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Sample records for blood-spinal cord barrier

  1. Propitious Therapeutic Modulators to Prevent Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Disruption in Spinal Cord Injury.

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    Kumar, Hemant; Ropper, Alexander E; Lee, Soo-Hong; Han, Inbo

    2016-05-18

    The blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is a specialized protective barrier that regulates the movement of molecules between blood vessels and the spinal cord parenchyma. Analogous to the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the BSCB plays a crucial role in maintaining the homeostasis and internal environmental stability of the central nervous system (CNS). After spinal cord injury (SCI), BSCB disruption leads to inflammatory cell invasion such as neutrophils and macrophages, contributing to permanent neurological disability. In this review, we focus on the major proteins mediating the BSCB disruption or BSCB repair after SCI. This review is composed of three parts. Section 1. SCI and the BSCB of the review describes critical events involved in the pathophysiology of SCI and their correlation with BSCB integrity/disruption. Section 2. Major proteins involved in BSCB disruption in SCI focuses on the actions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), angiopoietins (Angs), bradykinin, nitric oxide (NO), and endothelins (ETs) in BSCB disruption and repair. Section 3. Therapeutic approaches discusses the major therapeutic compounds utilized to date for the prevention of BSCB disruption in animal model of SCI through modulation of several proteins.

  2. Effect of lycopene on the blood-spinal cord barrier after spinal cord injury in mice.

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    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jianbo; Gu, Zhengsong; Zhang, Qing; Zheng, Hong

    2016-09-05

    The current study aimed to investigate the effect of lycopene on the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) after spinal cord injury (SCI) in a mouse model. Lycopene inhibited lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage as a highly efficient antioxidant and free radical scavenger. Lycopene (4 mg/kg/d) was administrated immediately following SCI. The permeability of the BSCB and water content in the spinal cord tissue were evaluated. Additionally, levels of expression of tight junction proteins and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were determined with Western blotting. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis of spinal cord tissue homogenates was performed 48 h after SCI to evaluate the expression of inflammation-related cytokines. In addition, recovery of motor function was assessed 1 d, 2 d, 5 d, 10 d, and 15 d after SCI using the Basso Mouse Scale to score locomotion. Compared to the group with an untreated SCI, mice with an SCI treated with lycopene had significantly reduced spinal cord tissue water content and BSCB permeability. Furthermore, motor function of mice with an SCI was also greatly improved by lycopene administration. The expression of the proinflammatory factors TNF-α and NF-kB increased markedly 48 h after SCI, and their upregulation was significantly attenuated by lycopene treatment. The expression of molecules that protect tight junctions, zonula occluden-1 and claudin-5, was upregulated by lycopene treatment after SCI. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that lycopene attenuated SCI by promoting repair of the damaged BSCB, so lycopene is a novel and promising treatment for SCI in humans.

  3. Transactivating-transduction protein-polyethylene glycol modified liposomes traverse the blood-spinal cord and blood-brain barriers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianhu Zhou; Chunyuan Wang; Shiqing Feng; Jin Chang; Xiaohong Kong; Yang Liu; Shijie Gao

    2012-01-01

    Naive liposomes can cross the blood-brain barrier and blood-spinal cord barrier in small amounts. Liposomes modified by a transactivating-transduction protein can deliver antibiotics for the treatment of acute bacterial infection-induced brain inflammation. Liposomes conjugated with polyethylene glycol have the capability of long-term circulation. In this study we prepared transactivating-transduction protein-polyethylene glycol-modified liposomes labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate. Thus, liposomes were characterized by transmembrane, long-term circulation and fluorescence tracing. Uptake, cytotoxicity, and the ability of traversing blood-spinal cord and blood-brain barriers were observed following coculture with human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7). Results demonstrated that the liposomes had good biocompatibility, and low cytotoxicity when cocultured with human breast adenocarcinoma cells. Liposomes could traverse cell membranes and entered the central nervous system and neurocytes through the blood-spinal cord and blood-brain barriers of rats via the systemic circulation. These results verified that fluorescein isothiocyanate-modified transactivating-transduction protein-polyethylene glycol liposomes have the ability to traverse the blood-spinal cord and blood-brain barriers.

