distances between the molecules (greater than or equal to 50 nm) in solution, ensure that any energy transfer observed is not due to random diffusive interactions. Lifetime data show that CB-lys has a single lifetime when it is the only species in solution. Similarly, LY-lys also exhibits a single lifetime of 4.63 ns (chi(sup 2) = 0.42) when alone in solution. Addition of LY-lys to CB-lys results in the appearance of a third lifetime component of 0.348ns for the CB-lys. The fractional intensities of the different species present can be used to estimate the distribution of monomer and n-mers in solution. The self

  10. Effects of Charge Balance and Exciton Confinement on the Operational Lifetime of Blue Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Caleb; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2017-04-01

    We measure the contribution of loss of charge balance and exciton confinement in the emission zone to the operational lifetime of blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs). Charge balance and exciton confinement are monitored as functions of time by measuring the emission intensity of either phosphorescent or fluorescent red-emitting "sensing" layers embedded within the charge-transport layers outside of the emission zone. We find no significant change in charge balance over the lifetime of the device, while loss of exciton confinement accounts for <5 % of luminance loss, confirming that degradation is primarily due to decomposition of molecular constituents within the emission layer of the PHOLED.

  11. FLUORESCENCE DIAGNOSIS FOR RECURRENT BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Ulyanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical case of successful use of local fluorescence spectroscopy combined with fluorescence imaging during cystoscopy for diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer is represented in the article. Histological study of fluorescent foci confirmed tumor growth (urothelial carcinoma in all areas with high levels of diagnostic parameter. In the fluorescent focus with low diagnostic parameter inflammation was detected.

  12. Predawn and high intensity application of supplemental blue light decreases the quantum yield of PSII and enhances the amount of phenolic acids, flavonoids, and pigments in Lactuca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of blue light intensity and timing, two cultivars of lettuce [Lactuca sativa cv. "Batavia" (green) and cv. "Lollo Rossa" (red)] were grown in a greenhouse compartment in late winter under natural light and supplemental high pressure sodium (SON-T) lamps yielding 90 (±10) μmol m(-2) s(-1) for up to 20 h, but never between 17:00 and 21:00. The temperature in the greenhouse compartments was 22/11°C day/night, respectively. The five light-emitting diode (LED) light treatments were Control (no blue addition), 1B 06-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 06:00 to 08:00), 1B 21-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 21:00 to 08:00), 2B 17-19 (Blue at 80 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 17:00 to 19:00), and 1B 17-19 (Blue at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 17:00 to 19:00). Total fresh and dry weight was not affected with additional blue light; however, plants treated with additional blue light were more compact. The stomatal conductance in the green lettuce cultivar was higher for all treatments with blue light compared to the Control. Photosynthetic yields measured with chlorophyll fluorescence showed different response between the cultivars; in red lettuce, the quantum yield of PSII decreased and the yield of non-photochemical quenching increased with increasing blue light, whereas in green lettuce no difference was observed. Quantification of secondary metabolites showed that all four treatments with additional blue light had higher amount of pigments, phenolic acids, and flavonoids compared to the Control. The effect was more prominent in red lettuce, highlighting that the results vary among treatments and compounds. Our results indicate that not only high light level triggers photoprotective heat dissipation in the plant, but also the specific spectral composition of the light itself at low intensities. However, these plant responses to light are cultivar dependent.

  13. Use of the aniline blue-KOH staining in the study of the banana-Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milady Mendoza-Rodríguez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the first stages of the infection process with the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet was made beginning with the inoculation of young banana plants obtained from in vitro culture. The experimental system host-pathogen studied, included the susceptible cultivar ‘Niyarma yik’ (AA to Black Sigatoka disease and the Pseudocercospora fijiensis isolate CCIBP-Pf1. The fluorescent staining technique with KOH-aniline blue was used for this study. Samples from infected leaves were taken and incubated in a KOH solution, rinsed in deionized water, mounted in the stain solution and examined with ultraviolet fluorescence. The use of this technique allowed to observe the epiphytic growing of the fungus over the plant tissue with high resolution and contrast, in an early stage of the infection. Key words: Black Sigatoka, fungi, Musa

  14. A turn-on near-infrared fluorescent chemosensor for selective detection of lead ions based on a fluorophore-gold nanoparticle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaozhen; Sun, Junyong; Gao, Feng

