WorldWideScience

Sample records for blue compact galaxies

  1. Kinematics of luminous blue compact galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östlin, Göran; Amram, Philippe; Boulesteix, Jaques; Bergvall, Nils; Masegosa, Josefa; Márquez, Isabel

    We present results from a Fabry-Perot study of the Hα velocity fields and morphologies of a sample of luminous blue compact galaxies. We estimate masses from photometry and kinematics and show that many of these BCGs are not rotationally supported. Mergers or strong interactions appear to be the triggering mechanism of the extreme starbursts seen in these galaxies.

  2. What are the Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, D J; Guzmán, R; Gallego, J Perez; Castander, F J; Gruel, N

    2007-01-01

    Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) are common at z~1, contributing significantly to the total star formation rate density. By z~0, they are a factor of ten rarer. While we know that LCBGs evolve rapidly, we do not know what drives their evolution nor into what types of galaxies they evolve. We present the results of a single-dish HI survey of local LCBGs undertaken to address these questions. Our results indicate that LCBGs have M(HI) and M(DYN) consistent with low-mass spirals, but typically exhaust their gas reservoirs in less than 2 Gyr. Overall, the properties of LCBGs are consistent with them evolving into high-mass dwarf elliptical or dwarf irregular galaxies or low-mass, late-type spiral galaxies.

  3. Chemical Evolution of Blue Compact Galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Shi; Xu Kong; Fu-Zhen Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Based on a sample of 72 Blue Compact Galaxies (BCGs) observed with the 2.16 m telescope of the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) and about 4000 strong emission line galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey,we analyzed their chemical evolution history using the revised chemical evolution model of Larsen et al. Our sample covers a much larger metallicity range (7.2<12+log(O/H) <9.0). We found that, in order to reproduce the observed abundance pattern and gas fraction over the whole metallicity range, a relatively continuous star formation history is needed for high metallicity galaxies, while assuming a series of instantaneous bursts with long quiescent periods (some Gyrs) for low metallicity galaxies. Model calculations also show that only the closed-box model is capable of reproducing the observational data over the whole metallicity range. Models that consider the ordinary winds and/or inflow can only fit the observations in the low metallicity range, and a model with enriched wind cannot fit the data in the whole metallicity range. This implies that the current adopted simple wind and inflow models are not applicable to massive galaxies, where the underlying physics of galactic winds or inflow could be more complicated.

  4. Radio Continuum and HI study of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Ramya, S.; Kantharia, N. G.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2010-01-01

    The multifrequency radio continuum and 21cm HI observations of five blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies, Mrk 104, Mrk 108, Mrk 1039, Mrk 1069 and I Zw 97 using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) are presented here. Radio continuum emission at 610 MHz and 325 MHz is detected from all the observed galaxies whereas only a few are detected at 240 MHz. In our sample, three galaxies are members of groups and two galaxies (Mrk 1069 and I Zw 97) are isolated galaxies. The radio emission from Mr...

  5. Radio Continuum and HI study of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ramya, S; Prabhu, T P

    2010-01-01

    The multifrequency radio continuum and 21cm HI observations of five blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies, Mrk 104, Mrk 108, Mrk 1039, Mrk 1069 and I Zw 97 using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) are presented here. Radio continuum emission at 610 MHz and 325 MHz is detected from all the observed galaxies whereas only a few are detected at 240 MHz. In our sample, three galaxies are members of groups and two galaxies (Mrk 1069 and I Zw 97) are isolated galaxies. The radio emission from Mrk 104 and Mrk 108 is seen to encompass the entire optical galaxy whereas the radio emission from Mrk 1039, Mrk 1069, I Zw 97 is confined to massive HII regions. This, we suggest, indicates that the star formation in the latter group of galaxies has recently been triggered and that the environment in which the galaxy is evolving plays a role. Star formation rates (SFR) calculated from 610 MHz emission is in the range 0.01-0.1 M_sun/yr; this is similar to the SFR obtained for individual star forming regions in BCDs. The int...

  6. The environment of nearby Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R; van Eymeren, Janine; Esteban, Cesar; Popping, Attila; Hibbard, John

    2009-01-01

    We are obtaining deep multiwavelength data of a sample of nearby blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDGs) combining broad-band optical/NIR and H$\\alpha$ photometry, optical spectroscopy and 21-cm radio observations. Here we present HI results obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array for some BCDGs, all showing evident interaction features in their neutral gas component despite the environment in which they reside. Our analysis strongly suggests that interactions with or between low-luminosity dwarf galaxies or HI clouds are the main trigger mechanism of the star-forming bursts in BCDGs; however these dwarf objects are only detected when deep optical images and complementary HI observations are performed. Are therefore BCDGs real isolated systems?

  7. The Evolution of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies: Disks or Spheroids?

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, D J; Garland, C A; Guzman, R; Castander, F J; Perez-Gallego, J

    2011-01-01

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) are a diverse class of galaxies characterized by high luminosity, blue color, and high surface brightness that sit at the critical juncture of galaxies evolving from the blue to the red sequence. As part of our multi-wavelength survey of local LCBGs, we have been studying the HI content of these galaxies using both single-dish telescopes and interferometers. Our goals are to determine if single-dish HI observations represent a true measure of the dynamical mass of LCBGs and to look for signatures of recent interactions that may be triggering star formation in LCBGs. Our data show that while some LCBGs are undergoing interactions, many appear isolated. While all LCBGs contain HI and show signatures of rotation, the population does not lie on the Tully-Fisher relation nor can it evolve onto it. Furthermore, the HI maps of many LCBGs show signatures of dynamically hot components, suggesting that we are seeing the formation of a thick disk or spheroid in at least some LCBGs....

  8. The Evolution of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies: Disks or Spheroids?

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, D J; Rabidoux, K; Wolfe, S; Guzman, R; Perez-Gallego, J; Castander, F J

    2009-01-01

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) are a diverse class of galaxies characterized by high luminosities, blue colors, and high surface brightnesses. Residing at the high luminosity, high mass end of the blue sequence, LCBGs sit at the critical juncture of galaxies that are evolving from the blue to the red sequence. Yet we do not understand what drives the evolution of LCBGs, nor how they will evolve. Based on single-dish HI observations, we know that they have a diverse range of properties. LCBGs are HI-rich with M(HI)=10^{9-10.5} M(sun), have moderate M(dyn)=10^{10-12} M(sun), and 80% have gas depletion timescales less than 3 Gyr. These properties are consistent with LCBGs evolving into low-mass spirals or high mass dwarf ellipticals or dwarf irregulars. However, LCBGs do not follow the Tully-Fisher relation, nor can most evolve onto it, implying that many LCBGs are not smoothly rotating, virialized systems. GMRT and VLA HI maps confirm this conclusion revealing signatures of recent interactions and dynam...

  9. Search for Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies During Quiescence

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, J Sanchez; Amorin, R; Aguerri, J A; Sanchez-Janssen, R; Tenorio-Tagle, G

    2008-01-01

    Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies are metal poor systems going through a major starburst that cannot last for long. We have identified galaxies which may be BCDs during quiescence (QBCD), i.e., before the characteristic starburst sets in or when it has faded away. These QBCD galaxies are assumed to be like the BCD host galaxies. The SDSS/DR6 database provides ~21500 QBCD candidates. We also select from SDSS/DR6 a complete sample of BCD galaxies to serve as reference. The properties of these two galaxy sets have been computed and compared. The QBCD candidates are thirty times more abundant than the BCDs, with their luminosity functions being very similar except for the scaling factor, and the expected luminosity dimming associated with the end of the starburst. QBCDs are redder than BCDs, and they have larger HII region based oxygen abundance. QBCDs also have lower surface brightness. The BCD candidates turn out to be the QBCD candidates with the largest specific star formation rate (actually, with the largest...

  10. The Neutral ISM in Nearby Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, C A; Williams, J P; Guzmán, R; Castander, F J

    2003-01-01

    We observed 20 nearby Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) in HI and CO(J=2-1) with the GBT and JCMT. These ~L^star galaxies are blue, high surface brightness, starbursting, high metallicity galaxies with an underlying older stellar population. They are common at z~1, but rare in the local Universe. It has been proposed that intermediate redshift LCBGs may be the progenitors of local dwarf ellipticals or low luminosity spirals, or that they may be more massive disks forming from the center outward to become L^star galaxies. To discriminate among various possible evolutionary scenarios, we have measured the dynamical masses and gas depletion time scales of this sample of nearby LCBGs. We find that local LCBGs span a wide range of dynamical masses, from 4 x 10^9 to 1 x 10^11 M_solar (measured within R_25). Molecular gas in local LCBGs is depleted quite quickly, in 30 to 200 million years. The molecular plus atomic gas is depleted in 30 million to 10 billion years; however, ~80% of the local LCBGs deplete thei...

  11. What will blue compact dwarf galaxies evolve into?

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Hagen T; Janz, Joachim; Papaderos, Polychronis

    2013-01-01

    We present and analyse the photometric properties of a nearly complete sample of blue compact dwarf (BCD) and irregular galaxies in the Virgo cluster from multi-band SDSS images. Our study intends to shed light on the ongoing debate of whether a structural evolution from present-day star-forming dwarf galaxies in a cluster environment into ordinary early-type dwarf galaxies is possible based on the structural properties. For this purpose, we decompose the surface brightness profiles of the BCDs into the luminosity contribution of the starburst component and that of their underlying low surface brightness (LSB) host. The latter dominates the stellar mass of the BCD. We find that the LSB-components of the Virgo BCDs are structurally compatible with the more compact half of the Virgo early-type dwarfs, except for a few extreme BCDs. Thus, after termination of starburst activity, the BCDs will presumably fade into galaxies that are structurally similar to ordinary early-type dwarfs. In contrast, the irregulars ar...

  12. The Mid-Infrared Properties of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yanling Wu; Houck, J R; Bernasrd-Salas, J; Lebouteiller, V

    2008-01-01

    The unprecedented sensitivity of the Spitzer Space Telescope has enabled us for the first time to detect a large sample of Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies (BCDs), which are intrinsically faint in the infrared. In the present paper we present a summary of our findings which providing essential information on the presence/absence of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon features in metal-poor environments. In addition, using Spitzer/IRS high-resolution spectroscopy, we study the elemental abundances of neon and sulfur in BCDs and compare with the results from optical studies. Finally, we present an analysis of the mid- and far-infrared to radio correlation in low luminosity low metallicity galaxies.

  13. The Fate of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies: An Environmental Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, S M; Glenn, A; Hössel, J G

    2004-01-01

    Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) are a heterogeneous class which dominate an intermediate phase of galaxy evolution. These sources account for the majority of the star formation between 0.3

  14. IN-SPIRALING CLUMPS IN BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Zhang Hongxin; Hunter, Deidre A., E-mail: bge@watson.ibm.com [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    Giant star formation clumps in dwarf irregular galaxies can have masses exceeding a few percent of the galaxy mass enclosed inside their orbital radii. They can produce sufficient torques on dark matter halo particles, halo stars, and the surrounding disk to lose their angular momentum and spiral into the central region in 1 Gyr. Pairs of giant clumps with similarly large relative masses can interact and exchange angular momentum to the same degree. The result of this angular momentum loss is a growing central concentration of old stars, gas, and star formation that can produce a long-lived starburst in the inner region, identified with the blue compact dwarf (BCD) phase. This central concentration is proposed to be analogous to the bulge in a young spiral galaxy. Observations of star complexes in five local BCDs confirm the relatively large clump masses that are expected for this process. The observed clumps also seem to contain old field stars, even after background light subtraction, in which case the clumps may be long-lived. The two examples with clumps closest to the center have the largest relative clump masses and the greatest contributions from old stars. An additional indication that the dense central regions of BCDs are like bulges is the high ratio of the inner disk scale height to the scale length, which is comparable to 1 for four of the galaxies.

  15. Possible Local Spiral Counterparts to Compact Blue Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, E J; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Zee, Liese van

    2001-01-01

    We identify nearby disk galaxies with optical structural parameters similar to those of intermediate-redshift compact blue galaxies. By comparing HI and optical emission-line widths, we show that the optical widths substantially underestimate the true kinematic widths of the local galaxies. By analogy, optical emission-line widths may underrepresent the masses of intermediate-z compact objects. For the nearby galaxies, the compact blue morphology is the result of tidally-triggered central star formation: we argue that interactions and minor mergers may cause apparently compact morphology at higher redshift.

  16. FUSE observations of the Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy Mrk 59

    CERN Document Server

    Thuan, T X; Izotov, Yu I

    2001-01-01

    New FUSE far-UV spectroscopy of the nearby metal-deficient (Zsun/8) cometary Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxy Markarian (Mrk) 59 is discussed. The data are used to investigate element abundances in its interstellar medium. The H I absorption lines are characterized by narrow cores which are interstellar in origin and by broad wings which are stellar in origin. The mean interstellar H I column density is ~ 7x10E20 cm-2 in Mrk 59. No H2 lines are seen and N(H2) is < 10E15 cm-2 at the 10 sigma level. The lack of diffuse H2 is due to the combined effect of a strong UV radiation field which destroys the H2 molecules and a low metallicity which leads to a scarcity of dust grains necessary for H2 formation. P-Cygni profiles of the S VI 933.4, 944.5 A and O VI 1031.9, 1037.6 A lines are seen, indicating the presence of very hot O stars and a stellar wind terminal velocity of ~ 1000 km/s. By fitting the line profiles with multiple components having each a velocity dispersion b = 7 km/s and spanning a radial velocity...

  17. Deep multiband surface photometry on star forming galaxies: I. A sample of 24 blue compact galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Micheva, Genoveva; Bergvall, Nils; Zackrisson, Erik; Masegosa, Josefa; Marquez, Isabel; Marquart, Thomas; Durret, Florence

    2012-01-01

    [Abridged] We present deep optical and near-infrared UBVRIHKs imaging data for 24 blue compact galaxies (BCGs). The sample contains luminous dwarf and intermediate-mass BCGs which are predominantly metal-poor, although a few have near-solar metallicities. We have analyzed isophotal and elliptical integration surface brightness and color profiles, extremely deep (mu_B<29 mag arcsec^{-2}) contour maps and RGB images for each galaxy in the sample. The colors are compared to different spectral evolutionary models. We detect extremely extended low surface brightness (LSB) components dominant beyond the Holmberg radius as well as optical bridges between companion galaxies at the mu_V~28th mag arcsec^{-2} isophotal level. The central surface brightness mu_0 and scale length h_r are derived from two radial ranges typically assumed to be dominated by the underlying host galaxy. We find that mu_0 and h_r of the BCGs host deviate from those of dwarf ellipticals (dE) and dwarf irregulars (dI) solely due to a strong bu...

  18. The WHIQII Survey: Metallicities and Spectroscopic Properties of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tollerud, Erik J; van Zee, Liese; Cooke, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    As part of the WIYN High Image Quality Indiana Irvine (WHIQII) survey, we present 123 spectra of emission-line galaxies, selected on intermediate redshift (.4galaxies with blue colors that appear physically compact. The sample includes 15 true Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) and an additional 27 slightly less extreme emission-line systems. These galaxies represent a highly evolving class that may play an important role in the decline of star formation since z~1, but their exact nature and evolutionary pathways remain a mystery. Here, we use emission lines to determine metallicities and ionization parameters, constraining their intrinsic properties and state of star formation. Some LCBG metallicities are consistent with a "bursting dwarf" scenario, while a substantial fraction of others are not, further confirming that LCBGs are a highly heterogeneous population but are broadly consistent with the intermediate redshift field. In agreement with previous studies, we observe overall evolution ...

  19. In-spiraling Clumps in Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G; Hunter, Deidre

    2012-01-01

    Giant star-formation clumps in dwarf irregular galaxies can have masses exceeding a few percent of the galaxy mass enclosed inside their orbital radii. They can produce sufficient torques on dark matter halo particles, halo stars, and the surrounding disk to lose their angular momentum and spiral into the central region in 1 Gyr. Pairs of giant clumps with similarly large relative masses can interact and exchange angular momentum to the same degree. The result of this angular momentum loss is a growing central concentration of old stars, gas, and star formation that can produce a long-lived starburst in the inner region, identified with the BCD phase. This central concentration is proposed to be analogous to the bulge in a young spiral galaxy. Observations of star complexes in five local BCDs confirm the relatively large clump masses that are expected for this process. The observed clumps also seem to contain old field stars, even after background light subtraction, in which case the clumps may be long-lived....

  20. Chemical Evolution of Irregular and Blue Compact Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    L. Carigi; Colin, P.; Peimbert, M.; Sarmiento, A

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the chemical evolution of metal poor galaxies and conclude that their oxygen deficiency is not due to: the production of black holes by massive stars or a varying slope of the Initial Mass Function, IMF, at the high-mass end. A varying IMF at the low-mass end alone or in combination with: (a) an outflow of oxygen-rich material, (b) an outflow of well-mixed material, and (c) the presence of dark matter that does not participate in the chemical evolution process, is needed to explain...

  1. The red extended structure of IC10, the nearest blue compact galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbrandt, Stephanie A N; Irwin, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The Local Group starburst galaxy IC10 is the closest example of a blue compact galaxy. Here, we use optical gi imaging from CFHT/MegaCam and near infra-red JHK imaging from UKIRT/WFCAM to conduct a comprehensive survey of the structure of IC10. We examine the spatial distribution of its resolved young, intermediate and old stellar populations to large radius and low effective surface brightness levels. Akin to other dwarfs with multiple populations of different ages, stellar populations of decreasing average age are increasingly concentrated in this galaxy. We find that the young, star-bursting population, and the AGB population, are both offset from the geometric center of the older RGB population by a few hundred parsecs, implying that the younger star formation occurred significantly away from the center of the galaxy. The RGB population traces an extended structure that is typical of blue compact galaxies, with an effective radius of ~5.75 arcmins (~1.25 kpc). These measurements show that IC10 is much mor...

  2. Kinematic Constraints on Evolutionary Scenarios for Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies I. Neutral Gas Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Zee, L; Skillman, E D; Zee, Liese van; Salzer, John J.; Skillman, Evan D.

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of high spatial resolution HI synthesis observations of six blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies. Optically, the selected galaxies have smooth, symmetric isophotes, and thus are the most likely of the BCD class to fade into an object morphologically similar to a dwarf elliptical when the current starburst ends. The neutral gas in all six galaxies appears to be rotationally supported, however, indicating that true morphological transformation from a BCD to a dE will require significant loss of angular momentum. Based on the observed neutral gas dynamics of these and other BCDs, it is unlikely that present-day BCDs will evolve directly into dwarf ellipticals after a starburst phase. We discuss alternative evolutionary scenarios for BCDs and place them within the larger context of galaxy formation and evolution models.

  3. The Nature of Nearby Counterparts to Intermediate Redshift Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies II. CO Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, C A; Pisano, D J; Guzmán, R; Castander, F J; Brinkmann, J

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of a single-dish beam-matched survey of the three lowest rotational transitions of CO in a sample of 20 local (D < 70 Mpc) Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs). These ~L*, blue, high surface brightness, starbursting galaxies were selected with the same criteria used to define LCBGs at higher redshifts. Our detection rate was 70%, with those galaxies having Lblue<7e9 Lsun no detected. We find the H2 masses of local LCBGs range from 6.6e6 to 2.7e9 Msun, assuming a Galactic CO-to-H2 conversion factor. Combining these results with our earlier HI survey of the same sample, we find that the ratio of molecular to atomic gas mass is low, typically 5-10%. Using a Large Velocity Gradient model, we find that the average gas conditions of the entire ISM in local LCBGs are similar to those found in the centers of star forming regions in our Galaxy, and nuclear regions of other galaxies. Star formation rates, determined from IRAS fluxes, are a few solar masses per year, much higher per unit d...

  4. The Host in Blue Compact Galaxies: Structural Properties and Scaling Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Amorín, Ricardo; Muñoz-Tuñón, C; Cairós, L M

    2009-01-01

    We have characterized the underlying stellar host in a sample of 28 blue compact galaxies (BCGs), by fitting their 2D light distributions. Their structural parameters were related with galaxy properties such as colours and gas content. These properties were also compared with those of other galaxy types. All the BCG hosts but one show low Sersic indexes (0.5 =1.11$\\pm$0.74 kpc, and mean surface brightness = 22.59$\\pm$0.68 mag arcsec$^{-2}$. Host effective radii scale linearly with their luminosity, while n and $\\mu_{\\rm e}$ do not. In addition, host colours and structural parameters are not linearly correlated. Overall,the flux enhancement caused by the starburst is about 0.8 mag while their B-R colours decrease by about 0.2 mag. Galaxies with more luminous and extended hosts show larger and luminous starburst components. BCG hosts show B-R=0.95$\\pm$0.26 in median. Overall, BCG hosts are more compact (by a factor ~2) and have higher central surface brightnesses (by about ~2 mag) than dIs and most dEs. BCG ho...

  5. FORMATION OF ULTRA-COMPACT BLUE DWARF GALAXIES AND THEIR EVOLUTION INTO NUCLEATED DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, The University of Western Australia 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley Western Australia, 6009 (Australia)

    2015-10-10

    We propose that there is an evolutionary link between ultra-compact blue dwarf galaxies (UCBDs) with active star formation and nucleated dwarfs based on the results of numerical simulations of dwarf–dwarf merging. We consider the observational fact that low-mass dwarfs can be very gas-rich, and thereby investigate the dynamical and chemical evolution of very gas-rich, dissipative dwarf–dwarf mergers. We find that the remnants of dwarf–dwarf mergers can be dominated by new stellar populations formed from the triggered starbursts and consequently can have blue colors and higher metallicities (Z ∼ [0.2–1]Z{sub ⊙}). We also find that the remnants of these mergers can have rather high mass densities (10{sup 4} M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −3}) within the central 10 pc and small half-light radii (40−100 pc). The radial stellar structures of some merger remnants are similar to those of nucleated dwarfs. Star formation can continue in nuclear gas disks (R < 100 pc) surrounding stellar galactic nuclei (SGNs) so that the SGNs can finally have multiple stellar populations with different ages and metallicities. These very compact blue remnants can be identified as UCBDs soon after merging and as nucleated dwarfs after the young stars fade. We discuss these results in the context of the origins of metal-rich ultra-compact dwarfs and SGNs.

  6. Luminosity-Metallicity Relations for Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies in the Optical and Near-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yinghe; Gu, Qiusheng

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present systematic studies on the B-, R- and $K_s$-band luminosity-metallicity (L-Z) relations for a set of metal poor, blue compact dwarf galaxies. Metallicity is derived by using both the empirical N2 and the direct $T_e$ methods. Our work reconciles contradictory results obtained by different authors and shows that the L-Z relationship does also hold for blue compact dwarf galaxies. The empirical N2-based slope of the L-Z relation, for each photometric band, is consistent with the $T_e$-based one. We confirm that the slope of the L-Z relation is shallower in the near-infrared than that in the optical. Our investigations on the correlations between the $L_B$-Z relation residuals and different galactic parameters show that the star formation activities could be a cause of the large scatter in the optical L-Z relationships, whereas the internal-absorption might be another possible contributing factor.

  7. The tidally disturbed luminous compact blue galaxy Mkn 1087 and its surroundings

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Sanchez, A R; Rodríguez, M; Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R.; Esteban, Cesar; Rodriguez, Monica

    2004-01-01

    We present new broad-band optical and near-infrared CCD imaging together with deep optical intermediate-resolution spectroscopy of Mkn 1087 and its surrounding objects. We analyze the morphology and colors of the stellar populations of the brightest objects, some of them star-formation areas, as well as the kinematics, physical conditions and chemical composition of the ionized gas associated with them. Mkn 1087 does not host an Active Galactic Nucleus, but it could be a Luminous Compact Blue Galaxy. Although it was classified as a suspected Wolf-Rayet galaxy, we do not detect the spectral features of these sort of massive stars. Mkn 1087 shows morphological and kinematical features that can be explained assuming that it is in interaction with two nearby galaxies: the bright KPG 103a and a dwarf ($M_B\\sim-18$) star-forming companion. We argue that this dwarf companion is not a tidal object but an external galaxy because of its low metallicity [12+log(O/H) = 8.24] with respect to the one derived for Mkn 1087 [...

  8. The HI content of extremely metal-deficient blue compact dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Thuan, T X; Hibbard, J E; Izotov, Y I; Hunt, L K

    2016-01-01

    We have obtained new HI observations with the 100m Green Bank Telescope (GBT) for a sample of 29 extremely metal-deficient star-forming Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectral data base to be extremely metal-deficient (12+logO/H<7.6). Neutral hydrogen was detected in 28 galaxies, a 97% detection rate. Combining the HI data with SDSS optical spectra for the BCD sample and adding complementary galaxy samples from the literature to extend the metallicity and mass ranges, we have studied how the HI content of a galaxy varies with various global galaxian properties. There is a clear trend of increasing gas mass fraction with decreasing metallicity, mass and luminosity. We obtain the relation M(HI)/L(g)~L(g)^{-0.3}, in agreement with previous studies based on samples with a smaller luminosity range. The median gas mass fraction f(gas) for the GBT sample is equal to 0.94 while the mean gas mass fraction is 0.90+/-0.15, with a lower limit of ~0.65. The HI depletion ti...

  9. 3D Spectroscopy of Local Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies: Kinematics of NGC 7673

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Gallego, J; Castillo-Morales, A; Castander, F J; Gallego, J; Garland, C A; Gruel, N; Pisano, D J; Sánchez, S F; Zamorano, J

    2009-01-01

    The kinematic properties of the ionized gas of local Luminous Compact Blue Galaxy (LCBG) NGC 7673 are presented using three dimensional data taken with the PPAK integral field unit at the 3.5-m telescope in the Centro Astron\\'omico Hispano Alem\\'an. Our data reveal an asymmetric rotating velocity field with a peak to peak difference of 60 km s$^{-1}$. The kinematic centre is found to be at the position of a central velocity width maximum ($\\sigma=54\\pm1$ km s$^{-1}$), which is consistent with the position of the luminosity-weighted centroid of the entire galaxy. The position angle of the minor rotation axis is 168$^{\\circ}$ as measured from the orientation of the velocity field contours. At least two decoupled kinematic components are found. The first one is compact and coincides with the position of the second most active star formation region (clump B). The second one is extended and does not have a clear optical counterpart. No evidence of active galactic nuclei activity or supernovae galactic winds poweri...

  10. Tracing the star formation history of three Blue Compact galaxies through the analysis of their star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Adamo, Angela; Zackrisson, Erik; Hayes, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a study of the compact star cluster populations in three local luminous blue compact galaxies: ESO 185-IG 013, ESO 350-IG 038 (a.k.a. Haro 11), and MRK 930. These systems show peculiar morphologies and the presence of hundreds of SCs that have been produced by the past, recent, and/or current starburst phases. We use a complete set of HST images ranging from the UV to IR for each galaxy. Deep images in V (WFPC2/f606w) and I (WFPC2/f814w) are used to capture most of the star cluster candidates up to the old ones (fainter) which have had, in the past, less possibility to be detected. The other bands are used in the SED fitting technique for constraining ages and masses. Our goals are to investigate the evolution of these three blue compact galaxies and the star cluster formation impact on their star formation history.

  11. Resolved H I observations of local analogs to z ~ 1 luminous compact blue galaxies: evidence for rotation-supported disks

    CERN Document Server

    Rabidoux, Katie; Garland, C A; Guzman, Rafael; Castander, Francisco J; Wolfe, Spencer

    2014-01-01

    While bright, blue, compact galaxies are common at $\\rm z \\sim 1$, they are relatively rare in the local universe, and their evolutionary paths are uncertain. We have obtained resolved H I observations of nine $\\rm z \\sim 0$ luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Very Large Array in order to measure their kinematic and dynamical properties and better constrain their evolutionary possibilities. We find that the LCBGs in our sample are rotating galaxies that tend to have nearby companions, relatively high central velocity dispersions, and can have disturbed velocity fields. We compare our measurements to those previously made with single dishes and find that single dish measurements tend to overestimate LCBGs' rotation velocities and H I masses. We also compare the ratio of LCBGs' rotation velocities to their velocity dispersions to those of other types of galaxies and find that LCBGs are strongly rotationally supported at large radii, similar to other types of disk...

  12. The Stellar Population and Star Formation Properties of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yinghe; Gao, Yu

    2010-01-01

    We study the stellar populations, star formation histories and star formation properties for a sample of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) selected by cross-correlating the Gil de Paz et al. (2003) sample with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6). The sample includes 31 BCDs, which span a large range in galactic parameters. Using a stellar population synthesis method, we derive the stellar populations and reconstruct the star formation histories for these BCDs. Our studies confirm that BCDs are not young systems experiencing their first star formation but old systems undergoing a starburst activity. The stellar mass-weighted ages can be as old as 10 Gyr while the luminosity-weighted ages might be up to $\\sim 3$ orders of magnitude younger ($\\sim 10$ Myr) for most galaxies. Based on multi-wavelength data, we also study the integrated star formation properties. The SFR for our sample galaxies spans nearly 3 orders of magnitude, from a few $10^{-3}$ to $\\sim1\\,M_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, with the medi...

  13. THE STELLAR POPULATION AND STAR FORMATION PROPERTIES OF BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study stellar populations, star formation histories (SFHs), and star formation properties for a sample of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) selected by cross-correlating the Gil de Paz et al. sample with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6. The sample includes 31 BCDs, which span a large range of galactic parameters. Using a stellar population synthesis method, we derive stellar populations and reconstruct SFHs for these BCDs. Our studies confirm that BCDs are not young systems experiencing their first star formation, but old systems undergoing a starburst activity. The stellar mass-weighted ages can be up to 10 Gyr, while the luminosity-weighted ages might be up to approximately three orders of magnitude younger (∼10 Myr) for most galaxies. Based on multiwavelength data, we also study the integrated star formation properties. The star formation rate (SFR) for our sample galaxies spans nearly three orders of magnitude, from a few 10-3 to ∼1 Msun yr-1, with a median value of ∼0.1 Msun yr-1. We find that about 90% of BCDs in our sample have their birthrate parameter (the ratio of the current SFR to the averaged past SFR) b>2-3. We further discuss correlations of the current SFR with the integrated galactic stellar mass and explore the connection between SFR and metallicity.

  14. LUMINOSITY-METALLICITY RELATIONS FOR BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES IN THE OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present systematic studies on the B-, R- and Ks -band luminosity-metallicity (L-Z) relations for a set of metal-poor, blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs). Metallicity is derived by using both the empirical N2 and the direct Te methods. Our work reconciles contradictory results obtained by different authors and shows that the L-Z relationship does also hold for BCDs. The empirical N2-based slope of the L-Z relation, for each photometric band, is consistent with the Te -based one. We confirm that the slope of the L-Z relation is shallower in the near-infrared than that in the optical. Our investigations on the correlations between the LB -Z relation residuals and different galactic parameters show that the star formation activities could be a cause of the large scatter in the optical L-Z relationships, whereas the internal absorption might be another possible contributing factor.

  15. The H I content of extremely metal-deficient blue compact dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuan, T. X.; Goehring, K. M.; Hibbard, J. E.; Izotov, Y. I.; Hunt, L. K.

    2016-09-01

    We have obtained new H I observations with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope (GBT) for a sample of 29 extremely metal-deficient star-forming Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectral data base to be extremely metal-deficient (12 + log O/H ≤ 7.6). Neutral hydrogen was detected in 28 galaxies, a 97% detection rate. Combining the H I data with SDSS optical spectra for the BCD sample and adding complementary galaxy samples from the literature to extend the metallicity and mass ranges, we have studied how the H I content of a galaxy varies with various global galaxian properties. There is a clear trend of increasing gas mass fraction with decreasing metallicity, mass and luminosity. We obtain the relation M(H I)/Lg∝ L_g^{-0.3}, in agreement with previous studies based on samples with a smaller luminosity range. The median gas mass fraction fgas for the GBT sample is equal to 0.94 while the mean gas mass fraction is 0.90±0.15, with a lower limit of ˜0.65. The H I depletion time is independent of metallicity, with a large scatter around the median value of 3.4 Gyr. The ratio of the baryonic mass to the dynamical mass of the metal-deficient BCDs varies from 0.05 to 0.80, with a median value of ˜0.2. About 65% of the BCDs in our sample have an effective yield larger than the true yield, implying that the neutral gas envelope in BCDs is more metal-deficient by a factor of 1.5-20, as compared to the ionized gas.

  16. VII Zw 403: HI Structure in a Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, Caroline E; Nordgren, Tyler E; Brinks, Elias; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Ashley, Trisha; Lynds, Roger; McIntyre, Vince J; O'Neil, Earl J; Östlin, Göran; Westpfahl, David J; Wilcots, Eric M

    2011-01-01

    We present optical (UBVJ), ultraviolet (FUV, NUV), and high resolution atomic hydrogen (HI) observations of the nearby blue compact dwarf (BCD), VII Zw 403. We find that VII Zw 403 has a relatively high HI mass-to-light ratio for a BCD. The rotation velocity is nominally 10-15 km/s, but rises to ~20 km/s after correction for the ~8-10 km/s random motions present in the gas. The velocity field is complex; including a variation in the position angle of the major axis going from the NE to the SW parts of the galaxy. Our high resolution HI maps reveal structure in the central gas, including a large, low-density HI depression or hole between the southern and northern halves of the galaxy, coincident with an unresolved x-ray source. Although interactions have been proposed as the triggering mechanism for the vigorous star formation occurring in BCDs, VII Zw 403 does not seem to have been tidally triggered by an external interaction, as we have found no nearby possible perturbers. It also doesn't appear to fall in t...

  17. Formation of ultra-compact blue dwarf galaxies and their evolution into nucleated dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We propose that there is an evolutionary link between ultra-compact blue dwarf galaxies (UCBDs) with active star formation and nucleated dwarfs based on the results of numerical simulations of dwarf-dwarf merging. We consider the observational fact that low-mass dwarfs can be very gas-rich, and thereby investigate the dynamical and chemical evolution of very gas-rich, dissipative dwarf-dwarf mergers. We find that the remnants of dwarf-dwarf mergers can be dominated by new stellar populations formed from the triggered starbursts and consequently can have blue colors and higher metallicities (Z~[0.2-1]Z_sun). We also find that the remnants of these mergers can have rather high mass-densities (10^4 M_sun pc^-3) within the central 10 pc and small half-light radii (40-100 pc). The radial stellar structures of some merger remnants are similar to those of nucleated dwarfs. Star formation can continue in nuclear gas disks (R<100 pc) surrounding stellar galactic nuclei (SGNs) so that the SGNs can finally have multi...

  18. The metallicity evolution of blue compact dwarf galaxies from the intermediate redshift to the local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jianhui; Fang, Guanwen; Ye, Chengyun; Kong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    We present oxygen abundance measurements for 74 blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies in the redshift range in [0.2, 0.5] using the strong-line method. The spectra of these objects are taken using Hectospec on the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT). More than half of these BCDs had dust attenuation corrected using the Balmer decrement method. For comparison, we also selected a sample of 2023 local BCDs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database. Based on the local and intermediate-z BCD samples, we investigated the cosmic evo- lution of the metallicity, star-formation rate (SFR), and Dn (4000) index. Com- pared with local BCDs, the intermediate-z BCDs had a systematically higher R23 ratio but similar O32 ratio. Interestingly, no significant deviation in the mass-metallicity (MZ) relation was found between the intermediate-z and lo- cal BCDs. Besides the metallicity, the intermediate-z BCDs also exhibited an SFR distribution that was consistent with local BCDs, suggesting a weak de- pendence on redshift. The i...

  19. A Study on the Chemical Properties of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yinghe; Gu, Qiusheng

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report our studies on the gaseous and chemical properties of a relatively large sample (53 members) of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs). The results of correlations among the oxygen abundance, stellar mass, gas mass, baryonic mass, and gas fraction are present both for E- and I-type BCDs, which are classified according to Loose & Thuan (1985) and show elliptical and irregular outer haloes, respectively. These correlations of I-type BCDs show similar slopes to those of E-type ones. However, in general, E-type BCDs are more gas-poor and metal-rich than I-type ones at a given baryonic mass. Based on these results, we suggest that E-type BCDs, at least a part of them, and I-type ones might be likely at different evolutionary phases and/or having different progenitors. Our investigation of the correlation between oxygen abundance and gas fraction shows that BCDs appear to have not evolved as isolated systems, but to have experienced some gas flows and/or mergers.

  20. A STUDY ON THE CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report our studies on the gaseous and chemical properties of a relatively large sample (53 members) of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs). The results of correlations among the oxygen abundance, stellar mass, gas mass, baryonic mass, and gas fraction are present both for E- and I-type BCDs, which are classified according to Loose and Thuan and show elliptical and irregular outer haloes, respectively. These correlations of I-type BCDs show slopes similar to those of E-type ones. However, in general, E-type BCDs are more gas-poor and metal-rich than I-type ones at a given baryonic mass. Based on these results, we suggest that E-type BCDs, at least a part of them, and I-type ones might be likely at different evolutionary phases and/or having different progenitors. Our investigation of the correlation between oxygen abundance and gas fraction shows that BCDs appear to have not evolved as isolated systems, but to have experienced some gas flows and/or mergers.

  1. New insights into the photometric structure of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies from a deep Near-Infrared study

    CERN Document Server

    Noeske, K G; Cairos, L M; Fricke, K J

    2003-01-01

    We present deep Near-Infrared (NIR) imaging of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies (BCDs), allowing for the first time to derive and systematize the NIR structural properties of their stellar low-surface brightness (LSB) host galaxies. Compared to optical data, NIR images, being less contamined by the extended stellar and ionized gas emission from the starburst, permit to study the LSB host galaxy closer to its center. We find that radial surface brightness profiles (SBPs) of the LSB hosts show at large radii a mostly exponential intensity distribution, in agreement with previous optical studies. At small to intermediate radii, however, the NIR data reveal an inwards flattening with respect to the outer exponential slope ("type V SBPs", Binggeli & Cameron 1991) in the LSB component of more than one half of the sample BCDs. This result may constitute an important observational constraint to the dynamics and evolution of BCDs. We apply a modified exponential fitting function (Papaderos et al. 1996a) to parametrize ...

  2. Spectroscopy of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies in Distant Clusters. I. Spectroscopic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Steven M.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Hon, Kimo

    2011-11-01

    We used the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II Telescope to obtain spectra of galaxies in the fields of five distant, rich galaxy clusters over the redshift range 0.5 reported in the literature, except for 11 targets which we believe were previously in error. Within our sample, we confirm the presence of 53 LCBGs in the five galaxy clusters. The clusters all stand out as distinct peaks in the redshift distribution of LCBGs with the average number density of LCBGs ranging from 1.65 ± 0.25 Mpc-3 at z = 0.55 to 3.13 ± 0.65 Mpc-3 at z = 0.8. The number density of LCBGs in clusters exceeds the field density by a factor of 749 ± 116 at z = 0.55; at z = 0.8, the corresponding ratio is E = 416 ± 95. At z = 0.55, this enhancement is well above that seen for blue galaxies or the overall cluster population, indicating that LCBGs are preferentially triggered in high-density environments at intermediate redshifts. Based in part on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  3. An imaging and spectroscopic study of the very metal-deficient blue compact dwarf galaxy Tol 1214--277

    CERN Document Server

    Fricke, K J; Papaderos, P; Guseva, N G; Thuan, T X

    2001-01-01

    We present a spectrophotometric study based on VLT/FORS I observations of one of the most metal-deficient blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies known, Tol 1214-277 (Z ~ Zsun/25). The data show that roughly half of the total luminosity of the BCD originates from a bright and compact starburst region located at the northeastern tip of a faint dwarf galaxy with cometary appearance. The starburst has ignited less than 4 Myr ago and its emission is powered by several thousands O7V stars and ~ 170 late-type nitrogen Wolf-Rayet stars located within a compact region with < 500 pc in diameter. For the first time in a BCD, a relatively strong [Fe V] 4227 emission line is seen which together with intense He II 4686 emission indicates the presence of a very hard radiation field in Tol 1214-277. We argue that this extraordinarily hard radiation originates from both Wolf--Rayet stars and radiative shocks in the starburst region. The structural properties of the low-surface-brightness (LSB) component underlying the starburst...

  4. 3D Spectroscopy of Local Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies: Kinematic Maps of a Sample of 22 Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Gallego, J; Castillo-Morales, A; Gallego, J; Castander, F J; Garland, C A; Gruel, N; Pisano, D J; Zamorano, J

    2011-01-01

    We use three dimensional optical spectroscopy observations of a sample of 22 local Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) to create kinematic maps. By means of these, we classify the kinematics of these galaxies into three different classes: rotating disk (RD), perturbed rotation (PR), and complex kinematics (CK). We find 48% are RDs, 28% are PRs, and 24% are CKs. RDs show rotational velocities that range between $\\sim50$ and $\\sim200 km s^{-1}$, and dynamical masses that range between $\\sim1\\times10^{9}$ and $\\sim3\\times10^{10} M_{\\odot}$. We also address the following two fundamental questions through the study of the kinematic maps: \\emph{(i) What processes are triggering the current starbust in LCBGs?} We search our maps of the galaxy velocity fields for signatures of recent interactions and close companions that may be responsible for the enhanced star formation in our sample. We find 5% of objects show evidence of a recent major merger, 10% of a minor merger, and 45% of a companion. This argues in favor...

  5. Properties of free-free, dust, and CO emissions in the starbursts of blue compact dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    The central star-forming regions in three blue compact dwarf galaxies (He 2-10, NGC 5253, and II Zw 40) were observed in the 340 GHz (880 micron) band at 5 arcsec resolution with the Submillimetre Array (SMA). Continuum emission associated with the central star-forming complex was detected in all these galaxies. The SMA 880 micron flux is decomposed into free-free emission and dust emission by using centimetre-wavelength data in the literature. We find that free-free emission contributes half or more of the SMA 880 micron flux in the central starbursts in those three galaxies. In spite of the dominance of free-free emission at 880 micron, the radio-to-far infrared (FIR) ratios in the central star-forming regions are not significantly higher than those of the entire systems, showing the robustness of radio-FIR relation. Based on the robustness of the radio-FIR relation, we argue that the free--free fraction in the 880 micron emission is regulated by the dust temperature. We also analyze the CO (J = 3--2) emiss...

  6. Surface brightness profiles of blue compact dwarf galaxies in the GOODS-N and GOODS-S field

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jianhui; Jiang, Ning; Yan, Wei; Gao, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the structural properties of the underlying hosts of 34 blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies with deep near-infrared (NIR) photometry. The BCD sample is selected from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey in the Great observatories origins Deep Survey North and South fields. We extract the surface brightness profile (SBP) in the optical F 435W and NIR F 160W bands. The SBPs of BCDs in the H band reach 26 mag arcsec^-2 at the 3\\sigma level, which is so far the deepest NIR imaging of BCDs. Then we fit the SBPs with one- and two- component Sersic models. About half of the BCDs favour the two-component model which significantly improves the fit quality. The effective radii of the underlying hosts of BCDs in the B band are smaller than those of early-type dwarfs (dEs) and dwarf irregulars at a fixed luminosity. This discrepancy is similar to findings in many previous works. However, the difference in structural parameters between BCDs and other dwarf galaxies seems to be less sig...

  7. Auto-consistent metallicity and star formation history of the nearest blue compact dwarf galaxy NGC 6789

    CERN Document Server

    García-Benito, Rubén

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed auto-consistent study of the nearest blue compact dwarf galaxy NGC 6789 by means of optical and UV archive photometry data and optical long-slit ISIS-WHT spectroscopy observations of the five brightest star-forming knots. The analysis of the spectra in all knots allowed the derivation of ionic chemical abundances of oxygen, nitrogen, sulphur, argon and neon using measures of both the high- and low-excitation electron temperatures, leading to the conclusion that NGC 6789 is chemically homogeneous with low values of the abundance of oxygen in the range 12+log(O/H) = 7.80-7.93, but presenting at the same time higher values of the nitrogen-to-oxygen ratio than expected for its metal regime. We used archival HST/WFPC2 F555W and F814W observations of NGC 6789 to perform a photometric study of the colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) of the resolved stellar populations and derive its star formation history (SFH), which is compatible with the presence of different young and old stellar populations who...

  8. VLT/X-shooter observations of blue compact galaxies Haro 11 and ESO 338-IG 004

    CERN Document Server

    Guseva, N G; Fricke, K J; Henkel, C

    2012-01-01

    (abridged) Strongly star-forming galaxies of subsolar metallicities are typical of the high-redshift universe. Here we therefore provide accurate data for two low-z analogs, the well-known low-metallicity emission-line galaxies Haro 11 and ESO 338-IG 004. On the basis of Very Large Telescope/X-shooter spectroscopic observations in the wavelength range 3000-24000\\AA, we use standard direct methods to derive physical conditions and element abundances. Furthermore, we use X-shooter data together with Spitzer observations in the mid-infrared range to attempt to find hidden star formation. We derive interstellar oxygen abundances of 12 + log O/H = 8.33+/-0.01, 8.10+/-0.04, and 7.89+/-0.01 in the two HII regions B and C of Haro 11 and in ESO 338-IG 004, respectively. The observed fluxes of the hydrogen lines correspond to the theoretical recombination values after correction for extinction with a single value of the extinction coefficient C(Hbeta) across the entire wavelength range from the near-ultraviolet to the ...

  9. The Nature of Nearby Counterparts to Intermediate Redshift Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies I. Optical/H I Properties and Dynamical Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, C A; Williams, J P; Guzmán, R; Castander, F J

    2004-01-01

    We present single-dish H I spectra obtained with the Green Bank Telescope, along with optical photometric properties from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, of 20 nearby (D < 70 Mpc) Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs). These ~L*, blue, high surface brightness, starbursting galaxies were selected with the same criteria used to define LCBGs at higher redshifts. We find these galaxies are gas-rich, with M(HI) ranging from 5*10^8 to 8*10^9 M_sun, and M(HI)/L_B ranging from 0.2 to 2 M_sun/L_sun, consistent with a variety of morphological types of galaxies. We find the dynamical masses (measured within R_25) span a wide range, from 3*10^9 to 1*10^11 M_sun. However, at least half have dynamical mass-to-light ratios smaller than nearby galaxies of all Hubble types, as found for LCBGs at intermediate redshifts. By comparing line widths and effective radii with local galaxy populations, we find that LCBGs are consistent with the dynamical mass properties of Magellanic (low luminosity) spirals, and the more massive ir...

  10. A Gemini/GMOS study of the physical conditions and kinematics of the blue compact dwarf galaxy Mrk 996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Eduardo; Thuan, Trinh X.; Izotov, Yuri I.; Carrasco, Eleazar R.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We present an integral field spectroscopic study with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) of the unusual blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy Mrk 996. Methods: We show through velocity and dispersion maps, emission-line intensity and ratio maps, and by a new technique of electron density limit imaging that the ionization properties of different regions in Mrk 996 are correlated with their kinematic properties. Results: From the maps, we can spatially distinguish a very dense high-ionization zone with broad lines in the nuclear region, and a less dense low-ionization zone with narrow lines in the circumnuclear region. Four kinematically distinct systems of lines are identified in the integrated spectrum of Mrk 996, suggesting stellar wind outflows from a population of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the nuclear region, superposed on an underlying rotation pattern. From the intensities of the blue and red bumps, we derive a population of ~473 late nitrogen (WNL) stars and ~98 early carbon (WCE) stars in the nucleus of Mrk 996, resulting in a high N(WR)/N(O+WR) of 0.19. We derive, for the outer narrow-line region, an oxygen abundance 12 + log (O/H) = 7.94 ± 0.30 (~0.2 Z⊙) by using the direct Te method derived from the detected narrow [O iii]λ4363 line. The nucleus of Mrk 996 is, however, nitrogen-enhanced by a factor of ~20, in agreement with previous CLOUDY modeling. This nitrogen enhancement is probably due to nitrogen-enriched WR ejecta, but also to enhanced nitrogen line emission in a high-density environment. Although we have made use here of two new methods - principal component analysis (PCA) tomography and a method for mapping low- and high-density clouds - to analyze our data, new methodology is needed to further exploit the wealth of information provided by integral field spectroscopy. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative

  11. The Nature of Nearby Counterparts to Intermediate-Redshift Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies. III. Interferometric Observations of Neutral Atomic and Molecular Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, C A; Williams, J P; Guzmán, R; Castander, F J; Sage, L J

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a VLA and OVRO-MMA follow-up to our single-dish surveys of the neutral atomic and molecular gas in a sample of nearby Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs). These luminous, blue, high surface brightness, starbursting galaxies were selected using criteria similar to that used to define LCBGs at higher redshifts. The surveys were undertaken to study the nature and evolutionary possibilities of LCBGs, using dynamical masses and gas depletion time scales as constraints. Here we present nearly resolved VLA H I maps of four LCBGs, as well as results from the literature for a fifth LCBG. In addition, we present OVRO-MMA maps of CO(J=1-0) in two of these LCBGs. We have used the resolved H I maps to separate the H I emission from target galaxies and their companions to improve the accuracy of our gas and dynamical mass estimates. For this sub-sample of LCBGs, we find that the dynamical masses measured with the single-dish telescope and interferometer are in agreement. However, we find that w...

  12. SBS 0335-052E+W: deep VLT/FORS+UVES spectroscopy of the pair of the lowest-metallicity blue compact dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Izotov, Yu I; Fricke, K J; Papaderos, P

    2009-01-01

    (abridged) We present deep archival VLT/FORS1+UVES spectroscopic observations of the system of two blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies SBS 0335-052E and SBS 0335-052W. Our aim is to derive element abundances in different HII regions of this unique system of galaxies and to study spatial abundance variations. We determine abundances of helium, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, chlorine, argon and iron. The oxygen abundance in the brighter eastern galaxy varies in the range 7.11 to 7.32 in different HII regions supporting previous findings and suggesting the presence of oxygen abundance variations on spatial scales of ~1-2 kpc. The oxygen abundance in the brightest region No.1 of SBS 0335-052W is 7.22+/-0.07, consistent with previous determinations.Three other HII regions are much more metal-poor with an unprecedently low oxygen abundance of 12+logO/H=7.01+/-0.07 (region No.2), 6.98+/-0.06 (region No.3), and 6.86+/-0.14 (region No.4). These are the lowest oxygen abundances ever derived in emission-line galaxies. He...

  13. New insights to the photometric structure of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies from deep Near-Infrared studies I. Observations, surface photometry and decomposition of surface brightness profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Noeske, K G; Cairos, L M; Fricke, K J

    2003-01-01

    (shortened) We analyze deep Near Infrared (NIR) broad band images for a sample of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies (BCDs), allowing for the quantitative study of their extended stellar low-surface brightness (LSB) host galaxies. NIR surface brightness profiles (SBPs) of the LSB hosts agree at large galactocentric radii with those from optical studies. At small to intermediate radii, however, the NIR data reveal for more than half of our sample a significant flattening of the exponential SBP of the LSB host. Such SBPs ("type V" SBPs, Binggeli & Cameron 1991) have rarely been detected in LSB hosts of BCDs at optical wavelengths, where the relative flux contribution of the starburst is stronger than in the NIR and can hide such central intensity depressions of the LSB host. The structural properties, frequency and physical origin of type V LSB SBPs in BCDs and other dwarf galaxies have not yet been systematically studied. Nevertheless, their occurrence in a significant fraction of BCDs would impose important new ...

  14. Compact Massive Object in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Melo, I Tosta e

    2016-01-01

    The central regions of galaxies show the presence of super massive black holes and/or very dense stellar clusters. Both objects seem to follow similar host-galaxy correlations, suggesting that they are members of the same family of Compact Massive Objects. We investigate here a huge data collection of Compact Massive Objects properties to correlate them with absolute magnitude, velocity dispersion and mass of their host galaxies.

  15. On the properties of the interstellar medium in extremely metal-poor blue compact dwarf galaxies: GMOS-IFU spectroscopy and SDSS photometry of the double-knot galaxy HS 2236+1344

    CERN Document Server

    Lagos, P; Gomes, J M; Castelli, A V Smith; Vega, L R; .,

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to carry out a spatially resolved investigation of the warm interstellar medium (ISM) in the extremely metal-poor Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxy HS 2236+1344. Special emphasis is laid on the analysis of the spatial distribution of chemical abundances, emission-line ratios and kinematics of the ISM, and to the recent star-forming activity in this galaxy. This study is based on optical integral field unit spectroscopy data from Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Gemini North telescope and archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey images. The data were obtained in two different positions across the galaxy, obtaining a total 4 arcsec X 8 arcsec field which encompasses most of its ISM. Emission-line maps and broad-band images obtained in this study indicate that HS 2236+1344 hosts three Giant HII regions. Our data also reveal some faint curved features in the BCD periphery that might be due to tidal perturbations or expanding ionized-gas shells. The ISM velocity field shows systematic ...

  16. Exploring the Interstellar Media of Optically Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Most, Hans P; Salzer, John J; Rosenberg, Jessica J; Engstrom, Eric; Fliss, Palmer

    2013-01-01

    We present new Very Large Array HI spectral line, archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and archival Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of eight star-forming blue compact dwarf galaxies that were selected to be optically compact (optical radii less than 1 kpc). These systems have faint blue absolute magnitudes (M_B >= -17), ongoing star formation (based on emission-line selection by the H alpha or [OIII] lines), and are nearby (mean velocity = 3315 km/s = 45 Mpc). One galaxy in the sample, ADBS 113845+2008, is found to have an HI halo that extends 58 r-band scale lengths from its stellar body. In contrast, the rest of the sample galaxies have HI radii to optical-scale-length ratios ranging from 9.3 to 26. The size of the HI disk in the "giant disk" dwarf galaxy ADBS 113845+2008 appears to be unusual as compared to similarly compact stellar populations.

  17. The formation of compact groups of galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马駬; 俞允强

    1999-01-01

    In the compact group of galaxies the galaxies can merge into a few massive ones in a very short time, so they must be formed very recently. On the other hand, according to the theory of structure formation, the denser system should form earlier. By analyzing the apparent paradox, we suggest that the merging process of CDM halo plays an important role in the formation of the compact groups of galaxies: it delays the formation of compact groups of galaxies, and makes the groups of galaxies much denser.

  18. Super Star Clusters in the Blue Dwarf Galaxy UM 462

    OpenAIRE

    Vanzi, Leonardo

    2003-01-01

    I present optical observations of the Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy UM 462. The images of this galaxy show several bright compact sources. A careful study of these sources has revealed their nature of young Super Star Clusters. The ages determined from the analysis of the stellar continuum and $H\\alpha$ are between few and few tens Myr. The total star formation taking place into the clusters is about 0.05 $\\mathrm{M_{\\odot}/yr}$. The clusters seem to be located at the edges of two large round-lik...

  19. Globular clusters in the blue compact galaxy ESO 338-IG04 (Tol 1924-416), as tracers of the star formation history. Results from HST/WFPC2 observations

    CERN Document Server

    Östlin, G A; Rönnback, J; Bergvall, Nils; Rönnback, Jari

    1998-01-01

    Multicolour images of the starbursting metal poor blue compact galaxy ESO338-IG04 have been obtained with WFPC2/HST. In the images we find numerous point-like sources concentrated towards the main body of the galaxy, which we identify as globular cluster candidates. We show that these objects are physically associated with the galaxy and that they are spatially extended. Given their high intrinsic luminosities, these objects cannot be individual stars. Using photometric evolution models we show that the objects constitute a rich population of massive star clusters with ages ranging from a few Myr to 10 Gyr, and masses ranging from 10^4 to more than 10^7 solar masses. We show that these objects are most likely globular clusters of varying age. There are peaks in the age distribution of the clusters: at <30 Myr, ~100 Myr, ~600 Myr, 2.5-5 Gyr and ~10 Gyr. The youngest objects are found in the crowded starburst region. The galaxy presently appears to be involved in a merger, which is the probable cause of the ...

  20. EXPLORING THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIA OF OPTICALLY COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Most, Hans P.; Cannon, John M.; Engstrom, Eric; Fliss, Palmer [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Salzer, John J. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Rosenberg, Jessica L., E-mail: hmost@macalester.edu, E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu, E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: jrosenb4@gmu.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    We present new Very Large Array H I spectral line, archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and archival Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of eight star-forming blue compact dwarf galaxies that were selected to be optically compact (optical radii <1 kpc). These systems have faint blue absolute magnitudes (M{sub B} {approx}> -17), ongoing star formation (based on emission-line selection by the H{alpha} or [O III] lines), and are nearby (mean velocity = 3315 km s{sup -1} {approx_equal} 45 Mpc). One galaxy in the sample, ADBS 113845+2008, is found to have an H I halo that extends 58 r-band scale lengths from its stellar body. In contrast, the rest of the sample galaxies have H I radii to optical-scale-length ratios ranging from 9.3 to 26. The size of the H I disk in the 'giant disk' dwarf galaxy ADBS 113845+2008 appears to be unusual as compared with similarly compact stellar populations.

  1. Compact nuclear objects and properties of their parent galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zasov, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    We consider the relationship between the masses of the compact nuclear objects in the centers of disky galaxies -- supermassive black holes (SMBHs) or nuclear star clusters (NCs) -- and such parameters as the maximal velocity of rotation $V_{\\textrm{max}}$, obtained from the rotation curves, indicative dynamical mass $M_{25}$, and the color index ($B{-}V$) of their parent galaxies. It was found that the mass of nuclear clusters $M_{\\rm nc}$ correlates more closely with the velocity of rotation and total mass of galaxies than the mass of supermassive black holes $M_{\\rm bh}$. The dependence of masses of the central objects on the color index is bimodal: galaxies of the red group (red-sequence), which have ($B{-}V) > 0.6{-}0.7$, differ from bluer galaxies, by higher values of $M_{\\rm bh}$ for similar host-galaxy parameters. In contrast, in the diagrams for nuclear clusters the "blue" and "red" galaxies form unified sequences. It agrees with scenarios in which most red-group galaxies form as a result of loss of ...

  2. Star formation suppression in compact group galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Lisenfeld, U.;

    2015-01-01

    We present CO(1-0) maps of 12 warm H-2-selected Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs), covering 14 individually imaged warm H2 bright galaxies, with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy. We found a variety of molecular gas distributions within the HCGs, including regularly rotating disks......, bars, rings, tidal tails, and possibly nuclear outflows, though the molecular gas morphologies are more consistent with spirals and earlytype galaxies than mergers and interacting systems. Our CO-imaged HCG galaxies, when plotted on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, shows star formation (SF) suppression...

  3. FIR extended emission from cold gas and dust in Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies: the anomalous cases of POX 186 and UM 461

    CERN Document Server

    Doublier, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    FIR observation of BCD galaxies with Herschel has revealed a wealth of new insights in these objects which are thought to resemble high-redshift forming galaxies. Dust and cold gas showed to be colder, in more or less quantities than expected and of uncertain origin. However, not unlike in the local universe, not all the dust or the cold gas is accounted for, making it more challenging. SPICA and its factor 10 to 100 in sensitivity will allow to image the faint extended cold gas/dusty disks in BCDGs in addition to detect faint C and O lines only marginally or not at all detected by Herschel/

  4. Forming Compact Massive Galaxies at z~2

    CERN Document Server

    van Dokkum, Pieter G; Franx, Marijn; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel; Schreiber, Natascha M Forster; Skelton, Rosalind E; Whitaker, Katherine E; van der Wel, Arjen; Bezanson, Rachel; Fumagalli, Mattia; Kriek, Mariska; Leja, Joel; Wuyts, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study a key phase in the formation of massive galaxies: the transition of star forming galaxies into massive (M_stars~10^11 Msun), compact (r_e~1 kpc) quiescent galaxies, which takes place from z~3 to z~1.5. We use HST grism redshifts and extensive photometry in all five 3D-HST/CANDELS fields, more than doubling the area used previously for such studies, and combine these data with Keck MOSFIRE and NIRSPEC spectroscopy. We first confirm that a population of massive, compact, star forming galaxies exists at z~2, using K-band spectroscopy of 25 of these objects at 2.0galaxies have rotating disks of ionized gas that are a factor of ~2 more extended than the stellar distribution. By combining measurements of individual galaxies, we find that the kinematics are co...

  5. Compact Quiescent Galaxies at Intermediate Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Shih, Hsin-Yi

    2014-01-01

    From several searches of the area common to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey, we have identified objects that have properties similar to those of the luminous quiescent compact galaxies found at z > 2. Here we present our results of 22 galaxies between z ~ 0.4 and z ~ 0.9 based on observations with the Keck I, Keck II and Subaru telescopes on Mauna Kea. By exploring sizes, morphologies, and stellar populations of these galaxies, we found that most of the galaxies we identified actually formed most of their stars at z 2 in the literature. Several of these young objects appear to be disk-like or possibly prolate. This lines up with several previous studies, which found that massive quiescent galaxies at high redshifts often have disk-like morphologies. If these galaxies were to be confirmed to be disks, their formation would be more likely caused by gas accretion than by major mergers. On the other hand, if these galaxies were to be confirmed to be...

  6. Compact groups in the UZC galaxy sample

    CERN Document Server

    Kelm, P; Kelm, Paola Focardi & Birgit

    2002-01-01

    Applying an automatic neighbour search algorithm to the 3D UZC galaxy catalogue (Falco 1999) we have identified 291 compact groups (CGs) with redshifts between 1000 and 10000 km/s. The sample is analysed to investigate whether Triplets display kinematical and morphological characteristics similar to higher order CGs (Multiplets). It is found that Triplets constitute low velocity dispersion structures, have a gas-rich galaxy population and are typically retrieved in sparse environments. Conversely Multiplets show higher velocity dispersion, include few gas-rich members and are generally embedded structures. Evidence hence emerges indicating that Triplets and Multiplets, though sharing a common scale, correspond to different galaxy systems. Triplets are typically field structures whilst Multiplets are mainly subclumps (either temporarily projected or collapsing) within larger structures. Simulations show that selection effects can only partially account for differences, but significant contamination of Triplets...

  7. Green Pea Galaxies and Cohorts: Luminous Compact Emission-line Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Yuri I.; Guseva, Natalia G.; Thuan, Trinh X.

    2011-02-01

    We present a large sample of 803 star-forming luminous compact galaxies (LCGs) in the redshift range z = 0.02-0.63, selected from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The global properties of these galaxies are similar to those of the so-called green pea star-forming galaxies in the redshift range z = 0.112-0.360 and selected from the SDSS on the basis of their green color and compact structure. In contrast to green pea galaxies, our LCGs are selected on the basis of both their spectroscopic and photometric properties, resulting in a ~10 times larger sample, with galaxies spanning a redshift range gsim2 times larger. We find that the oxygen abundances and the heavy element abundance ratios in LCGs do not differ from those of nearby low-metallicity blue compact dwarf galaxies. The median stellar mass of LCGs is ~109 M sun. However, for galaxies with high EW(Hβ), >= 100 Å, it is only ~7 × 108 M sun. The star formation rate in LCGs varies in the large range of 0.7-60 M sun yr-1, with a median value of ~4 M sun yr-1, a factor of ~3 lower than in high-redshift star-forming galaxies at z >~ 3. The specific star formation rates in LCGs are extremely high and vary in the range ~10-9-10-7 yr-1, comparable to those derived in high-redshift galaxies.

  8. A Search for Low Surface Brightness Structure Around Compact Narrow Emission Line Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, E J; Bershady, M A; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Zee, Liese van; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2006-01-01

    As the most extreme members of the rapidly evolving faint blue galaxy population at intermediate redshift, the compact narrow emission line galaxies (CNELGs) are intrinsically luminous (-22 -18). Conversely, 15 are not blue enough to fade to low-luminosity dwarfs (M_B > -15.2). The majority of the CNELGs are consistent with progenitors of intermediate-luminosity dwarfs and low-luminosity spiral galaxies with small disks. CNELGs are a heterogeneous progenitor population with significant fractions (up to 44%) capable of fading into today's faint dwarfs (M_B > -15.2), while 15 to 85% may only experience an apparently extremely compact CNELG phase at intermediate redshift but remain more luminous galaxies at the present epoch.

  9. Green Pea Galaxies and cohorts: Luminous Compact Emission-Line Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Izotov, Y I; Thuan, T X

    2010-01-01

    We present a large sample of 803 star-forming luminous compact galaxies (LCGs) in the redshift range z = 0.02-0.63, selected from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The global properties of these galaxies are similar to those of the so-called "green pea" star-forming galaxies, in the redshift range z=0.112-0.360 and selected from the SDSS on the basis of their green color and compact structure. In contrast to green pea galaxies, our LCGs are selected on the basis of both their spectroscopic and photometric properties, resulting in a ~10 times larger sample, with galaxies spanning a redshift range >2 times larger. We find that the oxygen abundances and the heavy element abundance ratios in LCGs do not differ from those of nearby low-metallicity blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies. The median stellar mass of LCGs is ~1e9 Msun. However, for galaxies with high EW(Hbeta), >100A, it is only ~7x1e8 Msun. The star formation rate in LCGs varies in the large range of 0.7-60 Msun yr^{-1}, with a median...