  4. Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Disruption Induced by Spinal Cord Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Rats

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    Bo Fang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Dexmedetomidine has beneficial effects on ischemia reperfusion (I/R injury to the spinal cord, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. This study investigated the effects and possible mechanisms of dexmedetomidine on blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB disruption induced by spinal cord I/R injury. Methods: Rats were intrathecally pretreated with dexmedetomidine or PBS control 30 minutes before undergoing 14-minute occlusion of aortic arch. Hind-limb motor function was assessed using Tarlov criteria, and motor neurons in the ventral gray matter were counted by histological examination. The permeability of the BSCB was examined using Evans blue (EB as a vascular tracer. The spinal cord edema was evaluated using the wet-dry method. The expression and localization of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1 and Tie2 were assessed by western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence. Results: Intrathecal preconditioning with dexmedetomidine minimized the neuromotor dysfunction and histopathological deficits, and attenuated EB extravasation after spinal cord I/R injury. In addition, dexmedetomidine preconditioning suppressed I/R-induced increase in MMP-9. Finally, Dexmedetomidine preconditioning enhanced the Ang1-Tie2 system activity after spinal cord I/R injury. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine preconditioning stabilized the BSCB integrity against spinal cord I/R injury by inhibition of MMP-9, and enhancing the Ang1-Tie2 system.

  5. Regulatory effect of vascular endothelial growth factor on blood spinal cord barrier in presyrinx state of experimental syringomyelia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfeng Li; Changrong Zhou; Haiying Liu; Penghui Xing

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is able to regulate blood spinal cord barrier function as well as influence neovascularization and cause edema. OBJECTIVE: Through establishment of a rabbit model of syringomyelia, to explore the correlation between VEGF protein and mRNA expressions and function of blood spinal cord barrier and edema degree of spinal cord in presyrinx state. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized controlled animal study was performed in the Tumor Institute of the Fourth Hospital, Hebei Medical University from January to June 2007. MATERIALS: A total of 0.6 mL Kaolin solution (250 g/L, 37 ℃) was injected into the cisterna magna of 40 rabbits in the kaolin group to establish syringomyelia models. Goat anti-rabbit VEGF monoclonal antibody was provided by DIACLONE Company, USA; RT-PCR related reagents were provided by Huamei Bioengineering Co., Ltd., Beijing.METHODS: Sixty Chinese white rabbits were divided randomly into two groups: Kaolin group (n = 40) and control group (n = 20). Physiological saline (0.6 mL at 37 ℃) was injected in rabbits of control group. On days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 after kaolin injection, cervical cords samples were harvested after sacrifice of animal. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: VEGF protein and mRNA expressions were detected by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after kaolin injection. A quantitative analysis of blood spinal cord barrier function was performed by Evans blue technique. Water content of the spinal cord was measured by dry-wet weight technique. The correlation between the expression of VEGF protein and mRNA and the function of blood spinal cord barrier in the upper cervical cord of the presyrinx state was analyzed by linear correlation analysis. RESULTS: The water content and Evans blue content increased in the kaolin group on days 1 and 3 postoperatively compared with the control group (F= 7.387, 61.35, P< 0.05, 0.01), and reached a peak on day 7 (F= 135.94, 528.35, P< 0

  6. Fluoxetine and vitamin C synergistically inhibits blood-spinal cord barrier disruption and improves functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

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    Lee, Jee Y; Choi, Hae Y; Yune, Tae Y

