WorldWideScience

Sample records for blooms connecting sources

  1. Environmental controls, oceanography and population dynamics of pathogens and harmful algal blooms: connecting sources to human exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minnett Peter

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Coupled physical-biological models are capable of linking the complex interactions between environmental factors and physical hydrodynamics to simulate the growth, toxicity and transport of infectious pathogens and harmful algal blooms (HABs. Such simulations can be used to assess and predict the impact of pathogens and HABs on human health. Given the widespread and increasing reliance of coastal communities on aquatic systems for drinking water, seafood and recreation, such predictions are critical for making informed resource management decisions. Here we identify three challenges to making this connection between pathogens/HABs and human health: predicting concentrations and toxicity; identifying the spatial and temporal scales of population and ecosystem interactions; and applying the understanding of population dynamics of pathogens/HABs to management strategies. We elaborate on the need to meet each of these challenges, describe how modeling approaches can be used and discuss strategies for moving forward in addressing these challenges.

  2. Satellite Remote Sensing and Crowd Sourcing to Monitor and Predict Cyanobacteria Blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyanobacterial blooms occur worldwide and are associated with human respiratory irritation, undesirable taste and odor of potable water, increased drinking water treatment costs, loss of revenue from recreational use, and human illness as a result of ingestion or skin exposure du...

  3. Effects of auxiliary source connections in multichip power module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Helong; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Beczkowski, Szymon;

    2016-01-01

    Auxiliary source bond wires and connections are widely used to in the power module with paralleled MOSFETs or IGBTs. This paper investigates the working mechanism and the effects of the auxiliary source connections in multichip power modules. It reveals that the auxiliary source connections cannot...

  4. SCoT: A Python Toolbox for EEG Source Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eBillinger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of brain connectivity has become an important research tool in neuroscience. Connectivity can be estimated between cortical sources reconstructed from the electroencephalogram (EEG. Such analysis often relies on trial averaging to obtain reliable results. However, some applications such as brain-computer interfaces (BCIs require single-trial estimation methods.In this paper, we present SCoT – a source connectivity toolbox for Python. This toolbox implements routines for blind source decomposition and connectivity estimation with theMVARICA approach. Additionally, a novel extension called CSPVARICA is available for labeled data. SCoT estimates connectivity from various spectral measures relying on vector autoregressive (VAR models. Optionally, these VAR models can be regularized to facilitate ill posed applications such as single-trial fitting.We demonstrate basic usage of SCoT on motor imagery (MI data. Furthermore, we show simulation results of utilizing SCoT for feature extraction in a BCI application. These results indicate that CSPVARICA and correct regularization can significantly improve MI classification. While SCoT was mainly designed for application in BCIs, it contains useful tools for other areas of neuroscience. SCoT is a software package that (1 brings combined source decomposition and connectivtiy estimation to the open Python platform, and (2 offers tools for single-trial connectivity estimation. The source code is released under the MIT license and is available online at github.com/SCoT-dev/SCoT.

  5. Source apportionment and dynamic changes of carbonaceous aerosols during the haze bloom-decay process in China based on radiocarbon and organic molecular tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junwen; Li, Jun; Liu, Di; Ding, Ping; Shen, Chengde; Mo, Yangzhi; Wang, Xinming; Luo, Chunling; Cheng, Zhineng; Szidat, Sönke; Zhang, Yanlin; Chen, Yingjun; Zhang, Gan

    2016-03-01

    Fine carbonaceous aerosols (CAs) is the key factor influencing the currently filthy air in megacities in China, yet few studies simultaneously focus on the origins of different CAs species using specific and powerful source tracers. Here, we present a detailed source apportionment for various CAs fractions, including organic carbon (OC), water-soluble OC (WSOC), water-insoluble OC (WIOC), elemental carbon (EC) and secondary OC (SOC) in the largest cities of North (Beijing, BJ) and South China (Guangzhou, GZ), using the measurements of radiocarbon and anhydrosugars. Results show that non-fossil fuel sources such as biomass burning and biogenic emission make a significant contribution to the total CAs in Chinese megacities: 56 ± 4 in BJ and 46 ± 5 % in GZ, respectively. The relative contributions of primary fossil carbon from coal and liquid petroleum combustions, primary non-fossil carbon and secondary organic carbon (SOC) to total carbon are 19, 28 and 54 % in BJ, and 40, 15 and 46 % in GZ, respectively. Non-fossil fuel sources account for 52 in BJ and 71 % in GZ of SOC, respectively. These results suggest that biomass burning has a greater influence on regional particulate air pollution in North China than in South China. We observed an unabridged haze bloom-decay process in South China, which illustrates that both primary and secondary matter from fossil sources played a key role in the blooming phase of the pollution episode, while haze phase is predominantly driven by fossil-derived secondary organic matter and nitrate.

  6. Graph analysis of spontaneous brain network using EEG source connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Kabbara, Aya; Falou, Wassim El; Khalil, Mohamad; Wendling, Fabrice; Hassan, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Exploring the human brain networks during rest is a topic of great interest. Several structural and functional studies have previously been conducted to study the intrinsic brain networks. In this paper, we focus on investigating the human brain network topology using dense Electroencephalography (EEG) source connectivity approach. We applied graph theoretical methods on functional networks reconstructed from resting state data acquired using EEG in 14 healthy subjects. Our findings confirmed...

  7. Incorporating priors for EEG source imaging and connectivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu eLei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography source imaging (ESI is a useful technique to localize the generators from a given scalp electric measurement and to investigate the temporal dynamics of the large-scale neural circuits. By introducing reasonable priors from other modalities, ESI reveals the most probable sources and communication structures at every moment in time. Here, we review the available priors from such techniques as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, functional MRI (fMRI, and positron emission tomography (PET. The modality's specific contribution is analyzed from the perspective of source reconstruction. For spatial priors, such as EEG-correlated fMRI, temporally coherent networks and resting-state fMRI are systematically introduced in the ESI. Moreover, the fiber tracking (diffusion tensor imaging, DTI and neuro-stimulation techniques (transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS are also introduced as the potential priors, which can help to draw inferences about the neuroelectric connectivity in the source space. We conclude that combining EEG source imaging with other complementary modalities is a promising approach towards the study of brain networks in cognitive and clinical neurosciences.

  8. Harmful algal blooms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.R.; PrabhaDevi; DeSouza, L.; Verlecar, X.N.; Naik, C.G.

    as harmful algal bloom. Bloom formation is a natural process and it enhances biological productivity, but turns worrisome when caused by toxic species, leading to massive fish mortalities and hazards to human health. Incidences of'red tide' are increasing...

  9. Cortical current source connectivity by means of partial coherence fields

    CERN Document Server

    Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Valdes-Sosa, Pedro A; Bosch-Bayard, Jorge; Riera-Diaz, Jorge J

    2011-01-01

    An important field of research in functional neuroimaging is the discovery of integrated, distributed brain systems and networks, whose different regions need to work in unison for normal functioning. The EEG is a non-invasive technique that can provide information for massive connectivity analyses. Cortical signals of time varying electric neuronal activity can be estimated from the EEG. Although such techniques have very high time resolution, two cortical signals even at distant locations will appear to be highly similar due to the low spatial resolution nature of the EEG. In this study a method for eliminating the effect of common sources due to low spatial resolution is presented. It is based on an efficient estimation of the whole-cortex partial coherence matrix. Using as a starting point any linear EEG tomography that satisfies the EEG forward equation, it is shown that the generalized partial coherences for the cortical grey matter current density time series are invariant to the selected tomography. I...

  10. The necessity of management in a lake of the Atlantic Forest biodiversity hotspot: nitrogen levels connected to a persistent bloom of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleber Cunha Figueredo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Conservational studies of the threatened Atlantic Forest biome are frequently restricted to terrestrial ecosystems. We know little about the water bodies, specially considering that this biome covers the third largest system of lakes in Brazil. Some of these lakes are located inside the protected "Rio Doce State Park", but many others are found outside this reserve. These external lakes are seldom studied, but understanding their response to human activities is essential for the conservation and the protection of the lakes inside the Park. We evaluated the effects of degradation in a lake outside the Park, which shows a constant bloom of the toxic invasive cyanobacteria Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii. Phytoplankton, climate and physico-chemical variables were assessed from 2011 to 2013 to evaluate which were the major determinants of the lake dynamics. Despite the seasonal changes, the lake was always eutrophic, and cyanobacteria, transparency and nutrients were the major indicators of water characteristics. The lake seems to be nitrogen-limited and cyanobacteria were negatively correlated with nitrogen levels, since the constantly dominant C. raciborskii is a superior competitor for N. We suggest that the monitoring of nitrogen levels is fundamental to establish management strategies to avoid harmful algae blooms in this Atlantic Forest lake.

  11. Subsurface phytoplankton blooms fuel pelagic production in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Kathrine; Visser, Andre; Pedersen, Flemming

    2000-01-01

    The seasonal phytoplankton biomass distribution pattern in stratified temperate marine waters is traditionally depicted as consisting of spring and autumn blooms. The energy source supporting pelagic summer production is believed to be the spring bloom. However, the spring bloom disappears...... relatively quickly from the water column and a large proportion of the material sedimenting to the bottom following the spring bloom is often comprised of intact phytoplankton cells. Thus, it is easy to argue that the spring bloom is fueling the energy demands of the benthos, but more difficult to argue...... convincingly that energy fixed during the spring bloom is fueling the pelagic production occurring during summer months. We argue here that periodic phytoplankton blooms are occurring during the summer in the North Sea at depths of >25 m and that the accumulated new production [sensu (Dugdale and Goering...

  12. Absolutely connected sets of standard radiation sources for dissemination of the activity unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sealed gamma sources and plane beta sources to be used as reference standards have been produced in such a way that in connecting measurements certain corrections have been avoided (e.g. self-absorption) or can be eliminated (e.g. backscattering). The production of the radiation sources and the technique of absolute connection to the primary standard of the activity unit are described for one set of gamma and beta radiation sources each, and a survey of the standard radiation source sets available is given, considering nuclides, type of source, activity and measuring accuracy. (author)

  13. Environmental problems connected to the use of renewable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of FER (renewable energy sources) can represent a fundamental answer to the growing energy need and the requirement for a new environmental quality. Also the renewable sources, however, have an environmental cost, whose amount can be considered of little importance at a world balance, but can have a large impact at a local level. Among FER the author has chosen hydroelectric source, biomass and wind energy, since they are most effective according to the aims of this discussion

  14. Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Eighth Annual National Conference on Health Communication, Marketing & Media August 19-21, 2014 Atlanta, GA Harmful Algal Blooms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this Page What's the ...

  15. Mapping of Escherichia coli Sources Connected to Waterways in the Ruamahanga Catchment, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymond, John R; Serezat, Dimitri; Ausseil, Anne-Gaelle E; Muirhead, Richard W

    2016-02-16

    Rivers and streams in New Zealand are natural with free access and used by many people for swimming and fishing. However, pastoral farming with free grazing animals is a common land use in New Zealand and faecal microorganisms from them often end up in waterways. These microorganisms can seriously affect human and animal health if ingested. This paper describes spatial modeling using GIS of Escherichia coli sources in a large catchment (350 000 ha), the Ruamahanga. By examining the pathway of water over and through soils, it is possible to determine whether E. coli sources are connected to waterways or not. The map of E. coli sources connected to waterways provides useful context to those setting water quality limits. This approach avoids the complexity of modeling the fate and transport of E. coli in waterways, yet still permits the assessment of catchment-wide mitigation and best management practice. Fencing of waterways would minimize E. coli sources directly defecated to water and would reduce total E. coli sources by approximately 35%. Introduction of dung beetles would minimize sources connected to waterways by overland flow and would reduce total E. coli sources by approximately 35%. Construction of dairy effluent ponds would minimize sources connected to waterways through high bypass flow in soils and would reduce total E. coli sources by approximately 25%. PMID:26771227

  16. Connecting mercury science to policy: from sources to seafood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Celia Y; Driscoll, Charles T; Lambert, Kathleen F; Mason, Robert P; Sunderland, Elsie M

    2016-03-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global contaminant whose presence in the biosphere has been increased by human activity, particularly coal burning/energy production, mining, especially artisanal scale gold mining, and other industrial activities. Mercury input to the surface ocean has doubled over the past century leading governments and organizations to take actions to protect humans from the harmful effects of this toxic element. Recently, the UN Environmental Program led 128 countries to negotiate and sign a legally binding agreement, the 2013 Minimata Convention, to control Hg emissions and releases to land and water globally. In an effort to communicate science to this emerging international policy, the Dartmouth Superfund Research Program formed the Coastal and Marine Mercury Ecosystem Research Collaborative (C-MERC) in 2010 that brought together more than 70 scientists and policy experts to analyze and synthesize the science on Hg pollution in the marine environment from Hg sources to MeHg in seafood. The synthesis of the science revealed that the sources and inputs of Hg and their pathways to human exposure are largely determined by ecosystem spatial scales and that these spatial scales determine the organizational level of policies. The paper summarizes the four major findings of the report. PMID:26820177

  17. Allan Bloom's Quarrel with History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Allan Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind." Concludes that despite cranky comments about bourgeois culture, the focus of Bloom's attack is on historicism, which undercuts his nostalgic vision of a prosperous and just America. Condemns Bloom's exclusion of Blacks, Hispanics, and women from America's cultural heritage. (DMM)

  18. Connecting Lunar Meteorites to Source Terrains on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Carpenter, P. K.; Korotev, R. L.; North-Valencia, S. N.; Wittmann, A.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    key questions is whether the mafic materials are ferroan or magnesian, which remote sensing does not clearly distinguish, and if mafic, whether they might contain mantlederived components such as olivine (dunite). Many but not all have mainly ferroan mafic components, consistent with a ferroan crustal source that is complementary to the ferroan anorthositic suite and that represents primary magma-ocean-derived feldspathic crust. Meteorites such as ALH 81005 [5] and Shisr 161 [6], however, contain coarse-grained magnesian mafic clasts (Fig. 1a) derived from deeply seated and melted material associated with impact basins. Comparison to LP gamma-ray data [2] supports an origin for magnesian feldspathic meteorites such as these (e.g., Shisr 161) as shown in Fig. 1b. Sayh al Uhaymir (SaU) 169. Another distinctive but much less common composition is represented by relatively mafic impact-melt breccia that is rich in incompatible elements known as KREEP. These meteorites can be related to the western nearside Procellarum KREEP Terrane, especially through a combination of Fe and Th contents. Among the most enriched is SaU 169, which has been related to high- Th impact-melt breccia found at the Apollo 12 site [7]. Through detailed EPMA and ion microprobe analysis we have shown that these two rock types are related in age and origin.

  19. Topical problems connected with the German act on electricity from renewable energy sources (StrEG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German act (StrEG) intended to enhance the use of renewable energy sources for electricity generation and to promote the relevant technologies raises some problems in connection with constitutional law that still await judicial review by the German Federal Constitutional Court. In addition, doubts as to the lawfulness of provisions of the act have been emerging in connection with EC laws governing the regime of subsidies and state aid. The article here summarizes the current situation. (orig./CB)

  20. Resting State Functional Connectivity MRI among Spectral MEG Current Sources in Children on the Autism Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datko, Michael; Gougelet, Robert; Huang, Ming-Xiong; Pineda, Jaime A

    2016-01-01

    Social and communicative impairments are among the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and a great deal of evidence supports the notion that these impairments are associated with aberrant functioning and connectivity of various cortical networks. The present study explored the links between sources of MEG amplitude in various frequency bands and functional connectivity MRI in the resting state. The goal of combining these modalities was to use sources of neural oscillatory activity, measured with MEG, as functionally relevant seed regions for a more traditional pairwise fMRI connectivity analysis. We performed a seed-based connectivity analysis on resting state fMRI data, using seed regions derived from frequency-specific amplitude sources in resting state MEG data in the same nine subjects with ASD (10-17 years of age). We then compared fMRI connectivity among these MEG-source-derived regions between participants with autism and typically developing, age-matched controls. We used a source modeling technique designed for MEG data to detect significant amplitude sources in six frequency bands: delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (12-30 Hz), low gamma (30-60 Hz), and high gamma (60-120 Hz). MEG-derived source maps for each participant were co-registered in standard MNI space, and group-level source maps were obtained for each frequency. For each frequency band, the 10 largest clusters resulting from these t-tests were used as regions of interest (ROIs) for the fMRI functional connectivity analysis. Pairwise BOLD signal correlations were obtained between each pair of these ROIs for each frequency band. Each pairwise correlation was compared between the ASD and TD groups using t-tests. We also constrained these pairwise correlations to known network structures, resulting in a follow-up set of correlation matrices specific to each network we considered. Frequency-specific MEG sources had distinct patterns of fMRI resting state functional

  1. Granger causal time-dependent source connectivity in the somatosensory network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin; Sommerlade, Linda; Coffman, Brian; Zhang, Tongsheng; Stephen, Julia M.; Li, Dichen; Wang, Jue; Grebogi, Celso; Schelter, Bjoern

    2015-05-01

    Exploration of transient Granger causal interactions in neural sources of electrophysiological activities provides deeper insights into brain information processing mechanisms. However, the underlying neural patterns are confounded by time-dependent dynamics, non-stationarity and observational noise contamination. Here we investigate transient Granger causal interactions using source time-series of somatosensory evoked magnetoencephalographic (MEG) elicited by air puff stimulation of right index finger and recorded using 306-channel MEG from 21 healthy subjects. A new time-varying connectivity approach, combining renormalised partial directed coherence with state space modelling, is employed to estimate fast changing information flow among the sources. Source analysis confirmed that somatosensory evoked MEG was mainly generated from the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex (SI) and bilateral secondary somatosensory cortices (SII). Transient Granger causality shows a serial processing of somatosensory information, 1) from contralateral SI to contralateral SII, 2) from contralateral SI to ipsilateral SII, 3) from contralateral SII to contralateral SI, and 4) from contralateral SII to ipsilateral SII. These results are consistent with established anatomical connectivity between somatosensory regions and previous source modeling results, thereby providing empirical validation of the time-varying connectivity analysis. We argue that the suggested approach provides novel information regarding transient cortical dynamic connectivity, which previous approaches could not assess.

  2. Late Blooming or Language Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Careers Certification Publications Events Advocacy Continuing Education Practice Management Research Home / Information for the Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Late Blooming or ...

  3. A New Bloom: Transforming Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, David; Conklin, Jack

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a new design for the classic Bloom's Taxonomy developed by Anderson, L. W. & Krathwohl, D. (2001), which can be used to evaluate learners' technology-enhanced experience in more powerful and critical ways. The New Bloom's Taxonomy incorporates contemporary research on learning and human cognition into its model. The original…

  4. Combining EEG source connectivity and network similarity: Application to object categorization in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Mheich, Ahmad; Hassan, Mahmoud; Dufor, Olivier; Khalil, Mohamad; Wendling, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge in cognitive neuroscience is to evaluate the ability of the human brain to categorize or group visual stimuli based on common features. This categorization process is very fast and occurs in few hundreds of millisecond time scale. However, an accurate tracking of the spatiotemporal dynamics of large-scale brain networks is still an unsolved issue. Here, we show the combination of recently developed method called dense-EEG source connectivity to identify functional brain netw...

  5. Optimal DG Source Allocation for Grid Connected Distributed Generation with Energy Storage System

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ezhilarasan; P. Palanivel; S. Sambath

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes an Energy Management System (EMS) for allocation of DG source in a grid connected hybrid power system. Modeling and simulation for EMS is implemented using MATLAB/SIMULINK package. The objective of proposed EMS for micro grid is to optimize the fuel cost, improving the energy utilization efficiency and to manage the peak load demand by scheduling the generation according to the availability of the fuel. The proposed intelligent energy management system is designed to optim...

  6. Dynamics of voltage source converter in a grid connected solar photovoltaic system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haribabu, Divyanagalakshmi; Vangari, Adithya; Sakamuri, Jayachandra N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper emphasises the modelling and control of a voltage source converter (VSC) for three phase grid connected PV system. The transfer functions for inner current control and outer DC link voltage control for VSC are derived. The controllers for VSC are designed based on PI and K factor control...... conditions. The effectiveness of the proposed controller is illustrated by evaluating the response of PV system for power system voltage sag and swell conditions as well as grid faults....

  7. Open-Source, Web-Based Dashboard Components for DICOM Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Catalina; Pineda, Julian; Rascovsky, Simon; Arango, Andres

    2016-08-01

    The administration of a DICOM network within an imaging healthcare institution requires tools that allow for monitoring of connectivity and availability for adequate uptime measurements and help guide technology management strategies. We present the implementation of an open-source widget for the Dashing framework that provides basic dashboard functionality allowing for monitoring of a DICOM network using network "ping" and DICOM "C-ECHO" operations. PMID:26856347

  8. Beamformer source analysis and connectivity on concurrent EEG and MEG data during voluntary movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuraman Muthuraman

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG and magnetoencephalography (MEG are the two modalities for measuring neuronal dynamics at a millisecond temporal resolution. Different source analysis methods, to locate the dipoles in the brain from which these dynamics originate, have been readily applied to both modalities alone. However, direct comparisons and possible advantages of combining both modalities have rarely been assessed during voluntary movements using coherent source analysis. In the present study, the cortical and sub-cortical network of coherent sources at the finger tapping task frequency (2-4 Hz and the modes of interaction within this network were analysed in 15 healthy subjects using a beamformer approach called the dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS with subsequent source signal reconstruction and renormalized partial directed coherence analysis (RPDC. MEG and EEG data were recorded simultaneously allowing the comparison of each of the modalities separately to that of the combined approach. We found the identified network of coherent sources for the finger tapping task as described in earlier studies when using only the MEG or combined MEG+EEG whereas the EEG data alone failed to detect single sub-cortical sources. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR level of the coherent rhythmic activity at the tapping frequency in MEG and combined MEG+EEG data was significantly higher than EEG alone. The functional connectivity analysis revealed that the combined approach had more active connections compared to either of the modalities during the finger tapping (FT task. These results indicate that MEG is superior in the detection of deep coherent sources and that the SNR seems to be more vital than the sensitivity to theoretical dipole orientation and the volume conduction effect in the case of EEG.

  9. Remote Sensing and the Vertical Distribution of the Chrysochromulina Polylepsis Bloom in the Skagerak in 1988

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, K.; Lindell, T.; G. Larsen; Nisell, J.

    1991-01-01

    The present study contributes to explain the development of the C. polylepsis bloom and to evaluatethe importance of combined use of in situ monitoring and remote sensing techniques. The results show the difficulties to map the surface distribution of C. polylepsis via satellitedata and to judge the primary sources of water to the area. However, the satellite data indicate the temperature to be a possible prime factor in theacceleration of the bloom. In the later phase of the bloom, the C. po...

  10. Connectivity from source to sink in a lowland area: the Loire river basin (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Aurore; Cerdan, Olivier; Degan, Francesca; Salvador, Sebastien

    2014-05-01

    Sediment connectivity relates to the transfer of sediments from sources to sinks via runoff and in channel transport. It is highly dependent on spatial variability of landscape properties such as differences in morphology, land use and infiltration/runoff characteristics but may also vary in time due to differences in rainfall amount/intensity and changes in vegetation cover throughout the year. In the Loire river basin, we found that sediment fluxes displayed strong variations in space but also at the interannual and seasonnal time scales (Gay et al. 2013). In this context, our goal is to better understand and quantify hillslope sediment redistributions within this lowland area thanks to the use of semi distributed connectivity approach. To this aim, Borselli's index of connectivity (IC, Borselli et al., 2008) is selected to assess hillslope connectivity at annual and seasonal time scales. Several improvements are proposed to take into account the coupling of the structural landscape connectivity and its hydrosedimentary response. Parameters such as rainfall intensity and differences in seasonal land cover are integrated into the model to account for landscape variations through time. Infiltration and runoff indices were also tested. Preliminary results confirm the variability of landscape connectivity throughout the year. The integration of the index of infiltration and runoff properties of landscape (IDPR) as defined by Mardhel et al. 2004 seems to improve the IC model outputs. From this first step, in-stream sediment connectivity index should be developed for a better understanding and assessment of sediment redistributions at the entire catchment scale. L. Borselli L., Cassi P., Torri D. Prolegomena to sediment and flow connectivity in the landscape: a GIS and field numerical assessment. Catena, 75 (2008), pp. 268-277 Gay A., Cerdan O., Delmas M., Desmet M., Variability of sediment yields in the Loire river basin (France): the role of small scale catchments

  11. Algal Bloom: Boon or Bane?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Algal blooms occur in response to nutrient deplete or replete conditions. Nitrogen fixing forms proliferate under oligotrophic conditions when nutrient levels are low. Replete conditions in response to upwelling creates the most biologically...

  12. OSU MODIS FLH Bloom Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Two bloom products were developed for the Oregon coast based on the observed change between running 8-day composite chlorophyll-a (CHL) and fluorescence line-height...

  13. Molecular Characterization of cyanobacterial blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditionally, the detection and identification of cyanobacteria implicated in harmful algal blooms has been conducted using microscopical techniques. Such conventional methods are time consuming and cumbersome, cannot discriminate between closely related taxa, and cannot discrim...

  14. Influence of basin connectivity on sediment source, transport, and storage within the Mkabela Basin, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. R.; Mackin, G.; Lechler, P.; Lord, M.; Lorentz, S.

    2013-02-01

    The management of sediment and other non-point source (NPS) pollution has proven difficult, and requires a sound understanding of particle movement through the drainage system. The primary objective of this investigation was to obtain an understanding of NPS sediment source(s), transport, and storage within the Mkabela Basin, a representative agricultural catchment within the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands of eastern South Africa, by combining geomorphic, hydrologic and geochemical fingerprinting analyses. The Mkabela Basin can be subdivided into three distinct subcatchments that differ in their ability to transport and store sediment along the axial valley. Headwater (upper catchment) areas are characterized by extensive wetlands that act as significant sediment sinks. Mid-catchment areas, characterized by higher relief and valley gradients, exhibit few wetlands, but rather are dominated by a combination of alluvial and bedrock channels that are conducive to sediment transport. The lower catchment exhibits a low-gradient alluvial channel that is boarded by extensive riparian wetlands that accumulate large quantities of sediment (and NPS pollutants). Fingerprinting studies suggest that silt- and clay-rich layers found within wetland and reservoir deposits of the upper and upper-mid subcatchments are derived from the erosion of fine-grained, valley bottom soils frequently utilized as vegetable fields. Coarser-grained deposits within these wetlands and reservoirs result from the erosion of sandier hillslope soils extensively utilized for sugar cane, during relatively high magnitude runoff events that are capable of transporting sand-sized sediment off the slopes. Thus, the source of sediment to the axial valley varies as a function of sediment size and runoff magnitude. Sediment export from upper to lower catchment areas was limited until the early 1990s, in part because the upper catchment wetlands were hydrologically disconnected from lower parts of the watershed during

  15. Meteorological and hydrological conditions driving the formation and disappearance of black blooms, an ecological disaster phenomena of eutrophication and algal blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlin; Shi, Kun; Liu, Junjie; Deng, Jianming; Qin, Boqiang; Zhu, Guangwei; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2016-11-01

    Potentially toxic black blooms can disrupt drinking water treatment plants and have fatal effects on aquatic ecosystems; therefore, lake management is required to determine whether conditions are favorable for the formation and disappearance of black blooms in water supply sources. Long-term climate background, short-term thresholds of meteorological and hydrological conditions, and the duration of harmful algal blooms (HABs) were investigated as factors affecting the formation and disappearance of black blooms in hyper-eutrophic Lake Taihu. Long-term climate warming (0.31°C/decade), decreases in wind speed (0.26m/s per decade) and air pressure (0.16hPa/decade), and the increase in the meteorological index of black blooms (3.6days/decade) in Lake Taihu over the past 51years provided climate conditions conducive to the formation and occurrence of black blooms. A total of 16 black bloom events with an area larger than 0.1km(2) were observed from 2007 to 2014. Several critical thresholds for short-term meteorological and hydrological conditions were determined for the formation of black blooms, including a five-day average air temperature above 25°C, a five-day average wind speed 5days. Heavy precipitation events, sudden cooling, and large wind disturbances were the driving factors of black blooms' disappearance. The use of a coupling model that combines the remote sensing of HABs with environmental, meteorological, and hydrological observations could permit an adequate and timely response to black blooms in drinking water sources. PMID:27396313

  16. Connecting Organic Aerosol Climate-Relevant Properties to Chemical Mechanisms of Sources and Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Joel

    2015-01-26

    The research conducted on this project aimed to improve our understanding of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere, and how the properties of the SOA impact climate through its size, phase state, and optical properties. The goal of this project was to demonstrate that the use of molecular composition information to mechanistically connect source apportionment and climate properties can improve the physical basis for simulation of SOA formation and properties in climate models. The research involved developing and improving methods to provide online measurements of the molecular composition of SOA under atmospherically relevant conditions and to apply this technology to controlled simulation chamber experiments and field measurements. The science we have completed with the methodology will impact the simulation of aerosol particles in climate models.

  17. Influences of upwelling and downwelling winds on red tide bloom dynamics in Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John P.; Fischer, Andrew M.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Gower, James F. R.; King, Stephanie A.; Marin, Roman, III; Chavez, Francisco P.

    2009-03-01

    It has recently been shown that inner shelf waters of NE Monterey Bay, California function as an "extreme bloom incubator", frequently developing dense "red tide" blooms that can rapidly spread. Located within the California Current upwelling system, this open bay is strongly influenced by oceanographic dynamics resulting from cycles of upwelling favorable winds and their relaxation and/or reversal. Different wind forcing causes influx of different water types that originate outside the bay: cold nutrient-rich waters during upwelling and warm nutrient-poor waters during relaxation. In this study, we examine how the bay's bloom incubation area can interact with highly variable circulation to cause red tide spreading, dispersal and retention. This examination of processes is supported by satellite, airborne and in situ observations of a major dinoflagellate bloom during August and September of 2004. Remote sensing of high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution shows that the bloom originated in the NE bay, where it was highly concentrated in a narrow band along a thermal front. Upwelling circulation rapidly spread part of the bloom, mixing cool waters of an upwelling filament with warm bloom source waters as they spread. Vertical migration of the dinoflagellate populations was mapped by autonomous underwater vehicle surveys through the spreading bloom. Following bloom expansion, a two-day wind reversal forced intrusion of warm offshore waters that dispersed much of the bloom. Upwelling winds then resumed, and the bloom was further dispersed by an influx of cold water. Throughout these oceanographic responses to changing winds, an intense bloom persisted in sheltered waters of the NE bay, where extreme blooms are most frequent and intense. Microscopic examination of surface phytoplankton samples from the central bay showed that spreading of the bloom from the NE bay and mixing with regional water masses resulted in significantly increased abundance of

  18. Role of intermodality in global sourcing and offshore outsourcing: maritime transport and new rail connections between Europe and Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Dalla Chiara, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    The work deals with the technical possibility of using railway connections between Europe and Asia - by way of the rail links under renewal in relation also with some United Nations' plans - for changing the commercial relationships between the two continents. Maritime transport has already undertaken, in the last years, different relationships, which elude in many connections the Suez Canal, therefore possibly the Mediterranean Sea; valorising the global sourcing and the offshore outsourcing...

  19. Reflections on Bloom's Revised Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Aly

    2006-01-01

    In the application of the "Original" Bloom's taxonomy since its publication in 1956, several weaknesses and practical limitations have been revealed. Besides, psychological and educational research has witnessed the introduction of several theories and approaches to learning which make students more knowledgeable of and responsible for their own…

  20. Service discovery using Bloom filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goering, Patrick; Heijenk, Geert; Lelieveldt, B.P.F.; Haverkort, B.R.H.M.; Laat, de C.T.A.M.; Heijnsdijk, J.W.J.

    2006-01-01

    A protocol to perform service discovery in adhoc networks is introduced in this paper. Attenuated Bloom filters are used to distribute services to nodes in the neighborhood and thus enable local service discovery. The protocol has been implemented in a discrete event simulator to investigate the beh

  1. Linking high-frequency DOC dynamics to the age of connected water sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunaley, C.; Tetzlaff, D.; Lessels, J.; Soulsby, C.

    2016-07-01

    We combined high-frequency dissolved organic matter fluorescence (FDOM) data with stable isotope observations to identify the sources and ages of runoff that cause temporal variability in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) within a peat-dominated Scottish catchment. FDOM was strongly correlated (r2 ˜ 0.8) with DOC, allowing inference of a 15 min time series. We captured 34 events over a range of hydrological conditions. Along with marked seasonality, different event responses were observed during summer depending on dry or wet antecedent conditions. The majority of events exhibited anticlockwise hysteresis as a result of the expansion of the riparian saturation zone, mobilizing previously unconnected DOC sources. Water ages from the main runoff sources were extracted from a tracer-aided hydrological model. Particularly useful were ages of overland flow, which were negatively correlated with DOC concentration. Overland flow age, which ranged between 0.2 and 360 days, reflected antecedent conditions, with younger water generally mobilizing the highest DOC concentrations in summer events. During small events with dry antecedent conditions, DOC response was proportionally higher due to the displacement and mixing of small volumes of previously unconnected highly concentrated riparian soil waters by new precipitation. During large events with wet antecedent conditions, the riparian saturation zone expands to organic layers on the hillslopes causing peaks in DOC. However, these peaks were limited by dilution and supply. This study highlights the utility of linking high-frequency DOC measurements with other tracers, allowing the effects of hydrologic connectivity and antecedent conditions on delivery of DOC to streams to be assessed.

  2. Harmful Freshwater Algal Blooms, With an Emphasis on Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans W. Paerl

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspended algae, or phytoplankton, are the prime source of organic matter supporting food webs in freshwater ecosystems. Phytoplankton productivity is reliant on adequate nutrient supplies; however, increasing rates of nutrient supply, much of it manmade, fuels accelerating primary production or eutrophication. An obvious and problematic symptom of eutrophication is rapid growth and accumulations of phytoplankton, leading to discoloration of affected waters. These events are termed blooms. Blooms are a prime agent of water quality deterioration, including foul odors and tastes, deoxygenation of bottom waters (hypoxia and anoxia, toxicity, fish kills, and food web alterations. Toxins produced by blooms can adversely affect animal (including human health in waters used for recreational and drinking purposes. Numerous freshwater genera within the diverse phyla comprising the phytoplankton are capable of forming blooms; however, the blue-green algae (or cyanobacteria are the most notorious bloom formers. This is especially true for harmful toxic, surface-dwelling, scum-forming genera (e.g., Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Nodularia, Microcystis and some subsurface bloom-formers (Cylindrospermopsis, Oscillatoria that are adept at exploiting nutrient-enriched conditions. They thrive in highly productive waters by being able to rapidly migrate between radiance-rich surface waters and nutrient-rich bottom waters. Furthermore, many harmful species are tolerant of extreme environmental conditions, including very high light levels, high temperatures, various degrees of desiccation, and periodic nutrient deprivation. Some of the most noxious cyanobacterial bloom genera (e.g., Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Cylindrospermopsis, Nodularia are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen (N2, enabling them to periodically dominate under nitrogen-limited conditions. Cyanobacteria produce a range of organic compounds, including those that are toxic to higher-ranked consumers, from

  3. Modeling the Galaxy-Halo Connection: An open-source approach with Halotools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearin, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Although the modern form of galaxy-halo modeling has been in place for over ten years, there exists no common code base for carrying out large-scale structure calculations. Considering, for example, the advances in CMB science made possible by Boltzmann-solvers such as CMBFast, CAMB and CLASS, there are clear precedents for how theorists working in a well-defined subfield can mutually benefit from such a code base. Motivated by these and other examples, I present Halotools: an open-source, object-oriented python package for building and testing models of the galaxy-halo connection. Halotools is community-driven, and already includes contributions from over a dozen scientists spread across numerous universities. Designed with high-speed performance in mind, the package generates mock observations of synthetic galaxy populations with sufficient speed to conduct expansive MCMC likelihood analyses over a diverse and highly customizable set of models. The package includes an automated test suite and extensive web-hosted documentation and tutorials (halotools.readthedocs.org). I conclude the talk by describing how Halotools can be used to analyze existing datasets to obtain robust and novel constraints on galaxy evolution models, and by outlining the Halotools program to prepare the field of cosmology for the arrival of Stage IV dark energy experiments.

  4. Optimal operation management of fuel cell/wind/photovoltaic power sources connected to distribution networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknam, Taher; Kavousifard, Abdollah; Tabatabaei, Sajad; Aghaei, Jamshid

    2011-10-01

    In this paper a new multiobjective modified honey bee mating optimization (MHBMO) algorithm is presented to investigate the distribution feeder reconfiguration (DFR) problem considering renewable energy sources (RESs) (photovoltaics, fuel cell and wind energy) connected to the distribution network. The objective functions of the problem to be minimized are the electrical active power losses, the voltage deviations, the total electrical energy costs and the total emissions of RESs and substations. During the optimization process, the proposed algorithm finds a set of non-dominated (Pareto) optimal solutions which are stored in an external memory called repository. Since the objective functions investigated are not the same, a fuzzy clustering algorithm is utilized to handle the size of the repository in the specified limits. Moreover, a fuzzy-based decision maker is adopted to select the 'best' compromised solution among the non-dominated optimal solutions of multiobjective optimization problem. In order to see the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, two standard distribution test systems are used as case studies.

  5. Power angle control of grid-connected voltage source converter in a wind energy application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Jan [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Electric Power Engineering

    1995-12-31

    In this thesis, the connection of a voltage source converter to the grid in a wind energy application is examined. The possibility of using a cheap control system without grid current measurements, is investigated. The control method is based on controlling the voltage angle of the inverter, which governs the active power flow. The highest frequency of the power variation, coming from wind turbine, is approx. 5 Hz. Since the proposed control method easily can handle such power variations it is very well suited for wind turbine applications. The characteristics of the system depend on the DC-link capacitor, the grid filter inductance and resistance. Large values of the resistance damp the system well but increase the energy losses. A high inductance leads to a reduced harmonic level on the grid but makes the system slower. By using feed-forward of the generator/rectifier current signal, the performance is increased compared to an ordinary PI-control. Combining the Linear Quadratic (LQ) control method with Kalman filtered input signals, a robust control method with a good performance is obtained. The LQ controller controls both the phase displacement angle and the modulation index, resulting in higher bandwidth, and the typical power angle resonance at the grid frequency disappears. 22 refs, 109 figs, 14 tabs

  6. Optimal DG Source Allocation for Grid Connected Distributed Generation with Energy Storage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ezhilarasan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes an Energy Management System (EMS for allocation of DG source in a grid connected hybrid power system. Modeling and simulation for EMS is implemented using MATLAB/SIMULINK package. The objective of proposed EMS for micro grid is to optimize the fuel cost, improving the energy utilization efficiency and to manage the peak load demand by scheduling the generation according to the availability of the fuel. The proposed intelligent energy management system is designed to optimize the availability of energy to the load according to the level of priority and to manage the power flow. The developed management system performance was assessed using a hybrid system having PV panels, Wind Turbine (WT, battery and biomass gasifier. Real time field test has been conducted and the parameters i.e., solar irradiance, temperature, wind speed are gathered from 4.05 KW off grid and 2.0 KW On grid Solar Photovoltaic systems (SPV system and wind turbine. The dynamic behavior of the proposed model is examined under different operating conditions. The simulation results of proposed EMS using fuzzy logic expert system shows the minimization on the operating cost and emission level of micro grid by optimal scheduling of power generation and maintains the State of Charge (SOC of batteries in desired value which improves the battery life. The proposed multi objective intelligent energy management system aims to minimize the operational cost and the environmental impact of a micro grid.

  7. Improved Passive-Damped LCL Filter to Enhance Stability in Grid-Connected Voltage-Source Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beres, Remus Narcis; Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede;

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes an improved passive-damped LCL filter to be used as interface between the grid-connected voltage-source converters and the utility grid. The proposed filter replaces the LCL filter capacitor with a traditional C-type filter with the resonant circuit tuned in such a way...

  8. Dangerous jellyfish blooms are predictable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershwin, Lisa-ann; Condie, Scott A; Mansbridge, Jim V; Richardson, Anthony J

    2014-07-01

    The potentially fatal Irukandji syndrome is relatively common in tropical waters throughout the world. It is caused by the sting of the Irukandji jellyfish, a family of box jellyfish that are almost impossible to detect in the water owing to their small size and transparency. Using collated medical records of stings and local weather conditions, we show that the presence of Irukandji blooms in coastal waters can be forecast on the basis of wind conditions. On the Great Barrier Reef, blooms largely coincide with relaxation of the prevailing southeasterly trade winds, with average conditions corresponding to near zero alongshore wind on the day prior to the sting. These conditions are consistent with hypotheses long held by local communities and provide a basis for designing management interventions that have the potential to eliminate the majority of stings. PMID:24829278

  9. Bloom Filter-Based Secure Data Forwarding in Large-Scale Cyber-Physical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyu Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyber-physical systems (CPSs connect with the physical world via communication networks, which significantly increases security risks of CPSs. To secure the sensitive data, secure forwarding is an essential component of CPSs. However, CPSs require high dimensional multiattribute and multilevel security requirements due to the significantly increased system scale and diversity, and hence impose high demand on the secure forwarding information query and storage. To tackle these challenges, we propose a practical secure data forwarding scheme for CPSs. Considering the limited storage capability and computational power of entities, we adopt bloom filter to store the secure forwarding information for each entity, which can achieve well balance between the storage consumption and query delay. Furthermore, a novel link-based bloom filter construction method is designed to reduce false positive rate during bloom filter construction. Finally, the effects of false positive rate on the performance of bloom filter-based secure forwarding with different routing policies are discussed.

  10. Phase-lock loop of Grid-connected Voltage Source Converter under non-ideal grid condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Haojie; Sun, Hai; Han, Minxiao;

    2015-01-01

    phase information cannot be accurately tracked. Based on analysis of the cause of double-frequency ripple when unbalance exists in main grid, a phase-locked loop (PLL) detection technique is proposed. Under the conditions of unsymmetrical system voltage, varying system frequency, single-phase system......It is a normal practice that the DC micro-grid is connected to AC main grid through Grid-connected Voltage Source Converter (G-VSC) for voltage support. Accurate control of DC micro-grid voltage is difficult for G-VSC under unbalanced grid condition as the fundamental positive-sequence component...

  11. MERUNUT PEMAHAMAN TAKSONOMI BLOOM: SUATU KONTEMPLASI FILOSOFIS

    OpenAIRE

    Dominikus Tulasi

    2010-01-01

    This article would like to share the use of Bloom's taxonomy as a cognitive framework for teaching-learning process to undertake the way student-centered learning. Related to the curriculum based competence in excellent education, the abstract cognitive in applying Blooms taxonomy is so called scaffolding. We know the taxonomy Bloom is a six-level classification system that uses observed student behavior to infer and absorb the level of cognitive achievement domain. This article surveys think...

  12. The effect of environmental parameters and cyanobacterial blooms on phytoplankton dynamics of a Portuguese temperate lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Figueiredo, Daniela R.; P. S. Reboleira, Ana Sofia; Antunes, Sara C.;

    2006-01-01

    The increasing occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in freshwaters is of great concern due to the ability of many cyanobacteria to produce cyanotoxins. In the present work, the eutrophied Vela Lake (Central Portugal), used for recreational purposes and as a water source for agriculture, was monito......The increasing occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in freshwaters is of great concern due to the ability of many cyanobacteria to produce cyanotoxins. In the present work, the eutrophied Vela Lake (Central Portugal), used for recreational purposes and as a water source for agriculture...... of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae occurred early in May 2001 and was preceded by the lowest nitrogen levels measured in the water during all the study period. At the time of this bloom senescence, dissolved oxygen was severely depleted and a massive death of ichthyofauna was recorded. A Microcystis aeruginosa bloom...

  13. Algae Bloom in a Lake

    OpenAIRE

    David Sanabria

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to determine the likelihood of an algae bloom in a particular lake located in upstate New York. The growth of algae in this lake is caused by a high concentration of phosphorous that diffuses to the surface of the lake. Our calculations, based on Fick's Law, are used to create a mathematical model of the driving force of diffusion for phosphorous. Empirical observations are also used to predict whether the concentration of phosphorous will diffuse to the surface...

  14. Algae Bloom in a Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sanabria

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to determine the likelihood of an algae bloom in a particular lake located in upstate New York. The growth of algae in this lake is caused by a high concentration of phosphorous that diffuses to the surface of the lake. Our calculations, based on Fick's Law, are used to create a mathematical model of the driving force of diffusion for phosphorous. Empirical observations are also used to predict whether the concentration of phosphorous will diffuse to the surface of this lake within a specified time and under specified conditions.

  15. A Novel Method of Suppressing the Inrush Current of Transformers Using a Series-Connected Voltage-Source PWM Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Funabiki, Shigeyuki

    This paper proposes a novel method of suppressing the inrush current of transformers. A small-rated voltage-source PWM converter is connected in series to the transformers through a matching transformer. As the connected PWM converter performs a resistor for the source current, no inrush phenomena occurs. The required-ratings of the PWM converter, which performs the damping resistor for the inrush phenomena, is one-four-hundredth as compared to that of the main transformers in single-phase circuits. In three-phase circuits, it is one-nine-hundredth. The basic principle of the proposed method is discussed. Digital computer simulation is implemented to confirm the validity and excellent practicability of the proposed method using the PSCAD/EMTDC. A prototype experimental-model is constructed and tested. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can perfectly suppress the inrush phenomena.

  16. Integration of semi-automatic detection and sediment connectivity assessment for the characterization of sediment source areas in mountain catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, Stefano; Bossi, Giulia; Marchi, Lorenzo; Cavalli, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Identifying areas that are directly delivering sediment to the channel network or to a catchment outlet is of great importance for a sound sediment dynamic characterization and for assessing sediment budget. We present an integration of remote sensing analysis techniques to characterize the effective sediment contributing area that is the sub-portion of the catchment in which sediment is effectively routed towards the catchment outlet. A semi-automatic mapping of active sediment source areas is carried out via image analysis techniques. To this purpose, satellite multispectral images and aerial orthophotos are considered for the analysis. Several algorithms for features extraction are applied and the maps obtained are compared with an expert-based sediment source mapping derived from photointerpretation and field surveys. The image-based analysis is additionally integrated with a topography-driven filtering procedure. Thanks to the availability of High-Resolution, LiDAR-derived Digital Terrain Models, it is possible to work at a fine scale and to compute morphometric parameters (e.g., slope, roughness, curvature) suitable for refining the image analysis. In particular, information on local topography was integrated with the image-based analysis to discriminate between rocky outcrops and sediment sources, thus improving the overall consistency of the procedure. The sediment source areas are then combined with the output of a connectivity assessment. A topography-based index of sediment connectivity is computed for the analyzed areas in order to better estimate the effective sediment contributing area and to obtain a ranking of the source areas in the studied catchments. The study methods have been applied in catchments of the Eastern Italian Alps where a detailed census of sediment source areas is available. The comparison of the results of image analysis with expert-based sediment sources mapping shows a satisfactory agreement between the two approaches

  17. The human health effects of Florida red tide (FRT) blooms: an expanded analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagland, Porter; Jin, Di; Beet, Andrew; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Reich, Andrew; Ullmann, Steve; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Gary

    2014-07-01

    Human respiratory and digestive illnesses can be caused by exposures to brevetoxins from blooms of the marine alga Karenia brevis, also known as Florida red tide (FRT). K. brevis requires macro-nutrients to grow; although the sources of these nutrients have not been resolved completely, they are thought to originate both naturally and anthropogenically. The latter sources comprise atmospheric depositions, industrial effluents, land runoffs, or submerged groundwater discharges. To date, there has been only limited research on the extent of human health risks and economic impacts due to FRT. We hypothesized that FRT blooms were associated with increases in the numbers of emergency room visits and hospital inpatient admissions for both respiratory and digestive illnesses. We sought to estimate these relationships and to calculate the costs of associated adverse health impacts. We developed environmental exposure-response models to test the effects of FRT blooms on human health, using data from diverse sources. We estimated the FRT bloom-associated illness costs, using extant data and parameters from the literature. When controlling for resident population, a proxy for tourism, and seasonal and annual effects, we found that increases in respiratory and digestive illnesses can be explained by FRT blooms. Specifically, FRT blooms were associated with human health and economic effects in older cohorts (≥55 years of age) in six southwest Florida counties. Annual costs of illness ranged from $60,000 to $700,000 annually, but these costs could exceed $1.0 million per year for severe, long-lasting FRT blooms, such as the one that occurred during 2005. Assuming that the average annual illness costs of FRT blooms persist into the future, using a discount rate of 3%, the capitalized costs of future illnesses would range between $2 and 24 million. PMID:24727069

  18. Cyanobacteria blooms: effects on aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Karl E

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria become increasingly dominant as concentrations of TP and TN increase during eutrophication of lakes, rivers and estuaries. Temporal dynamics of cyanobacteria blooms are variable--in some systems persistent blooms occur in summer to fall, whereas in other systems blooms are more sporadic. Cyanobacteria blooms have a wide range of possible biological impacts including potential toxic effects on other algae, invertebrates and fish, impacts to plants and benthic algae due to shading, and impacts to food web function as large inedible algae produce a bottleneck to C and energy flow in the plankton food web. In lakes with dense blooms of cyanobacteria, accumulation of organic material in lake sediments and increased bacterial activity also may lead to anoxic conditions that alter the structure of benthic macro-invertebrates. Diffusive internal P loading may increase, and hypolimnetic anoxia may lead to a loss of piscivorous fish that require a summer cold water refuge in temperate lakes. Ecosystem changes associated with frequent blooms may result in delayed response of lakes, rivers and estuaries to external nutrient load reduction. Despite numerous case studies and a vast literature on species-specific responses, community level effects of cyanobacterial blooms are not well understood--in particular the realized impacts of toxins and changes in food web structure/function. These areas require additional research given the prevalence of toxic blooms in the nation's lakes, rivers and coastal waters--systems that provide a wide range of valued ecosystem services. PMID:18461790

  19. Summer heatwaves promote blooms of harmful cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joehnk, K.D; Huisman, J.; Sharples, J.; Sommeijer, B.P.; Visser, P.M.; Stroom, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Dense surface blooms of toxic cyanobacteria in eutrophic lakes may lead to mass mortalities of fish and birds, and provide a serious health threat for cattle, pets, and humans. It has been argued that global warming may increase the incidence of harmful algal blooms. Here, we report on a lake experi

  20. Algal blooms and Membrane Based Desalination Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villacorte, L.O.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater desalination is rapidly growing in terms of installed capacity (~80 million m3/day in 2013), plant size and global application. An emerging threat to this technology is the seasonal proliferation of microscopic algae in seawater known as algal blooms. Such blooms have caused operational pro

  1. Nitrogen deposition fuels harmful algal blooms in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, K. R.; Kavanaugh, M.; Chien, C. T.; Chen, Y.; Glover, D. M.; Paytan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Chinese marginal seas support vast fisheries and vital economies, but their productivity is threatened by eutrophication and increasing harmful algal blooms (HABs). Here we provide direct experimental evidence that aerosol enrichment shifts seawater chemistry by increasing the ratio of N to phosphorus (N:P) and supports the growth of bloom-forming phytoplankton in the East China Sea. We use a combination of field-based aerosol addition incubation experiments, along with ocean color data on blooms dominated by different taxa to show that HAB forming dinoflagellates are particularly responsive to aerosol inputs. Moreover, we show that the effect of N deposition is strongest in offshore waters further from the Yangtze River outflow, consistent with the large anthropogenic flux of N from this source. This study shows the potential for aerosols to control N:P ratios in offshore waters and to shape the phytoplankton community, contributing to the success of bloom-forming organisms.

  2. Dynamic imaging of coherent sources reveals different network connectivity underlying the generation and perpetuation of epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Elshoff

    Full Text Available The concept of focal epilepsies includes a seizure origin in brain regions with hyper synchronous activity (epileptogenic zone and seizure onset zone and a complex epileptic network of different brain areas involved in the generation, propagation, and modulation of seizures. The purpose of this work was to study functional and effective connectivity between regions involved in networks of epileptic seizures. The beginning and middle part of focal seizures from ictal surface EEG data were analyzed using dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS, an inverse solution in the frequency domain which describes neuronal networks and coherences of oscillatory brain activities. The information flow (effective connectivity between coherent sources was investigated using the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC method. In 8/11 patients, the first and second source of epileptic activity as found by DICS were concordant with the operative resection site; these patients became seizure free after epilepsy surgery. In the remaining 3 patients, the results of DICS / RPDC calculations and the resection site were discordant; these patients had a poorer post-operative outcome. The first sources as found by DICS were located predominantly in cortical structures; subsequent sources included some subcortical structures: thalamus, Nucl. Subthalamicus and cerebellum. DICS seems to be a powerful tool to define the seizure onset zone and the epileptic networks involved. Seizure generation seems to be related to the propagation of epileptic activity from the primary source in the seizure onset zone, and maintenance of seizures is attributed to the perpetuation of epileptic activity between nodes in the epileptic network. Despite of these promising results, this proof of principle study needs further confirmation prior to the use of the described methods in the clinical praxis.

  3. Synthesis and structural property of Si nanosheets connected to Si nanowires using MnCl2/Si powder source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Erchao; Ueki, Akiko; Meng, Xiang; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Itahara, Hiroshi; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu

    2016-08-01

    Si nanosheets connected to Si nanowires were synthesized using a MnCl2/Si powder source with an Au catalyst. The synthesis method has benefits in terms of avoiding conventionally used air-sensitive SiH4 or SiCl4. The existence of the Si nanosheets connected to the Si nanowires, like sprouts or leaves with petioles, was observed, and the surface of the nanosheets was Si{111}. The nanosheets were grown in the growth direction of perpendicular to that of the Si nanowires. It was evident from these structural features of the nanosheets that the nanosheets were formed by the twin-plane reentrant-edge mechanism. The feature of the observed lattice fringes, which do not appear for Si bulk crystals, of the Si(111) nanosheets obtained by high resolution transmission electron microscopy was clearly explained due to the extra diffraction spots that arose by the reciprocal lattice streaking effect.

  4. Topical problems connected with the German act on electricity from renewable energy sources (StrEG); Aktuelle Probleme des Stromeinspeisungsgesetzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohlmann, M. [VDEW, Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Rechtsabteilung

    1998-11-16

    The German act (StrEG) intended to enhance the use of renewable energy sources for electricity generation and to promote the relevant technologies raises some problems in connection with constitutional law that still await judicial review by the German Federal Constitutional Court. In addition, doubts as to the lawfulness of provisions of the act have been emerging in connection with EC laws governing the regime of subsidies and state aid. The article here summarizes the current situation. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die verfassungsrechtlichen Fragen des Stromeinspeisungsgesetzes (StrEG) harren noch immer einer Loesung durch das Bundesverfassungsgericht. Auch auf einer anderen Ebene wird die Rechtmaessigkeit des StrEG immer mehr in Zweifel gezogen. Die Probleme der Vereinbarkeit mit dem europaeischen Beihilferecht treten immer offener zutage. Der Beitrag fasst die aktuelle Situation zusammen. (orig./CB)

  5. Possibilities by using a self-commutated voltage source inverter connected to a weak grid in wind parks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Jan [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Electric Power Engineering

    1996-12-01

    In this paper the hybrid wind farm connected to a weak grid is investigated. By combining different electrical wind power plant systems a cost-efficient solution is obtained. The point of common connection voltage level can be controlled by injecting reactive power from a phase-compensating capacitor battery and a voltage source inverter (VSI). If the short-circuit impedance ratio is lower than 1, the demanded reactive power injection to keep the voltage at nominal level is unrealistic. For short-circuit impedance ratios of 2 or higher the demanded reactive power level is acceptable. When using both induction generators and thyristor inverters the reactive power injector VSI size should be about 0.2 pu. If the hybrid farm consists of THYs, IGs and VSIs and the active power is equally shared between the systems, the VSI had to be scaled up by 5% to handle both active and reactive power. 7 refs, 10 figs, 2 tabs

  6. The Correlation between Prorocentrum donghaiense Blooms and the Taiwan Warm Current in the East China Sea - Evidence for the “Pelagic Seed Bank” Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Xinfeng Dai; Douding Lu; Weibing Guan; Ping Xia; Hongxia Wang; Piaoxia He; Dongsheng Zhang

    2013-01-01

    During the last two decades, large-scale high biomass algal blooms of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum donghaiense Lu have occurred frequently in the East China Sea (ECS). The role of increasing nutrient concentrations in driving those blooms is well-established, but the source population that initiates them is poorly understood. We hypothesized that the front of Taiwan Warm Current (TWC) may serve as a 'seed bank' that initiates P. donghaiense blooms in the ECS, as the physiochemical conditio...

  7. Detecting algae blooms in European waters

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Y; K. Ruddick

    2007-01-01

    A near real-time algal bloom detection service has been developed for European waters. Daily chlorophyll a data from Envisat/MERIS and Aqua/MODIS are compared to a predefined threshold map to determine whether an algal bloom has occurred. The design of the threshold map takes account of two factors. Firstly, over European waters regional differences in typical and extreme levels of chlorophyll a span two orders of magnitude. A concentration, e.g. 2 µg/l, that would be considered as a bloom co...

  8. Resonance Damping Techniques for Grid-Connected Voltage Source Converters with LCL filters – A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chi; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Vasquez, Juan Carlos;

    2014-01-01

    LCL filters play an important role in grid-connected converters when trying to reduce switching-frequency ripple currents injected into the grid. Besides, their small size and low cost make them attractive for many practical applications. However, the LCL filter is a third-order system, which...... presents a resonance peak frequency. Oscillation will occur in the control loop in high frequency ranges, especially in current loop in double-loops controlled converters. In order to solve this, many strategies have been proposed to damp resonance, including passive and active methods. This paper makes...

  9. Simulation of Five Phase Voltage Source Inverter with Different Excitation for Star Connected Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A Inayathullaah

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the torque ripple and harmonics for smooth operation of the machine and to reduce the amount of heat generated the motor has to be supplied with multi phase supply greater than three phase supply. Selection of even number of phases should be avoided, because it decreases the performance of the motor as poles coincide with each other. So, Five Phase Supply is preferred. A five phase five leg 10 switch inverter fed five phase star connected load operating with five different excitation is simulated and compared with that of three phase conventional inverter.

  10. Experimental Research of Variable Operating Performance on Water Source Multi-Connected Air-Conditioning System with Digital Scroll Compressor

    OpenAIRE

    Xingwang Zhu; Xueli Nie; Yanli Lv; Chaoxin Wang; Yugui Su

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we study the water source heat pump and digital scroll compressor and experimentally in the multi-connected air-conditioning system. Variable performance is developed when the unit operates in refrigerating and heating mode. The maximum of refrigerating capacity is 36519.95W when inlet water temperature of the condenser is 30°C and dry-bulb temperature of indoor air is 32°C, at the same time the maximum of EER is 4.33 when inlet water temperature of the condenser is 20°C and dr...

  11. Random Access for Machine-Type Communication based on Bloom Filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pratas, Nuno; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Madueño, Germán Corrales;

    2016-01-01

    We present a random access method inspired on Bloom filters that is suited for Machine-Type Communications (MTC). Each accessing device sends a signature during the contention process. A signature is constructed using the Bloom filtering method and contains information on the device identity...... utilizes the system resources more efficiently and achieves similar or lower latency of connection establishment in case of synchronous arrivals, compared to the variant of the LTE-A access protocol that is optimized for MTC traffic. A dividend of the proposed method is that allows the base station (BS...