  10. HI synthesis observations of the blue compact dwarf NGC 1705

    CERN Document Server

    Elson, E C; Kraan-Korteweg, R C; 10.1093/mnras/sts526

    2013-01-01

    Australia Telescope Compact Array HI-line observations of the nearby dwarf galaxy NGC 1705 are presented. The data are used to trace the gravitational potential of the galaxy out to several stellar disc scale lengths. A rotation curve is derived for the system and used to generate mass models. Dark matter dominates the gravitational potential at nearly all galactocentric radii. NFW and pseudo-isothermal sphere halo parameterisations allowing for good reproductions of the observations. The models suggest NGC 1705 to have a dark matter halo that it much denser and more compact than previously thought.

  11. Compact radio sources in luminous infrared galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Rodrigo

    2007-08-01

    Radio interferometry is an observational technique of high sensitivity and incomparably high spatial resolution. Moreover, because radio waves can freely propagate through interstellar dust and gas, it allows the study of regions of the universe completely obscured at other wavelengths. This thesis reports the observational and theoretical results of my research during the past four years which are mostly based on interferometric radio data. The COLA sample is an infrared selected sample of active star forming galaxies. We conducted 6 cm VLA and VLBI snapshot observations of the northern half of this sample. The radio emission seen at VLA scales is consistent with being powered by star formation activity because it follows the far infrared to radio correlation. We detect 22% of the sample sources in our VLBI snapshots. Based on luminosity arguments, we argue that these sub-parsec VLBI sources are powered by AGN activity. Furthermore, we find that VLBI detections are preferentially found in sources whose VLA scale structures have the highest peak brightnesses suggesting a strong correlation between compact starburst and AGN activity. This observational result is consistent with the theoretical picture of an Eddington-limited nuclear starburst acting as the last valve in the pipeline transporting the gas from kiloparsec scales onto the accretion disc of a buried AGN. Arp 220 is the archetypical ultra luminous infrared galaxy. For many years this source has been known to harbour a compact (~100 pc) cluster of unresolved 18 cm bright sources believed to be bright core collapse supernovae. Using multiwavelength VLBI observations, we obtained for the first time radio spectra for 18 of these sources. We find that over a half of them have spectra consistent with young supernovae. The rest can be better explained as older supernova remnants interacting with the high density starburst ISM. This finding allowed us to constrain the number of possible scenarios for the Arp 220

  12. Compact star forming galaxies as the progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies: clustering result

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Xiaozhi; Kong, Xu; Fang, Guanwen

    2016-01-01

    We present a measurement of the spatial clustering of massive compact galaxies at $1.2\\le z \\le 3$ in CANDELS/3D-HST fields. We obtain the correlation length for compact quiescent galaxies (cQGs) at $z\\sim1.6$ of $r_{0}=7.1_{-2.6}^{+2.3}\\ h^{-1}Mpc$ and compact star forming galaxies (cSFGs) at $z\\sim2.5$ of $r_{0}=7.7_{-2.9}^{+2.7}\\ h^{-1}Mpc$ assuming a power-law slope $\\gamma =1.8$. The characteristic dark matter halo masses $M_H$ of cQGs at $z\\sim1.6$ and cSFGs at $z\\sim2.5$ are $\\sim7.1\\times 10^{12}\\ h^{-1} M_\\odot$ and $\\sim4.4\\times10^{12}\\ h^{-1} M_\\odot$, respectively. Our clustering result suggests that cQGs at $z\\sim1.6$ are possibly the progenitors of local luminous ETGs and the descendants of cSFGs and SMGs at $z>2$. Thus an evolutionary connection involving SMGs, cSFGs, QSOs, cQGs and local luminous ETGs has been indicated by our clustering result.

  13. Formation and evolution of blue compact dwarfs: The origin of their steep rotation curves

    CERN Document Server

    Watts, A

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the observed steep rotation curves of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) remains largely unexplained by theoretical models of BCD formation. We therefore investigate the rotation curves in BCDs formed from mergers between gas- rich dwarf irregular galaxies based on the results of numerical simulations for BCD formation. The principal results are as follows. The dark matter of merging dwarf irregulars undergoes a central concentration so that the central density can become up to 6 times higher than those of the initial dwarf irregulars. However, the more compact dark matter halo alone can not reproduce the gradient differences observed between dwarf irregulars and BCDs. We provide further support that the central concentration of gas due to rapid gas-transfer to the central regions of dwarf-dwarf mergers is responsible for the observed difference in rotation curve gradients. The BCDs with central gas concentration formed from merging can thus show steeply rising rotation curves in their central r...

  14. ROSAT observations of compact groups of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, P; Saracco, P; Ciliegi, P

    1994-01-01

    A search for X-ray emission from compact groups revealed detection from 8 out of the 12 HCG images extracted from the ROSAT public archive. For two of them the X-ray emission originates from galaxies in the group. On the contrary, three groups show an extended emission clearly caused by hot intracluster gas. A Raymond-Smith hot plasma model provides an excellent fit to the X-ray spectra. The estimated temperatures are distributed in a quite narrow range (from 0.73 to 0.92 keV) and are consistent, within the errors, with 0.9 keV. The luminosity ranging from 0.75 to 5.1\\cdot10^{42}erg s^{-1}. The most relevant result is the low metal abundance surely detected in two of them and likely in a third that characterizes the hot gas cloud responsible for the X-ray emission. The data concerning the remaining 3 detected compact groups are not sufficient to discriminate with certainty between diffuse and/or point-like X-ray emission. However the results of the spectral analysis point to the presence of a hot gas again wi...

  15. The Ultraviolet and Infrared Star Formation Rates of Compact Group Galaxies: An Expanded Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Lenkic, Laura; Gallagher, Sarah; Desjardins, Tyler; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Hornschemeier, Ann; Durrell, Pat; Gronwall, Caryl

    2016-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended timescales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by \\citet{tzanavaris10} and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 \\micron\\ photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFR$_{\\mathrm{UV}}$) using the UVOT uvw2photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 \\micron\\ photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFR$_{\\mathrm{IR}}$). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-"red"), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific star formation rates, and tend to lie in H~{\\sc i}-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-"blue") have redder ...

  16. Isolated compact elliptical galaxies: Stellar systems that ran away

    CERN Document Server

    Chilingarian, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Compact elliptical galaxies form a rare class of stellar system (~30 presently known) characterized by high stellar densities and small sizes and often harboring metal-rich stars. They were thought to form through tidal stripping of massive progenitors, until two isolated objects were discovered where massive galaxies performing the stripping could not be identified. By mining astronomical survey data, we have now found 195 compact elliptical galaxies in all types of environment. They all share similar dynamical and stellar population properties. Dynamical analysis for nonisolated galaxies demonstrates the feasibility of their ejection from host clusters and groups by three-body encounters, which is in agreement with numerical simulations. Hence, isolated compact elliptical and isolated quiescent dwarf galaxies are tidally stripped systems that ran away from their hosts.

  17. The fate of high-redshift massive compact galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    de la Rosa, Ignacio G; Ferreras, Ignacio; Almeida, Jorge Sánchez; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Martínez-Valpuesta, Inma; Stringer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Massive high-redshift quiescent compact galaxies (nicknamed red nuggets) have been traditionally connected to present-day elliptical galaxies, often overlooking the relationships that they may have with other galaxy types. We use large bulge-disk decomposition catalogues based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to check the hypothesis that red nuggets have survived as compact cores embedded inside the haloes or disks of present-day massive galaxies. In this study, we designate a "compact core" as the bulge component that satisfies a prescribed compactness criterion. Photometric and dynamic mass-size and mass-density relations are used to show that, in the inner regions of galaxies at z ~ 0.1, there are "abundant" compact cores matching the peculiar properties of the red nuggets, an abundance comparable to that of red nuggets at z ~ 1.5. Furthermore, the morphology distribution of the present-day galaxies hosting compact cores is used to demonstrate that, in addition to the standard channel connecting red ...

  18. The number density of quiescent compact galaxies at intermediate redshift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damjanov, Ivana [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Chilingarian, Igor, E-mail: idamjanov@cfa.harvard.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    Massive compact systems at 0.2 < z < 0.6 are the missing link between the predominantly compact population of massive quiescent galaxies at high redshift and their analogs and relics in the local volume. The evolution in number density of these extreme objects over cosmic time is the crucial constraining factor for the models of massive galaxy assembly. We select a large sample of ∼200 intermediate-redshift massive compacts from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) spectroscopy by identifying point-like Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric sources with spectroscopic signatures of evolved redshifted galaxies. A subset of our targets have publicly available high-resolution ground-based images that we use to augment the dynamical and stellar population properties of these systems by their structural parameters. We confirm that all BOSS compact candidates are as compact as their high-redshift massive counterparts and less than half the size of similarly massive systems at z ∼ 0. We use the completeness-corrected numbers of BOSS compacts to compute lower limits on their number densities in narrow redshift bins spanning the range of our sample. The abundance of extremely dense quiescent galaxies at 0.2 < z < 0.6 is in excellent agreement with the number densities of these systems at high redshift. Our lower limits support the models of massive galaxy assembly through a series of minor mergers over the redshift range 0 < z < 2.

  19. Spatial Orientation of Spin Vectors of Blue-shifted Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yadav, S N; Saurer, W

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of the spin vector orientation of 5$\\,$987 SDSS galaxies having negative redshift from $-$87.6 to $-$0.3 km$\\,$s$^{-1}$. Two dimensional observed parameters are used to compute three dimensional galaxy rotation axes by applying `position angle--inclination' method. We aim to examine the non-random effects in the spatial orientation of blue-shifted galaxies. We generate 5$\\times$10$^6$ virtual galaxies to find expected isotropic distributions by performing numerical simulations. We have written MATLAB program to facilitate the simulation process and eliminate the manual errors in the process. Chi-square, auto-correlation, and the Fourier tests are used to examine non-random effects in the polar and azimuthal angle distributions of the galaxy rotation axes. In general, blue-shifted galaxies show no preferred alignments of galaxy rotation axes. Our results support Hierarchy model, which suggests a random orientation of angular momentum vectors of galaxies. However, local effects are noted...

  20. Evidence for tidal interaction and merger as the origin of galaxy morphology evolution in compact groups

    CERN Document Server

    Coziol, R

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a morphological study based on NIR images of 25 galaxies, with different levels of nuclear activity, in 8 Compact Groups of Galaxies (CGs). We perform independently two different analysis: a isophotal study and a study of morphological asymmetries. The results yielded by the two analysis are highly consistent. For the first time, it is possible to show that deviations from pure ellipses are produced by inhomogeneous stellar mass distributions related to galaxy interactions and mergers. We find evidence of mass asymmetries in 74% of the galaxies in our sample. In 59% of these cases, the asymmetries come in pairs, and are consistent with tidal effects produced by the proximity of companion galaxies. The symmetric galaxies are generally small in size or mass, inactive, and have an early-type morphology. In 20% of the galaxies we find evidence for cannibalism. In 36% of the early-type galaxies the color gradient is positive (blue nucleus) or flat. Summing up these results, as much as 52%...

  1. Formation and evolution of blue compact dwarfs: the origin of their steep rotation curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Adam; Bekki, Kenji

    2016-11-01

    The origin of the observed steep rotation curves of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) remains largely unexplained by theoretical models of BCD formation. We therefore investigate the rotation curves in BCDs formed from mergers between gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies based on the results of numerical simulations for BCD formation. The principal results are as follows. The dark matter of merging dwarf irregulars undergoes a central concentration so that the central density can become up to six times higher than those of the initial dwarf irregulars. However, the more compact dark matter halo alone cannot reproduce the gradient differences observed between dwarf irregulars and BCDs. We provide further support that the central concentration of gas due to rapid gas transfer to the central regions of dwarf-dwarf mergers is responsible for the observed difference in rotation curve gradients. The BCDs with central gas concentration formed from merging can thus show steeply rising rotation curves in their central regions. Such gas concentration is also responsible for central starbursts of BCDs and the high central surface brightness and is consistent with previous BCD studies. We discuss the relationship between rotational velocity gradient and surface brightness, the dependence of BCD rotation curves on star formation threshold density, progenitor initial profile, interaction type, and merger mass ratio, as well as potential evolutionary links between dwarf irregulars, BCDs, and compact dwarf irregulars.

  2. Star formation suppression in compact group galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Lisenfeld, U.;

    2015-01-01

    , bars, rings, tidal tails, and possibly nuclear outflows, though the molecular gas morphologies are more consistent with spirals and earlytype galaxies than mergers and interacting systems. Our CO-imaged HCG galaxies, when plotted on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, shows star formation (SF) suppression...... color space. This supports the idea that at least some galaxies in HCGs are transitioning objects, where a disruption of the existing molecular gas in the system suppresses SF by inhibiting the molecular gas from collapsing and forming stars efficiently. These observations, combined with recent work...

  3. Testing MOND with Ultra-Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Scarpa, Riccardo

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the recently discovered Ultra-Compact Dwarf Galaxies (UCDs) show that their internal acceleration of gravity is everywhere above a0, the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) constant of gravity. MOND therefore makes the strong prediction that no mass discrepancy should be observed for this class of objects. This is confirmed by the few UCDs for which virial masses were derived. We argue that UCD galaxies represent a suitable test-bench for the theory, in the sense that even a ...

  4. The Number Density of Quiescent Compact Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanov, Ivana; Geller, Margaret J; Chilingarian, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Massive compact systems at 0.2compact population of massive quiescent galaxies at high redshift and their analogs and relics in the local volume. The evolution in number density of these extreme objects over cosmic time is the crucial constraining factor for the models of massive galaxy assembly. We select a large sample of ~200 intermediate-redshift massive compacts from the BOSS spectroscopic dataset by identifying point-like SDSS photometric sources with spectroscopic signatures of evolved redshifted galaxies. A subset of our targets have publicly available high-resolution ground-based images that we use to augment the dynamical and stellar population properties of these systems by their structural parameters. We confirm that all BOSS compact candidates are as compact as their high-redshift massive counterparts and less than half the size of similarly massive systems at z~0. We use the completeness-corrected numbers of BOSS compacts to compute low...

  5. Anomalous Blue Colors in Extremely Isolated Early-Type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Christopher R.

    2009-01-01

    Highly isolated systems provide a baseline for assessing the role of interactions within galaxy evolution. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 1 - 5 to identify extremely isolated early-type galaxies (IEGs) in the nearby universe. Redshifts derived from the SDSS spectra permit a robust three-dimensional assessment of the local environment surrounding candidate IEGs. Isolated galaxies are chosen utilizing a projected physical separation of 2.5 Mpc from any neighboring non-dwarf galaxy brighter than M$_{V}$ = $-$16.5. A minimum redshift separation of 350 km s$^{-1}$ between a candidate galaxy and a neighboring was imposed to further insure the candidate's isolation. The IEG sample contains 33 galaxies that exhibit a number of unexpected features. Through the use of a bulge/disk decomposition technique using standard surface photometry, brightness profiles and model-subtracted images were created. Radial profiles of eccentricity, position angle, and surface brightness were employed with the model images to constrain the merger and interaction histories of the IEGs. The presence of shell and fan structures, signatures of recent mergers, were detected in approximately 12% of the sample. Dominant features of the IEG sample are blue colors and active star formation, atypical of normal early-type galaxies. The IEGs would require a substantial reservoir of neutral gas to fuel the levels of on-going star formation observed. We speculate that some of the IEGs may be the remains of a coalesced group of gas-rich dwarf galaxies. Three sample galaxies have red colors and undisturbed morphologies expected of a pristine isolated early-type galaxy formed early in cosmic time. We acknowledge support from NASA's Astrophysical Data Program; grant #NNG05C53G, the GALEX Guest Investigator program, and a Texas Space Grant Consortium Fellowship.

  6. Compact E+A Galaxies as a Progenitor of Massive Compact Quiescent Galaxies at 0.2

    CERN Document Server

    Zahid, H Jabran; Geller, Margaret J; Damjanov, Ivana; Chillingarian, Igor; Sohn, Jubee; Salmi, Fadia; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2016-01-01

    We search the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Baryon Oscillation Sky Survey to identify ~5500 massive compact quiescent galaxy candidates at 0.2galaxies based on their spectral properties and make this catalog publicly available. We examine sizes, stellar population ages and kinematics of galaxies in the sample and show that the physical properties of compact E+A galaxies suggest that they are a progenitor of massive compact quiescent galaxies. Thus, two separate classes of objects-compact E+A and compact quiescent galaxies-may be linked by a common evolutionary sequence. The typical stellar population age of compact E+A galaxies is <1 Gyr. The existence of compact E+A galaxies with young stellar populations at 0.2compact quiescent galaxies first appear at intermediate redshifts. We derive a lower limit for the number density of compact E+A galaxies. Assuming passive evolution, we convert this number density into an app...

  7. The BlueTides Simulation: First Galaxies and Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Yu; Croft, Rupert A; Bird, Simeon; Battaglia, Nicholas; Wilkins, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the BlueTides simulation and report initial results for the luminosity functions of the first galaxies and AGN, and their contribution to reionization. BlueTides was run on the BlueWaters cluster at NCSA from $z=99$ to $z=8.0$ and includes 2$\\times$7040$^3$ particles in a $400$Mpc/h per side box, making it the largest hydrodynamic simulation ever performed at high redshift. BlueTides includes a pressure-entropy formulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics, gas cooling, star formation (including molecular hydrogen), black hole growth and models for stellar and AGN feedback processes. The star formation rate density in the simulation is a good match to current observational data at $z\\sim 8-10$. We find good agreement between observations and the predicted galaxy luminosity function in the currently observable range $-18\\le M_{\\mathrm UV} \\le -22.5$ with some dust extinction required to match the abundance of brighter objects. BlueTides implements a patchy reionization model that produces a fluct...

  8. NGC 3934: a shell galaxy in a compact galaxy environment

    CERN Document Server

    Bettoni, D; Rampazzo, R; Marino, A; Mazzei, P; Buson, L M

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the NGC 3933 poor galaxy association, that contains NGC 3934, which is classified as a polar-ring galaxy. The multi-band photometric analysis of NGC 3934 allows us to investigate the nature of this galaxy and to re-define the NGC 3933 group members with the aim to characterize the group dynamical properties and its evolutionary phase. We imaged the group in the far (FUV,lambda = 1530A) and near (NUV, lambda=2316A) ultraviolet (UV) bands of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). From the deep optical imaging we determined the fine structure of NGC 3934. We measured the recession velocity of PGC 213894 which shows that it belongs to the NGC 3933 group. We derived the spectral energy distribution (SED) from FUV (GALEX) to far-IR emission of the two brightest members of the group. We compared a grid of smooth particle hydrodynamical (SPH) chemo-photometric simulations with the SED and the integrated properties of NGC 3934 and NGC 3933 to devise their possible formation/evolutionary scenarios. The N...

  9. Ages and Metallicities of Hickson Compact Group Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Proctor, R N; Hau, G K T; Beasley, M A; De Silva, G M; Contreras, R; Terlevich, A I; Proctor, Robert N.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Hau, George K. T.; Beasley, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) constitute an interesting extreme in the range of environments in which galaxies are located, as the space density of galaxies in these small groups are otherwise only found in the centres of much larger clusters. The work presented here uses Lick indices to make a comparison of ages and chemical compositions of galaxies in HCGs with those in other environments (clusters, loose groups and the field). The metallicity and relative abundance of `$\\alpha$-elements' show strong correlations with galaxy age and central velocity dispersion, with similar trends found in all environments. However, we show that the previously reported correlation between $\\alpha$-element abundance ratios and velocity dispersion disappears when a full account is taken of the the abundance ratio pattern in the calibration stars. This correlation is thus found to be an artifact of incomplete calibration to the Lick system. Variations are seen in the ranges and average values of age, metallicity and $\\alpha$-e...

  10. Fornax compact object survey FCOS: On the nature of Ultra Compact Dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mieske, S; Infante, L

    2004-01-01

    The results of the Fornax Compact Object Survey (FCOS) are presented. The FCOS aims at investigating the nature of the Ultra Compact Dwarf galaxies (UCDs) recently discovered in the center of the Fornax cluster (Drinkwater et al. 2000). 280 unresolved objects in the magnitude space covering UCDs and bright globular clusters (1820 mag) at 96% confidence. The mean velocity of the bright compact objects is consistent with that of the dwarf galaxy population in Fornax, but inconsistent with that of NGC 1399's globular cluster system at 93.5% confidence. The compact objects follow a colour magnitude relation with a slope very similar to that of normal dEs, but shifted about 0.2 mag redwards. The magnitude distribution of compact objects shows a fluent transition between UCDs and GCs with an overpopulation of 8 +/- 4 objects for V<20 mag with respect to the extrapolation of NGC 1399's GC luminosity function. The spatial distribution of bright compact objects is in comparison to the faint ones more extended at 88...

  11. Revealing the nature of star forming blue early-type galaxies at low redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Koshy; Zingade, Kshama

    2015-11-01

    Context. Star forming early-type galaxies with blue optical colours at low redshift can be used to test our current understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Aims: We want to reveal the fuel and triggering mechanism for star formation in these otherwise passively evolving red and dead stellar systems. Methods: We undertook an optical and ultraviolet study of 55 star forming blue early-type galaxies, searching for signatures of recent interactions that could be driving the molecular gas into the galaxy and potentially triggering the star formation. Results: We report here our results on star forming blue early-type galaxies with tidal trails and in close proximity to neighbouring galaxies that are evidence of ongoing or recent interactions between galaxies. There are 12 galaxies with close companions with similar redshifts, among which two galaxies are having ongoing interactions that potentially trigger the star formation. Two galaxies show a jet feature that could be due to the complete tidal disruption of the companion galaxy. The interacting galaxies have high star formation rates and very blue optical colours. Galaxies with no companion could have undergone a minor merger in the recent past. Conclusions: The recent or ongoing interaction with a gas-rich neighbouring galaxy could be responsible for bringing cold gas to an otherwise passively evolving early-type galaxy. The sudden gas supply could trigger the star formation, eventually creating a blue early-type galaxy. The galaxies with ongoing tidal interaction are blue and star forming, thereby implying that blue early-type galaxies can exist even when the companion is on flyby so does not end up in a merger. Based on data compiled from Galaxy Zoo project, and the volunteers contribution are acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx

  12. Revealing the nature of star forming blue early-type galaxies at low redshift

    CERN Document Server

    George, Koshy

    2015-01-01

    Context: Star forming early-type galaxies with blue optical colours at low redshift can be used to test our current understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Aims: We want to reveal the fuel and triggering mechanism for star formation in these otherwise passively evolving red and dead stellar systems. Methods: We undertook an optical and ultraviolet study of 55 star forming blue early-type galaxies, searching for signatures of recent interactions that could be driving the molecular gas into the galaxy and potentially triggering the star formation. Results: We report here our results on star forming blue early-type galaxies with tidal trails and in close proximity to neighbouring galaxies that are evidence of ongoing or recent interactions between galaxies. There are 12 galaxies with close companions with similar redshifts, among which two galaxies are having ongoing interactions that potentially trigger the star formation. Two galaxies show a jet feature that could be due to the complete tidal disrupti...

  13. CANDELS: The progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at z~2

    CERN Document Server

    Barro, Guillermo; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G; Koo, David C; Williams, Christina C; Kocevski, Dale D; Trump, Jonathan R; Mozena, Mark; McGrath, Elizabeth; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn; Bell, Eric F; Croton, Darren J; Dekel, Avishai; Ashby, M L N; Ferguson, Henry C; Fontana, Adriano; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grogin, Norman A; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish P; Hopkins, Philip F; Huang, Kuang-Han; Koekemoer, Anton M; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Newman, Jeffrey A; Porter, Lauren A; Primack, Joel R; Ryan, Russell E; Rosario, David; Somerville, Rachel S

    2012-01-01

    We combine high-resolution HST/WFC3 images with multi-wavelength photometry to track the evolution of structure and activity of massive (log(M*) > 10) galaxies at redshifts z = 1.4 - 3 in two fields of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). We detect compact, star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) whose number densities, masses, sizes, and star formation rates qualify them as likely progenitors of compact, quiescent, massive galaxies (cQGs) at z = 1.5 - 3. At z > 2 most cSFGs have specific star-formation rates (sSFR = 10^-9 yr^-1) half that of typical, massive SFGs at the same epoch, and host X-ray luminous AGN 30 times (~30%) more frequently. These properties suggest that cSFGs are formed by gas-rich processes (mergers or disk-instabilities) that induce a compact starburst and feed an AGN, which, in turn, quench the star formation on dynamical timescales (few 10^8 yr). The cSFGs are continuously being formed at z = 2 - 3 and fade to cQGs by z = 1.5. After this epoch, cSFGs are r...

  14. The effects of host galaxy properties on merging compact binaries detectable by LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Brooks, Alyson; Shen, Sijing; Governato, Fabio; Christensen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation can produce present-day galaxies with a large range of assembly and star formation histories. A detailed study of the metallicity evolution and star formation history of such simulations can assist in predicting LIGO-detectable compact object binary mergers. Recent simulations of compact binary evolution suggest the compact object merger rate depends sensitively on the progenitor's metallicity. Rare low-metallicity star formation during galaxy assembly can produce more detected compact binaries than typical star formation. Using detailed simulations of galaxy and chemical evolution, we determine how sensitively the compact binary populations of galaxies with similar present-day appearance depend on the details of their assembly. We also demonstrate by concrete example the extent to which dwarf galaxies overabundantly produce compact binary mergers, particularly binary black holes, relative to more massive galaxies. We discuss the implications for transient multimes...

  15. Galaxy interactions in the Hickson Compact Group 88

    CERN Document Server

    Brosch, Noah

    2015-01-01

    I present observations of the Hickson Compact Group 88 (HCG88) obtained during the commissioning of a new 28-inch telescope at the Wise Observatory. This galaxy group was advertised to be non-interacting, or to be in a very early interaction stage, but this is not the case. The observations reported here were done using a "luminance" filter, essentially a very broad R filter, reaching a low surface brightness level of about 26 mag per square arcsec. Additional observations were obtained in a narrow spectral band approximately centered on the rest-frame H-alpha line from the group. Contrary to previous studies, my observations show that at least two of the major galaxies have had significant interactions in the past, although probably not between themselves. I report the discovery of a faint extended tail emerging from the brightest of the group galaxies, severe isophote twisting and possible outer shells around another galaxy, and map the HII regions in all the galaxies.

  16. Faint Dwarf Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 90

    CERN Document Server

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Puzia, Thomas H; Muñoz, Roberto P; Eigenthaler, Paul; Georgiev, Iskren Y; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hilker, Michael; Lançon, Ariane; Mamon, Gary; Mieske, Steffen; Miller, Bryan W; Peng, Eric W; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a very diverse set of five low-surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxy candidates in Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) detected in deep U- and I-band images obtained with VLT/VIMOS. These are the first LSB dwarf galaxy candidates found in a compact group of galaxies. We measure spheroid half-light radii in the range $0.7\\!\\lesssim\\! r_{\\rm eff}/{\\rm kpc}\\! \\lesssim\\! 1.5$ with luminosities of $-11.65\\!\\lesssim\\! M_U\\! \\lesssim\\! -9.42$ and $-12.79\\!\\lesssim\\! M_I\\! \\lesssim\\! -10.58$ mag, corresponding to a color range of $(U\\!-\\!I)_0\\!\\simeq\\!1.1\\!-\\!2.2$ mag and surface brightness levels of $\\mu_U\\!\\simeq\\!28.1\\,{\\rm mag/arcsec^2}$ and $\\mu_I\\!\\simeq\\!27.4\\,{\\rm mag/arcsec^2}$. Their colours and luminosities are consistent with a diverse set of stellar population properties. Assuming solar and 0.02 Z$_\\odot$ metallicities we obtain stellar masses in the range $M_*|_{Z_\\odot} \\simeq 10^{5.7-6.3} M_{\\odot}$ and $M_*|_{0.02\\,Z_\\odot}\\!\\simeq\\!10^{6.3-8}\\,M_{\\odot}$. Three dwarfs are ol...

  17. The nature of Hα-selected galaxies at z > 2. II. Clumpy galaxies and compact star-forming galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Kodama, Tadayuki; Koyama, Yusei [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Tanaka, Ichi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Hayashi, Masao [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Shimakawa, Rhythm, E-mail: tadaki.ken@nao.ac.jp [Department of Astronomical Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    We present the morphological properties of Hα-selected galaxies at z > 2 in SXDF-UDS-CANDELS field. With high-resolution optical/near-infrared images obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope, we identify giant clumps within the Hα emitters (HAEs). We find that at least 41% of our sample shows clumpy structures in the underlying disks. The color gradient of clumps is commonly seen in the sense that the clumps near the galactic center tend to be redder than those in the outer regions. The mid-infrared detection in galaxies with red clumps and the spatial distribution of Hα emission suggest that dusty star-formation activity is probably occurring in the nuclear red clumps. A gas supply to a bulge component through clump migration is one of the most potent physical processes for producing such dusty star-forming clumps and forming massive bulges in local early-type galaxies. They would become large quiescent galaxies at later times just by consumption or blowout of remaining gas. Also, while most of the HAEs have extended disks, we observe two massive, compact HAEs whose stellar surface densities are significantly higher. They are likely to be the direct progenitors of massive, compact quiescent galaxies at z = 1.5-2.0. Two evolutionary paths to massive quiescent galaxies are devised to account for both the size growth of quiescent galaxies and their increased number density from z ∼ 2 to z = 0.

  18. Faint Dwarf Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Taylor, Matthew A.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Eigenthaler, Paul; Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hilker, Michael; Lançon, Ariane; Mamon, Gary; Mieske, Steffen; Miller, Bryan W.; Peng, Eric W.; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of a very diverse set of five low-surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxy candidates in Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) detected in deep U- and I-band images obtained with VLT/VIMOS. These are the first LSB dwarf galaxy candidates found in a compact group of galaxies. We measure spheroid half-light radii in the range 0.7 ≲ reff/kpc ≲ 1.5 with luminosities of -11.65 ≲ MU ≲ -9.42 and -12.79 ≲ MI ≲ -10.58 mag, corresponding to a color range of (U - I)0 ≃ 1.1 - 2.2 mag and surface brightness levels of μU ≃ 28.1 mag/arcsec2 and μI ≃ 27.4 mag/arcsec2. Their colours and luminosities are consistent with a diverse set of stellar population properties. Assuming solar and 0.02 Z⊙ metallicities we obtain stellar masses in the range M_*|_{Z_odot } ˜eq 10^{5.7-6.3} M_{odot } and M_*|_{0.02 Z_odot } ˜eq 10^{6.3-8} M_{odot }. Three dwarfs are older than 1 Gyr, while the other two significantly bluer dwarfs are younger than ˜2 Gyr at any mass/metallicity combination. Altogether, the new LSB dwarf galaxy candidates share properties with dwarf galaxies found throughout the Local Volume and in nearby galaxy clusters such as Fornax. We find a pair of candidates with ˜2 kpc projected separation, which may represent one of the closest dwarf galaxy pairs found. We also find a nucleated dwarf candidate, with a nucleus size of reff ≃ 46 - 63 pc and magnitude MU, 0 = -7.42 mag and (U - I)0 = 1.51 mag, which is consistent with a nuclear stellar disc with a stellar mass in the range 104.9 - 6.5 M⊙.

  19. Quiescent Compact Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift in the COSMOS field. I. The Number Density

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanov, Ivana; Zahid, H Jabran; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of compact galaxy number density over the redshift range $0.21$ for equivalently selected compact samples. Small variations in the abundance of the COSMOS compact sources as a function of redshift correspond to known structures in the field. The constancy of the compact galaxy number density is robust and does not depend on the compactness threshold or the stellar mass range (for $M_\\ast>10^{10}\\, M_\\odot$). To maintain constant number density any size growth of high-redshift compact systems with decreasing redshift must be balanced by formation of quiescent compact systems at $z<1$.

  20. Blue lobes in the Hydra A cluster central galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnamara, Brian R.

    1995-01-01

    We present new U- and I-band images of the centrally dominant galaxy in the Hydra A cluster, obtained with the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope at La Palma. The galaxy is centered in a poor, X-ray-luminous cluster whose gaseous intracluster medium is apparently cooling at a rate of m-dot(sub CF) approximately 3000 solar masses/yr. The galaxy's structure is that of a normal giant elliptical galaxy, apart from the central approximately 8 x 6 arcsec (approximately 12 x 9 kpc) region which contains an unusually blue, lobelike structure that is spatially coincident with a luminous emission-line nebula in rotation about the nucleus. Based on near spatial coincidence of the central continuum structure and the emission-line nebula, we suggest that the blue continuum is due to a warm stellar population in a central disk. In order to isolate and study the structure of the disk, we have subtracted a smooth galactic background model from the U-band image. The disk's surface brightness profiles along its major and minor axes decline roughly exponentially with radius. The disk's axial ratio is consistent with a nearly edge-on thick disk or a thin disk that is inclined with respect to the line of sight. The bluest regions, located a few arcsec on either side of the nucleus (giving the lobelike appearance), may be due to locally enhanced star formation or a seeing-blurred ring of young stars embedded in the disk observed nearly edge-on. If star-formation is occurring with the local initial mass function, the central color, surface brightness, and dynamical mass would be consistent with models for star formation at a rate of less than and approximately 1 solar masses/yr which has persisted for the past approximately 10(exp 9) yr, a short burst (10(exp 7) yr) of star formation at a rate of approximately 30 solar masses/yr which occurred less than and approximately 10(exp 8) yr ago, or an instantaneous burst of star formation which occurred approximately 5 x 10(exp 7) yr ago. While the

  1. Are dusty galaxies blue? Insights on UV attenuation from dust-selected galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, C. M.; Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Scoville, N. Z. [California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sanders, D. B.; Lee, N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai' i, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Finkelstein, S. L. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Capak, P. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); De Zotti, G. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 2, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Fu, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Le Floc' h, E. [CEA-Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, bât. 709, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Ilbert, O. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de marseille, UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Ivison, R. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Takeuchi, T. T. [Nagoya University, Division of Particle and Astrophysical Science, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2014-12-01

    Galaxies' rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) properties are often used to directly infer the degree to which dust obscuration affects the measurement of star formation rates (SFRs). While much recent work has focused on calibrating dust attenuation in galaxies selected at rest-frame ultraviolet wavelengths, locally and at high-z, here we investigate attenuation in dusty, star forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected at far-infrared wavelengths. By combining multiwavelength coverage across 0.15-500 μm in the COSMOS field, in particular making use of Herschel imaging, and a rich data set on local galaxies, we find an empirical variation in the relationship between the rest-frame UV slope (β) and the ratio of infrared-to-ultraviolet emission (L {sub IR}/L {sub UV} ≡ IRX) as a function of infrared luminosity, or total SFR. Both locally and at high-z, galaxies above SFR ≳ 50 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} deviate from the nominal IRX-β relation toward bluer colors by a factor proportional to their increasing IR luminosity. We also estimate contamination rates of DSFGs on high-z dropout searches of <<1% at z ≲ 4-10, providing independent verification that contamination from very dusty foreground galaxies is low in Lyman-break galaxy searches. Overall, our results are consistent with the physical interpretation that DSFGs, e.g., galaxies with >50 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, are dominated at all epochs by short-lived, extreme burst events, producing many young O and B stars that are primarily, yet not entirely, enshrouded in thick dust cocoons. The blue rest-frame UV slopes of DSFGs are inconsistent with the suggestion that most DSFGs at z ∼ 2 exhibit steady-state star formation in secular disks.

  2. Mid-Infrared Evidence for Accelerated Evolution in Compact Group Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Lisa May; Gallagher, Sarah C; Hibbard, John E; Hornschemeier, Ann E; Charlton, Jane C; Jarrett, Thomas H

    2009-01-01

    We find evidence for accelerated evolution in compact group galaxies from the distribution in mid-infrared colorspace of 42 galaxies from 12 Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) compared to the the distributions of several other samples including the LVL+SINGS galaxies, interacting galaxies, and galaxies from the Coma Cluster. We find that the HCG galaxies are not uniformly distributed in colorspace, as well as quantitative evidence for a gap. Galaxies in the infall region of the Coma cluster also exhibit a non-uniform distribution and a less well defined gap, which may reflect a similarity with the compact group environment. Neither the Coma Center or interacting samples show evidence of a gap, leading us to speculate that the gap is unique to the environment of high galaxy density where gas has not been fully processed or stripped.

  3. Probing the Central Regions of Nearby Compact Elliptical Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Davidge, T J; McGregor, P J

    2008-01-01

    K-band spectroscopic observations recorded with NIFS+ALTAIR on Gemini North are used to probe the central arcsec of the compact elliptical galaxies NGC 4486B, NGC 5846A, and M32. The angular resolution of these data is ~0.1 arcsec FWHM. The central stellar contents of NGC 4486B and NGC 5846A are similar, in the sense that they occupy the same regions of the (Ca I, 12CO), (Na I, 12CO) and (13CO, 12CO) diagrams. The NGC 4486B and NGC 5846A observations depart from the sequence defined by solar neighborhood giants in the (Na I, 12CO) diagram, in a sense that is consistent with both galaxies having non-solar chemical mixtures. For comparison, the M32 data is consistent with a chemical enrichment history like that in the Galactic disk; M32 could not have formed from the stripping of a larger elliptical galaxy. The behaviour of the near-infrared line indices as a function of radius is also investigated. The radial gradients that are present in NGC 4486B and NGC 5846A at large radii break down or reverse within the ...

  4. The Confinement of Star-Forming Galaxies into a Main Sequence through Episodes of Gas Compaction, Depletion, and Replenishment

    CERN Document Server

    Tacchella, Sandro; Carollo, C Marcella; Ceverino, Daniel; DeGraf, Colin; Lapiner, Sharon; Mandelker, Nir; Primack, Joel R

    2015-01-01

    Using cosmological simulations, we address the properties of high-redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs) across their main sequence (MS) in the plane of star-formation rate (SFR) versus stellar mass. We relate them to the evolution of galaxies through phases of gas compaction, depletion, possible replenishment, and eventual quenching. We find that the high-SFR galaxies in the upper envelope of the MS are compact, with high gas fractions and short depletion times ("blue nuggets"), while the lower-SFR galaxies in the lower envelope have lower central gas densities, lower gas fractions and longer depletion times, consistent with observed gradients across the MS. Stellar-structure gradients are negligible. The SFGs oscillate about the MS ridge on timescales $\\sim0.4~t_{\\mathrm{Hubble}}$ ($\\sim1$ Gyr at $z\\sim3$). The propagation upwards is due to gas compaction, triggered, e.g., by mergers, counter-rotating streams, and/or violent disc instabilities. The downturn at the upper envelope is due to central gas depleti...

  5. A Comprehensive Archival Search for Counterparts to Ultra-Compact High Velocity Clouds: Five Local Volume Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sand, D J; Bennet, P; Willman, B; Hargis, J; Strader, J; Olszewski, E; Tollerud, E J; Simon, J D; Caldwell, N; Guhathakurta, P; James, B L; Koposov, S; McLeod, B; Morrell, N; Peacock, M; Salinas, R; Seth, A C; Stark, D P; Toloba, E

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of five Local Volume dwarf galaxies uncovered during a comprehensive archival search for optical counterparts to ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs). The UCHVC population of HI clouds are thought to be candidate gas-rich, low mass halos at the edge of the Local Group and beyond, but no comprehensive search for stellar counterparts to these systems has been presented. Careful visual inspection of all publicly available optical and ultraviolet imaging at the position of the UCHVCs revealed six blue, diffuse counterparts with a morphology consistent with a faint dwarf galaxy beyond the Local Group. Optical spectroscopy of all six candidate dwarf counterparts show that five have an H$\\alpha$-derived velocity consistent with the coincident HI cloud, confirming their association; the sixth diffuse counterpart is likely a background object. The size and luminosity of the UCHVC dwarfs is consistent with other known Local Volume dwarf irregular galaxies. The gas fraction ($M_{HI}/M_{sta...

  6. Towards a census of super-compact massive galaxies in the Kilo Degree Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Tortora, C; Napolitano, N R; Roy, N; Radovich, M; Cavuoti, S; Brescia, M; Longo, G; Getman, F; Capaccioli, M; Grado, L; Kuijken, K H; de Jong, J T A; McFarland, J P

    2015-01-01

    The abundance of compact and massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) can provide significant constraints on the galaxy merging history. The optical Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), carried out with the VST, gives a unique opportunity to perform a complete census of the most compact galaxies in the Universe. This paper presents a first census of compact galaxy candidates from the first 156 square degrees of KIDS. Effective radii (Re) in the g-, r-, and i- bands are derived fitting galaxy images with PSF-convolved S\\'ersic models, high-quality photo-z, are derived from machine learning techniques, and stellar masses, are calculated by fitting aperture photometry with predictions from stellar population models. After the morphological star/galaxy separation, massiveness ($M_{\\star} > 8 \\times 10^{10}\\, \\rm M_{\\odot}$) and compactness ($R_{e} 0.2, while, remarkably, no such system is found at z<0.2. (abridged)

  7. A Population of Compact Elliptical Galaxies Detected with the Virtual Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Chilingarian, Igor; Revaz, Yves; Dodonov, Serguei; Durand, Daniel; Durret, Florence; Micol, Alberto; Slezak, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Compact elliptical galaxies are characterized by small sizes and high stellar densities. They are thought to form through tidal stripping of massive progenitors. However, only a handful of them were known, preventing us from understanding the role played by this mechanism in galaxy evolution. We present a population of 21 compact elliptical galaxies gathered with the Virtual Observatory. Follow-up spectroscopy and data mining, using high-resolution images and large databases, show that all the galaxies exhibit old metal-rich stellar populations different from those of dwarf elliptical galaxies of similar masses but similar to those of more massive early-type galaxies, supporting the tidal stripping scenario. Their internal properties are reproduced by numerical simulations, which result in compact dynamically hot remnants resembling the galaxies in our sample.

  8. Kinematics of galaxies in Compact Groups. Studying the B-band Tully-Fisher relation

    CERN Document Server

    Torres-Flores, S; Amram, P; Plana, H; Epinat, B; Carignan, C; Balkowski, C

    2010-01-01

    We obtained new Fabry-Perot data cubes and derived velocity fields, monochromatic and velocity dispersion maps for 28 galaxies in the Hickson compact groups 37, 40, 47, 49, 54, 56, 68, 79 and 93. We find that one third of the non-barred compact group galaxies have position angle misalignments between the stellar and gaseous components. This and the asymmetric rotation curves are clear signatures of kinematic perturbations, probably due to interactions among compact group galaxies. A comparison between the B-band Tully-Fisher relation for compact group galaxies and that for the GHASP field-galaxy sample shows that, despite the high fraction of compact group galaxies with asymmetric rotation curves, these lie on the Tully-Fisher relation defined by galaxies in less dense environments, although with more scatter. This is in agreement with previous results, but now confirmed for a larger sample of 41 galaxies. We confirm the tendency for compact group galaxies at the low-mass end of the Tully-Fisher relation (HCG...

  9. Tidal Tails in Interacting Galaxies: Formation of Compact Stellar Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Mullan, B; Konstantopoulos, I S; Bastian, N; Chandar, R; Durrell, P R; Elmegreen, D; English, J; Gallagher, S C; Gronwall, C; Hibbard, J E; Hunsberger, S; Johnson, K E; Kepley, A; Knierman, K; Koribalski, B; Lee, K H; Maybhate, A; Palma, C; Vacca, W D

    2009-01-01

    We have used V- and I- band images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to identify compact stellar clusters within the tidal tails of twelve different interacting galaxies. The seventeen tails within our sample span a physical parameter space of HI/stellar masses, tail pressure and density through their diversity of tail lengths, optical brightnesses, mass ratios, HI column densities, stage on the Toomre sequence, and tail kinematics. Our preliminary findings in this study indicate that star cluster demographics of the tidal tail environment are compatible with the current understanding of star cluster formation in quiescent systems, possibly only needing changes in certain parameters or normalization of the Schechter cluster initial mass function (CIMF) to replicate what we observe in color-magnitude diagrams and a brightest absolute magnitude -- log N plot.

  10. Optically Selected Compact Stellar Regions and Tidal Dwarf Galaxies in (Ultra)-Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Miralles-Caballero, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This thesis work is devoted to the analysis of compact star forming regions (knots) in a representative sample of 32 (U)LIRGs. The project is based mainly on optical high angular resolution images taken with the ACS and WFPC2 cameras on board the HST telescope, data from a high spatial resolution simulation of a major galaxy encounter, and with the combination of optical integral field spectroscopy (IFS) taken with the INTEGRAL (WHT) and VIMOS (VLT) instruments. A few thousand knots -a factor of more than one order of magnitude higher than in previous studies- are identified and their photometric properties are characterized as a function of the infrared luminosity of the system and of the interaction phase. These properties are compared with those of compact objects identified in simulations of galaxy encounters. Finally, and with the additional use of IFS data, we search for suitable candidates to tidal dwarf galaxies, setting up constraints on the formation of these objects for the (U)LIRG class. Knots in ...

  11. 3D spectroscopy of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Gallego, J.; Guzmán, R.; Gruel, N.

    2007-01-01

    Las galaxias luminosas compactas azules (LCBGs) son galaxias de elevado brillo superficial, más azules que una SBc tópica y más brillantes que 0:25L, que experimentan en la actualidad un violento brote de formación estelar. Las LCBGs representan el homólogo más cercano a la abundante población de galaxias starburst a z alto e intermedio, entre las que se incluyen las galaxias Lyman-break a z 2. Hemos seleccionado una muestra pequeña, aunque representativa, de 24 LCBGs de los catál...

  12. Compact collimators for high brightness blue LEDs using dielectric multilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, H.J.; Ma, H.; Ho, C.; Li, M.; Mu, C.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method is presented to inject the light of millimeter-sized high-brightness blue LEDs into light guides of submillimeter thickness. Use is made of an interference filter that is designed to pass only those modes that will propagate in the light guide by total internal reflection. Other modes

  13. The fate of high redshift massive compact galaxies in dense environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, Tobias; /Zurich, ETH; Mayer, Lucio; /Zurich U.; Carollo, Marcella; /Zurich, ETH; Feldmann, Robert; /Fermilab /Chicago U., KICP

    2012-01-01

    Massive compact galaxies seem to be more common at high redshift than in the local universe, especially in denser environments. To investigate the fate of such massive galaxies identified at z {approx} 2 we analyse the evolution of their properties in three cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that form virialized galaxy groups of mass {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}} hosting a central massive elliptical/S0 galaxy by redshift zero. We find that at redshift {approx} 2 the population of galaxies with M{sub *} > 2 x 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} is diverse in terms of mass, velocity dispersion, star formation and effective radius, containing both very compact and relatively extended objects. In each simulation all the compact satellite galaxies have merged into the central galaxy by redshift 0 (with the exception of one simulation where one of such satellite galaxy survives). Satellites of similar mass at z = 0 are all less compact than their high redshift counterparts. They form later than the galaxies in the z = 2 sample and enter the group potential at z < 1, when dynamical friction times are longer than the Hubble time. Also, by z = 0 the central galaxies have increased substantially their characteristic radius via a combination of in situ star formation and mergers. Hence in a group environment descendants of compact galaxies either evolve towards larger sizes or they disappear before the present time as a result of the environment in which they evolve. Since the group-sized halos that we consider are representative of dense environments in the {Lambda}CDM cosmology, we conclude that the majority of high redshift compact massive galaxies do not survive until today as a result of the environment.

  14. Photographic photometry of 16000 galaxies on ESO blue and red survey plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauberts, A.; Valentijn, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    An ongoing photometric survey of 16,000 galaxies on ESO red and blue plates is described. The galaxies of the ESO/Uppsala Catalog (Lauberts, 1982) are being PDS scanned, and the results are combined with existing photometry and supplementary observational data obtained at the 1-m ESO telescope to fo

  15. Caught in the act the identification of the galaxies responsible for the faint blue excess

    CERN Document Server

    Driver, S P; Griffiths, R E; Driver, Simon P; Windhorst, Rogier A; Griffiths, Richard E

    1995-01-01

    We summarise recent Hubble Space Telescope results on the morphology of faint field galaxies. Our two principle results are: (1) the galaxies responsible for the faint blue excess have late-type/irregular morphology and (2) the number counts of normal galaxies, ellipticals and early-type spirals, are well fit by standard no-evolution models implying that the giant population was in place and mature by a redshift of \\ge 0.7.

  16. Evolution of blue E/S0 galaxies from z ~ 1: merger remnants or disk-rebuilding galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Company, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Tresse, L.; Bolzonella, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Maier, C.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Studying outliers from the bimodal distribution of galaxies in the color-mass space, such as morphological early-type galaxies residing in the blue cloud (blue E/S0s), can help for better understanding the physical mechanisms that lead galaxy migrations in this space. Aims: In this paper we try to bring new clues to studying the evolution of the properties of a significant sample of blue E/S0 galaxies in the COSMOS field. Methods: We define blue E/S0 galaxies as objects having a clear early-type morphology on the HST/ACS images (according to our automated classification scheme galSVM) but with a blue rest-frame color (defined by using the SED best-fit template on the COSMOS primary photometric catalogs). Combining these two measurements with spectroscopic redshifts from the zCOSMOS 10k release, we isolated 210 IAB 1010 in three redshift bins (0.2 late type populations (bimodality mass) indicating that the abundance of blue E/S0 is another measure of the downsizing effect in the build-up of the red sequence. There seems to be a turn-over mass in the nature of blue E/S0 galaxies. Above log (M_*/M_⊙) ~ 10.8 blue E/S0 resemble to merger remnants probably migrating to the red sequence on a time scale of ˜3 Gyr. Below this mass, they seem to be closer to normal late-type galaxies, as if they were the result of minor mergers that triggered the central star formation and built a central bulge component or were (re)building a disk from the surrounding gas in a much longer time scale, suggesting that they are moving back or staying in the blue cloud. This turn-over mass does not seem to evolve significantly from z ~ 1 in contrast to the threshold mass and therefore does not seem to be linked with the relative abundance of blue E/S0s.

  17. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): deconstructing bimodality - I. Red ones and blue ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Edward N.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brown, Michael J. I.; Colless, Matthew; Driver, Simon; Norberg, Peder; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Brough, Sarah; Cluver, Michelle E.; Gunawardhana, Madusha; Kelvin, Lee S.; Liske, Jochen; Conselice, Christopher J.; Croom, Scott; Foster, Caroline; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Lara-Lopez, Maritza; Loveday, Jon

    2015-01-01

    We measure the mass functions for generically red and blue galaxies, using a z 8.7 field galaxies from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. Our motivation is that, as we show, the dominant uncertainty in existing measurements stems from how `red' and `blue' galaxies have been selected/defined. Accordingly, we model our data as two naturally overlapping populations, each with their own mass function and colour-mass relation, which enables us characterize the two populations without having to specify a priori which galaxies are `red' and `blue'. Our results then provide the means to derive objective operational definitions for the terms `red' and `blue', which are based on the phenomenology of the colour-mass diagrams. Informed by this descriptive modelling, we show that (1) after accounting for dust, the stellar colours of `blue' galaxies do not depend strongly on mass; (2) the tight, flat `dead sequence' does not extend much below log M* ˜ 10.5; instead, (3) the stellar colours of `red' galaxies vary rather strongly with mass, such that lower mass `red' galaxies have bluer stellar populations; (4) below log M* ˜ 9.3, the `red' population dissolves into obscurity, and it becomes problematic to talk about two distinct populations; as a consequence, (5) it is hard to meaningfully constrain the shape, including the existence of an upturn, of the `red' galaxy mass function below log M* ˜ 9.3. Points 1-4 provide meaningful targets for models of galaxy formation and evolution to aim for.

  18. On central black holes in ultra-compact dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mieske, Steffen; Baumgardt, Holger; Luetzgendorf, Nora; Neumayer, Nadine; Hilker, Michael

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: The dynamical mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of massive ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) are about 50% higher than predicted by stellar population models. AIMS: Here we investigate the possibility that these elevated M/L ratios are caused by a central black hole (BH), heating up the internal motion of stars. We focus on a sample of ~50 extragalactic UCDs for which velocity dispersions and structural parameters have been measured. METHODS: Using up-to-date distance moduli and a consistent treatment of aperture and seeing effects, we calculate the ratio Psi=(M/L)_{dyn}/(M/L)_{pop} between the dynamical and the stellar population M/L of UCDs. For all UCDs with Psi>1 we estimate the mass of a hypothetical central BH needed to reproduce the observed integrated velocity dispersion. RESULTS: Massive UCDs (M>10^7 M_*) have an average Psi = 1.7 +-0.2, implying notable amounts of dark mass in them. We find that, on average, central BH masses of 10-15% of the UCD mass can explain these elevated dynamical M/L rat...

  19. Distant Compact Clusters of Galaxies from the BMW survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Antonio, Ian; Guzzo, Luigi; Longhetti, Marcella; Moretti, Alberto; Campana, Sergio; Lazzati, Davide; Panzera, Mariarosa; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    2002-02-01

    We propose to use SQIID to identify high-redshift clusters of galaxies from the BMW, an X-ray selected sample of serendipitously detected extended sources from the ROSAT HRI archive. The BMW survey is unique because of the superior angular resolution of the HRI. In fact, this is the only modern sample of distant clusters available that is not based on the low-resolution PSPC. Using 4m optical imaging, we have already identified several high-redshift clusters, two of which have z> 0.8, thus confirming the ability of the survey to peer efficiently into the z~ 1 regime, where only a handful of X-ray clusters are known. To test the evolution of the cluster abundance, we must increase the number of clusters known in this redshift regime. The BMW survey provides us with the only current opportunity to study compact clusters missing in all PSPC surveys. Because z~ 1 ellipticals have very red colors, K-band imaging is the most effective way of identifying these clusters. With SQIID, we also can obtain redshift estimates via the J-K red sequence. We propose near-IR imaging in J,H,K of 30 highest-z cluster candidates from the BMW survey, as indicated by their small size and low flux. This will allow efficient use of 8-meter spectroscopy to follow up the high-end tail of the redshift distribution.

  20. Compact Groups of Galaxies with Complete Spectroscopic Redshifts in the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Sohn, Jubee; Geller, Margaret J; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Rines, Kenneth J; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lee, Gwang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Dynamical analysis of compact groups provides important tests of models of compact group formation and evolution. By compiling 2066 redshifts from FLWO/FAST, from the literature, and from SDSS DR12 in the fields of compact groups in \\citet{McC09}, we construct the largest sample of compact groups with complete spectroscopic redshifts in the redshift range $0.01 < z < 0.22$. This large redshift sample shows that the interloper fraction in the \\citet{McC09} compact group candidates is $\\sim 42\\%$. A secure sample of 332 compact groups includes 192 groups with four or more member galaxies and 140 groups with three members. The fraction of early-type galaxies in these compact groups is 62\\%, slightly higher than for the original Hickson compact groups. The velocity dispersions of early- and late-type galaxies in compact groups change little with groupcentric radius; the radii sampled are less than $100 ~h^{-1}$ kpc, smaller than the radii typically sampled by members of massive clusters of galaxies. The phy...

  1. Tidal Streams in Newly Discovered compact elliptical (cE) galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Huxor, Avon; Price, James; Harniman, Rob

    2010-01-01

    We present two newly-discovered, compact elliptical (cE) galaxies, which exhibit clear evidence of tidal steams, found in a search of SDSS DR7. The structural parameters of the cEs are derived using GALFIT and give effective radii < 400 pc. They also possess young to intermediate-age stellar populations. These two cEs provide direct evidence, a "smoking gun", for the process of tidal stripping that is believed to be the origin of M32-type galaxies. Both are found in small group environments with many late-type galaxies, suggesting that we may be seeing the formation of such galaxies in dynamically young galaxy groups.

  2. The diverse evolutionary paths of simulated high-z massive, compact galaxies to z = 0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellons, Sarah; Torrey, Paul; Ma, Chung-Pei; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Pillepich, Annalisa; Nelson, Dylan; Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Massive quiescent galaxies have much smaller physical sizes at high redshift than today. The strong evolution of galaxy size may be caused by progenitor bias, major and minor mergers, adiabatic expansion, and/or renewed star formation, but it is difficult to test these theories observationally. Herein, we select a sample of 35 massive, compact galaxies (M* = 1-3 × 1011 M⊙, M*/R1.5 > 1010.5 M⊙/kpc1.5) at z = 2 in the cosmological hydrodynamical simulation Illustris and trace them forwards to z = 0 to uncover their evolution and identify their descendants. By z = 0, the original factor of 3 difference in stellar mass spreads to a factor of 20. The dark matter halo masses similarly spread from a factor of 5 to 40. The galaxies' evolutionary paths are diverse: about half acquire an ex situ envelope and are the core of a more massive descendant, a third survive undisturbed and gain very little mass, 15 per cent are consumed in a merger with a more massive galaxy, and a small remainder are thoroughly mixed by major mergers. The galaxies grow in size as well as mass, and only ˜10 per cent remain compact by z = 0. The majority of the size growth is driven by the acquisition of ex situ mass. The most massive galaxies at z = 0 are the most likely to have compact progenitors, but this trend possesses significant dispersion which precludes a direct linkage to compact galaxies at z = 2. The compact galaxies' merger rates are influenced by their z = 2 environments, so that isolated or satellite compact galaxies (which are protected from mergers) are the most likely to survive to the present day.

  3. Evidence for (and Against) Progenitor Bias in the Size Growth of Compact Red Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Keating, Stephanie K; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Graves, Genevieve; Damjanov, Ivana; Yan, Renbin; Newman, Jeffrey; Simard, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Most massive passive galaxies are compact at high redshifts, but similarly compact massive galaxies are rare in the local universe. The most common interpretation of this phenomenon is that massive galaxies have grown in size by a factor of about five since redshift z=2. An alternative explanation is that recently quenched massive galaxies are larger (a "progenitor bias"). In this paper we explore the importance of progenitor bias by looking for systematic differences in the stellar populations of compact early-type galaxies in the DEEP2 survey as a function of size. Our analysis is based on applying the statistical technique of bootstrap resampling to constrain differences in the median ages of our samples and to begin to characterize the distribution of stellar populations in our co-added spectra. The light-weighted ages of compact early-type galaxies at redshifts 0.5 < z < 1.4 are compared to those of a control sample of larger galaxies at similar redshifts. We find that massive compact early-type ga...

  4. LoCuSS: Exploring the selection of faint blue background galaxies for cluster weak-lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziparo, Felicia; Smith, Graham P.; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Haines, Chris P.; Pereira, Maria J.; Egami, Eiichi

    2016-10-01

    Cosmological constraints from galaxy clusters rely on accurate measurements of the mass and internal structure of clusters. An important source of systematic uncertainty in cluster mass and structure measurements is the secure selection of background galaxies that are gravitationally lensed by clusters. This issue has been shown to be particular severe for faint blue galaxies. We therefore explore the selection of faint blue background galaxies, by reference to photometric redshift catalogues derived from the COSMOS survey and our own observations of massive galaxy clusters at z ≃ 0.2. We show that methods relying on photometric redshifts of galaxies in/behind clusters based on observations through five filters, and on deep 30-band COSMOS photometric redshifts are both inadequate to safely identify faint blue background galaxies with the same 1 per cent contamination level that we have achieved with red galaxies. This is due to the small number of filters used by the former, and absence of massive galaxy clusters at redshifts of interest in the latter. Nevertheless, our least contaminated blue galaxy sample yields stacked weak-lensing results consistent with our previously published results based on red galaxies, and we show that the stacked clustercentric number density profile of these faint blue galaxies is consistent with expectations from consideration of the lens magnification signal of the clusters. Indeed, the observed number density of blue background galaxies changes by ˜10 - 30 per cent across the radial range over which other surveys assume it to be flat.

  5. How robust are the size measurements of high-redshift compact galaxies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davari, Roozbeh [University of California, Riverside 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Peng, Chien Y. [Giant Magellan Telescope Organization 251 South Lake Avenue, Suite 300 Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Huang, Song [School of Space Science and Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-05-20

    Massive quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2 are apparently much more compact than galaxies of comparable mass today. How robust are these size measurements? We perform comprehensive simulations to determine possible biases and uncertainties in fitting single-component light distributions to real galaxies. In particular, we examine the robustness of the measurements of the luminosity, size, and other structural parameters. We devise simulations with increasing realism to systematically disentangle effects due to the technique (specifically using GALFIT) and the intrinsic structures of the galaxies. By accurately capturing the detailed substructures of nearby elliptical galaxies and then rescaling their sizes and signal-to-noise to mimic galaxies at different redshifts, we confirm that the massive quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2 are significantly more compact intrinsically than their local counterparts. Their observed compactness is not a result of missing faint outer light due to systematic errors in modeling. In fact, we find that fitting multi-component galaxies with a single Sérsic profile, the procedure most commonly adopted in the literature, biases the inferred sizes higher by up to 10%-20%, which accentuates the amount of size evolution required. If the sky estimation has been done robustly and the model for the point-spread function is fairly accurate, GALFIT can retrieve the properties of single-component galaxies over a wide range of signal-to-noise ratios without introducing any systematic errors.

  6. Radio continuum detection in blue early-type weak emission line galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Paswan, A.; Omar, A.

    2016-01-01

    The star formation rates (SFRs) in weak emission line (WEL) galaxies in a volume-limited ($0.02 < z < 0.05$) sample of blue early-type galaxies (ETGs) identified from SDSS, are constrained here using 1.4 GHz radio continuum emission. The direct detection of 1.4 GHz radio continuum emission is made in 8 WEL galaxies and a median stacking is performed on 57 WEL galaxies using VLA FIRST images. The median stacked 1.4 GHz flux density and luminosity are estimated as 79 $\\pm$ 19 $\\mu$Jy and 0.20 $...

  7. An over-massive black hole in the compact lenticular galaxy NGC 1277.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Remco C E; Gebhardt, Karl; Gültekin, Kayhan; van de Ven, Glenn; van der Wel, Arjen; Walsh, Jonelle L

    2012-11-29

    Most massive galaxies have supermassive black holes at their centres, and the masses of the black holes are believed to correlate with properties of the host-galaxy bulge component. Several explanations have been proposed for the existence of these locally established empirical relationships, including the non-causal, statistical process of galaxy-galaxy merging, direct feedback between the black hole and its host galaxy, and galaxy-galaxy merging and the subsequent violent relaxation and dissipation. The empirical scaling relations are therefore important for distinguishing between various theoretical models of galaxy evolution, and they furthermore form the basis for all black-hole mass measurements at large distances. Observations have shown that the mass of the black hole is typically 0.1 per cent of the mass of the stellar bulge of the galaxy. Until now, the galaxy with the largest known fraction of its mass in its central black hole (11 per cent) was the small galaxy NGC 4486B. Here we report observations of the stellar kinematics of NGC 1277, which is a compact, lenticular galaxy with a mass of 1.2 × 10(11) solar masses. From the data, we determine that the mass of the central black hole is 1.7 × 10(10) solar masses, or 59 per cent of its bulge mass. We also show observations of five other compact galaxies that have properties similar to NGC 1277 and therefore may also contain over-massive black holes. It is not yet known if these galaxies represent a tail of a distribution, or if disk-dominated galaxies fail to follow the usual black-hole mass scaling relations.

  8. A Blue Tilt in the Globular Cluster System of the Milky Way-like Galaxy NGC 5170

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Duncan; Harris, William; Bailin, Jeremy; Strader, Jay; Brodie, Jean; Larsen, Soeren

    2009-01-01

    Here we present HST/ACS imaging, in the B and I bands, of the edge-on Sb/Sc galaxy NGC 5170. Excluding the central disk region region, we detect a 142 objects with colours and sizes typical of globular clusters (GCs). Our main result is the discovery of a `blue tilt' (a mass-metallicity relation), at the 3sigma level, in the metal-poor GC subpopulation of this Milky Way like galaxy. The tilt is consistent with that seen in massive elliptical galaxies and with the self enrichment model of Bailin & Harris. For a linear mass-metallicity relation, the tilt has the form Z ~ L^{0.42 +/- 0.13}. We derive a total GC system population of 600 +/- 100, making it much richer than the Milky Way. However when this number is normalised by the host galaxy luminosity or stellar mass it is similar to that of M31. Finally, we report the presence of a potential Ultra Compact Dwarf of size ~ 6 pc and luminosity M_I ~ -12.5, assuming it is physically associated with NGC 5170.