    2015-06-21

    A turn-on fluorescent chemosensor of Pb(2+) in the near-infrared (NIR) region, which is based on the Pb(2+)-tuned restored fluorescence of a weakly fluorescent fluorophore-gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) assembly, has been reported. In this fluorophore-AuNP assembly, NIR fluorescent dye brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) molecules act as fluorophores and are used for signal transduction of fluorescence, while AuNPs act as quenchers to quench the nearby fluorescent BCB molecules via electron transfer. In the presence of Pb(2+), fluorescent BCB molecules detached from AuNPs and restored their fluorescence due to the formation of a chelating complex between Pb(2+) and glutathione confined on AuNPs. Under the optimal conditions, the present BCB-AuNP assembly is capable of detecting Pb(2+) with a concentration ranging from 7.5 × 10(-10) to 1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1) (0.16-2.1 ng mL(-1)) and a detection limit of 0.51 nM (0.11 ng mL(-1)). The present BCB-AuNP assembly can be used in aqueous media for the determination of Pb(2+) unlike common organic fluorescent reagents, and also shows advantages of NIR fluorescence spectrophotometry such as less interference, lower detection limit, and higher sensitivity. Moreover, the present method was successfully applied for the detection of Pb(2+) in water samples with satisfactory results.

  15. Fluorescence Quenching Property of C-Phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis and its Binding Efficacy with Viable Cell Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paswan, Meenakshi B; Chudasama, Meghna M; Mitra, Madhusree; Bhayani, Khushbu; George, Basil; Chatterjee, Shruti; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-03-01

    Phycocyanin is a natural brilliant blue colored, fluorescent protein, which is commonly present in cyanobacteria. In this study, C-phycocyanin was extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis, which are multicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria of greater importance because of its various biological and pharmacological potential. It was analyzed for its binding affinity towards blood cells, algal cells, genomic DNA of microalgae, and bacteria at different temperature and incubation time. It showed good binding affinity with these components even at low concentration of 2.5 μM. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of C-phycocyanin as a green fluorescent dye substituting carcinogenic chemical dyes.

  16. A clock reaction based on molybdenum blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Ulrich; Negron, Arnaldo; Jensen, Klavs F

    2013-05-30

    Clock reactions are rare kinetic phenomena, so far limited mostly to systems with ionic oxoacids and oxoanions in water. We report a new clock reaction in cyclohexanol that forms molybdenum blue from a noncharged, yellow molybdenum complex as precursor, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Interestingly, the concomitant color change is reversible, enabling multiple clock cycles to be executed consecutively. The kinetics of the clock reaction were experimentally characterized, and by adding insights from quantum chemical calculations, a plausible reaction mechanism was postulated. Key elementary reaction steps comprise sigmatropic rearrangements with five-membered or bicyclo[3.1.0] transition states. Importantly, numerical kinetic modeling demonstrated the mechanism's ability to reproduce the experimental findings. It also revealed that clock behavior is intimately connected to the sudden exhaustion of hydrogen peroxide. Due to the stoichiometric coproduction of ketone, the reaction bears potential for application in alcohol oxidation catalysis.

  17. Blue Marble: Remote Characterization of Habitable Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Neville; Lewis, Brian; Chartres, James; Genova, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The study of the nature and distribution of habitable environments beyond the Solar System is a key area for Astrobiology research. At the present time, our Earth is the only habitable planet that can be characterized in the same way that we might characterize planets beyond the Solar System. Due to limitations in our current and near-future technology, it is likely that extra-solar planets will be observed as single-pixel objects. To understand this data, we must develop skills in analyzing and interpreting the radiation obtained from a single pixel. These skills must include the study of the time variation of the radiation, and the range of its photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric properties. In addition, to understand whether we are properly analyzing the single pixel data, we need to compare it with a ground truth of modest resolution images in key spectral bands. This paper discusses the concept for a mission called Blue Marble that would obtain data of the Earth using a combination of spectropolarimetry, spectrophotometry, and selected band imaging. To obtain imagery of the proper resolution, it is desirable to place the Blue Marble spacecraft no closer than the outer region of cis-lunar space. This paper explores a conceptual mission design that takes advantage of low-cost launchers, bus designs and mission elements to provide a cost effective observing platform located at one of the stable Earth-moon Lagrangian points (L4, L5). The mission design allows for the development and use of novel technologies, such as a spinning moon sensor for attitude control, and leverages lessons-learned from previous low-cost spacecraft such as Lunar Prospector to yield a low-risk mission concept.