  12. Trophic connectivity and basal food sources sustaining tropical aquatic consumers along a mangrove to ocean gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudino, Marlucy Coelho; Pessanha, André Luiz Machado; Araújo, Francisco Gerson; Garcia, Alexandre Miranda

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the relative importance of autotrophic sources to aquatic consumers along environmental gradients and the trophic role of mangrove-derived detritus to marine coastal food webs are still poorly investigated in tropical systems. In this study, we employed stable isotope analyses to investigate the relative importance of basal food sources to macroconsumers (decapod crustaceans and fishes) in a tropical estuary along an environmental gradient extending from the mangroves to the ocean. Additionally, we evaluated the 'outwelling hypothesis', which hypothesizes that mangrove-derived detritus exported to the adjacent marine area is a food source for marine macroconsumers at open and reef-protected sandy beaches. Primary producers and macroconsumers (62 and 214 samples, respectively) were collected at five locations across the main longitudinal axis of the Mamanguape estuary, a tropical Southwestern Atlantic estuary. There were marked shifts in carbon and nitrogen isotope values for both food sources and consumers along the estuarine-marine gradient, and the mixing model results revealed similar patterns of assimilation of basal food sources by decapod crustaceans and fishes. In the inner section of the estuary, consumers tended to assimilated nutrients derived mainly from mangrove and macroalgae, whereas nearer the mouth of the estuary and in the adjacent marine area they assimilated nutrients derived mainly from macroalgae, seagrass and organic matter in the sediment (SOM). These findings support the hypothesis that the relative importance of basal food sources to macroconsumers in this tropical estuarine system reflects the dominant autochthonous primary production at each location. In contrast, our results did not support the outwelling hypothesis that mangrove-originated detritus, in the form of senescent mangrove leaves, makes a significant contribution as a primary source of carbon to high-order consumers inhabiting adjacent ocean sandy beaches.

  13. An iterative approach for symmetrical and asymmetrical Short-circuit calculations with converter-based connected renewable energy sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göksu, Ömer; Teodorescu, Remus; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte;

    2012-01-01

    As more renewable energy sources, especially more wind turbines are installed in the power system, analysis of the power system with the renewable energy sources becomes more important. Short-circuit calculation is a well known fault analysis method which is widely used for early stage analysis...... and design purposes and tuning of the network protection equipments. However, due to current controlled power converter-based grid connection of the wind turbines, short-circuit calculation cannot be performed with its current form for networks with power converter-based wind turbines. In this paper......, an iterative approach for short-circuit calculation of networks with power converter-based wind turbines is developed for both symmetrical and asymmetrical short-circuit grid faults. As a contribution to existing solutions, negative sequence current injection from the wind turbines is also taken into account...

  14. Connection between ambient density fluctuations and clumpy Langmuir waves in type III radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, I. H.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    A recent stochastic-growth theory of clumpy Langmuir waves in type III sources is shown to imply that the clumps will have the same size distribution as the ambient low-frequency density fluctuations in the solar wind. Spectral analysis of Langmuir-wave time series from the ISEE 3 plasma wave instrument confirms this prediction to within the uncertainties in the spectra. The smallest Langmuir clump size is inferred to be in the range 0.4-30 km in general, and 2-30 km for beam-resonant waves, and it is concluded that the diffusion of waves in the source is anomalous.

  15. Modularized multilevel and z-source power converter as renewable energy interface for vehicle and grid-connected applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dong

    Due the energy crisis and increased oil price, renewable energy sources such as photovoltaic panel, wind turbine, or thermoelectric generation module, are used more and more widely for vehicle and grid-connected applications. However, the output of these renewable energy sources varies according to different solar radiation, wind speed, or temperature difference, a power converter interface is required for the vehicle or grid-connected applications. Thermoelectric generation (TEG) module as a renewable energy source for automotive industry is becoming very popular recently. Because of the inherent characteristics of TEG modules, a low input voltage, high input current and high voltage gain dc-dc converters are needed for the automotive load. Traditional high voltage gain dc-dc converters are not suitable for automotive application in terms of size and high temperature operation. Switched-capacitor dc-dc converters have to be used for this application. However, high voltage spike and EMI problems exist in traditional switched-capacitor dc-dc converters. Huge capacitor banks have to be utilized to reduce the voltage ripple and achieve high efficiency. A series of zero current switching (ZCS) or zero voltage switching switched-capacitor dc-dc converters have been proposed to overcome the aforementioned problems of the traditional switched-capacitor dc-dc converters. By using the proposed soft-switching strategy, high voltage spike is reduced, high EMI noise is restricted, and the huge capacitor bank is eliminated. High efficiency, high power density and high temperature switched-capacitor dc-dc converters could be made for the TEG interface in vehicle applications. Several prototypes have been made to validate the proposed circuit and confirm the circuit operation. In order to apply PV panel for grid-connected application, a low cost dc-ac inverter interface is required. From the use of transformer and safety concern, two different solutions can be implemented, non

  16. Extreme Algal Bloom Detection with MERIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, R.; Gilerson, A.; Gould, R.; Arnone, R.; Ahmed, S.

    2009-05-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB's) are a major concern all over the world due to their negative impacts on the marine environment, human health, and the economy. Their detection from space still remains a challenge particularly in turbid coastal waters. In this study we propose a simple reflectance band difference approach for use with Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) data to detect intense plankton blooms. For convenience we label this approach as the Extreme Bloom Index (EBI) which is defined as EBI = Rrs (709) - Rrs (665). Our initial analysis shows that this band difference approach has some advantages over the band ratio approaches, particularly in reducing errors due to imperfect atmospheric corrections. We also do a comparison between the proposed EBI technique and the Maximum Chlorophyll Index (MCI) Gower technique. Our preliminary result shows that both the EBI and MCI indeces detect intense plankton blooms, however, MCI is more vulnerable in highly scattering waters, giving more positive false alarms than EBI.

  17. Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159082.html Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime Follow your care ... 27, 2016 FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma symptoms increase in spring, making it especially important ...

  18. A Review of Passive Filters for Grid-Connected Voltage Source Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beres, Remus Narcis; Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede;

    2014-01-01

    LCL filter is the common interface between the Pulse Width Modulated Voltage Source Converter (PWM VSC) and the utility grid due to high harmonic attenuation capability and reduced size of the passive elements. The present paper investigates the most promising passive damping methods for the LCL...

  19. Mapping sources, sinks, and connectivity using a simulation model of Northern Spotted Owls

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a study of source-sink dynamics at a landscape scale. In conducting the study, we make use of a mature simulation model for the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) that was developed as part of the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s most recent recovery plannin...

  20. Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive learning objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Nancy E

    2015-07-01

    Information professionals who train or instruct others can use Bloom's taxonomy to write learning objectives that describe the skills and abilities that they desire their learners to master and demonstrate. Bloom's taxonomy differentiates between cognitive skill levels and calls attention to learning objectives that require higher levels of cognitive skills and, therefore, lead to deeper learning and transfer of knowledge and skills to a greater variety of tasks and contexts.

  1. Algal blooms and Membrane Based Desalination Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Villacorte, L.O.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater desalination is rapidly growing in terms of installed capacity (~80 million m3/day in 2013), plant size and global application. An emerging threat to this technology is the seasonal proliferation of microscopic algae in seawater known as algal blooms. Such blooms have caused operational problems in seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plants due to clogging and poor effluent quality of the pre-treatment system which eventually forced the shutdown of the plant to avoid irreversible fouling...

  2. Connecting Source with Sink: The Role of Arabidopsis AAP8 in Phloem Loading of Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, James P; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2016-05-01

    Allocation of large amounts of nitrogen to developing organs occurs in the phloem and is essential for plant growth and seed development. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and many other plant species, amino acids represent the dominant nitrogen transport forms in the phloem, and they are mainly synthesized in photosynthetically active source leaves. Following their synthesis, a broad spectrum of the amino nitrogen is actively loaded into the phloem of leaf minor veins and transported within the phloem sap to sinks such as developing leaves, fruits, or seeds. Controlled regulation of the source-to-sink transport of amino acids has long been postulated; however, the molecular mechanism of amino acid phloem loading was still unknown. In this study, Arabidopsis AMINO ACID PERMEASE8 (AAP8) was shown to be expressed in the source leaf phloem and localized to the plasma membrane, suggesting its function in phloem loading. This was further supported by transport studies with aap8 mutants fed with radiolabeled amino acids and by leaf exudate analyses. In addition, biochemical and molecular analyses revealed alterations in leaf nitrogen pools and metabolism dependent on the developmental stage of the mutants. Decreased amino acid phloem loading and partitioning to sinks led to decreased silique and seed numbers, but seed protein levels were unchanged, demonstrating the importance of AAP8 function for sink development rather than seed quality. Overall, these results show that AAP8 plays an important role in source-to-sink partitioning of nitrogen and that its function affects source leaf physiology and seed yield. PMID:27016446

  3. A Battery-less Grid Connected Photovoltaic Power generation using Five-Level Common-Emitter Current-Source Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suroso Suroso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Renewable power generation using photovoltaic is very interesting to be developed to deal with the problems of conventional energy sources and environmental issues. The photovoltaic power generation can operate both in stand-alone and grid-connected operations. This paper presents an application of the five-level common-emitter current-source inverter (CE-CSI for grid connected photovoltaic system without batteries as energy storage system. In the proposed system, the five-level CE-CSI works generating a sinusoidal output current from photovoltaic system to be injected into the power grid. The transformer is used in the system to step-down the grid voltage to meet the voltage level of the photovoltaic system, and also works as a galvanic insulation between the power grid and the inverter system. Two conditions of the power grid voltage, i.e. a pure sinusoidal and a distorted power grid, are tested through computer simulation using PSIM software. Furthermore, experimental test result of the five-level inverter is also presented. The test results show that the five-level CE-CSI works well injecting a sinusoidal current into the power grid with low harmonic contents, and with unity power factor operation. The results also show that the distorted grid voltage affects the harmonic contents of the current injected by the inverter.

  4. Rainfall-enhanced blooming in typhoon wakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y-C; Oey, L-Y

    2016-01-01

    Strong phytoplankton blooming in tropical-cyclone (TC) wakes over the oligotrophic oceans potentially contributes to long-term changes in global biogeochemical cycles. Yet blooming has traditionally been discussed using anecdotal events and its biophysical mechanics remain poorly understood. Here we identify dominant blooming patterns using 16 years of ocean-color data in the wakes of 141 typhoons in western North Pacific. We observe right-side asymmetric blooming shortly after the storms, attributed previously to sub-mesoscale re-stratification, but thereafter a left-side asymmetry which coincides with the left-side preference in rainfall due to the large-scale wind shear. Biophysical model experiments and observations demonstrate that heavier rainfall freshens the near-surface water, leading to stronger stratification, decreased turbulence and enhanced blooming. Our results suggest that rainfall plays a previously unrecognized, critical role in TC-induced blooming, with potentially important implications for global biogeochemical cycles especially in view of the recent and projected increases in TC-intensity that harbingers stronger mixing and heavier rain under the storm. PMID:27545899

  5. Rainfall-enhanced blooming in typhoon wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.-C.; Oey, L.-Y.

    2016-08-01

    Strong phytoplankton blooming in tropical-cyclone (TC) wakes over the oligotrophic oceans potentially contributes to long-term changes in global biogeochemical cycles. Yet blooming has traditionally been discussed using anecdotal events and its biophysical mechanics remain poorly understood. Here we identify dominant blooming patterns using 16 years of ocean-color data in the wakes of 141 typhoons in western North Pacific. We observe right-side asymmetric blooming shortly after the storms, attributed previously to sub-mesoscale re-stratification, but thereafter a left-side asymmetry which coincides with the left-side preference in rainfall due to the large-scale wind shear. Biophysical model experiments and observations demonstrate that heavier rainfall freshens the near-surface water, leading to stronger stratification, decreased turbulence and enhanced blooming. Our results suggest that rainfall plays a previously unrecognized, critical role in TC-induced blooming, with potentially important implications for global biogeochemical cycles especially in view of the recent and projected increases in TC-intensity that harbingers stronger mixing and heavier rain under the storm.

  6. An Efficient Genetics Algorithm based Z-source Converter for Grid Connected System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mallika

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with a simulation of robust and reliable three phase grid power interface system for photo voltaic modules using genetics algorithm based optimization technique. A control system is designed to harvest maximum solar energy under varied weather conditions with the use of a genetics algorithm based SVPWM controlled Z source fed multilevel inverter. Using Z-source networks, the system can work within a wider range of PV array output voltages than for a conventional boost converter. This study describes an modified genetics algorithm that reduces the computational burden and optimum switching angles are determined to eliminate lower order harmonics and reduces total harmonics distortion. The simulation is done using MATLAB and the simulation results are presented.

  7. Solar wind interaction with the Reiner Gamma crustal magnetic anomaly: Connecting source magnetization to surface weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Andrew R.; Fatemi, Shahab; Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Hemingway, Doug; Holmström, Mats

    2016-03-01

    Remanent magnetization has long been known to exist in the lunar crust, yet both the detailed topology and ultimate origin(s) of these fields remains uncertain. Some crustal magnetic fields coincide with surface albedo anomalies, known as lunar swirls, which are thought to be formed by differential surface weathering of the regolith underlying crustal fields due to deflection of incident solar wind protons. Here, we present results from a three-dimensional, self-consistent, plasma hybrid model of the solar wind interaction with two different possible source magnetizations for the Reiner Gamma anomaly. We characterize the plasma interaction with these fields and the resulting spatial distribution of charged-particle weathering of the surface and compare these results to optical albedo measurements of Reiner Gamma. The model results constrain the proposed source magnetizations for Reiner Gamma and suggest that vertical crustal magnetic fields are required to produce the observed "dark lanes."

  8. Grid Connected Fuel Cell Powered System Using Cascaded Quasi Z Source Network

    OpenAIRE

    N.Pavithradevi; P.Karthick; J.Jenibha Joshi; R. Suresh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a cascaded quasi-Z-source network based step up DC/DC converter for fuel powered system reduces the component stresses and size of the converter. This network provides voltage boost and buck functions in single stage without any additional switches by the introduction of special switching strategy. Presence of this strategy provides continuous input current on the primary side of the inverter. A voltage doubler is designed for increasing the transformer secondary side volt...

  9. Grid Connected Fuel Cell Powered System Using Cascaded Quasi Z Source Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Pavithradevi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a cascaded quasi-Z-source network based step up DC/DC converter for fuel powered system reduces the component stresses and size of the converter. This network provides voltage boost and buck functions in single stage without any additional switches by the introduction of special switching strategy. Presence of this strategy provides continuous input current on the primary side of the inverter. A voltage doubler is designed for increasing the transformer secondary side voltage. To provide the stable output voltage under the condition of changing input voltage a closed loop response of PI controller is designed. However with the response of PI controller the VDR output is not stable. To stabilize the VDR output ANN technique is used. To maintain the grid voltage and current magnitude at constant value a three phase average model based voltage source inverter is designed. The cascaded quasi-Z-source network based fuel cell powered system is analyzed by Matlab Simulink environment.

  10. Biology in Bloom: Implementing Bloom's Taxonomy to Enhance Student Learning in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Alison; Dirks, Clarissa; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2008-01-01

    We developed the Blooming Biology Tool (BBT), an assessment tool based on Bloom's Taxonomy, to assist science faculty in better aligning their assessments with their teaching activities and to help students enhance their study skills and metacognition. The work presented here shows how assessment tools, such as the BBT, can be used to guide and…

  11. Renewable energy sources evolution connected with Romania's accession to the EU process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RES direct support in 2010 for the EU-15 countries varies from 0.08 Euro cents/kWh of total electricity in Finland, to 1.32 Euro cents/kWh of total electricity in Denmark, with a weighted average of 0-39 Euro cents/kWh of total electricity. In case of EU-15 countries using only feed-in tariffs to promote RES, the weighted average of RES direct support is 0.44 Euro cents/kWh. EURELECTRIC's position on RES support is in favor of market-based mechanisms to support renewable sources, which do not lead to market distortions. EURELECTRIC supports the Commission's intention to create a regulatory framework for the promotion of renewable sources in the internal market. Romanian Governmental Decision No. 443/2003 is aiming at the harmonization of the national legislative framework with EU Directive. The important share of large hydroelectricity generated in Romania could represent a good opportunity for Romania to participate in the EU green electricity market, but the key problem in Romania's case is the target of 12.5 % of RES-E in 2010 without large hydroelectricity. On the other hand, the development of the future European green market will influence Romania's energy policy concerning RES development. The development of some national schemes presenting an obstacle to a European certificate trading system, which do not recognize foreign certificates, could cut down the Romania's opportunities to sell into an European green electricity market the electricity generated at low price in the existing large hydropower plants. Some member states accepted electricity generated in large HPP as 'green', the others consider only small HPP in this category. The Romania's accession to EU could mean the acceptance to increase the share of new renewable sources in the next years. Such a request, involving the real implementation of schemes for RES support could be very difficult, taking into account the low support ability to increase the electricity price in Romania. (author)

  12. Bloom: A Relationship Visualization Tool for Complex Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Horsfall

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Faced with an ever-increasing capacity to collect and store data, organizations must find a way to make sense of it to their advantage. Methods are required to simplify the data so that it can inform strategic decisions and help solve problems. Visualization tools are becoming increasingly popular since they can display complex relationships in a simple, visual format. This article describes Bloom, a project at Carleton University to develop an open source visualization tool for complex networks and business ecosystems. It provides an overview of the visualization technology used in the project and demonstrates its potential impact through a case study using real-world data.

  13. Synchronization of grid-connected renewable energy sources under highly distorted voltages and unbalanced grid faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadjidemetriou, Lenos; Kyriakides, Elias; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    Renewable energy sources require accurate and appropriate performance not only under normal grid operation but also under abnormal and faulty grid conditions according to the modern grid codes. This paper proposes a novel phase-locked loop algorithm (MSHDC-PLL), which can enable the fast...... and dynamic synchronization of the interconnected renewable energy system under unbalanced grid faults and under highly harmonic distorted voltage. The outstanding performance of the suggested PLL is achieved by implementing an innovative multi-sequence/harmonic decoupling cell in order to dynamically cancel...... out the oscillation of the positive sequence voltage vector, produced by the existence of unbalanced and harmonic distorted voltage. The fast and accurate response of the proposed PLL under abnormal grid conditions is very important for the appropriate synchronization and control of the interconnected...

  14. Biomass decay rates and tissue nutrient loss in bloom and non-bloom-forming macroalgal species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Jessie; Green, Lindsay A.; Thornber, Carol S.

    2016-09-01

    Macroalgal blooms occur in shallow, low-wave energy environments and are generally dominated by fast-growing ephemeral macroalgae. When macroalgal mats undergo senescence and decompose they can cause oxygen depletion and release nutrients into the surrounding water. There are relatively few studies that examine macroalgal decomposition rates in areas impacted by macroalgal blooms. Understanding the rate of macroalgal bloom decomposition is essential to understanding the impacts of macroalgal blooms following senescence. Here, we examined the biomass, organic content, nitrogen decay rates and δ15N values for five macroalgal species (the bloom-forming Agardhiella subulata, Gracilaria vermiculophylla, Ulva compressa, and Ulva rigida and the non-bloom-forming Fucus vesiculosus) in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, U.S.A. using a litterbag design. Bloom-forming macroalgae had similar biomass decay rates (0.34-0.51 k d-1) and decayed significantly faster than non-bloom-forming macroalgae (0.09 k d-1). Biomass decay rates also varied temporally, with a significant positive correlation between biomass decay rate and water temperature for U. rigida. Tissue organic content decreased over time in all species, although A. subulata and G. vermiculophylla displayed significantly higher rates of organic content decay than U. compressa, U. rigida, and F. vesiculosus. Agardhiella subulata had a significantly higher rate of tissue nitrogen decay (0.35 k d-1) than all other species. By contrast, only the δ15N of F. vesiculosus changed significantly over the decay period. Overall, our results indicate that bloom-forming macroalgal species decay more rapidly than non-bloom-forming species.

  15. Grid-Current-Feedback Active Damping for LCL Resonance in Grid-Connected Voltage-Source Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede; Loh, Poh Chiang

    2016-01-01

    adding a virtual impedance across the grid-side inductance. This added impedance is more precisely represented by a series RL branch in parallel with a negative inductance. The negative inductance helps to mitigate phase lag caused by time delays found in a digitally controlled system. The mitigation of......This paper investigates active damping of LCL-filter resonance in a grid-connected voltage-source converter with only grid-current feedback control. Basic analysis in the s-domain shows that the proposed damping technique with a negative high-pass filter along its damping path is equivalent to...... phase-lag, in turn, helps to shrink the region of nonminimum-phase behavior caused by negative virtual resistance inserted unintentionally by most digitally implemented active damping techniques. The presented high-pass-filtered active damping technique with a single grid-current feedback loop is thus a...

  16. Analysis and design of grid-current-feedback active damping for LCL resonance in grid-connected voltage source converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede; Loh, Poh Chiang

    2014-01-01

    in a digital control system. The instability induced by the negative virtual resistance, which is commonly experienced in the feedback-type active damping, can thus be avoided. A systematic design method of the highpass filter is also proposed by the help of root locus analysis in the discrete z-domain. Lastly......This paper investigates the active damping of LCL-filter resonance within single-loop grid current control of grid-connected voltage source converters. First, the basic analysis in the continuous s-domain reveals that the grid-current-feedback active damping forms a virtual impedance across...... the grid-side inductor, and the use of a high-pass filter with a negative sign shapes the virtual impedance by an RL damper paralleled by a negative inductance. It is further found that such a negative virtual inductance plays a critical role in mitigating the phase lag caused by the time delay...

  17. Experimental Research of Variable Operating Performance on Water Source Multi-Connected Air-Conditioning System with Digital Scroll Compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwang Zhu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we study the water source heat pump and digital scroll compressor and experimentally in the multi-connected air-conditioning system. Variable performance is developed when the unit operates in refrigerating and heating mode. The maximum of refrigerating capacity is 36519.95W when inlet water temperature of the condenser is 30°C and dry-bulb temperature of indoor air is 32°C, at the same time the maximum of EER is 4.33 when inlet water temperature of the condenser is 20°C and dry-bulb temperature of indoor air is 27°C. The unit operates in heating mode, the maximum of heating capacity and EER is 33275.73W and 3.86 when inlet water temperature of the condenser is 30°C and dry-bulb temperature of indoor air is 20°C.

  18. Connecting Hundreds of Oceanographic Data Sources from 35 Countries in and around Europe into a Big Data Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruin, T.

    2014-12-01

    Until some years ago, oceanographic data in Europe were scattered across dozens of data centres and hundreds of government agencies, research institutes and university groups. As a consequence, it was impossible to get an overview of available data and very difficult to get access to the data. And even if one managed to get access, data were difficult to use because the data came in different formats and were of varying quality.All these issues were successfully addressed in a series of projects culminating in the current SeaDataNet-project. The resulting and operational SeaDataNet infrastructure now connects hundreds of data sources from 35 countries in and around Europe. It was designed to provide a central overview of available data as well as direct access to a distributed system of online data sources. When data are being transferred to the user, the data are converted into a standard format, chosen by the user. Through a joint activity with the MyOcean project, all data within the SeaDataNet infrastructure have been quality controlled.The SeaDataNet infrastructure now offers many possibilities in support of Europe's 'blue economy'. It forms the backbone for the projects under the umbrella of the European Marine Observation and Data Network or EMODNet. The EMODNet projects produce a series of dataproducts on all aspects of the European marine environment. The data for these dataproducts are provided using the SeaDataNet infrastructure.This presentation describes the principles of the SeaDataNet infrastructure and how it connects those hundreds of data sources in Europe. It will explain the strong link, but also the differences, with the MyOcean project and will go on to introduce the EMODNet-programme and -projects as an example of what can be done if one has achieved uniform access to a distributed system of hundreds of data sources. Finally, the presentation will also address the long-term sustainability of the chosen approach.

  19. Metatranscriptome profiling of a harmful algal bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Endymion D; Bentlage, Bastian; Gibbons, Theodore R; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Delwiche, Charles F

    2014-07-01

    Metagenomic methods provide a powerful means to investigate complex ecological phenomena. Developed originally for study of Bacteria and Archaea, the application of these methods to eukaryotic microorganisms is yet to be fully realized. Most prior environmental molecular studies of eukaryotes have relied heavily on PCR amplification with eukaryote-specific primers. Here we apply high throughput short-read sequencing of poly-A selected RNA to capture the metatranscriptome of an estuarine dinoflagellate bloom. To validate the metatranscriptome assembly process we simulated metatranscriptomic datasets using short-read sequencing data from clonal cultures of four algae of varying phylogenetic distance. We find that the proportion of chimeric transcripts reconstructed from community transcriptome sequencing is low, suggesting that metatranscriptomic sequencing can be used to accurately reconstruct the transcripts expressed by bloom-forming communities of eukaryotes. To further validate the bloom metatransciptome assembly we compared it to a transcriptomic assembly from a cultured, clonal isolate of the dominant bloom-causing alga and found that the two assemblies are highly similar. Eukaryote-wide phylogenetic analyses reveal the taxonomic composition of the bloom community, which is comprised of several dinoflagellates, ciliates, animals, and fungi. The assembled metatranscriptome reveals the functional genomic composition of a metabolically active community. Highlighting the potential power of these methods, we found that relative transcript abundance patterns suggest that the dominant dinoflagellate might be expressing toxin biosynthesis related genes at a higher level in the presence of competitors, predators and prey compared to it growing in monoculture. PMID:25484636

  20. Phytoplankton Bloom Phenology near Palmer Station Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, L.; Doney, S. C.; Kavanaugh, M.; Ducklow, H. W.; Schofield, O.; Glover, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) phytoplankton bloom phenology is coupled to growing season water column stratification precipitated by seasonal warming and the melting of winter sea-ice. Previous studies document declining bloom magnitude over decadal timescales in conjunction with decreasing sea-ice extent and duration in the Northern WAP, but less work has been to done explain the observed inter-annual variability in this region. Here we use a high-resolution in situ time series collected by the Palmer Station Antarctica Long Term Ecological Research program and satellite ocean color imagery to investigate the underlying mechanisms controlling phytoplankton bloom timing and magnitude near Palmer Station. We pair chlorophyll and CTD measurements collected twice per week during the austral summer, 1992—2003, with satellite ocean color and ice fractional cover data to examine bloom development and within-season trends in mixed layer depth. Initial results suggest a possible shift over time with spring/summer blooms occurring earlier in the growing season reflecting earlier sea-ice free conditions. Net phytoplankton accumulation rates are also computed and compared against growth estimates. Our results can be used to develop and validate models of coastal Antarctic primary production that better represent inter-annual primary production variability.

  1. An integrated method for removal of harmful cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the eutrophication of lakes becomes an increasingly widespread phenomenon, cyanobacterial blooms are occurring in many countries. Although some research has been reported, there is currently no good method for bloom removal. We propose here a new two-step integrated approach to resolve this problem. The first step is the inactivation of the cyanobacteria via the addition of H2O2. We found 60 mg/L was the lowest effective dose for a cyanobacterial concentration corresponding to 100 μg/L chlorophyll-a. The second step is the flocculation and sedimentation of the inactivated cyanobacteria. We found the addition of lake sediment clay (2 g/L) plus polymeric ferric sulfate (20 mg/L) effectively deposited them on the lake bottom. Since algaecides and flocculants had been used separately in previous reports, we innovatively combined these two types of reagents to remove blooms from the lake surface and to improve the dissolved oxygen content of lake sediments. - Graphical abstract: The mechanism for the removal of cyanobacterial blooms by using H2O2, polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS) and lake sediment clay. Display Omitted Highlights: ► We combined algaecide and flocculants together to control cyanobacterial blooms. ► H2O2 was used to irreversibly inactivate the photosynthesis of cyanobacteria. ► Lake sediment clay and polymeric ferric sulfate were used to deposit cyanobacteria. ► Removal rate was very high and re-suspension rate was very low under disturbance. ► The inactivated cyanobacteria could not serve as a seed source for the next bloom. - Inactivation by H2O2 and sedimentation using polymeric ferric sulfate and sediment clay demonstrated high integrated efficiency in removal of cyanobacterial blooms.

  2. Connecting ecohydrology and hydropedology in desert shrubs: stemflow as a source of preferential flow in soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Lin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Ecohydrology and hydropedology are two emerging fields that are interconnected. In this study, we demonstrate stemflow hydrology and preferential water flow along roots in two desert shrubs (H. scoparium and S. psammophila in the south fringe of Mu Us sandy land in North China. Stemflow generation and subsequent movement within soil-root system were investigated during the growing seasons from 2006 to 2008. The results indicated that the amount of stemflow in H. scoparium averaged 3.4% of incident gross rainfall with a range of 2.3–7.0%, while in S. psammophila stemflow averaged 6.3% with a range of 0.2–14.2%. Stemflow was produced from rainfall events with total amount more than 1 mm for both shrubs. The average funneling ratio (the ratio of rainfall amount delivered to the base of the tree to the rainfall that would have reached the ground should the tree were not present was 77.8 and 48.7 for H. scoparium and S. psammophila, respectively, indicating that branches and stems were fully contributing to stemflow generation and thereby provided sources of water for possible preferential flow into deeper soil layer. Analysis of Rhodamine-B dye distribution under the shrubs showed that root channels were preferential pathways for the movement of most stemflow water into the soil. Distribution of soil water content under the shrubs with and without stemflow ascertained that stemflow was conducive to concentrate and store water in deeper layers in the soil profiles, which may create favorable soil water conditions for plant growth under arid conditions. Accordingly, a clear linkage between aboveground ecohydrology and belowground hydropedology in the desert shrubs is worth noticing, whereby an increase in stemflow would result in an increase in soil hydrologic heterogeneity.

  3. AN OVERVIEW ON BLOOM'S REVISED TAKSONOMY

    OpenAIRE

    TUTKUN, Ömer Faruk

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the main purpose is to present the main frame of revised version in 2001 of Bloom's taxonomy that has been accepted extensively in our country since 1956 as well as around the world. In accordance with this purpose, in the study, answers have been searched to these questions: 1- The rise of the original Bloom's taxonomy and what are the key features of? 2- What are the reasons for renewal of original taxonomy? 3- What kind of arrangements has been made in revised taxonomy? 4- W...

  4. Coastal engineering and Harmful Algal Blooms along Alexandria coast, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany A. Ismael

    2014-01-01

    The phytoplankton composition and its standing crop became totally different during the two periods. The most important bloom was caused by Micromonas pusilla forming a heavy green tide accompanied by a bloom of Peridinium quinquecorne. Although there were no fish or invertebrate mortality, this bloom caused economic losses to internal tourism. In the absence of any Environmental Assessment, the coastal engineering works increased the harmful algal blooms in Alexandria coastal waters, even after corrective steps were taken to mitigate the harmful effects.

  5. Temporal and spatial characteristics of harmful algal blooms in Qingdao Waters, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yongquan; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian; Cao, Xihua

    2016-05-01

    Qingdao waters, including both the semi-enclosed Jiaozhou Bay (JB) and the adjacent water out of JB (OJB), have been the areas that are most frequently aff ected by harmful algal blooms (HABs) in the western Yellow Sea (west of 124°E). In this research, HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters from 1990 to 2009 were investigated using spatial tools in geographic information system (GIS) and are discussed in terms of their connection to temporal variation. Additionally, the eff ects of each HAB occurrence were further evaluated using a simple model. The calculated results were then visualized using a GIS software to indicate the eff ects of HABs in Qingdao waters during the entire period. As a result, the OJB was proven to be responsible for the frequent HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters after 2000, although JB was traditionally believed to be the principle source of HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters. In addition, increasing nitrogen and N/P structure imbalance were essential for increasing HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters throughout the entire period, especially for the recent HAB occurrences in the OJB. The results of this research would improve the current understanding on HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters, which would benefit HAB monitoring and the implementation of a control strategy in China as well.

  6. Spring bloom onset in the Nordic Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignot, Alexandre; Ferrari, Raffaele; Mork, Kjell Arne

    2016-06-01

    The North Atlantic spring bloom is a massive annual growth event of marine phytoplankton, tiny free-floating algae that form the base of the ocean's food web and generates a large fraction of the global primary production of organic matter. The conditions that trigger the onset of the spring bloom in the Nordic Seas, at the northern edge of the North Atlantic, are studied using in situ data from six bio-optical floats released north of the Arctic Circle. It is often assumed that spring blooms start as soon as phytoplankton cells daily irradiance is sufficiently abundant that division rates exceed losses. The bio-optical float data instead suggest the tantalizing hypothesis that Nordic Seas blooms start when the photoperiod, the number of daily light hours experienced by phytoplankton, exceeds a critical value, independently of division rates. The photoperiod trigger may have developed at high latitudes where photosynthesis is impossible during polar nights and phytoplankton enters into a dormant stage in winter. While the first accumulation of biomass recorded by the bio-optical floats is consistent with the photoperiod hypothesis, it is possible that some biomass accumulation started before the critical photoperiod but at levels too low to be detected by the fluorometers. More precise observations are needed to test the photoperiod hypothesis.

  7. MERUNUT PEMAHAMAN TAKSONOMI BLOOM: SUATU KONTEMPLASI FILOSOFIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominikus Tulasi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article would like to share the use of Bloom's taxonomy as a cognitive framework for teaching-learning process to undertake the way student-centered learning. Related to the curriculum based competence in excellent education, the abstract cognitive in applying Blooms taxonomy is so called scaffolding. We know the taxonomy Bloom is a six-level classification system that uses observed student behavior to infer and absorb the level of cognitive achievement domain. This article surveys thinking within general education and management education, which uses and draws on Bloom's taxonomy, and then describes suggested uses of the taxonomy. The empirical evaluation of its effect on student achievement follows, as do thoughts about ways colleagues might use this tool to empower and motivate students as self-responsible learners in the classroom. The objective is to promote higher order thinking in college students, we understood an effort to learn how to assess critical-thinking skills in an introductory course. It means, we develop a process by which questions are prepared with both content and critical-thinking skills in mind.

  8. Biology in Bloom: Implementing Bloom's Taxonomy to Enhance Student Learning in Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Crowe, Alison; Dirks, Clarissa; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2008-01-01

    We developed the Blooming Biology Tool (BBT), an assessment tool based on Bloom's Taxonomy, to assist science faculty in better aligning their assessments with their teaching activities and to help students enhance their study skills and metacognition. The work presented here shows how assessment tools, such as the BBT, can be used to guide and enhance teaching and student learning in a discipline-specific manner in postsecondary education. The BBT was first designed and extensively tested fo...

  9. Species dominance and niche breadth in bloom and non-bloom phytoplankton populations

    OpenAIRE

    Ignatiades, L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the quantitative relationships between phytoplankton abundance and species number, dominance and niche breadth during ''bloom'' and ''non-bloom'' stages in a coastal marine environment of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Analysis of the relative frequency distribution of the species breadth per sample showed each assemblage to be a mixture of species with narrow ( 8) niche breadth. Assemblages with higher (> 30) numbers of species tended to ...

  10. Hysteresis Current Controller Based Grid Connected Wind Energy Conversion System for Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator and Quasi Z-Source Inverter Using Power Quality Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    E.Rajendran; Dr.C.KUMAR; R.Rajesh kanna

    2013-01-01

    Wind energy is a leader area of application for variable-speed generators operating on the constant grid frequency. This paper depicts the power quality enhancement in wind power system using permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) and Quasi Z-source Inverter. The PMSG is connected to the power network by means of a quasi z-source inverter (qZSI). The PMSG are used by these technologies due to extraordinary characteristics such as a smaller amount weight and volume, superior performance...

  11. The correlation between Prorocentrum donghaiense blooms and the Taiwan warm current in the East China Sea - evidence for the "Pelagic Seed Bank" hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinfeng Dai

    Full Text Available During the last two decades, large-scale high biomass algal blooms of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum donghaiense Lu have occurred frequently in the East China Sea (ECS. The role of increasing nutrient concentrations in driving those blooms is well-established, but the source population that initiates them is poorly understood. We hypothesized that the front of Taiwan Warm Current (TWC may serve as a 'seed bank' that initiates P. donghaiense blooms in the ECS, as the physiochemical conditions in the TWC are suitable for the growth of P. donghaiense. In order to test this hypothesis, two surveys at different spatio-temporal scales were conducted in 2010 and 2011. We found a strong correlation in space and time between the abundance of P. donghaiense and the TWC. The spatial extent of the P. donghaiense bloom coincided with the TWC front in both 2010 and 2011. During the early development of the blooms, P. donghaiense concentration was highest at the TWC front, and then the bloom mass shifted inshore over the course of our 2011 survey. The TWC also moved inshore, albeit after the appearance of P. donghaiense. Overall, these results support our hypothesis that P. donghaiense blooms develop from the population at the TWC front in the ECS, suggesting the role of the ocean current front as a seed bank to dinoflagellate blooms.

  12. Wind-driven marine phytoplank blooms: Satellite observation and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, DanLing

    2016-07-01

    Algal bloom is defined as a rapid increase or accumulation in biomass in an aquatic system. It not only can increase the primary production but also could result in negative ecological consequence, e.g.,Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). According to the classic theory for the formation of algal blooms "critical depth" and "eutrophication", oligotrophic sea area is usually difficult to form a large area of algal blooms, and actuallythe traditional observation is only sporadic capture to the existence of algal blooms.Taking full advantage of multiple data of satellite remote sensing , this study introduces "Wind-driven algal blooms in open oceans: observation and mechanisms" It explained except classic coastal Ekman transport, the wind through a variety of mechanisms affecting the formation of algal blooms. Proposed a conceptual model of "Strong wind -upwelling-nutrient-phytoplankton blooms" in Western South China Sea (SCS) to assess role of wind-induced advection transport in phytoplankton bloom formation. It illustrates the nutrient resources that support long-term offshore phytoplankton blooms in the western SCS; (2)Proposal of the theory that "typhoons cause vertical mixing, induce phytoplankton blooms", and quantify their important contribution to marine primary production; Proposal a new ecological index for typhoon. Proposed remote sensing inversion models. (3)Finding of the spatial and temporaldistributions pattern of harmful algal bloom (HAB)and species variations of HAB in the South Yellow Sea and East China Sea, and in the Pearl River estuary, and their oceanic dynamic mechanisms related with monsoon; The project developed new techniques and generated new knowledge, which significantly improved understanding of the formation mechanisms of algal blooms. The proposed "wind-pump" mechanism integrates theoretical system combined "ocean dynamics, development of algal blooms, and impact on primary production", which will benefit fisheries management. These

  13. Siderophores: The special ingredient to cyanobacterial blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xue; Creed, Irena; Trick, Charles

    2013-04-01

    Freshwater lakes provide a number of significant ecological services including clean drinking water, habitat for aquatic biota, and economic benefits. The provision of these ecological services, as well as the health of these aquatic systems, is threatened by the excessive growth of algae, specifically, cyanobacteria. Historically, blooms have been linked to eutrophication but recent occurrences indicate that there are less dramatic changes that induce these blooms. Iron is an essential micronutrient required for specific essential metabolic pathways; however, the amount of biologically available iron in naturally occurring lake ranges from saturation to much lower than cell transport affinities. To assist in the modulation of iron availabilities, cyanobacteria in culture produce low molecular weight compounds that function in an iron binding and acquisition system; nevertheless, this has yet to be confirmed in naturally occurring lakes. This project explored the relationship of P, N and in particular, Fe, in the promotion of cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms in 30 natural freshwater lakes located in and around the Elk Island National Park, Alberta. It is hypothesized that cyanobacteria produce and utilize iron chelators called siderophores in low Fe and nitrogen (N) conditions, creating a competitive advantage over other algae in freshwater lakes. Lakes were selected to represent a range of iron availability to explore the nutrient composition of lakes that propagated cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms (cHABs) compared to lakes that did not. Lake water was analyzed for nutrients, microbial composition, siderophore concentration, and toxin concentration. Modifications were made to optimize the Czaky and Arnow tests for hydroxamate- and catecholate-type siderophores, respectively, for field conditions. Preliminary results indicate the presence of iron-binding ligands (0.11-2.34 mg/L) in freshwater lakes characterized by widely ranging Fe regimes (0.04-2.74 mg

  14. Ship-of-opportunity based phycocyanin fluorescence monitoring of the filamentous cyanobacteria bloom dynamics in the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, J.; Ylöstalo, P.; Kaitala, S.; Hällfors, S.; Raateoja, M.; Maunula, P.

    2007-07-01

    Distribution of cyanobacteria cannot be evaluated using chlorophyll a (Chl a) in vivo fluorescence, as most of their Chl a is located in non-fluorescing photosystem I. Phycobilin fluorescence, in turn, is noted as a useful tool in the detection of cyanobacterial blooms. We applied phycocyanin (PC) fluorometer in the monitoring of the filamentous cyanobacterial bloom in the Baltic Sea. For the bloom forming filamentous cyanobacteria Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and Nodularia spumigena, PC fluorescence maximum was identified using the excitation-emission fluorescence matrix. Consequently, the optical setup of our instrument was noted to be appropriate for the detection of PC, and with minor or no interference from Chl a and phycoerythrin fluorescence, respectively. During summer 2005, the instrument was installed on a ferryboat commuting between Helsinki (Finland) and Travemünde (Germany), and data were collected during 32 transects providing altogether 200 000 fluorescence records. PC in vivo fluorescence was compared with Chl ain vivo fluorescence and turbidity measured simultaneously, and with Chl a concentration and biomass of the bloom forming filamentous cyanobacteria determined from discrete water samples. PC fluorescence showed a linear relation to the biomass of the bloom forming filamentous cyanobacteria, and the other sources of PC fluorescence are considered minor in the open Baltic Sea. Estimated by PC fluorescence, cyanobacterial bloom initiated late June at the Northern Baltic Proper, rapidly extended to the central Baltic Proper and the Gulf of Finland, and peaked in the mid-July with values up to 10 mg l -1 (fresh weight). In late July, bloom vanished in most areas. During single transects, or for the whole summer, the variability in Chl a concentrations was explained more by PC fluorescence than by Chl a fluorescence. Thus, filamentous cyanobacteria dominated the overall variability in phytoplankton biomass. Consequently, we show that during the

  15. T.S. ELIOT'S MISREADING OF SOME LITERARY SOURCES IN THE WASTE LAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liem Satya Limanta

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A poet cannot be a poet at all if he is not connected with all the poetic tradition before him. This is T.S. Eliot's dictum which he stated in Tradition and the Individual Talent and which he practiced in his work The Waste Land. T.S. Eliot showed his relationship with the past through all the quotations and allusions to mythical, literary, and religious works. His reading of those sources according to Paul de Man cannot avoid misreading or misinterpretation. Harold Bloom has tried to build up a theory of misreading, which he prefers to call misprision, especially applied to and done by poets in The Anxiety of Influence. Throughout this article I shall show how T.S. Eliot has applied some of the ways Bloom describes in reading some of the literary sources, and by so doing Eliot has given new meaning to them.

  16. Exploration of the link between Emiliania huxleyi bloom dynamics and aerosol fluxes to the lower Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainic, M.

    2013-12-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are responsible for about 50% of the global photosynthesis, thus are a key component of the major nutrient cycles in the ocean. These blooms can be a significant source for flux of volatiles and aerosols, affecting physical chemical processes in the atmosphere. One of the most widely distributed and abundant phytoplankton species in the oceans is the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. In this research, we explore the influence of the different stages of E. huxleyi bloom on the emission of primary aerosols. For this purpose, we conducted a series of controlled lab experiments to measure aerosol emissions during the growth of E. huxleyi. The cultures were grown in a specially designed growth chamber, and the aerosols were generated in a bubbling system. We collected the emitted aerosol particles on filters, and conducted a series of analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the aerosols emitted from E.huxleyi 1216 cultures demonstrate emission of CaCO3 platelets from their exoskeleton into the air, while coccolithophores cells were absent. The results suggest that while healthy coccolithophore cells are too heavy to aerosolize, during cell lysis the coccoliths shed from the coccolithophore cells are emitted into the atmosphere. Therefore, aerosol production during bloom demise may be greater than from healthy E.huxleyi populations. We also investigated the size distribution of the aerosols at various stages of E. huxleyi growth. The presence of calcified cells greatly effects the size distribution of the emitted aerosol population. This work motivated us to explore aerosols emitted during E. huxleyi spring bloom, in a laboratory we constructed onboard the R/V Knorr research vessel, as part of the North Atlantic Virus Infection of Coccolithophore Expedition (June-July 2012). These results have far-reaching implications on the effect of E. huxleyi bloom dynamics on aerosol properties. We not only show that the E. huxleyi calcite

  17. Is Bloom's Taxonomy Appropriate for Computer Science?

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Colin G.; Fuller, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    Bloom's taxonomy attempts to provide a set of levels of cognitive engagement with material being learned. It is usually presented as a generic framework. In this paper we outline some studies which examine whether the taxonomy is appropriate for computing, and how its application in computing might differ from its application elsewhere. We place this in the context of ongoing debates concerning graduateness and attempts to benchmark the content of a computing degree.

  18. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-03

    We consider a general framework to predict the development of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in a lake driven by uncertain parameters. To quantify the concentration uncertainty of those algae groups via their joint probabilistic density function (PDF), we explore an approach based on the Fokker-Planck equation. Our result is presented in an example where abundant nutrients contribute to the proliferation of cyanobacteria and other minor algae groups.

  19. Seasonal dynamics in dissolved organic matter, hydrogen peroxide, and cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Erie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose M. Cory

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 has been suggested to influence cyanobacterial community structure and toxicity. However, no study has investigated H2O2 concentrations in freshwaters relative to cyanobacterial blooms when sources and sinks of H2O2 may be highly variable. For example, photochemical production of H2O2 from chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM may vary over the course of the bloom with changing CDOM and UV light in the water column, while microbial sources and sinks of H2O2 may change with community biomass and composition. To assess relationships between H2O2 and harmful algal blooms dominated by toxic cyanobacteria in the western basin of Lake Erie, we measured H2O2 weekly at six stations from June – November, 2014 and 2015, with supporting physical, chemical, and biological water quality data. Nine additional stations across the western, eastern, and central basins of Lake Erie were sampled during August and October, 2015. CDOM sources were quantified from the fluorescence fraction of CDOM using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC. CDOM concentration and source were significantly correlated with specific conductivity, demonstrating that discharge of terrestrially-derived CDOM from rivers can be tracked in the lake. Autochthonous sources of CDOM in the lake increased over the course of the blooms. Concentrations of H2O2 in Lake Erie ranged from 47 ± 16 nM to 1570 ± 16 nM (average of 371 ± 17 nM; n = 225, and were not correlated to CDOM concentration or source, UV light, or estimates of photochemical production of H2O2 by CDOM. Temporal patterns in H2O2 were more closely aligned with bloom dynamics in the lake. In 2014 and 2015, maximum concentrations of H2O2 were observed prior to peak water column respiration and chlorophyll a, coinciding with the onset of the widespread Microcystis blooms in late July. The spatial and temporal patterns in H2O2 concentrations suggested that production and decay of H2O2 from aquatic

  20. A Matching Transformer-less Inrush Current Suppressor for Transformers Using a Series-Connected Small-Rated Voltage-Source PWM Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Funabiki, Shigeyuki

    This paper proposes a new inrush current suppressor using a series-connected small-rated PWM converter for a transformer. The PWM converter is directly connected in series between the source and transformer without a matching transformer. The inrush phenomena of the matching transformer, thus, can be avoided. The control gain and required-ratings of the series-connected small-rated PWM converter is discussed in detail. The capacity of the dc capacitor of the PWM converter is also discussed considering the active power flows into the PWM converter. The PSCAD/EMTDC is used to verify the validity of the proposed inrush current suppressor. A prototype experimental model is constructed and tested. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed suppressor can perfectly overcome the inrush phenomena of transformers.

  1. Method of anti-blooming in measurement of low-light-level television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiali; Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Ping; Hao, Fang; Zhang, Shiming

    2013-08-01

    Blooming is a normal phenomenon in the measurement of low light level television (LLL TV) due to its inner auto-gain control, which will influence the test result and should be controlled in the measurement process. Analyzing the blooming principle, a solving method was improved by increasing the ambient illumination on the sense of LLL TV, which will decrease the auto-gain value of LLL TV. What's more, this method was validated in an experiment of resolution measurement of LLL TV by the applying an auxiliary lighting equipment. The auxiliary light equipment was composed with three ground glasses, twelve LED lamps, and a box brushed with diffuse materials inside. The color temperature of LED lamps was 3000K whose value is close to the light source (2856K) of resolution measurement. During the experiment, auxiliary light equipment was placed in front of the LLL TV. By analyzing the output image of the LLL TV, the blooming phenomenon disappeared and the covered resolution image appeared. The result means that the method of increasing the ambient illumination on the sense of LLL TV is an effective way to depress the blooming in measurement of LLL TV, and it can be used to other parameter measurement of LLL TV.

  2. Phytoplankton-Associated Bacterial Community Composition and Succession during Toxic Diatom Bloom and Non-Bloom Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sison-Mangus, Marilou P.; Jiang, Sunny; Kudela, Raphael M.; Mehic, Sanjin

    2016-01-01

    Pseudo-nitzschia blooms often occur in coastal and open ocean environments, sometimes leading to the production of the neurotoxin domoic acid that can cause severe negative impacts to higher trophic levels. Increasing evidence suggests a close relationship between phytoplankton bloom and bacterial assemblages, however, the microbial composition and succession during a bloom process is unknown. Here, we investigate the bacterial assemblages before, during and after toxic and non-toxic Pseudo-nitzschia blooms to determine the patterns of bacterial succession in a natural bloom setting. Opportunistic sampling of bacterial community profiles were determined weekly at Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf by 454 pyrosequencing and analyzed together with domoic acid levels, phytoplankton community and biomass, nutrients and temperature. We asked if the bacterial communities are similar between bloom and non-bloom events and if domoic acid or the presence of toxic algal species acts as a driving force that can significantly structure phytoplankton-associated bacterial communities. We found that bacterial diversity generally increases when Pseudo-nitzschia numbers decline. Furthermore, bacterial diversity is higher when the low-DA producing P. fraudulenta dominates the algal bloom while bacterial diversity is lower when high-DA producing P. australis dominates the algal bloom, suggesting that the presence of algal toxin can structure bacterial community. We also found bloom-related succession patterns among associated bacterial groups; Gamma-proteobacteria, were dominant during low toxic P. fraudulenta blooms comprising mostly of Vibrio spp., which increased in relative abundance (6–65%) as the bloom progresses. On the other hand, Firmicutes bacteria comprising mostly of Planococcus spp. (12–86%) dominate during high toxic P. australis blooms, with the bacterial assemblage showing the same bloom-related successional patterns in three independent bloom events. Other environmental

  3. DC Bus Control of Back-to-Back Connected Two-Level PWM Rectifier-Five-Level NPC Voltage Source Inverter to Torque Ripple Reduction in Induction Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkrim Thameur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a regulation method of back-to-back connected two-level PWM rectifier-five-level Voltage Source Inverter (VSI in order to reduce the torque ripple in induction motor. First part is dedicated to the presentation of the feedback control of two-level PWM rectifier. In the second part, five-level Neutral Point Clamped (NPC voltage source inverter balancing DC bus algorithm is presented. A theoretical analysis with a complete simulation of the system is presented to prove the excellent performance of the proposed technique.

  4. Further Studies on the Physical and Biogeochemical Causes for Large Interannual Changes in the Patagonian Shelf Spring-Summer Phytoplankton Bloom Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorini, Sergio R.; Garcia, Virginia M.T.; Piola, Alberto R.; Evangelista, Heitor; McClain, Charles R.; Garcia, Carlos A.E.; Mata, Mauricio M.

    2009-01-01

    A very strong and persistent phytoplankton bloom was observed by ocean color satellites during September - December 2003 along the northern Patagonian shelf. The 2003 bloom had the highest extent and chlorophyll a (Chl-a) concentrations of the entire Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) period (1997 to present). SeaWiFS-derived Chl-a exceeded 20 mg/cu m in November at the bloom center. The bloom was most extensive in December when it spanned more than 300 km across the shelf and nearly 900 km north-south (35degS to 43degS). The northward reach and the deep penetration on the shelf of the 2003 bloom were quite anomalous when compared with other years, which showed the bloom more confined to the Patagonian shelf break (PSB). The PSB bloom is a conspicuous austral spring-summer feature detected by ocean color satellites and its timing can be explained using the Sverdrup critical depth theory. Based on high-resolution numerical simulations, in situ and remote sensing data, we provide some suggestions for the probable mechanisms responsible for that large interannual change of biomass as seen by ocean color satellites. Potential sources of macro and micro (e.g., Fe) nutrients that sustain the high phytoplankton productivity of the Patagonian shelf waters are identified, and the most likely physical processes that maintain the nutrient balance in the region are discussed.

  5. Fluorescent characteristics of dissolved organic matter produced by bloom-forming coastal phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuzaki, K; Imai, I.; Fukushima, K; Ishii, K.-I.; SAWAYAMA, S.; Yoshioka, T.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics and sources of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) are important for understanding biogeochemical processes in aquatic ecosystems. This study aimed to analyse direct production of FDOM by marine phytoplankton cultures and reveal fluorescent characteristics of exuded FDOM. Axenic cultures of eight species of bloom-forming marine phytoplankton, including two diatoms; a raphidophyte; two dinoflagellates; a chlorophyte; a cryptophyte and a haptophyte, were incubated in an artific...

  6. Biology in bloom: implementing Bloom's Taxonomy to enhance student learning in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Alison; Dirks, Clarissa; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2008-01-01

    We developed the Blooming Biology Tool (BBT), an assessment tool based on Bloom's Taxonomy, to assist science faculty in better aligning their assessments with their teaching activities and to help students enhance their study skills and metacognition. The work presented here shows how assessment tools, such as the BBT, can be used to guide and enhance teaching and student learning in a discipline-specific manner in postsecondary education. The BBT was first designed and extensively tested for a study in which we ranked almost 600 science questions from college life science exams and standardized tests. The BBT was then implemented in three different collegiate settings. Implementation of the BBT helped us to adjust our teaching to better enhance our students' current mastery of the material, design questions at higher cognitive skills levels, and assist students in studying for college-level exams and in writing study questions at higher levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. From this work we also created a suite of complementary tools that can assist biology faculty in creating classroom materials and exams at the appropriate level of Bloom's Taxonomy and students to successfully develop and answer questions that require higher-order cognitive skills.

  7. Study on the Possible Cause of Water Blooming and the Bloom-PreventionTechnology in Lake Qiandaohu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUQi-gen; CHENMa-kang; TONGHe-yi; HEGuang-xi; HONGRong-hua; CHENLai-sheng; CHENLi-qiao

    2004-01-01

    A hypothesis was formulated to explain the possible cause of water bloom occurring in Lake Qiandaohu in 1998 and 1999. We tested this hypothesis with a 3-year in situ field study. The results showed that the reconstruction of the silver carp and bighead carp populations, without other measures of nutrient control, could prevent the recurrence of algal bloom in the lake successfully. This result could serve as an evidence to the suggested hypothesis for water blooming: The drastic decline of the filter feeding silver carp and bighead carp in the lake, rather than the nutrients overloading, was mainly responsible for the algal bloom. According to this study, we suggest a general hypothesis to the ecological mechanism of algal blooming: The insufficient grazing from the phytoplanktivores (top-down control) to the algal reproduction from nutrients available (bottom-up effect) is the radical cause of water blooming, while conventionally,it is primarily attributed to the enrichment of nutrients. Besides, this study showed that stocking silver carp and bighead carp in lakes could improve water quality, which is also contrary to the conventional opinion. Finally, this study provided a costeffective and practicable approach to control water bloom for the large-sized reservoirs,especially when water blooming occurred locally. A net-enclosed aquaculture zone (NEAZ) can be established in the nutrients-exposure area of the waters and stocked with the two carps, water bloom could be controlled and prevented.

  8. Study on the Possible Cause of Water Blooming and the Bloom-Prevention Technology in Lake Qiandaohu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qi-gen; CHEN Ma-kang; TONG He-yi; HE Guang-xi; HONG Rong-hua; CHEN Lai-sheng; CHEN Li-qiao

    2004-01-01

    A hypothesis was formulated to explain the possible cause of water bloom occurring inLake Qiandaohu in 1998 and 1999. We tested this hypothesis with a 3-year in situ fieldstudy. The results showed that the reconstruction of the silver carp and bighead carppopulations, without other measures of nutrient control, could prevent the recurrence ofalgal bloom in the lake successfully. This result could serve as an evidence to thesuggested hypothesis for water blooming: The drastic decline of the filter feedingsilver carp and bighead carp in the lake, rather than the nutrients overloading, wasmainly responsible for the algal bloom. According to this study, we suggest a generalhypothesis to the ecological mechanism of algal blooming: The insufficient grazing fromthe phytoplanktivores (top-down control) to the algal reproduction from nutrientsavailable (bottom-up effect) is the radical cause of water blooming, while conventionally,it is primarily attributed to the enrichment of nutrients. Besides, this study showedthat stocking silver carp and bighead carp in lakes could improve water quality, whichis also contrary to the conventional opinion. Finally, this study provided a cost-effective and practicable approach to control water bloom for the large-sized reservoirs,especially when water blooming occurred locally. A net-enclosed aquaculture zone (NEAZ)can be established in the nutrients-exposure area of the waters and stocked with the twocarps, water bloom could be controlled and prevented.

  9. THERMAL BLOOMING OF HIGH POWER LASER BEAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Philbert, M.; Billard, M.; Fertin, G.; Lefèvre, J.

    1980-01-01

    With a view to better predicting the effects of thermal defocusing within the atmosphere, an experimental simulation set-up has been designed at ONERA. This consists essentially of a vertical airtight cell containing a gas or gas mixture sufficiently absorbing to induce "blooming" of a CO2 laser beam over a distance of about 3 m. A return wind tunnel, integrated within the cell, creates a uniform wind on the beam propagation path ; the wind velocity may be precisely adjusted between 0.1 and 2...

  10. Approaches to monitoring, control and management of harmful algal blooms (HABs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Donald M

    2009-07-01

    Virtually every coastal country in the world is affected by harmful algal blooms (HABs, commonly called "red tides"). These phenomena are caused by blooms of microscopic algae. Some of these algae are toxic, and can lead to illness and death in humans, fish, seabirds, marine mammals, and other oceanic life, typically as a result of the transfer of toxins through the food web. Sometimes the direct release of toxic compounds can be lethal to marine animals. Non-toxic HABs cause damage to ecosystems, fisheries resources, and recreational facilities, often due to the sheer biomass of the accumulated algae. The term "HAB" also applies to non-toxic blooms of macroalgae (seaweeds), which can cause major ecological impacts such as the displacement of indigenous species, habitat alteration and oxygen depletion in bottom waters.Globally, the nature of the HAB problem has changed considerably over the last several decades. The number of toxic blooms, the resulting economic losses, the types of resources affected, and the number of toxins and toxic species have all increased dramatically. Some of this expansion has been attributed to storms, currents and other natural phenomena, but human activities are also frequently implicated. Humans have contributed by transporting toxic species in ballast water, and by adding massive and increasing quantities of industrial, agricultural and sewage effluents to coastal waters. In many urbanized coastal regions, these inputs have altered the size and composition of the nutrient pool which has, in turn, created a more favorable nutrient environment for certain HAB species. The steady expansion in the use of fertilizers for agricultural production represents a large and worrisome source of nutrients in coastal waters that promote some HABs.The diversity in HAB species and their impacts presents a significant challenge to those responsible for the management of coastal resources. Furthermore, HABs are complex oceanographic phenomena that

  11. Does the Sverdrup critical depth model explain bloom dynamics in estuaries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, L.V.; Cloern, J.E.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Thompson, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we use numerical models of coupled biological-hydrodynamic processes to search for general principles of bloom regulation in estuarine waters. We address three questions: what are the dynamics of stratification in coastal systems as influenced by variable freshwater input and tidal stirring? How does phytoplankton growth respond to these dynamics? Can the classical Sverdrup Critical Depth Model (SCDM) be used to predict the timing of bloom events in shallow coastal domains such as estuaries? We present results of simulation experiments which assume that vertical transport and net phytoplankton growth rates are horizontally homogeneous. In the present approach the temporally and spatially varying turbulent diffusivities for various stratification scenarios are calculated using a hydrodynamic code that includes the Mellor-Yamada 2.5 turbulence closure model. These diffusivities are then used in a time- and depth-dependent advection-diffusion equation, incorporating sources and sinks, for the phytoplankton biomass. Our modeling results show that, whereas persistent stratification greatly increases the probability of a bloom, semidiurnal periodic stratification does not increase the likelihood of a phytoplankton bloom over that of a constantly unstratified water column. Thus, for phytoplankton blooms, the physical regime of periodic stratification is closer to complete mixing than to persistent stratification. Furthermore, the details of persistent stratification are important: surface layer depth, thickness of the pycnocline, vertical density difference, and tidal current speed all weigh heavily in producing conditions which promote the onset of phytoplankton blooms. Our model results for shallow tidal systems do not conform to the classical concepts of stratification and blooms in deep pelagic systems. First, earlier studies (Riley, 1942, for example) suggest a monotonic increase in surface layer production as the surface layer shallows. Our model

  12. Phytoplankton Bloom in North Sea off Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The northern and western highlands of Scotland were still winter-brown and even dusted with snow in places, but the waters of the North Sea were blooming with phytoplankton on May 8, 2008, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the region and captured this image. The tiny, plant-like organisms swirled in the waters off the country's east coast, coloring the shallow coastal waters shades of bright blue and green. Phytoplankton are tiny organisms--many are just a single cell--that use chlorophyll and other pigments to capture light for photosynthesis. Because these pigments absorb sunlight, they change the color of the light reflected from the sea surface back to the satellite. Scientists have used observations of 'ocean color' from satellites for more than 20 years to track worldwide patterns in phytoplankton blooms. Phytoplankton are important to the Earth system for a host of reasons, including their status as the base of the ocean food web. In the North Sea, they are the base of the food web that supports Scotland's commercial fisheries, including monkfish and herring. As photosynthesizers, they also play a crucial role in the carbon cycle, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Some oceanographers are concerned that rising ocean temperatures will slow phytoplankton growth rates, harming marine ecosystems and causing carbon dioxide to accumulate more rapidly in the atmosphere.