    2016-10-01

    Recently we reported that fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) improves functional recovery by attenuating blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption after spinal cord injury (SCI). Here we investigated whether a low-dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg) and vitamin C (100 mg/kg), separately not possessing any protective effect, prevents BSCB disruption and improves functional recovery when combined. After a moderate contusion injury at T9 in rat, a low-dose of fluoxetine and vitamin C, or the combination of both was administered intraperitoneally immediately after SCI and further treated once a day for 14 d. Co-treatment with fluoxetine and vitamin C significantly attenuated BSCB permeability at 1 d after SCI. When only fluoxetine or vitamin C was treated after injury, however, there was no effect on BSCB disruption. Co-treatment with fluoxetine and vitamin C also significantly inhibited the expression and activation of MMP-9 at 8 h and 1 d after injury, respectively, and the infiltration of neutrophils (at 1 d) and macrophages (at 5 d) and the expression of inflammatory mediators (at 2 h, 6 h, 8 h or 24 h after injury) were significantly inhibited by co-treatment with fluoxetine and vitamin C. Furthermore, the combination of fluoxetine and vitamin C attenuated apoptotic cell death at 1 d and 5 d and improved locomotor function at 5 weeks after SCI. These results demonstrate the synergistic effect combination of low-dose fluoxetine and vitamin C on BSCB disruption after SCI and furthermore support the effectiveness of the combination treatment regimen for the management of acute SCI.

  7. Evidence of compromised blood-spinal cord barrier in early and late symptomatic SOD1 mice modeling ALS.

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    Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The blood-brain barrier (BBB, blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB, and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB control cerebral/spinal cord homeostasis by selective transport of molecules and cells from the systemic compartment. In the spinal cord and brain of both ALS patients and animal models, infiltration of T-cell lymphocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells, and IgG deposits have been observed that may have a critical role in motor neuron damage. Additionally, increased levels of albumin and IgG have been found in the cerebrospinal fluid in ALS patients. These findings suggest altered barrier permeability in ALS. Recently, we showed disruption of the BBB and BSCB in areas of motor neuron degeneration in the brain and spinal cord in G93A SOD1 mice modeling ALS at both early and late stages of disease using electron microscopy. Examination of capillary ultrastructure revealed endothelial cell degeneration, which, along with astrocyte alteration, compromised the BBB and BSCB. However, the effect of these alterations upon barrier function in ALS is still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the functional competence of the BSCB in G93A mice at different stages of disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Evans Blue (EB dye was intravenously injected into ALS mice at early or late stage disease. Vascular leakage and the condition of basement membranes, endothelial cells, and astrocytes were investigated in cervical and lumbar spinal cords using immunohistochemistry. Results showed EB leakage in spinal cord microvessels from all G93A mice, indicating dysfunction in endothelia and basement membranes and confirming our previous ultrastructural findings on BSCB disruption. Additionally, downregulation of Glut-1 and CD146 expressions in the endothelial cells of the BSCB were found which may relate to vascular leakage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results suggest that the BSCB is compromised in areas of motor neuron

  8. Morphological and function al changes in the blood-spinal cord barrier of rabbits in an experimental spinal cord presyrinx state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfeng Li; Haiying Liu; Qingjun Zhang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Presyrinx state of spinal cord reflect the initial lesion of syringomyelia (SM).The early trals has proved that ischamia and edema are main pathological of presyrinx state. OBJECTIVE: To estabilsh SM model of rabbits for investigating the relationship between changes of morphous and function of blood-spinal cord barrier and the edema degree, histological changes in presyrinx state of SM,and to explore the mechanism of the presyrinx state of SM.DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery,Fourth Hospital,Heibei Medical University.MATERIALS: Sixty Chinese healthy white rabbits,aged 3.5-4.5 months,weighing 1.5-2.0kg,were provided by Experimental Animal Center of Hehei Medical University[certification:(SYXK(Ji)2003-0026)].Evan's blue (EB)and dimethylformamide(DMF) were purchased from Jingmei Biotech Co.,Ltd RM2125 paraffin section cutter(Leica Company,Japan),H-7500 transmission electron microscope (Hitachi Company,Japan),PM-20 light microscope photograph system(Olympus Company,Japan).METHODS:The experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Neurosurgery Department,Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University from January to June 2006.①All the rabbits were randomly divided into two groups:model group(n=40),control group(n=20).Rabbits in two groups were divided into five subgroups once again at five time points(1st , 3rd ,7th ,14th ,21st days,n=8 and n=4 at each time point in the model group and control group,respectively).Under ketamine anesthesia,0.6 mL Kaolin solution(250 g/L,37℃)was injected into the cisterna magna of rabbits in model group,while 0.6 mL physiological saline(37℃)was injected into the rabbits of control group.②On the 1st ,3rd ,7th ,14th , 21st days after kaolin injection,cervical cord samples were harvested after sacrifice of animal. Quantitative analysis on the function of blood-spinal cord barrier was performed by Evan's blue technique.Water content of spinal cord was measured by dry

