WorldWideScience

Sample records for bloodstream parasite stages

  1. Bromodomain Proteins Contribute to Maintenance of Bloodstream Form Stage Identity in the African Trypanosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Danae; Mugnier, Monica R; Paulsen, Eda-Margaret; Kim, Hee-Sook; Chung, Chun-wa W; Tough, David F; Rioja, Inmaculada; Prinjha, Rab K; Papavasiliou, F Nina; Debler, Erik W

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, is transmitted to its mammalian host by the tsetse. In the fly, the parasite's surface is covered with invariant procyclin, while in the mammal it resides extracellularly in its bloodstream form (BF) and is densely covered with highly immunogenic Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG). In the BF, the parasite varies this highly immunogenic surface VSG using a repertoire of ~2500 distinct VSG genes. Recent reports in mammalian systems point to a role for histone acetyl-lysine recognizing bromodomain proteins in the maintenance of stem cell fate, leading us to hypothesize that bromodomain proteins may maintain the BF cell fate in trypanosomes. Using small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants for individual bromodomain proteins, we performed RNA-seq experiments that revealed changes in the transcriptome similar to those seen in cells differentiating from the BF to the insect stage. This was recapitulated at the protein level by the appearance of insect-stage proteins on the cell surface. Furthermore, bromodomain inhibition disrupts two major BF-specific immune evasion mechanisms that trypanosomes harness to evade mammalian host antibody responses. First, monoallelic expression of the antigenically varied VSG is disrupted. Second, rapid internalization of antibodies bound to VSG on the surface of the trypanosome is blocked. Thus, our studies reveal a role for trypanosome bromodomain proteins in maintaining bloodstream stage identity and immune evasion. Importantly, bromodomain inhibition leads to a decrease in virulence in a mouse model of infection, establishing these proteins as potential therapeutic drug targets for trypanosomiasis. Our 1.25Å resolution crystal structure of a trypanosome bromodomain in complex with I-BET151 reveals a novel binding mode of the inhibitor, which serves as a promising starting point for rational drug design. PMID:26646171

  2. Accurate real-time PCR strategy for monitoring bloodstream parasitic loads in chagas disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Duffy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This report describes a real-time PCR (Q-PCR strategy to quantify Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi DNA in peripheral blood samples from Chagas disease patients targeted to conserved motifs within the repetitive satellite sequence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Q-PCR has a detection limit of 0.1 and 0.01 parasites/mL, with a dynamic range of 10(6 and 10(7 for Silvio X10 cl1 (T. cruzi I and Cl Brener stocks (T. cruzi IIe, respectively, an efficiency of 99%, and a coefficient of determination (R(2 of 0.998. In order to express accurately the parasitic loads: (1 we adapted a commercial kit based on silica-membrane technology to enable efficient processing of Guanidine Hydrochloride-EDTA treated blood samples and minimize PCR inhibition; (2 results were normalized incorporating a linearized plasmid as an internal standard of the whole procedure; and (3 a correction factor according to the representativity of satellite sequences in each parasite lineage group was determined using a modified real-time PCR protocol (Lg-PCR. The Q-PCR strategy was applied (1 to estimate basal parasite loads in 43 pediatric Chagas disease patients, (2 to follow-up 38 of them receiving treatment with benznidazole, and (3 to monitor three chronic Chagas heart disease patients who underwent heart-transplantation and displayed events of clinical reactivation due to immunosupression. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: All together, the high analytical sensitivity of the Q-PCR strategy, the low levels of intra- and inter-assay variations, as well as the accuracy provided by the Lg-PCR based correction factor support this methodology as a key laboratory tool for monitoring clinical reactivation and etiological treatment outcome in Chagas disease patients.

  3. Identification of paralogous life-cycle stage specific cytoskeletal proteins in the parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Portman

    Full Text Available The life cycle of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei, is characterised by a transition between insect and mammalian hosts representing very different environments that present the parasite with very different challenges. These challenges are met by the expression of life-cycle stage-specific cohorts of proteins, which function in systems such as metabolism and immune evasion. These life-cycle transitions are also accompanied by morphological rearrangements orchestrated by microtubule dynamics and associated proteins of the subpellicular microtubule array. Here we employed a gel-based comparative proteomic technique, Difference Gel Electrophoresis, to identify cytoskeletal proteins that are expressed differentially in mammalian infective and insect form trypanosomes. From this analysis we identified a pair of novel, paralogous proteins, one of which is expressed in the procyclic form and the other in the bloodstream form. We show that these proteins, CAP51 and CAP51V, localise to the subpellicular corset of microtubules and are essential for correct organisation of the cytoskeleton and successful cytokinesis in their respective life cycle stages. We demonstrate for the first time redundancy of function between life-cycle stage specific paralogous sets in the cytoskeleton and reveal modification of cytoskeletal components in situ prior to their removal during differentiation from the bloodstream form to the insect form. These specific results emphasise a more generic concept that the trypanosome genome encodes a cohort of cytoskeletal components that are present in at least two forms with life-cycle stage-specific expression.

  4. An essential malaria protein defines the architecture of blood-stage and transmission-stage parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absalon, Sabrina; Robbins, Jonathan A; Dvorin, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Blood-stage replication of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum occurs via schizogony, wherein daughter parasites are formed by a specialized cytokinesis known as segmentation. Here we identify a parasite protein, which we name P. falciparum Merozoite Organizing Protein (PfMOP), as essential for cytokinesis of blood-stage parasites. We show that, following PfMOP knockdown, parasites undergo incomplete segmentation resulting in a residual agglomerate of partially divided cells. While organelles develop normally, the structural scaffold of daughter parasites, the inner membrane complex (IMC), fails to form in this agglomerate causing flawed segmentation. In PfMOP-deficient gametocytes, the IMC formation defect causes maturation arrest with aberrant morphology and death. Our results provide insight into the mechanisms of replication and maturation of malaria parasites. PMID:27121004

  5. An essential malaria protein defines the architecture of blood-stage and transmission-stage parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absalon, Sabrina; Robbins, Jonathan A.; Dvorin, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-stage replication of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum occurs via schizogony, wherein daughter parasites are formed by a specialized cytokinesis known as segmentation. Here we identify a parasite protein, which we name P. falciparum Merozoite Organizing Protein (PfMOP), as essential for cytokinesis of blood-stage parasites. We show that, following PfMOP knockdown, parasites undergo incomplete segmentation resulting in a residual agglomerate of partially divided cells. While organelles develop normally, the structural scaffold of daughter parasites, the inner membrane complex (IMC), fails to form in this agglomerate causing flawed segmentation. In PfMOP-deficient gametocytes, the IMC formation defect causes maturation arrest with aberrant morphology and death. Our results provide insight into the mechanisms of replication and maturation of malaria parasites. PMID:27121004

  6. Changes in parasite transmission stage excretion after pheasant release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanúa, D; Acevedo, P; Höfle, U; Rodríguez, O; Gortázar, C

    2006-09-01

    The production of parasite transmission stages was investigated in the faeces of 77 farm-bred ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). Coccidian oocysts (Eimeria sp.), and nematode eggs (Heterakis sp., and Capillaria-like eggs) were recovered before and after release but all birds were treated prior to release. Treatment with fenbendazole significantly reduced the abundance of transmission-stage excretion for all parasites, and reduced the prevalence in the case of Eimeria sp. and Heterakis sp. Nonetheless, a significant increase in the excretion abundance for all parasites and in the prevalence of Eimeria sp. and Heterakis sp. was found after release. Eggs of Ascaridia sp. were found only after releasing, suggesting infection ocurred in the wild. A negative relationship was found between the pheasant body condition and Heterakis excretion abundance and a higher abundance of Capillaria sp. eggs in female birds. No significant relationship was found between parasite excretion abundance and pheasant survival. Despite this, results suggest that an increase in the excretion of parasite transmission stages follows the release of captive pheasants into the wild. This can in part explain restocking failures, but also means that autochtonous free-living birds may become exposed to new and potentially harmful pathogens. To avoid these risks it is proposed that improved prophylactic measures should be taken. PMID:16923277

  7. The outcome of the first stages of pregnancy on mares' bloodstream thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, E; Medica, P; Trifiletti, C; Ferlazzo, A

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare in detail the total and free iodothyronines' pattern of mares from the first ovulation of the year over an extended period of 12 weeks. A total of 20 mares were used in the study. The mares were classified into two groups: mares mated at the ovulation (n = 10) used as observational group and mares unmated at the ovulation (n = 10) used as control group. Serum total and free triiodothyronine (T3, fT3) and thyroxine (T4, fT4) levels were measured in baseline conditions at the first ovulation of year and once a week until 12 weeks later. For the experimental group, the first week of postovulation mating was considered as the first week of gestation. One-way analysis of variance showed a significant effect of time over 12 weeks for T3 (F = 2.44; P = 0.007) in pregnant mares, with the higher levels at the seventh and 12th weeks (P embryonic growth and development, before the onset of fetal thyroid activity. Considerable additional research, outwith the aim of this study, will be required to elucidate the mechanisms by which gestational age affects the physiological thyroid function in mares and/or fetus ratio in the first pregnancy stage. PMID:27125693

  8. Bloodstream infection in patients with end-stage renal disease in a teaching hospital in central-western Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Trelha Gauna

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vascular access in patients undergoing hemodialysis is considered a critical determinant of bloodstream infection (BSI and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of BSI in patients with end-stage renal disease using central venous catheters for hemodialysis. Methods A cohort study was conducted in a public teaching hospital in central-western Brazil from April 2010 to December 2011. For every patient, we noted the presence of hyperemia/exudation upon catheter insertion, as well as fever, shivering, and chills during hemodialysis. Results Fifty-nine patients were evaluated. Thirty-five (59.3% patients started dialysis due to urgency, 37 (62.7% had BSI, and 12 (20% died. Hyperemia at the catheter insertion site (64.9% was a significant clinical manifestation in patients with BSI. Statistical analysis revealed 1.7 times more cases of BSI in patients with hypoalbuminemia compared with patients with normal albumin levels. The principal infective agents identified in blood cultures and catheter-tip cultures were Staphylococcus species (24 cases, non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli (7 cases of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and 5 cases of Chryseobacterium indologenes, and Candida species (6. Among the Staphylococci identified, 77.7% were methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative Staphylococci. Of the bacteria isolated, the most resistant were Chryseobacterium indologenes and Acinetobacter baumannii. Conclusions Blood culture was demonstrated to be an important diagnostic test and identified over 50% of positive BSI cases. The high frequency of BSI and the isolation of multiresistant bacteria were disturbing findings. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated microorganism, although Gram-negative bacteria predominated overall. These results highlight the importance of infection prevention and control measures in dialysis units.

  9. Climate change and parasite transmission: how temperature affects parasite infectivity via predation on infective stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedknegt, M.A.; Welsh, J.E.; Drent, J.; Thieltges, D.W.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to affect disease risk in many parasite-host systems, e.g., via an effect of temperature on infectivity (temperature effects). However, recent studies indicate that ambient communities can lower disease risk for hosts, for instance via predation on free-living stages of pa

  10. Ontology-based Malaria Parasite Stage and Species Identification from Peripheral Blood Smear Images

    OpenAIRE

    Makkapati, V.; Rao, R

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of malaria infection requires detectingthe presence of malaria parasite in the patient as well as identification of the parasite species. We present an image processing-basedapproach to detect parasites in microscope images of blood smear andan ontology-based classification of the stage of the parasite for identifying the species of infection. This approach is patterned after the diagnosis approach adopted by a pathologist for visual examination and hence is expect...

  11. Translational regulation during stage transitions in malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liwang; Lindner, Scott; Miao, Jun

    2015-04-01

    The complicated life cycle of the malaria parasite involves a vertebrate host and a mosquito vector, and translational regulation plays a prominent role in orchestrating the developmental events in the two transition stages: gametocytes and sporozoites. Translational regulation is executed in both global and transcript-specific manners. Plasmodium uses a conserved mechanism involving phosphorylation of eIF2α to repress global protein synthesis during the latent period of sporozoite development in the mosquito salivary glands. Transcript-specific translational regulation is achieved by a network of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), among which the Dhh1 RNA helicase DOZI and Puf family RBPs are by far the best studied in Plasmodium. While the DOZI complex defines a new P granule with a role in protecting certain gametocyte mRNAs from degradation, the Puf proteins appear to repress expression of mRNAs in both gametocytes and sporozoites. These examples underscore the significance of translational regulation in Plasmodium development. PMID:25387887

  12. Effects of parasites on larval and juvenile stages of the coral reef fish Pomacentrus moluccensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grutter, A. S.; Cribb, T. H.; McCallum, H.; Pickering, J. L.; McCormick, M. I.

    2010-03-01

    The ecological role of parasites in the early life-history stages of coral reef fish is far from clear. Parasitism in larval, recently settled and juvenile stages of a coral reef fish damselfish (Pomacentridae) was therefore investigated by quantifying the ontogenetic change in parasite load and comparing the growth rates of parasitized juvenile fish to those of unparasitized ones. Parasite prevalence in two lunar pulses of Pomacentrus moluccensis was 4 and 0% for larval stage fish, 34 and 56% for recently settled fish and 42 and 49% for juveniles. A significant increase in parasite prevalence with age group was found; the most marked increase occurred immediately after larval fish had settled. Standard length did not model prevalence well; as length is a proxy for age, this indicates that the higher prevalence in recently settled and juvenile fish compared with larvae was not a simple result of parasites accumulating with age. In one of three cohorts, there was some evidence that parasitism affected the growth rate of juveniles, as measured by otolith width. The study suggests that settling on the reef exposes young fish to potentially harmful parasites. This supports the idea that the pelagic phase may have the effect of reducing the exposure of young fish to the debilitating effects of parasites.

  13. Diagnostic stages of the parasites of the Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Monica; Larkin, Iskande V; Wright, Scott D; Greiner, Ellis C

    2014-02-01

    Limited information is available on diagnostic stages of parasites in Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris). We examined 67 fecal samples from captive and wild manatees to define the diagnostic stages of the parasite fauna known to occur in Florida manatees. Parasite eggs were freshly extracted ex utero from identified mature helminths and subsequently characterized, illustrated, and matched to those isolated from fecal samples. In addition, coccidian oocysts in the fecal samples were identified. These diagnostic stages included eggs from 5 species of trematodes (Chiorchis fabaceus, Chiorchis groschafti, Pulmonicola cochleotrema, Moniligerum blairi, and Nudacotyle undicola), 1 nematode (Heterocheilus tunicatus), and oocysts of 2 coccidians (Eimeria manatus and Eimeria nodulosa). PMID:24116863

  14. Application of molecular methods for monitoring transmission stages of malaria parasites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent technical advances in malaria research have allowed specific detection of mRNA of genes that are expressed exclusively in sexual stages (gametocytes) of malaria parasites. The specificity and sensitivity of these techniques were validated on cultured laboratory clones of both human malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum) and rodent parasites (P. chabaudi). More recently, quantitative molecular techniques have been developed to quantify these sexual stages and used to monitor gametocyte dynamics and their transmission to mosquitoes. Molecular techniques showed that the infectious reservoir for malaria is larger than expected from previous microscopic studies; individual parasite genotypes within an infection can simultaneously produce infectious gametocytes; gametocyte production can be sustained for several months, and is modulated by environmental factors. The above techniques have empowered approaches for in-depth analysis of the biology of the transmission stages of the parasite and epidemiology of malaria transmission

  15. Application of molecular methods for monitoring transmission stages of malaria parasites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babiker, Hamza A [Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Medicine, Sultan Qaboos University, Alkhod, PO Box 35, Muscat (Oman); Schneider, Petra [School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)], E-mail: H.babiker@ed.ac.uk

    2008-09-01

    Recent technical advances in malaria research have allowed specific detection of mRNA of genes that are expressed exclusively in sexual stages (gametocytes) of malaria parasites. The specificity and sensitivity of these techniques were validated on cultured laboratory clones of both human malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum) and rodent parasites (P. chabaudi). More recently, quantitative molecular techniques have been developed to quantify these sexual stages and used to monitor gametocyte dynamics and their transmission to mosquitoes. Molecular techniques showed that the infectious reservoir for malaria is larger than expected from previous microscopic studies; individual parasite genotypes within an infection can simultaneously produce infectious gametocytes; gametocyte production can be sustained for several months, and is modulated by environmental factors. The above techniques have empowered approaches for in-depth analysis of the biology of the transmission stages of the parasite and epidemiology of malaria transmission.

  16. Taxonomy and ecology of metazoan parasites of otariids from Patagonia, Argentina : adult and infective stages

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Orts, Jesús Servando

    2013-01-01

    At present, the metazoan parasite fauna of most species of otariids is generally poorly known, in part because these marine mammals are mostly protected and, therefore, sampling is limited to specimens stranded on the coast or captured as by-catch in fisheries. Similar problems also occur for the larval stages of gastrointestinal helminths of otariids. For most of these parasite species, the specific identity of the intermediate/paratenic of hosts is unknown and, therefore, many stages of the...

  17. Apoptosis of erythrocytic stage parasites of Plasmodium berghei chloroquine-resistant strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ke-qiang; SONG Guan-hong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the characteristics of crisis state at erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium berghei chloroquine-resistant (RC) strain. Methods: Agarose electrophoresis, optical and transmission electron microscopes were used. Patterns of genomic DNA structures and ultra-structures of the erythrocytic parasites were observed in ICA mice (infected with the RC strain) during rising and declining of parasitemia. Results: During the declining parasitemia, the erythrocytic stage parasites of the RC strain showed round or oval appearance with intact plasma membrane and shrank nuclei with no metabolic window, mitochondria or other membranaceous structures. Their DNA electrophoretogram revealed a ladder pattern which evidently differed from the parasites of the RC strain in the rising parasitemia and the chloroquine-sensitive (N) strain.Conclusion: The crisis state of the erythrocytic stage parasites of the P. berghei chloroquine-resistant (RC)strain is characterized by apoptosis.

  18. Comparison of Texture Features Used for Classification of Life Stages of Malaria Parasite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a vector borne disease widely occurring at equatorial region. Even after decades of campaigning of malaria control, still today it is high mortality causing disease due to improper and late diagnosis. To prevent number of people getting affected by malaria, the diagnosis should be in early stage and accurate. This paper presents an automatic method for diagnosis of malaria parasite in the blood images. Image processing techniques are used for diagnosis of malaria parasite and to detect their stages. The diagnosis of parasite stages is done using features like statistical features and textural features of malaria parasite in blood images. This paper gives a comparison of the textural based features individually used and used in group together. The comparison is made by considering the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the features for the same images in database.

  19. Bloodstream infections after solid-organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritikos, Antonios; Manuel, Oriol

    2016-04-01

    Solid-organ transplantation (SOT) has become the preferred strategy to treat a number of end-stage organ disease, because a continuous improvement in survival and quality of life. While preventive strategies has decreased the risk for classical opportunistic infections (such as viral, fungal and parasite infections), bacterial infections, and particularly bloodstream infections (BSIs) remain the most common and life-threatening complications in SOT recipients. The source of BSI after transplant depends on the type of transplantation, being urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and intraabdominal infections the most common infections occurring after kidney, lung and liver transplantation, respectively. The risk for candidemia is higher in abdominal-organ than in thoracic-organ transplantation. Currently, the increasing prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative pathogens, such as extended-spectrum betalactamase-producing Enterobacteriaciae and carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, is causing particular concerns in SOT recipients, a population which presents several risk factors for developing infections due to MDR organisms. The application of strict preventive policies to reduce the incidence of post transplant BSIs and to control the spread of MDR organisms, including the implementation of specific stewardship programs to avoid the overuse of antibiotics and antifungal drugs, are essential steps to reduce the impact of post transplant infections on allograft and patient outcomes. PMID:26766415

  20. Protection from Experimental Cerebral Malaria with a Single Dose of Radiation-Attenuated, Blood-Stage Plasmodium berghei Parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Gerald, Noel J.; Majam, Victoria; Mahajan, Babita; Kozakai, Yukiko; Kumar, Sanjai

    2011-01-01

    Background Whole malaria parasites are highly effective in inducing immunity against malaria. Due to the limited success of subunit based vaccines in clinical studies, there has been a renewed interest in whole parasite-based malaria vaccines. Apart from attenuated sporozoites, there have also been efforts to use live asexual stage parasites as vaccine immunogens. Methodology and Results We used radiation exposure to attenuate the highly virulent asexual blood stages of the murine malaria par...

  1. Parasites

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-05-06

    In this podcast, a listener wants to know what to do if he thinks he has a parasite or parasitic disease.  Created: 5/6/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/6/2010.

  2. KREX2 is not essential for either procyclic or bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Carnes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most mitochondrial mRNAs in Trypanosoma brucei require RNA editing for maturation and translation. The edited RNAs primarily encode proteins of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These parasites undergo extensive changes in energy metabolism between the insect and bloodstream stages which are mirrored by alterations in RNA editing. Two U-specific exonucleases, KREX1 and KREX2, are both present in protein complexes (editosomes that catalyze RNA editing but the relative roles of each protein are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The requirement for KREX2 for RNA editing in vivo was assessed in both procyclic (insect and bloodstream form parasites by methods that use homologous recombination for gene elimination. These studies resulted in null mutant cells in which both alleles were eliminated. The viability of these cells demonstrates that KREX2 is not essential in either life cycle stage, despite certain defects in RNA editing in vivo. Furthermore, editosomes isolated from KREX2 null cells require KREX1 for in vitro U-specific exonuclease activity. CONCLUSIONS: KREX2 is a U-specific exonuclease that is dispensable for RNA editing in vivo in T. brucei BFs and PFs. This result suggests that the U deletion activity, which is required for RNA editing, is primarily mediated in vivo by KREX1 which is normally found associated with only one type of editosome. The retention of the KREX2 gene implies a non-essential role or a role that is essential in other life cycle stages or conditions.

  3. Identification of Paralogous Life-Cycle Stage Specific Cytoskeletal Proteins in the Parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Neil Portman; Keith Gull

    2014-01-01

    The life cycle of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei, is characterised by a transition between insect and mammalian hosts representing very different environments that present the parasite with very different challenges. These challenges are met by the expression of life-cycle stage-specific cohorts of proteins, which function in systems such as metabolism and immune evasion. These life-cycle transitions are also accompanied by morphological rearrangements orchestrated by microtubule ...

  4. Parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Mehlum, Halvor; Moene, Karl Ove; Torvik, Ragnat

    2003-01-01

    Unproductive enterprises that feed on productive businesses, are rampant in developing countries. These parasitic enterprises take divergent forms, some headed by violent bandits and brutal mafia bosses, others by organized middlemen or smart political insiders. All of them seem to have the profit motive in common. A consequence of parasitic enterprises is that societies may be locked into a self enforcing configuration of beliefs and practices that result in persistent poverty. In some insta...

  5. Unfolded Protein Response Pathways in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiengwe, Calvin; Brown, Abigail E N A; Bangs, James D

    2015-11-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress mechanism to cope with misfolded proteins in the early secretory pathway, the hallmark being transcriptional upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones such as BiP and protein disulfide isomerase. Despite the lack of transcriptional regulation and the absence of the classical UPR machinery, African trypanosomes apparently respond to persistent ER stress by a UPR-like response, including upregulation of BiP, and a related spliced leader silencing (SLS) response whereby SL RNA transcription is shut down. Initially observed by knockdown of the secretory protein translocation machinery, both responses are also induced by chemical agents known to elicit UPR in mammalian cells (H. Goldshmidt, D. Matas, A. Kabi, A. Carmi, R. Hope, S. Michaeli, PLoS Pathog 6:e1000731, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000731). As these findings were generated primarily in procyclic-stage trypanosomes, we have investigated both responses in pathogenic bloodstream-stage parasites. RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of the core translocon subunit Trypanosoma brucei Sec61α (TbSec61α) failed to induce either response. Interestingly, cell growth halted within 16 h of silencing, but sufficient TbSec61α remained to allow full competence for translocation of nascent secretory proteins for up to 24 h, indicating that replication is finely coupled with the capacity to synthesize and transport secretory cargo. Tunicamycin and thapsigargin at concentrations compatible with short-term (4 h) and long-term (24 h) viability also failed to induce any of the indicators of UPR-like or SLS responses. Dithiothreitol (DTT) was lethal at all concentrations tested. These results indicate that UPR-like and SLS responses to persistent ER stress do not occur in bloodstream-stage trypanosomes. PMID:26318397

  6. Malaria parasite-synthesized heme is essential in the mosquito and liver stages and complements host heme in the blood stages of infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanathan Arun Nagaraj

    Full Text Available Heme metabolism is central to malaria parasite biology. The parasite acquires heme from host hemoglobin in the intraerythrocytic stages and stores it as hemozoin to prevent free heme toxicity. The parasite can also synthesize heme de novo, and all the enzymes in the pathway are characterized. To study the role of the dual heme sources in malaria parasite growth and development, we knocked out the first enzyme, δ-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS, and the last enzyme, ferrochelatase (FC, in the heme-biosynthetic pathway of Plasmodium berghei (Pb. The wild-type and knockout (KO parasites had similar intraerythrocytic growth patterns in mice. We carried out in vitro radiolabeling of heme in Pb-infected mouse reticulocytes and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human RBCs using [4-(14C] aminolevulinic acid (ALA. We found that the parasites incorporated both host hemoglobin-heme and parasite-synthesized heme into hemozoin and mitochondrial cytochromes. The similar fates of the two heme sources suggest that they may serve as backup mechanisms to provide heme in the intraerythrocytic stages. Nevertheless, the de novo pathway is absolutely essential for parasite development in the mosquito and liver stages. PbKO parasites formed drastically reduced oocysts and did not form sporozoites in the salivary glands. Oocyst production in PbALASKO parasites recovered when mosquitoes received an ALA supplement. PbALASKO sporozoites could infect mice only when the mice received an ALA supplement. Our results indicate the potential for new therapeutic interventions targeting the heme-biosynthetic pathway in the parasite during the mosquito and liver stages.

  7. Effect of mature blood-stage Plasmodium parasite sequestration on pathogen biomass in mathematical and in vivo models of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, David S; Cromer, Deborah; Best, Shannon E; James, Kylie R; Kim, Peter S; Engwerda, Christian R; Haque, Ashraful; Davenport, Miles P

    2014-01-01

    Parasite biomass and microvasculature obstruction are strongly associated with disease severity and death in Plasmodium falciparum-infected humans. This is related to sequestration of mature, blood-stage parasites (schizonts) in peripheral tissue. The prevailing view is that schizont sequestration leads to an increase in pathogen biomass, yet direct experimental data to support this are lacking. Here, we first studied parasite population dynamics in inbred wild-type (WT) mice infected with the rodent species of malaria, Plasmodium berghei ANKA. As is commonly reported, these mice became moribund due to large numbers of parasites in multiple tissues. We then studied infection dynamics in a genetically targeted line of mice, which displayed minimal tissue accumulation of parasites. We constructed a mathematical model of parasite biomass dynamics, incorporating schizont-specific host clearance, both with and without schizont sequestration. Combined use of mathematical and in vivo modeling indicated, first, that the slowing of parasite growth in the genetically targeted mice can be attributed to specific clearance of schizonts from the circulation and, second, that persistent parasite growth in WT mice can be explained solely as a result of schizont sequestration. Our work provides evidence that schizont sequestration could be a major biological process driving rapid, early increases in parasite biomass during blood-stage Plasmodium infection. PMID:24144725

  8. Developmental stages and fecundity of Lepeophtheirus simplex (Copepoda: Caligidae) parasitic on bullseye puffer fish (Sphoeroides annulatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neptali Morales-Serna, Francisco; Rivas-Salas, Ana Ines; Gomez, Samuel; Fajer-Avila, Emma Josefina

    2015-01-01

    Lepeophtheirus simplex Ho, Gómez et Fajer-Avila, 2001 is a parasite of Sphoeroides annulatus (Jenyns), an economically important fish species, with potential for aquaculture, in northwestern Mexico. The goal of this study was to describe the developmental stages under experimental conditions and seasonal fecundity of this parasite on wild fish. There are two naupliar, one copepodid, two chalimus and two pre-adult stages preceding the adult of L. simplex. The results support previous findings, which point out that the life cycle of the caligid copepods includes only six post-naupliar stages. The generation time from egg extrusion to adult for L. simplex was approximately 10 days at 22 °C. The body length of the ovigerous females ranged between 2.2 and 4.1 mm, and its fecundity between 12 and 36 eggs per string. Fecundity was negatively correlated with the egg size and positively correlated with the egg string length. Our data did not reveal significant differences in fecundity among sampling months, but ovigerous females were significantly larger in March (when water temperature was 22 °C) than in June and July (when water temperature was 30 °C). To some extent, our fecundity results contrast with those found in species of sea lice from higher latitudes. Undoubtedly, biological information on different species of sea lice from different environmental conditions will enhance our understanding of their infection strategies and will be valuable, given the increasing interest in marine fish farming in Mexico. PMID:25960548

  9. The destruction of parasitic resistant stages in sewage sludge by irradiation with low accelerating voltage electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The destroying effect of ionizing radiation on parasitic resistant stages in sludge has been tested. Suitable for that process is an electron beam accelerator which will be provided with energy from the electric power supply network which can be switched on and off according to the requirements. Such modern utilities have an enormous beam capacity and a high operating safety. The process is working according to the continuous flow principle and at room temperature. In a series of 13 experiments the effect of different doses has been tested. A dose of 480 kRad (accelerating voltage: 400 kV, beam current: 10 mA , irradiation time: 24 sec.) can easily obtained in practical work and is economically acceptable. By these means approximately 97% of the following parasitic stages have been destroyed: undeveloped eggs of Ascaris suum, Trichuris suis, Fasciola hepatica and gastrointestinal strongylids of pigs, embryonated eggs of Capillaria obsignata and probably of Taenia spec. A few third-stage larvae of Oesophagostomum (Strongylidae) of pigs survived even 108 sec of irradiation; however, they did not develop to maturity in the definitive host. Approximately 25% of the sporulated oocysts of Eimeria tenella were still infective after 108 sec of irradiation. (orig.)

  10. Optimizing culture conditions for free-living stages of the nematode parasite Strongyloides ratti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulovic, Alex; Puller, Vadim; Streit, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    The rat parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti (S. ratti) has recently emerged as a model system for various aspects of parasite biology and evolution. In addition to parasitic parthenogenetic females, this species can also form facultative free-living generations of sexually reproducing adults. These free-living worms are bacteriovorous and grow very well when cultured in the feces of their host. However, in fecal cultures the worms are rather difficult to find for observation and experimental manipulation. Therefore, it has also been attempted to raise S. ratti on Nematode Growth Media (NGM) plates with Escherichia coli OP50 as food, exactly as described for the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Whilst worms did grow on these plates, their longevity and reproductive output compared to fecal cultures were dramatically reduced. In order to improve the culture success we tested other plates occasionally used for C. elegans and, starting from the best performing one, systematically varied the plate composition, the temperature and the food in order to further optimize the conditions. Here we present a plate culturing protocol for free-living stages of S. ratti with strongly improved reproductive success and longevity. PMID:27334397

  11. A transcriptomic analysis of Echinococcus granulosus larval stages: implications for parasite biology and host adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Parkinson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cestode Echinococcus granulosus--the agent of cystic echinococcosis, a zoonosis affecting humans and domestic animals worldwide--is an excellent model for the study of host-parasite cross-talk that interfaces with two mammalian hosts. To develop the molecular analysis of these interactions, we carried out an EST survey of E. granulosus larval stages. We report the salient features of this study with a focus on genes reflecting physiological adaptations of different parasite stages. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated ~10,000 ESTs from two sets of full-length enriched libraries (derived from oligo-capped and trans-spliced cDNAs prepared with three parasite materials: hydatid cyst wall, larval worms (protoscoleces, and pepsin/H(+-activated protoscoleces. The ESTs were clustered into 2700 distinct gene products. In the context of the biology of E. granulosus, our analyses reveal: (i a diverse group of abundant long non-protein coding transcripts showing homology to a middle repetitive element (EgBRep that could either be active molecular species or represent precursors of small RNAs (like piRNAs; (ii an up-regulation of fermentative pathways in the tissue of the cyst wall; (iii highly expressed thiol- and selenol-dependent antioxidant enzyme targets of thioredoxin glutathione reductase, the functional hub of redox metabolism in parasitic flatworms; (iv candidate apomucins for the external layer of the tissue-dwelling hydatid cyst, a mucin-rich structure that is critical for survival in the intermediate host; (v a set of tetraspanins, a protein family that appears to have expanded in the cestode lineage; and (vi a set of platyhelminth-specific gene products that may offer targets for novel pan-platyhelminth drug development. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This survey has greatly increased the quality and the quantity of the molecular information on E. granulosus and constitutes a valuable resource for gene prediction on the

  12. Novel Pectate Lyase Genes of Heterodera glycines Play Key Roles in the Early Stage of Parasitism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huan; Cui, Jiangkuan; Long, Haibo; Huang, Wenkun; Kong, Lingan; Liu, Shiming; He, Wenting; Hu, Xianqi; Peng, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Pectate lyases are known to play a key role in pectin degradation by catalyzing the random cleavage of internal polymer linkages (endo-pectinases). In this paper, four novel cDNAs, designated Hg-pel-3, Hg-pel-4, Hg-pel-6 and Hg-pel-7, that encode pectate lyases were cloned and characterized from the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. The predicted protein sequences of HG-PEL-3, HG-PEL-4 and HG-PEL-6 differed significantly in both their amino acid sequences and their genomic structures from other pectate lyases of H. glycines (HG-PEL-1, HG-PEL-2 and HG-PEL-7). A phylogenetic study revealed that the pectate lyase proteins of H. glycines are clustered into distinct clades and have distinct numbers and positioning of introns, which suggests that the pectate lyase genes of H. glycines may have evolved from at least two ancestral genes. A Southern blot analysis revealed that multiple Hg-pel-6-like genes were present in the H. glycines genome. In situ hybridization showed that four novel pectate lyases (Hg-pel-3, Hg-pel-4, Hg-pel-6 and Hg-pel-7) were actively transcribed in the subventral esophageal gland cells. A semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay supported the finding that the expression of these genes was strong in the egg, pre-parasitic second-stage juvenile (J2) and early parasitic J2 stages and that it declined in further developmental stages of the nematode. This expression pattern suggests that these proteins play a role in the migratory phase of the nematode life cycle. Knocking down Hg-pel-6 using in vitro RNA interference resulted in a 46.9% reduction of the number of nematodes that invaded the plants and a 61.5% suppression of the development of H. glycines females within roots compared to the GFP-dsRNA control. Plant host-derived RNAi induced the silencing of the Hg-pel-6gene, which significantly reduced the nematode infection levels at 7 Days post inoculation (dpi). Similarly, this procedure reduced the number of female adults at 40 dpi, which suggests

  13. Exposure of the snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to herbicide boosts output and survival of parasite infective stages

    OpenAIRE

    Hock, Sabrina D.; Poulin, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic stressors such as pollutants can modulate levels of parasitic infections in aquatic animals by suppressing host immunity or through some other mechanisms. One such mechanism could involve increases in either the quantity or quality of infective stages produced by parasites. We investigated the effect of exposure of infected snails, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, to different concentrations of the widely-used herbicide glyphosate, on (i) the production of infective cercariae by three ...

  14. A Novel Meloidogyne incognita Effector Misp12 Suppresses Plant Defense Response at Latter Stages of Nematode Parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jialian; Li, Shaojun; Mo, Chenmi; Wang, Gaofeng; Xiao, Xueqiong; Xiao, Yannong

    2016-01-01

    Secreted effectors in plant root-knot nematodes (RKNs, or Meloidogyne spp.) play key roles in their parasite processes. Currently identified effectors mainly focus on the early stage of the nematode parasitism. There are only a few reports describing effectors that function in the latter stage. In this study, we identified a potential RKN effector gene, Misp12, that functioned during the latter stage of parasitism. Misp12 was unique in the Meloidogyne spp., and highly conserved in Meloidogyne incognita. It encoded a secretory protein that specifically expressed in the dorsal esophageal gland, and highly up-regulated during the female stages. Transient expression of Misp12-GUS-GFP in onion epidermal cell showed that Misp12 was localized in cytoplast. In addition, in planta RNA interference targeting Misp12 suppressed the expression of Misp12 in nematodes and attenuated parasitic ability of M. incognita. Furthermore, up-regulation of jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) pathway defense-related genes in the virus-induced silencing of Misp12 plants, and down-regulation of SA pathway defense-related genes in Misp12-expressing plants indicated the gene might be associated with the suppression of the plant defense response. These results demonstrated that the novel nematode effector Misp12 played a critical role at latter parasitism of M. incognita. PMID:27446188

  15. Ontology-based Malaria Parasite Stage and Species Identification from Peripheral Blood Smear Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makkapati, V.; Rao, R.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of malaria infection requires detectingthe presence of malaria parasite in the patient as well as identification of the parasite species. We present an image processing-basedapproach to detect parasites in microscope images of blood smear andan ontology-based classificati

  16. PLASMODIUM PRE-ERYTHROCYTIC STAGES: BIOLOGY, WHOLE PARASITE VACCINES AND TRANSGENIC MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kota Arun Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria remains one of the world’s worst health problems, which causes 216 million new cases and approximately 655,000 deaths every year WHO World Malaria Report, 2011. Malaria transmission to the mammalian host is initiated through a mosquito bite that delivers sporozoites into the vertebrate host. The injected sporozoites are selectively targeted to liver which is the first obligatory step in infection thus making this stage an attractive target for both drug and vaccine development. Research using rodent models of malaria has greatly facilitated the understanding of several aspects of pre-erythrocytic parasite biology and immunology. However, translation of this knowledge to combat Plasmodium falciparum infections still offers several challenges. We highlight in this review some of the recent advances in the field of Plasmodium sporozoite and liver stage biology and in the generation of whole organism attenuated vaccines. We also comment on the application of transgenic models central to Circumsporozoite Protein (CSP in understanding the mechanism of pre-erythrocytic immunity.

  17. Reversible host cell remodeling underpins deformability changes in malaria parasite sexual blood stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearnley, Megan; Chu, Trang; Zhang, Yao; Looker, Oliver; Huang, Changjin; Klonis, Nectarios; Yeoman, Jeff; Kenny, Shannon; Arora, Mohit; Osborne, James M; Chandramohanadas, Rajesh; Zhang, Sulin; Dixon, Matthew W A; Tilley, Leann

    2016-04-26

    The sexual blood stage of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum undergoes remarkable biophysical changes as it prepares for transmission to mosquitoes. During maturation, midstage gametocytes show low deformability and sequester in the bone marrow and spleen cords, thus avoiding clearance during passage through splenic sinuses. Mature gametocytes exhibit increased deformability and reappear in the peripheral circulation, allowing uptake by mosquitoes. Here we define the reversible changes in erythrocyte membrane organization that underpin this biomechanical transformation. Atomic force microscopy reveals that the length of the spectrin cross-members and the size of the skeletal meshwork increase in developing gametocytes, then decrease in mature-stage gametocytes. These changes are accompanied by relocation of actin from the erythrocyte membrane to the Maurer's clefts. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching reveals reversible changes in the level of coupling between the membrane skeleton and the plasma membrane. Treatment of midstage gametocytes with cytochalasin D decreases the vertical coupling and increases their filterability. A computationally efficient coarse-grained model of the erythrocyte membrane reveals that restructuring and constraining the spectrin meshwork can fully account for the observed changes in deformability. PMID:27071094

  18. Reversible host cell remodeling underpins deformability changes in malaria parasite sexual blood stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearnley, Megan; Chu, Trang; Zhang, Yao; Looker, Oliver; Huang, Changjin; Klonis, Nectarios; Yeoman, Jeff; Kenny, Shannon; Arora, Mohit; Osborne, James M.; Chandramohanadas, Rajesh; Zhang, Sulin; Dixon, Matthew W. A.; Tilley, Leann

    2016-01-01

    The sexual blood stage of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum undergoes remarkable biophysical changes as it prepares for transmission to mosquitoes. During maturation, midstage gametocytes show low deformability and sequester in the bone marrow and spleen cords, thus avoiding clearance during passage through splenic sinuses. Mature gametocytes exhibit increased deformability and reappear in the peripheral circulation, allowing uptake by mosquitoes. Here we define the reversible changes in erythrocyte membrane organization that underpin this biomechanical transformation. Atomic force microscopy reveals that the length of the spectrin cross-members and the size of the skeletal meshwork increase in developing gametocytes, then decrease in mature-stage gametocytes. These changes are accompanied by relocation of actin from the erythrocyte membrane to the Maurer’s clefts. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching reveals reversible changes in the level of coupling between the membrane skeleton and the plasma membrane. Treatment of midstage gametocytes with cytochalasin D decreases the vertical coupling and increases their filterability. A computationally efficient coarse-grained model of the erythrocyte membrane reveals that restructuring and constraining the spectrin meshwork can fully account for the observed changes in deformability. PMID:27071094

  19. Cytosolic peroxidases protect the lysosome of bloodstream African trypanosomes from iron-mediated membrane damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Hiller

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes express three virtually identical non-selenium glutathione peroxidase (Px-type enzymes which preferably detoxify lipid-derived hydroperoxides. As shown previously, bloodstream Trypanosoma brucei lacking the mitochondrial Px III display only a weak and transient proliferation defect whereas parasites that lack the cytosolic Px I and Px II undergo extremely fast lipid peroxidation and cell lysis. The phenotype can completely be rescued by supplementing the medium with the α-tocopherol derivative Trolox. The mechanism underlying the rapid cell death remained however elusive. Here we show that the lysosome is the origin of the cellular injury. Feeding the px I-II knockout parasites with Alexa Fluor-conjugated dextran or LysoTracker in the presence of Trolox yielded a discrete lysosomal staining. Yet upon withdrawal of the antioxidant, the signal became progressively spread over the whole cell body and was completely lost, respectively. T. brucei acquire iron by endocytosis of host transferrin. Supplementing the medium with iron or transferrin induced, whereas the iron chelator deferoxamine and apo-transferrin attenuated lysis of the px I-II knockout cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy with MitoTracker and antibodies against the lysosomal marker protein p67 revealed that disintegration of the lysosome precedes mitochondrial damage. In vivo experiments confirmed the negligible role of the mitochondrial peroxidase: Mice infected with px III knockout cells displayed only a slightly delayed disease development compared to wild-type parasites. Our data demonstrate that in bloodstream African trypanosomes, the lysosome, not the mitochondrion, is the primary site of oxidative damage and cytosolic trypanothione/tryparedoxin-dependent peroxidases protect the lysosome from iron-induced membrane peroxidation. This process appears to be closely linked to the high endocytic rate and distinct iron acquisition mechanisms of the infective

  20. Knockout studies reveal an important role of Plasmodium lipoic acid protein ligase A1 for asexual blood stage parasite survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja Günther

    Full Text Available Lipoic acid (LA is a dithiol-containing cofactor that is essential for the function of alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complexes. LA acts as a reversible acyl group acceptor and 'swinging arm' during acyl-coenzyme A formation. The cofactor is post-translationally attached to the acyl-transferase subunits of the multienzyme complexes through the action of octanoyl (lipoyl: N-octanoyl (lipoyl transferase (LipB or lipoic acid protein ligases (LplA. Remarkably, apicomplexan parasites possess LA biosynthesis as well as scavenging pathways and the two pathways are distributed between mitochondrion and a vestigial organelle, the apicoplast. The apicoplast-specific LipB is dispensable for parasite growth due to functional redundancy of the parasite's lipoic acid/octanoic acid ligases/transferases. In this study, we show that LplA1 plays a pivotal role during the development of the erythrocytic stages of the malaria parasite. Gene disruptions in the human malaria parasite P. falciparum consistently were unsuccessful while in the rodent malaria model parasite P. berghei the LplA1 gene locus was targeted by knock-in and knockout constructs. However, the LplA1((- mutant could not be cloned suggesting a critical role of LplA1 for asexual parasite growth in vitro and in vivo. These experimental genetics data suggest that lipoylation during expansion in red blood cells largely occurs through salvage from the host erythrocytes and subsequent ligation of LA to the target proteins of the malaria parasite.

  1. An evolving picture of the interactions between malaria parasites and their host erythrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas E Wellems; Rick M Fairhurst

    2012-01-01

    In patients with malaria,Plasmodium falciparum parasites multiply to enormous numbers in the bloodstream,initiating processes of erythrocyte destruction,endothelial activation and microvascular inflammation that cause devastating pathological effects on host tissues and organs.Recent research casts new Iight on a mechanism by which hemoglobin mutations may protect against these effects,and on a critical receptor-ligand interaction that provides fresh opportunities for the development of vaccines against blood-stage infection.

  2. Plasmodium Apicoplast Gln-tRNA Gln Biosynthesis Utilizes a Unique GatAB Amidotransferase Essential for Erythrocytic Stage Parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Mailu, Boniface M.

    2015-08-28

    © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc. The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast indirect aminoacylation pathway utilizes a non-discriminating glutamyl-tRNA synthetase to synthesize Glu-tRNAGln and a glutaminyl-tRNA amidotransferase to convert Glu-tRNAGln to Gln-tRNAGln. Here, we show that Plasmodium falciparum and other apicomplexans possess a unique heterodimeric glutamyltRNA amidotransferase consisting of GatA and GatB subunits (GatAB). We localized the P. falciparum GatA and GatB subunits to the apicoplast in blood stage parasites and demonstrated that recombinant GatAB converts Glu-tRNAGln to Gln-tRNAGln in vitro. We demonstrate that the apicoplast GatAB-catalyzed reaction is essential to the parasite blood stages because we could not delete the Plasmodium berghei gene encoding GatA in blood stage parasites in vivo. A phylogenetic analysis placed the split between Plasmodium GatB, archaeal GatE, and bacterial GatB prior to the phylogenetic divide between bacteria and archaea. Moreover, Plasmodium GatA also appears to have emerged prior to the bacterial-archaeal phylogenetic divide. Thus, although GatAB is found in Plasmodium, it emerged prior to the phylogenetic separation of archaea and bacteria.

  3. Ecology of the free-living stages of major trichostrongylid parasites of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Lauren J; Walkden-Brown, Stephen W; Kahn, Lewis P

    2006-11-30

    Significant developments over recent decades make it timely to review the ecology of the major gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) species of sheep. These include the relentless development and spread of anthelmintic resistance in all of the major sheep production regions of the world, and the consequent drive towards integrated parasite management (IPM) systems incorporating non-chemotherapeutic strategies such as grazing management. The success of such programs is dependent on a detailed understanding of the environmental influences on the free-living stages of the nematode lifecycle. Major reviews of the subject were conducted prior to 1980, however considerable work has been completed since, including the development of mathematical models describing the epidemiology of GIN infection. Knowledge of the temperature thresholds for free-living development has also improved, while investigations of moisture influences and interactions with temperature have allowed more effective exploitation of environmental effects for IPM. This review re-evaluates our understanding of the factors that determine the success or failure of the free-living phases of the lifecycle in light of these developments. Temperature and moisture are the dominant influences on the free-living stages of Haemonchus contortus, Teladorsagia circumcincta and Trichostrongylus colubriformis, with the effects of pasture conditions playing a significant modulating role. Early in the free-living phase, the developmental success of the three GIN species is limited by susceptibility to cold temperatures. In general, H. contortus is most susceptible, followed by T. colubriformis and then T. circumcincta. The length of the development cycle is dependent largely on temperature, with development rate increasing at warmer temperatures. However, in order for development to proceed to the infective larval stage, addition of moisture is generally required. There has been considerably less work quantifying the effects

  4. Pre-elimination stage of malaria in Sri Lanka: assessing the level of hidden parasites in the population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajakaruna, Rupika S; Alifrangis, Michael; Amerasinghe, Priyanie H;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With the dramatic drop in the transmission of malaria in Sri Lanka in recent years, the country entered the malaria pre-elimination stage in 2008. Assessing the community prevalence of hidden malaria parasites following several years of extremely low transmission is central to the...... districts, Anuradhapura and Kurunegala, previously considered as high malaria transmission areas in Sri Lanka, where peaks of transmission follow the rainy seasons was assessed. Blood samples of non-febrile individuals aged five to 55 years were collected from randomly selected areas in the two districts at...... hidden parasites. DISCUSSION: A reservoir of hidden parasites is unlikely to be a major concern or a barrier to the ongoing malaria elimination efforts in Sri Lanka. However, as very low numbers of indigenous cases are still recorded, an island-wide assessment and in particular, continued alertness and...

  5. Pre-erythrocytic stage malaria parasites: non-circumsporozoite protein antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Hollingdale, M R; Aikawa, M.; Chen, G. X.; J.F. Meis; Sakhuja, K.; Sina, B.; Zhu, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    A series of non-circumsporozoite proteins found in pre-erythrocytic parasites are being developed as putative vaccine candidates. It is anticipated that these will be useful in addition to, rather than instead of, the CS (circumsporozoite) vaccines. It is likely that a greater understanding of the basic biology of malaria parasite-host relationships will lead to development of improved malarial vaccines.

  6. Subcompartmentalisation of proteins in the rhoptries correlates with ordered events of erythrocyte invasion by the blood stage malaria parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth S Zuccala

    Full Text Available Host cell infection by apicomplexan parasites plays an essential role in lifecycle progression for these obligate intracellular pathogens. For most species, including the etiological agents of malaria and toxoplasmosis, infection requires active host-cell invasion dependent on formation of a tight junction - the organising interface between parasite and host cell during entry. Formation of this structure is not, however, shared across all Apicomplexa or indeed all parasite lifecycle stages. Here, using an in silico integrative genomic search and endogenous gene-tagging strategy, we sought to characterise proteins that function specifically during junction-dependent invasion, a class of proteins we term invasins to distinguish them from adhesins that function in species specific host-cell recognition. High-definition imaging of tagged Plasmodium falciparum invasins localised proteins to multiple cellular compartments of the blood stage merozoite. This includes several that localise to distinct subcompartments within the rhoptries. While originating from the same organelle, however, each has very different dynamics during invasion. Apical Sushi Protein and Rhoptry Neck protein 2 release early, following the junction, whilst a novel rhoptry protein PFF0645c releases only after invasion is complete. This supports the idea that organisation of proteins within a secretory organelle determines the order and destination of protein secretion and provides a localisation-based classification strategy for predicting invasin function during apicomplexan parasite invasion.

  7. A multi-stage malaria vaccine candidate targeting both transmission and asexual parasite life-cycle stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theisen, Michael; Roeffen, Will; Singh, Susheel K;

    2014-01-01

    Effective control and eventual eradication of malaria drives the imperative need for clinical development of a malaria vaccine. Asexual parasite forms are responsible for clinical disease and death while apathogenic gametocytes are responsible for transmission from man to mosquito. Vaccines that...

  8. SOIL CONTAMINATION IN PUBLIC SQUARES IN BELO HORIZONTE, MINAS GERAIS, BY CANINE PARASITES IN DIFFERENT DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES

    OpenAIRE

    Luciane Madureira Ribeiro; Ruth Massote Dracz; Lanuze Rose Mozzer; Walter dos Santos Lima

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY To evaluate soil contamination by parasites in different developmental stages in public squares used as recreation and leisure areas for children in Belo Horizonte (MG, Brazil), 210 soil samples and 141 canine fecal samples were collected from 42 squares in the city. These samples were analyzed by the Caldwell and Caldwell technique and the Hoffman, Pons, and Janer technique. Of the samples analyzed, 89 (42.4%) soil samples and 104 (73.5%) fecal samples were contaminated with Anc...

  9. Three-dimensional visualisation of developmental stages of an apicomplexan fish blood parasite in its invertebrate host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes Polly M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although widely used in medicine, the application of three-dimensional (3D imaging to parasitology appears limited to date. In this study, developmental stages of a marine fish haemogregarine, Haemogregarina curvata (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina, were investigated in their leech vector, Zeylanicobdella arugamensis; this involved 3D visualisation of brightfield and confocal microscopy images of histological sections through infected leech salivary gland cells. Findings 3D assessment demonstrated the morphology of the haemogregarine stages, their spatial layout, and their relationship with enlarged host cells showing reduced cellular content. Haemogregarine meronts, located marginally within leech salivary gland cells, had small tail-like connections to the host cell limiting membrane; this parasite-host cell interface was not visible in two-dimensional (2D light micrographs and no records of a similar connection in apicomplexan development have been traced. Conclusions This is likely the first account of the use of 3D visualisation to study developmental stages of an apicomplexan parasite in its invertebrate vector. Elucidation of the extent of development of the haemogregarine within the leech salivary cells, together with the unusual connections between meronts and the host cell membrane, illustrates the future potential of 3D visualisation in parasite-vector biology.

  10. Cyclosporin A treatment of Leishmania donovani reveals stage-specific functions of cyclophilins in parasite proliferation and viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Lok Yau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cyclosporin A (CsA has important anti-microbial activity against parasites of the genus Leishmania, suggesting CsA-binding cyclophilins (CyPs as potential drug targets. However, no information is available on the genetic diversity of this important protein family, and the mechanisms underlying the cytotoxic effects of CsA on intracellular amastigotes are only poorly understood. Here, we performed a first genome-wide analysis of Leishmania CyPs and investigated the effects of CsA on host-free L. donovani amastigotes in order to elucidate the relevance of these parasite proteins for drug development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Multiple sequence alignment and cluster analysis identified 17 Leishmania CyPs with significant sequence differences to human CyPs, but with highly conserved functional residues implicated in PPIase function and CsA binding. CsA treatment of promastigotes resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth with an IC50 between 15 and 20 microM as demonstrated by proliferation assay and cell cycle analysis. Scanning electron microscopy revealed striking morphological changes in CsA treated promastigotes reminiscent to developing amastigotes, suggesting a role for parasite CyPs in Leishmania differentiation. In contrast to promastigotes, CsA was highly toxic to amastigotes with an IC50 between 5 and 10 microM, revealing for the first time a direct lethal effect of CsA on the pathogenic mammalian stage linked to parasite thermotolerance, independent from host CyPs. Structural modeling, enrichment of CsA-binding proteins from parasite extracts by FPLC, and PPIase activity assays revealed direct interaction of the inhibitor with LmaCyP40, a bifunctional cyclophilin with potential co-chaperone function. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The evolutionary expansion of the Leishmania CyP protein family and the toxicity of CsA on host-free amastigotes suggest important roles of PPIases in parasite biology and implicate

  11. Assessment of the anthelmintic activity of medicinal plant extracts and purified condensed tannins against free-living and parasitic stages of Oesophagostomum dentatum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Andrew Richard; Ropiak, Honorata M.; Fryganas, Christos;

    2014-01-01

    . Oesophagostomum dentatum is an economically important parasite of pigs, as well as serving as a useful laboratory model of helminth parasites due to the ability to culture it in vitro for long periods through several life-cycle stages. Here, we investigated the anthelmintic effects of CT on multiple life cycle...

  12. SOIL CONTAMINATION IN PUBLIC SQUARES IN BELO HORIZONTE, MINAS GERAIS, BY CANINE PARASITES IN DIFFERENT DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Madureira Ribeiro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY To evaluate soil contamination by parasites in different developmental stages in public squares used as recreation and leisure areas for children in Belo Horizonte (MG, Brazil, 210 soil samples and 141 canine fecal samples were collected from 42 squares in the city. These samples were analyzed by the Caldwell and Caldwell technique and the Hoffman, Pons, and Janer technique. Of the samples analyzed, 89 (42.4% soil samples and 104 (73.5% fecal samples were contaminated with Ancylostoma sp., Toxocara sp., Trichuris sp., or Dipylidium sp. eggs; Giardia sp. cysts; or Isospora sp. oocysts. The commonest parasite was Ancylostoma sp., found in 85% soil and 99% fecal samples, followed by Toxocara sp., found in 43.7% soil and 30.7% fecal samples.

  13. Two-stage sample-to-answer system based on nucleic acid amplification approach for detection of malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Nam, Jeonghun; Kim, Sangho; Lim, Chwee Teck; Park, Mi Kyoung; Shin, Yong

    2016-08-15

    Rapid, early, and accurate diagnosis of malaria is essential for effective disease management and surveillance, and can reduce morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. Although significant advances have been achieved for the diagnosis of malaria, these technologies are still far from ideal, being time consuming, complex and poorly sensitive as well as requiring separate assays for sample processing and detection. Therefore, the development of a fast and sensitive method that can integrate sample processing with detection of malarial infection is desirable. Here, we report a two-stage sample-to-answer system based on nucleic acid amplification approach for detection of malaria parasites. It combines the Dimethyl adipimidate (DMA)/Thin film Sample processing (DTS) technique as a first stage and the Mach-Zehnder Interferometer-Isothermal solid-phase DNA Amplification (MZI-IDA) sensing technique as a second stage. The system can extract DNA from malarial parasites using DTS technique in a closed system, not only reducing sample loss and contamination, but also facilitating the multiplexed malarial DNA detection using the fast and accurate MZI-IDA technique. Here, we demonstrated that this system can deliver results within 60min (including sample processing, amplification and detection) with high sensitivity (malaria in low-resource settings. PMID:27031184

  14. In vitro effects of four tropical plants on three life-cycle stages of the parasitic nematode, Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hounzangbe-Adote, M S; Paolini, V; Fouraste, I; Moutairou, K; Hoste, H

    2005-04-01

    Alcoholic extracts of four tropical plants (Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides, Newbouldia laevis, Morinda lucida and Carica papaya) were screened in vitro for potential anti-parasitic effects against eggs, infective larvae and adult Haemonchus contortus. Significant effects were obtained with all four plants but differences were observed depending on the parasitic stage. The effects of the four plant extracts were similar on egg hatching and were dose dependent. In contrast, no dose-response relationship was found for infective larvae and adult worms, although more potent effects were usually observed with the highest concentrations. Using a larval inhibition migration test, extracts of fagara (Z. zanthoxyloides) were found to be less active against Haemonchus infective larvae than were the other plants. N. laevis was found to be highly and rapidly effective against adult worms. Overall, these in vitro results suggest that these four plants, traditionally used by small farmers in Western Africa, do possess anti-parasitic properties. These effects remain to be confirmed through in vivo studies. PMID:15563923

  15. Plasmodium falciparum erythrocytic stage parasites require the putative autophagy protein PfAtg7 for normal growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn M Walker

    Full Text Available Analysis of the Plasmodium falciparum genome reveals a limited number of putative autophagy genes, specifically the four genes involved in ATG8 lipidation, an essential step in formation of autophagosomes. In yeast, Atg8 lipidation requires the E1-type ligase Atg7, an E2-type ligase Atg3, and a cysteine protease Atg4. These four putative P. falciparum ATG (PfATG genes are transcribed during the parasite's erythrocytic stages. PfAtg7 has relatively low identity and similarity to yeast Atg7 (14.7% and 32.2%, respectively, due primarily to long insertions typical of P. falciparum. Excluding the insertions the identity and similarity are higher (38.0% and 70.8%, respectively. This and the fact that key residues are conserved, including the catalytic cysteine and ATP binding domain, we hypothesize that PfAtg7 is the activating enzyme of PfAtg8. To assess the role of PfAtg7 we have generated two transgenic parasite lines. In one, the PfATG7 locus was modified to introduce a C-terminal hemagglutinin tag. Western blotting reveals two distinct protein species, one migrating near the predicted 150 kDa and one at approximately 65 kDa. The second transgenic line introduces an inducible degradation domain into the PfATG7 locus, allowing us to rapidly attenuate PfAtg7 protein levels. Corresponding species are also observed in this parasite line at approximately 200 kDa and 100 kDa. Upon PfATG7 attenuation parasites exhibit a slow growth phenotype indicating the essentiality of this putative enzyme for normal growth.