  13. Margalef's mandala and phytoplankton bloom strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Margalef's mandala maps phytoplankton species into a phase space defined by turbulence (A) and nutrient concentrations (Ni); these are the hard axes. The permutations of high and low A and high and low Ni divide the space into four domains. Soft axes indicate some ecological dynamics. A main sequence shows the normal course of phytoplankton succession; the r-K axis of MacArthur and Wilson runs parallel to it. An alternative successional sequence leads to the low A-high Ni domain into which many red tide species are mapped. Astronomical and biological time are implicit. A mathematical transformation of the mandala (rotation) links it to the classical bloom models of Sverdrup (time) and Kierstead and Slobodkin (space).Both rarity and the propensity to form red tides are considered to be species characters, meaning that maximum population abundance can be a target of natural selection. Equally, both the unpredictable appearance of bloom species and their short-lived appearances may be species characters. There may be a correlation too between these features and long-lived dormant stages in the life-cycle; then the vegetative planktonic phase is the 'weak link' in the life-cycle. Red tides are thus due to species which have evolved suites of traits which result in specific demographic strategies.

  14. RECOMMENDATION SYSTEM USING BLOOM FILTER IN MAPREDUCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Pagare

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Many clients like to use the Web to discover product details in the form of online reviews. The reviews are provided by other clients and specialists. Recommender systems provide an important response to the information overload problem as it presents users more practical and personalized information facilities. Collaborative filtering methods are vital component in recommender systems as they generate high-quality recommendations by influencing the likings of society of similar users. The collaborative filtering method has assumption that people having same tastes choose the same items. The conventional collaborative filtering system has drawbacks as sparse data problem & lack of scalability. A new recommender system is required to deal with the sparse data problem & produce high quality recommendations in large scale mobile environment. MapReduce is a programming model which is widely used for large-scale data analysis. The described algorithm of recommendation mechanism for mobile commerce is user based collaborative filtering using MapReduce which reduces scalability problem in conventional CF system. One of the essential operations for the data analysis is join operation. But MapReduce is not very competent to execute the join operation as it always uses all records in the datasets where only small fraction of datasets are applicable for the join operation. This problem can be reduced by applying bloomjoin algorithm. The bloom filters are constructed and used to filter out redundant intermediate records. The proposed algorithm using bloom filter will reduce the number of intermediate results and will improve the join performance.

  15. The Self According to Allan Bloom and Charles Reich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspy, David N.; Aspy, Cheryl B.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the works of Charles Reich and Allan Bloom that have helped to shape current social and political debate concerning self theory. Both Reich and Bloom were concerned with the relationship between self and environment. Argues that it is important to insure that its cultural role of self theory is clearly interpreted and applied. (MKA)

  16. Closing Achievement Gaps: Revisiting Benjamin S. Bloom's "Learning for Mastery"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of achievement gaps among different subgroups of students has been evident in education for many years. This manuscript revisits the work of renowned educator Benjamin S. Bloom, who saw reducing gaps in the achievement of various groups of students as a simple problem of reducing variation in student learning outcomes. Bloom observed…

  17. WATER BLOOM OF BLUEGREEN ALGE IN CARP FISHPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melita Mihaljević

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available The massive development of bluegreen algae (Cyanophyta/Cyanobacteria, the so--called water bloom, is a frequent phenomenon in fishpond ecosystems. This study analyses water bloom development in three carp fishponds owned by a fishbreeding company at Donji Miholjac (Croatia, where one-year-old carps (Cyprinus carpio , were bred in defferent fishstock densities. Analyses of physicallychemical properties of water and phytoplankton biomass were per- formed in fortnight intervals from May till October, 1992. In all there investigated fishponds the water bloom of bluegreen algae developed, but at a different time and showing a different qualitative composition. In the fishpond with fishstock density of 250 kg/ha water bloom consisted of the species Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, and the biggest biomass (131.92 mg/I was found in August. In the fishpond with fishstock density of 437 kg/ha a water bloom consisting of species from the genues Anabaena and species Aphanizomenon flos-aquae developed at the end of July. In the fishpond with the so--called intensive breeding (fishstock density of 750 kg/ha water bloom of the species Microcystis aeruginosa developed as late as September. The beginning of water bloom development was caused by the low value (lower than 7 of the ratio between the quantities of total phosphorus and total nitrogen. However, the qualitative composition of water bloom was influenced by one-year-old carp fingerlings density.

  18. The Evolution of Educational Objectives: Bloom's Taxonomy and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Carolyn R.; LaMonaca, Frank H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    It is crucial for teachers to communicate effectively about educational objectives to students, colleagues, and others in education. In 1956, Bloom developed a cognitive learning taxonomy to enhance communication between college examiners. The Bloom taxonomy consists of 6 hierarchical levels of learning (knowledge, comprehension, application,…

  19. 地方小电源并网规范化管理%Standardized Management of Local Small Power Source Connected into the Grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖滢; 胡加祥; 陈伟

    2013-01-01

    With the economic development , electric power demand continues to increase , coupled with the encouragement of the national energy-saving emission reduction and comprehensive utilization of ener-gy policy , and it makes the local small power develop swiftly and violently .Based on the significance of the management of the small power source connected into the grid , the challenges facing the management of the small power source connected into the grid are analyzed from three aspects of the complexity of the small power source , the enterprise and the power supply enterprise function transformation , finally the suggestions of strengthening the management of the small power source connected into the grid are pro -posed from four aspects of perfecting process , strengthening supervision , strengthening communication and creating environment .%随着经济的发展,电力需求不断增长,加上国家节能减排和能源综合利用政策鼓励使地方小电源发展迅猛。文章在分析了小电源并网管理重要意义的基础上,从小电源的复杂性、企业本身以及供电企业职能转换三个方面分析了小电源并网管理面临的挑战,最后从完善流程、强化监管、加强沟通、营造环境四个方面对加强小电源并网管理提出建议。

  20. Thinking outside the box when reading aloud: Between (localist) module connection strength as a source of word frequency effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besner, Derek; Risko, Evan F

    2016-10-01

    The frequency with which words appear in print is a powerful predictor of the time to read monosyllabic words aloud, and consequently all models of reading aloud provide an explanation for this effect. The entire class of localist accounts assumes that the effect of word frequency arises because the mental lexicon is organized around frequency of occurrence (the action is inside the lexical boxes). We propose instead that the frequency of occurrence effect is better understood in terms of the hypothesis that the strength of between module connections varies as a function of word frequency. Findings from 3 different lines of investigation (experimental and computational) are difficult to understand in terms of the "within lexicon" account, but are consistent with the strength of between-module connections account. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27657439

  1. Mapping sources, sinks, and connectivity using a simulation model of northern spotted owls- 5/20/2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Source-sink dynamics are an emergent property of complex species- landscape interactions. A better understanding of how human activities affect source-sink dynamics has the potential to inform and improve the management of species of conservation concern. Here we use a study of t...

  2. Subsurface seeding of surface harmful algal blooms observed through the integration of autonomous gliders, moored environmental sample processors, and satellite remote sensing in southern California

    KAUST Repository

    Seegers, Bridget N.

    2015-04-01

    An observational study was performed in the central Southern California Bight in Spring 2010 to understand the relationship between seasonal spring phytoplankton blooms and coastal processes that included nutrient input from upwelling, wastewater effluent plumes, and other processes. Multi-month Webb Slocum glider deployments combined with MBARI environmental sample processors (ESPs), weekly pier sampling, and ocean color data provided a multidimensional characterization of the development and evolution of harmful algal blooms (HABs). Results from the glider and ESP observations demonstrated that blooms of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia sp. can develop offshore and subsurface prior to their manifestation in the surface layer and/or near the coast. A significant outbreak and surface manifestation of the blooms coincided with periods of upwelling, or other processes that caused shallowing of the pycnocline and subsurface chlorophyll maximum. Our results indicate that subsurface populations can be an important source for “seeding” surface Pseudo-nitzschia HAB events in southern California.

  3. Hysteresis Current Controller Based Grid Connected Wind Energy Conversion System for Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator and Quasi Z-Source Inverter Using Power Quality Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Rajendran

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy is a leader area of application for variable-speed generators operating on the constant grid frequency. This paper depicts the power quality enhancement in wind power system using permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG and Quasi Z-source Inverter. The PMSG is connected to the power network by means of a quasi z-source inverter (qZSI. The PMSG are used by these technologies due to extraordinary characteristics such as a smaller amount weight and volume, superior performance, eradicate the gear box and no need of peripheral power in permanent magnet excitation. The PMSG overcome the induction generator and other generators, because of their splendid performances without take up the grid power. But Induction Generator always needs the grid connectionfor getting power to start. In this paper the quasi Z-source inverter is a present that is a novel topology conjugated from the traditional Z source Inverter. The qZSI inherits all the advantages of the ZSI, that is performs buck-boost, inversion and power control in wind energy conversion system (WECS Moreover, the proposed qZSI the matchless advantages of less component ratings and stable dc current from the source. All over boost control methods are built for the ZSI can be used by the qZSI .This Paper presents hysteresis current control technique for the quasi Z- source inverter.

  4. Incestuous rape, abjection, and the colonization of psychic space in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye and Shani Mootoo’s Cereus Blooms at Night

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Koopman (Emy)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractToni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye (1970) and Shani Mootoo’s Cereus Blooms at Night (1996) both apply a strategy of connecting rape to other forms of oppression, suggesting that incest is at least partly the result of the dynamics of being colonized and “othered”. This article brings out the

  5. Temporal pattern in the bloom-forming macroalgae Chaetomorpha linum and Ulva pertusa in seagrass beds, Swan Lake lagoon, North China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We conducted an annual survey of bloom-forming macroalgae in a lagoon. • C. linum biomass reached 1712 ± 780 g DW m−2 at the northern part of the lagoon. • Macroalgae δ15N values indicated a land-based source of N enrichment to the blooms. • High nutrient concentrations near the river mouth supported the blooms. • C. linum blooms induced the loss of seagrasses and benthic filter feeders. - Abstract: Seagrasses that are distributed over a large area of the Swan Lake, Weihai, China, support a productive ecosystem. In recent years, however, frequent macroalgal blooms have changed the ecosystem structure and threatened the seagrasses. To understand the bloom-forming macroalgae we conducted a yearly field survey of Swan Lake. Results indicated that the macroalgae Chaetomorpha linum and Ulva pertusa both exhibited a much higher productivity and attained a greater maximum biomass (of 1712 ± 780 g DW m−2 and 1511 ± 555 g DW m−2, respectively) than was the case for the seagrasses. The mean annual atomic ratios of C/N, C/P and N/P in C. linum were 14.31 ± 4.45, 402.82 ± 130.25, and 28.12 ± 2.08, respectively. The δ15N values (11.09 ± 0.91‰ for C. linum; 9.27 ± 2.83‰ for U. pertusa) indicated a land-based source of N enrichment to the macroalgal blooms. High concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus in the lagoon, particularly near the river mouth, supported the blooms

  6. Proportional-Resonant Controllers. A New Breed of Controllers Suitable for Grid-Connected Voltage-Source Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2004-01-01

    decoupling for three-phase converters can be alleviated. Additionally, selective harmonic compensation is also possible with PR controllers. Suggested control-diagrams for three-phase grid converters and active filters are also presented. A practical application of PR current control for a photovoltaic (PV......This paper is describing the recently introduced proportional-resonant (PR) controllers and their suitability for grid-connected converters current control. It is shown that the known shortcomings associated with PI controllers like steady - state error for single-phase converters and the need of......) inverter is also described....

  7. A New Control Method for Grid-Connected PV System Based on Quasi-Z-Source Cascaded Multilevel Inverter Using Evolutionary Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Reza Mohammadi; Ali Akhavan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new control method for quasi-Z-source cascaded multilevel inverter based grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) system is proposed. The proposed method is capable of boosting the PV array voltage to a higher level and solves the imbalance problem of DC-link voltage in traditional cascaded H-bridge inverters. The proposed control system adjusts the grid injected current in phase with the grid voltage and achieves independent maximum power point tracking (MPPT) for the separate PV ar...

  8. Harmful Algal Bloom Research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Jilan; Zhou Mingjiang

    2001-01-01

    Proliferations of harmful algae in coastal waters, i.e., harmful algal blooms (HABs), popularly known as "red tides," have attracted the concern of governments and scientists worldwide. In recent years, HABs have occurred in China with increasing frequency and scope. These outbreaks have seriously affected the economy along the coast through fish kills, heavy losses in aquaculture, threats to human health, and other effects detrimental to the marine ecosystem. Therefore, it is important to pay special attention to the ecology and oceanography studies related to the outbreak of HABs. Only through the combination of the advancement of such knowledge with the strengthening of the monitoring network can we develop a HAB warning system for the sustainable development of the coastal economy.

  9. A chemical approach for the mitigation of Prymnesium parvum blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umphres, George D; Roelke, Daniel L; Netherland, Michael D

    2012-12-01

    Known as Golden Algae in popular media, the harmful algal bloom causing organism Prymnesium parvum secretes increased amounts of toxic chemicals called prymnesins when stressed, resulting in major fish kills in Texas. Although many options exist for mitigation of blooms, a feasible protocol for control of blooms on large-scale impoundments has yet to be identified. Chemical control of P. parvum using six different enzyme inhibiting aquatic herbicides was explored in laboratory experiments. Of the six chemicals screened, one (flumioxazin) was selected for further study due to a significant decrease in P. parvum cell numbers with increasing chemical concentration. It was applied to natural plankton communities during in-situ experiments (Lake Granbury, Texas). The first experiment was conducted during a period of P. parvum bloom initiation (March) and the second experiment conducted during a post bloom period (April). Experiments were carried out in 20 L polycarbonate carboys covered in 30% shade cloth to simulate natural light, temperature and turbulence conditions. Through cell counts via light-microscopy, the chemical flumioxazin was found to cause significant decreases in P. parvum, but no significant differences in zooplankton abundance during the period of bloom initiation. However, significant decreases in adult copepods were observed during the post bloom period, with no significant decreases in P. parvum most likely due to decreased light penetration and inhibition of the photosensitive mode of action. PMID:22960102

  10. Physical Hydrography and Algal Bloom Transport in Hong Kong Waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUANG Cui-ping; LEE Joseph H.W.

    2005-01-01

    In sub-tropical coastal waters around Hong Kong, algal blooms and red tides are usually first sighted in the Mirs Bay, in the eastern waters of Hong Kong. A calibrated three-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the Pearl River Estuary (Delft3D) has been applied to the study of the physical hydrography of Hong Kong waters and its relationship with algal bloom transport patterns in the dry and wet seasons. The general 3D hydrodynamic circulation and salinity structure in the partially-mixed estuary are presented. Extensive numerical surface drogue tracking experiments are performed for algal blooms that are initiated in the Mirs Bay under different seasonal, wind and tidal conditions. The probability of bloom impact on the Victoria Harbour and nearby urban coastal waters is estimated. The computations show that: I) In the wet season (May~August), algal blooms initiated in the Mirs Bay will move in a clockwise direction out of the bay, and be transported away from Hong Kong due to SW monsoon winds which drive the SW to NE coastal current; ii) In the dry season (November~April), algal blooms initiated in the northeast Mirs Bay will move in an anti-clockwise direction and be carried away into southern waters due to the NE to SW coastal current driven by the NE monsoon winds; the bloom typically flows past the east edge of the Victoria Harbour and nearby waters. Finally, the role of hydrodynamic transport in an important episodic event - the spring 1998 massive red tide - is quantitatively examined. It is shown that the strong NE to E wind during late March to early April, coupled with the diurnal tide at the beginning of April, significantly increased the probability of bloom transport into the Port Shelter and East Lamma Channel, resulting in the massive fish kill. The results provide a basis for risk assessment of harmful algal bloom (HAB) impact on urban coastal waters around the Victoria Habour.

  11. Optical researches for cyanobacteria bloom monitoring in Curonian Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirshin, Evgeny A.; Budylin, Gleb B.; Yakimov, Boris P.; Voloshina, Olga V.; Karabashev, Genrik S.; Evdoshenko, Marina A.; Fadeev, Victor V.

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteria bloom is a great ecological problem of Curonian Lagoon and Baltic Sea. The development of novel methods for the on-line control of cyanobacteria concentration and, moreover, for prediction of bloom spreading is of interest for monitoring the state of ecosystem. Here, we report the results of the joint application of hyperspectral measurements and remote sensing of Curonian Lagoon in July 2015 aimed at the assessment of cyanobacteria communities. We show that hyperspectral data allow on-line detection and qualitative estimation of cyanobacteria concentration, while the remote sensing data indicate the possibility of cyanobacteria bloom detection using the spectral features of upwelling irradiation.

  12. Revised Bloom Taxonomy And Its Apllication In Algebra Area

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet BEKDEMİR; SELİM, Yavuz

    2008-01-01

     The aim of this study was to introduce “Revised Bloom Taxonomy” and apply it to field of learning algebra in New Elementary Turkish Mathematics Pro- grams (for grades 6-8). Anderson at all (2001) revised Bloom Taxonomy in order to eliminate defi- ciencies and contradictions, improve and make it more modern, and renamed it as “Revised Bloom Taxonomy”. It has a two-dimension framework: Knowledge which indicates subject matter (content) and cognitive process which indicates a description of wha...

  13. Connection Strings Property on ADO Connection Object

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Girigi Deogratias; Wu Min; Cao Weihua

    2002-01-01

    The connection string property on ADO connection object contains the information used to establish a connection to the data source. The syntax, the keyword of that information must be in specific format. Depending on the type of data you are connecting to, you need either specify an OLEDB provider or use on ODBC driver. The biggest problem, the industries face is the proliferation of data access interfaces, and the complexity of creating,maintaining and programming against them, and the network problem when communicating over the Intranet or the Internet. This paper first provides an in-depth look of the standard arguments supported by ADO connection string; then gives the easier way for understanding the meaning, the utility and the syntax of the connection strings property on ADO connection object, and finally proposes solution to work around the problems due to the connection strings errors.

  14. Seasonal phytoplankton blooms in the North Atlantic linked to the overwintering strategies of copepods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D. Friedland

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The North Atlantic Ocean contains diverse patterns of seasonal phytoplankton blooms with distinct internal dynamics. We analyzed blooms using remotely-sensed chlorophyll a concentration data and change point statistics. The first bloom of the year began during spring at low latitudes and later in summer at higher latitudes. In regions where spring blooms occurred at high frequency (i.e., proportion of years that a bloom was detected, there was a negative correlation between bloom timing and duration, indicating that early blooms last longer. In much of the Northeast Atlantic, bloom development extended over multiple seasons resulting in peak chlorophyll concentrations in summer. Spring bloom start day was found to be positively correlated with a spring phenology index and showed both positive and negative correlations to sea surface temperature and the North Atlantic Oscillation in different regions. Based on the characteristics of spring and summer blooms, the North Atlantic can be classified into two regions: a seasonal bloom region, with a well-defined bloom limited to a single season; and a multi-seasonal bloom region, with blooms extending over multiple seasons. These regions differed in the correlation between bloom start and duration with only the seasonal bloom region showing a significant, negative correlation. We tested the hypothesis that the near-surface springtime distribution of copepods that undergo diapause (Calanus finmarchicus, C. helgolandicus, C. glacialis, and C. hyperboreus may contribute to the contrast in bloom development between the two regions. Peak near-surface spring abundance of the late stages of these Calanoid copepods was generally associated with areas having a well-defined seasonal bloom, implying a link between bloom shape and their abundance. We suggest that either grazing is a factor in shaping the seasonal bloom or bloom shape determines whether a habitat is conducive to diapause, while recognizing

  15. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  16. DC-bus voltage control of grid-connected voltage source converter by using space vector modulated direct power control under unbalanced network conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Lei; Huang, Shoudao; Lu, Kaiyuan

    2013-01-01

    Unbalanced grid voltage will cause large dc-bus voltage ripple and introduce high harmonic current components on the grid side. This will severely threaten the safety of the grid-connected voltage source converter (VSC) and consequently, affect the healthy operation condition of the load. In this......Unbalanced grid voltage will cause large dc-bus voltage ripple and introduce high harmonic current components on the grid side. This will severely threaten the safety of the grid-connected voltage source converter (VSC) and consequently, affect the healthy operation condition of the load....... In this study, a new proportional-integral-resonant (PI-RES) controller-based, space vector modulated direct power control topology is proposed to suppress the dc-bus voltage ripple and in the same time, controlling effectively the instantaneous power of the VSC. A special ac reactive power reference component...... is introduced in the controller, which is necessary in order to reduce the dc-bus voltage ripple and active power harmonics at the same time. The proposed control topology is implemented in the lab. Simulation and experimental results are provided to validate its performance and the analysis presented...

  17. Quantification of phytoplankton bloom dynamics by citizen scientists in urban and peri-urban environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla, Eva Pintado; Cunha, Davi Gasparini Fernandes; Lee, Fred Wang Fat; Loiselle, Steven; Ho, Kin Chung; Hall, Charlotte

    2015-11-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are severely threatened by urban development and agricultural intensification. Increased occurrence of algal blooms is a main issue, and the identification of local dynamics and drivers is hampered by a lack of field data. In this study, data from 13 cities (250 water bodies) were used to examine the capacity of trained community members to assess elevated phytoplankton densities in urban and peri-urban freshwater ecosystems. Coincident nutrient concentrations and land use observations were used to examine possible drivers of algal blooms. Measurements made by participants showed a good relationship to standard laboratory measurements of phytoplankton density, in particular in pond and lake ecosystems. Links between high phytoplankton density and nutrients (mainly phosphate) were observed. Microscale observations of pollution sources and catchment scale estimates of land cover both influenced the occurrence of algal blooms. The acquisition of environmental data by committed and trained community members represents a major opportunity to support agency monitoring programmes and to complement field campaigns in the study of catchment dynamics. PMID:26471276

  18. A Review of Passive Power Filters for Three-Phase Grid-Connected Voltage-Source Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beres, Remus Narcis; Wang, Xiongfei; Liserre, Marco;

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce size and cost, high-order passive filters are generally preferred in power converters to cancel out high frequency harmonics caused by pulse width modulation. However, the filter resonance peaks may require the use of passive dampers to stabilize the interactions between the load...... and source impedances. Furthermore, the stabilizing effect is more difficult to be guaranteed for cost-optimized filters, which are characterized by low inductance and high capacitance passive components. In this paper, several passive filter topologies used to interface voltage source converters...... with the utility grid are reviewed, and evaluated in terms of damping capability, stored energy in the passive components and power loss in the damping circuit. Additionally, the influences of different switching frequencies of power converters on the passive filter design are also discussed in the range of 1-15 k...

  19. On the Recurrence of Enigmatic Nannoplankton Blooms in the Subtropical South Atlantic during the Early Oligocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, L. V.; Kelly, D. C.; Meyers, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Climatic cooling and expansion of Antarctic ice sheets was accompanied by a global reorganization in ocean circulation during the early Oligocene. Such a change in the ocean-climate system is expected to alter the pelagic ecosystem through elevated rates of extinction and increased biogeographic provincialism. A well documented, but poorly understood, example of this provincialism is the recurrence of unusual chalks composed of the nannofossil genus Braarudosphaera across the subtropical South Atlantic Ocean. Here we present preliminary findings from a study of the paleoceanographic conditions that fostered these Braarudosphaera "blooms" at Deep Sea Drilling Site 516 (Rio Grande Rise, southwestern Atlantic). Within the early Oligocene stratigraphy at this site, there are four chalky (recrystallized) layers in which braarudosphaerids compose ~70% of the nannofossil assemblages. Astronomical tuning was performed on conventional benthic foraminiferal δ18O and δ13C records encompassing the four layers to determine the timing of their recurrence. A strong astronomical rhythm is preserved with the blooms occurring during nodes in the theoretical obliquity solution. In addition, planktic foraminiferal stable isotope (δ18O, δ13C) records were generated for the study section using both secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and conventional gas-source isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The SIMS-based δ13C record for the thermocline-dwelling genus Catapsydrax registers substantial (~1.5‰) decreases during the blooms, signaling pulsed increases in the upwelling of 13C-depleted waters. By contrast, the IRMS-based δ13C record for this same genus show no appreciable change in hydrographic conditions during the blooms. We attribute the invariant nature of the IRMS-based δ13C record to the smoothing effects of diagenesis. These results demonstrate how marine plankton respond to changing oceanographic conditions driven by astronomical forcing of ice-sheet dynamics.

  20. Harmful Algal Blooms of the West Florida Shelf and Campeche Bank: Visualization and Quantification using Remote Sensing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Ramos, Inia Mariel

    MODIS data and the new technique developed in Chapter One showed potential for a detection technique that can distinguish between Karenia and Scrippsiella blooms. Additional work is needed to improve the new technique developed for Mexican waters, but results show potential for detection techniques that can be used Gulf-wide. This will help better understand the dynamic and possible connectivity of phytoplankton blooms in the GOM.

  1. Airborne Monitoring of Harmful Algal Blooms over Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokars, Roger; Lekki, John

    2013-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Imager mounted to an aircraft was used to develop a remote sensing capability to detect the pigment Phycocyanin, an indicator of Microcystis, in low concentration as an early indicator of harmful algal bloom prediction.

  2. Algal blooms: an emerging threat to seawater reverse osmosis desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Villacorte, Loreen O.

    2014-08-04

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination technology has been rapidly growing in terms of installed capacity and global application over the last decade. An emerging threat to SWRO application is the seasonal proliferation of microscopic algae in seawater known as algal blooms. Such blooms have caused operational problems in SWRO plants due to clogging and poor effluent quality of the pre-treatment system which eventually forced the shutdown of various desalination plants to avoid irreversible fouling of downstream SWRO membranes. This article summarizes the current state of SWRO technology and the emerging threat of algal blooms to its application. It also highlights the importance of studying the algal bloom phenomena in the perspective of seawater desalination, so proper mitigation and preventive strategies can be developed in the near future. © 2014 © 2014 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  3. Lyngbya majuscula Blooms in an Enclosed Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Soon Lionel Ng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial blooms are a cause of concern because of their potential impacts on the marine environment. In Sentosa Cove, Singapore, Lyngbya majuscula blooms appeared regularly in the highly enclosed boat canals traversing the seafront residential development. This study investigated whether sediments resuspended by physical disturbance liberated nutrients that contribute to the blooms. Sediment resuspension events were mimicked in containers of sediment collected from the canals. Lyngbya majuscula that were incubated in containers with resuspended sediment attained greater biomass than those in filtered seawater only. Levels of iron, phosphates and nitrites in seawater with resuspended sediments were significantly higher than in those without. The results indicate that recurrent L. majuscula blooms in Sentosa Cove could be attributed to nutrient loading from sediment resuspension.

  4. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Sources Fondation Pablo Iglesias. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Archives privées de Manuel ArijaArchives extérieuresArchives FNJS de EspañaPrensa Archives Générales de l’Administration. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Opposition au franquismeSig. 653 Sig TOP 82/68.103-68.602.Índice de las cartas colectivas, Relaciones, Cartas al Ministro de Información de Marzo de 1965. c.662. Sources cinématographiques Filmothèque Nationale d’Espagne.NO.DO. N° 1157C. 08/03/1965.aguirre Javier, Blanco vertical....

  5. Connecting multiple clouds and mixing real and virtual resources via the open source WNoDeS framework

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Italiano, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the latest developments introduced in the WNoDeS framework (http://web.infn.it/wnodes); we will in particular describe inter-cloud connectivity, support for multiple batch systems, and coexistence of virtual and real environments on a single hardware. Specific effort has been dedicated to the work needed to deploy a "multi-sites" WNoDeS installation. The goal is to give end users the possibility to submit requests for resources using cloud interfaces on several sites in a transparent way. To this extent, we will show how we have exploited already existing and deployed middleware within the framework of the IGI (Italian Grid Initiative) and EGI (European Grid Infrastructure) services. In this context, we will also describe the developments that have taken place in order to have the possibility to dynamically exploit public cloud services like Amazon EC2. The latter gives WNoDeS the capability to serve, for example, part of the user requests through external computing resources when ne...

  6. Deadbeat Decoupling Control of Z-Source Grid-Connected Inverter%Z源光伏并网逆变器无差拍解耦控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑建勇; 刘孝辉

    2012-01-01

    An improved deadbeat decoupling control strategy is proposed and applied in three-phase grid connected Z-source inverter. By means combining deadbeat control strategy with improved space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM) technology, the decopling control of of active and reactive power of the grid connected Z-source inverter. The control dealy in deadbeat control due to sampling time and calculation time is reduced by dual-timer sampling, thus the accuracy and stability of deadbeat control are improved. Results from simulation and experiments show that using the proposed contol strategy the Z-source voltage boost as well as the cophase of current injected into grid and grid voltage, namely the unity power factor operation, can be implemented.%提出了光伏并网系统的无差拍解耦控制策略,并将其应用于三相z源光伏并网逆变器中。通过无差拍控制与改进的空间矢量脉宽调制技术相结合,实现了z源光伏并网系统有功与无功功率的解耦控制。采用双时采样策略减少了无差拍控制由于采样与运算时间的存在造成的控制延时,提高了无差拍控制的精度与稳定性。仿真与实验结果表明,该控制策略能实现z源的升压,并网电流谐波畸变率低,而且能实现并网电流与电网电压同相位即单位功率因数运行。郑建勇

  7. Lagrangian Analysis of Kerguelen's Naturally Iron-fertilised Phytoplankton Bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Penna, A.; Trull, T. W.; Grenier, M.; Wotherspoon, S.; Johnson, C.; De Monte, S.; d'Ovidio, F.

    2015-12-01

    The role of iron as a limiting micro-nutrient for primary production in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll regions has been highlighted by paleoceanography, artificial fertilisation experiments and observed naturally fertilised systems. Examples of natural fertilisation have suggested that (sub-)mesoscale (1-100 km, days-months) horizontal transport modulates and structures the spatial and temporal extent of iron enrichment, phytoplankton production and biogeography. Here we combine different satellite products (altimetry, ocean color, PHYSAT), in-situ sampling, drifting floats and autonomous profilers to analyse the naturally iron-fertilised phytoplankton bloom of the Kerguelen region (Southern Ocean). Considering the Kerguelen Plateau as the main local source of iron, we compute two Lagrangian diagnostics: the "age" - how long before a water parcel has touched the plateau- and the "origin" - the latitude where a water parcel has left the plateau. First, we verify that these altimetry-defined diagnostics' spatial patterns -computed using geostrophic and Ekman corrected velocity fields- are coherent with the ones structuring the trajectories of more than 100 drifters and that trends in surface Chlorophyll (Chl) present an overall agreement with total column content (yet with ~2-3x differences in dynamic ranges likely due to the varying presence of Chl below the mixed layer). Second, assuming a first-order removal, we fit "age" with iron measurements and we estimate removal rates for bloom and abiotic conditions of respectively 0.058 and 0.041 1/d. Then, we relate "age" and "origin" with locations of high Chl concentrations and diatom-dominance. We find out that locations of high Chl concentration correspond to water parcels that have recently left the plateau. Furthermore, general additive models reveal that recently enriched waters are more likely to present a diatom dominance. However, the expected exponential fit varies within the geographic domain suggesting that

  8. Seasonal Variations of Phytoplankton Blooms in Suat Ugurlu (Samsun - Turkey)

    OpenAIRE

    Gönülol, Arif

    1998-01-01

    The seasonal variations in phytoplankton blooms in Suat Uğurlu Reservoir were studied between July 1992 and De-cember 1993. In certain months, the species Asterionella formosa Hassal, Cyclotella planctonica Brunthaler, Melosira granulata (Ehr.) Ralfs (Bacillariophyta); Pediastrum simplex Meyen, Pandorina morum Borry (Chlorophyta) and Ceratium hirundinella (O F. Müller) Schrank (Dinophyta) produced blooms in the lake. During the study period, the measured N/P ratio in the water varied from...

  9. Step-by-Step Design Procedure for a Grid-Connected Three-Phase PWM Voltage Source Converter,

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede; Aquila, Antonio Dell’

    2004-01-01

    The voltage source active rectifier is one of the most interesting solutions to interfacing dc power systems to the grid. Many elements are responsible for the overall system behaviour, such as value of the passive elements, sensors position, analog/digital filters and ac current/dc voltage...... position and of the use of analog filters in the feedback signals....... controllers. In this paper a step-by-step design procedure, taking into account all these elements, is proposed and validated through the tests on an experimental prototype. The reported results are particularly relevant to evaluate the influence on the grid current harmonic content of the grid sensor...

  10. Mathematical model of heat transfer for bloom continuous casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Liu; Liangzhou Wang; Liqiang Zhang; Liguo Cao; Xiuzhong Ding; Mei Liang; Yongge Qi

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model for heat transfer during solidification in continuous casting of automobile steel, was established on researching under the influence of the solidifying process of bloom quality of CCM in the EAF steelmaking shop, at Shijiazhuang Iron and Steel Co. Ltd. Several steel grades were chosen to research, such as, 40Cr and 42CrMo. According to the results of the high temperature mechanical property tests of blooms, the respective temperature curves for controlling the solidification of differem steels were acquired, and a simulating software was developed. The model was verified using two methods, which were bloom pin-shooting and surface strand temperature measuring experiments. The model provided references for research on the solidifying proc-ess and optimization of a secondary cooling system for automobile steel. Moreover, it was already applied to real production. The calculated temperature distribution and solidification trend of blooms had offered a reliable theory for optimizing the solidifying process of blooms, increasing withdrawal speed, and improving bloom quality. Meanwhile, a new secondary cooling system was designed to optimize a secondary cooling water distribution, including choice and arrangements of nozzles, calculation of cooling water quantity, and so on.

  11. Harmful algal bloom smart device application: using image analysis and machine learning techniques for early classification of harmful algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Ecological Stewardship Institute at Northern Kentucky University and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are collaborating to optimize a harmful algal bloom detection algorithm that estimates the presence and count of cyanobacteria in freshwater systems by image analysis...

  12. Applications of MODIS Fluorescent Line Height Measurements to Monitor Water Quality Trends and Algal Bloom Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andrew; Moreno-Mardinan, Max; Ryan, John P.

    2012-01-01

    water quality changes. In situ monitoring locations that correlated well with satellite imagery were in depths greater than seven meters and were located over five kilometers from shore. Water quality parameter of total nitrogen, phosphorous, turbidity and biological oxygen demand had high correlations with these sites, as well. Satellite FLH estimates show improving water quality from 2003-2007 with a slight decline up through 2011. Dinoflagellate blooms in Monterey Bay, California (USA) have recently increased in frequency and intensity. Nine years of MODIS FLH observations are used to describe the annual and seasonal variability of bloom activity within the Bay. Three classes of MODIS algorithms were correlated against in situ chlorophyll measurements. The FLH algorithm provided the most robust estimate of bloom activity. Elevated concentrations of phytoplankton were evident during the months of August-November, a period during which increased occurrences of dinoflagellate blooms have been observed in situ. Seasonal patterns of FLH show the on- and offshore movement of areas of high phytoplankton biomass between oceanographic seasons. Higher concentrations of phytoplankton are also evident in the vicinity of the land-based nutrient sources and outflows, and the cyclonic bay-wide circulation can transport these nutrients to the northern Bay bloom incubation region. Both of these case studies illustrate the utility MODIS FLH observations in supporting management decisions in coastal and estuarine waters.

  13. Evaluation of Harmful Algal Bloom Outreach Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Weisman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available With an apparent increase of harmful algal blooms (HABs worldwide,healthcare providers, public health personnel and coastal managers are struggling toprovide scientifically-based appropriately-targeted HAB outreach and education. Since1998, the Florida Poison Information Center-Miami, with its 24 hour/365 day/year freeAquatic Toxins Hotline (1-888-232-8635 available in several languages, has received over 25,000 HAB-related calls. As part of HAB surveillance, all possible cases of HAB-relatedillness among callers are reported to the Florida Health Department. This pilot studyevaluated an automated call processing menu system that allows callers to access bilingualHAB information, and to speak directly with a trained Poison Information Specialist. Themajority (68% of callers reported satisfaction with the information, and many provided specific suggestions for improvement. This pilot study, the first known evaluation of use and satisfaction with HAB educational outreach materials, demonstrated that the automated system provided useful HAB-related information for the majority of callers, and decreased the routine informational call workload for the Poison Information Specialists, allowing them to focus on callers needing immediate assistance and their healthcare providers. These results will lead to improvement of this valuable HAB outreach, education and surveillance tool. Formal evaluation is recommended for future HAB outreach and educational materials.

  14. Spring blooms in the Baltic Sea have weakened but lengthened from 2000 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groetsch, Philipp M. M.; Simis, Stefan G. H.; Eleveld, Marieke A.; Peters, Steef W. M.

    2016-09-01

    Phytoplankton spring bloom phenology was derived from a 15-year time series (2000-2014) of ship-of-opportunity chlorophyll a fluorescence observations collected in the Baltic Sea through the Alg@line network. Decadal trends were analysed against inter-annual variability in bloom timing and intensity, and environmental drivers (nutrient concentration, temperature, radiation level, wind speed).Spring blooms developed from the south to the north, with the first blooms peaking mid-March in the Bay of Mecklenburg and the latest bloom peaks occurring mid-April in the Gulf of Finland. Bloom duration was similar between sea areas (43 ± 2 day), except for shorter bloom duration in the Bay of Mecklenburg (36 ± 11 day). Variability in bloom timing increased towards the south. Bloom peak chlorophyll a concentrations were highest (and most variable) in the Gulf of Finland (20.2 ± 5.7 mg m-3) and the Bay of Mecklenburg (12.3 ± 5.2 mg m-3).Bloom peak chlorophyll a concentration showed a negative trend of -0.31 ± 0.10 mg m-3 yr-1. Trend-agnostic distribution-based (Weibull-type) bloom metrics showed a positive trend in bloom duration of 1.04 ± 0.20 day yr-1, which was not found with any of the threshold-based metrics. The Weibull bloom metric results were considered representative in the presence of bloom intensity trends.Bloom intensity was mainly determined by winter nutrient concentration, while bloom timing and duration co-varied with meteorological conditions. Longer blooms corresponded to higher water temperature, more intense solar radiation, and lower wind speed. It is concluded that nutrient reduction efforts led to decreasing bloom intensity, while changes in Baltic Sea environmental conditions associated with global change corresponded to a lengthening spring bloom period.

  15. The Blooming Anatomy Tool (BAT): A Discipline-Specific Rubric for Utilizing Bloom's Taxonomy in the Design and Evaluation of Assessments in the Anatomical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Andrew R.; O'Loughlin, Valerie D.

    2015-01-01

    Bloom's taxonomy is a resource commonly used to assess the cognitive level associated with course assignments and examination questions. Although widely utilized in educational research, Bloom's taxonomy has received limited attention as an analytical tool in the anatomical sciences. Building on previous research, the Blooming Anatomy Tool (BAT)…

  16. The Design of Z-source Series Connected Inverter Based on MPPT%基于MPPT的串联型Z源并网逆变器设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宁; 炎云

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the method of maximum power point tracking (MPPT). According to the output characteristics of photovoltaic, we propose a structure of MPPT based Z - source series connected inverter, detail the working process of this design and make the data simulation.%阐述了最大功率点跟踪方法(MPPT),并结合光伏电池的输出特性,提出了一种基于MPPT的串联型Z源并网逆变器结构,并详细阐述了该方案的工作过程和软件的主要结构。最后根据该结构进行了数据仿真。

  17. On the existence of another source of heat production for the earth and planets, and its connection with gravitomagnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbeze, Alexandre Chaloum

    2013-01-01

    Recent revised estimates of the Earth's surface heat flux are in the order of 47 TW. Given that its internal radiogenic (mantle and crust) heat production is estimated to be around 20 TW, the Earth has a thermal deficit of around 27 TW. This article will try to show that the action of the gravitational field of the Sun on the rotating masses of the Earth is probably the source of another heat production in order of 54TW, which would satisfy the thermal balance of our celestial body and probably explain the reduced heat flow Qo. We reach this conclusion within the framework of gravitation implied by Einstein's special and general relativity theory (SR, GR). Our results show that it might possible, in principle, to calculate the heat generated by the action of the gravitational field of celestial bodies on the Earth and planets of the Solar System (a phenomenon that is different to that of the gravitational tidal effect from the Sun and the Moon). This result should help physicists to improve and develop new models of the Earth's heat balance, and suggests that contrary to cooling, the Earth is in a phase of thermal balance, or even reheating. PMID:24255828

  18. First record of Thalassiosira curviseriata Takano (Bacillariophyta) and its bloom in the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wenling; LI Yang; GAO Yahui

    2008-01-01

    A bloom caused by a diatom,Thalassiosira curviseriata Takano (Bacillariophyta),is recorded in the East China Sea for the first time in China during a red tide investigation cruise (MC2005 - 2) from 27 March to 12 April 2005.This bloom was developed with the competition of Chaetoceros debilis and Skeletonema spp.The highest cell density of T.curviseriata,which has reached 1.27 × 106 cells/dm3,was found in the surface and middle water layers of Stss ZD,ZB in the East China Sea (27.22°~29.48°N,121.53°~ 122.98°E)in early spring in 2005.During the blooming period of T.curviseriata,the population with high cell density was found in the water area with temperature of 10 ~ 15 ℃ and salinity of 29.0 ~ 33.5.The percentage of the predominant spe-cies,T.curviseriata,has reached 95.8% of total diatom cells at one time in the middle water layer.The morphological character-istics of T.curviseriata,were observed with light microscope (LM) and transmission electronic microscope (TEM).The cells are 5.0 ~ 12.6 μm in diameter,connecting each other by mucilaginous thread to form spiral and curved chains.Description and LM and TEM images of T.curviseriata are presented.T.curviseriata is ecologically characterized by eurythermy and euryhalinity,and its population variation is affected mainly by silicate,the ratios of phosphorus to silicon and nitrogen to sihcon.

  19. Physical and biological data collected along the Texas, Mississippi, and Florida Gulf coasts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Harmful Algal BloomS Observing System from 19 Aug 1953 to 11 July 2014 (NODC Accession 0120767)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — HABSOS (Harmful Algal BloomS Observing System) is a data collection and distribution system for harmful algal bloom (HAB) information in the Gulf of Mexico. The...

  20. A New Control Method for Grid-Connected PV System Based on Quasi-Z-Source Cascaded Multilevel Inverter Using Evolutionary Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Mohammadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new control method for quasi-Z-source cascaded multilevel inverter based grid-connected photovoltaic (PV system is proposed. The proposed method is capable of boosting the PV array voltage to a higher level and solves the imbalance problem of DC-link voltage in traditional cascaded H-bridge inverters. The proposed control system adjusts the grid injected current in phase with the grid voltage and achieves independent maximum power point tracking (MPPT for the separate PV arrays. To achieve these goals, the proportional-integral (PI controllers are employed for each module. For achieving the best performance, this paper presents an optimum approach to design the controller parameters using particle swarm optimization (PSO. The primary design goal is to obtain good response by minimizing the integral absolute error. Also, the transient response is guaranteed by minimizing the overshoot, settling time and rise time of the system response. The effectiveness of the new proposed control method has been verified through simulation studies based on a seven level quasi-Z-Source cascaded multilevel inverter.

  1. Source to sink: Evolution of lignin composition in the Madre de Dios River system with connection to the Amazon basin and offshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaojuan; Feakins, Sarah J.; Liu, Zongguang; Ponton, Camilo; Wang, Renée. Z.; Karkabi, Elias; Galy, Valier; Berelson, William M.; Nottingham, Andrew T.; Meir, Patrick; West, A. Joshua

    2016-05-01

    While lignin geochemistry has been extensively investigated in the Amazon River, little is known about lignin distribution and dynamics within deep, stratified river channels or its transformations within soils prior to delivery to rivers. We characterized lignin phenols in soils, river particulate organic matter (POM), and dissolved organic matter (DOM) across a 4 km elevation gradient in the Madre de Dios River system, Peru, as well as in marine sediments to investigate the source-to-sink evolution of lignin. In soils, we found more oxidized lignin in organic horizons relative to mineral horizons. The oxidized lignin signature was maintained during transfer into rivers, and lignin was a relatively constant fraction of bulk organic carbon in soils and riverine POM. Lignin in DOM became increasingly oxidized downstream, indicating active transformation of dissolved lignin during transport, especially in the dry season. In contrast, POM accumulated undegraded lignin downstream during the wet season, suggesting that terrestrial input exceeded in-river degradation. We discovered high concentrations of relatively undegraded lignin in POM at depth in the lower Madre de Dios River in both seasons, revealing a woody undercurrent for its transfer within these deep rivers. Our study of lignin evolution in the soil-river-ocean continuum highlights important seasonal and depth variations of river carbon components and their connection to soil carbon pools, providing new insights into fluvial carbon dynamics associated with the transfer of lignin biomarkers from source to sink.

  2. Optical detection of Prorocentrum donghaiense blooms based on multispectral reflectance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Bangyi; PAN Delu; MAO Zhihua; SHEN Yuzhang; ZHU Qiankun; CHEN Jianyu

    2013-01-01

    Prorocentrum donghaiense is one of the most common red tide causative dinoflagellates in the Changjiang (Yangtze) River Estuary and the adjacent area of the East China Sea. It causes large-scale blooms in late spring and early summer that lead to widespread ecologic and economic damage. A means for distinguish-ing dinoflagellate blooms from diatom (Skeletonema costatum) blooms is desired. On the basis of measure-ments of remote sensing reflectance [Rrs(λ)] and inherent optical parameters, the potential of using a mul-tispectral approach is assessed for discriminating the algal blooms due to P. donghaiense from those due to S. costatum. The behavior of two reflectance ratios [R1 =Rrs(560)/Rrs(532) and R2 =Rrs(708)/Rrs(665)], suggests that differentiation of P. donghaiense blooms from diatom bloom types is possible from the current band setup of ocean color sensors. It is found that there are two reflectance ratio regimes that indicate a bloom is dominated by P. donghaiense: (1) R1 >1.55 and R2 1.75 and R2 ?1.0. Various sensitivity analyses are conducted to investigate the effects of the variation in varying levels of chlorophyll concentration and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) as well as changes in the backscattering ratio (bbp/bp) on the efficacy of this multispectral approach. Results indicate that the intensity and inherent op-tical properties of the algal species explain much of the behavior of the two ratios. Although backscattering influences the amplitude of Rrs(λ), especially in the 530 and 560 nm bands, the discrimination between P. donghaiense and diatoms is not significantly affected by the variation of bbp/bp. Since a CDOM(440) in coastal areas of the ECS is typically lower than 1.0 m−1 in most situations, the presence of CDOM does not interfere with this discrimination, even as SCDOM varies from 0.01 to 0.026 nm−1. Despite all of these effects, the dis-crimination of P. donghaiense blooms from diatom blooms based on multispectral

  3. Toxicity of harmful cyanobacterial blooms to bream and roach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchet, Isabelle; Cadel-Six, Sabrina; Djediat, Chakib; Marie, Benjamin; Bernard, Cécile; Puiseux-Dao, Simone; Krys, Sophie; Edery, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are facing increasing environmental pressures, leading to an increasing frequency of cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms (cHABs) that have emerged as a worldwide concern due to their growing frequency and their potential toxicity to the fauna that threatens the functioning of ecosystems. Cyanobacterial blooms raise concerns due to the fact that several strains produce potent bioactive or toxic secondary metabolites, such as the microcystins (MCs), which are hepatotoxic to vertebrates. These strains of cyanobacteria may be potentially toxic to fish via gastrointestinal ingestion and also by direct absorption of the toxin MC from the water. The purpose of our study was to investigate toxic effects observed in fish taken from several lakes in the Ile-de-France region, where MCs-producing blooms occur. This study comprises histological studies and the measurement of MC concentrations in various organs. The histological findings are similar to those obtained following laboratory exposure of medaka fish to MCs: hepatic lesions predominate and include cell lysis and cell detachment. MC concentrations in the organs revealed that accumulation was particularly high in the digestive tract and the liver, which are known to be classical targets of MCs. In contrast concentrations were very low in the muscles. Differences in the accumulation of MC variants produced by blooms indicate that in order to more precisely evaluate the toxic potential of a specific bloom it is necessary not only to consider the concentration of toxins, but also the variants produced.

  4. Detection of surface algal blooms using the newly developed algorithm surface algal bloom index (SABI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawadi, Fahad

    2010-10-01

    Quantifying ocean colour properties has evolved over the past two decades from being able to merely detect their biological activity to the ability to estimate chlorophyll concentration using optical satellite sensors like MODIS and MERIS. The production of chlorophyll spatial distribution maps is a good indicator of plankton biomass (primary production) and is useful for the tracing of oceanographic currents, jets and blooms, including harmful algal blooms (HABs). Depending on the type of HABs involved and the environmental conditions, if their concentration rises above a critical threshold, it can impact the flora and fauna of the aquatic habitat through the introduction of the so called "red tide" phenomenon. The estimation of chlorophyll concentration is derived from quantifying the spectral relationship between the blue and the green bands reflected from the water column. This spectral relationship is employed in the standard ocean colour chlorophyll-a (Chlor-a) product, but is incapable of detecting certain macro-algal species that float near to or at the water surface in the form of dense filaments or mats. The ability to accurately identify algal formations that sometimes appear as oil spill look-alikes in satellite imagery, contributes towards the reduction of false-positive incidents arising from oil spill monitoring operations. Such algal formations that occur in relatively high concentrations may experience, as in land vegetation, what is known as the "red-edge" effect. This phenomena occurs at the highest reflectance slope between the maximum absorption in the red due to the surrounding ocean water and the maximum reflectance in the infra-red due to the photosynthetic pigments present in the surface algae. A new algorithm termed the surface algal bloom index (SABI), has been proposed to delineate the spatial distributions of floating micro-algal species like for example cyanobacteria or exposed inter-tidal vegetation like seagrass. This algorithm was

  5. Gully annealing by fluvially-sourced Aeolian sand: remote sensing investigations of connectivity along the Fluvial-Aeolian-hillslope continuum on the Colorado River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Joel B.; East, Amy E.; Collins, Brian D.; Caster, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Processes contributing to development of ephemeral gully channels are of great importance to landscapes worldwide, and particularly in dryland regions where soil loss and land degradation from gully erosion pose long-term, land-management problems. Whereas gully formation has been relatively well studied, much less is known of the processes that anneal gullies and impede their growth. This work investigates gully annealing by aeolian sediment, along the Colorado River downstream of Glen Canyon Dam in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons, Arizona, USA (Figure 1). In this segment of the Colorado River, gully erosion potentially affects the stability and preservation of archaeological sites that are located within valley margins. Gully erosion occurs as a function of ephemeral, rainfall-induced overland flow associated with intense episodes of seasonal precipitation. Measurements of sediment transport and topographic change have demonstrated that fluvial sand in some locations is transported inland and upslope by aeolian processes to areas affected by gully erosion, and aeolian sediment activity can be locally effective at counteracting gully erosion (Draut, 2012; Collins and others, 2009, 2012; Sankey and Draut, 2014). The degree to which specific locations are affected by upslope wind redistribution of sand from active channel sandbars to higher elevation valley margins is termed “connectivity”. Connectivity is controlled spatially throughout the river by (1) the presence of upwind sources of fluvial sand within the contemporary active river channel (e.g., sandbars), and (2) bio-physical barriers that include vegetation and topography that might impede aeolian sediment transport. The primary hypothesis of this work is that high degrees of connectivity lead to less gullying potential.

  6. Marine harmful algal blooms, human health and wellbeing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berdalet, Elisa; Fleming, Lora E.; Gowen, Richard;

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal blooms are a natural part of the seasonal cycle of photosynthetic organisms in marine ecosystems. They are key components of the structure and dynamics of the oceans and thus sustain the benefits that humans obtain from these aquatic environments. However, some microalgal blooms can...... cause harm to humans and other organisms. These harmful algal blooms (HABs) have direct impacts on human health and negative influences on human wellbeing, mainly through their consequences to coastal ecosystem services (fisheries, tourism and recreation) and other marine organisms and environments...... multidisciplinary research. At the beginning of the 21st century, with expanding human populations, particularly in coastal and developing countries, mitigating HABs impacts on human health and wellbeing is becoming a more pressing public health need. The available tools to address this global challenge include...

  7. Algal Bloom in Aquatic Ecosystems-an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghorbani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Algae play an important role in all aquatic ecosystems by providing all living organisms of water bodies with preliminary nutrients and energy required. However, abnormal and excessive algal growth so-called algal bloom would be detrimental as much. Given the importance of algae in aquatic environment as well as their sensitivity to environmental changes, algal measurements are of key components of water quality monitoring programs. The algal blooms could include a variety of adverse impacts on environmental, social, cultural and economic environments. The present study is an overview on the algal growth, its mechanisms and mitigating strategies in aquatic ecosystems whereas in spite of the growing knowledge of human being of ecological, physiological, and functional conditions of eutrophication, a systematic understanding of algal blooms is still lacking.

  8. Massive fish mortality and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii bloom in Aleksandrovac Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirčev, Zorica; Obradović, Vesna; Codd, Geoffrey A; Marjanović, Prvoslav; Spoof, Lisa; Drobac, Damjana; Tokodi, Nada; Petković, Anđelka; Nenin, Tanja; Simeunović, Jelica; Važić, Tamara; Meriluoto, Jussi

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a case study of a massive fish mortality during a Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii bloom in Aleksandrovac Lake, Serbia in mid-December 2012. According to a preliminary investigation of the samples taken on November 6 before the fish mortalities and to extended analyses of samples taken on November 15, no values of significant physicochemical parameters emerged to explain the cause(s) of the fish mortality. No industrial pollutants were apparent at this location, and results excluded the likelihood of bacterial infections. Even after freezing, the dissolved oxygen concentration in the water was sufficient for fish survival. High concentrations of chlorophyll a and phaeophytin occurred in the lake, and phytoplankton bloom samples were lethal in Artemia salina bioassays. A bloom of the cyanobacterium C. raciborskii was recorded during November. Although the A. salina bioassays indicated the presence of toxic compounds in the cyanobacterial cells, the cyanotoxins, microcystins, cylindrospermopsin and saxitoxin were not detected. PMID:27352231

  9. [Causes of jellyfish blooms and their influence on marine environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chang-feng; Song, Jin-ming; Li, Ning

    2014-12-01

    Jellyfish blooms have damaged the normal composition and function of marine ecosystem and ecological environments, which have been one of the new marine ecological disasters. In this study, we summarized the possible inducements of jellyfish blooms, and the influences of jellyfish blooms on biogenic elements, dissolved oxygen, seawater acidity and biological community were discussed emphatically. The results showed that jellyfish blooms had a close contact with its physiological structure and life history, which had favorable characteristics including simple body struc- ture, rapid growth, thriving reproduction and short generation interval to tolerate harsh environment better. Jellyfish abundance increased rapidly when it encountered suitable conditions. The temperature variations of seawater might be the major inducing factor which could result in jellyfish blooms. Jellyfish blooms may benefit from warmer temperature that could increase the food availability of jellyfish and promote jellyfish reproduction, especially for warm temperate jellyfish species. Eutrophication, climate change, overfishing, alien invasions and habitat modification were all possible important contributory factors of jellyfish blooms. Jellyfish could significantly influence the form distribution and biogeochemical cycling of biogenic elements. Jellyfish excreted NH4+ and P04(3-) at a rate of 59.1-91.5 micromol N x kg(-1) x h(-1) and 1.1-1.8 micromol P x kg(-1) x h(-1), which could meet about 8%-10% and 21.6% of the phytoplankton primary production requirement of N and P, respectively. Live jellyfish released dissolved organic carbon (DOC) at a rate of 1.0 micromol C x g(-1) x d(-1). As jellyfish decomposing, the effluxes of total N and total P were 4000 micromol N x kg(-1) x d(-1) and 120 micromol P x kg(-1) x d(-1), respectively, while the efflux of DOC reached 30 micromol C x g(-1) x d(-1). Jellyfish decomposition could cause seawater acidification and lowered level of dissolved oxygen

  10. Use of sleeved rolls in a blooming mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, G.

    1983-03-01

    The use of sleeved rolls in the blooming stand ahead of a continuous semifinishing mill is treated. Two sleeved rolls were produced. One comprises a tough steel arbor and the wear resistant roll sleeve of Cr-Ni-Mo-alloyed spheroidal cast iron with carbide. Both parts were joined together in an unstressed manner by adhesive bonding. Tests show that sleeved rolls can be used in blooming stands, thereby increasing their application possibilities, but porosity in the finishing grooves of the rolls caused during the casting process means that long term behavior can not be assessed.

  11. Phylogenies of microcystin-producing cyanobacteria in the lower Laurentian Great Lakes suggest extensive genetic connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Timothy W; Watson, Susan B; Rozmarynowycz, Mark J; Ciborowski, Jan J H; McKay, Robert Michael; Bullerjahn, George S

    2014-01-01

    Lake St. Clair is the smallest lake in the Laurentian Great Lakes system. MODIS satellite imagery suggests that high algal biomass events have occurred annually along the southern shore during late summer. In this study, we evaluated these events and tested the hypothesis that summer bloom material derived from Lake St. Clair may enter Lake Erie via the Detroit River and represent an overlooked source of potentially toxic Microcystis biomass to the western basin of Lake Erie. We conducted a seasonally and spatially resolved study carried out in the summer of 2013. Our goals were to: 1) track the development of the 2013 summer south-east shore bloom 2) conduct a spatial survey to characterize the extent of toxicity, taxonomic diversity of the total phytoplankton population and the phylogenetic diversity of potential MC-producing cyanobacteria (Microcystis, Planktothrix and Anabaena) during a high biomass event, and 3) compare the strains of potential MC-producers in Lake St. Clair with strains from Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. Our results demonstrated a clear predominance of cyanobacteria during a late August bloom event, primarily dominated by Microcystis, which we traced along the Lake St. Clair coastline downstream to the Detroit River's outflow at Lake Erie. Microcystin levels exceeded the Province of Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standard (1.5 µg L(-1)) for safe drinking water at most sites, reaching up to five times this level in some areas. Microcystis was the predominant microcystin producer, and all toxic Microcystis strains found in Lake St. Clair were genetically similar to toxic Microcystis strains found in lakes Erie and Ontario. These findings suggest extensive genetic connectivity among the three systems. PMID:25207941

  12. Phylogenies of microcystin-producing cyanobacteria in the lower Laurentian Great Lakes suggest extensive genetic connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy W Davis

    Full Text Available Lake St. Clair is the smallest lake in the Laurentian Great Lakes system. MODIS satellite imagery suggests that high algal biomass events have occurred annually along the southern shore during late summer. In this study, we evaluated these events and tested the hypothesis that summer bloom material derived from Lake St. Clair may enter Lake Erie via the Detroit River and represent an overlooked source of potentially toxic Microcystis biomass to the western basin of Lake Erie. We conducted a seasonally and spatially resolved study carried out in the summer of 2013. Our goals were to: 1 track the development of the 2013 summer south-east shore bloom 2 conduct a spatial survey to characterize the extent of toxicity, taxonomic diversity of the total phytoplankton population and the phylogenetic diversity of potential MC-producing cyanobacteria (Microcystis, Planktothrix and Anabaena during a high biomass event, and 3 compare the strains of potential MC-producers in Lake St. Clair with strains from Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. Our results demonstrated a clear predominance of cyanobacteria during a late August bloom event, primarily dominated by Microcystis, which we traced along the Lake St. Clair coastline downstream to the Detroit River's outflow at Lake Erie. Microcystin levels exceeded the Province of Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standard (1.5 µg L(-1 for safe drinking water at most sites, reaching up to five times this level in some areas. Microcystis was the predominant microcystin producer, and all toxic Microcystis strains found in Lake St. Clair were genetically similar to toxic Microcystis strains found in lakes Erie and Ontario. These findings suggest extensive genetic connectivity among the three systems.