  18. French contribution to develop Prussian blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse Bardot, Isabelle; Bardot, Sebastien; Menetrier, Florence; Leiterer, Alexandra; Pech, Annick

    2014-11-01

    Prussian blue is an antidote indicated for the treatment of internal cesium radioisotope contamination. The French armed forces develop and manufacture some antidotal drugs meeting regulatory, analytical and pharmaceutical requirements in order to submit marketing authorization documentation. Prior to an initial meeting with the French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety (ANSM) in 2011, the authors were following regulatory developments in free cyanide release, active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) synthesis, API specifications, ability of cesium/Prussian blue binding products and collection of pre-clinical data. Free cyanide release was assessed by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometry at 615 nm. The kinetics of cesium were evaluated in vitro by flame atomic absorption. Good laboratory practice (GLP) and mutagenic assays were examined in rat studies to assess 'no absorption'. A validated method makes it possible to assess the free cyanide in API according to the published tolerability in humans. The French synthesizer meets good manufacturing practice (GMP) to give a drug that is compliant with all specifications, ensuring its high quality. Two standard mutagenic assays showed mutagenic potential, leading to further tests to obtain more information on any induced chromosomal aberrations. Absorption could be an important factor in determining the risk posed by the drug. The French health service provides the country with several antidotal drugs reducing Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) risks. Using their GMP manufacturing facilities and pharmaceutical expertise, the French armed forces have contributed to developing drugs with marketing authorization, such as pentetate calcium trisodium (Ca-DTPA) for infusion, or under development with the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), such as Ca-DTPA by inhalation.

  19. Implantable CMOS imaging device with absorption filters for green fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunaga, Yoshinori; Haruta, Makito; Takehara, Hironari; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Green fluorescent materials such as Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) and fluorescein are often used for observing neural activities. Thus, it is important to observe the fluorescence in a freely moving state in order to understand neural activities corresponding to behaviors. In this work, we developed an implantable CMOS imaging device for in-vivo green fluorescence imaging with efficient excitation light rejection using a combination of absorption filters. An interference filter is usually used for a fluorescence microscope in order to achieve high fluorescence imaging sensitivity. However, in the case of the implantable device, interference filters are not suitable because their transmission spectra depend on incident angle. To solve this problem we used two kinds of absorption filters that do not have angle dependence. An absorption filter consisting of yellow dye (VARYFAST YELLOW 3150) was coated on the pixel array of an image sensor. The rejection ratio of ideal excitation light (490 nm) against green fluorescence (510 nm) was 99.66%. However, the blue LED as an excitation light source has a broad emission spectrum and its intensity at 510 nm is 2.2 x 10-2 times the emission peak intensity. By coating LEDs with the emission absorption filters, the intensity of the unwanted component of the excitation light was reduced to 1.4 x 10-4. Using the combination of absorption filters, we achieved excitation light transmittance of 10-5 onto the image sensor. It is expected that high-sensitivity green fluorescence imaging of neural activities in a freely moving mouse will be possible by using this technology.

  20. Blue light alters miR167 expression and microRNA-targeted auxin response factor genes in Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashkovskiy, Pavel P; Kartashov, Alexander V; Zlobin, Ilya E; Pogosyan, Sergei I; Kuznetsov, Vladimir V

    2016-07-01

    The effect of blue LED (450 nm) on the photomorphogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 plants and the transcript levels of several genes, including miRNAs, photoreceptors and auxin response factors (ARF) was investigated. It was observed that blue light accelerated the generative development, reduced the rosette leaf number, significantly reduced the leaf area, dry biomass and led to the disruption of conductive tissue formation. The blue LED differentially influenced the transcript levels of several phytochromes (PHY a, b, c, d, and e), cryptochromes (CRY 1 and 2) and phototropins (PHOT 1 and 2). At the same time, the blue LED significantly increased miR167 expression compared to a fluorescent lamp or white LEDs. This increase likely resulted in the enhanced transcription of the auxin response factor genes ARF4 and ARF8, which are regulated by this miRNA. These findings support the hypothesis that the effects of blue light on A. thaliana are mediated by auxin signalling pathway involving miRNA-dependent regulation of ARF gene expression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-destructive characterization of oriental porcelain glazes and blue underglaze pigments using μ-EDXRF, μ-Raman and VP-SEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutinho, M.L.; Muralha, V.S.F.; Mirao, J.; Veiga, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    The study of ancient materials with recognized cultural and economic value is a challenge to scientists and conservators, since it is usually necessary an approach through non-destructive techniques. Difficulties in establishing a correct analytical strategy are often significantly increased by the lack of knowledge on manufacture technologies and raw materials employed combined with the diversity of decay processes that may have acted during the lifetime of the cultural artefacts. A non-destructive characterization was performed on the glaze and underglaze pigments from a group of Chinese porcelain shards dated from the late Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) excavated at the Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha in Coimbra (Portugal). Chemical analysis was performed using micro-energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF). Mineralogical characterization was achieved by Raman microscopy (μ-Raman) and observation of small-surface crystallization dark spots with a metallic lustre in areas with high pigment concentration was done by variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). Cobalt aluminate was identified as the blue underglaze pigment and a comparison of blue and dark blue pigments was performed by the ratio of Co, Mn, and Fe oxides, indicating a compositional difference between the two blue tonalities. Manganese oxide compounds were also identified as colouring agents in dark blue areas and surface migration of manganese compounds was verified. (orig.)