  9. Cold Gas in Blue-Sequence E/S0s: Galaxies in Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Lisa H; Vogel, Stuart N; Baker, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    We examine the HI+H_2 content of blue-sequence E/S0s -- a recently identified population of galaxies that are morphologically early type, but reside alongside spiral galaxies in color vs. stellar mass space. We test the idea that the majority of low-to-intermediate mass blue-sequence E/S0s may be settled products of past mergers evolving toward later-type morphology via disk regrowth. We find that blue-sequence E/S0s with stellar masses 1.0, comparable to those of spiral galaxies. Preliminary CO(1-0) maps reveal disk-like rotation of molecular gas in the inner regions of several of our blue-sequence E/S0s, which suggests that they may have gas disks suitable for stellar disk regrowth. At the current rate of star formation, many of our blue-sequence E/S0s will exhaust their atomic gas reservoirs in <~ 3 Gyr. Over the same time period, most of these galaxies are capable of substantial growth in the stellar component. Star formation in blue-sequence E/S0s appears to be bursty, and likely involves inflow trig...

  10. Radio continuum detection in blue early-type weak emission line galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Paswan, A

    2016-01-01

    The star formation rates (SFRs) in weak emission line (WEL) galaxies in a volume-limited ($0.02 < z < 0.05$) sample of blue early-type galaxies (ETGs) identified from SDSS, are constrained here using 1.4 GHz radio continuum emission. The direct detection of 1.4 GHz radio continuum emission is made in 8 WEL galaxies and a median stacking is performed on 57 WEL galaxies using VLA FIRST images. The median stacked 1.4 GHz flux density and luminosity are estimated as 79 $\\pm$ 19 $\\mu$Jy and 0.20 $\\pm$ 0.05 $\\times$ 10$^{21}$ W Hz$^{-1}$ respectively. The radio far-infrared correlation in 4 WEL galaxies suggests that the radio continuum emission from WEL galaxies is most likely due to star formation activities. The median SFR for WEL galaxies is estimated as 0.23 $\\pm$ 0.06 M$_{\\odot}$yr$^{-1}$, which is much less compared to SFRs ($0.5 - 50$ M$_{\\odot}$yr$^{-1}$) in purely star forming blue ETGs. The SFRs in blue ETGs are found to be correlated with their stellar velocity dispersions ($\\sigma$) and decreasin...

  11. Discovery of Nine Intermediate Redshift Compact Quiescent Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanov, Ivana; Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J

    2013-01-01

    We identify nine galaxies with dynamical masses of M_dyn>10^10 M_sol as photometric point sources, but with redshifts between z=0.2 and z=0.6, in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectro-photometric database. All nine galaxies have archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. Surface brightness profile fitting confirms that all nine galaxies are extremely compact (with circularized half-light radii between 0.4 and 6.6 kpc and the median value of 0.74 kpc) for their velocity dispersion (1101 galaxies and the other eight objects follow the high-redshift dynamical size-mass relation.

  12. LoCuSS: Exploring the selection of faint blue background galaxies for cluster weak-lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Ziparo, Felicia; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Haines, Chris P; Pereira, Maria J; Egami, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological constraints from galaxy clusters rely on accurate measurements of the mass and internal structure of clusters. An important source of systematic uncertainty in cluster mass and structure measurements is the secure selection of background galaxies that are gravitationally lensed by clusters. This issue has been shown to be particular severe for faint blue galaxies. We therefore explore the selection of faint blue background galaxies, by reference to photometric redshift catalogs derived from the COSMOS survey and our own observations of massive galaxy clusters at z~0.2. We show that methods relying on photometric redshifts of galaxies in/behind clusters based on observations through five filters, and on deep 30-band COSMOS photometric redshifts are both inadequate to identify safely faint blue background galaxies. This is due to the small number of filters used by the former, and absence of massive galaxy clusters at redshifts of interest in the latter. We therefore develop a pragmatic method to c...

  13. From blue star-forming to red passive: galaxies in transition in different environments

    CERN Document Server

    Vulcani, Benedetta; Fritz, Jacopo; Fasano, Giovanni; Moretti, Alessia; Calvi, Rosa; Paccagnella, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Exploiting a mass complete (M_*>10^(10.25)M_sun) sample at 0.03Galaxy Group Catalog (PM2GC), we use the (U-B)_rf color and morphologies to characterize galaxies, in particular those that show signs of an ongoing or recent transformation of their star formation activity and/or morphology - green galaxies, red passive late types, and blue star-forming early types. Color fractions depend on mass and only for M_*<10^(10.7)M_sun on environment. The incidence of red galaxies increases with increasing mass, and, for M_*<10^(10.7)M_sun, decreases toward the group outskirts and in binary and single galaxies. The relative abundance of green and blue galaxies is independent of environment, and increases monotonically with galaxy mass. We also inspect galaxy structural parameters, star-formation properties, histories and ages and propose an evolutionary scenario for the different subpopulations. Color transformations are due to a reduction and suppression of SFR in bot...

  14. On the Shapes and Structures of High-Redshift Compact Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Chevance, M; Damjanov, I; Abraham, R G; Simard, L; Bergh, S van den; Caris, E; Glazebrook, K

    2012-01-01

    Recent deep Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 imaging suggests that a majority of compact quiescent massive galaxies at z~2 may contain disks. To investigate this claim, we have compared the ellipticity distribution of 31 carefully selected high-redshift massive quiescent compact galaxies to a set of mass-selected ellipticity and Sersic index distributions obtained from 2D structural fits to ~40,000$ nearby galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that the distribution of ellipticities for the high-redshift galaxies is consistent with the ellipticity distribution of a similarly chosen sample of massive early-type galaxies. However the distribution of Sersic indices for the high-redshift sample is inconsistent with that of local early-type galaxies, and instead resembles that of local disk-dominated populations. The mismatch between the properties of high-redshift compact galaxies and those of both local early-type and disk-dominated systems leads us to conclude that the basic stru...

  15. FROM BLUE STAR-FORMING TO RED PASSIVE: GALAXIES IN TRANSITION IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vulcani, Benedetta [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Poggianti, Bianca M.; Fasano, Giovanni; Moretti, Alessia [INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Fritz, Jacopo [Sterrenkundig Observatorium Vakgroep Fysica en Sterrenkunde Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, S9 B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Calvi, Rosa; Paccagnella, Angela [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universitá degli Studi di Padova, vicolo Osservatorio 2, I-35122 Padova (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting a mass-complete (M {sub *} > 10{sup 10.25} M {sub ☉}) sample at 0.03 Galaxy Group Catalog, we use the (U – B) {sub rf} color and morphologies to characterize galaxies, in particular those that show signs of an ongoing or recent transformation of their star-formation activity and/or morphology: green galaxies, red passive late types, and blue star-forming early types. Color fractions depend on mass and only for M {sub *} < 10{sup 10.7} M {sub ☉} on environment. The incidence of red galaxies increases with increasing mass, and, for M {sub *} < 10{sup 10.7} M {sub ☉}, decreases toward the group outskirts and in binary and single galaxies. The relative abundance of green and blue galaxies is independent of environment and increases monotonically with galaxy mass. We also inspect galaxy structural parameters, star-formation properties, histories, and ages and propose an evolutionary scenario for the different subpopulations. Color transformations are due to a reduction and suppression of the star-formation rate in both bulges and disks that does not noticeably affect galaxy structure. Morphological transitions are linked to an enhanced bulge-to-disk ratio that is due to the removal of the disk, not to an increase of the bulge. Our modeling suggests that green colors might be due to star-formation histories declining with long timescales, as an alternative scenario to the classical ''quenching'' processes. Our results suggest that galaxy transformations in star-formation activity and morphology depend neither on the environment nor on being a satellite or the most massive galaxy of a halo. The only environmental dependence we find is the higher fast quenching efficiency in groups giving origin to poststarburst signatures.

  16. The progenitors of the compact early-type galaxies at high redshift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use GOODS and CANDELS images to identify progenitors of massive (M > 1010 M ☉) compact early-type galaxies (ETGs) at z ∼ 1.6. Because merging and accretion increase the size of the stellar component of galaxies, if the progenitors are among known star-forming galaxies, these must be compact themselves. We select candidate progenitors among compact Lyman-break galaxies at z ∼ 3 on the basis of their mass, star-formation rate (SFR), and central stellar density, and we find that these account for a large fraction of, and possibly all, compact ETGs at z ∼ 1.6. We find that the average far-UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of the candidates is redder than that of the non-candidates, but the optical and mid-IR SED are the same, implying that the redder UV of the candidates is inconsistent with larger dust obscuration and consistent with more evolved (aging) star formation. This is in line with other evidence suggesting that compactness is a sensitive predictor of passivity among high-redshift massive galaxies. We also find that the light distribution of both the compact ETGs and their candidate progenitors does not show any extended 'halos' surrounding the compact 'core,' both in individual images and in stacks. We argue that this is generally inconsistent with the morphology of merger remnants, even if gas rich, as predicted by N-body simulations. This suggests that the compact ETGs formed via highly dissipative, mostly gaseous accretion of units whose stellar components are very small and undetected in the Hubble Space Telescope images, with their stellar mass assembling in situ, and that they have not experienced any major merging until the epoch of observations at z ∼ 1.6.

  17. The Environment of Massive Quiescent Compact Galaxies at $0.1

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanov, Ivana; Geller, Margaret J; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2015-01-01

    We use Hectospec mounted on the 6.5-meter MMT to carry out a redshift survey of red ($r-i>0.2$, $g-r>0.8$, $r<21.3$) galaxies in the COSMOS field to measure the environments of massive compact galaxies at intermediate redshift. The complete magnitude limited survey includes redshifts for 1766 galaxies with $r < 20.8$ covering the central square degree of the field; 65% of the redshifts in this sample are new. We select a complete magnitude limited quiescent sample based on the rest-frame $UVJ$ colors. When the density distribution is sampled on a scale of 2 Mpc massive compact galaxies inhabit systematically denser regions than the parent quiescent galaxy population. Non-compact quiescent galaxies with the same stellar masses as their compact counterparts populate a similar distribution of environments. Thus the massive nature of quiescent compacts accounts for the environment dependence and appears fundamental to their history.

  18. M32 Analogs? A Population of Massive Ultra Compact Dwarf Galaxies in intermediate redshift CLASH Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of relatively massive, M32-like Ultra Compact Dwarf (UCD) galaxy candidates in $0.2galaxy clusters imaged by the CLASH survey. Examining the nearly unresolved objects in the survey, we identify a sample of compact objects concentrated around the brightest cluster galaxies with colors similar to cluster red sequence galaxies. Their colors and magnitudes suggest stellar masses around $10^9 \\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$. More than half of these galaxies have half-light radii smaller than 200pc, falling into the category of massive Ultra Compact Dwarfs (UCD), with properties similar to M32. The properties are consistent with a tidal stripping origin, but we can not rule out the possibility that they are early-formed compact objects trapped in massive dark matter halos. The 17 CLASH clusters studied in this work on average contain 2.7 of these objects in the their central 0.3 Mpc and 0.6 in their central 50 kpc. Our study demonstrates the possibility of statistically characteriz...

  19. Radio continuum detection in blue early-type weak-emission-line galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paswan, A.; Omar, A.

    2016-06-01

    The star formation rates (SFRs) in weak-emission-line (WEL) galaxies in a volume-limited (0.02 Hz-1, respectively. The radio far-infrared correlation in four WEL galaxies suggests that the radio continuum emission from WEL galaxies is most likely a result of star formation activities. The median SFR for WEL galaxies is estimated as 0.23 ± 0.06 M⊙ yr-1, which is much less than SFRs (0.5-50 M⊙ yr-1) in purely star-forming blue ETGs. The SFRs in blue ETGs are found to be correlated with their stellar velocity dispersions (σ) and decreasing gradually beyond σ of ˜100 km s-1. This effect is most likely linked to the growth of a black hole and the suppression of star formation via active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. The colour differences between star-forming and WEL subtypes of blue ETGs appear to be driven to a large extent by the level of current star formation activities. In a likely scenario of an evolutionary sequence between subtypes, the observed colour distribution in blue ETGs can be explained best in terms of fast evolution through AGN feedback.

  20. NoSOCS in SDSS - V. Red disc and blue bulge galaxies across different environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, P. A. A.; Rembold, S. B.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Nascimento, R. S.; Vajgel, B.

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the typical environment and physical properties of `red discs' and `blue bulges', comparing those to the `normal' objects in the blue cloud and red sequence. Our sample is composed of cluster members and field galaxies at z ≤ 0.1, so that we can assess the impact of the local and global environment. We find that disc galaxies display a strong dependence on environment, becoming redder for higher densities. This effect is more pronounced for objects within the virial radius, being also strong related to the stellar mass. We find that local and global environment affect galaxy properties, but the most effective parameter is stellar mass. We find evidence for a scenario where `blue discs' are transformed into `red discs' as they grow in mass and move to the inner parts of clusters. From the metallicity differences of red and blue discs, and the analysis of their star formation histories, we suggest the quenching process is slow. We estimate a quenching time-scale of ˜2-3 Gyr. We also find from the sSFR-M* plane that `red discs' gradually change as they move into clusters. The `blue bulges' have many similar properties than `blue discs', but some of the former show strong signs of asymmetry. The high asymmetry `blue bulges' display enhanced recent star formation compared to their regular counterparts. That indicates some of these systems may have increased their star formation due to mergers. None the less, there may not be a single evolutionary path for these blue early-type objects.

  1. GAS MASS FRACTIONS AND STAR FORMATION IN BLUE-SEQUENCE E/S0 GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent work has identified a population of low-redshift E/S0 galaxies that lie on the blue sequence in color versus stellar mass parameter space, where spiral galaxies typically reside. While high-mass blue-sequence E/S0s often resemble young merger or interaction remnants likely to fade to the red sequence, we focus on blue-sequence E/S0s with lower stellar masses (M*10 Msun), which are characterized by fairly regular morphologies and low-density field environments where fresh gas infall is possible. This population may provide an evolutionary link between early-type galaxies and spirals through disk regrowth. Focusing on atomic gas reservoirs, we present new GBT H I data for 27 E/S0s on both sequences as well as a complete tabulation of archival H I data for other galaxies in the Nearby Field Galaxy Survey. Normalized to stellar mass, the atomic gas masses for 12 of the 14 blue-sequence E/S0s range from 0.1 to >1.0, demonstrating that morphological transformation is possible if the detected gas can be converted into stars. These gas-to-stellar mass ratios are comparable to those of spiral and irregular galaxies and have a similar dependence on stellar mass. Assuming that the H I is accessible for star formation, we find that many of our blue-sequence E/S0s can increase in stellar mass by 10%-60% in 3 Gyr in both of two limiting scenarios, exponentially declining star formation (i.e., closed box) and constant star formation (i.e., allowing gas infall). In a constant star formation scenario, about half of the blue-sequence E/S0s require fresh gas infall on a timescale of ∼<3 Gyr to avoid exhausting their atomic gas reservoirs and evolving to the red sequence. We present evidence that star formation in these galaxies is bursty and likely involves externally triggered gas inflows. Our analysis suggests that most blue-sequence E/S0s are indeed capable of substantial stellar disk growth on relatively short timescales.

  2. CANDELS+3D-HST : Compact SFGs at z~2-3, the progenitors of the first quiescent galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barro, G.; Faber, S. M.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Pacifici, C.; Trump, J. R.; Koo, D. C.; Wuyts, S.; Guo, Y.; Bell, E.; Dekel, A.; Porter, L.; Primack, J.; Ferguson, H.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Caputi, K.; Ceverino, D.; Croton, D.; Fazio, G. G.; Giavalisco, M.; Hsu, L.; Kocevski, D.; Koekemoer, A.; Kurczynski, P.; Kollipara, P.; Lee, J.; McIntosh, D. H.; McGrath, E.; Moody, C.; Somerville, R.; Papovich, C.; Salvato, M.; Santini, P.; Tal, T.; van der Wel, A.; Williams, C.C.; Willner, S. P.; Zolotov, A.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the star-forming and structural properties of 45 massive (log(M/M-circle dot) > 10) compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2 compact quiescent galaxies at z similar to 2. The optical/NIR and far-IR Spitzer/Herschel colors indicate that mos

  3. The blue host galaxy of the red GRB 000418

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorosabel, J.; Klose, S.; Christensen, L.;

    2003-01-01

    We report on multi-band (UBVRIZJ(s)K(s)) observations of the host galaxy of the April 18, 2000 gamma-ray burst. The Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) is analysed by fitting empirical and synthetic spectral templates. We find that: (i) the best SED fit is obtained with a starburst template, (ii) ...

  4. Dozens of compact and high dispersion early-type galaxies in Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Saulder, Christoph; Mieske, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We aim at finding candidates of potential survivors of high-redshift compact galaxies in SDSS, as targets for more detailed follow-up observations. Methods. From the virial theorem it is expected that for a given mass, compact galaxies have stellar velocity dispersion higher than the mean due to their smaller sizes. Therefore velocity dispersion coupled with size (or mass) is an appropriate method to select relics, independent of the stellar population properties. Based on these consideration we design a set of criteria using distribution of early-type galaxies from SDSS on the log$_{10}$(R$_{0}$)-log$_{10}$($\\sigma_{0}$) plane to find the most extreme objects on it. Results. We find 76 galaxies at 0.05 < z < 0.2, which have properties similar to the typical quiescent galaxies at high redshift. We study how well these galaxies fit on well-known local universe relations of early-type galaxies such as the fundamental plane, the red sequence or mass-size relations. As expected from the selection crit...

  5. Neutrino masses from clustering of red and blue galaxies: a test of astrophysical uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, Molly E C; Lahav, Ofer

    2010-01-01

    Combining measurements of the galaxy power spectrum and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a powerful means of constraining the summed mass of neutrino species sum(m_nu), but is subject to systematic uncertainties due to non-linear structure formation, redshift-space distortions and galaxy bias. We empirically test the robustness of neutrino mass results to these effects by separately analyzing power spectra of red and blue galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-II) Data Release 7 (DR7), combined with the CMB five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP5) data. We consider fitting for a range of maximum wavenumber k using twelve different galaxy bias models. For example, using a new model based on perturbation theory and including redshift space distortions (Saito et al. 2009), the all-galaxy power spectrum combined with WMAP5 for a wavenumber range of k<0.2 Mpc/h yields 95% CL sum(m_nu)<0.46 eV. The red and blue galaxy power spectra give 0.41 and 0.63 eV respectively for this mo...

  6. Keck-I MOSFIRE spectroscopy of compact star-forming galaxies at z$\\gtrsim$2: High velocity dispersions in progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barro, G; Koo, D C; Dekel, A; Kassin, S A; Kocevski, D D; Faber, S M; van der Wel, A; Guo, Y; Perez-Gonzalez, P G; Toloba, E; Fang, J J; Pacifici, C; Simons, R; Campbell, R D; Ceverino, D; Finkelstein, S L; Goodrich, B; Kassis, M; Koekemoer, A M; Konidaris, N P; Livermore, R C; Lyke, J E; Mobasher, B; Nayyeri, H; Peth, M; Primack, J R; Rizzi, L; Somerville, R S; Wirth, G D; Zolotov, A

    2014-01-01

    We present Keck-I MOSFIRE near-infrared spectroscopy for a sample of 13 compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at redshift $2\\leq z \\leq2.5$ with star formation rates of SFR$\\sim$100M$_{\\odot}$ y$^{-1}$ and masses of log(M/M$_{\\odot}$)$\\sim10.8$. Their high integrated gas velocity dispersions of $\\sigma_{\\rm{int}}$=230$^{+40}_{-30}$ km s$^{-1}$, as measured from emission lines of H$_{\\alpha}$ and [OIII], and the resultant M$_{\\star}-\\sigma_{\\rm{int}}$ relation and M$_{\\star}$$-$M$_{\\rm{dyn}}$ all match well to those of compact quiescent galaxies at $z\\sim2$, as measured from stellar absorption lines. Since log(M$_{\\star}$/M$_{\\rm{dyn}}$)$=-0.06\\pm0.2$ dex, these compact SFGs appear to be dynamically relaxed and more evolved, i.e., more depleted in gas and dark matter ($<$13$^{+17}_{-13}$\\%) than their non-compact SFG counterparts at the same epoch. Without infusion of external gas, depletion timescales are short, less than $\\sim$300 Myr. This discovery adds another link to our new dynamical chain of evidence...

  7. Massive blue early-type galaxies in the SDSS. I. A new population of recently quenched elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Daniel H; Cooper, Andrew; Bell, Eric F; Keres, Dusan; Bosch, Frank C van den; Gallazzi, Anna; Haines, Tim; Mann, Justin; Pasquali, Anna; Christian, Allison M

    2013-01-01

    We use the SDSS to explore early-type galaxies (ETGs) that are plausibly in transition between the red sequence and the blue cloud. Through careful morphological inspection, we identify 1500 unusually blue elliptical galaxies among a larger sample of blue ETGs with 0.011e10 h^{-2} M_sun. Blue ellipticals comprise 3.7% of all ETGs with 1e1050% of the expected quiescent growth at z~0 assuming this phase lasts 0.5Gyr. Based on color, stellar M/L ratios and metallicity estimates, we argue that RQEs have recent SFHs that differ from rejuvenated ETGs. Yet, a significant but small incidence (5%) of RQEs with E+A spectra implies that the quenching of most RQEs did not involve a large starburst. Most (90%) RQEs reside at the centers of 3x10^{12}h^{-1} M_sun groups, which agrees well with the `small group scale' in which spiral merging onto the halo center is maximally efficient. The preferred RQE environment rules out satellite-specific quenching processes for most. Under the assumption that most RQEs were quenched by...

  8. Detection of high Lyman continuum leakage from four low-redshift compact star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Schaerer, D.; Thuan, T. X.; Worseck, G.; Guseva, N. G.; Orlitová, I.; Verhamme, A.

    2016-10-01

    Following our first detection reported in Izotov et al., we present the detection of Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation of four other compact star-forming galaxies observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. These galaxies, at redshifts of z ˜ 0.3, are characterized by high emission-line flux ratios [O III] λ5007/[O II] λ3727 ≳ 5. The escape fractions of the LyC radiation fesc(LyC) in these galaxies are in the range of ˜6-13 per cent, the highest values found so far in low-redshift star-forming galaxies. Narrow double-peaked Ly α emission lines are detected in the spectra of all four galaxies, compatible with predictions for LyC leakers. We find escape fractions of Ly α, fesc(Ly α) ˜ 20-40 per cent, among the highest known for Ly α emitting galaxies. Surface brightness profiles produced from the COS acquisition images reveal bright star-forming regions in the centre and exponential discs in the outskirts with disc scalelengths α in the range ˜0.6-1.4 kpc. Our galaxies are characterized by low metallicity, ˜1/8-1/5 solar, low stellar mass ˜(0.2-4) × 109 M⊙, high star formation rates, SFR ˜ 14-36 M⊙ yr-1, and high SFR densities, Σ ˜ 2-35 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. These properties are comparable to those of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. Finally, our observations, combined with our first detection reported in Izotov et al., reveal that a selection for compact star-forming galaxies showing high [O III] λ5007/[O II] λ3727 ratios appears to pick up very efficiently sources with escaping LyC radiation: all five of our selected galaxies are LyC leakers.

  9. The Merger History, AGN and Dwarf Galaxies of Hickson Compact Group 59

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Gallagher, S. C.; Fedotov, K.; Durrell, P. R.; Tzanavaris, P.; Hill, A. R.; Zabludoff, A. I.; Maier, M. L.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Charlton, J. C.; Johnson, K. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Walker, L. M.; Eracleous, M.; Maybhate, A.; Gronwall, C.; English, J.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Compact group galaxies often appear unaffected by their unusually dense environment. Closer examination can, however, reveal the subtle, cumulative effects of multiple galaxy interactions. Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 59 is an excellent example of this situation. We present a photometric study of this group in the optical (HST), infrared (Spitzer) and X-ray (Chandra) regimes aimed at characterizing the star formation and nuclear activity in its constituent galaxies and intra-group medium. We associate five dwarf galaxies with the group and update the velocity dispersion, leading to an increase in the dynamical mass of the group of up to a factor of 10 (to 2.8 x 10(exp 13) Stellar Mass), and a subsequent revision of its evolutionary stage. Star formation is proceeding at a level consistent with the morphological types of the four main galaxies, of which two are star-forming and the other two quiescent. Unlike in some other compact groups, star-forming complexes across HCG 59 closely follow mass-radius scaling relations typical of nearby galaxies. In contrast, the ancient globular cluster populations in galaxies HCG 59A and B show intriguing irregularities, and two extragalactic HII regions are found just west of B. We age-date a faint stellar stream in the intra-group medium at approx. 1 Gyr to examine recent interactions. We detect a likely low-luminosity AGN in HCG 59A by its approx. 10(exp 40) erg/s X-ray emission; the active nucleus rather than star formation can account for the UV+IR SED. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of galaxy evolution in dense environments.

  10. The merger history, AGN and dwarf galaxies of Hickson Compact Group 59

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantopoulos, I S; Fedotov, K; Durrell, P R; Tzanavaris, P; Hill, A R; Zabludoff, A I; Maier, M L; Elmegreen, D M; Charlton, J C; Johnson, K E; Brandt, W N; Walker, L M; Eracleous, M; Maybhate, A; Gronwall, C; English, J; Hornschemeier, A E; Mulchaey, J S

    2011-01-01

    Compact group galaxies often appear unaffected by their unusually dense environment. Closer examination can, however, reveal the subtle, cumulative effects of multiple galaxy interactions. Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 59 is an excellent example of this situation. We present a photometric study of this group in the optical (HST), infrared (Spitzer) and X-ray (Chandra) regimes aimed at characterizing the star formation and nuclear activity in its constituent galaxies and intra-group medium. We associate five dwarf galaxies with the group and update the velocity dispersion, leading to an increase in the dynamical mass of the group of up to a factor of 10 (to 2.8e13 Msun), and a subsequent revision of its evolutionary stage. Star formation is proceeding at a level consistent with the morphological types of the four main galaxies, of which two are star-forming and the other two quiescent. Unlike in some other compact groups, star-forming complexes across HCG 59 closely follow mass-radius scaling relations typical o...

  11. Low Gas Fractions Connect Compact Star-Forming Galaxies to their z ~ 2 Quiescent Descendants

    CERN Document Server

    Spilker, Justin S; Marrone, Daniel P; Weiner, Benjamin J; Whitaker, Katherine E; Williams, Christina C

    2016-01-01

    Early quiescent galaxies at z~2 are known to be remarkably compact compared to their nearby counterparts. Possible progenitors of these systems include galaxies that are structurally similar, but are still rapidly forming stars. Here, we present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the CO(1-0) line towards three such compact, star-forming galaxies at z~2.3, significantly detecting one. The VLA observations indicate baryonic gas fractions >~5 times lower and gas depletion times >~10 times shorter than normal, extended massive star-forming galaxies at these redshifts. At their current star formation rates, all three objects will deplete their gas reservoirs within 100Myr. These objects are among the most gas-poor objects observed at z>2, and are outliers from standard gas scaling relations, a result which remains true regardless of assumptions about the CO-H2 conversion factor. Our observations are consistent with the idea that compact, star-forming galaxies are in a rapid state of transition t...

  12. The different star-formation histories of blue and red spiral and elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tojeiro, Rita; Richards, Joshua; Percival, Will J; Bamford, Steven P; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C; Skibba, Ramin; Thomas, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    [Abridged] We study the spectral properties of intermediate mass galaxies as a function of colour and morphology. We use Galaxy Zoo to define three morphological classes of galaxies, namely early-types (ellipticals), late-type (disk-dominated) face-on spirals and early-type (bulge-dominated) face-on spirals. We classify these galaxies as blue or red according to their SDSS g-r colour and use the spectral fitting code VESPA to calculate time-resolved star-formation histories, metallicity and total starlight dust extinction from their SDSS fibre spectra. We find that red late-type spirals show less star-formation in the last 500 Myr than blue late-type spirals by up to a factor of three, but share similar star-formation histories at earlier times. This decline in recent star-formation explains their redder colour: their chemical and dust content are the same. We postulate that red late-type spirals are recent descendants of blue late-type spirals, with their star-formation curtailed in the last 500 Myrs. The re...

  13. NoSOCS in SDSS. V. Red Disc and Blue Bulge Galaxies Across Different Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, P A A; Ribeiro, A L B; Nascimento, R S; Vajgel, B

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the typical environment and physical properties of "red discs" and "blue bulges", comparing those to the "normal" objects in the blue cloud and red sequence. Our sample is composed of cluster members and field galaxies at $z \\le 0.1$, so that we can assess the impact of the local and global environment. We find that disc galaxies display a strong dependence on environment, becoming redder for higher densities. This effect is more pronounced for objects within the virial radius, being also strong related to the stellar mass. We find that local and global environment affect galaxy properties, but the most effective parameter is stellar mass. We find evidence for a scenario where "blue discs" are transformed into "red discs" as they grow in mass and move to the inner parts of clusters. From the metallicity differences of red and blue discs, and the analysis of their star formation histories, we suggest the quenching process is slow. We estimate a quenching time scale of $\\sim $ 2$-$3 Gyr. We also...

  14. Size Evolution of Early-Type Galaxies and Massive Compact Objects as the Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Totani, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    The dramatic size evolution of early-type galaxies from z ~ 2 to 0 poses a new challenge in the theory of galaxy formation, which may not be explained by the standard picture. It is shown here that the size evolution can be explained if the non-baryonic cold dark matter is composed of compact objects having a mass scale of ~10^5 M_sun. This form of dark matter is consistent with or only weakly constrained by the currently available observations. The kinetic energy of the dark compact objects is transferred to stars by dynamical friction, and stars around the effective radius are pushed out to larger radii, resulting in a pure size evolution. This scenario has several good properties to explain the observations, including the ubiquitous nature of size evolution and faster disappearance of higher density galaxies.

  15. DISCOVERY OF NINE INTERMEDIATE-REDSHIFT COMPACT QUIESCENT GALAXIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We identify nine galaxies with dynamical masses of M dyn ∼> 1010 M ☉ as photometric point sources, but with redshifts between z = 0.2 and z = 0.6, in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectro-photometric database. All nine galaxies have archival Hubble Space Telescope images. Surface brightness profile fitting confirms that all nine galaxies are extremely compact (0.4 e,c e,c = 0.74 kpc) for their velocity dispersion (110 –1; median σ = 178 km s–1). From the SDSS spectra, three systems are dominated by very young stars; the other six are older than ∼1 Gyr (two are E+A galaxies). The three young galaxies have disturbed morphologies and the older systems have smooth profiles consistent with a single-Sérsic function. All nine lie below the z ∼ 0 velocity dispersion-half-light radius relation. The most massive system—SDSSJ123657.44+631115.4—lies right within the locus for massive compact z > 1 galaxies and the other eight objects follow the high-redshift dynamical size-mass relation

  16. Detection of compact ultraviolet nuclear emission in liner galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Maoz, D; Ho, L C; Rix, H W; Bahcall, J N; Schneider, D P; Macchetto, F D; Dan Maoz; Alexei V Filippenko; Luis C Ho; Hans-Walter Rix; John N Bahcall; Donald P Schneider

    1994-01-01

    Low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs), which exist in a large fraction of galaxies, may be the least luminous manifestation of quasar activity. The nature of LINERs has, however, remained controversial because an AGN-like nonstellar continuum source has not been directly observed in them. We report the detection of bright, unresolved (FWHM \\ltorder 0.1'') point sources of UV (\\sim 2300 \\AA) emission in the nuclei of nine nearby galaxies from a complete sample of 110 nearby galaxies imaged with {\\it HST}. Ground-based optical spectroscopy reveals that five of the nuclei are LINERs, three are starburst nuclei, and one is a Seyfert nucleus. The observed UV flux in each of the five LINERs implies an ionizing flux that is sufficient to account for the observed emission lines through photoionization. The detection of a strong UV continuum in the LINERs argues against shock excitation as the source of the observed emission lines, and supports the idea that photoionization excites the lines in at leas...

  17. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: The evolution of the blue fraction in groups and the field

    CERN Document Server

    Gerke, B F; Faber, S M; Cooper, M C; Croton, D J; Davis, M; Willmer, C N A; Yan, R; Coil, A L; Guhathakurta, P; Koo, D C; Weiner, B J; Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Croton, Darren J.; Davis, Marc; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the behavior of the blue galaxy fraction over the redshift range 0.75 <= z <= 1.3 in the DEEP2 Survey, both for field galaxies and for galaxies in groups. The primary aim is to determine the role that groups play in driving the evolution of galaxy colour at high z. The colour segregation observed between local group and field samples is already in place at z ~ 1: DEEP2 groups have a significantly lower blue fraction than the field. At fixed z, there is also a correlation between blue fraction and galaxy magnitude, such that brighter galaxies are more likely to be red, both in groups and in the field. In addition, there is a negative correlation between blue fraction and group richness. In terms of evolution, the blue fraction in groups and the field remains roughly constant from z=0.75 to z ~ 1, but beyond this redshift the blue fraction in groups rises rapidly with z, and the group and field blue fractions become indistinguishable at z ~ 1.3. Careful tests indicate that this effect does not ...

  18. A supermassive black hole in an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Anil C; van den Bosch, Remco; Mieske, Steffen; Baumgardt, Holger; den Brok, Mark; Strader, Jay; Neumayer, Nadine; Chilingarian, Igor; Hilker, Michael; McDermid, Richard; Spitler, Lee; Brodie, Jean; Frank, Matthias J; Walsh, Jonelle L

    2014-09-18

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies are among the densest stellar systems in the Universe. These systems have masses of up to 2 × 10(8) solar masses, but half-light radii of just 3-50 parsecs. Dynamical mass estimates show that many such dwarfs are more massive than expected from their luminosity. It remains unclear whether these high dynamical mass estimates arise because of the presence of supermassive black holes or result from a non-standard stellar initial mass function that causes the average stellar mass to be higher than expected. Here we report adaptive optics kinematic data of the ultra-compact dwarf galaxy M60-UCD1 that show a central velocity dispersion peak exceeding 100 kilometres per second and modest rotation. Dynamical modelling of these data reveals the presence of a supermassive black hole with a mass of 2.1 × 10(7) solar masses. This is 15 per cent of the object's total mass. The high black hole mass and mass fraction suggest that M60-UCD1 is the stripped nucleus of a galaxy. Our analysis also shows that M60-UCD1's stellar mass is consistent with its luminosity, implying a large population of previously unrecognized supermassive black holes in other ultra-compact dwarf galaxies.

  19. Discovery of ultra-compact nuclear rings in three spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Comerón, S; Beckman, J E; Shlosman, I

    2007-01-01

    Ring-shaped morphologies of nuclear star-forming regions within the central 40-200 pc of disk galaxies have been barely resolved so far in three composite Sy2 nuclei, the Sy2 Circinus galaxy and in three non-AGN galaxies. Such morphologies resemble those of the standard 1 kpc-size nuclear rings that lie in the inner Lindblad resonance regions of disk galaxies and, if they have a similar origin, represent recent radial gas inflows tantalisingly close to the central supermassive black holes. We aim to identify the population of such ultra-compact nuclear rings (UCNRs) and study their properties in relation to those of the host galaxies. From archival Hubble Space Telescope UV and Halpha images and from dust structure maps of the circumnuclear regions in nearby galaxies, we analyse the morphology of the star formation and dust, specifically searching for ring structures on the smallest observable scales. In a sample of 38 galaxies studied, we have detected a total of four new UCNRs, 30-130 pc in radius, in three...

  20. SXDF-ALMA 1.5 arcmin^2 deep survey. A compact dusty star-forming galaxy at z=2.5

    CERN Document Server

    Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Kodama, Tadayuki; Ikarashi, Soh; Aretxaga, Itziar; Berta, Stefano; Caputi, Karina I; Dunlop, James S; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hayashi, Masao; Hughes, David H; Ivison, Rob; Izumi, Takuma; Koyama, Yusei; Lutz, Dieter; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Tamura, Yoichi; Umehata, Hideki; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W; Wuyts, Stijn; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Yun, Min S

    2015-01-01

    We present first results from the SXDF-ALMA 1.5 arcmin^2 deep survey at 1.1 mm using Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The map reaches a 1sigma depth of 55 uJy/beam and covers 12 Halpha-selected star-forming galaxies at z = 2.19 or z=2.53. We have detected continuum emission from three of our Halpha-selected sample, including one compact star-forming galaxy with high stellar surface density, NB2315-07. They are all red in the rest-frame optical and have stellar masses of log (M*/Msun)>10.9 whereas the other blue, main-sequence galaxies with log(M*/Msun)=10.0-10.8 are exceedingly faint, <290 uJy (2sigma upper limit). We also find the 1.1 mm-brightest galaxy, NB2315-02, to be associated with a compact (R_e=0.7+-0.1 kpc), dusty star-forming component. Given high gas fraction (44^{+20}_{-8}% or 37^{+25}_{-3}%) and high star formation rate surface density (126^{+27}_{-30} Msun yr^{-1}kpc^{-2}), the concentrated starburst can within less than 50^{+12}_{-11} Myr build up a stellar surface density matching th...

  1. The diverse evolutionary paths of simulated high-$z$ massive, compact galaxies to $z = 0$

    CERN Document Server

    Wellons, Sarah; Ma, Chung-Pei; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Pillepich, Annalisa; Nelson, Dylan; Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Massive quiescent galaxies at high redshift have been observed to have much smaller physical sizes than their local counterparts. Several mechanisms have been invoked to explain the strong evolution of galaxy size with redshift, including progenitor bias, major and minor mergers, adiabatic expansion, and renewed star formation. However, it is difficult to connect galaxy populations between cosmological epochs to test these theories observationally. Herein, we select a sample of 35 massive, compact galaxies ($M_*$ = 1-3 x $10^{11}$ M$_\\odot$, $M_*/R^{1.5}$ > $10^{10.5}$ M$_\\odot$/kpc$^{1.5}$) at z=2 in the cosmological hydrodynamical simulation Illustris and trace them forward to z=0 to uncover how they evolve to the present day. By z=0, the original factor of 3 difference in stellar mass has spread to a factor of 20. The spread in dark matter halo mass similarly increases from a factor of 5 to a factor of 40. The compact galaxies' evolutionary paths are diverse: about half acquire an ex-situ envelope and exis...

  2. Physical properties of compact star-forming galaxies at $z\\sim2-3$

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Zhongyang; Kong, Xu; Fan, Lulu

    2014-01-01

    We present a study on the physical properties of compact star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) with $M_{*}\\geq10^{10}M_{\\odot}$ and $2\\leq z\\leq3$ in the COSMOS and GOODS-S fields, to explore whether they are a transitional type of galaxies between extended star-forming galaxies (eSFGs) and compact quiescent galaxies (cQGs) on the evolutionary path. The cSFGs distribute at nearly the same locus on the main sequence as eSFGs and dominate the high mass end. On the rest-frame $U-V$ vs. $V-J$ and $U-B$ vs. $M_{B}$ diagrams, cSFGs mainly distribute at the middle of eSFGs and cQGs in all colours, but are more inclined to "red sequence" than "green valley" galaxies. We find cSFGs have similar distributions with cQGs on the nonparametric morphology diagrams. About one third of cSFGs show signatures of post mergers, and nearly none of them can be recognized as disks. The general distributions of cSFGs on stellar population and structural parameters are very similar to cQGs, implying the cSFGs are the direct progenitors of cQG...

  3. Radio--Far infrared correlation in "blue cloud" galaxies with 0

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Aritra; Beelen, Alexandre; Singh, Veeresh; Archana, K N; Sirothia, Sandeep; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2015-01-01

    We study the radio--far infrared (FIR) correlation in "blue cloud" galaxies chosen from the PRism MUltiobject Survey (PRIMUS) up to redshift ($z$) of 1.2 in the XMM-LSS field. We use rest-frame emission at 1.4 GHz in the radio and both monochromatic (at 70$\\mu$m) and bolometric (between $8-1000~\\mu$m) emission in the FIR. To probe the nature of the correlation up to $z\\sim1.2$, where direct detection of blue star-forming galaxies is impossible with current technology, we employ the technique of image stacking at 0.325 and 1.4 GHz in the radio and in six infrared bands, viz. 24, 70, 160, 250, 350 and $500~\\mu$m. For comparison, we also study the correlation for more luminous galaxies that are directly detected. The stacking analysis allows us to probe the radio--FIR correlation for galaxies that are up to 2 orders of magnitude fainter than the ones detected directly. The $k-$correction in the infrared wavebands is obtained by fitting the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) with a composite mid-IR power...

  4. Low Power Compact Radio Galaxies at High Angular Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giroletti, Marcello; Giovannini, G.; /Bologna U. /Bologna, Ist. Radioastronomia; Taylor, G.B.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NRAO, Socorro

    2005-06-30

    We present sub-arcsecond resolution multi-frequency (8 and 22 GHz) VLA images of five low power compact (LPC) radio sources, and phase referenced VLBA images at 1.6 GHz of their nuclear regions. At the VLA resolution we resolve the structure and identify component positions and flux densities. The phase referenced VLBA data at 1.6 GHz reveals flat-spectrum, compact cores (down to a few milliJansky) in four of the five sources. The absolute astrometry provided by the phase referencing allows us to identify the center of activity on the VLA images. Moreover, these data reveal rich structures, including two-sided jets and secondary components. On the basis of the arcsecond scale structures and of the nuclear properties, we rule out the presence of strong relativistic effects in our LPCs, which must be intrinsically small (deprojected linear sizes {approx}< 10 kpc). Fits of continuous injection models reveal break frequencies in the GHz domain, and ages in the range 10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} yrs. In LPCs, the outermost edge may be advancing more slowly than in more powerful sources or could even be stationary; some LPCs might also have ceased their activity. In general, the properties of LPCs can be related to a number of reasons, including, but not limited to: youth, frustration, low kinematic power jets, and short-lived activity in the radio.

  5. Statistical analysis of galaxy surveys - III: The non-linear clustering of red and blue galaxies in the 2dFGRS

    CERN Document Server

    Croton, D J; Gaztañaga, E; Baugh, C M; Croton, Darren J.; Norberg, Peder; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Baugh, Carlton M.

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements of the higher-order clustering of red and blue galaxies as a function of scale and luminosity made from the two-degree field galaxy redshift survey (2dFGRS). We use a counts-in-cells analysis to estimate the volume averaged correlation functions, xi_p, as a function of scale up to order p=5, and also the reduced void probability function. Hierarchical amplitudes are constructed using the estimates of the correlation functions: S_p=(xi_p/xi_2)^(p-1). We find that: 1) Red galaxies display stronger clustering than blue galaxies at all orders measured. 2) Red galaxies show values of S_p that are strongly dependent on luminosity, whereas blue galaxies show no segregation in S_p within the errors; this is remarkable given the segregation in the variance. 3) The linear relative bias shows the opposite trend to the hierarchical amplitudes, with little segregation for the red sequence and some segregation for the blue. 4) Faint red galaxies deviate significantly from the "universal" negative bi...

  6. Intragroup and Galaxy-linked Diffuse X-ray Emission In Hickson Compact Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Mulchaey, John S.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Cardiff, Ann; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis, S.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L(sub X-Tau) relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L(sub X-sigma) relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L(sub X) increases with decreasing group Hi to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on Hi morphology whereby systems with intragroup Hi indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L(sub X) of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  7. Evolution of the Blue Luminosity-to-Baryon Mass Ratio of Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shimasaku, K

    2000-01-01

    We derive the ratio of total blue luminosity to total baryon mass, LB/Mb, for massive (Mgas at the Abell radius is \\ge 1 \\times 10^{13} h^{-2.5} \\Msolar) clusters of galaxies up to z \\simeq 1 from the literature. Twenty-two clusters in our sample are at z > 0.1. Assuming that the relative mix of hot gas and galaxies in clusters does not change during cluster evolution, we use LB/Mb to probe the star formation history of the galaxy population as a whole in clusters. We find that LB/Mb of clusters increases with redshift from LB/Mb=0.024 (solar units) at z = 0 to \\simeq 0.06 at z=1, indicating a factor of 2-3 brightening (we assume H0=70 km/s/Mpc). This amount of brightening is almost identical to the brightening of the M/LB ratio of early-type galaxies in clusters at 0.02 \\le z \\le 0.83 reported by van Dokkum et al. (1998). We compare the observed brightening of LB/Mb with luminosity evolution models for the galaxy population as a whole, changing the e-folding time of star formation brightening, while models w...

  8. COLA. III. RADIO DETECTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN COMPACT MODERATE LUMINOSITY INFRARED GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results from 4.8 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) and global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the northern half of the moderate FIR luminosity (median LIR = 1011.01 Lsun) COLA sample of star-forming galaxies. VLBI sources are detected in a high fraction (20/90) of the galaxies observed. The radio luminosities of these cores (∼1021 W Hz-1) are too large to be explained by radio supernovae or supernova remnants and we argue that they are instead powered by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These sub-parsec scale radio cores are preferentially detected toward galaxies whose VLA maps show bright 100-500 parsec scale nuclear radio components. Since these latter structures tightly follow the FIR to radio-continuum correlation for star formation, we conclude that the AGN-powered VLBI sources are associated with compact nuclear starburst environments. The implications for possible starburst-AGN connections are discussed. The detected VLBI sources have a relatively narrow range of radio luminosity consistent with models in which intense compact Eddington-limited starbursts regulate the gas supply onto a central supermassive black hole. The high incidence of AGN radio cores in compact starbursts suggests little or no delay between the starburst phase and the onset of AGN activity.

  9. Compact starbursts in z~3-6 submillimeter galaxies revealed by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Ikarashi, Soh; Caputi, Karina I; Aretxaga, Itziar; Dunlop, James S; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hughes, DavidH; Iono, Daisuke; Izumi, Takuma; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro; Lagos, ClaudiaD P; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Koichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tamura, Yoichi; Umehata, Hideki; Wilson, GrantG; Yabe, Kiyoto; Yun, Min S

    2014-01-01

    We report the source size distribution, as measured by ALMA millimetric continuum imaging, of a sample of 13 AzTEC-selected submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) believed to lie at z_photo ~ 3-6. Their infrared luminosities and star-formation rates (SFR) are L_IR ~ 2-6 x 10^12 L_sun and ~ 200-500 M_sun yr-1, respectively. The size of z ~ 3-6 SMGs ranges from 0''.10 to 0''.38 with a median of 0''.22 (FWHM), corresponding to a median effective radius (Re) of ~ 0.8 kpc, comparable to the typical size of the stellar component measured in compact quiescent galaxies at z ~ 2 (cQGs) --- R ~ 1 kpc. The surface SFR density of our z ~ 3-6 SMGs is 160+610-82 M_sun yr-1 kpc-2, comparable to that seen in local merger-driven (U)LIRGs, which implies that these SMGs are also likely to be merger-driven. The discovery of compact starbursts in z >~ 3 SMGs strongly supports a massive galaxy formation scenario wherein z ~ 3-6 SMGs evolve into the compact stellar components of z ~ 2 cQGs. These cQGs are then thought to evolve into the mos...

  10. First Results from the COLA Project- the Radio-FIR Correlation and Compact Radio Cores in Southern COLA Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Corbett, E A; Heisler, C A; Dopita, M A; Appleton, P; Struck, C; Murphy, T; Marston, A

    2001-01-01

    We present the first results from the COLA (Compact Objects in Low-power AGN) project which aims to determine the relationship between one facet of AGN activity, the compact radio core, with star formation in the circumnuclear region of the host galaxy. This will be accomplished by the comparison of the multi-wavelength properties of a sample of AGN with compact radio cores to those of a sample of AGN without compact cores and a matched sample of galaxies without AGN. In this paper we discuss the selection criteria for our galaxy samples and present the initial radio observations of the 107 Southern galaxies in our sample. Low-resolution ATCA observations at 4.8, 2.5 and 1.4 GHz and high resolution, single baseline snapshots at 2.3 GHz with the Australian LBA are presented. We find that for the majority of the galaxies in our sample, the radio luminosity is correlated with the FIR luminosity. Compact radio cores are detected in 9 galaxies. The majority (8/9) of these galaxies exhibit a significant radio exces...

  11. CANDELS+3D-HST: compact SFGs at z~2-3, the progenitors of the first quiescent galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barro, G; Perez-Gonzalez, P G; Pacifici, C; Trump, J R; Koo, D C; Wuyts, S; Guo, Y; Bell, E; Dekel, A; Porter, L; Primack, J; Ferguson, H; Ashby, M; Caputi, K; Ceverino, D; Croton, D; Fazio, G; Giavalisco, M; Hsu, L; Kocevski, D; Koekemoer, A; Kurczynski, P; Kollipara, P; Lee, J; McIntosh, D; McGrath, E; Moody, C; Somerville, R; Papovich, C; Salvato, M; Santini, P; Williams, C C; Willner, S; Zolotov, A

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the star-forming and structural properties of 45 massive (log(M/Msun)>10) compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2compact quiescent galaxies at z~2. The optical/NIR and far-IR Spitzer/Herschel colors indicate that most compact SFGs are heavily obscured. Nearly half (47%) host an X-ray bright AGN. In contrast, only about 10% of other massive galaxies at that time host AGNs. Compact SFGs have centrally-concentrated light profiles and spheroidal morphologies similar to quiescent galaxies, and are thus strikingly different from other SFGs. Most compact SFGs lie either within the SFR-M main sequence (65%) or below (30%), on the expected evolutionary path towards quiescent galaxies. These results show conclusively that galaxies become more compact before they lose their gas and dust, quenching star formation. Using extensive HST photometry from CANDELS and grism spectroscopy from the 3D-HST survey, we model their stellar populations with either expon...

  12. Morphology Dependence Of Stellar Age in Quenched Galaxies at Redshift ~ 1.2: Massive Compact Galaxies Are Older Than More Extended Ones

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Christina C; Bezanson, Rachel; Cappelluti, Nico; Cassata, Paolo; Liu, Teng; Lee, Bomee; Tundo, Elena; Vanzella, Eros

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of morphology-dependent stellar age in massive quenched galaxies at redshift z~1.2. The sense of the dependence is that compact quenched galaxies are 0.5-2 Gyr older than normal-sized ones. The evidence comes from three different age indicators, Dn4000, H$\\delta_{A}$, and fits to spectral synthesis models, applied to the stacked optical spectra of massive, quenched galaxies observed during the CANDELS project. All age indicators consistently show that the dominant stellar populations of compact passive galaxies are older than those of their normally-sized counterparts, with the Dn4000 and model fitting in excellent quantitative agreement. We detect weak [OII] emission in a fraction of passive galaxies, and the strength of the line, when present, is similar between the two samples; however, compact galaxies have a significantly lower frequency of [OII] emission than normal ones. A fraction of both compact and normal galaxies are also individually detected in the 4 Ms Chandra X-ray image...

  13. Simulating Compact Elliptical Galaxy Formation by Tidal Stripping for Comparison to the RESOLVE Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Christine; Snyder, Elaine M.; Kannappan, Sheila; Sinha, Manodeep; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    Observations of compact elliptical galaxies (cEs) have uncovered abnormally high velocity dispersions and surface brightnesses for objects of their mass. These properties indicate that they may be the tidally stripped remnants of larger disk galaxies. We test this tidal stripping scenario using N-body simulations of cE formation with the Gadget-2 code. We track the velocity dispersions of stellar particles within the half-light radius throughout our simulations, which allows us to compare our simulated galaxies with velocity dispersion data for cEs in the RESOLVE survey. We first consider initial conditions similar to published work, which report stripping of a large spiral galaxy (stellar mass ~ 10^11 solar masses) to cE size in a cluster potential. We find that the density of the disk galaxy is too high to allow it to lose particles to the less dense cluster. We argue that the initial position of the galaxy with respect to the cluster as well as the large size of the cluster particles in comparison to the size of the galaxy particles artificially heightened the stripping percentages reported in previous work. We hypothesize that only a dwarf galaxy with a shallower density profile can be stripped to cE size, and we present initial efforts to test this idea. We simulate a dwarf galaxy based on a real system in the RESOLVE survey, with stellar mass 10^9 solar masses and half-light radius 1.15 kpc. Within ~700 pc our dwarf is denser than our cluster, suggesting the stripped remnant should be close to the size of RESOLVE cEs. This radius contains approximately 13% of the total stellar mass of the galaxy, or ~2 x 10^8 solar masses. We therefore expect our stripped remnant to be at least this massive, although the impact parameter of the orbit will determine how much mass is actually removed. We discuss the position of our simulated galaxies compared to RESOLVE cEs in the velocity dispersion vs. mass plane. This research has been supported by National Science

  14. A Compact Group of Galaxies at z = 2.48 Hosting an AGN-driven Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2015-12-01

    We present observations of a remarkable compact group of galaxies at z = 2.48. Four galaxies, all within 40 kpc of each other, surround a powerful high-redshift radio source. This group comprises two compact red passive galaxies and a pair of merging galaxies. One of the red galaxies, with an apparent stellar mass of 3.6 × 1011M⊙ and an effective radius of 470 pc, is one of the most extreme examples of a massive quiescent compact galaxy found so far. One of the pair of merging galaxies hosts the active galactic nucleus (AGN) producing the large powerful radio structure. The merger is massive and enriched, consistent with the mass-metallicity relation expected at this redshift. Close to the merging nuclei, the emission lines exhibit broad and asymmetric profiles that suggest outflows powered either by a very young expanding radio jet or by AGN radiation. At ≳50 kpc from the system, we found a fainter extended-emission region that may be a part of a radio-jet-driven outflow. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. The work is also based, in part, on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  15. What Are the Progenitors of Compact, Massive, Quiescent Galaxies at z=2.3? The Population of Massive Galaxies at z>3 from NMBS and CANDELS

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanon, Mauro; Rudnick, Gregory H; Brammer, Gabriel B; Whitaker, Katherine E

    2013-01-01

    [Abridged] Using public data from the NMBS and CANDELS surveys, we study the population of massive galaxies at z>3 to identify the potential progenitors of z~2 compact, massive, quiescent (CMQ) galaxies, furthering our understanding of the evolution of massive galaxies. Our work is enabled by high-resolution CANDELS images and accurate photometric redshifts, stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) from 37-band NMBS photometry. The total number of z>3 massive galaxies is consistent with the number of massive quiescent (MQ) galaxies at z~2, implying that the SFRs for all of these galaxies must be much lower by z~2. We discover 4 CMQ galaxies at z>3, pushing back the time for which such galaxies have been observed. However, the volume density for these galaxies is significantly less than that of galaxies at z10^(10.6)Msun, likely to become members of the CMQ galaxy population at z~2. We evolve the stellar masses and SFRs of each individual z>3 galaxy adopting 5 different star formation histories (SFHs) an...

  16. BLUE LUMINOUS STARS IN NEARBY GALAXIES-UIT 005: A POSSIBLE LINK TO THE LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE STAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed study of the blue supergiant UIT 005 (B2-2.5Ia+) in M 33 is presented. The results of our quantitative spectral analysis indicate that the star is a very luminous (log L/Lsun ∼ 5.9 dex) and massive (M ∼ 50 Msun) object, showing a very high nitrogen-to-oxygen ratio in its surface (N/O∼8, by mass). Based on the derived Mg and Si abundances, we argue that this high N/O ratio cannot be the result of an initial low O content due to its location on the disk of M 33, a galaxy known to present a steep metallicity gradient. In combination with the He abundance, the most plausible interpretation is that UIT 005 is in an advanced stage of evolution, showing in its surface N enrichment and O depletion resulting from mixing with CNO processed material from the stellar interior. A comparison with the predictions of current stellar evolutionary models indicates that there are significant discrepancies, in particular with regard to the degree of chemical processing, with the models predicting a much lower degree of O depletion than observed. At the same time, the mass-loss rate derived in our analysis is an order of magnitude lower than the values considered in the evolutionary calculations. Based on a study of the surrounding stellar population and the nearby cluster, NGC 588, using Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 photometry, we suggest that UIT 005 could be in fact a runaway star from this cluster. Regardless of its origin, the derived parameters place the star in a region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram where luminous blue variables (LBVs) are usually found, but we find no evidence supporting photometric or spectroscopic variability, except for small Hα changes, otherwise observed in Galactic B-type supergiants. Whether UIT 005 is an LBV in a dormant state or a regular blue supergiant could not be discerned in this study. Subsequent monitoring would help us to improve our knowledge of the more massive stars, bridging the gap between regular and more exotic

  17. Detection of high Lyman continuum leakage from four low-redshift compact star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Izotov, Y I; Thuan, T X; Worseck, G; Orlitova, I; Verhamme, A

    2016-01-01

    Following our first detection reported in Izotov et al. (2016), we present the detection of Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation of four other compact star-forming galaxies observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These galaxies, at redshifts of z~0.3, are characterized by high emission-line flux ratios [OIII]5007/[OII]3727 > 5. The escape fractions of the LyC radiation fesc(LyC) in these galaxies are in the range of ~6%-13%, the highest values found so far in low-redshift star-forming galaxies. Narrow double-peaked Lyalpha emission lines are detected in the spectra of all four galaxies, compatible with predictions for Lyman continuum leakers. We find escape fractions of Lyalpha, fesc(Lyalpha) ~60%-90%, among the highest known for Lyalpha emitters (LAEs). Surface brightness profiles produced from the COS acquisition images reveal bright star-forming regions in the center and exponential discs in the outskirts with disc scale lengths alpha in the range ~0.6-1.4 k...

  18. The origin of compact galaxies with anomalously high black hole masses

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, Christopher; Bower, Richard G; Crain, Robert A; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Observations of local galaxies harbouring supermassive black holes (BH) of anomalously high mass, M_BH, relative to their stellar mass, M_star, appear to be at odds with simple models of the co-evolution between galaxies and their central BHs. We study the origin of such outliers in a LCDM context using the EAGLE cosmological, hydrodynamical simulation. We find 15 "M_BH(M_star)-outlier" galaxies, defined as having M_BH more than 1.5 dex above the median M_BH(M_star) relation in the simulation, M_{BH,med}. All M_BH(M_star)-outliers are satellite galaxies, typically with M_star ~ 10^10 M_sun and M_BH ~ 10^8 M_sun. They have all become outliers primarily due to tidal stripping of their outer stellar component acting over several Gyr, with a secondary effect of rapid BH growth at high-z causing some to lie approximately 1 dex above the z=0 relation prior to stripping. The same mechanisms also cause the M_BH(M_star)-outlier satellites to be amongst the most compact galaxies in the simulation, making them ideal can...

  19. Galaxy Zoo Green Peas: Discovery of A Class of Compact Extremely Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cardamone, Carolin N; Sarzi, Marc; Bamford, Steven P; Bennert, Nicola; Urry, C M; Lintott, Chris; Keel, William C; Parejko, John; Nichol, Robert C; Thomas, Daniel; Andreescu, Dan; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M Jordan; Slosar, Anze; Szalay, Alex; VandenBerg, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We investigate a class of rapidly growing emission line galaxies, known as "Green Peas", first noted by volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project because of their peculiar bright green colour and small size, unresolved in SDSS imaging. Their appearance is due to very strong optical emission lines, namely [O III] 5007 A, with an unusually large equivalent width of up to ~1000 A. We discuss a well-defined sample of 251 colour-selected objects, most of which are strongly star forming, although there are some AGN interlopers including 8 newly discovered narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies. The star-forming Peas are low mass galaxies (M~10^8.5 - 10^10 M_sun) with high star formation rates (~10 M_sun/yr), low metallicities (log[O/H] + 12 ~ 8.7) and low reddening (E(B-V) < 0.25) and they reside in low density environments. They have some of the highest specific star formation rates (up to ~10^{-8} yr^{-1}) seen in the local Universe, yielding doubling times for their stellar mass of hundreds of Myrs. The few star-forming P...

  20. The origin of compact galaxies with anomalously high black hole masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Christopher; Schaye, Joop; Bower, Richard G.; Crain, Robert A.; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2016-07-01

    Observations of local galaxies harbouring supermassive black holes (BH) of anomalously high mass, MBH, relative to their stellar mass, M*, appear to be at odds with simple models of the co-evolution between galaxies and their central BHs. We study the origin of such outliers in a Λ cold dark matter context using the EAGLE cosmological, hydrodynamical simulation. We find 15 `MBH(M*)-outlier' galaxies, defined as having MBH more than 1.5 dex above the median MBH(M*) relation in the simulation, MBH, med(M*). All MBH(M*)-outliers are satellite galaxies, typically with M* ˜ 1010 M⊙ and MBH ˜ 108 M⊙. They have all become outliers due to a combination of tidal stripping of their outer stellar component acting over several Gyr and early formation times leading to rapid BH growth at high redshift, with the former mechanism being most important for 67 per cent of these outliers. The same mechanisms also cause the MBH(M*)-outlier satellites to be amongst the most compact galaxies in the simulation, making them ideal candidates for ultracompact dwarf galaxy progenitors. The 10 most extreme central galaxies found at z = 0 (with log10(MBH/MBH, med(M*)) ∈ [1.2, 1.5]) grow rapidly in MBH to lie well above the present-day MBH - M* relation at early times (z ≳ 2), and either continue to evolve parallel to the z = 0 relation or remain unchanged until the present day, making them `relics' of the high-redshift universe. This high-z formation mechanism may help to explain the origin of observed MBH(M*)-outliers with extended dark matter haloes and undisturbed morphologies.

  1. Hot Dust Obscured Galaxies with Excess Blue Light: Dual AGN or Single AGN Under Extreme Conditions?

    CERN Document Server

    Assef, R J; Brightman, M; Stern, D; Alexander, D; Bauer, F; Blain, A W; Diaz-Santos, T; Eisenhardt, P R M; Finkelstein, S L; Hickox, R C; Tsai, C -W; Wu, J W

    2015-01-01

    Hot Dust-Obscured Galaxies (Hot DOGs) are a population of hyper-luminous infrared galaxies identified by the WISE mission from their very red mid-IR colors, and characterized by hot dust temperatures ($T>60~\\rm K$). Several studies have shown clear evidence that the IR emission in these objects is powered by a highly dust-obscured AGN that shows close to Compton-thick absorption at X-ray wavelengths. Thanks to the high AGN obscuration, the host galaxy is easily observable, and has UV/optical colors usually consistent with those of a normal galaxy. Here we discuss a sub-population of 8 Hot DOGs that show enhanced rest-frame UV/optical emission. We discuss three scenarios that might explain the excess UV emission: (i) unobscured light leaked from the AGN by reflection over the dust or by partial coverage of the accretion disk; (ii) a second unobscured AGN in the system; or (iii) a luminous young starburst. X-ray observations can help discriminate between these scenarios. We study in detail the blue excess Hot D...

  2. The Nature of Blue Early-Type Galaxies in the Goods Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J H; Hwang, H S; Lee, Joon Hyeop; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the nature of the blue early-type galaxies (BEGs) in the GOODS north and south fields using the GOODS HST/ACS archival data. Using visual inspection, we have selected 58 BEGs and 113 normal red early-type galaxies (REGs) in the sample of 1,949 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We find that the BEGs are generally bluer, fainter, and less-massive than the REGs, although a few BEGs are exceptionally bright and massive. The number fraction of the BEGs to total early-type galaxies is almost constant ($\\sim0.3$) at $z \\le 1.1$. In addition, we find that the size of the BEGs in given redshift bin decrease as redshift decreases. The BEGs look similar to the REGs in the images and surface brightness profiles. However, at least 27 BEGs show traces of tidal disturbances in their fine structures: elongated cores, off-centered cores, asymmetric internal color distributions, tidally distorted outer structures, collisional rings, or very nearby companions. Twenty-one BEGs are detected in the X-ray...

  3. Complex Gas Kinematics in Compact, Rapidly Assembling Star-forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorín, R.; Vílchez, J. M.; Hägele, G. F.; Firpo, V.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Papaderos, P.