  13. Karenia mikimotoi: An Exceptional Dinoflagellate Bloom in Western Irish Waters, Summer 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Silke, J.; O'Beirn, F.; Cronin, M.

    2005-01-01

    A protracted bloom of Karenia mikimotoi was present in summer 2005 along the northern half of the western Irish coastline. The onset of this bloom was identified in late May / early June. This event subsequently dissipated over the month of July and was succeeded by a bloom of the same species in the southwest in late July. The bloom was very intense and resulted in discolouration of seawater and foaming in coastal embayments. Major mortalities of benthic and pelagic marine organisms were obs...

  14. Comparative Metagenomics of Toxic Freshwater Cyanobacteria Bloom Communities on Two Continents

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Morgan M; Li, Zhou; Effler, T Chad; Hauser, Loren J.; Boyer, Gregory L.; Wilhelm, Steven W.

    2012-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have persisted in freshwater systems around the world for centuries and appear to be globally increasing in frequency and severity. Toxins produced by bloom-associated cyanobacteria can have drastic impacts on the ecosystem and surrounding communities, and bloom biomass can disrupt aquatic food webs and act as a driver for hypoxia. Little is currently known regarding the genomic content of the Microcystis strains that form blooms or the companion heterotrophic comm...

  15. Phytoplankton of the Swan-Canning Estuary: a comparison of nitrogen uptake by different bloom assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner Rosser, S. M. J.; Thompson, Peter A.

    2001-09-01

    Spring chlorophyte-, summer dinophyte- and autumn cryptophyte-dominated phytoplankton blooms occurring in the upper reaches of the Swan-Canning Estuary have been studied to compare species composition and diurnal distribution and to determine preferential uptake rates for different nitrogen sources. Species distribution patterns over diurnal cycles showed dinophyte and cryptophyte species exhibiting diurnal vertical migration patterns which changed over a three-week bloom period. The dinophyte and cryptophyte behaviour appeared to be related to measured changes in ambient nitrogen profiles over the course of the bloom. Chlorophyte species were not shown to be strongly migratory over diurnal periods. Absolute uptake rates (, approximating Pmax) for nitrogen, in the form of 15NO3-, 15NH4+ or 15N-urea, were compared between seasonal bloom assemblages and ranged between 0·02 and 12 µg N l-1 h-1 (NO3 0·02-7; NH4 0·4-9; urea 0·1-12 µg N l-1sources were implicated in supporting these blooms. Results indicated no physiological preference at any depth for NO

  16. Return bloom in 'Stayman' apple with NAA and/or ethephon: 2007 through 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following a season in which apple trees produce a full crop, many cultivars fail to produce enough bloom the next year for an adequate crop. Obtaining good return bloom is a problem for many apple growers. Plant growth regulators (PGRs) are recommended to enhance return bloom in apple. This study...

  17. Context discovery using attenuated Bloom filters in ad-hoc networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Fei; Heijenk, Geert

    2007-01-01

    A novel approach to performing context discovery in ad-hoc networks based on the use of attenuated Bloom filters is proposed in this paper. A Bloom filter is an efficient spacesaving data structure to represent context information. Attenuated Bloom filters are used to advertise the availability of c

  18. A Preliminary Bloom's Taxonomy Assessment of End-of-Chapter Problems in Business School Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jennings B.; Carson, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines textbook problems used in a sampling of some of the most common core courses found in schools of business to ascertain what level of learning, as defined by Bloom's Taxonomy, is required to provide a correct answer. A set of working definitions based on Bloom's Taxonomy (Bloom & Krathwohl, 1956) was developed for the six…

  19. Was Bloom's Taxonomy Pointed in the Wrong Direction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wineburg, Sam; Schneider, Jack

    2010-01-01

    Bloom's Taxonomy usually is depicted as a pyramid with knowledge at the lowest level and evaluation at the top. For the history classroom, however, that arrangement might be upside down. In history, evaluation is often necessary before new knowledge can be learned. (Contains 1 figure.)

  20. Controlling eutrophication by combined bloom precipitation and sediment phosphorus inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Oosterhout, J.F.X.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that the combination of the flocculent polyaluminium chloride (PAC) with the lanthanum-modified bentonite Phoslock® (Flock & Lock) could sink effectively a water bloom of cyanobacteria and could shift a turbid, cyanobacteria infested lake to a clear water lake was tested in a cont

  1. Eutrophic urban ponds suffer from cyanobacterial blooms: Dutch examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijenberg, G.W.A.M.; Faassen, E.J.; Lurling, M.

    2014-01-01

    Ponds play an important role in urban areas. However, cyanobacterial blooms counteract the societal need for a good water quality and pose serious health risks for citizens and pets. To provide insight into the extent and possible causes of cyanobacterial problems in urban ponds, we conducted a surv

  2. The Unfortunate Consequences of Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The sequenced levels of thinking articulated in Bloom's original taxonomy (or in the multitude of subsequent variations) is the most widely known list in education. In addition to enduring popularity, it is arguably one of the most destructive theories in education. In this article, the author explains what makes it so damaging and how…

  3. Toxins produced in cyanobacterial water blooms – toxicity and risks

    OpenAIRE

    Bláha, Luděk; Babica, Pavel; Maršálek, Blahoslav

    2009-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms in freshwaters represent a major ecological and human health problem worldwide. This paper briefly summarizes information on major cyanobacterial toxins (hepatotoxins, neurotoxins etc.) with special attention to microcystins-cyclic heptapeptides with high acute and chronic toxicities. Besides discussion of human health risks, microcystin ecotoxicology and consequent ecological risks are also highlighted. Although significant research attention has been paid to microcysti...

  4. Termination of a toxic Alexandrium bloom with hydrogen peroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burson, A.; Matthijs, H.C.P.; Bruijne, de W.; Talens, R.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.; Gerssen, A.; Visser, P.M.; Stomp, M.; Steur, K.; Scheppingen, van Y.; Huisman, J.

    2014-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii is a well-known harmful algal species that can potentially cause paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). Usually A. ostenfeldii occurs in low background concentrations only, but in August of 2012 an exceptionally dense bloom of more than 1 million cells L-1 oc

  5. Termination of a toxic Alexandrium bloom with hydrogen peroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Burson; H.C.P. Matthijs; W. de Bruijne; R. Talens; R. Hoogenboom; A. Gerssen; P.M. Visser; M. Stomp; K. Steur; Y. van Scheppingen; J. Huisman

    2014-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii is a well-known harmful algal species that can potentially cause paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). Usually A. ostenfeldii occurs in low background concentrations only, but in August of 2012 an exceptionally dense bloom of more than 1 million cells L−1 oc

  6. Fooling Mother Nature: Forcing Flower Bulbs for Indoor Bloom

    OpenAIRE

    Graine, George; Scoggins, Holly Lynne, 1962-

    2014-01-01

    Think about bulb forcing as an orderly process. This includes choosing the bulb, storing it if necessary, selecting the right size container, determining the potting mix, planting (including fertilizer, water and location), providing a cooling treatment if necessary and after care. Other considerations may be color, fragrance, and timing for seasonal enjoyment of winter or early spring bloom.

  7. Fungal parasitism: life cycle, dynamics and impact on cyanobacterial blooms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Gerphagnon

    Full Text Available Many species of phytoplankton are susceptible to parasitism by fungi from the phylum Chytridiomycota (i.e. chytrids. However, few studies have reported the effects of fungal parasites on filamentous cyanobacterial blooms. To investigate the missing components of bloom ecosystems, we examined an entire field bloom of the cyanobacterium Anabaena macrospora for evidence of chytrid infection in a productive freshwater lake, using a high resolution sampling strategy. A. macrospora was infected by two species of the genus Rhizosiphon which have similar life cycles but differed in their infective regimes depending on the cellular niches offered by their host. R. crassum infected both vegetative cells and akinetes while R. akinetum infected only akinetes. A tentative reconstruction of the developmental stages suggested that the life cycle of R. crassum was completed in about 3 days. The infection affected 6% of total cells (and 4% of akinètes, spread over a maximum of 17% of the filaments of cyanobacteria, in which 60% of the cells could be parasitized. Furthermore, chytrids may reduce the length of filaments of Anabaena macrospora significantly by "mechanistic fragmentation" following infection. All these results suggest that chytrid parasitism is one of the driving factors involved in the decline of a cyanobacteria blooms, by direct mortality of parasitized cells and indirectly by the mechanistic fragmentation, which could weaken the resistance of A. macrospora to grazing.

  8. Conception of Learning Outcomes in the Bloom's Taxonomy Affective Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savickiene, Izabela

    2010-01-01

    The article raises a problematic issue regarding an insufficient base of the conception of learning outcomes in the Bloom's taxonomy affective domain. The search for solutions introduces the conception of teaching and learning in the affective domain as well as presents validity criteria of learning outcomes in the affective domain. The…

  9. Developing Learning Objectives for Accounting Ethics Using Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Linda A.; Fisher, Dann G.; Braun, Robert L.; Swanson, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to offer a set of core knowledge learning objectives for accounting ethics education. Using Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives, we develop learning objectives in six content areas: codes of ethical conduct, corporate governance, the accounting profession, moral development, classical ethics theories, and…

  10. Using Bloom's Taxonomy to Teach Students about Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosen, Melissa A.

    2008-01-01

    Melissa A. Vosen outlines a unit she has designed to help students comprehend the often unclear boundaries and issues surrounding plagiarism. Using Bloom's taxonomy of the cognitive domain, students complete increasingly complex tasks, learning to construct a works cited page and assess scholarly opinions. They also research the consequences of…

  11. Reconsidering Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Cognitive Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David S.

    1982-01-01

    The hierarchical structure of the cognitive domain presented in Benjamin S. Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives does not reflect the actual nature of the learning process. Attempts to apply the classification levels to student learning in mathematics and other subjects place the taxonomy's usefulness in question. (PP)

  12. ENCLOSURE EXPERIMENTS ON AND LACUSTRINE PRACTICE FOR ELIMINATING MICROCYSTIS BLOOM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建康; 谢平

    2002-01-01

    Microcystis bloom, one of the most objectionable characteristics of eutrophication in tropical and subtropical waters, occurred in Donghu Lake (East Lake) of Wuhan every summer from the 1970s up to 1984, but from 1985 up tonow failed to occur there. The cause of its disappearance remained in obscurityuntil recently. In situ enclosure experiments in the lake for three years showed that the stocking of the filter-feeding silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and big-head carp (Aristichthys nobilis) played a decisive role in eliminating Microcystis bloom from the lake; but that recurrence of the bloom is possibleunder certain conditions. This paper presents the details and the results of enclosure experiments. The authors' analysis of fish biomass data obtained by echo-sounding and the fishery production of the lake over the years, revealed that the recurrence of Microcystis bloom can be prevented so long as the combined biomass of silver carp and big-head carp remains at or exceeds 50 g per cubic meter of lakewater, as was the case in the lake's 1985 fish yield of 1015 t.``

  13. Study of Algae Bloom in the Three-Gorges Reservoir Region Based on Complex Networks Model Theory%利用复杂网络理论研究三峡库区流域水华暴发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胥昌纯; 卢挺; 陈刚才

    2011-01-01

    Use the Complex Networks(CNs) theory to establish the dynamics model of the algal bloom in the three-gorges valley basically.This model firstly classifies the inducement of the algal bloom to three kinds and establish the no-connection inducements relation figure.And then to set the range of the inducement in the figure.Finally to consult the known literature to establish the border connection of the inducement in order to describe the algal bloom with the CNs model.In the end to use the actual inspect data in the Jialingjiang river and the Yangtze River in the pring of 2007 and the Wujiangdu reservior in the August of 2002 to calculate the average path length and the clustering coefficient of the CNs model of the algal bloom and it is found that the L in the area of water bloom is smaller.It explains that the smaller the L is, the easier is the possibility of the algal bloom, which fits in with the local results in this water area.Meanwhile , the coefficient of algae bloom in this water area is smaller than that of non-water bloom in this area.It demonstrates that at the period of algae bloom the coefficient of water bloom increases at first and then decreases and finally increases.Therefore,at the period of algae bloom(previous time of algae bloom, time of algae bloom,fadeaway time of algae bloom),the mutual effection of algae bloom factor strengthens at first and is weakened then and strengthens finally.%根据复杂网络(CNs)理论初步建立三峡流域的水华暴发动力学模型,利用水华暴发的三类因素建立起水华暴发CNs无边接连基本模型图,参考实际水域水华暴发因素设定各节点子节点范围,建立各节点的边连接,从而初步建立水华暴发的CNs模型.模型中代入2007年春季嘉陵江、长江和2002年乌江"黑潮"8月份乌江渡水库监测数据,计算得出两个区域水华暴发CNs模型的平均路径长度L和聚类系数C,发现发生水华的流域平均路径长度L越小流域水华暴发

  14. Thirty years - Alexandrium fundyense cyst, bloom dynamics and shellfish toxicity in the Bay of Fundy, eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer L.; LeGresley, Murielle M.; Hanke, Alex R.

    2014-05-01

    Sediment and water samples were collected for Alexandrium fundyense spatial and temporal distribution and abundance at more than 120 locations throughout the Bay of Fundy during the summers and winters of 1980-1984. These broad surveys have been repeated at various times through the past 30 years, with more regular sampling since 2004. In addition, A. fundyense abundance has been monitored at several locations within the Bay of Fundy at weekly intervals from April to November and monthly during the remaining months since 1988. Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) toxins in shellfish (notably Mya arenaria) have also been monitored at multiple locations in the Bay of Fundy since 1943. The datasets were examined to determine relationships and roles between overwintering resting cysts, bloom initiation, bloom decline, motile cell dispersal and A. fundyense motile populations and resulting shellfish toxicity since 1980. Cysts are widely dispersed throughout the Bay of Fundy in the offshore, inshore and intertidal zones with the largest deposits located in the offshore in silt/clay sediments to the east and north of Grand Manan Island at depths of 60-180 m. Results show that there is a constant stable source of cysts in the Bay of Fundy with highest concentrations of cysts (9780 cysts cm-3) observed in 2010 and highest concentrations of A. fundyense motile cells (18×106 cells L-1) observed in 1980. Interannual changes in abundance in A. fundyense populations, resting cysts and the temporal trends in M. arenaria toxicity are discussed. Results show that there was no relationship between the abundance of overwintering cysts and the magnitude of A. fundyense blooms. The offshore seed beds appear to be relatively constant in cyst density among most years and serve as an important source for the motile cells that lead to initiation of major blooms and resulting shellfish toxicity throughout the Bay of Fundy.

  15. Tropical cyanobacterial blooms: a review of prevalence, problem taxa, toxins and influencing environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxine A.D. Mowe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are a major issue in freshwater systems in many countries. The potentially toxic species and their ecological causes are likely to be different in tropical zones from those in temperate water bodies; however, studies on tropical toxic cyanobacterial blooms are sporadic and currently there is no global synthesis. In this review, we examined published information on tropical cyanobacterial bloom occurrence and toxin production to investigate patterns in their growth and distribution. Microcystis was the most frequently occurring bloom genus throughout tropical Asia, Africa and Central America, while Cylindrospermopsis and Anabaena blooms occurred in various locations in tropical Australia, America and Africa. Microcystis blooms were more prevalent during the wet season while Cylindrospermopsis blooms were more prevalent during the dry period. Microcystin was the most encountered toxin throughout the tropics. A meta-analysis of tropical cyanobacterial blooms showed that Microcystis blooms were more associated with higher total nitrogen concentrations, while Cylindrospermopsis blooms were more associated with higher maximum temperatures. Meta-analysis also showed a positive linear relationship between levels of microcystin and N:P (nitrate:phosphate ratio. Tropical African Microcystis blooms were found to have the lowest microcystin levels in relation to biomass and N:P (nitrate:phosphate compared to tropical Asian, Australian and American blooms. There was also no significant correlation between microcystin concentration and cell concentration for tropical African blooms as opposed to tropical Asian and American blooms. Our review illustrates that some cyanobacteria and toxins are more prevalent in tropical areas. While some tropical countries have considerable information regarding toxic blooms, others have few or no reported studies. 

  16. Novel Insights on the Dynamics and Consequence of Harmful Algal Blooms in the California Current System: From Parasites as Bloom Control Agents to Human Toxin Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzillo, Fernanda da Frota Mattos

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation provided novel insights on the dynamics and consequences of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in the California Current System (CCS). Parasitism is described as a biological control agent of harmful dinoflagellate blooms and referred to as a novel factor influencing HAB dynamics in coastal upwelling environments. Chapter 1 documented, for the first time, the presence of Amoebophrya, an endoparasitic dinoflagellate that infects and kills 7 bloom-forming dinoflagellate host species ...

  17. The plankton community on Sukkertop and Fylla Banks off West Greenland during a spring bloom and post-bloom period: Hydrography, phytoplankton and protozooplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Louise K.; Reuss, N.

    2002-01-01

    The plankton community structure was investigated on Sukkertop and Fylla Banks off West Greenland during the spring bloom in May 2000 and the post-bloom period in June 1999. In May a small change in density, clearly illustrated by the profile of potential energy, was sufficient to support a spring...... bloom in the upper part of the water column. The spring bloom phytoplankton community displayed high biomass (92 +/- 45 mg C m(-3)) dominated by species of the genera Thalassiosira and Chaetoceros. The phytoplankton species composition, ongoing sedimentation and nutrient depletion indicated late spring...

  18. Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Alex

    2015-11-01

    The Connected Traveler project is a multi-disciplinary undertaking that seeks to validate potential for transformative transportation system energy savings by incentivizing efficient traveler behavior. This poster outlines various aspects of the Connected Traveler project, including market opportunity, understanding traveler behavior and decision-making, automation and connectivity, and a projected timeline for Connected Traveler's key milestones.

  19. Towards "Intelligent Compression" in Streams: A Biased Reservoir Sampling based Bloom Filter Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Sourav; Narang, Ankur

    2011-01-01

    With the explosion of information stored world-wide,data intensive computing has become a central area of research.Efficient management and processing of this massively exponential amount of data from diverse sources,such as telecommunication call data records,online transaction records,etc.,has become a necessity.Removing redundancy from such huge(multi-billion records) datasets resulting in resource and compute efficiency for downstream processing constitutes an important area of study. "Intelligent compression" or deduplication in streaming scenarios,for precise identification and elimination of duplicates from the unbounded datastream is a greater challenge given the realtime nature of data arrival.Stable Bloom Filters(SBF) address this problem to a certain extent.However,SBF suffers from a high false negative rate(FNR) and slow convergence rate,thereby rendering it inefficient for applications with low FNR tolerance.In this paper, we present a novel Reservoir Sampling based Bloom Filter,(RSBF) data struc...

  20. Groundwater contamination by microcystin from toxic cyanobacteria blooms in Lake Chaohu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Kong, Fanxiang; Zhang, Min

    2016-05-01

    Lake Chaohu is a eutrophic lake that experiences massive cyanobacterial blooms. The high concentrations of microcystin observed in this lake are the result of the bloom's high proportion of toxic cyanobacteria strains. Groundwater is the important source of water for drinking, washing, and irrigation in the watershed of Lake Chaohu. This study examines the space-time distribution of microcystins and related environmental factors in wells near Lake Chaohu. All collected groundwater samples from the Lake Chaohu region had detectable concentrations of microcystins. The highest concentration of microcystins, 1.07 μg L(-1), occurred in a well hundreds of meters from the western coast of the lake in September. The distance from the lake shore to the well was significantly and positively correlated with the microcystin concentration in the groundwater. Moreover, a correlation analysis shows that the microcystin concentration in the groundwater was positively correlated with the total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) and microcystin concentration of the nearby lake water. Therefore, the microcystin in the groundwater likely originates from penetration by nearby lake water. Our results suggest that the groundwater near Lake Chaohu poses a significant health risk for the local residents when used for drinking water.

  1. Environmental and biological factors controlling the spring phytoplankton bloom at the Patagonian shelf-break front - Degraded fucoxanthin pigments and the importance of microzooplankton grazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreto, José I.; Montoya, Nora G.; Carignan, Mario O.; Akselman, Rut; Acha, E. Marcelo; Derisio, Carla

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biotic and abiotic factors controlling the spring phytoplankton blooms at the Patagonian shelf-break front (PSBF). Using a CHEMTAX analysis of HPLC pigment data and other methods, the biomass and spatial variability of plankton communities were studied in four sections (39-48°S) across the PSBF during October 2005. Environmental factors and the biomass and composition of plankton communities exhibited a marked spatial heterogeneity. The latitudinal and cross-shelf progression in the timing of the spring bloom initiation and the nutritive properties of the water masses (Subantarctic Shelf Waters and Malvinas Current Waters) seemed to be the key factors. Three plankton regions were distinguished: (a) Outer shelf (OS), (b) Shelf-break front (SBF) and (c) Malvinas Current (MC). At the highly stratified OS region, the post-bloom community showed low-biomasshigh-phytoplankton diversity formed mainly by small cells (haptophytes 30-62%, diatoms 17-49%, chlorophytes 0-34%, and prasinophytes 0-21% of total Chl a). High amounts of degraded fucoxanthin were found associated with the heterotrophic dinoflagellate, Protoperidinium capurroi. Grazing by this microheterotroph on the diatom population seemed to be the most important factor for the spring bloom decay at the OS. A remarkable quasi monospecific bloom (∼90%) of a nanodiatom (Thalassiosira bioculata var. raripora) associated with high Chl a (up to 20 mg m-3) occurred along (∼1000 km) the SBF and in the most northern extension of the MC. In the southern region, the bloom was developed under absent or incipient density stratification, increasing solar irradiance, high nitrate and phosphate availability, and low numbers of phytoplankton grazers. The average mixedlayer PAR irradiance (iron-rich sediments. The upwelling along the SBF provides a large source of macronutrients and probably the dissolved iron needed to sustain the intense diatom bloom, but also diatom resting

  2. Freshwater harmful algal blooms: toxins and children's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirich, Chelsea A; Miller, Todd R

    2014-01-01

    Massive accumulations of cyanobacteria (a.k.a. "blue-green algae"), known as freshwater harmful algal blooms (FHABs), are a common global occurrence in water bodies used for recreational purposes and drinking water purification. Bloom prevalence is increased due to anthropogenic changes in land use, agricultural activity, and climate change. These photosynthetic bacteria produce a range of toxic secondary metabolites that affect animals and humans at both chronic and acute dosages. Children are especially at risk because of their lower body weight, behavior, and toxic effects on development. Here we review common FHAB toxins, related clinical symptoms, acceptable concentrations in drinking water, case studies of children's and young adults' exposures to FHAB toxins through drinking water and food, methods of environmental and clinical detection in potential cases of intoxication, and best practices for FHAB prevention. PMID:24439026

  3. Sedimentation of phytoplankton during a diatom bloom : Rates and mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Hansen, J.L.S.; Alldredge, A.L.;

    1996-01-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are uncoupled from grazing and are normally terminated by sedimentation. There are several potential mechanisms by which phytoplankton cells may settle out of the photic zone: sinking of individual cells or chains, coagulation of cells into aggregates with high settling...... fjord, and evaluated their potential to control phytoplankton population dynamics. Overall specific sedimentation rates of intact phytoplankton cells were low during the Ii-day study period, averaging ca. 0.1 d(-1), and mass sedimentation and bloom termination did not occur. Most cells settled attached...... to marine snow aggregates formed from discarded larvacean houses, whereas settling of unaggregated cells was insignificant. Formation rates of phytoplankton aggregates by physical coagulation was very low, and losses by this mechanism were much less than 0.07 d(-1); phytoplankton aggregates were...

  4. Orbitally-forced Azolla blooms and middle Eocene Arctic hydrology; clues from palynology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barke, Judith; Abels, Hemmo A.; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Greenwood, David R.; Sweet, Arthur R.; Donders, Timme; Lotter, Andre F.; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2010-05-01

    The presence of high abundances of the freshwater fern Azolla in the early Middle Eocene central Arctic Ocean sediments recovered from the Lomonosov Ridge during IODP Expedition 302, have been related to the presence of a substantial freshwater cap. Azolla massulae, belonging to the newly described Eocene species Azolla arctica Collinson et al., have been found over at least a ~4 m-thick interval. There are strong indications that Azolla has bloomed and reproduced in situ in the Arctic Ocean for several hundreds of thousands of years. Possible causes for the sudden demise of Azolla at ~48.1 Ma include salinity changes due to evolving oceanic connections or sea-level change. Distinct cyclic fluctuation in the Azolla massulae abundances have previously been related to orbitally forced climate changes. In this study, we evaluate the possible underlying forcing mechanisms for these freshwater cycles and for the eventual demise of Azolla in an integrated palynological and cyclostratigraphical approach. Our results show two clear periodicities of ~1.3 and ~0.7 m in all major aquatic and terrestrial palynomorph associations, which we can relate to obliquity (41 ka) and precession (~21 ka), respectively. Cycles in the abundances of Azolla, freshwater-tolerant dinoflagellate cysts, and swamp vegetation pollen show co-variability in the obliquity domain. Their strong correlation suggests periods of enhanced rainfall and runoff during Azolla blooms, possibly associated with increased summer season length and insolation during obliquity maxima. Cycles in the angiosperm pollen record are in anti-phase with the Azolla cycles. We interpret this pattern as edaphically drier conditions on land and reduced associated runoff during Azolla lows, possibly corresponding to obliquity minima. The precession signal is distinctly weaker than that for obliquity, and is mainly detectable in the cold-temperate Larix and bisaccate conifer pollen abundances, which is interpreted as a response to

  5. Estimating the Budgets of Nutrients for Phytoplankton Bloom in the Central Yellow Sea Using a Modified Lower Tropic Ecosystem Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Chengyi; WANG Yuheng; WEI Hao

    2014-01-01

    A modified lower trophic ecosystem model (NEMURO) is coupled with a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model for an application in the central Yellow Sea. The model is used to simulate the horizontal distributions and annual cycles of chlorophyll-a and nutrients with results consistent with historical observations. Generally, during the winter background and spring bloom periods, the exchange with neighboring waters constitutes the primary sources of nutrients. Howerver, during the winter background period, the input of silicate from the layer deeper than 50 m is the most important source that contributes up to 60%to the total sources. Dur-ing the spring bloom period, the transport across the thermocline makes significant contribution to the input of phosphate and silicate. During the post spring bloom period, the relative contribution of relevant processes varies for different nutrients. For ammonium, atmospheric deposition, excretion of zooplankton and decomposition of particulate and dissolved nitrogen make similar contributions. For phosphate and silicate, the dominant input is the transport across the thermocline, accounting for 62% and 68% of the total sources, respectively. The N/P ratio averaged annually and over the whole southern Yellow Sea is up to 51.8, indicating the potential of P limitation in this region. The important influence of large scale sea water circulation is revealed by both the estimated fluxes and the corresponding N/P ratio of nutrients across a section linking the northeastern bank of the Changjiang River and Cheju Island. During the winter background period, the input of nitrate, ammonium, phosphate and silicate by the Yellow Sea Warm Current is estimated to be 4.6×1010, 2.3×1010, 2.0×109 and 1.2×1010 mol, respectively.

  6. Environmental Chemistry and Chemical Ecology of "Green Tide" Seaweed Blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Alstyne, Kathryn L; Nelson, Timothy A; Ridgway, Richard L

    2015-09-01

    Green tides are large growths or accumulations of green seaweeds that have been increasing in magnitude and frequency around the world. Because green tides consist of vast biomasses of algae in a limited area and are often seasonal or episodic, they go through periods of rapid growth in which they take up large amounts of nutrients and dissolved gases and generate bioactive natural products that may be stored in the plants, released into the environment, or broken down during decomposition. As a result of the use and production of inorganic and organic compounds, the algae in these blooms can have detrimental impacts on other organisms. Here, we review some of the effects that green tides have on the chemistry of seawater and the effects of the natural products that they produce. As blooms are developing and expanding, algae in green tides take up inorganic nutrients, such as nitrate and ortho-phosphate, which can limit their availability to other photosynthetic organisms. Their uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon for use in photosynthesis can cause localized spikes in the pH of seawater during the day with concomitant drops in the pH at night when the algae are respiring. Many of the algae that form green-tide blooms produce allelopathic compounds, which are metabolites that affect other species. The best documented allelopathic compounds include dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), dopamine, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their breakdown products. DMSP and dopamine are involved in defenses against herbivores. Dopamine and ROS are released into seawater where they can be allelopathic or toxic to other organisms. Thus, these macroalgal blooms can have harmful effects on nearby organisms by altering concentrations of nutrients and dissolved gas in seawater and by producing and releasing allelopathic or toxic compounds. PMID:25972565

  7. Phenolic Compounds Characterization and Biological Activities of Citrus aurantium Bloom

    OpenAIRE

    Armin Oskoueian; Jaafar, Hawa Z. E.; Rudi Hendra; Ehsan Oskoueian; Ehsan Karimi

    2012-01-01

    Citrus plants are known to possess beneficial biological activities for human health. In addition, ethnopharmacological application of plants is a good tool to explore their bioactivities and active compounds. This research was carried out to evaluate the phenolic and flavonoid analysis, antioxidant properties, anti inflammatory and anti cancer activity of Citrus aurantium bloom. The total phenolics and flavonoids results revealed that methanolic extract contained high total phenolics and fla...

  8. Environmental Chemistry and Chemical Ecology of "Green Tide" Seaweed Blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Alstyne, Kathryn L; Nelson, Timothy A; Ridgway, Richard L

    2015-09-01

    Green tides are large growths or accumulations of green seaweeds that have been increasing in magnitude and frequency around the world. Because green tides consist of vast biomasses of algae in a limited area and are often seasonal or episodic, they go through periods of rapid growth in which they take up large amounts of nutrients and dissolved gases and generate bioactive natural products that may be stored in the plants, released into the environment, or broken down during decomposition. As a result of the use and production of inorganic and organic compounds, the algae in these blooms can have detrimental impacts on other organisms. Here, we review some of the effects that green tides have on the chemistry of seawater and the effects of the natural products that they produce. As blooms are developing and expanding, algae in green tides take up inorganic nutrients, such as nitrate and ortho-phosphate, which can limit their availability to other photosynthetic organisms. Their uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon for use in photosynthesis can cause localized spikes in the pH of seawater during the day with concomitant drops in the pH at night when the algae are respiring. Many of the algae that form green-tide blooms produce allelopathic compounds, which are metabolites that affect other species. The best documented allelopathic compounds include dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), dopamine, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their breakdown products. DMSP and dopamine are involved in defenses against herbivores. Dopamine and ROS are released into seawater where they can be allelopathic or toxic to other organisms. Thus, these macroalgal blooms can have harmful effects on nearby organisms by altering concentrations of nutrients and dissolved gas in seawater and by producing and releasing allelopathic or toxic compounds.

  9. Bloom's Taxonomy (Classification of cognitive areas – remembering, understanding, applying)

    OpenAIRE

    Petrova Gjorgjeva, Emilija

    2011-01-01

    Traditional teaching is based upon the products of thought, but it neglects the processes which lead to these products. Efficacy in learning depends on the student‘s consciousness about the process of learning itself and on the usage of self-regulating learning mechanisms. The taxonomy conceived by Benjamin Bloom and his associates enables teachers to distinguish the questions that instigate lower and higher levels of students‘ thinking, i.e. to make the distinction between questions requi...

  10. Evaluating ILI Advanced Series through Bloom's Revised Taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    MAHDIPOUR, Nasim; SADEGHI, Bahador

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. This study investigated Iran Language Institute Advanced Series in terms of learning objectives based on Bloom's Revised Taxonomy. It examined the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains to see how the critical thinking skills are used and to what extent these books are different from each other. For these purposes, the frequencies, percentages and Standard Residual were analyzed. Results revealed that the lower-order cognitive skills (i.e. remembering, understanding and applyi...

  11. Modelling the production of dimethylsulfide during a phytoplankton bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabric, Albert; Murray, Nicholas; Stone, Lewi; Kohl, Manfred

    1993-12-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is an important sulfur-containing atmospheric trace gas of marine biogenic origin. DMS emitted from the oceans may be a precursor of tropospheric aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby affecting the Earth's radiative balance and possibly constituting a negative feedback to global warming, although this hypothesis is still somewhat controversial. The revised conceptual model of the marine pelagic food web gives a central role to planktonic bacteria. Recent experiments have shown that consumption of dissolved DMS by microbial metabolism may be more important than atmospheric exchange in controlling its concentration in surface waters and hence its ventilation to the atmosphere. In this paper we investigate the effect of the marine food web on cycling of dissolved DMS in surface waters during a phytoplankton bloom episode. A nitrogen-based flow network simulation model has been used to analyze the relative importance of the various biological and chemical processes involved. The model predictions suggest that the concentration of DMS in marine surface waters is indeed governed by bacterial metabolism. Environmental factors that affect the bacterial compartment are thus likely to have a relatively large influence on dissolved DMS concentrations. The ecological succession is particularly sensitive to the ratio of phytoplankton to bacterial nutrient uptake rates as well the interaction between herbivore food chain and the microbial loop. Importantly for the design of field studies, the model predicts that peak DMS concentrations are achieved during the decline of the phytoplankton bloom with a typical time lag between peak DMS and peak phytoplankton biomass of 1 to 2 days. Significantly, the model predicts a relatively high DMS concentration persisting after the phytoplankton bloom due to excretion from large protozoa and zooplankton, which may be an additional explanation for the lack of correlation between DMS and chlorophyll a

  12. Distribution and recurrence of phytoplankton blooms around South Georgia, Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Borrione

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available South Georgia phytoplankton blooms are amongst the largest of the Southern Ocean and are associated with a rich ecosystem and strong atmospheric carbon drawdown. Both aspects depend on the intensity of blooms, but also on their regularity. Here we use data from 12 yr of SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor ocean colour imagery and calculate the frequency of bloom occurrence (FBO to re-examine spatial and temporal bloom distributions. We find that upstream of the island and outside the borders of the Georgia Basin, blooms occurred in less than 4 out of the 12 yr (FBO < 4. In contrast, FBO was mostly greater than 8 downstream of the island, i.e., to the north and northwest, and in places equal to 12, indicating that blooms occurred every year. The typical bloom area, defined as the region where blooms occurred in at least 8 out of the 12 yr, covers the entire Georgia Basin and the northern shelf of the island. The time series of surface chlorophyll a (Chl a concentrations averaged over the typical bloom area shows that phytoplankton blooms occurred in every year between September 1997 and September 2010, and that Chl a values followed a clear seasonal cycle, with concentration peaks around December followed in many years by a second peak during late austral summer or early autumn, suggesting a bi-modal bloom pattern. The bloom regularity we describe here is in contrast with results of Park et al. (2010 who used a significantly different study area including regions that almost never exhibit bloom conditions.

  13. Deep-sea bioluminescence blooms after dense water formation at the ocean surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Tamburini

    Full Text Available The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as "open-sea convection". It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts.

  14. A Multipath Routing Protocol Based on Bloom Filter for Multihop Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwei Jin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On-demand multipath routing in a wireless ad hoc network is effective in achieving load balancing over the network and in improving the degree of resilience to mobility. In this paper, the salvage capable opportunistic node-disjoint multipath routing (SNMR protocol is proposed, which forms multiple routes for data transmission and supports packet salvaging with minimum overhead. The proposed mechanism constructs a primary path and a node-disjoint backup path together with alternative paths for the intermediate nodes in the primary path. It can be achieved by considering the reverse route back to the source stored in the route cache and the primary path information compressed by a Bloom filter. Our protocol presents higher capability in packet salvaging and lower overhead in forming multiple routes. Simulation results show that SNMR outperforms the compared protocols in terms of packet delivery ratio, normalized routing load, and throughput.

  15. Evidence for a novel marine harmful algal bloom: cyanotoxin (microcystin transfer from land to sea otters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Miller

    Full Text Available "Super-blooms" of cyanobacteria that produce potent and environmentally persistent biotoxins (microcystins are an emerging global health issue in freshwater habitats. Monitoring of the marine environment for secondary impacts has been minimal, although microcystin-contaminated freshwater is known to be entering marine ecosystems. Here we confirm deaths of marine mammals from microcystin intoxication and provide evidence implicating land-sea flow with trophic transfer through marine invertebrates as the most likely route of exposure. This hypothesis was evaluated through environmental detection of potential freshwater and marine microcystin sources, sea otter necropsy with biochemical analysis of tissues and evaluation of bioaccumulation of freshwater microcystins by marine invertebrates. Ocean discharge of freshwater microcystins was confirmed for three nutrient-impaired rivers flowing into the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, and microcystin concentrations up to 2,900 ppm (2.9 million ppb were detected in a freshwater lake and downstream tributaries to within 1 km of the ocean. Deaths of 21 southern sea otters, a federally listed threatened species, were linked to microcystin intoxication. Finally, farmed and free-living marine clams, mussels and oysters of species that are often consumed by sea otters and humans exhibited significant biomagnification (to 107 times ambient water levels and slow depuration of freshwater cyanotoxins, suggesting a potentially serious environmental and public health threat that extends from the lowest trophic levels of nutrient-impaired freshwater habitat to apex marine predators. Microcystin-poisoned sea otters were commonly recovered near river mouths and harbors and contaminated marine bivalves were implicated as the most likely source of this potent hepatotoxin for wild otters. This is the first report of deaths of marine mammals due to cyanotoxins and confirms the existence of a novel class of marine

  16. Evidence for a novel marine harmful algal bloom: cyanotoxin (microcystin) transfer from land to sea otters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Melissa A; Kudela, Raphael M; Mekebri, Abdu; Crane, Dave; Oates, Stori C; Tinker, M Timothy; Staedler, Michelle; Miller, Woutrina A; Toy-Choutka, Sharon; Dominik, Clare; Hardin, Dane; Langlois, Gregg; Murray, Michael; Ward, Kim; Jessup, David A

    2010-01-01

    "Super-blooms" of cyanobacteria that produce potent and environmentally persistent biotoxins (microcystins) are an emerging global health issue in freshwater habitats. Monitoring of the marine environment for secondary impacts has been minimal, although microcystin-contaminated freshwater is known to be entering marine ecosystems. Here we confirm deaths of marine mammals from microcystin intoxication and provide evidence implicating land-sea flow with trophic transfer through marine invertebrates as the most likely route of exposure. This hypothesis was evaluated through environmental detection of potential freshwater and marine microcystin sources, sea otter necropsy with biochemical analysis of tissues and evaluation of bioaccumulation of freshwater microcystins by marine invertebrates. Ocean discharge of freshwater microcystins was confirmed for three nutrient-impaired rivers flowing into the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, and microcystin concentrations up to 2,900 ppm (2.9 million ppb) were detected in a freshwater lake and downstream tributaries to within 1 km of the ocean. Deaths of 21 southern sea otters, a federally listed threatened species, were linked to microcystin intoxication. Finally, farmed and free-living marine clams, mussels and oysters of species that are often consumed by sea otters and humans exhibited significant biomagnification (to 107 times ambient water levels) and slow depuration of freshwater cyanotoxins, suggesting a potentially serious environmental and public health threat that extends from the lowest trophic levels of nutrient-impaired freshwater habitat to apex marine predators. Microcystin-poisoned sea otters were commonly recovered near river mouths and harbors and contaminated marine bivalves were implicated as the most likely source of this potent hepatotoxin for wild otters. This is the first report of deaths of marine mammals due to cyanotoxins and confirms the existence of a novel class of marine "harmful algal

  17. Euglenoid blooms in the floodplain wetlands of Barak Valley, Assam, North eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duttagupta, S; Gupta, Susmita; Gupta, Abhik

    2004-07-01

    Red blooms of Euglena sp. in the floodplain wetland ecosystems of Barak Valley, Assam, India, were found to be induced by high concentrations of NH3-N, NO3, Fe, Mg and to some extent, PO4, Cu and Zn in their water. The trace elements were rapidly accumulated by the bloom organisms to high levels, whereby their concentrations in the water declined, leading to a collapse of the bloom, which tended to reappear as decomposition again led to the release of the nutrients. The bloom also harboured fairly high density of certain other algae and zooplankton, thereby acting as a sub-system within the wetland ecosystem. The bloom is non-toxic and is exploited as a fish food by the fish-farmers who artificially induce a bloom for augmenting the growth of surface-feeding species of fishes. PMID:15847351

  18. Analysis of algal bloom risk with uncertainties in lakes by integrating self-organizing map and fuzzy information theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiuwen, E-mail: qchen@rcees.ac.cn [RCEES, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqinglu 18, Beijing 10085 (China); China Three Gorges University, Daxuelu 8, Yichang 443002 (China); CEER, Nanjing Hydraulics Research Institute, Guangzhoulu 223, Nanjing 210029 (China); Rui, Han; Li, Weifeng; Zhang, Yanhui [RCEES, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqinglu 18, Beijing 10085 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Algal blooms are a serious problem in waters, which damage aquatic ecosystems and threaten drinking water safety. However, the outbreak mechanism of algal blooms is very complex with great uncertainty, especially for large water bodies where environmental conditions have obvious variation in both space and time. This study developed an innovative method which integrated a self-organizing map (SOM) and fuzzy information diffusion theory to comprehensively analyze algal bloom risks with uncertainties. The Lake Taihu was taken as study case and the long-term (2004–2010) on-site monitoring data were used. The results showed that algal blooms in Taihu Lake were classified into four categories and exhibited obvious spatial–temporal patterns. The lake was mainly characterized by moderate bloom but had high uncertainty, whereas severe blooms with low uncertainty were observed in the northwest part of the lake. The study gives insight on the spatial–temporal dynamics of algal blooms, and should help government and decision-makers outline policies and practices on bloom monitoring and prevention. The developed method provides a promising approach to estimate algal bloom risks under uncertainties. - Highlights: • An innovative method is developed to analyze algal bloom risks with uncertainties. • The algal blooms in Taihu Lake showed obvious spatial and temporal patterns. • The lake is mainly characterized as moderate bloom but with high uncertainty. • Severe bloom with low uncertainty appeared occasionally in the northwest part. • The results provide important information to bloom monitoring and management.

  19. Analysis of algal bloom risk with uncertainties in lakes by integrating self-organizing map and fuzzy information theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algal blooms are a serious problem in waters, which damage aquatic ecosystems and threaten drinking water safety. However, the outbreak mechanism of algal blooms is very complex with great uncertainty, especially for large water bodies where environmental conditions have obvious variation in both space and time. This study developed an innovative method which integrated a self-organizing map (SOM) and fuzzy information diffusion theory to comprehensively analyze algal bloom risks with uncertainties. The Lake Taihu was taken as study case and the long-term (2004–2010) on-site monitoring data were used. The results showed that algal blooms in Taihu Lake were classified into four categories and exhibited obvious spatial–temporal patterns. The lake was mainly characterized by moderate bloom but had high uncertainty, whereas severe blooms with low uncertainty were observed in the northwest part of the lake. The study gives insight on the spatial–temporal dynamics of algal blooms, and should help government and decision-makers outline policies and practices on bloom monitoring and prevention. The developed method provides a promising approach to estimate algal bloom risks under uncertainties. - Highlights: • An innovative method is developed to analyze algal bloom risks with uncertainties. • The algal blooms in Taihu Lake showed obvious spatial and temporal patterns. • The lake is mainly characterized as moderate bloom but with high uncertainty. • Severe bloom with low uncertainty appeared occasionally in the northwest part. • The results provide important information to bloom monitoring and management

  20. Progressive eutrophication behind the world-largest super floating macroalgal blooms in the Yellow Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Q.; Gao, M; Gao, X; Tosi, L.; Schmitt, F G; Zhang, Y.; Shi, P.; Wei, J.; Luo, Y.

    2014-01-01

    World-largest super floating macroalgal blooms of Ulva prolifera have lasted 7 years by now in every summer in the Yellow Sea, the outer part of a semi-enclosed coastal sea. Evaluation of the inter-annual variability in the trophic status is one of fundamental tasks for prediction and management of the blooms. We show the new findings of a progressive eutrophication in the large Yellow Sea basin behind the super floating macroalgal blooms. The inter-annual...

  1. Critical Examination of a Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy for the Development of Art Education Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Kazuyo; Yamato, Hiroko; Nakashima, Atsuo; Kikkawa, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    This paper is aimed at developing Art Education Taxonomy Table through critically examining a revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives contrived by Anderson and Krathwohl. First, the overview of the history of Bloom's Taxonomy is provided in relation to art education. Second, the influence of Bloom's theory of educational evaluation and Taxonomy on the classroom practice of art education in Japan is discussed. Third, aiming at using for the development of art education curriculu...

  2. Diversity and Dynamics of a Widespread Bloom of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense

    OpenAIRE

    Erdner, Deana L.; Richlen, Mindy; McCauley, Linda A. R.; Anderson, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, cosmopolitan phytoplankton species were presumed to represent largely unstructured populations. However, the recent development of molecular tools to examine genetic diversity have revealed differences in phytoplankton taxa across geographic scales and provided insight into the physiology and ecology of blooms. Here we describe the genetic analysis of an extensive bloom of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense that occurred in the Gulf of Maine in 2005. This bloom was n...

  3. Shifts in Cyanobacterial Strain Dominance during the Onset of Harmful Algal Blooms in Florida Bay, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Dianna L; Goleski, Jennifer A; Koch, Florian; Wall, Charles C; Peterson, Bradley J; Anderson, O Roger; Gobler, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    Cyanobacteria are fundamental components of aquatic phytoplankton communities and some taxa can cause harmful blooms in coastal ecosystems. Harmful cyanobacterial blooms are typically comprised of multiple strains of a single genus or species that cannot be resolved microscopically. Florida Bay, USA, has experienced harmful cyanobacterial blooms that have been associated with the loss of eelgrass, spiny lobsters, and general food web disruption for more than two decades. To identify the strain or strains of cyanobacteria forming blooms in Florida Bay, samples were collected across the system over an annual cycle and analyzed via DNA sequencing using cyanobacterial-specific 16S rRNA gene primers, flow cytometry, and scanning electron microscopy. Analyses demonstrated that the onset of blooms in Florida Bay was coincident with a transformation of the cyanobacterial populations. When blooms were absent, the cyanobacterial population in Florida Bay was dominated by phycoerythrin-containing Synechococcus cells that were most similar to strains within Clade III. As blooms developed, the cyanobacterial community transitioned to dominance by phycocyanin-containing Synechococcus cells that were coated with mucilage, chain-forming, and genetically most similar to the coastal strains within Clade VIII. Clade VIII strains of Synechococcus are known to grow rapidly, utilize organic nutrients, and resist top-down control by protozoan grazers and viruses, all characteristics consistent with observations of cyanobacterial blooms in Florida Bay. Further, the strains of Synechococcus blooming in this system are genetically distinct from the species previously thought to cause blooms in Florida Bay, Synechococcus elongatus. Collectively, this study identified the causative organism of harmful cyanobacterial blooms in Florida Bay, demonstrates the dynamic nature of cyanobacterial stains within genera in an estuary, and affirms factors promoting Synechococcus blooms. PMID:25661475

  4. The 2008 Emiliania huxleyi bloom along the Patagonian Shelf: Ecology, biogeochemistry, and cellular calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Alex J.; Painter, Stuart C.; Young, Jeremy R.; Bates, Nicholas R.; Bowler, Bruce; Drapeau, Dave; Lyczsckowski, Emily; Balch, William M.

    2013-12-01

    blooms are significant contributors to the global production and export of calcium carbonate (calcite). The Patagonian Shelf is a site of intense annual coccolithophore blooms during austral summer. During December 2008, we made intensive measurements of the ecology, biogeochemistry, and physiology of a coccolithophore bloom. High numbers of Emiliania huxleyi cells and detached coccoliths (>1 × 103 mL-1 and >10 × 103 mL-1, respectively), high particulate inorganic carbon concentrations (>10 mmol C m-2), and high calcite production (up to 7.3 mmol C m-2 d-1) all characterized bloom waters. The bloom was dominated by the low-calcite-containing B/C morphotype of Emiliania huxleyi, although a small (30%, similar to estimates for E. huxleyi and indicative of a significant role for this diatom in bloom biogeochemistry. Cell-normalized calcification rates, when corrected for a high number of nonactive cells, were relatively high and when normalized to estimates of coccolith calcite indicate excessive coccolith production in the declining phase of the bloom. We find that low measures of calcite and calcite production relative to other blooms in the global ocean indicate that the dominance of the B/C morphotype may lead to overall lower calcite production. Globally, this suggests that morphotype composition influences regional bloom inventories of carbonate production and export and that climate-induced changes in morphotype biogeography could affect the carbon cycle.

  5. Succession and fate of the spring diatom bloom in Disko Bay, western Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dünweber, Michael; Swalethorp, Rasmus; Kjellerup, Sanne;

    2010-01-01

    from the initiation of the bloom but only had a small grazing impact on the phytoplankton. Consequently, there was a close coupling between the spring phytoplankton bloom and sedimentation of particulate organic carbon (POC). Out of 1836 ± 180 mg C m–2 d–1 leaving the upper 50 m, 60% was phytoplankton...... based carbon (PPC). The composition and quality of the sedimenting material changed throughout the bloom succession from PPC dominance in the initial phase with a POC/PON ratio close to 6.6 to a dominance of amorphous detritus with a higher POC/PON ratio (>10) in the post-bloom phase. The succession...

  6. Health risk assessment standards of cyanobacteria bloom occurrence in bathing sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Stankiewicz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Threat for human health appears during a massive cyanobacteria bloom in potable water used for human consumption or in basins used for recreational purposes. General health risk assessment standards and preventive measures to be taken by sanitation service were presented in scope of: – evaluation of cyanobacteria bloom occurrence in bathing sites / water bodies, – procedures in case of cyanobacteria bloom, including health risk assessment and decision making process to protect users’ health at bathing sites, – preventive measures, to be taken in case of cyanobacteria bloom occurrence in bathing sites and basins, where bathing sites are located.

  7. Fe availability drives phytoplankton photosynthesis rates during spring bloom in the Amundsen Sea Polynya, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Carlijn Alderkamp

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To evaluate what drives phytoplankton photosynthesis rates in the Amundsen Sea Polynya (ASP, Antarctica, during the spring bloom, we studied phytoplankton biomass, photosynthesis rates, and water column productivity during a bloom of Phaeocystis antarctica (Haptophyceae and tested effects of iron (Fe and light availability on these parameters in bioassay experiments in deck incubators. Phytoplankton biomass and productivity were highest (20 µg chlorophyll a L−1 and 6.5 g C m−2 d−1 in the central ASP where sea ice melt water and surface warming enhanced stratification, reducing mixed layer depth and increasing light availability. In contrast, maximum photosynthesis rate (P*max, initial light-limited slope of the photosynthesis–irradiance curve (α*, and maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm were highest in the southern ASP near the potential Fe sources of the Dotson and Getz ice shelves. In the central ASP, P*max, α*, and Fv/Fm were all lower. Fe addition increased phytoplankton growth rates in three of twelve incubations, and at a significant level when all experiments were analyzed together, indicating Fe availability may be rate-limiting for phytoplankton growth in several regions of the ASP early in the season during build-up of the spring bloom. Moreover, Fe addition increased P*max, α*, and Fv/Fm in almost all experiments when compared to unamended controls. Incubation under high light also increased P*max, but decreased Fv/Fm and α* when compared to low light incubation. These results indicate that the lower values for P*max, α*, and Fv/Fm in the central ASP, compared to regions close to the ice shelves, are constrained by lower Fe availability rather than light availability. Our study suggests that higher Fe availability (e.g., from higher melt rates of ice shelves would increase photosynthesis rates in the central ASP and potentially increase water column productivity 1.7-fold, making the ASP

  8. Radar manifestations of ship wakes in algae bloom zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mityagina, Marina I.; Lavrova, Olga Yu.

    2014-10-01

    Radar manifestations of ship wakes in zones of phytoplankton bloom are discussed. It is shown that these signatures can be regarded as indicators of biogenic activity. The main data are satellite radar images. Satellite visible (VIS) and infrared (IR) satellite data are also analyzed. The large amount of the available data allowed us to make some generalizations and obtain statistically reliable results concerning spatial and temporal variability of certain type of ship wake manifestations in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the sea surface. Traditional classification of surface ship wakes manifestations in satellite SAR images specifies distinct features such as a dark trailing centreline region (turbulent wake), narrow V-wakes aligned at some angle to the ship's path (the Kelvin wake), and, sometimes, internal wave wakes generated under conditions of shallow stratification. Their characteristic lengths are reported to be up to tens of kilometers and they can last from tens of minutes up to one hour. Instances of radar signatures of the ship wakes dissimilar to the previously described were detected in radar images obtained in the course of a satellite monitoring campaign of the central and south-eastern Baltic. These ship wakes can be seen in satellite radar images as long bright strips of enhanced backscatter with characteristic length of up to several hundred kilometres lasting more than 5 hours. A hypothesis is put forward of the coherence of this type of ship wakes detected in sea surface radar imagery and areas of intensive biogenic activity under conditions of low near-surface winds. Statistics on their seasonal, spatial and year-to-year distribution are drawn. These results are compared with temporal and spatial variations in chlorophyll a concentration and intensity of phytoplankton bloom in the area of interest. Chlorophyll a concentration maps derived from satellite data are used, as well as those based on in situ measurements. The relation

  9. Riverine nutrients fluxes to the North Sea and harmful algal blooms, what changed since 1984 ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passy, Paul; Gypens, Nathalie; Billen, Gilles; Garnier, Josette; Thieu, Vincent; Rousseau, Véronique; Callens, Julie; Parent, Jean-Yves; Lancelot, Christiane

    2013-04-01

    Nutrients fluxes delivered to the coastal zones reflect human activities taking place within watersheds. Silica (Si) fluxes mainly originate from soils and rocks weathering, so they are few impacted by human activities. On the contrary, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fluxes are dramatically impacted by human activities. N originates from urban waste water but mainly from agricultural activities. P originates mostly from urban and industrial waste waters. The enrichment of the hydrosystems in N and P leads to an imbalance between N and P in one hand and Si in the other hand. This imbalance leads to harmful algal blooms, which are damaging aquatic ecosystems, fishing activities and touristic activities. In 1992, the OSPAR convention was signed by 15 European States and targets to decrease the N and P fluxes delivered to the European coastal zones by 50 % with respect to the reference year of 1985. Focusing on the Seine, Somme and Scheldt watersheds (France and Belgium) and the adjacent coastal zone of the North Sea, we developed a retrospective modelling from 1984 to 2007 calculating nutrients fluxes from watersheds and Phaeocystis blooms occurring in the coastal zone. We coupled the biogeochemical deterministic model Seneque/Riverstrahler depicting processes occurring within hydrological networks with the marine model MIRO simulating Phaeocystis blooms in the coastal zone. The evolution of N and P fluxes were highly dissimilar. Indeed, P mainly originates from point sources. Thereby the banishment of P from the washing powders during the nineties, the development of sewage and the improvement of WWTP in terms of waste water treatment lead to a decrease of P fluxes delivered to the coastal zone. This decrease can be observed for the three watersheds. The P OSPAR objective is achieved since the middle of the 2000's years. On the other side, N, mostly originating from agricultural diffuse sources, did not decrease over the period. The fluxes even increased at the

  10. Controlling cyanobacterial blooms in hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China: will nitrogen reductions cause replacement of non-N2 fixing by N2 fixing taxa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans W Paerl

    Full Text Available Excessive anthropogenic nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P inputs have caused an alarming increase in harmful cyanobacterial blooms, threatening sustainability of lakes and reservoirs worldwide. Hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China's third largest freshwater lake, typifies this predicament, with toxic blooms of the non-N2 fixing cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. dominating from spring through fall. Previous studies indicate N and P reductions are needed to reduce bloom magnitude and duration. However, N reductions may encourage replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria. This potentially counterproductive scenario was evaluated using replicate, large (1000 L, in-lake mesocosms during summer bloom periods. N+P additions led to maximum phytoplankton production. Phosphorus enrichment, which promoted N limitation, resulted in increases in N2 fixing taxa (Anabaena spp., but it did not lead to significant replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria, and N2 fixation rates remained ecologically insignificant. Furthermore, P enrichment failed to increase phytoplankton production relative to controls, indicating that N was the most limiting nutrient throughout this period. We propose that Microcystis spp. and other non-N2 fixing genera can maintain dominance in this shallow, highly turbid, nutrient-enriched lake by outcompeting N2 fixing taxa for existing sources of N and P stored and cycled in the lake. To bring Taihu and other hypertrophic systems below the bloom threshold, both N and P reductions will be needed until the legacy of high N and P loading and sediment nutrient storage in these systems is depleted. At that point, a more exclusive focus on P reductions may be feasible.

  11. Can we measure connectivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazier, Richard; Vericat, Damia; Cerda, Artemi; Brardinoni, Francesco; Batalla, Ramon; Masselink, Rens; Wittenberg, Lea; Nadal Romero, Estela; López-Tarazón, José; Estrany, Joan; Keesstra, Saskia

    2015-04-01

    Whilst the term 'connectivity' in hydrological and sediment-based research is becoming increasing well-known, it is neither used consistently in the existing literature, nor is it clear from that literature, that the connectivity of a landscape, or part of a landscape can be measured. However, it is argued that understanding how well critical source areas of water or sediment are connected to receiving surface waters, may be an essential step towards improvement of land management to mitigate flooding, soil erosion and water quality problems. The first part of this paper, therefore, explores what is currently meant by the term connectivity; addressing the differences between structural and functional, or process-based connectivity, specifically with reference to the movement of water and sediment through an ecosystem. We argue that most existing studies do not measure connectivity. Instead, they address only part of the story. Existing work may describe structural change in a landscape, which can perhaps elucidate the potential for connectivity to occur, or indeed the emergent spatial properties of an ecosystem, but it rarely quantifies the connectivity of an ecosystem in a process-based manner through time. Alternatively, a great deal of work describes fluxes of water and sediment at (sometimes multiple) points in a landscape and infers connectivity of the system via analysis of time series data; from rainfall peak to hydrograph peak or start of sediment flux until peak sediment flux within an event. Such data are doubtless useful to understand catchment function, but alone, they do not provide evidence that quantifies (for example) how well connected sediment sources are to the outlets of the catchments from which they flux. Finally, there are many examples of water and particularly sediment tracing studies, which attempt to link, either directly or indirectly water or sediment sources with their sinks (which might more usefully be termed temporary stores

  12. Phenolic Compounds Characterization and Biological Activities of Citrus aurantium Bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Oskoueian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus plants are known to possess beneficial biological activities for human health. In addition, ethnopharmacological application of plants is a good tool to explore their bioactivities and active compounds. This research was carried out to evaluate the phenolic and flavonoid analysis, antioxidant properties, anti inflammatory and anti cancer activity of Citrus aurantium bloom. The total phenolics and flavonoids results revealed that methanolic extract contained high total phenolics and flavonoids compared to ethanolic and boiling water extracts. The obtained total phenolics value for methanolic Citrus aurantium bloom extract was 4.55 ± 0.05 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE/g dry weight (DW, and for total flavonoids it was 3.83 ± 0.05 mg rutin equivalent/g DW. In addition, the RP-HPLC analyses of phenolics and flavonoids indicated the presence of gallic acid, pyrogallol, syringic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, quercetin and naringin as bioactive compounds. The antioxidant activity of Citrus aurantium bloom were examined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH assay and the ferric reducing/antioxidant potential (FRAP. The free radical scavenging and ferric reducing power activities were higher for the methanolic extract of Citrus aurantium bloom at a concentration of 300 μg/mL, with values of 55.3% and 51.7%, respectively, as compared to the corresponding boiling water and ethanolic extracts, but the activities were lower than those of antioxidant standards such as BHT and α-tocopherol. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory result of methanolic extract showed appreciable reduction in nitric oxide production of stimulated RAW 264.7 cells at the presence of plant extract. Apart from that, the anticancer activity of the methanolic extract was investigated in vitro against human cancer cell lines (MCF-7; MDA-MB-231, human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29 and Chang cell as a normal human hepatocyte. The obtained result demonstrated the moderate to

  13. Control of toxic marine dinoflagellate blooms by serial parasitic killers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambouvet, Aurelie; Morin, Pascal; Marie, Dominique; Guillou, Laure

    2008-11-21

    The marine dinoflagellates commonly responsible for toxic red tides are parasitized by other dinoflagellate species. Using culture-independent environmental ribosomal RNA sequences and fluorescence markers, we identified host-specific infections among several species. Each parasitoid produces 60 to 400 offspring, leading to extraordinarily rapid control of the host's population. During 3 consecutive years of observation in a natural estuary, all dinoflagellates observed were chronically infected, and a given host species was infected by a single genetically distinct parasite year after year. Our observations in natural ecosystems suggest that although bloom-forming dinoflagellates may escape control by grazing organisms, they eventually succumb to parasite attack.