  16. Experimental ovine toxoplasmosis: influence of the gestational stage on the clinical course, lesion development and parasite distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño, Pablo; Fuertes, Miguel; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Ferre, Ignacio; Fernández, Miguel; Ferreras, M Carmen; Moreno-Gonzalo, Javier; González-Lanza, Camino; Pereira-Bueno, Juana; Katzer, Frank; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel; Pérez, Valentín; Benavides, Julio

    2016-01-01

    The relation between gestational age and foetal death risk in ovine toxoplasmosis is already known, but the mechanisms involved are not yet clear. In order to study how the stage of gestation influences these mechanisms, pregnant sheep of the same age and genetic background were orally dosed with 50 oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii (M4 isolate) at days 40 (G1), 90 (G2) and 120 (G3) of gestation. In each group, four animals were culled on the second, third and fourth week post infection (pi) in order to evaluate parasite load and distribution, and lesions in target organs. Ewes from G1 showed a longer period of hyperthermia than the other groups. Abortions occurred in all groups. While in G2 they were more frequent during the acute phase of the disease, in G3 they mainly occurred after day 20 pi. After challenge, parasite and lesions in the placentas and foetuses were detected from day 19 pi in G3 while in G2 or G1 they were only detected at day 26 pi. However, after initial detection at day 19 pi, parasite burden, measured through RT-PCR, in placenta or foetus of G3 did not increase significantly and, at in the third week pi it was lower than that measured in foetal liver or placenta from G1 to G3 respectively. These results show that the period of gestation clearly influences the parasite multiplication and development of lesions in the placenta and foetus and, as a consequence, the clinical course in ovine toxoplasmosis. PMID:26983883

  17. Expression of Plasmodium vivax crt-o Is Related to Parasite Stage but Not Ex Vivo Chloroquine Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pava, Zuleima; Handayuni, Irene; Wirjanata, Grennady; To, Sheren; Trianty, Leily; Noviyanti, Rintis; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne Rini; Auburn, Sarah; Price, Ric N; Marfurt, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ)-resistant Plasmodium vivax is present in most countries where P. vivax infection is endemic, but the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Increased expression of P. vivax crt-o (pvcrt-o) has been correlated with in vivo CQ resistance in an area with low-grade resistance. We assessed pvcrt-o expression in isolates from Papua (Indonesia), where P. vivax is highly CQ resistant. Ex vivo drug susceptibilities to CQ, amodiaquine, piperaquine, mefloquine, and artesunate were determined using a modified schizont maturation assay. Expression levels of pvcrt-o were measured using a novel real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method. Large variations in pvcrt-o expression were observed across the 51 isolates evaluated, with the fold change in expression level ranging from 0.01 to 59 relative to that seen with the P. vivax β-tubulin gene and from 0.01 to 24 relative to that seen with the P. vivax aldolase gene. Expression was significantly higher in isolates with the majority of parasites at the ring stage of development (median fold change, 1.7) compared to those at the trophozoite stage (median fold change, 0.5; P testing and showed high variability in CQ responses (median, 107.9 [range, 6.5 to 345.7] nM). After controlling for the parasite stage, we found that pvcrt-o expression levels did not correlate with the ex vivo response to CQ or with that to any of the other antimalarials tested. Our results highlight the importance of development-stage composition for measuring pvcrt-o expression and suggest that pvcrt-o transcription is not a primary determinant of ex vivo drug susceptibility. A comprehensive transcriptomic approach is warranted for an in-depth investigation of the role of gene expression levels and P. vivax drug resistance. PMID:26525783

  18. Catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Matthew R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are a common, frequently preventable complication of central venous catheterization. CR-BSIs can be prevented by strict attention to insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters and removing unneeded catheters as soon as possible. Antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated catheters are also an effective tool to prevent infections. The diagnosis of CR-BSI is made largely based on culture results. CR-BSIs should always be treated with antibiotics, and except in rare circumstances the infected catheter needs to be removed. PMID:19281894

  19. Distinct patterns of blood-stage parasite antigens detected by plasma IgG subclasses from individuals with different level of exposure to Plasmodium falciparum infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Højrup Peter

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In endemic regions naturally acquired immunity against Plasmodium falciparum develops as a function of age and exposure to parasite infections and is known to be mediated by IgG. The targets of protective antibodies remain to be fully defined. Several immunoepidemiological studies have indicated an association of cytophilic anti-parasite IgG with protection against malaria. It has been hypothesized that the initial antibody responses against parasite antigens upon first few Plasmodium falciparum infections is dominated by non-protective IgG2/IgG4 and IgM antibodies, which then gradually develop into protective response dominated by cytophilic IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies. Methods Naturally occurring IgG antibodies against P. falciparum blood-stage antigens were analysed from plasma samples collected from four groups of individuals differing in age and level of exposure to P. falciparum infections. Western Blot profiling of blood-stage parasite antigens displaying reactivity with individual plasma samples in terms of their subclass specificities was conducted. Parasite antigens detected by IgG were grouped based on their apparent molecular sizes resolved by SDS-PAGE as high molecular weight (≥ 70 kDa or low molecular weight (P. falciparum infections. Results IgG4 and IgM antibodies in plasma samples from all groups detected very few parasite antigens. IgG2 antibodies from all groups detected a common pattern of high molecular weight parasite antigens. Cytophilic IgG subclasses in plasma samples from individuals with higher levels of exposure to P. falciparum infections distinctly detected higher numbers of low molecular weight parasite antigens. Conclusions In the present study, there was no evidence for switching of antibody responses from non-cytophilic to cytophilic subclasses against blood-stage parasite antigens as a likely mechanism for induction of protective immunity against malaria.

  20. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression in Plasmodium falciparum Reveals the Global Expression Profile of Erythrocytic Stages and the Presence of Anti-Sense Transcripts in the Malarial Parasite

    OpenAIRE

    Patankar, Swati; Munasinghe, Anusha; Shoaibi, Azadeh; Cummings, Leda M.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2001-01-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was applied to the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum to characterize the comprehensive transcriptional profile of erythrocytic stages. A SAGE library of ∼8335 tags representing 4866 different genes was generated from 3D7 strain parasites. Basic local alignment search tool analysis of high abundance SAGE tags revealed that a majority (88%) corresponded to 3D7 sequence, and despite the low complexity of the genome, 70% of these highly abundant tag...

  1. Brugia malayi excreted/secreted proteins at the host/parasite interface: stage- and gender-specific proteomic profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasisekhar Bennuru

    Full Text Available Relatively little is known about the filarial proteins that interact with the human host. Although the filarial genome has recently been completed, protein profiles have been limited to only a few recombinants or purified proteins of interest. Here, we describe a large-scale proteomic analysis using microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry to identify the excretory-secretory (ES products of the L3, L3 to L4 molting ES, adult male, adult female, and microfilarial stages of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi. The analysis of the ES products from adult male, adult female, microfilariae (Mf, L3, and molting L3 larvae identified 852 proteins. Annotation suggests that the functional and component distribution was very similar across each of the stages studied; however, the Mf contributed a higher proportion to the total number of identified proteins than the other stages. Of the 852 proteins identified in the ES, only 229 had previous confirmatory expressed sequence tags (ESTs in the available databases. Moreover, this analysis was able to confirm the presence of 274 "hypothetical" proteins inferred from gene prediction algorithms applied to the B. malayi (Bm genome. Not surprisingly, the majority (160/274 of these "hypothetical" proteins were predicted to be secreted by Signal IP and/or SecretomeP 2.0 analysis. Of major interest is the abundance of previously characterized immunomodulatory proteins such as ES-62 (leucyl aminopeptidase, MIF-1, SERPIN, glutathione peroxidase, and galectin in the ES of microfilariae (and Mf-containing adult females compared to the adult males. In addition, searching the ES protein spectra against the Wolbachia database resulted in the identification of 90 Wolbachia-specific proteins, most of which were metabolic enzymes that have not been shown to be immunogenic. This proteomic analysis extends our knowledge of the ES and provides insight into the host-parasite interaction.

  2. Influence of the gestational stage on the clinical course, lesional development and parasite distribution in experimental ovine neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz-Solís, David; Benavides, Julio; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Fuertes, Miguel; Ferre, Ignacio; Ferreras, Maria Del Carmen; Collantes-Fernández, Esther; Hemphill, Andrew; Pérez, Valentín; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Neospora caninum is considered one of the main causes of abortion in cattle, yet recent studies have also emphasised its relevance as an abortifacient in small ruminants. In order to gain deeper insight into the pathogenesis of ovine neosporosis, pregnant ewes were intravenously inoculated with 10(6) tachyzoites of the Nc-Spain7 isolate at days 40, 90 or 120 of gestation. Infection during the first term resulted in the death of all foetuses between days 19 and 21 post-infection, showing mainly necrotic lesions in foetal liver and the highest parasite DNA detection and burden in both placenta and foetal viscera. After infection at day 90, foetal death was also detected in all ewes, although later (34-48 days post-infection). In this group, lesions were mainly inflammatory. Foetal livers showed the lowest frequency of lesions, as well as the lowest parasite detection and burden. All ewes infected at day 120 delivered viable lambs, although 3 out of 9 showed weakness and recumbency. Neospora DNA was detected in all lambs but one, and parasite burden was similar to that observed in day 90 group. Lesions in this group showed more conspicuous infiltration of inflammatory cells and higher frequency in foetal brain and muscle when compared to both previous groups. These results highlight the crucial role that the stage of gestation plays on the course of ovine neosporosis, similar to that reported in bovine neosporosis, and open the doors to consider sheep as a valid model for exogenous transplacental transmission for ruminant neosporosis. PMID:25884945

  3. Effects of temperature and host stage on the parasitization rate and offspring sex ratio of Aenasius bambawalei Hayat in Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Huang, Jun; Lu, Yaobin; Xia, Tianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Temperature and host stage are important factors that determine the successful development of parasitoids. Aenasius bambawalei Hayat (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) is a primary parasitoid of the newly invasive mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae). The effects of temperature on the parasitic characteristics of A. bambawalei have seldom been investigated. In the study, we explored the effects of temperature, exposure time, and host stage on the parasitization rate and offspring sex ratio (female to male) of A. bambawalei under laboratory conditions. The laboratory results showed that the successful parasitization rate of A. bambawalei increased with higher temperatures and older host stages. When the parasitoids were exposed to 36 °C for 24 h, the parasitization rate of female adults (52%) was nearly two times that of 3rd instar nymphs. Additionally, heat stress duration and host stage resulted in an increase in the offspring sex ratio of A. bambawalei. When A. bambawalei was exposed to 36 °C for 24 h, the offspring sex ratio increased dramatically to 81.78% compared with those exposed for 12 h, and it increased to 45.34% compared with those exposed for 16 h. The offspring sex ratio was clearly higher when the host stage was an adult female mealybug Our findings provide important guidance for the mass rearing and field releases of A. bambawalei for the management of P. solenopsis in the future. PMID:26788437

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of all parasitic stages of Haemaphysalis qinghaiensis Teng, 1980 (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ze; Li, Youquan; Liu, Zhijie; Ren, Qiaoyun; Ma, Miling; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2014-06-01

    Haemaphysalis qinghaiensis Teng (Acta Zootaxon Sin 5:144-149, 1980) is an endemic species in China. This tick species was first described based on engorged or semi-engorged specimens, and the drawings and description in words of morphological characteristics were poor. Therefore, the present study aims to redescribe morphological characteristics of all active stages of this tick species in detail by scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, a comparison between H. qinghaiensis and other sympatric Haemaphysalis species was also analyzed. Males of H. qinghaiensis can be distinguished from sympatric Haemaphysalis species by the following characters: palpi less salient laterally and curved in contour; ventrointernal setae of palpal segment II thin, number <7; the tips of palpal segment III not so strongly recurved inward to become "pincerlike" and lacking dorsal spur; dental formula 5/5; lateral grooves enclose first festoon; coxa IV with a short, broadly triangular spur; tarsi somewhat humped; and spiracular plates long comma-shaped. Females of H. qinghaiensis can be distinguished by palpi less salient laterally and curved in contour; ventrointernal setae of palpal segment II thin, number <7; segment III of palpi lacking dorsal spur; dental formula 4/4; scutum subcircula; and tarsi somewhat humped. Nymphs of H. qinghaiensis can be distinguished from those of other species by palpi less salient laterally and curved in contour; dental formula 2/2; basis capituli rectangular, with distinct dorsal cornua, without ventral cornua; and spiracular plates with short and narrow dorsal prolongation. Larvae of H. qinghaiensis can be distinguished by palpi less salient laterally and curved in contour; basis capituli rectangular, without distinct cornua. PMID:24687283

  5. Trophic Relationships between the Parasitic Plant Species Phelipanche ramosa (L.) and Different Hosts Depending on Host Phenological Stage and Host Growth Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Delphine; Gibot-Leclerc, Stéphanie; Girardin, Annette; Pointurier, Olivia; Reibel, Carole; Strbik, Florence; Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Colbach, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Phelipanche ramosa (L.) Pomel (branched broomrape) is a holoparasitic plant that reproduces on crops and also on weeds, which contributes to increase the parasite seed bank in fields. This parasite extracts all its nutrients at the host's expense so that host-parasite trophic relationships are crucial to determine host and parasite growth. This study quantified the intensity with which P. ramosa draws assimilates from its host and analyzed whether it varied with host species, host phenological stage and host growth rate. A greenhouse experiment was conducted on three host species: the crop species Brassica napus (L.) (oilseed rape) and two weed species, Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik. and Geranium dissectum (L.). Plants were grown with or without P. ramosa and under three light levels to modulate host growth rate. The proportion of host biomass loss due to parasitism by P. ramosa differed between host species (at host fructification, biomass loss ranged from 34 to 84%). B. napus and C. bursa-pastoris displayed a similar response to P. ramosa, probably because they belong to the same botanical family. The sensitivity to P. ramosa in each host species could be related to the precocity of P. ramosa development on them. Host compartments could be ranked as a function of their sensitivity to parasitism, with the reproductive compartment being the most severely affected, followed by stems and roots. The proportion of biomass allocated to leaves was not reduced by parasitism. The proportion of pathosystem biomass allocated to the parasite depended on host species. It generally increased with host stage progression but was constant across light induced-host growth rate, showing that P. ramosa adapts its growth to host biomass production. The rank order of host species in terms of sink strength differed from that in terms of host sensitivity. Finally, for B. napus, the biomass of individual parasite shoots decreased with increasing their number per host plant

  6. Trophic Relationships between the Parasitic Plant Species Phelipanche ramosa (L.) and Different Hosts Depending on Host Phenological Stage and Host Growth Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Delphine; Gibot-Leclerc, Stéphanie; Girardin, Annette; Pointurier, Olivia; Reibel, Carole; Strbik, Florence; Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Colbach, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Phelipanche ramosa (L.) Pomel (branched broomrape) is a holoparasitic plant that reproduces on crops and also on weeds, which contributes to increase the parasite seed bank in fields. This parasite extracts all its nutrients at the host’s expense so that host–parasite trophic relationships are crucial to determine host and parasite growth. This study quantified the intensity with which P. ramosa draws assimilates from its host and analyzed whether it varied with host species, host phenological stage and host growth rate. A greenhouse experiment was conducted on three host species: the crop species Brassica napus (L.) (oilseed rape) and two weed species, Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik. and Geranium dissectum (L.). Plants were grown with or without P. ramosa and under three light levels to modulate host growth rate. The proportion of host biomass loss due to parasitism by P. ramosa differed between host species (at host fructification, biomass loss ranged from 34 to 84%). B. napus and C. bursa-pastoris displayed a similar response to P. ramosa, probably because they belong to the same botanical family. The sensitivity to P. ramosa in each host species could be related to the precocity of P. ramosa development on them. Host compartments could be ranked as a function of their sensitivity to parasitism, with the reproductive compartment being the most severely affected, followed by stems and roots. The proportion of biomass allocated to leaves was not reduced by parasitism. The proportion of pathosystem biomass allocated to the parasite depended on host species. It generally increased with host stage progression but was constant across light induced-host growth rate, showing that P. ramosa adapts its growth to host biomass production. The rank order of host species in terms of sink strength differed from that in terms of host sensitivity. Finally, for B. napus, the biomass of individual parasite shoots decreased with increasing their number per host plant

  7. Trypanin, a component of the flagellar Dynein regulatory complex, is essential in bloodstream form African trypanosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Ralston

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The Trypanosoma brucei flagellum is a multifunctional organelle with critical roles in motility, cellular morphogenesis, and cell division. Although motility is thought to be important throughout the trypanosome lifecycle, most studies of flagellum structure and function have been restricted to the procyclic lifecycle stage, and our knowledge of the bloodstream form flagellum is limited. We have previously shown that trypanin functions as part of a flagellar dynein regulatory system that transmits regulatory signals from the central pair apparatus and radial spokes to axonemal dyneins. Here we investigate the requirement for this dynein regulatory system in bloodstream form trypanosomes. We demonstrate that trypanin is localized to the flagellum of bloodstream form trypanosomes, in a pattern identical to that seen in procyclic cells. Surprisingly, trypanin RNA interference is lethal in the bloodstream form. These knockdown mutants fail to initiate cytokinesis, but undergo multiple rounds of organelle replication, accumulating multiple flagella, nuclei, kinetoplasts, mitochondria, and flagellum attachment zone structures. These findings suggest that normal flagellar beat is essential in bloodstream form trypanosomes and underscore the emerging concept that there is a dichotomy between trypanosome lifecycle stages with respect to factors that contribute to cell division and cell morphogenesis. This is the first time that a defined dynein regulatory complex has been shown to be essential in any organism and implicates the dynein regulatory complex and other enzymatic regulators of flagellar motility as candidate drug targets for the treatment of African sleeping sickness.

  8. A new genus and species of demodecid mites from the tongue of a house mouse Mus musculus: description of adult and immature stages with data on parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izdebska, J N; Rolbiecki, L

    2016-06-01

    The study of the parasitofauna of the house mouse Mus musculus (Rodentia: Muridae) Linnaeus is particularly important owing to its multiple relationships with humans - as a cosmopolitan, synanthropic rodent, bred for pets, food for other animals or laboratory animal. This article proposes and describes a new genus and species of the parasitic mite based on adult and immature stages from the house mouse. Glossicodex musculi gen. n., sp. n. is a medium-sized demodecid mite (adult stages on average 199 µm in length) found in mouse tissue of the tongue. It is characterized by two large, hooked claws on each tarsus of the legs; the legs are relatively massive, consisting of large, non-overlapping segments. The palps consist of three slender, clearly separated, relatively narrow segments, wherein their coxal segments are also quite narrow and spaced. Also, segments of the palps of larva and nymphs are clearly isolated, and on the terminal segment, trident claws that resemble legs' claws can be found. On the ventral side, in immature stages, triangular scuta, topped with sclerotized spur, can be also observed. Glossicodex musculi was noted in 10.8% of mice with a mean infection intensity of 2.2 parasites per host. PMID:26991770

  9. Bloodstream infections in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoletti, Michele; Giannella, Maddalena; Lewis, Russell Edward; Viale, Pierluigi

    2016-04-01

    Bloodstream infections are a serious complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. Dysregulated intestinal bacterial translocation is the predominant pathophysiological mechanism of infections in this setting. For this reason enteric Gram-negative bacteria are commonly encountered as the first etiological cause of infection. However, through the years, the improvement in the management of cirrhosis, the recourse to invasive procedures and the global spread of multidrug resistant pathogens have importantly changed the current epidemiology. Bloodstream infections in cirrhotic patients are characterized by high mortality rate and complications including metastatic infections, infective endocarditis, and endotipsitis (or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt-related infection). For this reason early identification of patients at risk for mortality and appropriated therapeutic management is mandatory. Liver cirrhosis can significantly change the pharmacokinetic behavior of antimicrobials. In fact hypoproteinaemia, ascitis and third space expansion and impairment of renal function can be translated in an unpredictable drug exposure. PMID:26864729

  10. Nosocomial Bloodstream Infection and Clinical Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Hugonnet, Stéphane; Sax, Hugo; Eggimann, Philippe; Chevrolet, Jean-Claude; Pittet, Didier

    2004-01-01

    Primary bloodstream infection (BSI) is a leading, preventable infectious complication in critically ill patients and has a negative impact on patients’ outcome. Surveillance definitions for primary BSI distinguish those that are microbiologically documented from those that are not. The latter is known as clinical sepsis, but information on its epidemiologic importance is limited. We analyzed prospective on-site surveillance data of nosocomial infections in a medical intensive care unit. Of th...

  11. A simple method to purify biologically and antigenically preserved bloodstream trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi using Deae-cellulose columns

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Auxiliadora de Sousa

    1983-01-01

    A method to purify trypanosomastigotes of some strains of Trypanosoma cruzi (Y, CL, FL, F, "Berenice", "Colombiana" and "São Felipe") from mouse blood by using DEAE-cellulose columns was standardized. This procedure is a modification of the Lanham & Godfrey methods and differs in some aspects from others described to purify T. cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes, mainly by avoidance of prior purifications of parasites. By this method, the broad trypomastigotes were mainly isolated, accounting f...

  12. Biofilm-based central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Ammar; Jamal, Mohamed A; Raad, Issam

    2015-01-01

    Different types of central venous catheters (CVCs) have been used in clinical practice to improve the quality of life of chronically and critically ill patients. Unfortunately, indwelling devices are usually associated with microbial biofilms and eventually lead to catheter-related bloodstream infections (CLABSIs).An estimated 250,000-400,000 CLABSIs occur every year in the United States, at a rate of 1.5 per 1,000 CVC days and a mortality rate of 12-25 %. The annual cost of caring for patients with CLABSIs ranges from 296 million to 2.3 billion dollars.Biofilm formation occurs on biotic and abiotic surfaces in the clinical setting. Extensive studies have been conducted to understand biofilm formation, including different biofilm developmental stages, biofilm matrix compositions, quorum-sensing regulated biofilm formation, biofilm dispersal (and its clinical implications), and multi-species biofilms that are relevant to polymicrobial infections.When microbes form a matured biofilm within human hosts through medical devices such as CVCs, the infection becomes resistant to antibiotic treatment and can develop into a chronic condition. For that reason, many techniques have been used to prevent the formation of biofilm by targeting different stages of biofilm maturation. Other methods have been used to diagnose and treat established cases of CLABSI.Catheter removal is the conventional management of catheter associated bacteremia; however, the procedure itself carries a relatively high risk of mechanical complications. Salvaging the catheter can help to minimize these complications.In this article, we provide an overview of microbial biofilm formation; describe the involvement of various genetic determinants, adhesion proteins, organelles, mechanism(s) of biofilm formation, polymicrobial infections, and biofilm-associated infections on indwelling intravascular catheters; and describe the diagnosis, management, and prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections

  13. Transgenic Analysis of the Leishmania MAP Kinase MPK10 Reveals an Auto-inhibitory Mechanism Crucial for Stage-Regulated Activity and Parasite Viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayla, M.; Rachidi, N.; Leclercq, O.;

    2014-01-01

    Protozoan pathogens of the genus Leishmania have evolved unique signaling mechanisms that can sense changes in the host environment and trigger adaptive stage differentiation essential for host cell infection. The signaling mechanisms underlying parasite development remain largely elusive even...... though Leishmania mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been linked previously to environmentally induced differentiation and virulence. Here, we unravel highly unusual regulatory mechanisms for Leishmania MAP kinase 10 (MPK10). Using a transgenic approach, we demonstrate that MPK10 is stage...... at position 395 that could be implicated in kinase regulation. Finally, we uncovered a feedback loop that limits MPK10 activity through dephosphorylation of the tyrosine residue of the TxY motif. Together our data reveal novel aspects of protein kinase regulation in Leishmania, and propose MPK10...

  14. Transgenic analysis of the Leishmania MAP kinase MPK10 reveals an auto-inhibitory mechanism crucial for stage-regulated activity and parasite viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Cayla

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Protozoan pathogens of the genus Leishmania have evolved unique signaling mechanisms that can sense changes in the host environment and trigger adaptive stage differentiation essential for host cell infection. The signaling mechanisms underlying parasite development remain largely elusive even though Leishmania mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs have been linked previously to environmentally induced differentiation and virulence. Here, we unravel highly unusual regulatory mechanisms for Leishmania MAP kinase 10 (MPK10. Using a transgenic approach, we demonstrate that MPK10 is stage-specifically regulated, as its kinase activity increases during the promastigote to amastigote conversion. However, unlike canonical MAPKs that are activated by dual phosphorylation of the regulatory TxY motif in the activation loop, MPK10 activation is independent from the phosphorylation of the tyrosine residue, which is largely constitutive. Removal of the last 46 amino acids resulted in significantly enhanced MPK10 activity both for the recombinant and transgenic protein, revealing that MPK10 is regulated by an auto-inhibitory mechanism. Over-expression of this hyperactive mutant in transgenic parasites led to a dominant negative effect causing massive cell death during amastigote differentiation, demonstrating the essential nature of MPK10 auto-inhibition for parasite viability. Moreover, phosphoproteomics analyses identified a novel regulatory phospho-serine residue in the C-terminal auto-inhibitory domain at position 395 that could be implicated in kinase regulation. Finally, we uncovered a feedback loop that limits MPK10 activity through dephosphorylation of the tyrosine residue of the TxY motif. Together our data reveal novel aspects of protein kinase regulation in Leishmania, and propose MPK10 as a potential signal sensor of the mammalian host environment, whose intrinsic pre-activated conformation is regulated by auto-inhibition.

  15. Stage-specific Proteomes from Onchocerca ochengi, Sister Species of the Human River Blindness Parasite, Uncover Adaptations to a Nodular Lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Stuart D; Xia, Dong; Bah, Germanus S; Krishna, Ritesh; Ngangyung, Henrietta F; LaCourse, E James; McSorley, Henry J; Kengne-Ouafo, Jonas A; Chounna-Ndongmo, Patrick W; Wanji, Samuel; Enyong, Peter A; Taylor, David W; Blaxter, Mark L; Wastling, Jonathan M; Tanya, Vincent N; Makepeace, Benjamin L

    2016-08-01

    Despite 40 years of control efforts, onchocerciasis (river blindness) remains one of the most important neglected tropical diseases, with 17 million people affected. The etiological agent, Onchocerca volvulus, is a filarial nematode with a complex lifecycle involving several distinct stages in the definitive host and blackfly vector. The challenges of obtaining sufficient material have prevented high-throughput studies and the development of novel strategies for disease control and diagnosis. Here, we utilize the closest relative of O. volvulus, the bovine parasite Onchocerca ochengi, to compare stage-specific proteomes and host-parasite interactions within the secretome. We identified a total of 4260 unique O. ochengi proteins from adult males and females, infective larvae, intrauterine microfilariae, and fluid from intradermal nodules. In addition, 135 proteins were detected from the obligate Wolbachia symbiont. Observed protein families that were enriched in all whole body extracts relative to the complete search database included immunoglobulin-domain proteins, whereas redox and detoxification enzymes and proteins involved in intracellular transport displayed stage-specific overrepresentation. Unexpectedly, the larval stages exhibited enrichment for several mitochondrial-related protein families, including members of peptidase family M16 and proteins which mediate mitochondrial fission and fusion. Quantification of proteins across the lifecycle using the Hi-3 approach supported these qualitative analyses. In nodule fluid, we identified 94 O. ochengi secreted proteins, including homologs of transforming growth factor-β and a second member of a novel 6-ShK toxin domain family, which was originally described from a model filarial nematode (Litomosoides sigmodontis). Strikingly, the 498 bovine proteins identified in nodule fluid were strongly dominated by antimicrobial proteins, especially cathelicidins. This first high-throughput analysis of an Onchocerca spp

  16. Stage-specific Proteomes from Onchocerca ochengi, Sister Species of the Human River Blindness Parasite, Uncover Adaptations to a Nodular Lifestyle*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Stuart D.; Xia, Dong; Bah, Germanus S.; Krishna, Ritesh; Ngangyung, Henrietta F.; LaCourse, E. James; McSorley, Henry J.; Kengne-Ouafo, Jonas A.; Chounna-Ndongmo, Patrick W.; Wanji, Samuel; Enyong, Peter A.; Taylor, David W.; Blaxter, Mark L.; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Tanya, Vincent N.; Makepeace, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite 40 years of control efforts, onchocerciasis (river blindness) remains one of the most important neglected tropical diseases, with 17 million people affected. The etiological agent, Onchocerca volvulus, is a filarial nematode with a complex lifecycle involving several distinct stages in the definitive host and blackfly vector. The challenges of obtaining sufficient material have prevented high-throughput studies and the development of novel strategies for disease control and diagnosis. Here, we utilize the closest relative of O. volvulus, the bovine parasite Onchocerca ochengi, to compare stage-specific proteomes and host-parasite interactions within the secretome. We identified a total of 4260 unique O. ochengi proteins from adult males and females, infective larvae, intrauterine microfilariae, and fluid from intradermal nodules. In addition, 135 proteins were detected from the obligate Wolbachia symbiont. Observed protein families that were enriched in all whole body extracts relative to the complete search database included immunoglobulin-domain proteins, whereas redox and detoxification enzymes and proteins involved in intracellular transport displayed stage-specific overrepresentation. Unexpectedly, the larval stages exhibited enrichment for several mitochondrial-related protein families, including members of peptidase family M16 and proteins which mediate mitochondrial fission and fusion. Quantification of proteins across the lifecycle using the Hi-3 approach supported these qualitative analyses. In nodule fluid, we identified 94 O. ochengi secreted proteins, including homologs of transforming growth factor-β and a second member of a novel 6-ShK toxin domain family, which was originally described from a model filarial nematode (Litomosoides sigmodontis). Strikingly, the 498 bovine proteins identified in nodule fluid were strongly dominated by antimicrobial proteins, especially cathelicidins. This first high-throughput analysis of an Onchocerca spp

  17. Ultrastructural description of the spore maturation stages of the clam parasite Minchinia tapetis (Vilela, 1951) (Haplosporida: Haplosporidiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, C

    2001-07-01

    The fine structure of maturing spores of a haplosporidian parasite found in the gill, mantle and foot tissues of Ruditapes decussatus L. (Mollusca, Bivalvia), a species of commercial importance in Portugal, is described. When observed free in suspension, immature spores exhibit one or two epispore cytoplasmic extensions (ECE) which constitute a projection of a portion of the exosporoplasm, sometimes without ultrastructural organisation, surrounded by the plasmalemma. Free spores observed by light microscopy (LM) after 3-5 days of incubation in filtered sea-water exhibit no ECE attached to the spore wall. The mature spore is ovoid to ellipsoid, operculate, uninucleate and measures c. 4.8 microm long and c. 3.9 microm wide. The spore shape and size and the identity of the host living in the same geographical region suggest that this species is the same as previously described using LM observations as Haplosporidium tapetis Vilela, 1951 and later transferred to Minchinia Labbé, 1896. PMID:11466479

  18. The genome and life-stage specific transcriptomes of Globodera pallida elucidate key aspects of plant parasitism by a cyst nematode

    KAUST Repository

    Cotton, James A

    2014-03-03

    Background: Globodera pallida is a devastating pathogen of potato crops, making it one of the most economically important plant parasitic nematodes. It is also an important model for the biology of cyst nematodes. Cyst nematodes and root-knot nematodes are the two most important plant parasitic nematode groups and together represent a global threat to food security. Results: We present the complete genome sequence of G. pallida, together with transcriptomic data from most of the nematode life cycle, particularly focusing on the life cycle stages involved in root invasion and establishment of the biotrophic feeding site. Despite the relatively close phylogenetic relationship with root-knot nematodes, we describe a very different gene family content between the two groups and in particular extensive differences in the repertoire of effectors, including an enormous expansion of the SPRY domain protein family in G. pallida, which includes the SPRYSEC family of effectors. This highlights the distinct biology of cyst nematodes compared to the root-knot nematodes that were, until now, the only sedentary plant parasitic nematodes for which genome information was available. We also present in-depth descriptions of the repertoires of other genes likely to be important in understanding the unique biology of cyst nematodes and of potential drug targets and other targets for their control. Conclusions: The data and analyses we present will be central in exploiting post-genomic approaches in the development of much-needed novel strategies for the control of G. pallida and related pathogens. 2014 Cotton et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  19. Surface electrical charge of bloodstream trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, M A

    1983-01-01

    Bloodstream trypomastigotes of some Trypanosoma cruzi strains were processed through DEAE-cellulose columns under standardized conditions. The results obtained suggest mainly that these strains present different surface charges, that there are subpopulations of bloodstream trypomastigotes as regards electrical charges and that the broad forms are less negative than the slender ones. PMID:6443631

  20. Protective CD8+ T cell responses against the pre-erythrocytic stages of malaria parasites: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira-Ferreira J

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells have been implicated as critical effector cells in protection against the pre-erythrocytic stage of malaria in mice and humans following irradiated sporozoite immunization. Immunization experiments in animal models by several investigators have suggested different strategies for vaccination against malaria and many of the targets from liver stage malaria antigens have been shown to be immunogenic and to protect mice from the sporozoite challenge. Several prime/boost protocols with replicating vectors, such as vaccinia/influenza, with non-replicating vectors, such as recombinant particles derived from yeast transposon (Ty-particles and modified vaccinia virus Ankara, and DNA, significantly enhanced CD8+ T cell immunogenicity and also the protective efficacy against the circumsporosoite protein of Plasmodium berghei and P. yeti. Based on these experimental results the development of a CD8+ T cell inducing vaccine has moved forward from epitope identification to planning stages of safety and immunogenicity trials of candidate vaccines.

  1. Ultrastructure observation on the cells at different life history stages of Cryptocaryon irritans (Ciliophora: Prostomatea), a parasitic ciliate of marine fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Ni, Bing; Fan, Xinpeng; Warren, Alan; Yin, Fei; Gu, Fukang

    2016-09-01

    Cells of Cryptocaryon irritans at different life history stages were studied using both light and electron microscopy. The characteristics of several organelles were revealed for the first time at the ultrastructural level. It was confirmed that the cytostome of trophonts, protomonts and theronts was surrounded by cilium-palp triplets rather than ciliary triplets. The nematodesmata underlying the circumoral dikinetids were single bundles, whereas these were always paired in Prorodontids. Toxicysts were present in late-stage tomonts and theronts, but were absent in trophonts and protomonts. We posited that toxicysts might play a role in infection and invasion of host-fish tissue by theronts. The adoral brosse was unlike that of any other family of the class Prostomatea based on its location and morphology. Membranous folds were present in trophonts, protomonts and theronts. These folds were longer and more highly developed in C. irritans than in exclusively free-living prostome ciliates suggesting that they might be linked to parasitism in C. irritans. Trophonts, protomonts and theronts had multiple contractile vacuoles. The basic ultrastructure of the contractile vacuole of C. irritans was similar to that of other kinetofragminophoran ciliates. They might play different roles in different stages of the life cycle since their ultrastructure varied among trophonts, protomonts and theronts. PMID:27460894

  2. Bloodstream infections in patients with solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiol, Carlota; Aguado, José María; Carratalà, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Little information is currently available regarding bloodstream infection (BSI) in patients with solid tumors who, for a variety of reasons, are particularly predisposed to develop this condition. In this review we focus on the incidence, epidemiology, clinical features, etiology, antimicrobial resistance, and outcomes of BSI of adult cancer patients with solid tumors. Most episodes of BSI occur in non-neutropenic patients, in whom the site of primary or metastatic tumor often serves as the portal of entry. The urinary tract and the abdomen are the most frequent sources of infection, and cholangitis is the most common recurrent source of BSI. Gram-negative bacilli are becoming the leading cause of BSI in patients with solid tumors, and the rate of multidrug resistance is increasingly being recognized. The case-fatality rate in patients with solid tumors and BSI is high, especially among those with comorbidities, advanced neoplasms, corticosteroid therapy, and shock at presentation. PMID:26787095

  3. Risk and Prognosis of Bloodstream Infections among Patients on Chronic Hemodialysis: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Skov Dalgaard

    Full Text Available Infections are common complications among patients on chronic hemodialysis. This population-based cohort study aims to estimate risk and case fatality of bloodstream infection among chronic hemodialysis patients.In this population-based cohort study we identified residents with end-stage renal disease in Central and North Jutland, Denmark who had hemodialysis as first renal replacement therapy (hemodialysis patients during 1995-2010. For each hemodialysis patient, we sampled 19 persons from the general population matched on age, gender, and municipality. Information on positive blood cultures was obtained from regional microbiology databases. All persons were observed from cohort entry until first episode of bloodstream infection, emigration, death, or end of hemodialysis treatment, whichever came first. Incidence-rates and incidence-rate ratios were computed and risk factors for bloodstream infection assessed by Poisson regression. Case fatality was compared by Cox regression.Among 1792 hemodialysis patients and 33 618 matched population controls, we identified 461 and 1126 first episodes of bloodstream infection, respectively. Incidence rates of first episode of bloodstream infection were 13.7 (95% confidence interval (CI, 12.5-15.0 per 100 person-years among hemodialysis patients and 0.53 (95% CI, 0.50-0.56 per 100 person-years among population controls. In hemodialysis patients, the most common causative microorganisms were Staphylococcus aureus (43.8% and Escherichia coli (12.6%. The 30-day case fatality was similar among hemodialysis patients and population controls 16% (95% CI, 13%-20% vs. 18% (95% CI, 15%-20%.Hemodialysis patients have extraordinary high risk of bloodstream infection while short-term case fatality following is similar to that of population controls.

  4. Risk and Prognosis of Bloodstream Infections among Patients on Chronic Hemodialysis: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skov Dalgaard, Lars; Nørgaard, Mette; Jespersen, Bente; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Infections are common complications among patients on chronic hemodialysis. This population-based cohort study aims to estimate risk and case fatality of bloodstream infection among chronic hemodialysis patients. Methods In this population-based cohort study we identified residents with end-stage renal disease in Central and North Jutland, Denmark who had hemodialysis as first renal replacement therapy (hemodialysis patients) during 1995–2010. For each hemodialysis patient, we sampled 19 persons from the general population matched on age, gender, and municipality. Information on positive blood cultures was obtained from regional microbiology databases. All persons were observed from cohort entry until first episode of bloodstream infection, emigration, death, or end of hemodialysis treatment, whichever came first. Incidence-rates and incidence-rate ratios were computed and risk factors for bloodstream infection assessed by Poisson regression. Case fatality was compared by Cox regression. Results Among 1792 hemodialysis patients and 33 618 matched population controls, we identified 461 and 1126 first episodes of bloodstream infection, respectively. Incidence rates of first episode of bloodstream infection were 13.7 (95% confidence interval (CI), 12.5–15.0) per 100 person-years among hemodialysis patients and 0.53 (95% CI, 0.50–0.56) per 100 person-years among population controls. In hemodialysis patients, the most common causative microorganisms were Staphylococcus aureus (43.8%) and Escherichia coli (12.6%). The 30-day case fatality was similar among hemodialysis patients and population controls 16% (95% CI, 13%–20%) vs. 18% (95% CI, 15%–20%). Conclusions Hemodialysis patients have extraordinary high risk of bloodstream infection while short-term case fatality following is similar to that of population controls. PMID:25910221

  5. Parasites - Lice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Lice Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Parents Schools Listen to audio/Podcast Related Links Parasites A-Z Index Parasites Glossary Neglected Tropical Diseases ...

  6. Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites ... can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies ...

  7. Differentiation of Haemonchus placei from Haemonchus contortus by PCR and by morphometrics of adult parasites and third stage larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Cardoso dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and morphological methods were evaluated to distinguish between Haemonchus contortus and Haemonchus placei species. A total of 141 H. contortus and 89 H. placei male adult specimens collected from artificially infected lambs were identified individually by PCR analysis, using a species-specific primer pair. These PCR results were used as gold standard for Haemonchus spp. identification. Haemonchus placei presented higher mean spicule and barb lengths than H. contortus (P<0.05. However, some measurements overlapped. For this reason, a discriminate function did not allow the correct identification of 13 H. contortus and one H. placei specimen. The sheath tail length of the third stage larvae (L3, which comprises the distance between the tip of the larval tail and the end of the sheath tail, were measured. Only three of the 485 H. placei larvae (0.619% had a sheath tail shorter than 85 µm, while only four of the 500 H. contortus larvae (0.8% presented a sheath tail longer than 85 µm. The results indicated that 6.09% of the male adult specimens would be misclassified based on the discriminate function, while only 0.71% of infective larvae would be misclassified. Therefore, identification of L3 can be used as the first method to indicate the presence of H. placei and/or H. contortus in a population of domestic ruminants.

  8. Influence of site, season, silvering stage, and length on the parasites of the European eel Anguilla anguilla in two Mediterranean coastal lagoons of the island of Corsica, France using indicator species method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Jean-José; Quilichini, Yann; Foata, Joséphine; Marchand, Bernard

    2013-08-01

    The parasites of 425 European eels, Anguilla anguilla, were studied between 2009 and 2012 in two Mediterranean coastal lagoons of the island of Corsica, France. An indicator value (IndVal) method was used for analysis, which combines measures of fidelity and specificity. Because of its resilience to detect changes in abundance, IndVal is an effective ecological bioindicator. The IndVal method demonstrated that site, season, silvering stage, and length could influence the occurrence of parasite species in European eel. A randomization test identified ten parasite species as having a significant indicator value for site (lagoons differed principally in salinity: oligohaline to polyhaline for the Biguglia lagoon and polyhaline to euhaline for the Urbino lagoon; the digeneans Bucephalus anguillae and Lecithochirium musculus, the cestodes Bothriocephalus claviceps, Proteocephalus macrocephalus, and larvae of Myzophyllobothrium sp., the nematodes Anguillicoloides crassus, and encysted larvae of Contracaecum sp., the acanthocephalan Acanthocephaloides incrassatus, the monogenean Pseudodactyogyrus anguillae, and the copepod Ergasilus gibbus); one parasite species for the spring season (the acanthocephalan A. incrassatus); six parasite species for silvering stage (yellow, pre-silver, silver; the trematodes B. anguillae and Deropristis inflata, encysted larvae of the nematode Contracaecum sp., the acanthocephalan A. incrassatus, the monogenean P. anguillae, and the copepod E. gibbus); and three parasite species for some of the five length classes (the cestode P. macrocephalus, encysted larvae of the nematode Contracaecum sp., and the monogenean P. anguillae). Data for species composition and infection levels should help to improve the management of parasitism in the populations of European eels. PMID:23739809

  9. Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Bloodstream Infections In Hospitals, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This table shows the incidence rates of hospital onset (HO) vancomycin-resistant Enterococci bloodstream infections (VRE BSI) reported by California general acute...

  10. Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections (CLABSI) In Hospitals, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This table shows the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI)...

  11. Surface electrical charge of bloodstream trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi strains

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Auxiliadora de Sousa

    1983-01-01

    Bloodstream trypomastigotes of some Trypanosoma cruzi strains were processed through DEAE-cellulose columns under standardized conditions. The results obtained suggest mainly that these strains present different surface charges, that there are subpopulations of bloodstream trypomastigotes as regards electrical charges and that the broad forms are less negative than the slender ones.Tripomastigotas sanguíneos de algumas cepas de Trypanosoma cruzi foram processadas em colunas de DEAE-celulose s...

  12. Bloodstream Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis among HIV patients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-23

    This podcast looks at bloodstream infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogens among outpatients infected with HIV in Southeast Asia. CDC health scientist Kimberly McCarthy discusses the study and why bloodstream infections occur in HIV-infected populations.  Created: 9/23/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 9/23/2010.

  13. The de novo and salvage pathways of GDP-mannose biosynthesis are both sufficient for the growth of bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Kuettel, Sabine; Wadum, Majken C T; Güther, Maria Lucia S; Mariño, Karina; Riemer, Carolin; Ferguson, Michael A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The sugar nucleotide GDP-mannose is essential for Trypanosoma brucei. Phosphomannose isomerase occupies a key position on the de novo pathway to GDP-mannose from glucose, just before intersection with the salvage pathway from free mannose. We identified the parasite phosphomannose isomerase gene, confirmed that it encodes phosphomannose isomerase activity and localized the endogenous enzyme to the glycosome. We also created a bloodstream-form conditional null mutant of phosphomannose ...

  14. When Prostate Cancer Circulates in the Bloodstream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Vlaeminck-Guillem

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Management of patients with prostate cancer is currently based on imperfect clinical, biological, radiological and pathological evaluation. Prostate cancer aggressiveness, including metastatic potential, remains difficult to accurately estimate. In an attempt to better adapt therapeutics to an individual (personalized medicine, reliable evaluation of the intrinsic molecular biology of the tumor is warranted, and particularly for all tumor sites (primary tumors and secondary sites at any time of the disease progression. As a consequence of their natural tendency to grow (passive invasion or as a consequence of an active blood vessel invasion by metastase-initiating cells, tumors shed various materials into the bloodstream. Major efforts have been recently made to develop powerful and accurate methods able to detect, quantify and/or analyze all these circulating tumor materials: circulating tumors cells, disseminating tumor cells, extracellular vesicles (including exosomes, nucleic acids, etc. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge about these circulating tumor materials and their applications in translational research.

  15. New antibiotic agents for bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergidis, Paschalis I; Falagas, Matthew E

    2008-11-01

    Infections due to multidrug-resistant pathogens have shown a dramatic worldwide increase in prevalence. Bloodstream infections (BSIs) represent an important cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalised patients. Research in the field led to the introduction of several novel antibiotic agents in the fight against bacterial pathogens. New antibiotics used against Gram-positive bacteria, mainly meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, include daptomycin, linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin and semisynthetic lipoglycopeptides. Among the Gram-negative bacteria, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae as well as highly resistant Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter isolates are of particular concern. Doripenem is a recently approved carbapenem. Polymyxins are reconsidered as valuable therapeutic options for Gram-negative infections. Tigecycline, a glycylcycline, and ceftobiprole, a novel cephalosporin under investigation, have activity both against Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In addition to the above agents, alternative treatment approaches that require further investigation have also been introduced into clinical practice. These include antibiotic lock therapy and continuous intravenous administration of antibiotics. In this article, we review the above treatment options for BSIs based on current clinical evidence. Comparative trials specifically focusing on patients with bacteraemia were generally not performed; however, a proportion of patients from the reported studies did have bacteraemia. PMID:18723329

  16. In vivo approaches reveal a key role for DCs in CD4+ T cell activation and parasite clearance during the acute phase of experimental blood-stage malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Borges da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are phagocytes that are highly specialized for antigen presentation. Heterogeneous populations of macrophages and DCs form a phagocyte network inside the red pulp (RP of the spleen, which is a major site for the control of blood-borne infections such as malaria. However, the dynamics of splenic DCs during Plasmodium infections are poorly understood, limiting our knowledge regarding their protective role in malaria. Here, we used in vivo experimental approaches that enabled us to deplete or visualize DCs in order to clarify these issues. To elucidate the roles of DCs and marginal zone macrophages in the protection against blood-stage malaria, we infected DTx (diphtheria toxin-treated C57BL/6.CD11c-DTR mice, as well as C57BL/6 mice treated with low doses of clodronate liposomes (ClLip, with Plasmodium chabaudi AS (Pc parasites. The first evidence suggesting that DCs could contribute directly to parasite clearance was an early effect of the DTx treatment, but not of the ClLip treatment, in parasitemia control. DCs were also required for CD4+ T cell responses during infection. The phagocytosis of infected red blood cells (iRBCs by splenic DCs was analyzed by confocal intravital microscopy, as well as by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, at three distinct phases of Pc malaria: at the first encounter, at pre-crisis concomitant with parasitemia growth and at crisis when the parasitemia decline coincides with spleen closure. In vivo and ex vivo imaging of the spleen revealed that DCs actively phagocytize iRBCs and interact with CD4+ T cells both in T cell-rich areas and in the RP. Subcapsular RP DCs were highly efficient in the recognition and capture of iRBCs during pre-crisis, while complete DC maturation was only achieved during crisis. These findings indicate that, beyond their classical role in antigen presentation, DCs also contribute to the direct elimination of iRBCs during acute Plasmodium infection.

  17. JVG9, a benzimidazole derivative, alters the surface and cytoskeleton of Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Chiguer, Dylan L; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; Castillo, Rafael; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Ambrosio, Javier R

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a particular cytoskeleton that consists of a subpellicular network of microtubules and actin microfilaments. Therefore, it is an excellent target for the development of new anti-parasitic drugs. Benzimidazole 2-carbamates, a class of well-known broad-spectrum anthelmintics, have been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of many protozoa. Therefore, to find efficient anti-trypanosomal (trypanocidal) drugs, our group has designed and synthesised several benzimidazole derivatives. One, named JVG9 (5-chloro-1H-benzimidazole-2-thiol), has been found to be effective against T. cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Here, we present the in vitro effects observed by laser scanning confocal and scanning electron microscopy on T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Changes in the surface and the distribution of the cytoskeletal proteins are consistent with the hypothesis that the trypanocidal activity of JVG9 involves the cytoskeleton as a target. PMID:25317703

  18. Flow cytometric readout based on Mitotracker Red CMXRos staining of live asexual blood stage malarial parasites reliably assesses antibody dependent cellular inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jogdand, Prajakta S; Singh, Susheel K; Christiansen, Michael; Dziegiel, Morten H; Singh, Subhash; Theisen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Functional in vitro assays could provide insights into the efficacy of malaria vaccine candidates. For estimating the anti-parasite effect induced by a vaccine candidate, an accurate determination of live parasite count is an essential component of most in vitro bioassays...

  19. The phosphoproteome of bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei, causative agent of African sleeping sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nett, Isabelle R E; Martin, David M A; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Lamont, Douglas; Barber, Jonathan D; Mehlert, Angela; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2009-07-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of human African sleeping sickness and related animal diseases, and it has over 170 predicted protein kinases. Protein phosphorylation is a key regulatory mechanism for cellular function that, thus far, has been studied in T.brucei principally through putative kinase mRNA knockdown and observation of the resulting phenotype. However, despite the relatively large kinome of this organism and the demonstrated essentiality of several T. brucei kinases, very few specific phosphorylation sites have been determined in this organism. Using a gel-free, phosphopeptide enrichment-based proteomics approach we performed the first large scale phosphorylation site analyses for T.brucei. Serine, threonine, and tyrosine phosphorylation sites were determined for a cytosolic protein fraction of the bloodstream form of the parasite, resulting in the identification of 491 phosphoproteins based on the identification of 852 unique phosphopeptides and 1204 phosphorylation sites. The phosphoproteins detected in this study are predicted from their genome annotations to participate in a wide variety of biological processes, including signal transduction, processing of DNA and RNA, protein synthesis, and degradation and to a minor extent in metabolic pathways. The analysis of phosphopeptides and phosphorylation sites was facilitated by in-house developed software, and this automated approach was validated by manual annotation of spectra of the kinase subset of proteins. Analysis of the cytosolic bloodstream form T. brucei kinome revealed the presence of 44 phosphorylated protein kinases in our data set that could be classified into the major eukaryotic protein kinase groups by applying a multilevel hidden Markov model library of the kinase catalytic domain. Identification of the kinase phosphorylation sites showed conserved phosphorylation sequence motifs in several kinase activation segments, supporting the view that

  20. Interacting parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Parasitism is the most popular life-style on Earth, and many vertebrates host more than one kind of parasite at a time. A common assumption is that parasite species rarely interact, because they often exploit different tissues in a host, and this use of discrete resources limits competition (1). On page 243 of this issue, however, Telfer et al. (2) provide a convincing case of a highly interactive parasite community in voles, and show how infection with one parasite can affect susceptibility to others. If some human parasites are equally interactive, our current, disease-by-disease approach to modeling and treating infectious diseases is inadequate (3).

  1. Dual stage synthesis and crucial role of cytoadherence-linked asexual gene 9 in the surface expression of malaria parasite var proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goel, Suchi; Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Achur, Rajeshwara N;

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family members mediate the adherence of parasite-infected red blood cells (IRBCs) to various host receptors. A previous study has shown that the parasite protein, cytoadherence-linked asexual gene 9 (CLAG9), is also essential for IRBC...... within the parasite. Based on these findings, we propose that CLAG9 plays a critical role in the trafficking of PfEMP1s onto the IRBC surface. These results have important implications for the development of therapeutics for cerebral, placental, and other cytoadherence-associated malaria illnesses....

  2. The clinical-grade 42-kilodalton fragment of merozoite surface protein 1 of Plasmodium falciparum strain FVO expressed in Escherichia coli protects Aotus nancymai against challenge with homologous erythrocytic-stage parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darko, Christian A; Angov, Evelina; Collins, William E; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S; Girouard, Autumn S; Hitt, Stacy L; McBride, Jana S; Diggs, Carter L; Holder, Anthony A; Long, Carole A; Barnwell, John W; Lyon, Jeffrey A

    2005-01-01

    A 42-kDa fragment from the C terminus of major merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) is among the leading malaria vaccine candidates that target infection by asexual erythrocytic-stage malaria parasites. The MSP1(42) gene fragment from the Vietnam-Oak Knoll (FVO) strain of Plasmodium falciparum was expressed as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli and purified according to good manufacturing practices. This clinical-grade recombinant protein retained some important elements of correct structure, as it was reactive with several functional, conformation-dependent monoclonal antibodies raised against P. falciparum malaria parasites, it induced antibodies (Abs) that were reactive to parasites in immunofluorescent Ab tests, and it induced strong growth and invasion inhibitory antisera in New Zealand White rabbits. The antigen quality was further evaluated by vaccinating Aotus nancymai monkeys and challenging them with homologous P. falciparum FVO erythrocytic-stage malaria parasites. The trial included two control groups, one vaccinated with the sexual-stage-specific antigen of Plasmodium vivax, Pvs25, as a negative control, and the other vaccinated with baculovirus-expressed MSP1(42) (FVO) as a positive control. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) Ab titers induced by E. coli MSP1(42) were significantly higher than those induced by the baculovirus-expressed antigen. None of the six monkeys that were vaccinated with the E. coli MSP1(42) antigen required treatment for uncontrolled parasitemia, but two required treatment for anemia. Protective immunity in these monkeys correlated with the ELISA Ab titer against the p19 fragment and the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain 2 fragment of MSP1(42), but not the MSP1(42) protein itself or the EGF-like domain 1 fragment. Soluble MSP1(42) (FVO) expressed in E. coli offers excellent promise as a component of a vaccine against erythrocytic-stage falciparum malaria. PMID:15618165

  3. Parasites: Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Water Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Parasites can live in natural water sources. When outdoors, treat your water before drinking ...

  4. The genome and life-stage specific transcriptomes of Globodera pallida elucidate key aspects of plant parasitism by a cyst nematode

    OpenAIRE

    Cotton, James A.; Lilley, Catherine J; Jones, Laura M.; Kikuchi, Taisei; Reid, Adam J; Thorpe, Peter; Tsai, Isheng J.; Beasley, Helen; Blok, Vivian; Cock, Peter J A; den Akker, Sebastian Eves-van; Holroyd, Nancy; Hunt, Martin; Mantelin, Sophie; Naghra, Hardeep

    2014-01-01

    Date of Acceptance: 03/03/2014 Background: Globodera pallida is a devastating pathogen of potato crops, making it one of the most economically important plant parasitic nematodes. It is also an important model for the biology of cyst nematodes. Cyst nematodes and root-knot nematodes are the two most important plant parasitic nematode groups and together represent a global threat to food security. Results: We present the complete genome sequence of G. pallida, together with transcriptomic d...

  5. Transcriptome analyses reveal protein and domain families that delineate stage-related development in the economically important parasitic nematodes, Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora

    OpenAIRE

    Heizer, Esley; Zarlenga, Dante S.; Rosa, Bruce; Gao, Xin; Gasser, Robin B; De Graef, Jessie; Geldhof, Peter; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi are among the most important gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle worldwide. The economic losses caused by these parasites are on the order of hundreds of millions of dollars per year. Conventional treatment of these parasites is through anthelmintic drugs; however, as resistance to anthelmintics increases, overall effectiveness has begun decreasing. New methods of control and alternative drug targets are necessary. In-depth analysis of ...

  6. Genotypic analysis of Acinetobacter bloodstream infection isolates in a Turkish university hospital.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alp, E.; Esel, D.; Yildiz, O.; Voss, A.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Doganay, M.

    2006-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a significant pathogen of bloodstream infections in hospital patients that frequently causes single clone outbreaks. We aimed to evaluate the genetic relatedness and antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter spp. bloodstream isolates, in order to obtain insight into th

  7. Mortality in enterococcal bloodstream infections increases with inappropriate antimicrobial therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, M.; Aabenhus, R.; Harboe, Z.B.;

    2010-01-01

    Enterococcus species are common in nosocomial bloodstream infections and their incidence is rising. Although well recognized in several serious bacterial infections, the influence of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in enterococcal bacteraemia has not been fully settled. The aim of the study was.......7-10), thrombocytopenia (3.9, 1.6-9.3), chronic liver failure (3.3, 1.1-10) and age >/=60 years (2.2, 0.99-5.0). Antibiotics not appropriately covering enterococci are frequently administered empirically in suspected bloodstream infections. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy was an independent risk factor for mortality in...

  8. Plasmodium vivax Tryptophan Rich Antigen PvTRAg36.6 Interacts with PvETRAMP and PvTRAg56.6 Interacts with PvMSP7 during Erythrocytic Stages of the Parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Kriti; Hossain, Mohammad Enayet; Thakur, Vandana; Aggarwal, Praveen; Malhotra, Pawan; Mohmmed, Asif; Sharma, Yagya Dutta

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is most wide spread and a neglected malaria parasite. There is a lack of information on parasite biology of this species. Genome of this parasite encodes for the largest number of tryptophan-rich proteins belonging to 'Pv-fam-a' family and some of them are potential drug/vaccine targets but their functional role(s) largely remains unexplored. Using bacterial and yeast two hybrid systems, we have identified the interacting partners for two of the P. vivax tryptophan-rich antigens called PvTRAg36.6 and PvTRAg56.2. The PvTRAg36.6 interacts with early transcribed membrane protein (ETRAMP) of P.vivax. It is apically localized in merozoites but in early stages it is seen in parasite periphery suggesting its likely involvement in parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) development or maintenance. On the other hand, PvTRAg56.2 interacts with P.vivax merozoite surface protein7 (PvMSP7) and is localized on merozoite surface. Co-localization of PvTRAg56.2 with PvMSP1 and its molecular interaction with PvMSP7 probably suggest that, PvTRAg56.2 is part of MSP-complex, and might assist or stabilize the protein complex at the merozoite surface. In conclusion, the PvTRAg proteins have different sub cellular localizations and specific associated functions during intra-erythrocytic developmental cycle. PMID:26954579

  9. Physical model of the bloodstream systemic resistance of human

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlup, Hynek; Konvičková, S.

    Praha : Czech Technical University in Prague, 2005, s. 806-807. ISBN 80-01-03201-9. [Workshop 2005 : Biomedical Engineering. Praha (CZ), 21.03.2005-25.03.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/04/1181 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : system resistence * bloodstream * experimental lina Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  10. Polymicrobial Bloodstream Infection with Eggerthella lenta and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Liderot, Karin; Larsson, Martin; Boräng, Stina; Özenci, Volkan

    2010-01-01

    The advancement in culture identification methods has made possible the culture and identification of slow-growing anaerobic bacteria in clinical samples. Here, we describe a case of polymicrobial bloodstream infection (BSI) caused by Eggerthella lenta and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, identified by API 20A and Vitek 2 systems and by 16S rRNA sequencing.

  11. First Case of Bloodstream Infection Caused by Rhodococcus erythropolis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Baba, Hisashi; Nada, Toshi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Ezaki, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; PATERSON, DAVID L.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the first case of bloodstream infection caused by Rhodococcus erythropolis. The identification was performed using 16S rRNA sequencing. This case illustrates that non-equi Rhodococcus infections may be underdiagnosed due to difficulties in identification in the routine clinical microbiology laboratory.

  12. Prevention of nosocomial bloodstream infections in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Helder MScN (Onno)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractProtecting patients from harm is the overarching theme of the studies presented here. More precisely, this thesis places a focus on the prevention of nosocomial or hospitalacquired bloodstream infections in preterm infants, thus saving them from further harm. A nosocomial infection is an

  13. Pichia farinosa Bloodstream Infection in a Lymphoma Patient▿

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, A.; Hidalgo-Grass, C.; Boekhout, T.; Theelen, B.; Sionov, E.; Polacheck, I

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of Pichia farinosa bloodstream infection in a lymphoma patient. Phenotypic methods failed to identify the isolate, which was identified by sequence-based methods. This case highlights the importance of implementing molecular methods for the identification of rare fungal pathogens.

  14. Parasitic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; McQuade, Jennifer A

    2015-06-01

    Over one billion people worldwide harbor intestinal parasites. Parasitic intestinal infections have a predilection for developing countries due to overcrowding and poor sanitation but are also found in developed nations, such as the United States, particularly in immigrants or in the setting of sporadic outbreaks. Although the majority of people are asymptomatically colonized with parasites, the clinical presentation can range from mild abdominal discomfort or diarrhea to serious complications, such as perforation or bleeding. Protozoa and helminths (worms) are the two major classes of intestinal parasites. Protozoal intestinal infections include cryptosporidiosis, cystoisosporiasis, cyclosporiasis, balantidiasis, giardiasis, amebiasis, and Chagas disease, while helminth infections include ascariasis, trichuriasis, strongyloidiasis, enterobiasis, and schistosomiasis. Intestinal parasites are predominantly small intestine pathogens but the large intestine is also frequently involved. This article highlights important aspects of parasitic infections of the colon including epidemiology, transmission, symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as appropriate medical and surgical treatment. PMID:26034403

  15. Horse parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Kunová, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    Among the horse breeders, it has always been known that the most common cause of malnutrition of horses is an incidence of parasites. Problems with parasites are ever discussed topic of many scientists and veterinarians. The reason is not just poor nutritional status of horses, but parasites can also cause severe colic, diarrhea and damage the intestinal mucosa. Young infestated horses grow poorly and are unable to absorb all the nutrients from their feed. Ectoparasites can cause very miserab...

  16. [The nature of changes of some immunophysiological characteristics in bream (Abramis brama) infected with plerocercoids (Ligula intestinalis) at various stages of parasite development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silkina, N I; Mikriakov, V R; Mikriakov, D V

    2012-01-01

    The data from studies of the antimicrobial properties of blood serum, the content of total lipids, and antioxidant activity of immunocompetent tissues and organs of breams Abramis brama infected with plerocercoids Ligula intestinalis depending on the phase of development of the parasite are presented. The quantitative characteristics of the studied parameters are determined. PMID:23136746

  17. Distribution of Parasitic Cestod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Karimi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ligulae intestinalis is a parasitic cestode, which has the economic-health importance in fishery industries. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of this parasite in Mazandaran. The effects of habitat temperature and kind of pool (sandy-cement were considered as well. Methods: In this study, 103 fish samples were obtained in all stages; the samples (male and female were divided into 3 groups based on length of fish, temperature, origin of cultured fish, kind of pool, height from sea and sex. Macroscopic and microscopic observations were carried out in all stages of the parasite (procercoid, plerocercoid and adult. Chi-square and Pearson's double square tests (P<0.05 were conducted in order to evaluate the prevalence and determination of reliability in six sampling areas, respectively. Results: Total rate of the parasites were 9.7% in all groups. There was significant difference between parasitism rate and height of sea level, kind of pool (maximum in sandy pools and high temperature. The multi analyses regarding to above-mentioned three criteria also indicated meaningful difference between these criteria and parasitism rate. Seasonal conditions enhance the prevalence of ligulae intestinalis. Conclusion: Flexibility in parasite's life cycle and choosing different hosts makes it challenging case in fishery industry; moreover its prevalence could be predicted according to environmental conditions so choosing the minimal at risk place for salmonids farming. Further studies are recommended for evaluating the problems in fish fertility and probable risk for infected fish consumers.