    2012-08-01

    Deep, high-resolution spectroscopic observations have been obtained for six compact, strongly star-forming galaxies at redshift z ~ 0.1-0.3, most of them also known as green peas. Remarkably, these galaxies show complex emission-line profiles in the spectral region including Hα, [N II] λλ6548, 6584, and [S II] λλ6717, 6731, consisting of the superposition of different kinematical components on a spatial extent of few kiloparsecs: a very broad line emission underlying more than one narrower component. For at least two of the observed galaxies some of these multiple components are resolved spatially in their two-dimensional spectra, whereas for another one a faint detached Hα blob lacking stellar continuum is detected at the same recessional velocity ~7 kpc away from the galaxy. The individual narrower Hα components show high intrinsic velocity dispersion (σ ~ 30-80 km s-1), suggesting together with unsharped masking Hubble Space Telescope images that star formation proceeds in an ensemble of several compact and turbulent clumps, with relative velocities of up to ~500 km s-1. The broad underlying Hα components indicate in all cases large expansion velocities (full width zero intensity >=1000 km s-1) and very high luminosities (up to ~1042 erg s-1), probably showing the imprint of energetic outflows from supernovae. These intriguing results underline the importance of green peas for studying the assembly of low-mass galaxies near and far. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  4. HOT DUST OBSCURED GALAXIES WITH EXCESS BLUE LIGHT: DUAL AGN OR SINGLE AGN UNDER EXTREME CONDITIONS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assef, R. J.; Diaz-Santos, T. [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Walton, D. J.; Brightman, M. [Space Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, D.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Tsai, C.-W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 169-236, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Alexander, D. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Bauer, F. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Blain, A. W. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, 1 University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Finkelstein, S. L. [The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hickox, R. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Wu, J. W., E-mail: roberto.assef@mail.udp.cl [UCLA Astronomy, P.O. Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    Hot dust-obscured galaxies (Hot DOGs) are a population of hyper-luminous infrared galaxies identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission from their very red mid-IR colors, and characterized by hot dust temperatures (T > 60 K). Several studies have shown clear evidence that the IR emission in these objects is powered by a highly dust-obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) that shows close to Compton-thick absorption at X-ray wavelengths. Thanks to the high AGN obscuration, the host galaxy is easily observable, and has UV/optical colors usually consistent with those of a normal galaxy. Here we discuss a sub-population of eight Hot DOGs that show enhanced rest-frame UV/optical emission. We discuss three scenarios that might explain the excess UV emission: (i) unobscured light leaked from the AGN by reflection over the dust or by partial coverage of the accretion disk; (ii) a second unobscured AGN in the system; or (iii) a luminous young starburst. X-ray observations can help discriminate between these scenarios. We study in detail the blue excess Hot DOG WISE J020446.13–050640.8, which was serendipitously observed by Chandra/ACIS-I for 174.5 ks. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with a single, hyper-luminous, highly absorbed AGN, and is strongly inconsistent with the presence of a secondary unobscured AGN. Based on this, we argue that the excess blue emission in this object is most likely either due to reflection or a co-eval starburst. We favor the reflection scenario as the unobscured star formation rate needed to power the UV/optical emission would be ≳1000 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. Deep polarimetry observations could confirm the reflection hypothesis.

  5. Hot Dust Obscured Galaxies with Excess Blue Light: Dual AGN or Single AGN Under Extreme Conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assef, R. J.; Walton, D. J.; Brightman, M.; Stern, D.; Alexander, D.; Bauer, F.; Blain, A. W.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Hickox, R. C.; Tsai, C.-W.; Wu, J. W.

    2016-03-01

    Hot dust-obscured galaxies (Hot DOGs) are a population of hyper-luminous infrared galaxies identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission from their very red mid-IR colors, and characterized by hot dust temperatures (T > 60 K). Several studies have shown clear evidence that the IR emission in these objects is powered by a highly dust-obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) that shows close to Compton-thick absorption at X-ray wavelengths. Thanks to the high AGN obscuration, the host galaxy is easily observable, and has UV/optical colors usually consistent with those of a normal galaxy. Here we discuss a sub-population of eight Hot DOGs that show enhanced rest-frame UV/optical emission. We discuss three scenarios that might explain the excess UV emission: (i) unobscured light leaked from the AGN by reflection over the dust or by partial coverage of the accretion disk; (ii) a second unobscured AGN in the system; or (iii) a luminous young starburst. X-ray observations can help discriminate between these scenarios. We study in detail the blue excess Hot DOG WISE J020446.13-050640.8, which was serendipitously observed by Chandra/ACIS-I for 174.5 ks. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with a single, hyper-luminous, highly absorbed AGN, and is strongly inconsistent with the presence of a secondary unobscured AGN. Based on this, we argue that the excess blue emission in this object is most likely either due to reflection or a co-eval starburst. We favor the reflection scenario as the unobscured star formation rate needed to power the UV/optical emission would be ≳1000 M⊙ yr-1. Deep polarimetry observations could confirm the reflection hypothesis.

  6. Hierarchical Formation in Action: Characterizing Accelerated Galaxy Evolution in Compact Groups Using Whole-Sky WISE Data

    CERN Document Server

    Zucker, Catherine; Johnson, Kelsey; Gallagher, Sarah; Alatalo, Katherine; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    Compact groups provide an environment to study the growth of galaxies amid multiple prolonged interactions. With their dense galaxy concentrations and relatively low velocity dispersions, compact groups mimic the conditions of hierarchical galaxy assembly. Compact group galaxies are known to show a bimodality in $Spitzer$ IRAC infrared colorspace: galaxies are preferentially either quiescent with low specific star formation rates, or are prolifically forming stars---galaxies with moderate levels of specific star formation are rare. Previous $Spitzer$ IRAC studies identifying this "canyon" have been limited by small number statistics. We utilize whole-sky WISE data to study 163 compact groups, thereby tripling our previous sample and including more galaxies with intermediate mid-IR colors indicative of moderate specific star formation rates (SSFRs). We define a distinct WISE mid-IR color-space ($\\log[{\\frac{\\rm f_{12}}{\\rm f_{4.6}}}]$ vs. $\\log[{\\frac{\\rm f_{22}}{\\rm f_{3.4}}}]$) that we use to identify canyon...

  7. Galaxy Interactions in Compact Groups I : The Galactic Winds of HCG16

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, Frédéric P A; Kewley, Lisa J

    2013-01-01

    Using the WiFeS integral field spectrograph, we have undertaken a series of observations of star-forming galaxies in Compact Groups. In this first paper dedicated to the project, we present the analysis of the spiral galaxy NGC838, a member of the Hickson Compact Group 16, and of its galactic wind. Our observations reveal that the wind forms an asymmetric, bipolar, rotating structure, powered by a nuclear starburst. Emission line ratio diagnostics indicate that photoionization is the dominant excitation mechanism at the base of the wind. Mixing from slow shocks (up to 20%) increases further out along the outflow axis. The asymmetry of the wind is most likely caused by one of the two lobes of the wind bubble bursting out of its HI envelope, as indicated by line ratios and radial velocity maps. The characteristics of this galactic wind suggest that it is caught early (a few Myr) in the wind evolution sequence. The wind is also quite different to the galactic wind in the partner galaxy NGC839 which contains a sy...

  8. OFDM-based broadband underwater wireless optical communication system using a compact blue LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Kong, Meiwei; Lin, Aobo; Song, Yuhang; Yu, Xiangyu; Qu, Fengzhong; Han, Jun; Deng, Ning

    2016-06-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an IM/DD-OFDM-based underwater wireless optical communication system. We investigate the dependence of its BER performance on the training symbol number as well as LED's bias voltage and driving voltage. With single compact blue LED and a low-cost PIN photodiode, we achieve net bit rates of 225.90 Mb/s at a BER of 1.54×10-3 using 16-QAM and 231.95 Mb/s at a BER of 3.28×10-3 using 32-QAM, respectively, over a 2-m air channel. Over a 2-m underwater channel, we achieve net bit rates of 161.36 Mb/s using 16-QAM, 156.31 Mb/s using 32-QAM, and 127.07 Mb/s using 64-QAM, respectively. The corresponding BERs are 2.5×10-3, 7.42×10-4, and 3.17×10-3, respectively, which are all below the FEC threshold.

  9. The Most Massive Ultra-Compact Dwarf Galaxy in the Virgo Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chengze; Toloba, Elisa; Mihos, J Christopher; Ferrarese, Laura; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Zhang, Hong-Xin; Côté, Patrick; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Cunningham, Emily C; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gwyn, Stephen; Herczeg, Gregory; Lim, Sungsoon; Puzia, Thomas H; Roediger, Joel; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We report on the properties of the most massive ultra-compact dwarf galaxy (UCD) in the nearby Virgo Cluster of galaxies using imaging from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) and spectroscopy from Keck/DEIMOS. This object (M59-UCD3) appears to be associated with the massive Virgo galaxy M59 (NGC 4621), has an integrated velocity dispersion of 78 km/s, a dynamical mass of $3.7\\times10^8 M_\\odot$, and an effective radius ($R_e$) of 25 pc. With an effective surface mass density of $9.4\\times10^{10} M_\\odot/kpc^2$, it is the densest galaxy in the local Universe discovered to date, surpassing the density of the luminous Virgo UCD, M60-UCD1. M59-UCD3 has a total luminosity of $M_{g'}=-14.2$ mag, and a spectral energy distribution consistent with an old (14 Gyr) stellar population with [Fe/H]=0.0 and [$\\alpha$/Fe]=+0.2. We also examine deep imaging around M59 and find a broad low surface brightness stream pointing towards M59-UCD3, which may represent a tidal remnant of the UCD progenitor. This UCD, alo...

  10. H ii REGIONS WITHIN A COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD. A NEARLY STARLESS DWARF GALAXY?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellazzini, M. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Magrini, L. [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Mucciarelli, A.; Fraternali, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat, 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Beccari, G. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura Santiago (Chile); Ibata, R.; Martin, N. [Obs. astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l’Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Battaglia, G. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Testa, V. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy); Fumana, M.; Marchetti, A. [INAF—IASF, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133, Milano (Italy); Correnti, M., E-mail: michele.bellazzini@oabo.inaf.it [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    Within the SECCO survey we identified a candidate stellar counterpart to the Ultra Compact High Velocity Cloud (UCHVC) HVC274.68+74.70-123 that was suggested by Adams et al. to be a possible mini halo within the Local Group of galaxies. The spectroscopic follow-up of the brightest sources within the candidate reveals the presence of two H ii regions whose radial velocity is compatible with a physical association with the UVHVC. The available data do not allow us to give a definite answer on the nature of the newly identified system. A few alternative hypotheses are discussed. However, the most likely possibility is that we have found a new faint dwarf galaxy residing in the Virgo cluster of galaxies, which we name SECCO 1. Independently of its actual distance, SECCO 1 displays a ratio of neutral hydrogen mass to V luminosity of M{sub H} {sub I}/L{sub V}≳20, by far the largest among local dwarfs. Hence, it appears to be a nearly starless galaxy and it may be an example of the missing links between normal dwarfs and the dark mini halos that are predicted to exist in large numbers according to the currently accepted cosmological model.

  11. The Black Hole in the Compact, High-dispersion Galaxy NGC 1271

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Jonelle L; Gebhardt, Karl; Yıldırım, Akın; Gültekin, Kayhan; Husemann, Bernd; Richstone, Douglas O

    2015-01-01

    Located in the Perseus cluster, NGC 1271 is an early-type galaxy with a small effective radius of 2.2 kpc and a large stellar velocity dispersion of 276 km/s for its K-band luminosity of 8.9x10^{10} L_sun. We present a mass measurement for the black hole in this compact, high-dispersion galaxy using observations from the integral field spectrograph NIFS on the Gemini North telescope assisted by laser guide star adaptive optics, large-scale integral field unit observations with PPAK at the Calar Alto Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 imaging observations. We are able to map out the stellar kinematics on small spatial scales, within the black hole sphere of influence, and on large scales that extend out to four times the galaxy's effective radius. We find that the galaxy is rapidly rotating and exhibits a sharp rise in the velocity dispersion. Through the use of orbit-based stellar dynamical models, we determine that the black hole has a mass of (3.0^{+1.0}_{-1.1}) x 10^9 M_sun and the H-band stellar...

  12. Star Formation Suppression in Compact Group Galaxies: A New Path to Quenching?

    CERN Document Server

    Alatalo, K; Lisenfeld, U; Bitsakis, T; Lanz, L; Lacy, M; Charmandaris, V; Cluver, M; Dopita, M A; Guillard, P; Jarrett, T; Kewley, L J; Nyland, K; Ogle, P M; Rasmussen, J; Rich, J A; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Xu, C K; Yun, M

    2015-01-01

    We present CO(1-0) maps of 12 warm H$_2$-selected Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs), covering 14 individually imaged warm H$_2$ bright galaxies, with CARMA. We found a variety of molecular gas distributions within the HCGs, including regularly rotating disks, bars, rings, tidal tails, and possibly nuclear outflows, though the molecular gas morphologies are more consistent with spirals and early-type galaxies than mergers and interacting systems. Our CO-imaged HCG galaxies show star formation suppression of $\\langle$S$\\rangle$=10$\\pm$5, distributed bimodally, with five objects exhibiting suppressions of S$\\gtrsim$10 and depletion timescales $\\gtrsim$10Gyr. This star formation inefficiency is also seen in the efficiency per freefall time. We investigate the gas-to-dust ratios of these galaxies to determine if an incorrect conversion caused the apparent suppression and find that HCGs have normal ratios. It is likely that the cause of the suppression in these objects is associated with shocks injecting turbulence int...

  13. Complex gas kinematics in compact, rapidly assembling star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Amorín, Ricardo; Hägele, Guillermo; Firpo, Verónica; Pérez-Montero, Enrique; Papaderos, Polychronis

    2012-01-01

    Deep, high resolution spectroscopic observations have been obtained for six compact, strongly star-forming galaxies at redshift z~0.1-0.3, most of them also known as Green Peas. Remarkably, these galaxies show complex emission-line profiles in the spectral region including H\\alpha, [NII]$\\lambda\\lambda 6548, 6584$ and [SII]$\\lambda\\lambda 6717, 6731$, consisting of the superposition of different kinematical components on a spatial extent of few kpc: a very broad line emission underlying more than one narrower component. For at least two of the observed galaxies some of these multiple components are resolved spatially in their 2D-spectra, whereas for another one a faint detached H\\alpha\\ blob lacking stellar continuum is detected at the same recessional velocity ~7 kpc away from the galaxy. The individual narrower H\\alpha\\ components show high intrinsic velocity dispersion (\\sigma ~30-80 km s$^{-1}$), suggesting together with unsharped masking HST images that star formation proceeds in an ensemble of several c...

  14. Stellar Systems in the direction of the Hickson Compact Group 44 - I. Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Castelli, A V Smith; Escudero, C G

    2016-01-01

    Context. In spite of the numerous studies of low-luminosity galaxies in different environments, there is still no consensus about their formation scenario. In particular, a large number of galaxies displaying extremely low-surface brightnesses have been detected in the last year, and the nature of these objects is under discussion. Aims. In this paper we report the detection of two extended low-surface brightness (LSB) objects (mueff_g'~27 mag) found, in projection, next to NGC 3193 and in the zone of the Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 44, respectively. Methods. We analyzed deep, high-quality, GEMINI-GMOS images with ELLIPSE within IRAF in order to obtain their brightness profiles and structural parameters. We also search for the presence of globular clusters (GC) in these fields. Results. We have found that, if these LSB galaxies were at the distances of NGC 3193 and HCG 44, they would show sizes and luminosities similar to those of the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) found in the Coma cluster and other associati...

  15. A Compact Starburst Core in the Dusty Lyman Break Galaxy Westphal-MD11

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, A J; Lehnert, M D; Lutz, D; Tacconi, L J; Baker, Andrew J.; Tacconi, Linda J.; Genzel, Reinhard; Lutz, Dieter

    2004-01-01

    Using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer, we have searched for CO(3-2) emission from the dusty Lyman break galaxy Westphal-MD11 at z = 2.98. Our sensitive upper limit is surprisingly low relative to the system's 850 um flux density and implies a far-IR/CO luminosity ratio as elevated as those seen in local ultraluminous mergers. We conclude that the observed dust emission must originate in a compact structure radiating near its blackbody limit and that a relatively modest molecular gas reservoir must be fuelling an intense nuclear starburst (and/or deeply buried active nucleus) that may have been triggered by a major merger. In this regard, Westphal-MD11 contrasts strikingly with the lensed Lyman break galaxy MS1512-cB58, which is being observed apparently midway through an extended episode of more quiescent disk star formation.

  16. CANDELS+3D-HST: Compact SFGs at z ∼ 2-3, the progenitors of the first quiescent galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barro, G.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Guo, Y. [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Pérez-González, P. G. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, F. CC. Físicas, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pacifici, C. [Yonsei University Observatory, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Trump, J. R. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wuyts, S.; Hsu, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstr., D-85741 Garching (Germany); Bell, E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Dekel, A. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Porter, L.; Primack, J. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ferguson, H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Caputi, K. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Ceverino, D. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Croton, D. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Giavalisco, M. [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); and others

    2014-08-10

    We analyze the star-forming and structural properties of 45 massive (log(M/M{sub ☉}) >10) compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2 < z < 3 to explore whether they are progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at z ∼ 2. The optical/NIR and far-IR Spitzer/Herschel colors indicate that most compact SFGs are heavily obscured. Nearly half (47%) host an X-ray-bright active galactic nucleus (AGN). In contrast, only about 10% of other massive galaxies at that time host AGNs. Compact SFGs have centrally concentrated light profiles and spheroidal morphologies similar to quiescent galaxies and are thus strikingly different from other SFGs, which typically are disk-like and sometimes clumpy or irregular. Most compact SFGs lie either within the star formation rate (SFR)-mass main sequence (65%) or below it (30%), on the expected evolutionary path toward quiescent galaxies. These results show conclusively that galaxies become more compact before they lose their gas and dust, quenching star formation. Using extensive HST photometry from CANDELS and grism spectroscopy from the 3D-HST survey, we model their stellar populations with either exponentially declining (τ) star formation histories (SFHs) or physically motivated SFHs drawn from semianalytic models (SAMs). SAMs predict longer formation timescales and older ages ∼2 Gyr, which are nearly twice as old as the estimates of the τ models. Both models yield good spectral energy distribution fits, indicating that the systematic uncertainty in the age due to degeneracies in the SFH is of that order of magnitude. However, SAM SFHs better match the observed slope and zero point of the SFR-mass main sequence. Contrary to expectations, some low-mass compact SFGs (log(M/M{sub ☉}) =10-10.6) have younger ages but lower specific SFRs than that of more massive galaxies, suggesting that the low-mass galaxies reach the red sequence faster. If the progenitors of compact SFGs are extended SFGs, state-of-the-art SAMs show that mergers

  17. The Rise and Fall of Star Formation Histories of Blue Galaxies at Redshifts 0.2 < z < 1.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Camilla; Kassin, Susan A.; Weiner, Benjamin; Charlot, Stephane; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    Popular cosmological scenarios predict that galaxies form hierarchically from the merger of many progenitor, each with their own unique star formation history (SFH). We use the approach recently developed by Pacifici et al. to constrain the SFHs of 4517 blue (presumably star-forming) galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range O.2 star formation and chemical enrichment histories, stellar population synthesis, nebular emission and attenuation by dust. We constrain the SFH of each galaxy in our sample by comparing the observed fluxes in the B, R,l and K(sub s) bands and rest-frame optical emission-line luminosities with those of one million model spectral energy distributions. We explore the dependence of the resulting SFH on galaxy stellar mass and redshift. We find that the average SFHs of high-mass galaxies rise and fall in a roughly symmetric bell-shaped manner, while those of low-mass galaxies rise progressively in time, consistent with the typically stronger activity of star formation in low-mass compared to high-mass galaxies. For galaxies of all masses, the star formation activity rises more rapidly at high than at low redshift. These findings imply that the standard approximation of exponentially declining SFHs wIdely used to interpret observed galaxy spectral energy distributions is not appropriate to constrain the physical parameters of star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts.

  18. AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF SDSS-SELECTED BLUE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A near-infrared (NIR; 2.5-4.5 μm) spectroscopic survey of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-selected blue early-type galaxies (BEGs) has been conducted using the AKARI. The NIR spectra of 36 BEGs are secured, which are well balanced in their star formation (SF)/Seyfert/LINER-type composition. For high signal-to-noise ratio, we stack the BEG spectra in its entirety and in bins of several properties: color, specific star formation rate, and optically determined spectral type. We estimate the NIR continuum slope and the equivalent width of 3.29 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission. In the comparison between the estimated NIR spectral features of the BEGs and those of model galaxies, the BEGs seem to be old-SSP(simple stellar population)-dominated metal-rich galaxies with moderate dust attenuation. The dust attenuation in the BEGs may originate from recent SF or active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity and the BEGs have a clear feature of PAH emission, evidence of current SF. BEGs show NIR features different from those of ULIRGs from which we do not find any clear relationship between BEGs and ULIRGs. We find that Seyfert BEGs have more active SF than LINER BEGs, in spite of the fact that Seyferts show stronger AGN activity than LINERs. One possible scenario satisfying both our results and the AGN feedback is that SF, Seyfert, and LINER BEGs form an evolutionary sequence: SF → Seyfert → LINER.

  19. AKARI Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of SDSS-Selected Blue Early-Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Joon Hyeop; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lee, Jong Chul; Matsuhara, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    A near-infrared (NIR; 2.5 - 4.5 micron) spectroscopic survey of SDSS(Sloan Digital Sky Survey)-selected blue early-type galaxies (BEGs) has been conducted using the AKARI. The NIR spectra of 36 BEGs are secured, which are well balanced in their star-formation(SF)/Seyfert/LINER type composition. For high signal-to-noise ratio, we stack the BEG spectra all and in bins of several properties: color, specific star formation rate and optically-determined spectral type. We estimate the NIR continuum slope and the equivalent width of 3.29 micron PAH emission. In the comparison between the estimated NIR spectral features of the BEGs and those of model galaxies, the BEGs seem to be old-SSP(Simple Stellar Population)-dominated metal-rich galaxies with moderate dust attenuation. The dust attenuation in the BEGs may originate from recent star formation or AGN activity and the BEGs have a clear feature of PAH emission, the evidence of current SF. BEGs show NIR features different from those of ULIRGs, from which we do not f...

  20. Central Stellar Mass Deficits in the Bulges of Local Lenticular Galaxies, and the Connection with Compact z ~ 1.5 Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dullo, Bililign T

    2013-01-01

    We have used the full radial extent of images from the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 to extract surface brightness profiles from a sample of six, local lenticular galaxy candidates. We have modelled these profiles using a core-Sersic bulge plus an exponential disk model. Our lenticular disk galaxies with bulge magnitudes M_V 10^11 M_sun, and therefore appear to be descendants of the compact galaxies reported at z ~ 1.5 to 2. Past studies which have searched for these local counterparts by using single-component galaxy models to provide the z ~ 0 size comparisons have over-looked these dense, compact and massive bulges in today's early-type disk galaxies. This evolutionary scenario not only accounts for what are today generally old bulges---which must be present in z ~ 1.5 images---residing in what are generally young disks, but it eliminates the uncomfortable suggestion of a factor of 3 to 5 growth in size for the compact, z ~ 1.5 galaxies that are kno...

  1. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: Cosmological neutrino mass constraint from blue high-redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Riemer--Sørensen, Signe; Parkinson, David; Davis, Tamara M; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Contreras, Carlos; Couch, Warrick; Croom, Scott; Croton, Darren; Drinkwater, Michael J; Forster, Karl; Gilbank, David; Gladders, Mike; Glazebrook, Karl; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J; Li, I-hui; Madore, Barry; Martin, D Christopher; Pimbblet, Kevin; Poole, Gregory B; Pracy, Michael; Sharp, Rob; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David; Wyder, Ted K; Yee, H K C

    2011-01-01

    The absolute neutrino mass scale is currently unknown, but can be constrained from cosmology. The WiggleZ high redshift star-forming blue galaxy sample is less sensitive to systematics from non-linear structure formation, redshift-space distortions and galaxy bias than previous surveys. We obtain a upper limit on the sum of neutrino masses of 0.60eV (95% confidence) for WiggleZ+Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. Combining with priors on the Hubble Parameter and the baryon acoustic oscillation scale gives an upper limit of 0.29eV, which is the strongest neutrino mass constraint derived from spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys.

  2. Gravitational-wave radiation from double compact objects with eLISA in the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jinzhong

    2014-01-01

    The phase of in-spiral of double compact objects (DCOs: NS+WD, NS+NS, BH+NS, and BH+BH binaries) in the disk field population of the Galaxy provides a potential source in the frequency range from $10^{-4}$ to 0.1 Hz, which can be detected by the European New Gravitational Observatory (NGO: eLISA is derived from the previous LISA proposal) project. In this frequency range, much stronger gravitational wave (GW) radiation can be obtained from DCO sources because they possess more mass than other compact binaries (e.g., close double white dwarfs). In this study, we aim to calculate the gravitational wave signals from the resolvable DCO sources in the Galaxy using a binary population synthesis approach, and to carry out physical properties of these binaries using Monte Carlo simulations. Combining the sensitivity curve of the eLISA detector and a confusion-limited noise floor of close double white dwarfs, we find that only a handful of DCO sources can be detected by the eLISA detector. The detectable number of DCO...

  3. Intragroup diffuse light in compact groups of galaxies II. HCG 15, 35 and 51

    CERN Document Server

    Da Rocha, C; de Oliveira, C Mendes

    2008-01-01

    This continuing study of intragroup light in compact groups of galaxies aims to establish new constraints to models of formation and evolution of galaxy groups, specially of compact groups, which are a key part in the evolution of larger structures, such as clusters. In this paper we present three additional groups (HCG 15, 35 and 51) using deep wide field $B$ and $R$ band images observed with the LAICA camera at the 3.5m telescope at the Calar Alto observatory (CAHA). This instrument provides us with very stable flatfielding, a mandatory condition for reliably measuring intragroup diffuse light. The images were analyzed with the OV\\_WAV package, a wavelet technique that allows us to uncover the intragroup component in an unprecedented way. We have detected that 19, 15 and 26% of the total light of HCG 15, 35 and 51, respectively, is in the diffuse component, with colours that are compatible with old stellar populations and with mean surface brightness that can be as low as $28.4 {\\rm B mag arcsec^{-2}}$. Dyn...

  4. Intragroup diffuse light in compact groups of galaxies - II. HCG 15, 35 and 51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rocha, C.; Ziegler, B. L.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.

    2008-08-01

    This continuing study of intragroup light in compact groups of galaxies aims to establish new constraints to models of formation and evolution of galaxy groups, specially of compact groups, which are a key part in the evolution of larger structures, such as clusters. In this paper we present three additional groups (HCG 15, 35 and 51) using deep wide-field B- and R-band images observed with the LAICA camera at the 3.5-m telescope at the Calar Alto observatory (CAHA). This instrument provides us with very stable flat-fielding, a mandatory condition for reliably measuring intragroup diffuse light. The images were analysed with the OV_WAV package, a wavelet technique that allows us to uncover the intragroup component in an unprecedented way. We have detected that 19, 15 and 26 per cent of the total light of HCG 15, 35 and 51, respectively, are in the diffuse component, with colours that are compatible with old stellar populations and with mean surface brightness that can be as low as 28.4 B mag arcsec-2. Dynamical masses, crossing times and mass-to-light ratios were recalculated using the new group parameters. Also tidal features were analysed using the wavelet technique.

  5. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: Direct constraints on blue galaxy intrinsic alignments at intermediate redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Bridle, Sarah; Abdalla, Filipe B; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick; Croom, Scott; Davis, Tamara; Drinkwater, Michael J; Forster, Karl; Glazebrook, Karl; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J; Li, Tornado; Madore, Barry; Martin, Chris; Pimbblet, Kevin; Poole, Gregory B; Pracy, Michael; Sharp, Rob; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David; Wyder, Ted

    2009-01-01

    Correlations between the intrinsic shapes of galaxy pairs, and between the intrinsic shapes of galaxies and the large-scale density field, may be induced by tidal fields. These correlations, which have been detected at low redshifts (z<0.35) for bright red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and for which upper limits exist for blue galaxies at z~0.1, provide a window into galaxy formation and evolution, and are also an important contaminant for current and future weak lensing surveys. Measurements of these alignments at intermediate redshifts (z~0.6) that are more relevant for cosmic shear observations are very important for understanding the origin and redshift evolution of these alignments, and for minimising their impact on weak lensing measurements. We present the first such intermediate-redshift measurement for blue galaxies, using galaxy shape measurements from SDSS and spectroscopic redshifts from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. Our null detection allows us to place upper limits on the...

  6. CANDELS: THE PROGENITORS OF COMPACT QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barro, Guillermo; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Mozena, Mark; McGrath, Elizabeth; Cheung, Edmond; Fang, Jerome [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G. [Departamento de Astrof isica, Facultad de CC F isicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, F. CC. Fisicas, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Williams, Christina C. [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, 710 N. Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Van der Wel, Arjen [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wuyts, Stijn [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstr., D-85741 Garching (Germany); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Croton, Darren J. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Ceverino, Daniel; Dekel, Avishai [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Ashby, M. L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ferguson, Henry C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Fontana, Adriano [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio, Rome (Italy); and others

    2013-03-10

    We combine high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 images with multi-wavelength photometry to track the evolution of structure and activity of massive (M{sub *} > 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }) galaxies at redshifts z = 1.4-3 in two fields of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. We detect compact, star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) whose number densities, masses, sizes, and star formation rates (SFRs) qualify them as likely progenitors of compact, quiescent, massive galaxies (cQGs) at z = 1.5-3. At z {approx}> 2, cSFGs present SFR = 100-200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, yet their specific star formation rates (sSFR {approx} 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1}) are typically half that of other massive SFGs at the same epoch, and host X-ray luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) 30 times ({approx}30%) more frequently. These properties suggest that cSFGs are formed by gas-rich processes (mergers or disk-instabilities) that induce a compact starburst and feed an AGN, which, in turn, quench the star formation on dynamical timescales (few 10{sup 8} yr). The cSFGs are continuously being formed at z = 2-3 and fade to cQGs down to z {approx} 1.5. After this epoch, cSFGs are rare, thereby truncating the formation of new cQGs. Meanwhile, down to z = 1, existing cQGs continue to enlarge to match local QGs in size, while less-gas-rich mergers and other secular mechanisms shepherd (larger) SFGs as later arrivals to the red sequence. In summary, we propose two evolutionary tracks of QG formation: an early (z {approx}> 2), formation path of rapidly quenched cSFGs fading into cQGs that later enlarge within the quiescent phase, and a late-arrival (z {approx}< 2) path in which larger SFGs form extended QGs without passing through a compact state.

  7. Ultra Compact Dwarf galaxies in Abell 1689: a photometric study with the ACS

    CERN Document Server

    Mieske, S; Benítez, N; Coe, D; Blakeslee, J P; Zekser, K; Ford, H; Broadhurst, T J; Illingworth, G D; Hartig, G F; Clampin, M; Ardila, D R; Bartko, F; Bouwens, R J; Brown, R A; Burrows, C J; Cheng, E S; Cross, N J G; Feldman, P D; Franx, M; Golimowski, D A; Goto, T; Gronwall, C; Holden, B; Homeier, N; Kimble, R A; Krist, J E; Lesser, M P; Martel, A R; Menanteau, F; Meurer, G R; Miley, G K; Postman, M; Rosati, P; Sirianni, M; Sparks, W B; Tran, H D; Tsvetanov, Z I; White, R L; Zheng, W

    2004-01-01

    The properties of Ultra Compact Dwarf (UCD) galaxy candidates in Abell 1689 (z=0.183) are investigated, based on deep high resolution ACS images. A UCD candidate has to be unresolved, have i26.8 mag, the radial and luminosity distribution of the UCD candidates can be explained well by Abell 1689's globular cluster (GC) system. For i<26.8 mag, there is an overpopulation of 15 +/- 5 UCD candidates with respect to the GC luminosity function. For i<26 mag, the radial distribution of UCD candidates is more consistent with the dwarf galaxy population than with the GC system of Abell 1689. The UCD candidates follow a color-magnitude trend with a slope similar to that of Abell 1689's genuine dwarf galaxy population, but shifted fainter by about 2-3 mag. Two of the three brightest UCD candidates (M_V ~ -17 mag) are slightly resolved. At the distance of Abell 1689, these two objects would have King-profile core radii of ~35 pc and r_eff ~300 pc, implying luminosities and sizes 2-3 times those of M32's bulge. Addi...

  8. On the compact HII galaxy UM 408 as seen by GMOS-IFU: Physical conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Lagos, Patricio; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Carrasco, Eleazar R; Cuisinier, Francois; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    We present Integral Field Unit GMOS-IFU data of the compact HII galaxy UM408, obtained at Gemini South telescope, in order to derive the spatial distribution of emission lines and line ratios, kinematics, plasma parameters, and oxygen abundances as well the integrated properties over an area of 3"x4".4(~750x1100 pc) located in the central part of the galaxy. The starburst in this area is resolved into two giant regions of ~375 and 250pc diameter, respectively. The ages of these two regions, estimated using Hb equivalent widths, suggest that they are coeval events of ~5Myr with stellar masses of ~10^4M_o. We have also used [OIII]/Hb and [SII]/Ha ratio maps to explore the excitation mechanisms in this galaxy. The Ha emission line was used to measure the radial velocity and velocity dispersion. We derived an integrated oxygen abundance of 12+log(O/H)=7.87 summing over all spaxels in our field of view. An average value of 12+log(O/H)=7.77 and a difference of D(O/H)=0.47 between the minimum and maximum values (7.5...

  9. Intragroup diffuse light in compact groups of galaxies: HCG 79, 88 and 95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rocha, C.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.

    2005-12-01

    Deep B and R images of three Hickson Compact Groups, HCG 79, 88 and 95, have been analysed using a new wavelet technique to measure possible intragroup diffuse light present in these systems. The method used, OV_WAV, is a wavelet technique particularly suitable for detecting low surface brightness extended structures, down to a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) = 0.1 per pixel, which corresponds to a 5σ detection level in wavelet space. The three groups studied are in different evolutionary stages, as can be judged by their very different fractions of the total light contained in their intragroup haloes: 46 +/- 11 per cent for HCG 79 and 11 +/- 26 per cent for HCG 95, in the B band, and HCG 88 had no component detected down to a limiting surface brightness of 29.1B mag arcsec-2. For HCG 95, the intragroup light (IGL) is red, similar to the mean colours of the group galaxies themselves, suggesting that it is formed by an old population with no significant ongoing star formation. For HCG 79, however, the intragroup material has a significantly bluer colour than the mean colour of the group galaxies, suggesting that the diffuse light may, at least in part, come from stripping of dwarf galaxies which dissolved into the group potential well.

  10. ISO observations of Hickson Compact Group 31 with the central Wolf-Rayet galaxy NGC 1741

    CERN Document Server

    O'Halloran, B; McBreen, B; Laureijs, R J; Leech, K; Delaney, M; Watson, D; Hanlon, L O

    2002-01-01

    Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 31, consisting of the Wolf-Rayet galaxy NGC 1741 and its irregular dwarf companions, was observed using the Infrared Space Observatory. The deconvolved ISOCAM maps of the galaxies using the 7.7 micron and 14.3 micron (LW6 and LW3) filters are presented, along with ISOPHOT spectrometry of the central starburst region of NGC 1741 and the nucleus of galaxy HCG 31A. Strong mid-IR emission was detected from the central burst in NGC 1741, along with strong PAH features and a blend of features including [S IV] at 10.5 micron. The 14.3/6.75 micron flux ratio, where the 6.75 micron flux was synthesized from the PHT-S spectrum, and 14.3/7.7 micron flux ratios suggest that the central burst within NGC 1741 may be moving towards the post-starburst phase. Diagnostic tools including the ratio of the integrated PAH luminosity to the 40 to 120 micron infrared luminosity and the far-infrared colours reveal that despite the high surface brightness of the nucleus, the properties of NGC 1741 can be ex...

  11. Monsters in the Dark: Predictions for Luminous Galaxies in the Early Universe from the BlueTides Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Waters, Dacen; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Feng, Yu; Croft, Ruper; Nagai, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Using deep Hubble and Spitzer observations Oesch et al. (2016) have identified a bright ($M_{\\rm UV}\\approx -22$) star forming galaxy candidate at $z \\approx 11$. The presence of GN-$z11$ implies a number density $\\sim 10^{-6}\\,{\\rm Mpc^{-3}}$, roughly an order of magnitude higher than the expected value based on extrapolations from lower redshift. Using the unprecedented volume and high resolution of the BlueTides cosmological hydrodynamical simulation, we study the population of luminous rare objects at $z > 10$. The luminosity function in BlueTides implies an enhanced number of massive galaxies, consistent with the observation of GN-$z11$. We find about 30 galaxies at $M_{\\rm UV}\\approx -22$ at $z = 11$ in the BlueTides volume, including a few objects about 1.5 magnitudes brighter. The probability of observing GN-$z11$ in the volume probed by Oesch et al. (2016) is $\\sim 13$ per cent. The predicted properties of the rare bright galaxies at $z = 11$ in BlueTides closely match those inferred from the observa...

  12. Near-infrared imaging of gigahertz peaked spectrum, compact steep spectrum, and large-scale FR II radio galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, WH; O'Dea, CP; Perlman, E; Baum, SA; Lehnert, MD; Stocke, J; Rector, T; Elston, R

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we present the data from our J-, H-, and K-band imaging program of powerful radio sources. The sample consists of radio galaxies classified as either compact (20 kpc) radio sources. Source images, photometry results, radial profiles, and profile fits are presented. Source decomposition

  13. Studying the evolution of galaxies in compact groups over the past 3 Gyr. I. The nuclear activity

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsakis, T; Ciesla, L; Krongold, Y; Charmandaris, V; Zezas, A

    2015-01-01

    We present the first -- of a series -- study of the evolution of galaxies in compact groups over the past 3 Gyr. This paper focuses on the evolution of the nuclear activity and how it has been affected by the dense environment of the groups. Our analysis is based on the largest multiwavelength compact group sample to-date, containing complete ultraviolet-to-infrared (UV-to-IR) photometry for 1,770 isolated groups (7,417 galaxies). We classified the nuclear activity of the galaxies based on optical emission line and mid-infrared diagnostic methods, as well as using spectral energy distribution fitting. We observe a 15% increase on the number of the AGN-hosting late-type galaxies found in dynamically old groups, over the past 3 Gyr, accompanied by the corresponding decrease of their circumnuclear star formation. Comparing our compact group results with those of local isolated field and interacting pair galaxies, we find no differences in the AGN at the same redshift range. Based on both optical and mid-IR colou...

  14. The ACS LCID project VII: the blue stragglers population in the isolated dSph galaxies Cetus and Tucana

    CERN Document Server

    Monelli, M; Mapelli, M; Bernard, E J; Aparicio, A; Skillman, E D; Stetson, P B; Gallart, C; Hidalgo, S L; Mayer, L; Tolstoy, E

    2011-01-01

    We present the first investigation of the Blue Straggler star (BSS) population in two isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group, Cetus and Tucana. Deep HST/ACS photometry allowed us to identify samples of 940 and 1214 candidates, respectively. The analysis of the star formation histories of the two galaxies suggests that both host a population of BSSs. Specifically, if the BSS candidates are interpreted as young main sequence stars, they do not conform to their galaxy's age-metallicity relationship. The analysis of the luminosity function and the radial distributions support this conclusion, and suggest a non-collisional mechanism for the BSS formation, from the evolution of primordial binaries. This scenario is also supported by the results of new dynamical simulations presented here. Both galaxies coincide with the relationship between the BSS frequency and the absolute visual magnitude Mv found by Momany et al (2007). If this relationship is confirmed by larger sample, then it could be a valuab...

  15. Compact High-Power Blue Light from a Diode-Pumped Intracavity-Doubled Nd:YAG Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李德华; 李平雪; 张治国; 张世文

    2002-01-01

    We report an effcient continuous wave (cw) operation of 946 nm and 473nm laser beams generated from a diodepumped composite Nd: YAG rod. A very simple compact linear cavity was employed with cavity length of 35 mm.A composite Nd:YAG laser rod was used to release thermal effects. The maximum cw output of 3.3 W at 946nm was obtained with slope efficiency of 22% at incident pump power of 17.5 W. By intracavity doubling with an LBO crystal, as much as 590mW of single-ended blue output at 473nm was achieved with an optical-optical conversion e fffciency of 3.4%. The total blue output would be 1.06 W with overall conversion efficiency of 6.1% if the lasers emitted in both the directions were taken into account.

  16. The red and blue galaxy populations in the GOODS field: evidence for an excess of red dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Salimbeni, S; Menci, N; Castellano, M; Fontana, A; Grazian, A; Pentericci, L; Trevese, D; Cristiani, S; Nonino, M; Vanzella, E

    2007-01-01

    We study the evolution of the galaxy population up to z\\sim3 as a function of its colour properties. In particular, luminosity functions and luminosity densities have been derived as a function of redshift for the blue/late and red/early populations. We use data from the GOODS-MUSIC catalogue which have typical magnitude limits z<26 and Ks<23.5 for most of the sample. About 8% of the galaxies have spectroscopic redshifts; the remaining have well calibrated photometric redshifts derived from the extremely wide multi-wavelength coverage in 14 bands (from the U band to the Spitzer 8 \\mu m band). We have derived a catalogue of galaxies complete in rest-frame B-band, which has been divided in two subsamples according to their rest-frame U-V colour (or derived specific star formation rate, SSFR) properties. We confirm a bimodality in the U-V colour and SSFR of the galaxy sample up to z\\sim 3. This bimodality is used to compute the LFs of the blue/late and red/early subsamples. The LFs of the blue/late and tot...

  17. Obtaining mass parameters of compact objects from red-blue shifts emitted by geodesic particles around them

    CERN Document Server

    Becerril, Ricardo; Nucamendi, Ulises

    2016-01-01

    The mass parameters of compact objects such as Boson Stars, Schwarzschild, Reissner Nordstrom and Kerr black holes are computed in terms of the measurable redshift-blueshift (zred, zblue) of photons emitted by particles moving along circular geodesics around these objects and the radius of their orbits. We found bounds for the values of (zred, zblue) that may be observed. For the case of Kerr black hole, recent observational estimates of SrgA\\* mass and rotation parameter are employed to determine the corresponding values of these red-blue shifts.

  18. Star formation in the hosts of GHz peaked spectrum and compact steep spectrum radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Labiano, A; Barthel, P D; De Vries, W H; Baum, S A

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: Search for star formation regions in the hosts of potentially young radio galaxies (Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum and Compact Steep Spectrum sources). METHODS: Near-UV imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys.} RESULTS: We find near-UV light which could be the product of recent star formation in eight of the nine observed sources, though other explanations are not currently ruled out. The UV luminosities of the GPS and CSS sources are similar to those of a sample of nearby large scale radio galaxies. Stellar population synthesis models are consistent with a burst of recent star formation occuring before the formation of the radio source. However, observations at other wavelengths and colors are needed to definitively establish the nature of the observed UV light. In the CSS sources 1443+77 and 1814-637 the near-UV light is aligned with and is co-spatial with the radio source. We suggest that in these sources the UV light is produced by star formation triggered and/or enhanced by t...

  19. Non-thermal radiation from collisions of compact objects with intermediate scale jets in active galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bednarek, W

    2015-01-01

    Massive black holes in active galaxies are immersed in huge concentrations of late type stars in the galactic bulges and also early type massive stars in the nuclear stellar clusters which are additionally surrounded by quasi-spherical several kpc scale halos containing from a few hundred up to several thousand globular clusters (GCs). It is expected that significant numbers of red giant stars, massive stars and also GCs can move through the jet expelled from the central engine of active galaxy. We consider collisions of stars from the galactic bulge, nuclear cluster and globular clusters with the jet plasma. As a result of such collisions, multiple shocks are expected to appear in the jet around these compact objects. Therefore, the plasma in the kpc scale jet can be significantly disturbed. We show that particles can be accelerated on these shocks up to the multi-TeV energies. TeV leptons emit synchrotron radiation, extending up to the X-ray energies, and also comptonize radiation produced in a stellar clus...

  20. Evolution of Density Profiles in High-z Galaxies: Compaction and Quenching Inside-Out

    CERN Document Server

    Tacchella, Sandro; Carollo, C Marcella; Ceverino, Daniel; DeGraf, Colin; Lapiner, Sharon; Mandelker, Nir; Primack, Joel R

    2015-01-01

    Using cosmological simulations, we address the interplay between structure and star formation in high-redshift galaxies via the evolution of surface density profiles. Our sample consists of 26 galaxies evolving in the redshift range $z=7-1$, spanning the stellar mass range $(0.2-6.4)\\times 10^{10}M_\\odot$ at $z=2$. We recover the main trends by stacking the profiles in accordance to their evolution phases. Following a wet compaction event that typically occurs when the stellar mass is $\\sim10^{9.5}~M_{\\odot}$ at $z\\sim2-4$, the gas develops a cusp inside the effective radius, associated with a peak in star-formation rate (SFR). The SFR peak and the associated feedback, in the absence of further gas inflow to the centre, marks the onset of gas depletion from the central 1 kpc, leading to quenching of the central SFR. An extended, star-forming ring that forms by fresh gas during the central quenching process shows as a rising specific SFR (sSFR) profile, which is interpreted as inside-out quenching. Before quen...

  1. A search for moderate-redshift survivors from the population of luminous compact passive galaxies at high redshift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a search of a ∼2400 deg2 region covered by both the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey databases, we have attempted to identify galaxies at z ∼ 0.5 that are consistent with their being essentially unmodified examples of the luminous passive compact galaxies found at z ∼ 2.5. After isolating good candidates via deeper imaging, we further refine the sample with Keck moderate-resolution spectroscopy and laser guide star adaptive-optics imaging. For four of the five galaxies that so far remain after passing through this sieve, we analyze plausible star-formation histories based on our spectra in order to identify galaxies that may have survived with little modification from the population formed at high redshift. We find two galaxies that are consistent with having formed ≳ 95% of their mass at z > 5. We attempt to estimate masses both from our stellar population determinations and from velocity dispersions. Given the high frequency of small axial ratios, both in our small sample and among samples found at high redshifts, we tentatively suggest that some of the more extreme examples of passive compact galaxies may have prolate morphologies.

  2. The B-Band Luminosity Function of Red and Blue Galaxies up to z=3.5

    CERN Document Server

    Giallongo, E; Menci, N; Zamorani, G; Fontana, A; Dickinson, M; Cristiani, S; Pozzetti, L

    2004-01-01

    We have explored the redshift evolution of the luminosity function of red and blue galaxies up to $z=3.5$. This was possible joining a deep I band composite galaxy sample, which includes the spectroscopic K20 sample and the HDFs samples, with the deep $H_{AB}=26$ and $K_{AB}=25$ samples derived from the deep NIR images of the Hubble Deep Fields North and South, respectively. About 30% of the sample has spectroscopic redshifts and the remaining fraction well-calibrated photometric redshifts. This allowed to select and measure galaxies in the rest-frame blue magnitude up to $z\\sim 3$ and to derive the redshift evolution of the B-band luminosity function of galaxies separated by their rest-frame $U-V$ color or specific (i.e. per unit mass) star-formation rate. The class separation was derived from passive evolutionary tracks or from their observed bimodal distributions. Both distributions appear bimodal at least up to $z\\sim 2$ and the locus of red/early galaxies is clearly identified up to these high redshifts....

  3. VLT/X-SHOOTER NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY AND HST IMAGING OF GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED z ∼ 2 COMPACT QUIESCENT GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, S.; Man, A. W. S.; Krühler, T.; Toft, S.; Fynbo, J. P. U. [Dark Cosmology Centre, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Richard, J. [Centre de Recherche Astronomique de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, 9 Avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint Genis Laval (France); Marchesini, D., E-mail: sgeier@astro.ku.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 06520 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    Quiescent massive galaxies at z ∼ 2 are thought to be the progenitors of present-day massive ellipticals. Observations revealed them to be extraordinarily compact. Until now, the determination of stellar ages, star formation rates, and dust properties via spectroscopic measurements has been feasible only for the most luminous and massive specimens (∼3 × M*). Here we present a spectroscopic study of two near-infrared-selected galaxies that are close to the characteristic stellar mass M* (∼0.9 × M* and ∼1.3 × M*) and whose observed brightness has been boosted by the gravitational lensing effect. We measure the redshifts of the two galaxies to be z = 1.71 ± 0.02 and z = 2.15 ± 0.01. By fitting stellar population synthesis models to their spectrophotometric spectral energy distributions we determine their ages to be 2.4{sup +0.8}{sub -0.6} Gyr and 1.7 ± 0.3 Gyr, respectively, which implies that the two galaxies have higher mass-to-light ratios than most quiescent z ∼ 2 galaxies in other studies. We find no direct evidence for active star formation or active galactic nucleus activity in either of the two galaxies, based on the non-detection of emission lines. Based on the derived redshifts and stellar ages we estimate the formation redshifts to be z=4.3{sup +3.4}{sub -1.2} and z=4.3{sup +1.0}{sub -0.6}, respectively. We use the increased spatial resolution due to the gravitational lensing to derive constraints on the morphology. Fitting Sérsic profiles to the de-lensed images of the two galaxies confirms their compactness, with one of them being spheroid-like and the other providing the first confirmation of a passive lenticular galaxy at a spectroscopically derived redshift of z ∼ 2.

  4. Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 Grism Spectroscopy and Imaging of a Growing Compact Galaxy at z=1.9

    CERN Document Server

    van Dokkum, Pieter G

    2010-01-01

    We present HST/WFC3 grism spectroscopy of the brightest galaxy at z>1.5 in the GOODS-South WFC3 Early Release Science grism pointing, covering the wavelength range 0.9-1.7 micron. The spectrum is of remarkable quality and shows the redshifted Balmer lines Hbeta, Hgamma, and Hdelta in absorption at z=1.902, correcting previous erroneous redshift measurements from the rest-frame UV. The average rest-frame equivalent width of the Balmer lines is 8+-1 Angstrom, which can be produced by a post-starburst stellar population with a luminosity-weighted age of ~0.5 Gyr. The M/L ratio inferred from the spectrum implies a stellar mass of ~4x10^11 Msun. We determine the morphology of the galaxy from a deep WFC3 F160W image. Similar to other massive galaxies at z~2 the galaxy is compact, with an effective radius of 2.1+-0.3 kpc. Although most of the light is in a compact core, the galaxy has two red, smooth spiral arms that appear to be tidally-induced. The spatially-resolved spectroscopy demonstrates that the center of th...

  5. Stellar Populations in Compact Galaxy Groups: a Multi-wavelength Study of HCGs 16, 22, and 42, Their Star Clusters, and Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Maybhate, A.; Charlton, J. C.; Fedotov, K.; Durrell, P. R.; Mulchaey, J. S.; English, J.; Desjardins, T. D.; Gallagher, S. C.; Walker, L. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gronwall, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of three compact galaxy groups, Hickson compact groups (HCGs) 16, 22, and 42, which describe a sequence in terms of gas richness, from space- (Swift, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and Spitzer) and ground-based (Las Campanas Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory) imaging and spectroscopy.We study various signs of past interactions including a faint, dusty tidal feature about HCG 16A, which we tentatively age-date at galaxies at accordant redshifts. The inclusion of 33 members and 27 "associates" (possible members) radically changes group dynamical masses, which in turn may affect previous evolutionary classifications. The extended membership paints a picture of relative isolation in HCGs 16 and 22, but shows HCG 42 to be part of a larger structure, following a dichotomy expected from recent studies. We conclude that (1) star cluster populations provide an excellent metric of evolutionary state, as they can age-date the past epochs of star formation; and (2) the extended dwarf galaxy population must be considered in assessing the dynamical state of a compact group.

  6. An ultra-compact dwarf around the Sombrero galaxy (M104): the nearest massive UCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, George K. T.; Spitler, Lee R.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Proctor, Robert N.; Strader, Jay; Mendel, J. Trevor; Brodie, Jean P.; Harris, William E.

    2009-03-01

    We report the discovery of an ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) associated with the Sombrero galaxy (M104). This is the closest massive UCD known and the first spectroscopically verified massive UCD which is located in a low-density environment. The object, we name SUCD1, was identified in Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) imaging and confirmed to be associated with the Sombrero galaxy by its recession velocity obtained from Keck spectra. The light profile is well fitted by a Wilson model. We measure a half-light size of 14.7 +/- 1.4 pc, an absolute magnitude of MV = -12.3 mag (MK = -15.1 mag) and an internal velocity dispersion of 25.0 +/- 5.6 km s-1. Such values are typical of UCDs. From Lick spectral indices we measure a luminosity-weighted central age of 12.6 +/- 0.9 Gyr, [Fe/H] of -0.08 +/- 0.08 dex and [α/Fe] of 0.06 +/- 0.07 dex. The lack of colour gradients suggests these values are representative of the entire UCD. The derived stellar and virial masses are the same, within errors, at ~3.3 × 107Msolar. Thus, we find no strong evidence for dark matter or the need to invoke a non-standard initial mass function. We also report arguably the first X-ray detection of a bona fide UCD, which we attribute to the presence of low-mass X-ray binaries. The X-ray luminosity of LX = 0.56 × 1038 ergs-1 is consistent with the values observed for globular clusters (GCs) of the same metallicity. Overall, we find SUCD1 has properties similar to other known UCDs and massive GCs.

  7. Quiescent Compact Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift in the COSMOS Field. II. The Fundamental Plane of Massive Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, H. Jabran; Damjanov, Ivana; Geller, Margaret J.; Chilingarian, Igor

    2015-06-01

    We examine the relation between surface brightness, velocity dispersion, and size—the fundamental plane (FP)—for quiescent galaxies at intermediate redshifts in the COSMOS field. The COSMOS sample consists of ˜150 massive quiescent galaxies with an average velocity dispersion of σ ˜ 250 km s-1 and redshifts between 0.2 MCQ) COSMOS galaxies onto the local FP at z = 0. Therefore, evolution in size or velocity dispersion for MCQ galaxies since z ˜ 1 is constrained by the small scatter observed in the FP. We conclude that MCQ galaxies at z ≲ 1 are not a special class of objects but rather the tail of the mass and size distribution of the normal quiescent galaxy population.

  8. ULTRA-COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS AS MINIHALOS AND DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faerman, Yakov; Sternberg, Amiel [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel); McKee, Christopher F., E-mail: yakovfae@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    We present dark matter minihalo models for the Ultra-Compact, High-Velocity H I Clouds (UCHVCs) recently discovered in the 21 cm ALFALFA survey. We assume gravitational confinement of 10{sup 4} K H I gas by flat-cored dark-matter subhalos within the Local Group. We show that for flat cores, typical (median) tidally stripped cosmological subhalos at redshift z = 0 have dark-matter masses of ∼10{sup 7} M{sub ☉} within the central 300 pc (independent of total halo mass), consistent with the 'Strigari mass scale' observed in low-luminosity dwarf galaxies. Flat-cored subhalos also resolve the mass discrepancy between simulated and observed satellites around the Milky Way. For the UCHVCs, we calculate the photoionization-limited hydrostatic gas profiles for any distance-dependent total observed H I mass and predict the associated (projected) H I half-mass radii, assuming the clouds are embedded in distant (d ∼> 300 kpc) and unstripped subhalos. For a typical UCHVC (0.9 Jy km s{sup –1}), we predict physical H I half-mass radii of 0.18 to 0.35 kpc (or angular sizes of 0.'6 to 2.'1) for distances ranging from 300 kpc to 2 Mpc. As a consistency check, we model the gas-rich dwarf galaxy Leo T, for which there is a well-resolved H I column density profile and a known distance (420 kpc). For Leo T, we find that a subhalo with M{sub 300} = 8 (± 0.2) × 10{sup 6} M{sub ☉} best fits the observed H I profile. We derive an upper limit of P{sub HIM} ∼< 150 cm{sup –3} K for the pressure of any enveloping hot intergalactic medium gas at the distance of Leo T. Our analysis suggests that some of the UCHVCs may in fact constitute a population of 21 cm-selected but optically faint dwarf galaxies in the Local Group.

  9. Sub-kpc ALMA imaging of compact star-forming galaxies at z~2.5: revealing the formation of dense galactic cores in the progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barro, G; Pérez-González, P G; Trump, J R; Koo, D C; Faber, S M; Dekel, A; Primack, J R; Guo, Y; Kocevski, D D; Muñoz-Mateos, J C; Rujoparkarn, W; Sheth, K

    2016-01-01

    We present spatially-resolved Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) 870 $\\mu$m dust continuum maps of six massive, compact, dusty star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at $z\\sim2.5$. These galaxies are selected for their small rest-frame optical sizes ($r_{\\rm e, F160W}\\sim1.6$ kpc) and high stellar-mass densities that suggest that they are direct progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at $z\\sim2$. The deep observations yield high far-infrared (FIR) luminosities of L$_{\\rm IR}=10^{12.3-12.8}$ L$_{\\odot}$ and star formation rates (SFRs) of SFR$=200-700$ M$_{\\odot}$yr$^{-1}$, consistent with those of typical star-forming "main sequence" galaxies. The high-spatial resolution (FWHM$\\sim$0.12"-0.18") ALMA and HST photometry are combined to construct deconvolved, mean radial profiles of their stellar mass and (UV+IR) SFR. We find that the dusty, nuclear IR-SFR overwhelmingly dominates the bolometric SFR up to $r\\sim5$ kpc, by a factor of over 100$\\times$ from the unobscured UV-SFR. Furthermore, the effecti...

  10. Red Nuggets at z~1.5: Compact passive galaxies and the formation of the Kormendy Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanov, Ivana; Abraham, Roberto G; Glazebrook, Karl; Yan, Haojing; Mentuch, Erin; Le Borgne, Damien; Savaglio, Sandra; Crampton, David; Murowinski, Richard; Juneau, Stephanie; Carlberg, R G; Jorgensen, Inger; Roth, Kathy; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Marzke, Ronald O

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of NICMOS imaging of a sample of 16 high mass passively evolving galaxies with 1.31 Gyr. Our rest-frame R-band images show that most of these objects have compact regular morphologies which follow the classical R^1/4 law. These galaxies scatter along a tight sequence in the Kormendy relation. Around one-third of the massive red objects are extraordinarily compact, with effective radii under one kiloparsec. Our NICMOS observations allow the detection of such systems more robustly than is possible with optical (rest-frame UV) data, and while similar systems have been seen at z>2, this is the first time such systems have been detected in a rest-frame optical survey at 1.3

  11. A mid-IR study of Hickson Compact Groups I : Probing the Effects of Environment in Galaxy Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsakis, T; Le Floc'h, E; Diaz-Santos, T; Slater, S K; Xilouris, E; Haynes, M P

    2010-01-01

    Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) are among the densest galaxy environments of the local universe. To examine the effects of the environment on the infrared properties of these systems, we present an analysis of Spitzer and ISO mid-infrared imaging as well as deep ground based near-infrared imaging of 14 HCGs containing a total of 69 galaxies. Based on mid-infrared color diagnostics we identify the galaxies which appear to host an active nucleus, while using a suite of templates, we fit the complete infrared spectral energy distribution for each group member. We compare our estimates of galaxy mass, star formation rate, total infrared luminosities, and specific star formation rates (sSFR) for our HCG sample, to samples of isolated galaxies and interacting pairs and find that overall there is no discernible difference among them. However, HCGs which can be considered as dynamically "old", host late-type galaxies with a slightly lower sSFR than the one found in dynamically "young" groups. This could be attributed t...

  12. THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM AND FEEDBACK IN THE PROGENITORS OF THE COMPACT PASSIVE GALAXIES AT z ∼ 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Christina C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Lee, Bomee [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Tundo, Elena [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Firenze, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Mobasher, Bahram; Nayyeri, Hooshang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton; Grogin, Norman [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Trump, Jonathan R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Cassata, Paolo [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaíso, Gran Bretaña 1111, Valparaíso (Chile); Dekel, Avishai [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Guo, Yicheng [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lee, Kyoung-Soo [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Pentericci, Laura; Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Grazian, Andrea [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, 00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Finkelstein, Steven L., E-mail: ccwilliams@email.arizona.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin (United States); and others

    2015-02-10

    Quenched galaxies at z > 2 are nearly all very compact relative to z ∼ 0, suggesting a physical connection between high stellar density and efficient, rapid cessation of star-formation. We present rest-frame UV spectra of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at z ∼ 3 selected to be candidate progenitors of the quenched galaxies at z ∼ 2 based on their compact rest-frame-optical sizes and high Σ{sub SFR}. We compare their UV properties to those of more extended LBGs of similar mass and star-formation rate (non-candidates). We find that candidate progenitors have faster bulk interstellar medium (ISM) gas velocities and higher equivalent widths of interstellar absorption lines, implying larger velocity spread among absorbing clouds. Candidates deviate from the relationship between equivalent widths of Lyα and interstellar absorption lines in that their Lyα emission remains strong despite high interstellar absorption, possibly indicating that the neutral H I fraction is patchy, such that Lyα photons can escape. We detect stronger C IV P-Cygni features (emission and absorption) and He II emission in candidates, indicative of larger populations of metal-rich Wolf-Rayet stars compared to non-candidates. The faster bulk motions, broader spread of gas velocity, and Lyα properties of candidates are consistent with their ISM being subject to more energetic feedback than non-candidates. Together with their larger metallicity (implying more evolved star-formation activity) this leads us to propose, if speculatively, that they are likely to quench sooner than non-candidates, supporting the validity of selection criteria used to identify them as progenitors of z ∼ 2 passive galaxies. We propose that massive, compact galaxies undergo more rapid growth of their stellar mass content, perhaps because the gas accretion mechanisms are different, and quench sooner than normally sized LBGs at these (early) epochs.

  13. Detecting Sub-lunar Mass Compact Objects toward the Local Group Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2016-01-01

    By monitoring a large number of stars in the Local Group galaxies such as M33 with an 8\\,m-class telescope with time integration of $\\sim 100\\,$sec per shot, we can detect microlensing events by sub-lunar mass compact objects (SULCOs) such as primordial black holes (PBHs) and rogue (free-floating) dwarf planets. For one night observation, we would be able to detect $10^{3-4}$ microlensing events caused by SULCOs with a mass of $10^{-9}$ to $10^{-7}$ solar mass for sources with S/N$>5$ if SULCOs constitute all the dark matter components. Moreover, we expect $10^{1-2}$ events in which sources with S/N$>100$ are weakly amplified due to lensing by SULCOs with a mass range of $10^{-11}$ to $10^{-7}$ solar mass. The method would provide a stringent constraint on the abundance of SULCOs at the distance $0.1-100$ kpc from us.

  14. The massive dark halo of the compact, early-type galaxy NGC 1281

    CERN Document Server

    Yıldırım, Akın; van de Ven, Glenn; Dutton, Aaron; Läsker, Ronald; Husemann, Bernd; Walsh, Jonelle L; Gebhardt, Karl; Gültekin, Kayhan; Martín-Navarro, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the compact, early-type galaxy NGC 1281 with integral field unit observations to map the stellar LOSVD out to 5 effective radii and construct orbit-based dynamical models to constrain its dark and luminous matter content. Under the assumption of mass-follows-light, the H-band stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) is {\\Upsilon} = 2.7(+-0.1) {\\Upsilon}_{sun}, higher than expected from our stellar population synthesis fits with either a canonical Kroupa ({\\Upsilon} = 1.3 {\\Upsilon}_{sun}) or Salpeter ({\\Upsilon} = 1.7 {\\Upsilon}_{sun}) stellar initial mass function. Such models also cannot reproduce the details of the LOSVD. Models with a dark halo recover the kinematics well and indicate that NGC 1281 is dark matter dominated, making up ~ 90 per cent of the total enclosed mass within the kinematic bounds. Parameterised as a spherical NFW profile, the dark halo mass is 11.5 < log(M_{DM}/M_{sun}) < 11.8 and the stellar M/L is 0.6 < {\\Upsilon} < 1.1. However, this stellar M/L is lower than p...

  15. Ultra-Compact High Velocity Clouds as Minihalos and Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Faerman, Yakov; McKee, Christopher F

    2013-01-01

    We present dark-matter minihalo models for the Ultra-Compact High Velocity HI Clouds (UCHVCs) recently discovered in the 21 cm ALFALFA survey. We assume gravitational confinement of 10^4 K HI gas by flat-cored dark-matter subhalos within the Local Group. We show that for flat cores, typical (median) tidally-stripped cosmological subhalos at redshift z=0 have dark-matter masses of ~10^7 M_{sun} within the central 300 pc (independent of total halo mass), consistent with the "Strigari mass scale" observed in low-luminosity dwarf galaxies. Flat-cored subhalos also resolve the mass-discrepancy between simulated and observed satellites around the Milky Way. For the UCHVCs we calculate the photoionization-limited hydrostatic gas profiles for any distance-dependent total observed HI mass and predict the associated (projected) HI half-mass radii, assuming the clouds are embedded in distant (d > 300 kpc) and unstripped subhalos. For a typical UCHVC (0.9 Jy km/s) we predict physical HI half-mass radii of 0.18 to 0.35 kp...

  16. THE ACS LCID PROJECT. VII. THE BLUE STRAGGLERS POPULATION IN THE ISOLATED dSph GALAXIES CETUS AND TUCANA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first investigation of the Blue Straggler star (BSS) population in two isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group, Cetus and Tucana. Deep Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys photometry allowed us to identify samples of 940 and 1214 candidates, respectively. The analysis of the star formation histories of the two galaxies suggests that both host a population of BSSs. Specifically, if the BSS candidates are interpreted as young main sequence stars, they do not conform to their galaxy's age-metallicity relationship. The analysis of the luminosity function and the radial distributions supports this conclusion, and suggests a non-collisional mechanism for the BSS formation, from the evolution of primordial binaries. This scenario is also supported by the results of new dynamical simulations presented here. Both galaxies coincide with the relationship between the BSS frequency and the absolute visual magnitude MV found by Momany et al. If this relationship is confirmed by larger sample, then it could be a valuable tool to discriminate between the presence of BSSs and galaxies hosting truly young populations.