  14. The Bloom-Gilman duality and leading logarithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, C.E. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Mukhopadhyay, N.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The existing inclusive electroproduction data base allows the authors a look at the issue of the relative behaviors of background and resonance excitations, a part of the Bloom-Gilman duality. These data lack accuracy at high Q{sup 2} but establish PQCD scaling in the resonance region and even allow the authors a glimpse at the leading logarithmic corrections due to the gluon radiation and its possible quenching at large W and x. These should inspire better quality experimental tests at facilities like CEBAF II.

  15. Harmful algal blooms: a case study in two mesotrophic drinking water supply reservoirs in South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journey, Celeste A.; Beaulieu, Karen M.; Knight, Rodney R.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Arrington, Jane M.; West, Rebecca; Westcott, John; Bradley, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Algal blooms can be harmful and a nuisance in a variety of aquatic ecosystems, including reservoirs and lakes. Cyanobacterial(blue-green algae) harmful algal blooms are notorious for producing both taste-and-odor compounds and potent toxins that may affect human health. Taste–and-odor episodes are aesthetic problems often caused by cyanobacterial-produced organic compounds (geosmin and methylisoborneol) and are common in reservoirs and lakes used as source water supplies. The occurrences of these taste-and-odor compounds and toxins (like microcystin) can be sporadic and vary in intensity both spatially and temporally. Recent publications by the U.S. Geological Survey address this complexity and provide protocols for cyanotoxin and taste-and-odor sampling programs. A case study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Spartanburg Water, monitored two mesotrophic reservoirs that serve as public drinking water supplies in South Carolina. Study objectives were (1) to identify spatial and temporal occurrence of the taste-and-odor compound geosmin and the cyanotoxin microcystin and (2) to assess the associated limnological conditions before, during, and after these occurrences. Temporal and spatial occurrence of geosmin and microcystin were highly variable from 2007 to 2009. The highest geosmin concentrations tended to occur in the spring. Microcystin tended to occur in the late summer and early fall, but occurrence was rare and well below World Health Organization guidelines for finished drinking water and recreational activities. No current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards are applicable to cyanotoxins in drinking or ambient water. In general, elevated geosmin and microcystin concentrations were the result of complex interactions between cyanobacterial ⬚community composition, nutrient availability, water clarity, hydraulic residence time, and stratification.

  16. Gendered Connections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Bo

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the gendered nature of urban politics in Cape Town by focusing on a group of female, township politicians. Employing the Deleuzian concept of `wild connectivity', it argues that these politically entrepreneurial women were able to negotiate a highly volatile urban landscape ...... of connectivity might endure, as Capetonian politics assumes a post-apartheid structure....

  17. Energy storage connection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Eric L.; Borland, Nicholas P.; Dale, Magdelena; Freeman, Belvin; Kite, Kim A.; Petter, Jeffrey K.; Taylor, Brendan F.

    2012-07-03

    A power system for connecting a variable voltage power source, such as a power controller, with a plurality of energy storage devices, at least two of which have a different initial voltage than the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. The power system includes a controller that increases the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. When such output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a first one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the first one of the energy storage devices. The controller then causes the output voltage of the variable voltage power source to continue increasing. When the output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a second one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the second one of the energy storage devices.

  18. Monthly Ensembles in Algal Bloom Predictions on the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiha, Petra; Westerlund, Antti; Stipa, Tapani

    2010-05-01

    In this work we explore the statistical features of monthly ensembles and their capability to predict biogeochemical conditions in the Baltic Sea. Operational marine environmental modelling has been considered hard, and consequently there are very few operational ecological models. Operational modelling of harmful algal blooms is harder still, since it is difficult to separate the algal species in models, and in general, very little is known of HAB properties. We present results of an ensemble approach to HAB forecasting in the Baltic, and discuss the applicability of the forecasting method to biochemical modelling. It turns out that HABs are indeed possible to forecast with useful accuracy. For modelling the algal blooms in Baltic Sea we used FMI operational 3-dimensional biogeochemical model to produce seasonal ensemble forecasts for different physical, chemical and biological variables. The modelled variables were temperature, salinity, velocity, silicate, phosphate, nitrate, diatoms, flagellates and two species of potentially toxic filamentous cyanobacteria nodularia spumigena and aphanizomenon flos-aquae. In this work we concentrate to the latter two. Ensembles were produced by running the biogeochemical model several times and forcing it on every run with different set of seasonal weather parameters from ECMWF's mathematically perturbed ensemble prediction forecasts. The ensembles were then analysed by statistical methods and the median, quartiles, minimum and maximum values were calculated for estimating the probable amounts of algae. Validation for the forecast method was made by comparing the final results against available and valid in-situ HAB data.

  19. Natural and anthropogenic nitrogen uptake by bloom-forming macroalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornber, Carol S. [Department of Biological Sciences, 100 Flagg Road, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881 (United States)], E-mail: thornber@uri.edu; DiMilla, Peter; Nixon, Scott W. [Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, South Ferry Road, Narragansett, RI 02881 (United States); McKinney, Richard A. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Atlantic Ecology Division, 27 Tarzwell Drive, Narragansett, RI 02882 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    The frequency and duration of macroalgal blooms have increased in many coastal waters over the past several decades. We used field surveys and laboratory culturing experiments to examine the nitrogen content and {delta}{sup 15}N values of Ulva and Gracilaria, two bloom-forming algal genera in Narragansett Bay, RI (USA). The northern end of this bay is densely populated with large sewage treatment plant nitrogen inputs; the southern end is more lightly populated and opens to the Atlantic Ocean. Field-collected Ulva varied in {delta}{sup 15}N among sites, but with two exceptions had {delta}{sup 15}N above 10 per mille , reflecting a significant component of heavy anthropogenic N. This variation was not correlated with a north-south gradient. Both Ulva and Gracilaria cultured in water from across Narragansett Bay also had high signals ({delta}{sup 15}N = {approx}14-17 per mille and 8-12 per mille , respectively). These results indicate that inputs of anthropogenic N can have far-reaching impacts throughout estuaries.

  20. Bacterial and protist community changes during a phytoplankton bloom

    KAUST Repository

    Pearman, John K.

    2015-10-01

    The present study aims to characterize the change in the composition and structure of the bacterial and microzooplankton planktonic communities in relation to the phytoplankton community composition during a bloom. High-throughput amplicon sequencing of regions of the 16S and 18S rRNA gene was undertaken on samples collected during a 20 day (d) mesocosm experiment incorporating two different nutrient addition treatments [Nitrate and Phosphate (NPc) and Nitrate, Phosphate and Silicate (NPSc)] as well as a control. This approach allowed us to discriminate the changes in species composition across a broad range of phylogenetic groups using a common taxonomic level. Diatoms dominated the bloom in the NPSc treatment while dinoflagellates were the dominant phytoplankton in the control and NPc treatment. Network correlations highlighted significant interactions between OTUs within each treatment including changes in the composition of Paraphysomonas OTUs when the dominant Chaetoceros OTU switched. The microzooplankton community composition responded to changes in the phytoplankton composition while the prokaryotic community responded more to changes in ammonia concentration.

  1. Seawater reverse osmosis desalination and (harmful) algal blooms

    KAUST Repository

    Villacorte, Loreen O.

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews the occurrence of HABs in seawater, their effects on the operation of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plants, the indicators for quantifying/predicting these effects, and the pretreatment strategies for mitigating operational issues during algal blooms. The potential issues in SWRO plants during HABs are particulate/organic fouling of pretreatment systems and biological fouling of RO membranes, mainly due to accumulation of algal organic matter (AOM). The presence of HAB toxins in desalinated water is also a potential concern but only at very low concentrations. Monitoring algal cell density, AOM concentrations and membrane fouling indices is a promising approach to assess the quality of SWRO feedwater and performance of the pretreatment system. When geological condition is favourable, subsurface intake can be a robust pretreatment for SWRO during HABs. Existing SWRO plants with open intake and are fitted with granular media filtration can improve performance in terms of capacity and product water quality, if preceded by dissolved air flotation or sedimentation. However, the application of advanced pretreatment using ultrafiltration membrane with in-line coagulation is often a better option as it is capable of maintaining stable operation and better RO feed water quality during algal bloom periods with significantly lower chemical consumption.

  2. Effects of nutrients on Microcystis growth more easily forming bloom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Ming-ming; ZHOU Bao-xue; XIE Wei-jie; JIANG Ju-hui; CAI Wei-min

    2004-01-01

    Different nutrient media experimentally were N, P and Fe-limited conditions and a serial of diluted BG11 media. The cell change of morphology and life history, cell number, cell color and cell area of Microcystis were analyzed quantitatively. First, the effects of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron depletion were distinctively different. Phosphorus and iron depletion caused more special division cells, slowly growth increasing, the easier change of bigger cell area. Second, the nitrogen and iron depletion could make the color of alga from green to brown. Finally, according to the resource competition and Monod equation, Microcystis kinetics of phosphorus and iron were also examined. Ks and μmax of phosphorus absorption were 0.0352 μmol/L, 0.493 d-1 respectively; iron absorption: 0.00323 μmol/L, 0.483 d-1. In a word, some evidences of the Microcystis bloom privilege in certain nutrient conditions were indicated in the experiments. The privileges were determined as the reviving under the adverse circumstances through the special division, the various nitrogen resources, and the lower kinetics of phosphorus and iron than that of most of other algae. The conclusions provided the scientific basis for preventing and managing Microcystis bloom in freshwater.

  3. Is iron a limiting factor of Nodularia spumigena blooms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Paczuska

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that a deficiency of iron, a trace element essential to every living organism, limits the growth of algae and cyanobacteria. Nodularia spumigena Mertens is a blue-green algae species inhabiting the Baltic region that often forms toxic blooms.     The aim of the study was to assess the growth of the toxic cyanobacteria with respect to iron bioavailability. The measured growth parameters were the numbers of cells (optical density, chlorophyll a and pheopigment a concentrations. The iron concentrations used ranged from 10-7 to 10-4 mol dm-3. Under iron stress conditions (<5 × 10-7 mol dm-3, growth inhibition, gradual pigment decay and cell mortality were observed. However, enriching the medium with complexing factors like citric acid and EDTA significantly stimulated the growth rate and chlorophyll a production. The citric acid - EDTA - Fe (5 × 10-7 mol dm-3 complex was demonstrably effective in stimulating the rate of cell division. Starting with 10-6 mol dm-3, the higher the iron(III concentration used in the media, the more intensive the growth of the cyanobacteria populations. This was most rapid in the presence of high iron concentrations (10-4 mol dm-3, regardless of the presence of complexing agents.     It appears that the growth of toxic cyanobacteria N. spumigena, and thus also its ability to form blooms, may well depend on iron availability in the environment.

  4. Lake level fluctuations boost toxic cyanobacterial "oligotrophic blooms".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Callieri

    Full Text Available Global warming has been shown to strongly influence inland water systems, producing noticeable increases in water temperatures. Rising temperatures, especially when combined with widespread nutrient pollution, directly favour the growth of toxic cyanobacteria. Climate changes have also altered natural water level fluctuations increasing the probability of extreme events as dry periods followed by heavy rains. The massive appearance of Dolichospermum lemmermannii ( = planktonic Anabaena, a toxic species absent from the pelagic zone of the subalpine oligotrophic Lake Maggiore before 2005, could be a consequence of the unusual fluctuations of lake level in recent years. We hypothesized that these fluctuations may favour the cyanobacterium as result of nutrient pulses from the biofilms formed in the littoral zone when the lake level is high. To help verify this, we exposed artificial substrates in the lake, and evaluated their nutrient enrichment and release after desiccation, together with measurements of fluctuations in lake level, precipitation and D. lemmermannii population. The highest percentage of P release and the lowest C:P molar ratio of released nutrients coincided with the summer appearance of the D. lemmermannii bloom. The P pulse indicates that fluctuations in level counteract nutrient limitation in this lake and it is suggested that this may apply more widely to other oligotrophic lakes. In view of the predicted increase in water level fluctuations due to climate change, it is important to try to minimize such fluctuations in order to mitigate the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms.

  5. Indian satellite IRS-P4 (OCEANSAT). Monitoring algal blooms in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Matondkar, S.G.P.; Bhat, S.R.; Dwivedi, R.M.; Nayak, S.R.

    While there have been a number of reports on occurrences of algal blooms in the coastal waters of India, the observation on large scale Noctiluca bloom during FORV Sagar Sampada cruises (years 2003 and 2004), forms the first report from NE Arabian...

  6. Phytoplankton bloom and subpolar gyre induced dynamics in the North Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Ana Sofia; Hátún, Hjálmar; Counillion, Francois;

    represents the integrated oceanic dynamics over the Northern North Atlantic, while the timing of the spring bloom is more governed by direct atmospheric forcing during the pre-bloom weeks. We, therefore, further investigate which published theories (Sverdrup [1953], Siegel et al [2002], Huisman et al [2002...

  7. The Internationalization of Bloom's Learning for Mastery: A 25-Year Retrospective-Prospective View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymel, Glenn M.; Dyck, Walter E.

    Twenty-five years have elapsed since the publication of Benjamin S. Bloom's article titled "Learning for Mastery." With approximately 2,000 master learning/testing citations in the ERIC data base alone, Bloom's 1968 piece is indeed one of the most generative works to appear in the educational psychology literature in decades. At this…

  8. Timing of migratory baleen whales at the Azores in relation to the North Atlantic spring bloom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Visser; K.L. Hartman; G.J. Pierce; V.D. Valavanis; J. Huisman

    2011-01-01

    Each year, a phytoplankton spring bloom starts just north of the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre, and then expands northwards across the entire North Atlantic. Here, we investigate whether the timing of the spring migration of baleen whales is related to the timing of the phytoplankton spring bloom,

  9. Biomanipulation with quagga mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) to control harmful algal blooms in eutrophic urban ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waajen, Guido W.A.M.; Bruggen, Van Niek C.B.; Pires, Miguel Dionisio L.; Lengkeek, Wouter; Lurling, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Many urban ponds in The Netherlands and other countries suffer from eutrophication, resulting in harmful algal blooms which are often dominated by cyanobacteria. A sufficient reduction of nutrients, as prerequisite to mitigate cyanobacterial blooms in urban ponds, is not always feasible. Water ma

  10. A Roof without Walls: Benjamin Bloom's Taxonomy and the Misdirection of American Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Plato wrote that higher order thinking could not start until the student had mastered conventional wisdom. The American educational establishment has turned Plato on his head with the help of a dubious approach to teaching developed by one Benjamin Bloom. Bloom's taxonomy was intended for higher education, but its misappropriation has resulted in…

  11. Biomanipulation with quagga mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) to control harmful algal blooms in eutrophic urban ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waajen, Guido W. A. M.; Van Bruggen, Niek C. B.; Pires, L. Miguel Dionisio; Lengkeek, Wouter; Lurling, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    Many urban ponds in The Netherlands and other countries suffer from eutrophication, resulting in harmful algal blooms which are often dominated by cyanobacteria. A sufficient reduction of nutrients, as prerequisite to mitigate cyanobacterial blooms in urban ponds, is not always feasible. Water manag

  12. Calibrating the Difficulty of an Assessment Tool: The Blooming of a Statistics Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Bruce; Yapa, Gaitri; Yu, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Bloom's taxonomy is proposed as a tool by which to assess the level of complexity of assessment tasks in statistics. Guidelines are provided for how to locate tasks at each level of the taxonomy, along with descriptions and examples of suggested test questions. Through the "Blooming" of an examination--that is, locating its constituent…

  13. Nitrogen and phosphorus requirements of an Alexandrium minutum bloom in the Penze' Estuary, France

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Maguer, J.-F.; Wafar, M.V.M.; Madec, C.; Morin, P.; Denn, E.E.

    . The role of NO3 was restricted to sustenance of the bloom, whereas warm conditions resulting in a water column stability seem to have triggered the bloom, and a self-shading, probably coupled with a phosphorus limitation, caused its decline...

  14. Allan Bloom, Mike Rose, and Paul Goodman: In Search of a Lost Pedagogical Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeff

    1993-01-01

    Discusses and compares two recent books on American higher education: "The Closing of the American Mind" by Allan Bloom, and "Lives on the Boundary" by Mike Rose. Develops a view which synthesizes those of Bloom and Rose. Considers this view as comparable to that of Paul Goodman. (HB)

  15. Byatt versus Bloom; or Poetic Influence – a Case of Anxiety or Desire?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børch, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Antonia Byatt's Possession; a Romance (1990) implicitly critiques Harold Bloom's theory of poetic influence as laid out in the influential Anxiety of Influence; her narrative suggests that a better metaphor than Bloom's Oedipal patricide would be that of love, an emotion that opens up for external...

  16. Self-Awareness and Personal Growth: Theory and Application of Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugur, Hasan; Constantinescu, Petru-Madalin; Stevens, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: In this article, we summarize a group-based, self-development curriculum based on humanistic principles, framed by contemporary self-determination theory (SDT), and designed in accordance with Bloom's Taxonomy. The processes of awareness and integration are common to SDT and Bloom's Taxonomy, and to our knowledge, have not been…

  17. Use of Bloom's Taxonomy in Developing Reading Comprehension Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebke, Stephen; Lorie, James

    2013-01-01

    This article is a brief account of the use of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (Bloom, Engelhart, Furst, Hill, & Krathwohl, 1956) by staff of the Law School Admission Council in the 1990 development of redesigned specifications for the Reading Comprehension section of the Law School Admission Test. Summary item statistics for…

  18. Evaluating Course-Objective Writing Effectiveness: Applying the Comprehensive Bloom Verb List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Russell; Almerico, Gina M.; Thornton, Barry

    2008-01-01

    This study is a comparative analysis of the objective writing skills of pre-service teachers to determine the efficacy of utilizing a master verb list based on Bloom's Taxonomy. Students enrolled in a mid-size university were asked to create a set of objectives to measure Bloom's Taxonomy learning outcomes. One group received a master list of…

  19. Critical Thinking in the Management Classroom: Bloom's Taxonomy as a Learning Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassiou, Nicholas; McNett, Jeanne M.; Harvey, Carol

    2003-01-01

    Using Bloom's taxonomy as a scaffolding device moves students toward self-management of learning. Analysis of journals and assignments completed by 42 students in business courses showed that repeated emphasis of Bloom's concepts improved higher-level conceptual thinking. (Contains 35 references.) (SK)

  20. An Evaluative Calculus Project: Applying Bloom's Taxonomy to the Calculus Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaali, Gizem

    2011-01-01

    In education theory, Bloom's taxonomy is a well-known paradigm to describe domains of learning and levels of competency. In this article I propose a calculus capstone project that is meant to utilize the sixth and arguably the highest level in the cognitive domain, according to Bloom et al.: evaluation. Although one may assume that mathematics is…

  1. Importance of deep mixing for initiating the North Atlantic spring bloom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Karen; Paulsen, Maria Lund; Thingstad, T. Frede;

    The phytoplankton spring bloom is one of the most important recurrent events in the sup-polar part of the Atlantic Ocean. The classical idea is that the bloom is controlled by nutrients and light, but recent observations challenge this hypothesis. During repeated visits to stations in the deep...

  2. Intense blooms of Trichodesmium erythraeum (Cyanophyta) in the open waters along east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jyothibabu, R.; Madhu, N.V.; Murukesh, N.; Haridas, P.; Nair, K.K.C.; Venugopal, P.

    Two blooms of Trichodesmium erythraeum were observed during April 2001, in the open waters of Bay of Bengal and this is the first report from this region. The locations of the bloom were off Karaikkal (10°58'N, 81°50'E) and off south of Calcutta (19...

  3. Species dynamics in phytoplankton blooms: Incomplete mixing and competition for light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J.; Van Oostveen, P.; Weissing, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    With the eutrophication of many freshwaters and coastal environments, phytoplankton blooms have become a common phenomenon. This article uses a reaction-diffusion model to investigate the implications of mixing processes for the dynamics and species composition of phytoplankton blooms. The model ide

  4. Rising CO2 levels will intensify phytoplankton blooms in eutrophic and hypertrophic lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verspagen, J.M.H.; Van de Waal, D.B.; Finke, J.F; Visser, P.M.; Van Donk, E.; Huisman, J.

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms threaten the water quality of many eutrophic and hypertrophic lakes and cause severe ecological and economic damage worldwide. Dense blooms often deplete the dissolved CO2 concentration and raise pH. Yet, quantitative prediction of the feedbacks between phytoplankton growth, CO2

  5. The decline process and major pathways of Microcystis bloom in Taihu Lake, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhicong; LI Guowen; LIGenbao; LI Dunhai

    2012-01-01

    Eutrophication has become a serious concern in many lakes,resulting in cyanobacterial blooms.However,the mechanism and pathways of cyanobacteria decline are less understood.To identify and define the growth and decline of Microcystis blooms in Taihu Lake of China,and to illuminate the destination of surface floating blooms,we investigated the biomass distribution and variations in colony size,morphology,and floating velocity from October 2008 to September 2009.The results showed that the Microcystis bloom declined in response to biomass decrease,colony disaggregation,buoyancy reduction,and increased phytoplankton biodiversity,and these indicative parameters could be applied for recognition of the development phases of the bloom.Three major decline pathways were proposed to describe the bloom decline process,colony disaggregation (Pathway Ⅰ),colony settlement (Pathway Ⅱ),and cell lysis in colonies (Pathway Ⅲ).We proposed a strategy to define the occurrence and decline of Microcystis blooms,to evaluate the survival state under different stress conditions,and to indicate the efficiency of controlling countermeasures against algal blooms.

  6. Species dynamics in phytoplankton blooms : Incomplete mixing and competition for light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J.; van Oostveen, P.; Weissing, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    With the eutrophication of many freshwaters and coastal environments, phytoplankton blooms have become a common phenomenon. This article uses a reaction-diffusion model to investigate the implications of mixing processes for the dynamics and species composition of phytoplankton blooms. The model ide

  7. Simulation of annual biogeochemical cycles of nutrient balance, phytoplankton bloom(s), and DO in Puget Sound using an unstructured grid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-08-14

    Nutrient pollution from rivers, nonpoint source runoff, and nearly 100 wastewater discharges is a potential threat to the ecological health of Puget Sound with evidence of hypoxia in some basins. However, the relative contributions of loads entering Puget Sound from natural and anthropogenic sources, and the effects of exchange flow from the Pacific Ocean are not well understood. Development of a quantitative model of Puget Sound is thus presented to help improve our understanding of the annual biogeochemical cycles in this system using the unstructured grid Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model framework and the Integrated Compartment Model (CE-QUAL-ICM) water quality kinetics. Results based on 2006 data show that phytoplankton growth and die-off, succession between two species of algae, nutrient dynamics, and dissolved oxygen in Puget Sound are strongly tied to seasonal variation of temperature, solar radiation, and the annual exchange and flushing induced by upwelled Pacific Ocean waters. Concentrations in the mixed outflow surface layer occupying approximately 5–20 m of the upper water column show strong effects of eutrophication from natural and anthropogenic sources, spring and summer algae blooms, accompanied by depleted nutrients but high dissolved oxygen levels. The bottom layer reflects dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations of upwelled Pacific Ocean water modulated by mixing with biologically active surface outflow in the Strait of Juan de Fuca prior to entering Puget Sound over the Admiralty Inlet. The effect of reflux mixing at the Admiralty Inlet sill resulting in lower nutrient and higher dissolved oxygen levels in bottom waters of Puget Sound than the incoming upwelled Pacific Ocean water is reproduced. Finally, by late winter, with the reduction in algal activity, water column constituents of interest, were renewed and the system appeared to reset with cooler temperature, higher nutrient, and higher dissolved oxygen waters from the Pacific

  8. Identification of non-indigenous phytoplankton species dominated bloom off Goa using inverted microscopy and pigment (HPLC) analysis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhaskar, P.V.; Roy, R.; Gauns, M.; Shenoy, D.M.; Rao, V.D.; Mochemadkar, S.

    analysis indicated a decline in the bloom, pheaophytin concentrations in the water column measured by both techniques were very low, presumably due to fast recycling and/or settling rate. The unique composition of the bloom and its probable causes...

  9. Defining the Cognitive Levels in Bloom?s Taxonomy through the Quranic Levels of Understanding - Initial Progress of Developing an Islamic Concept Education

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Zainal Abidin; Syed Kamarul Bahrin; Nur Firdaus Abdul Razak

    2013-01-01

    The cognitive domain of a Bloom?s taxonomy and the Quranic levels of understanding are elements in education that focus on the ability to think. However, there is currently no education system or method that is based on the Quranic levels of understanding due to the absence of proper definition. Therefore, this paper will provide general correlations between the cognitive levels and the Quranic levels of understanding so that the cognitive domain can be defined in term of Quranic levels of un...

  10. About Connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen S Rockland

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the attention attracted by connectomics, one can lose sight of the very real questions concerning What are connections? In the neuroimaging community, structural connectivity is ground truth and underlying constraint on functional or effective connectivity. It is referenced to underlying anatomy; but, as increasingly remarked, there is a large gap between the wealth of human brain mapping and the relatively scant data on actual anatomical connectivity. Moreover, connections have typically been discussed as pairwise, point x projecting to point y (or: to points y and z, or more recently, in graph theoretical terms, as nodes or regions and the interconnecting edges. This is a convenient shorthand, but tends not to capture the richness and nuance of basic anatomical properties as identified in the classic tradition of tracer studies. The present short review accordingly revisits connectional weights, heterogeneity, reciprocity, topography, and hierarchical organization, drawing on concrete examples. The emphasis is on presynaptic long-distance connections, motivated by the intention to probe current assumptions and promote discussions about further progress and synthesis.

  11. Rapid establishment of the CO2 sink associated with Kerguelen's bloom observed during the KEOPS2/OISO20 cruise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lo Monaco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron and light are the main factors limiting the biological pump of CO2 in the Southern Ocean. Iron fertilization experiments have demonstrated the potential for increased uptake of atmospheric CO2, but little is known about the evolution of fertilized environnements. This paper presents observations collected in one of the largest phytoplankton bloom of the Southern Ocean sustained by iron originating from the Kerguelen Plateau. We first complement previous studies by investigating the mechanisms that control air–sea CO2 fluxes over and downstream of the Kerguelen Plateau at the onset of the bloom based on measurements obtained in October–November 2011. These new observations show the rapid establishment of a strong CO2 sink in waters fertilized with iron as soon as vertical mixing is reduced. The magnitude of the CO2 sink was closely related to chlorophyll a and iron concentrations. Because iron concentration strongly depends on the distance from the iron source and the mode of delivery, we identified lateral advection as the main mechanism controlling air–sea CO2 fluxes downtream the Kerguelen Plateau during the growing season. In the southern part of the bloom, situated over the Plateau (iron source, the CO2 sink was stronger and spatially more homogeneous than in the plume offshore. However, we also witnessed a substantial reduction in the uptake of atmospheric CO2 over the Plateau following a strong winds event. Next, we used all the data available in this region in order to draw the seasonal evolution of air–sea CO2 fluxes. The CO2 sink is rapidly reduced during the course of the growing season, which we attribute to iron and silicic acid depletion. South of the Polar Front, where nutrients depletion is delayed, we suggest that the amplitude and duration of the CO2 sink is mainly controlled by vertical mixing. The impact of iron fertilization on air–sea CO2 fluxes is revealed by comparing the uptake of CO2 integrated over the

  12. 基于Bloom Filter的网络爬虫URL消重算法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春梅

    2011-01-01

    针对网络大量重复页面,本文研究基于Bloom Filter的网络爬虫URL地址消重算法.首先,本文对Bloom Filter算法进行了分析研究;其次,本文应用Bloom Filter算法设计并实现了网络爬虫的URL消重;最后,论文采用URL消重率争爬虫爬取某类网站所用时间等性能指标,对基于遍历法和基于MD5算法的URL消重性能与基于Bloom Filter的消重性能做了对比.实验证明,基于Bloom Filter的网络爬虫URL地址消重算法效率较高.

  13. Accumulated chilling hours during endodormancy impact blooming and fruit shape developmentin peach (Prunus persicaL.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong; FANG Wei-chao; ZHU Geng-rui; CAO Ke; CHEN Chang-wen; WANG Xin-wei; WANG Li-rong

    2016-01-01

    Winter chil is essential for the growth and development of deciduous species. To understand the relationship between accumulated chiling hours during endodormancy and blooming and fruit shape development, we controled chiling hours and investigated their effects on blooming date and fruit shape of peaches. The results showed that the number of days to full bloom date and the heat requirement for blooming were negatively correlated with accumulated chilling hours. Accumulated chiling hours were signiifcantly negatively correlated with fruit shape index and fruit tip lengths, suggesting that the number of chiling hours affect the fruit shape development. Fewer accumulated chiling hours may be the major reason for longer fruit shape and protruding fruit tips. In conclusion, our results indicate speciifcaly that decreased winter chiling hours can delay the bloom date and may lead to aberrant fruit shape development in peaches. Our study provides preliminary insights into the response of temperate fruit species to global climate change.

  14. Is Occurrence of Harmful Algal Blooms in the Exclusive Economic Zone of India on the Rise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Padmakumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence, increase in frequency, intensity and spatial coverage of harmful algal blooms during the past decade in the EEZ of India are documented here. Eighty algal blooms were recorded during the period 1998–2010. Of the eighty algal blooms, 31 blooms were formed by dinoflagellates, 27 by cyanobacteria, and 18 by diatoms. Three raphidophyte and one haptophyte blooms were also observed. Potentially toxic microalgae recorded from the Indian waters were Alexandrium spp., Gymnodinium spp. Dinophysis spp., Coolia monotis, Prorocentrum lima, and Pseudo-nitzschia spp. Examination of available data from the literature during the last hundred years and in situ observations during 1998–2010 indicates clear-cut increase in the occurrence of HABs in the Indian EEZ.

  15. Free polyamine content during algal bloom succession in the East China Sea in spring 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Zhao, Weihong; Li, Caiyan; Miao, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We measured the concentrations and distribution of major polyamines (spermine, putrescine and spermidine) in seawater during successive spring algal blooms in an area of frequent harmful blooms in the East China Sea. Spermine, putrescine, and spermidine concentrations were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and ranged from 1-64, 7-81, and 0-19 nmol/L. Spermine was present at the highest concentrations, followed by putrescine and spermidine. In late April, when a diatom bloom dominated by Skeletonema costatum dispersed, polyamine concentrations increased, presumably as a result of diatom decomposition. In early May, when a dinoflagellate bloom dominated by Prorocentrum donghaiense occurred, the polyamine concentration decreased from the level seen in late April. The abundant polyamines that decomposed and were released during the diatom bloom in late April may have promoted the growth of P. donghaiense, resulting in its dominance.

  16. A cold phase of the East Pacific triggers new phytoplankton blooms in San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, J.E.; Jassby, A.D.; Thompson, J.K.; Hieb, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ecological observations sustained over decades often reveal abrupt changes in biological communities that signal altered ecosystem states. We report a large shift in the biological communities of San Francisco Bay, first detected as increasing phytoplankton biomass and occurrences of new seasonal blooms that began in 1999. This phytoplankton increase is paradoxical because it occurred in an era of decreasing wastewater nutrient inputs and reduced nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations, contrary to the guiding paradigm that algal biomass in estuaries increases in proportion to nutrient inputs from their watersheds. Coincidental changes included sharp declines in the abundance of bivalve mollusks, the key phytoplankton consumers in this estuary, and record high abundances of several bivalve predators: Bay shrimp, English sole, and Dungeness crab. The phytoplankton increase is consistent with a trophic cascade resulting from heightened predation on bivalves and suppression of their filtration control on phytoplankton growth. These community changes in San Francisco Bay across three trophic levels followed a state change in the California Current System characterized by increased upwelling intensity, amplified primary production, and strengthened southerly flows. These diagnostic features of the East Pacific "cold phase" lead to strong recruitment and immigration of juvenile flatfish and crustaceans into estuaries where they feed and develop. This study, built from three decades of observation, reveals a previously unrecognized mechanism of ocean-estuary connectivity. Interdecadal oceanic regime changes can propagate into estuaries, altering their community structure and efficiency of transforming land-derived nutrients into algal biomass. ?? 2007 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  17. Contributions of meteorology to the phenology of cyanobacterial blooms: implications for future climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Duan, Hongtao; Shi, Xiaoli; Yu, Yang; Kong, Fanxiang

    2012-02-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms are often a result of eutrophication. Recently, however, their expansion has also been found to be associated with changes in climate. To elucidate the effects of climatic variables on the expansion of cyanobacterial blooms in Taihu, China, we analyzed the relationships between climatic variables and bloom events which were retrieved by satellite images. We then assessed the contribution of each climate variable to the phenology of blooms using multiple regression models. Our study demonstrates that retrieving ecological information from satellite images is meritorious for large-scale and long-term ecological research in freshwater ecosystems. Our results show that the phenological changes of blooms at an inter-annual scale are strongly linked to climate in Taihu during the past 23 yr. Cyanobacterial blooms occur earlier and last longer with the increase of temperature, sunshine hours, and global radiation and the decrease of wind speed. Furthermore, the duration increases when the daily averages of maximum, mean, and minimum temperature each exceed 20.3 °C, 16.7 °C, and 13.7 °C, respectively. Among these factors, sunshine hours and wind speed are the primary contributors to the onset of the blooms, explaining 84.6% of their variability over the past 23 yr. These factors are also good predictors of the variability in the duration of annual blooms and determined 58.9% of the variability in this parameter. Our results indicate that when nutrients are in sufficiently high quantities to sustain the formation of cyanobacterial blooms, climatic variables become crucial in predicting cyanobacterial bloom events. Climate changes should be considered when we evaluate how much the amount of nutrients should be reduced in Taihu for lake management.

  18. HR Connect

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — HR Connect is the USAID HR personnel system which allows HR professionals to process HR actions related to employee's personal and position information. This system...

  19. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of scaled steel samples taken from continuous casting blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Christoph; Sturm, Volker; Fleige, Rüdiger; Fricke-Begemann, Cord; Noll, Reinhard

    2016-09-01

    To analyse continuous casting steel blooms a removal of non-representative surface layers is required prior to the analysis. In this work, an optimized process is developed to ablate such layers and to analyse the bulk material underneath with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). A high ablation rate is crucial since the time slot for an inline analysis is limited, e.g. to measurements and cross-section polish methods. These studies show that the surface layers may consist both of oxides and metallic layers and typically have thicknesses from 200 μm to 600 μm each. The ablation behaviour of the oxide differs significantly from that of the metallic layers. An operation scheme for inline material identification is worked out to perform ablation and analysis with a single laser source. During the ablation phase and the subsequent measurement phase the laser source is operated with individually tailored parameters. A total penetration depth exceeding 1 mm in steel can be achieved within 20 s of ablation. Thereby the influence of non-representative surface layers on the following LIBS measurement can be suppressed to a large extent. For chromium, relative root mean square errors of predictions of less than 13% were achieved on high alloy samples with up to 16 m.-% Cr and on low alloy samples with Cr contents below 2 m.-%.

  20. 多 MOSFET 并联均流的高稳定度恒流源研究%Research on the high stable constant current source based on multi-MOSFETs in paralleling connection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张存凯; 李正坤; 陈乐; 张钟华

    2016-01-01

    In this paper , an approach for a high stable constant current source is presented , which is based on multi-ple power MOSFETs paralleling connection method , the maxim output of current source is up to 30 A, and it is con-tinuously adjustable .The performance of the designed constant current source has been tested , and the measurement results indicate that the stability of constant source is better than 5 ppm when the current is 30 A.The working princi-ple of the designed constant current circuit is analyzed in detail , and the selection of key components is explained clearly.We use the high precision reference voltage source and current series negative feedback based on high -power precision sample resistor to increase the stability of system .In order to realize the high stable current , multiple MOS-FETs in paralleling connection are used as regulator , and systematic analysis on factors affecting MOSFETs in paralle-ling work are presented as well .The constant current source that we designed has a certain reference value for the de-sign of DC current source .%提出了一种基于多MOSFET并联均流的高稳定度大电流恒流源研究方案,输出电流最高可达30 A且连续可调,输出30 A时,30分钟内电流稳定度优于5 ppm。文中详细分析了恒流源基本稳流电路的工作原理,并对电路中关键元器件的选型进行了分析说明。通过高精度基准电压芯片和基于大功率精密电阻采样的电流串联负反馈方法提高系统的稳流精度,通过多只功率MOSFET并联均流工作作为调整管,实现了输出大电流的高稳定度,同时对影响功率MOSFET并联工作的因素进行了系统分析。提出的恒流源方案,对高稳定度直流电源的设计具有一定的参考价值。

  1. Discussion about mechanism of harmful algal blooms breakout

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BU Xianwei; XU Weiyi; ZHU Dedi; CHEN Gengxin

    2005-01-01

    HAB (harmful algal bloom) is a serious marine ecological disaster. Up to now there is no definite conclusion about its mechanism of occurrence.The observation results show that the HAB breakout in the Xiangshan Bay was mainly caused by physical convergence ca pacity,and the breakout process had no direct relation to eutrophication. As a new idea it is thought that the process of the HAB break out is mainly a physical convergence or accumulation process in some areas. A hypothesis about dynamic mechanism of the HAB ap pearing in the area off the Changjiang Estuary is put forward according to hydrology and topography and the past work, and a breakthrough is expected to be made for doing further research.

  2. The Role of Cyanobacteria Blooms in Cholera Epidemic in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagir Ahmed, Md.; Raknuzzaman, Md.; Akther, Hafeza; Ahmed, Sumaiya

    A study was conducted on association of Vibrio cholerae with plankton specially emphasis on cyanobacteria in relation to some physico-chemical parameters in the River Buriganga, Dhaka, from January to December 2002. Monthly abundance of phytoplankton and zooplankton varied from 457 to 14166 and from 169 to 1055 individual L-1, respectively. Monthly average of faecal coliform in water, zooplankton and phytoplankton samples were 3.99x109, 4.54x103 and 4.28x102 (CFU L-1), respectively. During epidemics, toxigenic V. cholerae 01 and 0139 were isolated from the patients as well as from the surface water. V. cholerae 01 and 0139 were also isolated from plankton samples. More over, it was observed that ctx (cholera toxic) positive in water and phytoplankton samples of the river. A bloom of Oscillatoria sp. (1.6x104 individual L-1) occurred in the upper reaches of the River Buriganga in May 2002. Methanol-water extract of bloom sample was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection and Mass Spectrum (MS) detected microcystin-RR. Cyanobacteria are abundant in the aquatic environment of Bangladesh and it was established that V. cholerae maintain a symbiotic relationship with these algae particularly mucilaginous cyanobacteria. During epidemics, patients symptoms included diarrhea, vomiting and hemorrhagic enteritis and in severe cases hemorrhagic diarrhea. So, question has arisen that which is responsible, microcystins or cholera for death of cholera/diarrhea patients in Bangladesh. Future research should be directed to isolate microcystins and cholera toxins from the epidemic areas to clarify the fact.

  3. Interactions between algal-bacterial populations and trace metals in fjord surface waters during a nutrient stimulated summer bloom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, F.; Larsen, A.; Stedmon, C.;

    2005-01-01

    We examined how variations in algal-bacterial community structure relate to Cu, Zn, and Mn speciation during a diatom-rich bloom that was induced by daily additions of inorganic macronutrients to fjord waters in August 2002. The experiments were carried out in 11-m3 floating mesocosm bags deployed...... in the Raunefjord, near Bergen, Norway, and operated in a chemostat (flow-through) mode. Copper speciation was controlled by the formation of very strong organic complexes (log K1' = 15.2-15.8; log 1' = 13.0-13.4) whose likely source was the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strong ligand concentrations were...... this period, the weaker Cu-binding ligands appeared to have the same source or production process as the proteinlike fluorophores detected in these coastal waters. Zinc speciation was controlled by complexation with a single class of organic ligands that appeared to be released inadvertently upon the death...

  4. Cyanotoxin mixtures and taste-and-odor compounds in cyanobacterial blooms from the midwestern united states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J.L.; Loftin, K.A.; Meyer, M.T.; Ziegler, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    The mixtures of toxins and taste-and-odor compounds present during cyanobacterial blooms are not well characterized and of particular concern when evaluating potential human health risks. Cyanobacterial blooms were sampled in twenty-three Midwestern United States lakes and analyzed for community composition, thirteen cyanotoxins by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and immunoassay, and two taste-and-odor compounds by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Aphanizomenon, Cylindrospermopsis and/or Microcystis were dominant in most (96%) blooms, but community composition was not strongly correlated with toxin and taste-and-odor occurrence. Microcystins occurred in all blooms. Total microcystin concentrations measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and immunoassay were linearly related (rs = 0.76, p Geosmin (87%), 2-methylisoborneol (39%), anatoxin-a (30%), saxitoxins (17%), cylindrospermopsins (9%), and nodularin-R (9%) also were present in these blooms. Multiple classes of cyanotoxins occurred in 48% of blooms and 95% had multiple microcystin variants. Toxins and taste-and-odor compounds frequently co-occurred (91% of blooms), indicating odor may serve as a warning that cyanotoxins likely are present. However, toxins occurred more frequently than taste-and-odor compounds, so odor alone does not provide sufficient warning to ensure human-health protection. ?? This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2010 by the American Chemical Society.

  5. Factors determining the diurnal dynamics of blooming of chosen plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Denisow

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to synthesize the determinants which may influence the diurnal rhythm of blooming. Additionally, I tried to explore and bring together topics that concern blooming and have always been considered separately because of their origin in different disciplines. The following species were included: Hydrangea arborescens L. subsp. discolor (Raf., H. paniculata Sieb., Viburnum opulus L., Chaenomeles japonica Lindl., Knautia arvensis L., Adonis vernalis L., Aster saggitifolius Willd., Taraxacum officinale L. Chelidonium majus L. The taxons were observed in Lublin (51008' - 51018' N and 21027' - 21041' E in the years 2001-2007. The blooming of species was determined at least for two vegetation seasons. During observations all flowers developed in one-hour intervals were counted. The diurnal dynamics of blooming differs among species and is modified by different endogenous and exogenous factors. The endogenous determinants of diurnal dynamics of blooming are morphological diversity of flowers (fertility or sterility within species or heterostyly. The different pattern of blooming succour different mechanisms which prevent self-pollination (Chaenomeles japonica Lindl., Knautia arvensis L.. The abiotic factors, such as day length and temperature during the vegetation season, influence the change in the process of diurnal dynamics of blooming (e. g. Taraxacum officinale, Chelidonium majus.

  6. Comparative Metagenomics of Toxic Freshwater Cyanobacteria Bloom Communities on Two Continents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Morgan M [ORNL; Li, Zhou [ORNL; Effler, Chad [Department of Microbiology, University of Tennessee; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Boyer, Gergory [College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York, Syracuse; Wilhelm, Steven W [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have persisted in freshwater systems around the world for centuries and appear to be globally increasing in frequency and severity. Toxins produced by bloom-associated cyanobacteria can have drastic impacts on the ecosystem and surrounding communities, and bloom biomass can disrupt aquatic food webs and act as a driver for hypoxia. Little is currently known regarding the genomic content of the Microcystis strains that form blooms or the companion heterotrophic community associated with bloom events. To address these issues, we examined the bloomassociated microbial communities in single samples from Lake Erie (North America), Lake Tai (Taihu, China), and Grand Lakes St. Marys (OH, USA) using comparative metagenomics. Together the Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria comprised .90% of each bloom bacterial community sample, although the dominant phylum varied between systems. Relative to the existing Microcystis aeruginosa NIES 843 genome, sequences from Lake Erie and Taihu revealed a number of metagenomic islands that were absent in the environmental samples. Moreover, despite variation in the phylogenetic assignments of bloomassociated organisms, the functional potential of bloom members remained relatively constant between systems. This pattern was particularly noticeable in the genomic contribution of nitrogen assimilation genes. In Taihu, the genetic elements associated with the assimilation and metabolism of nitrogen were predominantly associated with Proteobacteria, while these functions in the North American lakes were primarily contributed to by the Cyanobacteria. Our observations build on an emerging body of metagenomic surveys describing the functional potential of microbial communities as more highly conserved than that of their phylogenetic makeup within natural systems.

  7. Bio-optical observations of the 2004 Labrador Sea phytoplankton bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutton, Peter G.; Martz, Todd R.; Degrandpre, Michael D.; McGillis, Wade R.; Drennan, William M.; Boss, Emmanuel

    2011-11-01

    A unique time series of moored bio-optical measurements documented the 2004 spring-summer bloom in the southern Labrador Sea. In situ and satellite chlorophyll data show that chlorophyll levels in the 2004 bloom were at the upper end of those typically observed in this region. Satellite chlorophyll and profiling float temperature/salinity data show that the main bloom, which typically peaks in June/July, is often preceded by ephemeral mixed layer shoaling and a lesser, short-lived bloom in May; this was the case in 2004. The particulate backscatter to beam attenuation ratio (bbp[470 nm]/Cp[660 nm]) showed peaks in the relative abundance of small particles at bloom initiation and during the decline of the bloom, while larger particles dominated during the bloom. Chlorophyll/Cp and bbp/chlorophyll were correlated with carbon export and dominated by changes in the pigment per cell associated with lower light levels due to enhanced attenuation of solar radiation during the bloom. An NPZ (nutrients, phytoplankton, zooplankton) model captured the phytoplankton bloom and an early July peak in zooplankton. Moored acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data showed an additional mid-June peak in zooplankton biomass which was attributed to egg-laying copepods. The data reported here represent one of the few moored time series of Cp, bbp and chlorophyll extending over several months in an open ocean region. Interpretation of data sets such as this will become increasingly important as these deployments become more commonplace via ocean observing systems. Moreover, these data contribute to the understanding of biological-physical coupling in a biogeochemically important, yet poorly studied region.

  8. Low-wind summers promote blooms of cyanobacteria in Lake Tiefer See, NE Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienel, Ulrike; Kirillin, Georgiy; Brademann, Brian; Plessen, Brigit; Dräger, Nadine; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Low-wind summers promote blooms of cyanobacteria in Lake Tiefer See, NE Germany Monitoring in three successive but meteorologically different summer seasons in 2012 to 2014 revealed a major impact of the duration of low-wind periods in summer on the outcome of cyanobacteria blooms. During summer 2014, the period from mid-June to mid-September with wind speeds below the average of 3.5 m s-1 promoted a bloom of Limnothrix redekekei with up to 12 mg particulate matter per liter. This bloom from June to September 2014 led to an enrichment of 13C in the organic matter deposited, and terminated a weak diatom spring bloom. The shorter low-wind period from mid-July to mid-September 2012 caused a less strong 13C enrichment by a weak bloom of cyanobacteria, which coexisted with diatoms, while no such bloom occurred during generally windier summer 2013. The validity of the observed relation of 13C enrichment by cyanobacteria blooms during extended low-wind periods in summer was tested using annual measurements of delta13Corg in the varved sediments deposited between AD1924 and 2008 and the mixing depth as derived from FLake-model calculations based on meteorological data from Schwerin (for 1951-2008). Accordingly, the duration of mixing depth less than 3.5 m water depth explains 25% of the variability of 13C enrichment by cyanobacteria blooms for the full period from 1951 - 2006. The explained variability increases to 53% when the period with increased nutrient load from1970 onwards is considered. In terms of explained variability of lake production, this relation is supplementary to the inverse relation of diatom silica determined by the duration of lake mixing in spring, which is suppressed during the period of increased nutrient load.

  9. Challenges in modelling spatiotemporally varying phytoplankton blooms in the Northwestern Arabian Sea and Gulf of Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sedigh Marvasti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We examine interannual variability of phytoplankton blooms in northwestern Arabian Sea and Gulf of Oman. Satellite data (SeaWIFS ocean color shows two climatological blooms in this region, a wintertime bloom peaking in February and a summertime bloom peaking in September. A pronounced anti-correlation between the AVISO sea surface height anomaly (SSHA and chlorophyll is found during the wintertime bloom. On a regional scale, interannual variability of the wintertime bloom is thus dominated by cyclonic eddies which vary in location from one year to another. These results were compared against the outputs from three different 3-D Earth System models. We show that two coarse (1° models with the relatively complex biogeochemistry (TOPAZ capture the annual cycle but neither eddies nor the interannual variability. An eddy-resolving model (GFDL CM2.6 with a simpler biogeochemistry (miniBLING displays larger interannual variability, but overestimates the wintertime bloom and captures eddy-bloom coupling in the south but not in the north. The southern part of the domain is a region with a much sharper thermocline and nutricline relatively close to the surface, in which eddies modulate diffusive nutrient supply to the surface (a mechanism not previously emphasized in the literature. We suggest that for the model to simulate the observed wintertime blooms within cyclones, it will be necessary to represent this relatively unusual nutrient structure as well as the cyclonic eddies. This is a challenge in the Northern Arabian Sea as it requires capturing the details of the outflow from the Persian Gulf.

  10. Comparative metagenomics of toxic freshwater cyanobacteria bloom communities on two continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Morgan M; Li, Zhou; Effler, T Chad; Hauser, Loren J; Boyer, Gregory L; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have persisted in freshwater systems around the world for centuries and appear to be globally increasing in frequency and severity. Toxins produced by bloom-associated cyanobacteria can have drastic impacts on the ecosystem and surrounding communities, and bloom biomass can disrupt aquatic food webs and act as a driver for hypoxia. Little is currently known regarding the genomic content of the Microcystis strains that form blooms or the companion heterotrophic community associated with bloom events. To address these issues, we examined the bloom-associated microbial communities in single samples from Lake Erie (North America), Lake Tai (Taihu, China), and Grand Lakes St. Marys (OH, USA) using comparative metagenomics. Together the Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria comprised >90% of each bloom bacterial community sample, although the dominant phylum varied between systems. Relative to the existing Microcystis aeruginosa NIES 843 genome, sequences from Lake Erie and Taihu revealed a number of metagenomic islands that were absent in the environmental samples. Moreover, despite variation in the phylogenetic assignments of bloom-associated organisms, the functional potential of bloom members remained relatively constant between systems. This pattern was particularly noticeable in the genomic contribution of nitrogen assimilation genes. In Taihu, the genetic elements associated with the assimilation and metabolism of nitrogen were predominantly associated with Proteobacteria, while these functions in the North American lakes were primarily contributed to by the Cyanobacteria. Our observations build on an emerging body of metagenomic surveys describing the functional potential of microbial communities as more highly conserved than that of their phylogenetic makeup within natural systems.

  11. Comparative metagenomics of toxic freshwater cyanobacteria bloom communities on two continents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan M Steffen

    Full Text Available Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have persisted in freshwater systems around the world for centuries and appear to be globally increasing in frequency and severity. Toxins produced by bloom-associated cyanobacteria can have drastic impacts on the ecosystem and surrounding communities, and bloom biomass can disrupt aquatic food webs and act as a driver for hypoxia. Little is currently known regarding the genomic content of the Microcystis strains that form blooms or the companion heterotrophic community associated with bloom events. To address these issues, we examined the bloom-associated microbial communities in single samples from Lake Erie (North America, Lake Tai (Taihu, China, and Grand Lakes St. Marys (OH, USA using comparative metagenomics. Together the Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria comprised >90% of each bloom bacterial community sample, although the dominant phylum varied between systems. Relative to the existing Microcystis aeruginosa NIES 843 genome, sequences from Lake Erie and Taihu revealed a number of metagenomic islands that were absent in the environmental samples. Moreover, despite variation in the phylogenetic assignments of bloom-associated organisms, the functional potential of bloom members remained relatively constant between systems. This pattern was particularly noticeable in the genomic contribution of nitrogen assimilation genes. In Taihu, the genetic elements associated with the assimilation and metabolism of nitrogen were predominantly associated with Proteobacteria, while these functions in the North American lakes were primarily contributed to by the Cyanobacteria. Our observations build on an emerging body of metagenomic surveys describing the functional potential of microbial communities as more highly conserved than that of their phylogenetic makeup within natural systems.

  12. Current source grid connected inverter using fuzzy hysteresis technologies%电流型并网逆变器的模糊滞环控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄少辉; 林培杰; 程树英; 孙占东

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the main shortcomings of hysteresis band control used in grid connected inverter where the switch frequency is not fixed, a new method that hysteresis comparator combined with fuzzy controler is proposed. By modeling the grid connected inverter and analyzing the principle of hysteresis current control , we have revealed that the switch frequency is closely related to the width of the hysteresis loop. We make grid voltage and the partial differential of instruction current as input variables to establish the fuzzy control rules. After some fuzzy arithmetic outputing hysteresis band. The switching frequency is stabilized by regulating the width of the hysteresis dynamically. The method has a high performance in reducing the current harmonics and decreasing the switching frequency. The simulation and experiment results demonstrate that this method is feasibility on stable hysteresis switching frequency, especially in zero crossing point and top point, meanwhile it can improve the harmonic characteristic.%为改善滞环控制应用在并网逆变器中会出现系统开关频率不固定的问题,提出一种将模糊控制器与滞环比较器相结合的控制方法。通过对并网逆变器的建模和滞环电流控制原理的分析,可知开关频率与滞环环宽之间的关系。以电网电压及指令电流的偏微分为输入变量建立模糊控制规则,经过一定的模糊运算输出滞环环宽,从而动态地控制环宽达到稳定频率的目的。该方法能有效地降低开关频率,减小电流谐波。仿真和实验结果证明了该方法对稳定滞环开关频率是有效的,尤其是在过零点与顶点处,同时能够改善谐波特性。

  13. Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-01

    The Connected Traveler framework seeks to boost the energy efficiency of personal travel and the overall transportation system by maximizing the accuracy of predicted traveler behavior in response to real-time feedback and incentives. It is anticipated that this approach will establish a feedback loop that 'learns' traveler preferences and customizes incentives to meet or exceed energy efficiency targets by empowering individual travelers with information needed to make energy-efficient choices and reducing the complexity required to validate transportation system energy savings. This handout provides an overview of NREL's Connected Traveler project, including graphics, milestones, and contact information.

  14. Web GIS in practice IV: publishing your health maps and connecting to remote WMS sources using the Open Source UMN MapServer and DM Solutions MapLab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Maged N Kamel; Honda, Kiyoshi

    2006-01-18

    Open Source Web GIS software systems have reached a stage of maturity, sophistication, robustness and stability, and usability and user friendliness rivalling that of commercial, proprietary GIS and Web GIS server products. The Open Source Web GIS community is also actively embracing OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) standards, including WMS (Web Map Service). WMS enables the creation of Web maps that have layers coming from multiple different remote servers/sources. In this article we present one easy to implement Web GIS server solution that is based on the Open Source University of Minnesota (UMN) MapServer. By following the accompanying step-by-step tutorial instructions, interested readers running mainstream Microsoft(R) Windows machines and with no prior technical experience in Web GIS or Internet map servers will be able to publish their own health maps on the Web and add to those maps additional layers retrieved from remote WMS servers. The 'digital Asia' and 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami experiences in using free Open Source Web GIS software are also briefly described.

  15. Web GIS in practice IV: publishing your health maps and connecting to remote WMS sources using the Open Source UMN MapServer and DM Solutions MapLab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honda Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Open Source Web GIS software systems have reached a stage of maturity, sophistication, robustness and stability, and usability and user friendliness rivalling that of commercial, proprietary GIS and Web GIS server products. The Open Source Web GIS community is also actively embracing OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium standards, including WMS (Web Map Service. WMS enables the creation of Web maps that have layers coming from multiple different remote servers/sources. In this article we present one easy to implement Web GIS server solution that is based on the Open Source University of Minnesota (UMN MapServer. By following the accompanying step-by-step tutorial instructions, interested readers running mainstream Microsoft® Windows machines and with no prior technical experience in Web GIS or Internet map servers will be able to publish their own health maps on the Web and add to those maps additional layers retrieved from remote WMS servers. The 'digital Asia' and 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami experiences in using free Open Source Web GIS software are also briefly described.

  16. Microcystin accumulation in cladocerans: first evidence of MC uptake from aqueous extracts of a natural bloom sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrão-Filho, Aloysio S; Herrera, Natalia A; Echeverri, Luis Fernando

    2014-09-01

    Bioaccumulation of microcystins (MC) in zooplankton has been shown in several studies, mainly in field samples. A few studies, however, have demonstrated MC bioaccumulation in laboratory experiments. Although ingestion of cell-bound MC is considered the main route of MC accumulation, another important source is the MC from the dissolved fraction (DMC). This study reports the accumulation of DMC from aqueous extracts of natural bloom samples in three cladoceran species: Moina micrura, Daphnia laevis and Daphnia similis. Animals were exposed for 96 h to aqueous extracts of lyophilized matter from two bloom samples from Colombian reservoirs in different concentrations (25-1000 mg DW L(-1)). Analysis by HPLC-MS detected MC-LR in these samples at concentrations of 434-538 μg g(-1). For the analysis of MC in animal tissues the samples were homogenized and sonicated in methanol:water (75%) and analyzed by ELISA. Results showed that the animals uptake of MC increased with increasing exposure concentrations of aqueous extracts, with M. micrura and D. laevis clones presenting the highest MC concentrations in their tissues (up to 1170-1260 μg g(-1)) while D. similis the lowest (184 μg g(-1)). This study shows, for the first time, that MC uptake from dissolved fraction by zooplankton is possible, not only from the ingestion of seston or cell-bound MC as previously demonstrated. PMID:24880137

  17. Recreational Exposure to Low Concentrations of Microcystins During an Algal Bloom in a Small Lake

    OpenAIRE

    Yung-Sung Cheng; Kieszak, Stephanie M.; Hill, Vincent R.; Kate Nierenberg; Johnson, Trisha B.; Yue Zhou; Mitch Irvin; Christopher Williams; Barbara Kirkpatrick; Wayne Carmichael; Backer, Lorraine C.

    2008-01-01

    We measured microcystins in blood from people at risk for swallowing water or inhaling spray while swimming, water skiing, jet skiing, or boating during an algal bloom. We monitored water samples from a small lake as a Microcystis aeruginosa bloom developed. We recruited 97 people planning recreational activities in that lake and seven others who volunteered to recreate in a nearby bloom-free lake. We conducted our field study within a week of finding a 10-μg/L microcystin concentration. W...