  18. Fish parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book contains 22 chapters on some of the most important parasitic diseases in wild and farmed fish. International experts give updated reviews and provide solutions to the problems......This book contains 22 chapters on some of the most important parasitic diseases in wild and farmed fish. International experts give updated reviews and provide solutions to the problems...

  19. Parasitic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foundations of roentgenological semiotics of parasitic diseases of lungs, w hich are of the greatest practical value, are presented. Roentgenological pictu res of the following parasitic diseases: hydatid and alveolar echinococcosis, pa ragonimiasis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiasis, bilharziasis (Schistosomias is) of lungs, are considered

  20. Artemisinin activity-based probes identify multiple molecular targets within the asexual stage of the malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum 3D7

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Hanafy M; Barton, Victoria; Phanchana, Matthew; Charoensutthivarakul, Sitthivut; Wong, Michael H. L.; Hemingway, Janet; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; O’Neill, Paul M.; Ward, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of action of the artemisinin (ART) class of antimalarial drugs, the most important antimalarial drug class in use today, remains controversial, despite more than three decades of intensive research. We have developed an unbiased chemical proteomic approach using a suite of ART activity-based protein profiling probes to identify proteins within the malaria parasite that are alkylated by ART, including proteins involved in glycolysis, hemoglobin metabolism, and redox defense. The ...

  1. [Parasitic specificity and development of stray parasites of animal origin in man].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euzéby, J

    1994-04-01

    As on introduction to the selected topic, the author, after conjuring up the problem of parasite specificity, describes the various biological behaviour of parasites of animal origin having got into man. So doing, he quotes two main types of parasitic zoonoses (1) holozoonoses, in which the parasites are able to pass from animals to man and back; (2) hemi-zoonoses, in which parasites cannot go back from man to animals. The latter are due: (a) either to the inability for the parasite to reach, in man, the stage which would enable it to follow on its life cycle; this is a biological phenomenon: man is a dead-lock for the parasite; (b) or to the necessity for a parasite having reached a suitable stage in man, to go back-to animal through predation of man by the animal; this is an ethological phenomenon: man is a cul-de-sac for the parasite. PMID:8076195

  2. Surface electrical charge of bloodstream trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora de Sousa

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Bloodstream trypomastigotes of some Trypanosoma cruzi strains were processed through DEAE-cellulose columns under standardized conditions. The results obtained suggest mainly that these strains present different surface charges, that there are subpopulations of bloodstream trypomastigotes as regards electrical charges and that the broad forms are less negative than the slender ones.Tripomastigotas sanguíneos de algumas cepas de Trypanosoma cruzi foram processadas em colunas de DEAE-celulose sob condições padronizadas. Os resultados obtidos sugerem principalmente que estas cepas possuem cargas superficiais diferentes, que em relação a este aspecto existem subpopulações de tripomastigotas e que as formas largas são menos negativas do que as finas.

  3. Comparison of Total Hospital-Acquired Bloodstream Infections to Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections and Implications for Outcome Measures in Infection Control

    OpenAIRE

    Leekha, Surbhi; Li, Shanshan; Thom, Kerri A.; Anne Preas, Michael; Caffo, Brian S.; Morgan, Daniel J.; Harris, Anthony D.

    2013-01-01

    Validity of the central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) measure is compromised by subjectivity. We observed significant decreases in both CLABSI and total hospital-acquired bloodstream infection (BSI) following a CLABSI prevention intervention in adult intensive care units. Total hospital-acquired BSI could be explored as an adjunct, objective CLABSI measure.

  4. Comparison of serum procalcitonin in respiratory infections and bloodstream infections

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yanhui; Yuan, Yulin; Huang, Huayi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study observed the relationship between procalcitonin (PCT) and results of sputum culture, the relationship between PCT and results of blood culture to evaluate and compare the value of PCT in respiratory and bloodstream infections. Methods: We analyzed 1616 patients in which PCT and sputum culture were concurrently ordered and analyzed, and 1096 patients in which PCT and blood culture were concurrently ordered and analyzed from January 2014 to May 2015. PCT concentrations were ...

  5. Candida bracarensis Bloodstream Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Thomas A.; McTaggart, Lisa; Richardson, Susan E.; Zhang, Sean X.

    2010-01-01

    Candida bracarensis is a recently described Candida species which is phenotypically similar to Candida glabrata. A case of C. bracarensis bloodstream infection in a bone marrow transplant patient is described and confirms this organism as an opportunistic human pathogen. The organism can be distinguished from C. glabrata by its white color on CHROMagar and by DNA sequence analysis using D1/D2 and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) primers.

  6. Clonal relationships among bloodstream isolates of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Maslow, J.N.; Whittam, T S; Gilks, C F; Wilson, R A; Mulligan, M E; Adams, K S; Arbeit, R D

    1995-01-01

    The clonal relationships among 187 bloodstream isolates of Escherichia coli from 179 patients at Boston, Mass., Long Beach, Calif., and Nairobi, Kenya, were determined by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), analysis of polymorphisms associated with the ribosomal operon (ribotyping), and serotyping. MLEE based on 20 enzymes resolved 101 electrophoretic types (ETs), forming five clusters; ribotyping resolved 56 distinct patterns concordant with the analysis by MLEE. The isolates at each s...

  7. Molecular Detection of Bloodstream Pathogens in Critical Illness

    OpenAIRE

    Al_griw, Huda Hm

    2012-01-01

    Background: Critically ill patients are at particular risk of developing bloodstream infection. Such infections are associated with the development of sepsis, leading to a marked increase in mortality rate. Early detection of the causative organism and appropriate antibiotic treatment are therefore critical for optimum outcome of patients with nosocomial infection. Current infection diagnosis is based on standard blood culture techniques. However, microbiological culture has a number of limi...

  8. Probing the metabolic network in bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei using untargeted metabolomics with stable isotope labelled glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Creek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate.

  9. A microarray analysis of gene expression in the free-living stages of the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkes Clare P; Hughes Louise; Barker Gary LA; Thompson Fiona J; Coghill Jane; Viney Mark E

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The nematode Strongyloides ratti has two adult phases in its lifecycle: one obligate, female and parasitic and one facultative, dioecious and free-living. The molecular control of the development of this free-living generation remains to be elucidated. Results We have constructed an S. ratti cDNA microarray and used it to interrogate changes in gene expression during the free-living phase of the S. ratti life-cycle. We have found very extensive differences in gene expressi...

  10. Quantifying Transmission Investment in Malaria Parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Greischar, Megan A.; Nicole Mideo; Andrew F Read; Bjørnstad, Ottar N.

    2016-01-01

    Many microparasites infect new hosts with specialized life stages, requiring a subset of the parasite population to forgo proliferation and develop into transmission forms. Transmission stage production influences infectivity, host exploitation, and the impact of medical interventions like drug treatment. Predicting how parasites will respond to public health efforts on both epidemiological and evolutionary timescales requires understanding transmission strategies. These strategies can rarely...

  11. Quantifying Transmission Investment in Malaria Parasites.

    OpenAIRE

    Greischar, Megan A.; Nicole Mideo; Read, Andrew F.; Bjørnstad, Ottar N.

    2016-01-01

    Many microparasites infect new hosts with specialized life stages, requiring a subset of the parasite population to forgo proliferation and develop into transmission forms. Transmission stage production influences infectivity, host exploitation, and the impact of medical interventions like drug treatment. Predicting how parasites will respond to public health efforts on both epidemiological and evolutionary timescales requires understanding transmission strategies. These strategies can rarely...

  12. A Model to Study the Impact of Polymorphism Driven Liver-Stage Immune Evasion by Malaria Parasites, to Help Design Effective Cross-Reactive Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kirsty L.; Xiang, Sue D.; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Malaria parasites engage a multitude of strategies to evade the immune system of the host, including the generation of polymorphic T cell epitope sequences, termed altered peptide ligands (APLs). Herein we use an animal model to study how single amino acid changes in the sequence of the circumsporozoite protein (CSP), a major target antigen of pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccines, can lead to a reduction of cross reactivity by T cells. For the first time in any APL model, we further compare different inflammatory adjuvants (Montanide, Poly I:C), non-inflammatory adjuvants (nanoparticles), and peptide pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) for their potential capacity to induce broadly cross reactive immune responses. Results show that the capacity to induce a cross reactive response is primarily controlled by the T cell epitope sequence and cannot be modified by the use of different adjuvants. Moreover, we identify how specific amino acid changes lead to a one-way cross reactivity: where variant-x induced responses are re-elicited by variant-x and not variant-y, but variant-y induced responses can be re-elicited by variant-y and variant-x. We discuss the consequences of the existence of this one-way cross reactivity phenomenon for parasite immune evasion in the field, as well as the use of variant epitopes as a potential tool for optimized vaccine design. PMID:27014226

  13. Tetractinomyxon stages genetically consistent with Sphaerospora dicentrarchi (Myxozoa: Sphaerosporidae) found in Capitella sp. (Polychaeta: Capitellidae) suggest potential role of marine polychaetes in parasite's life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Luis F; Castro, Ricardo; Rocha, Sónia; Severino, Ricardo; Casal, Graça; Azevedo, Carlos; Cavaleiro, Francisca; Santos, Maria J

    2016-07-01

    Known life cycles of myxosporean parasites have two hosts, but very few life cycles have been disclosed, especially in the marine environment. Sphaerospora dicentrarchi Sitjà-Bobadilla and Álvarez-Pellitero, 1992 is a systemic parasite from the European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax (Linnaeus, 1758), a highly valuable commercial fish. It affects its health, leading to aquaculture production losses. During 2013 and 2014, an actinospore survey was conducted in a total of 5942 annelids collected from a fish farm in Algarve and from the Aveiro Estuary, in Portugal. A new tetractinomyxon actinospore was found in a capitellid polychaete, belonging to the genera Capitella collected at the fish farm. The tetractinomyxons were pyriform measuring 11·1 ± 0·7 µm in length and 7·2 ± 0·4 µm in width, and presented three rounded polar capsules measuring 2·4 ± 0·3 µm in diameter. The molecular analysis of the 18S rRNA gene sequences from the tetractinomyxons revealed a similarity of 100% with the DNA sequences deposited in the GenBank from S. dicentrarchi myxospores collected from the European seabass and the spotted seabass in the same fish farm and 99·9% similarity with the DNA sequence obtained from the myxospores found infecting the European seabass in the Aveiro Estuary. Therefore, the new tetractinomyxons are inferred to represent the actinospore phase of the S. dicentrarchi life cycle. PMID:27041279

  14. A Model to Study the Impact of Polymorphism Driven Liver-Stage Immune Evasion by Malaria Parasites, to Help Design Effective Cross-Reactive Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kirsty L; Xiang, Sue D; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Malaria parasites engage a multitude of strategies to evade the immune system of the host, including the generation of polymorphic T cell epitope sequences, termed altered peptide ligands (APLs). Herein we use an animal model to study how single amino acid changes in the sequence of the circumsporozoite protein (CSP), a major target antigen of pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccines, can lead to a reduction of cross reactivity by T cells. For the first time in any APL model, we further compare different inflammatory adjuvants (Montanide, Poly I:C), non-inflammatory adjuvants (nanoparticles), and peptide pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) for their potential capacity to induce broadly cross reactive immune responses. Results show that the capacity to induce a cross reactive response is primarily controlled by the T cell epitope sequence and cannot be modified by the use of different adjuvants. Moreover, we identify how specific amino acid changes lead to a one-way cross reactivity: where variant-x induced responses are re-elicited by variant-x and not variant-y, but variant-y induced responses can be re-elicited by variant-y and variant-x. We discuss the consequences of the existence of this one-way cross reactivity phenomenon for parasite immune evasion in the field, as well as the use of variant epitopes as a potential tool for optimized vaccine design. PMID:27014226

  15. Controle biológico de helmintos parasitos de animais: estágio atual e perspectivas futuras Biological control of helminth parasites of animals: current stage and future outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Andrade Mota

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available O controle biológico é um método desenvolvido para diminuir uma população de parasitas pela utilização de antagonista natural. A administração de fungos nematófagos aos animais domésticos é considerada uma promissora alternativa na profilaxia das helmintíases gastrintestinais parasitárias. Os fungos nematófagos desenvolvem estruturas em forma de armadilhas, responsáveis pela captura e destruição dos estágios infectantes dos nematóides. Os fungos dos gêneros Arthrobotrys, Duddingtonia e Monacrosporium têm demonstrado eficácia em experimentos laboratoriais e no campo no controle de parasitos de bovinos, eqüinos, ovinos e suínos. Diversas formulações fúngicas têm sido avaliadas, no entanto, ainda não há nenhum produto comercial disponível. A associação dos grupos de pesquisa e o envolvimento das indústrias poderão colaborar para o sucesso na implementação desta forma de controle.Biological control is a non-chemical alternative method with its main goal to reduce the amount of parasite population using natural antagonists. The administration of nematophagous fungi to animals has been considered an alternative in gastrointestinal helminthiasis prophylaxis. The nematophagous fungi produce trap-shaped structures, which are responsible for capturing and destroying the free-living stages of nematodes. The genera Arthrobotrys, Duddingtonia and Monacrosporium has been shown efficacy in laboratory and field experiments against cattle, equine, ovine and swine parasites. Several fungi formulations have been evaluated, but there is so far no commercial product available. The association of research groups with industry could improve the successful implementation of this control method.

  16. Neonatal bloodstream infections in a pediatric hospital in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Alexandra Yasmin; Thieu Chuong, D.H.; Phuong, C.N.; Duc, T.; Graff Stensballe, L.; Prag, J.; Kurtzhals, Jørgen; Greisen, Gorm; Pedersen, Freddy Karup

    2013-01-01

    Septicemia and bloodstream infections (BSIs) are major causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. We prospectively recorded all positive blood cultures (BSI) among neonates admitted consecutively to a tertiary pediatric hospital in Vietnam during a 12-month period. Among...... 5763 neonates, 2202 blood cultures were performed, of which 399 were positive in 385 neonates. Among these, 64 died, 62 in relation to septicemia. Of the BSI isolates, 56% was known pathogenic and 48% was gram-negative bacteria, most frequently Klebsiella spp. (n = 78), Acinetobacter spp. (n = 58) and...

  17. Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to worms that can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies can lead to Giardia infections. Cats can transmit toxoplasmosis, which is dangerous for pregnant women. Others, like malaria, are common in other parts ...

  18. Is there a sphingomyelin-based hydrogen bond barrier at the mammalian host-schistosome parasite interface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliardo, Federica; Tallima, Hatem; El Ridi, Rashika

    2014-03-01

    Schistosomes develop, mature, copulate, lay eggs, and live for years in the mammalian host bloodstream, importing nutrients across the tegument, but entirely impervious to the surrounding elements of the immune system. We have hypothesized that sphingomyelin (SM) in the parasite apical lipid bilayer is responsible for these sieving properties via formation of a tight hydrogen bond network with the surrounding water. Here we have used quasi-elastic neutron scattering for characterizing the diffusion of larval and adult Schistosoma mansoni and adult Schistosoma haematobium in the surrounding medium, under various environmental conditions. The results documented the presence of a hydrogen bond barrier around larvae and adult schistosomes. The hydrogen bond network readily collapses if worms are subjected to hypoxic conditions, likely via activation of the parasite tegument-associated neutral sphingomyelinase, and consequent excessive SM hydrolysis. The slower dynamics of lung-stage larvae as compared to adult worms has been related to the existence of hydrogen-bonded networks of different strength and then to their differential resistance to immune attacks. PMID:23943053

  19. Staphylococcus aureus Regulatory RNAs as Potential Biomarkers for Bloodstream Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeau, Valérie; Cady, Anne; Revest, Matthieu; Rostan, Octavie; Sassi, Mohamed; Tattevin, Pierre; Donnio, Pierre-Yves; Felden, Brice

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal bacterium and pathogen. Identifying biomarkers for the transition from colonization to disease caused by this organism would be useful. Several S. aureus small RNAs (sRNAs) regulate virulence. We investigated presence and expression of 8 sRNAs in 83 S. aureus strains from 42 patients with sepsis or septic shock and 41 asymptomatic colonized carriers. Small pathogenicity island sRNAs sprB and sprC were clade specific. Six sRNAs had variable expression not correlated with clinical status. Expression of RNAIII was lower in strains from septic shock patients than in strains from colonized patients. When RNAIII was associated with expression of sprD, colonizing strains could be discriminated from strains in patients with bloodstream infections, including patients with sepsis and septic shock. Isolates associated with colonization might have sRNAs with target expression different from those of disease isolates. Monitoring expression of RNAIII and sprD could help determine severity of bloodstream infections. PMID:27224202

  20. Reinstatement of Dermacentor bellulus (Acari: Ixodidae) as a Valid Species Previously Confused with D. taiwanensis and Comparison of All Parasitic Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apanaskevich, Maria A.; Apanaskevich, Dmitry A.

    2015-01-01

    Re-examination of Dermacentor taiwanensis Sugimoto, 1935 specimens in the United States National Tick Collection revealed that two morphologically distinct Dermacentor species were identified under this name. One of them corresponds to Sugimoto’s description of D. taiwanensis, while another species is identical to Schulze’s Dermacentor bellulus (Schulze, 1935). The latter species has not been considered valid by recent workers. D. bellulus is reinstated here as a valid species and all its stages are redescribed. The adults of D. taiwanensis are also redescribed, and its immature stages are described for the first time. Males and females of D. bellulus can be distinguished from those of D. taiwanensis by the shape of the conscutum and scutum, color pattern, genital structures, size of the palpi and cornua, and the spurs of coxa I. Nymphs of D. bellulus can be distinguished from those of D. taiwanensis by the shape of the scutum, basis capituli, and the hypostomal dentition. Larvae of D. bellulus can be differentiated from those of D. taiwanensis by the shape of the basis capituli, and the degree of development of the auriculae and spur on palpal segment III ventrally. D. bellulus has been recorded from China, Japan, Nepal, Taiwan, and Vietnam; adults have been collected from wild boars, bears, panda, dog, and human; the immature stages are known from rodents, hares, ferret-badger, and bamboo-partridge. D. taiwanensis is found in China, Taiwan, and Vietnam; adults have been collected from wild boars; the immature stages are known from rodents, hares, mustelids, and domestic dog. PMID:26335464

  1. Reinstatement of Dermacentor bellulus (Acari: Ixodidae) as a Valid Species Previously Confused with D. taiwanensis and Comparison of All Parasitic Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apanaskevich, Maria A; Apanaskevich, Dmitry A

    2015-07-01

    Re-examination of Dermacentor taiwanensis Sugimoto, 1935 specimens in the United States National Tick Collection revealed that two morphologically distinct Dermacentor species were identified under this name. One of them corresponds to Sugimoto's description of D. taiwanensis, while another species is identical to Schulze's Dermacentor bellulus (Schulze, 1935). The latter species has not been considered valid by recent workers. D. bellulus is reinstated here as a valid species and all its stages are redescribed. The adults of D. taiwanensis are also redescribed, and its immature stages are described for the first time. Males and females of D. bellulus can be distinguished from those of D. taiwanensis by the shape of the conscutum and scutum, color pattern, genital structures, size of the palpi and cornua, and the spurs of coxa I. Nymphs of D. bellulus can be distinguished from those of D. taiwanensis by the shape of the scutum, basis capituli, and the hypostomal dentition. Larvae of D. bellulus can be differentiated from those of D. taiwanensis by the shape of the basis capituli, and the degree of development of the auriculae and spur on palpal segment III ventrally. D. bellulus has been recorded from China, Japan, Nepal, Taiwan, and Vietnam; adults have been collected from wild boars, bears, panda, dog, and human; the immature stages are known from rodents, hares, ferret-badger, and bamboo-partridge. D. taiwanensis is found in China, Taiwan, and Vietnam; adults have been collected from wild boars; the immature stages are known from rodents, hares, mustelids, and domestic dog. PMID:26335464

  2. Stearoyl-CoA desaturase is an essential enzyme for the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloatti, Andres [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Gupta, Shreedhara; Gualdron-Lopez, Melisa; Nguewa, Paul A. [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute and Laboratory of Biochemistry, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Altabe, Silvia G. [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Deumer, Gladys; Wallemacq, Pierre [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, LTAP, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Michels, Paul A.M. [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute and Laboratory of Biochemistry, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Uttaro, Antonio D., E-mail: toniuttaro@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Inhibiting {Delta}9 desaturase drastically changes T. brucei's fatty-acid composition. {yields} Isoxyl specifically inhibits the {Delta}9 desaturase causing a growth arrest. {yields} RNA interference of desaturase expression causes a similar effect. {yields} Feeding T. brucei-infected mice with Isoxyl decreases the parasitemia. {yields} 70% of Isoxyl-treated mice survived the trypanosome infection. -- Abstract: Trypanosoma brucei, the etiologic agent of sleeping sickness, is exposed to important changes in nutrients and temperature during its life cycle. To adapt to these changes, the fluidity of its membranes plays a crucial role. This fluidity, mediated by the fatty-acid composition, is regulated by enzymes named desaturases. We have previously shown that the oleoyl desaturase is essential for Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei. In this work, we present experimental support for the relevance of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) for T. brucei's survival, in both its insect or procyclic-form (PCF) and bloodstream-form (BSF) stages. We evaluated this essentiality in two different ways: by generating a SCD knocked-down parasite line using RNA interference, and by chemical inhibition of the enzyme with two compounds, Isoxyl and a thiastearate with the sulfur atom at position 10 (10-TS). The effective concentration for 50% growth inhibition (EC{sub 50}) of PCF was 1.0 {+-} 0.2 {mu}M for Isoxyl and 5 {+-} 2 {mu}M for 10-TS, whereas BSF appeared more susceptible with EC{sub 50} values 0.10 {+-} 0.03 {mu}M (Isoxyl) and 1.0 {+-} 0.6 {mu}M (10-TS). RNA interference showed to be deleterious for both stages of the parasite. In addition, T. brucei-infected mice were fed with Isoxyl, causing a reduction of the parasitemia and an increase of the rodents' survival.

  3. Stearoyl-CoA desaturase is an essential enzyme for the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Inhibiting Δ9 desaturase drastically changes T. brucei's fatty-acid composition. → Isoxyl specifically inhibits the Δ9 desaturase causing a growth arrest. → RNA interference of desaturase expression causes a similar effect. → Feeding T. brucei-infected mice with Isoxyl decreases the parasitemia. → 70% of Isoxyl-treated mice survived the trypanosome infection. -- Abstract: Trypanosoma brucei, the etiologic agent of sleeping sickness, is exposed to important changes in nutrients and temperature during its life cycle. To adapt to these changes, the fluidity of its membranes plays a crucial role. This fluidity, mediated by the fatty-acid composition, is regulated by enzymes named desaturases. We have previously shown that the oleoyl desaturase is essential for Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei. In this work, we present experimental support for the relevance of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) for T. brucei's survival, in both its insect or procyclic-form (PCF) and bloodstream-form (BSF) stages. We evaluated this essentiality in two different ways: by generating a SCD knocked-down parasite line using RNA interference, and by chemical inhibition of the enzyme with two compounds, Isoxyl and a thiastearate with the sulfur atom at position 10 (10-TS). The effective concentration for 50% growth inhibition (EC50) of PCF was 1.0 ± 0.2 μM for Isoxyl and 5 ± 2 μM for 10-TS, whereas BSF appeared more susceptible with EC50 values 0.10 0.03 μM (Isoxyl) and 1.0 ± 0.6 μM (10-TS). RNA interference showed to be deleterious for both stages of the parasite. In addition, T. brucei-infected mice were fed with Isoxyl, causing a reduction of the parasitemia and an increase of the rodents' survival.

  4. The adaptive significance of inquiline parasite workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumner, Seirian; Nash, David R; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2003-01-01

    Social parasites exploit the socially managed resources of their host's society. Inquiline social parasites are dependent on their host throughout their life cycle, and so many of the traits inherited from their free-living ancestor are removed by natural selection. One trait that is commonly lost...... is the worker caste, the functions of which are adequately fulfilled by host workers. The few inquiline parasites that have retained a worker caste are thought to be at a transitional stage in the evolution of social parasitism, and their worker castes are considered vestigial and non-adaptive. However...... a vital role in ensuring the parasite's fitness. We show that the presence of these parasite workers has a positive effect on the production of parasite sexuals and a negative effect on the production of host sexuals. This suggests that inquiline workers play a vital role in suppressing host queen...

  5. Malaria parasite interactions with the human host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouniotis D

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between the malaria parasite and the human host involves a number of interactions that result in the parasite evading the human immune system. Since the stages of the malaria lifecycle are complex, this allows the use of various immune evasion strategies by the malaria parasite and has major implications in the development of a vaccine for malaria endemic areas. The present review highlights key host:parasite interactions. Plasmodia puts selection pressure on human gene frequencies, and studies into host genetic factors such as the Duffy blood group and sickle cell anaemia offer insight into the host- parasite relationship. In addition, parasite interactions with the different effector arms of the immune system can result in altered peptide ligand (APL antagonism which alters the immune response from a pro- to an anti-inflammatory T cell response. Recent insights into the interaction between professional antigen presenting cells, dendritic cells (DCs, and malaria parasites is discussed in detail.

  6. Emerging commercial molecular tests for the diagnosis of bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwaigwisya, Solomon; Assiri, Rasha Assad M; O'Grady, Justin

    2015-05-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) by microorganisms can lead to sepsis. This condition has a high mortality rate, which rises significantly with delays in initiation of appropriate antimicrobial treatment. Current culture methods for diagnosing BSI have long turnaround times and poor clinical sensitivity. While clinicians wait for culture diagnosis, patients are treated empirically, which can result in inappropriate treatment, undesirable side effects and contribute to drug resistance development. Molecular diagnostics assays that target pathogen DNA can identify pathogens and resistance markers within hours. Early diagnosis improves antibiotic stewardship and is associated with favorable clinical outcomes. Nonetheless, limitations of current molecular diagnostic methods are substantial. This article reviews recent commercially available molecular methods that use pathogen DNA to diagnose BSI, either by testing positive blood cultures or directly testing patient blood. We critically assess these tests and their application in clinical microbiology. A view of future directions in BSI diagnosis is also provided. PMID:25866124

  7. No effect of human serum and erythrocytes enriched in n-3 fatty acids by oral intake on Plasmodium falciparum blood stage parasites in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Zeid, Y A; Hansen, H S; Jakobsen, P H;

    1993-01-01

    acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) of 3.5 g/d and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) of 2.5 g/d and 24 mg/d of total tocopherol. Post-intake fish oil serum (post-s) and erythrocytes (post-e) were tested in vitro for inhibitory activity against blood stages of P. falciparum compared with pre-intake serum (pre-s) and...... pre-intake erythrocyte (pre-e). Also the effect of EPA and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) on the erythrocytic growth of P. falciparum was tested using in vitro assays. The results show that both post-s and post-e had no antimalarial activity on P. falciparum. No differential antimalarial effect was...

  8. Cefotaxime resistance and outcome of Klebsiella spp bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, M; Marco, F; Soriano, A; Almela, M; Martínez, J A; López, J; Pitart, C; Mensa, J

    2011-12-01

    We attempt to describe the epidemiology and outcome associated with cefotaxime-resistant (CTX-R) Klebsiella spp bacteraemia. Klebsiella spp bloodstream infection episodes prospectively collected through a blood culture surveillance programme from January 1991 to December 2008 in a single institution were analysed. A total of 910 monomicrobial episodes of Klebsiella spp bacteraemia were identified during the study period. The most important sources were from urinary tract infection, unknown sources, billiary focus and catheter related infection. There were 112 (12%) CTX-R isolates. Out of 112 isolates, 98 were CTX-R by Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase production. Shock on presentation and mortality were significantly more frequent in CTX-R than in CTX susceptible isolates. Inappropriate empirical therapy was received in 50 (45%) cases in the CTX-R Klebsiella spp group (13 cases of death, 26%). Predictive factors associated with CTX-R Klebsiella spp isolate were: previous β-lactam therapy (OR = 4.16), nosocomial acquired bacteraemia (OR = 1.93), solid organ trasplantation (OR = 2.09) and shock (OR = 1.90). Independent risk factors associated with mortality in Klebsiella spp bacteraemia were: age (OR = 1.03), liver cirrhosis (OR = 2.63), ultimately or rapidly fatal prognosis of underlying disease (OR = 2.44), shock (OR = 8.60), pneumonia (OR = 4.96) or intraabdominal (OR = 3.85) source of bacteraemia and CTX-R isolate (OR = 4.63). Klebsiella spp is an important cause of bloodstream infection. CTX-R isolates have been increasing since 2000. CTX-R is an independent factor associated with mortality in Klebsiella spp bacteraemia. PMID:21509474

  9. Antimicrobial resistance predicts death in Tanzanian children with bloodstream infections: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Msangi Viola

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloodstream infection is a common cause of hospitalization, morbidity and death in children. The impact of antimicrobial resistance and HIV infection on outcome is not firmly established. Methods We assessed the incidence of bloodstream infection and risk factors for fatal outcome in a prospective cohort study of 1828 consecutive admissions of children aged zero to seven years with signs of systemic infection. Blood was obtained for culture, malaria microscopy, HIV antibody test and, when necessary, HIV PCR. We recorded data on clinical features, underlying diseases, antimicrobial drug use and patients' outcome. Results The incidence of laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection was 13.9% (255/1828 of admissions, despite two thirds of the study population having received antimicrobial therapy prior to blood culture. The most frequent isolates were klebsiella, salmonellae, Escherichia coli, enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, 21.6% had malaria and 16.8% HIV infection. One third (34.9% of the children with laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection died. The mortality rate from Gram-negative bloodstream infection (43.5% was more than double that of malaria (20.2% and Gram-positive bloodstream infection (16.7%. Significant risk factors for death by logistic regression modeling were inappropriate treatment due to antimicrobial resistance, HIV infection, other underlying infectious diseases, malnutrition and bloodstream infection caused by Enterobacteriaceae, other Gram-negatives and candida. Conclusion Bloodstream infection was less common than malaria, but caused more deaths. The frequent use of antimicrobials prior to blood culture may have hampered the detection of organisms susceptible to commonly used antimicrobials, including pneumococci, and thus the study probably underestimates the incidence of bloodstream infection. The finding that antimicrobial resistance, HIV-infection and malnutrition predict fatal

  10. On the life cycle and morphology of development stages of Paraspiralatus sakeri Gibbons et al., 2004 (Nematoda: Spiroidea, Spirocercidae), a heteroxenic stomach parasite of falcons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Rolf Karl; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Kinne, Jörg

    2014-06-01

    Pitted darkling beetles (Adesmia cancellata) were infected with nematode eggs found in the alimentary tract of a gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) naturally infected with Paraspiralatus sakeri. Third-stage larvae in numbers between 1 and 84 were removed from the beetles 5 weeks postinfection and were used for morphological studies as well as to infect domestic chicken, yellow-bellied geckos (Hemidactylus flaviviridis) and fringe-toed lizards (Acanthodactylus schmidti). All experimental animals, necropsied 4-38 weeks later, were positive for spirally coiled nematode larvae located under the skin and in the interstitium of skeletal muscles. Despite similarities in general morphology, larvae from beetles and reptiles and chicken differed strikingly in the total body length and body width. Differences in length of the muscular oesophagus and distances of cervical papillae, nerve ring and excretory pore from the anterior end were less distinct. Morphology of these larvae matched with larvae found in subcutaneous cysts in naturally infected houbara bustards (Chlamydotis macqueeni) from Pakistan and UAE as well as with those detected in the muscles of an ocellated skink (Chalcides ocellatus). PMID:24652447

  11. The nomenclature of two fungi parasitizing Brassica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerema, G.H.; Kesteren, van H.A.

    1964-01-01

    The nomenclature of the perfect and imperfect stages of Mycosphaerella brassicicola (Duby) Lind. and Leptosphaeria maculans (Desm.) Ces. & De Not. is discussed. The imperfect stages of these two parasites of Brassica spp. are often confused. Mycosphaerella brassicicola has a spermagonial stage with

  12. Cross-stage immunity for malaria vaccine development

    OpenAIRE

    Nahrendorf, Wiebke; Scholzen, Anja; Sauerwein, Robert W; Langhorne, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Highlights • Antigens are shared between liver and blood-stage malaria parasites. • Cross-stage antigens can mediate protection which is life cycle stage transcending. • Multi-stage malaria vaccine development should identify cross-stage antigens.

  13. Catheter Removal versus Retention in the Management of Catheter-Associated Enterococcal Bloodstream Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Marschall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterococci are an important cause of central venous catheter (CVC-associated bloodstream infections (CA-BSI. It is unclear whether CVC removal is necessary to successfully manage enterococcal CA-BSI.

  14. Women and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Parasites About Parasites Animals Blood Food Insects Water Education ...

  15. Children and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Parasites About Parasites Animals Blood Food Insects Water Education ...

  16. Parasitic Diseases: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Parasites About Parasites Animals Blood Food Insects Water Education ...

  17. Distinct Phenotypes Caused by Mutation of MSH2 in Trypanosome Insect and Mammalian Life Cycle Forms Are Associated with Parasite Adaptation to Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Grazielle-Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair mechanisms are crucial for maintenance of the genome in all organisms, including parasites where successful infection is dependent both on genomic stability and sequence variation. MSH2 is an early acting, central component of the Mismatch Repair (MMR pathway, which is responsible for the recognition and correction of base mismatches that occur during DNA replication and recombination. In addition, recent evidence suggests that MSH2 might also play an important, but poorly understood, role in responding to oxidative damage in both African and American trypanosomes.To investigate the involvement of MMR in the oxidative stress response, null mutants of MSH2 were generated in Trypanosoma brucei procyclic forms and in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote forms. Unexpectedly, the MSH2 null mutants showed increased resistance to H2O2 exposure when compared with wild type cells, a phenotype distinct from the previously observed increased sensitivity of T. brucei bloodstream forms MSH2 mutants. Complementation studies indicated that the increased oxidative resistance of procyclic T. brucei was due to adaptation to MSH2 loss. In both parasites, loss of MSH2 was shown to result in increased tolerance to alkylation by MNNG and increased accumulation of 8-oxo-guanine in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, indicating impaired MMR. In T. cruzi, loss of MSH2 also increases the parasite capacity to survive within host macrophages.Taken together, these results indicate MSH2 displays conserved, dual roles in MMR and in the response to oxidative stress. Loss of the latter function results in life cycle dependent differences in phenotypic outcomes in T. brucei MSH2 mutants, most likely because of the greater burden of oxidative stress in the insect stage of the parasite.

  18. Bloodstream infections related to totally implantable venous access port: What is the situation in our hospital?

    OpenAIRE

    Desgranges F.

    2012-01-01

    Port-a-Cath© (PAC) are totally implantable devices that offer an easy and long term access to venous circulation. They have been extensively used for intravenous therapy administration and are particularly well suited for chemotherapy in oncologic patients. Previous comparative studies have shown that these devices have the lowest catheter-related bloodstream infection rates among all intravascular access systems. However, bloodstream infection (BSI) still remains a major issue of port use an...

  19. Infectious Complications and Morbidities After Neonatal Bloodstream Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Horng; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Chu, Shih-Ming; Lee, I-Ta; Lien, Reyin; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Fu, Ren-Huei; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few data are available on the clinical characteristics of complications and morbidities after neonatal bloodstream infections (BSIs), understood as any newly infectious focus or organ dysfunction directly related to BSIs but not occur concurrently. However, these bloodstream-associated infectious complications (BSICs) contribute significantly to increased hospital stay, cost, and final mortality. We performed an observational cohort study of unselected neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients based on records in a large clinical database. All neonates hospitalized in our NICU with BSI between 2006 and 2013 were reviewed, and those who developed BSICs were analyzed to identify the clinical characteristics and outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for BSICs. Of 975 episodes of neonatal BSI, 101 (10.4%) BSICs occurred in 93 neonates with a median interval of 3 days (range, 0–17 days) after onset of BSI and included newly infectious focuses in 40 episodes (39.6%), major organ dysfunctions after septic shock in 36 episodes (35.6%), and neurological complications after meningitis or septic shock in 34 episodes (33.7%). All patients with BSICs encountered various morbidities, which subsequently resulted in in-hospital death in 30 (32.3%) neonates, critical discharge in 4 (4.3%), and persistent sequelae in 17 (18.3%). After multivariate logistic regression analysis, independent risk factors for BSICs included initial inappropriate antibiotics (odds ratio [OR], 5.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.40–9.01), BSI with septic shock (OR, 5.75; 95% CI, 3.51–9.40), and BSI concurrent with meningitis (OR, 9.20; 95% CI, 4.33–19.56). It is worth noting that a percentage of neonates with BSI encountered subsequent sequelae or died of infections complications, which were significantly associated with initial inappropriate antibiotic therapy, septic shock, and the occurrence of meningitis. Further investigation is

  20. Parasitic diseases of lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roentgenologic semiotics of the main parasitic diseases of lungs is described: echinococcosis, paragonimiasis, cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiosis and some rarely met parasitic diseases

  1. The changing epidemiology of group B streptococcus bloodstream infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballard, Mark S; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Lyytikäinen, Outi;

    2016-01-01

    Background Population-based studies conducted in single regions or countries have identified significant changes in the epidemiology of invasive group B streptococcus (GBS) infection. However, no studies have concurrently compared the epidemiology of GBS infections among multiple different region...... these regions, it was consistently found that rates increased among older adults, especially in association with diabetes. The burden of this infection may be expected to continue to increase in ageing populations worldwide....... and countries over time. The study objectives were to define the contemporary incidence and determinants of GBS bloodstream infection (BSI) and assess temporal changes in a multi-national population. Methods Population-based surveillance for GBS BSI was conducted in nine regions in Australia, Canada, Denmark...... differences in the overall (range = 1.8-4.1 per 100 000 person-year) and neonatal (range = 0.19-0.83 per 1000 live births) incidences of GBS BSI observed among the study regions. The overall incidence significantly (p = 0.05) increased. Rates of neonatal disease were stable, while the incidence in individuals...

  2. The changing epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbraith, J.C.; Valiquette, G.; Kennedy, K.J.;

    2013-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect ABSTRACT: Although the epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) has been changing, international comparisons are lacking. We sought to determine the incidence of S. aureus BSI and assess trends over time and by region. Population-based surveillance...... episodes of S. aureus BSI were identified. The overall annual incidence rate for S. aureus BSI was 26.1 per 100 000 population, and those for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were 24.2 and 1.9 per 100 000, respectively. Although the overall incidence...... of community-onset MSSA BSI (15.0 per 100 000) was relatively similar across regions, the incidence rates of hospital-onset MSSA (9.2 per 100 000), community-onset MRSA (1.0 per 100 000) and hospital-onset MRSA (0.8 per 100 000) BSI varied substantially. Whereas the overall incidence of S. aureus BSI did...

  3. Bloodstream Infections in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sah Ižpek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the pattern of bloodstream infections (BSIs and antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU.Material and Method: Positive hemoculture of neonates diagnosed with nosocomial sepsis from March 2011 to March 2014 in the NICU of Diyarbakir Maternity and Children%u2019s Hospital, in the southeastern region of Anatolia, Turkey, were retrospectively reviewed. Results: A total of 148 pathogens were isolated in 142 neonates. The most common microorganisms isolated were Klebsiella pneumoniae (40.5% and Acinetobacter baumannii (29.7% which was a result of a hospital outbreak. Multi-drug resistant (MDR strains accounted for 20.0% of K. pneumoniae isolates and 93.2% of A. baumannii isolates. The sepsis-attributable mortality rate was higher in cases infected with MDR strains than in cases infected without MDR strains or Candida spp (24% vs. 9.7%, p=0.032. Discussion: In our unit, BSIs were more often caused by Gram negative bacteria. BSIs caused by MDR strains were associated with a higher rate of sepsis-attributable mortality.

  4. Protozoan Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodio, Haidee

    2016-02-01

    • Stool antigen detection for Cryptosporidium sp, Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica are now commercially available, have better sensitivity and specificity than the traditional stool microscopy, and are less dependent on personnel skill. Tests employing newer techniques with faster turnaround time are also available for diagnosing trichomoniasis.• Nitazoxanide, the only U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved medication for therapy of cryptosporidiosis, is effective among immunocompetent patients. However, on the basis of strong evidence from multiple clinical trials, nitazoxanide is considered ineffective among immunocompromised patients. (14) • Giardiasis can be asymptomatic or have a chronic course leading to malabsorption and failure to thrive. It can be treated with metronidazole, tinidazole, or nitazoxanide. On the basis of growing observational studies, postinfectious and extraintestinal manifestations of giardiasis occur, but the mechanisms are unclear. Given the high prevalence of giardiasis, public health implications need to be defined. (16) • Eradicating E histolytica from the gastrointestinal tract requires only intraluminal agent therapy. Therapy for invasive illnesses requires use of imidazole followed by intraluminal agents to eliminate persistent intraluminal parasites. • Malaria is considered the most lethal parasitic infection, with Plasmodium falciparum as the predominant cause of mortality. P vivax and P ovale can be dormant in the liver, and primaquine is necessary to resolve infection by P vivax and P ovale. • Among immunocompetent patients, infection with Toxoplasma gondii may be asymptomatic, involve localized lymphadenopathy, or cause ocular infection. In immunocompromised patients, reactivation or severe infection is not uncommon. On the basis of limited observational studies (there are no well-controlled randomized trials), therapy is recommended for acute infection during pregnancy to prevent transmission to the

  5. Predicting optimal transmission investment in malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greischar, Megan A; Mideo, Nicole; Read, Andrew F; Bjørnstad, Ottar N

    2016-07-01

    In vertebrate hosts, malaria parasites face a tradeoff between replicating and the production of transmission stages that can be passed onto mosquitoes. This tradeoff is analogous to growth-reproduction tradeoffs in multicellular organisms. We use a mathematical model tailored to the life cycle and dynamics of malaria parasites to identify allocation strategies that maximize cumulative transmission potential to mosquitoes. We show that plastic strategies can substantially outperform fixed allocation because parasites can achieve greater fitness by investing in proliferation early and delaying the production of transmission stages. Parasites should further benefit from restraining transmission investment later in infection, because such a strategy can help maintain parasite numbers in the face of resource depletion. Early allocation decisions are predicted to have the greatest impact on parasite fitness. If the immune response saturates as parasite numbers increase, parasites should benefit from even longer delays prior to transmission investment. The presence of a competing strain selects for consistently lower levels of transmission investment and dramatically increased exploitation of the red blood cell resource. While we provide a detailed analysis of tradeoffs pertaining to malaria life history, our approach for identifying optimal plastic allocation strategies may be broadly applicable. PMID:27271841

  6. Biofilm formation is a risk factor for mortality in patients with Candida albicans bloodstream infection – Scotland, 2012-2013

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Sherry, Leighann; Nile, Christopher; Sherriff, Andrea; Johnson, Elizabeth; Hanson, Mary; Williams, Craig; Munro, Carol; Jones, Brian; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infections caused by Candida species remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Biofilm formation by Candida species is an important virulence factor for disease pathogenesis. A prospective analysis of patients with Candida bloodstream infection (n = 217) in Scotland (2012–2013) was performed to assess the risk factors associated with patient mortality, in particular the impact of biofilm formation. Candida bloodstream isolates (n = 280) and cl...

  7. Genetic determinism of parasitic circadian periodicity and subperiodicity in human lymphatic filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon, Gaston; Treuil, Jean-Pierre

    2004-12-01

    The larval parasites of the pantropical lymphatic filariasis exhibit two types of circadian behaviour. Typically, they only appear in the human bloodstream at nighttime, synchronised with their mosquito vectors. In Polynesia and parts of Southeast Asia, free of nocturnal vectors, they are found at all hours, and each population biorhythm differs. Through a geometrical approach, we explain this circadian diversity by a single, dominant mutation: the clocks of individual parasites are set at midnight (ubiquitous) or at 2 p.m. Compared to other circadian genes, this mutation must be very old, as it is shared by four biologically remote genera of parasites. This seniority sheds new light on several theoretical and practical aspects of vector-parasite temporal relations. PMID:15656351

  8. Hosts and parasites as aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraschewski, H

    2006-06-01

    Over the past decades, various free-living animals (hosts) and their parasites have invaded recipient areas in which they had not previously occurred, thus gaining the status of aliens or exotics. In general this happened to a low extent for hundreds of years. With variable frequency, invasions have been followed by the dispersal and establishment of non-indigenous species, whether host or parasite. In the literature thus far, colonizations by both hosts and parasites have not been treated and reviewed together, although both are usually interwoven in various ways. As to those factors permitting invasive success and colonization strength, various hypotheses have been put forward depending on the scientific background of respective authors and on the conspicuousness of certain invasions. Researchers who have tried to analyse characteristic developmental patterns, the speed of dispersal or the degree of genetic divergence in populations of alien species have come to different conclusions. Among parasitologists, the applied aspects of parasite invasions, such as the negative effects on economically important hosts, have long been at the centre of interest. In this contribution, invasions by hosts as well as parasites are considered comparatively, revealing many similarities and a few differences. Two helminths, the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, of cattle and sheep and the swimbladder nematode, Anguillicola crassus, of eels are shown to be useful as model parasites for the study of animal invasions and environmental global change. Introductions of F. hepatica have been associated with imports of cattle or other grazing animals. In various target areas, susceptible lymnaeid snails serving as intermediate hosts were either naturally present and/or were introduced from the donor continent of the parasite (Europe) and/or from other regions which were not within the original range of the parasite, partly reflecting progressive stages of a global biota change. In several

  9. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of Malassezia furfur from bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatta, Roberta; Figueredo, Luciana A; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Otranto, Domenico; Cafarchia, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Fungaemia caused by Malassezia spp. in hospitalized patients requires prompt and appropriate therapy, but standard methods for the definition of the in vitro antifungal susceptibility have not been established yet. In this study, the in vitro susceptibility of Malassezia furfur from bloodstream infections (BSIs) to amphotericin B (AMB), fluconazole (FLC), itraconazole (ITC), posaconazole (POS) and voriconazole (VRC) was assessed using the broth microdilution (BMD) method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) with different media such as modified Sabouraud dextrose broth (SDB), RPMI and Christensen's urea broth (CUB). Optimal broth media that allow sufficient growth of M. furfur, and produce reliable and reproducible MICs using the CLSI BMD protocol were assessed. Thirty-six M. furfur isolates collected from BSIs of patients before and during AMB therapy, and receiving FLC prophylaxis, were tested. A good growth of M. furfur was observed in RPMI, CUB and SDB at 32 °C for 48 and 72 h. No statistically significant differences were detected between the MIC values registered after 48 and 72 h incubation. ITC, POS and VRC displayed lower MICs than FLC and AMB. These last two antifungal drugs showed higher and lower MICs, respectively, when the isolates were tested in SDB. SDB is the only medium in which it is possible to detect isolates with high FLC MICs in patients receiving FLC prophylaxis. A large number of isolates showed high AMB MIC values regardless of the media used. In conclusion, SDB might be suitable to determine triazole susceptibility. However, the media, the drug formulation or the breakpoints herein applied might not be useful for assessing the AMB susceptibility of M. furfur from BSIs. PMID:25168965

  10. Distinct patterns of blood-stage parasite antigens detected by plasma IgG subclasses from individuals with different level of exposure to Plasmodium falciparum infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Cathrine Holm; Brahimi, Karima; Vandahl, Brian;

    2010-01-01

    -PAGE as high molecular weight ([greater than or equal to] 70 kDa) or low molecular weight (< 70 kDa). The number of discernable low molecular weight parasite antigens detected by different IgG subclass antibodies from each plasma sample was recorded. Using Wilcoxons rank sum test these reactivities were...... compared amongst groups of individuals with different levels of exposure to P. falciparum infections. RESULTS: IgG4 and IgM antibodies in plasma samples from all groups detected very few parasite antigens. IgG2 antibodies from all groups detected a common pattern of high molecular weight parasite antigens....... Cytophilic IgG subclasses in plasma samples from individuals with higher levels of exposure to P. falciparum infections distinctly detected higher numbers of low molecular weight parasite antigens. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, there was no evidence for switching of antibody responses from non...

  11. Parasites and marine invasions: Ecological and evolutionary perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedknegt, M. Anouk; Feis, Marieke E.; Wegner, K. Mathias; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; Buschbaum, Christian; Camphuysen, Kees (C. J.); van der Meer, Jaap; Thieltges, David W.

    2016-07-01

    Worldwide, marine and coastal ecosystems are heavily invaded by introduced species and the potential role of parasites in the success and impact of marine invasions has been increasingly recognized. In this review, we link recent theoretical developments in invasion ecology with empirical studies from marine ecosystems in order to provide a conceptual framework for studying the role of parasites and their hosts in marine invasions. Based on an extensive literature search, we identified six mechanisms in which invaders directly or indirectly affect parasite and host populations and communities: I) invaders can lose some or all of their parasites during the invasion process (parasite release or reduction), often causing a competitive advantage over native species; II) invaders can also act as a host for native parasites, which may indirectly amplify the parasite load of native hosts (parasite spillback); III) invaders can also be parasites themselves and be introduced without needing co-introduction of the host (introduction of free-living infective stages); IV) alternatively, parasites may be introduced together with their hosts (parasite co-introduction with host); V) consequently, these co-introduced parasites can sometimes also infect native hosts (parasite spillover); and VI) invasive species may be neither a host nor a parasite, but nevertheless affect native parasite host interactions by interfering with parasite transmission (transmission interference). We discuss the ecological and evolutionary implications of each of these mechanisms and generally note several substantial effects on natural communities and ecosystems via i) mass mortalities of native populations creating strong selection gradients, ii) indirect changes in species interactions within communities and iii) trophic cascading and knock-on effects in food webs that may affect ecosystem function and services. Our review demonstrates a wide range of ecological and evolutionary implications of

  12. Expanding the antimalarial toolkit: Targeting host-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorne, Jean; Duffy, Patrick E

    2016-02-01

    Recent successes in malaria control are threatened by drug-resistant Plasmodium parasites and insecticide-resistant Anopheles mosquitoes, and first generation vaccines offer only partial protection. New research approaches have highlighted host as well as parasite molecules or pathways that could be targeted for interventions. In this study, we discuss host-parasite interactions at the different stages of the Plasmodium life cycle within the mammalian host and the potential for therapeutics that prevent parasite migration, invasion, intracellular growth, or egress from host cells, as well as parasite-induced pathology. PMID:26834158

  13. Enterobacteriaceae Bloodstream Infections: Presence of Integrons, Risk Factors, and Outcome▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daikos, George L.; Kosmidis, Chris; Tassios, Panayotis T.; Petrikkos, George; Vasilakopoulou, Alexandra; Psychogiou, Mina; Stefanou, Ioanna; Avlami, Athina; Katsilambros, Nikolaos

    2007-01-01

    A prospective observational study was conducted to identify factors associated with bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by integron-carrying Enterobacteriaceae and to evaluate the clinical significance of integron carriage. Consecutive patients with Enterobacteriaceae BSIs were identified and followed up until discharge or death. Identification of blood isolates and susceptibility testing were performed by the Wider I automated system. int-1-specific PCR, conserved-segment PCR, and DNA sequencing were used to determine the presence, length, and content of integrons. The relatedness among the isolates was examined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Two hundred fifty episodes of Enterobacteriaceae BSI occurred in 233 patients; 109 (43.6%) were nosocomial, 82 (32.8%) were community acquired, and 59 (23.6%) were health care associated. Integrons were detected in 11 (13.4%) community-acquired, 24 (40.7%) health care-associated, and 46 (42.2%) nosocomial isolates. Integron-carrying organisms were more likely to exhibit resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobials (odds ratio [OR], 9.84; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 5.31 to 18.23; P < 0.001) or to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases (OR, 5.75; 95% CI, 2.38 to 13.89; P < 0.001) or a VIM-type metallo-β-lactamase (P, 0.003). Inter- or intraspecies integron transfer and cross-transmission of integron-carrying clones were observed. Use of cotrimoxazole (OR, 4.77; 95% CI, 1.81 to 12.54; P < 0.001) and a nosocomial or other health care setting (OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.30 to 7.22; P, 0.01) were independently associated with BSIs caused by integron-carrying Enterobacteriaceae. Patients with a nonurinary source of bacteremia (OR, 9.46; 95% CI, 2.77 to 32.32; P < 0.001) and a Pitt bacteremia score of ≥4 (OR, 23.36; 95% CI, 7.97 to 68.44; P < 0.001) had a significantly higher 14-day mortality rate, whereas integron carriage did not affect clinical outcomes. These findings may have implications affecting antibiotic

  14. Clonal relationships among bloodstream isolates of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, J N; Whittam, T S; Gilks, C F; Wilson, R A; Mulligan, M E; Adams, K S; Arbeit, R D

    1995-01-01

    The clonal relationships among 187 bloodstream isolates of Escherichia coli from 179 patients at Boston, Mass., Long Beach, Calif., and Nairobi, Kenya, were determined by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), analysis of polymorphisms associated with the ribosomal operon (ribotyping), and serotyping. MLEE based on 20 enzymes resolved 101 electrophoretic types (ETs), forming five clusters; ribotyping resolved 56 distinct patterns concordant with the analysis by MLEE. The isolates at each study site formed a genetically diverse group and demonstrated similar clonal structures, with the same small subset of lineages accounting for the majority of isolates at each site. Moreover, two ribotypes accounted for approximately 30% of the isolates at each study site. One cluster contained the majority (65%) of isolates and, by direct comparison of the ETs and ribotypes of individual isolates, was genetically indistinguishable from the largest cluster for each of two other collections of E. coli causing pyelonephritis and neonatal meningitis (R. K. Selander, T. K. Korhonen, V. Väisänen-Rhen, P. H. Williams, P. E. Pattison, and D. A. Caugent, Infect. Immun. 52:213-222, 1986; M. Arthur, C. E. Johnson, R. H. Rubin, R. D. Arbeit, C. Campanelli, C. Kim, S. Steinbach, M. Agarwal, R. Wilkinson, and R. Goldstein, Infect. Immun. 57:303-313, 1989), thus defining a virulent set of lineages. The isolates within these virulent lineages typically carried DNA homologous to the adhesin operon pap or sfa and the hemolysin operon hly and expressed O1, O2, O4, O6, O18, O25, or O75 antigens. DNA homologous to pap was distributed among isolates of each major cluster, whereas hly was restricted to isolates of two clusters, typically detected in pap-positive strains, and sfa was restricted to isolates of one cluster, typically detected in pap- and hly-positive strains. The occurrence of pap-positive isolates in the same geographically and genetically divergent lineages suggests that this

  15. Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood sample and sending it to a lab. Blood smear This test is used to look for parasites ... found in the blood. By looking at a blood smear under a microscope, parasitic diseases such as filariasis, ...

  16. Parasites and Foodborne Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Parasites and Foodborne Illness Introduction Giardia duodenalis or intestinalis ... gondii Trichinella spiralis Taenia saginata/Taenia solium (Tapeworms) Parasites may be present in food or in water ...

  17. The transcriptomes of the cattle parasitic nematode Ostertagia ostartagi

    OpenAIRE

    Abubucker, Sahar; Zarlenga, Dante S.; Martin, John; Yin, Yong; Wang, Zhengyuan; McCarter, James P.; Gasbarree, Louis; Wilson, Richard K.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2009-01-01

    Ostertagia ostertagi is a gastrointestinal parasitic nematode that affects cattle and leads to a loss of production. In this study, we present the first large-scale genomic survey of Ostertagia ostertagi by the analysis of expressed transcripts from three stages of the parasite: third-stage larvae, fourth-stage larvae and adult worms. Using an in silico approach, 2,284 genes were identified from over 7,000 expressed sequence tags and abundant transcripts were analyzed and characterized by the...

  18. Secular Trends in Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections : Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Increase the Total Burden of Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, H. S. M.; Harbarth, S.; Buiting, A. G. M.; Crook, D. W.; Fitzpatrick, F.; Hanberger, H.; Herwaldt, L. A.; van Keulen, P. H. J.; Kluytmans, J. A. J. W.; Kola, A.; Kuchenbecker, R. S.; Lingaas, E.; Meessen, N.; Morris-Downes, M. M.; Pottinger, J. M.; Rohner, P.; dos Santos, R. P.; Seifert, H.; Wisplinghoff, H.; Ziesing, S.; Walker, A. S.; Bonten, M. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether rising incidence rates of nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) replace antibiotic-susceptible bacteria (ASB), leaving the total BSI rate unaffected. Methods. We investigated temporal trends in annual incidence densit

  19. First Report of Treatment of Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens Bloodstream Infection with Levofloxacin ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Bard, Jennifer Dien; Humphries, Romney; Ward, Kevin; Lewinski, Michael A.; Uslan, Daniel Z.

    2010-01-01

    The full extent of the clinical spectrum and optimal therapy of Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens infections remains to be determined. We describe the first case of bloodstream infection (BSI) due to A. succiniciproducens in an asymptomatic elderly male with poor dentition that was treated with levofloxacin.

  20. A case of catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium phocaicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkins, Jacques; Rosenblatt, Joseph D

    2013-05-01

    We present a patient with double hit Burkitt's like lymphoma who developed a catheter-related bloodstream infection due to Mycobacterium phocaicum that was identified by rpoB gene sequencing. His infection resolved with 7 weeks of antibiotics and port-a-cath removal. PMID:23537787

  1. Bloodstream Infections in Very Low Birth Weight Infants with Intestinal Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cole, Conrad R.; Hansen, Nellie I.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Bell, Edward F.; Shankaran, Seetha; Laptook, Abbot R.; Walsh, Michele C.; Hale, Ellen C.; Newman, Nancy S.; Das, Abhik; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine pathogens and other characteristics associated with late-onset bloodstream infections (BSIs) in infants with intestinal failure (IF) as a consequence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Study design Infants weighing 401-1500 g at birth who survived for >72 hours and received car

  2. Reducing Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections 
on Inpatient Oncology Units Using Peer Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavotsky, Kathleen Evanovich; Malast, Tracey; Festus, Onyekachi; Riskie, Vickie

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a peer-to-peer program and the outcomes of interventions to reduce the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infections in patients in bone marrow transplantation, medical, and surgical oncology units. The article reviews the process and describes tools used to achieve success in a Magnet®-designated academic medical center. PMID:26583628

  3. Routine Surveillance for Bloodstream Infections in a Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Cohort: Do Patients Benefit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Rigby

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients are at a high risk for late bloodstream infection (BSI. Controversy exists regarding the benefit of surveillance blood cultures in this immunosuppressed population. Despite the common use of this practice, the practical value is not well established in non-neutropenic children following HSCT.

  4. Association between prehospital vitamin D status and hospital-acquired bloodstream infections123

    OpenAIRE

    Quraishi, Sadeq A.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Moromizato, Takuhiro; Gibbons, Fiona K; Camargo, Carlos A; Giovannucci, Edward; Christopher, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alterations in immune function can predispose patients to nosocomial infections. Few studies have explored potentially modifiable host factors that may improve immune function and decrease risk of hospital-acquired bloodstream infection (HABSI). Vitamin D is a key regulator of innate and adaptive immune systems that may influence host susceptibility to infections.

  5. Patients with Central Lines - What You Need to Know to Avoid a Bloodstream Infection PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-03-01

    This 60 second PSA is based on the March, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report which indicates bloodstream infections in patients with central lines are largely preventable when healthcare providers use CDC-recommended infection control steps.  Created: 3/1/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/1/2011.

  6. Eaten alive: cannibalism is enhanced by parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunke, Mandy; Alexander, Mhairi E; Dick, Jaimie T A; Hatcher, Melanie J; Paterson, Rachel; Dunn, Alison M

    2015-03-01

    Cannibalism is ubiquitous in nature and especially pervasive in consumers with stage-specific resource utilization in resource-limited environments. Cannibalism is thus influential in the structure and functioning of biological communities. Parasites are also pervasive in nature and, we hypothesize, might affect cannibalism since infection can alter host foraging behaviour. We investigated the effects of a common parasite, the microsporidian Pleistophora mulleri, on the cannibalism rate of its host, the freshwater amphipod Gammarus duebeni celticus. Parasitic infection increased the rate of cannibalism by adults towards uninfected juvenile conspecifics, as measured by adult functional responses, that is, the rate of resource uptake as a function of resource density. This may reflect the increased metabolic requirements of the host as driven by the parasite. Furthermore, when presented with a choice, uninfected adults preferred to cannibalize uninfected rather than infected juvenile conspecifics, probably reflecting selection pressure to avoid the risk of parasite acquisition. By contrast, infected adults were indiscriminate with respect to infection status of their victims, probably owing to metabolic costs of infection and the lack of risk as the cannibals were already infected. Thus parasitism, by enhancing cannibalism rates, may have previously unrecognized effects on stage structure and population dynamics for cannibalistic species and may also act as a selective pressure leading to changes in resource use. PMID:26064614

  7. Mitosis in the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Gerald, Noel; Mahajan, Babita; Kumar, Sanjai

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is caused by intraerythrocytic protozoan parasites belonging to Plasmodium spp. (phylum Apicomplexa) that produce significant morbidity and mortality, mostly in developing countries. Plasmodium parasites have a complex life cycle that includes multiple stages in anopheline mosquito vectors and vertebrate hosts. During the life cycle, the parasites undergo several cycles of extreme population growth within a brief span, and this is critical for their continued transmission and a contri...