  17. The fate of a red nugget: In-situ star formation of satellites around a massive compact galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Morishita, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    To study the accretion phase for local massive galaxies, we search accreting satellites around a massive compact galaxy (M_*~3.9x10^10Msun), spectroscopically confirmed (z_spec-1.9213) in the eXtreme Deep Field, which has been originally reported in Szomoru et al. We detect 1369 satellite candidates within the projected virial radius (rvir~300 kpc) of the compact galaxy in the all-combined ACS image with 5sigma-limiting magnitude of mACS~30.6 ABmag, which corresponds to ~1.6x10^7M_sun at the redshift. The photometric redshift measured with 12 multi-band images confirms 34 satellites out of the candidates. Most of the satellites are found to have the rest-frame colors consistent with star forming galaxies. We investigate the relation between stellar mass and star formation rate (the star formation main sequence), and find the steeper slope at the low-mass end (<10^8M_sun), while more massive satellites are consistently on the sequence reported in previous studies. Within the uncertainties of star formation ...

  18. Mapping Luminous Blue Compact Galaxies with VIRUS-P: morphology, line ratios and kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Cairos, L M; Garcia-Lorenzo, B; Kelz, A; Roth, M; Papaderos, P; Streicher, O

    2012-01-01

    [abridged] We carry out an integral field spectroscopy (IFS) study of a sample of luminous BCGs, with the aim to probe the morphology, kinematics, dust extinction and excitation mechanisms of their warm interstellar medium (ISM). IFS data for five luminous BCGs were obtained using VIRUS-P, the prototype instrument for the Visible Integral Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph, attached to the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory. VIRUS-P consists of a square array of 247 optical fibers, which covers a 109"x109" field of view, with a spatial sampling of 4.2" and a 0.3 filling factor. We observed in the 3550-5850 Angstrom spectral range, with a resolution of 5 A FWHM. From these data we built two-dimensional maps of the continuum and the most prominent emission-lines ([OII]3727, Hgamma, Hbeta and [OIII]5007), and investigate the morphology of diagnostic emission-line ratios and the extinction patterns in the ISM as well as stellar and gas kinematics. Additionally, from integrated spectra we i...

  19. Effects of dust abundance on the far-infrared colours of blue compact dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the FIR properties of a sample of BCDs observed by AKARI. By utilizing the data at wavelengths of $\\lambda =65 \\mu$m, 90 $\\mu$m, and 140 $\\mu$m, we find that the FIR colours of the BCDs are located at the natural high-temperature extension of those of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. This implies that the optical properties of dust in BCDs are similar to those in the Milky Way. Indeed, we explain the FIR colours by assuming the same grain optical properties, which may be appropriate for amorphous dust grains, and the same size distribution as those adopted for the Milky Way dust. Since both interstellar radiation field and dust optical depth affect the dust temperature, it is difficult to distinguish which of these two physical properties is responsible for the change of FIR colours. Then, in order to examine if the dust optical depth plays an important role in determining the dust temperature, we investigate the correlation between FIR colour (dust temperature) and dust-to-gas ratio. W...

  20. THE SLOAN LENS ACS SURVEY. XI. BEYOND HUBBLE RESOLUTION : SIZE, LUMINOSITY, AND STELLAR MASS OF COMPACT LENSED GALAXIES AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Marshall, Philip J.; Treu, Tommaso; Auger, Matthew W.; Gavazzi, Raphaeel; Bolton, Adam S.; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2011-01-01

    We exploit the strong lensing effect to explore the properties of intrinsically faint and compact galaxies at intermediate redshift (z(s) similar or equal to 0.4-0.8) at the highest possible resolution at optical wavelengths. Our sample consists of 46 strongly lensed emission line galaxies (ELGs) di

  1. CO observations of high-z radio galaxies MRC 2104-242 and MRC 0943-242 : spectral-line performance of the Compact Array Broadband Backend

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonts, B. H. C.; Norris, R. P.; Feain, I.; Miley, G.; Sadler, E. M.; Villar-Martin, M.; Mao, M. Y.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Ekers, R. D.; Stevens, J. B.; Wieringa, M. H.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Tadhunter, C. N.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first 7-mm observations of two high-redshift, Ly alpha-bright radio galaxies (MRC 2104-242 and MRC 0943-242) performed with the 2 x 2 GHz instantaneous bandwidth of the Compact Array Broadband Backend (CABB) at the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The aim was to search for (C

  2. The ionizing photon production efficiency of compact z~0.3 Lyman continuum leakers and comparison with high redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schaerer, D; Verhamme, A; Orlitova, I; Thuan, T X; Worseck, G; Guseva, N

    2016-01-01

    We have recently discovered five Lyman continuum leaking galaxies at z~0.3, selected for their compactness, intense star-formation, and high [OIII]/[OII] ratio (Izotov et al. 2016ab). Here we derive their ionizing photon production efficiency, a fundamental quantity for inferring the number of photons available to reionize the Universe, for the first time for galaxies with confirmed strong Lyman continuum escape (fesc~6-13%). We find an ionizing photon production per unit UV luminosity, which is a factor 2-6 times higher than the canonical value when reported to their observed UV luminosity. After correction for extinction this value is close to the canonical value. The properties of our five Lyman continuum leakers are found to be very similar to those of the confirmed z=3.218 leaker Ion2 from de Barros et al. (2016) and very similar to those of typical star-forming galaxies at z>~6. Our results suggest that UV bright galaxies at high-z such as Lyman break galaxies can be Lyman continuum leakers and that the...

  3. The bursting nature of star formation in compact star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Izotov, Y I; Fricke, K J; Henkel, C

    2016-01-01

    We study integrated characteristics of ~14000 low-redshift (0compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) selected from the Data Release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that emission of these galaxies is dominated by strong young bursts of star formation, implying that their luminosities experience rapid variations on a time scale of a few Myr. Reducing integrated characteristics of these galaxies to zero burst age would result in a considerably tighter and almost linear relation between stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR). The same correction implies that the specific star formation rate (the ratio of SFR and stellar mass) is not dependent on the galaxy stellar mass. We conclude that the correction for rapid luminosity evolution must be taken into account in a similar way when comparing different samples of low- and high-redshift SFGs. If the bursting nature of star formation and young burst ages are characteristics of the galaxies selected at high redshifts, the age correction of ...

  4. The bursting nature of star formation in compact star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Guseva, N. G.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.

    2016-11-01

    We study integrated characteristics of ˜14 000 low-redshift (0 < z < 1) compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) selected from the Data Release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that emission of these galaxies is dominated by strong young bursts of star formation, implying that their luminosities experience rapid variations on a time-scale of a few Myr. Reducing integrated characteristics of these galaxies to zero burst age would result in a considerably tighter and almost linear relation between stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR). The same correction implies that the specific star formation rate (the ratio of SFR and stellar mass) is not dependent on the galaxy stellar mass. We conclude that the correction for rapid luminosity evolution must be taken into account in a similar way when comparing different samples of low- and high-redshift SFGs. If the bursting nature of star formation and young burst ages are characteristics of the galaxies selected at high redshifts, the age correction of observed SFRs derived from the Hβ emission line or UV continua would modify the derived SFR densities in the early universe.

  5. A Study in Blue: The Baryon Content of Isolated Low Mass Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bradford, Jeremy D; Blanton, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    We study the baryon content of low mass galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR8), focusing on galaxies in isolated environments where the complicating physics of galaxy-galaxy interactions are minimized. We measure neutral hydrogen (HI) gas masses and line-widths for 148 isolated galaxies with stellar mass between $10^7$ and $10^{9.5} M_{\\odot}$. We compare isolated low mass galaxies to more massive galaxies and galaxies in denser environments by remeasuring HI emission lines from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey 40% data release. All isolated low mass galaxies either have large atomic gas fractions or large atomic gas fractions cannot be ruled out via their upper limits. We measure a median atomic gas fraction of $f_{\\rm gas} = 0.82 \\pm 0.13$ for our isolated low mass sample with no systems below 0.30. At all stellar masses, the correlations between galaxy radius, baryonic mass and velocity width are not significantly affected by environment. Finally, we estimate a median b...

  6. Disky elliptical galaxies and the allegedly over-massive black hole in the compact massive `ES' galaxy NGC 1271

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Alister W; Savorgnan, Giulia A D

    2016-01-01

    While spiral and lenticular galaxies have large-scale disks extending beyond their bulges, and most local early-type galaxies with 10^{10} < M_*/M_Sun < 2x10^{11} contain a disk (e.g., ATLAS^3D), the early-type galaxies do possess a range of disk sizes. The edge-on, `intermediate-scale' disk in the `disky elliptical' galaxy NGC 1271 has led to some uncertainty as to what is its spheroidal component. Walsh et al. reported a directly measured black hole mass of 3x10^9 M_Sun for this galaxy; which they remarked was an order of magnitude greater than what they expected based on their derivation of the host spheroid's luminosity. Our near-infrared image analysis supports a small embedded disk within a massive spheroidal component with M_{sph,*} = (0.9+/-0.2)x10^{11} M_Sun (using M_*/L_H = 1.4 from Walsh et al.). This places NGC 1271 just 1.6-sigma above the near-linear M_bh-M_{sph,*} relation for early-type galaxies. Therefore, past speculation that there may be a systematic difference in the black hole scal...

  7. The evolution of the galaxy luminosity function in the rest frame blue band up to z=3.5

    CERN Document Server

    Poli, F; Fontana, A; Menci, N; Zamorani, G; Nonino, M; Saracco, P; Vanzella, E; Donnarumma, I; Salimbeni, S; Cimatti, A; Cristiani, S; Daddi, E; D'Odorico, S; Mignoli, M; Pozzetti, L; Renzini, A

    2003-01-01

    We present an estimate of the cosmological evolution of the field galaxy luminosity function (LF) in the rest frame 4400 Angstrom B -band up to redshift z=3.5. To this purpose, we use a composite sample of 1541 I--selected galaxies selected down to I_(AB)=27.2 and 138 galaxies selected down to K_(AB)=25 from ground-based and HST multicolor surveys, most notably the new deep JHK images in the Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) taken with the ISAAC instrument at the ESO-VLT telescope. About 21% of the sample has spectroscopic redshifts, and the remaining fraction well calibrated photometric redshifts. The resulting blue LF shows little density evolution at the faint end with respect to the local values, while at the bright end (M_B(AB)<-20) a brightening increasing with redshift is apparent with respect to the local LF. Hierarchical CDM models overpredict the number of faint galaxies by about a factor 3 at z=1. At the bright end the predicted LFs are in reasonable agreement only at low and intermediate redshift...

  8. The Properties of the Circumgalactic Medium in Red and Blue Galaxies: Results from the COS-GASS+COS-Halos Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Tumlinson, Jason; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Catinella, Barbara; Schiminovich, David; Dave, Romeel; Moran, Sean M; Saintonge, Amelie

    2016-01-01

    We use the combined data from the COS-GASS and COS-Halos surveys to characterize the Circum-Galactic Medium (CGM) surrounding typical low-redshift galaxies in the mass range $\\rm~M_*\\sim~10^{9.5-11.5}~M_{\\odot} $, and over a range of impact parameters extending to just beyond the halo virial radius ($\\rm~R_{vir}$). We find the radial scale length of the distributions of the equivalent widths of the Lyman~$\\alpha$ and Si III absorbers to be 0.9 and 0.4 $\\rm~R_{vir}$, respectively. The radial distribution of equivalent widths is relatively uniform for the blue galaxies, but highly patchy (low covering fraction) for the red galaxies. We also find that the Lyman~$\\alpha$ and Si III equivalent widths show significant positive correlations with the specific star-formation rate (sSFR) of the galaxy. We find a surprising lack of correlations between the halo mass (virial velocity) and either the velocity dispersions or velocity offsets of the Lyman~$\\alpha$ lines. The ratio of the velocity offset to the velocity disp...

  9. An Over-Massive Black Hole in the Compact Lenticular Galaxy NGC1277

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch, Remco C E van den; Gültekin, Kayhan; van de Ven, Glenn; van der Wel, Arjen; Walsh, Jonelle L; 10.1038/nature11592

    2012-01-01

    All massive galaxies likely have supermassive black holes at their centers, and the masses of the black holes are known to correlate with properties of the host galaxy bulge component. Several explanations have been proposed for the existence of these locally-established empirical relationships; they include the non-causal, statistical process of galaxy-galaxy merging, direct feedback between the black hole and its host galaxy, or galaxy-galaxy merging and the subsequent violent relaxation and dissipation. The empirical scaling relations are thus important for distinguishing between various theoretical models of galaxy evolution, and they further form the basis for all black hole mass measurements at large distances. In particular, observations have shown that the mass of the black hole is typically 0.1% of the stellar bulge mass of the galaxy. The small galaxy NGC4486B currently has the largest published fraction of its mass in a black hole at 11%. Here we report observations of the stellar kinematics of NGC...

  10. NGC 1277: A MASSIVE COMPACT RELIC GALAXY IN THE NEARBY UNIVERSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo, Ignacio; Vazdekis, Alexandre [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, c/Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205-La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Ferré-Mateu, Anna [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Balcells, Marc [Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma, Canary Islands (Spain); Sánchez-Blázquez, Patricia, E-mail: trujillo@iac.es [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-10

    As early as 10 Gyr ago, galaxies with more than 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} of stars already existed. While most of these massive galaxies must have subsequently transformed through on-going star formation and mergers with other galaxies, a small fraction (≲0.1%) may have survived untouched until today. Searches for such relic galaxies, useful windows to explore the early universe, have been inconclusive to date: galaxies with masses and sizes like those observed at high redshift (M {sub *} ≳ 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}; R{sub e} ≲ 1.5 kpc) have been found in the local universe, but their stars are far too young for the galaxy to be a relic galaxy. This paper explores the first case of a nearby galaxy, NGC 1277 (at a distance of 73 Mpc in the Perseus galaxy cluster), which fulfills many criteria to be considered a relic galaxy. Using deep optical spectroscopy, we derive the star formation history along the structure of the galaxy: the stellar populations are uniformly old (>10 Gyr) with no evidence for more recent star formation episodes. The metallicity of their stars is super-solar ([Fe/H] = 0.20 ± 0.04 with a smooth decline toward the outer regions) and α-enriched ([α/Fe] = 0.4 ± 0.1). This suggests a very short formation time scale for the bulk of the stars in this galaxy. This object also rotates very fast (V {sub rot} ∼ 300 km s{sup –1}) and has a large central velocity dispersion (σ > 300 km s{sup –1}). NGC 1277 allows the exploration in full detail of properties such as the structure, internal dynamics, metallicity, and initial mass function as they were at ∼10-12 Gyr ago when the first massive galaxies were built.

  11. Globular cluster clustering and tidal features around ultra compact dwarf galaxies in the halo of NGC1399

    CERN Document Server

    Voggel, Karina; Richtler, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel approach to constrain the formation channels of Ultra-Compact Dwarf Galaxies (UCDs). This inhomogeneous class of objects of remnants of tidally stripped dwarf elliptical galaxies and high mass globular clusters. We use three methods to unravel their nature: 1) we analysed their surface brightness profiles, 2) we carried out a direct search for tidal features around UCDs and 3) we compared the spatial distribution of GCs and UCDs in the halo of their host galaxy. Based on FORS2 observations, we have studied the detailed structural composition of a large sample of 97 UCDs in the halo of NGC1399, the central galaxy of the Fornax cluster, by analysing theirsurface brightness profiles. We derived the structural parameters of 13 extended UCDs modelling them with a single Sersic function and decomposing them into composite King and Sersic profiles. We find evidence for faint stellar envelopes at mu=~26 mag\\arcsec^-2 surrounding the UCDs up to an extension of 90pc in radius. We also show new eviden...

  12. LBT-LUCIFER spectroscopy: kinematics of a compact early type galaxy at z\\simeq1.4

    CERN Document Server

    Longhetti, Marcella; Gargiulo, Adriana; Tamburri, Sonia; Lonoce, Ilaria

    2014-01-01

    We present a high signal to noise (S/N$>$10) medium resolution (R=2000) LBT-LUCIFER spectrum of the early-type galaxy (ETG) S2F1-142 at $z\\simeq1.4$. By means of the CaT line at $8662$ \\AA, we measured its redshift $z=1.386\\pm 0.001$ and we estimated its velocity dispersion $\\sigma_{v}=340 ^{-60}_{+120}$ km/s. Its corresponding virial mass is 3.9$\\times10^{11}$ M$_\\odot$, compatible with the stellar mass estimates obtained assuming Initial Mass Functions (IMFs) less dwarf rich than the Salpeter one. S2F1-142 is a compact galaxy with $R_{e}$=3.1$\\pm$0.2 kpc, i.e., an effective radius more than three times smaller than the average $R_{e}$ of early-type galaxies with the same mass in the local universe. At the same time, we found local and high redshift galaxies with a similar mass content and similar effective radius confirming that it is fully consistent with the already available measures of $R_{e}$ and $\\sigma_{v}$ both in the local and in the distant universe. Considering the distribution of $R_{e}$ and $\\s...

  13. Spectroscopy of the short-hard GRB 130603B. The host galaxy and environment of a compact object merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Thöne, C. C.; Rowlinson, A.; García-Benito, R.; Levan, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Goldoni, P.; Schulze, S.; Zafar, T.; Wiersema, K.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Melandri, A.; D'Avanzo, P.; Oates, S.; D'Elia, V.; De Pasquale, M.; Krühler, T.; van der Horst, A. J.; Xu, D.; Watson, D.; Piranomonte, S.; Vergani, S. D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Kaper, L.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Cano, Z.; Covino, S.; Flores, H.; Greiss, S.; Hammer, F.; Hartoog, O. E.; Hellmich, S.; Heuser, C.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Mottola, S.; Sparre, M.; Sollerman, J.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tanvir, N. R.; Vestergaard, M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Short duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are thought to be related to the violent merger of compact objects, such as neutron stars or black holes, which makes them promising sources of gravitational waves. The detection of a "kilonova"-likesignature associated to the Swift-detected GRB 130603B has suggested that this event is the result of a compact object merger. Aims: Our knowledge on SGRB has been, until now, mostly based on the absence of supernova signatures and the analysis of the host galaxies to which they cannot always be securely associated. Further progress has been significantly hampered by the faintness and rapid fading of their optical counterparts (afterglows), which has so far precluded spectroscopy of such events. Afterglow spectroscopy is the key tool to firmly determine the distance at which the burst was produced, crucial to understand its physics, and study its local environment. Methods: Here we present the first spectra of a prototypical SGRB afterglow in which both absorption and emission features are clearly detected. Together with multi-wavelength photometry we study the host and environment of GRB 130603B. Results: From these spectra we determine the redshift of the burst to be z = 0.3565 ± 0.0002, measure rich dynamics both in absorption and emission, and a substantial line of sight extinction of AV = 0.86 ± 0.15 mag. The GRB was located at the edge of a disrupted arm of a moderately star forming galaxy with near-solar metallicity. Unlike for most long GRBs (LGRBs), NHX/AV is consistent with the Galactic ratio, indicating that the explosion site differs from those found in LGRBs. Conclusions: The merger is not associated with the most star-forming region of the galaxy; however, it did occur in a dense region, implying a rapid merger or a low natal kick velocity for the compact object binary. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. CONSTRAINING THE ASSEMBLY OF NORMAL AND COMPACT PASSIVELY EVOLVING GALAXIES FROM REDSHIFT z = 3 TO THE PRESENT WITH CANDELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassata, P. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Giavalisco, M.; Williams, C. C.; Lee, Bomee [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Guo, Yicheng; Faber, S. F.; Barro, G.; Koo, D. C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Renzini, A. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (INAF-OAPD), Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122, Padova (Italy); Ferguson, H.; Ryan, R. E.; Grogin, N.; Koekemoer, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); McIntosh, D. H. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States); Lu, Yu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Bell, E. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Papovich, C. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Conselice, C. J. [The School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Hathi, N. P., E-mail: paolo.cassata@oamp.fr [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We study the evolution of the number density, as a function of the size, of passive early-type galaxies (ETGs) with a wide range of stellar masses (10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} < M{sub *} ∼< 10{sup 11.5} M{sub ☉}) from z ∼ 3 to z ∼ 1, exploiting the unique data set available in the GOODS-South field, including the recently obtained WFC3 images as part of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. In particular, we select a sample of ∼107 massive (M{sub *} > 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}), passive (SSFR < 10{sup –2} Gyr{sup –1}), and morphologically spheroidal galaxies at 1.2 < z < 3, taking advantage of the panchromatic data set available for GOODS, including VLT, CFHT, Spitzer, Chandra, and HST ACS+WFC3 data. We find that at 1 < z < 3 the passively evolving ETGs are the reddest and most massive objects in the universe, and we prove that a correlation between mass, morphology, color, and star formation activity is already in place at that epoch. We measure a significant evolution in the mass-size relation of passive ETGs from z ∼ 3 to z ∼ 1, with galaxies growing on average by a factor of two in size in a 3 Gyr timescale only. We also witness an increase in the number density of passive ETGs of 50 times over the same time interval. We find that the first ETGs to form at z ∼> 2 are all compact or ultra-compact, while normal-sized ETGs (meaning ETGs with sizes comparable to those of local counterparts of the same mass) are the most common ETGs only at z < 1. The increase of the average size of ETGs at 0 < z < 1 is primarily driven by the appearance of new large ETGs rather than by the size increase of individual galaxies.

  15. The spiral-compact galaxy pair AM 2208-251: Computer simulations versus observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaric, Mario; Byrd, Gene G.

    1990-01-01

    The system AM2208-251 is a roughly edge-on spiral extending east-west with a smaller round compact E system about 60 arcsec east of the spiral nucleus along the major axis of the spiral. Bertola, Huchtmeier, and Zeilinger (1990) have presented optical spectroscopic as well as single dish 21 cm observations of this system. Their spectroscopic data show, via emission lines lambda lambda 3727-29A, a rising rotation curve near the nucleus. These spectroscopic observations may indicate a tidal interaction in the system. In order to learn more about such pairs, the authors simulated the interaction using the computer model developed by Miller (1976 a,b, 1978) and modified by the authors (Byrd 1986, 1987, 1988). To do the simulation they need an idea of the mutual orbits of the two galaxies. Their computer model is a two-dimensional polar N-body program. It consists of a self-gravitating disk of particles, within an inert axially symmetric stabilizing halo potential. The particles are distributed in a 24(radial) by 36(azimuthal) polar grid. Self consistent calculations can be done only within the grid area. The disk is modeled with a finite Mestel disk, where all the particles initially move in circular orbits with constant tangential velocities (Mestel 1963), resulting in a flat rotation curve. The gas particles in the spiral's disk, which make up 30 percent of its mass, collide in the following manner. The number of particles in each bin of the polar grid is counted every time step. If it is greater than a given critical density, all the particles in the bin collide, obtaining in the result the same velocities, equal to the average for the bin. This process produces clumps of gas particles-the star formation sites. The authors suppress the collision in the inner part of the disk (within the circle r = 6) to represent the hole seen in the gas in the nuclear bulge of spirals. They thus avoid spurious effects due to collisions in that region. They also varied the size of

  16. The spiral-compact galaxy pair AM 2208-251: Computer simulations versus observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaric, Mario; Byrd, Gene G.

    1990-11-01

    The system AM2208-251 is a roughly edge-on spiral extending east-west with a smaller round compact E system about 60 arcsec east of the spiral nucleus along the major axis of the spiral. Bertola, Huchtmeier, and Zeilinger (1990) have presented optical spectroscopic as well as single dish 21 cm observations of this system. Their spectroscopic data show, via emission lines lambda lambda 3727-29A, a rising rotation curve near the nucleus. These spectroscopic observations may indicate a tidal interaction in the system. In order to learn more about such pairs, the authors simulated the interaction using the computer model developed by Miller (1976 a,b, 1978) and modified by the authors (Byrd 1986, 1987, 1988). To do the simulation they need an idea of the mutual orbits of the two galaxies. Their computer model is a two-dimensional polar N-body program. It consists of a self-gravitating disk of particles, within an inert axially symmetric stabilizing halo potential. The particles are distributed in a 24(radial) by 36(azimuthal) polar grid. Self consistent calculations can be done only within the grid area. The disk is modeled with a finite Mestel disk, where all the particles initially move in circular orbits with constant tangential velocities (Mestel 1963), resulting in a flat rotation curve. The gas particles in the spiral's disk, which make up 30 percent of its mass, collide in the following manner. The number of particles in each bin of the polar grid is counted every time step. If it is greater than a given critical density, all the particles in the bin collide, obtaining in the result the same velocities, equal to the average for the bin. This process produces clumps of gas particles-the star formation sites. The authors suppress the collision in the inner part of the disk (within the circle r = 6) to represent the hole seen in the gas in the nuclear bulge of spirals. They thus avoid spurious effects due to collisions in that region. They also varied the size of

  17. The role of major gas-rich mergers on the evolution of galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Rui; Xia, X Y; Mao, Shude; Shi, Yong

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of exploring the fast evolutionary path from the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies to the red sequence of quiescent galaxies in the local universe, we select a local advanced merging infrared luminous and ultraluminous galaxy (adv-merger (U)LIRGs) sample and perform careful dust extinction corrections to investigate their positions in the SFR-$M_{\\ast}$, u-r and NUV-r color-mass diagrams. The sample consists of 89 (U)LIRGs at the late merger stage, obtained from cross-correlating the IRAS Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey and 1 Jy ULIRGs samples with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 database. Our results show that $74\\%\\pm 5\\%$ of adv-merger (U)LIRGs are localized above the $1\\, \\sigma$ line of the local star-forming galaxy main sequence. We also find that all adv-merger (U)LIRGs are more massive than and as blue as the blue cloud galaxies after corrections of Galactic and internal dust extinctions, with $95\\%\\pm 2\\%$ and $81\\%\\pm 4\\%$ of them outside the blue cloud on the u-r and NUV-r colo...

  18. The Effect of Many Minor Mergers on the Size Growth of Compact Quiescent Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bédorf, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    Massive galaxies with a half-mass radius 2), but not in the local universe. In the local universe similar-mass (within a factor of two) galaxies tend to be a factor of 4 to 5 larger. Dry minor mergers are known to drive the evolution of the size of a galaxy without much increasing the mass, but it is unclear if the growth in size is sufficient to explain the observations. We test the hypothesis that galaxies grow through dry minor mergers by simulating merging galaxies with mass ratios of q=1:1 (equal mass) to q=1:160. In our N-body simulations the total mass of the parent galaxy doubles. We confirm that major mergers do not cause a sufficient growth in size. The observation can be explained with mergers with a mass ratio of q=1:5--1:10. Smaller mass ratios cause a more dramatic growth in size, up to a factor of ~17 for mergers with a mass ratio of 1:80. For relatively massive minor mergers q ~> 1:20 the mass of the incoming child galaxies tend to settle in the halo of the parent galaxy. This is caused by the...

  19. Studying the evolution of galaxies in compact groups over the past 3 Gyr - II. The importance of environment in the suppression of star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsakis, T.; Dultzin, D.; Ciesla, L.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Appleton, P. N.; Charmandaris, V.; Krongold, Y.; Guillard, P.; Alatalo, K.; Zezas, A.; González, J.; Lanz, L.

    2016-06-01

    We present an in depth study on the evolution of galaxy properties in compact groups over the past 3 Gyr. We are using the largest multiwavelength sample to-date, comprised 1770 groups (containing 7417 galaxies), in the redshift range of 0.01 times). Moreover, their star formation histories as well as their UV-optical and mid-infrared colours are significantly different from those of field and cluster galaxies, indicating that compact group galaxies spend more time transitioning through the green valley. The morphological transformation from late-type spirals to early-type galaxies occurs in the mid-infrared transition zone rather than in the UV-optical green valley. We find evidence of shocks in the emission line ratios and gas velocity dispersions of the late-type galaxies located below the star forming main sequence. Our results suggest that in addition to gas stripping, turbulence and shocks might play an important role in suppressing the star formation in compact group galaxies.

  20. Dissecting the Assembly Histories of Spheroidal Post-merger and Unusually Blue Elliptical Galaxies from the SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Daniel H.; Haines, Tim; Sanchez, Sebastian; Tremonti, Christina A.; Rudnick, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The modern merger hypothesis predicts the formation of new elliptical galaxies (Es) through the merging of two equal-mass, gas-rich spirals. Under the right conditions, simulations predict that such mergers produce a strong, central burst of star formation (SF) in the remnant. If merger-induced SF is subsequently quenched, this scenario offers an attractive blue-to-red migration channel to explain the buildup of massive quiescent galaxies over cosmic time. To test this prediction, we study 12 high-mass (Mstar>1e10 Msun), nearby (z1 R50, dust-reddened core colors, and inner morphological features (rings, dust). These galaxies are the best candidates for a "frosting" of young stars a top an older population, and their properties are consistent with a recent accretion of a gas-rich satellite. The remaining 5 Es are inconsistent with the merger hypothesis. They have quiescent-like indices, strong radial index gradients suggesting older core stars, and 80% exhibit broad LSB asymmetries at large radii that are consistent with being remnants of recent gas-poor (dry) merging.

  1. The origin of compact galaxies with anomalously high black hole masses.

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, C.; Schaye, J.; Bower, R. G.; Crain, R. A.; Schaller, M.; Theuns, T.

    2016-01-01

    Observations of local galaxies harbouring supermassive black holes (BH) of anomalously high mass, MBH, relative to their stellar mass, M*, appear to be at odds with simple models of the co-evolution between galaxies and their central BHs. We study the origin of such outliers in a Λ cold dark matter context using the EAGLE cosmological, hydrodynamical simulation. We find 15 ‘MBH(M*)-outlier' galaxies, defined as having MBH more than 1.5 dex above the median MBH(M*) relation in the simulation, ...

  2. Structure and time variations of compact radio sources in galaxies and quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution observations made with intercontinental arrays of up to seven radio telescopes permit resolutions better than one thousandth of an arc second, and have disclosed remarkably complex structure in the nuclei of galaxies and quasars. Dimensions as small as a few hundredths of a parsec have been measured for the nuclei of some nearby galaxies; the source at the nucleus of our own Galaxy contains a component only 7 A.U. across and puts a limit on the size of the fundamental energy machine at the Galactic nucleus. (Auth.)

  3. The origin of compact galaxies with anomalously high black hole masses.

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, C; Schaye, J.; Bower, R. G.; Crain, R.A.; Schaller, M.; Theuns, T.

    2016-01-01

    Observations of local galaxies harbouring supermassive black holes (BHs) of anomalously high mass, M_BH, relative to their stellar mass, M_star, appear to be at odds with simple models of the co-evolution between galaxies and their central BHs. We study the origin of such outliers in a Lambda cold dark matter context using the EAGLE cosmological, hydrodynamical simulation. We find 15 'M_BH(M_star)-outlier' galaxies, defined as having M_BH more than 1.5 dex above the median M_BH(M_star) relati...

  4. The Role of Major Gas-rich Mergers on the Evolution of Galaxies from the Blue Cloud to the Red Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Hao, Cai-Na; Xia, X. Y.; Mao, Shude; Shi, Yong

    2016-07-01

    With the aim of exploring the fast evolutionary path from the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies to the red sequence of quiescent galaxies in the local universe, we select a local advanced merging infrared luminous and ultraluminous galaxy (adv-merger (U)LIRGs) sample and perform careful dust extinction corrections to investigate their positions in the star formation rate-M *, u - r, and NUV - r color-mass diagrams. The sample consists of 89 (U)LIRGs at the late merger stage, obtained from cross-correlating the Infrared Astronomical Satellite Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey and 1 Jy ULIRGs samples with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 database. Our results show that 74 % +/- 5 % of adv-merger (U)LIRGs are localized above the 1σ line of the local star-forming galaxy main sequence. We also find that all adv-merger (U)LIRGs are more massive than and as blue as the blue cloud galaxies after corrections for Galactic and internal dust extinctions, with 95 % +/- 2 % and 81 % +/- 4 % of them outside the blue cloud on the u - r and NUV - r color-mass diagrams, respectively. These results, combined with the short timescale for exhausting the molecular gas reservoir in adv-merger (U)LIRGs (3× {10}7 to 3× {10}8 years), imply that the adv-merger (U)LIRGs are likely at the starting point of the fast evolutionary track previously proposed by several groups. While the number density of adv-merger (U)LIRGs is only ˜ 0.1 % of the blue cloud star-forming galaxies in the local universe, this evolutionary track may play a more important role at high redshift.

  5. What Powers the Compact Radio Emission in Nearby Elliptical and S0 Galaxies?

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Luis C.

    1998-01-01

    Many nearby early-type (elliptical and S0) galaxies contain weak (milli-Jansky level) nuclear radio sources on scales a few hundred parsecs or less. The origin of the radio emission, however, has remained unclear, especially in volume-limited samples that select intrinsically less luminous galaxies. Both active galactic nuclei and nuclear star formation have been suggested as possible mechanisms for producing the radio emission. This paper utilizes optical spectroscopic information to address...

  6. Radio continuum emission and HI gas accretion in the NGC 5903/5898 compact group of early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gopal-Krishna,; Wiita, Paul J; Sirothia, S K; Kantharia, N G; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the nature of the multi-component radio continuum and HI emission associated with the nearby galaxy group comprised of two dominant ellipticals, NGC 5898 and NGC 5903, and a dwarf lenticular ESO514-G003. Striking new details of radio emission are unveiled from the 2nd Data Release of the ongoing TIFR.GMRT.SKY.SURVEY (TGSS) which provides images with a resolution of ~ 24 arcsec x 18 arcsec and a typical rms noise of 5 mJy at 150 MHz. Previous radio observations of this compact triplet of galaxies include images at higher frequencies of the radio continuum as well as HI emission, the latter showing huge HI trails originating from the vicinity of NGC 5903 where HI is in a kinematically disturbed state. The TGSS 150 MHz image has revealed a large asymmetric radio halo around NGC 5903 and also established that the dwarf SO galaxy ESO514-G003 is the host to a previously known bright double radio source. The radio emission from NGC 5903 is found to have a very steep radio spectrum ({\\alpha} ~ -1.5) and to...

  7. The Majority of Compact Massive Galaxies at z~2 are Disk Dominated

    CERN Document Server

    van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn; McGrath, Elizabeth J; Koekemoer, Anton M; Bell, Eric F; Holden, Bradford P; Robaina, Aday R; McIntosh, Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the stellar structure of massive, quiescent galaxies at z~2, based on HST/WFC3 imaging from the Early Release Science program. Our sample of 14 galaxies has stellar masses of M* > 10^{10.8} Msol and photometric redshifts of 1.5 < z < 2.5. In agreement with previous work, their half-light radii are <2 kpc, much smaller than equally massive galaxies in the present-day universe. A significant subset of the sample appear highly flattened in projection, which implies, considering viewing angle statistics, that a significant fraction of the galaxies in our sample have pronounced disks. This is corroborated by two-dimensional surface brightness profile fits. We estimate that 65% +/- 15% of the population of massive, quiescent z~2 galaxies are disk-dominated. The median disk scale length is 1.5 kpc, substantially smaller than the disks of equally massive galaxies in the present-day universe. Our results provide strong observational evidence that the much-discussed ultra-dense high-redshift gal...

  8. On the universality of luminosity-metallicity and mass-metallicity relations for compact star-forming galaxies at redshifts 0 < z < 3

    CERN Document Server

    Izotov, Y I; Fricke, K J; Henkel, C

    2015-01-01

    We study relations between global characteristics of low-redshift (0 1. These data were combined with the corresponding data for high-redshift (2 < z < 3) star-forming galaxies. We find that in all diagrams low-z and high-z star-forming galaxies are closely related indicating a very weak dependence of metallicity on stellar mass, redshift, and star-formation rate. This finding argues in favour of the universal character of the global relations for compact star-forming galaxies with high-excitation HII regions over redshifts 0 < z < 3.

  9. NGC1277: a massive compact relic galaxy in the nearby Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Trujillo, Ignacio; Balcells, Marc; Vazdekis, Alexandre; Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    As early as 10 Gyr ago, galaxies with more than 10^11 Msun in stars already existed. While most of these massive galaxies must have subsequently transformed through on-going star formation and mergers with other galaxies, a small fraction (10^11 Msun; Re10 Gyr) with no evidence for more recent star formation episodes. The metallicity of their stars is super-solar ([Fe/H]=0.20+-0.04) and alpha enriched ([alpha/Fe]=0.4+-0.1). This suggests a very short formation time scale for the bulk of stars of this galaxy. This object also rotates very fast (Vrot~300 km/s) and has a large velocity dispersion (sigma>300 km/s). NGC1277 will allow future explorations in full detail of properties such as the structure, internal dynamics, metallicity, dust content and initial mass function at around 10-12 Gyr back in time when the first massive galaxies were built.

  10. Studying the evolution of galaxies in compact groups over the past 3 Gyr - II. The importance of environment in the suppression of star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsakis, T; Ciesla, L; Diaz-Santos, T; Appleton, P; Charmandaris, V; Krongold, Y; Guillard, P; Alatalo, K; Zezas, A; Gonzalez, J; Lanz, L

    2016-01-01

    We present an in depth study on the evolution of galaxy properties in compact groups over the past 3 Gyr. We are using the largest multi-wavelength sample to-date, comprised 1770 groups (containing 7417 galaxies), in the redshift range of 0.01galaxies we rely on ultraviolet (UV)-to-infrared spectral energy distribution modeling, using CIGALE. Our results suggest that during the 3 Gyr period covered by our sample, the star formation activity of galaxies in our groups has been substantially reduced (3-10 times). Moreover, their star formation histories as well as their UV-optical and mid-infrared colors are significantly different from those of field and cluster galaxies, indicating that compact group galaxies spend more time transitioning through the green valley. The morphological transformation from late-type spirals into early-type galaxies occurs in the mid-infrared transition zone rather than in the UV-optical green valley. We find evidence of shocks...

  11. Stellar Populations in Compact Galaxy Groups: a Multi-Wavelength Study of HCGs 16, 22, and 42, their Star Clusters and Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantopoulos, I S; Charlton, J C; Fedotov, K; Durrell, P R; Mulchaey, J S; English, J; Desjardins, T D; Gallagher, S C; Walker, L M; Johnson, K E; Tzanavaris, P; Gronwall, C

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of three compact galaxy groups, HCGs 16, 22, and 42, which describe a sequence in terms of gas richness, from space- (Swift, HST, Spitzer) and ground-based (LCO, CTIO) imaging and spectroscopy. We study various signs of past interactions including a faint, dusty tidal feature about HCG 16A, which we tentatively age-date at <1 Gyr. This represents the possible detection of a tidal feature at the end of its phase of optical observability. Our HST images also resolve what were thought to be double nuclei in HCG 16C and D into multiple, distinct sources, likely to be star clusters. Beyond our phenomenological treatment, we focus primarily on contrasting the stellar populations across these three groups. The star clusters show a remarkable intermediate-age population in HCG 22, and identify the time at which star formation was quenched in HCG 42. We also search for dwarf galaxies at accordant redshifts. The inclusion of 33 members and 27 'associates' (possible members) rad...

  12. What Powers the Compact Radio Emission in Nearby Elliptical and S0 Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, L C

    1999-01-01

    Many nearby early-type (elliptical and S0) galaxies contain weak (milli-Jansky level) nuclear radio sources on scales a few hundred parsecs or less. The origin of the radio emission, however, has remained unclear, especially in volume-limited samples that select intrinsically less luminous galaxies. Both active galactic nuclei and nuclear star formation have been suggested as possible mechanisms for producing the radio emission. This paper utilizes optical spectroscopic information to address this issue. A substantial fraction of the early-type galaxies surveyed with the Very Large Array by Wrobel & Heeschen (1991) exhibits detectable optical emission lines in their nuclei down to very sensitive limits. Comparison of the observed radio continuum power with that expected from the thermal gas traced by the optical emission lines implies that the bulk of the radio emission is nonthermal. Both the incidence and the strength of optical line emission correlate with the radio power. At a fixed line luminosity, e...

  13. The Frequency of Field Blue-Straggler Stars in the Thick Disk and Halo System of the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Santucci, Rafael M; Rossi, Silvia; Beers, Timothy C; Reggiani, Henrique M; Lee, Young Sun; Xue, Xiang-Xiang; Carollo, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of a new, large sample of field blue-straggler stars (BSSs) in the thick disk and halo system of the Galaxy, based on stellar spectra obtained during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). Using estimates of stellar atmospheric parameters obtained from application of the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline, we obtain a sample of some 8000 BSSs, which are considered along with a previously selected sample of some 4800 blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars. We derive the ratio of BSSs to BHB stars, F$_{\\rm BSS/BHB}$, as a function of Galactocentric distance and distance from the Galactic plane. The maximum value found for F$_{\\rm BSS/BHB}$ is $\\sim~$4.0 in the thick disk (at 3 kpc $<$ $|$Z$|$ $<$ 4 kpc), declining to on the order of $\\sim~1.5-2.0$ in the inner-halo region; this ratio continues to decline to $\\sim~$1.0 in the outer-halo region. We associate a minority of field BSSs with a likely extragalactic origin; ...

  14. THE GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS DOWN TO MR = –10 IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We derived the luminosity function (LF) of dwarf galaxies in the Coma Cluster down to MR = –10 at three fields located at the center, intermediate, and outskirt of the cluster. The LF (–19 R R ∼ –13 and is composed of two distinct components of different slopes; the bright component with –19 R R R R < –10) consists largely of point-spread-function-like compact galaxies. We found that both these compact galaxies and some extended galaxies are present in the center while only compact galaxies are seen in the outskirt. In the faint component, the fraction of blue galaxies is larger in the outskirt than in the center. We suggest that the dwarf galaxies in the Coma Cluster, which make up the two components in the LF, are heterogeneous with some different origins.

  15. ESO 546-G34: The most metal poor LSB galaxy?

    CERN Document Server

    Mattsson, Lars; Bergvall, Nils

    2011-01-01

    We present a re-analysis of spectroscopic data for 23 HII-regions in 12 blue, metal-poor low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) taking advantage of recent developments in calibrating strong-line methods. In doing so we have identified a galaxy (ESO 546-G34) which may be the most metal-poor LSB galaxy found in the local Universe. Furthermore, we see evidence that blue metal-poor LSBGs, together with blue compact galaxies (BCGs) and many other HII galaxies, fall outside the regular luminosity-metallicity relation. This suggests there might be an evolutionary connection between LSBGs and BCGs. In such case, several very metal-poor LSBGs should exist in the local Universe.

  16. A CATALOG OF ULTRA-COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS FROM THE ALFALFA SURVEY: LOCAL GROUP GALAXY CANDIDATES?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P., E-mail: betsey@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    We present a catalog of 59 ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) extracted from the 40% complete ALFALFA HI-line survey. The ALFALFA UCHVCs have median flux densities of 1.34 Jy km s{sup -1}, median angular diameters of 10', and median velocity widths of 23 km s{sup -1}. We show that the full UCHVC population cannot easily be associated with known populations of high velocity clouds. Of the 59 clouds presented here, only 11 are also present in the compact cloud catalog extracted from the commensal GALFA-HI survey, demonstrating the utility of this separate dataset and analysis. Based on their sky distribution and observed properties, we infer that the ALFALFA UCHVCs are consistent with the hypothesis that they may be very low mass galaxies within the Local Volume. In that case, most of their baryons would be in the form of gas, and because of their low stellar content, they remain unidentified by extant optical surveys. At distances of {approx}1 Mpc, the UCHVCs have neutral hydrogen (H I) masses of {approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }, H I diameters of {approx}2-3 kpc, and indicative dynamical masses within the H I extent of {approx}10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, similar to the Local Group ultra-faint dwarf Leo T. The recent ALFALFA discovery of the star-forming, metal-poor, low mass galaxy Leo P demonstrates that this hypothesis is true in at least one case. In the case of the individual UCHVCs presented here, confirmation of their extragalactic nature will require further work, such as the identification of an optical counterpart to constrain their distance.

  17. The Morphologies of Massive Galaxies at 1Compact Bulges, and the Rise and Fall of Massive Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, V A; Cirasuolo, M; McLure, R J; Targett, T A; Bell, E F; Croton, D J; Dekel, A; Faber, S M; Ferguson, H C; Grogin, N A; Kocevski, D D; Koekemoer, A M; Koo, D C; Lai, K; Lotz, J M; McGrath, E J; Newman, J A; van der Wel, A

    2012-01-01

    We have used deep, HST, near-IR imaging to study the morphological properties of the most massive galaxies at high z, modelling the WFC3/IR H-band images of the ~200 galaxies in the CANDELS-UDS field with 1 10^11 M_sun. We have used both single-Sersic and bulge+disk models, have investigated the errors/biases introduced by uncertainties in the background and the PSF, and have obtained formally-acceptable model fits to >90% of the galaxies. Our results indicate that these massive galaxies at 1 2 the compact bulges display effective radii a factor ~4 smaller than local ellipticals of comparable mass. These trends appear to extend to the bulge components of disk-dominated galaxies, and vice versa. We also find that, while such massive galaxies at low z are bulge-dominated, at 1 2 they are mostly disk-dominated. The majority of the disk-dominated galaxies are actively forming stars, but this is also true for many of the bulge-dominated systems. Interestingly, however, while most of the quiescent galaxies are b...

  18. Compact stellar systems in the polar ring galaxies NGC 4650A and NGC 3808B: Clues to polar disk formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Puzia, Thomas H; Goudfrooij, Paul; Arnaboldi, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Polar ring galaxies (PRGs) are composed of two kinematically distinct and nearly orthogonal components, a host galaxy (HG) and a polar ring/disk (PR). The HG usually contains an older stellar population than the PR. The suggested formation channel of PRGs is still poorly constrained. Suggested options are merger, gas accretion, tidal interaction, or a combination of both. To constrain the formation scenario of PRGs, we study the compact stellar systems (CSSs) in two PRGs at different evolutionary stages: NGC 4650A with well-defined PR, and NGC 3808B, which is in the process of PR formation. We use archival HST/WFPC2 imaging. PSF-fitting techniques, and color selection criteria are used to select cluster candidates. Photometric analysis of the CSSs was performed to determine their ages and masses using stellar population models at a fixed metallicity. Both PRGs contain young CSSs ($< 1$ Gyr) with masses of up to 5$\\times$10$^6$M$_\\odot$, mostly located in the PR and along the tidal debris. The most massive ...

  19. Motion of halo compact objects in the gravitational potential of a low-mass model of the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Sikora, Szymon; Jałocha, Joanna; Kutschera, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we derived a lower bound for the Galaxy mass in the approximation of a point mass potential, assuming a spherical symmetric ensemble of test bodies representing compact objects of the halo. This result was obtained for a representative of most general phase-space distribution functions consistent with the measured radial velocity dispersion, assuming no constraints on the form of the velocity dispersion anisotropy parameter. In this paper we make use of the representative phase function to set the initial conditions for a simulation of test bodies in a more realistic gravitational potential with the same total mass. The predicted radial velocity dispersion profile evolves to forms still consistent with the measured profile, proving structural stability of the point mass approximation and the reliability of its lower bound estimate for Galaxy mass of about $2.1\\times10^{11}\\mathrm{M}_{\\odot}$ within $150\\,\\mathrm{kpc}$. We derive also a relationship holding in spherical symmetry between the radial ve...

  20. ISO spectroscopy of compact HII regions in the Galaxy - II. Ionization and elemental abundances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin-Hernandez, NL; Peeters, E; Morisset, C; Tielens, AGGM; Cox, P; Roelfsema, PR; Baluteau, JP; Schaerer, D; Mathis, JS; Damour, F; Churchwell, E; Kessler, MF

    2002-01-01

    Based on the ISO spectral catalogue of compact H II regions by Peeters et al. (2002), we present a first analysis of the hydrogen recombination and atomic fine-structure lines originated in the ionized gas. The sample consists of 34 H II regions located at galactocentric distances between R-Gal = 0

  1. Compact Starbursts in z ∼ 3–6 Submillimeter Galaxies Revealed by ALMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikarashi, Soh; Ivison, R. J.; Caputi, Karina I.; Aretxaga, Itziar; Dunlop, James S.; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hughes, David H.; Iono, Daisuke; Izumi, Takuma; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro; Lagos, Claudia D. P.; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tamura, Yoichi; Umehata, Hideki; Wilson, Grant W.; Yabe, Kiyoto; Yun, Min S.

    2015-01-01

    We report the source size distribution, as measured by ALMA millimetric continuum imaging, of a sample of 13 AzTEC-selected submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at {z}{phot}∼ 3–6. Their infrared luminosities and star formation rates (SFRs) are {L}{IR}∼ 2–6× {10}12 {L}ȯ and ∼200–600 {M}ȯ yr‑1, respectively.

  2. A Catalog of Ultra-compact High Velocity Clouds from the ALFALFA Survey: Local Group Galaxy Candidates?

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Elizabeth A K; Haynes, Martha P

    2013-01-01

    We present a catalog of 59 ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) extracted from the 40% complete ALFALFA HI-line survey. The ALFALFA UCHVCs have median flux densities of 1.34 Jy km/s, median angular diameters of 10', and median velocity widths of 23 km/s. We show that the full UCHVC population cannot easily be associated with known populations of high velocity clouds. Of the 59 clouds presented here, only 11 are also present in the compact cloud catalog extracted from the commensal GALFA-HI survey, demonstrating the utility of this separate dataset and analysis. Based on their sky distribution and observed properties, we infer that the ALFALFA UCHVCs are consistent with the hypothesis that they may be very low mass galaxies within the Local Volume. In that case, most of their baryons would be in the form of gas, and because of their low stellar content, they remain unidentified by extant optical surveys. At distances of ~1 Mpc, the UCHVCs have neutral hydrogen (HI) masses of ~10^5 -10^6 M_sun, HI diamet...

  3. THE GALEX/S{sup 4}G UV–IR COLOR–COLOR DIAGRAM: CATCHING SPIRAL GALAXIES AWAY FROM THE BLUE SEQUENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouquin, Alexandre Y. K.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Gallego, Jesús [Departamento de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Boissier, Samuel [Aix Marseille Université, CNGRS, LAM (Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Sheth, Kartik [National Radio Astronomy Observatory/NAASC, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Laine, Jarkko [Astronomy Division, Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Peletier, Reynier F. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Postbus 800, NL-9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Röck, Benjamin R.; Knapen, Johan H., E-mail: abouquin@fis.ucm.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea, S/N, E-38205 La Laguna (Spain)

    2015-02-10

    We obtained GALEX FUV, NUV, and Spitzer/IRAC 3.6 μm photometry for >2000 galaxies, available for 90% of the S{sup 4}G sample. We find a very tight GALEX blue sequence (GBS) in the (FUV–NUV) versus (NUV–[3.6]) color–color diagram, which is populated by irregular and spiral galaxies, and is mainly driven by changes in the formation timescale (τ) and a degeneracy between τ and dust reddening. The tightness of the GBS provides an unprecedented way of identifying star-forming galaxies and objects that are just evolving to (or from) what we call the GALEX green valley (GGV). At the red end of the GBS, at (NUV–[3.6]) > 5, we find a wider GALEX red sequence (GRS) mostly populated by E/S0 galaxies that has a perpendicular slope to that of the GBS and of the optical red sequence. We find no such dichotomy in terms of stellar mass (measured by M{sub [3.6]}) since both massive (M{sub ⋆}>10{sup 11}M{sub ⊙}) blue- and red-sequence galaxies are identified. The type that is proportionally more often found in the GGV is the S0-Sa’s, and most of these are located in high-density environments. We discuss evolutionary models of galaxies that show a rapid transition from the blue to the red sequence on a timescale of 10{sup 8} yr.

  4. Bottom-heavy initial mass function in a nearby compact L*-galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Läsker, Ronald; van de Ven, Glenn; Ferreras, Ignacio; La Barbera, Francesco; Vazdekis, Alexandre; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    We present orbit-based dynamical models and stellar population analysis of galaxy SDSS J151741.75-004217.6, a low-redshift (z=0.116) early-type galaxy (ETG) which, for its moderate luminosity, has an exceptionally high velocity dispersion. We aim to determine the central black hole mass (M_bh), the i-band stellar mass-to-light ratio, and the low-mass slope of the initial mass function (IMF). Combining constraints from HST imaging and longslit kinematic data with those from fitting the SDSS spectrum with stellar populations models of varying IMF, we show that this galaxy has a large fraction of low-mass stars, significantly higher than implied even by a Salpeter IMF. We exclude a Chabrier/Kroupa as well as a unimodal (i.e. single-segment) IMF, while a bimodal (low-mass tapered) shape is consistent with the dynamical constraints. Thereby, our study demonstrates that a very bottom-heavy IMF can exist even in an L* ETG. We place an upper limit of ~10^{10.5}M_sun on M_bh, which still leaves open the possibility of...

  5. HerMES : SPIRE detection of high redshift massive compact galaxies in GOODS-N field

    CERN Document Server

    Cava, A; Perez-Fournon, I; Buitrago, F; Trujillo, I; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Auld, R; Bock, J; Brisbin, D; Burgarella, D; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Chanial, P; Cirasuolo, M; Clements, D L; Conselice, C J; Cooray, A; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Ferrero, P; Franceschini, A; Glenn, J; Solares, E A Gonzalez; Griffin, M; Ibar, E; Ivison, R J; Marchetti, L; Morrison, G E; Mortier, A M J; Oliver, S J; Page, M J; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Raymond, G; Rigopoulou, D; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Smith, A J; Symeonidis, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Vieira, J D; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Wright, G

    2010-01-01

    We have analysed the rest-frame far infrared (FIR) properties of a sample of massive (Mstar > 10^11Msun) galaxies at 2galaxies with structural parameters characterised with HST NICMOS-3. We study detections at submm Herschel bands, together with Spitzer 24{\\mu}m data, as a function of the morphological type, mass and size. We find that 26/45 sources are detected at MIPS-24{\\mu}m and 15/45 (all MIPS-24{\\mu}m detections) are detected at SPIRE-250{\\mu}m, with disk-like galaxies more easily detected. We derive star formation rates (SFR) and specific star formation rates (sSFR) by fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) of our sources, taking into account non-detections for SPIRE and syst...

  6. Host Galaxies, Obscuration and Nuclear Structure of Three Nearby Compact Symmetric Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Perlman, E S; Conway, J; Reynolds, C; Perlman, Eric S.; Stocke, John T.; Conway, John; Reynolds, Christopher S

    2001-01-01

    We present 3-band HST imaging of three z/= 10^8 years ago. Such a merger could have "triggered" the current activity in these objects, but our data require a significant time delay between the merger and the onset of nuclear activity. However, these data are also consistent with the hypothesis that the onset of nuclear activity in radio galaxies is due to relatively minor "feeding" events and/or the formation of "bars within bars", which would disturb the internal kinematics only slightly.

  7. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. XI. Beyond Hubble resolution: size, luminosity and stellar mass of compact lensed galaxies at intermediate redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Newton, Elisabeth R; Auger, Matthew W; Gavazzi, Raphael; Bolton, Adam S; Koopmans, Leon V E; Moustakas, Leonidas A

    2011-01-01

    We exploit the strong lensing effect to explore the properties of intrinsically faint and compact galaxies at intermediate redshift, at the highest possible resolution at optical wavelengths. Our sample consists of 46 strongly-lensed emission line galaxies discovered by the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey. The galaxies have been imaged at high resolution with HST in three bands (V_HST, I_814 and H_160), allowing us to infer their size, luminosity, and stellar mass using stellar population synthesis models. Lens modeling is performed using a new fast and robust code, klens, which we test extensively on real and synthetic non-lensed galaxies, and also on simulated galaxies multiply-imaged by SLACS- like galaxy-scale lenses. Our tests show that our measurements of galaxy size, flux, and Sersic index are robust and accurate, even for objects intrinsically smaller than the HST point spread function. The median magnification is 8.8, with a long tail that extends to magnifications above 40. Modeling the SLACS sources ...

  8. A spectroscopic study of blue supergiant stars in the Sculptor galaxy NGC 55: chemical evolution and distance

    CERN Document Server

    Kudritzki, Rolf; Castro, Norberto; Ho, I-Ting; Bresolin, Fabio; Gieren, Wolfgang; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Przybilla, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Low resolution (4.5 to 5 Angstroem) spectra of 58 blue supergiant stars distributed over the disk of the Magellanic spiral galaxy NGC 55 in the Sculptor group are analyzed by means of non-LTE techniques to determine stellar temperatures, gravities and metallicities (from iron peak and alpha-elements). A metallicity gradient of -0.22 +/- 0.06$ dex/R_25 is detected. The central metallicity on a logarithmic scale relative to the Sun is [Z] = -0.37 +\\- 0.03. A chemical evolution model using the observed distribution of stellar and interstellar medium gas mass column densities reproduces the observed metallicity distribution well and reveals a recent history of strong galactic mass accretion and wind outflows with accretion and mass-loss rates of the order of the star formation rate. There is an indication of spatial inhomogeneity in metallicity. In addition, the relatively high central metallicity of the disk confirms that two extra-planar metal poor HII regions detected in previous work 1.13 to 2.22 kpc above th...

  9. A Spectroscopic Study of Blue Supergiant Stars in the Sculptor Galaxy NGC 55: Chemical Evolution and Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudritzki, R. P.; Castro, N.; Urbaneja, M. A.; Ho, I.-T.; Bresolin, F.; Gieren, W.; Pietrzyński, G.; Przybilla, N.

    2016-10-01

    Low-resolution (4.5-5 Å) spectra of 58 blue supergiant stars distributed over the disk of the Magellanic spiral galaxy NGC 55 in the Sculptor group are analyzed by means of non-LTE techniques to determine stellar temperatures, gravities, and metallicities (from iron peak and α-elements). A metallicity gradient of -0.22 ± 0.06 dex/R 25 is detected. The central metallicity on a logarithmic scale relative to the Sun is [Z] = -0.37 ± 0.03. A chemical evolution model using the observed distribution of column densities of the stellar and interstellar medium gas mass reproduces the observed metallicity distribution well and reveals a recent history of strong galactic mass accretion and wind outflows with accretion and mass-loss rates of the order of the star formation rate. There is an indication of spatial inhomogeneity in metallicity. In addition, the relatively high central metallicity of the disk confirms that two extraplanar metal-poor H ii regions detected in previous work 1.13 to 2.22 kpc above the galactic plane are ionized by massive stars formed in situ outside the disk. For a subsample of supergiants, for which Hubble Space Telescope photometry is available, the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship is used to determine a distance modulus of 26.85 ± 0.10 mag.

  10. Identifying galaxy candidates in WSRT HI imaging of ultra-compact high velocity clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Elizabeth A K; Cannon, John M; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) were identified in the ALFALFA HI survey as potential gas-bearing dark matter halos. Here we present higher resolution neutral hydrogen (HI) observations of twelve UCHVCS with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). The UCHVCs were selected based on a combination of size, isolation, large recessional velocity and high column density as the best candidate dark matter halos. The WSRT data were tapered to image the UCHVCs at 210" (comparable to Arecibo) and 105" angular resolution. In a comparison of the single-dish to interferometer data, we find that the line flux recovered in the WSRT observations is comparable to that from the single-dish ALFALFA data. In addition, any structure seen in the ALFALFA data is reproduced in the WSRT maps at the same angular resolution. At 210'" resolution all the sources are generally compact with a smooth HI morphology, as expected from their identification as UCHVCs. At the higher angular resolution, a majority of the source...

  11. In vitro effectiveness of 455-nm blue LED to reduce the load of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans biofilms in compact bone tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Luciano Pereira; da Silva, Francine Cristina; Viana, Magda Souza; Meira, Giselle Andrade

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 455-nm blue light-emitting diode (LED), at different application times, to reduce the load of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans biofilms applied to compact bone tissue. The microorganisms S. aureus (ATCC 25923) and C. albicans (ATCC 18804) were used to form biofilms on 160 specimens of compact bones that had been divided into eight experimental groups (n = 10) for each microorganism, according to the times of application of the 455-nm blue LED (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 10 min) with an irradiance of 75 mW/cm2. After LED application, decimal dilutions of microorganisms were performed, plated on BHI or Sabouraud agar and incubated for 24 h/35 °C to obtain CFU/mL counts. The findings were statistically analyzed using a ANOVA 5 %. For the group of S. aureus biofilms, all groups of 455-nm LED application differ compared with the control group (p albicans biofilms, only those samples receiving 3, 7, and 10 min of LED application presented a significant difference compared with the control group (p albicans biofilms, especially during 10 min of application.

  12. Galaxies The Long Wavelength View

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, J

    2000-01-01

    Far-infrared spectroscopy obtained with the ISO LWS has shown that there is strong variation (more than 2 orders of magnitude) in the [C II]/FIR ratios in galaxies extending from blue compact dwarfs, to normal and starburst galaxies, down to elliptical and ultraluminous galaxies (ULIGs). The variation in the relative [C II] 158 micron line strength has been attributed to low metallicity in blue compact dwarfs, high /n for normal galaxies and ULIGs, soft radiation fields in ellipticals, and extinction or enhanced abundance of dust in ionized regions in ULIGs. Full ISO/LWS far-infrared (43 - 197 micron) spectra of six nearby IR-bright galaxies reveal a dramatic progression of decreasing fine-structure line emission from ionized species to molecular (OH and H2O) absorption line dominated. The archetypical ULIG, Arp 220, lies at the absorption line dominated end of this sequence. For Arp 220, radiative transfer models indicate that it is optically thick in the FIR and that the water molecules observed in absorpti...

  13. Lopsidedness in dwarf irregular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, A B; Almoznino, E; Van Zee, L; Salzer, J J; Heller, Ana B.; Brosch, Noah; Almoznino, Elchanan; Zee, Liese van; Salzer, John J.

    2000-01-01

    We quantify the amplitude of the lopsidedness, the azimuthal angular asymmetry index, and the concentration of star forming regions, as represented by the distribution of the H$\\alpha$ emission, in a sample of 78 late-type irregular galaxies. We bin the observed galaxies in two groups representing blue compact galaxies (BCDs) and low surface brightness dwarf galaxies (LSBs). The light distribution is analysed with a novel algorithm, which allows detection of details in the light distribution pattern. We find that while the asymmetry of the underlying continuum light, representing the older stellar generations, is relatively small, the H$\\alpha$ emission is very asymmetric and is correlated in position angle with the continuum light. We test a model of random star formation over the extent of a galaxy by simulating HII regions in artificial dwarf galaxies. The implication is that random star formation over the full extent of a galaxy may be generated in LSB dwarf-irregular galaxies but not in BCD galaxies.

  14. Deep Chandra Observations of the Compact Starburst Galaxy Henize 2-10: X-rays from the Massive Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Reines, Amy; Miller, Jon; Sivakoff, Gregory; Greene, Jenny; Hickox, Ryan; Johnson, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    We present follow-up X-ray observations of the candidate massive black hole (BH) in the nucleus of the low-mass, compact starburst galaxy Henize 2-10. Using new high-resolution observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory totaling 200 ks in duration, as well as archival Chandra observations from 2001, we demonstrate the presence of a previously unidentified X-ray point source that is spatially coincident with the known nuclear radio source in Henize 2-10 (i.e., the massive BH). We show that the hard X-ray emission previously identified in the 2001 observation is dominated by a source that is distinct from the nucleus, with the properties expected for a high-mass X-ray binary. The X-ray luminosity of the nuclear source suggests the massive BH is radiating significantly below its Eddington limit (~10^-6 L_Edd), and the soft spectrum resembles other weakly accreting massive BHs including Sagittarius A*. Analysis of the X-ray light curve of the nucleus reveals the tentative detection of a ~9-hour periodicity, ...

  15. Multi-epoch VLBA observations of radio galaxy 0932+075: is this a compact symmetric object?

    CERN Document Server

    Marecki, A

    2014-01-01

    A part of the radio structure of the galaxy 0932+075 emerged as a possible compact symmetric object (CSO) after the observation with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 GHz in 1997. More than a decade later, we carried out observations at 5, 15.4, and 22.2 GHz using the VLBA to test this possibility. We report here that we have found a component whose spectrum is inverted in the whole range from 5 GHz to 22 GHz and we label it a high-frequency peaker (HFP). Using a set of 5 GHz images from two epochs separated by 11.8 years and a set of 15.4 GHz images separated by 8.2 years, we were able to examine the proper motions of the three components of the CSO candidate with respect to the HFP. We found that their displacements cannot be reconciled with the CSO paradigm. This has led to the rejection of the hypothesis that the western part of the arcsecond-scale radio structure of 0932+075 is a CSO anchored at the HFP. Consequently, the HFP cannot be labelled a core and its role in this system is unclear.