  18. Extensive Chaetoceros curvisetus bloom in relation to water quality in Port Blair Bay, Andaman Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Mehmuna; Sahu, Biraja Kumar; Das, Apurba Kumar; Vinithkumar, Nambali Valsalan; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam

    2015-05-01

    Blooming of diatom species Chaetoceros curvisetus (Cleve, 1889) was observed in Junglighat Bay and Haddo Harbour of Port Blair Bay of Andaman and Nicobar Islands during June 2010. Physico-chemical parameters, nutrient concentrations and phytoplankton composition data collected from five stations during 2010 were classified as bloom area (BA) and non-bloom area (NBA) and compared. Elevated values of dissolved oxygen were recorded in the BA, and it significantly varied (p parametric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) ordinations; cluster analysis powered by SIMPROF test also grouped the stations as BA and NBA.

  19. Extensive Chaetoceros curvisetus bloom in relation to water quality in Port Blair Bay, Andaman Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Mehmuna; Sahu, Biraja Kumar; Das, Apurba Kumar; Vinithkumar, Nambali Valsalan; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam

    2015-05-01

    Blooming of diatom species Chaetoceros curvisetus (Cleve, 1889) was observed in Junglighat Bay and Haddo Harbour of Port Blair Bay of Andaman and Nicobar Islands during June 2010. Physico-chemical parameters, nutrient concentrations and phytoplankton composition data collected from five stations during 2010 were classified as bloom area (BA) and non-bloom area (NBA) and compared. Elevated values of dissolved oxygen were recorded in the BA, and it significantly varied (p parametric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) ordinations; cluster analysis powered by SIMPROF test also grouped the stations as BA and NBA. PMID:25838063

  20. Phytoplankton spring and fall blooms in the North Atlantic in the 1980s and 2000s.

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Elodie; Antoine, David; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; de Boyer Montégut, Clément

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton chlorophyll-a (Chl) seasonal cycles of the North Atlantic are described using satellite ocean color observations covering the 1980s and the 2000s. The study region is where warmer SST and higher Chl in the 2000s as compared to the 1980s have been reported. It covers latitudes from 30 degrees N-50 degrees N and longitudes from 60 degrees W-0 degrees W, where two phytoplankton blooms take place: a spring bloom that follows stratification of upper layers, and a fall bloom due to nu...

  1. 南水水库水华发生机理和防治对策研究%Research on Occurring Mechanism and Control Measures of Algal Bloom in Nanshui Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新伟

    2012-01-01

    Eutrophication and water bloom is the security risks of drinking water sources. The occurring time and incentives of algal bloom are different in different lakes and reservoirs. After analyzing the hydrological condition, water quality, algal composition and density, and meteorological characteristics during the bloom period of the Nanshui Reservoir, the mechanisms of cyanobateria outbreak were revealed. The high concentrations of total nitrogen caused by cage culture with high-density led to the cyanobacteria bloom even in dry and low temperature seasons while the other conditions are adequate such as slow water flow, continuous rise of temperature, sufficient Illumination. According to the incentives of water bloom, specific countermeasures for the control and treatment of algae bloom were proposed.%富营养化和水华爆发是饮用水水源地的安全隐患,不同湖泊和水库水华发生的时间、诱因不同.通过对广东省南水水库近几年水华发生期间的水文、水质、藻类、气象等特征进行分析,揭示了南水水库蓝藻发生的机理.由于高密度网箱养殖导致总氮浓度超标,在水库处于枯水季节,水体流动速度慢,温度虽然低但呈连续多日上升趋势、无雨且光照充足的条件下,容易发生蓝藻水华.针对水华发生的诱因,提出了控制和治理南水水库蓝藻爆发的具体对策措施.

  2. Remote Sensing Marine Ecology: Wind-driven algal blooms in the open oceans and their ecological impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, DanLing

    2016-07-01

    Algal bloom not only can increase the primary production but also could result in negative ecological consequence, e.g., Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). According to the classic theory for the formation of algal blooms "critical depth" and "eutrophication", oligotrophic sea area is usually difficult to form a large area of algal blooms, and actually the traditional observation is only sporadic capture to the existence of algal blooms. Taking full advantage of multiple data of satellite remote sensing, this study: 1), introduces "Wind-driven algal blooms in open oceans: observation and mechanisms" It explained except classic coastal Ekman transport, the wind through a variety of mechanisms affecting the formation of algal blooms. Proposed a conceptual model of "Strong wind -upwelling-nutrient-phytoplankton blooms" in Western South China Sea (SCS) to assess role of wind-induced advection transport in phytoplankton bloom formation. It illustrates the nutrient resources that support long-term offshore phytoplankton blooms in the western SCS; 2), Proposal of the theory that "typhoons cause vertical mixing, induce phytoplankton blooms", and quantify their important contribution to marine primary production; Proposal a new ecological index for typhoon. Proposed remote sensing inversion models. 3), Finding of the spatial and temporaldistributions pattern of harmful algal bloom (HAB)and species variations of HAB in the South Yellow Sea and East China Sea, and in the Pearl River estuary, and their oceanic dynamic mechanisms related with monsoon; The project developed new techniques and generated new knowledge, which significantly improved understanding of the formation mechanisms of algal blooms. 1), It proposed "wind-pump" mechanism integrates theoretical system combing "ocean dynamics, development of algal blooms, and impact on primary production", which will benefit fisheries management. 2), A new interdisciplinary subject "Remote Sensing Marine Ecology"(RSME) has been

  3. 78 FR 55684 - ConnectED Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration ConnectED Workshop AGENCY: National... in the United States to next- generation broadband. This Notice announces that the ConnectED Workshop... ConnectED Workshop will discuss the growing bandwidth needs of K-12 schools as more schools use...

  4. Dust-induced episodic phytoplankton blooms in the Arabian Sea during winter monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, P.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    Phytoplankton blooms mediated by the oceanic supply of nutrients is a well-understood phenomenon in the Arabian Sea (AS), while the role of dust deposition in enhancing phytoplankton is less explored. In this paper, we show that during winter...

  5. Phytoplankton ice-edge blooms in the marginal ice zone at Princess Astrid Coast in Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verlecar, X.N; Dhargalkar, V.K.; Goswami, S.C.; Mhamal, N

    with zooplankton. Spiral and straight chains of Fragilaria striatulla, F. cylindrus, Nitzschia closterium and N. seriata were abundant during bloom. Copepods dominated the zooplankton. Increase in euphausiids on 31st December were responsible for reduction...

  6. West Coast DA Event data - West Coast Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia bloom

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Beginning in the spring of 2015 the US West Coast began to experience the most wide-spread toxic Pseudo-nitzschia bloom to date, after approximately eight years...

  7. Harmful algal blooms discovered during the Mote Monthly transect cruises, 1998 and 1999 (NODC Accession 0000532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Harmful algal blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, have caused massive fish kills in the Gulf of Mexico since the 1500's, with most occurrences on...

  8. Algal-bloom control by allelopathy of aquatic macrophytes——A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongying HU; Yu HONG

    2008-01-01

    Algal-bloom control is an important issue for water environment protection as it induces several nega-tive impacts on the lives of aquatic organisms, aquacul-ture, landscaping, and human health. The development of an environment-friendly, cost-effective, and convenient alternative for controlling algal bloom has gained much concern. Using the allelopathy of aquatic macrophytes as a novel and safe method for algal-bloom control is a promising alternative. This paper reviews the develop-ment and potential application about allelopathy of aquatic plants on algae, including the allelopathic research history, the potential research problems, the research methodology, and the reported aquatic macro-phytes and their inhibitory allelochemicals. Potential modes of inhibition action of allelochemicals on algae, possible ways for application, and future development directions of research on algal-bloom control by aquatic macrophytes were also presented.

  9. Enhancement of Chlorophyll Concentration and Growing Harmful Algal Bloom Along the California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves, Joselyn; Singh, Ramesh

    2016-07-01

    We have carried out detailed analysis of satellite and ground data at different locations, Cal Poly, Goleta, Newport, Santa Monica, and Scripps piers and Monterey, Stearns and Santa Cruz wharfs along the California coast for the period 2008-2015. The sea surface temperature and chlorophyll concentrations derived from satellite data are analyzed together with ground observations of nitrogen, phosphorus, domoic acids and harmful algal blooms. The frequency of harmful algal blooms are found to increase in recent years depending upon the enhancement of chlorophyll concentrations and the discharges along the coast and dynamics of the sea surface temperature. The frequency of harmful algal blooms is higher in the northern California compared to southern California. The anthropogenic activities along the coast have increased which are associated with the forest fires and long range transport of dusts from Asia. The aerosol optical depth derived from satellite data during summer months seems to play an important role in the frequency of harmful algal blooms.

  10. Effect of macrophyte community composition and nutrient enrichment on plant biomass and algal blooms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, E.S.; Van Donk, E.; Declerck, S.A.J.; Helmsing, N.R.; Hidding, B.; Nolet, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Submerged freshwater macrophytes decline with increasing eutrophication. This has consequences for ecosystem processes in shallow lakes and ponds as macrophytes can reduce algal blooms under eutrophic conditions. We hypothesize that the productivity of submerged vegetation, biomass change under eutr

  11. Status, Alert System, and Prediction of Cyanobacterial Bloom in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacterial genera pose a major ecological problem due to their ability to produce toxins and other bioactive compounds, which can have important implications in illnesses of humans and livestock. Cyanobacteria such as Microcystis, Anabaena, Oscillatoria, Phormidium, and Aphanizomenon species producing microcystins and anatoxin-a have been predominantly documented from most South Korean lakes and reservoirs. With the increase in frequency of such blooms, various monitoring approaches, treatment processes, and prediction models have been developed in due course. In this paper we review the field studies and current knowledge on toxin producing cyanobacterial species and ecological variables that regulate toxin production and bloom formation in major rivers (Han, Geum, Nakdong, and Yeongsan and reservoirs in South Korea. In addition, development of new, fast, and high-throughput techniques for effective monitoring is also discussed with cyanobacterial bloom advisory practices, current management strategies, and their implications in South Korean freshwater bodies.

  12. Effect of monsoonal perturbations on the occurrence of phytoplankton blooms in a tropical bay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    In this study, the influence of intraseasonal variations in rainfall and the resultant freshwater flux (monsoon perturbations) on phytoplankton bloom dynamics were evaluated by quantifying live phytoplankton at a fixed station (Dona Paula Bay, west...

  13. Influence of northeasterly trade winds on intensity of winter bloom in the northern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dwivedi, R.M.; Raman, M.; Parab, S.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Nayak, S.

    Chlorophyll and wind pattern retrieved from remote sensing data have been used to study biological activity in the oceanic waters of Northern Arabian Sea (NAS) during February–March 2002–05. Occurrence of algal bloom in these waters during...

  14. Effect of microstructure on the impact toughness of a bainitic steel bloom for large plastic molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Wu, Xiao-chun; Zhou, Quan; Duan, Li-li

    2015-08-01

    The correlation between the impact toughness and microstructural characteristics of a large bainitic steel bloom has been investigated. The study focuses on microcrack nucleation and propagation in the basic cleavage plane. To analyze the phase transformation during the wind-cooling process, the temperature field of the bloom was acquired by computer simulation, and a continuous cooling transformation experiment was conducted. The results show that compared with the surface of the bloom, the toughness of the bloom's core is decreased by the increase in proeutectoid ferrite and the coarsening of tempered martensite-austenite constituents. The proeutectoid ferrite decreases the toughness via its effects on carbide precipitation, the formation of martensite-austenite constituents, and the bainite transformation. The relatively large tempered martensite-austenite constituents are conducive to microcrack nucleation and propagation.

  15. Study of Under-ice Blooms In the Chukchi Ecosystem (SUBICE) (HLY1401, EM122)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The primary objectives of SUBICE were to determine the spatial distribution of large under-ice phytoplankton blooms on the Chukchi Shelf and the physical mechanisms...

  16. Satellite Remote Sensing of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs and a Potential Synthesized Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xulin Guo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms (HABs are severe ecological disasters threatening aquatic systems throughout the World, which necessitate scientific efforts in detecting and monitoring them. Compared with traditional in situ point observations, satellite remote sensing is considered as a promising technique for studying HABs due to its advantages of large-scale, real-time, and long-term monitoring. The present review summarizes the suitability of current satellite data sources and different algorithms for detecting HABs. It also discusses the spatial scale issue of HABs. Based on the major problems identified from previous literature, including the unsystematic understanding of HABs, the insufficient incorporation of satellite remote sensing, and a lack of multiple oceanographic explanations of the mechanisms causing HABs, this review also attempts to provide a comprehensive understanding of the complicated mechanism of HABs impacted by multiple oceanographic factors. A potential synthesized framework can be established by combining multiple accessible satellite remote sensing approaches including visual interpretation, spectra analysis, parameters retrieval and spatial-temporal pattern analysis. This framework aims to lead to a systematic and comprehensive monitoring of HABs based on satellite remote sensing from multiple oceanographic perspectives.

  17. Satellite remote sensing of harmful algal blooms (HABs) and a potential synthesized framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Xu, Huiping; Guo, Xulin

    2012-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are severe ecological disasters threatening aquatic systems throughout the World, which necessitate scientific efforts in detecting and monitoring them. Compared with traditional in situ point observations, satellite remote sensing is considered as a promising technique for studying HABs due to its advantages of large-scale, real-time, and long-term monitoring. The present review summarizes the suitability of current satellite data sources and different algorithms for detecting HABs. It also discusses the spatial scale issue of HABs. Based on the major problems identified from previous literature, including the unsystematic understanding of HABs, the insufficient incorporation of satellite remote sensing, and a lack of multiple oceanographic explanations of the mechanisms causing HABs, this review also attempts to provide a comprehensive understanding of the complicated mechanism of HABs impacted by multiple oceanographic factors. A potential synthesized framework can be established by combining multiple accessible satellite remote sensing approaches including visual interpretation, spectra analysis, parameters retrieval and spatial-temporal pattern analysis. This framework aims to lead to a systematic and comprehensive monitoring of HABs based on satellite remote sensing from multiple oceanographic perspectives. PMID:22969372

  18. Flawed citation practices facilitate the unsubstantiated perception of a global trend toward increased jellyfish blooms

    KAUST Repository

    Sanz-Martín, Marina

    2016-06-24

    Speculation over a global rise in jellyfish populations has become widespread in the scientific literature, but until recently the purported ‘global increase’ had not been tested. Here we present a citation analysis of peer-reviewed literature to track the evolution of the current perception of increases in jellyfish and identify key papers involved in its establishment. Trend statements and citation threads were reviewed and arranged in a citation network. Trend statements were assessed according their degree of affirmation and spatial scale, and the appropriateness of the citations used to support statements was assessed. Analyses showed that 48.9% of publications misinterpreted the conclusions of cited sources, with a bias towards claiming jellyfish populations are increasing, with a single review having the most influence on the network. Collectively, these disparities resulted in a network based on unsubstantiated statements and citation threads. As a community, we must ensure our statements about scientific findings in general are accurately substantiated and carefully communicated such that incorrect perceptions, as in the case of jellyfish blooms, do not develop in the absence of rigorous testing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  19. How hydrodynamics control algal blooms in the Ythan estuary, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champangern, Khruewan; Hoey, Trevor; Thomas, Rhian

    2016-04-01

    The Ythan estuary, northeast Scotland, was designated in 2000 as a Nitrate Vulnerable Zone (NVZ) under the European Commission (EC) Nitrates Directive. Much of the catchment is intensively farmed and water quality has been adversely affected by nutrients from agricultural fertilizers. As a result, algal mats develop annually on tidal flats where sediment from upstream and from the adjacent dune systems is deposited. Understanding the patterns of water (river and ocean) circulation in the estuary as well as understanding how nutrients and sediments are transported in the estuary is crucial for understanding the role of several factors (elevation; sediment characteristics; nutrient flux) control the locations and scale of annual algal blooms. In order to understand those controls, study of interactions between hydrodynamic factors and water quality, in particular chlorophyll levels, at different time scales has been carried out. The results from the study reveal complex seasonal and event-scale relationships of river flow with the amount of chlorophyll, which provide an initial comprehension of controls over the concentrations of chlorophyll in the estuary. The concentration of chlorophyll changes, whether increasing or decreasing, with regards to changes in river flow. During high flow events, high amounts of chlorophyll are found when the tide is low. During low flow events, high amounts of chlorophyll are found at high tides. These phenomena reveal that both river flow and tidal cycle affect the amount of chlorophyll in the estuary. In addition, the Delft3d flow model, which has been extensively applied to many coastal and estuarine studies is used to simulate hydrodynamic patterns in the estuary during high flow and low flow events. The model is composed of 36,450 fine resolution grids and the upstream/ downstream boundary that represents water level is based on time-series data from river flow and tidal measurements. The bathymetry used for the model domain is

  20. Integrating phylogeny, geographic niche partitioning, and secondary metabolite synthesis in bloom-forming Planktothrix

    OpenAIRE

    Kurmayer, Rainer; Blom, Judith F.; Deng, Li; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Toxic freshwater cyanobacteria form harmful algal blooms that can cause acute toxicity to humans and livestock. Globally distributed, bloom-forming cyanobacteria Planktothrix either retain or lose the mcy gene cluster (encoding the synthesis of the secondary metabolite hepatotoxin microcystin or MC), resulting in a variable spatial/temporal distribution of (non)toxic genotypes. Despite their importance to human well-being, such genotype diversity is not being mapped at scales relevant to natu...

  1. Initiation of winter phytoplankton blooms within the Gironde plume waters in the Bay of Biscay

    OpenAIRE

    Labry, Claire; Herbland, Alain; Delmas, Daniel; Laborde, P.; Lazure, Pascal; Froidefond, J; Jegou, Anne-marie; Sautour, B.

    2001-01-01

    Thermostratification and seasonal Light increase are generally considered the first causes of phytoplankton spring blooms in temperate waters. The objective of this study is to confirm the existence of winter phytoplankton blooms, responsible for the early exhaustion of phosphate, within the Gironde plume waters (southeast Bay of Biscay), and to understand what may initiate them so early. Two cruises, BIOMET 2 and BIOMET 3, were carried out respectively in early (8 to 21 January) and late win...

  2. Sustaining recreational quality of European lakes: minimizing the health risks from algal blooms through phosphorus control

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Laurence; McDonald, Claire; de Hoyos, Caridad; Mischke, U.; Phillips, Geoff; Borics, Gabor; Poikane, Sandra; Skjelbred, B.; Lyche Solheim, Anne; Van Wichelen, Jeroen; CARDOSO Ana

    2012-01-01

    A safe, clean water supply is critical for sustaining many important ecosystem services provided by freshwaters. The development of cyanobacterial blooms in lakes and reservoirs has a major impact on the provision of these services, particularly limiting their use for recreation and water supply for drinking and spray irrigation. Nutrient enrichment is thought to be the most important pressure responsible for the widespread increase in cyanobacterial blooms in recent decades. Quantifying how ...

  3. How rising CO2 and global warming may stimulate harmful cyanobacterial blooms

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, P. M.; Verspagen, J.M.H.; Sandrini, G; Stal, L.J.; Matthijs, H.C.P.; Davis, T. W.; Pearl, H.W.; Huisman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is likely to stimulate the development of harmful cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic waters, with negative consequences for water quality of many lakes, reservoirs and brackish ecosystems across the globe. In addition to effects of temperature and eutrophication, recent research has shed new light on the possible implications of rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Depletion of dissolved CO2 by dense cyanobacterial blooms creates a concentration gradient across the air–water ...

  4. Occurrence of toxic cyano bacterial blooms for the first time in Lake Karaoun, Lebanon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing occurrence of cyanobacterial bloom in freshwaters worldwide is of great importance because of public health risks. In addition, they are very likely to have negative impact on ecological and economic aspects. In this study, the seasonal succession of phytoplankton population in Lake Karaoun in Lebanon was monitored from May 2009 to June 2011. The physicochemical parameters of lake water were then monitored for 1 year, from June 2010 until June 2011, to correlate the physicochemical parameters with the phytoplankton population in the lake. Our results showed, for the first time in Lebanon, that the eutrophied Lake Karaoun has been under the invasion of toxic cyanobacterial blooms since May 2009. The cyanobacterial bloom was persistent from late spring (May) until late fall (December) for 2 consecutive years. The high water temperature in the summer season is the main factor that has been affecting the growth of the cyanobacteria. The most frequently encountered bloom-forming species were Microcystis aeruginosa and Aphanizomenon ovalisporum, which were either present individually or coexistent. The obtained results showed that during the period of cyanobacterial bloom, a deterioration of water quality defined by low levels of dissolved oxygen, total dissolved solids, and electric conductivity was reported. During cyanobacterial bloom period, the concentration of the orthophosphate-P (PO4-P) was very minimal. The measured high value of chlorophyll-a concentration during cyanobacterial bloom period (48.6 mg/L) was attributed to high photosynthetic activity. Cyanobacterial blooms can cause a variety of water-quality problems in Lake Karaoun in addition to human health risk. (author)

  5. Phytoplankton dynamics in contrasting early stage North Atlantic spring blooms: composition, succession, and potential drivers

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, C.J.; Poulton, A. J.; Esposito, M; Paulsen, M. L.; Bellerby, R; M St John; Martin, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    The spring bloom is a key annual event in the phenology of pelagic ecosystems, making a major contribution to the oceanic biological carbon pump through the production and export of organic carbon. However, there is little consensus as to the main drivers of spring bloom formation, exacerbated by a lack of in situ observations of the phytoplankton community composition and its evolution during this critical period. We investigated the dynamics of the phytoplankton...

  6. Dinoflagellate Bloom of Karenia mikimotoi along the Southeast Arabian Sea, Bordering Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Robin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A harmful algal bloom (HAB occurred along the southeast Arabian Sea, bordering Western India, during September to November 2004. This bloom was unique in the region in terms of its large spatial extent, and the trend was weakened towards November. Mass mortality of fish, emanation of noxious odour, and respiratory problems among the children on the coastal stretch were noticed. The phytoplankton species Gymnodiniium, class Dinophyceae bloom accounted for 98% of the standing crop. The bloom Karenia mikimotoi showed a maximum density of 19.37×104 cells L−1 and 18.94×104 cells L−1 at nearshore and offshore, respectively. The remotely sensed chlorophyll a (Chl a data from seaWiFS, sea surface temperature (SST from advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR, rainfall from tropical rainfall measuring Mission (TRMM, and Sea winds from QuickSCAT reflected the bloom due to Karenia mikimotoi, suggesting the advection process at the coastal waters. The release of toxins specifically the neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP and azaspiracid shellfish poisoning (AZP from the bloom was assessed by chemical and mouse bioassay of the extract from mussel Perna indica, showing negative results. These indicate that asphyxiation and abnormal mucus secreted by the K. mikimotoi led to clogging of gills that accentuated the mass fish kills.

  7. Diversity and dynamics of a widespread bloom of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdner, Deana L; Richlen, Mindy; McCauley, Linda A R; Anderson, Donald M

    2011-01-01

    Historically, cosmopolitan phytoplankton species were presumed to represent largely unstructured populations. However, the recent development of molecular tools to examine genetic diversity have revealed differences in phytoplankton taxa across geographic scales and provided insight into the physiology and ecology of blooms. Here we describe the genetic analysis of an extensive bloom of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense that occurred in the Gulf of Maine in 2005. This bloom was notable for its intensity and duration, covering hundreds of kilometers and persisting for almost two months. Genotypic analyses based on microsatellite marker data indicate that the open waters of the northeastern U.S. harbor a single regional population of A. fundyense comprising two genetically distinct sub-populations. These subpopulations were characteristic of early- and late-bloom samples and were derived from the northern and southern areas of the bloom, respectively. The temporal changes observed during this study provide clear evidence of succession during a continuous bloom and show that selection can act on the timescale of weeks to significantly alter the representation of genotypes within a population. The effects of selection on population composition and turnover would be magnified if sexual reproduction were likewise influenced by environmental conditions. We hypothesize that the combined effects of differential growth and reproduction rates serves to reduce gene flow between the sub-populations, reinforcing population structure while maintaining the diversity of the overall regional population. PMID:21829565

  8. Algicidal bacteria in the sea and their impact on algal blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayali, Xavier; Azam, Farooq

    2004-01-01

    Over the past two decades, many reports have revealed the existence of bacteria capable of killing phytoplankton. These algicidal bacteria sometimes increase in abundance concurrently with the decline of algal blooms, suggesting that they may affect algal bloom dynamics. Here, we synthesize the existing knowledge on algicidal bacteria interactions with marine eukaryotic microalgae. We discuss the effectiveness of the current methods to characterize the algicidal phenotype in an ecosystem context. We briefly consider the literature on the phylogenetic identification of algicidal bacteria, their interaction with their algal prey, the characterization of algicidal molecules, and the enumeration of algicidal bacteria during algal blooms. We conclude that, due to limitations of current methods, the evidence for algicidal bacteria causing algal bloom decline is circumstantial. New methods and an ecosystem approach are needed to test hypotheses on the impact of algicidal bacteria in algal bloom dynamics. This will require enlarging the scope of inquiry from its current focus on the potential utility of algicidal bacteria in the control of harmful algal blooms. We suggest conceptualizing bacterial algicidy within the general problem of bacterial regulation of algal community structure in the ocean. PMID:15134248

  9. Assessment of microcystis bloom toxicity associated with wildlife mortality in the Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masango, Mxolisi G; Myburgh, Jan G; Labuschagne, Leonie; Govender, Danny; Bengis, Roy G; Naicker, Dharmarai

    2010-01-01

    Based on previous necropsy results, Microcystis blooms in constructed water impoundments in the Kruger National Park (KNP) have been identified as a cause of wildlife mortality. In response to wildlife mortality during 2007, water samples, containing algal bloom material, were collected during February 2007 and July 2007 from four dams (Nhlanganzwani, Mpanamana, Makhohlola, and Sunset) in the southeastern part of the KNP as part of the follow-up investigation. The toxicity of the Microcystis blooms was determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), protein phosphatase inhibition (PPI) assay, mouse bioassay, and African sharptooth catfish (Clarias gariepinus) primary hepatocytes. Both the ELISA and PPI assays indicated that the water sample collected during February 2007 from the Nhlanganzwani Dam, and samples collected from the Nhlanganzwani and Sunset dams in June 2007, were toxic. These dams, exhibiting the toxic Microcystis blooms, were also associated with the wildlife mortality. Mice injected intraperitoneally with water samples from Nhlanganzwani Dam (February 2007) induced hepatotoxicity and mortality within 1 hr. Primary hepatocytes from the sharptooth catfish exposed to samples from these dams gave similar results. This laboratory investigation and results strongly incriminate the toxic Microcystis blooms as the cause of the wildlife mortality. Eutrophication and bloom formation appear to have been the consequence of the high numbers of hippopotami (Hippopotamus amphibius) in specific dams.

  10. Diversity and dynamics of a widespread bloom of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deana L Erdner

    Full Text Available Historically, cosmopolitan phytoplankton species were presumed to represent largely unstructured populations. However, the recent development of molecular tools to examine genetic diversity have revealed differences in phytoplankton taxa across geographic scales and provided insight into the physiology and ecology of blooms. Here we describe the genetic analysis of an extensive bloom of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense that occurred in the Gulf of Maine in 2005. This bloom was notable for its intensity and duration, covering hundreds of kilometers and persisting for almost two months. Genotypic analyses based on microsatellite marker data indicate that the open waters of the northeastern U.S. harbor a single regional population of A. fundyense comprising two genetically distinct sub-populations. These subpopulations were characteristic of early- and late-bloom samples and were derived from the northern and southern areas of the bloom, respectively. The temporal changes observed during this study provide clear evidence of succession during a continuous bloom and show that selection can act on the timescale of weeks to significantly alter the representation of genotypes within a population. The effects of selection on population composition and turnover would be magnified if sexual reproduction were likewise influenced by environmental conditions. We hypothesize that the combined effects of differential growth and reproduction rates serves to reduce gene flow between the sub-populations, reinforcing population structure while maintaining the diversity of the overall regional population.

  11. Potentially harmful microalgae and algal blooms in a eutrophic estuary in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. TAS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of potentially harmful microalgae and algal blooms were investigated at monthly and weekly time scales between October 2009 and September 2010 in the Golden Horn, a eutrophic estuary in the Sea of Marmara (Turkey. Several physical and chemical parameters were analysed together with phytoplankton composition and abundance. A total number of 23 potentially harmful and/or bloom-forming microalgae (14 dinoflagellates, 4 diatoms and 5 phytoflagellates were identified throughout this study period, of which nine taxa have been confirmed to be toxic elsewhere in the world. Most harmful species and algal blooms were observed in late spring and summer particularly in the middle and upper estuaries, and nine taxa formed dense and successive algal blooms causing water discoloration. Nutrient concentrations increased significantly from the lower to the upper estuary. Additionally, high organic matter loads in the upper estuary could also have benefited by mixotrophic species. The increasing number of potentially harmful and bloom-forming species and algal blooms indicated that the GHE is a potential risk area for future HABs. 

  12. Off-flavor compounds from decaying cyanobacterial blooms of Lake Taihu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhimei Ma; Yuan Niu; Ping Xie; Jun Chen; Min Tao; Xuwei Deng

    2013-01-01

    The effect of cyanobacterial bloom decay on water quality and the complete degradation of cyanobacterial blooms in a short period were examined by an enclosure experiment in Gonghu Bay of Lake Taihu,China.Water quality parameters as well as taste and odor compounds during the breakdown of cyanobacterial blooms were measured.Results showed that the decay of cyanobacterial blooms caused anoxic water conditions,decreased pH,and increased nutrient loading to the lake water.The highest concentrations of dimethyl sulfide (DMS),dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS),and β-cyclocitral were observed in the anoxic water,at 62331.8,12413.3,and 1374.9 ng/L,respectively.2-Methylisoborneol was dominant during the live growth phase of cyanobacterial blooms,whereas DMS and DMTS were dominant during the decomposition phase.Dissolved oxygen,pH,and chlorophyll a were negatively correlated with DMS,DMTS,and β-cyclocitral,whereas total phosphorus,total nitrogen,and ammonium (NH4+-N) were positively correlated with DMS,DMTS,β-cyclocitral,and β-ionone.The experimental results suggested that preventing the anaerobic decomposition of cyanobactedal blooms is an important strategy against the recurrence of a malodor crisis in Lake Taihu.

  13. Maintenance of clonal diversity during a spring bloom of the centric diatom Ditylum brightwellii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynearson, Tatiana A; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2005-05-01

    Maintenance of genetic diversity in eukaryotic microbes reflects a synergism between reproductive mode (asexual vs. sexual) and environmental conditions. We determined clonal diversity in field samples of the planktonic marine diatom, Ditylum brightwellii, during a bloom, when cell number increased by seven-fold because of rapid asexual division. The genotypes at three microsatellite loci were determined for 607 individual cell lines isolated during the 11 days of sampling. Genetic diversity remained high during the bloom and 87% of the cells sampled each day were genetically distinct. Sixty-nine clonal lineages were sampled two or more times during the bloom, and two clones were sampled seven times. Based on the frequency of resampled clonal lineages, capture-recapture statistics were used to determine that at least 2400 genetically distinct clonal lineages comprised the bloom population. No significant differences in microsatellite allele frequencies were observed among daily samples indicating that the bloom was comprised of a single population. No sexual stages were observed, although linkage equilibrium at two loci, high levels of allelic and genotypic diversity, and heterozygote deficiencies were all indicative of past sexual reproduction events. At the height of the bloom, a windstorm diluted cell numbers by 51% and coincided with a change in the frequency distribution of some resampled lineages. The extensive clonal diversity generated through past sexual reproduction events coupled with frequent environmental changes appear to prevent individual clonal lineages from becoming numerically dominant, maintaining genetic diversity and the adaptive potential of the population. PMID:15836638

  14. Copepod Behavior in ``Cryptic Blooms'' of Toxic Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, A. C.; Webster, D. R.; Weissburg, M. J.; Yen, J.

    2014-11-01

    Copepods,Acartia tonsa and Temora longicornis, were exposed to thin layers of exudates from the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (1 - 10,000 cells/mL) (i.e. models of ``cryptic blooms'' of toxic phytoplankton). Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to quantify the spatiotemporal structure of the layer allowing for correlation of behavioral responses with toxin levels. Both species explicitly avoided the exudate layer and the vicinity of the layer. Measures of path kinematics (swimming speed, turn frequency) by location (in-layer vs. out-of-layer) and exposure (pre-contact vs. post-contact) revealed some similarities, but also significant differences, in trends for each species. A. tonsa significantly increases swimming speed and swimming speed variability in the exudate layer and post-contact, whereas T. longicornis slightly increases both in-layer and slightly reduces both post-contact. Both species increase turn frequency in-layer and post-contact with increasing K. brevis exudate concentration. Path fracticality indicates that A. tonsatrajectories became more diffuse/sinuous and T. longicornis trajectories became more linear/ballistic (trending effects). Regression analyses revealed that the rate of change of behavior with increasing exudate concentration for A. tonsa was thrice to fifty times that of T. longicornis. Toxic K. brevis can essentially eliminate top-down grazer control ,another sinister means by which it gains a competitive advantage over the local phytoplankton taxa.

  15. Thermomechanical Behavior in Continuous Bloom Casting with Different Mold Tapers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Xin; CHEN Yong; SHEN Houfa

    2008-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite element model was used to analyze the thermal and mechanical behavior dunng solidification of the strand in a continuous bloom casting mold.The coupled heat transfer and defermation were analyzed to simulate the formation of the air gap between the mold and the strand.The model was used to investigate the influence of mold taper on the temperature and stress distributions in the strand.The results show that the air gap mainly forms around the strand corner,causing a hoRer and thinner solidifying shell in this region.The mold taper partially compensates for the strand shell shnnkage and reduces the infiuence of the air gap on the heat transfer.The mold taper compresses the shell and changes the stress state around the stmnd comer region.As the strand moves down into the mold,the mold constraint causes compressive stress beneath the comer surface.which reduces the hot tear that forms on the strand.

  16. Recurrent jellyfish blooms are a consequence of global oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, Robert H; Duarte, Carlos M; Pitt, Kylie A; Robinson, Kelly L; Lucas, Cathy H; Sutherland, Kelly R; Mianzan, Hermes W; Bogeberg, Molly; Purcell, Jennifer E; Decker, Mary Beth; Uye, Shin-ichi; Madin, Laurence P; Brodeur, Richard D; Haddock, Steven H D; Malej, Alenka; Parry, Gregory D; Eriksen, Elena; Quiñones, Javier; Acha, Marcelo; Harvey, Michel; Arthur, James M; Graham, William M

    2013-01-15

    A perceived recent increase in global jellyfish abundance has been portrayed as a symptom of degraded oceans. This perception is based primarily on a few case studies and anecdotal evidence, but a formal analysis of global temporal trends in jellyfish populations has been missing. Here, we analyze all available long-term datasets on changes in jellyfish abundance across multiple coastal stations, using linear and logistic mixed models and effect-size analysis to show that there is no robust evidence for a global increase in jellyfish. Although there has been a small linear increase in jellyfish since the 1970s, this trend was unsubstantiated by effect-size analysis that showed no difference in the proportion of increasing vs. decreasing jellyfish populations over all time periods examined. Rather, the strongest nonrandom trend indicated jellyfish populations undergo larger, worldwide oscillations with an approximate 20-y periodicity, including a rising phase during the 1990s that contributed to the perception of a global increase in jellyfish abundance. Sustained monitoring is required over the next decade to elucidate with statistical confidence whether the weak increasing linear trend in jellyfish after 1970 is an actual shift in the baseline or part of an oscillation. Irrespective of the nature of increase, given the potential damage posed by jellyfish blooms to fisheries, tourism, and other human industries, our findings foretell recurrent phases of rise and fall in jellyfish populations that society should be prepared to face. PMID:23277544

  17. Discordant connections

    OpenAIRE

    Arora-Jonsson, Seema

    2009-01-01

    The importance of gender-equality and of women’s work in relation to the environment are considered to be crucial questions for development in ‘third world’ rural societies. ‘Development’ and a certain standard of welfare make these issues appear to be less urgent in a wealthier country like Sweden. In this paper I trace some of the contradictions and connections in the ways in which gender equality is conceptualised in women’s struggles vis á vis environmental issues in rural areas in Swede...

  18. Experimental studies on the role of planktivorous fishes in the elimination of Microcystis bloom from Donghu Lake using enclosure method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ping

    1996-09-01

    The hypertrophic subtropic Donghu Lake's dense water bloom (of mainly Microcystis, Anabaena and Oscillatoria) that occurred annually from the beginning of the 1970s, has disappeared since 1985. The influence of planktivorous fishes (silver and bighead carps) on the water bloom was studied for three years using the enclosure method. The enclosures stocked densely with bighead and/or silver carp were free of water bloom during the experimental period. The water bloom that appeared in the fish-free enclosures was completely eliminated in 10 20 days by introduction of silver and/or bighead carp(grass carp was not effective in controlling water bloom). This study showed clearly that grazing pressure by planktivorous fishes is a key factor in eliminating water bloom from the lake.

  19. Modelling green macroalgal blooms on the coasts of Brittany, France to enhance water quality management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, Thierry; Rossi, Nadège; Ménesguen, Alain; Dumas, Franck

    2014-04-01

    First recorded in the 1970s, massive green macroalgal blooms have since become an annual recurrence in Brittany, France. Eutrophication (in particular to anthropogenic nitrogen input) has been identified as the main factor controlling Ulva ‘green tide' events. In this study, we modelled Ulva proliferation using a two-dimensional model by coupling hydrodynamic and biological models (coined ‘MARS-Ulves') for five sites along the Brittany coastline (La Fresnaye Bay, Saint-Brieuc Bay, Lannion Bay, Guissény Bay and Douarnenez Bay). Calibration of the biological model was mainly based on the seasonal variation of the maximum nitrogen uptake rate (VmaxN) and the half-saturation constant for nitrogen (KN) to reproduce the internal nutrient quotas measured in situ for each site. In each bay, model predictions were in agreement with observed algal coverage converted into biomass. A numerical tracking method was implemented to identify the contribution of the rivers that empty into the study bays, and scenarios of decreases in nitrate concentration in rivers were simulated. Results from numerical nitrogen tracking highlighted the main nitrogen sources of green tides and also showed that each river contributes locally to green tides. In addition, dynamic modelling showed that the nitrate concentrations in rivers must be limited to between 5 and 15 mg l- 1, depending on the bay, to reduce Ulva biomass by half on the coasts. The three-step methodology developed in this study (analysing total dissolved inorganic nitrogen flux from rivers, tracking nitrogen sources in Ulva and developing scenarios for reducing nitrogen) provides qualitative and quantitative guidelines for stakeholders to define specific nitrogen reduction targets for better environmental management of water quality.

  20. Research on the Z-Source Inverter Grid-Connected Control of Micro-Grid System Based on Differential Geometry%基于微分几何的微网Z源逆变器并网控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈艳; 周林; 雷建; 甘元兴

    2012-01-01

    针对应用于微网系统中的Z源逆变器及其并网控制研究,以光伏系统为例,根据Z源变换器本身具有的非线性特性,建立Z源逆变器直流链及逆变侧的仿射非线性模型,利用微分几何基本工具,构造恰当的坐标变换和预反馈,将原非线性系统精确线性化,然后对该系统进行线性最优控制器设计。该逆变器集最大功率点跟踪、升降压和并网发电等功能于一体。仿真及实验表明:当光伏电池在输入条件发生变化时,本文控制方法能够使Z源逆变器直流链快速稳定无超调地跟踪最大功率点,逆变侧输出的三相电压能够实现快速平稳过渡并改善并网电流畸变。%For the Z-source inverter used in the distributed generation system and its grid-connected control,the paper takes the photovoltaic system as the example.According to the nonlinear characteristic of Z-source inverter,the affine model of Z-source inverter DC-link and AC side are created.Based on the differential geometry,the proper coordinate transformation and pre-feedback are constructed,and the original nonlinear system is exact linearized,then designed linear optimal controller for the system.The inverter integrates three functions including maximum power point tracking(MPPT),step-up/down DC-side voltage and output grid-connected.The simulation and experiment are performed to validate the strategies: when input condition of the photovoltaic array changes,this method has better performance than PI control.

  1. 基于Bloom filter引擎的分布式网络取证系统%Distributed network forensics system based on Bloom filter engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵骞; 崔益民; 邹涛

    2009-01-01

    针对目前网络取证的特点和技术挑战,提出和设计了一种基于Bloom filter引擎的分布式网络取证系统.该系统以Bloom filter引擎为核心,能够实时的对网络原始数据进行过滤,映射压缩和存储,捕获完整的证据,节省存储空间,有效支持网络取证的事后分析查询.%Aiming at technical challenges of network forensics at present,a distributed network forensics system based on the Bloom filter engine was proposed and designed.The system with the Bloom filter engine as the core can filtrate,memory-map raw network data for compression,capture complete evidence,save storage space,and help with post-event investigation of network forensics.

  2. How to estimate costs from harmful algal blooms : economic impacts on wild fisheries, aquaculture and commercial tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Lorentzen, Torbjørn; Pettersson, Lasse H.

    2005-01-01

    The background for the analysis is the increased registration of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in different sea areas world wide. The frequency of algae blooms in for example Skagerrak and along the coast of Norway is relatively high. There exist about 4000 algae species, and the micro organisms play normally an important role in the ecosystem. But under certain conditions the algal can bloom and be harmful for other species and inflict economic losses. The report is addressed to methodological...

  3. Can LANDSAT be used to catalog historical freshwater harmful algal blooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J. C.; Michalak, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Blooms of toxic algae are becoming increasingly common in freshwater lakes globally, progressively impacting human and ecosystem health in more locales around the world. Despite this growing footprint of harmful algal blooms (HABs), however, there still exist few quantitative tools for monitoring the temporal and spatial progression of HABs in individual lakes, a prerequisite for documenting and understanding their global increase. Past efforts using MODIS and MERIS to monitor blooms have been limited to studying the subset of blooms that have occurred since those instruments began collecting data (1999 and 2002, respectively) and MERIS imagery in particular is not freely available. In contrast, LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery is available with data starting from 1982 and is freely accessible. Therefore, if LANDSAT could be used to identify blooms, then this would be advantageous for future monitoring and research. In this work, we assess the use of LANDSAT TM for identifying the presence, spatial extent, and timing of HABs. We do this by comparing LANDSAT-generated maps of phycocyanin content in Lake Erie with literature reports of harmful algal blooms and MERIS-generated maps of cyanobacteria. Lake Erie is used as the case study because its HABs have been extensively documented in the scientific literature. Maps are generated using a linear combination of spectral ratios tested previously for Lake Erie, using the Google Earth Engine platform for data processing. We further assess the effectiveness of LANDSAT TM for identifying HABs in other bloom-impacted freshwater lakes around the world. Most of the previous work using remote sensing to identify freshwater HABs has focused on individual remote sensing platforms and individual lakes; this work contributes to knowledge by comparing across platforms and water bodies. This assessment will improve understanding of the challenges of monitoring freshwater HABs, and will contribute to the development of effective

  4. Concentration and dispersal of a Pseudo-nitzschia bloom in Penn Cove, Washington, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, V L; Adams, N G; Bill, B D; Anulacion, B F; Wekell, J C

    1998-01-01

    A bloom of the pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia, several species of which are associated with the production of the potent excitotoxin domoic acid, was observed in a Puget Sound, Washington embayment in July and August of 1997. Penn Cove, which receives nutrients from the nearby Skagit River and abundant sunshine during summer months due to its location in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains, is the home of a commercial mussel farm which supplies shellfish to many coastal areas of the USA. Levels of domoic acid in mussels increased to 3 ppm on 6 and 10 July, corresponding to the observation of a brown algal bloom in Penn Cove. Four species of Pseudo-nitzschia (P. pungens, P. multiseries, P. australis, and P. pseudodelicatissima) were present in our samples from the cove, corresponding to levels of domoic acid in seawater ranging from 0.1-0.8 mirog l(-1) as measured by a receptor binding assay. The highest Pseudo-nitzschia concentration during the time of our sampling was 13 million cells per liter on 28 July. The bloom of Pseudo-nitzschia occurred after a period of strong discharge from the Skagit River and rain accompanied by elevated south and southeasterly winds. Stratification of the cove, providing optimal bloom conditions, was facilitated by weak winds, sunshine, and a freshwater lens at the mouth of the cove. The position of the Pseudo-nitzschia bloom was influenced by buoyancy fronts caused by exchange of water within the cove with that of Saratoga Passage. The decay of this bloom in Penn Cove was accompanied by decreasing nitrate levels at all measured depths. These and future observations aid in the development of a model for prediction of toxic bloom events in the shallow embayments of Puget Sound. PMID:10223627

  5. Pigment characterization for the 2011 bloom in Qinhuangdao implicated "brown tide" events in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Fanzhou; YU Rencheng; ZHANG Qingchun; YAN Tian; ZHOU Mingjiang

    2012-01-01

    A large-scale bloom occurred from May to June in 2011 in sea area near Qinhuangdao of the Bohai Sea,leading to huge damage of the scallop culture industry.Similar blooms have been observed in this region for three years.The causative species of the bloom,which dominated the phytoplankton community with the maximum cell density around 109 cell/L,could not be identified with morphological features due to the small cell size (~2 μm).A pigment analytical method was then adopted to analyze the pigment profile of the phytoplankton samples collected from the blooming sea area.It was found that pico-sized (<2 μm),nano-sized (2-20 μm),and bulk phytoplankton samples had similar pigment profile,representing the pigment signature of the bloom-causative species.The major pigments detected included 19-butanoyloxyfucoxanthin (But-fuco),fucoxanthin (Fuco),diadinoxanthin (Diad) and chlorophyll a (Chl a),and high content of But-fuco was the most significant characteristics of the phytoplankton samples.Based on the pigment composition and content,the bloom-causative species could be tentatively identified as pelagophyte,"type 8" group of haptophyte,or silicoflagellate.Some unique features of the bloom,such as the extremely high cell density,small-sized and But-fuco containing cells,occurring in early summer,and the feeding-cessation effects on scallops,suggest it be a "brown tide" event similar to those reported in the east coast of the United States of America.The recurrent "brown tide" events and their dramatic impacts on the shellfish mariculture industry in Qinhuangdao need close attention in the coming years.

  6. A niche model to predict Microcystis bloom decline in Chaohu Lake, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhicong; LI Zhongjie; LI Dunhai

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms occur frequently in lakes due to eutrophication.Although a number of models have been proposed to forecast algal blooms,a good and applicable method is still lacking.This study explored a simple and effective mathematical-ecological model to evaluate the growth status and predict the population dynamics of Microcystis blooms.In this study,phytoplankton were collected and identified from 8 sampling sites in Chaohu Lake every month from July to October,2010.The niche breadth and niche overlap of common species were calculated using standard equations,and the potential relative growth rates of Microcystis were calculated as a weighted-value of niche overlap.In July,the potential relative growth rate was 2.79 (a.u.,arbitrary units) but then rapidly declined in the following months to -3.99 a.u.in September.A significant correlation (R=0.998,P<0.01) was found in the model between the net-increase in biomass of Microcystis in the field and the predicted values calculated by the niche model,we concluded that the niche model is suitable for forecasting the dynamics of Microcystis blooms.Redundancy analysis indicated that decreases in water temperature,dissolved oxygen and total dissolved phosphorus might be major factors underlying bloom decline.Based on the theory of community succession being caused by resource competition,the growth and decline of blooms can be predicted from a community structure.This may provide a basis for early warning and control of algal blooms.

  7. Early spawning of Antarctic krill in the Scotia Sea is fuelled by “superfluous” feeding on non-ice associated phytoplankton blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Katrin; Atkinson, Angus; Venables, Hugh J.; Pond, David W.

    2012-01-01

    The spawning success of Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba) is generally assumed to depend on substantial winter sea ice extent, as ice biota can serve as a food source during winter/spring and the seasonal ice melt conditions the upper water column for extensive phytoplankton blooms. However, direct observations during spring are rare. Here we studied krill body condition and maturity stage in relation to feeding (i.e. stomach fullness, diet, absorption of individual fatty acids and defecation rate) across the Scotia Sea in November 2006. The phytoplankton concentrations were low at the marginal ice zone (MIZ) in the southern Scotia Sea (Stn. 1, 2, and 3), high in open waters of the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front (SACCF) in the central Scotia Sea (Stn. 5), and moderate further north (Stn. 6 and 7). Krill had low lipid reserves (˜6.5% of dry mass, DM), low mass:length ratios (˜1.7 mg DM mm -1), and small digestive glands (˜7% of total DM) near the ice edge. The stomachs contained lithogenic particles, diatom debris, and bacterial fatty acids, but low proportions of diatom-indicating fatty acids, which suggest that these krill were feeding on detritus rather than on fresh ice algae. In the SACCF, krill had higher lipid reserves (˜10% of DM), high mass:length ratios (˜2.2 mg DM mm -1), and large digestive glands (˜16% of total DM). Stomach content and tissue composition indicate feeding on diatoms. In the north, moderate food concentrations co-occurred with low lipid reserves in krill, and moderate mass:length ratios and digestive gland sizes. Only in the phytoplankton bloom in the SACCF had the mating season already started and some females were about to spawn. Based on the way krill processed their food at the different stations, we indicate two mechanisms that can lead to fast regeneration of body reserves and oocyte maturation in E. superba. One is "superfluous" feeding at high food concentrations, which maximises the overall nutrient gain

  8. Analysis of algal bloom risk with uncertainties in lakes by integrating self-organizing map and fuzzy information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiuwen; Rui, Han; Li, Weifeng; Zhang, Yanhui

    2014-06-01

    Algal blooms are a serious problem in waters, which damage aquatic ecosystems and threaten drinking water safety. However, the outbreak mechanism of algal blooms is very complex with great uncertainty, especially for large water bodies where environmental conditions have obvious variation in both space and time. This study developed an innovative method which integrated a self-organizing map (SOM) and fuzzy information diffusion theory to comprehensively analyze algal bloom risks with uncertainties. The Lake Taihu was taken as study case and the long-term (2004-2010) on-site monitoring data were used. The results showed that algal blooms in Taihu Lake were classified into four categories and exhibited obvious spatial-temporal patterns. The lake was mainly characterized by moderate bloom but had high uncertainty, whereas severe blooms with low uncertainty were observed in the northwest part of the lake. The study gives insight on the spatial-temporal dynamics of algal blooms, and should help government and decision-makers outline policies and practices on bloom monitoring and prevention. The developed method provides a promising approach to estimate algal bloom risks under uncertainties.

  9. Population dynamics of phytoplankton, heterotrophic bacteria, and viruses during the spring bloom in the western subarctic Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Koji; Kuwata, Akira; Yoshie, Naoki; Shibata, Akira; Kawanobe, Kyoko; Saito, Hiroaki

    2011-05-01

    We characterized the community composition of phytoplankton in the western subarctic Pacific from the pre-bloom to the decline phase of the spring bloom with special reference to decreases in the silicic acid concentration in surface waters as an index for diatom bloom development. Furthermore, responses of heterotrophic bacteria and viruses to the spring bloom were also concomitantly investigated. Under pre-bloom conditions when nutrients were abundant but the surface mixed layer depth was relatively deep, chlorophyll (Chl) a concentrations were consistently low and green algae (chlorophytes and prasinophytes), cryptophytes, and diatoms were predominant in the phytoplankton assemblages as estimated by algal pigment signatures. Together with the shallowing of the mixed layer depth and the decrease in silicic acid concentration, diatoms bloomed remarkably in the Oyashio region, though the magnitude of the bloom in the Kuroshio-Oyashio transition (hereafter Transition) region was relatively small. A total of 77 diatom species were identified, with the bloom-forming diatoms mainly consisting of Thalassiosira, Chaetoceros, and Fragilariopsis species. It has become evident that the carotenoid fucoxanthin can serve as a strong indicator of the diatom carbon biomass during the spring diatom bloom. Differences in the species richness of diatoms among stations generally enabled us to separate the Oyashio bloom stations from the Transition and the Oyashio pre-bloom stations. Relatively high values of the Shannon-Wiener index for the diatom species were also maintained during the Oyashio bloom, indicating that a wide variety of species then shared dominance. In the decline phase of the Oyashio bloom when surface nutrient concentrations decreased, senescent diatom cells increased, as inferred from the levels of chlorophyllide a. Although the cell density of heterotrophic bacteria changed little with the development of the diatom bloom, viral abundance increased toward the end

  10. Inhibition effect of engineered silver nanoparticles to bloom forming cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuy Duong, Thi; Son Le, Thanh; Thu Huong Tran, Thi; Kien Nguyen, Trung; Ho, Cuong Tu; Hien Dao, Trong; Phuong Quynh Le, Thi; Chau Nguyen, Hoai; Dang, Dinh Kim; Thu Huong Le, Thi; Thu Ha, Phuong

    2016-09-01

    Silver nanoparticle (AgNP) has a wide range antibacterial effect and is extensively used in different aspects of medicine, food storage, household products, disinfectants, biomonitoring and environmental remediation etc. In the present study, we examined the growth inhibition effect of engineered silver nanoparticles against bloom forming cyanobacterial M. aeruginosa strain. AgNPs were synthesized by a chemical reduction method at room temperature and UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed that they presented a maximum absorption at 410 nm and size range between 10 and 18 nm. M. aeruginosa cells exposed during 10 d to AgNPs to a range of concentrations from 0 to 1 mg l-1. The changes in cell density and morphology were used to measure the responses of the M. aeruginosa to AgNPs. The control and treatment units had a significant difference in terms of cell density and growth inhibition (p < 0.05). Increasing the concentration of AgNPs, a reduction of the cell growths in all treatment was observed. The inhibition efficiency was reached 98.7% at higher concentration of AgNPs nanoparticles. The term half maximal effective concentration (EC50) based on the cell growth measured by absorbance at 680 nm (A680) was 0.0075 mg l-1. The inhibition efficiency was 98.7% at high concentration of AgNPs (1 mg l-1). Image of SEM and TEM reflected a shrunk and damaged cell wall indicating toxicity of silver nanoparticles toward M. aeruginosa.

  11. Selective algicidal action of peptides against harmful algal bloom species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Cheol Park

    Full Text Available Recently, harmful algal bloom (HAB, also termed "red tide", has been recognized as a serious problem in marine environments according to climate changes worldwide. Many novel materials or methods to prevent HAB have not yet been employed except for clay dispersion, in which can the resulting sedimentation on the seafloor can also cause alteration in marine ecology or secondary environmental pollution. In the current study, we investigated that antimicrobial peptide have a potential in controlling HAB without cytotoxicity to harmless marine organisms. Here, antimicrobial peptides are proposed as new algicidal compounds in combating HAB cells. HPA3 and HPA3NT3 peptides which exert potent antimicrobial activity via pore forming action in plasma membrane showed that HPA3NT3 reduced the motility of algal cells, disrupted their plasma membrane, and induced the efflux of intracellular components. Against raphidoflagellate such as Heterosigma akashiwo, Chattonella sp., and C. marina, it displayed a rapid lysing action in cell membranes at 1~4 µM within 2 min. Comparatively, its lysing effects occurred at 8 µM within 1 h in dinoflagellate such as Cochlodium polykrikoides, Prorocentrum micans, and P. minimum. Moreover, its lysing action induced the lysis of chloroplasts and loss of chlorophyll a. In the contrary, this peptide was not effective against Skeletonema costatum, harmless algal cell, even at 256 µM, moreover, it killed only H. akashiwo or C. marina in co-cultivation with S. costatum, indicating to its selective algicidal activity between harmful and harmless algal cells. The peptide was non-hemolytic against red blood cells of Sebastes schlegeli, the black rockfish, at 120 µM. HAB cells were quickly and selectively lysed following treatment of antimicrobial peptides without cytotoxicity to harmless marine organisms. Thus, the antibiotic peptides examined in our study appear to have much potential in effectively controlling HAB with minimal

  12. Selective algicidal action of peptides against harmful algal bloom species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Lee, Jong-Kook; Kim, Si Wouk; Park, Yoonkyung

    2011-01-01

    Recently, harmful algal bloom (HAB), also termed "red tide", has been recognized as a serious problem in marine environments according to climate changes worldwide. Many novel materials or methods to prevent HAB have not yet been employed except for clay dispersion, in which can the resulting sedimentation on the seafloor can also cause alteration in marine ecology or secondary environmental pollution. In the current study, we investigated that antimicrobial peptide have a potential in controlling HAB without cytotoxicity to harmless marine organisms. Here, antimicrobial peptides are proposed as new algicidal compounds in combating HAB cells. HPA3 and HPA3NT3 peptides which exert potent antimicrobial activity via pore forming action in plasma membrane showed that HPA3NT3 reduced the motility of algal cells, disrupted their plasma membrane, and induced the efflux of intracellular components. Against raphidoflagellate such as Heterosigma akashiwo, Chattonella sp., and C. marina, it displayed a rapid lysing action in cell membranes at 1~4 µM within 2 min. Comparatively, its lysing effects occurred at 8 µM within 1 h in dinoflagellate such as Cochlodium polykrikoides, Prorocentrum micans, and P. minimum. Moreover, its lysing action induced the lysis of chloroplasts and loss of chlorophyll a. In the contrary, this peptide was not effective against Skeletonema costatum, harmless algal cell, even at 256 µM, moreover, it killed only H. akashiwo or C. marina in co-cultivation with S. costatum, indicating to its selective algicidal activity between harmful and harmless algal cells. The peptide was non-hemolytic against red blood cells of Sebastes schlegeli, the black rockfish, at 120 µM. HAB cells were quickly and selectively lysed following treatment of antimicrobial peptides without cytotoxicity to harmless marine organisms. Thus, the antibiotic peptides examined in our study appear to have much potential in effectively controlling HAB with minimal impact on marine

  13. Places Connected:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    Nations Volunteer of Japanese nationality. Networks of personal ties, ideas, feelings, and material culture. By combining work on the experience of place with network historiography on migration and kinship, the paper presents a case on the function of the temporary encounter in human networks....... experience the places of Denmark and Japan temporarily integrate the national histories of these two countries in the histories of their home countries and vice versa. Thereby, I wish to offer a dynamic understanding of development history and globalization, which challenges the nationally bound histories...... experiences of place, however, when it is often the same people who experience many different places? Along with many other so-called donors in the 1950s, Denmark and Japan chose to invest in the education of own and other nationals involved in development and thereby financed personal connections between...