  8. Paradigms for parasite conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Eric R; Carlson, Colin J; Bueno, Veronica M; Burgio, Kevin R; Cizauskas, Carrie A; Clements, Christopher F; Seidel, Dana P; Harris, Nyeema C

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic species, which depend directly on host species for their survival, represent a major regulatory force in ecosystems and a significant component of Earth's biodiversity. Yet the negative impacts of parasites observed at the host level have motivated a conservation paradigm of eradication, moving us farther from attainment of taxonomically unbiased conservation goals. Despite a growing body of literature highlighting the importance of parasite-inclusive conservation, most parasite species remain understudied, underfunded, and underappreciated. We argue the protection of parasitic biodiversity requires a paradigm shift in the perception and valuation of their role as consumer species, similar to that of apex predators in the mid-20th century. Beyond recognizing parasites as vital trophic regulators, existing tools available to conservation practitioners should explicitly account for the unique threats facing dependent species. We built upon concepts from epidemiology and economics (e.g., host-density threshold and cost-benefit analysis) to devise novel metrics of margin of error and minimum investment for parasite conservation. We define margin of error as the risk of accidental host extinction from misestimating equilibrium population sizes and predicted oscillations, while minimum investment represents the cost associated with conserving the additional hosts required to maintain viable parasite populations. This framework will aid in the identification of readily conserved parasites that present minimal health risks. To establish parasite conservation, we propose an extension of population viability analysis for host-parasite assemblages to assess extinction risk. In the direst cases, ex situ breeding programs for parasites should be evaluated to maximize success without undermining host protection. Though parasitic species pose a considerable conservation challenge, adaptations to conservation tools will help protect parasite biodiversity in the face of

  9. CORRELATION OF VOLUME BLOOD CIRCULATION IN THE HEPATIC ARTERY AND THE STATE OF MICROCIRCULATORY BLOODSTREAM OF THE TRANSPLANTED LIVER AFTER ITS REVASCULIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Granov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: optimization of the surgical treatment policy with orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT depending on the results of intraoperative fl owmetry and the state of intrahepatic microcirculatory bloodstream according to immunohistochemical (IHC study of microspecimens of the donor’s liver.Materials and methods. 60 patients are included in the study. Group I (n = 30 comprised of patients for whom it was not necessary to perform any additional interventions on the bloodstream in the hepatopancreatobiliary area during OLT. Group II (n = 30 had patients with insuffi cient arterial blood supply for the graft in the intraoperative stage where it was needed to perform additional and/or repeated interventions in the arteries of the hepatopancreatobilliary area. Intraoperative fl owmetry with assessment of the volume blood circulation (VBC in the hepatic artery (HA was carried out in the both studied groups. Reference value of VBC was 100 ml/min and higher. Before and after reperfusion in the liver biopsy material we performed immunohistochemical study with the use of endothelial marker CD 31 with subsequent morphometric estimation of the specifi c square of the microvascular bloodstream.Results. In both groups there was no change in the specifi c square in the areas of portal tract and central vein before and after restoring blood fl ow. In the second group, an 8 times increase of the specifi c square of sinusoids was observed after restoring blood fl ow (р < 0,01.Conclusion. Intraoperative fl owmetric control of the blood fl ow allows in due time to perform surgical correction of the graft arterial blood supply during OLT, and it reduces the risk of thrombosis up to 0%. The value of VBC in the hepatic artery (HA has reliable dependence upon the state of microcirculatory bloodstream of cadaveric donor’s liver after reperfusion.

  10. Emerging parasitic diseases of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M A

    2012-09-30

    There have been changes in the emergence and inability to control of a number of sheep parasitic infections over the last decade. This review focuses on the more globally important sheep parasites, whose reported changes in epidemiology, occurrence or failure to control are becoming increasingly evident. One of the main perceived driving forces is climate change, which can have profound effects on parasite epidemiology, especially for those parasitic diseases where weather has a direct effect on the development of free-living stages. The emergence of anthelmintic-resistant strains of parasitic nematodes and the increasing reliance placed on anthelmintics for their control, can exert profound changes on the epidemiology of those nematodes causing parasitic gastroenteritis. As a consequence, the effectiveness of existing control strategies presents a major threat to sheep production in many areas around the world. The incidence of the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, is inextricably linked to high rainfall and is particularly prevalent in high rainfall years. Over the last few decades, there have also been increasing reports of other fluke associated diseases, such as dicroceliosis and paramphistomosis, in a number of western European countries, possibly introduced through animal movements, and able to establish with changing climates. External parasite infections, such as myiasis, can cause significant economic loss and presents as a major welfare problem. The range of elevated temperatures predicted by current climate change scenarios, result in an elongated blowfly season with earlier spring emergence and a higher cumulative incidence of fly strike. Additionally, legislative decisions leading to enforced changes in pesticide usage and choices have resulted in increased reports and spread of ectoparasitic infections, particularly mite, lice and tick infestations in sheep. Factors, such as dip disposal and associated environmental concerns, and, perhaps more

  11. Density-dependence and within-host competition in a semelparous parasite of leaf-cutting ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, William; Petersen, Klaus; Ugelvig, Line;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Parasite heterogeneity and within-host competition are thought to be important factors influencing the dynamics of host-parasite relationships. Yet, while there have been many theoretical investigations of how these factors may act, empirical data is more limited. We investigated the e...... stages. Such parasites make useful models for investigating infection dynamics and the impact of parasite competition....

  12. A simple method to purify biologically and antigenically preserved bloodstream trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi using Deae-cellulose columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora de Sousa

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available A method to purify trypanosomastigotes of some strains of Trypanosoma cruzi (Y, CL, FL, F, "Berenice", "Colombiana" and "São Felipe" from mouse blood by using DEAE-cellulose columns was standardized. This procedure is a modification of the Lanham & Godfrey methods and differs in some aspects from others described to purify T. cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes, mainly by avoidance of prior purifications of parasites. By this method, the broad trypomastigotes were mainly isolated, accounting for higher recoveries obtained with strains having higher percentages of these forms: processing of infected blood from irradiated mice could be advantageous by increasing the recovery of parasites (percentage and/or total number and elution of more slender trypomastigotes. Trypomastigotes purified by this method presented normal morphology and motility, remained infective to triatomine bugs and mice, showing in the latter prepatent periods and courses parasitemia similar to those of control parasites, and also reproducing the polymorphism pattern of each strain. Their virulence and pathogenicity also remained considerably preserved, the latter property being evaluated by LD 50 tests, mortality rates and mean survival time of inoculated mice. Moreover, these parasites presented positive, clear and peripheral immunofluorescence reaction at titres similar to those of control organisms, thus suggesting important preservation of their surface antigens.Usando colunas de DEAE-cellulose foi padronizado um método para purificação de tripomastigotas de várias cepas de Trypanosoma cruzi (Y, CL, FL, F, "Berenice", "Columbiana" e "São Felipe" a partir do sangue de camundongos. Este método é uma modificação daqueles descritos por Lanham & Godfrey e difere em vários aspectos de outros descritos para purificar as formas sanguíneas deste parasita, particularmente na dispensa de pré-purificações. Por ele foram isolados principalmente os tripomastigotas largos

  13. Foodborne parasites from wildlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapel, Christian Moliin Outzen; Fredensborg, Brian Lund

    2015-01-01

    The majority of wild foods consumed by humans are sourced from intensively managed or semi-farmed populations. Management practices inevitably affect wildlife density and habitat characteristics, which are key elements in the transmission of parasites. We consider the risk of transmission...... of foodborne parasites to humans from wildlife maintained under natural or semi-natural conditions. A deeper understanding will be useful in counteracting foodborne parasites arising from the growing industry of novel and exotic foods....

  14. Parasites of rhinoceros

    OpenAIRE

    Kettnerová, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is focuses on parasites of rhinoceros. Thesis is in form a literary review, and is focused of parasites both in captivity and wildness. The aim of mine work was to describe the different kinds of parasites, their morphology, life cycles, and especially diseases that cause to the rhinoceros. Rhinoceros are endangered species, some of them are on the verge of extinction therefore they are in order to be saved often moved to reservations or zoos. In the new environment, they meet ...

  15. The parasite clearance curve

    OpenAIRE

    White NJ

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Parasite clearance rates are important measures of anti-malarial drug efficacy. They are particularly important in the assessment of artemisinin resistance. The slope of the log-linear segment in the middle of the parasite clearance curve has the least inter-individual variance and is the focus of therapeutic assessment. The factors affecting parasite clearance are reviewed. Methods of presentation and the approaches to analysis are discussed.

  16. Parasitic Roundworm Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, Chairuddin P.

    2008-01-01

    A parasite is an organism that exists by depending on another organism. Parasites that infect humans are much more widespread than many of us realize. These diseases affect not only poverty-stricken peoples in remote areas of the world, but they also can be important health problems for people throughout the world, including the United States. As with other parasitic diseases, roundworm infections are more common in warm climates than in cooler, temperate areas. Many r...

  17. Langevin Dynamics Deciphers the Motility Pattern of Swimming Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaburdaev, Vasily; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Pfohl, Thomas; Engstler, Markus; Friedrich, Rudolf; Stark, Holger

    2011-05-01

    The parasite African trypanosome swims in the bloodstream of mammals and causes the highly dangerous human sleeping sickness. Cell motility is essential for the parasite’s survival within the mammalian host. We present an analysis of the random-walk pattern of a swimming trypanosome. From experimental time-autocorrelation functions for the direction of motion we identify two relaxation times that differ by an order of magnitude. They originate from the rapid deformations of the cell body and a slower rotational diffusion of the average swimming direction. Velocity fluctuations are athermal and increase for faster cells whose trajectories are also straighter. We demonstrate that such a complex dynamics is captured by two decoupled Langevin equations that decipher the complex trajectory pattern by referring it to the microscopic details of cell behavior.

  18. Quantifying Transmission Investment in Malaria Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greischar, Megan A; Mideo, Nicole; Read, Andrew F; Bjørnstad, Ottar N

    2016-02-01

    Many microparasites infect new hosts with specialized life stages, requiring a subset of the parasite population to forgo proliferation and develop into transmission forms. Transmission stage production influences infectivity, host exploitation, and the impact of medical interventions like drug treatment. Predicting how parasites will respond to public health efforts on both epidemiological and evolutionary timescales requires understanding transmission strategies. These strategies can rarely be observed directly and must typically be inferred from infection dynamics. Using malaria as a case study, we test previously described methods for inferring transmission stage investment against simulated data generated with a model of within-host infection dynamics, where the true transmission investment is known. We show that existing methods are inadequate and potentially very misleading. The key difficulty lies in separating transmission stages produced by different generations of parasites. We develop a new approach that performs much better on simulated data. Applying this approach to real data from mice infected with a single Plasmodium chabaudi strain, we estimate that transmission investment varies from zero to 20%, with evidence for variable investment over time in some hosts, but not others. These patterns suggest that, even in experimental infections where host genetics and other environmental factors are controlled, parasites may exhibit remarkably different patterns of transmission investment. PMID:26890485

  19. Neglected Parasitic Infections: Toxocariasis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-01-05

    This podcast is an overview of the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Neglected Parasitic Infections in the United States. Neglected Parasitic Infections are a group of diseases that afflict vulnerable populations and are often not well studied or diagnosed. A subject matter expert from CDC's Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria describes the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of toxocariasis.  Created: 1/5/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria (DPDM); Emergency Risk Communication Branch (ERCB)/Joint Information Center (JIC), Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).   Date Released: 1/9/2012.

  20. [General overview of camel parasites and the situation in Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azrug, Abdalla Fadlalla; Burgu, Ayşe

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review is overview the main protozoan, arthropoda and helminthic parasites seen in camels and to evaluate the publications related to camel parasites in Turkey. In different parts of the world, trichostrongylose, mange, nasal myiasis and trypanosomiasis are the most common parasitic diseases found in camels. Hydatic cyst larval stage of E. granulosus is important both economically and in terms of public health. It is also emphasized that the records concerning parasites of the Turkish camel population, which is decreasing significantly, are extremely limited. PMID:21618196

  1. Fecal Occult Blood Test and Gastrointestinal Parasitic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed H. Wakid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stool specimens of 1238 workers in western region of Saudi Arabia were examined for infection with intestinal parasites and for fecal occult blood (FOB to investigate the possibility that enteroparasites correlate to occult intestinal bleeding. Direct smears and formal ether techniques were used for detection of diagnostic stages of intestinal parasites. A commercially available guaiac test was used to detect fecal occult blood. 47.01% of the workers were infected with intestinal parasites including eight helminthes species and eight protozoan species. The results provided no significant evidence (P-value=0.143 that intestinal parasitic infection is in association with positive guaiac FOB test.

  2. Competition and the Evolution of Reproductive Restraint in Malaria Parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Pollitt, Laura C.; Mideo, Nicole; Drew, Damien R.; Schneider, Petra; Colegrave, Nick; Reece, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    All organisms must trade off resource allocation between different life processes that determine their survival and reproduction. Malaria parasites replicate asexually in the host but must produce sexual stages to transmit between hosts. Because different specialized stages are required for these functions, the division of resources between these life-history components is a key problem for natural selection to solve. Despite the medical and economic importance of these parasites, their repro...

  3. Cluster of Candida parapsilosis primary bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Carmem Lúcia P. da

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida parapsilosis is an increasingly important bloodstream pathogen in neonatal intensive care units (NICU. We investigated a cluster of bloodstream infections in a NICU to determine whether nosocomial transmission occurred. During a 3-day period, 3 premature infants hospitalized in the same unit presented with sepsis caused by C. parapsilosis. Electrophoretic karyotype of the organisms was performed by using pulsed field gel electrophoresis in a countour-clamped homogeneous electric field system. The isolate from 1 newborn could not be typed, and the isolates from the remaining 2 infants had identical patterns. All 3 cases are described. We conclude that nosocomial transmission of C. parapsilosis occurred and that neonates under intensive care may represent a risk group for this pathogen.

  4. Current strategies for the prevention and management of central line-associated bloodstream infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuolin Han

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Zhuolin Han, Stephen Y Liang, Jonas MarschallDivision of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Central venous catheters are an invaluable tool for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in today’s medicine, but their use can be complicated by bloodstream infections (BSIs. While evidence-based preventive measures are disseminated by infection control associations, the optimal management of established central line-associated BSIs has been summarized in infectious diseases guidelines. We prepared an overview of the state-of-the-art of prevention and management of central line-associated BSIs and included topics such as the role of antibiotic-coated catheters, the role of catheter removal in the management, and a review of currently used antibiotic compounds and the duration of treatment.Keywords: central venous catheters, bloodstream infections, guidelines, prevention

  5. The Impact of Infectious Disease Specialist Consultation for Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Julie; Solligård, Erik; Damås, Jan Kristian; DeWan, Andrew; Åsvold, Bjørn Olav; Bracken, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of severe bloodstream infection. We performed a systematic review to assess whether consultation with infectious disease specialists decreased all-cause mortality or rate of complications of S aureus bloodstream infections. The review also assessed parameters associated with the quality of management of the infection. We searched for eligible studies in PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and clinical trials.gov as well as the references of included studies. We identified 22 observational studies and 1 study protocol for a randomized trial. A meta-analysis was not performed because of the high risk of bias in the included studies. The outcomes are reported in a narrative review. Most included studies reported survival benefit, in the adjusted analysis. Recommended management strategies were carried out significantly more often among patients seen by an infectious disease specialist. Trials, such as cluster-randomized controlled trials, can more validly assess the studies at low risk of bias. PMID:27047985

  6. Catheter related bloodstream infection%导管相关血流感染

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶建平

    2012-01-01

    儿科患者发生的医院获得性菌血症,绝大多数与血管内装置相关,本文根据国内外指南和新的研究,对导管相关血流感染的流行病学、发病机制、诊断及预防和管理作一综述.%Most nosocomial bloodstream infections among pediatric patients are related to the usage of an intravascular device.This article reviewed catheter related bloodstream infections from aspects of epidemiology,pathogenesis,diagnosis,prevention and care based on guidelines and new research both in abroad and at home.

  7. Using metabolomics to dissect host-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloehn, J; Blume, M; Cobbold, S A; Saunders, E C; Dagley, M J; McConville, M J

    2016-08-01

    Protozoan parasites have evolved diverse growth and metabolic strategies for surviving and proliferating within different extracellular and intracellular niches in their mammalian hosts. Metabolomic approaches, including high coverage metabolite profiling and (13)C/(2)H-stable isotope labeling, are increasingly being used to identify parasite metabolic pathways that are important for survival and replication in vivo. These approaches are highlighting new links between parasite carbon metabolism and the ability of different parasite stages to colonize specific niches or host cell types. They have also revealed novel metabolic regulatory mechanisms that are important for homeostasis and survival in potentially nutrient variable environments. These studies highlight the importance of parasite and host metabolism as determinants of host-parasite interactions. PMID:27200489

  8. Parasitic disease of the liver and biliary tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdulrahman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Several parasites infest liver or biliary tree, either during their maturation stages or as adult worms. Bile iry tree parasites may cause pancreatitis, cholecystitis, biliary tree obstruction, recurrent cholangitis, biliary tree strictures and some may lead to cholangiocarcinoma. This review discusses the hepatobiliary parasites, and shows our experience in diagnosis and management of these parasites. Ultrasonography of the liver is diagnostic in schistosomiasis, hydatid cysts, amebic liver abscess, ascariasis and other biliary tree parasites showing bile duct dilatation. Percutaneous aspiration under ultrasonography guidance of hydatid liver cysts or amebic abscess are effective measures in management. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP is safe and effective in diagnosis and management of biliary tree parasites.

  9. Parasites from the Past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Nejsum, Peter;

    will investigate how the diversity of food-borne parasitic infections has changed with cultural and dietary habits, hunting practice and intensity of animal husbandry. This is done by isolating and typing ancient DNA remains from parasite eggs found in archeological samples from across Denmark....

  10. The Outcomes of Using Colistin for Treating Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Species Bloodstream Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Seung-Kwan; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Seong-Ho; Choi, Jae-Phil; Kim, Sung-Han; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Choi, Sang-Ho; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Yang Soo

    2011-01-01

    Despite the identification of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates that demonstrate susceptibility to only colistin, this antimicrobial agent was not available in Korea until 2006. The present study examined the outcomes of patients with multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter species bloodstream infection and who were treated with or without colistin as part of their regimen. The colistin group was given colistin as part of therapy once colistin became available in 2006. The non-colistin group w...

  11. Delays in Appropriate Antibiotic Therapy for Gram-Negative Bloodstream Infections: A Multicenter, Community Hospital Study

    OpenAIRE

    Moehring, Rebekah W.; Richard Sloane; Chen, Luke F.; Smathers, Emily C.; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Fowler, Vance G.; Weber, David J.; Sexton, Daniel J.; Anderson, Deverick J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gram-negative bacterial bloodstream infection (BSI) is a serious condition with estimated 30% mortality. Clinical outcomes for patients with severe infections improve when antibiotics are appropriately chosen and given early. The objective of this study was to estimate the association of prior healthcare exposure on time to appropriate antibiotic therapy in patients with gram-negative BSI. METHOD: We performed a multicenter cohort study of adult, hospitalized patients with gram-ne...

  12. Experimental testing of the system resistance bloodstream component for the simulation line of the cardiovascular system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlup, Hynek; Pražák, Josef; Kovičková, S.

    Nečtiny : Computational Mechanics 2004, 2004, s. 169-174. ISBN 80-7043-314-0. [Computational mechanics 2004 /20./. Nečtiny (CZ), 08.11.2004-10.11.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/04/1181 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : simulation lines * systemresistance bloodstream component * experimental testing Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  13. Three Epidemics of Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Bloodstream Infection in Blantyre, Malawi, 1998–2014

    OpenAIRE

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Masesa, Clemens; Jassi, Chikondi; Faragher, E. Brian; Mallewa, Jane; Mallewa, Macpherson; MacLennan, Calman A.; Msefula, Chisomo; Robert S Heyderman; Gordon, Melita A.

    2015-01-01

    Background.  The Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme (MLW) has routinely collected specimens for blood culture from febrile patients, and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with suspected meningitis, presenting to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi, since 1998. Methods.  We present bloodstream infection (BSI) and meningitis surveillance data from 1998 to 2014. Automated blood culture, manual speciation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility...

  14. Muscle Releases Alpha-Sarcoglycan Positive Extracellular Vesicles Carrying miRNAs in the Bloodstream

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Guescini; Barbara Canonico; Francesco Lucertini; Serena Maggio; Giosué Annibalini; Elena Barbieri; Francesca Luchetti; Stefano Papa; Vilberto Stocchi

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, skeletal muscle has emerged as an important secretory organ producing soluble factors, called myokines, that exert either autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects. Moreover, recent studies have shown that muscle releases microRNAs into the bloodstream in response to physical exercise. These microRNAs affect target cells, such as hormones and cytokines. The mechanisms underlying microRNA secretion are poorly characterized at present. Here, we investigated whether muscle...

  15. Tsukamurella catheter-related bloodstream infection in a pediatric patient with pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen A. Wendorf

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI are important complications in patients with long-term indwelling central venous catheters. In this report, we present the case of a 14-year-old male with pulmonary hypertension treated with continuous treprostinil infusion, who presented with a CR-BSI caused by a Tsukamurella species. This case highlights the potential for this unusual organism to cause infection in immunocompetent patients.

  16. Trends in paediatric bloodstream infections at a South African referral hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Dramowski, Angela; Mark F Cotton; Rabie, Helena; Whitelaw, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of paediatric bloodstream infection (BSI) in Sub-Saharan Africa is poorly documented with limited data on hospital-acquired sepsis, impact of HIV infection, BSI trends and antimicrobial resistance. Methods We retrospectively reviewed paediatric BSI (0–14 years) at Tygerberg Children’s Hospital between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2013 (excluding neonatal wards). Laboratory and hospital data were used to determine BSI rates, blood culture contamination, pathogen p...

  17. Epidemiology of Hospital-Acquired Urinary Tract-Related Bloodstream Infection at a University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Robert; Greene, M. Todd; Chenoweth, Carol E.; Kuhn, Latoya; Shuman, Emily; Rogers, Mary A M; Saint, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the epidemiology of nosocomial urinary tract-related bloodstream infection. In a case series from an academic medical center, Enterococcus sp. (28.7%) and Candida sp. (19.6%) were the predominant microorganisms isolated, suggesting a potential shift from previously observed Gram-negative microorganisms. A case-fatality rate of 32.8% highlights the severity of this condition.

  18. Controle biológico de helmintos parasitos de animais: estágio atual e perspectivas futuras Biological control of helminth parasites of animals: current stage and future outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo de Andrade Mota; Artur Kanadani Campos; Jackson Victor de Araújo

    2003-01-01

    O controle biológico é um método desenvolvido para diminuir uma população de parasitas pela utilização de antagonista natural. A administração de fungos nematófagos aos animais domésticos é considerada uma promissora alternativa na profilaxia das helmintíases gastrintestinais parasitárias. Os fungos nematófagos desenvolvem estruturas em forma de armadilhas, responsáveis pela captura e destruição dos estágios infectantes dos nematóides. Os fungos dos gêneros Arthrobotrys, Duddingtonia e Monacr...

  19. Pitting of malaria parasites and spherocyte formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gichuki Charity W

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high prevalence of spherocytes was detected in blood smears of children enrolled in a case control study conducted in the malaria holoendemic Lake Victoria basin. It was speculated that the spherocytes reflect intraerythrocytic removal of malarial parasites with a concurrent removal of RBC membrane through a process analogous to pitting of intraerythrocytic inclusion bodies. Pitting and re-circulation of RBCs devoid of malaria parasites could be a host mechanism for parasite clearance while minimizing the anaemia that would occur were the entire parasitized RBC removed. The prior demonstration of RBCs containing ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (pf 155 or RESA but no intracellular parasites, support the idea of pitting. Methods An in vitro model was developed to examine the phenomenon of pitting and spherocyte formation in Plasmodium falciparum infected RBCs (iRBC co-incubated with human macrophages. In vivo application of this model was evaluated using blood specimens from patients attending Kisumu Ditrict Hospital. RBCs were probed with anti-RESA monoclonal antibody and a DNA stain (propidium iodide. Flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy was used to compare RBCs containing both the antigen and the parasites to those that were only RESA positive. Results Co-incubation of iRBC and tumor necrosis factor-alpha activated macrophages led to pitting (14% ± 1.31% macrophages with engulfed trophozoites as opposed to erythrophagocytosis (5.33% ± 0.95% (P Conclusion It is proposed that in malaria holoendemic areas where prevalence of asexual stage parasites approaches 100% in children, RBCs with pitted parasites are re-circulated and pitting may produce spherocytes.

  20. Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections (CR-BSI) in Geriatric Patients in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernecky, Cynthia; Macklin, Denise; Blackburn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are bloodstream infections that, through specific laboratory testing, identify the intravascular catheter as the source of the bloodstream infection. By 2015, the rate of elderly patients 80 years of age and older admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) will represent 1 in 4 admissions. Approximately 80 000 CR-BSIs occur in ICUs annually, potentially resulting in as many as 56 000 CR-BSIs occurring in the geriatric ICU patient, with 20% of these cases resulting in death. To minimize the occurrence of CR-BSIs in these patients, specific knowledge about the geriatric patient will have to be factored into the ICU health care professional's practice, including the development of a vascular access plan, which includes selection of the correct device and proper insertion of that device along with an evidence-based care and maintenance program. Intensive care unit health care professionals may be at a loss when it comes to navigating the vast array of vascular access medical devices available today. The Healthcare and Technology Synergy framework can assist the ICU health care professional to logically review each vascular access device and select those devices that best meet patient needs. PMID:26039650

  1. Cross-stage immunity for malaria vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahrendorf, Wiebke; Scholzen, Anja; Sauerwein, Robert W; Langhorne, Jean

    2015-12-22

    A vaccine against malaria is urgently needed for control and eventual eradication. Different approaches are pursued to induce either sterile immunity directed against pre-erythrocytic parasites or to mimic naturally acquired immunity by controlling blood-stage parasite densities and disease severity. Pre-erythrocytic and blood-stage malaria vaccines are often seen as opposing tactics, but it is likely that they have to be combined into a multi-stage malaria vaccine to be optimally safe and effective. Since many antigenic targets are shared between liver- and blood-stage parasites, malaria vaccines have the potential to elicit cross-stage protection with immune mechanisms against both stages complementing and enhancing each other. Here we discuss evidence from pre-erythrocytic and blood-stage subunit and whole parasite vaccination approaches that show that protection against malaria is not necessarily stage-specific. Parasites arresting at late liver-stages especially, can induce powerful blood-stage immunity, and similarly exposure to blood-stage parasites can afford pre-erythrocytic immunity. The incorporation of a blood-stage component into a multi-stage malaria vaccine would hence not only combat breakthrough infections in the blood should the pre-erythrocytic component fail to induce sterile protection, but would also actively enhance the pre-erythrocytic potency of this vaccine. We therefore advocate that future studies should concentrate on the identification of cross-stage protective malaria antigens, which can empower multi-stage malaria vaccine development. PMID:26469724

  2. Efficacy of common laboratory disinfectants and heat on killing trypanosomatid parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Kevin M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The disinfectants TriGene, bleach, ethanol and liquid hand soap, and water and temperature were tested for their ability to kill bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei, epimastigotes of Trypanosoma rangeli and promastigotes of Leishmania major. A 5-min exposure to 0.2% TriGene, 0.1% liquid hand soap and 0.05% bleach (0.05% NaOCl killed all three trypanosomatids. Ethanol and water destroyed the parasites within 5 min at concentrations of 15–17.5% and 80–90%, respectively. All three organisms were also killed when treated for 5 min at 50°C. The results indicate that the disinfectants, water and temperature treatment (i.e. autoclaving are suitable laboratory hygiene measures against trypanosomatid parasites.

  3. Leishmania development in sand flies: parasite-vector interactions overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dostálová Anna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leishmaniases are vector-borne parasitic diseases with 0.9 – 1.4 million new human cases each year worldwide. In the vectorial part of the life-cycle, Leishmania development is confined to the digestive tract. During the first few days after blood feeding, natural barriers to Leishmania development include secreted proteolytic enzymes, the peritrophic matrix surrounding the ingested blood meal and sand fly immune reactions. As the blood digestion proceeds, parasites need to bind to the midgut epithelium to avoid being excreted with the blood remnant. This binding is strictly stage-dependent as it is a property of nectomonad and leptomonad forms only. While the attachment in specific vectors (P. papatasi, P. duboscqi and P. sergenti involves lipophosphoglycan (LPG, this Leishmania molecule is not required for parasite attachment in other sand fly species experimentally permissive for various Leishmania. During late-stage infections, large numbers of parasites accumulate in the anterior midgut and produce filamentous proteophosphoglycan creating a gel-like plug physically obstructing the gut. The parasites attached to the stomodeal valve cause damage to the chitin lining and epithelial cells of the valve, interfering with its function and facilitating reflux of parasites from the midgut. Transformation to metacyclic stages highly infective for the vertebrate host is the other prerequisite for effective transmission. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of molecular interactions occurring in all these distinct phases of parasite colonization of the sand fly gut, highlighting recent discoveries in the field.

  4. Pathoecology of Chiribaya parasitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinson Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The excavations of Chiribaya culture sites in the Osmore drainage of southern Peru focused on the recovery of information about prehistoric disease, including parasitism. The archaeologists excavated human, dog, guinea pig, and llama mummies. These mummies were analyzed for internal and external parasites. The results of the analysis and reconstruction of prehistoric life from the excavations allows us to interpret the pathoecology of the Chiribaya culture.

  5. Ungulate malaria parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas J. Templeton; Masahito Asada; Montakan Jiratanh; Ishikawa, Sohta A.; Sonthaya Tiawsirisup; Thillaiampalam Sivakumar; Boniface Namangala; Mika Takeda; Kingdao Mohkaew; Supawan Ngamjituea; Noboru Inoue; Chihiro Sugimoto; Yuji Inagaki; Yasuhiko Suzuki; Naoaki Yokoyama

    2016-01-01

    Haemosporida parasites of even-toed ungulates are diverse and globally distributed, but since their discovery in 1913 their characterization has relied exclusively on microscopy-based descriptions. In order to bring molecular approaches to bear on the identity and evolutionary relationships of ungulate malaria parasites, we conducted Plasmodium cytb-specific nested PCR surveys using blood from water buffalo in Vietnam and Thailand, and goats in Zambia. We found that Plasmodium is readily dete...

  6. Parasitism of Trichoderma on Meloidogyne javanica and role of the gelatinous matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichoderma (T. asperellum-203, 44 and GH11; T. atroviride-IMI 206040 and T. harzianum-248) parasitism on Meloidogyne javanica life stages was examined in vitro. Conidium attachment and parasitism differed among the various fungi. Egg masses, their derived eggs and second-stage juveniles (J2) were p...

  7. Parasites and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, George H

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of human evolutionary and population history can be advanced by ecological and evolutionary studies of our parasites. Many parasites flourish only in the presence of very specific human behaviors and in specific habitats, are wholly dependent on us, and have evolved with us for thousands or millions of years. Therefore, by asking when and how we first acquired those parasites, under which environmental and cultural conditions we are the most susceptible, and how the parasites have evolved and adapted to us and we in response to them, we can gain considerable insight into our own evolutionary history. As examples, the tapeworm life cycle is dependent on our consumption of meat, the divergence of body and head lice may have been subsequent to the development of clothing, and malaria hyperendemicity may be associated with agriculture. Thus, the evolutionary and population histories of these parasites are likely intertwined with critical aspects of human biology and culture. Here I review the mechanics of these and multiple other parasite proxies for human evolutionary history and discuss how they currently complement our fossil, archeological, molecular, linguistic, historical, and ethnographic records. I also highlight potential future applications of this promising model for the field of evolutionary anthropology. PMID:25627083

  8. The immunological balance between host and parasite in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroost, Katrien; Pham, Thao-Thy; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van den Steen, Philippe E

    2016-03-01

    Coevolution of humans and malaria parasites has generated an intricate balance between the immune system of the host and virulence factors of the parasite, equilibrating maximal parasite transmission with limited host damage. Focusing on the blood stage of the disease, we discuss how the balance between anti-parasite immunity versus immunomodulatory and evasion mechanisms of the parasite may result in parasite clearance or chronic infection without major symptoms, whereas imbalances characterized by excessive parasite growth, exaggerated immune reactions or a combination of both cause severe pathology and death, which is detrimental for both parasite and host. A thorough understanding of the immunological balance of malaria and its relation to other physiological balances in the body is of crucial importance for developing effective interventions to reduce malaria-related morbidity and to diminish fatal outcomes due to severe complications. Therefore, we discuss in this review the detailed mechanisms of anti-malarial immunity, parasite virulence factors including immune evasion mechanisms and pathogenesis. Furthermore, we propose a comprehensive classification of malaria complications according to the different types of imbalances. PMID:26657789

  9. The development of malaria parasites in the mosquito midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennink, Sandra; Kiesow, Meike J; Pradel, Gabriele

    2016-07-01

    The mosquito midgut stages of malaria parasites are crucial for establishing an infection in the insect vector and to thus ensure further spread of the pathogen. Parasite development in the midgut starts with the activation of the intraerythrocytic gametocytes immediately after take-up and ends with traversal of the midgut epithelium by the invasive ookinetes less than 24 h later. During this time period, the plasmodia undergo two processes of stage conversion, from gametocytes to gametes and from zygotes to ookinetes, both accompanied by dramatic morphological changes. Further, gamete formation requires parasite egress from the enveloping erythrocytes, rendering them vulnerable to the aggressive factors of the insect gut, like components of the human blood meal. The mosquito midgut stages of malaria parasites are unprecedented objects to study a variety of cell biological aspects, including signal perception, cell conversion, parasite/host co-adaptation and immune evasion. This review highlights recent insights into the molecules involved in gametocyte activation and gamete formation as well as in zygote-to-ookinete conversion and ookinete midgut exit; it further discusses factors that can harm the extracellular midgut stages as well as the measures of the parasites to protect themselves from any damage. PMID:27111866

  10. Attenuated reproduction of Strombus gigas by an Apicomplexa: Emeriidae-like parasite in the digestive gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqueiro Cardenas, Erick; Montero, Jorge; Frenkiel, Liliane; Aldana Aranda, Dalila

    2012-07-01

    An intense and generalized sporozoan infection was detected in every population of the queen conch, Strombus gigas through the Caribbean. In this contribution we establish the relationship between occurrences of an Apicomplexa: Emeriidae-like organism and reproductive activity at San Andres archipelago, Colombia. Occurrence of the parasites was estimated counting the feeding stage Merozoites and cysts Sporozoites at 40× magnification. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis (NMDS) was made to correlate the parasites stages abundance with frequency of the reproductive stages. Gametogenesis and spawning were always low coinciding with high numbers of Merozoites, a positive correlation was established between parasite abundance with reabsorption and undifferentiated stages, and negative correlation was observed between parasite abundance with maturity and spawning stages. The nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) shows that gametogenesis, maturity and spawning increase as the number of parasites decrease, factor that could be threatening reproduction of S. gigas through the Caribbean. PMID:22484565

  11. Control method exploration of nosocomial bloodstream infection and its effect evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAI Wen-zhao; WANG Xiao-ting; ZHOU Jiong; LI Xin; LUO Hong-bo; LIU Da-wei

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently,slightly more than 50% of bloodstream infections (BSIs) are hospital acquired.When these infections occur in patients in intensive care units,they are associated with a high mortality rate,additional hospital days and excess hospital costs.Because of multifactor of nosocomial BSIs,measurements of control nosocomial BSIs are wide variety and lead to some confusion in practice.The aim of this study was to explore special way in accordance with self-hospital base on common principle.Methods In one ward of the Intensive Care Unit,Peking Union Medical College Hospital,at first,we divided the all operation about bloodstream way into three sections used as keypoints.By surveying keypoints respectively,some operation faults of blood way were discovered.For decreasing the mobidity of nosocomial BSls,some intervention measurements were executed.The rate of nosocomial BSIs was analyzed by chi-square test.Results According to the statistics from January to June,we received and cured 618 patients in total; among them,there were 13 cases of nosocomial BSI and the average occurrence was 2.3 cases/month.After intervention measurements from July to December 2011,we received and cured 639 patients in total with seven cases of nosocomial BSI,and the average occurrence was 1.2 cases/month (P <0.05).From January to April 2012,no nosocomial BSI occurred in the investigated ward.Conclusion Removing the operation faults of bloodstream way might decrease the nosocomial BSI rapidly and efficiently by utilizing a key point survey.

  12. Reduced erythrocyte susceptibility and increased host clearance of young parasites slows Plasmodium growth in a murine model of severe malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, David S.; Cromer, Deborah; Best, Shannon E.; James, Kylie R.; Sebina, Ismail; Haque, Ashraful; Davenport, Miles P.

    2015-05-01

    The best correlate of malaria severity in human Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) infection is the total parasite load. Pf-infected humans could control parasite loads by two mechanisms, either decreasing parasite multiplication, or increasing parasite clearance. However, few studies have directly measured these two mechanisms in vivo. Here, we have directly quantified host clearance of parasites during Plasmodium infection in mice. We transferred labelled red blood cells (RBCs) from Plasmodium infected donors into uninfected and infected recipients, and tracked the fate of donor parasites by frequent blood sampling. We then applied age-based mathematical models to characterise parasite clearance in the recipient mice. Our analyses revealed an increased clearance of parasites in infected animals, particularly parasites of a younger developmental stage. However, the major decrease in parasite multiplication in infected mice was not mediated by increased clearance alone, but was accompanied by a significant reduction in the susceptibility of RBCs to parasitisation.

  13. EFFECT OF INFLIXIMAB ON PARAMETERS OF REMODELING OF ARTERIAL BLOODSTREAM, RANKL AND OSTEOPROTEGERIN LEVELS IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Aleksandrovna Knyazeva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the effect of infliximab (INF on serum levels of RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG, as well as on structural and functional properties of the vascular wall in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA.Material and Methods. A total of 79 RA patients who corresponded to the classification criteria ACR (1987 or ACR/EULAR (2010 and were seronegative for IgM rheumatoid factor (RF were examined. The mean age of patients was 43.6±8.5 years. The serum levels of OPG and RANKL were determined by ELISA (Biomedica, Austria; the common carotid arteries (CCAs were visualized using an Acuson X/10 ultrasonic complex equipped with a 7 MHz linear sensor in the β-mode prior to therapy and after 12-month therapy with INF.Results and Discussion. An increased OPG level was observed mostly in patients with RA duration up to 1 year; an increase in RANKL level was pronounced stronger in patients with PA duration over 2 years. The disturbance of structural and functional properties of the arterial bloodstream was revealed, manifesting itself as an increase in the intimamedia complex thickness, diameter and rigidity index of CCA that were stronger pronounced in patients with late onset RA. A correlation analysis showed the presence of reliable relationship between the RANKL and OPG levels and CCA remodeling parameters. INF therapy showed high clinical effectiveness and correction effect on the RANKL/OPG system. In addition, it was accompanied by a reduction of signs of CCA remodeling, which was stronger pronounced in patients with early RA.Conclusion. The results prove the reasonability of using INF at early stages of RA in order to optimize the therapy and achieve more efficient control of cardiovascular complications.

  14. Whole organism blood stage vaccines against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisic, Danielle I; Good, Michael F

    2015-12-22

    Despite a century of research focused on the development and implementation of effective control strategies, infection with the malaria parasite continues to result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. An effective malaria vaccine is considered by many to be the definitive solution. Yet, after decades of research, we are still without a vaccine that is capable of inducing robust, long lasting protection in naturally exposed individuals. Extensive sub-unit vaccine development focused on the blood stage of the malaria parasite has thus far yielded disappointing results. There is now a renewed focus on whole parasite vaccine strategies, particularly as they may overcome some of the inherent weaknesses deemed to be associated with the sub-unit approach. This review discusses the whole parasite vaccine strategy focusing on the blood stage of the malaria parasite, with an emphasis on recent advances and challenges in the development of killed and live attenuated vaccines. PMID:26428451

  15. JBP2, a SWI2/SNF2-like protein, regulates de novo telomeric DNA glycosylation in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Rudo; Brand, Verena; Ekanayake, Dilrukshi K; Sweeney, Kate; DiPaolo, Courtney; Reznikoff, William S; Sabatini, Robert

    2007-11-01

    Synthesis of the modified thymine base, beta-d-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil or J, within telomeric DNA of Trypanosoma brucei correlates with the bloodstream form specific epigenetic silencing of telomeric variant surface glycoprotein genes involved in antigenic variation. In order to analyze the function of base J in the regulation of antigenic variation, we are characterizing the regulatory mechanism of J biosynthesis. We have recently proposed a model in which chromatin remodeling by a SWI2/SNF2-like protein (JBP2) regulates the developmental and de novo site-specific localization of J synthesis within bloodstream form trypanosome DNA. Consistent with this model, we now show that JBP2 (-/-) bloodstream form trypanosomes contain five-fold less base J and are unable to stimulate de novo J synthesis in newly generated telomeric arrays. PMID:17706299

  16. Host age modulates parasite infectivity, virulence and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhar, Rony; Ben-Ami, Frida

    2015-07-01

    Host age is one of the most striking differences among hosts within most populations, but there is very little data on how age-dependent effects impact ecological and evolutionary dynamics of both the host and the parasite. Here, we examined the influence of host age (juveniles, young and old adults) at parasite exposure on host susceptibility, fecundity and survival as well as parasite transmission, using two clones of the water flea Daphnia magna and two clones of its bacterial parasite Pasteuria ramosa. Younger D. magna were more susceptible to infection than older ones, regardless of host or parasite clone. Also, younger-infected D. magna became castrated faster than older hosts, but host and parasite clone effects contributed to this trait as well. Furthermore, the early-infected D. magna produced considerably more parasite transmission stages than late-infected ones, while host age at exposure did not affect virulence as it is defined in models (host mortality). When virulence is defined more broadly as the negative effects of infection on host fitness, by integrating the parasitic effects on host fecundity and mortality, then host age at exposure seems to slide along a negative relationship between host and parasite fitness. Thus, the virulence-transmission trade-off differs strongly among age classes, which in turn affects predictions of optimal virulence. Age-dependent effects on host susceptibility, virulence and parasite transmission could pose an important challenge for experimental and theoretical studies of infectious disease dynamics and disease ecology. Our results present a call for a more explicit stage-structured theory for disease, which will incorporate age-dependent epidemiological parameters. PMID:25661269

  17. Acanthocephala Larvae parasitizing Ameiva ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758) (Squamata: Teiidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Lilian Cristina Macedo; Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos Melo; Teresa Cristina Sauer Ávila-Pires; Elane Guerreiro Giese; Jeannie Nascimento dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Knowledge concerning the taxonomy and biology of species of Acanthocephala, helminth parasites of the helminth species of the phylum Acanthocephala, parasites of lizards in Brazilian Amazonia, is still insufficient, but reports of Acanthocephala in reptiles are becoming increasingly common in the literature. Cystacanth-stage Acanthocephalan larvae have been found in the visceral peritoneum during necropsy of Ameiva ameiva ameivalizards from the “Osvaldo Rodrigues da Cunha” Herpetolog...

  18. Empirical support for optimal virulence in a castrating parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Helge Jensen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The trade-off hypothesis for the evolution of virulence predicts that parasite transmission stage production and host exploitation are balanced such that lifetime transmission success (LTS is maximised. However, the experimental evidence for this prediction is weak, mainly because LTS, which indicates parasite fitness, has been difficult to measure. For castrating parasites, this simple model has been modified to take into account that parasites convert host reproductive resources into transmission stages. Parasites that kill the host too early will hardly benefit from these resources, while postponing the killing of the host results in diminished returns. As predicted from optimality models, a parasite inducing castration should therefore castrate early, but show intermediate levels of virulence, where virulence is measured as time to host killing. We studied virulence in an experimental system where a bacterial parasite castrates its host and produces spores that are not released until after host death. This permits estimating the LTS of the parasite, which can then be related to its virulence. We exposed replicate individual Daphnia magna (Crustacea of one host clone to the same amount of bacterial spores and followed individuals until their death. We found that the parasite shows strong variation in the time to kill its host and that transmission stage production peaks at an intermediate level of virulence. A further experiment tested for the genetic basis of variation in virulence by comparing survival curves of daphniids infected with parasite spores obtained from early killing versus late killing infections. Hosts infected with early killer spores had a significantly higher death rate as compared to those infected with late killers, indicating that variation in time to death was at least in part caused by genetic differences among parasites. We speculate that the clear peak in lifetime reproductive success at intermediate killing times

  19. Disentangling phylogenetic constraints from selective forces in the evolution of trematode transmission stages

    OpenAIRE

    Koehler, A.V.; Brown, B.; Poulin, R.; Thieltges, D.W.; Fredensborg, B.L.

    2012-01-01

    The transmission stages of parasites are key determinants of parasite fitness, but they also incur huge mortality. Yet the selective forces shaping the sizes of transmission stages remain poorly understood. We ran a comparative analysis of interspecific variation in the size of transmission stages among 404 species of parasitic trematodes. There are two transmission steps requiring infective stages in the life cycle of trematodes: transmission from the definitive to the first intermediate (sn...

  20. Coordinated Molecular Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus, Endothelial Cells and Platelets in Bloodstream Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina D. Garciarena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen often carried asymptomatically on the human body. Upon entry to the otherwise sterile environment of the cardiovascular system, S. aureus can lead to serious complications resulting in organ failure and death. The success of S. aureus as a pathogen in the bloodstream is due to its ability to express a wide array of cell wall proteins on its surface that recognise host receptors, extracellular matrix proteins and plasma proteins. Endothelial cells and platelets are important cells in the cardiovascular system and are a major target of bloodstream infection. Endothelial cells form the inner lining of a blood vessel and provide an antithrombotic barrier between the vessel wall and blood. Platelets on the other hand travel throughout the cardiovascular system and respond by aggregating around the site of injury and initiating clot formation. Activation of either of these cells leads to functional dysregulation in the cardiovascular system. In this review, we will illustrate how S. aureus establish intimate interactions with both endothelial cells and platelets leading to cardiovascular dysregulation.

  1. Muscle Releases Alpha-Sarcoglycan Positive Extracellular Vesicles Carrying miRNAs in the Bloodstream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Guescini

    Full Text Available In the past few years, skeletal muscle has emerged as an important secretory organ producing soluble factors, called myokines, that exert either autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects. Moreover, recent studies have shown that muscle releases microRNAs into the bloodstream in response to physical exercise. These microRNAs affect target cells, such as hormones and cytokines. The mechanisms underlying microRNA secretion are poorly characterized at present. Here, we investigated whether muscle tissue releases extracellular vesicles (EVs, which carry microRNAs in the bloodstream under physiological conditions such as physical exercise. Using density gradient separation of plasma from sedentary and physically fit young men we found EVs positive for TSG101 and alpha-sarcoglycan (SGCA, and enriched for miR-206. Cytometric analysis showed that the SGCA+ EVs account for 1-5% of the total and that 60-65% of these EVs were also positive for the exosomal marker CD81. Furthermore, the SGCA-immuno captured sub-population of EVs exhibited higher levels of the miR-206/miR16 ratio compared to total plasma EVs. Finally, a significant positive correlation was found between the aerobic fitness and muscle-specific miRNAs and EV miR-133b and -181a-5p were significantly up-regulated after acute exercise. Thus, our study proposes EVs as a novel means of muscle communication potentially involved in muscle remodeling and homeostasis.

  2. Determination of germ tube, phospholipase, and proteinase production by bloodstream isolates of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Souza Mattei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Candida albicans is a commensal and opportunistic agent that causes infection in immunocompromised individuals. Several attributes contribute to the virulence and pathogenicity of this yeast, including the production of germ tubes (GTs and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, particularly phospholipase and proteinase. This study aimed to investigate GT production and phospholipase and proteinase activities in bloodstream isolates of C. albicans. Methods One hundred fifty-three C. albicans isolates were obtained from blood samples and analyzed for GT, phospholipase, and proteinase production. The assays were performed in duplicate in egg yolk medium containing bovine serum albumin and human serum. Results Detectable amounts of proteinase were produced by 97% of the isolates, and 78% of the isolates produced phospholipase. GTs were produced by 95% of the isolates. A majority of the isolates exhibited low levels of phospholipase production and high levels of proteinase production. Conclusions Bloodstream isolates of C. albicans produce virulence factors such as GT and hydrolytic enzymes that enable them to cause infection under favorable conditions.

  3. Trends in antibiotic susceptibility of bloodstream pathogens in hospitalized patients in France, 1996 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Lamy, Brigitte; Pina, Patrick; Allouch, Pierre Yves

    2010-03-01

    Nationwide surveys of antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria isolated from bloodstream infections are required to fit empiric therapy to recent trends and detect emerging resistance. We report the results of a French national prospective survey based on the College of Bacteriology-Virology and Hygiene study group network performed each October during the 1996 to 2007 period, with focus on Enterobacteriaceae (7708 isolates) and Staphylococcus aureus (2271 isolates). The most relevant antimicrobial susceptibilities trends were i) a decrease in fluoroquinolones susceptibility among Enterobacteriaceae (96-90%, P < 0.0001) and Escherichia coli isolates (98-89%, P < 0.0001), respectively, ii) the slight but significant decrease in cefotaxime susceptibility among E. coli (P = 0.016), and iii) the significant increase in gentamicin susceptibility among S. aureus strains (P = 0.016). This survey reports antibiotic susceptibility of bloodstream pathogens in France. The empiric use of fluoroquinolones in severe infections should be cautiously monitored by thorough clinical and microbiologic follow-up. PMID:19903587

  4. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN IRAN

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad, K; M.R. Zalie; S. Sirous; Masjedi, M. R.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the status and epidemiology of Intestinal Parasites in Iran. The information was driven from an extensive Health Survey which was done by the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, deputy of Research Affairs in 1990-92. Sampling fraction was 1 per 1000 of individuals aged between 2 and 69, the sampling method was cluster sampling and each cluster consisted of 7 families. Formal-ether was the method of finding parasites which included: Oxior, Asc...

  5. Facultative social parasitism in the allodapine bee Macrogalea berentyensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JACLYN A. SMITH

    2007-01-01

    Previous research on social parasitism has largely ignored allodapine socialparasites, which is surprising given the huge potential of these bees to provide a betterunderstanding of social parasitism. Macrogalea berentyensis, a species that was previouslysuggested to be a social parasite, was collected in nests of M. ellioti, and also in nestsconsisting of only M. berentyensis. These findings, along with morphological and phyloge-netic evidence, show that this species is a facultative social parasite. In the independentlyliving M. berentyensis nests, brood were present that had been reared to an advanced stage,suggesting that: (i) these parasites may be effective at foraging and caring for their brood;or (ii) these nests may be colonies where all the hosts had died, and these parasites had yetto disperse. Macrogalea berentyensis is the closest relative of the facultative social parasite,M. antanosy, and both these species represent the most recent evolutionary origin of socialparasitism within the allodapines. Further behavioral research on both these parasitic specieswould therefore have important implications for the understanding of the evolution of socialparasitism.

  6. Virulence and transmission success of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Hayward, Rhian E.; Tiwari, Bela; Piper, Karen P.; Baruch, Dror I.; Day, Karen P

    1999-01-01

    Virulence of Plasmodium falciparum is associated with the expression of variant surface antigens designated PfEMP1 (P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1) that are encoded by a family of var genes. Data presented show that the transmission stages of P. falciparum also express PfEMP1 variants. Virulence in this host–parasite system can be considered a variable outcome of optimizing the production of sexual transmission stages from the population of disease-inducing asexual stages. Immun...

  7. Ungulate malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Thomas J; Asada, Masahito; Jiratanh, Montakan; Ishikawa, Sohta A; Tiawsirisup, Sonthaya; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Namangala, Boniface; Takeda, Mika; Mohkaew, Kingdao; Ngamjituea, Supawan; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Inagaki, Yuji; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Kaewthamasorn, Morakot; Kaneko, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Haemosporida parasites of even-toed ungulates are diverse and globally distributed, but since their discovery in 1913 their characterization has relied exclusively on microscopy-based descriptions. In order to bring molecular approaches to bear on the identity and evolutionary relationships of ungulate malaria parasites, we conducted Plasmodium cytb-specific nested PCR surveys using blood from water buffalo in Vietnam and Thailand, and goats in Zambia. We found that Plasmodium is readily detectable from water buffalo in these countries, indicating that buffalo Plasmodium is distributed in a wider region than India, which is the only area in which buffalo Plasmodium has been reported. Two types (I and II) of Plasmodium sequences were identified from water buffalo and a third type (III) was isolated from goat. Morphology of the parasite was confirmed in Giemsa-reagent stained blood smears for the Type I sample. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequences were isolated and used to infer a phylogeny in which ungulate malaria parasites form a monophyletic clade within the Haemosporida, and branch prior to the clade containing bird, lizard and other mammalian Plasmodium. Thus it is likely that host switching of Plasmodium from birds to mammals occurred multiple times, with a switch to ungulates independently from other mammalian Plasmodium. PMID:26996979

  8. Parasite-related diarrhoeas*

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    This article reviews available knowledge on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, immunology, diagnosis, and therapy of parasite-related diarrhoeas of public health importance, primarily amoebiasis, giardiasis, trichuriasis, strongyloidiasis, balantidiasis, coccidioses, schistosomiasis, and capillariasis. Research priorities are recommended in each of these fields with the aim of developing better means of prevention and treatment.

  9. Candidate parasitic diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Behbehani, K

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses five parasitic diseases: American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease), dracunculiasis, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis and schistosomiasis. The available technology and health infrastructures in developing countries permit the eradication of dracunculiasis and the elimination of lymphatic filariasis due to Wuchereria bancrofti. Blindness due to onchocerciasis and transmission of this disease will be prevented in eleven West African countries; transmission of Chagas dise...

  10. Detection of circulating parasite-derived microRNAs in filarial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritten, Lucienne; Burkman, Erica; Moorhead, Andrew; Satti, Mohammed; Geary, James; Mackenzie, Charles; Geary, Timothy

    2014-07-01

    Filarial nematodes cause chronic and profoundly debilitating diseases in both humans and animals. Applications of novel technology are providing unprecedented opportunities to improve diagnosis and our understanding of the molecular basis for host-parasite interactions. As a first step, we investigated the presence of circulating miRNAs released by filarial nematodes into the host bloodstream. miRNA deep-sequencing combined with bioinformatics revealed over 200 mature miRNA sequences of potential nematode origin in Dirofilaria immitis-infected dog plasma in two independent analyses, and 21 in Onchocerca volvulus-infected human serum. Total RNA obtained from D. immitis-infected dog plasma was subjected to stem-loop RT-qPCR assays targeting two detected miRNA candidates, miR-71 and miR-34. Additionally, Brugia pahangi-infected dog samples were included in the analysis, as these miRNAs were previously detected in extracts prepared from this species. The presence of miR-71 and miR-34 discriminated infected samples (both species) from uninfected samples, in which no specific miRNA amplification occurred. However, absolute miRNA copy numbers were not significantly correlated with microfilaraemia for either parasite. This may be due to the imprecision of mf counts to estimate infection intensity or to miRNA contributions from the unknown number of adult worms present. Nonetheless, parasite-derived circulating miRNAs are found in plasma or serum even for those species that do not live in the bloodstream. PMID:25033073

  11. Detection of circulating parasite-derived microRNAs in filarial infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucienne Tritten

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Filarial nematodes cause chronic and profoundly debilitating diseases in both humans and animals. Applications of novel technology are providing unprecedented opportunities to improve diagnosis and our understanding of the molecular basis for host-parasite interactions. As a first step, we investigated the presence of circulating miRNAs released by filarial nematodes into the host bloodstream. miRNA deep-sequencing combined with bioinformatics revealed over 200 mature miRNA sequences of potential nematode origin in Dirofilaria immitis-infected dog plasma in two independent analyses, and 21 in Onchocerca volvulus-infected human serum. Total RNA obtained from D. immitis-infected dog plasma was subjected to stem-loop RT-qPCR assays targeting two detected miRNA candidates, miR-71 and miR-34. Additionally, Brugia pahangi-infected dog samples were included in the analysis, as these miRNAs were previously detected in extracts prepared from this species. The presence of miR-71 and miR-34 discriminated infected samples (both species from uninfected samples, in which no specific miRNA amplification occurred. However, absolute miRNA copy numbers were not significantly correlated with microfilaraemia for either parasite. This may be due to the imprecision of mf counts to estimate infection intensity or to miRNA contributions from the unknown number of adult worms present. Nonetheless, parasite-derived circulating miRNAs are found in plasma or serum even for those species that do not live in the bloodstream.

  12. Foodborne and waterborne parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozio, Edoardo

    2003-01-01

    More than 72 species of protozoan and helminth parasites can reach humans by food and water, and most of these infections are zoonoses. Some parasites show a cosmopolitan distribution, others a more restricted distribution due to their complex life cycles, which need the presence of one or more intermediate hosts. Of this large number of pathogens, only Toxoplasma gondii can be transmitted to humans by two different ways, i.e., by cysts present in infected meat and by oocysts contaminating food and water. Eleven helminthic species (Taenia saginata, Taenia solium, Taenia asiatica, Trichinella spiralis, Tr. nativa, Tr. britovi, Tr. pseudospiralis, Tr. murrelli, Tr nelsoni, Tr. papuae and Tr. zimbabwensis) can grow in meat of different animal species and can be transmitted to humans by the consumption of raw meat or meat products. Twenty trematode species, four cestode species and seven nematode species can infect humans through the consumption of raw sea- and/or fresh-water food (fishes, molluscs, frogs, tadpoles, camarons, crayfishes). Six species of Cryptosporidium, Isospora belli, Cyclospora cayetanensis, Giardia duodenalis and Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar can contaminate food and water. Among the helminths, seven trematode species, seven cestode species and five species of nematodes can reach humans by contaminated food and water. Diagnostic and detection methods that can be carried out routinely on food and water samples are available only for few parasites (Cryptosporidium sp., Giardia sp., Anisakidae, Trichinella sp., Taenia sp.), i.e., for parasites which represent a risk to human populations living in industrialised countries. The majority of food and waterborne infections of parasitic origin are related to poverty, low sanitation, and old food habits. PMID:15058817

  13. Antifungal susceptibility of invasive Candida bloodstream isolates from the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Thean Yen; Hsu, Li Yang; Alejandria, Marissa M; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Chinniah, Terrence; Chayakulkeeree, Methee; Choudhury, Saugata; Chen, Yen Hsu; Shin, Jong Hee; Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Mendoza, Myrna; Prabhu, Kavitha; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Tan, Ai Ling; Phan, Xuan Thi; Tran, Thi Thanh Nga; Nguyen, Gia Binh; Doan, Mai Phuong; Huynh, Van An; Nguyen, Su Minh Tuyet; Tran, Thanh Binh; Van Pham, Hung

    2016-07-01

    Bloodstream infections caused by Candida species are of increasing importance and associated with significant mortality. We performed a multi-centre prospective observational study to identify the species and antifungal susceptibilities of invasive bloodstream isolates of Candida species in the Asia-Pacific region. The study was carried out over a two year period, involving 13 centers from Brunei, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam. Identification of Candida species was performed at each study center, and reconfirmed at a central laboratory. Susceptibility testing was performed using a commercial broth dilution panel (Sensititre YeastOne YST-010, Thermofisher, United Kingdom) with susceptibility categorisation (S = susceptible, S-DD = susceptible dose-dependent) applied using breakpoints from the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. Eight hundred and sixty-one Candida isolates were included in the study. The most common species were C. albicans (35.9%), C. tropicalis (30.7%), C. parapsilosis (15.7%), and C. glabrata (13.6%). Non-albicans species exceeded C. albicans species in centers from all countries except Taiwan. Fluconazole susceptibility was almost universal for C. albicans (S = 99.7%) but lower for C. tropicalis (S = 75.8%, S-DD = 6.1%), C. glabrata (S-DD = 94.9%), and C. parapsilosis (S = 94.8%). Echinocandins demonstrated high rates of in vitro susceptibility (S>99%) against C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis This study demonstrates that non-albicans species are the most common isolates from bloodstream infections in most countries in the Asia-Pacific region, with C. tropicalis as the predominant species. Because of the prevalence of reduced susceptibility to fluconazole in non-albicans species, the study indicates that echinocandins should be the antifungal of choice in clinically unstable or high-risk patients with documented candidemia. PMID:26868904

  14. The Aetiology of the Bloodstream Infections in the Patients Who Presented to a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Santwana; Raza, Shahid; Bhatta, Chandra Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bloodstream infections are associated with a significant patient morbidity and mortality. The detection of microorganisms in the patients’ blood has a great diagnostic and prognostic significance. The early positive results provide valuable diagnostic information, based on which the appropriate antimicrobial therapy can be initiated.

  15. Patients with Central Lines — What You Need to Know to Avoid a Bloodstream Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-03-01

    This podcast is based on the March, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report which indicates bloodstream infections in patients with central lines are largely preventable when healthcare providers use CDC-recommended infection control steps.  Created: 3/1/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/1/2011.