  16. Intra-group diffuse light in compact groups of galaxies. HCG 79, HCG 88 and HCG 95

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha, C D; Rocha, Cristiano Da; Oliveira, Claudia Mendes de

    2005-01-01

    Deep $B$ and $R$ images of three Hickson Compact Groups, HCG 79, HCG 88 and HCG 95, were analyzed using a new wavelet technic to measure possible intra-group diffuse light present in these systems. The method used, OV\\_WAV, is a wavelet technic particularly suitable to detect low-surface brightness extended structures, down to a $S/N = 0.1$ per pixel, which corresponds to a 5-$\\sigma$-detection level in wavelet space. The three groups studied are in different evolutionary stages, as can be judged by their very different fractions of the total light contained in their intra-group halos: $46\\pm11$\\% for HCG 79 and $11\\pm26$\\% for HCG 95, in the $B$ band, and HCG 88 had no component detected down to a limiting surface brightness of $29.1~B~mag~arcsec^{-2}$. For HCG 95 the intra-group light is red, similar to the mean colors of the group galaxies themselves, suggesting that it is formed by an old population with no significant on-going star formation. For HCG 79, however, the intra-group material has significantl...

  17. Characterizing the Cool KOIs IV: Kepler-32 as a prototype for the formation of compact planetary systems throughout the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Swift, Jonathan J; Morton, Timothy D; Crepp, Justin R; Montet, Benjamin T; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Muirhead, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    The Kepler space telescope has opened new vistas in exoplanet discovery space by revealing populations of Earth-sized planets that provide a new context for understanding planet formation. Approximately 70% of all stars in the Galaxy belong to the diminutive M dwarf class, several thousand of which lie within Kepler's field of view, and a large number of these targets show planet transit signals. Kepler-32 is a typical star in the Kepler M dwarf sample that presents us with a rare opportunity: five planets transit this star giving us an expansive view of its architecture. All five planets of this compact system orbit their host star within a distance one third the size of Mercury's orbit with the innermost planet positioned a mere 4.3 stellar radii from the stellar photosphere. New observations limit possible false positive scenarios allowing us to validate the entire Kepler-32 system making it the richest known system of transiting planets around an M dwarf. Based on considerations of the stellar dust sublim...

  18. CHARACTERIZING THE COOL KOIs. IV. KEPLER-32 AS A PROTOTYPE FOR THE FORMATION OF COMPACT PLANETARY SYSTEMS THROUGHOUT THE GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, Jonathan J.; Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Muirhead, Philip S. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Physics, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel C., E-mail: jswift@astro.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-02-10

    The Kepler space telescope has opened new vistas in exoplanet discovery space by revealing populations of Earth-sized planets that provide a new context for understanding planet formation. Approximately 70% of all stars in the Galaxy belong to the diminutive M dwarf class, several thousand of which lie within Kepler's field of view, and a large number of these targets show planet transit signals. The Kepler M dwarf sample has a characteristic mass of 0.5 M {sub Sun} representing a stellar population twice as common as Sun-like stars. Kepler-32 is a typical star in this sample that presents us with a rare opportunity: five planets transit this star, giving us an expansive view of its architecture. All five planets of this compact system orbit their host star within a distance one-third the size of Mercury's orbit, with the innermost planet positioned a mere 4.3 stellar radii from the stellar photosphere. New observations limit possible false positive scenarios, allowing us to validate the entire Kepler-32 system making it the richest known system of transiting planets around an M dwarf. Based on considerations of the stellar dust sublimation radius, a minimum mass protoplanetary nebula, and the near period commensurability of three adjacent planets, we propose that the Kepler-32 planets formed at larger orbital radii and migrated inward to their present locations. The volatile content inferred for the Kepler-32 planets and order of magnitude estimates for the disk migration rates suggest that these planets may have formed beyond the snow line and migrated in the presence of a gaseous disk. If true, then this would place an upper limit on their formation time of {approx}10 Myr. The Kepler-32 planets are representative of the full ensemble of planet candidates orbiting the Kepler M dwarfs for which we calculate an occurrence rate of 1.0 {+-} 0.1 planet per star. The formation of the Kepler-32 planets therefore offers a plausible blueprint for the formation

  19. Characterizing the Cool KOIs. IV. Kepler-32 as a Prototype for the Formation of Compact Planetary Systems throughout the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Jonathan J.; Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D.; Crepp, Justin R.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Muirhead, Philip S.

    2013-02-01

    The Kepler space telescope has opened new vistas in exoplanet discovery space by revealing populations of Earth-sized planets that provide a new context for understanding planet formation. Approximately 70% of all stars in the Galaxy belong to the diminutive M dwarf class, several thousand of which lie within Kepler's field of view, and a large number of these targets show planet transit signals. The Kepler M dwarf sample has a characteristic mass of 0.5 M ⊙ representing a stellar population twice as common as Sun-like stars. Kepler-32 is a typical star in this sample that presents us with a rare opportunity: five planets transit this star, giving us an expansive view of its architecture. All five planets of this compact system orbit their host star within a distance one-third the size of Mercury's orbit, with the innermost planet positioned a mere 4.3 stellar radii from the stellar photosphere. New observations limit possible false positive scenarios, allowing us to validate the entire Kepler-32 system making it the richest known system of transiting planets around an M dwarf. Based on considerations of the stellar dust sublimation radius, a minimum mass protoplanetary nebula, and the near period commensurability of three adjacent planets, we propose that the Kepler-32 planets formed at larger orbital radii and migrated inward to their present locations. The volatile content inferred for the Kepler-32 planets and order of magnitude estimates for the disk migration rates suggest that these planets may have formed beyond the snow line and migrated in the presence of a gaseous disk. If true, then this would place an upper limit on their formation time of ~10 Myr. The Kepler-32 planets are representative of the full ensemble of planet candidates orbiting the Kepler M dwarfs for which we calculate an occurrence rate of 1.0 ± 0.1 planet per star. The formation of the Kepler-32 planets therefore offers a plausible blueprint for the formation of one of the largest

  20. Some like it hot: Linking diffuse X-ray luminosity, baryonic mass, and star formation rate in compact groups of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in LX -T and LX -σ, even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and H I masses ≳ 1011.3 M☉ are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 μm star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due to gas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  1. Some Like it Hot: Linking Diffuse X-Ray Luminosity, Baryonic Mass, and Star Formation Rate in Compact Groups of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mulchaey, John S.; Walker, Lisa May; Brandt, Willian N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in L(x-T) and (L(x-sigma), even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and Hi masses are great than or equal to 10(sup (11.3) solar mass are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 micron star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due togas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  2. A Critical Review of the Evidence for M32 being a Compact Dwarf Satellite of M31 rather than a More Distant Normal Galaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. Ke-shih Young; Malcolm J. Currie; Robert J. Dickens; A-Li Luo; Tong-Jie Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Since Baade's photographic study of M32 in the mid 1940s, it has been accepted as an established fact that M32 is a compact dwarf satellite of M31. The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of our investigation into the nature of the existing evidence. We find that the case for M32 being a satellite of M31 rests upon Hubble Space Telescope (HST) based stellar population studies which have resolved red-giant branch (RGB) and red clump stars in M32 as well as other nearby galaxies. Taken in isolation, this recent evidence could be considered to be conclusive in favour of the existing view. However, the conventional scenario does not explain M32's anomalously high central velocity dispersion for a dwarf galaxy (several times that of either NGC 147, NGC 185 or NGC 205) or existing planetary nebula observations (which suggest that M32 is more than twice as distant as M31) and also requires an elaborate physical explanation for M32's inferred compactness. Conversely, we find that the case for M32 being a normal galaxy, of the order of three times as distant as M31, is supported by: (1) a central velocity dispersion typical of intermediate galaxies, (2) the published planetary nebula observations, and (3) known scaling relationships for normal early-type galaxies. However, this novel scenario cannot account for the high apparent luminosities of the RGB stars resolved in the M32 direction by HST observations. We are therefore left with two apparently irreconcilable scenarios, only one of which can be correct, but both of which suffer from potentially fatal evidence to the contrary. This suggests that current understanding of some relevant fields is still very far from adequate.

  3. Bursts of star formation in computer simulations of dwarf galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comins, N.F.

    1984-09-01

    A three-dimensional Stochastic Self-Propagating Star Formation (SSPSF) model of compact galacies is presented. Two phases of gas, active and inactive, are present, and permanent depletion of gas in the form of long lived, low mass stars and remnants occurs. Similarly, global infall of gas from a galactic halo or through galactic cannibalism is permitted. We base our parameters on the observed properties of the compact blue galaxy I Zw 36. Our results are that bursts of star formation occur much more frequently in these runs than continuous nonbursting star formation, suggesting that the blue compact galaxies are probably undergoing bursts rather than continuous, nonbursting low-level star formation activity.

  4. The StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey. II. Sensitivity of the survey and an Atlas of Synthetic Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Beccari, G; Battaglia, G; Ibata, R; Martin, N; Testa, V; Cignoni, M; Correnti, M

    2016-01-01

    SECCO is a survey devoted to the search for stellar counterparts within Ultra Compact High Velocity Clouds. In this contribution we present the results of a set of simulations aimed at the quantitative estimate of the sensitivity of the survey as a function of the total luminosity, size and distance of the stellar systems we are looking for. For all our synthetic galaxies we assumed an exponential surface brightness profile and an old and metal-poor population. The synthetic galaxies are simulated both on the images and on the photometric catalogs, taking into account all the observational effects. In the fields where the available observational material is of the top quality we detect synthetic galaxies as >=5 sigma over-densities of resolved stars down to muV,h=30.0 mag/arcsec2, for D<=1.5 Mpc, and down to muV,h~29.5 mag/arcsec2, for D<=2.5 Mpc. In the field with the worst observational material of the whole survey we detect synthetic galaxies with muV,h<=28.8 mag/arcsec2 out to D<=1.0 Mpc, and ...

  5. Very Compact Dense Galaxy Overdensity with {\\delta} ~ 130 Identified at z ~ 8: Implications for Early Protocluster and Cluster-Core Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ishigaki, Masafumi; Harikane, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    We report the first identification of a compact dense galaxy overdensity at $z\\sim 8$ dubbed A2744z8OD. A2744z8OD consists of eight $Y$-dropout galaxies behind Abell 2744 that is originally pinpointed by Hubble Frontier Fields studies. However, no studies have, so far, derived basic physical quantities of structure formation or made comparisons with theoretical models. We obtain a homogeneous sample of dropout galaxies at $z\\sim 8$ from eight field data of Hubble legacy images that are as deep as the A2744z8OD data. Using the sample, we find that a galaxy surface overdensity value of A2744z8OD is very high $\\delta\\simeq 130$ that is defined in a small circle of $6"$ ($\\simeq 30$ physical kpc) radius. Because there is no such a large $\\delta$ value reported for high-$z$ overdensities to date, A2744z8OD is a system clearly different from those found in previous high-$z$ overdensity studies. The total stellar mass of A2744z8OD is estimated to be $3.8\\times 10^9 M_\\odot$ that is as small as today's Large Magellan...

  6. The evolutionary status of high and extremely low surface brightness dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowiecki, Steven

    2015-07-01

    Studying dwarf galaxies can shed light on the original building blocks of galaxy formation. Most large galaxies are thought to be built up over billions of years through the collisions and mergers of smaller galaxies. The dwarf galaxies we see today are the evolved remnants of those building blocks, and by understanding their nature and evolution, we can study the raw ingredients of galaxy formation. Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies (BCDs) and Almost Dark galaxies are at opposite extremes of today's population of dwarf galaxies. BCDs are exceptionally compact and host very intense starbursts, while Almost Dark galaxies are much more diffuse and have weak stellar populations. This work studies the evolutionary context of BCDs by using deep, high-resolution images to study the detailed structure of their components, and by fitting our multi-wavelength observations with models to describe the properties of their stars, gas, and dust. BCDs appear to have exceptionally compact old stellar populations and unusually large star formation rates, when compared to typical dwarf galaxies. By contrast, the optically faint, gas-dominated Almost Dark galaxies have extremely low star formation rates and weak stellar populations. In particular, one of the Almost Darks studied in this work has very unusual properties and is in disagreement with widely-studied scaling relations for large samples of galaxies. It appears to have too little stellar mass, a distribution of HI that is too extended to be supported by its modest rotation, and the highest well-measured gas mass-to-light ratio ever observed. These two extreme classes may represent evolutionary stages that all galaxies pass through, and appear to be extreme ends of the broad continuum of dwarf galaxy properties. In order to use today's dwarf galaxies as windows into the building blocks of early galaxy formation, these unusual states and evolutionary pathways must be understood.

  7. PTF11eon/SN2011dh: Discovery of a Type IIb Supernova From a Compact Progenitor in the Nearby Galaxy M51

    CERN Document Server

    Arcavi, Iair; Yaron, Ofer; Sternberg, Assaf; Rabinak, Itay; Waxman, Eli; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Quimby, Robert M; Ofek, Eran O; Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Filippenko, Alexei V; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Cenko, S Bradley; Li, Weidong; Bloom, Joshua S; Sullivan, Mark; Fox, Derek B; Nugent, Peter E; Poznanski, Dovi; Gorbikov, Evgeny; Riou, Amedee; Lamotte-Bailey, Stephane; Griga, Thomas; Cohen, Judith G; Polishook, David; Xu, Dong; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Manulis, Ilan; Walker, Emma S; Mazzali, Paulo A; Pian, Elena; Matheson, Thomas; Maquire, Kate; Pan, Yen-Chen; Bersier, David; James, Philip; Marchant, Jonathan M; Smith, Robert J; Mottram, Chris J; Barnsley, Robert M; Kandrashoff, Michael T; Clubb, Kelsey I

    2011-01-01

    On May 31, 2011 UT a supernova (SN) exploded in the nearby galaxy M51 (the Whirlpool Galaxy). We discovered this event using small telescopes equipped with CCD cameras, as well as by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) survey, and rapidly confirmed it to be a Type II supernova. Our early light curve and spectroscopy indicates that PTF11eon resulted from the explosion of a relatively compact progenitor star as evidenced by the rapid shock-breakout cooling seen in the light curve, the relatively low temperature in early-time spectra and the prompt appearance of low-ionization spectral features. The spectra of PTF11eon are dominated by H lines out to day 10 after explosion, but initial signs of He appear to be present. Assuming that He lines continue to develop in the near future, this SN is likely a member of the cIIb (compact IIb; Chevalier and Soderberg 2010) class, with progenitor radius larger than that of SN 2008ax and smaller than the eIIb (extended IIb) SN 1993J progenitor. Our data imply that the object...

  8. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey VIII : Discovery of an Isolated Dwarf Galaxy in the Local Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, R; Herbst, H; Smith, R

    2014-01-01

    The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey (AGES) has detected a nearby HI source at a heliocentric velocity of +363 km/s . The object was detected through its neutral hydrogen emission and has an obvious possible optical counterpart in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data (though it does not have an optical redshift measurement). We discuss three possible scenarios for the object : 1) It is within the Local Group, in which case its HI properties are comparable with recently discovered ultra-compact high velocity clouds; 2) It is just behind the Local Group, in which case its optical characteristics are similar to the newly discovered Leo P galaxy; 3) It is a blue compact dwarf galaxy within the local volume but not associated with the Local Group. We find the third possibility to be the most likely, based on distance estimates from the Tully-Fisher relation and its velocity relative to the Local Group.

  9. Gemini GMOS--IFU spectroscopy of the compact HII galaxies Tol 0104-388 and Tol 2146-391: The dependence on the properties of the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Lagos, P; Nigoche-Netro, A; Carrasco, E R

    2012-01-01

    Using GMOS--IFU spectroscopic observations of the compact HII/BCD galaxies Tol 0104-388 and Tol 2146-391, we study the spatial distribution of emission lines, equivalent width EW(Hb), extinction c(Hb), ionization ratios ([OIII]5007/Hb, [SII]6717,6731/Ha and [NII]6584/Ha), kinematics, and the chemical pattern (O/H, N/H and N/O) of the warm interstellar medium in these galaxies. We also investigate a possible dependence of these properties on the I(HeII4686)/I(Hb) ratio and find no significant correlation between these variables. In fact, the oxygen abundances appear to be uniform in the regions where the HeII4686 emission line was measured. It can be interpreted in the sense that these correlations are related to global properties of the galaxies and not with small patches of the interstellar medium. Although a possible weak N/H gradient is observed in Tol 2146-391, the available data suggest that the metals from previous star-formation events are well mixed and homogeneously distributed through the optical ex...

  10. The StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey. II. Sensitivity of the survey and the atlas of synthetic dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccari, G.; Bellazzini, M.; Battaglia, G.; Ibata, R.; Martin, N.; Testa, V.; Cignoni, M.; Correnti, M.

    2016-06-01

    The searching for StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey is devoted to the search for stellar counterparts within ultra compact high velocity clouds that are candidate low-mass, low-luminosity galaxies. We present the results of a set of simulations aimed at the quantitative estimate of the sensitivity of the survey as a function of the total luminosity, size, and distance of the stellar systems we are looking for. For all of our synthetic galaxies we assumed an exponential surface brightness profile and an old and metal-poor population. The synthetic galaxies are simulated both on the images and on the photometric catalogues, taking all the observational effects into account. In the fields where the available observational material is of top quality (≃36% of the SECCO fields), we detect synthetic galaxies as ≥5σ over-densities of resolved stars down to μV,h ≃ 30.0 mag/arcsec2, for D ≤ 1.5 Mpc, and down to μV,h ≃ 29.5 mag/arcsec2, for D ≤ 2.5 Mpc. In the field with the worst observational material of the whole survey, we detect synthetic galaxies with μV,h ≤ 28.8 mag/arcsec2 out to D ≤ 1.0 Mpc, and those with μV,h ≤ 27.5 mag/arcsec2 out to D ≤ 2.5 Mpc. Dwarf galaxies with MV = -10.0, with sizes in the range spanned by known dwarfs, are detected by visual inspection of the images up to D = 5 Mpc independent of the image quality. In the best quality images, dwarfs are partially resolved into stars up to D = 3.0 Mpc and completely unresolved at D = 5 Mpc. As an independent test of the sensitivity of our images to low surface brightness galaxies, we report on the detection of several dwarf spheroidal galaxies probably located in the Virgo cluster with MV ≲ -8.0 and μV,h ≲ 26.8 mag/arcsec2. The nature of the previously discovered SECCO 1 stellar system, also likely located in the Virgo cluster, is rediscussed in comparison with these dwarfs. While specific for the SECCO survey, our study may also provide general

  11. The bursting nature of star formation in compact star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Guseva, N. G.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.

    2016-08-01

    We study integrated characteristics of ˜ 14000 low-redshift (0 integrated characteristics of these galaxies to zero burst age would result in a considerably tighter and almost linear relation between stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR). The same correction implies that the specific star formation rate (the ratio of SFR and stellar mass) is not dependent on the galaxy stellar mass. We conclude that the correction for rapid luminosity evolution must be taken into account in a similar way when comparing different samples of low- and high-redshift SFGs. If the bursting nature of star formation and young burst ages are characteristics of the galaxies selected at high redshifts, the age correction of observed SFRs derived from the Hβ emission line or UV continua would modify the derived SFR densities in the early universe.

  12. `Zwicky's Nonet': a compact merging ensemble of nine galaxies and 4C 35.06, a peculiar radio galaxy with dancing radio jets

    CERN Document Server

    Biju, K G; H., Ishwara-Chandra C; Pandey-Pommier, M; Jacob, Joe; Patil, M K; P., Sunil Kumar; Pandge, Mahadev; Dabhade, Pratik; Gaikwad, Madhuri; Abraham, Sheelu; Vivek, M; Mahabal, Ashish A; Djorgovski, S G

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of our radio, optical and infrared studies of a peculiar radio source 4C 35.06, an extended radio-loud AGN found at the center of galaxy cluster Abell 407 (z=0.047). The central region also hosts a remarkably tight ensemble of nine galaxies within an ~1' (53 kpc) region, surrounded by a very faint, diffuse stellar halo. This remarkable system (named here the 'Zwicky's Nonet') provides a unique and compelling evidence for an ongoing formation of a giant cD galaxy at the cluster center. Multifrequency deep radio observations carried out with Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope at 610, 235 and 150 MHz reveal a system of 400 kpc scale helically twisted and kinked radio jets and outer relic lobes associated with 4C 35.06 in 'Zwicky's Nonet'. The outer extremities of jets show extremely steep spectrum (spectral index -1.7 to -2.5) relic or fossil radio plasma with a relatively short spectral age of few times 10^6 - 10^7 years. Such ultra steep spectrum relic radio plasma lobes without definitive h...

  13. High velocity blue-shifted FeII absorption in the dwarf star-forming galaxy PHL293B: Evidence for a wind driven supershell?

    CERN Document Server

    Terlevich, R; Bosch, G; Diaz, A I; Hagele, G; Cardaci, M; Firpo, V

    2014-01-01

    X-shooter and ISIS WHT spectra of the starforming galaxy PHL 293B also known as A2228-00 and SDSS J223036.79-000636.9 are presented in this paper. We find broad (FWHM = 1000km/s) and very broad (FWZI = 4000km/s) components in the Balmer lines, narrow absorption components in the Balmer series blueshifted by 800km/s, previously undetected FeII multiplet (42) absorptions also blueshifted by 800km/s, IR CaII triplet stellar absorptions consistent with [Fe/H] < -2.0 and no broad components or blushifted absorptions in the HeI lines. Based on historical records, we found no optical variability at the 5 sigma level of 0.02 mag between 2005 and 2013 and no optical variability at the level of 0.1mag for the past 24 years. The lack of variability rules out transient phenomena like luminous blue variables or SN IIn as the origin of the blue shifted absorptions of HI and FeII. The evidence points to either a young and dense expanding supershell or a stationary cooling wind, in both cases driven by the young cluster w...

  14. Galaxy-galaxy(-galaxy) lensing as a sensitive probe of galaxy evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghiha, H.; Hilbert, S.; Schneider, P.; Simon, P.

    2012-11-01

    Context. The gravitational lensing effect provides various ways to study the mass environment of galaxies. Aims: We investigate how galaxy-galaxy(-galaxy) lensing can be used to test models of galaxy formation and evolution. Methods: We consider two semi-analytic galaxy formation models based on the Millennium Run N-body simulation: the Durham model by Bower et al. (2006, MNRAS, 370, 645) and the Garching model by Guo et al. (2011, MNRAS, 413, 101). We generate mock lensing observations for the two models, and then employ Fast Fourier Transform methods to compute second- and third-order aperture statistics in the simulated fields for various galaxy samples. Results: We find that both models predict qualitatively similar aperture signals, but there are large quantitative differences. The Durham model predicts larger amplitudes in general. In both models, red galaxies exhibit stronger aperture signals than blue galaxies. Using these aperture measurements and assuming a linear deterministic bias model, we measure relative bias ratios of red and blue galaxy samples. We find that a linear deterministic bias is insufficient to describe the relative clustering of model galaxies below ten arcmin angular scales. Dividing galaxies into luminosity bins, the aperture signals decrease with decreasing luminosity for brighter galaxies, but increase again for fainter galaxies. This increase is likely an artifact due to too many faint satellite galaxies in massive group and cluster halos predicted by the models. Conclusions: Our study shows that galaxy-galaxy(-galaxy) lensing is a sensitive probe of galaxy evolution.

  15. Compact radio cores in three Seyfert galaxies - high resolution studies of Mkn 3, Mkn 231, and Mkn 463

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The small-scale morphologies of Mkn 231 and Mkn 463 have been investigated using the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 1.6 GHz and the VLA at 15 and 22 GHz. Mkn 3 has been studied using the EVN at 1.4 and 1.6 GHz. All of the galaxies have a substantial fraction of their core radio flux in linear or elongated structures, typically tens of parsecs in extent. Agreement between the parsec- and kiloparsec-scale position angles of continuum radio emission suggests collimated outflow from the galaxy centers that continues over several orders of magnitude in scale. Supernova rates of order one hundred per year on scales of tens of parsecs are required to explain the nuclear radio emission as the result of bursts of star formation. The luminosities, small extents, and linear morphologies of the radio sources all support the idea that the nuclear radio sources are energized by active galactic nuclei and therefore support the more general picture of Seyfert galaxy nuclei being low-luminosity quasars. All of the galaxies appear to have undergone violent interactions in the recent past. 55 references

  16. VCC 144 - a star-bursting dwarf galaxy in the Virgo Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Brosch, N.; Almoznino, E.; L. Hoffman

    1997-01-01

    We describe results of a multi-spectral study of a blue compact dwarf galaxy in Virgo. The object was observed with broad-band and H$\\alpha$ imaging, UV observations, and radio synthesis. Our data were combined with published optical observations, with HI single-beam observation and with FIR data, and were compared to results of evolutionary synthesis programs. The radio observations revealed a compact source of HI coincident with the optical galaxy, embedded in a diffuse, HI cloud which has ...

  17. Galaxy-galaxy(-galaxy) lensing as a sensitive probe of galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Saghiha, Hananeh; Schneider, Peter; Simon, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The gravitational lensing effect provides various ways to study the mass environment of galaxies. We investigate how galaxy-galaxy(-galaxy) lensing can be used to test models of galaxy formation and evolution. We consider two semi-analytic galaxy formation models based on the Millennium Run N-body simulation: the Durham model by Bower et al. (2006) and the Garching model by Guo et al. (2011). We generate mock lensing observations for the two models, and then employ Fast Fourier Transform methods to compute second- and third-order aperture statistics in the simulated fields for various galaxy samples. We find that both models predict qualitatively similar aperture signals, but there are large quantitative differences. The Durham model predicts larger amplitudes in general. In both models, red galaxies exhibit stronger aperture signals than blue galaxies. Using these aperture measurements and assuming a linear deterministic bias model, we measure relative bias ratios of red and blue galaxy samples. We find that...

  18. Les galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Francoise

    2016-08-01

    Considerable progress has been made on galaxy formation and evolution in recent years, and new issues. The old Hubble classification according to the tuning fork of spirals, lenticulars and ellipticals, is still useful but has given place to the red sequence, the blue cloud and the green valley, showing a real bimodality of types between star forming galaxies (blue) and quenched ones (red). Large surveys have shown that stellar mass and environment density are the two main factors of the evolution from blue to red sequences. Evolution is followed directly with redshift through a look-back time of more than 12 billion years. The most distant galaxy at z=11. has already a stellar mass of a billion suns. In an apparent anti-hierarchical scenario, the most massive galaxies form stars early on, while essentially dwarf galaxies are actively star-formers now. This downsizing feature also applies to the growth of super-massive black holes at the heart of each bulgy galaxy. The feedback from active nuclei is essential to explain the distribution of mass in galaxies, and in particular to explain why the fraction of baryonic matter is so low, lower by more than a factor 5 than the baryonic fraction of the Universe. New instruments just entering in operation, like MUSE and ALMA, provide a new and rich data flow, which is developed in this series of articles.

  19. CO observations of high-z radio galaxies MRC 2104-242 and MRC 0943-242: spectral-line performance of the Compact Array Broadband Backend

    CERN Document Server

    Emonts, B H C; Feain, I; Miley, G; Sadler, E M; Villar-Martin, M; Mao, M Y; Oosterloo, T A; Ekers, R D; Stevens, J B; Wieringa, M H; Coppin, K E K; Tadhunter, C N

    2011-01-01

    We present the first 7-millimetre observations of two high-redshift, Lya-bright radio galaxies (MRC 2104-242 and MRC 0943-242) performed with the 2 x 2 GHz instantaneous bandwidth of the Compact Array Broadband Backend (CABB) at the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The aim was to search for 12CO(1-0) emission in these systems and test the millimetre capabilities of CABB for performing spectral line observations at high redshifts. We show that the stable band and enhanced velocity coverage of CABB, combined with hybrid array configurations, provide the ATCA with excellent 7-mm capabilities that allow reliable searches for the ground transition of CO at high redshifts. In this paper we explicitly discuss the calibration procedures used to reach our results. We set a firm upper limit to the mass of molecular gas in MRC 2104-242 (z = 2.5) of M(H2) < 2 x 10^10 (alpha_x/0.8) M_sun. For MRC 0943-242 (z=2.9) we derive an upper limit of M(H2) < 6 x 10^10 (alpha_x/0.8) M_sun. We also find a tentative 3-s...

  20. The obscured hyper-energetic GRB 120624B hosted by a luminous compact galaxy at z = 2.20

    CERN Document Server

    Postigo, A de Ugarte; Thoene, C C; D'Avanzo, P; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Melandri, A; Gorosabel, J; Ghirlanda, G; Veres, P; Martin, S; Petitpas, G; Covino, S; Fynbo, J P U; Levan, A J

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions that we can witness in the Universe. Studying the most extreme cases of these phenomena allows us to constrain the limits for the progenitor models. In this Letter, we study the prompt emission, afterglow, and host galaxy of GRB 120624B, one of the brightest GRBs detected by Fermi, to derive the energetics of the event and characterise the host galaxy in which it was produced. Following the high-energy detection we conducted a multi-wavelength follow-up campaign, including near-infrared imaging from HAWKI/VLT, optical from OSIRIS/GTC, X-ray observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and at sub-millimetre/millimetre wavelengths from SMA. Optical/nIR spectroscopy was performed with X-shooter/VLT. We detect the X-ray and nIR afterglow of the burst and determine a redshift of z = 2.1974 +/- 0.0002 through the identification of emission lines of [OII], [OIII] and H-alpha from the host galaxy of the GRB. This implies an energy release of Eiso = (3.0+/-0.2)x10^5...

  1. SPT0346-52: Negligible AGN Activity in a Compact, Hyper-starburst Galaxy at z = 5.7

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Jingzhe; Vieira, J D; Aravena, M; Ashby, M L N; Bethermin, M; Bothwell, M S; Brandt, W N; de Breuck, C; Carlstrom, J E; Chapman, S C; Gullberg, B; Hezaveh, Y; Litke, K; Malkan, M; Marrone, D P; McDonald, M; Murphy, E J; Spilker, J S; Sreevani, J; Stark, A A; Strandet, M; Wang, S X

    2016-01-01

    We present Chandra ACIS-S and ATCA radio continuum observations of the strongly lensed dusty, star-forming galaxy SPT-S J034640-5204.9 (hereafter SPT0346-52) at $z$ = 5.656. This galaxy has also been observed with ALMA, HST, Spitzer, Herschel, APEX, and the VLT. Previous observations indicate that if the infrared (IR) emission is driven by star formation, then the inferred lensing-corrected star formation rate ($\\sim$ 4500 $M_{\\sun}$ yr$^{-1}$) and star formation rate surface density $\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$ ($\\sim$ 2000 $M_{\\sun} {yr^{-1}} {kpc^{-2}}$) are both exceptionally high. It remained unclear from the previous data, however, whether a central active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributes appreciably to the IR luminosity. The {\\it Chandra} upper limit shows that SPT0346-52 is consistent with being star-formation dominated in the X-ray, and any AGN contribution to the IR emission is negligible. The ATCA radio continuum upper limits are also consistent with the FIR-to-radio correlation for star-forming galaxies w...

  2. Nearby Clumpy, Gas Rich, Star Forming Galaxies: Local Analogs of High Redshift Clumpy Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, C A; Mac Low, M -M; Kreckel, K; Rabidoux, K; Guzmán, R

    2015-01-01

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) have enhanced star formation rates and compact morphologies. We combine Sloan Digital Sky Survey data with HI data of 29 LCBGs at redshift z~0 to understand their nature. We find that local LCBGs have high atomic gas fractions (~50%) and star formation rates per stellar mass consistent with some high redshift star forming galaxies. Many local LCBGs also have clumpy morphologies, with clumps distributed across their disks. Although rare, these galaxies appear to be similar to the clumpy star forming galaxies commonly observed at z~1-3. Local LCBGs separate into three groups: 1. Interacting galaxies (~20%); 2. Clumpy spirals (~40%); 3. Non-clumpy, non-spirals with regular shapes and smaller effective radii and stellar masses (~40%). It seems that the method of building up a high gas fraction, which then triggers star formation, is not the same for all local LCBGs. This may lead to a dichotomy in galaxy characteristics. We consider possible gas delivery scenarios and sugges...

  3. Haro15: Is it actually a low metallicity galaxy?

    CERN Document Server

    Firpo, V; Hagele, G; Díaz, A I; Morrell, N

    2009-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the physical properties of the nebular material in multiple knots of the blue compact dwarf galaxy Haro 15. Using long slit and echelle spectroscopy, obtained at Las Campanas Observatory, we study the physical conditions (electron density and temperature), ionic and total chemical abundances of several atoms, reddening and ionization structure. The latter was derived by comparing the oxygen and sulphur ionic ratios to their corresponding observed emission line ratios (the eta and eta' plots) in different regions of the galaxy. Applying direct and empirical methods for abundance determination, we perform a comparative analysis between these regions.

  4. Infrared color selection of massive galaxies at z > 3

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, T; Schreiber, C; Pannella, M; Shu, X; Willner, S P; Ashby, M L N; Huang, J -S; Fontana, A; Dekel, A; Daddi, E; Ferguson, H C; Dunlop, J; Ciesla, L; Koekemoer, A M; Giavalisco, M; Boutsia, K; Finkelstein, S; Juneau, S; Barro, G; Koo, D C; Michałowski, M J; Orellana, G; Lu, Y; Castellano, M; Bourne, N; Buitrago, F; Santini, P; Faber, S M; Hathi, N; Lucas, R A; Pérez-González, P G

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new color-selection technique to identify high-redshift, massive galaxies that are systematically missed by Lyman-break selection. The new selection is based on the H_{160} and IRAC 4.5um bands, specifically H - [4.5] > 2.25 mag. These galaxies, dubbed "HIEROs", include two major populations that can be separated with an additional J - H color. The populations are massive and dusty star-forming galaxies at z > 3 (JH-blue) and extremely dusty galaxies at z 3) HIEROs, which have a median photometric redshift z ~4.4 and stellar massM_{*}~10^{10.6} Msun, and are much fainter in the rest-frame UV than similarly massive Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). Their star formation rates (SFRs) reaches ~240 Msun yr^{-1} leading to a specific SFR, sSFR ~4.2 Gyr^{-1}, suggesting that the sSFRs for massive galaxies continue to grow at z > 2 but at a lower growth rate than from z=0 to z=2. With a median half-light radius of 2 kpc, including ~20% as compact as quiescent galaxies at similar redshifts, JH-blue HIEROs r...

  5. Parsec-scale HI absorption structure in a low-redshift galaxy seen against a Compact Symmetric Object

    CERN Document Server

    Biggs, A D; Hatziminaoglou, E; Péroux, C; Liske, J

    2016-01-01

    We present global VLBI observations of the 21-cm transition of atomic hydrogen seen in absorption against the radio source J0855+5751. The foreground absorber (SDSS~J085519.05+575140.7) is a dwarf galaxy at $z$ = 0.026. As the background source is heavily resolved by VLBI, the data allow us to map the properties of the foreground HI gas with a spatial resolution of 2pc. The absorbing gas corresponds to a single coherent structure with an extent $>$35pc, but we also detect significant and coherent variations, including a change in the HI optical depth by a factor of five across a distance of $\\leq$6pc. The large size of the structure provides support for the Heiles & Troland model of the ISM, as well as its applicability to external galaxies. The large variations in HI optical depth also suggest that caution should be applied when interpreting $T_S$ measurements from radio-detected DLAs. In addition, the distorted appearance of the background radio source is indicative of a strong jet-cloud interaction in ...

  6. SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3 at VLBI: a compact radio galaxy in a narrow-line Seyfert 1

    CERN Document Server

    Caccianiga, A; Anton, S; Ballo, L; Berton, M; Mack, K -H; Paulino-Afonso, A

    2016-01-01

    We present VLBI observations, carried out with the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (EVN), of SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3, a radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (RLNLS1) characterized by a steep radio spectrum. The source, compact at Very Large Array (VLA) resolution, is resolved on the milliarcsec scale, showing a central region plus two extended structures. The relatively high brightness temperature of all components (5x10^6-1.3x10^8 K) supports the hypothesis that the radio emission is non-thermal and likely produced by a relativistic jet and/or small radio lobes. The observed radio morphology, the lack of a significant core and the presence of a low frequency (230 MHz) spectral turnover are reminiscent of the Compact Steep Spectrum sources (CSS). However, the linear size of the source (~0.5kpc) measured from the EVN map is lower than the value predicted using the turnover/size relation valid for CSS sources (~6kpc). This discrepancy can be explained by an additional component not detected in ou...

  7. Galaxy luminosity function per morphological type up to z=1.2

    CERN Document Server

    Ilbert, O; Tresse, L; Buat, V; Arnout, S; Lefèvre, O; Burgarella, D; Zucca, E; Bardelli, S; Zamorani, G; Bottini, D; Garilli, B; Le Brun, V; MacCagni, D; Picat, J P; Scaramella, R; Scodeggio, M; Vettolani, G; Zanichelli, A; Adami, C; Arnaboldi, M; Bolzonella, M; Cappi, A; Charlot, S; Contini, T; Foucaud, S; Franzetti, P; Gavignaud, I; Guzzo, L; Iovino, A; McCracken, H J; Marano, B; Marinoni, C; Mathez, G; Mazure, A; Meneux, B; Merighi, R; Paltani, S; Pellò, R; Pollo, A; Pozzetti, L; Radovich, M; Bondi, M; Bongiorno, A; Busarello, G; Ciliegi, P; Mellier, Y; Merluzzi, P; Ripepi, V; Rizzo, D

    2006-01-01

    We have computed the evolution of the rest-frame B-band luminosity function (LF) for bulge and disk-dominated galaxies since z=1.2. We use a sample of 605 spectroscopic redshifts with I_{AB}0.9 and bright galaxies showing a strongly decreasing LF slope \\alpha=+0.55 \\pm 0.21, and 32% of blue (B-I)_{AB}<0.9 and more compact galaxies which populate the LF faint-end. We observe that red bulge-dominated galaxies are already well in place at z~1, but the volume density of this population is increasing by a factor 2.7 between z~1 and z~0.6. It may be related to the building-up of massive elliptical galaxies in the hierarchical scenario. In addition, we observe that the blue bulge-dominated population is dimming by 0.7 magnitude between z~1 and z~0.6. Galaxies in this faint and more compact population could possibly be the progenitors of the local dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  8. The formation of Milky Way-mass disk galaxies in the first 500 million years of a cold dark matter universe

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Yu; Croft, Rupert; Tenneti, Ananth; Bird, Simeon; Battaglia, Nicholas; Wilkins, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    In current cosmological models, galaxies form from the gravitational collapse of small perturbations in the matter distribution. This process involves both a hierarchy of merging structures and smooth accretion, so that early galaxies are predicted to be morphologically irregular, clumpy, and compact. This is supported by recent observational data on samples of galaxies at redshift $z=8$ and beyond. The volumes accessible to these studies, both computational and observational are however thousands of times smaller than those that will be probed by upcoming telescopes, such as WFIRST. As a result, studies so far have never been able to reach the realm of massive galaxies. Whether among the myriad tiny proto-galaxies there exists a population with similarities to present day galaxies is an open question. Here we show, using BlueTides, the first hydrodynamic simulation large enough to resolve the relevant scales, that the first massive galaxies to form are in fact predicted to have extensive rotationally-support...

  9. First detection in gamma-rays of a young radio galaxy: Fermi-LAT observations of the Compact Symmetric Object PKS 1718-649

    CERN Document Server

    Migliori, Giulia; Sobolewska, Malgorzata; Loh, Alan; Corbel, Stéphane; Ostorero, Luisa; Stawarz, Łukasz

    2016-01-01

    We report the $\\gamma$-ray detection of a young radio galaxy, PKS 1718$-$649, belonging to the class of Compact Symmetric Objects (CSOs), with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the {\\it Fermi} satellite. The third {\\it Fermi} Gamma-ray LAT catalog (3FGL) includes an unassociated $\\gamma$-ray source, 3FGL J1728.0$-$6446, located close to PKS 1718$-$649. Using the latest Pass 8 calibration, we confirm that the best fit $1 \\sigma$ position of the $\\gamma$-ray source is compatible with the radio location of PKS 1718$-$649. Cross-matching of the $\\gamma$-ray source position with the positions of blazar sources from several catalogs yields negative results. Thus, we conclude that PKS 1718$-$649 is the most likely counterpart to the unassociated LAT source. We obtain a detection test statistics TS$\\sim 36$ ($>$5$\\sigma$) with a best fit photon spectral index $\\Gamma=$2.9$\\pm$0.3 and a 0.1-100 GeV photon flux density $F_{\\rm 0.1-100GeV}=$(11.5$\\pm$0.3)$\\times{\\rm 10^{-9}}$ ph cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. We argue that t...

  10. SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3: a link between radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies and compact steep-spectrum radio sources?

    CERN Document Server

    Caccianiga, A; Ballo, L; Dallacasa, D; Della Ceca, R; Fanali, R; Foschini, L; Hamilton, T; Kraus, A; Maccacaro, T; Mack, K -H; Marchã, M J; Paulino-Afonso, A; Sani, E; Severgnini, P

    2014-01-01

    We present SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3, a new case of radio-loud narrow line Seyfert 1 (RL NLS1) with a relatively high radio power (P1.4GHz=2.1x10^25 W Hz^-1) and large radioloudness parameter (R1.4=600+/-100). The radio source is compact with a linear size below ~1.4 kpc but, contrary to most of the RL NLS1 discovered so far with such a high R1.4, its radio spectrum is very steep (alpha=0.93) and not supporting a 'blazar-like' nature. Both the small mass of the central super-massive black-hole and the high accretion rate relative to the Eddington limit estimated for this object (3.2x10^7 Msun and 0.27, respectively, with a formal error of ~0.4 dex on both quantities) are typical of the class of NLS1. Through a modeling of the spectral energy distribution of the source we have found that the galaxy hosting SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3 is undergoing a quite intense star-formation (SFR=50 Msun y^-1) which, however, is expected to contribute only marginally (~1 per cent) to the observed radio emission. The radio propert...

  11. The spectral energy distribution of PKS 2004-447: a compact steep-spectrum source and possible radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, L C; Ferrero, E; Kataoka, J; Lewis, D R; Ellingsen, S P; Misanovic, Z; Welsh, W F; Whiting, M; Boller, T; Brinkmann, W; Greenhill, J; Oshlack, A; Boller, Th.

    2006-01-01

    (abridged) The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the compact steep spectrum (CSS) source and possible radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1), PKS2004-447, is presented. Five out of six well studied RL NLS1 share this dual classification (optically defined as a NLS1 with radio definition of a CSS or giga-hertz peaked spectrum (GPS) source). The SED is created from simultaneous observations at radio (ATCA), optical/NIR (Siding Spring) and UV/X-ray (XMM-Newton) wavelengths. The X-ray data show evidence of short-term variability, a possible soft excess, and negligible absorption. Together with the rest of the SED, the X-ray emission is excessive in comparison to synchrotron plus synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models. The SED can be described with a two component model consisting of extended synchrotron/SSC emission with Comptonisation in the X-rays, though SSC models with a very high electron-to-magnetic energy density ratio cannot be excluded either. The peak emission in the SED appears to be in the ...

  12. Compact Galactic Planetary Nebulae: A HST/WFC3 Morphological Catalog, and a Study of their Role in the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Stanghellini, Letizia; Villaver, Eva

    2016-01-01

    We present the images of a \\textit{Hubble Space Telescope} (\\textit{HST}/WFC3) snapshot program of angularly compact Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe), acquired with the aim of studying their size, evolutionary status, and morphology. PNe that are smaller than $\\sim4\\arcsec$ are underrepresented in most morphological studies, and today they are less well studied than their immediate evolutionary predecessors, the pre-planetary nebulae. The images have been acquired in the light of [\\ion{O}{3}]$\\lambda5007$, which is commonly used to classify the PN morphology, in the UV continuum with the aim of detecting the central star unambiguously, and in the $I-$band to detect a cool stellar companion, if present. The sample of 51 confirmed PNe exhibits nearly the full range of primary morphological classes, with the distribution more heavily weighted toward bipolar PNe, but with total of aspherical PNe almost identical to that of the general Galactic sample. A large range of microstructures is evident in our sample as w...

  13. Detection of HI in Emission in the Lyman Alpha Emitting Galaxy Haro 11

    CERN Document Server

    Pardy, Stephen A; Östlin, Göran; Hayes, Matthew; Bergvall, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present the first robust detection of HI 21 cm emission in the blue compact galaxy Haro 11 using the 100m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Haro 11 is a luminous blue compact galaxy with emission in both Lyman Alpha and the Lyman continuum. We detect (5.1 $\\pm$ 0.7 $\\times$10$^8$) M$_{\\odot}$ of HI gas at an assumed distance of 88 Mpc, making this galaxy HI deficient compared to other local galaxies with similar optical properties. Given this small HI mass, Haro 11 has an elevated M$_{H2}$/M$_{HI}$ ratio and a very low gas fraction compared to most local galaxies, and contains twice as much mass in ionized hydrogen as in neutral hydrogen. The HI emission has a linewidth of 71 kms$^{-1}$ and is offset 60 kms$^{-1}$ redward of the optical line center. It is undergoing a starburst after a recent merger which has elevated the star formation rate, and will deplete the gas supply in $<$ 0.2 Gyr. Although this starburst has elevated the SFR compared to galaxies with similar HI masses and linewidths, H...

  14. Origin of ultra-compact dwarfs: a dynamical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Xin; Peng, Eric W.; Côté, Patrick; Liu, Chengze; Ferrarese, Laura; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Caldwell, Nelson; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; Jordán, Andrés; Lançon, Ariane; Li, Biao; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Bekki, Kenji; Blakeslee, John; Boselli, Alessandro; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Durrell, Patrick; Emsellem, Eric; Firth, Peter; Sánchez-Janssen, Ruben

    2016-02-01

    Discovery of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs) in the past 15 years blurs the once thought clear division between classic globular clusters (GCs) and early-type galaxies. The intermediate nature of UCDs, which are larger and more massive than typical GCs but more compact than typical dwarf galaxies, has triggered hot debate on whether UCDs should be considered galactic in origin or merely the most extreme GCs. Previous studies of various scaling relations, stellar populations and internal dynamics did not give an unambiguous answer to the primary origin of UCDs. In this contribution, we present the first ever detailed study of global dynamics of 97 UCDs (r h >~ 10 pc) associated with the central cD galaxy of the Virgo cluster, M87. We found that UCDs follow a different radial number density profile and different rotational properties from GCs. The orbital anisotropies of UCDs are tangentially-biased within ~ 40 kpc of M87 and become radially-biased with radius further out. In contrast, the blue GCs, which have similar median colors to our sample of UCDs, become more tangentially-biased at larger radii beyond ~ 40 kpc. Our analysis suggests that most UCDs in M87 are not consistent with being merely the most luminous and extended examples of otherwise normal GCs. The radially-biased orbital structure of UCDs at large radii is in general agreement with the scenario that most UCDs originated from the tidally threshed dwarf galaxies.

  15. Observational constraints on dwarf galaxy evolution: a retrospective of lequeux et al. (1979)

    OpenAIRE

    Evan D. Skillman

    2002-01-01

    Las contribuciones de los Peimbert han sido fundamentales para establecer ideas concernientes tanto a las propiedades como a la evoluci on de las galaxias enanas. Revisar e brevemente estas ideas dentro del contexto de una retrospectiva del art culo hist orico \\Chemical Composition and Evolution of Irregular and Blue Compact Galaxies" de Lequeux, Peimbert, Rayo, Serrano, & Torres-Peimbert, 1979, A&A, 80, 155. Este art culo aport o observaciones espectrosc opicas pioneras de regi...

  16. Self-consistent photometric and spectroscopic Star Formation Histories in Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Benito, R.; Pérez, E.; Pérez-Montero, E.; González Delgado, R.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    This project aims to unify the spectroscopic and stellar photometric views by performing a comprehensive study of a sample of the nearest Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies (BCDs). We plan to derive Star Formation Histories (SFH) both by means of Color-Magnitude Diagrams (CMDs) from extant Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical imaging and with spectral fitting methods techniques using MUSE, allowing us to obtain state-of-the-art 2D stellar properties and abundances of the gas in BCDs.

  17. ULTRA-COMPACT DWARFS IN THE CORE OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have discovered both a red and a blue subpopulation of ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxy candidates in the Coma galaxy cluster. We analyzed deep F475W (Sloan g) and F814W (I) Hubble Space Telescope images obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel as part of the Coma Cluster Treasury Survey and have fitted the light profiles of ∼5000 point-like sources in the vicinity of NGC 4874, one of the two central dominant galaxies of the Coma Cluster. Although almost all of these sources are globular clusters that remain unresolved, we found that 52 objects have effective radii between ∼10 and 66 pc, in the range spanned by dwarf globular transition objects (DGTOs) and UCDs. Of these 52 compact objects, 25 are brighter than MV ∼ -11 mag, a magnitude conventionally thought to separate UCDs and globular clusters. The UCD/DGTO candidates have the same color and luminosity distribution as the most luminous globular clusters within the red and blue subpopulations of the immensely rich NGC 4874 globular cluster system. Unlike standard globular clusters, blue and red UCD/DGTO subpopulations have the same median effective radius. The spatial distribution of UCD/DGTO candidates reveals that they congregate toward NGC 4874 and are not uniformly distributed. We find a relative deficit of UCD/DGTOs compared with globular clusters in the inner 15 kpc around NGC 4874; however, at larger radii UCD/DGTO and globular clusters follow the same spatial distribution.

  18. GREEN GALAXIES IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Zhizheng; Kong, Xu; Fan, Lulu, E-mail: panzz@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xkong@ustc.edu.cn [Center of Astrophysics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2013-10-10

    We present research on the morphologies, spectra, and environments of ≈2350 'green valley' galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the COSMOS field. The bimodality of dust-corrected NUV–r {sup +} color is used to define 'green valley'; it removes dusty star-forming galaxies from galaxies that are truly transitioning between the blue cloud and the red sequence. Morphological parameters of green galaxies are intermediate between those of blue and red galaxy populations, both on the Gini-asymmetry and the Gini-M{sub 20} planes. Approximately 60%-70% of green disk galaxies have intermediate or big bulges, and only 5%-10% are pure disk systems, based on morphological classification using the Zurich Estimator of Structural Types. The obtained average spectra of green galaxies are intermediate between blue and red ones in terms of [O II], Hα, and Hβ emission lines. Stellar population synthesis on the average spectra shows that green galaxies are on average older than blue galaxies but younger than red galaxies. Green galaxies and blue galaxies have similar projected galaxy density (Σ{sub 10}) distributions at z > 0.7. At z < 0.7, the fractions of M{sub *} < 10{sup 10.0} M{sub ☉} green galaxies located in a dense environment are found to be significantly larger than those of blue galaxies. The morphological and spectral properties of green galaxies are consistent with the transitioning population between the blue cloud and the red sequence. The possible mechanisms for quenching star formation activities in green galaxies are discussed. The importance of active galactic nucleus feedback cannot be well constrained in our study. Finally, our findings suggest that environmental conditions, most likely starvation and harassment, significantly affect the transformation of M{sub *} < 10{sup 10.0} M{sub ☉} blue galaxies into red galaxies, especially at z < 0.5.

  19. Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoversten, Erik A. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-10-01

    This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set (~ 105 galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy Hα equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M is Γ = 1.5 ± 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around Mr,0.1 = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has Mr,0.1 ~ -21) are well fit by a universal Γ ~ 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf galaxies is reported. These

  20. Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoversten, Erik A.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2007-10-01

    This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set ({approx} 10{sup 5} galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy H{alpha} equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M{sub {circle_dot}} is {Lambda} = 1.5 {+-} 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around M{sub r,0.1} = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has M{sub r,0.1} {approx} -21) are well fit by a universal {Lambda} {approx} 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf

  1. Star formation and the interstellar medium in low surface brightness galaxies III. Why they are blue, thin and poor in molecular gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, JPE; de Blok, WJG

    1999-01-01

    We present N-body simulations of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies and their Interstellar Medium to investigate the cause for their low star formation rates (SFR). Due to their massive halos, stellar disks of LSB galaxies are very stable and thin. Lack of dust makes the projected edge-on surface

  2. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blues The postpartum blues E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. Please enter a ... blues: Talk to your partner or a good friend about how you feel Get plenty of rest ...

  3. Broad-Band Imaging of a Large Sample of Irregular Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, D A; Hunter, Deidre A.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of UBV imaging of a large sample of irregular galaxies: 94 Im systems, 24 Blue Compact Dwarfs (BCDs), and 18 Sm galaxies. We also include JHK imaging of 41 of these galaxies. The sample spans a large range in galactic parameters. Ellipse fit axial ratios, inclinations, and position angles are derived, integrated photometry and azimuthally-averaged surface photometry profiles are determined, and exponential fits give the central surface brightnesses, scale lengths, and isophotal and half-power radii. These data are used to address the shapes of Im galaxies, look for clues to past interactions in large-scale peculiarities, examine the nature and consequences of bars, study color gradients and large-scale color variations, and compare the exponential disk profiles of the young and old stellar components. For example, color gradients exhibit a great variety and not all passbands are correlated. Bars are associated with higher star formation rates. Many irregulars show a double exponential r...

  4. HI in XMD Galaxies III. GMRT observations of BCG HS0822+3542

    CERN Document Server

    Chengalur, J N; Martin, J M; Kniazev, A Yu; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2006-01-01

    We present Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) HI 21-cm line data for the smallest known eXtremely Metal Deficient (XMD) blue compact galaxy (BCG) HS0822+3542. From HST imaging it has been suggested that HS0822+3542 actually consists of two still smaller (~ 100pc sized) ultra-compact dwarfs that are in the process of merging. The brighter of these two putative ultra compact dwarfs has an ocular appearance, similar to that seen in galaxies that have suffered a penetrating encounter with a smaller companion. From our HI imaging we find that the gas distribution and kinematics in this object are similar to that of other low mass galaxies, albeit with some evidence for tidal disturbance. On the other hand, the HI emission has an angular size ~25 times larger than that of the putative ultra-compact dwarfs. The optical emission is also offset from the centre of the HI emission. HS0822+3542 is located in the Lynx-Cancer void, but has a nearby companion LSB dwarf galaxy SAO0822+3545. In light of all this we also c...

  5. H1 in RSA galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, OTTO-G.

    1993-01-01

    The original Revised Shapley-Ames (RSA) galaxy sample of almost 1300 galaxies has been augmented with further bright galaxies from the RSA appendix as well as newer galaxy catalogs. A complete and homogeneous, strictly magnitude-limited all-sky sample of 2345 galaxies brighter than 13.4 in apparent blue magnitude was formed. New 21 cm H1 line observations for more than 600 RSA galaxies have been combined with all previously available H1 data from the literature. This new extentise data act allows detailed tests of widely accepted 'standard' reduction and analysis techniques.

  6. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. VI. The Kinematics of Ultra-compact Dwarfs and Globular Clusters in M87

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hong-Xin; Cote, Patrick; Liu, Chengze; Ferrarese, Laura; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Caldwell, Nelson; Gwyn, Stephen D J; Jordan, Andres; Lancon, Ariane; Li, Biao; Munoz, Roberto P; Puzia, Thomas H; Bekki, Kenji; Blakeslee, John; Boselli, Alessandro; Drinkwater, Michael J; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Durrell, Patrick; Emsellem, Eric; Firth, Peter; Sanchez-Janssen, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    The origin of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs)--objects larger and more massive than typical globular clusters (GCs), but more compact than typical dwarf galaxies--has been hotly debated in the 15 years since their discovery. Even whether UCDs should be considered galactic in origin, or simply the most extreme GCs, is not yet settled. We present the dynamical properties of 97 spectroscopically confirmed UCDs (rh >~10 pc) and 911 GCs associated with central cD galaxy of the Virgo cluster, M87. Our UCDs, of which 89% have M_star > ~2X10^6 M_sun and 92% are as blue as the classic blue GCs, nearly triple the sample of previous confirmed Virgo UCDs, providing by far the best opportunity for studying the global dynamics of a UCD system. We found that (1) UCDs have a surface number density profile that is shallower than that of the blue GCs in the inner ~ 70 kpc and as steep as that of the red GCs at larger radii; (2) UCDs exhibit a significantly stronger rotation than the GCs, and the blue GCs seem to have a velocity fi...

  7. Spectroscopic and photometric studies of low-metallicity star-forming dwarf galaxies. I. SBS 1129+576

    CERN Document Server

    Guseva, N G; Izotov, Yu I; Green, R F; Fricke, K J; Thuan, T X; Noeske, K G

    2003-01-01

    Spectroscopy and V,I CCD photometry of the dwarf irregular galaxy SBS 1129+576 are presented for the first time. The CCD images reveal a chain of compact H II regions within the elongated low-surface-brightness (LSB) component of the galaxy. Star formation takes place mainly in two high-surface-brightness H II regions. The mean (V-I) colour of the LSB component in the surface brightness interval between 23 and 26 mag/sq.arcsec is relatively blue ~0.56+/-0.03 mag, as compared to the (V-I)~0.9-1.0 for the majority of known dwarf irregular and blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies. Spectroscopy shows that the galaxy is among the most metal-deficient galaxies with an oxygen abundance 12+log(O/H)= 7.36+/-0.10 in the brightest H II region and 7.48+/-0.12 in the second brightest H II region, or 1/36 and 1/28 of the solar value, respectively. Hbeta and Halpha emission lines and Hdelta and Hgamma absorption lines are detected in a large part of the LSB component. We use two extinction-insensitive methods based on the equi...

  8. RemoveYoung: A tool for the removal of the young stellar component in galaxies within an adjustable age cutoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.

    2016-10-01

    The optical morphology of galaxies holds the cumulative record of their assembly history, and techniques for its quantitative characterization offer a promising avenue toward understanding galaxy formation and evolution. However, the morphology of star-forming galaxies is generally dictated by the youngest stellar component, which can readily overshine faint structural/morphological features in the older underlying stellar background (e.g., relics from recent minor mergers) that could hold important insights into the galaxy build-up process. Stripping off galaxy images from the emission from stellar populations younger than an adjustable age cutoff tcut can therefore provide a valuable tool in extragalactic research. RemoveYoung (), a publicly available tool that is presented here, exploits the combined power of integral field spectroscopy (IFS) and spectral population synthesis (SPS) toward this goal. Two-dimensional (2D) post-processing of SPS models to IFS data cubes with permits computation of the spectral energy, surface brightness, and stellar surface density distribution of stellar populations older than a user-defined tcut. This suggests a variety of applications of star-forming galaxies, such as interacting or merging galaxy pairs and lower mass starburst galaxies near and far; these include blue compact and tidal dwarf galaxies.

  9. ENHANCED WARM H{sub 2} EMISSION IN THE COMPACT GROUP MID-INFRARED ''GREEN VALLEY''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cluver, M. E.; Ogle, P.; Guillard, P. [Spitzer Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Appleton, P. N. [NASA Herschel S Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Jarrett, T. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Rasmussen, J. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Lisenfeld, U. [Departmento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada (Spain); Verdes-Montenegro, L. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA/CSIC), Apdo. 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Antonucci, R. [Department of Physics, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Bitsakis, T.; Charmandaris, V. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece); Boulanger, F. [Institute d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Universite Paris Sud 11, Orsay (France); Egami, E. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Xu, C. K. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Yun, M. S., E-mail: mcluver@aao.gov.au [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    We present results from a Spitzer mid-infrared spectroscopy study of a sample of 74 galaxies located in 23 Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs), chosen to be at a dynamically active stage of H I depletion. We find evidence for enhanced warm H{sub 2} emission (i.e., above that associated with UV excitation in star-forming regions) in 14 galaxies ({approx}20%), with 8 galaxies having extreme values of L(H{sub 2} S(0)-S(3))/L(7.7 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon), in excess of 0.07. Such emission has been seen previously in the compact group HCG 92 (Stephan's Quintet), and was shown to be associated with the dissipation of mechanical energy associated with a large-scale shock caused when one group member collided, at high velocity, with tidal debris in the intragroup medium. Similarly, shock excitation or turbulent heating is likely responsible for the enhanced H{sub 2} emission in the compact group galaxies, since other sources of heating (UV or X-ray excitation from star formation or active galactic nuclei) are insufficient to account for the observed emission. The group galaxies fall predominantly in a region of mid-infrared color-color space identified by previous studies as being connected to rapid transformations in HCG galaxy evolution. Furthermore, the majority of H{sub 2}-enhanced galaxies lie in the optical ''green valley'' between the blue cloud and red sequence, and are primarily early-type disk systems. We suggest that H{sub 2}-enhanced systems may represent a specific phase in the evolution of galaxies in dense environments and provide new insight into mechanisms which transform galaxies onto the optical red sequence.

  10. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Quality Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is team science? More than 75 years of solving problems ... delivery cause the postpartum blues. How can you manage the baby blues? The American College of Obstetricians ...

  11. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with this condition are happy most of the time. But compared to how she usually feels, the ... the "blues" usually lessens and goes away over time. What causes the baby blues? Medical experts believe ...

  12. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Postpartum care > The postpartum blues The postpartum blues E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. Please enter a valid e-mail address. Your information: Your recipient's information: Your ...

  13. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can you manage the baby blues? The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that women do ... can you manage the baby blues? The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that women do ...

  14. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Feels sad Feels confused The postpartum blues peak three to five days after delivery. They usually end ... Feels sad Feels confused The postpartum blues peak three to five days after delivery. They usually end ...

  15. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... postpartum blues The postpartum blues E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. Please enter ... hear about breakthroughs for babies and families. Ask a question Our health experts can answer questions about ...

  16. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medical experts believe that changes in the woman's hormones after delivery cause the postpartum blues. How can ... Medical experts believe that changes in the woman's hormones after delivery cause the postpartum blues. How can ...

  17. CARMA Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies (STING) II: Molecular Gas Star Formation Law and Depletion Time Across the Blue Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, Nurur; Xue, Rui; Wong, Tony; Leroy, Adam K; Walter, Fabian; Bigiel, Frank; Rosolowsky, Erik; Fisher, David B; Vogel, Stuart N; Blitz, Leo; West, Andrew A; Ott, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between molecular gas and current star formation rate surface density at sub-kpc and kpc scales in a sample of 14 nearby star-forming galaxies. Measuring the relationship in the bright, high molecular gas surface density ($\\Shtwo\\gtrsim$20 \\msunpc) regions of the disks to minimize the contribution from diffuse extended emission, we find an approximately linear relation between molecular gas and star formation rate surface density, $\

  18. Galaxies in the First Billion Years After the Big Bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Daniel P.

    2016-09-01

    In the past five years, deep imaging campaigns conducted with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based observatories have delivered large samples of galaxies at 6.5luminosity function becomes steeper (α≃‑2.0 at z≃7‑8), revealing a dominant population of low-luminosity galaxies. Analysis of multiwavelength imaging from HST and the Spitzer Space Telescope demonstrates that z>6 UV-selected galaxies are relatively compact with blue UV continuum slopes, low stellar masses, and large specific star formation rates. In the last year, ALMA (the Atacama Large Millimeter Array) and ground-based infrared spectrographs have begun to complement this picture, revealing minimal dust obscuration and hard radiation fields, and providing evidence for metal-poor ionized gas. Weak low-ionization absorption lines suggest a patchy distribution of neutral gas surrounds O and B stars, possibly aiding in the escape of ionizing radiation. Gamma ray burst afterglows and Lyman-α surveys have provided evidence that the intergalactic medium (IGM) evolves from mostly ionized at z≃6‑6.5 ([Formula: see text]) to considerably neutral at z≃7‑8 ([Formula: see text]). The reionization history that emerges from considering the UV output of galaxies over 6luminosity function extends ≃4 mag below current surveys and a moderate fraction ([Formula: see text]) of ionizing radiation escapes from galaxies.

  19. Amazing Andromeda Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The many 'personalities' of our great galactic neighbor, the Andromeda galaxy, are exposed in this new composite image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Spitzer Space Telescope. The wide, ultraviolet eyes of Galaxy Evolution Explorer reveal Andromeda's 'fiery' nature -- hotter regions brimming with young and old stars. In contrast, Spitzer's super-sensitive infrared eyes show Andromeda's relatively 'cool' side, which includes embryonic stars hidden in their dusty cocoons. Galaxy Evolution Explorer detected young, hot, high-mass stars, which are represented in blue, while populations of relatively older stars are shown as green dots. The bright yellow spot at the galaxy's center depicts a particularly dense population of old stars. Swaths of red in the galaxy's disk indicate areas where Spitzer found cool, dusty regions where stars are forming. These stars are still shrouded by the cosmic clouds of dust and gas that collapsed to form them. Together, Galaxy Evolution Explorer and Spitzer complete the picture of Andromeda's swirling spiral arms. Hints of pinkish purple depict regions where the galaxy's populations of hot, high-mass stars and cooler, dust-enshrouded stars co-exist. Located 2.5 million light-years away, the Andromeda is our largest nearby galactic neighbor. The galaxy's entire disk spans about 260,000 light-years, which means that a light beam would take 260,000 years to travel from one end of the galaxy to the other. By comparison, our Milky Way galaxy's disk is about 100,000 light-years across. This image is a false color composite comprised of data from Galaxy Evolution Explorer's far-ultraviolet detector (blue), near-ultraviolet detector (green), and Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer at 24 microns (red).