  14. Phytoplankton dynamics in contrasting early stage North Atlantic spring blooms: composition, succession, and potential drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Daniels

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spring bloom is a key annual event in the phenology of pelagic ecosystems, making a major contribution to the oceanic biological carbon pump through the production and export of organic carbon. However, there is little consensus as to the main drivers of spring bloom formation, exacerbated by a lack of in situ observations of the phytoplankton community composition and its evolution during this critical period. We investigated the dynamics of the phytoplankton community structure at two contrasting sites in the Iceland and Norwegian Basins during the early stage (25 March–25 April of the 2012 North Atlantic spring bloom. The plankton composition and characteristics of the initial stages of the bloom were markedly different between the two basins. The Iceland Basin (ICB appeared well mixed to > 400 m, yet surface chlorophyll a (0.27–2.2 mg m–3 and primary production (0.06–0.66 mmol C m–3 d–1 were elevated in the upper 100 m. Although the Norwegian Basin (NWB had a persistently shallower mixed layer (< 100 m, chlorophyll a (0.58–0.93 mg m–3 and primary production (0.08–0.15 mmol C m–3 d–1 remained lower than in the ICB, with picoplankton (> 2 μm dominating chlorophyll a biomass. The ICB phytoplankton composition appeared primarily driven by the physicochemical environment, with periodic events of increased mixing restricting further increases in biomass. In contrast, the NWB phytoplankton community was potentially limited by physicochemical and/or biological factors such as grazing. Diatoms dominated the ICB, with the genus Chaetoceros (1–166 cells mL–1 being succeeded by Pseudo-nitzschia (0.2–210 cells mL–1. However, large diatoms (> 10 μm were virtually absent (< 0.5 cells mL–1 from the NWB, with only small nanno-sized (< 5 μm diatoms present (101–600 cells mL–1. We suggest micro-zooplankton grazing, potentially coupled with the lack of a seed population of bloom forming diatoms, was restricting diatom

  15. River flow and ammonium discharge determine spring phytoplankton blooms in an urbanized estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Richard; Wilkerson, Frances; Parker, Alexander E.; Marchi, Al; Taberski, Karen

    2012-12-01

    Nutrient loadings to urbanized estuaries have increased over the past decades in response to population growth and upgrading to secondary sewage treatment. Evidence from the San Francisco Estuary (SFE) indicates that increased ammonium (NH4) loads have resulted in reduced primary production, a counter-intuitive finding; the NH4 paradox. Phytoplankton uptake of nitrate (NO3), the largest pool of dissolved inorganic nitrogen, is necessary for blooms to occur in SFE. The relatively small pool of ambient NH4, by itself insufficient to support a bloom, prevents access to NO3 and bloom development. This has contributed to the current rarity of spring phytoplankton blooms in the northern SFE (Suisun Bay), in spite of high inorganic nutrient concentrations, improved water transparency and seasonally low biomass of bivalve grazers. The lack of blooms has likely contributed to deleterious bottom-up impacts on estuarine fish. This bloom suppression may also occur in other estuaries that receive large amounts of anthropogenic NH4. In 2010 two rare diatom blooms were observed in spring in Suisun Bay (followed by increased abundances of copepods and pelagic fish), and like the prior bloom observed in 2000, chlorophyll accumulated after NH4 concentrations were decreased. In 2010, low NH4 concentrations were apparently due to a combination of reduced NH4 discharge from a wastewater treatment plant and increased river flow. To understand the interactions of river flow, NH4 discharge and bloom initiation, a conceptual model was constructed with three criteria; 1) NH4 loading must not exceed the capacity of the phytoplankton to assimilate the inflow of NH4, 2) the NH4 concentration must be ≤4 μmol L-1 to enable phytoplankton NO3 uptake, 3) the dilution rate of phytoplankton biomass set by river flow must not exceed the phytoplankton growth rate to avoid "washout". These criteria were determined for Suisun Bay; with sufficient irradiance and present day discharge of 15 tons NH4-N d

  16. The Subpolar North Atlantic Spring Bloom - What Did We Learn from the NAB 2008 Autonomous Experiment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The subpolar North Atlantic bloom is one of the most remarkable features on the planet, with almost explosive 'greening' of the oceans. Over decades, investigators from countries bordering the North Atlantic have caught snippets of the bloom from research vessels or merchant ships transiting between continents. On 4 April 2008, Eric D'Asaro, Craig Lee, and I began a comprehensive study of the initiation and demise of the spring bloom using 2 types of autonomous platforms - a patch-following Lagrangian mixed-layer float and 4 float-following gliders. The 3 mo autonomous experiment integrated measurements from the float, gliders and ships, observations from satellites, and analyses from models. The diatom-dominated bloom began in mid April when the water column stabilized, not by solar warming, but rather by eddy-driven slumping of horizontal density gradients. The resulting bloom was patchy in both biomass and phytoplankton diversity, despite high, non-limiting concentrations of macronutrients. Magnitudes and relative proportions of net community productivity (NCP; determined from autonomous budgets of O2 and NO3) and net phytoplankton productivity (NPP; computed from ship-based photosynthetic parameters and float-based biomass and light) diverged as the bloom evolved, with higher fractions of particulate organic carbon (POC) consumed within the mixed layer as the bloom aged. Export productivity (EP; derived as the difference between NCP and accumulation rate of POC) was of similar magnitude during the May diatom bloom and the June picophytoplankton bloom. When silicic acid dropped to 1 μM, diatoms aggregated and sank; the deep flux event was dominated by resting spores of Chaetoceros. Although a short-lived event, it was ubiquitously observed by the 4 gliders and ship. An eddy-driven subduction event was likewise observed, indicating transport of otherwise non-sinking POC along isopycnals to depths of > 200 m. These striking export events reinforce the value of a

  17. Great Lakes Hyperspectral Water Quality Instrument Suite for Airborne Monitoring of Algal Blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekki, John; Leshkevich, George; Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Flatico, Joseph; Prokop, Norman; Kojima, Jun; Anderson, Robert; Demers, James; Krasowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center and NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab are collaborating to utilize an airborne hyperspectral imaging sensor suite to monitor Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) in the western basin of Lake Erie. The HABs are very dynamic events as they form, spread and then disappear within a 4 to 8 week time period in late summer. They are a concern for human health, fish and wildlife because they can contain blue green toxic algae. Because of this toxicity there is a need for the blooms to be continually monitored. This situation is well suited for aircraft based monitoring because the blooms are a very dynamic event and they can spread over a large area. High resolution satellite data is not suitable by itself because it will not give the temporal resolution due to the infrequent overpasses of the quickly changing blooms. A custom designed hyperspectral imager and a point spectrometer mounted on aT 34 aircraft have been used to obtain data on an algal bloom that formed in the western basin of Lake Erie during September 2006. The sensor suite and operations will be described and preliminary hyperspectral data of this event will be presented

  18. DMS gas transfer coefficients from algal blooms in the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Bell

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Air/sea dimethylsulfide (DMS fluxes and bulk air/sea gradients were measured over the Southern Ocean in February/March 2012 during the Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP study. The cruise encountered three distinct phytoplankton bloom regions, consisting of two blooms with moderate DMS levels, and a high biomass, dinoflagellate-dominated bloom with high seawater DMS levels (>15 nM. Gas transfer coefficients were considerably scattered at wind speeds above 5 m s−1. Bin averaging the data resulted in a linear relationship between wind speed and mean gas transfer velocity consistent with that previously observed. However, the wind speed-binned gas transfer data distribution at all wind speeds is positively skewed. The flux and seawater DMS distributions were also positively skewed, which suggests that eddy covariance-derived gas transfer velocities are consistently influenced by additional, log-normal noise. A~flux footprint analysis was conducted during a transect into the prevailing wind and through elevated DMS levels in the dinoflagellate bloom. Accounting for the temporal/spatial separation between flux and seawater concentration significantly reduces the scatter in computed transfer velocity. The SOAP gas transfer velocity data shows no obvious modification of the gas transfer-wind speed relationship by biological activity or waves. This study highlights the challenges associated with eddy covariance gas transfer measurements in biologically active and heterogeneous bloom environments.

  19. A Recent Survey on Bloom Filters in Network Intrusion Detection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Saravanan,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Computer networks are prone to hacking, viruses and other malware; a Network Intrusion Detection System (NIDS is needed to protect the end-user machines from threats. An effective NIDS is therefore anetwork security system capable of protecting the end user machines well before a threat or intruder affects. NIDS requires a space efficient data base for detection of threats in high speed conditions. A bloom filter is a space efficient randomized data structure for representing a set in order to support membership queries. These Bloom filters allow false positive results (FPR but the space saving capability often outweigh this drawback provided the probability of FPR is controlled. Research is being done to reduce FPR by modifying the structure of bloom filters and enabling it to operate in the increasing network speeds, thus variant bloom filters are being introduced. The aim of this paper is to survey the ways in which Bloom filters have been used and modified to be used in high speed Network Intrusion Detection Systems with their merits and demerits.

  20. 广东省微囊藻水华成因分析及防控措施%Cause Analysis and Prevention and Control Measures of Microcystis Algal Blooms in Guangdong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁惠苹

    2012-01-01

    Microcystis algal blooms have a serious impact on the aquatic ecosystem and water supply security.From the actual situation of Guangdong Province,combined with microcystin research at home and abroad,to explore the causes of Microcystis bloom.The results showed that: Guangdong Province Microcystis bloom through the impact factor of temperature,light,flow,precipitation,nitrogen and phosphorus,trace element contents,algal sources and herbivorous aquatic organisms,the number of changes.In order to reduce the probability of bloom,should minimize the inflow of exogenous nutrients and trace elements,rational fishing and timely released fish fry.When the non-shallow water lakes and reservoirs occurrence of Microcystis bloom,you can use exogenous replenishment,artificial rainfall.%微囊藻水华对水生态及供水安全都有严重影响。文章从广东省实际情况出发,结合国内外微囊藻研究成果,对微囊藻水华的成因进行探索。结果表明:广东省微囊藻水华的影响因子主要有温度、光照、流速、降水、氮磷浓度、微量元素含量、藻种来源以及植食性水生生物数量变化等。为减少水华发生概率,应该尽量减少外源营养物质和微量元素的流入,合理捕捞并适时投放鱼苗。当非浅水湖库发生微囊藻水华时,可以采用外源补水、人工降雨等方式。

  1. The link between shrimp farm runoff and blooms of toxic Heterosigma akashiwo in Red Sea coastal waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria A. Mohamed

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In May 2010 a copious bloom of the raphidophyte Heterosigma akashiwo was observed for the first time in Red Sea waters off the coasts of Saudi Arabia.This bloom was confined to an area where water and phytoplankton flow freely between the sea and a shrimp farm. The phytoplankton density and physico-chemical characteristics of the sea water were therefore investigated weekly at bloom and non-bloom sites in order to gain insightinto the environmental factors prevailing at the bloom site and their link with the shrimp farm runoff. The bloom site showed higher nutrient concentrations than the non-bloom site, indicating the possible role of the shrimp farm in flushing nutrients into this site. The bloom appeared on 27 May, coinciding with a decrease in salinity (19°C. The results of toxicological assays showed that both bloom samples and batch cultures of H. akashiwo were toxic toArtemia salina and exhibited haemolytic activity with respectto rabbit erythrocytes.Bloom samples showed a higher toxicity (LC50=8.9 ×10^4 cells ml-1 and haemolytic activity (EC50=3.64 × 104cells ml-1 than the batch cultures (LC50=11.6 × 104 cells ml-1, EC50=5.1 imes 104 cells ml-1. In the light ofthe results of this study, the link between H. akashiwoblooms and shrimp farm runoff should be considered during the monitoring of Red Sea coastal waters for the presence of harmful algal blooms.

  2. Bio-oil production through pyrolysis of blue-green algae blooms (BGAB): Product distribution and bio-oil characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrolysis experiments of blue-green algae blooms (BGAB) were carried out in a fixed-bed reactor to determine the effects of pyrolysis temperature, particle size and sweep gas flow rate on pyrolysis product yields and bio-oil properties. The pyrolysis temperature, particle size and sweep gas flow rate were varied in the ranges of 300–700 °C, below 0.25–2.5 mm and 50–400 mL min−1, respectively. The maximum oil yield of 54.97% was obtained at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C, particle size below 0.25 mm and sweep gas flow rate of 100 mL min−1. The elemental analysis and calorific value of the oil were determined, and the chemical composition of the oil was investigated using gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy (GC–MS) technique. The analysis of bio-oil composition showed that bio-oil from BGAB could be a potential source of renewable fuel with a heating value of 31.9 MJ kg−1. - Highlights: ► Bio-oil production from pyrolysis of blue-green algae blooms in fixed bed reactor. ► Effects of pyrolysis conditions on product distribution were investigated. ► The maximum bio-oil yield reached 54.97 wt %. ► The bio-oil has high heating value and may be suitable as renewable fuel. ► Pyrolysis of algal biomass beneficial for energy recovery, eutrophication control

  3. Naturally Connecting the World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ During China International Trade Fair for Home Textiles and Accessories held in Shanghai 2010(on Aug.25th the second day of the fair),Cotton Council International(CCI)hosted an exchange meeting targeted the COTTON USATM home textile licenses,taking"Naturally Connecting the World-Opportunities for Sourcing and Collaboration with Cotton-Made Home Textiles"as the theme of the meeting.CCI's representative institution in China invited the domestic famous home textile brands,enterprises and their customers to participate in the exchange which aims to introduce the current development trend of the global cotton textile industry through CCI,the powerful platform of communication.

  4. Bioaccumulation of microcystins in two freshwater gastropods from a cyanobacteria-bloom plateau lake, Lake Dianchi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the bioaccumulation patterns of microcystins (MCs) in organs of two gastropods, samples were collected in Lake Dianchi monthly from May to October, 2008, when cyanobacteria typically bloom. The average MCs concentrations for Radix swinhoei (pulmonate) and Margarya melanioides (prosobranch) tended to be similar for the different organs: the highest values in the hepatopancreas (9.33 by 3.74 μg/g DW), followed by digestive tracts (1.66 by 3.03 μg/g DW), gonads (0.45 by 1.34 μg/g DW) and muscles (0.22 by 0.40 μg/g DW). Pulmonate had higher value than prosobranch because of the stronger bioaccumulation ability in hepatopancreas. The levels in organs of R. swinhoei were correlated with environmentally dissolved MCs, but influenced by intracellular MCs for M. melanioides. The estimated MCs concentrations in edible parts of M. melanioides were beyond the WHO’s provisional tolerable daily intake (0.04 μg/kg), suggesting the risk of consumption of M. melanioides from the lake. Highlights: ► We probe bioaccumulated patterns of microcystins in organs of pulmonate and prosobranch. ► The highest microcystins in hepatopancreas for both snails. ► The higher microcystins for pulmonate results from the stronger bioaccumulation ability in hepatopancreas. ► Environmentally dissolved microcystins are the main sources for pulmonate, but intracellular for prosobranch. ► Suggesting the risk of consumption snails in the studying regions. - Higher bioaccumulation MCs level for pulmonate mainly contributed to the stronger bioaccumulation ability in its hepatopancreas.

  5. A review of the use of sonication to control cyanobacterial blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekhar, Pradeep; Fan, Linhua; Nguyen, Thang; Roddick, Felicity A

    2012-09-15

    The development of cyanobacterial blooms in water bodies imparts undesirable characteristics to the water such as odours, tastes and the potential presence of toxins. Several chemical and physical methods have been used to control the blooms, but have limitations in terms of pollution and application on a large scale. A more recent approach has been the use of sonication in the control of cyanobacteria (also referred to as blue-green algae). This paper reviews current advancements in research on using sonication to control cyanobacteria, particularly Microcystis aeruginosa, as it is a prevalent and a major bloom-forming toxic species. The impact of sonication on the structure and function of M. aeruginosa is discussed, including the influence of sonication parameters such as power intensity, frequency and exposure time. Alternate strategies of cyanobacterial control in combination with sonication are also reviewed. PMID:22727861

  6. Dynamic Cognitive Process Application of Blooms Taxonomy for Complex Software Design in the Cognitive Domain

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, NR Shashi; Selvarani, R

    2010-01-01

    Software design in Software Engineering is a critical and dynamic cognitive process. Accurate and flawless system design will lead to fast coding and early completion of a software project. Blooms taxonomy classifies cognitive domain into six dynamic levels such as Knowledge at base level to Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis and Evaluation at the highest level in the order of increasing complexity. A case study indicated in this paper is a gira system, which is a gprs based Intranet Remote Administration which monitors and controls the intranet from a mobile device. This paper investigates from this case study that the System Design stage in Software Engineering uses all the six levels of Blooms Taxonomy. The application of the highest levels of Blooms Taxonomy such as Synthesis and Evaluation in the design of gira indicates that Software Design in Software Development Life Cycle is a complex and critical cognitive process.

  7. Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of the Continuous Casting Bloom in the Heavy Reduction Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cheng; Wu, Chen-hui; Zhu, Miao-yong

    2016-08-01

    A two-stage sequential heavy reduction (HR) method, in which the reduction amount was increased both before and after the solidification end, is presented to simultaneously improve the homogeneity and compactness of the continuous casting bloom. With bearing steel GCr15 chosen as the specific research steel, a three-dimensional thermal-mechanical finite element model was developed to simulate and analyze the thermal and mechanical behaviors of the continuous casting bloom during the HR process. In order to ensure the accuracy of the simulation, the constitutive model parameters were derived from the experimental results. The predicted temperature distribution and shell thickness were verified using a thermal infrared camera and nail shooting results, respectively. The real measured relationship between the HR pressure and amount were applied to verify the mechanical model. The explorative application results showed that the quality of the bloom center and compactness of rolled bars have both been significantly improved after the HR was applied.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of 3-D Electromagnetic Field in Bloom Continuous Casting Mold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xu-dong; YANG Xiao-dong; ZHU Miao-yong; CHEN Yong; YANG Su-bo

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite element model of electromagnetic stirrer was built to predict magnetic field in a bloom continuous casting mold for steel during operation. The effects of current intensity, current frequency, and mold copper plate thickness on the magnetic field distribution in the mold were investigated. The results show that the magnetic induction intensity increases linearly with the increase in current intensity and decreases with the increase in current frequency. Increasing current intensity and frequency is available in increasing the electromagnetic force. The Joule heat decreases gradually from surface to center of bloom, and a maximum Joule heat can be found on corner of bloom. The prediction of magnetic induction intensity is in good agreement with the measured values.

  9. Synchronicity between ice retreat and phytoplankton bloom in circum-Antarctic polynyas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Ji, Rubao; Jenouvrier, Stephanie; Jin, Meibing; Stroeve, Julienne

    2016-03-01

    Phytoplankton in Antarctic coastal polynyas has a temporally short yet spatially variant growth window constrained by ice cover and day length. Using 18-year satellite measurements (1997-2015) of sea ice and chlorophyll concentrations, we assessed the synchronicity between the spring phytoplankton bloom and light availability, taking into account the ice cover and the incident solar irradiance, for 50 circum-Antarctic coastal polynyas. The synchronicity was strong (i.e., earlier ice-adjusted light onset leads to earlier bloom and vice versa) in most of the western Antarctic polynyas but weak in a majority of the eastern Antarctic polynyas. The west-east asymmetry is related to sea ice production rate: the formation of many eastern Antarctic polynyas is associated with strong katabatic wind and high sea ice production rate, leading to stronger water column mixing that could damp phytoplankton blooms and weaken the synchronicity.

  10. Categorization of ber varieties in relation to blooming period, fruit setting and harvesting time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty four local Ber varieties were evaluated at Horticultural Research Institute AARI, Faisalabad, Horticultural Research Station Bahawalpur (Punjab) and Jujube Research Station, Tandojam (Sindh). Traits viz. total period of blooming (dates), peak period of blooming (dates), total period of fruit set (dates), peak period of fruit set (dates), total period of fruit harvest (dates), peak period of fruit harvest (dates), total flowering days, peak flowering days, total fruit setting days, peak fruit setting days, total harvesting days and peak harvesting days were studied. The results revealed significant differences in parameters studied except total period of blooming under Tandojam, Sindh conditions. Varieties were classified as early, mid and late season for both provinces. Local varieties had potential for further manipulation in terms of variety improvement to attract growers for extensive ber cultivations under changing global climatic scenario. (author)

  11. 基于Z源逆变器的光伏并网功率调节系统%PHOTOVOLTAIC GRID-CONNECTED POWER CONDITIONER BASED ON Z-SOURCE INVERTER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓高; 王飞; 余世杰

    2012-01-01

    将具有升压特性的Z源逆变器应用到光伏并网功率调节系统中,减少了传统用于升压控制的DC/DC变换环节.在控制技术方面,针对Z源电容电压升压比和直通占空比的非线性问题,提出一种线性控制方法来实现对Z源电容电压的控制,以满足系统直流侧的稳定要求.此外,将经最大功率控制器调节后得到的光伏有功电流分量嵌入到谐波检测回路,产生了包含有光伏并网电流和用于补偿的无功、谐波、基波负序电流的参考指令信号.通过仿真和实验验证,该系统在很好地实现光伏并网发电的同时,不仅可在三相电网电压对称、不对称或畸变的情况下,对电网电流电能质量问题进行治理,还可对三相不对称电路进行无功、谐波及基波负序电流的有效补偿.%A Z-source inverter with boost capability was applied in photovoltaic (PV) grid-connected power conditioner, instead of traditional DC/DC booster. In the aspect of control technology, regarding the non-linear problems between boost ratio of Z-source capacitor' s voltage and shoot-through ratio, a linear control method was put forward to solve it for the purpose of keeping DC link constant. In addition, the PV active power from maximum power point tracking (MPPT) controller is embedded into the harmonics detecting loop so as to produce reference currents which contain PV active power for grid-connection and reactive power, harmonic and fundamental negative sequence currents for compensation, The verifications through simulation and experiment demonstrate that the proposed system can implement, at same time PV grid-connected generation. Meanwhile it can improve the power quality of grid currents when in three-phase grid of balance or unbalance or distortion. Furthermore, reactive power, harmonic currents and fundamental negative sequence currents can be compensated effectively even in three-phase unbalanced circuit.

  12. Multiscale bloom dynamics from a high frequency autonomous measurement system in the Eastern English Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derot, Jonathan; Schmitt, François; Gentilhomme, Valérie

    2014-05-01

    We consider here a dataset from an Eulerian automated system, located on the coastal area of the French side of the English Channel (Boulogne-sur-Mer), called MAREL Carnot, operated by IFREMER (France). This system records more than 15 physico-chemical parameters at 20 minutes intervals, and at the constant depth of -1,5m whatever the tidal range. Our study focuses on the period 2004 to 2011. The objective of this study is to have a better understanding of the bloom fluorescence multiscale dynamics, as regards the coastal area of English Channel and possible influence of temperature on this dynamics. Annual blooms are visible, superposed to multiscale fluctuations. The probability density function (PDF) of the fluorescence time series very nicely obeys a power law with slope -2. The PDF for annual portions obeys also power laws, with slopes which are related to the annual average. Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is used to study the dynamics and display the power spectrum, which will be linked with these dynamics. EMD method is also used to extract a trend and isolate the blooms from the high frequency dynamics. We show that the high frequency part of the fluorescence dynamics has a very large variance during bloom events, compared to normal conditions. We also show that there is a link between the mean winter temperature and the strength of bloom next spring. These results contribute to statistically characterize the bloom dynamics and extract some possible universal relations. Keywords: English Channel; Autonomous monitoring; Power spectra; EMD method; Probability density functions; Power laws.

  13. The effects of the antioxidant lipoic acid on beef longissimus bloom time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentfrow, G; Linville, M L; Stahl, C A; Olson, K C; Berg, E P

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of lipoic acid (LA) on beef LM steak bloom time, as well-as to characterize bloom time in the CIE L*, a*, and b* color space over a 93-min period. Thirty-two Simmental steers were supplemented with LA for 21 d immediately before slaughter at levels of 0, 8, 16, or 24 mg of LA/kg BW (eight steers per treatment). Lipoic acid was mixed with liquid paraffin, allowed to solidify, prilled, and top-dressed over a standard finishing diet. Steers were slaughtered at the University of Missouri abattoir in four groups of eight (two steers per treatment) over a 2-wk period. After a 24-h chill at 4 degrees C, the right LM was removed from each carcass. One 2.54cm steak was removed from the anterior portion of the LM, and its color characteristics (CIE L*, a*, and b*) were measured immediately with a standardized spectrocolorimeter. Color measurements were taken every 3 min thereafter for a total of 93-min. Hue angle (true red) and chroma (color saturation) were calculated from the color measurements. Addition of LA to the diet had no effect on bloom time (P = 0.67). When treatment means were analyzed, the addition of 24 mg of LA/kg BW to the diet resulted in higher (lighter) L* values (P 0.05) during the 93-min bloom time; however, a* and chroma values increased for 9 min and plateaued after 12 min (P < 0.01). Similarly, b* values increased (P < 0.01) for the first 6 min, and after 9 min, no further increase in yellowness was detected. Bloom time had little effect on hue angle, which stabilized after 3 min. Supplementing steers with the antioxidant LA for 21 d had no effect on the bloom time of beef LM; however, higher levels of supplemental LA affected L* values and hue angles of beef. PMID:15484956

  14. Site fidelity by bees drives pollination facilitation in sequentially blooming plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Jane E; Thomson, James D

    2016-06-01

    Plant species can influence the pollination and reproductive success of coflowering neighbors that share pollinators. Because some individual pollinators habitually forage in particular areas, it is also possible that plant species could influence the pollination of neighbors that bloom later. When flowers of a preferred forage plant decline in an area, site-fidelity may cause individual flower feeders to stay in an area and switch plant species rather than search for preferred plants in a new location. A newly blooming plant species may quickly inherit a set of visitors from a prior plant species, and therefore experience higher pollination success than it would in an area where the first species never bloomed. To test this, we manipulated the placement and timing of two plant species, Delphinium barbeyi and later-blooming Gentiana parryi. We recorded the responses of individually marked bumble bee pollinators. About 63% of marked individuals returned repeatedly to the same areas to forage on Delphinium. When Delphinium was experimentally taken out of bloom, most of those site-faithful individuals (78%) stayed and switched to Gentiana. Consequently, Gentiana flowers received more visits in areas where Delphinium had previously flowered, compared to areas where Delphinium was still flowering or never occurred. Gentiana stigmas received more pollen in areas where Delphinium disappeared than where it never bloomed, indicating that Delphinium increases the pollination of Gentiana when they are separated in time. Overall, we show that individual bumble bees are often site-faithful, causing one plant species to increase the pollination of another even when separated in time, which is a novel mechanism of pollination facilitation. PMID:27459775

  15. Observations of phytoplankton spring bloom onset triggered by a density front in NW Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olita

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton bloom in NW Mediterranan sea is a seasonal event that mainly occurrs in a limited area (Gulf of Lyon and Provençal basin where this phenomenon is promoted by a cyclonic circulation, strong wind-driven mixing and subsequent spring restratification. At the southern boundary of this area a density front (North Balearic Front separating denser waters from the lighter Modified Atlantic Waters reservoir at south is suspected to trigger weaker and earlier (late winter blooms by (a enhanced pumping of nutrients into the euphotic layer and (b promoting an early restratification of the water column (by frontal instabilities. A multisensor glider round trip, equipped with CTD and fluorimeter, crossing the frontal area in February–March 2013, allowed to observe the bloom triggering after the decrease of intense wind-driven turbulent convection and mixing. Satellite imagery supports and confirms in-situ observations. It was shown that frontal activity has a relevant role in the promotion and acceleration of the dynamical restratification, with a consequent biological response in terms of primary production. Restratification is necessary preconditioning factor for bloom triggering in frontal area, net of other involved mechanism promoting the bloom as the enhanced biological pump. So, like for high-latitude fronts (Taylor and Ferrari, 2011a, also for this mid-latitude oligotrophic region front seems to promote new production by dynamically enahnced restratification inhibiting mixing. Finally, we argued that Sverdrup's Critical Depth criterion seems to apply in the northern well-mixed area, where the zeroing of heat fluxes (and related turbulent convection does not correspond to a prompt onset of the bloom (which appeared 1 month later.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Flower Volatiles from Nine Citrus at Three Blooming Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Azam

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatiles from flowers at three blooming stages of nine citrus cultivars were analyzed by headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME-GC-MS. Up to 110 volatiles were detected, with 42 tentatively identified from citrus flowers for the first time. Highest amounts of volatiles were present in fully opened flowers of most citrus, except for pomelos. All cultivars were characterized by a high percentage of either oxygenated monoterpenes or monoterpene hydrocarbons, and the presence of a high percentage of nitrogen containing compounds was also observed. Flower volatiles varied qualitatively and quantitatively among citrus types during blooming. Limonene was the most abundant flower volatile only in citrons; α-citral and β-citral ranked 2nd and 3rd only for Bergamot, and unopened flowers of Ponkan had a higher amount of linalool and β-pinene while much lower amount of γ-terpinene and p-cymene than Satsuma. Taking the average of all cultivars, linalool and limonene were the top two volatiles for all blooming stages; β-pinene ranked 3rd in unopened flowers, while indole ranked 3rd for half opened and fully opened flower volatiles. As flowers bloomed, methyl anthranilate increased while 2-hexenal and p-cymene decreased. In some cases, a volatile could be high in both unopened and fully opened flowers but low in half opened ones. Through multivariate analysis, the nine citrus cultivars were clustered into three groups, consistent with the three true citrus types. Furthermore, an influence of blooming stages on clustering was observed, especially with hybrids Satsuma and Huyou. Altogether, it was suggested that flower volatiles can be suitable markers for revealing the genetic relationships between citrus cultivars but the same blooming stage needs to be strictly controlled.

  17. Blooms of cyanobacteria in a temperate Australian lagoon system post and prior to European settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Perran L. M.; Jennings, Miles; Holland, Daryl P.; Beardall, John; Briles, Christy; Zawadzki, Atun; Doan, Phuong; Mills, Keely; Gell, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Blooms of noxious N2 fixing cyanobacteria such as Nodularia spumigena are a recurring problem in some estuaries; however, the historic occurrence of such blooms in unclear in many cases. Here we report the results of a palaeoecological study on a temperate Australian lagoon system (the Gippsland Lakes) where we used stable isotopes and pigment biomarkers in dated cores as proxies for eutrophication and blooms of cyanobacteria. Pigment proxies show a clear signal, with an increase in cyanobacterial pigments (echinenone, canthaxanthin and zeaxanthin) in the period coinciding with recent blooms. Another excursion in these proxies was observed prior to the opening of an artificial entrance to the lakes in 1889, which markedly increased the salinity of the Gippsland Lakes. A coincident increase in the sediment organic-carbon content in the period prior to the opening of the artificial entrance suggests that the bottom waters of the lakes were more stratified and hypoxic, which would have led to an increase in the recycling of phosphorus. After the opening of the artificial entrance, there was a ˜ 60-year period with low values for the cyanobacterial proxies as well as a low sediment organic-carbon content suggesting a period of low bloom activity associated with the increased salinity of the lakes. During the 1940s, the current period of re-eutrophication commenced, as indicated by a steadily increasing sediment organic-carbon content and cyanobacterial pigments. We suggest that increasing nitrogen inputs from the catchment led to the return of hypoxia and increased phosphorus release from the sediment, which drove the re-emergence of cyanobacterial blooms.

  18. Spatiotemporal molecular analysis of cyanobacteria blooms reveals Microcystis--Aphanizomenon interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd R Miller

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variability in cyanobacterial community composition (CCC within and between eutrophic lakes is not well-described using culture independent molecular methods. We analyzed CCC across twelve locations in four eutrophic lakes and within-lake locations in the Yahara Watershed, WI, on a weekly basis, for 5 months. Taxa were discriminated by length of MspI-digested cpcB/A intergenic spacer gene sequences and identified by comparison to a PCR-based clone library. CCC across all stations was spatially segregated by depth of sampling locations (ANOSIM R = 0.23, p < 0.001. Accordingly, CCC was correlated with thermal stratification, nitrate and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP, R = 0.2-0.3. Spatial variability in CCC and temporal trends in taxa abundances were rarely correlative between sampling locations in the same lake indicating significant within lake spatiotemporal heterogeneity. Across all stations, a total of 37 bloom events were observed based on distinct increases in phycocyanin. Out of 97 taxa, a single Microcystis, and two different Aphanizomenon taxa were the dominant cyanobacteria detected during bloom events. The Microcystis and Aphanizomenon taxa rarely bloomed together and were significantly anti-correlated with each other at 9 of 12 stations with Pearson R values of -0.6 to -0.9 (p < 0.001. Of all environmental variables measured, nutrients, especially nitrate were significantly greater during periods of Aphanizomenon dominance while the nitrate+nitrite:SRP ratio was lower. This study shows significant spatial variability in CCC within and between lakes structured by depth of the sampling location. Furthermore, our study reveals specific genotypes involved in bloom formation. More in-depth characterization of these genotypes should lead to a better understanding of factors promoting bloom events in these lakes and more reliable bloom prediction models.

  19. Rapid formation of large aggregates during the spring bloom of Kerguelen Island: observations and model comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouandet, M.-P.; Jackson, G. A.; Carlotti, F.; Picheral, M.; Stemmann, L.; Blain, S.

    2014-08-01

    While production of aggregates and their subsequent sinking is known to be one pathway for the downward movement of organic matter from the euphotic zone, the rapid transition from non-aggregated to aggregated particles has not been reported previously. We made one vertical profile of particle size distributions (PSD; sizes ranging from 0.052 to several millimeters in equivalent spherical diameter) at pre-bloom stage and seven vertical profiles 3 weeks later over a 48 h period at early bloom stage using the Underwater Vision Profiler during the Kerguelen Ocean and Plateau Compared Study cruise 2 (KEOPS2, October-November 2011). In these naturally iron-fertilized waters southeast of Kerguelen Island (Southern Ocean), the total particle numerical abundance increased by more than fourfold within this time period. A massive total volume increase associated with particle size distribution changes was observed over the 48 h survey, showing the rapid formation of large particles and their accumulation at the base of the mixed layer. The results of a one-dimensional particle dynamics model support coagulation as the mechanism responsible for the rapid aggregate formation and the development of the VT subsurface maxima. The comparison of VT profiles between early bloom stage and pre-bloom stage indicates an increase of particulate export below 200 m when bloom has developed. These results highlight the role of coagulation in forming large particles and triggering carbon export at the early stage of a naturally iron-fertilized bloom, while zooplankton grazing may dominate later in the season. The rapid changes observed illustrate the critical need to measure carbon export flux with high sampling temporal resolution. Our results are the first published in situ observations of the rapid accumulation of marine aggregates and their export and the general agreement of this rapid event with a model of phytoplankton growth and coagulation.

  20. Maintenance of coastal surface blooms by surface temperature stratification and wind drift.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Carmen Ruiz-de la Torre

    Full Text Available Algae blooms are an increasingly recurrent phenomenon of potentially socio-economic impact in coastal waters globally and in the coastal upwelling region off northern Baja California, Mexico. In coastal upwelling areas the diurnal wind pattern is directed towards the coast during the day. We regularly found positive Near Surface Temperature Stratification (NSTS, the resulting density stratification is expected to reduce the frictional coupling of the surface layer from deeper waters and allow for its more efficient wind transport. We propose that the net transport of the top layer of approximately 2.7 kilometers per day towards the coast helps maintain surface blooms of slow growing dinoflagellate such as Lingulodinium polyedrum. We measured: near surface stratification with a free-rising CTD profiler, trajectories of drifter buoys with attached thermographs, wind speed and direction, velocity profiles via an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler, Chlorophyll and cell concentration from water samples and vertical migration using sediment traps. The ADCP and drifter data agree and show noticeable current shear within the first meters of the surface where temperature stratification and high cell densities of L. polyedrum were found during the day. Drifters with 1m depth drogue moved towards the shore, whereas drifters at 3 and 5 m depth showed trajectories parallel or away from shore. A small part of the surface population migrated down to the sea floor during night thus reducing horizontal dispersion. The persistent transport of the surface bloom population towards shore should help maintain the bloom in favorable environmental conditions with high nutrients, but also increasing the potential socioeconomic impact of the blooms. The coast wise transport is not limited to blooms but includes all dissolved and particulate constituents in surface waters.

  1. Approaches to monitoring, control and management of harmful algal blooms (HABs)

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    Virtually every coastal country in the world is affected by harmful algal blooms (HABs, commonly called “red tides”). These phenomena are caused by blooms of microscopic algae. Some of these algae are toxic, and can lead to illness and death in humans, fish, seabirds, marine mammals, and other oceanic life, typically as a result of the transfer of toxins through the food web. Sometimes the direct release of toxic compounds can be lethal to marine animals. Non-toxic HABs cause damage to ecosys...

  2. The C-terminal domain of the Bloom syndrome DNA helicase is essential for genomic stability

    OpenAIRE

    Noonan James P; Yankiwski Victor; Neff Norma F

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Background Bloom syndrome is a rare cancer-prone disorder in which the cells of affected persons have a high frequency of somatic mutation and genomic instability. Bloom syndrome cells have a distinctive high frequency of sister chromatid exchange and quadriradial formation. BLM, the protein altered in BS, is a member of the RecQ DNA helicase family, whose members share an average of 40% identity in the helicase domain and have divergent N-terminal and C-terminal flanking regions of ...

  3. Blooming biology and sugar efficiency of two cultivars of Lonicera kamtschatica (Sevast.) Pojark.

    OpenAIRE

    Małgorzata Bożek; Justyna Wieniarska

    2012-01-01

    The studies on the period and abundance of blooming, flower development, as well as nectar productivity of two cultivars of Lonicera kamtschatica (Sevast.) Pojark. were carried out in 2004-2005 in Lublin. The investigated plants bloomed between the third decade of April and the middle of May. The life span of protogynous flowers was about 4-5 days. The mean amount of sugars secreted by 10 flowers of the examined cultivars ranged from 17.77 mg to 28.31 mg. The sugars yield amounted to from 44....

  4. Physiological features of toleranceof the main species of blooming lawns in the urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Zaiyko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The activity of enzymes of the antioxidative complex and glutathione-ascorbic acid system of the main species of decoratively-flowering plants used for blooming lawns in the urban environment are determined. The activity of catalase, peroxydase and polyphenoloxydase, and the content of glutathione and ascorbic acid in 13 plant species were analyzed. One of the basic criteria of plants tolerance is the level of prooxydative and antioxydative metabolic processes. The plant species resistant to adverse conditions are recommended for use in the blooming lawns design in industrial cities.

  5. Modelling the production and cycling of dimethylsulphide during the vernal bloom in the Barents Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Albert J. GABRIC; Matrai, Patricia A; Vernet, María

    2011-01-01

    Recent field work suggests an important ro^le for the Arctic Ocean in the global budget of dimethylsulphide (DMS), a climatically active volatile sulphur compound. Here, we have used an existing DMS production model and local field data to examine the temporal dynamics of the DMS cycle during the spring bloom in the Arctic shelf of the Barents Sea. The timing and duration of the spring phytoplankton bloom has been shown to be a key determinant of the flux of DMS to the atmosphere. Particular ...

  6. Detection of microcystins in Pamvotis lake water and assessment of cyanobacterial bloom toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Theodoti; Armeni, Euthimia; Stalikas, Constantine D; Kagalou, Ifigeneia; Leonardos, Ioannis D

    2012-05-01

    Lake Pamvotis is a shallow, eutrophic Mediterranean lake with ecological significance. This paper deals with the evaluation of cyanobacterial toxicity in Lake Pamvotis. ELISA and HPLC revealed the presence of significant amounts of MCYST-LR. Danio rerio bioassay confirmed the toxic nature of the bloom. Cyanobacterial extracts had adverse toxic effects on development of D. rerio. Also, it was shown that cyanobacterial extracts containing environmentally detected concentrations of MCYST can cause reduced survival rate of fish species. The results clearly indicate that cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Pamvotis may be regarded as human and fish health hazard. Continuous monitoring of the lake is suggested, in order to prevent future possible intoxications. PMID:21713485

  7. Reduction of blooming artifacts in cardiac CT images by blind deconvolution and anisotropic diffusion filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Amor, Angélica M.; Navarro-Navia, Cristian A.; Cadena-Bonfanti, Alberto J.; Contreras-Ortiz, Sonia H.

    2015-12-01

    Even though CT is an imaging technique that offers high quality images, limitations on its spatial resolution cause blurring in small objects with high contrast. This phenomenon is known as blooming artifact and affects cardiac images with small calcifications and stents. This paper describes an approach to reduce the blooming artifact and improve resolution in cardiac images using blind deconvolution and anisotropic diffusion filtering. Deconvolution increases resolution but reduces signal-to-noise ratio, and the anisotropic diffusion filter counteracts this effect without affecting the edges in the image.

  8. Intensive aggregate formation with low vertical flux during an upwelling-induced diatom bloom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Tiselius, P.; Mitchell-Innes, B.;

    1998-01-01

    The surfaces of most pelagic diatoms are sticky at times and may therefore form rapidly settling aggregates by physical coagulation. Stickiness and aggregate formation may be particularly adaptive in upwelling systems by allowing the retention of diatom populations in the vicinity of the upwelling...... center. We therefore hypothesized that upwelling diatom blooms are terminated by aggregate formation and rapid sedimentation. We monitored the development of a maturing diatom (mainly Chaetoceros spp.) bloom in the Benguela upwelling current during 7 d in February. Chlorophyll concentrations remained...

  9. Benthic‐pelagic coupling drives non‐seasonal zooplankton blooms and restructures energy flows in shallow tropical lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schagerl, Michael; Yasindi, Andrew; Singer, Gabriel; Kaggwa, Mary Nakabungo; Winder, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Zooplankton blooms are a frequent phenomenon in tropical systems. However, drivers of bloom formation and the contribution of emerging resting eggs are largely unexplored. We investigated the dynamics and the triggers of rotifer blooms in African soda‐lakes and assessed their impact on other trophic levels. A meta‐analysis of rotifer peak densities including abundances of up to 6 × 105 individuals L−1 demonstrated that rotifer bloom formation was uncoupled from the food environment and the seasonality of climatic conditions. A time series with weekly sampling intervals from Lake Nakuru (Kenya) revealed that intrinsic growth factors (food quality and the physicochemical environment) significantly affected rotifer population fluctuations, but were of minor importance for bloom formation. Instead, rotifer bloom formation was linked to sediment resuspension, a prerequisite for hatching of resting‐eggs. Population growth rates exceed pelagic birth rates and simulations of rotifer dynamics confirmed the quantitative importance of rotifer emergence from the sediment egg‐bank and signifying a decoupling of bloom formation from pelagic reproduction. Rotifer blooms led to a top‐down control of small‐sized algae and facilitated a switch to more grazing‐resistant, filamentous cyanobacteria. This shift in phytoplankton composition cascaded up the food chain and triggered the return of filter‐feeding flamingos. Calculations of consequent changes in the lake's energy budget and export of aquatic primary production to terrestrial ecosystems demonstrated the large potential impact of nonseasonal disturbances on the functioning of shallow tropical lakes.

  10. Field and laboratory guide to freshwater cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms for Native American and Alaska Native communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Barry H.; Ann St. Amand

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria can produce toxins and form harmful algal blooms. The Native American and Alaska Native communities that are dependent on subsistence fishing have an increased risk of exposure to these cyanotoxins. It is important to recognize the presence of an algal bloom in a waterbody and to distinguish a potentially toxic harmful algal bloom from a non-toxic bloom. This guide provides field images that show cyanobacteria blooms, some of which can be toxin producers, as well as other non-toxic algae blooms and floating plants that might be confused with algae. After recognition of a potential toxin-producing cyanobacterial bloom in the field, the type(s) of cyanobacteria present needs to be identified. Species identification, which requires microscopic examination, may help distinguish a toxin-producer from a non-toxin producer. This guide also provides microscopic images of the common cyanobacteria that are known to produce toxins, as well as images of algae that form blooms but do not produce toxins.

  11. Factors controlling the timing of the spring bloom in the Strait of Georgia estuary, British Columbia, Canada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, K.D.; Harrison, P.J.; Goldblatt, R.H.;

    1997-01-01

    El Nino year, the annual freshet of the Fraser River and probably the spring bloom started 1 month earlier. The bloom was interrupted by a wind event in late March. A few days later, its full recovery was interrupted by the peak in zooplankton grazing, and ambient ammonium concentrations increased...

  12. Promoting Cognitive Complexity in Graduate Written Work: Using Bloom's Taxonomy as a Pedagogical Tool To Improve Literature Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granello, Darcy Haag

    2001-01-01

    Applies Bloom's "Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Handbook I: Cognitive Domain" to the process of graduate-level writing in counselor education. Bloom's Taxonomy is provided as a mechanism to help students develop and demonstrate cognitive complexity when writing comprehensive literature reviews. Outlines tips to move students' writing to more…

  13. Enumeration of bacteria from a Trichodesmium spp. bloom of the eastern Arabian Sea: Elucidation of their possible role in biogeochemistry

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Basu, S.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Furtado, I.

    The carbon-flux via algal bloom events involves bacteria as an important mediator. The present study, carried out during the spring inter-monsoon month of April 2008 onboard CRV Sagar Manjusha-06 in the Eastern Arabian Sea, addresses the bloom...

  14. Structural Dynamics of Community Gene Expression In a Freshwater Cyanobacterial Bloom Over a Day-Night Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Fernando, S.; Thompson, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms are a major problem in eutrophic lakes and reservoirs, negatively impacting the ecology of the water body through oxygen depletion upon bloom decay and in some cases through production of toxins. Waterborne cyanobacterial toxins pose a public health threat through drinking and recreational exposure. The frequency of harmful cyanobacterial blooms (cyanoHABs) is predicted to increase due to warming regional climates (Paerl et.al, 2011) and increases in non-point source pollution due to urban expansion (Novotny, 2011). CyanoHABs represent complex consortia of cyanobacteria that live in association with diverse assemblages of heterotrophic and anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. A better understanding of the structure, function, and interaction between members of the complex microbial communities that support the proliferation of toxigenic cyanobacteria will improve our ability to prevent and control cyanoHABs. Studies of community gene expression, or metatranscriptomics, provide a powerful approach for quantifying changes in both the taxonomic composition (structure) and activity (function) of complex microbial systems in response to dynamic environmental conditions. We have used next-generation Illumina sequencing to characterize the metatranscriptome of a tropical eutrophic drinking water reservoir dominated by the toxigenic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa over a day/night cycle. Bacterioplankton sampling was carried out at six time points over a 24 hour period to capture variability associated with changes in the balance between phototrophic and heterotrophic activity. Total RNA was extracted and subjected to ribosomal depletion followed by cDNA synthesis and sequencing, generating 493,468 to 678,064 95-101 bp post-quality control reads per sample. Hierarchical Clustering of transcriptional profiles supported sorting of samples into two clusters corresponding to "day" and "night" collection times. Annotation of reads through the MG

  15. Cyanobacteria and algae blooms: Review of health and environmental data from the Harmful Algal Bloom-Related Illness Surveillance System (HABISS) 2007-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Lorraine C; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; LePrell, Rebecca; Bolton, Birgit

    2015-04-01

    Algae and cyanobacteria are present in all aquatic environments. We do not have a good sense of the extent of human and animal exposures to cyanobacteria or their toxins, nor do we understand the public health impacts from acute exposures associated with recreational activities or chronic exposures associated with drinking water. We describe the Harmful Algal Bloom-related Illness Surveillance System (HABISS) and summarize the collected reports describing bloom events and associated adverse human and animal health events. For the period of 2007-2011, Departments of Health and/or Environment from 11 states funded by the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention contributed reports for 4534 events. For 2007, states contributed 173 reports from historical data. The states participating in the HABISS program built response capacity through targeted public outreach and prevention activities, including supporting routine cyanobacteria monitoring for public recreation waters. During 2007-2010, states used monitoring data to support196 public health advisories or beach closures. The information recorded in HABISS and the application of these data to develop a wide range of public health prevention and response activities indicate that cyanobacteria and algae blooms are an environmental public health issue that needs continuing attention.

  16. What are the effects of macroalgal blooms on the structure and functioning of marine ecosystems? A systematic review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyons Devin A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anthropogenic activities are believed to have caused an increase in the magnitude, frequency, and extent of macroalgal blooms in marine and estuarine environments. These blooms may contribute to declines in seagrasses and non-blooming macroalgal beds, increasing hypoxia, and reductions in the diversity of benthic invertebrates. However, they may also provide other marine organisms with food and habitat, increase secondary production, and reduce eutrophication. The objective of this systematic review will be to quantify the positive and negative impacts of anthropogenically induced macroalgal blooms in order to determine their effects on ecosystem structure and functioning, and to identify factors that cause their effects to vary. Methods We will search a number of online databases to gather empirical evidence from the literature on the impacts of macroalgal blooms on: (1 species richness and other univariate measures of biodiversity; (2 productivity and abundance of algae, plants, and animals; and (3 biogeochemical cycling and other flows of energy and materials, including trophic interactions and cross-ecosystem subsidies. Data from relevant studies will be extracted and used in a random effects meta-analysis in order to estimate the average effect of macroalgal blooms on each response of interest. Where possible, sub-group analyses will be conducted in order to evaluate how the effects of macroalgal blooms vary according to: (1 which part of the ecosystem is being studied (e.g. which habitat type, taxonomic group, or trophic level; (2 the size of blooms; (3 the region in which blooms occurred; (4 background levels of ecosystem productivity; (5 physical and chemical conditions; (6 aspects of study design and quality (e.g. lab vs. field, experimental vs. observational, degree of replication; and (7 whether the blooms are believed to be anthropogenically induced or not.

  17. Molecular identification of bloom-forming species Phaeocystis globosa (Prymnesiophyta) and its dispersal based on rDNA ITS sequence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yueqin; Shao Peng; Wang Ning; Zhou Hui; Qu Lianghu; Linda K. Medlin

    2003-01-01

    The colony-forming Phaeocystis species are causative agents of dense bloom occurrences in coastal waters worldwide. It is difficult to separate them because of the different morphologies associated with their colonial stages. In this study we applied molecular approaches to analyze the genetic variation of Phaeocystis globosa and Phaeocystis pouchetii from several geographic regions, and to assist in tracing the dispersal of bloom-forming Phaeocystis species in coastal waters of China. The sequences of the internal transcribed spacers ( ITS1 and ITS2) of rDNA and the 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene of Phaeocystis strains were determined. Sequence comparison shows that P.globosa was the most divergent to P. pouchetii, exhibiting sequence divergence higher than 0.08. However, lower genetic divergences existed between strains of P. globosa. The sequence comparison of the Phaeocystis rDNA ITS clearly shows that the species isolated from the southeast coast of China is identified as P. globosa rather than P. cf. pouchetii or other species. Furthermore, the significance of rDNA variation in distinct global populations of P. globosa suggested it might have had sufficient time to accumulate detectable mutations at the rDNA locus, supporting the hypothesis of ancient dispersal of P.globosa to many areas, meaning that P. globosa blooms in the coastal waters of China are endemic rather than a newly introduced species or a foreign source. Finally, based on the high divergent region of rDNA ITS, a pair of species-specific primers for P. globosa were designed, they could be useful to detect the presence of this species in mixed plankton assemblages or flagellate stages that are recognized with diffculties by means of conventional microscopy.

  18. 太湖蓝藻水华一体化监测系统应用%Application of Cyanobacteria Blooms Integrated Monitoring System in Taihu Lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱玉东; 王玉; 程立刚; 徐建秋

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the trend of Taihu Lake eutrophication is not going well and the cyanobacteria blooms occurs frequently. Taihu Basin Authority builds the Taihu Lake monitoring system integrated with water quality online monitoring, real-time video monitoring, satellite remote-sensing monitoring and artificial survey. The system realizes a comprehensive, multi channel and three-dimensional integrated Taihu Lake cyanobacteria blooms monitoring function, which integrates point monitoring of water quality, video monitoring along shoreline and area monitoring by satellite. The integrated application of multi source information provides a valid method to get the information about area, intensity, position, variety of cyanobacteria blooms accurately and timely.%太湖近年来水体富营养化趋势不容乐观,蓝藻水华频发。太湖流域管理局采用水质在线监测、实时视频监控、卫星遥感监测辅以人工调查相结合的技术手段,从水质的点监测、沿湖视频的岸线监测到卫星的面监测实现全方位、多通道、三维一体的太湖蓝藻水华监测系统。多源监测信息的综合应用,为及时全面准确掌握蓝藻水华的发生面积、程度、位置及变化情况提供可靠的技术手段。

  19. Effect of volcano ash additions on nutrient concentrations, bloom dynamics and community metabolism in a short-term experiment in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbauer, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Volcano ash deposition is now considered as an important source of inorganic bioavailable iron which can relieve Fe-limitation in the ocean. As volcano ash also releases PO4, a experiment was performed in the NW Mediterranean Sea to test whether volcano ash deposition can affect nutrient dynamics and bloom development in a P-limited system. In a 54h experiment, it was shown that the development of a phytoplankton bloom was not enhanced or even repressed by ash additions of 2 and 20 mg l-1, whereas higher ash concentrations (200 mg l-1) induced a phytoplankton bloom as indicated by elevated Chlorophyll-a levels. Concurrently, net community production (NCP) and gross primary production (GPP) were enhanced at T24h at the highest ash additions. The metabolic balance was roughly neutral at low or no ash additions, but shifted towards phototrophy at the highest ash additions. The data on inorganic nutrient development and release estimates from ash material assays suggest relieving of P-limitation concomitant with NO3 and silicate use from ash. The concentration of TEP increased with increasing ash levels. The abundances of the heterotrophic compartment (bacteria, viruses and ciliates) also indicated dose-dependent responses. Our data suggest that heterotrophs won the competition for inorganic nutrients at ash levels of 2 and 20 mg l-1, whereas phytoplankton won at levels of 200 mg l-1. Overall, our experiments point to a strong potential of volcano ash deposition as forcing factor for nutrient dynamics and the activity of microbial plankton in a P-limited system.

  20. Attribute-space connectivity and connected filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper connected operators from mathematical morphology are extended to a wider class of operators, which are based on connectivities in higher dimensional spaces, similar to scale spaces, which will be called attribute-spaces. Though some properties of connected filters are lost, granulometr

  1. Patterns of plankton communities in subtropical waters off the Canary Islands during the late winter bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoker, Claire; Ojeda, Alicia; Hernández-León, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    The microbial planktonic community of the subtropical waters around Gran Canaria Island, Canary Islands, was studied before, during and after the typical late winter bloom. The study consisted of a weekly sampling from October 2005 to June 2006 at five stations. Abundances and biomass of heterotrophic prokaryotes, small autotrophic plankton (picoplankton 0.2-2 μm in ESD), heterotrophic and autotrophic nanoflagellates (nanoplankton mainly in the range of 3-4 μm in ESD), microzooplankton (mainly ciliates and dinoflagellates 15-200 μm in ESD) and mesozooplankton (> 200 μm in ESD) were estimated in order to know the effect of the winter mixing. During all the period of study, microplankton abundance was dominated by small athecate dinoflagellates (15-20 μm in ESD) whereas its biomass was dominated by aloricate ciliates (20-30 μm and > 40 μm in ESD). The bloom began with the increase of autotrophic picoplanktonic cells and small diatoms. Consecutively, nano-, micro-, and mesozooplankton biomass also increased. During the development of the winter bloom, picoplankton, heterotrophic nanoflagellates, microzooplankton, mainly aloricate ciliates, and mesozooplankton showed inverse trends suggesting that the bloom is a succession of complex top-down controls.

  2. BLOOMS OF EPHEMERAL GREEN ALGAE IN SAN ANDRES ISLAND, INTERNATIONAL BIOSPHERE RESERVE SEAFLOWER, SOUTHWESTERN CARIBBEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Gavio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the presence of persistent blooms of Chaetomorpha linum in San Andres island, Southwestern Caribbean, during the year 2013.RESUMENReportamos la presencia de florecimientos persistentes del alga verde Chaetomorpha linum en la isla de San Andrès, Caribe suroccidental.

  3. Impact of Harmful Algal Blooms on Several Lake Erie Drinking Water Treatment Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent events in Ohio have demonstrated the challenge treatment facilities face in providing safe drinking water when encountering extreme harmful algal bloom (HAB) events. Over the last two years the impact of HAB-related microcystins on several drinking water treatment facilit...

  4. Effect of Multiple Intelligence Theory Practice on Student Success by Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunoz, Abdulkadir

    2011-01-01

    In this study, it is aimed to determine the effects of the "Multiple Intelligence Theory" on the retention and achievement of the students according to Bloom Taxonomy. This study is a research as an experimental model. Research in academic year of 2008/2009 in Foca Izmir Lesbos Reha Country High School 9 Class is conducted on students. In this…

  5. Interaction between the helicases genetically linked to Fanconi anemia group J and Bloom's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhasini, Avvaru N; Rawtani, Nina A; Wu, Yuliang;

    2011-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) and Fanconi anemia (FA) are autosomal recessive disorders characterized by cancer and chromosomal instability. BS and FA group J arise from mutations in the BLM and FANCJ genes, respectively, which encode DNA helicases. In this work, FANCJ and BLM were found to interact...

  6. Monitoring of ocean surface algal blooms in coastal and oceanic waters around India.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tholkapiyan, M.; Shanmugam, P.; Suresh, T.

    .1029/2010JC006796. Shanmugam, P., Suresh, M., & Sundarabalan, V.B. (2013). OSABT An innovative algorithm to detect and characterize surface algal blooms. IEEE Transaction on Selected Topics in Earth Observations and Remote Sensing, 6, 1879-1892. Shankar, D...

  7. How rising CO2 and global warming may stimulate harmful cyanobacterial blooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Visser; J.M.H. Verspagen; G. Sandrini; L.J. Stal; H.C.P. Matthijs; T.W. Davis; H.W. Paerl; J. Huisman

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is likely to stimulate the development of harmful cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic waters, with negative consequences for water quality of many lakes, reservoirs and brackish ecosystems across the globe. In addition to effects of temperature and eutrophication, recent research has s

  8. Algal blooms in the seas around India - Networking for research and outreach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.R.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    - goers and seaside residents in South Africa?s largest False Bay, faced discomfort of coughing, burning of n a- sal pass ages, difficulty in breathing, stinging eyes and skin irritation due to release of toxins in the sea - spray aerosols by the blooms...

  9. "Byatt versus Bloom: or, Reading by Patricide versus Reading by Love"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børch, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Antonia Byatt's Possession takes issue with Harold Bloom's famous claim that creation - including an author's creative reading of an intertext - entails a violent encounter. Byatt's book suggests a more positive Construction of the process by which tradition is transformed in transmission....

  10. Using Bloom's Taxonomy to Evaluate the Cognitive Levels of Master Class Textbook's Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaly, Ibtihal R.; Smadi, Oqlah M.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the cognitive levels of the questions following the reading texts of Master Class textbook. A checklist based on Bloom's Taxonomy was the instrument used to categorize the cognitive levels of these questions. The researchers used proper statistics to rank the cognitive levels of the comprehension questions. The…

  11. An Evaluation of E-Learning on the Basis of Bloom's Taxonomy: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawi, Leila A.; McCarthy, Richard V.; Pires, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Universities have rushed to expand their delivery of courses through e-learning environments. But is e-learning effective? The authors conducted an exploratory study to evaluate e-learning through WebCT on the basis of Bloom's taxonomy. The authors distributed 75 questionnaires to investigate whether individual or instructional factors play an…

  12. Bloom de Noctiluca scintillans y Ceratium dens en el Golfo de Guayaquil (2004)

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, G.; Palacios, C.

    2007-01-01

    El objetivo de este estudio fue difundir las investigaciones del bloom de C. dens y N. scintillans ocurridos en el Golfo de Guayaquil como parte del Proyecto de Mareas Rojas desarrollado por el Instituto Oceanográfico de la Armada (INOCAR).

  13. Impact of elevated pH on succession in the Arctic spring bloom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Karen; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Hansen, Per Juel

    2015-01-01

    at the initiation of the spring bloom each year and manipulated to cover pH levels in the range of 8.0-9.5 to test the immediate tolerance of Arctic protist plankton to elevated pH under nutrient-limiting (2011) and nutrient-rich conditions (2012). The most pronounced effect of elevated pH was found......The development of pH during the spring bloom in 2011 and 2012 was investigated in Disko Bay, West Greenland. During the spring phytoplankton bloom pH reached 8.5 at the peak of the bloom. Subsequently, the pH decreased to 7.5. Microcosm experiments were conducted on natural assemblages sampled...... for heterotrophic protists, whereas phytoplankton proved more robust. Two out of three heterotrophic protist species were significantly affected if pH increased above 8.5, and all heterotrophic protists had disappeared at pH 9.5. Based on Chl a measurements from the two sets of experiments, phytoplankton community...

  14. Phytoplankton Dynamics During the Spring Bloom in the South-eastern English Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, C.; Brylinski, J. M.; Bodineau, L.; Thoumelin, G.; Bentley, D.; Hilde, D.

    1996-10-01

    The two main phases of a phytoplankton spring bloom in the South-eastern English Channel were studied during two 3-day cruises in March and May 1992. Physico-chemical parameters were measured, such as temperature, salinity, density, turbidity and nutrients, as well as biological parameters ( in situchlorophyll afluorescence, photosynthetic pigments and fatty acids). Photo-synthetic pigments and fatty acids were used as taxonomic and physiological markers of phytoplankton populations. Data suggest the existence of two ' biological provinces ' north and south of the Bay of Somme. In the Northern province, the bloom starts earlier, probably due to the shallower coastal water, and is characterized by high proportions of diatoms and, successively, of Prymnesiophytes ( Phaeocystissp.). The bloom maintains high biomass levels sustained by inputs from the Somme River and probable nutrient regeneration. The Southern province, directly influenced by the Seine River, is characterized by a deeper coastal water column and the presence of phytoflagellates. Despite the higher supply of nutrients from the Seine River, the bloom starts later and supports a lower phytoplankton biomass. The differences between both areas are analysed on the basis of the hydrodynamism of the area, and are interpreted as two different stages of the same process. To understand the spatio-temporal variations of phytoplankton dynamics, interactions between biology and hydrodynamical characteristics of this area are discussed.