  2. Non-destructive characterization of oriental porcelain glazes and blue underglaze pigments using μ-EDXRF, μ-Raman and VP-SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, M. L.; Muralha, V. S. F.; Mirão, J.; Veiga, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    The study of ancient materials with recognized cultural and economic value is a challenge to scientists and conservators, since it is usually necessary an approach through non-destructive techniques. Difficulties in establishing a correct analytical strategy are often significantly increased by the lack of knowledge on manufacture technologies and raw materials employed combined with the diversity of decay processes that may have acted during the lifetime of the cultural artefacts. A non-destructive characterization was performed on the glaze and underglaze pigments from a group of Chinese porcelain shards dated from the late Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) excavated at the Monastery of Santa Clara- a- Velha in Coimbra (Portugal). Chemical analysis was performed using micro-energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF). Mineralogical characterization was achieved by Raman microscopy (μ-Raman) and observation of small-surface crystallization dark spots with a metallic lustre in areas with high pigment concentration was done by variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). Cobalt aluminate was identified as the blue underglaze pigment and a comparison of blue and dark blue pigments was performed by the ratio of Co, Mn, and Fe oxides, indicating a compositional difference between the two blue tonalities. Manganese oxide compounds were also identified as colouring agents in dark blue areas and surface migration of manganese compounds was verified.

  3. Non-destructive characterization of oriental porcelain glazes and blue underglaze pigments using μ-EDXRF, μ-Raman and VP-SEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho, M.L. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, REQUIMTE-CQFB, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Caparica (Portugal); Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Departamento de Conservacao e Restauro, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Caparica (Portugal); Muralha, V.S.F. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Research Unit VICARTE, Vidro e Ceramica para as Artes, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Caparica (Portugal); Mirao, J. [Universidade de Evora, Laboratorio HERCULES, Evora (Portugal); Veiga, J.P. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, CENIMAT/I3N, Departamento de Ciencia dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Caparica (Portugal)

    2014-03-15

    The study of ancient materials with recognized cultural and economic value is a challenge to scientists and conservators, since it is usually necessary an approach through non-destructive techniques. Difficulties in establishing a correct analytical strategy are often significantly increased by the lack of knowledge on manufacture technologies and raw materials employed combined with the diversity of decay processes that may have acted during the lifetime of the cultural artefacts. A non-destructive characterization was performed on the glaze and underglaze pigments from a group of Chinese porcelain shards dated from the late Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) excavated at the Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha in Coimbra (Portugal). Chemical analysis was performed using micro-energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF). Mineralogical characterization was achieved by Raman microscopy (μ-Raman) and observation of small-surface crystallization dark spots with a metallic lustre in areas with high pigment concentration was done by variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). Cobalt aluminate was identified as the blue underglaze pigment and a comparison of blue and dark blue pigments was performed by the ratio of Co, Mn, and Fe oxides, indicating a compositional difference between the two blue tonalities. Manganese oxide compounds were also identified as colouring agents in dark blue areas and surface migration of manganese compounds was verified. (orig.)

  4. Yellow taxis have fewer accidents than blue taxis because yellow is more visible than blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Teck-Hua; Chong, Juin Kuan; Xia, Xiaoyu

    2017-03-21

    Is there a link between the color of a taxi and how many accidents it has? An analysis of 36 mo of detailed taxi, driver, and accident data (comprising millions of data points) from the largest taxi company in Singapore suggests that there is an explicit link. Yellow taxis had 6.1 fewer accidents per 1,000 taxis per month than blue taxis, a 9% reduction in accident probability. We rule out driver difference as an explanatory variable and empirically show that because yellow taxis are more noticeable than blue taxis-especially when in front of another vehicle, and in street lighting-other drivers can better avoid hitting them, directly reducing the accident rate. This finding can play a significant role when choosing colors for public transportation and may save lives as well as millions of dollars.