  20. Mid-Infrared Colors of Dwarf Galaxies: Young Starbursts Mimicking Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Hainline, Kevin N; Greene, Jenny E; Stern, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Searching for active galactic nuclei (AGN) in dwarf galaxies is important for our understanding of the seed black holes that formed in the early Universe. Here, we test infrared selection methods for AGN activity at low galaxy masses. Our parent sample consists of ~18,000 nearby dwarf galaxies (M*< 3 x 10^9 Msun, $z<0.055$) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with significant detections in the first three bands of the AllWISE data release from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). First, we demonstrate that the majority of optically-selected AGNs in dwarf galaxies are not selected as AGNs using WISE infrared color diagnostics and that the infrared emission is dominated by the host galaxies. We then investigate the infrared properties of optically-selected star-forming dwarf galaxies, finding that the galaxies with the reddest infrared colors are the most compact, with blue optical colors, young stellar ages and large specific star formation rates. These results indicate that great care must be tak...

  1. SXDF-ALMA 1.5 arcmin2 Deep Survey: A Compact Dusty Star-forming Galaxy at z = 2.5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Kohno, Kotaro; Kodama, Tadayuki; Ikarashi, Soh; Aretxaga, Itziar; Berta, Stefano; Caputi, Karina I.; Dunlop, James S.; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hayashi, Masao; Hughes, David H.; Ivison, Rob; Izumi, Takuma; Koyama, Yusei; Lutz, Dieter; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Tamura, Yoichi; Umehata, Hideki; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W.; Wuyts, Stijn; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Yun, Min S.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first results from the SXDF-Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 1.5 arcmin2 deep survey at 1.1 mm using ALMA. The map reaches a 1σ depth of 55 μJy/beam and covers 12 Hα-selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at z = 2.19 or z = 2.53. We have detected continuum emission f

  2. Ultra-Compact Dwarfs around NGC 3258 in Antlia

    CERN Document Server

    Caso, Juan Pablo; Richtler, T; Castelli, A V Smith; Faifer, Favio; 10.1093/mnras/sts687

    2013-01-01

    We present the first compact stellar systems with luminosities in the range of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs), discovered in the Antlia galaxy cluster (-10.5 < M_V < -11.6). The magnitude limit between UCDs and globular clusters (CGs) is discussed. By means of imaging from VLT (FORS1), CTIO (MOSAIC), and the HST (ACS) archive, eleven UCDs/bright GCs are selected on the basis of photometry and confirmed as Antlia members through radial velocities measured on new GEMINI (GMOS-S) spectra. In addition, nine UCD candidates are identified taking into account properties derived from their surface brightness profiles. All of them, members and candidates, are located in the proximity of NGC\\,3258, one of the two brightest elliptical galaxies in the cluster core. Antlia UCDs in this sample present absolute magnitudes fainter than M_V ~ -11.6 mag and most of them have colours within the blue GC range, falling only two within the red GC range. Effective radii measured for the ones lying on the ACS field are in the ran...

  3. CARMA SURVEY TOWARD INFRARED-BRIGHT NEARBY GALAXIES (STING). II. MOLECULAR GAS STAR FORMATION LAW AND DEPLETION TIME ACROSS THE BLUE SEQUENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Fisher, David B.; Vogel, Stuart N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Xue Rui; Wong, Tony [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institute fur Astronomie, Heidelberg (Germany); Bigiel, Frank [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rosolowsky, Erik [I. K. Barber School of the Arts and Science, University of British-Columbia, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Blitz, Leo [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); West, Andrew A. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Ott, Juergen, E-mail: nurur@astro.umd.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2012-02-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between molecular gas and current star formation rate surface density at sub-kiloparsec and kiloparsec scales in a sample of 14 nearby star-forming galaxies. Measuring the relationship in the bright, high molecular gas surface density ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}>20 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}) regions of the disks to minimize the contribution from diffuse extended emission, we find an approximately linear relation between molecular gas and star formation rate surface density, N{sub mol} {approx} 0.96 {+-} 0.16, with a molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sup mol}{sub dep} {approx} 2.30 {+-} 1.32 Gyr. We show that in the molecular regions of our galaxies there are no clear correlations between {tau}{sup mol}{sub dep} and the free-fall and effective Jeans dynamical times throughout the sample. We do not find strong trends in the power-law index of the spatially resolved molecular gas star formation law or the molecular gas depletion time across the range of galactic stellar masses sampled (M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 9.7}-10{sup 11.5} M{sub Sun }). There is a trend, however, in global measurements that is particularly marked for low-mass galaxies. We suggest that this trend is probably due to the low surface brightness CO J = 1-0, and it is likely associated with changes in CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor.

  4. Green galaxies in the COSMOS field

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Zhizheng; Fan, Lulu

    2013-01-01

    We present a research of morphologies, spectra and environments of $\\approx$ 2350 "green valley" galaxies at $0.20.7$. At $z<0.7$, the fractions of $M_{\\ast}<10^{10.0}M_{\\sun}$ green galaxies located in dense environment are found to be significantly larger than those of blue galaxies. The morphological and spectral properties of green galaxies are consistent with the transiting population between blue cloud and red sequence. The possible mechanisms for quenching star formation activities in green galaxies are discussed. The importance of AGN feedback cannot be well constrained in our study. Finally, our findings suggest that environment conditions, most likely starvation and harassment, significantly affect the transformation of $M_{\\ast}<10^{10.0}M_{\\sun}$ blue galaxies into red galaxies, especially at $z<0.5$.

  5. Pox 186: an ultracompact galaxy with dominant ionized gas emission

    CERN Document Server

    Guseva, N G; Izotov, Yu I; Noeske, K G; Fricke, K J

    2004-01-01

    We present a ground-based optical spectroscopic and HST U, V, I photometric study of the blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy Pox 186. It is found that the emission of the low-surface brightness (LSB) component in Pox 186 at radii 3'' the light of the LSB component is contaminated by the emission of background galaxies complicating the study of the outermost regions. The surface brightness distribution in the LSB component can be approximated by an exponential law with a scale length alpha < 120 pc. This places Pox 186 among the most compact dwarf galaxies known. The derived alpha is likely to be an upper limit to the scale length of the LSB component because of the strong contribution of the gaseous emission. The oxygen abundance in the bright HII region derived from the 4.5m Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) and 3.6m ESO telescope spectra are 12+log(O/H)= 7.76+/-0.02 and 7.74+/-0.01 (~ Zsun/15), respectively, in accordance with previous determinations. The helium mass fractions found in this region are Y=0.248...

  6. Dust and star-formation properties of a complete sample of local galaxies drawn from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Clemens, M S; De Zotti, G; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J; Bonavera, L; Cosco, G; Guarese, G; Boaretto, L; Salucci, P; Baccigalupi, C; Clements, D L; Danese, L; Lapi, A; Mandolesi, N; Partridge, R B; Perrotta, F; Serjeant, S; Scott, D; Toffolatti, L

    2013-01-01

    We combine Planck HFI data at 857, 545, 353 & 217GHz with data from WISE, Spitzer, IRAS & Herschel to investigate the properties of a flux limited sample of local star-forming galaxies. A 545GHz flux density limit was chosen so that the sample is 80% complete at this frequency, giving a sample of 234 local galaxies. We investigate the dust emission and star formation properties of the sample via various models & calculate the local dust mass function. Although 1-component modified black bodies fit the dust emission longward of 80um very well (median beta=1.83) the degeneracy between dust temp & beta also means that the SEDs are very well described by a dust emissivity index fixed at beta=2 and 10

  7. Do AGN suppress star formation in early-type galaxies?

    OpenAIRE

    Schawinski, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The observation that AGN host galaxies preferentially inhabit the "green valley" between the blue cloud and the red sequence has significant consequences for our understanding of the co-evolution of galaxies and black holes via accretion events. I discuss the interpretation of green valley AGN host galaxy colours with particular focus on early-type galaxies.

  8. Ecology of blue straggler stars

    CERN Document Server

    Carraro, Giovanni; Beccari, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    The existence of blue straggler stars, which appear younger, hotter, and more massive than their siblings, is at odds with a simple picture of stellar evolution. Such stars should have exhausted their nuclear fuel and evolved long ago to become cooling white dwarfs. They are found to exist in globular clusters, open clusters, dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group, OB associations and as field stars. This book summarises the many advances in observational and theoretical work dedicated to blue straggler stars. Carefully edited extended contributions by well-known experts in the field cover all the relevant aspects of blue straggler stars research: Observations of blue straggler stars in their various environments; Binary stars and formation channels; Dynamics of globular clusters; Interpretation of observational data and comparison with models. The book also offers an introductory chapter on stellar evolution written by the editors of the book.

  9. An Active Black Hole in a Compact Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    A new type of galaxy has just been added to the galaxy zoo: a small, compact, and old elliptical galaxy that shows signs of a monster black hole actively accreting material in its center. What can this unusual discovery tell us about how compact elliptical galaxies form?A New Galactic BeastCompact elliptical galaxies are an extremely rare early-type dwarf galaxy. Consistent with their name, compact ellipticals are small, very compact collections of ancient stars; these galaxies exhibit a high surface brightness and arent actively forming stars.Optical view of the ancient compact elliptical galaxy SDSS J085431.18+173730.5 (center of image) in an SDSS color composite image. [Adapted from Paudel et al. 2016]Most compact ellipticals are found in dense environments, particularly around massive galaxies. This has led astronomers to believe that compact ellipticals might form via the tidal stripping of a once-large galaxy in interactions with another, massive galaxy. In this model, once the original galaxys outer layers are stripped away, the compact inner bulge component would be left behind as a compact elliptical galaxy. Recent discoveries of a few isolated compact ellipticals, however, have strained this model.Now a new galaxy has been found to confuse our classification schemes: the first-ever compact elliptical to also display signs of an active galactic nucleus. Led by Sanjaya Paudel (Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute), a team of scientists discovered SDSS J085431.18+173730.5 serendipitously in Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. The team used SDSS images and spectroscopy in combination with data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope to learn more about this unique galaxy.Puzzling CharacteristicsSDSS J085431.18+173730.5 presents an interesting conundrum. Ancient compact ellipticals are supposed to be devoid of gas, with no fuel left to trigger nuclear activity. Yet SDSS J085431.18+173730.5 clearly shows the emission lines that indicate active accretion onto

  10. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Galaxy colour gradients versus colour, structure and luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Häußler, Boris; Brough, Sarah; Holwerda, Benne; Hopkins, Andrew M; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    Using single-component fits to SDSS/UKIDSS images of galaxies in the G09 region of the GAMA survey we study radial colour gradients across the galaxy population. We use the multiwavelength information provided by MegaMorph analysis of galaxy light profiles to calculate intrinsic colour gradients, and divide into six subsamples split by overall S\\'{e}rsic index ($n$) and galaxy colour. We find a bimodality in the colour gradients of high- and low-$n$ galaxies in all wavebands, which varies with overall galaxy luminosity. Global trends in colour gradients therefore result from combining the contrasting behaviour of a number of different galaxy populations. The ubiquity of strong negative colour gradients supports the picture of inside-out growth through gas accretion for blue, low-$n$ galaxies, and through dry minor mergers for red, high-$n$ galaxies. An exception is the blue high-n population, with properties indicative of dissipative major mergers.

  11. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Galaxy colour gradients versus colour, structure, and luminosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Bamford, Steven P.; Häußler, Boris; Brough, Sarah; Holwerda, Benne; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-09-01

    Using single-component fits to SDSS/UKIDSS images of galaxies in the G09 region of the GAMA survey we study radial colour gradients across the galaxy population. We use the multi-wavelength information provided by MegaMorph analysis of galaxy light profiles to calculate intrinsic colour gradients, and divide into six subsamples split by overall Sérsic index (n) and galaxy colour. We find a bimodality in the colour gradients of high- and low-n galaxies in all wavebands which varies with overall galaxy luminosity. Global trends in colour gradients therefore result from combining the contrasting behaviour of a number of different galaxy populations. The ubiquity of strong negative colour gradients supports the picture of inside-out growth through gas accretion for blue, low-n galaxies, and through dry minor mergers for red, high-n galaxies. An exception is the blue high-n population which has properties indicative of dissipative major mergers.

  12. Kind of Blue - Europa Blues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Tore; Kirkegaard, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Bidraget reflekterer over sammenhænge mellem to værker fra det musikalske og litterære område. Det drejer sig om Miles Davis' Kind of Blue fra 1959 og Arne Dahls krimi, Europa Blues fra 2001. Den grundlæggende indfaldsvinkel er det performative, den frie, men samtidigt disciplinerede musikalske...

  13. Backwards Spiral Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have found a spiral galaxy that may rotate in the opposite direction from what was expected. A picture of the oddball galaxy is available at http://heritage.stsci.edu or http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/03 or http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . It was taken in May 2001 by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The picture showed which side of galaxy NGC 4622 is closer to Earth; that information helped astronomers determine that the galaxy may be spinning clockwise. The image shows NGC 4622 and its outer pair of winding arms full of new stars, shown in blue. Astronomers are puzzled by the clockwise rotation because of the direction the outer spiral arms are pointing. Most spiral galaxies have arms of gas and stars that trail behind as they turn. But this galaxy has two 'leading' outer arms that point toward the direction of the galaxy's clockwise rotation. NGC 4622 also has a 'trailing' inner arm that is wrapped around the galaxy in the opposite direction. Based on galaxy simulations, a team of astronomers had expected that the galaxy was turning counterclockwise. NGC 4622 is a rare example of a spiral galaxy with arms pointing in opposite directions. Astronomers suspect this oddity was caused by the interaction of NGC 4622 with another galaxy. Its two outer arms are lopsided, meaning that something disturbed it. The new Hubble image suggests that NGC 4622 consumed a smaller companion galaxy. Galaxies, which consist of stars, gas, and dust, rotate very slowly. Our Sun, one of many stars in our Milky Way galaxy, completes a circuit around the Milky Way every 250 million years. NGC 4622 lies 111 million light-years away in the direction of the constellation Centaurus. The science team, consisting of Drs. Ron Buta and Gene Byrd from the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, and Tarsh Freeman of Bevill State Community College in Alabama

  14. Multi-wavelength study of 14000 star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Izotov, Y I; Fricke, K J; Henkel, C

    2013-01-01

    (abridged) We studied a large sample of ~14000 dwarf star-forming galaxies with strong emission lines selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and distributed in the redshift range of z~0-0.6. We modelled spectral energy distributions (SED) of all galaxies which were based on the SDSS spectra in the visible range of 0.38-0.92 micron and included both the stellar and ionised gas emission. These SEDs were extrapolated to the UV and mid-infrared ranges to cover the wavelength range of 0.1-22 micron. The SDSS spectroscopic data were supplemented by photometric data from the GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, IRAS, and NVSS all-sky surveys. We derived global characteristics of the galaxies, such as their element abundances, luminosities, and stellar masses. The luminosities and stellar masses range within the sample over ~5 orders of magnitude, thereby linking low-mass and low-luminosity blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies to luminous galaxies, which are similar to high-redshift Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). The lumi...

  15. The Tully-Fisher Relation as a Measure of Luminosity Evolution A Low Redshift Baseline for Evolving Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, E J; Bromley, B C; Van Zee, L; Kenyon, S J; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Geller, Margaret J.; Bromley, Benjamin C.; Zee, Liese van; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2001-01-01

    We use optical rotation curves to investigate the R-band Tully-Fisher properties of a sample of 90 spiral galaxies in close pairs. The galaxies follow the Tully-Fisher relation remarkably well, with the exception of eight distinct 3-sigma outliers. Although most of the outliers show signs of recent star formation, gasdynamical effects are probably the dominant cause of their anomalous Tully-Fisher properties. Four outliers with small emission line widths have very centrally concentrated line emission and truncated rotation curves; the central emission indicates recent gas infall after a close galaxy-galaxy pass. These four galaxies may be local counterparts to compact, blue galaxies at intermediate redshift. The remaining galaxies have a negligible offset from the reference Tully-Fisher relation, but a shallower slope (2.6-sigma significance) and a 25% larger scatter. We characterize the non-outlier sample with measures of distortion and star formation to search for third parameter dependence in the residuals...

  16. Inclination-Independent Galaxy Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Bailin, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    We present a new method to classify galaxies from large surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using inclination-corrected concentration, inclination-corrected location on the color-magnitude diagram, and apparent axis ratio. Explicitly accounting for inclination tightens the distribution of each of these parameters and enables simple boundaries to be drawn that delineate three different galaxy populations: Early-type galaxies, which are red, highly concentrated, and round; Late-type galaxies, which are blue, have low concentrations, and are disk dominated; and Intermediate-type galaxies, which are red, have intermediate concentrations, and have disks. We have validated our method by comparing to visual classifications of high-quality imaging data from the Millennium Galaxy Catalogue. The inclination correction is crucial to unveiling the previously unrecognized Intermediate class. Intermediate-type galaxies, roughly corresponding to lenticulars and early spirals, lie on the red sequence. The red sequence ...

  17. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... leader Partner Spotlight Become a partner World Prematurity Day Your support helps babies We are determined to ... confused The postpartum blues peak three to five days after delivery. They usually end by the tenth ...

  18. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Saving Just a moment, please. You've saved this page It's been added to your dashboard . After ... blues" is not really correct since women with this condition are happy most of the time. But ...

  19. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dashboard . After the baby is born, many new mothers have the postpartum blues (also called the baby ... compared to how she usually feels, the new mother: Is more irritable Cries more easily Feels sad ...

  20. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for your baby Feeding your baby Common illnesses New parents Family health & safety Complications & Loss Pregnancy complications ... your dashboard . After the baby is born, many new mothers have the postpartum blues (also called the ...

  1. Localized Eruptive Blue Nevi after Herpes Zoster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Fany; Arrese, Jorge E.; Nikkels, Arjen F.

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old White man presented with a dozen small, well-restricted, punctiform, asymptomatic, blue-gray macules on the left shoulder. A few months earlier, he had been treated with oral acyclovir for herpes zoster (HZ) affecting the left C7–C8 dermatomes. All the blue macules appeared over a short period of time and then remained stable. The patient had not experienced any previous trauma or had tattooing in this anatomical region. The clinical diagnosis suggested blue nevi. Dermatoscopy revealed small, well-limited, dark-blue, compact, homogeneous areas evoking dermal blue nevi. An excisional biopsy was performed and the histological examination confirmed a blue nevus. As far as we are aware of, this is the first report of eruptive blue nevi following HZ, and it should be included in the differential diagnosis of zosteriform dermatoses responding to an isotopic pathway. In addition, a brief review concerning eruptive nevi is presented. PMID:27462219

  2. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. X. PROPERTIES OF ULTRA-COMPACT DWARFS IN THE M87, M49, AND M60 REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chengze [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hong-Xin [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen; Blakeslee, John P. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Jordán, Andrés; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Puzia, Thomas H. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Mihos, J. Christopher [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lançon, Ariane [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg and CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l’Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [CEA/IRFU/SAp, Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CNRS/INSU, Université Paris Diderot, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Boselli, Alessandro [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Durrell, Patrick R., E-mail: czliu@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: peng@pku.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); and others

    2015-10-10

    We use imaging from the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS) to present a comparative study of ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies associated with three prominent Virgo sub-clusters: those centered on the massive red-sequence galaxies M87, M49, and M60. We show how UCDs can be selected with high completeness using a combination of half-light radius and location in color–color diagrams (u*iK{sub s} or u*gz). Although the central galaxies in each of these sub-clusters have nearly identical luminosities and stellar masses, we find large differences in the sizes of their UCD populations, with M87 containing ∼3.5 and 7.8 times more UCDs than M49 and M60, respectively. The relative abundance of UCDs in the three regions scales in proportion to sub-cluster mass, as traced by X-ray gas mass, total gravitating mass, number of globular clusters (GCs), and number of nearby galaxies. We find that the UCDs are predominantly blue in color, with ∼85% of the UCDs having colors similar to blue GCs and stellar nuclei of dwarf galaxies. We present evidence that UCDs surrounding M87 and M49 may follow a morphological sequence ordered by the prominence of their outer, low surface brightness envelope, ultimately merging with the sequence of nucleated low-mass galaxies, and that envelope prominence correlates with distance from either galaxy. Our analysis provides evidence that tidal stripping of nucleated galaxies is an important process in the formation of UCDs.

  3. Hubble Deep Fever A faint galaxy diagnosis

    CERN Document Server

    Driver, S P

    1998-01-01

    The longstanding faint blue galaxy problem is gradually subsiding as a result of technological advancement, most notably from high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging. In particular two categorical facts have recently been established, these are: 1) The excess faint blue galaxies are of irregular morphologies, and, 2) the majority of these irregulars occur at redshifts 1 2. Taking these facts together we favour a scenario where the faint blue excess is primarily due to the formation epoch of spiral systems via merging at redshifts 1 < z < 2. The final interpretation now awaits refinements in our understanding of the local galaxy population !

  4. HST/WFPC2 Imaging of the QDOT Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Farrah, D; Oliver, S; Serjeant, S; Borne, K; Lawrence, A; Lucas, R A; Bushouse, H; Colina, L

    2001-01-01

    We present HST WFPC2 V band imaging for 23 Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies taken from the QDOT redshift survey. The fraction of sources observed to be interacting is 87%. Most of the merging systems show a number of compact `knots', whose colour and brightness differ substantially from their immediate surroundings. Colour maps for nine of the objects show a non-uniform colour structure. Features include blue regions located towards the centres of merging systems which are likely to be areas of enhanced star formation, and compact red regions which are likely to be dust shrouded starbursts or AGN. The host galaxies of the QSOs in the sample were found to be either interacting systems or ellipticals. Our data shows no evidence that ULIRGs are a simple transition stage between galaxy mergers and QSOs. We propose an alternative model for ULIRGs based on the morphologies in our sample and previous N-body simulations. Under this model ULIRGs as a class are much more diverse than a simple transition between galaxy m...

  5. HUBBLE REVEALS 'BACKWARDS' SPIRAL GALAXY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Astronomers have found a spiral galaxy that may be spinning to the beat of a different cosmic drummer. To the surprise of astronomers, the galaxy, called NGC 4622, appears to be rotating in the opposite direction to what they expected. Pictures by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope helped astronomers determine that the galaxy may be spinning clockwise by showing which side of the galaxy is closer to Earth. A Hubble telescope photo of the oddball galaxy is this month's Hubble Heritage offering. The image shows NGC 4622 and its outer pair of winding arms full of new stars [shown in blue]. Astronomers are puzzled by the clockwise rotation because of the direction the outer spiral arms are pointing. Most spiral galaxies have arms of gas and stars that trail behind as they turn. But this galaxy has two 'leading' outer arms that point toward the direction of the galaxy's clockwise rotation. To add to the conundrum, NGC 4622 also has a 'trailing' inner arm that is wrapped around the galaxy in the opposite direction it is rotating. Based on galaxy simulations, a team of astronomers had expected that the galaxy was turning counterclockwise. NGC 4622 is a rare example of a spiral galaxy with arms pointing in opposite directions. What caused this galaxy to behave differently from most galaxies? Astronomers suspect that NGC 4622 interacted with another galaxy. Its two outer arms are lopsided, meaning that something disturbed it. The new Hubble image suggests that NGC 4622 consumed a small companion galaxy. The galaxy's core provides new evidence for a merger between NGC 4622 and a smaller galaxy. This information could be the key to understanding the unusual leading arms. Galaxies, which consist of stars, gas, and dust, rotate very slowly. Our Sun, one of many stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, completes a circuit around the Milky Way every 250 million years. NGC 4622 resides 111 million light-years away in the constellation Centaurus. The pictures were taken in May 2001 with Hubble

  6. THE OPTICAL GREEN VALLEY VERSUS MID-INFRARED CANYON IN COMPACT GROUPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Lisa May; Butterfield, Natalie; Johnson, Kelsey; Zucker, Catherine [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Gallagher, Sarah [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Konstantopoulos, Iraklis [Australian Astronomical Observatory, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Zabludoff, Ann [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis [Laboratory for X-Ray Astrophysics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Charlton, Jane C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide conditions similar to those experienced by galaxies in the earlier universe. Recent work on compact groups has led to the discovery of a dearth of mid-infrared transition galaxies (MIRTGs) in Infrared Array Camera (3.6-8.0 μm) color space as well as at intermediate specific star formation rates. However, we find that in compact groups these MIRTGs have already transitioned to the optical ([g–r]) red sequence. We investigate the optical color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of 99 compact groups containing 348 galaxies and compare the optical CMD with mid-infrared (mid-IR) color space for compact group galaxies. Utilizing redshifts available from Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we identified new galaxy members for four groups. By combining optical and mid-IR data, we obtain information on both the dust and the stellar populations in compact group galaxies. We also compare with more isolated galaxies and galaxies in the Coma Cluster, which reveals that, similar to clusters, compact groups are dominated by optically red galaxies. While we find that compact group transition galaxies lie on the optical red sequence, LVL+SINGS mid-IR transition galaxies span the range of optical colors. The dearth of mid-IR transition galaxies in compact groups may be due to a lack of moderately star-forming low mass galaxies; the relative lack of these galaxies could be due to their relatively small gravitational potential wells. This makes them more susceptible to this dynamic environment, thus causing them to more easily lose gas or be accreted by larger members.

  7. The Environment of Galaxies at Low Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Ivezic, Nicolas B Cowan Zeljko

    2008-01-01

    We compare environmental effects in two analogous samples of galaxies, one from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the other from a semi-analytic model (SAM) based on the Millennium Simulation (MS), to test to what extent current SAMs of galaxy formation are reproducing environmental effects. We estimate the large-scale environment of each galaxy using a Bayesian density estimator based on distances to all ten nearest neighbors and compare broad-band photometric properties of the two samples as a function of environment. The feedbacks implemented in the semi-analytic model produce a qualitatively correct galaxy population with similar environmental dependence as that seen in SDSS galaxies. In detail, however, the colors of MS galaxies exhibit an exaggerated dependence on environment: the field contains too many blue galaxies while clusters contain too many red galaxies, compared to the SDSS sample. We also find that the MS contains a population of highly clustered, relatively faint red galaxies with velo...

  8. Blue gods, blue oil, and blue people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, V F

    1994-09-01

    Studies of the composition of coal tar, which began in Prussia in 1834, profoundly affected the economies of Germany, Great Britain, India, and the rest of the world, as well as medicine and surgery. Such effects include the collapse of the profits of the British indigo monopoly, the growth in economic power of Germany based on coal tar chemistry, and an economic crisis in India that led to more humane tax laws and, ultimately, the independence of India and the end of the British Empire. Additional consequences were the development of antiseptic surgery and the synthesis of a wide variety of useful drugs that have eradicated infections and alleviated pain. Many of these drugs, particularly the commonly used analgesics, sulfonamides, sulfones, and local anesthetics, are derivatives of aniline, originally called "blue oil" or "kyanol." Some of these aniline derivatives, however, have also caused aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis, and methemoglobinemia (that is, "blue people"). Exposure to aniline drugs, particularly when two or three aniline drugs are taken concurrently, seems to be the commonest cause of methemoglobinemia today. PMID:8065194

  9. Compact groups in theory and practice - I. The spatial properties of compact groups

    CERN Document Server

    McConnachie, Alan W; Patton, David R

    2008-01-01

    We use a mock galaxy catalogue based upon the Millennium Run simulation to investigate the intrinsic spatial properties of compact groups of galaxies. We find that approximately 30% of galaxy associations identified in our mock catalogue are physically dense systems of four or more galaxies with no interlopers, approximately half are close associations of 2, 3 or 4 galaxies with one or more interlopers, and the remainder are not physically dense. Genuine compact groups are preferentially brighter and more isolated than those with interlopers; by increasing the required minimum surface brightness of a group from the canonical value of 26mags/arcsec^2 to 22mags/arcsec^2, we can increase the proportion of genuinely compact systems identified with no interlopers from 29% to 75%. Of the genuine compact groups identified, more than half consist of a single dark matter halo with all the member galaxies deeply embedded within it. In some cases, there are other galaxies which share the same halo (typically with mass ~...

  10. Chemical Pollution and Evolution of Massive Starbursts: Cleaning up the Environment in Star-Forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobulnicky, C.

    1996-12-01

    I present the results of a research program seeking to characterize the impact of massive star-clusters on the chemical and dynamical evolution of metal-poor, irregular and blue compact galaxies. The evolution of high mass stars is thought to contribute the bulk of heavy element enrichment in the interstellar medium, especially alpha -process elements like O, Si, etc. Yet, in actively star-forming galaxies, localized chemical inhomogeneities are seldom observed. Spatially-resolved optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based observatories is used to search for chemical enrichment in the vicinity of young star clusters in nearby galaxies. VLA aperture synthesis maps are used to examine the neutral hydrogen content, dynamics, and local environment of the sample galaxies. Despite the spread in evolutionary state of the starbursts determined by the EW of Balmer emission lines and the radio continuum spectral index, few instances of localized enrichment are found. In light of these data, the ``instantaneous enrichment'' scenario for extragalactic HII regions appears less probable than one which operates on long timescales and global spatial scales. The results are consistent with the idea that starburst driven winds expel freshly synthesized metals in a hot 10(6) K phase into the halos of galaxies where they cool, condense into globules, and mix homogeneously with the rest of the galaxy on long (dynamical) timescales. The C/O and N/O ratios of the galaxies are used as new tools for measuring the recent star formation history. Implications for chemical evolution of galaxies both locally and cosmologically are developed.

  11. High resolution spectroscopy of the BCD galaxy Haro 15: II. Chemodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hagele, Guillermo F; Bosch, Guillermo; Diaz, Angeles I; Morrell, Nidia

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the physical properties of the nebular material in four star-forming knots of the blue compact dwarf galaxy Haro 15. Using long-slit and echelle spectroscopy obtained at Las Campanas Observatory, we study the physical conditions (electron density and temperatures), ionic and total chemical abundances of several atoms, reddening and ionization structure, for the global flux and for the different kinematical components. The latter was derived by comparing the oxygen and sulphur ionic ratios to their corresponding observed emission line ratios (the $\\eta$ and $\\eta$' plots) in different regions of the galaxy. Applying the direct method or empirical relationships for abundance determination, we perform a comparative analysis between these regions. The similarities found in the ionization structure of the different kinematical components implies that the effective temperatures of the ionizing radiation fields are very similar in spite of some small differences in the ionization state...

  12. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. X. Properties of Ultra-Compact Dwarfs in the M87, M49 and M60 Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chengze; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Jordan, Andres; Mihos, J Christopher; Zhang, Hong-Xin; Munoz, Roberto P; Puzia, Thomas H; Lancon, Ariane; Gwyn, Stephen; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Blakeslee, John P; Boselli, Alessandro; Durrell, Patrick R; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Guhathakurta, Puragra; MacArthur, Lauren A; Mei, Simona; Sanchez-Janssen, Ruben; Xu, Haiguang

    2015-01-01

    We use imaging from the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS) to present a comparative study of ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies associated with three prominent Virgo sub-clusters: those centered on the massive, red-sequence galaxies M87, M49 and M60. We show how UCDs can be selected with high completeness using a combination of half-light radius and location in color-color diagrams ($u^*iK_s$ or $u^*gz$). Although the central galaxies in each of these sub-clusters have nearly identical luminosities and stellar masses, we find large differences in the sizes of their UCD populations, with M87 containing ~3.5 and 7.8 times more UCDs than M49 and M60, respectively. The relative abundance of UCDs in the three regions scales in proportion to sub-cluster mass, as traced by X-ray gas mass, total gravitating mass, number of globular clusters, and number of nearby galaxies. We find that the UCDs are predominantly blue in color, with ~85% of the UCDs having colors similar to blue GCs and stellar nuclei of dwarf...

  13. The growth of the central region by acquisition of counter-rotating gas in star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yan-Mei; Tremonti, Christy A; Bershady, Matt; Merrifield, Michael; Emsellem, Eric; Jin, Yi-Fei; Huang, Song; Fu, Hai; Wake, David A; Bundy, Kevin; Stark, David; Lin, Lihwai; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Bergmann, Thaisa Storchi; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brownstein, Joel; Bureau, Martin; Chisholm, John; Drory, Niv; Guo, Qi; Hao, Lei; Hu, Jian; Li, Cheng; Li, Ran; Lopes, Alexandre Roman; Pan, Kai-Ke; Riffel, Rogemar A; Thomas, Daniel; Wang, Lan; Westfall, Kyle; Yan, Ren-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Galaxies grow through both internal and external processes. In about 10% of nearby red galaxies with little star formation, gas and stars are counter-rotating, demonstrating the importance of external gas acquisition in these galaxies. However, systematic studies of such phenomena in blue, star-forming galaxies are rare, leaving uncertain the role of external gas acquisition in driving evolution of blue galaxies. Based on new measurements with integral field spectroscopy of a large representative galaxy sample, we find an appreciable fraction of counter-rotators among blue galaxies (9 out of 489 galaxies). The central regions of blue counter-rotators show younger stellar populations and more intense, ongoing star formation than their outer parts, indicating ongoing growth of the central regions. The result offers observational evidence that the acquisition of external gas in blue galaxies is possible; the interaction with pre-existing gas funnels the gas into nuclear regions (< 1 kpc) to form new stars.

  14. Where are compact groups in the local Universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Gimenez, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to perform a statistical analysis of the location of compact groups in the Universe from observational and semi-analytical points of view. We used the velocity-filtered compact group sample extracted from the Two Micron All Sky Survey for our analysis. We also used a new sample of galaxy groups identified in the 2M++ galaxy redshift catalogue as tracers of the large-scale structure. We defined a procedure to search in redshift space for compact groups that can be considered embedded in other overdense systems and applied this criterion to several possible combinations of different compact and galaxy group subsamples. We also performed similar analyses for simulated compact and galaxy groups identified in a 2M++ mock galaxy catalogue constructed from the Millennium Run Simulation I plus a semi-analytical model of galaxy formation. We observed that only $\\sim27\\%$ of the compact groups can be considered to be embedded in larger overdense systems, that is, most of the compact groups a...

  15. Ultraviolet ISM Diagnostics for Star-Forming Galaxies I. Tracers of Metallicity and Extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Zetterlund, Erika; Leitherer, Claus; Danforth, Charles W

    2015-01-01

    We have observed a sample of 14 nearby ($z \\sim 0.03$) star-forming blue compact galaxies in the rest-frame far-UV ($\\sim1150-2200 \\AA$) using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We have also generated a grid of stellar population synthesis models using the Starburst99 evolutionary synthesis code, allowing us to compare observations and theoretical predictions for the SiIV_1400 and CIV_1550 UV indices; both are comprised of a blend of stellar wind and interstellar lines and have been proposed as metallicity diagnostics in the UV. Our models and observations both demonstrate that there is a positive linear correlation with metallicity for both indices, and we find generally good agreement between our observations and the predictions of the Starburst99 models. By combining the rest-frame UV observations with pre-existing rest-frame optical spectrophotometry of our blue compact galaxy sample, we also directly compare the predictions of metallicity and extinction diagnostics across both...

  16. Examining the Role of Environment in a Comprehensive Sample of Compact Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Lisa May; Gallagher, Sarah C; Charlton, Jane C; Hibbard, John E

    2012-01-01

    (Abridged) Compact groups, with their high number densities, small velocity dispersions, and an interstellar medium that has not been fully processed, provide a local analog to conditions of galaxy interactions in the earlier universe. The frequent and prolonged gravitational encounters that occur in compact groups affect the evolution of the constituent galaxies in a myriad of ways, for example gas processing and star formation. Recently, a statistically significant "gap" has been discovered mid-infrared IRAC colorspace of compact group galaxies. This gap is not seen in field samples and is a new example of how the compact group environment may affect the evolution of member galaxies. In order to investigate the origin and nature of this gap, we have compiled a sample of 49 compact groups. We find that a statistically significant deficit of galaxies in this gap region of IRAC colorspace is persistant in this sample, lending support to the hypothesis that the compact group environment inhibits moderate SSFRs....

  17. The merging dwarf galaxy UM 448: chemodynamics of the ionized gas from VLT integral field spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    James, B L; Barlow, M J; Walsh, J R; Westmoquette, M S

    2012-01-01

    Using VLT/FLAMES optical IFU observations, we present a detailed study of UM 448, a nearby Blue Compact Galaxy (BCG) previously reported to have an anomalously high N/O abundance ratio. NTT/SuSI2 images reveal a morphology suggestive of a merger of two systems of contrasting colour, whilst our H-alpha emission maps resolve UM 448 into three separate regions that do not coincide with the stellar continuum peaks. UM 448 exhibits complex emission line profiles, with lines consisting of a narrow, central component, an underlying broad component and a third, narrow blue-shifted component. Radial velocity maps show signs of solid body rotation across UM 448, with a projected rotation axis that correlates with the continuum morphology of the galaxy. A spatially-resolved, chemodynamical analysis is presented. Whilst the eastern tail of UM 448 has electron temperatures (Te) that are typical of BCGs, we find a region within the main body of the galaxy where the narrow and broad [O III] 4363 line components trace temper...

  18. The Galaxy Population of Low-Redshift Abell Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Barkhouse, Wayne A; Lopez-Cruz, Omar

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of the luminosity and color properties of galaxies selected from a sample of 57 low-redshift Abell clusters. We utilize the non-parametric dwarf-to-giant ratio (DGR) and the blue galaxy fraction (fb) to investigate the clustercentric radial-dependent changes in the cluster galaxy population. Composite cluster samples are combined by scaling the counting radius by r200 to minimize radius selection bias. The separation of galaxies into a red and blue population was achieved by selecting galaxies relative to the cluster color-magnitude relation. The DGR of the red and blue galaxies is found to be independent of cluster richness (Bgc), although the DGR is larger for the blue population at all measured radii. A decrease in the DGR for the red and red+blue galaxies is detected in the cluster core region, while the blue galaxy DGR is nearly independent of radius. The fb is found not to correlate with Bgc; however, a steady decline toward the inner-cluster region is observed for the giant galaxies....

  19. Starburst galaxies in the COSMOS field: clumpy star-formation at redshift 0 < z < 0.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa-Goñi, R.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Méndez-Abreu, J.

    2016-08-01

    kind of study. Star-forming clumps in the central regions of Mknots galaxies are more massive, and present higher star formation rates, than those in the outskirts. This trend is less clear when we consider either the mass surface density or surface star formation rate. Sknot galaxies do show properties similar to both dwarf elliptical and irregulars in the surface brightness (μ) versus Mhost diagram in the B-band, and to spheroidals and ellipticals in the μ versus Mhost diagram in the V-band. Conclusions: The properties of our star-forming knots in Sknot+diffuse and Mknots/clumpy galaxies support the predictions of recent numerical simulations claiming that they have been produced by violent disk instabilities. We suggest that the evolution of these knots means that large and massive clumps at the galaxy centers represent the end product of the coalescence of surviving smaller clumps from the outskirts. Our results support this mechanism and make it unlikely that mergers are the reason behind the observed starburst knots. Sknot galaxies might be transitional phases of the Blue Compact Dwarfs (BCD) class, with their properties consistent with spheroidal-like, but blue structures. Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A122

  20. It takes a supercluster to raise a galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Lietzen, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The properties of galaxies depend on their environment: red, passive elliptical galaxies are usually located in denser environments than blue, star-forming spiral galaxies. This difference in galaxy populations can be detected at all scales from groups of galaxies to superclusters. In this paper, we will discuss the effect of the large-scale environment on galaxies. Our results suggest that galaxies in superclusters are more likely to be passive than galaxies in voids even when they belong to groups with the same richness. In addition, the galaxies in superclusters are also affected by the morphology of the supercluster: filament-type superclusters contain relatively more red, passive galaxies than spider-type superclusters. These results suggest that the evolution of a galaxy is not determined by its local environment alone, but the large-scale environment also affects.

  1. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Color and Luminosity Dependence of Galaxy Clustering at z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Coil, Alison L; Croton, Darren; Cooper, Michael C; Davis, Marc; Faber, S M; Gerke, Brian F; Koo, David C; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Wechsler, Risa H; Weiner, Benjamin J

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of the color and luminosity dependence of galaxy clustering at z~1 in the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey. Using volume-limited subsamples in bins of both color and luminosity, we find that: 1) The clustering dependence is much stronger with color than with luminosity and is as strong with color at z~1 as is found locally. We find no dependence of the clustering amplitude on color for galaxies on the red sequence, but a significant dependence on color for galaxies within the blue cloud. 2) For galaxies in the range L/L*~0.7-2, a stronger large-scale luminosity dependence is seen for all galaxies than for red and blue galaxies separately. The small-scale clustering amplitude depends significantly on luminosity for blue galaxies, with brighter samples having a stronger rise on scales r_p<0.5 Mpc/h. 3) Redder galaxies exhibit stronger small-scale redshift-space distortions ("fingers of god"), and both red and blue populations show large-scale distortions in xi(r_p,pi) due to coherent infa...

  2. Compact Lumps

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Menezes, R

    2015-01-01

    We study the presence of lumplike solutions in models described by a single real scalar field with standard kinematics in two-dimensional spacetime. The results show several distinct models that support the presence of bell-shaped, lumplike structures which may live in a compact space.

  3. Multi-Wavelength Study of a Complete IRAC 3.6micron-Selected Galaxy Sample: a Fair Census of Red and Blue Populations at Redshifts 0.4-1

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, J -S; Willmer, C N A; Rigopoulou, D; Koo, D; Newman, J; Shu, C; Ashby, M L N; Barmby, P; Coil, A; Luo, Z; Magdis, G; Wang, T; Weiner, B; Willner, S P; Zheng, X Z; Fazio, G G

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of a 3.6 $\\mu$m-selected galaxy sample in the Extended Groth strip. The sample is complete for galaxies with stellar mass $>10^{9.5}$ \\Msun and redshift $0.4}3\\sigma$ errors) is about 3.5%. A new method of validation based on pair statistics confirms the estimate of standard deviation even for galaxies lacking spectroscopic redshifts. Basic galaxy properties measured include rest-frame $U-B$ colors, $B$- and $K$-band absolute magnitudes, and stellar masses. We divide the sample into quiescent and star-forming galaxies according to their rest-frame $U-B$ colors and 24 to 3.6 \\micron\\ flux density ratios and derive rest $K$-band luminosity functions and stellar mass functions for quiescent, star forming, and all galaxies. The results show that massive, quiescent galaxies were in place by $z\\approx1$, but lower mass galaxies generally ceased their star formation at later epochs.

  4. MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF A COMPLETE IRAC 3.6 μm SELECTED GALAXY SAMPLE: A FAIR CENSUS OF RED AND BLUE POPULATIONS AT REDSHIFTS 0.4-1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a multi-wavelength study of a 3.6 μm selected galaxy sample in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). The sample is complete for galaxies with stellar mass >109.5 M☉ and redshift 0.4 3σ errors) is about 3.5%. A new method of validation based on pair statistics confirms the estimate of standard deviation even for galaxies lacking spectroscopic redshifts. Basic galaxy properties measured include rest-frame U – B colors, B- and K-band absolute magnitudes, and stellar masses. We divide the sample into quiescent and star-forming galaxies according to their rest-frame U – B colors and 24-3.6 μm flux density ratios and derive rest K-band luminosity functions and stellar mass functions for quiescent, star-forming, and all galaxies. The results show that massive, quiescent galaxies were in place by z ≈ 1, but lower mass galaxies generally ceased their star formation at later epochs.

  5. A Fundamental Line for Elliptical Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nair, Preethi; Abraham, Roberto G

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that massive galaxies in the distant universe are surprisingly compact, with typical sizes about a factor of three smaller than equally massive galaxies in the nearby universe. It has been suggested that these massive galaxies grow into systems resembling nearby galaxies through a series of minor mergers. In this model the size growth of galaxies is an inherently stochastic process, and the resulting size-luminosity relationship is expected to have considerable environmentally-dependent scatter. To test whether minor mergers can explain the size growth in massive galaxies, we have closely examined the scatter in the size-luminosity relation of nearby elliptical galaxies using a large new database (Nair & Abraham 2010) of accurate visual galaxy classifications. We demonstrate that this scatter is much smaller than has been previously assumed, and may even be so small as to challenge the plausibility of the merger driven hierarchical models for the formation of massive ellipticals.

  6. Posthuman blues

    CERN Document Server

    Tonnies, Mac

    2013-01-01

    Posthuman Blues, Vol. I is first volume of the edited version of the popular weblog maintained by author Mac Tonnies from 2003 until his tragic death in 2009. Tonnies' blog was a pastiche of his original fiction, reflections on his day-to-day life, trenchant observations of current events, and thoughts on an eclectic range of material he culled from the Internet. What resulted was a remarkably broad portrait of a thoughtful man and the complex times in which he lived, rendered with intellige...

  7. The Densest Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, Jay; Seth, Anil C.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Conroy, Charlie; Caldwell, Nelson; Pota, Vincenzo; Usher, Christopher; Arnold, Jacob A.

    2013-09-01

    We report the discovery of a remarkable ultra-compact dwarf galaxy around the massive Virgo elliptical galaxy NGC 4649 (M60), which we call M60-UCD1. With a dynamical mass of 2.0 × 108 M ⊙ but a half-light radius of only ~24 pc, M60-UCD1 is more massive than any ultra-compact dwarfs of comparable size, and is arguably the densest galaxy known in the local universe. It has a two-component structure well fit by a sum of Sérsic functions, with an elliptical, compact (rh = 14 pc n ~ 3.3) inner component and a round, exponential, extended (rh = 49 pc) outer component. Chandra data reveal a variable central X-ray source with LX ~ 1038 erg s-1 that could be an active galactic nucleus associated with a massive black hole or a low-mass X-ray binary. Analysis of optical spectroscopy shows the object to be old (gsim 10 Gyr) and of solar metallicity, with elevated [Mg/Fe] and strongly enhanced [N/Fe] that indicates light-element self-enrichment; such self-enrichment may be generically present in dense stellar systems. The velocity dispersion (σ ~ 70 km s-1) and resulting dynamical mass-to-light ratio (M/LV = 4.9 ± 0.7) are consistent with—but slightly higher than—expectations for an old, metal-rich stellar population with a Kroupa initial mass function. The presence of a massive black hole or a mild increase in low-mass stars or stellar remnants is therefore also consistent with this M/LV . The stellar density of the galaxy is so high that no dynamical signature of dark matter is expected. However, the properties of M60-UCD1 suggest an origin in the tidal stripping of a nucleated galaxy with MB ~ -18 to -19.

  8. The Densest Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Strader, Jay; Forbes, Duncan; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Romanowsky, Aaron; Brodie, Jean; Conroy, Charlie; Caldwell, Nelson; Pota, Vincenzo; Usher, Christopher; Arnold, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a remarkable ultra-compact dwarf galaxy around the massive Virgo elliptical galaxy NGC 4649 (M60), which we term M60-UCD1. With a dynamical mass of 2.0 x 10^8 M_sun but a half-light radius of only ~ 24 pc, M60-UCD1 is more massive than any ultra-compact dwarfs of comparable size, and is arguably the densest galaxy known in the local universe. It has a two-component structure well-fit by a sum of Sersic functions, with an elliptical, compact (r_h=14 pc; n ~ 3.3) inner component and a round, exponential, extended (r_h=49 pc) outer component. Chandra data reveal a variable central X-ray source with L_X ~ 10^38 erg/s that could be an active galactic nucleus associated with a massive black hole or a low-mass X-ray binary. Analysis of optical spectroscopy shows the object to be old (~> 10 Gyr) and of solar metallicity, with elevated [Mg/Fe] and strongly enhanced [N/Fe] that indicates light element self-enrichment; such self-enrichment may be generically present in dense stellar systems. T...

  9. AGN Population in Compact Groups Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, M A; del Olmo, A.; R. Coziol; Perea, J.

    2008-01-01

    El propósito de este trabajo es establecer la frecuencia de actividad nuclear (ya sea por formación estelar ó por actividad tipo AGN) en las galaxias pertenecientes a los Grupos Compactos de Hickson (CGs), y caracterizar el tipo de actividad como función de las propiedades de la galaxia huésped y del grupo que las contiene. Con este propósito, hemos seleccionado una muestra estadísticamente significativa de 65 grupos compactos del catálogo de Hickson y obtenido espectroscopía de resoluc...

  10. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  11. Compact NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  12. The Optical Green Valley vs Mid-IR Canyon in Compact Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey; Zucker, Catherine; Gallagher, Sarah; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis; Zabludoff, Ann; Hornschemeier, Ann E; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Charlton, Jane C

    2013-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide conditions similar to those experienced by galaxies in the earlier universe. Recent work on compact groups has led to the discovery of a dearth of mid-infrared transition galaxies (MIRTGs) in IRAC (3.6 - 8.0 micron) color space (Johnson et al. 2007; Walker et al. 2012) as well as at intermediate specific star formation rates (Tzanavaris et al. 2010). However, we find that in compact groups these mid-infrared (mid-IR) transition galaxies in the mid-infrared dearth have already transitioned to the optical ([g-r]) red sequence. We investigate the optical color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of 99 compact groups containing 348 galaxies and compare the optical CMD with mid-IR color space for compact group galaxies. Utilizing redshifts available from SDSS, we identified new galaxy members for 6 groups. By combining optical and mid-IR data, we obtain information on both the dust and the stellar populations in compact group galaxies. We also compare with more isolated galaxies and galaxies...

  13. On the properties of compact groups identified in different photometric bands

    CERN Document Server

    Taverna, Antonela; Zandivarez, Ariel; Joray, Francisco; Kanagusuku, Maria Jose

    2016-01-01

    Historically, compact group catalogues vary not only in their identification algorithms and selection functions, but also in their photometric bands. Differences between compact group catalogues have been reported. However, it is difficult to assess the impact of the photometric band in these differences given the variety of identification algorithms. We used the mock lightcone built by Henriques et al. (2012) to identify and compare compact groups in three different photometric bands: $K$, $r$, and $u$. We applied the same selection functions in the three bands, and found that compact groups in the u-band look the smallest in projection, the difference between the two brightest galaxies is the largest in the K-band, while compact groups in the r-band present the lowest compactness. We also investigated the differences between samples when galaxies are selected only in one particular band (pure compact groups) and those that exist regardless the band in which galaxies were observed (common compact groups). We...

  14. Abundance patterns in the low-metallicity emission-line galaxies from the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Izotov, Yu I; Guseva, N G; Thuan, T X

    2004-01-01

    We have derived element abundances in 310 emission-line galaxies from the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) for which the [O {\\sc iii}] 4363 emission line was detected, allowing abundance determination by direct methods. We found no extremely metal-deficient galaxy (Zgalaxies sample lies in the range from ~7.6 (Zsun/12) to ~8.4 (Zsun/2). This sample is merged with a sample of ~100 blue compact dwarf galaxies with high quality spectra containing some very low-metallicity objects to study the abundance patterns of low-metallicity emission-line galaxies. We find that the $\\alpha$ element-to-oxygen abundance ratios do not show any significant trends with the oxygen abundance, in agreement with previous studies. The Fe/O abundance ratio is smaller than the solar value, which we interpret as an indication that type Ia supernovae have not yet appeared in these galaxie...

  15. Modeling color-dependent galaxy clustering in cosmological simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Masaki, Shogo; Lin, Yen-Ting; Yoshida, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    We extend the subhalo abundance matching method to assign galaxy color to subhalos. We separate a luminosity-binned subhalo sample into two groups by a secondary subhalo property which is presumed to be correlated with galaxy color. The two subsamples then represent red and blue galaxy populations. We explore two models for the secondary property, namely subhalo assembly time and local dark matter density around each subhalo. The model predictions for the galaxy two-point correlation function...

  16. Galaxy alignment on large and small scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, X.; Lin, W. P.; Dong, X.; Wang, Y. O.; Dutton, A.; Macciò, A.

    2016-10-01

    Galaxies are not randomly distributed across the universe but showing different kinds of alignment on different scales. On small scales satellite galaxies have a tendency to distribute along the major axis of the central galaxy, with dependence on galaxy properties that both red satellites and centrals have stronger alignment than their blue counterparts. On large scales, it is found that the major axes of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) have correlation up to 30Mpc/h. Using hydro-dynamical simulation with star formation, we investigate the origin of galaxy alignment on different scales. It is found that most red satellite galaxies stay in the inner region of dark matter halo inside which the shape of central galaxy is well aligned with the dark matter distribution. Red centrals have stronger alignment than blue ones as they live in massive haloes and the central galaxy-halo alignment increases with halo mass. On large scales, the alignment of LRGs is also from the galaxy-halo shape correlation, but with some extent of mis-alignment. The massive haloes have stronger alignment than haloes in filament which connect massive haloes. This is contrary to the naive expectation that cosmic filament is the cause of halo alignment.

  17. Galaxy alignment on large and small scales

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, X; Wang, Y O; Dutton, A; Macciò, A

    2014-01-01

    Galaxies are not randomly distributed across the universe but showing different kinds of alignment on different scales. On small scales satellite galaxies have a tendency to distribute along the major axis of the central galaxy, with dependence on galaxy properties that both red satellites and centrals have stronger alignment than their blue counterparts. On large scales, it is found that the major axes of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) have correlation up to 30Mpc/h. Using hydro-dynamical simulation with star formation, we investigate the origin of galaxy alignment on different scales. It is found that most red satellite galaxies stay in the inner region of dark matter halo inside which the shape of central galaxy is well aligned with the dark matter distribution. Red centrals have stronger alignment than blue ones as they live in massive haloes and the central galaxy-halo alignment increases with halo mass. On large scales, the alignment of LRGs is also from the galaxy-halo shape correlation, but with some ex...

  18. Young star clusters in the outer disks of LITTLE THINGS dwarf irregular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, Deidre A; Gehret, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    We examine FUV images of the LITTLE THINGS sample of nearby dwarf irregular (dIrr) and Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies to identify distinct young regions in their far outer disks. We use these data, obtained with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite, to determine the furthest radius at which in situ star formation can currently be identified. The FUV knots are found at distances from the center of the galaxies of 1 to 8 disk scale lengths and have ages of <20 Myrs and masses of 20 to 1E5 Msolar. The presence of young clusters and OB associations in the outer disks of dwarf galaxies shows that dIrrs do have star formation taking place there in spite of the extreme nature of the environment. Most regions are found where the HI surface density is ~1 Msolar per pc2, although both the HI and dispersed old stars go out much further. This limiting density suggests a cutoff in the ability to form distinct OB associations and perhaps even stars. We compare the star formation rates in the FUV regions to the ave...

  19. TOUGH: Observational aspects of gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hjorth, Jens; Jaunsen, Andreas O; Levan, Andrew J; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Watson, Darach; Gorosabel, Javier; Fynbo, Johan P U; Michałowski, Michał J; Tanvir, Nial R; Jakobsson, Páll; Møller, Palle; Schulze, Steve; Krühler, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    GRB-selected galaxies are broadly known to be faint, blue, young, star-forming dwarf galaxies. This insight, however, is based in part on heterogeneous samples of optically selected, lower-redshift galaxies. To study the statistical properties of GRB-selected galaxies we here introduce The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) complete sample of 69 X-ray selected Swift GRB host galaxies spanning the redshift range 0.03-6.30 and summarise the first results of a large observational survey of these galaxies.

  20. Color vision: retinal blues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jamie; Esposti, Federico; Lagnado, Leon

    2012-08-21

    Two complementary studies have resolved the circuitry underlying green-blue color discrimination in the retina. A blue-sensitive interneuron provides the inhibitory signal required for computing green-blue color opponency.

  1. Galaxy Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Martin

    Galaxy formation is an enormously complex discipline due to the many physical processes that play a role in shaping galaxies. The objective of this thesis is to study galaxy formation with two different approaches: First, numerical simulations are used to study the structure of dark matter and how...... galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof-the-art...

  2. Compact Radio Sources in NGC 660

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiercigroch, A. B.

    1995-12-01

    The nuclei of starburst galaxies are often obscured by dust and hence are probed best in non-visual wavelength regimes such as the infrared and radio. For example, radio studies of classical starburst galaxies such as NGC 253 and M82 have identified ~ 50 compact sources in each galaxy. One of the purposes of this type of observing program has been to classify the compact radio sources as H II regions or radio supernovae, and to estimate the supernova rates. If obtainable, spectral indices are used to identify the compact structures; otherwise supporting evidence or assumptions are needed. NGC 660, located at a distance of 7.5 Mpc, is a strong candidate for a search for compact radio sources. It is a relatively strong infrared emitter, has far infrared colors similar to NGC 253 and M82, and shows several peaks in published Very Large Array (VLA) maps at 6 cm and 20 cm. We therefore observed NGC 660 at 3.6 cm in the A-configuration of the VLA on 1995 July 13--14. Total integration time on-source was 4.8 hrs. The image shows a large family ( ~ 20) of compact radio structures with a flux density range of 0.1--3.4 mJy, three of which have fluxes > 2.0 mJy. The source luminosities are comparable to those of the stronger sources in M82 and NGC 253, typically a few times more powerful than Cas A. A number of the compact sources appear to lie along a ring projected against the more diffuse radio emission in the galaxy's nuclear region. The work described in this paper was carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  3. 3D-HST Grism Spectroscopy of a Gravitationally Lensed, Low-metallicity Starburst Galaxy at z=1.847

    CERN Document Server

    Brammer, Gabriel B; Labbe, Ivo; da Cunha, Elisabete; Erb, Dawn K; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt; Marchesini, Danilo; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Patel, Shannon; Quadri, Ryan; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E; Schmidt, Kasper B; van der Wel, Arjen; van Dokkum, Pieter G; Wake, David A; Whitaker, Katherine E

    2012-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging and spectroscopy of the gravitational lens SL2SJ02176-0513, a cusp arc at z=1.847. The UV continuum of the lensed galaxy is very blue, which is seemingly at odds with its redder optical colors. The 3D-HST WFC3/G141 near-infrared spectrum of the lens reveals the source of this discrepancy to be extremely strong [OIII]5007 and H-beta emission lines with rest-frame equivalent widths of 2000 +/- 100 and 520 +/- 40 Angstroms, respectively. The source has a stellar mass ~10^8 Msun, sSFR\\sim100/Gyr, and detection of [OIII]4363 yields a metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.5 +/- 0.2. We identify local blue compact dwarf analogs to SL2SJ02176-0513, which are among the most metal-poor galaxies in the SDSS. The local analogs resemble the lensed galaxy in many ways, including UV/optical SED, spatial morphology and emission line equivalent widths and ratios. Common to SL2SJ02176-0513 and its local counterparts is an upturn at mid-IR wavelengths likely arising from hot dust heate...

  4. Indirect Evidence for Escaping Lyman Continuum Photons in Local Lyman Break Galaxy Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandroff, Rachael; Heckman, Timothy M.; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Overzier, Roderik

    2015-01-01

    A population of early star-forming galaxies is the leading candidate for the re-ionization of the universe. It is still unclear, however, what conditions and physical processes would enable a significant fraction of the ionizing photons to escape from these gas-rich galaxies. In addition, studies of high redshift galaxies have yet to uncover a large sample of galaxies with the required high escape fraction of ionizing photons.We have uncovered a sample of local analogs to high-redshift, star-forming Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) called Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs) by matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) catalogs. These galaxies are remarkably similar to LBGs in their properties-- morphology, size, UV luminosity, SFR, mass, velocity dispersion, metallicity and dust content. We obtained HST COS far-UV spectroscopy plus ancillary multi-waveband data of a sample of 22 LBAs to look for indirect evidence of escaping ionizing radiation (leakiness).We measure three parameters: (1) the residual intensity in the cores of saturated interstellar low-ionization absorption-lines, which indicates incomplete covering by that gas in the galaxy. (2) The relative amount of blue-shifted Lyman alpha line emission, which can indicate the existence of holes in the neutral hydrogen on the front-side of the galaxy outflow, and (3) the relative weakness of the [SII] optical emission lines that trace matter-bounded HII regions. We find all three diagnostics agree well with one another. Finally, we find the strongest correlation between these leakiness indicators and both the compactness of the galactic star-forming region (size and star formation rate/area) and the speed of the galactic outflow. This suggests that extreme feedback- a high intensity of ionizing radiation and strong pressure from both radiation and a hot galactic wind- combines to create significant holes in the neutral gas. These results not only shed new light on the physical

  5. Detailed photometric analysis of young star groups in the galaxy NGC 300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, M. J.; Baume, G.; Feinstein, C.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: The purpose of this work is to understand the global characteristics of the stellar populations in NGC 300. In particular, we focused our attention on searching young star groups and study their hierarchical organization. The proximity and orientation of this Sculptor Group galaxy make it an ideal candidate for this study. Methods: The research was conducted using archival point spread function (PSF) fitting photometry measured from images in multiple bands obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys of the Hubble Space Telescope (ACS/HST). Using the path linkage criterion (PLC), we cataloged young star groups and analyzed them from the observation of individual stars in the galaxy NGC 300. We also built stellar density maps from the bluest stars and applied the SExtractor code to identify overdensities. This method provided an additional tool for the detection of young stellar structures. By plotting isocontours over the density maps and comparing the two methods, we could infer and delineate the hierarchical structure of the blue population in the galaxy. For each region of a detected young star group, we estimated the size and derived the radial surface density profiles for stellar populations of different color (blue and red). A statistical decontamination of field stars was performed for each region. In this way it was possible to build the color-magnitude diagrams (CMD) and compare them with theoretical evolutionary models. We also constrained the present-day mass function (PDMF) per group by estimating a value for its slope. Results: The blue population distribution in NGC 300 clearly follows the spiral arms of the galaxy, showing a hierarchical behavior in which the larger and loosely distributed structures split into more compact and denser ones over several density levels. We created a catalog of 1147 young star groups in six fields of the galaxy NGC 300, in which we present their fundamental characteristics. The mean and the mode radius values

  6. Galaxy Zoo: Passive Red Spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Masters, Karen L; Romer, A Kathy; Nichol, Robert C; Bamford, Steven P; Schawinski, Kevin; Lintott, Chris J; Andreescu, Dan; Campbell, Heather C; Crowcroft, Ben; Doyle, Isabelle; Edmondson, Edward M; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M Jordan; Slosar, Anze; Szalay, Alexander S; Vandenberg, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We study the spectroscopic properties and environments of red spiral galaxies found by the Galaxy Zoo project. By carefully selecting face-on, disk dominated spirals we construct a sample of truly passive disks (not dust reddened, nor dominated by old stellar populations in a bulge). As such, our red spirals represent an interesting set of possible transition objects between normal blue spirals and red early types. We use SDSS data to investigate the physical processes which could have turned these objects red without disturbing their morphology. Red spirals prefer intermediate density regimes, however there are no obvious correlations between red spiral properties and environment - environment alone is not sufficient to determine if a galaxy will become a red spiral. Red spirals are a small fraction of spirals at low masses, but dominate at large stellar masses - massive galaxies are red independent of morphology. We confirm that red spirals have older stellar populations and less recent star formation than ...

  7. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): Projected Galaxy Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Farrow, D J; Norberg, Peder; Metcalfe, N; Baldry, I; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brown, Michael J I; Hopkins, A M; Lacey, Cedric G; Liske, J; Loveday, Jon; Palamara, David P; Robotham, A S G; Sridhar, Srivatsan

    2015-01-01

    We measure the projected 2-point correlation function of galaxies in the 180 deg$^2$ equatorial regions of the GAMA II survey, for four different redshift slices between z = 0.0 and z=0.5. To do this we further develop the Cole (2011) method of producing suitable random catalogues for the calculation of correlation functions. We find that more r-band luminous, more massive and redder galaxies are more clustered. We also find that red galaxies have stronger clustering on scales less than ~3 $h^{-1}$ Mpc. We compare to two different versions of the GALFORM galaxy formation model, Lacey et al (in prep.) and Gonzalez-Perez et al. (2014), and find that the models reproduce the trend of stronger clustering for more massive galaxies. However, the models under predict the clustering of blue galaxies, can incorrectly predict the correlation function on small scales and under predict the clustering in our sample of galaxies with ~3$L_r$ . We suggest possible avenues to explore to improve these cluster- ing predictions....