  16. [Prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections in the operation room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ema, Yoshiaki; Nishiwaki, Kimitoshi

    2010-05-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are recognized as an important and serious problem, especially in an intensive care unit (ICU), since they have far higher infection rates compared to those for other type of intravascular devices. However, in the operation room, there seems to be little concern among anesthesiologists regarding this problem. It is important for anesthesiologists to understand that CRBSIs can be prevented or reduced by evidence-based interventions such as hand hygiene, education in hand washing and alcohol-based hand rubbing, sterile catheter care techniques, proper skin disinfection, maximal barrier precautions during catheter insertion, choice of subclavian vein placement, avoidance of femoral vein placement, and removal of an unnecessary catheter. This evidence is based mainly on findings in ICU patients, but introduction of these interventions into operation rooms may be very useful for reducing perioperative CRBSIs. PMID:20486568

  17. Metagenomic analysis of bloodstream infections in patients with acute leukemia and therapy-induced neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyarmati, P; Kjellander, C; Aust, C; Song, Y; Öhrmalm, L; Giske, C G

    2016-01-01

    Leukemic patients are often immunocompromised due to underlying conditions, comorbidities and the effects of chemotherapy, and thus at risk for developing systemic infections. Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a severe complication in neutropenic patients, and is associated with increased mortality. BSI is routinely diagnosed with blood culture, which only detects culturable pathogens. We analyzed 27 blood samples from 9 patients with acute leukemia and suspected BSI at different time points of their antimicrobial treatment using shotgun metagenomics sequencing in order to detect unculturable and non-bacterial pathogens. Our findings confirm the presence of bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens alongside antimicrobial resistance genes. Decreased white blood cell (WBC) counts were associated with the presence of microbial DNA, and was inversely proportional to the number of sequencing reads. This study could indicate the use of high-throughput sequencing for personalized antimicrobial treatments in BSIs. PMID:26996149

  18. Bloodstream-To-Eye Infections Are Facilitated by Outer Blood-Retinal Barrier Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Phillip S.; Wiskur, Brandt J.; Miller, Frederick C.; LaGrow, Austin L.; Astley, Roger A.; Elliott, Michael H.; Callegan, Michelle C.

    2016-01-01

    The blood-retinal barrier (BRB) functions to maintain the immune privilege of the eye, which is necessary for normal vision. The outer BRB is formed by tightly-associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells which limit transport within the retinal environment, maintaining retinal function and viability. Retinal microvascular complications and RPE dysfunction resulting from diabetes and diabetic retinopathy cause permeability changes in the BRB that compromise barrier function. Diabetes is the major predisposing condition underlying endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis (EBE), a blinding intraocular infection resulting from bacterial invasion of the eye from the bloodstream. However, significant numbers of EBE cases occur in non-diabetics. In this work, we hypothesized that dysfunction of the outer BRB may be associated with EBE development. To disrupt the RPE component of the outer BRB in vivo, sodium iodate (NaIO3) was administered to C57BL/6J mice. NaIO3-treated and untreated mice were intravenously injected with 108 colony forming units (cfu) of Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae. At 4 and 6 days postinfection, EBE was observed in NaIO3-treated mice after infection with K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, although the incidence was higher following S. aureus infection. Invasion of the eye was observed in control mice following S. aureus infection, but not in control mice following K. pneumoniae infection. Immunohistochemistry and FITC-dextran conjugate transmigration assays of human RPE barriers after infection with an exoprotein-deficient agr/sar mutant of S. aureus suggested that S. aureus exoproteins may be required for the loss of the tight junction protein, ZO-1, and for permeability of this in vitro barrier. Our results support the clinical findings that for both pathogens, complications which result in BRB permeability increase the likelihood of bacterial transmigration from the bloodstream into the eye. For S. aureus, however, BRB permeability is

  19. Bloodstream infection among children presenting to a general hospital outpatient clinic in urban Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Pradhan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are limited data on the etiology and characteristics of bloodstream infections in children presenting in hospital outpatient settings in South Asia. Previous studies in Nepal have highlighted the importance of murine typhus as a cause of febrile illness in adults and enteric fever as a leading bacterial cause of fever among children admitted to hospital. METHODS: We prospectively studied a total of 1084 febrile children aged between 2 months and 14 years presenting to a general hospital outpatient department in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, over two study periods (summer and winter. Blood from all patients was tested by conventional culture and by real-time PCR for Rickettsia typhi. RESULTS: Putative etiological agents for fever were identified in 164 (15% patients. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi was identified in 107 (10%, S. enterica serovar Paratyphi A (S. Paratyphi in 30 (3%, Streptococcus pneumoniae in 6 (0.6%, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in 2 (0.2%, Haemophilus influenzae type b in 1 (0.1%, and Escherichia coli in 1 (0.1% patient. S. Typhi was the most common organism isolated from blood during both summer and winter. Twenty-two (2% patients were PCR positive for R. typhi. No significant demographic, clinical and laboratory features distinguished culture positive enteric fever and murine typhus. CONCLUSIONS: Salmonella infections are the leading cause of bloodstream infection among pediatric outpatients with fever in Kathmandu Valley. Extension of immunization programs against invasive bacterial disease to include the agents of enteric fever and pneumococcus could improve the health of children in Nepal.

  20. Bloodstream-To-Eye Infections Are Facilitated by Outer Blood-Retinal Barrier Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip S Coburn

    Full Text Available The blood-retinal barrier (BRB functions to maintain the immune privilege of the eye, which is necessary for normal vision. The outer BRB is formed by tightly-associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells which limit transport within the retinal environment, maintaining retinal function and viability. Retinal microvascular complications and RPE dysfunction resulting from diabetes and diabetic retinopathy cause permeability changes in the BRB that compromise barrier function. Diabetes is the major predisposing condition underlying endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis (EBE, a blinding intraocular infection resulting from bacterial invasion of the eye from the bloodstream. However, significant numbers of EBE cases occur in non-diabetics. In this work, we hypothesized that dysfunction of the outer BRB may be associated with EBE development. To disrupt the RPE component of the outer BRB in vivo, sodium iodate (NaIO3 was administered to C57BL/6J mice. NaIO3-treated and untreated mice were intravenously injected with 108 colony forming units (cfu of Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae. At 4 and 6 days postinfection, EBE was observed in NaIO3-treated mice after infection with K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, although the incidence was higher following S. aureus infection. Invasion of the eye was observed in control mice following S. aureus infection, but not in control mice following K. pneumoniae infection. Immunohistochemistry and FITC-dextran conjugate transmigration assays of human RPE barriers after infection with an exoprotein-deficient agr/sar mutant of S. aureus suggested that S. aureus exoproteins may be required for the loss of the tight junction protein, ZO-1, and for permeability of this in vitro barrier. Our results support the clinical findings that for both pathogens, complications which result in BRB permeability increase the likelihood of bacterial transmigration from the bloodstream into the eye. For S. aureus, however, BRB

  1. Trypanocidal action of bisphosphonium salts through a mitochondrial target in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam A.M. Alkhaldi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipophilic bisphosphonium salts are among the most promising antiprotozoal leads currently under investigation. As part of their preclinical evaluation we here report on their mode of action against African trypanosomes, the etiological agents of sleeping sickness. The bisphosphonium compounds CD38 and AHI-9 exhibited rapid inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei growth, apparently the result of cell cycle arrest that blocked the replication of mitochondrial DNA, contained in the kinetoplast, thereby preventing the initiation of S-phase. Incubation with either compound led to a rapid reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP levels decreased by approximately 50% within 1 h. Between 4 and 8 h, cellular calcium levels increased, consistent with release from the depolarized mitochondria. Within the mitochondria, the Succinate Dehydrogenase complex (SDH was investigated as a target for bisphosphonium salts, but while its subunit 1 (SDH1 was present at low levels in the bloodstream form trypanosomes, the assembled complex was hardly detectable. RNAi knockdown of the SDH1 subunit produced no growth phenotype, either in bloodstream or in the procyclic (insect forms and we conclude that in trypanosomes SDH is not the target for bisphosphonium salts. Instead, the compounds inhibited ATP production in intact mitochondria, as well as the purified F1 ATPase, to a level that was similar to 1 mM azide. Co-incubation with azide and bisphosphonium compounds did not inhibit ATPase activity more than either product alone. The results show that, in T. brucei, bisphosphonium compounds do not principally act on succinate dehydrogenase but on the mitochondrial FoF1 ATPase.

  2. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohammad

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the status and epidemiology of Intestinal Parasites in Iran. The information was driven from an extensive Health Survey which was done by the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, deputy of Research Affairs in 1990-92. Sampling fraction was 1 per 1000 of individuals aged between 2 and 69, the sampling method was cluster sampling and each cluster consisted of 7 families. Formal-ether was the method of finding parasites which included: Oxior, Ascariasis, Giardiasis, Entamoeba-histolytica, Tinea, Strongyloidiasis, Ancylostoma, and Trichocephaliasis. The highest prevalence rate belonged to Giardiasis with 14.4% and the lowest one belonged to Tinea and Ancylostoma with 0.2%. The prevalence rate in rural area was significantly lower than urban area (p<0.0001.

  3. A review of the complexity of biology of lymphatic filarial parasites

    OpenAIRE

    K. P. Paily; Hoti, S. L.; Das, P K

    2009-01-01

    There are about five more common, including Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi, and four less common filarial parasites infecting human. Genetic analysis of W. bancrofti populations in India showed that two strains of the species are prevalent in the country. The adult filarial parasites are tissue specific in the human host and their embryonic stage, called microfilariae (mf), are found in the blood or skin of the host, depending upon the species of the parasite. Three genetically determ...

  4. Integrated parasite management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jesper Hedegaard; Madsen, Henry; Van, Phan Thi;

    2015-01-01

    Fishborne zoonotic trematodes (FZT) are an emerging problem and there is now a consensus that, in addition to wild-caught fish, fish produced in aquaculture present a major food safety risk, especially in Southeast Asia where aquaculture is important economically. Current control programs target ...... that target critical control points in the aquaculture production cycle identified from a thorough understanding of FZT and host biology and epidemiology. We present recommendations for an integrated parasite management (IPM) program for aquaculture farms....

  5. Host-parasite interactions under extreme climatic conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. MARTINEZ; S. MERINO

    2011-01-01

    The effect that climatic changes can exert on parasitic interactions represents a multifactor problem whose results are difficult to predict. The actual impact of changes will depend on their magnitude and the physiological tolerance of affected organisms. When the change is considered extreme (I.e. Unusual weather events that are at the extremes of the historical distribution for a given area), the probability of an alteration in an organisms' homeostasis increases dramatically. However, factors determining the altered dynamics of host-parasite interactions due to an extreme change are the same as those acting in response to changes of lower magnitude. Only a deep knowledge of these factors will help to produce more accurate predictive models for the effects of extreme changes on parasitic interactions. Extreme environmental conditions may affect pathogens directly when they include free-living stages in their life-cycles and indirectly through reduced resource availability for hosts and thus reduced ability to produce efficient anti-parasite defenses, or by effects on host density affecting transmission dynamics of diseases or the frequency of intraspecific contact. What are the consequences for host-parasite interactions? Here we summarize the present knowledge on three principal factors in determining host-parasite associations; biodiversity, population density and immunocompetence. In addition, we analyzed examples of the effects of environmental alteration of anthropogenic origin on parasitic systems because the effects are analogous to that exerted by an extreme climatic change.

  6. PARASITIC CONTAMINATION OF WELLS DRINKING WATER IN MAZANDARAN PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yousefi ، H. Ziaei hezarjaribi ، A. A. Enayati ، R. A. Mohammadpoor

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a direct relation between the prevalence of some parasitic diseases and the presence of those etiologic agents in water. The purpose of this research was to determine the contamination rate of wells drinking water to parasites in Mazandaran province in the north of Iran. 989 water samples were randomly taken based on the population of towns and number of health centers from 12 cities of Mazandaran province and transferred to the laboratory in sterile containers. Water samples were then filtered and analyzed according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Direct method and Gram staining procedure were used to identify the parasites. If cryptosporidium was seen, floatation (sheather’s sugar and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining method were performed. Parasites count was undertaken using McMaster counting slide (0.3 mL. 197 out of 989 water samples were contaminated with different parasites. From 197 contaminated samples, 20 different types of parasites were separated of which 53 (26.9% were pathogenic, 100 (50.8% non pathogenic, and 44 non-infective stages of parasites. Distance between wells and sources of contamination, type of water distribution systems, city and chlorination status had significantly statistical relationship with contamination prevalence (p<0.001. According to the results and considering the direct correlation between safe water and human health, proper implementation of providing hygienic drinking water should be enforced.

  7. Microscopic diagnosis of blood parasites following a cytoconcentration technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petithory, J C; Ardoin, F; Ash, L R; Vandemeulebroucke, E; Galeazzi, G; Dufour, M; Paugam, A

    1997-12-01

    An isotonic fixative (formalin and thimerosal) solution, with a saponin additive to lyse erythrocytes and platelets, has been developed. The formalin and thimerosal ensure good preservation of blood parasites. This fixative has led to the development of a new concentration technique using cytocentrifugation (cytospin) in the search for Plasmodium spp., Leishmania spp., and microfilariae, as well as leukocytes in which parasites or pigment may be present. The concentration of the parasites present in the sediment from 100 microl of blood spread on a 6-mm diameter circle results in good morphology that is well stained using the usual Giemsa or Wright techniques. This new technique has the advantage of a relatively low cost and offers the possibility of isolating and identifying in the same sediment the main blood-stage parasites, with the exception of young trophozoites, of Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:9430518

  8. Invaders interfere with native parasite-host interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieltges, David W.; Reise, Karsten; Prinz, Katrin;

    2009-01-01

    interference with native parasite-host interactions. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that two invasive molluscan filter-feeders of European coastal waters interfere with the transmission of free-living infective trematode larval stages and hereby mitigate the parasite burden of native mussels (Mytilus...... edulis). In laboratory mesocosm experiments, the presence of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and American slipper limpets (Crepidula fornicata) reduced the parasite load in mussels by 65-77% and 89% in single and mixed species treatments, respectively. Both introduced species acted as decoys for the...... trematodes thus reducing the risk of hosts to become infected. This dilution effect was density-dependent with higher reductions at higher invader densities. Similar effects in a field experiment with artificial oyster beds suggest the observed dilution effect to be relevant in the field. As parasite...

  9. Proteinases and associated genes of parasitic helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tort, J; Brindley, P J; Knox, D; Wolfe, K H; Dalton, J P

    1999-01-01

    Many parasites have deployed proteinases to accomplish some of the tasks imposed by a parasitic life style, including tissue penetration, digestion of host tissue for nutrition and evasion of host immune responses. Information on proteinases from trematodes, cestodes and nematode parasites is reviewed, concentrating on those worms of major medical and economical importance. Their biochemical characterization is discussed, along with their putative biological roles and, where available, their associated genes. For example, proteinases expressed by the various stages of the schistosome life-cycle, in particular the well-characterized cercarial elastase which is involved in the penetration of the host skin and the variety of proteinases, such as cathepsin B (Sm31), cathepsin L1, cathepsin L2, cathepsin D, cathepsin C and legumain (Sm32), which are believed to be involved in the catabolism of host haemoglobin. The various endo- and exoproteinases of Fasciola hepatica, the causative agent of liver fluke disease, are reviewed, and recent reports of how these enzymes have been successfully employed in cocktail vaccines are discussed. The various proteinases of cestodes and of the diverse superfamilies of parasitic nematodes are detailed, with special attention being given to those parasites for which most is known, including species of Taenia, Echinococcus, Spirometra, Necator, Acylostoma and Haemonchus. By far the largest number of papers in the literature and entries to the sequence data bases dealing with proteinases of parasitic helminths report on enzymes belonging to the papain superfamily of cysteine proteinases. Accordingly, the final section of the review is devoted to a phylogenetic analysis of this superfamily using over 150 published sequences. This analysis shows that the papain superfamily can be divided into two major branches. Branch A contains the cathepin Bs, the cathepsin Cs and a novel family termed cathepsin Xs, while Branch B contains the cruzipains

  10. Discovery of Dual-Stage Malaria Inhibitors with New Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphemot, Rene; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria J; Gamo-Benito, Francisco Javier; Clardy, Jon; Derbyshire, Emily R

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global health problem, with more than half of the world population at risk of contracting the disease and nearly a million deaths each year. Here, we report the discovery of inhibitors that target multiple stages of malaria parasite growth. To identify these inhibitors, we took advantage of the Tres Cantos Antimalarial Compound Set (TCAMS) small-molecule library, which is comprised of diverse and potent chemical scaffolds with activities against the blood stage of the malaria parasite, and investigated their effects against the elusive liver stage of the malaria parasite using a forward chemical screen. From a screen of nearly 14,000 compounds, we identified and confirmed 103 compounds as dual-stage malaria inhibitors. Interestingly, these compounds show preferential inhibition of parasite growth in liver- versus blood-stage malaria parasite assays, highlighting the drug susceptibility of this parasite form. Mode-of-action studies were completed using genetically modified and drug-resistant Plasmodium parasite strains. While we identified some compound targets as classical antimalarial pathways, such as the mitochondrial electron transport chain through cytochrome bc1 complex inhibition or the folate biosynthesis pathway, most compounds induced parasite death through as yet unknown mechanisms of action. Importantly, the identification of new chemotypes with different modes of action in killing Plasmodium parasites represents a promising opportunity for probing essential and novel molecular processes that remain to be discovered. The chemical scaffolds identified with activity against drug-resistant Plasmodium parasites represent starting points for dual-stage antimalarial development to surmount the threat of malaria parasite drug resistance. PMID:26666931

  11. Use of the Tego needlefree connector is associated with reduced incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunelli SM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven M Brunelli,1 Levi Njord,2 Abigail E Hunt,1 Scott P Sibbel1 1DaVita Clinical Research®, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2DaVita HealthCare Partners, Inc, Denver, CO, USA Background and objectives: Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs are common in hemodialysis patients using central venous catheters, and catheter occlusion also occurs frequently. The Tego needlefree connector was developed to reduce the incidence of these complications; however, existing studies of its effectiveness and safety are limited. Materials and methods: This retrospective analysis compared outcomes among patients of a large dialysis organization receiving in-center hemodialysis using a central venous catheter with either the Tego connector or standard catheter caps between October 1 and June 30, 2013. Incidence rates for intravenous (IV antibiotic starts, receipt of an IV antibiotic course, positive blood cultures, mortality, and missed dialysis treatments were calculated, and incidence-rate ratios (IRRs were estimated using Poisson regression models. Utilization of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs and thrombolytics was described for each patient-month and compared using mixed linear models. Models were run without adjustment, adjusted for covariates that were imbalanced between cohorts, or fully adjusted for all potential confounders. Results: The analysis comprised 10,652 Tego patients and 6,493 controls. Tego use was independently associated with decreased risk of CRBSI, defined by initiation of IV antibiotics (adjusted IRR 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87–0.97 or initiation of IV antibiotic course (adjusted IRR 0.89, 95% CI 0.84–0.95. Tego use was independently associated with decreased rate of missed dialysis treatments (adjusted IRR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97–1.00; no significant difference between Tego and control cohorts was observed with respect to mortality. Tego use was associated with decreased likelihood of thrombolytic use (adjusted per

  12. Density-dependence and within-host competition in a semelparous parasite of leaf-cutting ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen Lene

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasite heterogeneity and within-host competition are thought to be important factors influencing the dynamics of host-parasite relationships. Yet, while there have been many theoretical investigations of how these factors may act, empirical data is more limited. We investigated the effects of parasite density and heterogeneity on parasite virulence and fitness using four strains of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae, and its leaf-cutting ant host Acromyrmex echinatior as the model system. Results The relationship between parasite density and infection was sigmoidal, with there being an invasion threshold for an infection to occur (an Allee effect. Although spore production was positively density-dependent, parasite fitness decreased with increasing parasite density, indicating within-host scramble competition. The dynamics differed little between the four strains tested. In mixed infections of three strains the infection-growth dynamics were unaffected by parasite heterogeneity. Conclusions The strength of within-host competition makes dispersal the best strategy for the parasite. Parasite heterogeneity may not have effected virulence or the infection dynamics either because the most virulent strain outcompeted the others, or because the interaction involved scramble competition that was impervious to parasite heterogeneity. The dynamics observed may be common for virulent parasites, such as Metarhizium, that produce aggregated transmission stages. Such parasites make useful models for investigating infection dynamics and the impact of parasite competition.

  13. Global gene expression analysis of the zoonotic parasite Trichinella spiralis revealed novel genes in host parasite interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trichinellosis is a typical food-borne zoonotic disease which is epidemic worldwide and the nematode Trichinella spiralis is the main pathogen. The life cycle of T. spiralis contains three developmental stages, i.e. adult worms, new borne larva (new borne L1 larva and muscular larva (infective L1 larva. Stage-specific gene expression in the parasites has been investigated with various immunological and cDNA cloning approaches, whereas the genome-wide transcriptome and expression features of the parasite have been largely unknown. The availability of the genome sequence information of T. spiralis has made it possible to deeply dissect parasite biology in association with global gene expression and pathogenesis. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we analyzed the global gene expression patterns in the three developmental stages of T. spiralis using digital gene expression (DGE analysis. Almost 15 million sequence tags were generated with the Illumina RNA-seq technology, producing expression data for more than 9,000 genes, covering 65% of the genome. The transcriptome analysis revealed thousands of differentially expressed genes within the genome, and importantly, a panel of genes encoding functional proteins associated with parasite invasion and immuno-modulation were identified. More than 45% of the genes were found to be transcribed from both strands, indicating the importance of RNA-mediated gene regulation in the development of the parasite. Further, based on gene ontological analysis, over 3000 genes were functionally categorized and biological pathways in the three life cycle stage were elucidated. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The global transcriptome of T. spiralis in three developmental stages has been profiled, and most gene activity in the genome was found to be developmentally regulated. Many metabolic and biological pathways have been revealed. The findings of the differential expression of several protein

  14. Olfaction shapes host–parasite interactions in parasitic nematodes

    OpenAIRE

    Dillman, Adler R.; Guillermin, Manon L.; Lee, Joon Ha; KIM, Brian; Sternberg, Paul W.; Hallem, Elissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Many parasitic nematodes actively seek out hosts in which to complete their lifecycles. Olfaction is thought to play an important role in the host-seeking process, with parasites following a chemical trail toward host-associated odors. However, little is known about the olfactory cues that attract parasitic nematodes to hosts or the behavioral responses these cues elicit. Moreover, what little is known focuses on easily obtainable laboratory hosts rather than on natural or other ecologically ...

  15. P. berghei telomerase subunit TERT is essential for parasite survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka A Religa

    Full Text Available Telomeres define the ends of chromosomes protecting eukaryotic cells from chromosome instability and eventual cell death. The complex regulation of telomeres involves various proteins including telomerase, which is a specialized ribonucleoprotein responsible for telomere maintenance. Telomeres of chromosomes of malaria parasites are kept at a constant length during blood stage proliferation. The 7-bp telomere repeat sequence is universal across different Plasmodium species (GGGTTT/CA, though the average telomere length varies. The catalytic subunit of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT, is present in all sequenced Plasmodium species and is approximately three times larger than other eukaryotic TERTs. The Plasmodium RNA component of TERT has recently been identified in silico. A strategy to delete the gene encoding TERT via double cross-over (DXO homologous recombination was undertaken to study the telomerase function in P. berghei. Expression of both TERT and the RNA component (TR in P. berghei blood stages was analysed by Western blotting and Northern analysis. Average telomere length was measured in several Plasmodium species using Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF analysis. TERT and TR were detected in blood stages and an average telomere length of ∼ 950 bp established. Deletion of the tert gene was performed using standard transfection methodologies and we show the presence of tert- mutants in the transfected parasite populations. Cloning of tert- mutants has been attempted multiple times without success. Thorough analysis of the transfected parasite populations and the parasite obtained from extensive parasite cloning from these populations provide evidence for a so called delayed death phenotype as observed in different organisms lacking TERT. The findings indicate that TERT is essential for P. berghei cell survival. The study extends our current knowledge on telomere biology in malaria parasites and validates further

  16. A simple model for the within-host dynamics of a protozoan parasite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinkenberg, D.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of parasite–host systems can be complicated if the parasite life cycle contains an obligatory environmental stage and if the hosts' immunity increases upon re-infection. The dynamics then greatly depend on the relation between infection history and parasite uptake and excretion of indiv

  17. Trypanosoma brucei: Differential requirement of membrane potential for import of proteins into mitochondria in two developmental stages

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Shuntae; Saha, Lipi; Singha, Ujjal K; Chaudhuri, Minu

    2007-01-01

    Trypanosome alternative oxidase (TAO) and the cytochrome oxidase (COX) are two developmentally regulated terminal oxidases of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in Trypanosoma brucei. Here, we have compared the import of TAO and cytochrome oxidase subunit IV (COIV), two stage specific nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins, into the bloodstream and procyclic form mitochondria of T. brucei to understand the import processes in two different developmental stages. Under in vitro conditio...

  18. Modelling parasite transmission in a grazing system: the importance of host behaviour and immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi J Fox

    Full Text Available Parasitic helminths present one of the most pervasive challenges to grazing herbivores. Many macro-parasite transmission models focus on host physiological defence strategies, omitting more complex interactions between hosts and their environments. This work represents the first model that integrates both the behavioural and physiological elements of gastro-intestinal nematode transmission dynamics in a managed grazing system. A spatially explicit, individual-based, stochastic model is developed, that incorporates both the hosts' immunological responses to parasitism, and key grazing behaviours including faecal avoidance. The results demonstrate that grazing behaviour affects both the timing and intensity of parasite outbreaks, through generating spatial heterogeneity in parasite risk and nutritional resources, and changing the timing of exposure to the parasites' free-living stages. The influence of grazing behaviour varies with the host-parasite combination, dependent on the development times of different parasite species and variations in host immune response. Our outputs include the counterintuitive finding that under certain conditions perceived parasite avoidance behaviours (faecal avoidance can increase parasite risk, for certain host-parasite combinations. Through incorporating the two-way interaction between infection dynamics and grazing behaviour, the potential benefits of parasite-induced anorexia are also demonstrated. Hosts with phenotypic plasticity in grazing behaviour, that make grazing decisions dependent on current parasite burden, can reduce infection with minimal loss of intake over the grazing season. This paper explores how both host behaviours and immunity influence macro-parasite transmission in a spatially and temporally heterogeneous environment. The magnitude and timing of parasite outbreaks is influenced by host immunity and behaviour, and the interactions between them; the incorporation of both regulatory processes

  19. Eruption patterns of parasitic volcanoes

    OpenAIRE

    Izumi Yokoyama

    2015-01-01

    Eruption patterns of parasitic volcanoes are discussed in order to study their correlation to the activities of their parental polygenetic volcanoes. The distribution density of parasitic vents on polygenetic volcanoes is diversified, probably corresponding to the age and structure of parental volcanoes. Describing existing parasitic cones contextually in relation to parental volcanoes is as indispensable as collecting observational data of their actual formations. In the present paper, spati...

  20. Parasitic Diseases With Cutaneous Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Mark M; Phillips, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases result in a significant global health burden. While often thought to be isolated to returning travelers, parasitic diseases can also be acquired locally in the United States. Therefore, clinicians must be aware of the cutaneous manifestations of parasitic diseases to allow for prompt recognition, effective management, and subsequent mitigation of complications. This commentary also reviews pharmacologic treatment options for several common diseases. PMID:27621348

  1. [Emerging parasitic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel Galluzzo, C; Wagner, N; Michel, Y; Jackson, Y; Chappuis, F

    2014-05-01

    Travels, migration and circulation of goods facilitate the emergence of new infectious diseases often unrecognized outside endemic areas. Most of emerging infections are of viral origin. Muscular Sarcocystis infection, an acute illness acquired during short trips to Malaysia, and Chagas disease, a chronic illness with long incubation period found among Latin American migrants, are two very different examples of emerging parasitic diseases. The former requires a preventive approach for travelers going to Malaysia and must be brought forth when they return with fever, myalgia and eosinophilia, while the latter requires a proactive attitude to screen Latin American migrant populations that may face difficulties in accessing care. PMID:24908745

  2. Serial Dissection of Parasite Gene Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzik, David J

    2016-05-01

    Calcium ion signaling regulates central aspects of the biology controlling stage and life cycle transitions of apicomplexan parasites. In the current issue of Infection and Immunity, Long and coworkers (S. Long, Q. Wang, and L. D. Sibley, Infect Immun 84:1262-1273, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.01173-15) describe a powerful genetic system enabling reliable serial genetic dissection of a large gene family encoding novel calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) that provides new insights into the roles of CDPKs during Toxoplasma gondii infection. PMID:26953326

  3. The neurotropic parasite Toxoplasma gondii increases dopamine metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    The common parasite Toxoplasma gondii induces behavioral alterations in its hosts including phenotypes increasing the likelihood of its transmission in rodents and reports of psychobehavioral alterations in humans. We have found that elevated levels of dopamine are associated with the encysted stage...

  4. The increased risks of death and extra lengths of hospital and ICU stay from hospital-acquired bloodstream infections: a case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, Adrian G.; Page, Katie; Campbell, Megan; Martin, Elizabeth; Rashleigh-Rolls, Rebecca; Halton, Kate; PATERSON, DAVID L.; Hall, Lisa; Jimmieson, Nerina; White, Katherine; Graves, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Hospital-acquired bloodstream infections are known to increase the risk of death and prolong hospital stay, but precise estimates of these two important outcomes from well-designed studies are rare, particularly for non-intensive care unit (ICU) patients. We aimed to calculate accurate estimates, which are vital for estimating the economic costs of hospital-acquired bloodstream infections. Design Case–control study. Setting 9 Australian public hospitals. Participants All the patien...

  5. Healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: length of stay, attributable mortality, and additional direct costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primo, Mariusa Gomes Borges; Guilarde, Adriana Oliveira; Martelli, Celina M Turchi; Batista, Lindon Johnson de Abreu; Turchi, Marília Dalva

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the excess length of stay, extra expenditures, and attributable mortality to healthcare-associated S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) at a teaching hospital in central Brazil. The study design was a matched (1:1) case-control. Cases were defined as patients >13 years old, with a healthcare-associated S. aureus BSI. Controls included patients without an S. aureus BSI, who were matched to cases by gender, age (± 7 years), morbidity, and underlying disease. Data were collected from medical records and from the Brazilian National Hospital Information System (Sistema de Informações Hospitalares do Sistema Único de Saúde - SIH/SUS). A Wilcoxon rank sum test was performed to compare length of stay and costs between cases and controls. Differences in mortality between cases and controls were compared using McNemar's tests. The Mantel-Haenzel stratified analysis was performed to compare invasive device utilization. Data analyses were conducted using Epi Info 6.0 and Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 13.0). 84 case-control pairs matched by gender, age, admission period, morbidity, and underlying disease were analyzed. The mean lengths of hospital stay were 48.3 and 16.2 days for cases and controls, respectively (p<0.01), yielding an excess hospital stay among cases of 32.1 days. The excess mortality among cases compared to controls that was attributable to S. aureus bloodstream infection was 45.2%. Cases had a higher risk of dying compared to controls (OR 7.3, 95% CI 3.1-21.1). Overall costs of hospitalization (SIH/SUS) reached US$ 123,065 for cases versus US$ 40,247 for controls (p<0.01). The cost of antimicrobial therapy was 6.7 fold higher for cases compared to controls. Healthcare-associated S. aureus BSI was associated with statistically significant increases in length of hospitalization, attributable mortality, and economic burden. Implementation of measures to minimize the risk of healthcare-associated bacterial

  6. Interaction between the solitary bee Chelostoma florisomne and its nest parasite Sapyga clavicornis - empty cells reduce the impact of parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster-Swendsen (deceased), Mikael; Calabuig, Isabel

    2000-01-01

    Summary 1. Nesting behaviour and interactions between the bee Chelostoma florisomne (L.) (Megachilidae) and its nest parasite Sapyga clavicornis (L.) (Sapygidae) were studied through continual observations of individuals and dissections of bee nests. Protection of bee offspring is based on (1) th...... at an early stage due to intraspecific interference competition within brood cells and as result of the wasps’ oviposition into empty cells....

  7. The application of High Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) for rapid detection of bacteria responsible for bloodstream infections

    OpenAIRE

    Ozbak, Hani

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Background: The diagnosis of bloodstream infection is a significant challenge for healthcare providers and is often associated with severe illness (sepsis) and poor outcomes. Rapid detection and identification of pathogens followed by characterisation of antibiotic resistance could help direct early treatment and improve patient care. Standard blood culture methods, which usually take 2-5 days to complete, can confirm if there is a bacteraemia or not in suspected patients. However, ...

  8. Impact of the introduction of an automated microbiologic system on the clinical outcomes of bloodstream infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae strains

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Azevedo Callefi; Eduardo Alexandrino Servolo Medeiros; Guilherme Henrique Campos Furtado

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Enterobacteriaceae strains are a leading cause of bloodstream infections (BSI). The aim of this study is to assess differences in clinical outcomes of patients with BSI caused by Enterobacteriaceae strains before and after introduction of an automated microbiologic system by the microbiology laboratory. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study aimed to evaluate the impact of the introduction of an automated microbiologic system (Phoenix(tm)...

  9. Monitoring Quality of Care Through Linkage of Administrative Data: National Trends in Bloodstream Infection in UK PICUs 2003-2012

    OpenAIRE

    Harron, K.; Parslow, R.; Mok, Q; Tibby, S. M.; WADE, A.; Muller-Pebody, B; Gilbert, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Interventions to reduce hospital-acquired bloodstream infection (BSI) have succeeded in reducing rates in US paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) but there is a lack of evidence for the impact of similar interventions in the UK. We assessed variation in BSI rates within and between PICUs over a 10-year period, during which time infection control strategies (care bundles) were implemented. Design: Observational study linking laboratory data to national audit data of paediatric i...

  10. Risk-adjusted monitoring of blood-stream infection in paediatric intensive care: a data linkage study

    OpenAIRE

    Harron, K.; WADE, A.; Muller-Pebody, B; Goldstein, H.; Parslow, R.; Gray, J.; Hartley, J. C.; Mok, Q; Gilbert, R.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: National monitoring of variation in the quality of infection control in paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) requires comparisons of risk-adjusted rates. To inform the development of a national monitoring system, we evaluated the effects of risk-adjustment and outcome definition on comparisons of blood-stream infection (BSI) rates in PICU, using linkage of risk-factor data captured by national audit (PICANet) with laboratory records of BSI. METHODS: Admission data for two children...

  11. Molecular and Clinical Characteristics of Hospital and Community Onset Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Associated with Bloodstream Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shu-Hua; Hines, Lisa; van Balen, Joany; José R Mediavilla; Pan, Xueliang; Hoet, Armando E; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Pancholi, Preeti; Stevenson, Kurt B.

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infections (BSI) are classified epidemiologically as health care-associated hospital onset (HAHO)-, health care-associated community onset (HACO)-, or community-associated (CA)-MRSA. Clinical and molecular differences between HAHO- and HACO-MRSA BSI are not well known. Thus, we evaluated clinical and molecular characteristics of MRSA BSI to determine if distinct features are associated with HAHO- or HACO-MRSA strains. Molecular ge...

  12. Interação entre Trypanosoma cruzi e macrófagos: diferenças entre tripomastigotas sangüí-colas e de cultivo de tecidos Trypanosoma cruzi interaction with macrophages: differences between tissue culture and bloodstream forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith K. Kloetzel

    1984-08-01

    Full Text Available Macrófagos obtidos do peritoneo de camundongos após estímulo, com peptona, foram cultivados em lamínulas, infectados com tripomastigotas das cepas F e Y de T. cruzi, obtidos de cultivo de tecidos ou do sangue de camundongos infectados. Os parasitas, obtidos de cultivo de tecidos, tanto da cepa Y como os da cepa F, são interiorizados por macrófagos em proporção muito mais elevada do que os sanguícolas. Parasitas de cultivo de tecidos incubados com soro de camundongos normais, ou soro híperimune específico em diluição sub-aglutinante, comportam-se essencialmente como parasitas não opsonizados. Foram observadas diferenças a nível ultraestrutural na fase inicial de interação entre macrófagos e tripomastigotas das duas origens. Após 30 minutos, tripomastigotas de cultivo de tecidos localizam-se em agrupamentos na área de contato com os macrófagos. Enquanto os tripomastigotas sanguícolas estão na maioria das vezes no interior de vacúolos fagocíticos largos, após 3 horas de interação os tripomastigotas de cultura situam-se em um único vacúolo estreito. Tanto as formas de cultivo de tecidos quanto os tripomastigotas sanguícolas da cepa Y multiplicam-se em macrófagos; os tripomastigotas sanguícolas da cepa F são destruídos no interior da célula hospedeira, enquanto os tripomastigotas de cultivo de tecidos desta cepa são capazes de multiplicar-se.Mouse peritoneal elicited macrophages cultured on coverslips were infected with Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes from both the F strain and Y strain obtained either from tissue culture or from the bloodstream of infected mice. Both the Y strain and F parasites obtained from tissue culture were interiorized by macrophages at a much higher rate than bloodstream trypomastigotes. Tissue culture parasites incubated with normal mouse serum, mouse plasma obtained at the 7th day after infection, or specific hyperimmune serum at subagglutinating concentration, behaved essentially as

  13. Taken to the limit--Is desiccation stress causing precocious encystment of trematode parasites in snails?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Katie; Poulin, Robert

    2015-12-01

    When hosts experience environmental stress, the quantity and quality of resources they provide for parasites may be diminished, and host longevity may be decreased. Under stress, parasites may adopt alternative strategies to avoid fitness reductions. Trematode parasites typically have complex life cycles, involving asexual reproduction in a gastropod first intermediate host. A rare phenomenon, briefly mentioned in the literature, and termed 'precocious encystment' involves the next stage in the parasites' life cycle (metacercarial cyst) forming within the preceding stage (redia), while still inside the snail. In the trematode Parorchis sp. NZ using rocky shore snails exposed to long periods outside water, we hypothesised that this might be an adaptive strategy against desiccation, preventing parasite emergence from the snail. To test this, we first investigated the effect of prolonged desiccation on the survival of two species of high intertidal snails. Secondly, we measured the reproductive output (cercarial production) of the parasite under wet and dry conditions. Finally, we quantified the influence of desiccation stress on the occurrence of precocious encystment. Snail mortality was higher under dry conditions, indicating stress, and it was somewhat exacerbated for infected snails. Parasite reproductive output differed between wet and dry conditions, with parasites of snails kept in dry conditions producing more cercariae when placed in water. Little variation was observed in the occurrence of precocious encystment, although some subtle patterns emerged. Given the stresses associated with living in high intertidal environments, we discuss precocious encystment as a possible stress response in this trematode parasite. PMID:26344863

  14. Seasonal transmission of gastrointestinal parasites of equids in southern Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, M R; French, D D; Klei, T R

    2001-12-01

    Parasite-naive pony foals were used as sentinels to monitor transmission of gastrointestinal parasites of equids in Louisiana during 4 seasons of the year. Two annual periods were studied, 1988-1989 and 1992-1993. Two or 3 foals each season were turned out to graze a contaminated pasture along with resident parasitized mares and their foals. After a grazing period of 8 wk, sentinel ponies were held in a parasite-free box stall for a period of 6 wk to allow parasites to develop, thus enhancing the evaluation of hypobiotic stages. Following this holding period, necropsies were performed for complete parasite recoveries. Data show that transmission of large and small strongyles occurs during all seasons in southern Louisiana, with highest levels of transmission occurring in the winter and only minimal transmission taking place in the summer. Numbers of mucosal cyathostomes, as well as total cyathostome numbers, were highest in the winter, and luminal cyathostome numbers were highest in the spring. Transmission of Anoplocephala perfoliata and Parascaris equorum occurred during all seasons of the year, although numbers of P. equorum were reduced in spring 1989 and 1993. Gasterophilus intestinalis instars were recovered from fall and winter sentinels only. Oxyuris equi L4 were found all seasons 1 yr, but only during the fall and winter of the final year. PMID:11780824

  15. Staging Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    lived as people are “staging themselves” (from below). Staging mobilities is a dynamic process between “being staged” (for example, being stopped at traffic lights) and the “mobile staging” of interacting individuals (negotiating a passage on the pavement). Staging Mobilities is about the fact that...

  16. Improved methods for magnetic purification of malaria parasites and haemozoin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeRisi Joseph L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria parasites generate free haem upon catabolism of host haemoglobin during their intraerythrocytic growth cycle. In order to minimize oxidative toxicity of the ferric iron, the free haem molecules are polymerized into the biomineral beta-haematin (commonly referred to as haemozoin. Haemozoin crystals are paramagnetic, and this property can be exploited for the purification of late stage parasites as they contain larger haemozoin crystals than early stage parasites and uninfected cells. Commercially available magnets that were originally developed for the purpose of antibody-mediated cell purification are widely used for this purpose. As these methods are not necessarily optimized for parasite purification, the relationship between magnetic field strength and the quantity and quality of yield during parasite purification was explored. Methods Inexpensive rare-earth neodymium magnets with commercially available disposable columns were employed to explore the relationship between magnetic field strength and recovery of free haemozoin and infected erythrocytes (iRBCs. Results Yields of free haemozoin increased nearly linearly with increasing magnetic field strength to the strongest fields tested (8,500 Gauss. Stronger magnetic fields also improved the recovery of iRBCs with no detrimental effects on parasite viability. An in-house constructed magnetic stand, built for $75 in materials, produced superior results when compared with much more expensive commercial products. Conclusions Existing protocols for the magnetic purification of free haemozoin and iRBCs result in sub-optimal yields. Inexpensive high-strength neodymium magnets offer a better option, resulting in higher yields with no detrimental effects on parasite viability.

  17. Repetitive elements in parasitic protozoa

    OpenAIRE

    Clayton Christine

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A recent paper published in BMC Genomics suggests that retrotransposition may be active in the human gut parasite Entamoeba histolytica. This adds to our knowledge of the various types of repetitive elements in parasitic protists and the potential influence of such elements on pathogenicity. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/321

  18. Repetitive elements in parasitic protozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Christine

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent paper published in BMC Genomics suggests that retrotransposition may be active in the human gut parasite Entamoeba histolytica. This adds to our knowledge of the various types of repetitive elements in parasitic protists and the potential influence of such elements on pathogenicity. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/321

  19. The genomic basis of parasitism in the Strongyloides clade of nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Vicky L; Tsai, Isheng J; Coghlan, Avril; Reid, Adam J; Holroyd, Nancy; Foth, Bernardo J; Tracey, Alan; Cotton, James A; Stanley, Eleanor J; Beasley, Helen; Bennett, Hayley M; Brooks, Karen; Harsha, Bhavana; Kajitani, Rei; Kulkarni, Arpita; Harbecke, Dorothee; Nagayasu, Eiji; Nichol, Sarah; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Quail, Michael A; Randle, Nadine; Xia, Dong; Brattig, Norbert W; Soblik, Hanns; Ribeiro, Diogo M; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Itoh, Takehiko; Denver, Dee R; Grant, Warwick; Stoltzfus, Jonathan D; Lok, James B; Murayama, Haruhiko; Wastling, Jonathan; Streit, Adrian; Kikuchi, Taisei; Viney, Mark; Berriman, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Soil-transmitted nematodes, including the Strongyloides genus, cause one of the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases. Here we compare the genomes of four Strongyloides species, including the human pathogen Strongyloides stercoralis, and their close relatives that are facultatively parasitic (Parastrongyloides trichosuri) and free-living (Rhabditophanes sp. KR3021). A significant paralogous expansion of key gene families-families encoding astacin-like and SCP/TAPS proteins-is associated with the evolution of parasitism in this clade. Exploiting the unique Strongyloides life cycle, we compare the transcriptomes of the parasitic and free-living stages and find that these same gene families are upregulated in the parasitic stages, underscoring their role in nematode parasitism. PMID:26829753

  20. Magnet® Hospital Recognition Linked to Lower Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Hilary; Rearden, Jessica; McHugh, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) are among the deadliest heathcare-associated infections, with an estimated 12-25% mortality rate. In 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) began to penalize hospitals for poor performance with respect to selected hospital-acquired conditions, including CLABSI. A structural factor associated with high-quality nursing care and better patient outcomes is The Magnet Recognition Program®. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between Magnet status and hospital CLABSI rates. We used propensity score matching to match Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals with similar hospital characteristics. In a matched sample of 291 Magnet hospitals and 291 non-Magnet hospitals, logistic regression models were used to examine whether there was a link between Magnet status and CLABSI rates. Both before and after matching, Magnet hospital status was associated with better (lower than the national average) CLABSI rates (OR = 1.60, 95%CI: 1.10, 2.33 after matching). While established programs such as Magnet recognition are consistently correlated with high-quality nursing work environments and positive patient outcomes, additional research is needed to determine whether Magnet designation produces positive patient outcomes or rewards existing excellence. PMID:26809115

  1. Survey of physicians' perspectives and knowledge about diagnostic tests for bloodstream infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary C She

    Full Text Available Physicians rely on blood culture to diagnose bloodstream infections (BSI despite its limitations. As new technologies emerge for rapid BSI diagnosis, optimization of their application to patient care requires an understanding of clinicians' perspectives on BSI diagnosis and how a rapid test would influence medical decisions.We administered a 26-question survey to practitioners in infectious diseases/microbiology, critical care, internal medicine, and hematology/oncology services in USA and Germany about current standards in diagnosing and treating BSI and a hypothetical rapid BSI test.Responses from 242 providers had roughly equal representation across specialties. For suspected BSI patients, 78% of practitioners would administer empiric broad spectrum antibiotics although they estimated, on average, that 31% of patients received incorrect antibiotics while awaiting blood culture results. The ability of blood culture to rule in or rule out infection was very/extremely acceptable in 67% and 36%, respectively. Given rapid test results, 60-87% of practitioners would narrow the spectrum of antimicrobial therapy depending on the microorganism detected, with significantly higher percentages when resistance determinants were also tested. Over half of respondents felt a rapid test would be very/extremely influential on clinical practice.Limitations of blood culture were perceived as a barrier to patient care. A rapid test to diagnose BSI would impact clinical practice, but the extent of impact may be limited by prevailing attitudes and practices. Opportunities exist for interventions to influence practitioners' behaviors in BSI management particularly with emergence of newer diagnostic tests.

  2. Microbiologic characterization of isolates from a dalbavancin clinical trial for catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Beth P; Jones, Ronald N; Fritsche, Thomas R; Biedenbach, Douglas J

    2006-02-01

    Dalbavancin, a new-generation semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide in phase 3 clinical development, has been documented to be more active than vancomycin or teicoplanin against Gram-positive bacteria, including multidrug-resistant strains, by in vitro testing and in animal models. The human pharmacokinetics of dalbavancin predicts efficacy at weekly dosing intervals. In a phase 2 open-label clinical trial, dalbavancin exhibited superiority when compared with vancomycin against catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI). The majority of pathogens identified in this study as in clinical practice were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), necessitating rigorous characterization of duplicate isolates to rule out contaminants and to validate cases for study evaluations. At follow-up for the intent-to-treat population, overall pathogen eradication was 92.3% for dalbavancin and 75.9% for vancomycin. We describe the details of organisms isolated, their epidemiologic/genetic characterization, susceptibility patterns against glycopeptides, and the eradication rates by organism group. In conclusion, dalbavancin was active against all isolated pathogens associated with CR-BSI (CoNS, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis; all MIC results, < or = 0.25 microg/mL) and achieved significant (P < 0.05) clinical success when compared with vancomycin. PMID:16458124

  3. Risk factors and outcomes of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter bloodstream infection in North-eastern Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zakuan Zainy Deris; Mohd Nazri Shafei; Azian Harun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the risk factors and outcomes of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacterbaumannii (IRAB) bloodstream infection (BSI) cases, since there is very little publication on Acinetobacter baumannii infections from Malaysia. Methods: A cross sectional study of 41 cases (73.2%) of imipenem-sensitive Acinetobacter baumanii (ISAB) and 15 cases (26.8%) of IRAB was conducted in a teaching hospital which was located at North-Eastern state of Malaysia. Results:There was no independent risk factor for IRAB BSI identified but IRAB BSI was significantly associated with longer bacteraemic days [OR 1.23 (95% CI 1.01, 1.50)]. Although prior use of carbepenems and cephalosporin were higher among IRAB than ISAB group, statistically they were not significant. There was no significant difference in term of outcomes between the two groups. Conclusions: Although statistically not significant, this analysis compliments previous publication highlighting the importance of appropriate empiric antibiotic usage in hospital especially carbepenems and need further evaluation with bigger subjects.

  4. The Validation of a Novel Surveillance System for Monitoring Bloodstream Infections in the Calgary Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Jenine R.; Gregson, Daniel B.; Church, Deirdre L.; Henderson, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Terry; Laupland, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Electronic surveillance systems (ESSs) that utilize existing information in databases are more efficient than conventional infection surveillance methods. The objective was to assess an ESS for bloodstream infections (BSIs) in the Calgary Zone for its agreement with traditional medical record review. Methods. The ESS was developed by linking related data from regional laboratory and hospital administrative databases and using set definitions for excluding contaminants and duplicate isolates. Infections were classified as hospital-acquired (HA), healthcare-associated community-onset (HCA), or community-acquired (CA). A random sample of patients from the ESS was then compared with independent medical record review. Results. Among the 308 patients selected for comparative review, the ESS identified 318 episodes of BSI of which 130 (40.9%) were CA, 98 (30.8%) were HCA, and 90 (28.3%) were HA. Medical record review identified 313 episodes of which 136 (43.4%) were CA, 97 (30.9%) were HCA, and 80 (25.6%) were HA. Episodes of BSI were concordant in 304 (97%) cases. Overall, there was 85.5% agreement between ESS and medical record review for the classification of where BSIs were acquired (kappa = 0.78, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.75–0.80). Conclusion. This novel ESS identified and classified BSIs with a high degree of accuracy. This system requires additional linkages with other related databases.

  5. Species distribution and antifungal susceptibility profile of Candida spp. bloodstream isolates from Latin American hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrício Godoy

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available From March 1999 to March 2000, we conducted a prospective multicenter study of candidemia involving five tertiary care hospitals from four countries in Latin America. Yeast isolates were identified by classical methods and the antifungal susceptibility profile was determined according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards microbroth assay method. During a 12 month-period we were able to collect a total of 103 bloodstream isolates of Candida spp. C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species accounting for 42% of all isolates. Non-albicans Candida species strains accounted for 58% of all episodes of candidemia and were mostly represented by C. tropicalis (24.2% and C. parapsilosis (21.3%. It is noteworthy that we were able to identify two cases of C. lusitaniae from different institutions. In our casuistic, non-albicans Candida species isolates related to candidemic episodes were susceptible to fluconazole. Continuously surveillance programs are needed in order to identify possible changes in the species distribution and antifungal susceptibility patterns of yeasts that may occurs after increasing the use of azoles in Latin American hospitals.

  6. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  7. Parasitism and mutualism in Wolbachia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordenstein, Seth R; Paraskevopoulos, Charalampos; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C;

    2009-01-01

    Ecological and evolutionary theories predict that parasitism and mutualism are not fixed endpoints of the symbiotic spectrum. Rather, parasitism and mutualism may be host or environment dependent, induced by the same genetic machinery, and shifted due to selection. These models presume....... Wolbachia is an inherited obligate, intracellular infection of invertebrates containing taxa that act broadly as both parasites in arthropods and mutualists in certain roundworms. Here, we analyze the ancestry of mutualism and parasitism in Wolbachia and the evolutionary trajectory of this variation...... the root lies in the middle of the Wolbachia mutualists and parasites. We show that different inference methods yield different results and high bootstrap support did not equal phylogenetic accuracy. Recombination was rare among this taxonomically diverse data set, indicating that elevated levels...

  8. Serine proteases of parasitic helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-02-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  9. Homeopathy in parasitic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Marques de Araujo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of homeopathic medicines has increased, once traditional medicines sometimes do not produce the desired effects and because side effects sometimes compromise the treatment. In recent years, research on homeopathy has clearly developed, both in the implementation of more consistent methodologies and in the description of the data and published methods, improvement are still required in these matters. The acknowledgment of homeopathy depends on the credibility of the groups researching this topic Objective: list and criticize articles highlighting main effects, schedule of treatment and potencies used in different animals models. Material and Methods: A review of articles published since 2000 in journals indexed in the PubMed/Scielo databases was performed. Keywords used were parasitosis/homeopathy and parasitosis/ultra-diluted, in English and Portuguese. Specialized journals such as Homeopathy, International Journal of High Dilution Research, and Brazilian Homeopathic Journal were also used. The contents of each issue of these journals were examined for the "Use of highly diluted medication in parasitic infections." Results and Discussion: Thirty nine papers have been gathered. The methodology of the articles surveyed did not meet the requirements listed in the REHBaR[1]. Thirty seven reports have shown the benefits/effects of highly diluted medicine in the treatment of infectious diseases. In models where experimental conditions are carefully controlled, the conclusions follow the same pattern as those observed in the treatment of farm animals, where, even without completely controlled conditions, clinical result is positive. In fourteen reports using the same model, eight where animals were treated in a constant and prolonged way shown a better result, compared with six reports in which animals were treated for a short period of time, receiving a single daily dose. Several authors have conducted clinical trials using

  10. How have fisheries affected parasite communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    To understand how fisheries affect parasites, we conducted a meta-analysis of studies that contrasted parasite assemblages in fished and unfished areas. Parasite diversity was lower in hosts from fished areas. Larger hosts had a greater abundance of parasites, suggesting that fishing might reduce the abundance of parasites by selectively removing the largest, most heavily parasitized individuals. After controlling for size, the effect of fishing on parasite abundance varied according to whether the host was fished and the parasite's life cycle. Parasites of unfished hosts were more likely to increase in abundance in response to fishing than were parasites of fished hosts, possibly due to compensatory increases in the abundance of unfished hosts. While complex life cycle parasites tended to decline in abundance in response to fishing, directly transmitted parasites tended to increase. Among complex life cycle parasites, those with fished hosts tended to decline in abundance in response to fishing, while those with unfished hosts tended to increase. However, among directly transmitted parasites, responses did not differ between parasites with and without fished hosts. This work suggests that parasite assemblages are likely to change substantially in composition in increasingly fished ecosystems, and that parasite life history and fishing status of the host are important in predicting the response of individual parasite species or groups to fishing.

  11. Parasites in algae mass culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd William Lane

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Parasites are now known to be ubiquitous across biological systems and can play an important role in modulating algal populations. However, there is a lack of extensive information on their role in artificial ecosystems such as algal production ponds and photobioreactors. Parasites have been implicated in the demise of algal blooms. Because individual mass culture systems often tend to be unialgal and a select few algal species are in wide scale application, there is an increased potential for parasites to have a devastating effect on commercial scale monoculture. As commercial algal production continues to expand with a widening variety of applications, including biofuel, food and pharmaceuticals, the parasites associated with algae will become of greater interest and potential economic impact. A number of important algal parasites have been identified in algal mass culture systems in the last few years and this number is sure to grow as the number of commercial algae ventures increases. Here, we review the research that has identified and characterized parasites infecting mass cultivated algae, the techniques being proposed and or developed to control them, and the potential impact of parasites on the future of the algal biomass industry.

  12. Trading stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim;

    2012-01-01

    Interest in stage-and age structured models has recently increased because they can describe quantitative traits such as size that are left out of age-only demography. Available methods for the analysis of effects of vital rates on lifespan in stage-structured models have not been widely applied ...... examples. Much of our approach relies on trading of time and mortality risk in one stage for time and risk in others. Our approach contributes to the new framework of the study of age- and stage-structured biodemography....

  13. Cryptosporidia: epicellular parasites embraced by the host cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valigurová, Andrea; Jirků, Miloslav; Koudela, Bretislav; Gelnar, Milan; Modrý, David; Slapeta, Jan

    2008-07-01

    The ultrastructure of two gastric cryptosporidia, Cryptosporidium muris from experimentally infected rodents (Mastomys natalensis) and Cryptosporidium sp. 'toad' from naturally infected toads (Duttaphrynus melanostictus), was studied using electron microscopy. Observations presented herein allowed us to map ultrastructural aspects of the cryptosporidian invasion process and the origin of a parasitophorous sac. Invading parasites attach to the host cell, followed by gradual envelopment, with the host's cell membrane folds, eventually forming the parasitophorous sac. Cryptosporidian developmental stages remain epicellular during the entire life cycle. The parasite development is illustrated in detail using high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy. This provides a new insight into the ultrastructural detail of host-parasite interactions and species-specific differences manifested in frequency of detachment of the parasitophorous sac, radial folds of the parasitophorous sac and stem-formation of the parasitised host cell. PMID:18158154

  14. DNA microarray analysis of Staphylococcus aureus causing bloodstream infection: bacterial genes associated with mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomfeldt, A; Aamot, H V; Eskesen, A N; Monecke, S; White, R A; Leegaard, T M; Bjørnholt, J V

    2016-08-01

    Providing evidence for microbial genetic determinants' impact on outcome in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (SABSI) is challenging due to the complex and dynamic microbe-host interaction. Our recent population-based prospective study reported an association between the S. aureus clonal complex (CC) 30 genotype and mortality in SABSI patients. This follow-up investigation aimed to examine the genetic profiles of the SABSI isolates and test the hypothesis that specific genetic characteristics in S. aureus are associated with mortality. SABSI isolates (n = 305) and S. aureus CC30 isolates from asymptomatic nasal carriers (n = 38) were characterised by DNA microarray analysis and spa typing. Fisher's exact test, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) and elastic net regressions were performed to discern within four groups defined by patient outcome and characteristics. No specific S. aureus genetic determinants were found to be associated with mortality in SABSI patients. By applying LASSO and elastic net regressions, we found evidence suggesting that agrIII and cna were positively and setC (=selX) and seh were negatively associated with S. aureus CC30 versus non-CC30 isolates. The genes chp and sak, encoding immune evasion molecules, were found in higher frequencies in CC30 SABSI isolates compared to CC30 carrier isolates, indicating a higher virulence potential. In conclusion, no specific S. aureus genes were found to be associated with mortality by DNA microarray analysis and state-of-the-art statistical analyses. The next natural step is to test the hypothesis in larger samples with higher resolution methods, like whole genome sequencing. PMID:27177754

  15. Clinical significance of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolates from nosocomial bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morad Asaad, Ahmed; Ansar Qureshi, Mohamed; Mujeeb Hasan, Syed

    2016-05-01

    Background Identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) as nosocomial pathogens or contaminants is significant for microbiologists and clinicians. This study aimed to determine the frequency of isolation and antimicrobial resistance patterns of CoNS isolates from nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) and to identify risk factors associated with true bacteremia caused by these emerging pathogens in a Saudi tertiary care hospital. Methods All CoNS-positive cultures from inpatients were identified using the standard methods during a 10-month period. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done using the reference broth microdilution method. Results A total of 208 isolates were identified; of these 75 (32.2%) were considered infection associated, and 133 (67.8%) were considered contamination. S. epidermidis accounted for 34.7% of bacteremia cases, followed by S. hominis (21.3%), S. haemolyticus (16%), and S. saprophyticus (12%). Central venous catheters (p ≤ 0.0001), prior antibiotic therapy (p ≤ 0.0001), the occurrence of more than one positive blood culture (p ≤ 0.0001), and intensive care unit (ICU) admission (p = 0.007) were all independently associated with CoNS bacteremia. Overall, all isolates were highly resistant to penicillin (94.7%), oxacillin (90.7%), and erythromycin (85.3%). The rates of susceptibility to vancomycin, daptomycin, and teicoplanin were 98.7%, 98.7%, and 93.3%, respectively. Conclusions Our results further highlight that accurate identification and susceptibility testing of CoNS isolates from nosocomial BSIs are crucial to minimize excessive antibiotic use and unnecessary catheter removal. In addition, daptomycin may be an efficient alternative therapeutic option for CoNS resistant to oxacillin and other commonly used antibiotics. PMID:26666168

  16. Hospital-wide multidisciplinary, multimodal intervention programme to reduce central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingg, Walter; Cartier, Vanessa; Inan, Cigdem; Touveneau, Sylvie; Theriault, Michel; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Clergue, François; Pittet, Didier; Walder, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) is the major complication of central venous catheters (CVC). The aim of the study was to test the effectiveness of a hospital-wide strategy on CLABSI reduction. Between 2008 and 2011, all CVCs were observed individually and hospital-wide at a large university-affiliated, tertiary care hospital. CVC insertion training started from the 3rd quarter and a total of 146 physicians employed or newly entering the hospital were trained in simulator workshops. CVC care started from quarter 7 and a total of 1274 nurses were trained by their supervisors using a web-based, modular, e-learning programme. The study included 3952 patients with 6353 CVCs accumulating 61,366 catheter-days. Hospital-wide, 106 patients had 114 CLABSIs with a cumulative incidence of 1.79 infections per 100 catheters. We observed a significant quarterly reduction of the incidence density (incidence rate ratios [95% confidence interval]: 0.92 [0.88-0.96]; P<0.001) after adjusting for multiple confounders. The incidence densities (n/1000 catheter-days) in the first and last study year were 2.3/1000 and 0.7/1000 hospital-wide, 1.7/1000 and 0.4/1000 in the intensive care units, and 2.7/1000 and 0.9/1000 in non-intensive care settings, respectively. Median time-to-infection was 15 days (Interquartile range, 8-22). Our findings suggest that clinically relevant reduction of hospital-wide CLABSI was reached with a comprehensive, multidisciplinary and multimodal quality improvement programme including aspects of behavioural change and key principles of good implementation practice. This is one of the first multimodal, multidisciplinary, hospital-wide training strategies successfully reducing CLABSI. PMID:24714418

  17. Three Epidemics of Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Bloodstream Infection in Blantyre, Malawi, 1998–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Masesa, Clemens; Jassi, Chikondi; Faragher, E. Brian; Mallewa, Jane; Mallewa, Macpherson; MacLennan, Calman A.; Msefula, Chisomo; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Melita A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme (MLW) has routinely collected specimens for blood culture from febrile patients, and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with suspected meningitis, presenting to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi, since 1998. Methods. We present bloodstream infection (BSI) and meningitis surveillance data from 1998 to 2014. Automated blood culture, manual speciation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed at MLW. Population data for minimum-incidence estimates in urban Blantyre were drawn from published estimates. Results. Between 1998 and 2014, 167 028 blood cultures were taken from adult and pediatric medical patients presenting to QECH; Salmonella Typhi was isolated on 2054 occasions (1.2%) and nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars were isolated 10 139 times (6.1%), of which 8017 (79.1%) were Salmonella Typhimurium and 1608 (15.8%) were Salmonella Enteritidis. There were 392 cases of NTS meningitis and 9 cases of Salmonella Typhi meningitis. There have been 3 epidemics of Salmonella BSI in Blantyre; Salmonella Enteritidis from 1999 to 2002, Salmonella Typhimurium from 2002 to 2008, and Salmonella Typhi, which began in 2011 and was ongoing in 2014. Multidrug resistance has emerged in all 3 serovars and is seen in the overwhelming majority of isolates, while resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones is currently uncommon but has been identified. Conclusions. Invasive Salmonella disease in Malawi is dynamic and not clearly attributable to a single risk factor, although all 3 epidemics were associated with multidrug resistance. To inform nonvaccine and vaccine interventions, reservoirs of disease and modes of transmission require further investigation. PMID:26449953

  18. Combination Regimens for Treatment of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Simmonds, A; Nelson, B; Eiras, D P; Loo, A; Jenkins, S G; Whittier, S; Calfee, D P; Satlin, M J; Kubin, C J; Furuya, E Y

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies reported decreased mortality in patients with carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infections (BSIs) treated with combination therapy but included carbapenem-susceptible and -intermediate isolates, as per revised CLSI breakpoints. Here, we assessed outcomes in patients with BSIs caused by phenotypically carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae (CRKP) according to the number of in vitro active agents received and whether an extended-spectrum beta-lactam (BL) antibiotic, including meropenem, or an extended-spectrum cephalosporin was administered. We retrospectively reviewed CRKP BSIs at two New York City hospitals from 2006 to 2013, where all isolates had meropenem or imipenem MICs of ≥4 μg/ml. Univariate and multivariable models were created to identify factors associated with mortality. Of 141 CRKP BSI episodes, 23% were treated with a single active agent (SAA), 26% were treated with an SAA plus BL, 28% were treated with multiple active agents (MAA), and 23% were treated with MAA plus BL. Ninety percent of isolates had meropenem MICs of ≥16 μg/ml. Thirty-day mortality was 33% overall and did not significantly differ across the four treatment groups in a multivariable model (P = 0.4); mortality was significantly associated with a Pitt bacteremia score of ≥4 (odds ratio [OR], 7.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.2 to 18.1; P = 0.1), and immunosuppression was protective (OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2 to 1.0; P = 0.04). Individual treatment characteristics were also not significantly associated with outcome, including use of SAAs versus MAA (26% versus 38%, P = 0.1) or BL versus no BL (26% versus 39%, P = 0.1). In summary, in patients with CRKP BSIs caused by isolates with high carbapenem MICs, the role of combination therapy remains unclear, highlighting the need for prospective studies to identify optimal treatment regimens. PMID:27044555

  19. The Changing Epidemiology of Bloodstream Infections and Resistance in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mücahit Yemişen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT are exposed to highly immunosuppressive conditions and bloodstream infections (BSIs are one of the most common major complications within this period. Our aim, in this study, was to evaluate the epidemiology of BSIs in these patients retrospectively. Materials and Methods: The epidemiological properties of 312 patients with HSCT were retrospectively evaluated. Results: A total of 312 patients, followed between 2000 and 2011, who underwent autologous (62% and allogeneic (38% HSCT were included in the study. The most common underlying malignancies were multiple myeloma (28% and Hodgkin lymphoma (21.5%. A total of 142 (45% patients developed at least 1 episode of BSI and 193 separate pathogens were isolated from the blood cultures. There was a trend of increase in the numbers of BSIs in 2005-2008 and a relative increase in the proportion of gram-positive infections in recent years (2009-2011, and central venous catheter-related BSI was found to be most common source. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (49.2% and Acinetobacter baumannii (8.8% were the most common pathogens. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing strains were 23% and 22% among Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates, respectively. Quinolone resistance was detected in 10% of Enterobacteriaceae. Resistance to carbapenems was not detected in Enterobacteriaceae, while it was seen at 11.1% and 23.5% in Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter strains, respectively. Conclusion: A shift was detected from gram-negative bacteria to gram-positive in the etiology over the years and central lines were the most common sources of BSIs.