  9. Inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress by lithium chloride contributes to the integrity of blood-spinal cord barrier and functional recovery after spinal cord injury

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    He, Zili; Zhou, Yulong; Wang, Qingqing; Li, Jiawei; Zheng, Zengming; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Hongyu; Wang, Zhouguang; Xu, Huazi; Xiao, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress play important roles in the spinal cord injury (SCI), which including blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption. Lithium chloride (LiCl) is a clinical drug for bipolar mood disorders and contributes to neuroprotection. This study aims to investigate the effects of LiCl on BSCB disruption and the ER stress pathway induced by spinal cord injury. We examined the integrity of the BSCB with Evans Blue dye and macrophages extravasation, measured the microvessels loss, the junction proteins degeneration, the activation ER stress, and the locomotor function recovery. Our data indicated that LiCl treatment could attenuates BSCB disruption and improved the recovery of functional locomotion in rats SCI model, reduced the structure damage and number loss of microvessels, increased the expressions of junction proteins, including p120, β-catenin, occludin, and claudin-5, via reversed the upregulated ER stress associated proteins. In addition, LiCl significantly inhibited the increase of ER stress markers and prevents loss of junction proteins in thapsigargin (TG)-treated human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). These findings suggest that LiCl treatment alleviates BSCB disruption and promote the neurological function recovery after SCI, partly through inhibiting the activation of ER stress.

  10. Salvianolic acid A ameliorates the integrity of blood-spinal cord barrier via miR-101/Cul3/Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway.

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    Yu, De-Shui; Wang, Yan-Song; Bi, Yun-Long; Guo, Zhan-Peng; Yuan, Ya-Jiang; Tong, Song-Ming; Su, Rui-Chao; Ge, Li-Hao; Wang, Jian; Pan, Ya-Li; Guan, Ting-Ting; Cao, Yang

    2017-02-15

    Salvianolic acid A (Sal A), a bioactive compound isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Danshen, is used for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. However, the protective function of Sal A on preserving the role of blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) after spinal cord injury (SCI) is unclear. The present study investigated the effects and mechanisms of Sal A (2.5, 5, 10mg/kg, i.p.) on BSCB permeability at different time-points after compressive SCI in rats. Compared to the SCI group, treatment with Sal A decreased the content of the Evans blue in the spinal cord tissue at 24h post-SCI. The expression levels of tight junction proteins and HO-1 were remarkably increased, and that of p-caveolin-1 protein was greatly decreased after SCI Sal A. The effect of Sal A on the expression level of ZO-1, occluding, and p-caveolin-1 after SCI was blocked by the HO-1 inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP). Also, Sal A inhibited the level of apoptosis-related proteins and improved the motor function until 21days after SCI. In addition, Sal A significantly increased the expression of microRNA-101 (miR-101) in the RBMECs under hypoxia. AntagomiR-101 markedly increased the RBMECs permeability and the expression of the Cul3 protein by targeting with 3'-UTR of its mRNA. The expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and HO-1 was significantly increased after agomiR-101 treatment. Therefore, Sal A could improve the recovery of neurological function after SCI, which could be correlated with the repair of BSCB integrity by the miR-101/Cul3/Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway.