  5. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan

    2017-05-12

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  6. Fluorescence and phosphorescence of rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarev, Stanislav L., E-mail: bondarev@imaph.bas-net.by [Minsk State Higher Radioengineering College, 220005 Minsk (Belarus); Knyukshto, Valeri N. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-10-15

    Rutin is one of the most promising flavonoid from a pharmacological and biochemical point of view. Here we have explored its spectroscopic and photophysical properties at room temperature and 77 K using steady-state absorption-luminescence methods and pulse spectroscopy equipment. By excitation into the absorption band 1 of rutin in methanol at room temperature the normal Stokes' shifted fluorescence with a maximum at 415 nm and quantum yield of 2×10{sup −4} was revealed. However, by excitation into the bands 2 and 3 any emission wasn’t observed. At 77 K in ethanol glass we have observed fluorescence at 410 nm and phosphorescence at 540 nm for the first time. As a result the adequate energetic scheme including the lowest electronic excited singlet at 26000 cm{sup −1} and triplet at 19600 cm{sup −1} states was proposed. -- Highlights: • Rutin fluorescence and phosphorescence at 77 K were revealed for the first time. • Room temperature fluorescence is determined by maximum at 415 nm and yield of 2×10{sup −4}. • Violation of Vavilov–Kasha rule by excitation into the absorption bands 2 and 3. • Fluorescence and phosphorescence in rutin are caused by the allowed π, π{sup (⁎)} transitions.

  7. No effect of blue on winning contests in judo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Peter D.; Preenen, Paul T. Y.

    2008-01-01

    A study by Rowe et al. reported a winning bias for judo athletes wearing a blue outfit relative to those wearing a white one during the 2004 Olympics. It was suggested that blue is associated with a higher likelihood of winning through differential effects of colour on opponent visibility and/or an

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Blue Green Algae from Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    meldemellawy

    2014-02-20

    Feb 20, 2014 ... aminotransferase (AMT) domains of the mycE and ndaF genes (Jungblut et al., 2006) allowing detection of microcystin and nodularin-producing cyanobacteria. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Isolation and cultivation of blue green algae. Blue green algae had been isolated from soil of Rice field in river.

  9. Designing green and blue infrastructure to support healthy urban living

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gehrels, H.; Meulen, van der Suzanne; Schasfoort, F.; Bosch, Peter; Brolsma, R.; Dinther, van D.; Geerling, G.J.; Goossens, M.; Jacobs, C.M.J.; jong, de Merijn; Kok, Sien; Massop, H.T.L.

    2016-01-01

    This report focuses on developing concepts and design principles for blue and green infrastructure that not only support climate resilience but also contribute to a healthy and liveable urban environment. We will first assess the effectiveness of blue and green infrastructure on the basis of

  10. Effects of fire and browsing on regeneration of blue oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Bartolome; Mitchel P. McClaran; Barbara H. Allen-Diaz; Jim Dunne; Lawrence D. Ford; Richard B. Standiford; Neil K. McDougald; Larry C. Forero

    2002-01-01

    Blue oaks (Quercus douglasii) are not regenerating well over much of California. The roles of fire and browsing in regeneration are probably significant, but poorly understood. We burned two foothill blue oak woodland sites which contained significant numbers of small trees between 40 and 70 cm tall, then compared height growth over 14 years among 48...

  11. QCD on the BlueGene/L Supercomputer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, G.; Chen, D.; Gara, A.; Sexton, J.; Vranas, P.

    2005-03-01

    In June 2004 QCD was simulated for the first time at sustained speed exceeding 1 TeraFlops in the BlueGene/L supercomputer at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Lab. The implementation and performance of QCD in the BlueGene/L is presented.

  12. QCD on the BlueGene/L Supercomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanot, G.; Chen, D.; Gara, A.; Sexton, J.; Vranas, P.

    2005-01-01

    In June 2004 QCD was simulated for the first time at sustained speed exceeding 1 TeraFlops in the BlueGene/L supercomputer at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Lab. The implementation and performance of QCD in the BlueGene/L is presented

  13. Trypan Blue Dye In Extra-Capsular Cataract Surgery: Initial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The two groups had incidence of striate keratitis, anterior capsule remnants, unplanned anterior chamber (A/C) lens implants and average increase in surgery time compared. The trypan blue group had better results than the non-trypan group. The trypan blue group had an incidence of 40.7% striate keratitis as against ...