  20. Staphylococcus species and their Methicillin-Resistance in 7424 Blood Cultures for Suspected Bloodstream Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana ALMAŞ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of Staphylococcus species in bloodstream infections and to assess their susceptibility to methicillin. Material and Methods: Between January 1st 2008 - December 31st 2010, 7424 blood culture sets were submitted to the Laboratory Department of the Hospital for Clinical Infectious Diseases in Cluj-Napoca, Romania. The blood cultures were performed using BacT/Alert until January 2010 and BacT/Alert 3D automated system (bioMérieux after that date. The blood culture bottles were incubated at 37°C in a continuously monitoring system for up to 7 days. The strain identifications were performed by conventional methods, ApiStaph galleries and Vitek 2 Compact system. Susceptibility to methicillin was determined by disk diffusion method with cefoxitin disk and by using Vitek 2 Compact system. Results: From the total number of performed blood cultures, 568 were positive with Staphylococcus species. From 168 bacteriemic episodes 103 were with Staphylococcus aureus. Among 65 coagulase-negative staphylococci isolates, Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most frequently isolated species (34, followed by Staphylococcus hominis (15, Staphylococcus haemolyticus (8, Staphylococcus saprophyticus (3, Staphylococcus cohnii (1, Staphylococcus auricularis (1, and 3 strains that were not identified at species level. Methicillin resistance was encountered in 53.40% of Staphylococcus aureus strains and in 80% of coagulase-negative staphylococci. Conclusions: An important percentage of blood cultures were contaminated with Staphylococcus species. The main species identified in true bacteriemia cases were Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The percentage of methicillin-resistance, proved to be high not only for coagulase-negative staphylococci but also for Staphylococcus aureus.

  1. Bloodstream infection following 217 consecutive systemic-enteric drained pancreas transplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Walter

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combined kidney pancreas transplantation (PTx evolved as excellent treatment for diabetic nephropathy. Infections remain common and serious complications. Methods 217 consecutive enteric drained PTxs performed from 1997 to 2004 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to bloodstream infection. Immunosuppression consisted of antithymocyteglobuline induction, tacrolimus, mycophenolic acid and steroids for the majority of cases. Standard perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis consisted of pipercillin/tazobactam in combination with ciprofloxacin and fluconazole. Results One year patient, pancreas and kidney graft survival were 96.4%, 88.5% and 94.8%, surgical complication rate was 35%, rejection rate 30% and rate of infection 59%. In total 46 sepsis episodes were diagnosed in 35 patients (16% with a median onset on day 12 (range 1–45 post transplant. Sepsis source was intraabdominal infection (IAI (n = 21, a contaminated central venous line (n = 10, wound infection (n = 5, urinary tract infection (n = 2 and graft transmitted (n = 2. Nine patients (4% experienced multiple episodes of sepsis. Overall 65 pathogens (IAI sepsis 39, line sepsis 15, others 11 were isolated from blood. Gram positive cocci accounted for 50 isolates (77%: Coagulase negative staphylococci (n = 28, i.e. 43% (nine multi-resistant, Staphylococcus aureus (n = 11, i.e. 17% (four multi-resistant, enterococci (n = 9, i.e. 14% (one E. faecium. Gram negative rods were cultured in twelve cases (18%. Patients with blood borne infection had a two year pancreas graft survival of 76.5% versus 89.4% for those without sepsis (p = 0.036, patient survival was not affected. Conclusion Sepsis remains a serious complication after PTx with significantly reduced pancreas graft, but not patient survival. The most common source is IAI.

  2. The Phosphoproteome of Bloodstream Form Trypanosoma brucei, Causative Agent of African Sleeping Sickness

    OpenAIRE

    Nett, Isabelle R. E.; Martin, David M. A.; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Lamont, Douglas; Barber, Jonathan D.; Mehlert, Angela; Ferguson, Michael A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of human African sleeping sickness and related animal diseases, and it has over 170 predicted protein kinases. Protein phosphorylation is a key regulatory mechanism for cellular function that, thus far, has been studied in T.brucei principally through putative kinase mRNA knockdown and observation of the resulting phenotype. However, despite the relatively large kinome of this organism and the demonstrated essentiality of severa...

  3. Synanthropic birds and parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipineto, Ludovico; Borrelli, Luca; Pepe, Paola; Fioretti, Alessandro; Caputo, Vincenzo; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Rinaldi, Laura

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the parasitologic findings for 60 synanthropic bird carcasses recovered in the Campania region of southern Italy. Birds consisted of 20 yellow-legged gulls (Larus michahellis), 15 rock pigeons (Columba livia), 15 common kestrels (Falco tinnunculus), and 10 carrion crows (Corvus corone). Each carcass was examined to detect the presence of ectoparasites and then necropsied to detect helminths. Ectoparasites occurred in 100% of the birds examined. In particular, chewing lice were recovered with a prevalence of 100%, whereas Pseudolynchia canariensis (Hippoboscidae) were found only in pigeons with a prevalence of 80%. Regarding endoparasites, a total of seven helminth species were identified: three nematodes (Ascaridia columbae, Capillaria columbae, Physaloptera alata), one cestoda (Raillietina tetragona), one trematoda (Cardiocephalus longicollis), and two acanthocephalans (Centrorhynchus globocaudatus and Centrorhynchus buteonis). The findings of the present study add data to the parasitologic scenario of synanthropic birds. This is important because parasitic infection can lead to serious health problems when combined with other factors and may affect flying performance and predatory effectiveness. PMID:24597118

  4. Parasites in pet reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavri Urška

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Exotic reptiles originating from the wild can be carriers of many different pathogens and some of them can infect humans. Reptiles imported into Slovenia from 2000 to 2005, specimens of native species taken from the wild and captive bred species were investigated. A total of 949 reptiles (55 snakes, 331 lizards and 563 turtles, belonging to 68 different species, were examined for the presence of endoparasites and ectoparasites. Twelve different groups (Nematoda (5, Trematoda (1, Acanthocephala (1, Pentastomida (1 and Protozoa (4 of endoparasites were determined in 26 (47.3% of 55 examined snakes. In snakes two different species of ectoparasites were also found. Among the tested lizards eighteen different groups (Nematoda (8, Cestoda (1, Trematoda (1, Acanthocephala (1, Pentastomida (1 and Protozoa (6 of endoparasites in 252 (76.1% of 331 examined animals were found. One Trombiculid ectoparasite was determined. In 563 of examined turtles eight different groups (Nematoda (4, Cestoda (1, Trematoda (1 and Protozoa (2 of endoparasites were determined in 498 (88.5% animals. In examined turtles three different species of ectoparasites were seen. The established prevalence of various parasites in reptiles used as pet animals indicates the need for examination on specific pathogens prior to introduction to owners.

  5. Substantially reduced pre-patent parasite multiplication rates are associated with naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, A D; Andrews, L; Draper, S J; Bojang, K; Milligan, P; Gilbert, S C; Imoukhuede, E B; Hill, A V S

    2011-05-01

    Naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum's asexual blood stage reduces parasite multiplication at microscopically detectable densities. The effect of natural immunity on initial prepatent parasite multiplication during the period following a new infection has been uncertain, contributing to doubt regarding the utility of experimental challenge models for blood-stage vaccine trials. Here we present data revealing that parasite multiplication rates during the initial prepatent period in semi-immune Gambian adults are substantially lower than in malaria-naive participants. This supports the view that a blood-stage vaccine capable of emulating the disease-reducing effect of natural immunity could achieve a detectable effect during the prepatent period. PMID:21459819

  6. Fauna Europaea: Helminths (Animal Parasitic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gibson, D. I.; Bray, R. A.; Hunt, D.; Georgiev, B. B.; Scholz, Tomáš; Harris, P.D.; Bakke, T.A.; Pomajska, T.; Niewiadomska, K.; Kostadinova, Aneta; Tkach, V.; Bain, O.; Durette-Desset, M.-C.; Gibbons, L.; Moravec, František; Petter, A.; Dimitrova, Z.M.; Buchmann, K.; Valtonen, E. T.; de Jong, Y.

    -, č. 2 (2014), e1060. ISSN 1314-2828 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Acanthocephala * Biodiversity * Biodiversity Informatics * Cestoda * Fauna Europaea * Helminth * Monogenea * Nematoda * Parasite * Taxonomic indexing * Taxonomy * Trematoda * Zoology Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  7. Metapopulation dynamics in marine parasites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pérez-del-Olmo, A.; Kostadinova, Aneta; Morand, S.

    Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013, s. 35-48. ISBN 9781107019614 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : metapopulation dynamics * marine parasites * human impact Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine

  8. Feed intake and utilization by the parasitized ruminant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic abomasal parasitism was induced in sheep reared worm-free from birth by daily dosing with Ostertagia circumcincta larvae, and intestinal parasitism by either Trichostrongylus colubriformis or Trichostrongylus vitrinus larvae. The experimental design allowed effects on food intake to be separated from changes in efficiency of food utilization. The effects of the parasites were assessed from conventional balance trials and comparative slaughter techniques. Infection with gastrointestinal parasites severely limited animal performance in the absence of obvious clinical signs. Liveweight gain was reduced by 30-50%, partly as a result of reductions of 10-20% in voluntary food intake and partly from a decrease in the efficiency of utilization of food. Apparent digestibility of nitrogen was lowered by 25% in the early stages of Ostertagia infections but subsequently showed a recovery. Lower nitrogen retention was reflected in the decreased deposition of protein in the bodies of both O. and T. infected sheep. Fat deposition in the body was reduced by abomasal and intestinal parasitism as a result of reductions in food intake and a 30-50% reduction in the gross efficiency of utilization of metabolizable energy for growth. The rate of deposition of minerals in the skeleton was decreased by gastrointestinal parasitism and there is evidence that absorption of minerals from the intestine is impaired in T. colubriformis infections. The possible mechanisms responsible for the reductions in efficiency of utilization of nutrients by the parasitized ruminant are discussed. Only passing reference is made to the use of 32P for calculating endogenous loss of P in sheep receiving 3000 T. colubriformis larvae per day

  9. Parasites in algae mass culture

    OpenAIRE

    ToddWilliamLane; LauraTruesdaleCarney

    2014-01-01

    Parasites are now known to be ubiquitous across biological systems and can play an important role in modulating algal populations. However, there is a lack of extensive information on their role in artificial ecosystems such as algal production ponds and photobioreactors. Parasites have been implicated in the demise of algal blooms. Because individual mass culture systems often tend to be unialgal and a select few algal species are in wide scale application, there is an increased potential f...

  10. Molecular diagnostics and parasitic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasoo, Shawn; Pritt, Bobbi S

    2013-09-01

    Molecular parasitology represents an emerging field in microbiology diagnostics. Although most assays use nonstandardized, laboratory-developed methods, a few commercial systems have recently become available and are slowly being introduced into larger laboratories. In addition, a few methodologies show promise for use in field settings in which parasitic infections are endemic. This article reviews the available techniques and their applications to major parasitic diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, and trichomoniasis. PMID:23931835

  11. Serine Proteases of Parasitic Helminths

    OpenAIRE

    Yong YANG; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we...

  12. Everyday and exotic foodborne parasites

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Everyday foodborne parasites, which are endemic in Canada, include the protozoans Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum. However, these parasites are most frequently acquired through unfiltered drinking water, homosexual activity or close personal contact such as in daycare centres and occasionally via a food vehicle. It is likely that many foodborne outbreaks from these protozoa go undetected. Transmission of helminth infections, such as tapeworms, is rare in Cana...

  13. Pervasiveness of parasites in pollinators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie E F Evison

    Full Text Available Many pollinator populations are declining, with large economic and ecological implications. Parasites are known to be an important factor in the some of the population declines of honey bees and bumblebees, but little is known about the parasites afflicting most other pollinators, or the extent of interspecific transmission or vectoring of parasites. Here we carry out a preliminary screening of pollinators (honey bees, five species of bumblebee, three species of wasp, four species of hoverfly and three genera of other bees in the UK for parasites. We used molecular methods to screen for six honey bee viruses, Ascosphaera fungi, Microsporidia, and Wolbachia intracellular bacteria. We aimed simply to detect the presence of the parasites, encompassing vectoring as well as actual infections. Many pollinators of all types were positive for Ascosphaera fungi, while Microsporidia were rarer, being most frequently found in bumblebees. We also detected that most pollinators were positive for Wolbachia, most probably indicating infection with this intracellular symbiont, and raising the possibility that it may be an important factor in influencing host sex ratios or fitness in a diversity of pollinators. Importantly, we found that about a third of bumblebees (Bombus pascuorum and Bombus terrestris and a third of wasps (Vespula vulgaris, as well as all honey bees, were positive for deformed wing virus, but that this virus was not present in other pollinators. Deformed wing virus therefore does not appear to be a general parasite of pollinators, but does interact significantly with at least three species of bumblebee and wasp. Further work is needed to establish the identity of some of the parasites, their spatiotemporal variation, and whether they are infecting the various pollinator species or being vectored. However, these results provide a first insight into the diversity, and potential exchange, of parasites in pollinator communities.

  14. Parasitic Effects on Memristor Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Makoto; Chua, Leon O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we show that parasitic elements have a significant effect on the dynamics of memristor circuits. We first show that certain 2-terminal elements such as memristors, memcapacitors, and meminductors can be used as nonvolatile memories, if the principle of conservation of state variables hold by open-circuiting, or short-circuiting, their terminals. We also show that a passive memristor with a strictly-increasing constitutive relation will eventually lose its stored flux when we switch off the power if there is a parasitic capacitance across the memristor. Similarly, a memcapacitor (resp., meminductor) with a positive memcapacitance (resp., meminductance) will eventually lose their stored physical states when we switch off the power, if it is connected to a parasitic resistance. We then show that the discontinuous jump that circuit engineers assumed to occur at impasse points of memristor circuits contradicts the principles of conservation of charge and flux at the time of the discontinuous jump. A parasitic element can be used to break an impasse point, resulting in the emergence of a continuous oscillation in the circuit. We also define a distance, a diameter, and a dimension, for each circuit element in order to measure the complexity order of the parasitic elements. They can be used to find higher-order parasitic elements which can break impasse points. Furthermore, we derived a memristor-based Chua’s circuit from a three-element circuit containing a memristor by connecting two parasitic memcapacitances to break the impasse points. We finally show that a higher-order parasitic element can be used for breaking the impasse points on two-dimensional and three-dimensional constrained spaces.

  15. Introduction of New Parasites in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Heidi L.

    examples of such parasites/parasitic diseases: Setaria tundra, a mosquito-borne filarioid nematode which was detected for the first time in Danish deer in 2010. This parasite is usually considered harmless but is capable of causing peritonitis and mortality in ungulates. The newly detected parasite...

  16. Parasitic Pneumonia and Lung Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attapon Cheepsattayakorn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infestations demonstrated a decline in the past decade as a result of better hygiene practices and improved socioeconomic conditions. Nevertheless, global immigration, increased numbers of the immunocompromised people, international traveling, global warming, and rapid urbanization of the cities have increased the susceptibility of the world population to parasitic diseases. A number of new human parasites, such as Plasmodium knowlesi, in addition to many potential parasites, have urged the interest of scientific community. A broad spectrum of protozoal parasites frequently affects the respiratory system, particularly the lungs. The diagnosis of parasitic diseases of airway is challenging due to their wide varieties of clinical and roentgenographic presentations. So detailed interrogations of travel history to endemic areas are critical for clinicians or pulmonologists to manage this entity. The migrating adult worms can cause mechanical airway obstruction, while the larvae can cause airway inflammation. This paper provides a comprehensive review of both protozoal and helminthic infestations that affect the airway system, particularly the lungs, including clinical and roentgenographic presentations, diagnostic tests, and therapeutic approaches.

  17. Fungal parasitism: life cycle, dynamics and impact on cyanobacterial blooms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Gerphagnon

    Full Text Available Many species of phytoplankton are susceptible to parasitism by fungi from the phylum Chytridiomycota (i.e. chytrids. However, few studies have reported the effects of fungal parasites on filamentous cyanobacterial blooms. To investigate the missing components of bloom ecosystems, we examined an entire field bloom of the cyanobacterium Anabaena macrospora for evidence of chytrid infection in a productive freshwater lake, using a high resolution sampling strategy. A. macrospora was infected by two species of the genus Rhizosiphon which have similar life cycles but differed in their infective regimes depending on the cellular niches offered by their host. R. crassum infected both vegetative cells and akinetes while R. akinetum infected only akinetes. A tentative reconstruction of the developmental stages suggested that the life cycle of R. crassum was completed in about 3 days. The infection affected 6% of total cells (and 4% of akinètes, spread over a maximum of 17% of the filaments of cyanobacteria, in which 60% of the cells could be parasitized. Furthermore, chytrids may reduce the length of filaments of Anabaena macrospora significantly by "mechanistic fragmentation" following infection. All these results suggest that chytrid parasitism is one of the driving factors involved in the decline of a cyanobacteria blooms, by direct mortality of parasitized cells and indirectly by the mechanistic fragmentation, which could weaken the resistance of A. macrospora to grazing.

  18. Biofilm formation is a risk factor for mortality in patients with Candida albicans bloodstream infection-Scotland, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, R; Sherry, L; Nile, C J; Sherriff, A; Johnson, E M; Hanson, M F; Williams, C; Munro, C A; Jones, B J; Ramage, G

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infections caused by Candida species remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Biofilm formation by Candida species is an important virulence factor for disease pathogenesis. A prospective analysis of patients with Candida bloodstream infection (n = 217) in Scotland (2012-2013) was performed to assess the risk factors associated with patient mortality, in particular the impact of biofilm formation. Candida bloodstream isolates (n = 280) and clinical records for 157 patients were collected through 11 different health boards across Scotland. Biofilm formation by clinical isolates was assessed in vitro with standard biomass assays. The role of biofilm phenotype on treatment efficacy was also evaluated in vitro by treating preformed biofilms with fixed concentrations of different classes of antifungal. Available mortality data for 134 patients showed that the 30-day candidaemia case mortality rate was 41%, with predisposing factors including patient age and catheter removal. Multivariate Cox regression survival analysis for 42 patients showed a significantly higher mortality rate for Candida albicans infection than for Candida glabrata infection. Biofilm-forming ability was significantly associated with C. albicans mortality (34 patients). Finally, in vitro antifungal sensitivity testing showed that low biofilm formers and high biofilm formers were differentially affected by azoles and echinocandins, but not by polyenes. This study provides further evidence that the biofilm phenotype represents a significant clinical entity, and that isolates with this phenotype differentially respond to antifungal therapy in vitro. Collectively, these findings show that greater clinical understanding is required with respect to Candida biofilm infections, and the implications of isolate heterogeneity. PMID:26432192

  19. Paleoparasitology: the origin of human parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adauto Araujo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Parasitism is composed by three subsystems: the parasite, the host, and the environment. There are no organisms that cannot be parasitized. The relationship between a parasite and its host species most of the time do not result in damage or disease to the host. However, in a parasitic disease the presence of a given parasite is always necessary, at least in a given moment of the infection. Some parasite species that infect humans were inherited from pre-hominids, and were shared with other phylogenetically close host species, but other parasite species were acquired from the environment as humans evolved. Human migration spread inherited parasites throughout the globe. To recover and trace the origin and evolution of infectious diseases, paleoparasitology was created. Paleoparasitology is the study of parasites in ancient material, which provided new information on the evolution, paleoepidemiology, ecology and phylogenetics of infectious diseases.

  20. Epidemiology of community-onset bloodstream infections in Bouaké, central Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoua-Koffi, C; Tia, H; Plo, J K; Monemo, P; Cissé, A; Yao, C; Yenan, P J; Touré, F S; Ilupeju, V; Bogoch, I I; Utzinger, J; Herrmann, M; Becker, S L

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial bloodstream infections (BSI) account for considerable morbidity worldwide, but epidemiological data from resource-constrained tropical settings are scarce. We analysed 293 blood cultures from patients presenting to a regional referral hospital in Bouaké, central Côte d'Ivoire, to determine the aetiology of community-onset BSI. The prevalence of bacteraemia was 22.5%, with children being most commonly affected. Enterobacteriaceae (predominantly Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella enterica) accounted for 94% of BSI. Staphylococcus aureus was the only relevant Gram-positive pathogen. Clinical signs and symptoms were not significantly associated with blood culture positivity after controlling for malaria. PMID:26442153

  1. Epidemiology of community-onset bloodstream infections in Bouaké, central Côte d’Ivoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Akoua-Koffi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial bloodstream infections (BSI account for considerable morbidity worldwide, but epidemiological data from resource-constrained tropical settings are scarce. We analysed 293 blood cultures from patients presenting to a regional referral hospital in Bouaké, central Côte d’Ivoire, to determine the aetiology of community-onset BSI. The prevalence of bacteraemia was 22.5%, with children being most commonly affected. Enterobacteriaceae (predominantly Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella enterica accounted for 94% of BSI. Staphylococcus aureus was the only relevant Gram-positive pathogen. Clinical signs and symptoms were not significantly associated with blood culture positivity after controlling for malaria.

  2. Epidemiology of community-onset bloodstream infections in Bouaké, central Côte d’Ivoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoua-Koffi, C.; Tia, H.; Plo, J.K.; Monemo, P.; Cissé, A.; Yao, C.; Yenan, P.J.; Touré, F.S.; Ilupeju, V.; Bogoch, I.I.; Utzinger, J.; Herrmann, M.; Becker, S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial bloodstream infections (BSI) account for considerable morbidity worldwide, but epidemiological data from resource-constrained tropical settings are scarce. We analysed 293 blood cultures from patients presenting to a regional referral hospital in Bouaké, central Côte d’Ivoire, to determine the aetiology of community-onset BSI. The prevalence of bacteraemia was 22.5%, with children being most commonly affected. Enterobacteriaceae (predominantly Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella enterica) accounted for 94% of BSI. Staphylococcus aureus was the only relevant Gram-positive pathogen. Clinical signs and symptoms were not significantly associated with blood culture positivity after controlling for malaria. PMID:26442153

  3. Exploring the host parasitism of the migratory plant-parasitic nematode Ditylenchus destuctor by expressed sequence tags analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huan; Gao, Bing-li; Kong, Ling-an; Yu, Qing; Huang, Wen-kun; He, Xu-feng; Long, Hai-bo; Peng, De-liang

    2013-01-01

    The potato rot nematode, Ditylenchus destructor, is a very destructive nematode pest on many agriculturally important crops worldwide, but the molecular characterization of its parasitism of plant has been limited. The effectors involved in nematode parasitism of plant for several sedentary endo-parasitic nematodes such as Heterodera glycines, Globodera rostochiensis and Meloidogyne incognita have been identified and extensively studied over the past two decades. Ditylenchus destructor, as a migratory plant parasitic nematode, has different feeding behavior, life cycle and host response. Comparing the transcriptome and parasitome among different types of plant-parasitic nematodes is the way to understand more fully the parasitic mechanism of plant nematodes. We undertook the approach of sequencing expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from a mixed stage cDNA library of D. destructor. This is the first study of D. destructor ESTs. A total of 9800 ESTs were grouped into 5008 clusters including 3606 singletons and 1402 multi-member contigs, representing a catalog of D. destructor genes. Implementing a bioinformatics' workflow, we found 1391 clusters have no match in the available gene database; 31 clusters only have similarities to genes identified from D. africanus, the most closely related species to D. destructor; 1991 clusters were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO); 1550 clusters were assigned enzyme commission (EC) numbers; and 1211 clusters were mapped to 181 KEGG biochemical pathways. 22 ESTs had similarities to reported nematode effectors. Interestedly, most of the effectors identified in this study are involved in host cell wall degradation or modification, such as 1,4-beta-glucanse, 1,3-beta-glucanse, pectate lyase, chitinases and expansin, or host defense suppression such as calreticulin, annexin and venom allergen-like protein. This result implies that the migratory plant-parasitic nematode D. destructor secrets similar effectors to those of sedentary

  4. Exploring the host parasitism of the migratory plant-parasitic nematode Ditylenchus destuctor by expressed sequence tags analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Peng

    Full Text Available The potato rot nematode, Ditylenchus destructor, is a very destructive nematode pest on many agriculturally important crops worldwide, but the molecular characterization of its parasitism of plant has been limited. The effectors involved in nematode parasitism of plant for several sedentary endo-parasitic nematodes such as Heterodera glycines, Globodera rostochiensis and Meloidogyne incognita have been identified and extensively studied over the past two decades. Ditylenchus destructor, as a migratory plant parasitic nematode, has different feeding behavior, life cycle and host response. Comparing the transcriptome and parasitome among different types of plant-parasitic nematodes is the way to understand more fully the parasitic mechanism of plant nematodes. We undertook the approach of sequencing expressed sequence tags (ESTs derived from a mixed stage cDNA library of D. destructor. This is the first study of D. destructor ESTs. A total of 9800 ESTs were grouped into 5008 clusters including 3606 singletons and 1402 multi-member contigs, representing a catalog of D. destructor genes. Implementing a bioinformatics' workflow, we found 1391 clusters have no match in the available gene database; 31 clusters only have similarities to genes identified from D. africanus, the most closely related species to D. destructor; 1991 clusters were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO; 1550 clusters were assigned enzyme commission (EC numbers; and 1211 clusters were mapped to 181 KEGG biochemical pathways. 22 ESTs had similarities to reported nematode effectors. Interestedly, most of the effectors identified in this study are involved in host cell wall degradation or modification, such as 1,4-beta-glucanse, 1,3-beta-glucanse, pectate lyase, chitinases and expansin, or host defense suppression such as calreticulin, annexin and venom allergen-like protein. This result implies that the migratory plant-parasitic nematode D. destructor secrets similar effectors to

  5. Whirling disease revisited: pathogenesis, parasite biology and disease intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Subhodeep; Kallert, Dennis Marc; Hedrick, Ronald P; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2015-05-21

    Whirling disease (WD) is an ecologically and economically debilitating disease of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss caused by the actinosporean spores of the parasite Myxobolus cerebralis. M. cerebralis has a complex, 2-host life cycle alternating between salmonid fish and the oligochaete host Tubifex tubifex. The parasite alternates between 2 spore forms as transmission stages: an actinosporean triactinomyxon spore that is produced in the oligochaete host and a myxosporean spore that develops in the salmonid host. Waterborne triactinomyxon spores released from infected T. tubifex oligochaetes attach to the salmonid host by polar filament extrusion elicited by chemical (nucleoside) and mechanical (thigmotropy) stimuli-a process which is rapidly followed by active penetration of the sporoplasms into the fish epidermis. Upon penetration, sporoplasms multiply and migrate via peripheral nerves and the central nervous system to reach the cartilage where they form trophozoites which undergo further multiplication and subsequent sporogenesis. M. cerebralis myxospores are released into the aquatic environment when infected fish die and autolyse, or when they are consumed and excreted by predators. Myxospores released into the water are ingested by susceptible T. tubifex where they develop intercellularly in the intestine over a period of 3 mo through 4 developmental stages to give rise to mature actinospores. In this article, we review our current understanding of WD-the parasite and its alternate hosts, life cycle and development of the parasite in either host, disease distribution, susceptibility and resistance mechanisms in salmonid host and strategies involved in diagnosis, prevention and control of WD. PMID:25993890

  6. Parasitism, the diversity of life, and paleoparasitology

    OpenAIRE

    Adauto Araújo; Ana Maria Jansen; Françoise Bouchet; Karl Reinhard; Luiz Fernando Ferreira

    2003-01-01

    The parasite-host-environment system is dynamic, with several points of equilibrium. This makes it difficult to trace the thresholds between benefit and damage, and therefore, the definitions of commensalism, mutualism, and symbiosis become worthless. Therefore, the same concept of parasitism may encompass commensalism, mutualism, and symbiosis. Parasitism is essential for life. Life emerged as a consequence of parasitism at the molecular level, and intracellular parasitism created evolutive ...

  7. Parasites in soil/sludge systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for the transmission of parasites, such as Entamoeba sp., schistosomes, and nematodes such as Ascaris sp., to man through the use of sewage sludges as fertilizer is reviewed. The eggs of Ascaris have been found to be the most resistant of these parasites to normal sludge treatment methods. Results of studies on the effectiveness of heat and ionizing radiation treatments reported show that a treatment of 550C for 1 hour or more sufficiently reduces the number of viable Ascaris eggs in seeded sludge systems. An absorbed dose of 300 kilorads radiation is more than adequate for the same purpose. However, before an unequivocal statement can be made about the effectiveness of either of these treatments in reducing viable ova in real systems, certain qualifying factors must be investigated. There are conflicting reports on the radiation sensitivities of Ascaris eggs in different stages of development. Also, irradiation of composted sludge using an electron beam was unsuccessful in rendering all naturally-occurring Ascaris ova non-viable, even at 300 kilorads. The significant differences in radiation and heat sensitivities of Ascaris eggs in compost vs liquid systems points out the need to further investigate the effects of moisture levels on these sensitivities

  8. Parasites in soil/sludge systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandon, J.R.

    1978-03-01

    The potential for the transmission of parasites, such as Entamoeba sp., schistosomes, and nematodes such as Ascaris sp., to man through the use of sewage sludges as fertilizer is reviewed. The eggs of Ascaris have been found to be the most resistant of these parasites to normal sludge treatment methods. Results of studies on the effectiveness of heat and ionizing radiation treatments reported show that a treatment of 55/sup 0/C for 1 hour or more sufficiently reduces the number of viable Ascaris eggs in seeded sludge systems. An absorbed dose of 300 kilorads radiation is more than adequate for the same purpose. However, before an unequivocal statement can be made about the effectiveness of either of these treatments in reducing viable ova in real systems, certain qualifying factors must be investigated. There are conflicting reports on the radiation sensitivities of Ascaris eggs in different stages of development. Also, irradiation of composted sludge using an electron beam was unsuccessful in rendering all naturally-occurring Ascaris ova non-viable, even at 300 kilorads. The significant differences in radiation and heat sensitivities of Ascaris eggs in compost vs liquid systems points out the need to further investigate the effects of moisture levels on these sensitivities.

  9. Classification of parasite eggs used as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, J. M.; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Thamsborg, S.;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the project is to describe the developmental stages of parasite eggs using digital image analysis of multispectral imagery. The primary focus is to identify and count eggs of different developmental stages and distinguish them from unrelated particles. This information is used to asses...

  10. Molecular Identification and Echinocandin Susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis Complex Bloodstream Isolates in Italy, 2007-2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Lovero

    Full Text Available The Candida parapsilosis group encompasses three species: C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis, and C. metapsilosis. Here, we describe the incidence and echinocandin susceptibility profile of bloodstream isolates of these three species collected from patients admitted to an Italian university hospital from 2007 to 2014. Molecular identification of cryptic species of the C. parapsilosis complex was performed using polymerase chain reaction amplification of the gene encoding secondary alcohol dehydrogenase, followed by digestion with the restriction enzyme BanI. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined using the broth microdilution method according to European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST EDef 7.2 and Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI M27-A3 guidelines, and the results were compared with those obtained using the E-test and Sensititre methods. Of the 163 C. parapsilosis complex isolates, 136 (83.4% were identified as C. parapsilosis, and 27 (16.6% as C. orthopsilosis. The species-specific incidences were 2.9/10,000 admissions for C. parapsilosis and 0.6/10,000 admissions for C. orthopsilosis. No resistance to echinocandins was detected with any of the methods. The percent essential agreement (EA between the EUCAST and E-test/Sensititre methods for anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin susceptibility was, respectively, as follows: C. parapsilosis, 95.6/97.8, 98.5/88.2, and 93.4/96.3; C. orthopsilosis, 92.6/92.6, 96.3/77.8, and 63.0/66.7. The EA between the CLSI and E-test/Sensititre methods was, respectively, as follows: C. parapsilosis, 99.3/100, 98.5/89.0, and 96.3/98.5; C. orthopsilosis, 96.3/92.6, 100/81.5, and 92.6/88.9. Only minor discrepancies, ranging from 16.9% (C. parapsilosis to 11.1% (C. orthopsilosis, were observed between the CLSI and E-test/Sensititre methods. In conclusion, this epidemiologic study shows a typical C. parapsilosis complex species distribution, no echinocandin

  11. Comparison of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome between monomicrobial and polymicrobial Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial bloodstream infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzel Richard P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some studies of nosocomial bloodstream infection (nBSI have demonstrated a higher mortality for polymicrobial bacteremia when compared to monomicrobial nBSI. The purpose of this study was to compare differences in systemic inflammatory response and mortality between monomicrobial and polymicrobial nBSI with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods We performed a historical cohort study on 98 adults with P. aeruginosa (Pa nBSI. SIRS scores were determined 2 days prior to the first positive blood culture through 14 days afterwards. Monomicrobial (n = 77 and polymicrobial BSIs (n = 21 were compared. Results 78.6% of BSIs were caused by monomicrobial P. aeruginosa infection (MPa and 21.4% by polymicrobial P. aeruginosa infection (PPa. Median APACHE II score on the day of BSI was 22 for MPa and 23 for PPa BSIs. Septic shock occurred in 33.3% of PPa and in 39.0% of MPa (p = 0.64. Progression to septic shock was associated with death more frequently in PPa (OR 38.5, CI95 2.9–508.5 than MPa (OR 4.5, CI95 1.7–12.1. Maximal SIR (severe sepsis, septic shock or death was seen on day 0 for PPa BSI vs. day 1 for MPa. No significant difference was noted in the incidence of organ failure, 7-day or overall mortality between the two groups. Univariate analysis revealed that APACHE II score ≥20 at BSI onset, Charlson weighted comorbidity index ≥3, burn injury and respiratory, cardiovascular, renal and hematologic failure were associated with death, while age, malignant disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatic failure, gastrointestinal complications, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, infection with imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa and polymicrobial nBSI were not. Multivariate analysis revealed that hematologic failure (p Conclusion In this historical cohort study of nBSI with P. aeruginosa, the incidence of septic shock and organ failure was high in both groups. Additionally, patients with PPa BSI were not more acutely ill, as judged by APACHE II

  12. Dual RNA-seq of parasite and host reveals gene expression dynamics during filarial worm-mosquito interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jun Choi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parasite biology, by its very nature, cannot be understood without integrating it with that of the host, nor can the host response be adequately explained without considering the activity of the parasite. However, due to experimental limitations, molecular studies of parasite-host systems have been predominantly one-sided investigations focusing on either of the partners involved. Here, we conducted a dual RNA-seq time course analysis of filarial worm parasite and host mosquito to better understand the parasite processes underlying development in and interaction with the host tissue, from the establishment of infection to the development of infective-stage larva. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the Brugia malayi-Aedes aegypti system, we report parasite gene transcription dynamics, which exhibited a highly ordered developmental program consisting of a series of cyclical and state-transitioning temporal patterns. In addition, we contextualized these parasite data in relation to the concurrent dynamics of the host transcriptome. Comparative analyses using uninfected tissues and different host strains revealed the influence of parasite development on host gene transcription as well as the influence of the host environment on parasite gene transcription. We also critically evaluated the life-cycle transcriptome of B. malayi by comparing developmental stages in the mosquito relative to those in the mammalian host, providing insight into gene expression changes underpinning the mosquito-borne parasitic lifestyle of this heteroxenous parasite. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data presented herein provide the research community with information to design wet lab experiments and select candidates for future study to more fully dissect the whole set of molecular interactions of both organisms in this mosquito-filarial worm symbiotic relationship. Furthermore, characterization of the transcriptional program over the complete life cycle of

  13. Metabolic labeling with (14C)-glucose of bloodstream and cell culture trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi from infected mouse blood and from cell culture were metabolically labeled by incubation with D-(14C)-glucose. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of lysates from parasites of two strains (RA and CA1) showed a significantly different pattern. The difference was mainly quantitative when the blood and cell culture trypomastigotes of the RA strain were compared. Analysis of the culture medium by paper electrophoresis showed an anionic exometabolite only in the blood forms of both strains. (Author)

  14. Malaria and trypanosome transmission: different parasites, same rules?

    OpenAIRE

    Pollitt, Laura C.; MacGregor, Paula; Matthews, Keith; Reece, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    African trypanosomes produce different specialized stages for within-host replication and between-host transmission and therefore face a resource allocation trade-off between maintaining the current infection (survival) and investment into transmission (reproduction). Evolutionary theory predicts the resolution of this trade-off will significantly affect virulence and infectiousness. The application of life history theory to malaria parasites has provided novel insight into their strategies f...

  15. Retaliatory mafia behavior by a parasitic cowbird favors host acceptance of parasitic eggs

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey P Hoover; Robinson, Scott K.

    2007-01-01

    Why do many hosts accept costly avian brood parasitism even when parasitic eggs and nestlings differ dramatically in appearance from their own? Scientists argue that evolutionary lag or equilibrium can explain this evolutionary enigma. Few, however, consider the potential of parasitic birds to enforce acceptance by destroying eggs or nestlings of hosts that eject parasitic eggs and thereby reject parasitism. This retaliatory “mafia” behavior has been reported in one species of parasitic cucko...

  16. Parasitism, the diversity of life, and paleoparasitology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adauto Araújo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The parasite-host-environment system is dynamic, with several points of equilibrium. This makes it difficult to trace the thresholds between benefit and damage, and therefore, the definitions of commensalism, mutualism, and symbiosis become worthless. Therefore, the same concept of parasitism may encompass commensalism, mutualism, and symbiosis. Parasitism is essential for life. Life emerged as a consequence of parasitism at the molecular level, and intracellular parasitism created evolutive events that allowed species to diversify. An ecological and evolutive approach to the study of parasitism is presented here. Studies of the origin and evolution of parasitism have new perspectives with the development of molecular paleoparasitology, by which ancient parasite and host genomes can be recovered from disappeared populations. Molecular paleoparasitology points to host-parasite co-evolutive mechanisms of evolution traceable through genome retrospective studies.

  17. Investigations of significance of blood smear results in diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Potkonjak Aleksandar; Lako Branislav; Belić Branislava; Milošević Nikolina; Stevančević Ognjen; Cincović Marko; Lako Bjanka

    2010-01-01

    The microscopic examination of stained smears of peripheral blood is of vital significance in the speedy diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases, in particular during the stage of infection when the cause is present in the blood, or blood cells. It is sometimes possible to make a definitive diagnosis of an infectious or parasitic disease following an examination of a stained smear of the peripheral blood. Since microscopic examinations of a peripheral blood smear are applied increasi...

  18. Targeted Reduction in Expression of Trypanosoma cruzi Surface Glycoprotein gp90 Increases Parasite Infectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Málaga, Sergio; Yoshida, Nobuko

    2001-01-01

    A previous study had shown that the expression of gp90, a stage-specific surface glycoprotein of Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes, is inversely correlated with the parasite's ability to invade mammalian cells. By using antisense oligonucleotides complementary to a region of the gp90 gene implicated in host cell adhesion, we investigated whether the selective inhibition of gp90 synthesis affected the capacity of metacyclic forms to enter target cells. Parasites were incubated for 2...

  19. Rodents as shared indicators for zoonotic parasites of carnivores in urban environments

    OpenAIRE

    Reperant, L A; Hegglin, D; Tanner, I; Fischer, C.; Deplazes, P.

    2009-01-01

    Rodents are shared intermediate or paratenic hosts for Echinococcus multilocularis, Toxocara spp. and Toxoplasma gondii, and may serve as valuable indicators for assessing the occurrence and the level of environmental contamination and infection pressure with free-living stages of these zoonotic parasites. We investigated 658 non-commensal rodents for parasite infections in the canton of Geneva, Switzerland. The prevalence of infection with E. multilocularis was highest in Arvicola terrestris...

  20. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Asrar Alam

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes...

  1. Co-Infection and Wild Animal Health: Effects of Trypanosomatids and Gastrointestinal Parasites on Coatis of the Brazilian Pantanal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Olifiers

    Full Text Available Wild animals are infected by diverse parasites, but how they influence host health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship of trypanosomatids and gastrointestinal parasites with health of wild brown-nosed coatis (Nasua nasua from the Brazilian Pantanal. We used coati body condition and hematological parameters as response variables in linear models that were compared using an information theoretic approach. Predictors were high/low parasitemias by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi, and indices representing the abundance of distinct groups of gastrointestinal parasites. We also analyzed how host health changed with host sex and reproductive seasonality. Hemoparasites was best related to coati body condition and hematological indices, whereas abundance of gastrointestinal parasites was relatively less associated with coati health. Additionally, some associations were best predicted by models that incorporated reproductive seasonality and host sex. Overall, we observed a lower health condition during the breeding season, when coatis are under reproductive stress and may be less able to handle infection. In addition, females seem to handle infection better than males. Body condition was lower in coatis with high parasitemias of T. evansi, especially during the reproductive season. Total red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, platelets and eosinophils were also lower in animals with high T. evansi parasitemias. Total white blood cell counts and mature neutrophils were lower in animals with high parasitemias for both Trypanosoma species, with neutrophils decreasing mainly during the reproductive season. Overall, decreases in hematological parameters of females with T. evansi high parasitemias were less evident. For T. cruzi, monocytes decreased in individuals with high parasitemias. High abundances of microfilariae in the bloodstream, and cestode eggs and coccidian oocysts in feces were also associated with coati blood parameters. This

  2. Co-Infection and Wild Animal Health: Effects of Trypanosomatids and Gastrointestinal Parasites on Coatis of the Brazilian Pantanal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olifiers, Natalie; Jansen, Ana Maria; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Bianchi, Rita de Cassia; D’Andrea, Paulo Sergio; Mourão, Guilherme de Miranda; Gompper, Matthew Edzart

    2015-01-01

    Wild animals are infected by diverse parasites, but how they influence host health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship of trypanosomatids and gastrointestinal parasites with health of wild brown-nosed coatis (Nasua nasua) from the Brazilian Pantanal. We used coati body condition and hematological parameters as response variables in linear models that were compared using an information theoretic approach. Predictors were high/low parasitemias by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi, and indices representing the abundance of distinct groups of gastrointestinal parasites. We also analyzed how host health changed with host sex and reproductive seasonality. Hemoparasites was best related to coati body condition and hematological indices, whereas abundance of gastrointestinal parasites was relatively less associated with coati health. Additionally, some associations were best predicted by models that incorporated reproductive seasonality and host sex. Overall, we observed a lower health condition during the breeding season, when coatis are under reproductive stress and may be less able to handle infection. In addition, females seem to handle infection better than males. Body condition was lower in coatis with high parasitemias of T. evansi, especially during the reproductive season. Total red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, platelets and eosinophils were also lower in animals with high T. evansi parasitemias. Total white blood cell counts and mature neutrophils were lower in animals with high parasitemias for both Trypanosoma species, with neutrophils decreasing mainly during the reproductive season. Overall, decreases in hematological parameters of females with T. evansi high parasitemias were less evident. For T. cruzi, monocytes decreased in individuals with high parasitemias. High abundances of microfilariae in the bloodstream, and cestode eggs and coccidian oocysts in feces were also associated with coati blood parameters. This study shows the

  3. Experimental insight into the process of parasite community assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budischak, Sarah A; Hoberg, Eric P; Abrams, Art; Jolles, Anna E; Ezenwa, Vanessa O

    2016-09-01

    Community assembly is a fundamental process that has long been a central focus in ecology. Extending community assembly theory to communities of co-infecting parasites, we used a gastrointestinal nematode removal experiment in free-ranging African buffalo to examine the community assembly patterns and processes. We first asked whether reassembled communities differ from undisturbed communities by comparing anthelmintic-treated and control hosts. Next, we examined the temporal dynamics of assembly using a cross-section of communities that reassembled for different periods of time since last experimental removal. Next, we tested for evidence of assembly processes that might drive such reassembly patterns: environmental filtering based on host traits (i.e. habitat patches), interspecific interactions, priority effects and chance dispersal from the environmental pool of infective stages (i.e. the regional species pool). On average, reassembled parasite communities had lower abundance, but were more diverse and even, and these patterns varied tightly with reassembly time. Over time, the communities within treated hosts progressively resembled controls as diversity and evenness decreased, while total abundance increased. Notably, experimental removal allowed us to attribute observed differences in abundance, diversity and evenness to the process of community assembly. During early reassembly, parasite accumulation was biased towards a subordinate species and, by excluding stochastic assembly processes (i.e. chance dispersal and priority effects), we were able to determine that early assembly is deterministic. Later in the reassembly process, we established that host traits, as well as stochastic dispersal from the environmental pool of infective stages, can affect the community composition. Overall, our results suggest that there is a high degree of resiliency and environmental dependence to the worm communities of buffalo. More generally, our data show that both

  4. Inhibition of cathepsin B by E-64 induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in filarial parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Wadhawan

    Full Text Available Current available antifilarial drug strategies only eliminate the larval stages of filarial parasites. Therefore, there is an urgent need of drugs which are macrofilaricidals. Identification of molecular targets crucial for survival of parasite is a prerequisite for drug designing. Cathepsin B, a cysteine protease family member is known to play crucial role in the normal growth, digestion of nutrients, exsheathment of the helminth parasites. Therefore, we targeted this enzyme in the filarial parasite using its specific inhibitor, E-64.We have exposed the parasites to E-64 and observed their motility and viability at various time intervals. It caused marked decrease in the motility and viability of the parasites ultimately leading to their death after 8 hours. It is well known that E-64 protects the cell from apoptosis, however, it causes apoptotic effect in carcinoma cell lines. To understand the mechanism of action of E-64 on parasite survival, we have measured levels of different apoptotic markers in the treated parasites. E-64 significantly reduced the level of ced-9 and activity of tyrosine phosphatases, cytochrome c oxidase. It also activated ced-3, homolog of mammalian caspase 3 suggesting initiation of an apoptotic like event in the filarial parasites. Different antioxidant enzymes were also evaluated to further explore the mechanism behind the death of the parasites. There was marked decrease in the level of GSH and activity of Glutathione reductase and glutathione-s-transferase leading to increased generation of reactive oxygen species. This led to the induced oxidation of fatty acids and protein which might alter the mitochondrial membrane permeability.This study suggests that inhibition of cathepsin B by E-64 generates oxidative stress followed by mitochondrial mediated apoptotic like event in filarial parasites leading to their death. Hence, suggesting filarial cathepsin B as a potential chemotherapeutic target for lymphatic

  5. Oncogenic Brain Metazoan Parasite Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela N. Spurgeon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple observations suggest that certain parasitic infections can be oncogenic. Among these, neurocysticercosis is associated with increased risk for gliomas and hematologic malignancies. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman with colocalization of a metazoan parasite, possibly cysticercosis, and a WHO grade IV neuroepithelial tumor with exclusively neuronal differentiation by immunohistochemical stains (immunopositive for synaptophysin, neurofilament protein, and Neu-N and not for GFAP, vimentin, or S100. The colocalization and temporal relationship of these two entities suggest a causal relationship.

  6. Parasite communities of four fish species in the Wadden Sea and the role of fish discarded by the shrimp fisheries in parasite transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewold, S.; Berghahn, R.; Zander, C.-D.

    1996-03-01

    Parasites were observed in medium- and small-sized fish taken from the discards of a commercial shrimper during seven different cruises in the tidal channels of the North Frisian Wadden Sea (Süderaue, North Sea) from April to September 1991. In total, 442 fish comprising four species ( Sprattus sprattus, Hyperoplus lanceolatus, Ammodytes tobianus, Pomatoschistus minutus) were investigated. The parasite fauna consisted of 22 species. The parasite community structure of the 4 hosts was compared. The diet of the hosts seemed to be the main factor determining the structure of the parasite community. Other factors could not be assessed. Eight species of parasites occurred as larval stages. This indicated that fish were intermediate or paratenic hosts in their life cycle. The nematode Hysterothylacium sp. (Anisakidae) and the digenean Cryptocotyle lingua (Heterophyidea) were the dominant parasites, reaching their highest prevalence and density in sprat and sand eel. Sprat and sand eel play a very important role in parasite transmission to predacious fish and seabirds.

  7. Relative reproductive success of co-infecting parasite genotypes under intensified within-host competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, Otto; Louhi, Katja-Riikka; Karvonen, Anssi; Rellstab, Christian; Jokela, Jukka

    2015-12-01

    In nature, host individuals are commonly simultaneously infected with more than one genotype of the same parasite species. These co-infecting parasites often interact, which can affect their fitness and shape host-parasite ecology and evolution. Many of such interactions take place through competition for limited host resources. Therefore, variation in ecological factors modifying the host resource level could be important in determining the intensity of competition and the outcome of co-infections. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the relative reproductive success of co-infecting genotypes of the trematode parasite Diplostomum pseudospathaceum in its snail host Lymnaea stagnalis while experimentally manipulating snail resource level using contrasting feeding treatments (ad libitum food supply, no food). We found that food deprivation constrained the overall parasite within-host reproduction as the release of parasite transmission stages (cercariae) was reduced. This indicates intensified competition among the parasite genotypes. The genotypic composition of the released cercariae, however, was not affected by the feeding treatments. This suggests that in this system, the relative reproductive success of co-infecting parasite genotypes, which is an important component determining their fitness, is robust to variation in ecological factors modifying the strength of resource competition. PMID:26296607

  8. Novel parasitic nematode-specific protein of bovine filarial parasite Setaria digitata displays conserved gene structure and ubiquitous expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, W W; Dassanayake, R S; Weerasena, S J; Silva Gunawardene, Y I

    2014-09-01

    Setaria digitata is an animal filarial parasite, which can cause fatal diseases to livestock such as cattle, sheep, goat, buffaloes, horses etc. inflicting considerable economic losses to livelihood of livestock farmers. In spite of this, the biology and parasitic nature of this organism is largely unknown. As a step towards understanding these, we screened the cDNA library of S. digitata and identified an open reading frame that code for parasitic nematode-specific protein, which showed a significant homology to functionally and structurally unannotated sequences of parasitic nematodes Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, Loa loa etc., suggesting its role in parasitism. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the S. digitata novel gene (SDNP) is expressed in adult female and male, and microfilariae. Southern hybridization studies revealed that this gene is a single-copy gene. Sequence analysis of the genomic region obtained from overlapping PCR amplification indicated that the size of the genomic region is 1819 bp in which four exons encoding 205 amino acids were interrupted by three introns of varying lengths of 419, 659 and 123 bp, and also the expansion of the size of the introns of S. digitata compared to its orthologues by integrating micro and mini-satellite containing sequence. Sequences around the splice junctions were conserved and agreed with the general GT-AG splicing rule. The gene was found to be AT rich with a GC content of 38.1%. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the gene structure of SDNP and its orthologues is conserved and it expressed ubiqutously in all the stages of nematode's life cycle. Therefore, taking these outcomes together, it can be concluded that SDNP is a parasitic nematode-specific, single copy gene having conserved gene structure of four exons interrupted by three introns and that the gene is expressed ubiquitously throughout nematode's life cycle. PMID:25382479

  9. Impact of a modified Broviac maintenance care bundle on bloodstream infections in paediatric cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furtwängler, Rhoikos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: During intensive chemotherapy, bloodstream infection (BSI represents an important complication in paediatric cancer patients. Most patients carry a long-term central venous access device (CVAD. Improved maintenance care of these vascular catheters may decrease the risk of BSI.Methods: Intervention study (adapted CVAD prevention protocol with two observation periods (P1: 09-2009 until 05-2011; P2: 09-2011 until 05-2013; prospective surveillance of all laboratory confirmed BSIs. In P2, ready to use sterile NaCl 0.9% syringes were used for CVAD flushing and octenidine/isopropanol for the disinfection of catheter hubs and 3-way stopcocks. Results: During P1, 84 patients were included versus 81 patients during P2. There were no significant differences between the two patient populations in terms of median age, gender, underlying malignancy or disease status (first illness or relapse. Nearly all CVADs were Broviac catheters. The median duration from implantation to removal of the CVAD was 192 days (Inter-quartile-range (IQR; 110–288 days in P1 and 191 days (IQR; 103–270 days in P2. 28 BSI were diagnosed in 22 patients in P1 (26% of all patients experienced at least one BSI and 15 BSI in 12 patients in P2 (15% of all patients. The corresponding results for incidence density (ID were 0.44 (CI95 0.29–0.62 for P1 vs. 0.34 (0.19–0.53 BSI per 100 inpatient days for P2 and for incidence rate (IR 7.76 (5.16–10.86 in P1 vs. 4.75 (2.66–7.43 BSI per 1,000 inpatient CVAD utilization days. In P1, 9 BSI were caused by CoNS vs. only 2 in P2 (IR 2.49; CI95 0.17–4.17 vs. 0.63; CI95 0.08–1.72. In P1 two BSI (7% lead to early removal of the device. During P2 one CVAD was prematurely removed due to a Broviac-related BSI (6.7%.Conclusion: The preventive protocol investigated in this study led to a reduction of BSI in paediatric cancer patients. This result was clinically relevant but – due to insufficient power in a single centre observation

  10. Can Parasites Really Reveal Environmental Impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review assesses the usefulness of parasites as bioindicators of environmental impact. Relevant studies published in the past decade were compiled; factorial meta-analysis demonstrated significant effects and interactions between parasite levels and the presence and concentra...

  11. Travel/Travelers and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Travel/Travelers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir International ... The Parasitic Illnesses That Can Be Acquired During Travel* Contaminated Food and Water More Common giardiasis cryptosporidiosis ...

  12. Parasitic Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Parasitic Diseases URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Parasitic Diseases - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  13. Cytoplasmic free Ca2+ is essential for multiple steps in malaria parasite egress from infected erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glushakova Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    programme requires intracellular free Ca2+ for egress initiation, vacuole swelling, and host cell cytoskeleton digestion. The evidence that parasitophorous vacuole swelling, a stage of unaffected egress, is dependent upon a rise in intracellular Ca2+ suggests a mechanism for ionophore-inducible egress and a new target for Ca2+ in the programme liberating parasites from the host cell. A regulatory pathway for egress that depends upon increases in intracellular free Ca2+ is proposed.

  14. Decoys in Predation and Parasitism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    2003-01-01

    Predator-prey or host-parasite dynamics can be altered by the presence of other species through several mechanisms. One such mechanism is the ‘‘decoy effect,’’ which itself can take a variety of forms. In its simplest form, the third species, which is inedible to the predator, nonetheless interferes

  15. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    . Nevertheless, people’s experience of the environment is sought manipulated in a variety of contexts, often without offering a less ‘true’ experience of a situation than if it had not been manipulated by people. In fact, orchestrations of space are often central to sociality, politics and aesthetics. This...... introduction seeks to outline how a number of scholars have addressed the relationship between staged atmospheres and experience, and thus highlight both the philosophical, social and political aspects of atmospheres...

  16. DNA microarray genotyping and virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene profiling of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream isolates from renal patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Sinead

    2012-02-01

    Thirty-six methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream isolates from renal patients were genetically characterized by DNA microarray analysis and spa typing. The isolates were highly clonal, belonging mainly to ST22-MRSA-IV. The immune evasion and enterotoxin gene clusters were found in 29\\/36 (80%) and 33\\/36 (92%) isolates, respectively.

  17. “What the Eyes Don’t See, the Heart Doesn’t Grieve Over”: Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Bloodstream Infections following Cardiac Catheterization

    OpenAIRE

    Dicks, Kristen V.; Staheli, Russell; Anderson, Deverick J.; Miller, Becky A.; Jones, W. Schuyler; Harrison, J. Kevin; Sexton, Daniel J.; Moehring, Rebekah W.; Chen, Luke F.

    2012-01-01

    No standard definition exists for surveillance and characterization of the epidemiology of bloodstream infections (BSIs) after cardiac catheterization (CC) procedures. We proposed a novel case definition and determined the epidemiology and risk factors of BSIs after CC procedure using this new definition.

  18. Detection of mcr-1 encoding plasmid-mediated colistin-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from human bloodstream infection and imported chicken meat, Denmark 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, H.; Hammerum, A. M.; Hansen, F.;

    2015-01-01

    The plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, was detected in an Escherichia coli isolate from a Danish patient with bloodstream infection and in five E. coli isolates from imported chicken meat. One isolate from chicken meat belonged to the epidemic spreading sequence type ST131. In...

  19. DNA microarray genotyping and virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene profiling of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream isolates from renal patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Sinead

    2011-12-01

    Thirty-six methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream isolates from renal patients were genetically characterized by DNA microarray analysis and spa typing. The isolates were highly clonal, belonging mainly to ST22-MRSA-IV. The immune evasion and enterotoxin gene clusters were found in 29\\/36 (80%) and 33\\/36 (92%) isolates, respectively.

  20. Helicosporidia: a genomic snapshot of an early transition to parasitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukun Sun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicosporidia are gut parasites of invertebrates. These achlorophyllous, non-photosynthetic green algae are the first reported to infect insects. Helicosporidia are members of the green algal class Trebouxiophyceae and are further related to the photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic genera Auxenochlorella and Prototheca, respectively, the latter of which can also turn to parasitism under opportunistic conditions. Molecular analyses suggest that Helicosporidia diverged from other photosynthetic trebouxiophytes less than 200 million years ago and that its adaptation to parasitism is therefore recent. In this minireview, we summarize the current knowledge of helicosporidian genomics. Unlike many well-known parasitic lineages, the Helicosporidium sp. organelle and nuclear genomes have lost surprisingly little in terms of coding content aside from photosynthesis-related genes. While the small size of its nuclear genome compared to other sequenced trebouxiophycean representatives suggests that Helicosporidium is going through a streamlining process, this scenario cannot be ascertained at this stage. Genome expansions and contractions have occurred independently multiple times in the green algae, and the small size of the Helicosporidium genome may reflect a lack of expansion from a lean ancestor state rather than a tendency towards reduction.