  15. From Rare to Dominant: a Fine-Tuned Soil Bacterial Bloom during Petroleum Hydrocarbon Bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Sebastián; Barra, Bárbara; Caporaso, J Gregory; Seeger, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Hydrocarbons are worldwide-distributed pollutants that disturb various ecosystems. The aim of this study was to characterize the short-lapse dynamics of soil microbial communities in response to hydrocarbon pollution and different bioremediation treatments. Replicate diesel-spiked soil microcosms were inoculated with either a defined bacterial consortium or a hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial enrichment and incubated for 12 weeks. The microbial community dynamics was followed weekly in microcosms using Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Both the bacterial consortium and enrichment enhanced hydrocarbon degradation in diesel-polluted soils. A pronounced and rapid bloom of a native gammaproteobacterium was observed in all diesel-polluted soils. A unique operational taxonomic unit (OTU) related to the Alkanindiges genus represented ∼ 0.1% of the sequences in the original community but surprisingly reached >60% after 6 weeks. Despite this Alkanindiges-related bloom, inoculated strains were maintained in the community and may explain the differences in hydrocarbon degradation. This study shows the detailed dynamics of a soil bacterial bloom in response to hydrocarbon pollution, resembling microbial blooms observed in marine environments. Rare community members presumably act as a reservoir of ecological functions in high-diversity environments, such as soils. This rare-to-dominant bacterial shift illustrates the potential role of a rare biosphere facing drastic environmental disturbances. Additionally, it supports the concept of "conditionally rare taxa," in which rareness is a temporary state conditioned by environmental constraints. PMID:26590285

  16. Phaeocystis blooms in the global ocean and their controlling mechanisms : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemann, [No Value; Becquevort, S; Stefels, J; Rousseau, W; Lancelot, C

    2005-01-01

    Phaeocystis is a genus of marine phytoplankton with a world-wide distribution. It has a polymorphic life cycle alternating free-living cells and colonies but develops massive blooms under the colony form in nutrient (major)-enriched areas (mostly nitrates) of the global ocean. Among the 6 species, o

  17. Long term characterization of Trichodesmium erythraeum blooms in Gabès Gulf (Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabeur, Hamza Ismail; Wafa, Feki-Sahnoun; Asma, Hamza; Malika, Bel Hassen

    2016-08-01

    The present paper reports on a twenty six year monitoring of the diazotrophic cyanobacteria, Trichodesmium erythraeum in the Gulf of Gabès associated with environmental parameters and meteorological variables. Trichodesmium erythraeum blooms were not recurrent all years and were observed on average 2.11 times per year over the period between 1988 and 2013. Blooms were associated with temperature exceeding 24 °C and wind speed generally less than 5 m s-1. Trichodesmium erythraeum reached very high densities fluctuating between 0.12×106 and 720×106 trichomes dm-3. The wind speed during dust events and the number of dust days per year were highly correlated to Trichodesmium abundances. Two wind regimes during dust events were identified. The South -South East direction crossing the Tunisian desert generated the most intensive blooms. High dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations (2-14.6 μM) and orthophosphate concentrations (0.05-2.79 μM) were observed during bloom events leading to high N/P ratio well above the Redfield ratio and fluctuating linearly as function of Trichodesmium abundance. The anomalous N/P ratio could result from Trichodesmium erythraeum biological N2 fixation and/or the contribution of atmospheric deposition.

  18. Pronounced daily succession of phytoplankton, archaea and bacteria following a spring bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, David M; Fuhrman, Jed A

    2016-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton perform approximately half of global carbon fixation, with their blooms contributing disproportionately to carbon sequestration(1), and most phytoplankton production is ultimately consumed by heterotrophic prokaryotes(2). Therefore, phytoplankton and heterotrophic community dynamics are important in modelling carbon cycling and the impacts of global change(3). In a typical bloom, diatoms dominate initially, transitioning over several weeks to smaller and motile phytoplankton(4). Here, we show unexpected, rapid community variation from daily rRNA analysis of phytoplankton and prokaryotic community members following a bloom off southern California. Analysis of phytoplankton chloroplast 16S rRNA demonstrated ten different dominant phytoplankton over 18 days alone, including four taxa with animal toxin-producing strains. The dominant diatoms, flagellates and picophytoplankton varied dramatically in carbon export potential. Dominant prokaryotes also varied rapidly. Euryarchaea briefly became the most abundant organism, peaking over a few days to account for about 40% of prokaryotes. Phytoplankton and prokaryotic communities correlated better with each other than with environmental parameters. Extending beyond the traditional view of blooms being controlled primarily by physics and inorganic nutrients, these dynamics imply highly heterogeneous, continually changing conditions over time and/or space and suggest that interactions among microorganisms are critical in controlling plankton diversity, dynamics and fates. PMID:27572439

  19. Bloom-Gilman Duality of Nucleon Spin Structure Function and Elastic Peak Contribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-Bing

    2005-01-01

    By employing the parametrization form of the nucleon spin structure function in the resonance region,which includes the contributions of the resonance peaks and of nonresonance background, we study Bloom-Gilman quark-hadron duality of g1 both in the inelastic resonance region and elastic one.

  20. Risk in Daily Newspaper Coverage of Red Tide Blooms in Southwest Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongchao; Garrison, Bruce; Ullmann, Steven G.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fleming, Lora E.; Hoagland, Porter

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated newspaper coverage of Florida red tide blooms in four metropolitan areas of Southwest Florida during a 25-year period, 1987-2012. We focused on how journalists framed red tide stories with respect to environmental risk, health risk, and economic risk. We determined risk to be a key factor in this news coverage, being an…

  1. Application of Bloom's Taxonomy for Affective Learning and Teaching in College English Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhou-xian

    2014-01-01

    Based on B. S. Bloom's Taxonomy for affective learning and teaching, an overview of how to apply affective teaching into English teaching is demonstrated. It is argued that to cultivate students' affective characteristics should be an indispensable ob-jective in college English teaching.

  2. Using Action Verbs as Learning Outcomes: Applying Bloom's Taxonomy in Measuring Instructional Objectives in Introductory Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevid, Jeffrey S.; McClelland, Nate

    2013-01-01

    We used a set of action verbs based on Bloom's taxonomy to assess learning outcomes in two college-level introductory psychology courses. The action verbs represented an acronym, IDEA, comprising skills relating to identifying, defining or describing, evaluating or explaining, and applying psychological knowledge. Exam performance demonstrated…

  3. Matching Functions and Graphs at Multiple Levels of Bloom's Revised Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kris H.

    2010-01-01

    This article illustrates the power of Bloom's revised taxonomy for teaching, learning, and assessing in aligning our curriculum expectations and our assessment tools in multivariable calculus. The particular assessment tool considered involves a common matching problem to evaluate students' abilities to think about functions from graphical and…

  4. "Analysis" in Teaching with Cases: A Revisit to Bloom's Taxonomy of Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzouk, Nabil Y.; Razzouk, Jay N.

    2008-01-01

    "Analysis", the core of graduate business education is probably one of the least understood and most misrepresented learning activities. Everyone seems to claim that they know it, yet most seem unable to actually define it or practice it. This paper reviews Bloom's taxonomy of learning objectives with a special focus on "analysis." More…

  5. Measurement of Learning Process by Semantic Annotation Technique on Bloom's Taxonomy Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanchinda, Jirawit; Yodmongkol, Pitipong; Chakpitak, Nopasit

    2016-01-01

    A lack of science and technology knowledge understanding of most rural people who had the highest education at elementary education level more than others level is unsuccessfully transferred appropriate technology knowledge for rural sustainable development. This study provides the measurement of the learning process by on Bloom's Taxonomy…

  6. Spring Blooms Observed with Biochemical Profiling Floats from a Chemical and Biological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, J. N.; Johnson, K. S.; Sakamoto, C.; Jannasch, H. W.; Coletti, L. J.; Elrod, V.

    2015-12-01

    Recently there has been renewed interest in the mechanisms which control the seasonal increases in plankton biomass (spring blooms). Changes in physical and chemical forcing (light, wind, heat and nutrients) may increase the specific growth rate of phytoplankton. These changes may also shift the predator - prey relationships within the food web structure, which can alter the balance between plankton growth and loss rates. Biogeochemical profiling floats provide a means to observe the seasonal evolution of spring blooms from a physical, chemical and biological perspective in near real time. Floats equipped with optical sensors to measure nitrate, oxygen, chlorophyll fluorescence, and optical backscatter now have a presence in many ocean regions including the North Pacific, Subarctic Pacific, North Atlantic, South Atlantic and the Southern Ocean. Data from these regions are used to compare and contrast the evolution of spring blooms. The evolution of the bloom is examined using both chemical (oxygen, nitrate) and biooptical (phytoplankton from chlorophyll fluorescence and particulate organic carbon from optical backscatter) sensors under vastly different environmental conditions.

  7. An Efficient Data Fingerprint Query Algorithm Based on Two-Leveled Bloom Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhou

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The function of the comparing fingerprints algorithm was to judge whether a new partitioned data chunk was in a storage system a decade ago.  At present, in the most de-duplication backup system the fingerprints of the big data chunks are huge and cannot be stored in the memory completely. The performance of the system is unavoidably retarded by data chunks accessing the storage system at the querying stage. Accordingly, a new query mechanism namely Two-stage Bloom Filter (TBF mechanism is proposed. Firstly, as a representation of the entirety for the first grade bloom filter, each bit of the second grade bloom filter in the TBF represents the chunks having the identical fingerprints reducing the rate of false positives. Secondly, a two-dimensional list is built corresponding to the two grade bloom filter for the absolute addresses of the data chunks with the identical fingerprints.  Finally, a new hash function class with the strong global random characteristic is set up according to the data fingerprints’ random characteristics. To reduce the comparing data greatly, TBF decreases the number of accessing disks, improves the speed of detecting the redundant data chunks, and reduces the rate of false positives which helps the improvement of the overall performance of system.

  8. Beach-goer behavior during a retrospectively detected algal bloom at a Great Lakes beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algal blooms occur among nutrient rich, warm surface waters and may adversely impact recreational beaches. During July – September 2003, a prospective study of beachgoers was conducted on weekends at a public beach on a Great Lake in the United States. We measured each beac...

  9. Aggregation and sedimentation processes during a spring phytoplankton bloom: A field experiment to test coagulation theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Lundsgaard, Claus; Olesen, Michael;

    1994-01-01

    , on the turbulent shear that makes particles collide, and on their stickiness (= probability of adhesion upon collision), During a mixed diatom bloom in a shallow Danish fjord, for 3 weeks we monitored the concentration and stickiness of suspended particles and the species composition of the phytoplankton at 2-3 d...

  10. Controls of primary production in two phytoplankton blooms in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppe, C.J.M.; Klaas, C.; Ossebaar, S.; Soppa, M.A.; Cheah, W.; Laglera, L.M.; Santos-Echeandia, J.; Rost, B.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.A.; Bracher, A.; Hoppema, M.; Strass, V.

    2016-01-01

    The Antarctic Circumpolar Current has a high potential for primary production and carbon sequestration through the biological pump. In the current study, two large-scale blooms observed in 2012 during a cruise with R.V. Polarstern were investigated with respect to phytoplankton standing stocks, prim

  11. Critical depth and critical turbulence : Two different mechanisms for the development of phytoplankton blooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J.; van Oostveen, P.; Weissing, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    A turbulent diffusion model shows that there are two different mechanisms for the development of phytoplankton blooms. One of these mechanisms works in well-mixed environments and corresponds to the classical critical depth theory. The other mechanism is based on the rate of turbulent mixing. If tur

  12. Critical depth and critical turbulence: two different mechanisms for the development of phytoplankton blooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J.; Van Oostveen, P.; Weissing, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    A turbulent diffusion model shows that there are two different mechanisms for the development of phytoplankton blooms. One of these mechanisms works in well-mixed environments and corresponds to the classical critical depth theory. The other mechanism is based on the rate of turbulent mixing. If tur

  13. Impact of river discharge on phytoplankton bloom dynamics in eutrophic estuaries: A model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, B.; de Swart, H.E.

    2015-01-01

    Field observations in estuaries reveal that phytoplankton blooms are strongly affected by advection processes related to river flow. To gain quantitative insight into this dependence, experiments were performed with a new idealised model that couples physical and biological processes. Advection of p

  14. FATTY ACID AND STEROL COMPOSITION OF A KARENIA BREVIS BLOOM IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the Gulf of Mexico, recurring algal blooms, caused by Karenia brevis (formerly known as Gymnodinium breve), have significant adverse health and economic impacts. K. brevis is one member of a small group of dinoflagellates, related morphologically and by DNA-based phylogenetic ...

  15. Optimization of micro-source output of a grid-connected micro-grid%并网状态下微电网中微电源出力优化算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王振华; 朱桂萍

    2012-01-01

    Conforming to the system operation constraints, the optimization of micro-source outputs of a grid-connected micro-grid was conducted for different objectives, such as total power generation cost and consumption cost minimization, or the environmental benefit maximization. The mathematical model was established for a benchmark micro-grid system suggested by CIGRE which was consisted of a micro-turbine, fuel cells, two photovoltaic systems and a flywheel energy storage system. The numerical solution based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) was performed. Optimization results demonstrate the validity and feasibility of the proposed method.%研究并网状态下微电网中的微电源出力优化问题,在满足系统运行约束的条件下根据不同的优化目标优化微电网中各微电源的出力,使系统的运行成本最低、负荷用电成本最低或环境效益最高.建立含有微型燃气轮机、燃料电池、太阳能光伏电池、风力发电和飞轮储能的微电网系统在与上级配电网系统并网状态下各微电源出力优化的数学模型,介绍基于粒子群优化算法的求解方法,通过基准测试系统进行算例分析,验证所提出方法的有效性与可行性.

  16. Then the Wilderness Shall Bloom like a Rosy Bower

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    In his article “The holy Road as a Bridge: The Role of Chapter 35 in the Book of Isaiah”, Hallvard Hagelia has demonstrated the intertextual connections between Isa 35 and the rest of the book. According to Hagelia, the animal motive plays a very small part in Isa 35, although he points at variou...... the same function. They are metaphors for Israel's enemies (cf. Isa 34 and 36-39). The animal motive is therefore part of the bridge made by Isa 35. My analysis thereby strengthens Hallvard Hagelia's arguments for seeing Isa 35 as a bridge in the Book of Isaiah....

  17. Teaching Introductory Organic Chemistry: 'Blooming' beyond a Simple Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pungente, Michael D.; Badger, Rodney A.

    2003-07-01

    Undergraduate students often experience fear and trepidation when studying introductory organic chemistry: the majority of these students use a memorization approach to the material, sacrificing understanding. This paper describes one way the problem can be resolved. The cognitive working level we emphasize in our teaching practice involves making the necessary connections between the general chemistry principles that students have learned (or at least have been exposed to in their senior high school years and have revisited again in their university freshman year) and the many reactions and mechanisms they will encounter in organic chemistry. Educating students early in the course about the various levels of the cognitive process and the necessary working level of cognition for success in organic chemistry teaches connections between the general chemistry principles and reaction mechanisms. This empowers students to approach the subject from a perspective of understanding rather than memorization, and replaces fear and trepidation with confidence. In addition, this can help narrow the gap between what instructors expect from their students and what their students think is sufficient to master the course content.

  18. Arctic spring awakening - Steering principles behind the phenology of vernal ice algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, E.; Mundy, C. J.; Assmy, P.; Campbell, K.; Gabrielsen, T. M.; Gosselin, M.; Juul-Pedersen, T.; Gradinger, R.

    2015-12-01

    Marine ecosystems at high latitudes are characterized by extreme seasonal changes in light conditions, as well as a limited period of high primary production during spring and early summer. As light returns at the end of winter to Arctic ice-covered seas, a first algal bloom takes place in the bottom layer of the sea ice. This bottom ice algae community develops through three distinct phases in the transition from winter to spring, starting with phase I, a predominantly net heterotroph community that has limited interaction with the pelagic or benthic realms. Phase II begins in the spring once light for photosynthesis becomes available at the ice bottom, although interaction with the water column and benthos remains limited. The transition to the final phase III is then mainly driven by a balance of atmospheric and oceanographic forcing that induce structural changes in the sea ice and ultimately the removal of algal biomass from the ice. Due to limited data availability an incomplete understanding exists of all the processes determining ice algal bloom phenology and the considerable geographic differences in sympagic algal standing stocks and primary production. We present here the first pan-Arctic compilation of available time-series data on vernal sea ice algal bloom development and identify the most important factors controlling its development and termination. Using data from the area surrounding Resolute Bay (Nunavut, Canada) as an example, we support previous investigations that snow cover on top of the ice influences sea ice algal phenology, with highest biomass development, but also earliest termination of blooms, under low snow cover. We also provide a pan-Arctic overview of sea ice algae standing stocks and primary production, and discuss the pertinent processes behind the geographic differences we observed. Finally, we assess potential future changes in vernal algal bloom phenology as a consequence of climate change, including their importance to

  19. Is the ''blooming sign'' a promising additional tool to determine malignancy in MR mammography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate potential diagnostic relevance of blooming effect for verification of suspicious breast lesions in MR mammography (MRM). The MRM examinations of 1035 patients, all following the same imaging protocol (from 1994 to 2001) were retrospectively evaluated by two experienced radiologists in consensus. A total of 817 lesions showed a focal enhancement; of these, 793 were histologically verified after surgical intervention so that 514 malignant and 279 benign lesions could be evaluated. Using a 1.5-T Gyroscan ACS II-imager (Philips, Hamburg, Germany) and a double breast coil with the patient lying in a prone position, 0.1 mmol/kgbw Magnevist (Schering, Berlin, Germany) were injected into the cubital vein to obtain dynamic axial and coronal T1-weighted fast-field-echo images every minute up to 7 min after bolus injection. Blooming sign describes a progradient unsharpness of lesion borders initially sharply shaped and fast enhancing 7 min after bolus injection; 324 of 514 (63.0%) malignant lesions and 41 of 279 (14.7%) benign lesions revealed a blooming sign (sensitivity 63.0%, specificity 85.3%, accuracy 70.9%, positive predictive value 88.8%, negative predictive value 56.0%). Forty-one of 279 benign lesions showed a blooming sign; of these, there were 4 of 86 (4.7%) fibroadenomas, 2 of 21 (9.5%) phylloides tumours, 11 of 38 (28.9%) papillomas, 3 of 9 (33.3%) radial scars, 2 of 19 (10.5%) mastitis, 1 of 4 (25%) galactophoritis, 1 of 3 (33.3%) ADH and 19 of 99 (17.2%) mastopathic proliferations, respectively. Blooming sign is a phenomenon which should be taken into account when diagnosing MR mammographies because it might increase the ability to discriminate uncertain breast lesions; however, this effect can only be used as an additional item to other well-known effects such as plateau, washout and cancer corner

  20. Future Climate Impacts on Harmful Algal Blooms in an Agriculturally Dominated Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloysius, N. R.; Martin, J.; Ludsin, S.; Stumpf, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    Cyanobacteria blooms have become a major problem worldwide in aquatic ecosystems that receive excessive runoff of limiting nutrients from terrestrial drainage. Such blooms often are considered harmful because they degrade ecosystem services, threaten public health, and burden local economies. Owing to changing agricultural land-use practices, Lake Erie, the most biologically productive of the North American Great Lakes, has begun to undergo a re-eutrophication in which the frequency and extent of harmful algal blooms (HABs) has increased. Continued climate change has been hypothesized to magnify the HAB problem in Lake Erie in the absence of new agricultural management practices, although this hypothesis has yet to be formally tested empirically. Herein, we tested this hypothesis by predicting how the frequency and extent of potentially harmful cyanobacteria blooms will change in Lake Erie during the 21st century under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment climate projections in the region. To do so, we used 80 ensembles of climate projections from 20 Global Climate Models (GCMs) and two greenhouse gas emission scenarios (moderate reduction, RCP4.5; business-as-usual, RCP8.5) to drive a spatiotemporally explicit watershed-hydrology model that was linked to several statistical predictive models of annual cyanobacteria blooms in Lake Erie. Owing to anticipated increases in precipitation during spring and warmer temperatures during summer, our ensemble of predictions revealed that, if current land-management practices continue, the frequency of severe HABs in Lake Erie will increase during the 21st century. These findings identify a real need to consider future climate projections when developing nutrient reduction strategies in the short term, with adaptation also needing to be encouraged under both greenhouse gas emissions scenarios in the absence of effective nutrient mitigation strategies.

  1. Development of Phaeocystis globosa blooms in the upwelling waters of the South Central coast of Viet Nam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Doan-Nhu; Lam, Nguyen-Ngoc; Dippner, Joachim W.

    2010-11-01

    Blooms of haptophyte algae in the south central coastal waters of Viet Nam often occur in association with upwelling phenomenon during the southwest (SW) monsoon. Depending on the magnitude of the blooms, damage to aquaculture farms may occur. Based on two years of data on biology, oceanography, and marine chemistry, the present study suggests a conceptual model of the growth of the haptophyte Phaeocystis globosa. At the beginning of the bloom, low temperature and abundant nutrient supply, especially nitrate from rain and upwelling, favour bloom development. Diatoms utilize available nitrate and phosphate; subsequently, higher ammonium concentration allows P. globosa to grow faster than the diatoms. At the end of the Phaeocystis bloom, free cells may become available as food for a heterotrophic dinoflagellate species, Noctiluca scintillans. During and after the phytoplankton bloom, remineralization by bacteria reduces dissolved oxygen to a very low concentration at depth, and favors growth of nitrate-reducing bacteria.A Lagrangian Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) model, driven by a circulation model of the area, realistically simulates the transport of microalgae in surface waters during strong and weak SW monsoon periods, suggesting that it may be a good tool for early warning of HABs in Vietnamese coastal waters.

  2. Proteomic analysis of hepatic tissue of Cyprinus carpio L. exposed to cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Taihu, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlin Jiang

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of industry and agriculture and associated pollution, the cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Taihu have become a major threat to aquatic wildlife and human health. In this study, the ecotoxicological effects of cyanobacterial blooms on cage-cultured carp (Cyprinus carpio L. in Meiliang Bay of Lake Taihu were investigated. Microcystins (MCs, major cyanobacterial toxins, have been detected in carp cultured at different experimental sites of Meiliang Bay. We observed that the accumulation of MCs in carp was closely associated with several environmental factors, including temperature, pH value, and density of cyanobacterial blooms. The proteomic profile of carp liver exposed to cyanobacterial blooms was analyzed using two-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry. The toxic effects of cyanobacterial blooms on carp liver were similar to changes caused by MCs. MCs were transported into liver cells and induced the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. MCs and ROS inhibited protein phosphatase and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH, directly or indirectly resulting in oxidative stress and disruption of the cytoskeleton. These effects further interfered with metabolic pathways in the liver through the regulation of series of related proteins. The results of this study indicated that cyanobacterial blooms pose a major threat to aquatic wildlife in Meiliang Bay in Lake Taihu. These results provided evidence of the molecular mechanisms underlying liver damage in carp exposed to cyanobacterial blooms.

  3. Effects of sludge dredging on the prevention and control of algae-caused black bloom in Taihu Lake, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei He; Jingge Shang; Xin Lu; Chengxin Fan

    2013-01-01

    Algae-caused black bloom (also known as black water agglomerate) has recently become a critical problem in some Ctinese lakes.It has been suggested that the occurrence of algae-caused black bloom was caused by the cooperation of nutrient-rich sediment with dead algae,and sludge dredging was adopted to control black bloom in some lakes of China.In this article,based on the simulation of black bloom using a Y-shape apparatus for modeling natural conditions,both un-dredged and dredged sites in three areas of Taihu Lake,China were studied to estimate the effects of dredging on the prevention and control of black bloom.During the experiment,drained algae were added to all six sites as an additional organic load; subsequently,the dissolved oxygen decreased rapidly,dropping to 0 mg/L at the sediment-water interface.Black bloom did not occur in the dredged sites of Moon Bay and Nan Quan,whereas all three un-dredged sites at Fudu Port,Moon Bay and Nan Quan experienced black bloom.Black bloom also occurred at the dredged site of Fudu Port one day later than at the other sites,and the odor and color were lighter than at the other locations.The color and odor of the black water mainly result from the presence of sulfides such as metal sulfides and hydrogen sulfide,among other chemicals,under reductive conditions.The color and odor of the water,together with the high concentrations of nutrients,were mainly caused by the decomposition of the algae and the presence of nutrient-rich sediment.Overall,the removal of the nutrient-rich sediment by dredging can prevent the occurrence and control the degree of algae-caused black bloom in Taihu Lake.

  4. Extraction methods of cyanobacteria bloom in Lake Tai based on MODIS vegetation index%基于MODIS植被指数的太湖蓝藻信息提取方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亚春; 孙佳丽; 谢志清; 谢小萍

    2011-01-01

    有效地提取蓝藻水华信息对分析蓝藻动态分布有重要意义,而卫星遥感技术是进行太湖水质监测与保护的措施之一.本文以2007年7月25日Terra/MODIS数据为主要数据源,用比值植被指数(Irv)、归一化植被指数(Indv)和增强型植被指数(Iev),研究提取太湖蓝藻信息.结果表明:植被指数可以有效提取遥感影像中的蓝藻水华信息,其中Indv是应用效果较好的植被指数之一;在掩膜处理后,用Indv提取了太湖蓝藻的面积分布信息,效果较好;此外,选取Indv为测试变量,利用决策树分类法,有效地把蓝藻水华高浓度覆盖区、中浓度覆盖区和轻浓度覆盖区分开来,为准确掌握太湖蓝藻发生、发展趋势和发生程度提供可靠信息.%It is very important to extract the information of cyanobacteria bloom-forming in order to analyze the distribution of cyanobacteria bloom, and remote sensing is one of measures of monitoring and protecting water quality in Lake Tai. In this paper, Terra/MODIS data of July 25, 2007 were selected as a main data source. The information of cyanobacteria bloom was extracted by three kinds of MODIS vegetation index(Irv, Indv and Iev). The results showed that these vegetation index methods were able to get cyanobacteria information from the image, and that Indv is one of the methods which have better application effect. The area information of cyanobacteria bloom was also extracted by Indv after mask treatment. Then the areas covered by high, middle or low of cyanobacteria bloom was able to be separated by building decision tree with Indv, as the test variable. Therefore, the present study provides technical reference for long-term monitoring cyanobacteria bloom-forming in Lake Tai.

  5. Responses of dissolved trace gases (CH4, N2O, CO, NMHCs, CH3Cl) to phytoplankton bloom during in situ iron enrichment (SEEDII) in the western subarctic Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, S.; Nakagawa, F.; Sasakawa, M.; Yamaguchi, J.; Komatsu, D. D.; Ijiri, A.; Tsunogai, U.; Horiguchi, T.; Kawamura, H.; Tsuda, A.

    2006-12-01

    Biogeochemical processes in ocean surface are known to play important roles in the global circulation of many trace gases: not only CO2 but also non-CO2 gases, such as CH4, N2O, CO, NMHCs and CH3Cl. The mixing ratios of these components in air are highly responsible for controlling global warming, stratospheric and tropospheric O3, tropospheric OH, organic aerosols, and peroxides. While future global changes could alter air-sea fluxes of these components in ocean surface, the detailed processes to produce/consume these components, as well as the range of the variations, are not clarified as yet. The iron fertilization experiment offers us a wonderful chance to quantify the effect of phytoplankton bloom to the production of the trace gases. During 2004 iron-enrichment experiment in the northwest subarctic Pacific (SEEDSII), we monitored mixing ratios of the trace gases (CH4, N2O, CO, NMHCs and CH3Cl) within the phytoplankton bloom. Besides, the stable isotopic ratios were also monitored to clarify the processes that are responsible for the variations. Both the mixing ratios and the stable isotopic ratios of dissolved CH4, N2O and CH3Cl exhibit little changes during the 23 days observation. On the other hand, dissolved CO exhibit remarkable change in the carbon isotopic composition as phytoplankton bloomed. The maximum variation reached to about 25‰ depletion in δ13C. We conclude that the enrichment of the CO precursor must be responsible for the variation. Furthermore, in accordance with the phytoplankton bloomed, the concentration of NMHCs, especially alkane, exhibit remarkable enrichment in the mixing rations: 3 times for ethane, 4 times for propane, 13 times for butane compared with those prior to the bloom. In accordance with the enrichment, the stable carbon isotopic composition of ethane and propane increased, while that of butane decreased. To clarify the source of alkane during the bloom, we determined both concentration and δ13C of alkane emitted from

  6. Minimum cost connection networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    . We use three axioms to characterize allocation rules that truthfully implement cost minimizing networks satisfying all connection demands in a game where: (1) a central planner announces an allocation rule and a cost estimation rule; (2) every agent reports her own connection demand as well as all...... connection costs; and, (3) the central planner selects a cost minimizing network satisfying reported connection demands based on estimated connection costs and allocates true connection costs of the selected network.......In the present paper we consider the allocation of cost in connection networks. Agents have connection demands in form of pairs of locations they want to be connected. Connections between locations are costly to build. The problem is to allocate costs of networks satisfying all connection demands...

  7. Simulation and experimental characterization of the point spread function, pixel saturation, and blooming of a mercury cadmium telluride focal plane array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soehnel, Grant; Tanbakuchi, Anthony

    2012-11-20

    A custom IR spot scanning experiment was constructed to project subpixel spots on a mercury cadmium telluride focal plane array (FPA). The hardware consists of an FPA in a liquid nitrogen cooled Dewar, high precision motorized stages, a custom aspheric lens, and a 1.55 and 3.39 μm laser source. By controlling the position and intensity of the spot, characterizations of cross talk, saturation, blooming, and (indirectly) the minority carrier lifetime were performed. In addition, a Monte-Carlo-based charge diffusion model was developed to validate experimental data and make predictions. Results show very good agreement between the model and experimental data. Parameters such as wavelength, reverse bias, and operating temperature were found to have little effect on pixel crosstalk in the absorber layer of the detector. Saturation characterizations show that these FPAs, which do not have antiblooming circuitry, exhibit an increase in cross talk due to blooming at ∼39% beyond the flux required for analog saturation. PMID:23207309

  8. Phosphorus fractionation in sediment cores collected in 2005 before and after onset of an Aphanizomenon flos-aquae bloom in upper Klamath Lake, OR, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, N.S.; Lynch, D.; Gallaher, T.N.

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that there would be measurable losses of phosphorus (P) from surficial sediments of Upper Klamath Lake (UKL), Oregon, if sediments were a source of P during an algal bloom. We compared concentrations of total and forms of P at various depths in cores collected before and after the onset of a large Aphanizomenon flos-aquae bloom. Concentrations of inorganic P were determined in extraction solutions of MgCl2 (1 M, pH 8), citrate-dithionite-bicarbonate, and 1 M HCl. Sediments below 2 cm were dominated by residual P which is defined as total P minus inorganic P. During the study period, data from the top 2-cm of sediment indicated (a) significant decrease in total P concentration, primarily associated with iron oxyhydroxides at one site, and (b) significant increase in total P concentration associated with residual P at a second site. Data from two other sites indicated no net changes in concentrations of total P. ?? 2009 US Government.

  9. Visualizing neuronal network connectivity with connectivity pattern tables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilen Nordlie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex ideas are best conveyed through well-designed illustrations. Up to now, computational neuroscientists have mostly relied on box-and-arrow diagrams of even complex neuronal networks, often using ad hoc notations with conflicting use of symbols from paper to paper. This significantly impedes the communication of ideas in neuronal network modeling. We present here Connectivity Pattern Tables (CPTs as a clutter-free visualization of connectivity in large neuronal networks containing two-dimensional populations of neurons. CPTs can be generated automatically from the same script code used to create the actual network in the NEST simulator. Through aggregation, CPTs can be viewed at different levels, providing either full detail or summary information. We also provide the open source ConnPlotter tool as a means to create connectivity pattern tables.

  10. Retreived bacteria from Noctiluca miliaris (green) bloom of the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BASU Subhajit; MATONDKAR SG Prabhu; FURTADO Irene

    2013-01-01

    In recent years,seasonal blooms of the dinoflagellate Noctiluca miliaris have appeared in the open-waters of the northern Arabian Sea (NAS).This study provides the first characterization of bacteria from a seasonal bloom of green Noctiluca ofNAS (20°N-17°N and 64°E-70°E),during the spring-inter-monsoon cruise ofSagar Sampada 253,in March 2007.Bacterial growth as assessed by most-probable number (MPN) and plate counts,revealed ‘variable-physiotypes' over a wide range of salinities (0%-25% w/v NaC1),pH levels (5-8.5),and organic nutrient strengths,in comparison to non-bloom waters.MPN indices of bacteria in surface waters of bloom stations *DWK and *PRB,corresponded to (3.08-4.41)× 103 cells/mL at 3.5%NaC1 (w/v),and (2.82-9.49)× 102 cells/mL at 25% (w/v) NaC1 in tryptone-yeast extract broth (TYE).Plate counts were (1.12-4) × 106 CFU/mL at 0% (w/v) NaCl,(1.28-3.9) × 106 CFU/mL at 3.5% (w/v) NaC1,and (0.4-7)× 104 CFU/mL at 25% NaC1 (w/v) on TYE.One-tenth-strength Zobell's gave (0.6-3.74)× 105 CFU/mL at pH 5 to (3.58-7.5)× 105 CFU/mL at pH 8.5.These bacteria were identified to the genera Bacillus,Cellulomonas,Staphylococcus,Planococcus,Dietzia,Virgibacillus,Micrococcus,Sporosarcinae,Leucobacter,and Halomonas.The identity of three strains (GUFBSS253N2,GUFBSS253N30,and GUFBSS253N84) was confirmed through 16S rDNA sequence homology as Bacillus cohnii,Bacillusflexus,and Bacillus cereus.The ~2-3-fold higher plate counts of culturable bacteria from the open-waters of the NAS indicate that these bacteria could critically determine the biogeochemical dynamics of the bloom and its milieu.The role of these bacteria in sustaining/terminating the bloom is under evaluation.

  11. Retreived bacteria from Noctiluca miliaris (green) bloom of the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Subhajit; Matondkar, S. G. Prabhu; Furtado, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, seasonal blooms of the dinoflagellate Noctiluca miliaris have appeared in the open-waters of the northern Arabian Sea (NAS). This study provides the first characterization of bacteria from a seasonal bloom of green Noctiluca of NAS (20°N-17°N and 64°E-70°E), during the spring-inter-monsoon cruise of Sagar Sampada 253, in March 2007. Bacterial growth as assessed by most-probable number (MPN) and plate counts, revealed `variable-physiotypes' over a wide range of salinities (0%-25% w/v NaCl), pH levels (5-8.5), and organic nutrient strengths, in comparison to non-bloom waters. MPN indices of bacteria in surface waters of bloom stations *DWK and *PRB, corresponded to (3.08-4.41)×103 cells/mL at 3.5% NaCl (w/v), and (2.82-9.49)×102 cells/mL at 25% (w/v) NaCl in tryptone-yeast extract broth (TYE). Plate counts were (1.12-4)×106 CFU/mL at 0% (w/v) NaCl, (1.28-3.9)×106 CFU/mL at 3.5% (w/v) NaCl, and (0.4-7)×104 CFU/mL at 25% NaCl (w/v) on TYE. One-tenth-strength Zobell's gave (0.6-3.74)×105 CFU/mL at pH 5 to (3.58-7.5)×105 CFU/mL at pH 8.5. These bacteria were identified to the genera Bacillus, Cellulomonas, Staphylococcus, Planococcus, Dietzia, Virgibacillus, Micrococcus, Sporosarcinae, Leucobacter, and Halomonas. The identity of three strains (GUFBSS253N2, GUFBSS253N30, and GUFBSS253N84) was confirmed through 16S rDNA sequence homology as Bacillus cohnii, Bacillus flexus, and Bacillus cereus. The ˜2-3-fold higher plate counts of culturable bacteria from the open-waters of the NAS indicate that these bacteria could critically determine the biogeochemical dynamics of the bloom and its milieu. The role of these bacteria in sustaining/terminating the bloom is under evaluation.

  12. The 2008 North Atlantic Spring Bloom Experiment II: Autonomous Platforms and Mixed Layer Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. M.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Perry, M.; Fennel, K.; Gray, A.; Rehm, E.; Briggs, N.; Sackmann, B. S.; Gudmundsson, K.

    2008-12-01

    The 2008 North Atlantic Spring Bloom Experiment (NAB08) employed a system of drifting floats, mobile gliders and ship-based measurements to resolve patch-scale physical and biological variability over the 3- month course of an entire bloom. Although both autonomous and ship-based elements were essential to achieving NAB08 goals, the autonomous system provided a novel perspective by employing long-range gliders to repeatedly survey the volume surrounding a drifting Lagrangian float, thus characterizing patch- scale bloom evolution. Integration of physical and biogeochemical sensors (temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll and CDOM fluorescence, light transmission, optical backscatter, spectral light, and nitrate) and development of in situ calibration techniques were required to support this new autonomous approach. Energetic, small-scale eddy activity at the experiment site (southeast of Iceland, near the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study and Marine Light Mixed Layer sites) produced a swift, heterogeneous velocity field that challenged the gliders" operational abilities and drove refinements to the piloting techniques used to maintain float-following surveys. Although intentionally deployed outside of energetic eddies, floats and gliders were rapidly entrained into these features. Floats circulated within eddies near the start and end of the experiment, drifting generally northwest, across the basin, in-between. An eddy sampled late in the deployment provided particularly interesting signatures, with elevated biological signals manifest consistently in one quadrant. As measurements were collected in a parcel-following Lagrangian frame, this suggests energetic small-scale exchange process (such as vertical or lateral mixing) paired with fast-acting biological processes capable of modifying the newly entrained water as it navigates its path around the eddy. Despite this energetic kilometer-scale heterogeneity, broadly distributed platforms appeared to

  13. Modelling of Peach Tree (Prunus persica) Full Blooming Dates Using APCC MME Seasonal Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Jong; Kim, Sung; Lee, Hyojin; Han, Hyun-Hee; Son, In-Chang; Cho, Kyung Hwa

    2016-04-01

    Due to global warming, recently, bud-burst and flowering dates of fruit crops have become earlier and the abnormal climate increases the variabilities of temperature in spring, suggesting that the risk of frost damage has increased. However, the full blooming date prediction model for peach tree used by the Rural Developmental Administration (RDA) were developed using only one cultivar (Youmyeong) and observations from a station (Suwon). This model might not adequately reflect the characteristics of peach cultivars or local orchards. the objectives of this study were to develops the site-and cultivar-specific blooming date prediction models for major peach cultivation regions and cultivars and presents a framework for applications of the APEC Climate Center Multimodel Ensemble (APCC MME) seasonal datasets.Developmental rate (DVR), and Sequential dormancy models (Chill day, New chill day, and fraction-time models) were used to develop the locally tailored full blooming date prediction models for major peach cultivars. For the development of these models, bud-burst and full blooming dates of peach tree for 5 cultivars (Cheonhong, Youmyeong, Changbangjosaeng, Cheonjoongdo, and Janghowon) were collected from the 6 major peach cultivation sites: Chuncheon, Suwon, Cheongwon, Cheongdo, Naju, and Jinju. For the chill day model, those measures for the entire dataset regardless the location and cultivar were 2.31%, 0.79, and 3.36 day for MAPE, R2, RMSE, respectively. For the new chill day model, those values (2.19%, 0.82, and 3.16 day for MAPE, R2, RMSE, respectively) were slightly better than those of the chill day model. The model results showed that the new chill day model was found slightly highest performance than others. Based on the considerations of the predictability of the statistical downscaling method and the observed periods of the full blooming dates at each site, we determined that the APCC MME seasonal datasets were applied for the new chill day model for the

  14. Upstream factors affecting Tualatin River algae—Tracking the 2008 Anabaena algae bloom to Wapato Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Stewart A.; Carpenter, Kurt D.; Fesler, Kristel J.; Dorsey, Jessica L.

    2015-12-17

    Significant Findings A large bloom that included floating mats of the blue-green algae Anabaena flos-aquae occurred in the lower 20 miles of the Tualatin River in northwestern Oregon between July 7 and July 17, 2008.

  15. Quantifying the impact of submesoscale processes on the spring phytoplankton bloom in a turbulent upper ocean using a Lagrangian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Sarah R.; Lozier, M. Susan; Mahadevan, Amala

    2016-05-01

    The spring phytoplankton bloom in the subpolar North Atlantic and the mechanisms controlling its evolution and onset have important consequences for marine ecosystems and carbon cycling. Submesoscale mixed layer eddies (MLEs) play a role in the onset of the bloom by creating localized stratification and alleviating phytoplankton light limitation; however, the importance of MLEs for phytoplankton in a turbulent surface mixed layer has not yet been examined. We explore the effect of MLEs on phytoplankton by simulating their trajectories with Lagrangian particles subject to turbulent vertical displacements in an MLE-resolving model. By tracking the light exposure of the simulated phytoplankton, we find that MLEs can advance the timing of the spring bloom by 1 to 2 weeks, depending on surface forcing conditions. The onset of the bloom is linked with the onset of positive heat fluxes, whether or not MLEs are present.

  16. Agreement of 10 September 1991 between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Government of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan for the application of safeguards in connection with the supply of a miniature neutron source reactor from the People's Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document reproduces the text of the Agreement of 10 September 1991, between the Government of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the supply of a miniature neutron source reactor from the People's Republic of China. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 20 February 1990 and entered into force upon signature on 10 September 1991

  17. 'Wax bloom' on beeswax cultural heritage objects: Exploring the causes of the phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, B; Kobera, L; Drábková, K; Ďurovič, M; Brus, J

    2015-07-01

    The term 'wax bloom' is used to describe a thin whitish crystalline layer that develops on the surface of beeswax objects under specific conditions. This phenomenon is undesirable, especially in the cases of objects with aesthetic or informational value, such as wax sculptures or historical seals. A combination of solid-state NMR and FTIR measurements allowed to obtain fairly detailed insight into the problem and to suggest a probable mechanism of its development. Secondary crystallization of unsaturated hydrocarbons from beeswax was determined as a primary cause. After the macroscopic solidification of beeswax from the melt, these molecules remain for months in a highly mobile, liquid-like state. This facilitates their diffusion to the surface, where they eventually crystallize, forming the 'wax bloom' effect. Although these results are of particular interest with respect to the conservation of beeswax artifacts, they are relevant to this material in general and help with understanding its unique properties.

  18. High-resolution observations of aggregate flux during a sub-polar North Atlantic spring bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Nathan; Perry, Mary Jane; Cetinić, Ivona; Lee, Craig; D'Asaro, Eric; Gray, Amanda M.; Rehm, Eric

    2011-10-01

    An aggregate flux event was observed by ship and by four underwater gliders during the 2008 sub-polar North Atlantic spring bloom experiment (NAB08). At the height of the diatom bloom, aggregates were observed as spikes in measurements of both particulate backscattering coefficient ( bbp) and chlorophyll a fluorescence. Optical sensors on the ship and gliders were cross-calibrated through a series of simultaneous profiles, and bbp was converted to particulate organic carbon. The aggregates sank as a discrete pulse, with an average sinking rate of ˜75 m d -1; 65% of aggregate backscattering and 90% of chlorophyll fluorescence content was lost between 100 m and 900 m. Mean aggregate organic carbon flux at 100 m in mid-May was estimated at 514 mg C m -2 d -1, consistent with independent flux estimates. The use of optical spikes observed from gliders provides unprecedented coupled vertical and temporal resolution measurements of an aggregate flux event.

  19. Toxic Microalgal Blooms: What Can Nuclear Techniques Provide for Their Management?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some harmful algal blooms (HABs) produce potent toxins that accumulate in shellfish and fish and represent a major threat to human health, international trade and sustainable coastal fisheries development. In the context of climate change and displacement of endemic toxigenic species (via ship ballast waters and other vectors) to new coastal areas, HABs appear to be more frequent and widespread. The IAEA Marine Environment Laboratory and its partners have been developing and transferring isotopic based analytical methods and instrumentation for monitoring HAB species, their biotoxins, and radiometric dating of sediment cores. The extremely sensitive and robust Receptor Binding Assay (RBA) for toxins associated with Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) and Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) provides an alternative method to the standard mouse bioassay, and radiometric sediment core dating combined with fossil cyst abundance allows reconstruction of the prior history of blooms and their relationship to climate. (author)

  20. Phytoplankton dynamics in contrasting early stage North Atlantic spring blooms: composition, succession, and potential drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniels, C.J.; Poulton, A. J.; Esposito, M.;

    2015-01-01

    The spring bloom is a key annual event in the phenology of pelagic ecosystems, making a major contribution to the oceanic biological carbon pump through the production and export of organic carbon. However, there is little consensus as to the main drivers of spring bloom formation, exacerbated...... by a lack of in situ observations of the phytoplankton community composition and its evolution during this critical period. We investigated the dynamics of the phytoplankton community structure at two contrasting sites in the Iceland and Norwegian Basins during the early stage (25 March–25 April...... a biomass. The ICB phytoplankton composition appeared primarily driven by the physicochemical environment, with periodic events of increased mixing restricting further increases in biomass. In contrast, the NWB phytoplankton community was potentially limited by physicochemical and/or biological factors...

  1. Harmful algal blooms and climate change: Learning from the past and present to forecast the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Mark L.; Trainer, Vera L.; Smayda, Theodore J.; Karlson, Bengt S.O.; Trick, Charles G.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Ishikawa, Akira; Bernard, Stewart; Wulff, Angela; Anderson, Donald M.; Cochlan, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change pressures will influence marine planktonic systems globally, and it is conceivable that harmful algal blooms may increase in frequency and severity. These pressures will be manifest as alterations in temperature, stratification, light, ocean acidification, precipitation-induced nutrient inputs, and grazing, but absence of fundamental knowledge of the mechanisms driving harmful algal blooms frustrates most hope of forecasting their future prevalence. Summarized here is the consensus of a recent workshop held to address what currently is known and not known about the environmental conditions that favor initiation and maintenance of harmful algal blooms. There is expectation that harmful algal bloom (HAB) geographical domains should expand in some cases, as will seasonal windows of opportunity for harmful algal blooms at higher latitudes. Nonetheless there is only basic information to speculate upon which regions or habitats HAB species may be the most resilient or susceptible. Moreover, current research strategies are not well suited to inform these fundamental linkages. There is a critical absence of tenable hypotheses for how climate pressures mechanistically affect HAB species, and the lack of uniform experimental protocols limits the quantitative cross-investigation comparisons essential to advancement. A HAB “best practices” manual would help foster more uniform research strategies and protocols, and selection of a small target list of model HAB species or isolates for study would greatly promote the accumulation of knowledge. Despite the need to focus on keystone species, more studies need to address strain variability within species, their responses under multifactorial conditions, and the retrospective analyses of long-term plankton and cyst core data; research topics that are departures from the norm. Examples of some fundamental unknowns include how larger and more frequent extreme weather events may break down natural biogeographic

  2. Eutrophic waters, algal bloom and fish kill in fish farming areas in Bolinao, Pangasinan, Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Diego-McGlone, Maria Lourdes [Marine Science Institute, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines)], E-mail: mcglonem@upmsi.ph; Azanza, Rhodora V.; Villanoy, Cesar L.; Jacinto, Gil S. [Marine Science Institute, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines)

    2008-07-01

    The coastal waters of Bolinao, Pangasinan, Philippines experienced environmental changes over a 10-year period (1995-2005), the most significant effect of which was the major fish kill event in 2002 that coincided with the first reported Philippine bloom of a dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum. Days before the bloom, dissolved oxygen was <2.0 mg/l in the waters that were stratified. These conditions may be linked to the uncontrolled proliferation of fish pens and cages to more than double the allowable limit of 544 units for Bolinao waters. Mariculture activities release organic matter from unconsumed feed and fecal material that accumulate in the water and sediments. In over 10 years, water quality conditions have become eutrophic with ammonia increasing by 56%, nitrite by 35%, nitrate by 90%, and phosphate by 67%. The addition of more fish pens and cages placed additional stress to this poorly flushed, shallow area that affected water quality due to changes in the water residence time.

  3. Utilizing the Effective Xanthophyll Cycle for Blooming of Ochromonas smithii and O. itoi (Chrysophyceae) on the Snow Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Yukiko Tanabe; Tomofumi Shitara; Yasuhiro Kashino; Yoshiaki Hara; Sakae Kudoh

    2011-01-01

    Snow algae inhabit unique environments such as alpine and high latitudes, and can grow and bloom with visualizing on snow or glacier during spring-summer. The chrysophytes Ochromonas smithii and Ochromonas itoi are dominant in yellow-colored snow patches in mountainous heavy snow areas from late May to early June. It is considered to be effective utilizing the xanthophyll cycle and holding sunscreen pigments as protective system for snow algae blooming in the vulnerable environment such as lo...

  4. Survey of higher education students answering to the math questions based on different levels of cognitive technical Guilan Bloom

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Hedayatpanah

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, an effort to improve the learning process, instead of using modern techniques and traditional methods in active learning is essential. Among these active methods, problem solving has been considered as a new approach for promoting the learning process. In this regard, it has been attempted to remedy some of the shortcomings of the design test questions are examined in Bloom's cognitive levels.This study aims to evaluate student performance in math based on Bloom's taxonomy, based on...

  5. Investigating vertical migration and bloom dynamics of a red tide dinoflagellate: Laboratory observations and a novel sensing approach. (AQU 2)

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanie Moorthi; Beth Stauffer; Carl Oberg; Gaurav Sukhatme; David Caron

    2006-01-01

    Lingulodinium polyedrum is a marine, bioluminescent dinoflagellate that is a common red tide species and potential toxin producer (yessotoxin) along a large expanse of the coast of Southern California. Little is known about the factors leading to bloom formation, or its impact on planktonic food webs. Bloom abundances can reach over 1000 cells/ml, events in which the interplay of physical forces (wind and surface currents) and of algal behavior (vertical migration) presumably play an importan...

  6. AQU 2: Investigating Vertical Migration and Bloom Dynamics of a Red Tide Dinoflagellate: Laboratory Observations and a Novel Sensing Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanie Moorthi; Beth Stauffer; Carl Oberg; Gaurav Sukhatme; David Caron

    2006-01-01

    Lingulodinium polyedrum is a marine, bioluminescent dinoflagellate that is a common red tide species and potential toxin producer (yessotoxin) along a large expanse of the coast of Southern California. Little is known about the factors leading to bloom formation, or its impact on planktonic food webs. Bloom abundances can reach over 1000 cells/ml, events in which the interplay of physical forces (wind and surface currents) and of algal behavior (vertical migration) presumably play an importan...

  7. Connection between Transmission Quality Parametrs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Sulovec

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Errors occuring in digital transmission are the major source of degradation in that they affect voice services in terms of distortion of voice, and data type services in terms of lost or inaccurate information or reduces throughput. Therefore International Telecommunication Union ITU-T defined some objectives that enable to express the measure of digital transmission quality. It is often necessary to know the connection between these parameters.

  8. Connection between Transmission Quality Parametrs

    OpenAIRE

    Andrej Sulovec

    2003-01-01

    Errors occuring in digital transmission are the major source of degradation in that they affect voice services in terms of distortion of voice, and data type services in terms of lost or inaccurate information or reduces throughput. Therefore International Telecommunication Union ITU-T defined some objectives that enable to express the measure of digital transmission quality. It is often necessary to know the connection between these parameters.

  9. Minimum cost connection networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    2015-01-01

    demands. We use a few axioms to characterize allocation rules that truthfully implement cost minimizing networks satisfying all connection demands in a game where: (1) a central planner announces an allocation rule and a cost estimation rule; (2) every agent reports her own connection demand as well...... as all connection costs; (3) the central planner selects a cost minimizing network satisfying reported connection demands based on the estimated costs; and, (4) the planner allocates the true costs of the selected network. It turns out that an allocation rule satisfies the axioms if and only if relative......In the present paper we consider the allocation of costs in connection networks. Agents have connection demands in form of pairs of locations they want to have connected. Connections between locations are costly to build. The problem is to allocate costs of networks satisfying all connection...

  10. Retrieved bacteria from Noctiluca miliaris (green) bloom of the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Basu, S.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Furtado, I.

    ., 1999). Unlike the haloarchaea, which prefer a “salt-in” strategy to adjust intracellular osmotic balance in hypersaline environments, the marine halophilic/ halotolerant heterotrophic bacteria synthesize or accumulate organic compatible solutes... stations and bloom-patch (*DWK and *PRB) 16 CHIN. J. OCEANOL. LIMNOL., 31(1), 2013 Vol.31 translucent (2.63%). Following the generic keys from Bergey’s Manual of Determinative Biology (Holt et al., 1994; Reva et al., 2001), 20 bacterial isolates...

  11. Dynamic Cognitive Process Application of Blooms Taxonomy for Complex Software Design in the Cognitive Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, NR Shashi; Pushpavathi, TP; Selvarani, R.

    2010-01-01

    Software design in Software Engineering is a critical and dynamic cognitive process. Accurate and flawless system design will lead to fast coding and early completion of a software project. Blooms taxonomy classifies cognitive domain into six dynamic levels such as Knowledge at base level to Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis and Evaluation at the highest level in the order of increasing complexity. A case study indicated in this paper is a gira system, which is a gprs based Intr...

  12. Physical Water Quality and Algal Density for Remediation of Algal Blooms in Tropical Shallow Eutrophic Reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Gurminder Kaur Sardool Singh; Perumal Kuppan; Goto, Masafumi; Sugiura, Norio; Megat Johari Megat Mohd Noor; Zaini Ujang

    2013-01-01

    This study is on physical water quality data with regards to algal bloom occurrence in a shallow eutrophic reservoir in Malaysia. Some of the important physical parameters emphasized for future remedial studies for the Semberong Dam, a tropical reservoir, are dissolved oxygen, temperature and light intensity. The use of Planktothrix culture as a dominant algae or a mixed culture with a spike of this dominant algae is suggested for remedial study. Other influencing factors for consideration ar...

  13. Modelling green macroalgal blooms on the coasts of Brittany, France to enhance water quality management

    OpenAIRE

    Perrot, Thierry; Rossi, Nadege; Menesguen, Alain; Dumas, Franck

    2014-01-01

    First recorded in the 1970s, massive green macroalgal blooms have since become an annual recurrence in Brittany, France. Eutrophication (in particular to anthropogenic nitrogen input) has been identified as the main factor controlling Ulva ‘green tide’ events. In this study, we modelled Ulva proliferation using a two-dimensional model by coupling hydrodynamic and biological models (coined ‘MARS-Ulves’) for five sites along the Brittany coastline (La Fresnaye Bay, Saint-Brieuc Bay, Lannion Bay...

  14. The role of nitrogen fixation in cyanobacterial bloom toxicity in a temperate, eutrophic lake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas J Beversdorf

    Full Text Available Toxic cyanobacterial blooms threaten freshwaters worldwide but have proven difficult to predict because the mechanisms of bloom formation and toxin production are unknown, especially on weekly time scales. Water quality management continues to focus on aggregated metrics, such as chlorophyll and total nutrients, which may not be sufficient to explain complex community changes and functions such as toxin production. For example, nitrogen (N speciation and cycling play an important role, on daily time scales, in shaping cyanobacterial communities because declining N has been shown to select for N fixers. In addition, subsequent N pulses from N(2 fixation may stimulate and sustain toxic cyanobacterial growth. Herein, we describe how rapid early summer declines in N followed by bursts of N fixation have shaped cyanobacterial communities in a eutrophic lake (Lake Mendota, Wisconsin, USA, possibly driving toxic Microcystis blooms throughout the growing season. On weekly time scales in 2010 and 2011, we monitored the cyanobacterial community in a eutrophic lake using the phycocyanin intergenic spacer (PC-IGS region to determine population dynamics. In parallel, we measured microcystin concentrations, N(2 fixation rates, and potential environmental drivers that contribute to structuring the community. In both years, cyanobacterial community change was strongly correlated with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN concentrations, and Aphanizomenon and Microcystis alternated dominance throughout the pre-toxic, toxic, and post-toxic phases of the lake. Microcystin concentrations increased a few days after the first significant N(2 fixation rates were observed. Then, following large early summer N(2 fixation events, Microcystis increased and became most abundant. Maximum microcystin concentrations coincided with Microcystis dominance. In both years, DIN concentrations dropped again in late summer, and N(2 fixation rates and Aphanizomenon abundance increased

  15. Physiological features of toleranceof the main species of blooming lawns in the urban environment

    OpenAIRE

    G. A. Zaiyko; U. V. Lykholat

    2011-01-01

    The activity of enzymes of the antioxidative complex and glutathione-ascorbic acid system of the main species of decoratively-flowering plants used for blooming lawns in the urban environment are determined. The activity of catalase, peroxydase and polyphenoloxydase, and the content of glutathione and ascorbic acid in 13 plant species were analyzed. One of the basic criteria of plants tolerance is the level of prooxydative and antioxydative metabolic processes. The plant species resistant to ...

  16. Links between Bloom's Taxonomy and Gardener's Multiple Intelligences: The issue of Textbook Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Abdi Tabari; Iman Abdi Tabari

    2015-01-01

    The major thrust of this research was to investigate the cognitive aspect of the high school textbooks and interchange series, due to their extensive use, through content analysis based on Bloom's taxonomy and Gardner's Multiple Intelligences (MI). This study embraced two perspectives in a grid in order to broaden and deepen the analysis by determining the numbers and the types of intelligences with respect to their learning objectives tapped in the textbooks and comparing them. Through codif...

  17. Application of Bloom´s taxonomy of learning objectives in vocational subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Procházka, Miloslav

    2012-01-01

    Bachelor thesis with entitle "Application of Bloom's taxonomy of objectives in teaching vocational subjects" is focused on analyzing the current taxonomy of educational aims in education, the goal is to find out what is the final function in education process and what is the experience with the use of taxonomy targets among secondary school teachers. For the research were used three methods and tools for educational research. Firstly, content analysis of curriculum documents. Secondly, obser...

  18. Comprehension of Technology in Parent-Child Activities Using Bloom's Taxonomy of the Cognitive Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Tzu-Hsiang Ger; Yao-Ming Chu; Mei-Chen Chang

    2014-01-01

    Science museums often hold various science education activities in exhibition halls to enhance visitors' cognition and comprehension of science and technology. However, the experience and knowledge accumulated during the participation in technological experiential and learning activities merits exploration. This study conducts a quantitative survey and qualitatively analyzes the data based on the taxonomy of educational objectives that are outlined in the revised version of Bloom's taxonomy h...

  19. Fish Sound Production in the Presence of Harmful Algal Blooms in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Carrie C Wall; Chad Lembke; Chuanmin Hu; Mann, David A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first known research to examine sound production by fishes during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Most fish sound production is species-specific and repetitive, enabling passive acoustic monitoring to identify the distribution and behavior of soniferous species. Autonomous gliders that collect passive acoustic data and environmental data concurrently can be used to establish the oceanographic conditions surrounding sound-producing organisms. Three passive acoustic glider ...

  20. Numerical simulation on the solidification structure of Ø600mm continuous casting round bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Q.; Ni, H. W.; Wang, S. J.; Zang, H.

    2016-03-01

    A FE (Finite Element)—CA (Cellular Automation) coupling model was developed for the simulation of solidification structure formation during the Ø600mm round bloom continuous casting process of Q345E steel. The simulation result of the temperature field was consistent with the nail-shooting experimental result, and the simulated solidification structure of the bloom was in great agreement with corrosion testing under the same casting condition. The simulation results showed that the centre equiaxed crystal ratio increased slightly with the increase of secondary cooling water rate and decreased with the increase of casting temperature and casting speed. When the secondary cooling water rate was over 0.08L/kg, it had less effect on the solidification structure. As the casting temperature increased by 1°C or the casting speed increased by 0.01m/min, the centre equiaxed crystal ratio would decrease by 0.4%∼1.2% and 3%∼0.8% respectively. According to the simulation results, the optimized continuous casting process of Ø600mm round bloom should be the secondary cooling water rate of 0.08L/kg, the casting temperature of 1532°C∼1539°C and the casting speed of 0.20m/min∼0.22m/min. It was found that the solidification structure of Ø600mm Q345E steel round bloom was much improved after the optimized continuous casting process was adopted in practical production.