  11. Experimental syringohydromyelia induced by adhesive arachnoiditis in the rabbit: changes in the blood-spinal cord barrier, neuroinflammatory foci, and syrinx formation.

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    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Kato, Katsura; Rodríguez Guerrero, Alexander; Baba, Hisatoshi; Yoshizawa, Hidezo

    2012-06-10

    There are many histological examinations of syringohydromyelia in the literature. However, there has been very little experimental work on blood permeability in the spinal cord vessels and ultrastructural changes. We prepared an animal model of spinal adhesive arachnoiditis by injecting kaolin into the subarachnoid space at the eighth thoracic vertebra of rabbits. The animals were evaluated 4 months later. Of the 30 rabbits given kaolin injection into the cerebrospinal fluid, 23 showed complete circumferential obstruction. In the 7 animals with partial obstruction of the subarachnoid space, intramedullary changes were not observed. However, among the 23 animals showing complete obstruction of the subarachnoid space, dilatation of the central canal (hydromyelia) occurred in 21, and intramedullary syrinx (syringomyelia) was observed in 11. In animals with complete obstruction, fluorescence microscopy revealed intramedullary edema around the central canal, extending to the posterior columns. Electron microscopy of hydromyelia revealed a marked reduction of villi on the ependymal cells, separation of the ependymal cells, and cavitation of the subependymal layer. The dilated perivascular spaces indicate alterations of fluid exchange between the subarachnoid and extracellular spaces. Syringomyelia revealed that nerve fibers and nerve cells were exposed on the surface of the syrinx, and necrotic tissue was removed by macrophages to leave a syrinx. Both pathologies differ in their mechanism of development: hydromyelia is attributed to disturbed reflux of cerebrospinal fluid, while tissue necrosis due to disturbed intramedullary blood flow is considered to be involved in formation of the syrinx in syringomyelia.

  12. CB1大麻素受体激动剂抑制基质金属蛋白酶参与脊髓损伤后血-脊髓屏障通透性调节%Involvement of CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist in the permeability of blood spinal cord barrier after acute spinal cord in-jury in rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董宝铁; 李泓; 费良健; 王岩峰

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨CB1大麻素受体激动剂在大鼠脊髓损伤后对血-脊髓屏障通透性调节的作用。方法将150只雌性SD大鼠随机分为假手术组( Sham组)、脊髓损伤组( SCI组)和CB1激动剂处理组( ACEA组)。采用改良Allen法建立T9脊髓损伤实验动物模型。 Sham组仅行T9椎板切除术,SCI组和ACEA组以30 g·cm致伤力制作模型。 ACEA组建模成功后,每日腹腔给药ACEA 3mg/(kg·d);Sham组和SCI组以生理盐水代替。建模术后12、24、72 h分时段处死动物,取T8~T10脊髓节段,Evans蓝含量测定法检测SCI后血-脊髓屏障通透性变化,定量RT-PCR法检测脊髓组织基质金属蛋白酶9(MMP9)表达水平。结果 Sham组脊髓通透性无改变,脊髓组织中无Evans蓝渗入,ACEA组Evans蓝通过血-脊髓屏障渗漏至脊髓,但渗漏量明显低于SCI组。 ACEA组MMP9表达水平显著低于Sci组。结论 CB1受体激动剂ACEA能降低Allen′s大鼠脊髓损伤模型血-脊髓屏障的破坏,其作用机制可能与MMP9的表达下调相关。%Objective To investigate whether the CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist has regulating effect on permeability of blood spi-nal cord barrier( BSCB) after spinal cord injury( SCI) in rat model. Methods Totally 150 female SD rats were randomly divided into three groups,including sham operation group(Sham group),spinal cord injury group(SCI group)and ACEA treatment group(ACEA group). Modified Allen′s method was carried out at T9 level spinal segment for SCI group and ACEA group to induce acute SCI. While Sham group only underwent laminectomy. Rats in ACEA group were treated with ACEA 3 mg/( kg·d) after surgery until killed. After modeling,the animals were sacrificed at 12,24 and 72 hours,and the level of permeability for BSC was detected by Evans blue assay at T8-T10. The expression level of MMP9 was detected by quantitative RT-PCR method. Results There was no change in the permeabil-ity of BSCB for the Sham group,no Evans blue in the