  1. Parasite control in transhumant situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, J; Hertzberg, H

    1994-08-01

    Transhumance is defined as 'seasonal moving of livestock to regions of different climate'. It is an integral part of livestock production in many parts of the world and takes several forms including moving of livestock from lowland to mountainous pastures or from dry to humid areas. The impact of transhumance on parasite populations of livestock and on parasite control is described, mainly using examples from Europe. The epidemiology of trichostrongylidosis of cattle, mainly caused by Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora, is characterised by prolonged survival of overwintered infective larvae until the end of June. Cattle moved to such contaminated pastures in a transhumant grazing system are exposed to these larvae and may be protected, during the second half of the grazing season until autumn, by a late application (June/July) of an intraruminal drug-release device. Community pastures used in a transhumant system with mixed grazing of young cattle originating from various farms may enhance transmission of dictyocaulosis. Therefore, specific prophylactic measures are required. Hill sheep nematode populations may differ from those in lowland sheep in that Haemonchus contortus generally plays a minor role in hill sheep in which Ostertagia circumcincta and Nematodirus spp. predominate. Infections with Fasciola hepatica and Dicrocoelium dendriticum can be acquired on mountainous pastures by cattle, sheep and other livestock grazing in a transhumant system as intermediate hosts of these parasites may find suitable habitats in these regions. There is evidence that in the prealpine and alpine area both parasites are mainly transmitted in two-season cycles. Further examples for the impact of transhumance on parasite-host inter-relationships include cysticercosis in cattle, echinococcosis, psoroptic manage in sheep, tick-borne fever of cattle, and hypodermosis in cattle. These are described and discussed. PMID:7846845

  2. Parasites of mammals species abundance near zone Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In wildlife reserve parasitize various types of parasites: arachnids (mites) parasitic insects (horseflies, keds, mosquitoes, gnats, midges), helminths (trematodes, cestodes, nematodes and acanthocephalans) and parasitic protozoa. In quantity: 3 (beaver) to 25 species (wolf). (authors)

  3. Quantitative Analysis of a Parasitic Antiviral Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hwijin; Yin, John

    2004-01-01

    We extended a computer simulation of viral intracellular growth to study a parasitic antiviral strategy that diverts the viral replicase toward parasite growth. This strategy inhibited virus growth over a wide range of conditions, while minimizing host cell perturbations. Such parasitic strategies may inhibit the development of drug-resistant virus strains.

  4. 9 CFR 381.88 - Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parasites. 381.88 Section 381.88 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.88 Parasites. Organs or other parts of carcasses which are found to be infested with parasites,...

  5. Effectiveness of a programme to reduce the burden of catheter-related bloodstream infections in a tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Morel, H R; Sanchez-Payá, J; García-Shimizu, P; Mendoza-García, J L; Tenza-Iglesias, I; Rodríguez-Díaz, J C; Merino-DE-Lucas, E; Nolasco, A

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR BSI) reduction programme and healthcare workers' compliance with recommendations. A 3-year surveillance programme of CR BSIs in all hospital settings was implemented. As part of the programme, there was a direct observation of insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters (CVCs) to determine performance. A total of 38 education courses were held over the study period and feedback reports with the results of surveillance and recommendations were delivered to healthcare workers every 6 months. A total of 6722 short-term CVCs were inserted in 4982 patients for 58 763 catheter-days. Improvements of compliance with hand hygiene was verified at the insertion (87·1-100%, P education programme clearly improved compliance with recommendations for CVC handling, and was effective in reducing the burden of CR BSIs. PMID:26758404

  6. Surveillance of Candida spp bloodstream infections: epidemiological trends and risk factors of death in two Mexican tertiary care hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora E Corzo-Leon

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Larger populations at risk, broader use of antibiotics and longer hospital stays have impacted on the incidence of Candida sp. bloodstream infections (CBSI. OBJECTIVE: To determine clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of patients with CBSI in two tertiary care reference medical institutions in Mexico City. DESIGN: Prospective and observational laboratory-based surveillance study conducted from 07/2008 to 06/2010. METHODS: All patients with CBSI were included. Identification and antifungal susceptibility were performed using CLSI M27-A3 standard procedures. Frequencies, Mann-Whitney U test or T test were used as needed. Risk factors were determined with multivariable analysis and binary logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: CBSI represented 3.8% of nosocomial bloodstream infections. Cumulative incidence was 2.8 per 1000 discharges (incidence rate: 0.38 per 1000 patient-days. C. albicans was the predominant species (46%, followed by C. tropicalis (26%. C. glabrata was isolated from patients with diabetes (50%, and elderly patients. Sixty-four patients (86% received antifungals. Amphotericin-B deoxycholate (AmBD was the most commonly used agent (66%. Overall mortality rate reached 46%, and risk factors for death were APACHE II score ≥ 16 (OR = 6.94, CI95% = 2.34-20.58, p<0.0001, and liver disease (OR = 186.11, CI95% = 7.61-4550.20, p = 0.001. Full susceptibility to fluconazole, AmBD and echinocandins among C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis was observed. CONCLUSIONS: The cumulative incidence rate in these centers was higher than other reports from tertiary care hospitals from Latin America. Knowledge of local epidemiologic patterns permits the design of more specific strategies for prevention and preemptive therapy of CBSI.

  7. Bloodstream infections caused by multi-drug resistant Proteus mirabilis: Epidemiology, risk factors and impact of multi-drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korytny, Alexander; Riesenberg, Klaris; Saidel-Odes, Lisa; Schlaeffer, Fransisc; Borer, Abraham

    2016-06-01

    Background The prevalence of antimicrobial co-resistance among ESBL-producing Enterobactereaceae is extremely high in Israel. Multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strains (MDR-PM), resistant to almost all antibiotic classes have been described. The aim was to determine the risk factors for bloodstream infections caused by MDR-PM and clinical outcomes. Methods A retrospective case-control study. Adult patients with PM bacteremia during 7 years were identified retrospectively and their files reviewed for demographics, underlying diseases, Charlson Comorbidity Index, treatment and outcome. Results One hundred and eighty patients with PM-bloodstream infection (BSI) were included; 90 cases with MDR-PM and 90 controls with sensitive PM (S-PM). Compared to controls, cases more frequently were from nursing homes, had recurrent hospital admissions in the past year and received antibiotic therapy in the previous 3 months, were bedridden and suffered from peripheral vascular disease and peptic ulcer disease (p < 0.001). Two-thirds of the MDR-PM isolates were ESBL-producers vs 4.4% of S-PM isolates (p < 0.001, OR = 47.6, 95% CI = 15.9-142.6). In-hospital crude mortality rate of patients with MDR-PM BSI was 37.7% vs 23.3% in those with S-PM BSI (p = 0.0359, OR = 2, 95% CI = 1.4-3.81). Conclusions PM bacteremia in elderly and functionally-dependent patients is likely to be caused by nearly pan-resistant PM strains in the institution; 51.8% of the patients received inappropriate empiric antibiotic treatment. The crude mortality rate of patients with MDR-PM BSI was significantly higher than that of patients with S-PM BSI. PMID:26763474

  8. The multifunctional autophagy pathway in the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Serena; Bunnik, Evelien M; Saraf, Anita; Conner, Christopher M; Escalante, Aster; Sardiu, Mihaela E; Ponts, Nadia; Prudhomme, Jacques; Florens, Laurence; Le Roch, Karine G

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic pathway typically induced by nutrient starvation to recycle amino acids, but can also function in removing damaged organelles. In addition, this pathway plays a key role in eukaryotic development. To date, not much is known about the role of autophagy in apicomplexan parasites and more specifically in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Comparative genomic analysis has uncovered some, but not all, orthologs of autophagy-related (ATG) genes in the malaria parasite genome. Here, using a genome-wide in silico analysis, we confirmed that ATG genes whose products are required for vesicle expansion and completion are present, while genes involved in induction of autophagy and cargo packaging are mostly absent. We subsequently focused on the molecular and cellular function of P. falciparum ATG8 (PfATG8), an autophagosome membrane marker and key component of the autophagy pathway, throughout the parasite asexual and sexual erythrocytic stages. In this context, we showed that PfATG8 has a distinct and atypical role in parasite development. PfATG8 localized in the apicoplast and in vesicles throughout the cytosol during parasite development. Immunofluorescence assays of PfATG8 in apicoplast-minus parasites suggest that PfATG8 is involved in apicoplast biogenesis. Furthermore, treatment of parasite cultures with bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine, both lysosomotropic agents that inhibit autophagosome and lysosome fusion, resulted in dramatic morphological changes of the apicoplast, and parasite death. Furthermore, deep proteomic analysis of components associated with PfATG8 indicated that it may possibly be involved in ribophagy and piecemeal microautophagy of the nucleus. Collectively, our data revealed the importance and specificity of the autophagy pathway in the malaria parasite and offer potential novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:24275162

  9. Glutathione-deficient Plasmodium berghei parasites exhibit growth delay and nuclear DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padín-Irizarry, Vivian; Colón-Lorenzo, Emilee E; Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Castro, María Del R; González-Méndez, Ricardo; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; Serrano, Adelfa E

    2016-06-01

    Plasmodium parasites are exposed to endogenous and exogenous oxidative stress during their complex life cycle. To minimize oxidative damage, the parasites use glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx) as primary antioxidants. We previously showed that disruption of the Plasmodium berghei gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (pbggcs-ko) or the glutathione reductase (pbgr-ko) genes resulted in a significant reduction of GSH in intraerythrocytic stages, and a defect in growth in the pbggcs-ko parasites. In this report, time course experiments of parasite intraerythrocytic development and morphological studies showed a growth delay during the ring to schizont progression. Morphological analysis shows a significant reduction in size (diameter) of trophozoites and schizonts with increased number of cytoplasmic vacuoles in the pbggcs-ko parasites in comparison to the wild type (WT). Furthermore, the pbggcs-ko mutants exhibited an impaired response to oxidative stress and increased levels of nuclear DNA (nDNA) damage. Reduced GSH levels did not result in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage or protein carbonylations in neither pbggcs-ko nor pbgr-ko parasites. In addition, the pbggcs-ko mutant parasites showed an increase in mRNA expression of genes involved in oxidative stress detoxification and DNA synthesis, suggesting a potential compensatory mechanism to allow for parasite proliferation. These results reveal that low GSH levels affect parasite development through the impairment of oxidative stress reduction systems and damage to the nDNA. Our studies provide new insights into the role of the GSH antioxidant system in the intraerythrocytic development of Plasmodium parasites, with potential translation into novel pharmacological interventions. PMID:26952808

  10. Nuclear techniques in the study of parasitic infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Out of 57 papers published, 47 fall within the INIS subject scope. Seven main topics were covered: resistance to infections with protozoan parasites; resistance to infections with African trypanosomes and helminths of ruminant animals; resistance to infections with filarial parasites and schistosomes; pathology of parasitic infections; epidemiology and diagnosis of parasitic infections; physiology and biochemistry of parasitic organisms; pharmacodynamics of anti-parasitic agents

  11. Postcolonial Ecologies of Parasite and Host: Making Parasitism Cosmopolitan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Warwick

    2016-04-01

    The interest of F. Macfarlane Burnet in host-parasite interactions grew through the 1920s and 1930s, culminating in his book, Biological Aspects of Infectious Disease (1940), often regarded as the founding text of disease ecology. Our knowledge of the influences on Burnet's ecological thinking is still incomplete. Burnet later attributed much of his conceptual development to his reading of British theoretical biology, especially the work of Julian Huxley and Charles Elton, and regretted he did not study Theobald Smith's Parasitism and Disease (1934) until after he had formulated his ideas. Scholars also have adduced Burnet's fascination with natural history and the clinical and public health demands on his research effort, among other influences. I want to consider here additional contributions to Burnet's ecological thinking, focusing on his intellectual milieu, placing his research in a settler society with exceptional expertise in environmental studies and pest management. In part, an ''ecological turn'' in Australian science in the 1930s, derived to a degree from British colonial scientific investments, shaped Burnet's conceptual development. This raises the question of whether we might characterize, in postcolonial fashion, disease ecology, and other studies of parasitism, as successful settler colonial or dominion science. PMID:27188710

  12. [Intestinal parasitic infections in Serbia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, A; Djurković-Djaković, O; Bobić, B

    1998-01-01

    To determine the public health significance of intestinal parasitism in Serbia today, systematic parasitologic examination of 16 regions (Kragujevac, Luchani, Zhagubica, Bor, Sjenica, Novi Pazar, Valjevo, Aleksandrovac, Pirot, Bosilegrad, Ivanjica, Golubac, Uzhice, Kladovo, Negotin, Beograd) in central Serbia were carried out over the period 1984-1993. The study involved a total of 5981 schoolchildren (2887 F, 3094 M), 7-11 years old representing 10% of the total age-matched population (N = 58,228) of the examined regions, residing in 91 settlements. Field parasitological examinations included the examination of perianal swabs for E. vermicularis and Taenia sp., and examination of a single feces sample by direct saline smear and Lugol stained smear for intestinal protozoa, and the Kato and Lörincz methods for intestinal helminths. Nine species of intestinal parasites were detected, of which five protozoan: Entamoeba histolytica (0.02%), Entamoeba hartmanni (0.02%), Entamoeba coli (1.3%), Iodamoeba bütschlii (0.02%), Giardia lamblia (6.8%), and four helminthic: Hymenolepis nana (0.06%), Enterobius vermicularis (14.7%), Ascaris lumbricoides (3.3%), Trichuris trichiura (1.8%). The overall prevalence of intestinal parasite infections amounted to 24.6% (1207/4913), with a highly significant difference (p hartmanni, I. bütschlii, H. nana) were each found in a single region (Figure 2). The predominant species (E. coli, G. lamblia, E. vermicularis, A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura) were distributed at considerably different prevalence rates, with a significant difference between the minimal and maximal values (p < 0.01). Of 91 settlements examined, intestinal parasites were found in all but one. However, the prevalence rates in 90 settlements varied significantly (p = 0.0004), from a low of 5.9% to a high of 66.7%. Thus, according to the World Health Organization criteria [19], infections with the four clinically relevant species (G. lamblia, E. vermicularis, A

  13. PARASITIC INTERFERENCE IN LONG BASELINE OPTICAL INTERFEROMETRY: REQUIREMENTS FOR HOT JUPITER-LIKE PLANET DETECTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    reference star, at this accuracy level, seems very difficult. Moreover, since parasitic phase is an object-dependent quantity, the use of a hypothetical phase abacus, directly giving the parasitic phase from a given parasitic flux level, is also impossible. Some instrumental solutions, implemented at the instrument design stage for limiting or preventing this parasitic interference, appear to be crucial and are presented in this paper.

  14. Chlorophyllin as a possible measure against vectors of human parasites and fish parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rolf Richter

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Water soluble chlorophyll (chlorophyllin exerts pronounced photodynamic activity. Chlorophyllin is a potential remedy against mosquito larvae and aquatic stages in the life cycle of parasites as well as against ectoparasites in fish. In the recent years it was found that mosquito larvae and other pest organisms can be killed by means of photodynamic substances such as different porphyrin derivates (e.g. hematoporphyrin, meso-tri(N-methylpyridyl, meso-mono(N-tetra-decylpyridyl porphyrine, hematoporphyrin IX, or hermatoporphyrin formula (HPF. It was found that incubation of mosquito larvae in chlorophyllin solution and subsequent irradiation results in photodynamic destruction of the larvae. Incorporation of about 8 ng chlorophyllin per larvae was sufficient to induce its death. In fish mass cultivation ichthyophthiriosis is a severe parasitic protozoan disease caused by the ciliate Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. It was found that incubation of infected fishes in chlorophyllin and subsequent illumination reduced the number of trophonts significantly (more than 50 %. The fishes were not impaired. Chlorophyllin and other photodynamic substances may become a possible countermeasure against I. multifiliis and other ectoparasites in aquaculture. The effectiveness of chlorophyllin depends on light attenuation in the water body.

  15. Independent origins of parasitism in Animalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Sara B; Kuris, Armand M

    2016-07-01

    Nearly half of all animals may have a parasitic lifestyle, yet the number of transitions to parasitism and their potential for species diversification remain unresolved. Based on a comprehensive survey of the animal kingdom, we find that parasitism has independently evolved at least 223 times in just 15 phyla, with the majority of identified independent parasitic groups occurring in the Arthropoda, at or below the level of Family. Metazoan parasitology is dominated by the study of helminthes; however, only 20% of independently derived parasite taxa belong to those groups, with numerous transitions also seen in Mollusca, Rotifera, Annelida and Cnidaria. Parasitism is almost entirely absent from deuterostomes, and although worm-like morphology and host associations are widespread across Animalia, the dual symbiotic and trophic interactions required for parasitism may constrain its evolution from antecedent consumer strategies such as generalist predators and filter feeders. In general, parasitic groups do not differ from their free-living relatives in their potential for speciation. However, the 10 largest parasitic clades contain 90% of described parasitic species, or perhaps 40% of all animal species. Hence, a substantial fraction of animal diversity on the Earth arose following these few transitions to a parasitic trophic strategy. PMID:27436119

  16. Prevalence-dependent costs of parasite virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Bedhomme

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Costs of parasitism are commonly measured by comparing the performance of infected groups of individuals to that of uninfected control groups. This measure potentially underestimates the cost of parasitism because it ignores indirect costs, which may result from the modification of the competitiveness of the hosts by the parasite. In this context, we used the host-parasite system consisting of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti and the microsporidian parasite Vavraia culicis to address this question: Do infected individuals exert a more or less intense intraspecific competition than uninfected individuals? Our experimental results show that, indeed, infected hosts incur a direct cost of parasitism: It takes them longer to become adults than uninfected individuals. They also incur an indirect cost, however, which is actually larger than the direct cost: When grown in competition with uninfected individuals they develop even slower. The consequence of this modification of competitiveness is that, in our system, the cost of parasitism is underestimated by the traditional measure. Moreover, because the indirect cost depends on the frequency of interactions between infected and uninfected individuals, our results suggest that the real cost of parasitism, i.e., virulence, is negatively correlated with the prevalence of the parasite. This link between prevalence and virulence may have dynamical consequences, such as reducing the invasion threshold of the parasite, and evolutionary consequences, such as creating a selection pressure maintaining the host's constitutive resistance to the parasite.

  17. Allee effect from parasite spill-back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krkošek, Martin; Ashander, Jaime; Frazer, L Neil; Lewis, Mark A

    2013-11-01

    The exchange of native pathogens between wild and domesticated animals can lead to novel disease threats to wildlife. However, the dynamics of wild host-parasite systems exposed to a reservoir of domesticated hosts are not well understood. A simple mathematical model reveals that the spill-back of native parasites from domestic to wild hosts may cause a demographic Allee effect in the wild host population. A second model is tailored to the particulars of pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) and salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis), for which parasite spill-back is a conservation and fishery concern. In both models, parasite spill-back weakens the coupling of parasite and wild host abundance-particularly at low host abundance-causing parasites per host to increase as a wild host population declines. These findings show that parasites shared across host populations have effects analogous to those of generalist predators and can similarly cause an unstable equilibrium in a focal host population that separates persistence and extirpation. Allee effects in wildlife arising from parasite spill-back are likely to be most pronounced in systems where the magnitude of transmission from domestic to wild host populations is high because of high parasite abundance in domestic hosts, prolonged sympatry of domestic and wild hosts, a high transmission coefficient for parasites, long-lived parasite larvae, and proximity of domesticated populations to wildlife migration corridors. PMID:24107371

  18. Parasitic interference in nulling interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Matter, Alexis; Danchi, William C; Lopez, Bruno; Absil, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Nulling interferometry aims to detect faint objects close to bright stars. Its principle is to produce a destructive interference along the line-of-sight so that the stellar flux is rejected, while the flux of the off-axis source can be transmitted. In practice, various instrumental perturbations can degrade the nulling performance. Any imperfection in phase, amplitude, or polarization produces a spurious flux that leaks to the interferometer output and corrupts the transmitted off-axis flux. One of these instrumental pertubations is the crosstalk phenomenon, which occurs because of multiple parasitic reflections inside transmitting optics, and/or diffraction effects related to beam propagation along finite size optics. It can include a crosstalk of a beam with itself, and a mutual crosstalk between different beams. This can create a parasitic interference pattern, which degrades the intrinsic transmission map - or intensity response - of the interferometer. In this context, we describe how this instrumental ...

  19. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas' disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply. PMID:20859503

  20. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gagandeep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas′ disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply.

  1. Adaptive automatic segmentation of Leishmaniasis parasite in Indirect Immunofluorescence images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouertani, F; Amiri, H; Bettaib, J; Yazidi, R; Ben Salah, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the first steps for the automation of the serum titration process. In fact, this process requires an Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) diagnosis automation. We deal with the initial phase that represents the fluorescence images segmentation. Our approach consists of three principle stages: (1) a color based segmentation which aims at extracting the fluorescent foreground based on k-means clustering, (2) the segmentation of the fluorescent clustered image, and (3) a region-based feature segmentation, intended to remove the fluorescent noisy regions and to locate fluorescent parasites. We evaluated the proposed method on 40 IIF images. Experimental results show that such a method provides reliable and robust automatic segmentation of fluorescent Promastigote parasite. PMID:25571049

  2. Targeting protein-protein interactions for parasite control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Taylor

    Full Text Available Finding new drug targets for pathogenic infections would be of great utility for humanity, as there is a large need to develop new drugs to fight infections due to the developing resistance and side effects of current treatments. Current drug targets for pathogen infections involve only a single protein. However, proteins rarely act in isolation, and the majority of biological processes occur via interactions with other proteins, so protein-protein interactions (PPIs offer a realm of unexplored potential drug targets and are thought to be the next-generation of drug targets. Parasitic worms were chosen for this study because they have deleterious effects on human health, livestock, and plants, costing society billions of dollars annually and many sequenced genomes are available. In this study, we present a computational approach that utilizes whole genomes of 6 parasitic and 1 free-living worm species and 2 hosts. The species were placed in orthologous groups, then binned in species-specific orthologous groups. Proteins that are essential and conserved among species that span a phyla are of greatest value, as they provide foundations for developing broad-control strategies. Two PPI databases were used to find PPIs within the species specific bins. PPIs with unique helminth proteins and helminth proteins with unique features relative to the host, such as indels, were prioritized as drug targets. The PPIs were scored based on RNAi phenotype and homology to the PDB (Protein DataBank. EST data for the various life stages, GO annotation, and druggability were also taken into consideration. Several PPIs emerged from this study as potential drug targets. A few interactions were supported by co-localization of expression in M. incognita (plant parasite and B. malayi (H. sapiens parasite, which have extremely different modes of parasitism. As more genomes of pathogens are sequenced and PPI databases expanded, this methodology will become increasingly

  3. Peritoneal manifestations of parasitic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Yeon; Ha, Hyun Kwon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe of peritoneal manifestations of parasitic infection at CT. A broad spectrum of CT findings can be seen in the peritoneal cavity, including a varying degree of omental or mesenteric infiltration, single or multiple peritoneal mass or nodule, and peritoneal thickening or stranding. Recognition of these findings are crucial for establish an early diagnosis and helps avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:17924162

  4. PARASITE MYCOPOPULATION OF SOYBEAN GRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Jasenka Ćosić; Karolina Vrandečić; Draženka Jurković; Ivan Ereš; Jelena Poštić

    2008-01-01

    Disease appearance on soybean can influence quality and quantity of yield. Different spieces of saprophyte and parasite fungi can be isolated from stems, pods and grain of soybean. The aim of the research was to evaluate the incidence of important disease on natural soybean grain over the period of 4 years (2004-2007) of experiment held on the location Sopot-Vinkovci and included 9 cultivars of soybean. The following plant pathogenic fungi were identified: Peronospora, Sclerotinia, Cercospora...

  5. Differential prevalence and diversity of haemosporidian parasites in two sympatric closely related non-migratory passerines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubiec, Anna; Podmokła, Edyta; Zagalska-Neubauer, Magdalena; Drobniak, Szymon M; Arct, Aneta; Gustafsson, Lars; Cichoń, Mariusz

    2016-09-01

    Haemosporidian parasites infecting birds show distinct heterogeneity in their distribution among host species. However, despite numerous studies on the prevalence and diversity of parasite communities across species, very little is known on patterns of differences between them. Such data is lacking because up to date the majority of studies explored the patterns of variation in infections in different years, different time of sampling within a year or a breeding cycle, different study sites or was based on a small sample size, all of which may affect the estimates of prevalence and parasite diversity. Here, the prevalence, richness and diversity of haemosporidian parasites from the genera Plasmodium and Haemoproteus were studied in two closely related non-migratory hole-nesting passerines: Great Tits and Blue Tits. Birds were sampled in sympatrically breeding populations during two seasons at the same stage of their breeding cycle - late nestling care. Great Tits were more prevalently infected with Plasmodium and Haemoproteus parasites (97·1 vs 71·2%), harboured a higher proportion of multiple infections (26·2 vs 3·2%) and had a more diverse parasite community (11 vs 5 parasite lineages) than Blue Tits. Observed differences between two host species are discussed with reference to their breeding densities and immunological and behavioural characteristics. PMID:27173618

  6. Parasitism Performance of Tetrastichus brontispae Ferriere over the Coconut Hispine Beetle, Brontispa longissima (Gestro).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K; Fu, B L; Lin, J R; Fu, Y G; Peng, Z Q; Jin, Q A; Tang, L D

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the effect of host density, host, and parasitoid ages in choice and no-choice tests on the parasitism performance of Tetrastichus brontispae Ferriere, one of the major parasitoid of Brontispa longissima (Gestro), was investigated in the laboratory. The results revealed that an increased host density resulted in no increased parasitism of B. longissima by T. brontispae; the optimal host density was three host pupae per parasitoid when considering the costs for mass rearing. Moreover, parasitoid age was quite crucial for effective parasitism and affected the emergence rate. Although 2-h to 4-day-old parasitoids successfully parasitized the host pupae, younger parasitoids (within 2-day-old) presented higher parasitism capacity than older parasitoids. More importantly, both choice and no-choice tests confirmed that all host stages tested from 2-h to 4-day-old were suitable for T. brontispae parasitization, although 2-h to 2-day-old hosts were preferred. We also demonstrated that sex ratio, emergence rate, and egg to adult developmental time were not influenced by host density, parasitoid, and host age in both choice and no-choice tests. Our data will allow for more accurate prediction and interpretation on the parasitization by T. brontispae, supporting mass-production initiatives and mass release in programs of B. longissima. PMID:27048172

  7. Fauna Europaea: Helminths (Animal Parasitic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gibson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region, and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Helminths parasitic in animals represent a large assemblage of worms, representing three phyla, with more than 200 families and almost 4,000 species of parasites from all major vertebrate and many invertebrate groups. A general introduction is given for each of the major groups of parasitic worms, i.e. the Acanthocephala, Monogenea, Trematoda (Aspidogastrea and Digenea, Cestoda and Nematoda. Basic information for each group includes its size, host-range, distribution, morphological features, life-cycle, classification, identification and recent key-works. Tabulations include a complete list of families dealt with, the number of species in each and the name of the specialist responsible for data acquisition, a list of additional specialists who helped with particular groups, and a list of higher taxa dealt with down to the family level. A compilation of useful references is appended.

  8. Gene Expression in Trypanosomatid Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Martínez-Calvillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parasites Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi are the trypanosomatid protozoa that cause the deadly human diseases leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease, respectively. These organisms possess unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes and trans-splicing. Little is known about either the DNA sequences or the proteins that are involved in the initiation and termination of transcription in trypanosomatids. In silico analyses of the genome databases of these parasites led to the identification of a small number of proteins involved in gene expression. However, functional studies have revealed that trypanosomatids have more general transcription factors than originally estimated. Many posttranslational histone modifications, histone variants, and chromatin modifying enzymes have been identified in trypanosomatids, and recent genome-wide studies showed that epigenetic regulation might play a very important role in gene expression in this group of parasites. Here, we review and comment on the most recent findings related to transcription initiation and termination in trypanosomatid protozoa.

  9. Eosinophilic fasciitis after parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marta; Patinha, Fabia; Marinho, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by symmetrical swelling and skin induration of the distal portions of the arms and/or legs, evolving into a scleroderma-like appearance, accompanied by peripheral blood eosinophilia. It is a rare disease with a poorly understood etiology. Corticosteroid treatment remains the standard therapy, either taken alone or in association with an immunosuppressive drug. This paper presents a case of a male patient with palpebral edema and marked eosinophilia, diagnosed with intestinal parasitic infection in October 2006. He was treated with an antiparasitic drug, but both the swelling and the analytical changes remained. This was followed by a skin and muscle biopsy, which turned out to be compatible with eosinophilic fasciitis. There was progressive worsening of the clinical state, with stiffness of the abdominal wall and elevated inflammatory parameters, and the patient was referred to the Immunology Department, medicated with corticosteroids and methotrexate. Over the years there were therapeutic adjustments and other causes were excluded. Currently the patient continues to be monitored, and there is no evidence of active disease. The case described in this article is interesting because of the diagnosis of eosinophilic fasciitis probably associated/coexisting with a parasite infection. This case report differs from others in that there is an uncommon cause associated with the onset of the disease, instead of the common causes such as trauma, medication, non-parasitic infections or cancer. PMID:27407276

  10. [Formation and diversity of parasitophorous vacuoles in parasitic protozoa. The Coccidia (Sporozoa, Apicomplexa)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beĭer, T V; Svezhova, N V; Radchenko, A I; Sidorenko, N V

    2003-01-01

    Data on parasitophorous vacuole (PV) formation in host cells (HC) harbouring different intracellular protozoan parasites have been reviewed and critically analysed, with special reference to the main representatives of the Coccidia. The vacuole membrane (PVM) is the interface between host and parasite, playing a role in nutrient acquisition by the parasite from the HC. The PV phenomenon is regarded as a generalized HC response to the introduction of alien bodies (microorganisms), which eventually reflects the evolutionary established host-parasite relationships at cellular, subcellular and molecular levels. Special attention has been paid to the existing morpho-functional diversity of the PVs within the same genera and species of parasites, and even at different stages of the parasite life cycle. The PVM is generally considered to derive from the HC plasmalemma, whose biochemical composition undergoes significant changes as the intravacuolar parasite grows. The original HC proteins are selectively excluded from the PVM, while those of the parasite are incorporated. As the result, the changed PVM becomes not fusigenic for HC lysosomes. For Toxoplasma gondii and other cyst-forming coccidia (Isospora, Sarcocystis), a definite correlation has been noticed between the extent of rhoptry and dense granule secrets released by a zoite during HC internalization, on the one hand, and the pattern of the PV that forms, on the other one. In T. gondii, tachyzoites, known to discharge abundant secrets, commonly force the development of PVs limited with a single unit membrane and equipped with a tubulovesicular network in the lumen. Unlike, bradyzoites known to be deficient in secretory materials trigger the formation of PVs with a three-membrane lining composed of the changed invaginated plasmalemma in addition to two membranes of endoplasmic reticulum. The two different types of PV harbour, respectively, exoenteric and enteric stages of T. gondii, the latter being confined to the

  11. Frequent vocalizing is negatively associated with brood parasitism in a host of the brown-headed cowbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckler, Sonya E.; Conway, Courtney J.

    2012-01-01

    Brood parasitism by the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) can substantially affect host species' reproductive success. The "host-activity" hypothesis suggests that parasites eavesdrop on conspicuous behaviors to locate and parasitize hosts, and several studies of cowbird hosts support this hypothesis. In contrast, a recent study of the Least Bell's Vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus) reported a negative association between the host's vocalization rate near the nest and brood parasitism. This contradictory pattern is intriguing because Bell's Vireo is a common cowbird host and vocalizes near and on its nests. We tested a key assumption of the host-activity hypothesis in a different subspecies (V. b. arizonae) to determine whether the contradictory pattern reported in V. b. pusillus is an anomaly or could be generalized to other subspecies. Unparasitized vireos vocalized more frequently than parasitized birds, confirming that the pattern in Bell's Vireos is the opposite of that reported for other cowbird hosts. Nesting stage played a role: unparasitized birds vocalized more than parasitized birds only during the nest-building and incubation stages. Given that vocalization rate and other behaviors change through the breeding season, future tests of the host-activity hypothesis should control for nesting stage. Moreover, future efforts to identify the underlying cause for the association between vocalization rate and probability of parasitism should consider the possibility of reciprocal causal relationships between them. We propose five additional hypotheses to explain why in Bell's Vireo the pattern between these two traits is opposite of what has been reported in other birds.

  12. Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites in Leafy Vegetables in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafa A.I. Al-Megrin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate some of the leafy vegetable plants sold in local markets for human consumption to check whether they harbor different parasites stages. A total of 470 leafy vegetable samples were collected from 12 different plant species randomly from local markets in the Riyadh city during the period April and March 2008. The samples were analysed in the laboratory for parasitic stages contained in these samples after washing them in physiological saline and then examining the sediment. Results of the present study has shown that 76 out of 470 samples (16.2% contained parasite stages. Depending on the type of leafy plant, examined the prevalence of parasitic stages in these plants, was found to be 27.8% (17/61 in lettuce, 22.8% (13/57 in watercress, 20.6% (7/34 in leek, 19.1% (9/47 in green onion, 17.4% (15/87 in parsley, 15.4% (4/26 in spinach, 13.6% (3/22 in basil, 11.5% (3/26 in coriander, 9.4% (3/32 in radish, 5.3% (1/19 in dill and 4.7% (2/42 in mint. No parasites were detected in 17 samples collected from cabbage. Stages of intestinal parasites detected were Entamoeba coli (35.5%, Giardia lamblia (31.6%, Dicrocoelium sp. (28.9%, Ascaris sp. (26.3%, Taenia sp. (19.7%, Blastocystis hominis (17.1%, Fasciola sp. (14.5%, Hymenolepis sp. (14.5%, Ancylostoma sp. (11.8%, Toxoplasma gondii (6.6% and Trichostrongylus sp. (2.6%. The results indicated a significant seasonal variation (p<0.05, with highest prevalence in spring (23.1%, followed in descending order by Summer (17.9%, Autumn (10.6% and Winter (9.9%.

  13. Nematodes parasitizing Trachurus trachurus (L.) and Boops boops (L.) from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichalal, Keltoum; Ramdane, Zouhir; Ider, Djamila; Kacher, Mohammed; Iguerouada, Mokrane; Trilles, Jean-Paul; Courcot, Luci; Amara, Rachid

    2015-11-01

    A total of 455 Boops boops (Linnaeus, 1758) and 953 Trachurus trachurus Linnaeus, 1758 from the east coast of Algeria were examined for their parasitic Nematoda. Two hundred ninety-five specimens of larval stages L3 and L4 were collected from the peritoneal cavity of these two examined fishes. Photonic and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) studies were performed on these larvae specimens in order to characterize their morphology. Two different species of Nematoda (Anisikidae) were identified: Anisakis simplex (Rudolphi, 1809) and Hysterothylacium aduncum (Rudolphi, 1802). These two parasitic species were reported for the first time on T. trachurus and B. boops from the eastern coast of Algeria. These parasites were attached on different organs in the abdominal cavity (particularly on ovaries and testes). The infestation rate changed according to the month and the host size. The parasitism did not show a significant negative impact on the condition of the examined fishes. PMID:26220559

  14. Contamination of public squares and parks with parasites in Erbil city, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khder Nooraldeen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective. The soil of public squares and parks may be contaminated with the infective stages of parasites because of the presence of stray animals in these parks. Many people take a rest in these places and they may be at risk of infection with parasites because the infective stages of parasites can survive for months, or even years, in spite of the factors of weather. Objective. To evaluate contamination with the eggs of parasites in the soil of parks in Erbil city, Iraq. Material and methods. Forty-eight soil samples were collected from 12 public parks and gardens from 11 different neighbourhoods (8 parks and 3 playgrounds and one district in Erbil city. The zinc sulfate floatation method was used to recover the eggs of parasites from the samples. Results. Eggs of parasites were identified in 91.6% of the parks. Eggs of [i]Hymenolepis diminuta[/i] were found in 75%, [i]Toxocara [/i]spp. in 50%, [i]Ascaris[/i] spp. in 33.3%, [i]Taenia[/i] spp. in 25%, hookworm in 25%, [i]Trichostrongylus[/i] spp. in 16.7% and Trichuris spp. in 16.7% of the parks. [i]Helminth[/i] eggs were found in 48% soil samples with a mean number of 1.1 per soil sample. The most contaminated soil sample was found in a park in neighbourhood number 325 with 6 eggs. Conclusions. The presence of pathogenic parasites in the soil of parks in Erbil city constitutes a high risk to the people who use these parks for recreation, and requires the appropriate control for these parasites.

  15. RNA trafficking in parasitic plant systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L LeBlanc

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available RNA trafficking in plants contributes to local and long-distance coordination of plant development and response to the environment. However, investigations of mobile RNA identity and function are hindered by the inherent difficulty of tracing a given molecule of RNA from its cell of origin to its destination. Several methods have been used to address this problem, but all are limited to some extent by constraints associated with accurately sampling phloem sap or detecting trafficked RNA. Certain parasitic plant species form symplastic connections to their hosts and thereby provide an additional system for studying RNA trafficking. The haustorial connections of Cuscuta and Phelipanche species are similar to graft junctions in that they are able to transmit mRNAs, viral RNAs, siRNAs and proteins from the host plants to the parasite. In contrast to other graft systems, these parasites form connections with host species that span a wide phylogenetic range, such that a high degree of nucleotide sequence divergence may exist between host and parasites and allow confident identification of most host RNAs in the parasite system. The ability to identify host RNAs in parasites, and vice versa, will facilitate genomics approaches to understanding RNA trafficking. This review discusses the nature of host parasite connections and the potential significance of host RNAs for the parasite. Additional research on host-parasite interactions is needed to interpret results of RNA trafficking studies, but parasitic plants may provide a fascinating new perspective on RNA trafficking.

  16. Knowledge and risk factors of intestinal parasitic infections among women in Makurdi, Benue State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amuta EU; Houmsou RS; Mker SD

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess women's perceptions and risk factors that could expose them to intestinal parasitic infections in Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria. Methods: A total of 750 faecal samples were collected from women at different reproductive stages (pre-menstrual, menstrual and post-menstrual), and the faeces were tested by the formol ether concentration technique. Results: A total of 426 (56.8%) samples were found positive for various intestinal parasites with hookworm (4.8%), Ascaris lumbricoides (9.3%), Taenia sp (2.1%), Entamoeba histolytica (18.9%) and Entamoeba coli (21.6%). Women at pre-menstrual and post-menstrual stages recorded higher prevalence rates with 72.8% and 63.9%, respectively. No significant difference in prevalence was observed between women at different reproductive stages and women infected by different parasites (χ2=30.6, P> 0.05). Sweet things, rotten fruits and improperly cooked meat were perceived as the causes of intestinal parasitic infections among the pre and post menstrual women. Sources of drinking water like river, well, water bought from vendors and patronizing food vendors were observed as risk factors contributing to the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among women. Factors like not washing hands before eating and after defaecation, use of leaves and ordinary papers for cleaning after defaecation were also observed to be contributing to the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections. Conclusions: Persuasive health education and rigorous hygiene measures should be employed in schools, maternity clinics and among the populace to reduce transmission and infection with intestinal parasites.

  17. Antibodies against the Plasmodium falciparum glutamate-rich protein from naturally exposed individuals living in a Brazilian malaria-endemic area can inhibit in vitro parasite growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose; Bianco, Cesare; Totino, Paulo Renato Rivas;

    2011-01-01

    The glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) is an exoantigen expressed in all stages of the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle in humans. Anti-GLURP antibodies can inhibit parasite growth in the presence of monocytes via antibody-dependent cellular inhibition (ADCI), and a major parasite-inhibitory region h...

  18. Haemolymph electrophoretic pattern of Ascia monuste orseis larvae (Lepidoptera: pieridae parasitized by Cotesia glomerata (Hymenoptera: braconidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scaglia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotesia glomerata is a natural enemy of the vegetable plague Ascia monuste orseis and preferably parasites 2nd, 3rd and 4th instar larvae. Parasitism effects on the haemolymph protein profile of Ascia monuste orseis larvae from the 2nd to 7th days were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively by SDS-PAGE and Coomassie-Blue binding methods. Quantitative analysis showed a progressive increase in the protein content of about 6.5 and 12.5 times in parasitized and non-parasitized larvae from the 2nd to 5th days, respectively. On the 6th day, a decrease in protein content was observed in both groups, although this decrease was significantly less than the control group that continued to metamorphosis. Meanwhile, parasitized larvae had one more day (7th day in their larval period to complete parasitoid development, justified by the fact that parasitoid is koinobiont and allows host feeding. On this day, a drastic increase in protein content was detected when the parasitoids left the host. The SDS-PAGE showed proteins of high molecular weight (>120 kDa on the 5th day of the non-parasitized larvae when they entered pre-pupa stage and on the 7th day of parasitized larvae. Proteins with MW lower than 62 kDa and higher than 27 kDa were absent on the 5th day in control larvae (pre-pupa phase, but present in parasitized larvae. This could indicate a possible relation between these proteins and the host juvenile hormone. Therefore, the presence of C. glomerata influences Ascia monuste orseis development, but its own physiological development is apparently independent of the host, which tends to die when parasitism succeeds.

  19. Circannual variation in blood parasitism in a sub-Saharan migrant passerine bird, the garden warbler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, O; Wood, M J; Waldenström, J; Hasselquist, D; Ottosson, U; Stervander, M; Bensch, S

    2013-05-01

    Knowing the natural dynamics of pathogens in migratory birds is important, for example, to understand the factors that influence the transport of pathogens to and their transmission in new geographical areas, whereas the transmission of other pathogens might be restricted to a specific area. We studied haemosporidian blood parasites of the genera Plasmodium, Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon in a migratory bird, the garden warbler Sylvia borin. Birds were sampled in spring, summer and early autumn at breeding grounds in Sweden, on migration at Capri, Italy and on arrival and departure from wintering staging areas in West Africa: mapping recoveries of garden warblers ringed in Fennoscandia and Capri showed that these sites are most probably on the migratory flyway of garden warblers breeding at Kvismaren. Overall, haemosporidian prevalence was 39%, involving 24 different parasite lineages. Prevalence varied significantly over the migratory cycle, with relatively high prevalence of blood parasites in the population on breeding grounds and at the onset of autumn migration, followed by marked declines in prevalence during migration both on spring and autumn passage. Importantly, we found that when examining circannual variation in the different lineages, significantly different prevalence profiles emerged both between and within genera. Our results suggest that differences in prevalence profiles are the result of either different parasite transmission strategies or coevolution between the host and the various parasite lineages. When separating parasites into common vs. rare lineages, we found that two peaks in the prevalence of rare parasites occur; on arrival at Swedish breeding grounds, and after the wintering period in Africa. Our results stress the importance of appropriate taxonomic resolution when examining host-parasite interactions, as variation in prevalence both between and within parasite genera can show markedly different patterns. PMID:23621369

  20. Occurrence of entomopathogenic fungi and parasitic nematodes on Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae collected in Central Chiapas, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall armyworm larvae (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) were collected from whorl-stage cornfields, between the V2 and V4 stages, in 22 localities of Central, Chiapas, México, called "La Frailesca" during late June 2009 to determine the occurrence of native entomopathogens and parasitic nema...

  1. Angiogenesis and parasitic helminth-associated neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Roger D; Schubert, Uwe; Bauer, Christian

    2011-04-01

    Successful metazoan parasitism, among many other factors, requires a supply of nutrients and the removal of waste products. There is a prerequisite for a parasite-defined vasculature. The angiogenic mechanism(s) involved presumably depend on the characteristics of the tissue- and vascular system-dwelling, parasitic helminths. Simplistically, 2 possibilities or a combination of both have been considered in this review. The multifactorial induction of parasitic helminth-associated neovascularization could arise through, either a host-, a parasite- or a host-/parasite-dependent, angiogenic switch. Most studies appear to support the first and third hypotheses, but evidence exists for the intrahepatic cestode Echinococcus multilocularis, the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the intravascular trematode Schistosoma mansoni for the second inference. In contrast, the nematode anti-coagulant protein NAPc2 from adult Ancylostoma caninum is also an anti-angiogenic factor. PMID:21232174

  2. Bloodstream Infection in Neutropenic Cancer Patients Related to Short-Term Nontunnelled Catheters Determined by Quantitative Blood Cultures, Differential Time to Positivity, and Molecular Epidemiological Typing with Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Seifert, Harald; Cornely, Oliver; Seggewiss, Kerstin; Decker, Mathias; Stefanik, Danuta; Wisplinghoff, Hilmar; Fätkenheuer, Gerd

    2003-01-01

    To determine the rate of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) among cases of primary bloodstream infection (BSI) in febrile neutropenic cancer patients with short-term nontunnelled catheters, quantitative paired blood cultures (Isolator) from the central venous catheter (CVC) and peripheral vein were obtained between November 1999 and January 2001. Bactec blood culture bottles were obtained to determine the differential time to positivity (DTP). CRBSI was defined as a quantitative b...

  3. Parasite vaccines--a reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, J P; Mulcahy, G

    2001-07-12

    Over the last decade, the anti-parasitics market has been the fastest growing sector of the overall $18 billion animal health market. While drugs for the treatment of parasites of livestock still dominate this sector and will continue to be developed or re-formulated, because of consumer demands for chemical-free food and of concerns regarding the environment and animal welfare there is a growing interest in the development of safe and effective vaccines. There is also a call for vaccines in the lucrative $3 billion-plus companion animal market. These demands for vaccines will add a greater impetus to an area that has seen tremendous success in the last 15 years. A number of anti-parasite vaccines have been developed, e.g. the recombinant 45w and EG95 oncosphere proteins against Taenia ovis and Echinococcus granulosis, respectively, and the Bm86 vaccine against Boophilus microplus. In addition, the cathepsin L vaccines against the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, and the H11 vaccine against Haemonchus contortus are progressing well. There are also many additional vaccine candidates for H. contortus and for other nematodes such as Ostertagia and Trichostrongylus spp. that may ultimately lead to broad-spectrum gastrointestinal worm vaccines. Live or attenuated-live vaccines are available for the control of avian coccidiosis, toxplasmosis in sheep and anaplasmosis in cattle, although molecular vaccines against protozoans are still proving elusive. The wealth of information in genomics, proteomics and immunology that has been forthcoming together will new methods of vaccine production and delivery should see many new vaccines reach the marketplace in the near future. PMID:11516584

  4. Parasitic interference in nulling interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, A.; Defrère, D.; Danchi, W. C.; Lopez, B.; Absil, O.

    2013-05-01

    Nulling interferometry aims to detect faint objects close to bright stars. Its principle is to produce a destructive interference along the line of sight so that the stellar flux is rejected, while the flux of the off-axis source can be transmitted. In practice, various instrumental perturbations can degrade the nulling performance. Any imperfection in phase, amplitude or polarization produces a spurious flux that leaks to the interferometer output and corrupts the transmitted off-axis flux. One of these instrumental perturbations is the crosstalk phenomenon, which occurs because of multiple parasitic reflections inside transmitting optics, and/or diffraction effects related to beam propagation along finite size optics. It can include a crosstalk of a beam with itself, and a mutual crosstalk between different beams. This can create a parasitic interference pattern, which degrades the intrinsic transmission map - or intensity response - of the interferometer. In this context, we describe how this instrumental effect impairs the performance of a Bracewell interferometer. A simple formalism is developed to derive the corresponding modified intensity response of the interferometer, as a function of the two parameters of interest: the crosstalk level (or contamination rate) and the phase shift between the primary and secondary - parasitic - beams. We then apply our mathematical approach to a few scientific cases, both analytically and using the GENIESIM simulation software, adapted to handle coherent crosstalk. Our results show that a coherent crosstalk level of about 1 per cent implies a 20 per cent drop of the signal-to-noise ratio at most. Careful attention should thus be paid to reduce the crosstalk level inside an interferometric instrument and ensure an instrumental stability that provides the necessary sensitivity through calibration procedures.

  5. Healthcare Burden, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Mucosal Barrier Injury Laboratory-Confirmed Bloodstream Infections after Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandoy, Christopher E; Haslam, David; Lane, Adam; Jodele, Sonata; Demmel, Kathy; El-Bietar, Javier; Flesch, Laura; Myers, Kasiani C; Pate, Abigail; Rotz, Seth; Daniels, Paulina; Wallace, Gregory; Nelson, Adam; Waters, Heather; Connelly, Beverly; Davies, Stella M

    2016-09-01

    Mucosal barrier injury laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infections (MBI-LCBIs) lead to significant morbidity, mortality, and healthcare resource utilization in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients. Determination of the healthcare burden of MBI-LCBIs and identification of patients at risk of MBI-LCBIs will allow researchers to identify strategies to reduce MBI-LCBI rates. The objective of our study was to describe the incidence, risk factors, timing, and outcomes of MBI-LCBIs in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of 374 patients who underwent HSCT at a large free-standing academic children's hospital to determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of patients that developed a bloodstream infection (BSI) including MBI-LCBI, central line-associated BSI (CLABSI), or secondary BSI in the first year after HSCT. Outcome measures included nonrelapse mortality (NRM), central venous catheter removal within 7 days of positive culture, shock, admission to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) within 48 hours of positive culture, and death within 10 days of positive culture. One hundred seventy BSIs were diagnosed in 100 patients (27%): 80 (47%) MBI-LCBIs, 68 (40%) CLABSIs, and 22 (13%) secondary infections. MBI-LCBIs were diagnosed at a significantly higher rate in allogeneic HSCT patients (18% versus 7%, P = .007). Reduced-intensity conditioning (OR, 1.96; P = .015) and transplant-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (OR, 2.94; P = .0004) were associated with MBI-LCBI. Nearly 50% of all patients with a BSI developed septic shock, 10% died within 10 days of positive culture, and nearly 25% were transferred to the PICU. One-year NRM was significantly increased in patients with 1 (34%) and more than 1 (56%) BSIs in the first year post-HSCT compared with those who did not develop BSIs (14%) (P ≤ .0001). There was increased 1-year NRM in patients with at least 1 MBI-LCBI (OR, 1.94; P

  6. Host manipulation by parasites: a multidimensional phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, F; Poulin, R.; Brodeur, J.

    2010-01-01

    The diversity of ways in which parasites manipulate the phenotype of their hosts to increase their transmission has been well-documented during the past decades. Parasites clearly have the potential to alter a broad range of phenotypic traits in their hosts, extending from behaviour and colour to morphology and physiology. While the vast majority of studies have concentrated on few, often only one, host characters, there is increasing evidence that manipulative parasites alter multiple charac...

  7. Introduction of New Parasites in Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Enemark, Heidi L.

    2011-01-01

    Movement of wildlife across borders and between different regions entail an increased risk of (re-) introduction and spread of new or otherwise low prevalent diseases, which may have consequences not only for the wildlife itself but also for pets, farm animals and humans. The lecture presents examples of such parasites/parasitic diseases: Setaria tundra, a mosquito-borne filarioid nematode which was detected for the first time in Danish deer in 2010. This parasite is usually considered harmle...

  8. Regulation of Gene Expression in Protozoa Parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Consuelo Gomez; Esther Ramirez, M.; Mercedes Calixto-Galvez; Olivia Medel; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2010-01-01

    Infections with protozoa parasites are associated with high burdens of morbidity and mortality across the developing world. Despite extensive efforts to control the transmission of these parasites, the spread of populations resistant to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines against them contribute to their persistence as major public health problems. Parasites should perform a strict control on the expression of genes involved in their pathogenicity, differentiation, immune evasion, or dru...

  9. Biochemical and Functional Analysis of Two Plasmodium falciparum Blood-Stage 6-Cys Proteins: P12 and P41

    OpenAIRE

    Tana Taechalertpaisarn; Cecile Crosnier; S Josefin Bartholdson; Hodder, Anthony N.; Jenny Thompson; Bustamante, Leyla Y.; Wilson, Danny W.; Sanders, Paul R.; Wright, Gavin J.; Rayner, Julian C.; Cowman, Alan F.; Gilson, Paul R.; Crabb, Brendan S

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria in humans, other primates, birds, and rodents all encode multiple 6-cys proteins. Distinct 6-cys protein family members reside on the surface at each extracellular life cycle stage and those on the surface of liver infective and sexual stages have been shown to play important roles in hepatocyte growth and fertilization respectively. However, 6-cys proteins associated with the blood-stage forms of the parasite have no known function. Here...

  10. Estimation of the total parasite biomass in acute falciparum malaria from plasma PfHRP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In falciparum malaria sequestration of erythrocytes containing mature forms of Plasmodium falciparum in the microvasculature of vital organs is central to pathology, but quantitation of this hidden sequestered parasite load in vivo has not previously been possible. The peripheral blood parasite count measures only the circulating, relatively non-pathogenic parasite numbers. P. falciparum releases a specific histidine-rich protein (PfHRP2 into plasma. Quantitative measurement of plasma PfHRP2 concentrations may reflect the total parasite biomass in falciparum malaria. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We measured plasma concentrations of PfHRP2, using a quantitative antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in 337 adult patients with falciparum malaria of varying severity hospitalised on the Thai-Burmese border. Based on in vitro production rates, we constructed a model to link this measure to the total parasite burden in the patient. The estimated geometric mean parasite burden was 7 x 10(11 (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.8 x 10(11 to 8.5 x 10(11 parasites per body, and was over six times higher in severe malaria (geometric mean 1.7 x 10(12, 95% CI 1.3 x 10(12 to 2.3 x 10(12 than in patients hospitalised without signs of severity (geometric mean 2.8 x 10(11, 95% CI 2.3 x 10(11 to 3.5 x 10(11; p < 0.001. Parasite burden was highest in patients who died (geometric mean 3.4 x 10(12, 95% CI 1.9 x 10(12 to 6.3 x 10(12; p = 0.03. The calculated number of sequestered parasites increased with disease severity and was higher in patients with late developmental stages of P. falciparum present on peripheral blood smears. Comparing model and laboratory estimates of the time of sequestration suggested that admission to hospital with uncomplicated malaria often follows schizogony-but in severe malaria is unrelated to stage of parasite development. CONCLUSION: Plasma PfHRP2 concentrations may be used to estimate the total body parasite biomass in

  11. Antimicrobial co-resistance patterns of gram-negative bacilli isolated from bloodstream infections: a longitudinal epidemiological study from 2002–2011

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Patrick HP; von Krosigk, Marcus; Roscoe, Diane L.; Lau, Tim TY; Yousefi, Masoud; William R Bowie

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing multidrug resistance in gram-negative bacilli (GNB) infections poses a serious threat to public health. Few studies have analyzed co-resistance rates, defined as an antimicrobial susceptibility profile in a subset already resistant to one specific antibiotic. The epidemiologic and clinical utility of determining co-resistance rates are analyzed and discussed. Methods A 10-year retrospective study from 2002–2011 of bloodstream infections with GNB were analyzed from three ...

  12. Nationwide German Multicenter Study on Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcal Bloodstream Isolates and Comparative In Vitro Activities of Quinupristin-Dalfopristin

    OpenAIRE

    von Eiff, Christof; Reinert, Ralf René; Kresken, Michael; Brauers, Johannes; Hafner, Dieter; Peters, Georg

    2000-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant gram-positive bacteria have become an increasing problem in the last two decades. In order to evaluate the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in staphylococcal bloodstream isolates in Germany, 2,042 staphylococci collected in 21 tertiary-care hospitals were investigated during a 3-year period (March 1996 to March 1999). Altogether, 1,448 S. aureus isolates and 594 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) that comprised 13 different species were included. Furthermore, the ...

  13. Use of Ceftolozane/Tazobactam in the Treatment of Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infection in a Pediatric Leukemia Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Samuel L; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; DePombo, April M; Bhatti, Micah M; Tverdek, Frank P; Gettys, Suzanne C; Nicolau, David P; Nunez, Cesar A

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is of increasing concern in pediatric patients. Ceftolozane/tazobactam is a novel cephalosporin/β-lactamase inhibitor combination with activity against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas; however, no data exist on its use in children. This report summarizes the treatment of a multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa bloodstream infection in a pediatric leukemia patient with ceftolozane/tazobactam and provides the first description of its pharmacokinetics in pediatrics. PMID:27254038

  14. Long-term, low-dose tigecycline to treat relapsing bloodstream infection due to KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae after major hepatic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Morelli; Dario Tartaglia; Niccolò Furbetta; Matteo Palmeri; Simone Ferranti; Enrico Tagliaferri; Giulio Di Candio; Franco Mosca

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old male underwent a right hepatectomy, resection of the biliary convergence, and a left hepatic jejunostomy for a Klatskin tumour. The postoperative course was complicated by biliary abscesses with relapsing bloodstream infections due to Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp). A 2-week course of combination antibiotic therapy failed to provide source control and the bacteraemia relapsed. Success was obtained with a regimen of tigecycline ...

  15. The first reported catheter-related Brevibacterium casei bloodstream infection in a child with acute leukemia and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Zumrut Sahbudak; Sen, Semra; Karapinar, Deniz Yilmaz; Aydemir, Sohret; Vardar, Fadil

    2015-01-01

    Brevibacterium spp. are catalase-positive, non-spore-forming, non motile, aerobic Gram-positive rods that were considered apathogenic until a few reports of infections in immunocompromised patients had been published. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of B. casei catheter-related bloodstream infection in a child with acute leukemia. We aim to enhance the awareness of pediatric hematology and infectious disease specialists about this pathogen and review of the literature. PMID:25636191

  16. The first reported catheter-related Brevibacterium casei bloodstream infection in a child with acute leukemia and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zumrut Sahbudak Bal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Brevibacteriumspp. are catalase-positive, non-spore-forming, non motile, aerobic Gram- positive rods that were considered apathogenic until a few reports of infections in immunocompromised patients had been published. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of B. caseicatheter-related bloodstream infection in a child with acute leukemia. We aim to enhance the awareness of pediatric hematology and infectious disease specialists about this pathogen and review of the literature.

  17. Timing of positive blood samples does not differentiate pathogens causing healthcare-associated from community-acquired bloodstream infections in children in England: a linked retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, K. L.; MÜLLER-PEBODY, B.; WADE, A.; Sharland, M.; MINAJI, M.; Johnson, A P; Gilbert, R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Paediatricians recognize that using the time-dependent community-acquired vs. hospital-acquired bloodstream infection (BSI) dichotomy to guide empirical treatment no longer distinguishes between causative pathogens due to the emergence of healthcare-associated BSIs. However, paediatric epidemiological evidence of the aetiology of BSIs in relation to hospital admission in England is lacking. For 12 common BSI-causing pathogens in England, timing of laboratory reports of positive paedia...

  18. Linkage, evaluation and analysis of national electronic healthcare data: application to providing enhanced blood-stream infection surveillance in paediatric intensive care.

    OpenAIRE

    Katie Harron; Harvey Goldstein; Angie Wade; Berit Muller-Pebody; Roger Parslow; Ruth Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    Background: Linkage of risk-factor data for blood-stream infection (BSI) in paediatric intensive care (PICU) withbacteraemia surveillance data to monitor risk-adjusted infection rates in PICU is complicated by a lack of uniqueidentifiers and under-ascertainment in the national surveillance system. We linked, evaluated and performedpreliminary analyses on these data to provide a practical guide on the steps required to handle linkage of suchcomplex data sources.Methods: Data on PICU admissions...

  19. Risk of bloodstream infection in children admitted to paediatric intensive care units in England and Wales following emergency inter-hospital transfer.

    OpenAIRE

    Harron, K.; Mok, Q; Parslow, R.; Muller-Pebody, B; Gilbert, R.; Ramnarayan, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Adherence to full sterile procedures may be compromised when central venous catheters are inserted as part of emergency resuscitation and stabilisation, particularly outside the intensive care unit. Half of emergency admissions to paediatric intensive care units (PICU) in the UK occur after stabilisation at other hospitals. We determined whether bloodstream infection (BSI) occurred more frequently in children admitted to PICU after inter-hospital transfer compared to within-hospital a...

  20. Draft genome sequence of blaVeb-1, blaoxa-10producing multi-drug resistant (MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosastrain VRFPA09 recovered from bloodstream infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandagopal Murugan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa bacteremia causes significant mortality rate due to emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR nosocomial infections. We report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain VRFPA09, a human bloodstream isolate, phenotypically proven as MDR strain. Whole genome sequencing on VRFPA09, deciphered betalactamase encoding blaveb-1 and blaOXA-10genes and multiple drug resistance, virulence factor encoding genes.

  1. Draft genome sequence of blaVeb-1, blaoxa-10 producing multi-drug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain VRFPA09 recovered from bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Nandagopal; Malathi, Jambulingam; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Madhavan, Hajib NarahariRao

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteremia causes significant mortality rate due to emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) nosocomial infections. We report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain VRFPA09, a human bloodstream isolate, phenotypically proven as MDR strain. Whole genome sequencing on VRFPA09, deciphered betalactamase encoding blav(eb-1) and bla(OXA-10) genes and multiple drug resistance, virulence factor encoding genes. PMID:26413042

  2. Parasites in the Wadden Sea food web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieltges, David W.; Engelsma, Marc Y.; Wendling, Carolin C.; Wegner, K. Mathias

    2013-09-01

    While the free-living fauna of the Wadden Sea has received much interest, little is known on the distribution and effects of parasites in the Wadden Sea food web. However, recent studies on this special type of trophic interaction indicate a high diversity of parasites in the Wadden Sea and suggest a multitude of effects on the hosts. This also includes effects on specific predator-prey relationships and the general structure of the food web. Focussing on molluscs, a major group in the Wadden Sea in terms of biomass and abundance and an important link between primary producers and predators, we review existing studies and exemplify the ecological role of parasites in the Wadden Sea food web. First, we give a brief inventory of parasites occurring in the Wadden Sea, ranging from microparasites (e.g. protozoa, bacteria) to macroparasites (e.g. helminths, parasitic copepods) and discuss the effects of spatial scale on heterogeneities in infection levels. We then demonstrate how parasites can affect host population dynamics by acting as a strong mortality factor, causing mollusc mass mortalities. In addition, we will exemplify how parasites can mediate the interaction strength of predator-prey relationships and affect the topological structure of the Wadden Sea food web as a whole. Finally, we highlight some ongoing changes regarding parasitism in the Wadden Sea in the course of global change (e.g. species introduction, climate change) and identify important future research questions to entangle the role of parasites in the Wadden Sea food web.