  8. Surface Brightness Profiles of Dwarf Galaxies: I. Profiles and Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, Kimberly A; Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2013-01-01

    Radial surface brightness profiles of spiral galaxies are classified into three types: (I) single exponential, or the light falls off with one exponential to a break before falling off (II) more steeply, or (III) less steeply. Profile breaks are also found in dwarf disks, but some dwarf Type IIs are flat or increasing out to a break before falling off. Here we re-examine the stellar disk profiles of 141 dwarfs: 96 dwarf irregulars (dIms), 26 Blue Compact Dwarfs (BCDs), and 19 Magellanic-type spirals (Sms). We fit single, double, or even triple exponential profiles in up to 11 passbands: GALEX FUV and NUV, ground-based UBV JHK and H{\\alpha}, and Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {\\mu}m. We find that more luminous galaxies have brighter centers, larger inner and outer scale lengths, and break at larger radii; dwarf trends with M_B extend to spirals. However, the V-band break surface brightness is independent of break type, M_B, and Hubble type. Dwarf Type II and III profiles fall off similarly beyond the breaks but have diff...

  9. Galaxy interactions II: High density environments

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, Sol; Padilla, Nelson; Lambas, Diego G

    2011-01-01

    With the aim to assess the role of dense environments in galaxy interactions, properties we present an analysis of close galaxy pairs in groups and clusters, obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7). We identified pairs that reside in groups by cross-correlating the total galaxy pair catalogue with the SDSS-DR7 group catalogue from Zapata et al. (2009). We classify pair galaxies according to the intensity of interaction. We analysed the effect of high density environments on different classes of galaxy-galaxy interactions and we have also studied the impact of the group global environment on pair galaxies. We find that galaxy pairs are more concentrated towards the group centres with respect to the other group galaxy members, and disturbed pairs show a preference to contain the brightest galaxy in the groups. The color-magnitude relation exhibits significant differences between pair galaxies and the control sample, consisting in color tails with a clear excess of extremely blue and...

  10. On the properties of the interstellar medium in extremely metal-poor galaxies: A VIMOS-IFU study of the cometary galaxy and Ly $\\alpha$ absorber Tol 65

    CERN Document Server

    Lagos, P; Papaderos, P; Telles, E; Nigoche-Netro, A; Humphrey, A; Roche, N; Gomes, J M

    2015-01-01

    In this study we present high resolution VIMOS-IFU spectroscopy of the extremely metal-poor HII/blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy Tol 65. The optical appearance of this galaxy shows clearly a cometary morphology with a bright main body and an extended and diffuse stellar tail. We focus on the detection of metallicity gradients or inhomogeneities as expected if the ongoing star-formation activity is sustained by the infall/accretion of metal-poor gas. No evidences of significant spatial variations of abundances were found within our uncertainties. However, our findings show a slight anticorrelation between gas metallicity and star-formation rate at spaxel scales, in the sense that high star-formation is found in regions of low-metallicity, but the scatter in this relation indicates that the metals are almost fully diluted. Our observations show the presence of extended H$\\alpha$ emission in the stellar tail of the galaxy. We estimated that the mass of the ionized gas in the tail M(HII)$_{tail} \\sim$1.7$\\times$10...

  11. The Dependence of galaxy colors on luminosity and environment at z~0.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, H.K.C.; /Toronto U., Astron. Dept.; Hsieh, B.C.; /Taiwan, Natl. Central U. /Taipei, Inst. Astron. Astrophys.; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab; Gladders, M.D.; /Carnegie Inst.

    2005-08-01

    The authors analyze the B-R{sub c} colors of galaxies as functions of luminosity and local galaxy density using a large photometric redshift catalog based on the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey. They select two samples of galaxies with a magnitude limit of M{sub R{sub e}} < -18.5 and redshift ranges of 0.2 {le} z < 0.4 and 0.4 {le} x < 0.6 containing 10{sup 5} galaxies each. they model the color distributions of subsamples of galaxies and derive the red galaxy fraction and peak colors of red and blue galaxies as functions of galaxy luminosity and environment. The evolution of these relationships over the redshift range of x {approx} 0.5 to z {approx} 0.05 is analyzed in combination with published results from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They find that there is a strong evolution in the restframe peak color of bright blue galaxies in that they become redder with decreasing redshift, while the colors of faint blue galaxies remain approximately constant. This effect supports the ''downsizing'' scenario of star formation in galaxies. While the general dependence of the galaxy color distributions on the environment is small, they find that the change of red galaxy fraction with epoch is a function of the local galaxy density, suggesting that the downsizing effect may operate with different timescales in regions of different galaxy densities.

  12. Shrinking galaxy disks with fountain-driven accretion from the halo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Struck, Curtis [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Hunter, Deidre A., E-mail: bge@watson.ibm.com, E-mail: curt@iastate.edu, E-mail: dah@lowell.edu [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Star formation in most galaxies requires cosmic gas accretion because the gas consumption time is short compared to the Hubble time. This accretion presumably comes from a combination of infalling satellite debris, cold flows, and condensation of hot halo gas at the cool disk interface, perhaps aided by a galactic fountain. In general, the accretion will have a different specific angular momentum than the part of the disk that receives it, even if the gas comes from the nearby halo. The gas disk then expands or shrinks over time. Here we show that condensation of halo gas at a rate proportional to the star formation rate in the fountain model will preserve an initial shape, such as an exponential, with a shrinking scale length, leaving behind a stellar disk with a slightly steeper profile of younger stars near the center. This process is slow for most galaxies, producing imperceptible radial speeds, and it may be dominated by other torques, but it could be important for blue compact dwarfs, which tend to have large, irregular gas reservoirs and steep blue profiles in their inner stellar disks.

  13. Segregation effects in DEEP2 galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, R. S.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Lopes, P. A. A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate segregation phenomena in galaxy groups in the range of 0.2 low(z ≤ 0.6) and high (z > 0.6) redshift groups. Assuming that the color index (U - B)0 can be used as a proxy for the galaxy type, we found that the fraction of blue (star-forming) objects is higher in the high-z sample, with blue objects being dominant at MB > -19.5 for both samples, and red objects being dominant at MB low-z sample. Also, the radial variation of the red fraction indicates that there are more red objects with R low-z sample than in the high-z sample. Our analysis indicates statistical evidence of kinematic segregation, at the 99% c.l., for the low-z sample: redder and brighter galaxies present lower velocity dispersions than bluer and fainter ones. We also find a weaker evidence for spatial segregation between red and blue objects, at the 70% c.l. The analysis of the high-z sample reveals a different result: red and blue galaxies have velocity dispersion distributions not statistically distinct, although redder objects are more concentrated than the bluer ones at the 95% c.l. From the comparison of blue/red and bright/faint fractions, and considering the approximate lookback timescale between the two samples (˜3 Gyr), our results are consistent with a scenario where bright red galaxies had time to reach energy equipartition, while faint blue/red galaxies in the outskirts infall to the inner parts of the groups, thus reducing spatial segregation from z ˜ 0.8 to z ˜ 0.4.

  14. Compact Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date

  15. GLOBAL PROPERTIES OF NEUTRAL HYDROGEN IN COMPACT GROUPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Lisa May [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Johnson, Kelsey E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Gallagher, Sarah C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Privon, George C. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Kepley, Amanda A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Whelan, David G. [Physics Department, Austin College, Sherman, TX 75090 (United States); Desjardins, Tyler D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Zabludoff, Ann I. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Compact groups of galaxies provide a unique environment to study the evolution of galaxies amid frequent gravitational encounters. These nearby groups have conditions similar to those in the earlier universe when galaxies were assembled and give us the opportunity to witness hierarchical formation in progress. To understand how the compact group environment affects galaxy evolution, we examine the gas and dust in these groups. We present new single-dish GBT neutral hydrogen (H i) observations of 30 compact groups and define a new way to quantify the group H i content as the H i-to-stellar mass ratio of the group as a whole. We compare the H i content with mid-IR indicators of star formation and optical [g − r] color to search for correlations between group gas content and star formation activity of individual group members. Quiescent galaxies tend to live in H i-poor groups, and galaxies with active star formation are more commonly found in H i-rich groups. Intriguingly, we also find “rogue” galaxies whose star formation does not correlate with group H i content. In particular, we identify three galaxies (NGC 2968 in RSCG 34, KUG 1131+202A in RSCG 42, and NGC 4613 in RSCG 64) whose mid-IR activity is discrepant with the H i. We speculate that this mismatch between mid-IR activity and H i content is a consequence of strong interactions in this environment that can strip H i from galaxies and abruptly affect star formation. Ultimately, characterizing how and on what timescales the gas is processed in compact groups will help us understand the interstellar medium in complex, dense environments similar to the earlier universe.

  16. THE DENSEST GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Forbes, Duncan A.; Pota, Vincenzo; Usher, Christopher [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Romanowsky, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San José State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Brodie, Jean P.; Arnold, Jacob A. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Conroy, Charlie, E-mail: strader@pa.msu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    We report the discovery of a remarkable ultra-compact dwarf galaxy around the massive Virgo elliptical galaxy NGC 4649 (M60), which we call M60-UCD1. With a dynamical mass of 2.0 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉} but a half-light radius of only ∼24 pc, M60-UCD1 is more massive than any ultra-compact dwarfs of comparable size, and is arguably the densest galaxy known in the local universe. It has a two-component structure well fit by a sum of Sérsic functions, with an elliptical, compact (r{sub h} = 14 pc; n ∼ 3.3) inner component and a round, exponential, extended (r{sub h} = 49 pc) outer component. Chandra data reveal a variable central X-ray source with L{sub X} ∼ 10{sup 38} erg s{sup –1} that could be an active galactic nucleus associated with a massive black hole or a low-mass X-ray binary. Analysis of optical spectroscopy shows the object to be old (∼> 10 Gyr) and of solar metallicity, with elevated [Mg/Fe] and strongly enhanced [N/Fe] that indicates light-element self-enrichment; such self-enrichment may be generically present in dense stellar systems. The velocity dispersion (σ ∼ 70 km s{sup –1}) and resulting dynamical mass-to-light ratio (M/L{sub V} = 4.9 ± 0.7) are consistent with—but slightly higher than—expectations for an old, metal-rich stellar population with a Kroupa initial mass function. The presence of a massive black hole or a mild increase in low-mass stars or stellar remnants is therefore also consistent with this M/L{sub V} . The stellar density of the galaxy is so high that no dynamical signature of dark matter is expected. However, the properties of M60-UCD1 suggest an origin in the tidal stripping of a nucleated galaxy with M{sub B} ∼ –18 to –19.

  17. The clustering properties of faint galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Infante, L; Infante, L; Pritchet, C J

    1994-01-01

    The two-point angular correlation function of galaxies, \\wte, has been computed from a new survey of faint galaxies covering a 2 deg^2 area near the North Galactic Pole. This survey, which is complete to limiting magnitudes \\jmag=24 and \\fmag=23, samples angular scales as large as 1\\degpoint5. Faint galaxies are found to be more weakly clustered (by a factor of at least two) compared to galaxies observed locally. Clustering amplitudes are closer to model predictions in the red than in the blue. The weak clustering of faint galaxies cannot be explained by any plausible model of clustering evolution with redshift. However, one possible explanation of the clustering properties of intermediate redshift galaxies is that they resemble those of starburst galaxies and H II region galaxies, which are observed locally to possess weak clustering amplitudes. Our clustering amplitudes are also similar to those of nearby late-type galaxies, which are observed to be more weakly clustered than early-type galaxies A simple, s...

  18. HST images of FeLoBAL quasars: Testing quasar-galaxy evolution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Hanna; Hamann, Fred; Villforth, Carolin; Caselli, Paola; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results from an HST imaging study of FeLoBAL quasars, which have extremely low-ionization Broad Absorption Line (BAL) outflows and might be a young quasar population based on their red colors, large far-IR luminosities (suggesting high star formation rates), and powerful outflows. Some models of quasar - host galaxy evolution propose a triggering event, such as a merger, to fuel both a burst of star formation and the quasar/AGN activity. These models suggest young quasars are initially obscured inside the dusty starburst until a "blowout" phase, driven by the starburst or quasar outflows like FeLoBALs, ends the star formation and reveals the visibly luminous quasar. Despite the popularity of this evolution scheme, there is little observational evidence to support the role of mergers in triggering AGN or the youth of dust-reddened quasars (such as FeLoBALs) compared to normal blue quasars.Our Cycle 22 HST program is designed to test the youth of FeLoBAL quasars and the connection of FeLoBALs to mergers. We obtain WFC3/IR F160W images of 10 FeLoBAL quasars at redshift z~0.9 (covering ~8500A in the quasar rest frame). We will compare the host galaxy morphologies and merger signatures of FeLoBALs with normal blue quasars (which are older according to the evolution model) and non-AGN galaxies matched in redshift and stellar mass. If FeLoBAL quasars are indeed in a young evolutionary state, close in time to the initial merging event, they should have stronger merger features compared to blue quasars and non-AGN galaxies. Preliminary results suggest that this is not the case - FeLoBAL quasars appear to reside in faint, compact hosts with weak or absent merger signatures. We discuss the implications of these results for galaxy evolution models and other studies of dust-reddened quasar populations.

  19. The faint galaxy contribution to the diffuse extragalactic background light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Shaun; Treyer, Marie-Agnes; Silk, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Models of the faint galaxy contribution to the diffuse extragalactic background light are presented, which are consistent with current data on faint galaxy number counts and redshifts. The autocorrelation function of surface brightness fluctuations in the extragalactic diffuse light is predicted, and the way in which these predictions depend on the cosmological model and assumptions of biasing is determined. It is confirmed that the recent deep infrared number counts are most compatible with a high density universe (Omega-0 is approximately equal to 1) and that the steep blue counts then require an extra population of rapidly evolving blue galaxies. The faintest presently detectable galaxies produce an interesting contribution to the extragalactic diffuse light, and still fainter galaxies may also produce a significant contribution. These faint galaxies still only produce a small fraction of the total optical diffuse background light, but on scales of a few arcminutes to a few degrees, they produce a substantial fraction of the fluctuations in the diffuse light.

  20. 12CO mapping of the low-metallicity BCD galaxy Mrk86

    CERN Document Server

    De Paz, A G; Madore, B F; Contreras, C S; Zamorano, J; Gallego, J

    2002-01-01

    We have mapped the 12CO J=1-0 and J=2-1 line emission in Mrk86, one of the most metal-deficient Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies so far detected in 12CO. The 12CO emission is distributed in a horseshoe-like structure that follows the locus of the most recent star formation regions. The minimum in molecular-line emission corresponds to the position of an older, massive nuclear starburst. The H2 mass of the galaxy (in the range 0.4-5x10^7 Msun) and its morphology have been compared with the predictions of hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution of the interstellar medium surrounding a nuclear starburst. These simulations suggest that the physical conditions in the gas swept out by the starburst could have led to the formation of the ring of molecular gas reported here. This result provides an attractive scenario for explaining the propagation (in a galactic scale) of the star formation in dwarf galaxies.

  1. Blue cures blue but be cautious

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Sikka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Methemoglobinemia is a disorder characterized by the presence of >1% methemoglobin (metHb in the blood. Spontaneous formation of methemoglobin is normally counteracted by protective enzyme systems, for example, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH methemoglobin reductase. Methemoglobinemia is treated with supplemental oxygen and methylene blue (1-2 mg/kg administered slow intravenously, which acts by providing an artificial electron acceptor for NADPH methemoglobin reductase. But known or suspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is a relative contraindication to the use of methylene blue because G6PD is the key enzyme in the formation of NADPH through pentose phosphate pathway and G6PD-deficient individuals generate insufficient NADPH to efficiently reduce methylene blue to leukomethylene blue, which is necessary for the activation of the NADPH-dependent methemoglobin reductase system. So, we should be careful using methylene blue in methemoglobinemia patient before G6PD levels.

  2. Faint Tidal Features in Galaxies within the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Wide Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Atkinson, Adam M; Ferguson, Annette M N

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous M_r10^10.5 M_sun, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

  3. Observational constraints on dwarf galaxy evolution: a retrospective of lequeux et al. (1979

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan D. Skillman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Las contribuciones de los Peimbert han sido fundamentales para establecer ideas concernientes tanto a las propiedades como a la evoluci on de las galaxias enanas. Revisar e brevemente estas ideas dentro del contexto de una retrospectiva del art culo hist orico \\Chemical Composition and Evolution of Irregular and Blue Compact Galaxies" de Lequeux, Peimbert, Rayo, Serrano, & Torres-Peimbert, 1979, A&A, 80, 155. Este art culo aport o observaciones espectrosc opicas pioneras de regiones H II en 6 galaxias enanas y proporcion o muchas de las bases de nuestra visi on moderna de las galaxias enanas. La mayor a de las conclusiones e inferencias permanecen v alidas hoy, a dos d ecadas de su publicaci on.

  4. Aspects of the interstellar medium in starburst galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researchers are engaged in a multifaceted program to investigate the stellar content and star formation history of actively star-forming galaxies. A large body of stellar spectra have been examined to identify spectral features characteristic of specific stellar types. These spectral diagnostics are then calibrated in terms of temperature (spectral type), gravity (luminosity class) and metallicity. The spectral data is compiled into a stellar library whose members represent specific locations in the HR diagram. Through the use of population synthesis techniques, both optimizing and evolutionary approaches, the stellar luminosity function in composite populations can be determined. Researchers have concentrated on the ultraviolet wavelength region (lambda lambda 1200 to 3200). In the optical, virtually all stars will contribute to the integrated light. In the ultraviolet however, cool stars will produce negligible flux due to their steep ultraviolet-to-visual continua, greatly simplifying the investigation of the hot component in a composite population. The researchers' initial stellar library has been applied to several blue compact galaxies, (BCGs), a class of starburst galaxy which is UV luminous. BCGs possess a complex interstellar medium which affects the emergent stellar continuum in several ways. This presents a challenge to the stellar analysis but affords insight into the properties of the gas and dust from which the massive OB stars have formed. The optimizing synthesis method solves for the stellar luminosity function and extinction simultaneously. This therefore provides an independent measure of the extinction affecting the hot population component. Despite the rise of the reddening law towards the ultraviolet, BCGs are found to be brighter in the ultraviolet than expected

  5. Aspects of the interstellar medium in starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Michael N.

    1990-07-01

    Researchers are engaged in a multifaceted program to investigate the stellar content and star formation history of actively star-forming galaxies. A large body of stellar spectra have been examined to identify spectral features characteristic of specific stellar types. These spectral diagnostics are then calibrated in terms of temperature (spectral type), gravity (luminosity class) and metallicity. The spectral data is compiled into a stellar library whose members represent specific locations in the HR diagram. Through the use of population synthesis techniques, both optimizing and evolutionary approaches, the stellar luminosity function in composite populations can be determined by analysis of their integrated light. Researchers have concentrated on the ultraviolet wavelength region (lambda lambda 1200 to 3200), utilizing the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) archives supplemented by additional observations. In the optical, virtually all stars will contribute to the integrated light. In the ultraviolet however, cool stars will produce negligible flux due to their steep ultraviolet-to-visual continua, greatly simplifying the investigation of the hot component in a composite population. The researchers' initial stellar library has been applied to several blue compact galaxies, (BCGs), a class of starburst galaxy which is UV luminous. BCGs possess a complex interstellar medium which affects the emergent stellar continuum in several ways. This presents a challenge to the stellar analysis but affords insight into the properties of the gas and dust from which the massive OB stars have formed. The optimizing synthesis method solves for the stellar luminosity function and extinction simultaneously. This therefore provides an independent measure of the extinction affecting the hot population component. Despite the rise of the reddening law towards the ultraviolet, BCGs are found to be brighter in the ultraviolet than expected.

  6. ESO 603-G21: A strange polar-ring galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Reshetnikov, V. P.; Faundez-Abans, M.; Oliveira-Abans, M.

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of B, V, R surface photometry of ESO603-G21 - a galaxy with a possible polar ring. The morphological and photometric features of this galaxy are discussed. The central round object of the galaxy is rather red and presents a nearly exponential surface brightness distribution. This central structure is surrounded by a blue warped ring or disk. The totality of the observed characteristics (optical and NIR colors, strong color gradients, HI and H_2 content, FIR luminosity a...

  7. NUV signatures of environment driven galaxy quenching in SDSS groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossett, Jacob P.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Jones, D. Heath; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stott, John P.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of group environment on residual star formation in galaxies, using GALEX NUV galaxy photometry with the SDSS group catalogue of Yang et al. (2007). We compared the (NUV - r) colours of grouped and non-grouped galaxies, and find a significant increase in the fraction of red sequence galaxies with blue (NUV - r) colours outside of groups. When comparing galaxies in mass matched samples of satellite (non-central), and non-grouped galaxies, we found a >4σ difference in the distribution of (NUV - r) colours, and an (NUV - r) blue fraction >3σ higher outside groups. A comparison of satellite and non-grouped samples has found the NUV fraction is a factor of ˜2 lower for satellite galaxies between 1010.5M⊙ and 1010.7M⊙, showing that higher mass galaxies are more able to form stars when not influenced by a group potential. There was a higher (NUV - r) blue fraction of galaxies with lower Sérsic indices (n < 3) outside of groups, not seen in the satellite sample. We have used stellar population models of Bruzual & Charlot (2003) with multiple burst, or exponentially declining star formation histories to find that many of the (NUV - r) blue non-grouped galaxies can be explained by a slow (˜2 Gyr) decay of star formation, compared to the satellite galaxies. We suggest that taken together, the difference in (NUV - r) colours between samples can be explained by a population of secularly evolving, non-grouped galaxies, where star formation declines slowly. This slow channel is less prevalent in group environments where more rapid quenching can occur.

  8. Galaxy-scale AGN Feedback - Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, A. Y.; Bicknell, G.V.; Umemura, M; Sutherland, R. S.; Silk, J.

    2015-01-01

    Powerful relativistic jets in radio galaxies are capable of driving strong outflows but also inducing star-formation by pressure-triggering collapse of dense clouds. We review theoretical work on negative and positive active galactic nuclei feedback, discussing insights gained from recent hydrodynamical simulations of jet-driven feedback on galaxy scales that are applicable to compact radio sources. The simulations show that the efficiency of feedback and the relative importance of negative a...

  9. Galaxy-scale AGN feedback – theory

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, A. Y.; Bicknell, G.V.; Umemura, M; Sutherland, R. S.; Silk, J.

    2016-01-01

    Powerful relativistic jets in radio galaxies are capable of driving strong outflows but also inducing star-formation by pressure-triggering collapse of dense clouds. We review theoretical work on negative and positive active galactic nuclei feedback, discussing insights gained from recent hydrodynamical simulations of jet-driven feedback on galaxy scales that are applicable to compact radio sources. The simulations show that the efficiency of feedback and the relative importance of negative a...

  10. Polar-ring galaxies: the SDSS view on the symbiotic galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnikov, V

    2014-01-01

    Polar-ring galaxies are multi-spin systems, showing star formation in a blue late-type component, perpendicular to a red early-type one, revealing how galaxy formation can sometimes occur in successive steps. We perform two-dimensional decomposition in the $g$, $r$, $i$ bandpasses of 50 polar-ring galaxies (PRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Each object was fit with a S\\'ersic host galaxy and a S\\'ersic ring. Our general results are: (i) The central (host) galaxies of the PRGs are non-dwarf sub-$L^{\\ast}$ galaxies with colors typical for early-type galaxies. (ii) Polar structures in our sample are, on average, fainter and bluer than their host galaxies. (iii) In most galaxies, the stellar mass M$_*$ of the polar component is not negligible in comparison with that of the host. (iv) The distributions of the host galaxies on the size -- luminosity and Kormendy diagrams are shifted by $\\sim 1^m$ to fainter magnitudes in comparison with E/S0 galaxies. It means that the PRGs hosts are more similar to quenched...

  11. The Masses of Distant Galaxies from Optical Emission Line Widths

    CERN Document Server

    Gillespie, E B; Gillespie, Elizabeth Barton; Zee, Liese van

    2002-01-01

    Promising methods for studying galaxy evolution rely on optical emission line width measurements to compare intermediate-redshift objects to galaxies with equivalent masses at the present epoch. However, emission lines can be misleading. We show empirical examples of galaxies with concentrated central star formation from a survey of galaxies in pairs; HI observations of these galaxies indicate that the optical line emission fails to sample their full gravitational potentials. We use simple models of bulge-forming bursts of star formation to demonstrate that compact optical morphologies and small half-light radii can accompany these anomalously narrow emission lines; thus late-type bulges forming on rapid (0.5-1 Gyr) timescales at intermediate redshift would exhibit properties similar to those of heavily bursting dwarfs. We conclude that some of the luminous compact objects observed at intermediate and high redshift may be starbursts in the centers of massive galaxies and/or bulges in formation.

  12. ECO and RESOLVE: Galaxy Disk Growth in Environmental Context

    CERN Document Server

    Moffett, Amanda J; Berlind, Andreas A; Eckert, Kathleen D; Stark, David V; Hendel, David; Norris, Mark A; Grogin, Norman A

    2015-01-01

    We study the relationships between galaxy environments and galaxy properties related to disk (re)growth, considering two highly complete samples that are approximately baryonic mass limited into the high-mass dwarf galaxy regime, the Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog (data release herein) and the B-semester region of the REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey. We quantify galaxy environments using both group identification and smoothed galaxy density field methods. We use by-eye and quantitative morphological classifications plus atomic gas content measurements and estimates. We find that blue early-type (E/S0) galaxies, gas-dominated galaxies, and UV-bright disk host galaxies all become distinctly more common below group halo mass ~10^11.5 Msun, implying that this low group halo mass regime may be a preferred regime for significant disk growth activity. We also find that blue early-type and blue late-type galaxies inhabit environments of similar group halo mass at fixed baryonic mass, con...

  13. NUV signatures of environment driven galaxy quenching in SDSS groups

    CERN Document Server

    Crossett, Jacob P; Jones, D Heath; Brown, Michael J I; Stott, John P

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of group environment on residual star formation in galaxies, using Galex NUV galaxy photometry with the SDSS group catalogue of Yang et al. (2007). We compared the (NUV $- r$) colours of grouped and non-grouped galaxies, and find a significant increase in the fraction of red sequence galaxies with blue (NUV $- r$) colours outside of groups. When comparing galaxies in mass matched samples of satellite (non-central), and non-grouped galaxies, we found a > 4{\\sigma} difference in the distribution of (NUV $- r$) colours, and an (NUV $- r$) blue fraction $> 3{\\sigma}$ higher outside groups. A comparison of satellite and non-grouped samples has found the NUV fraction is a factor of $\\sim2$ lower for satellite galaxies between $10^{10.5}M_{\\bigodot}$ and $10^{10.7}M_{\\bigodot}$, showing that higher mass galaxies are more able to form stars when not influenced by a group potential. There was a higher (NUV $- r$) blue fraction of galaxies with lower Sersic indices (n < 3) outside of ...

  14. Planck early results. XVI. The Planck view of nearby galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    Theall-sky coverage of the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) provides an unsurpassed survey of galaxies at submillimetre (submm) wavelengths, representing a major improvement in the numbers of galaxies detected, as well as the range of far-IR/submm wavelengths over which they ...

  15. On the Fraction of Barred Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nair, Preethi B

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the stellar masses of strongly barred spiral galaxies. Our analysis is based on a sample of ~14000 visually-classified nearby galaxies given in Nair & Abraham 2010(a). The fraction of barred spiral galaxies is found to be a strong function of stellar mass and star formation history, with a minimum near the characteristic mass at which bimodality is seen in the stellar populations of galaxies. We also find bar fractions are very sensitive to the central concentration of galaxies below the transition mass but not above it. This suggests that whatever process is causing the creation of the red and blue sequences is either influencing, or being influenced by, structural changes which manifest themselves in the absence of bars. As a consequence of strong bar fractions being sensitive to the mass range probed, our analysis helps resolve discrepant results on the reported evolution of bar fractions with redshift.

  16. Physical properties of local star-forming analogues to z ˜ 5 Lyman-break galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greis, Stephanie M. L.; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Davies, Luke J. M.; Levan, Andrew J.

    2016-07-01

    Intense, compact, star-forming galaxies are rare in the local Universe but ubiquitous at high redshift. We interpret the 0.1-22 μm spectral energy distributions of a sample of 180 galaxies at 0.05 origin and evolution of early galaxies.

  17. Galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaxy formation is at the forefront of observation and theory in cosmology. An improved understanding is essential for improving our knowledge both of the cosmological parameters, of the contents of the universe, and of our origins. In these lectures intended for graduate students, galaxy formation theory is reviewed and confronted with recent observational issues. In lecture 1, the following topics are presented: star formation considerations, including IMF, star formation efficiency and star formation rate, the origin of the galaxy luminosity function, and feedback in dwarf galaxies. In lecture 2, we describe formation of disks and massive spheroids, including the growth of supermassive black holes, negative feedback in spheroids, the AGN-star formation connection, star formation rates at high redshift and the baryon fraction in galaxies.

  18. Galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Silk, Joseph; Dvorkin, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy formation is at the forefront of observation and theory in cosmology. An improved understanding is essential for improving our knowledge both of the cosmological parameters, of the contents of the universe, and of our origins. In these lectures intended for graduate students, galaxy formation theory is reviewed and confronted with recent observational issues. In Lecture 1, the following topics are presented: star formation considerations, including IMF, star formation efficiency and star formation rate, the origin of the galaxy luminosity function, and feedback in dwarf galaxies. In Lecture 2, we describe formation of disks and massive spheroids, including the growth of supermassive black holes, negative feedback in spheroids, the AGN-star formation connection, star formation rates at high redshift and the baryon fraction in galaxies.

  19. Stability of Hickson Groups of Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    IQBAL, Ibrahim SELIM and Naseer

    2008-01-01

    In this work we have used the Viril theorem to investigate the dynamical stability of Hickson compact groups of galaxies. The average luminous mass of the galaxies member is approximately 1.3 \\times 011 M\\odot and average total luminous mass of group is approximately 4.6 \\times 011 M\\odot. The virial theorem has used to estimate the virial mass. The average Virial mass of group of galaxies is approximately 6.3 \\times 013 M\\odot This is attributed to the presence of large amount of d...

  20. Annihilation Radiation in the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, C D

    2000-01-01

    Observations of annihilation radiation in the Galaxy are briefly reviewed. We summarize astrophysical mechanisms leading to positron production, and recent estimates for production rates from nova and supernova nucleosynthesis in the Galaxy. The physical processes involved in the production of annihilation radiation in the interstellar medium are described. These include positron thermalization, charge exchange, radiative recombination, and direct annihilation. Calculations of 2\\gamma and 3\\gamma spectra and the positronium (Ps) fraction due to the annihilation of positrons in media containing H and He at different temperatures and ionization states are presented. Quenching of Ps by high temperature plasmas or dust could account for differences between 0.511 MeV and 3\\gamma Ps continuum maps. These results are presented in the context of the potential of INTEGRAL to map sites of annihilation radiation in the Galaxy. Positron production by compact objects is also considered.

  1. Annihilation radiation in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermer, C. D.; Murphy, R. J.

    2001-09-01

    Observations of annihilation radiation in the Galaxy are briefly reviewed. We summarize astrophysical mechanisms leading to positron production and recent estimates for production rates from nova and supernova nucleosynthesis in the Galaxy. The physical processes involved in the production of annihilation radiation in the interstellar medium are described. These include positron thermalization, charge exchange, radiative recombination, and direct annihilation. Calculations of 2γ and 3γ spectra and the positronium (Ps) fraction due to the annihilation of positrons in media containing H and He at different temperatures and ionization states are presented. Quenching of Ps by high temperature plasmas or dust could account for differences betwen 0.511 MeV and 3γ Ps continuum maps. These results are presented in the context of the potential of INTEGRAL to map sites of annihilation radiation in the Galaxy. Positron production by compact objects is also considered.

  2. Close neighbors of Markarian galaxies. I. Optical database

    CERN Document Server

    Nazaryan, T A; McLean, B J

    2012-01-01

    The catalogue of close neighbors of Markarian galaxies located inside of circles with radii 60 kpc from the centers of Markarian objects is presented, which combines extensive new measurements of their optical parameters with a literature and database search. The measurements were made using images extracted from the Digitized Sky Survey (DSS) Jpg (blue), Fpg (red) and Ipg (near-infrared) band photographic plates. We provide names, accurate coordinates, redshifts, morphological types, blue, red and near-infrared apparent magnitudes, apparent blue major diameters, axial ratios, as well as position angles for the neighbor galaxies. We also include their 2MASS infrared magnitudes. The total number of Markarian galaxies in the database is 274 and number of their neighbors is 359. The physical parameters of the systems of Markarian galaxies and their neighbors are determined and presented.

  3. Segregation effects in DEEP2 galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Nascimento, Raquel S; Lopes, Paulo A A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate segregation phenomena in galaxy groups in the range of $0.20.6$) redshift groups. Assuming that the color index ${(U-B)_0}$ can be used as a proxy for the galaxy type, we found that the fraction of blue (star-forming) objects is higher in the high-z sample, with blue objects being dominant at $M_{B}>-19.5$ for both samples, and red objects being dominant at $M_{B}<-19.5$ only for the low-z sample. Also, the radial variation of the red fraction indicates that there are more red objects with $Rgalaxies present lower velocity dispersions than bluer and fainter ones. We also find a weaker evidence for spatial segregation between red and blue objects, at the 70%c.l. The analysis of the high-z sample reveals a different result: red and blue galaxies have velocity dispersion distributions not statistically distinc...

  4. Isolated elliptical galaxies in the local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lacerna, I; Avila-Reese, V; Abonza-Sane, J; del Olmo, A

    2015-01-01

    We have studied a sample of 89 very isolated elliptical galaxies at z < 0.08 and compared their properties with elliptical galaxies located in a high-density environment such as the Coma supercluster. Our aim is to probe the role of environment on the morphological transformation and quenching of elliptical galaxies as a function of mass. In addition, we elucidate about the nature of a particular set of blue and star-forming isolated ellipticals identified here. We study physical properties of ellipticals such as color, specific star formation rate, galaxy size and stellar age as a function of stellar mass and environment based on SDSS data. We analyze in more detail the blue star-forming isolated ellipticals through photometric characterization using GALFIT and infer their star formation history using STARLIGHT. Among the isolated ellipticals ~ 20% are blue, 8% are star-forming and ~ 10% are recently quenched, while among the Coma ellipticals ~ 8% are blue and just <= 1% are star-forming or recently qu...

  5. THE NUCLEUS OF THE CYGNUS A GALAXY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VESTERGAARD, M; BARTHEL, PD

    1993-01-01

    Newly obtained high resolution optical images of the prototypical luminous radio galaxy Cygnus A (3C 405) indicate an inhomogeneous distribution of obscuring dust and, in combination with previous data, three types of radiation (stellar and blue featureless continuum as well as luminous line emissio

  6. Disk Galaxies and Galaxy Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Funes, J G

    2000-01-01

    The conference Galaxy Disks and Disk Galaxies, sponsored by the Vatican Observatory, was held in June 12-16, 2000 at the Pontifical Gregorian University, in Rome (Italy). The meeting hosted about 230 participants coming from 30 countries. The very full program consisted of 29 review papers, 34 invited talks, and more than 180 posters. The meeting covered topics regarding the structure, formation and evolution of galaxies with disks. Particular attention was dedicated to the stellar and gaseous disk of the Milky Way, the global characteristics of galaxy disks, their structure, morphology and dynamics, the gaseous components, star formation, and chemical evolution, the interactions, accretion, mergers and starbursts, the dark and luminous matter, the establishment of the scaling laws, and the formation and evolution of disk galaxies from a theoretical and observational point of view.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Star-forming compact groups (Hernandez-Fernandez+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Fernandez, J. D.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.

    2016-03-01

    This article provides a local sample (zstar-forming galaxies. In this type of groups, galaxies strongly interact among themselves and with the rest of the group components (ICM, dark matter halo). This induces morphological changes and star formation events which are currently taking place. The peculiar evolutionary stage of these groups provides a wealth of galaxy observables that may clarify the theoretical framework about galaxy evolution in groups. We have performed an all-sky search for compact groups of star-forming galaxies in the GALEX UV catalogues. (3 data files).

  8. Galaxy-Galaxy Weak Lensing Measurements from SDSS: I. Image Processing and Lensing signals

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Wentao; Zhang, Jun; Tweed, Dylan; Fu, Liping; Mo, H J; Bosch, Frank C van den; Shu, Chenggang; Li, Ran; Li, Nan; Liu, Xiangkun; Pan, Chuzhong; Wang, Yiran; Radovich, Mario

    2016-01-01

    As the first paper in a series on the study of the galaxy-galaxy lensing from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7), we present our image processing pipeline that corrects the systematics primarily introduced by the Point Spread Function (PSF). Using this pipeline, we processed SDSS DR7 imaging data in $r$ band and generated a background galaxy catalog containing the shape information of each galaxy. Based on our own shape measurements of the galaxy images from SDSS DR7, we extract the galaxy-galaxy (GG) lensing signals around foreground spectroscopic galaxies binned in different luminosity and stellar mass. The overall signals are in good agreement with those obtained by \\citet{Mandelbaum2005, Mandelbaum2006} from the SDSS DR4. The results in this paper with higher signal to noise ratio is due to the larger survey area than SDSS DR4, confirm that more luminous/massive galaxies bear stronger GG lensing signal. We also divide the foreground galaxies into red/blue and star forming/quenched subsampl...

  9. An Investigation of the Dust Content in the Galaxy pair NGC 1512/1510 from Near-Infrared to Millimeter Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Guilin; Yun, Min S; Wilson, Grant W; Draine, Bruce T; Scott, Kimberly; Austermann, Jason; Perera, Thushara; Hughes, David; Aretxaga, Itziar; Kohno, Kotaro; Kawabe, Ryohei; Ezawa, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    We combine new ASTE/AzTEC 1.1 mm maps of the galaxy pair NGC 1512/1510 with archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images covering the wavelength range 3.6--160 um from the SINGS project to derive accurate dust masses in each galaxy, and in sub--galactic regions in NGC 1512. The two galaxies form a pair consisting of a large, high--metallicity spiral (NGC 1512) and a low metallicity, blue compact dwarf (NGC 1510). The derived total dust masses are (2.4+/-0.6) 10^7 Msun and (1.7+/-3.6) 10^5 Msun for NGC 1512 and NGC 1510, respectively. The derived ratio of dust mass to H I gas mass for the galaxy pair (0.0034) is much lower than expected, while regions within NGC 1512, specifically the central region and the arms, do not show such unusually low ratios; furthermore, the dust--to--gas ratio is within expectations for NGC 1510. These results suggest that a fraction of the H I included in the determination of the M_d/M_HI ratio of the NGC 1512/1510 pair is not associated with the star forming disks/regions of either galax...

  10. DISTANT CLUSTER OF GALAXIES [left

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    constellation Serpens. Based on the colors and the statistical distribution of the galaxies in 3C 324's vicinity, astronomers conclude a remote cluster is at the same distance as a radio galaxy. [center right] This pair of elliptical galaxies, seen together with a few fainter companions, is remarkably similar in shape, light distribution, and color to their present day descendants. This Hubble image provides evidence that ellipticals formed remarkably early in the universe. [top right] Some of the objects in this compact tangled group resemble today's spiral galaxies. However, they have irregular shapes and appear disrupted and asymmetric. This might be due to a high frequency of galaxy collisions and close encounters in the early universe. Credit: Mark Dickinson (STScI) and NASA

  11. Counting pairs of faint galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, D; Richer, H B; Woods, David; Fahlman, Gregory G; Richer, Harvey B

    1995-01-01

    The number of close pairs of galaxies observed to faint magnitude limits, when compared to nearby samples, determines the interaction or merger rate as a function of redshift. The prevalence of mergers at intermediate redshifts is fundamental to understanding how galaxies evolve and the relative population of galaxy types. Mergers have been used to explain the excess of galaxies in faint blue counts above the numbers expected from no-evolution models. Using deep CFHT (I\\leq24) imaging of a ``blank'' field we find a pair fraction which is consistent with the galaxies in our sample being randomly distributed with no significant excess of ``physical'' close pairs. This is contrary to the pair fraction of 34\\%\\pm9\\% found by Burkey {\\it et al.} for similar magnitude limits and using an identical approach to the pair analysis. Various reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Colors and morphologies of our close pairs are consistent with the bulk of them being random superpositions although, as indicators of int...

  12. Blue and White Pot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Many recent archaeological studies have proven that the earliest blue and white porcelain was produced from the kiln in Gongxian County, Henan Province in the Tang Dynasty (618-907). It was an important variety of porcelain available for export then. The early blue and white porcelain in the Yuan Dynasty appeared dark and gray. During the reign of Zhizheng, clear blue and white porcelain was produced, indicating

  13. Luminosity function of galaxies in groups in the SDSS DR7: the dependence on mass, environment and galaxy type

    CERN Document Server

    Zandivarez, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    We perform an analysis of the luminosities of galaxies in groups in the SDSS DR7. We analyse the luminosity function (LF) as a function of group mass for different photometric bands, galaxy populations, galaxy positions within the groups, and the group surrounding large scale density. We find that M* brightens and alpha becomes steeper as a function of mass in all SDSS photometric bands, in agreement with previous results. From the analysis of different galaxy populations, we observe that different methods to split galaxy populations, based on the concentration index or the colour-magnitude diagram, produce quite different behaviours in the luminosity trends, mainly for alpha. These discrepancies and the trends with mass mentioned above are explained when analysing the LF of galaxies classified simultaneously according to their concentrations and colours. We find that only the red spheroids have a LF that strongly depends on group mass. Late type galaxies, whether blue or red, have luminosity functions that d...

  14. Excitation properties of galaxies with the highest [OIII]/[OII] ratios: No evidence for massive escape of ionizing photons

    CERN Document Server

    Stasinska, G; Morisset, C; Guseva, N

    2015-01-01

    The possibility that star-forming galaxies may leak ionizing photons is at the heart of many present-day studies that investigate the reionization of the Universe. We test this hypothesis on local blue compact dwarf galaxies of very high excitation. We assembled a sample of such galaxies by examining the spectra from Data Releases 7 and 10 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We argue that reliable conclusions cannot be based on strong lines alone, and adopt a strategy that includes important weak lines such as [OI] and the high-excitation HeII and [ArIV] lines. Our analysis is based on purely observational diagrams and on a comparison of photoionization models with well-chosen emission-line ratio diagrams. We show that spectral energy distributions from current stellar population synthesis models cannot account for all the observational constraints, which led us to mimick several scenarios that could explain the data. These include the additional presence of hard X-rays or of shocks. We find that only ionization...

  15. A pilot study of the radio-emitting AGN population: the emerging new class of FR0 radio-galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Baldi, Ranieri D; Giovannini, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a pilot JVLA project aimed at studying the bulk of the radio-emitting AGN population, unveiled by the NVSS/FIRST and SDSS surveys.We obtained A-array observations at the JVLA at 1.4, 4.5, and 7.5 GHz for 12 sources of the SDSS/NVSS sample. The radio maps reveal compact unresolved or slightly resolved radio structures on a scale of 1-3 kpc, with only one exception of a FRI/FRII source extended over $\\sim$40 kpc. We isolate the radio core component in most of them. The sample splits into two groups. Four sources have small black hole (BH) masses (mostly $\\sim$10$^{7}$ M$_{\\odot}$) and are hosted by blue galaxies, often showing evidence of a contamination from star formation to their radio emission and associated with radio-quiet AGN. The second group consists in seven radio-loud AGN, which live in red massive ($\\sim10^{11}$ M$_{\\odot}$) early-type galaxies, with large BH masses ($\\gtrsim$10$^{8}$ M$_{\\odot}$), and spectroscopically classified as Low Excitation Galaxies, all characteris...

  16. Relating basic properties of bright early-type dwarf galaxies to their location in Abell 901/902

    CERN Document Server

    Barazza, F D; Gray, M E; Jogee, S; Balogh, M; McIntosh, D H; Bacon, D; Barden, M; Bell, E F; Boehm, A; Caldwell, J A R; Haeussler, B; Heiderman, A; Heymans, C; van Kampen, K Jahnke E; Lane, K; Marinova, I; Meisenheimer, K; Peng, C Y; Sánchez, S F; Taylor, A; Wisotzki, L; Zheng, X

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of the population of bright early-type dwarf galaxies in the multiple-cluster system Abell 901/902. We use data from the STAGES survey and COMBO-17 to investigate the relation between the color and structural properties of the dwarfs and their location in the cluster. The definition of the dwarf sample is based on the central surface brightness and includes galaxies in the luminosity range -16 >= M_B <~-19 mag. Using a fit to the color magnitude relation of the dwarfs, our sample is divided into a red and blue subsample. We find a color-density relation in the projected radial distribution of the dwarf sample: at the same luminosity dwarfs with redder colors are located closer to the cluster centers than their bluer counterparts. Furthermore, the redder dwarfs are on average more compact and rounder than the bluer dwarfs. These findings are consistent with theoretical expectations assuming that bright early-type dwarfs are the remnants of transformed late-type disk galaxies involving pro...

  17. KINEMATICS AND EXCITATION OF THE RAM PRESSURE STRIPPED IONIZED GAS FILAMENTS IN THE COMA CLUSTER OF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of deep imaging and spectroscopic observations of very extended ionized gas (EIG) around four member galaxies of the Coma Cluster of galaxies: RB 199, IC 4040, GMP 2923, and GMP 3071. The EIGs were serendipitously found in an Hα narrowband imaging survey of the central region of the Coma Cluster. The relative radial velocities of the EIGs with respect to the systemic velocities of the parent galaxies from which they emanate increase almost monotonically with the distance from the nucleus of the respective galaxies, reaching ∼ – 400 to – 800 km s–1 at around 40-80 kpc from the galaxies. The one-sided morphologies and the velocity fields of the EIGs are consistent with the predictions of numerical simulations of ram pressure stripping. We found a very low velocity filament (vrel ∼ –1300 km s–1) at the southeastern edge of the disk of IC 4040. Some bright compact knots in the EIGs of RB 199 and IC 4040 exhibit blue continuum and strong Hα emission. The equivalent widths of the Hα emission exceed 200 Å and are greater than 1000 Å for some knots. The emission-line intensity ratios of the knots are basically consistent with those of sub-solar abundance H II regions. These facts indicate that intensive star formation occurs in the knots. Some filaments, including the low-velocity filament of the IC 4040 EIG, exhibit shock-like emission-line spectra, suggesting that shock heating plays an important role in ionization and excitation of the EIGs.

  18. Feeling blue? Blue phosphors for OLEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hungshin Fu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs has been revitalized, partly due to the debut of the OLED TV by SONY in 2008. While there is still plenty of room for improvement in efficiency, cost-effectiveness and longevity, it is timely to report on the advances of light emitting materials, the core of OLEDs, and their future perspectives. The focus of this account is primarily to chronicle the blue phosphors developed in our laboratory. Special attention is paid to the design strategy, synthetic novelty, and their OLED performance. The report also underscores the importance of the interplay between chemistry and photophysics en route to true-blue phosphors.

  19. Two formation channels of UCDs in Hickson Compact Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Da Rocha, C; Georgiev, I Y; Hilker, M; Ziegler, B L; de Oliveira, C Mendes

    2010-01-01

    The formation of ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) is believed to be interaction driven, and UCDs are abundant in the cores of galaxy clusters, environments that mark the end-point of galaxy evolution. Nothing is known about the properties of UCDs in compact groups of galaxies, environments where most of galaxy evolution and interaction is believed to occur and where UCDs in intermediate state of evolution may be expected. The main goal of this study is to detect and characterize, for the first time, the UCD population of compact groups. For that, 2 groups in different evolutionary stages, HCG 22 and HCG 90, were targeted with VLT/FORS2/MXU. We detect 16 and 5 objects belonging to HCG 22 and HCG 90, respectively, covering the magnitude range -10.0 > M_R > -11.5 mag. Their colours are consistent with old ages covering a broad range in metallicities. Photometric mass estimates put 4 objects in HCG 90 and 9 in HCG 22 in the mass range of UCDs (>2x10^6 M_Sun) for an assumed age of 12 Gyr. These UCDs are on aver...

  20. Compact radio cores : from the first black holes to the last

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcke, H; Kording, E; Nagar, NM

    2004-01-01

    One of the clearest signs of black hole activity is the presence of a compact radio core in the nuclei of galaxies. While in the past the focus had been on the few bright and relativistically beamed sources, new surveys now show that essentially all black holes produce compact radio emission that ca

  1. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: first 1000 galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, J. T.; Team, the SAMI Galaxy Survey

    2014-01-01

    The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey is an ongoing project to obtain integral field spectroscopic observations of ~3400 galaxies by mid-2016. Including the pilot survey, a total of ~1000 galaxies have been observed to date, making the SAMI Galaxy Survey the largest of its kind in existence. This unique dataset allows a wide range of investigations into different aspects of galaxy evolution. The first public data from the SAMI Galaxy Survey, consisting o...

  2. Dual Halos and Formation of Early-Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Hong Soo

    2013-01-01

    We present a determination of the two-dimensional shape parameters of the blue and red globular cluster systems (GCSs) in a large number of elliptical galaxies and lenticular galaxies (early-type galaxies, called ETGs). We use a homogeneous data set of the globular clusters in 23 ETGs obtained from the HST/ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. The position angles of both blue and red GCSs show a correlation with those of the stellar light distribution, showing that the major axes of the GCSs are well aligned with those of their host galaxies. However, the shapes of the red GCSs show a tight correlation with the stellar light distribution as well as with the rotation property of their host galaxies, while the shapes of the blue GCSs do much less. These provide clear geometric evidence that the origins of the blue and red globular clusters are distinct and that ETGs may have dual halos: a blue (metal-poor) halo and a red (metal-rich) halo. These two halos show significant differences in metallicity, structure, and kinemati...

  3. Infrared Galaxies in the Nearby Universe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We used the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 5 (DR5) to study the morphological properties of 1137 nearby infrared (IR) galaxies, most of which are brighter than 15.9 mag in r-band. This sample was drawn from a cross-correlation of the Infra-Red Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) point source catalog redshift survey with DR5 at z(≤)0.08. Based on this IR galaxy sample, we constructed five volume-limited sub-samples with IR luminosity ranging from 109.5L⊙ to 1012L⊙. By deriving the IR luminosity functions (LF) for different morphological types, we found that normal spiral galaxies are the dominant population below LIR~ 8 × 1010 L⊙; while the fraction of barred spiral galaxies increases with increasing IR luminosity and becomes dominant in spiral galaxies beyond LIR(≈) 5×1010L⊙. As the IR luminosity decreases, the IR galaxies become more compact and have lower stellar masses. The analysis also shows that normal spiral galaxies give the dominant contribution to the total comoving IR energy density in the nearby universe, while, in contrast, the contribution from peculiar galaxies is only 39%.

  4. Blue Willow Story Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  5. A MEGACAM SURVEY OF OUTER HALO SATELLITES. II. BLUE STRAGGLERS IN THE LOWEST STELLAR DENSITY SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Felipe A.; Munoz, Ricardo R. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Geha, Marla [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Cote, Patrick; Stetson, Peter [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Simon, Joshua D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Djorgovski, S. G., E-mail: fsantana@das.uchile.cl, E-mail: rmunoz@das.uchile.cl [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    We present a homogeneous study of blue straggler stars across 10 outer halo globular clusters, 3 classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and 9 ultra-faint galaxies based on deep and wide-field photometric data taken with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We find blue straggler stars to be ubiquitous among these Milky Way satellites. Based on these data, we can test the importance of primordial binaries or multiple systems on blue straggler star formation in low-density environments. For the outer halo globular clusters, we find an anti-correlation between the specific frequency of blue stragglers and absolute magnitude, similar to that previously observed for inner halo clusters. When plotted against density and encounter rate, the frequency of blue stragglers is well fit by a single trend with a smooth transition between dwarf galaxies and globular clusters; this result points to a common origin for these satellites' blue stragglers. The fraction of blue stragglers stays constant and high in the low encounter rate regime spanned by our dwarf galaxies, and decreases with density and encounter rate in the range spanned by our globular clusters. We find that young stars can mimic blue stragglers in dwarf galaxies only if their ages are 2.5 {+-} 0.5 Gyr and they represent {approx}1%-7% of the total number of stars, which we deem highly unlikely. These results point to mass-transfer or mergers of primordial binaries or multiple systems as the dominant blue straggler formation mechanism in low-density systems.

  6. ATLASGAL --- Complete compact source catalogue: 280\\degr\\ $ <\\ell <$ 60\\degr

    CERN Document Server

    Urquhart, J S; Wyrowski, F; Schuller, F; Bontemps, S; Bronfman, L; Menten, K M; Walmsley, C M; Contreras, Y; Beuther, H; Wienen, M; Linz, H

    2014-01-01

    The APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) is the largest and most sensitive systematic survey of the inner Galactic plane in the submillimetre wavelength regime. The observations were carried out with the Large APEX Bolometer Camera (LABOCA), an array of 295 bolometers observing at 870\\,$\\mu$m (345 GHz). Aim: In this research note we present the compact source catalogue for the 280\\degr\\ $ <\\ell <$ 330\\degr\\ and 21\\degr\\ $ <\\ell <$ 60\\degr\\ regions of this survey. Method: The construction of this catalogue was made with the source extraction routine \\sex\\ using the same input parameters and procedures used to analyse the inner Galaxy region presented in an earlier publication (i.e., 330\\degr\\ $ <\\ell <$ 21\\degr). Results: We have identified 3523 compact sources and present a catalogue of their properties. When combined with the regions already published this provides a comprehensive and unbiased database of ~10163 massive, dense clumps located across the inner Galaxy.

  7. From blue jeans to blue genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka

    2009-03-01

    Cutaneous venous anomalies are common. They are blue and vary in size, number, and location and account for most consultations at specialized interdisciplinary clinics for vascular anomalies. Venous lesions are clinically important because they cause pain, dysfunction, destruction of adjacent tissues, and esthetic concern. Only resection and sclerotherapy are helpful, although not always curative. Understanding etiopathogenesis could help design animal models and develop novel therapeutic approaches. John B. Mulliken, MD, envisioned a project to uncover the genetic basis of an inherited form of venous malformation in a large New England family. Recruitment of 2 young fellows resulted in a collaborative project that unraveled the searched-for gene and its mutation. This was an opening for a new era in vascular anomalies. Two blue genes' mutations were discovered, which account for most, if not all, of the inherited forms of venous anomalies, but other genes as well, for rheologically diverse lesions. Differential diagnosis and management has improved, and animal models are being made. This was achieved through the help of Dr Mulliken, who inspired 2 young investigators in blue jeans to find 2 blue genes.

  8. Analysis of 'Coma strip' galaxy redshift catalog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results of the analysis of a galaxy redshift catalog made at the 6-m telescope by Karachentsev and Kopylov (1990. Mon. Not. R. astr. Soc., 243, 390). The catalog covers a long narrow strip on the sky (10 arcmin by 630) and lists 283 galaxies up to limiting blue magnitude mB = 17.6. The strip goes through the core of Coma cluster and this is called the 'Coma strip' catalog. The catalog is almost two times deeper than the CfA redshift survey and creates the possibility of studying the galaxy distribution on scales of 100-250 Mpc. Due to the small number of galaxies in the catalog, we were able to estimate only very general and stable parameters of the distribution. (author)

  9. The stellar-to-halo mass relations of local galaxies segregated by color

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Puebla, A; Yang, X; Foucaud, S; Drory, N; Jing, Y P

    2014-01-01

    We derive the stellar-to-halo mass relations, SHMR, of local blue and red central galaxies separately, as well as the fraction of halos hosting blue/red central galaxies. We find that: 1) the SHMR of central galaxies is segregated by color, with blue centrals having a SHMR above the one of red centrals; at logMh~12, the Ms/Mh ratio of the blue centrals is ~0.05, which is ~1.7 times larger than the value of red centrals. 2) The intrinsic scatters of the SHMRs of red and blue centrals are ~0.14 and ~0.11dex, respectively. The intrinsic scatter of the average SHMR of all central galaxies changes from ~0.20dex to ~0.14dex in the 11.3blue centrals at Mh=1E11Msun is 87%, but at 2x1E12Msun decays to ~20%, approaching to a few per cents at higher masses. The characteristic mass at which this fraction is the same for blue and red galaxies is Mh~7x1E11Msun. Our results suggest that the SHMR of central galaxies at large masses is shaped by halo mass quenching (like...

  10. Galaxy Outflows Without Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, Sharanya; Ostriker, Eve C

    2016-01-01

    High surface density, rapidly star-forming galaxies are observed to have $\\approx 50-100\\,{\\rm km\\,s^{-1}}$ line-of-sight velocity dispersions, which are much higher than expected from supernova driving alone, but may arise from large-scale gravitational instabilities. Using three-dimensional simulations of local regions of the interstellar medium, we explore the impact of high velocity dispersions that arise from these disk instabilities. Parametrizing disks by their surface densities and epicyclic frequencies, we conduct a series of simulations that probe a broad range of conditions. Turbulence is driven purely horizontally and on large scales, neglecting any energy input from supernovae. We find that such motions lead to strong global outflows in the highly-compact disks that were common at high redshifts, but weak or negligible mass loss in the more diffuse disks that are prevalent today. Substantial outflows are generated if the one-dimensional horizontal velocity dispersion exceeds $\\approx 35\\,{\\rm km\\...

  11. Induced galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Dokuchaev, V; Rubin, S; Dokuchaev, Vyacheslav; Eroshenko, Yury; Rubin, Sergei

    2004-01-01

    We describe the model of protogalaxy formation around the cluster of primordial black holes with a minimum extension of standard cosmological model. Namely, it is supposed, that a mass fraction of the universe ~10^-3 is composed of the compact clusters of primordial (relict) black holes produced during the phase transitions in the early universe. These clusters are the centers of the dark matter (DM) condensations. As a result the protogalaxies with a mass 2x10^8Msun form at the redshift z=15. These induced protogalaxies contain the central black holes of mass ~10^5Msun and look like the dwarf spheroidal galaxies with a central density spike. Subsequent merging of the induced protogalaxies and ordinary DM haloes leads to the standard scenario of the large scale structure formation. Black holes merging gives the nowadays supermassive black holes and reproduces the observed correlations between their masses and velocity dispersions in the bulges.

  12. Large-scale HI in nearby radio galaxies : segregation in neutral gas content with radio source size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonts, B. H. C.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; van der Hulst, J. M.; van Moorsel, G.; Tadhunter, C. N.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of a study of neutral hydrogen ( HI) in a complete sample of nearby non-cluster radio galaxies. We find that radio galaxies with large amounts of extended HI (M-HI >= 109 M-circle dot) all have a compact radio source. The host galaxies of the more extended radio sources, all of Fa

  13. Recovering dark-matter clustering from galaxies with Gaussianization

    CERN Document Server

    McCullagh, Nuala; Norberg, Peder; Cole, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    The Gaussianization transform has been proposed as a method to remove the issues of scale-dependent galaxy bias and nonlinearity from galaxy clustering statistics, but these benefits have yet to be thoroughly tested for realistic galaxy samples. In this paper, we test the effectiveness of the Gaussianization transform for different galaxy types by applying it to realistic simulated blue and red galaxy samples. We show that in real space, the shapes of the Gaussianized power spectra of both red and blue galaxies agree with that of the underlying dark matter, with the initial power spectrum, and with each other to smaller scales than do the statistics of the usual (untransformed) density field. However, we find that the agreement in the Gaussianized statistics breaks down in redshift space. We attribute this to the fact that red and blue galaxies exhibit very different fingers of god in redshift space. After applying a finger-of-god compression, the agreement on small scales between the Gaussianized power spect...

  14. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): merging galaxies and their properties

    CERN Document Server

    De Propris, Roberto; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Driver, Simon P; Hopkins, Andrew M; Kelvin, Lee; Loveday, Jon; Phillipps, Steve; Robotham, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    We derive the close pair fractions and volume merger rates as a function of luminosity and morphology for galaxies in the GAMA survey with -23 < M(r) < -17 at 0.01 < z < 0.22. The merger fraction is about 0.015 at all luminosities (assuming 1/2 of pairs merge) and the volume merger rate is about 0.00035 per cubic Mpc per Gyr. Dry mergers (between red or spheroidal galaxies) are uncommon and decrease with decreasing luminosity. Fainter mergers are wet, between blue or disky galaxies. Damp mergers (one of each type) follow the average of dry and wet mergers. In the brighter luminosity bin (-23 < M(r) < -20) the merger rate evolution is flat, irrespective of colour or morphology. The makeup of the merging population does not change since z = 0.2. Major mergers and dry mergers appear comparatively unimportant in the buildup of the red sequence over the past 2 Gyr. We compare the colour, morphology, environmental density and degree of activity of galaxies in pairs to those of more isolated object...

  15. S0 galaxies in Formax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bedregal...[], A. G.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Merrifield, M. R.;

    2006-01-01

    Galaxies: elliptical and lenticular, cD: galaxies: kinematics and dynamics Udgivelsesdato: Oct.1......Galaxies: elliptical and lenticular, cD: galaxies: kinematics and dynamics Udgivelsesdato: Oct.1...

  16. Mapping the Milky Way Galaxy with LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Jose A.; Littenberg, Tyson

    2012-01-01

    Gravitational wave detectors in the mHz band (such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, or LISA) will observe thousands of compact binaries in the galaxy which can be used to better understand the structure of the Milky Way. To test the effectiveness of LISA to measure the distribution of the galaxy, we simulated the Close White Dwarf Binary (CWDB) gravitational wave sky using different models for the Milky Way. To do so, we have developed a galaxy density distribution modeling code based on the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. The code uses different distributions to construct realizations of the galaxy. We then use the Fisher Information Matrix to estimate the variance and covariance of the recovered parameters for each detected CWDB. This is the first step toward characterizing the capabilities of space-based gravitational wave detectors to constrain models for galactic structure, such as the size and orientation of the bar in the center of the Milky Way

  17. Star clusters as tracers of galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S

    2009-01-01

    Star clusters represent the most common 'mode' of star formation. They are found in all types of environments, cascading down from galaxy groups and merging pairs through starbursts to normal galaxies and dwarves and even isolated regions in extragalactic space. As they maintain a link to the overall star formation in a system, they can be used as tracers of the star formation history of environments located at distances prohibitive to the study of individual stars. This makes them ideally suited to the study of mergers and interactions in galaxy pairs and groups. In this work we present observations of the star cluster populations in the local starburst galaxy M82, post-interaction spiral NGC 6872, the "Antennae" merging pair and two compact groups, "Stephan's Quintet" and HCG 7. In each case, we extract information on the clusters and their hosts using mainly HST photometry and Gemini spectroscopy.

  18. Blue ocean strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2004-10-01

    Despite a long-term decline in the circus industry, Cirque du Soleil profitably increased revenue 22-fold over the last ten years by reinventing the circus. Rather than competing within the confines of the existing industry or trying to steal customers from rivals, Cirque developed uncontested market space that made the competition irrelevant. Cirque created what the authors call a blue ocean, a previously unknown market space. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profitable and rapid. In red oceans--that is, in all the industries already existing--companies compete by grabbing for a greater share of limited demand. As the market space gets more crowded, prospects for profits and growth decline. Products turn into commodities, and increasing competition turns the water bloody. There are two ways to create blue oceans. One is to launch completely new industries, as eBay did with online auctions. But it's much more common for a blue ocean to be created from within a red ocean when a company expands the boundaries of an existing industry. In studying more than 150 blue ocean creations in over 30 industries, the authors observed that the traditional units of strategic analysis--company and industry--are of limited use in explaining how and why blue oceans are created. The most appropriate unit of analysis is the strategic move, the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market-creating business offering. Creating blue oceans builds brands. So powerful is blue ocean strategy, in fact, that a blue ocean strategic move can create brand equity that lasts for decades. PMID:15559577

  19. Blue ocean strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2004-10-01

    Despite a long-term decline in the circus industry, Cirque du Soleil profitably increased revenue 22-fold over the last ten years by reinventing the circus. Rather than competing within the confines of the existing industry or trying to steal customers from rivals, Cirque developed uncontested market space that made the competition irrelevant. Cirque created what the authors call a blue ocean, a previously unknown market space. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profitable and rapid. In red oceans--that is, in all the industries already existing--companies compete by grabbing for a greater share of limited demand. As the market space gets more crowded, prospects for profits and growth decline. Products turn into commodities, and increasing competition turns the water bloody. There are two ways to create blue oceans. One is to launch completely new industries, as eBay did with online auctions. But it's much more common for a blue ocean to be created from within a red ocean when a company expands the boundaries of an existing industry. In studying more than 150 blue ocean creations in over 30 industries, the authors observed that the traditional units of strategic analysis--company and industry--are of limited use in explaining how and why blue oceans are created. The most appropriate unit of analysis is the strategic move, the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market-creating business offering. Creating blue oceans builds brands. So powerful is blue ocean strategy, in fact, that a blue ocean strategic move can create brand equity that lasts for decades.

  20. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; OUCHI, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.