  13. Involvement of Shh/Gli1 signaling in the permeability of blood spinal cord barrier and locomotion recovery after spinal cord injury in mice%Shh/Gli1信号参与小鼠脊髓损伤后血-脊髓屏障渗透性改变及运动功能恢复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊洪; 邝芳; 王亚周; 鞠躬

    2013-01-01

    after SCI,the expression of Shh and LacZ was increased,mainly in the lesion area and reactive astrocyte,respectively.Immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR showed that Gli1 mutation did not affect the expression of GFAP.Evens Blue staining and its quantification showed that the leakage of Evens Blue was prolonged in the Gli1lz/lz mice after SCI.BMS scoring showed that the locomotion recovery of Gli1 lz/lz mice was much poorer than that of wild type control.Conclusion:Shh/Gli1 signaling is activated after SCI,probably involved in the permeability of blood spinal cord barrier and the locomotion recovery after SCI.

  14. Imatinib enhances functional outcome after spinal cord injury.

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    Mathew B Abrams

    Full Text Available We investigated whether imatinib (Gleevec®, Novartis, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, could improve functional outcome in experimental spinal cord injury. Rats subjected to contusion spinal cord injury were treated orally with imatinib for 5 days beginning 30 minutes after injury. We found that imatinib significantly enhanced blood-spinal cord-barrier integrity, hindlimb locomotor function, sensorimotor integration, and bladder function, as well as attenuated astrogliosis and deposition of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, and increased tissue preservation. These improvements were associated with enhanced vascular integrity and reduced inflammation. Our results show that imatinib improves recovery in spinal cord injury by preserving axons and other spinal cord tissue components. The rapid time course of these beneficial effects suggests that the effects of imatinib are neuroprotective rather than neurorestorative. The positive effects on experimental spinal cord injury, obtained by oral delivery of a clinically used drug, makes imatinib an interesting candidate drug for clinical trials in spinal cord injury.

  15. Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luigi Aloe; Patrizia Bianchi; Alberto De Bellis; Marzia Soligo; Maria Luisa Rocco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an in-creased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deifcits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells.

  16. Comparative study of prostaglandin E2 production in chick spinal cord and meninges.

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    Billotte, C; Vesin, M F

    1997-03-01

    In chick spinal cord the presence of low affinity (KD = 2.2 microM) receptors for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) raises the question whether spinal cord possesses a PGE2 biosynthetic capacity able to activate these receptors. The production of PGE2 in spinal cord and meninges was investigated by enzyme immunoassay. Spinal cord exhibited a 30- to 100-fold lower PGE2 biosynthetic capacity compared to meninges, but can generate PGE2 resulting in micromolar concentrations, sufficient to activate the low affinity PGE2 receptors. It is suggested that in physiological conditions, PGE2 synthesized within the spinal cord might locally activate the low affinity PGE2 receptors, whereas in pathological situations, after disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier, PGE2 produced by the meninges might be accessible to spinal cord PGE2 receptors, and thus largely contribute to their saturation.