  3. Parasites of cottontail rabbits of southern Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepitzki, D A; Woolf, A; Bunn, B M

    1992-12-01

    Fifteen species of parasites including Haemaphysalis leporispalustris, Ixodes dentatus, Amblyomma americanum, Cediopsylla simplex, Odontopsyllus multispinosus, Cuterebra sp., Obeliscoides cuniculi, Trichostrongylus calcaratus, Trichostrongylus affinis, Longistriata noviberiae, Dermatoxys veligera, Trichuris sp., Mosgovoyia sp., Taenia pisiformis, and Hasstilesia tricolor as well as coccidia oocysts were collected from 96 cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) confined to a pen in southern Illinois in 1983 and 1984. The diversity of parasites and the intensities of infections were similar to published reports on free-ranging populations. Most variations in parasite abundances were attributable to season. Few lesions were seen in association with parasitism. PMID:1491303

  4. Bold, Sedentary Fathead Minnows Have More Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tiffany; Gladen, Kelsey; Duncan, Elizabeth C; Cotner, Sehoya; Cotner, James B; McEwen, Daniel C; Wisenden, Brian D

    2016-08-01

    Parasites that rely on trophic transmission can manipulate the behavior of an intermediate host to compromise the host's antipredator competence and increase the probability of reaching the next host. Selection for parasite manipulation is diminished when there is significant risk of host death to causes other than consumption by a suitable definitive host for the parasite. Consequently, behavioral manipulation by parasites can be expected to be subtle. Ornithodiplostomum ptychocheilus (Op) is a trematode parasite that has a bird-snail-fish host life cycle. Fathead minnows are a common intermediate host of Op, where metacercariae encyst in the minnow brain. In this study, we report a link between metacercarial intensity and behavior in fathead minnows. In the field, we found that roaming distance by free-living minnows over 24 h was negatively correlated with parasite intensity. In the laboratory, we found that boldness in an open field test was positively correlated with parasite intensity. These parasite-induced behavioral changes may render infected minnows more susceptible to predators, which would serve to facilitate trophic transmission of parasites to the bird host. PMID:27093037

  5. Fish Parasites: A Growing Concern During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villazanakretzer, Diana L; Napolitano, Peter G; Cummings, Kelly F; Magann, Everett F

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal parasitic worms affect more than 2 billion people worldwide according to the World Health Organization. Fish-borne parasitic infections are becoming more common with the increasing popularity of sushi, sashimi, Carpaccio, tartare, gefilte, and ceviche. The ingestion of these parasites can cause serve anemia, malabsorption, severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, strong allergic reactions, and gastric ulcers. Knowledge about fish parasites and pregnancy is limited. A literature search on PubMed and Web of Science used the search terms "fish parasites" OR "diphyllobothrium" OR "anisakiasis" OR "pseudoterranova" OR ("food borne parasites" AND "fish") AND "pregnancy" OR "maternal" OR "fetus" OR "fetal" OR "newborn" OR "neonatal" OR "childbirth." No limit was put on the number of years searched. There were 281 publications identified. The abstracts of all of these publications were read. After exclusion of the articles that were not relevant to pregnancy, pregnancy outcome, and fish parasites, there were 24 articles that became the basis of this review. The pathophysiology, altered maternal immunity related to the infection, limited information about fish-borne parasitic infections and pregnancy, and treatments are discussed. The main impact of a fish-borne parasitic infection on pregnant women is anemia and altered immunity, which may increase the risk of a maternal infection. The primary fetal effects include intrauterine growth restriction and preterm delivery. PMID:27065071

  6. Possible influence of B chromosomes on genes included in immune response and parasite burden in Apodemus flavicollis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnađević, Tanja; Jovanović, Vladimir M; Blagojević, Jelena; Budinski, Ivana; Cabrilo, Borislav; Bjelić-Čabrilo, Olivera; Bijelić-Čabrilo, Olivera; Vujošević, Mladen

    2014-01-01

    Genetic background underlying wild populations immune response to different parasites is still not well understood. We studied immune response to multiple infections and to competition between different parasite species at different developmental stages in population of yellow-necked mouse, Apodemus flavicollis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to investigate associations of MHC II-DRB, IL-10 and Tgf-β genes expressions with presence of intestinal parasites at different developmental stages. Furthermore, we were interested whether the host related characteristics (sex, age, body condition, presence of B chromosomes or expression of other genes) or characteristics of present parasites (number of adult parasites of each identified species, egg count of each parasite genus, total number of nematode individuals) affect differential expression of the studied genes. A significant invert association between the expression of MHC II-DRB and Tgf-β gene was found, which together with absence of IL-10 association confirmed modified Th2 as the main type of immune response to nematode infections. Effect of recorded parasites and parasite life-cycle stage on expression levels of MHC II-DRB gene was detected only through interactions with host-related characteristics such as sex, age, and the presence of B chromosomes. The presence of B chromosomes is associated with lower expression level of Tgf-β gene. Although the influence of host genetic background on parasite infection has already been well documented, this is the first study in mammals that gave presence of B chromosomes on immune response full consideration. PMID:25372668

  7. Possible influence of B chromosomes on genes included in immune response and parasite burden in Apodemus flavicollis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Adnađević

    Full Text Available Genetic background underlying wild populations immune response to different parasites is still not well understood. We studied immune response to multiple infections and to competition between different parasite species at different developmental stages in population of yellow-necked mouse, Apodemus flavicollis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to investigate associations of MHC II-DRB, IL-10 and Tgf-β genes expressions with presence of intestinal parasites at different developmental stages. Furthermore, we were interested whether the host related characteristics (sex, age, body condition, presence of B chromosomes or expression of other genes or characteristics of present parasites (number of adult parasites of each identified species, egg count of each parasite genus, total number of nematode individuals affect differential expression of the studied genes. A significant invert association between the expression of MHC II-DRB and Tgf-β gene was found, which together with absence of IL-10 association confirmed modified Th2 as the main type of immune response to nematode infections. Effect of recorded parasites and parasite life-cycle stage on expression levels of MHC II-DRB gene was detected only through interactions with host-related characteristics such as sex, age, and the presence of B chromosomes. The presence of B chromosomes is associated with lower expression level of Tgf-β gene. Although the influence of host genetic background on parasite infection has already been well documented, this is the first study in mammals that gave presence of B chromosomes on immune response full consideration.

  8. Northeast India Helminth Parasite Information Database (NEIHPID): Knowledge Base for Helminth Parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Biswal, Devendra Kumar; Debnath, Manish; Kharumnuid, Graciously; Thongnibah, Welfrank; Tandon, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Most metazoan parasites that invade vertebrate hosts belong to three phyla: Platyhelminthes, Nematoda and Acanthocephala. Many of the parasitic members of these phyla are collectively known as helminths and are causative agents of many debilitating, deforming and lethal diseases of humans and animals. The North-East India Helminth Parasite Information Database (NEIHPID) project aimed to document and characterise the spectrum of helminth parasites in the north-eastern region of India, providin...

  9. Reduced helminth parasitism in the introduced bank vole (Myodes glareolus): More parasites lost than gained

    OpenAIRE

    Loxton, Karen C.; Colin Lawton; Peter Stafford; Celia V. Holland

    2016-01-01

    Introduced species are often less parasitised compared to their native counterparts and to ecologically similar hosts in the new environment. Reduced parasitism may come about due to both the loss of original parasites and low acquisition of novel parasites. In this study we investigated the intestinal helminth parasites of the introduced bank vole (Myodes glareolus) in Ireland. Results were compared to data from other European studies and to the intestinal helminth fauna of an ecologically s...

  10. [Trichostrongyloidea nematodes, parasites of Microchiroptera].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durette-Desset, M C; Chabaud, A G

    1975-01-01

    1. a) List of Nematodes collected by Professor Aellen in european Microchiroptera. Additionnal morphological data to the study of Molinostrongylus alatus, M. panousei, M. skrjabini. Description of M. aelleni n. sp. b) Description of M. richardae n. sp., M. benexae n. sp. et M. bauchoti n. sp., parasites of malagasian Molossidae. c) Description of M. colleyi n. sp. and M. owyangi n. sp., parasites of Malaysian Vespertilioninae, and of Allintoschius dunni n. sp., discovered in Myotis mystacinus from Malaysia and Pipistrellus nanus from Africa. 2. Taking into account the characteristics of the synlophe, the 17 species of the genus Molinostrongylus may be divided into five groups, each one being reasonably well characteristic of the genus of their Chiropteran host. 3. The composition of the Trichostrongyloidea fauna of Chiroptera and its relationship with Trichostrongyloidea from other Mammals (Tupaiidae, Pholidotes, Primates, Sciuridés) are analysed. Six groups are separated and divided into two well defined lines: 1) genus Strongylacantha, and 2) 12 genera stemming more or less directly from the Molineinae, 4. The three conical outgrowths at the tip of the female tail which differenciate presently the Anoplostrogylinae from the Molineinae appear to be an unreliable characteristic. The two subfamilies form a complex group which will be better understood if the evolution of the synlophe and that of the caudal bursa of the males are taken into account. PMID:1211768

  11. Local immune mechanisms against parasites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The secretory immunological system of the gastrointestinal tract is associated with the production of secretory IgA immunoglobulins. However, despite the fact that secretory IgA antibodies are known to mediate protection against infection with a number of bacteria and viruses, little information is available on their role in protection against infection with parasites. Thus, although elevated levels of IgA immunoglobulins and antibodies are present in the gastrointestinal tract after infection with a number of helminths and protozoa, conclusive evidence that these are associated with protection against infection is often lacking. However, it has now been demonstrated that intestinal IgA antibodies are associated with protection against infection with Taenia taeniaeformis in mice. In addition, secretory IgA antibodies arising from the common mucosal immunological system of the mammary gland are associated with protection against infection with T. taeniaeformis in mice and rats. Thus, since the portal of entry and site of residence of many parasites is the gastrointestinal tract, the secretory immunological system may act as a first line of defence against infection, and it is possible that oral immunization and local stimulation of the gastrointestinal tract may be effective in inducing protection against infection. The use of nuclear techniques (radioisotope-labelled IgA, autoradiography to follow the role of hepatocytes in IgA transport across the liver) are mentioned marginally only in this review

  12. Effects of experimental reduction in nest micro-parasite and macro-parasite loads on nestling hemoglobin level in blue tits Parus caeruleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słomczyński, Robert; Kaliński, Adam; Wawrzyniak, Jarosław; Bańbura, Mirosława; Skwarska, Joanna; Zieliński, Piotr; Bańbura, Jerzy

    2006-09-01

    Theory suggests that macro- and micro-parasites may be important factors of selection for life-histories. They generate selection pressures by detrimental effects on host health. Nests of secondary cavity nesters provide a convenient habitat for an assemblage of parasites exploiting nestlings. In this study, natural blue tit Parus caeruleus nests (26) were replaced with clean artificial nests, twice during the nestling stage. This treatment caused an increase of 7-10.5 g/l in hemoglobin level of 12-day-old nestlings in comparison with control nestlings. Nestlings that developed in parasite-pathogen-free nests improved their health status. The experimental sterilization did not affect a morphometric index of condition. Potential effects on condition indices might be masked by trophic conditions.

  13. Experimental Life Cycle of Hypoderaeum conoideum (Block, 1872) Diez, 1909(Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) Parasite from the North of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    AZIZI, Hakim; FARAHNAK, Ali; Mobedi, Iraj; MohamadBagher MOLAEI RAD

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human Echinostomiasis is an intestinal disease caused by the members of family Echinostomatidae parasites. The aim of present research was to identify echinos­tomatidae cercariae emitted by Lymnaea palustris snails from Mazandaran province in the north of Iran based on the morphological and morphometrical charac­teristics of the different stages of experimental parasite life cycle.Methods: Echinostomatidae cercariae were collected from L. palustris (Gastropoda: Lymnaeidae) of the ...

  14. Depletion of Plasmodium berghei Plasmoredoxin Reveals a Non-Essential Role for Life Cycle Progression of the Malaria Parasite

    OpenAIRE

    Kathrin Buchholz; Stefan Rahlfs; R Heiner Schirmer; Katja Becker; Kai Matuschewski

    2008-01-01

    Proliferation of the pathogenic Plasmodium asexual blood stages in host erythrocytes requires an exquisite capacity to protect the malaria parasite against oxidative stress. This function is achieved by a complex antioxidant defence system composed of redox-active proteins and low MW antioxidants. Here, we disrupted the P. berghei plasmoredoxin gene that encodes a parasite-specific 22 kDa member of the thioredoxin superfamily. The successful generation of plasmoredoxin knockout mutants in the...

  15. Endohelminth parasites of the leafscale gulper shark, Centrophorus squamosus (Bonnaterre, 1788) (Squaliformes:Centrophoridae) off Madeira Archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Graça; Chada, Tomás; Melo-Moreira, Egberto; Cavallero, Serena; D'Amelio, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    The endohelminth parasite fauna of a deep water shark, the leafscale gulper shark, Centrophorus squamosus, examined from Madeiran waters, from September 2009 to January 2010, consisted of larval and juvenile cestodes of two orders, namely Trypanorhyncha and Tetraphyllidea, and L3 stages of Anisakis spp. Infection with Anisakis spp. could be due to the shark's opportunistic feeding on squids and black-scabbard fish, Aphanopus carbo, which is heavily parasitized by Anisakis spp. in Madeira waters. The occurrence of larval and juvenile cestodes only, in this shark, suggests that the leafscale gulper shark features as a paratenic or a dead-end host for the parasites. PMID:24827105

  16. Parasitic gastro-enteritis in lambs — A model for estimating the timing of the larval emergence peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, J. R.; Thomas, R. J.

    1980-09-01

    The life history of the nematode parasites of domestic ruminants usually involves the development and survival of free-living stages on pasture. The pasture is, therefore, the site of deposition, development and transmission of nematode infection and meteorological factors affecting the pasture will affect the parasites. Recently Thomas and Starr (1978) discussed an empirical technique for forecasting the timing of the summer wave of gastro-intestinal parasitism in North-East England in the lamb crop using meteorological data and in particular estimates of the duration of “surface wetness”. This paper presents an attempt to model “surface wetness” and the temperature limitation to nematode development.

  17. Protease-associated cellular networks in malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilburn Timothy G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria continues to be one of the most severe global infectious diseases, responsible for 1-2 million deaths yearly. The rapid evolution and spread of drug resistance in parasites has led to an urgent need for the development of novel antimalarial targets. Proteases are a group of enzymes that play essential roles in parasite growth and invasion. The possibility of designing specific inhibitors for proteases makes them promising drug targets. Previously, combining a comparative genomics approach and a machine learning approach, we identified the complement of proteases (degradome in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and its sibling species 123, providing a catalog of targets for functional characterization and rational inhibitor design. Network analysis represents another route to revealing the role of proteins in the biology of parasites and we use this approach here to expand our understanding of the systems involving the proteases of P. falciparum. Results We investigated the roles of proteases in the parasite life cycle by constructing a network using protein-protein association data from the STRING database 4, and analyzing these data, in conjunction with the data from protein-protein interaction assays using the yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H system 5, blood stage microarray experiments 678, proteomics 9101112, literature text mining, and sequence homology analysis. Seventy-seven (77 out of 124 predicted proteases were associated with at least one other protein, constituting 2,431 protein-protein interactions (PPIs. These proteases appear to play diverse roles in metabolism, cell cycle regulation, invasion and infection. Their degrees of connectivity (i.e., connections to other proteins, range from one to 143. The largest protease-associated sub-network is the ubiquitin-proteasome system which is crucial for protein recycling and stress response. Proteases are also implicated in heat shock response, signal peptide

  18. Detection of mycobacteria in the bloodstream of patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in a University Hospital in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Paz Oplustil

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was done to determine the occurrence of mycobacteria in the bloodstreams of patients with fever and advanced AIDS in a Brazilian hospital. We also verified the capability of an automated method for recovering these bacteria. During a period of 19 months, 254 patients with AIDS were evaluated. Blood cultures were generally submitted in pairs and drawn separately. Blood cultures were processed by the BACTEC 460TB System (Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems, Sparks, MD, using the Bactec 13A media (Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems, Sparks, MD. Of the 530 vials submitted, 77 (14.5% from 41 (16% patients were positive. Mycobacterium avium complex was recovered from 45 (58.4% of the 77 positive vials, corresponding to 22 (53.6% patients with positive blood cultures. The average time to detect Mycobacterium avium complex was 15 days. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was recovered from 26 (33.8% of the 77 positive vials, corresponding to 15 (36.6% patients with positive blood cultures, with an average detection time of 24 days. Other species of mycobacteria were recovered from 6 (7.8% of the 77 vials, corresponding to 4 (9.8% patients. M.avium complex was fairly prevalent (8.7% in severely ill patients with AIDS in our hospital. M. tuberculosis was also an important (6.0% agent of systemic bacterial infections in these patients. The rapid diagnosis of mycobacteremia was possible with the implementation of this automated technology.

  19. Cefazolin versus Nafcillin for Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection in a California Tertiary Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollett, S; Baxi, S M; Rutherford, G W; Doernberg, S B; Bacchetti, P; Chambers, H F

    2016-08-01

    Recent observational studies have suggested possible reductions in mortality in patients receiving cefazolin versus antistaphylococcal penicillins. We examined 90-day mortality in patients receiving cefazolin compared to nafcillin for methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bloodstream infection (BSI). We identified persons with MSSA BSI admitted to San Francisco General Hospital from January 2008 to July 2013 through a hospital-wide infection surveillance system and confirmed 90-day mortality using U.S. national vital registries. We included persons receiving cefazolin or nafcillin as the predominant intravenous antimicrobial agent; all participants received inpatient Infectious Diseases service consultation. We estimated the association between receipt of cefazolin and 90-day risk of death by multivariate logistic regression, including a propensity score for receiving cefazolin as the second predictor. Of 230 MSSA BSI cases, 30 received nafcillin and 70 received cefazolin as the predominant antimicrobial; 10 died within 90 days, 5 from each group. Unadjusted analysis showed substantial but not statistically significant reduced odds of death in those receiving cefazolin (odds ratio, 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.10 to 1.44). Multivariate analysis with propensity scores found a similar adjusted odds ratio (0.40; 95% CI, 0.09 to 1.74; P = 0.22). We found a large reduction in 90-day mortality in those receiving cefazolin compared to nafcillin for MSSA BSI, but this finding was not statistically significant. The magnitude of effect seen in this and other studies justifies further study. PMID:27216053

  20. The impact of HIV infection on blood leukocyte responsiveness to bacterial stimulation in asymptomatic patients and patients with bloodstream infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huson, Michaëla A M; Hoogendijk, Arie J; de Vos, Alex F; Grobusch, Martin P; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV-induced changes in cytokine responses to bacteria may influence susceptibility to bacterial infections and the consequent inflammatory response. Methods We examined the impact of HIV on whole blood responsiveness to bacterial stimulation in asymptomatic subjects and patients with bacterial bloodstream infection (BSI). Whole blood was stimulated ex vivo with two bacterial Toll-like receptor agonists (lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid) and two pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae and non-typhoidal Salmonella), which are relevant in HIV-positive patients. Production of interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 was used as a read-out. Results In asymptomatic subjects, HIV infection was associated with reduced interferon-γ, release after stimulation and priming of the pro-inflammatory cytokine response to non-typhoidal Salmonella. In patients with BSI, we found no such priming effect, nor was there evidence for more profound sepsis-induced immunosuppression in BSI patients with HIV co-infection. Conclusions These results suggest a complex effect of HIV on leukocyte responses to bacteria. However, in patients with sepsis, leukocyte responses were equally blunted in patients with and without HIV infection. PMID:27189532

  1. High MICs for Vancomycin and Daptomycin and Complicated Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections with Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viedma, Esther; Chaves, Fernando; Lalueza, Antonio; Fortún, Jesús; Loza, Elena; Pujol, Miquel; Ardanuy, Carmen; Morales, Isabel; de Cueto, Marina; Resino-Foz, Elena; Morales-Cartagena, Alejandra; Rico, Alicia; Romero, María P.; Orellana, María Ángeles; López-Medrano, Francisco; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic role of high MICs for antistaphylococcal agents in patients with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus catheter-related bloodstream infection (MSSA CRBSI). We prospectively reviewed 83 episodes from 5 centers in Spain during April 2011–June 2014 that had optimized clinical management and analyzed the relationship between E-test MICs for vancomycin, daptomycin, oxacillin, and linezolid and development of complicated bacteremia by using multivariate analysis. Complicated MSSA CRBSI occurred in 26 (31.3%) patients; MICs for vancomycin and daptomycin were higher in these patients (optimal cutoff values for predictive accuracy = 1.5 μg/mL and 0.5 μg/mL). High MICs for vancomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.2–5.5) and daptomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.1–5.9) were independent risk factors for development of complicated MSSA CRBSI. Our data suggest that patients with MSSA CRBSI caused by strains that have high MICs for vancomycin or daptomycin are at increased risk for complications. PMID:27192097

  2. High MICs for Vancomycin and Daptomycin and Complicated Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections with Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Juan, Rafael; Viedma, Esther; Chaves, Fernando; Lalueza, Antonio; Fortún, Jesús; Loza, Elena; Pujol, Miquel; Ardanuy, Carmen; Morales, Isabel; de Cueto, Marina; Resino-Foz, Elena; Morales-Cartagena, Alejandra; Rico, Alicia; Romero, María P; Orellana, María Ángeles; López-Medrano, Francisco; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the prognostic role of high MICs for antistaphylococcal agents in patients with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus catheter-related bloodstream infection (MSSA CRBSI). We prospectively reviewed 83 episodes from 5 centers in Spain during April 2011-June 2014 that had optimized clinical management and analyzed the relationship between E-test MICs for vancomycin, daptomycin, oxacillin, and linezolid and development of complicated bacteremia by using multivariate analysis. Complicated MSSA CRBSI occurred in 26 (31.3%) patients; MICs for vancomycin and daptomycin were higher in these patients (optimal cutoff values for predictive accuracy = 1.5 μg/mL and 0.5 μg/mL). High MICs for vancomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-5.5) and daptomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.1-5.9) were independent risk factors for development of complicated MSSA CRBSI. Our data suggest that patients with MSSA CRBSI caused by strains that have high MICs for vancomycin or daptomycin are at increased risk for complications. PMID:27192097

  3. Comparison of severity of illness scoring systems for patients with nosocomial bloodstream infection due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzel Richard P

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several acute illness severity scores have been proposed for evaluating patients on admission to intensive care units but these have not been compared for patients with nosocomial bloodstream infection (nBSI. We compared three severity of illness scoring systems for predicting mortality in patients with nBSI due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods We performed a historical cohort study on 63 adults in intensive care units with P. aeruginosa monomicrobial nBSI. Results The Acute Physiology, Age, Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, and Simplified Acute Physiologic Score (SAPS II, were calculated daily from 2 days prior through 2 days after the first positive blood culture. Calculation of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve confirmed that APACHE II and SAPS II at day -1 and SOFA at day +1 were better predictors of outcome than days -2, 0 and day 2 of BSI. By stepwise logistic regression analysis of these three scoring systems, SAPS II (OR: 13.03, CI95% 2.51–70.49 and APACHE II (OR: 12.51, CI95% 3.12–50.09 on day -1 were the best predictors for mortality. Conclusion SAPS II and APACHE II are more accurate than the SOFA score for predicting mortality in this group of patients at day -1 of BSI.

  4. A 12-year review of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in haemodialysis patients: more work to be done.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, S F

    2012-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (BSI) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in haemodialysis patients. This study describes a 12-year retrospective review of S. aureus BSI in a large haemodialysis centre in a tertiary referral hospital. The overall rate of S. aureus BSI was 17.9 per 100 patient-years (range 9.7-36.8). The rate of meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) BSI was 5.6 per 100 patient-years (range 0.9-13.8). Infective complications occurred in 11% of episodes, the most common being infective endocarditis (7.6%). Ten percent of patients died within 30 days of S. aureus being isolated from blood. Most cases of S. aureus BSI (83%) were related to vascular catheters. The provision of lower-risk vascular access, such as arteriovenous fistulae, and reduced use of intravascular catheters should be priorities in all haemodialysis units. Where alternative vascular access cannot be established, interventions to reduce the risk of catheter-related infections should be implemented to reduce morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable patient group.

  5. Surveillance of bloodstream infections in pediatric cancer centers – what have we learned and how do we move on?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon, Arne

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric patients receiving conventional chemotherapy for malignant disease face an increased risk of bloodstream infection (BSI. Since BSI may represent an acute life-threatening event in patients with profound immunosuppression, and show further negative impact on quality of life and anticancer treatment, the prevention of BSI is of paramount importance to improve and guarantee patients’ safety during intensive treatment. The great majority of all pediatric cancer patients (about 85% have a long-term central venous access catheter in use (type Broviac or Port; CVAD. Referring to the current surveillance definitions a significant proportion of all BSI in pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia is categorized as CVAD- BSI. This state of the art review summarizes the epidemiology and the distinct pathogen profile of BSI in pediatric cancer patients from the perspective of infection surveillance. Problems in executing the current surveillance definition in this patient population are discussed and a new concept for the surveillance of BSI in pediatric cancer patients is outlined.

  6. CLABSI Conversations: Lessons From Peer-to-Peer Assessments to Reduce Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Julius Cuong; Goeschel, Christine A; Berenholtz, Sean M; Demski, Renee; Lubomski, Lisa H; Rosen, Michael A; Sawyer, Melinda D; Thompson, David A; Trexler, Polly; Weaver, Sallie J; Weeks, Kristina R; Pronovost, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    A national collaborative helped many hospitals dramatically reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), but some hospitals struggled to reduce infection rates. This article describes the development of a peer-to-peer assessment process (CLABSI Conversations) and the practical, actionable practices we discovered that helped intensive care unit teams achieve a CLABSI rate of less than 1 infection per 1000 catheter-days for at least 1 year. CLABSI Conversations was designed as a learning-oriented process, in which a team of peers visited hospitals to surface barriers to infection prevention and to share best practices and insights from successful intensive care units. Common practices led to 10 recommendations: executive and board leaders communicate the goal of zero CLABSI throughout the hospital; senior and unit-level leaders hold themselves accountable for CLABSI rates; unit physicians and nurse leaders own the problem; clinical leaders and infection preventionists build infection prevention training and simulation programs; infection preventionists participate in unit-based CLABSI reduction efforts; hospital managers make compliance with best practices easy; clinical leaders standardize the hospital's catheter insertion and maintenance practices and empower nurses to stop any potentially harmful acts; unit leaders and infection preventionists investigate CLABSIs to identify root causes; and unit nurses and staff audit catheter maintenance policies and practices. PMID:27031355

  7. Parasitic Contamination of Commonly Consumed Fresh Leafy Vegetables in Benha, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa Ahmad Eraky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the degree of parasitic contamination of vegetables which are commercialized and consumed fresh in Benha, Egypt. It included 530 vegetables: lettuce, watercress, parsley, green onion, and leek. Vegetables were collected randomly from markets within Benha. Samples were washed in saline, and the resulting washing solution was filtered and centrifuged to concentrate the parasitic stages. Sediments and supernatants were examined by iodine and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stained smears. Intestinal parasites were detected in 157/530 (29.6% samples. Giardia lamblia cysts were the most prevalent parasite (8.8% followed by Entamoeba spp. cysts (6.8%, Enterobius vermicularis eggs (4.9%, various helminth larvae (3.6%, Hymenolepis nana eggs (2.8%, Hymenolepis diminuta eggs (2.1%, and Ascaris lumbricoides eggs (0.6%. The highest contaminated vegetable was lettuce (45.5% followed by watercress (41.3%, parsley (34.3%, green onion (16.5%, and leek (10.7%. These results indicate a significant seasonal variation (P<0.05, with highest prevalence in summer (49% and the lowest in winter (10.8%. These findings provide evidence for the high risk of acquiring parasitic infection from the consumption of raw vegetables in Benha, Egypt. Effective measures are necessary to reduce parasitic contamination of vegetables.

  8. Parasitic contamination of commonly consumed fresh leafy vegetables in benha, egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraky, Maysa Ahmad; Rashed, Samia Mostafa; Nasr, Mona El-Sayed; El-Hamshary, Azza Mohammed Salah; Salah El-Ghannam, Amera

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the degree of parasitic contamination of vegetables which are commercialized and consumed fresh in Benha, Egypt. It included 530 vegetables: lettuce, watercress, parsley, green onion, and leek. Vegetables were collected randomly from markets within Benha. Samples were washed in saline, and the resulting washing solution was filtered and centrifuged to concentrate the parasitic stages. Sediments and supernatants were examined by iodine and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stained smears. Intestinal parasites were detected in 157/530 (29.6%) samples. Giardia lamblia cysts were the most prevalent parasite (8.8%) followed by Entamoeba spp. cysts (6.8%), Enterobius vermicularis eggs (4.9%), various helminth larvae (3.6%), Hymenolepis nana eggs (2.8%), Hymenolepis diminuta eggs (2.1%), and Ascaris lumbricoides eggs (0.6%). The highest contaminated vegetable was lettuce (45.5%) followed by watercress (41.3%), parsley (34.3%), green onion (16.5%), and leek (10.7%). These results indicate a significant seasonal variation (P parasitic infection from the consumption of raw vegetables in Benha, Egypt. Effective measures are necessary to reduce parasitic contamination of vegetables. PMID:25024845

  9. Vaccination of chicks against Plasmodium gallinaceum by erythrocytic and exoerythrocytic parasites attenuated by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmodium gallinaceum-infected blood which received up to 24 krad during exposure to gamma-rays from a cobalt-60 source produced infections of normal course and duration when injected into chickens. The prepatent period advanced with increasing exposure of infected blood to radiation, suggesting some degree of attenuation. At 26, 28 and 30 krad, the infections were transient and the parasites were morphologically abnormal. It is thought that the amount of radiation required to render the parasites non-viable is about 45 krad for an inoculum of 106 parasites. There is evidence that exoerythrocytic stages may be more susceptible to gamma-rays than are blood parasites. Chickens were inoculated three times, over a period of four weeks, with vaccines prepared from gamma-irradiated infected blood and brain tissue. Half the birds which had been inoculated with attenuated parasitized blood exhibited mild infections during vaccination, and they were the only birds to show at challenge immunity to both homologous blood and exoerythrocytic parasites. (author)

  10. Development and Assessment of Transgenic Rodent Parasites for the Preclinical Evaluation of Malaria Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Diego A; Radtke, Andrea J; Zavala, Fidel

    2016-01-01

    Rodent transgenic parasites are useful tools for the preclinical evaluation of malaria vaccines. Over the last decade, several studies have reported the development of transgenic rodent parasites expressing P. falciparum antigens for the assessment of vaccine-induced immune responses, which traditionally have been limited to in vitro assays. However, the genetic manipulation of rodent Plasmodium species can have detrimental effects on the parasite's infectivity and development. In this chapter, we present a few guidelines for designing transfection plasmids, which should improve transfection efficiency and facilitate the generation of functional transgenic parasite strains. In addition, we provide a transfection protocol for the development of transgenic P. berghei parasites as well as practical methods to assess the viability and infectivity of these newly generated strains throughout different stages of their life cycle. These techniques should allow researchers to develop novel rodent malaria parasites expressing antigens from human malaria species and to determine whether these transgenic strains are fully infectious and thus represent stringent platforms for the in vivo evaluation of malaria vaccine candidates. PMID:27076155

  11. Host-parasite Red Queen dynamics with phase-locked rare genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabajante, Jomar F; Tubay, Jerrold M; Ito, Hiromu; Uehara, Takashi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Morita, Satoru; Yoshimura, Jin; Ebert, Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between hosts and parasites have been hypothesized to cause winnerless coevolution, called Red Queen dynamics. The canonical Red Queen dynamics assume that all interacting genotypes of hosts and parasites undergo cyclic changes in abundance through negative frequency-dependent selection, which means that any genotype could become frequent at some stage. However, this prediction cannot explain why many rare genotypes stay rare in natural host-parasite systems. To investigate this, we build a mathematical model involving multihost and multiparasite genotypes. In a deterministic and controlled environment, Red Queen dynamics occur between two genotypes undergoing cyclic dominance changes, whereas the rest of the genotypes remain subordinate for long periods of time in phase-locked synchronized dynamics with low amplitude. However, introduction of stochastic noise in the model might allow the subordinate cyclic host and parasite types to replace dominant cyclic types as new players in the Red Queen dynamics. The factors that influence such evolutionary switching are interhost competition, specificity of parasitism, and degree of stochastic noise. Our model can explain, for the first time, the persistence of rare, hardly cycling genotypes in populations (for example, marine microbial communities) undergoing host-parasite coevolution. PMID:26973878

  12. Parasites as biological tags for Eleginops maclovinus (Teleostei: Eleginopidae) around the Falkland Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickle, Paul; Mackenzie, Ken

    2007-06-01

    This is the first study of the parasite fauna of Eleginops maclovinus in the Falkland Islands. It was undertaken to catalogue the parasite fauna of E. maclovinus in order to provide a baseline for future studies and to determine whether parasites might be used as biological tags. Between 21 January and 17 March 2002 samples were taken from three stations, Teal Creek (30 fish), Port Louis (30 fish) and Camilla Creek (10 fish), all in East Falkland, and examined for protozoan and metazoan parasites. Twenty-four parasite taxa were recorded, of which three were possible new species, two new host records and five new geographical records. Because of the small number of fish in the Camilla Creek sample it was excluded from further analyses. E. maclovinus is a protandrous hermaphrodite and all fish greater than 53 cm total length were found to be female, so these too were excluded from further analyses. The parasite data from the remaining fish were analysed by an agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis using an average linkage and a Jaccard measure of similarity, followed by a linear discriminant function analysis (LDA). Both analyses misclassified only one fish from Port Louis as being from Teal Creek, with the LDA giving an overall correct classification of 97.5% (39/40). The results support mechanical tagging data in suggesting that smaller male E. maclovinus are resident in the creeks in which they are caught, and that at this stage of their lives they tend not to migrate over long distances. PMID:17578595

  13. Origins of amino acid transporter loci in trypanosomatid parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Andrew P

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large amino acid transporter gene families were identified from the genome sequences of three parasitic protists, Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania major. These genes encode molecular sensors of the external host environment for trypanosomatid cells and are crucial to modulation of gene expression as the parasite passes through different life stages. This study provides a comprehensive phylogenetic account of the origins of these genes, redefining each locus according to a positional criterion, through the integration of phyletic identity with comparative gene order information. Results Each locus was individually specified by its surrounding gene order and associated with homologs showing the same position ('homoeologs' in other species, where available. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenies were in general agreement on systematic relationships and confirmed several 'orthology sets' of genes retained since divergence from the common ancestor. Reconciliation analysis quantified the scale of duplication and gene loss, as well as identifying further apparent orthology sets, which lacked conservation of genomic position. These instances suggested substantial genomic restructuring or transposition. Other analyses identified clear instances of evolutionary rate changes post-duplication, the effects of concerted evolution within tandem gene arrays and gene conversion events between syntenic loci. Conclusion Despite their importance to cell function and parasite development, the repertoires of AAT loci in trypanosomatid parasites are relatively fluid in both complement and gene dosage. Some loci are ubiquitous and, after an ancient origin through transposition, originated through descent from the ancestral trypanosomatid. However, reconciliation analysis demonstrated that unilateral expansions of gene number through tandem gene duplication, transposition of gene duplicates to otherwise well conserved genomic

  14. Consequences of Food Restriction for Immune Defense, Parasite Infection, and Fitness in Monarch Butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Alexa Fritzsche; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Altizer, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Organisms have a finite pool of resources to allocate toward multiple competing needs, such as development, reproduction, and enemy defense. Abundant resources can support investment in multiple traits simultaneously, but limited resources might promote trade-offs between fitness-related traits and immune defenses. We asked how food restriction at both larval and adult life stages of the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) affected measures of immunity, fitness, and immune-fitness interactions. We experimentally infected a subset of monarchs with a specialist protozoan parasite to determine whether parasitism further affected these relationships and whether food restriction influenced the outcome of infection. Larval food restriction reduced monarch fitness measures both within the same life stage (e.g., pupal mass) as well as later in life (e.g., adult lifespan); adult food restriction further reduced adult lifespan. Larval food restriction lowered both hemocyte concentration and phenoloxidase activity at the larval stage, and the effects of larval food restriction on phenoloxidase activity persisted when immunity was sampled at the adult stage. Adult food restriction reduced only adult phenoloxidase activity but not hemocyte concentration. Parasite spore load decreased with one measure of larval immunity, but food restriction did not increase the probability of parasite infection. Across monarchs, we found a negative relationship between larval hemocyte concentration and pupal mass, and a trade-off between adult hemocyte concentration and adult life span was evident in parasitized female monarchs. Adult life span increased with phenoloxidase activity in some subsets of monarchs. Our results emphasize that food restriction can alter fitness and immunity across multiple life stages. Understanding the consequences of resource limitation for immune defense is therefore important for predicting how increasing constraints on wildlife resources will affect fitness and

  15. Ecology and biogeography of marine parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    A review is given of (mainly recent) work on the biodiversity, ecology, biogeography and practical importance of marine parasites. Problems in estimating species numbers have been thoroughly discussed for free-living species, and the main points of these discussions are reviewed here. Even rough estimates of the richness of most parasite groups in the oceans are premature for the following reasons: species numbers of host groups, in particular in the deep sea and the meiofauna, are not known; most host groups have been examined only insufficiently for parasites or not at all; even in some of the best known groups, latitudinal, longitudinal and depth gradients in species richness are only poorly understood or not known at all; effects of hosts on parasite morphology and geographical variation have been studied only in a few cases; there are few studies using techniques of molecular biology to distinguish sibling species. Estimates of species richness in the best known groups, trematodes, monogeneans and copepods of marine fishes, are given. Parasites are found in almost all taxa of eukaryotes, but most parasitic species are concentrated in a few taxa. Important aspects of the ecology of marine parasites are discussed. It is emphasized that host specificity and host ranges should be distinguished, and an index that permits calculation of host specificity is discussed. The same index can be applied to measure site specificity. Central problems in ecology are the importance of interspecific competition and whether equilibrium or non-equilibrium conditions prevail. Marine parasites are among the few groups of organisms that have been extensively examined in this regard. A holistic approach, i.e. application of many methods, has unambiguously shown that metazoan ecto- (and probably endo-) parasites of marine fish live in largely non-saturated niche space under non-equilibrium conditions, i.e. they live in assemblages rather than in communities structured by competition

  16. Testing parasite 'intimacy': the whipworm Trichuris muris in the European house mouse hybrid zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasimuddin; Bryja, Josef; Ribas, Alexis; Baird, Stuart J E; Piálek, Jaroslav; Goüy de Bellocq, Joëlle

    2016-05-01

    Host-parasite interaction studies across hybrid zones often focus on host genetic variation, treating parasites as homogeneous. 'Intimately' associated hosts and parasites might be expected to show similar patterns of genetic structure. In the literature, factors such as no intermediate host and no free-living stage have been proposed as 'intimacy' factors likely constraining parasites to closely follow the evolutionary history of their hosts. To test whether the whipworm, Trichuris muris, is intimately associated with its house mouse host, we studied its population genetics across the European house mouse hybrid zone (HMHZ) which has a strong central barrier to gene flow between mouse taxa. T. muris has a direct life cycle and nonmobile free stage: if these traits constrain the parasite to an intimate association with its host we expect a geographic break in the parasite genetic structure across the HMHZ. We genotyped 205 worms from 56 localities across the HMHZ and additionally T. muris collected from sympatric woodmice (Apodemus spp.) and allopatric murine species, using mt-COX1, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA and 10 microsatellites. We show four haplogroups of mt-COX1 and three clear ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 clades in the HMHZ suggesting a complex demographic/phylogeographic history. Microsatellites show strong structure between groups of localities. However, no marker type shows a break across the HMHZ. Whipworms from Apodemus in the HMHZ cluster, and share mitochondrial haplotypes, with those from house mice. We conclude Trichuris should not be regarded as an 'intimate' parasite of the house mouse: while its life history might suggest intimacy, passage through alternate hosts is sufficiently common to erase signal of genetic structure associated with any particular host taxon. PMID:27064973

  17. Batflies Parasitic on Some Phyllostomid Bats in Southeastern Brazil: Parasitism Rates and Host-parasite Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Komeno

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Ectoparasitic batflies were studied on 12 species of phyllostomid bats, by making 35 nightly collections of bats using mist nets at the "Panga" Ecological Reservation near Uberlândia, State of Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil, from August 1989 to July 1990. Eleven species of Streblidae and one of Nycteribiidae were collected on 12 species of bats. Prevalence of ectoparasitic flies was lower than those reported by other authors for the New World and may be the result of the lack of caves in the study area, causing bats to roost in less favorable locations, forming smaller colonies. The fly, Trichobius joblingi Wenzel, was found on Carollia perspicillata (Linnaeus, showing preference for adult male bats. This could be explained by the predominance of males in the bat colonies, and by the fact that females rest in isolation during the reproductive period making them less exposed to the parasites. The streblid flies, Aspidoptera falcata Wenzel and Megistopoda proxima (Séguy, were found on Sturnira lilium (Geoffroy. A. falcata occurred mainly on young and adult females, whereas M. proxima did not show any preferences relative to the reproductive condition of the host. Ecological factors are important in determining differential numbers of parasites occurring on the different sexes, ages and reproductive state of the hosts.

  18. Inhibition of Plasmepsin V activity demonstrates its essential role in protein export, PfEMP1 display, and survival of malaria parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleebs, Brad E; Lopaticki, Sash; Marapana, Danushka S;

    2014-01-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum exports several hundred proteins into the infected erythrocyte that are involved in cellular remodeling and severe virulence. The export mechanism involves the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL), which is a cleavage site for the parasite protease, Plasmep......The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum exports several hundred proteins into the infected erythrocyte that are involved in cellular remodeling and severe virulence. The export mechanism involves the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL), which is a cleavage site for the parasite protease...... surface, and cytoadherence. The inhibitor killed parasites at the trophozoite stage and knockdown of PMV enhanced sensitivity to the inhibitor, while overexpression of PMV increased resistance. This provides the first direct evidence that PMV activity is essential for protein export in Plasmodium spp. and...... for parasite survival in human erythrocytes and validates PMV as an antimalarial drug target....

  19. Besnoitiosis in rodents from Colorado. [Parasitic infestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, G E; Winsor, T F; Adee, R R

    1976-01-01

    Parasitic cysts of Besnoitia jellisoni (coccidia) were found in rodents (Peromyscus maniculatus and Spermophilus tridecemlineatus) trapped in Eastern Colorado. The parasite was associated with a granulomatous inflammatory reaction in the lungs of each rodent and was disseminated in several organs from one Peromyscus. The ultrastructural appearance of the merozoites and the cyst wall formed by the host cell were studied.

  20. Cell fractionation of parasitic protozoa: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Souza Wanderley de; Cunha-e-Silva Narcisa Leal da

    2003-01-01

    Cell fractionation, a methodological strategy for obtaining purified organelle preparations, has been applied successfully to parasitic protozoa by a number of investigators. Here we present and discuss the work of several groups that have obtained highly purified subcellular fractions from trypanosomatids, Apicomplexa and trichomonads, and whose work have added substantially to our knowledge of the cell biology of these parasites.

  1. Parasitic Skin Infections for Primary Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadabhoy, Irfan; Butts, Jessica F

    2015-12-01

    The 2 epidermal parasitic skin infections most commonly encountered by primary care physicians in developed countries are scabies and pediculosis. Pediculosis can be further subdivided into pediculosis capitis, corporis, and pubis. This article presents a summary of information and a review of the literature on clinical findings, diagnosis, and treatment of these commonly encountered parasitic skin infestations. PMID:26612378

  2. Cell fractionation of parasitic protozoa: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Wanderley de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell fractionation, a methodological strategy for obtaining purified organelle preparations, has been applied successfully to parasitic protozoa by a number of investigators. Here we present and discuss the work of several groups that have obtained highly purified subcellular fractions from trypanosomatids, Apicomplexa and trichomonads, and whose work have added substantially to our knowledge of the cell biology of these parasites.

  3. Characterization and role of protozoan parasite proteasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paugam, André; Bulteau, Anne Laure; Dupouy-Camet, Jean; Creuzet, Claudine; Friguet, Bertrand

    2003-02-01

    The proteasome, a large non-lysosomal multi-subunit protease complex, is ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells. In protozoan parasites, the proteasome is involved in cell differentiation and replication, and could therefore be a promising therapeutic target. This article reviews the present knowledge of proteasomes in protozoan parasites of medical importance such as Giardia, Entamoeba, Leishmania, Trypanosoma, Plasmodium and Toxoplasma spp. PMID:12586468

  4. Investigating the burden of parasitic zoonotic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Torgerson, P.R.; Craig, P

    2010-01-01

    Although the global burden for most parasitic zoonoses is not yet known, it is clear that collectively parasitic zoonoses have a similar human disease burden to any one of the big three human infectious diseases: malaria, tuberculosis or HIV. In addition many also have a substantial animal health and economic burden.

  5. Zoonotic Parasites of Bobcats around Human Landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Carver, Scott; Scorza, Andrea V.; Bevins, Sarah N.; Seth P D Riley; Crooks, Kevin R.; VandeWoude, Sue; Lappin, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed Lynx rufus fecal parasites from California and Colorado, hypothesizing that bobcats shed zoonotic parasites around human landscapes. Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium, Ancylostoma, Uncinaria, and Toxocara cati were shed. Toxoplasma gondii serology demonstrated exposure. Giardia and Cryptosporidium shedding increased near large human populations. Genotyped Giardia may indicate indirect transmission with humans.

  6. Trichinella spiralis: the evolution of adaptation and parasitism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasitism among nematodes has occurred in multiple, independent events. Deciphering processes that drive species diversity and adaptation are keys to understanding parasitism and advancing control strategies. Studies have been put forth on morphological and physiological aspects of parasitism and a...

  7. Coupled range dynamics of brood parasites and their hosts responding to climate and vegetation changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péron, Guillaume; Altwegg, Res; Jamie, Gabriel A; Spottiswoode, Claire N

    2016-09-01

    As populations shift their ranges in response to global change, local species assemblages can change, setting the stage for new ecological interactions, community equilibria and evolutionary responses. Here, we focus on the range dynamics of four avian brood parasite species and their hosts in southern Africa, in a context of bush encroachment (increase in woody vegetation density in places previously occupied by savanna-grassland mosaics) favouring some species at the expense of others. We first tested whether hosts and parasites constrained each other's ability to expand or maintain their ranges. Secondly, we investigated whether range shifts represented an opportunity for new host-parasite and parasite-parasite interactions. We used multispecies dynamic occupancy models with interactions, fitted to citizen science data, to estimate the contribution of interspecific interactions to range shifts and to quantify the change in species co-occurrence probability over a 25-year period. Parasites were able to track their hosts' range shifts. We detected no deleterious effect of the parasites' presence on either the local population viability of host species or the hosts' ability to colonize newly suitable areas. In the recently diversified indigobird radiation (Vidua spp.), following bush encroachment, the new assemblages presented more potential opportunities for speciation via host switch, but also more potential for hybridization between extant lineages, also via host switch. Multispecies dynamic occupancy models with interactions brought new insights into the feedbacks between range shifts, biotic interactions and local demography: brood parasitism had little detected impact on extinction or colonization processes, but inversely the latter processes affected biotic interactions via the modification of co-occurrence patterns. PMID:27155344

  8. Conserved mosquito/parasite interactions affect development of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M Mendes

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In much of sub-Saharan Africa, the mosquito Anopheles gambiae is the main vector of the major human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Convenient laboratory studies have identified mosquito genes that affect positively or negatively the developmental cycle of the model rodent parasite, P. berghei. Here, we use transcription profiling and reverse genetics to explore whether five disparate mosquito gene regulators of P. berghei development are also pertinent to A. gambiae/P. falciparum interactions in semi-natural conditions, using field isolates of this parasite and geographically related mosquitoes. We detected broadly similar albeit not identical transcriptional responses of these genes to the two parasite species. Gene silencing established that two genes affect similarly both parasites: infections are hindered by the intracellular local activator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, WASP, but promoted by the hemolymph lipid transporter, ApoII/I. Since P. berghei is not a natural parasite of A. gambiae, these data suggest that the effects of these genes have not been drastically altered by constant interaction and co-evolution of A. gambiae and P. falciparum; this conclusion allowed us to investigate further the mode of action of these two genes in the laboratory model system using a suite of genetic tools and infection assays. We showed that both genes act at the level of midgut invasion during the parasite's developmental transition from ookinete to oocyst. ApoII/I also affects the early stages of oocyst development. These are the first mosquito genes whose significant effects on P. falciparum field isolates have been established by direct experimentation. Importantly, they validate for semi-field human malaria transmission the concept of parasite antagonists and agonists.

  9. Climate change and parasitic disease: farmer mitigation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Eric R; Wall, Richard

    2009-07-01

    Global climate change predictions suggest that far-ranging effects might occur in the population dynamics and distributions of livestock parasites, provoking fears of widespread increases in disease incidence and production loss. However, several biological mechanisms (including increased parasite mortality and more rapid acquisition of immunity), in tandem with changes in husbandry practices (including reproduction, housing, nutrition, breed selection, grazing patterns and other management interventions), might act to mitigate increased parasite development rates, preventing dramatic rises in overall levels of disease. Such changes might, therefore, counteract predicted climate-driven increases in parasite challenge. Optimum mitigation strategies will be highly system specific and depend on detailed understanding of interactions between climate, parasite abundance, host availability and the cues for and economics of farmer intervention. PMID:19540163

  10. Pervalence of intestinal parasites in Ordu province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülkü Karaman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The epidemiology of intestinal parasites vary according to country’s geographic location, sociocultural structure and diet. An epidemiological study of intestinal parasites has not been observed in Ordu Province and around. The aim of this study was determining the intestinal parasites data of Ordu Provincial Health Directorate retrosrectively. Methods: Between January 2006 and December 2013 the data of the provinceal Health Directorate of Ordu were retrospectively evaluated. Results: 7194 positivity has been reported in the study. Quantitative distribution of the parasites were as follows; 3415 Enterobius vermicularis, 2802 Ascaris lumbricoides, 1182 Entamoeba histolytica, 705 Giardia intestinalis, 682 Taenia spp, 245 Hookworm infection, 22 Trichuris trichiura, 17 Fasciola hepatica and 12 Strongiloides stercoralis. Conclusion: As a result intestinal parasites in Ordu Province is a major public health problem.

  11. Immunodiagnosis of parasitic infections using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the recommendations of the ''Advisory Group on Immunodiagnosis of Parasitic Infections Using Nuclear Techniques'' with a focus on malaria, schistosomiasis and filariasis. Radionuclide tracers are considered an important component of present and future immunological methods for the assessment of the host's humoral and cellular immunity to the parasite and the detection of parasite antigen(s) in human body fluids. The Advisory Group has concluded that there is a continuing need for the development and application of immunodiagnostic methods in parasitic diseases. This report concerns methods which are currently or potentially applicable to immunodiagnostic investigations in parasitic diseases. Reference is made, where appropriate, to recent developments in research which may lead to improvement and standardization of methods now available and the development of new methodology. Separate abstracts on various papers presented were prepared

  12. Parasitic infections in germfree animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Q. Vieira

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The association of vertebrate hosts with the indigenous microbiota and its effect on the response to infections has long been a subject of scientific curiosity. From the first theory supported by Louis Pasteur that life would be impossible in the absence of associated microorganisms to the development of germfree mammals for research, a lot was learned about how the normal microbiota influences the environment in which pathogens may find themselves. In the present review, we attempt to summarize the more recent results from our group and others on the influence of the normal microbiota on the outcome of parasitic infections. Our results and those of others point to a complex relationship between the mammalian system and its indigenous microbiota, leading to greater resistance to some infections and enhanced susceptibility to others

  13. PARASITE MYCOPOPULATION OF SOYBEAN GRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasenka Ćosić

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Disease appearance on soybean can influence quality and quantity of yield. Different spieces of saprophyte and parasite fungi can be isolated from stems, pods and grain of soybean. The aim of the research was to evaluate the incidence of important disease on natural soybean grain over the period of 4 years (2004-2007 of experiment held on the location Sopot-Vinkovci and included 9 cultivars of soybean. The following plant pathogenic fungi were identified: Peronospora, Sclerotinia, Cercospora, Fusarium and Diaporthe/Phomopsis. The most frequent fungi on soybean grains were: Cladosporium, Alternaria, Penicillium, Aspergillus and Epicoccum. The health condition of the natural soybean grains over the four years period on all cultivars was good.

  14. Assessment of Dual Life Stage Antiplasmodial Activity of British Seaweeds

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz Tasdemir; Mota, Maria M.; Gerald Blunden; Maurice Ayamba Itoe; Jasmine Spavieri; Andrea Allmendinger; Marcel Kaiser

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial plants have proven to be a prolific producer of clinically effective antimalarial drugs, but the antimalarial potential of seaweeds has been little explored. The main aim of this study was to assess the in vitro chemotherapeutical and prophylactic potential of the extracts of twenty-three seaweeds collected from the south coast of England against blood stage (BS) and liver stage (LS) Plasmodium parasites. The majority (14) of the extracts were active against BS of P. falciparum, w...

  15. Identification, biochemical characterization, and in-vivo expression of the intracellular invertase BfrA from the pathogenic parasite Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaz, Sorya; Rattier, Thibault; Lafite, Pierre; Moreau, Philippe; Routier, Françoise H; Robert-Gangneux, Florence; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Daniellou, Richard

    2015-10-13

    The parasitic life cycle of Leishmania includes an extracellular promastigote stage that occurs in the gut of the insect vector. During that period, the sucrose metabolism and more specifically the first glycosidase of this pathway are essential for growth and survival of the parasite. We investigated the expression of the invertase BfrA in the promastigote and amastigote stages of three parasite species representative of the three various clinical forms and of various geographical areas, namely Leishmania major, L. donovani and L. braziliensis. Thereafter, we cloned, overexpressed and biochemically characterized this invertase BfrA from L. major, heterologously expressed in both Escherichia coli and L. tarentolae. For all species, expression levels of BfrA mRNA were correlated to the time of the culture and the parasitic stage (promastigotes > amastigotes). BfrA exhibited no activity when expressed as a glycoprotein in L. tarentolae but proved to be an invertase when not glycosylated, yet owing low sequence homology with other invertases from the same family. Our data suggest that BfrA is an original invertase that is located inside the parasite. It is expressed in both parasitic stages, though to a higher extent in promastigotes. This work provides new insight into the parasite sucrose metabolism. PMID:26279524

  16. Heterochromatin protein 1 secures survival and transmission of malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancucci, Nicolas M B; Bertschi, Nicole L; Zhu, Lei; Niederwieser, Igor; Chin, Wai Hoe; Wampfler, Rahel; Freymond, Céline; Rottmann, Matthias; Felger, Ingrid; Bozdech, Zbynek; Voss, Till S

    2014-08-13

    Clonally variant expression of surface antigens allows the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to evade immune recognition during blood stage infection and secure malaria transmission. We demonstrate that heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), an evolutionary conserved regulator of heritable gene silencing, controls expression of numerous P. falciparum virulence genes as well as differentiation into the sexual forms that transmit to mosquitoes. Conditional depletion of P. falciparum HP1 (PfHP1) prevents mitotic proliferation of blood stage parasites and disrupts mutually exclusive expression and antigenic variation of the major virulence factor PfEMP1. Additionally, PfHP1-dependent regulation of PfAP2-G, a transcription factor required for gametocyte conversion, controls the switch from asexual proliferation to sexual differentiation, providing insight into the epigenetic mechanisms underlying gametocyte commitment. These findings show that PfHP1 is centrally involved in clonally variant gene expression and sexual differentiation in P. falciparum and have major implications for developing antidisease and transmission-blocking interventions against malaria. PMID:25121746

  17. Ecology of avian brood parasitism at an early interfacing of host and parasite populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The shiny cowbird (Molothrus bonariensis), a brood parasite, has recently spread into the Greater Antilles from South America via the Lesser Antilles. This species is a host generalist and upon reaching Puerto Rico exploited avian communities with no history of social parasitism. Forty-two percent of the resident non-raptorial land bird species were parasitized in mangrove habitat study areas. Cowbird parasitism affected hosts by (1) depressing nest success an average of 41 percent below non-parasitized nests, and (2) reducing host productivity. Parasitized hosts produced 12 percent fewer eggs and fledged 67 percent fewer of their own chicks than non-parasitized pairs. Growth rates of chicks of some host species were lower in parasitized nests compared with non-parasitized nests while growth of others was not affected by brood parasitism. Cowbird chick growth varied directly with host size; i.e., cowbird chicks grew faster and attained greater fledging weight and body size in nests of larger hosts. Factors important in shiny cowbird host selection were examined within the mangrove study community. Cowbirds did not parasitize avian species in proportion to their abundance. The cowbird breeding season coincided with that of its major hosts, which were high quality foster species, and did not extend into other periods even though nests of poor quality species were available. Food habits and egg size of cowbirds were similar to those of their hosts, suggesting that cowbirds choose hosts partly on the basis of this alignment. Cowbirds locate nests by cryptically watching activities of birds in likely habitat. Despite the recency of the cowbird's arrival in Puerto Rico, some nesting species have effective anti-parasite strategies, including alien egg rejection and nest guarding. Behavior effective in avoiding parasitism is similar to that used by certain birds in evading nest predators. It is suggested that anti-predator behavior is preadaptive to countering cowbird

  18. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of hydrazinyl phthalazines against malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Gowtham; Babu Rajeev, C P; Mohan, Chakrabhavi Dhananjaya; Sinha, Ameya; Chu, Trang T T; Anusha, Sebastian; Ximei, Huang; Fuchs, Julian E; Bender, Andreas; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S; Chandramohanadas, Rajesh; Basappa

    2016-07-15

    In this report, we describe the synthesis of 1-(Phthalazin-4-yl)-hydrazine using bronsted acidic ionic liquids and demonstrate their ability to inhibit asexual stage development of human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Through computational studies, we short-listed chemical scaffolds with potential binding affinity to an essential parasite protein, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). Further, these compounds were synthesized in the lab and tested against P. falciparum. Several compounds from our library showed inhibitory activity at low micro-molar concentrations with minimal cytotoxic effects. These results indicate the potential of hydralazine derivatives as reference scaffolds to develop novel antimalarials. PMID:27261180

  19. Proteomic profiling of Plasmodium sporozoite maturation identifies new proteins essential for parasite development and infectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasonder, Edwin; Janse, Chris J; van Gemert, Geert-Jan;

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites that develop and mature inside an Anopheles mosquito initiate a malaria infection in humans. Here we report the first proteomic comparison of different parasite stages from the mosquito -- early and late oocysts containing midgut sporozoites, and the mature...... three previously uncharacterized Plasmodium proteins that appear to be essential for sporozoite development at distinct points of maturation in the mosquito. This study sheds light on the development and maturation of the malaria parasite in an Anopheles mosquito and also identifies proteins that may be...

  20. Oestrogenic pollutants promote the growth of a parasite in male sticklebacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnab, Vicki; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Tilley, Ceinwen A.; Barber, Iain

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic environments are especially susceptible to anthropogenic chemical pollution. Yet although knowledge on the biological effects of pollutants on aquatic organisms is increasing, far less is known about how ecologically-important interspecific interactions are affected by chemicals. In particular, the consequences of anthropogenic pollution for the interaction of hosts and parasites are poorly understood. Here, we examine how exposure to 17β-oestradiol (E2)—a natural oestrogen and a model endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) —affects infection susceptibility and emergent infection phenotypes in an experimental host–parasite system; three spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) infected with the common, debilitating cestode Schistocephalus solidus. We exposed individual sticklebacks to a 0 ng l−1 (control), 10 ng l−1 or 100 ng l−1 E2 treatment before feeding them infective stages of S. solidus. E2 exposure significantly elevated vitellogenin (VTG) levels—a biomarker of exposure to xenoestrogens—in both female and male fish, and reduced their body condition. Susceptibility to parasite infection was unaffected by EDC exposure; however, E2 treatment and fish sex interacted significantly to determine the growth rate of parasites, which grew quickest in male hosts held under the higher (100 ng l−1) E2 treatment. Tissue VTG levels and parasite mass correlated positively across the whole sample of experimentally infected fish, but separate regressions run on the male and female datasets demonstrated a significant relationship only among male fish. Hence, among males—but not females—elevated VTG levels elicited by E2 exposure led to more rapid parasite growth. We outline plausible physiological mechanisms that could explain these results. Our results demonstrate that oestrogenic pollutants can alter host–parasite interactions by promoting parasite growth, and that male hosts may be disproportionately affected. Because ecologically