  14. POSTPARTUM BLUES PADA PERSALINAN DIBAWAH USIA DUA PULUH TAHUN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurniasari Pratiwi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum blues or baby blues is a feeling of sadness experienced by mothers after childbirth related to the baby. Postpartum blues is like an iceberg that is difficult to detect because there are still many people who do not understand about the event. Nevertheless, postpartum blues not being handled properly is one of the factors precipitating the occurrence of postpartum depression,  can be fatal for mother and baby. Postpartum blues more common in women who marry in their early age. Indonesia has high percentage of early age marriage in the world (ranked 37 and is the second highest in ASEAN after Cambodia. Based on data, there was increasing number of woman cases delivering labor and having children in the village Panggungharjo Sewon Bantul from year 2013 to 2015. Research objectives are to determine the postpartum blues in labor under the age of 20 years. This study is a descriptive study with retrospective design. The study population consists of women who gave birth  under the age of 20 years in the village of Panggungharjo, Sewon, Bantul using total sampling (33 subjects. The result showed that 45.5% of respondents who experienced postpartum blues and 54.5% did not experience postpartum blues.

  15. nonlinear kinetics and mechanism of nile blue reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. S.B. Jonnalagadda

    A 11-step mechanism, consistent with the overall reaction dynamics and supported by simulations, is ... been designed based on the chemistry of BZ reactions, the role of bromide ion under various concentration ... dynamics of nile blue - acidic bromate reaction arises from the extremely slow depletion rate of nile blue in the ...

  16. Clinical and histological effects of blue light on normal skin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinpenning, M.M.; Smits, T.; Frunt, M.H.A.; Erp, P.E.J. van; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Gerritsen, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Phototherapy with visible light is gaining interest in dermatological practice. Theoretically, blue light could induce biological effects comparable to ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation. OBJECTIVES: To study the effects of blue light on normal skin in terms of photodamage, skin ageing and

  17. Blue Genes : Sharing and Conserving the World's Aquatic Biodiversity

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Blue Genes : Sharing and Conserving the World's Aquatic Biodiversity. Couverture du livre Blue Genes: Sharing and Conserving the World's Aquatic Biodiversity. Auteur(s) : David Greer et Brian Harvey. Maison(s) d'édition : Earthscan, CRDI. 31 août 2004. ISBN : 1844071065. 246 pages. e-ISBN : 1552501574.

  18. Soluble or insoluble prussian blue for radiocesium and thallium poisoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dennis F; Callen, Erin D

    2004-09-01

    To review the available English-language literature concerning the efficacy of soluble and insoluble Prussian blue used as a therapeutic agent in radiocesium and thallium poisoning. A thorough search of MEDLINE, Toxline, and EMBASE databases (1960s-August 2003) was performed. Search terms included Prussian blue, thallium, and radiocesium poisoning. Bibliographies of relevant papers were reviewed for additional citations. study selection AND DATA EXTRACTION: Reports and studies of human trials and cases, along with animal and relevant in vitro data, were sought. Data were categorized as insoluble and soluble Prussian blue and by thallium and radiocesium poisoning. The majority of evidence describing the efficacy of Prussian blue for radiocesium poisoning is based on the use of the insoluble form. In contrast, the majority of data supporting the efficacy of Prussian blue in thallium poisoning involves the use of the soluble form. Insoluble Prussian blue has recently been approved in the US for treatment of both thallium and radiocesium poisoning. While there is sufficient evidence that the insoluble form of Prussian blue is effective in radiocesium poisoning, there is a paucity of analogous data supporting its use in thallium poisoning. Whether the physicochemical differences between soluble and insoluble Prussian blue have any effect on outcomes in human poisoning is not known.

  19. Fluctuating and Directional Asymmetry of the Blue Mussel (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lajus, D.; Katolikova, M.; Strelkov, P.; Hummel, H.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we examined morphological variation at different levels to study performance and population structuring of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Our objectives were: (i) to develop an integrated technique for analyzing morphological variation in blue mussels and, based on this technique; (ii)

  20. Blue whales Balaenoptera musculus off Angola: recent sightings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The population of blue whales Balaenoptera musculus inhabiting the South-East Atlantic (Gabon to South Africa) was heavily depleted by commercial whaling. We report four photographically-verified sightings, and one probable sighting, of blue whales in deep waters (>1 000 m) off central Angola (11° S to 12°30′S) ...