  17. Perceived impact of environmental barriers on participation among people living with spinal cord injury in Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, Jan D; Ballert, Carolina; Brinkhof, Martin W G; Post, Marcel W M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the impact of environmental barriers perceived by people living with spinal cord injury in the Swiss community and to compare this across subpopulations. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SUBJECTS: A total of 1,549 participants in the community survey of the Swiss spinal cord inj

  18. Advances in imaging studies of spinal cord injury%脊髓损伤的影像学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张峻; 季欣然; 唐佩福

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary hemorrhage, loss of blood spinal cord barrier integrity, perilesional ischemia, microvascular damage and subtle structural changes happen after spinal cord injury, but a safe and effective imaging examination technology to discover series of microstructural changes after the trauma of the spinal cord is lacking. Traditional imaging techniques can effectively determine the level and range of bone and ligament damage in patients with spinal cord injury. However, regarding to the ifne structure of the spinal cord, it can only provide insufifcient information. To some extent, it promotes the development of new imaging technology on the spinal ifne structure and biochemical functions. But the development levels are not identical, some are still in the laboratory, and some are applied to the clinical diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, the application of traditional imaging technology in the old spinal cord injury, the application of new imaging technology in the diagnosis of spinal cord, curative effects and so on are summarized.

  19. Matrix metalloproteinases limit functional recovery after spinal cord injury by modulation of early vascular events.

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    Noble, Linda J; Donovan, Frances; Igarashi, Takuji; Goussev, Staci; Werb, Zena

    2002-09-01

    Inflammation in general and proteinases generated as a result are likely mediators of early secondary pathogenesis after spinal cord injury. We report that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays an important role in blood-spinal cord barrier dysfunction, inflammation, and locomotor recovery. MMP-9 was present in the meninges and neurons of the uninjured cord. MMP-9 increased rapidly after a moderate contusion spinal cord injury, reaching a maximum at 24 hr, becoming markedly reduced by 72 hr, and not detectable at 7 d after injury. It was seen in glia, macrophages, neutrophils, and vascular elements in the injured spinal cord at 24 hr after injury. The natural tissue inhibitors of MMPs were unchanged over this time course. MMP-9-null mice exhibited significantly less disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier, attenuation of neutrophil infiltration, and significant locomotor recovery compared with wild-type mice. Similar findings were observed in mice treated with a hydroxamic acid MMP inhibitor from 3 hr to 3 d after injury, compared with the vehicle controls. Moreover, the area of residual white matter at the lesion epicenter was significantly greater in the inhibitor-treated group. This study provides evidence that MMP-9 plays a key role in abnormal vascular permeability and inflammation within the first 3 d after spinal cord injury, and that blockade of MMPs during this critical period attenuates these vascular events and leads to improved locomotor recovery. Our findings suggest that early inhibition of MMPs may be an efficacious strategy for the spinal cord-injured patient.

  20. Barriers to and facilitators of coping with spinal cord injury for Iranian patients: a qualitative study.

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    Babamohamadi, Hassan; Negarandeh, Reza; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the perspectives and experiences of Iranian patients regarding barriers and facilitators to their ability to cope with spinal cord injury (SCI). A qualitative design, based on the content analysis approach, was used to collect and analyze the experiences of 18 patients with spinal cord injury in two centers in Tehran, Iran. After using purposeful sampling for selection of the participants, semi-structured interviews were held for data collection. Lack of "knowledge", "financial resources", "employment opportunities", "suitable facilities and accessibility" as well as "societal acceptance and support" emerged as barriers; and having "self-confidence", "religious beliefs", "support networks" and "positive thinking" emerged as facilitators in coping with spinal cord injury. Participants believed that with these hindering factors in place, adapting to their new condition had been difficult, therefore they can only manage to adapt partially to their situation. Additional multidisciplinary endeavors are needed to help this group cope adequately and further research is required to influence policy making and legislation processes efficiently.

  1. Changes of blood flow, oxygen tension, action potential and vascular permeability induced by arterial ischemia or venous congestion on the spinal cord in canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Hidezo; Shimada, Seiichiro; Guerrero, Alexander Rodríguez; Miyachi, Masaya

    2013-01-01

    It is generally considered that the genesis of myelopathy associated with the degenerative conditions of the spine may result from both mechanical compression and circulatory disturbance. Many references about spinal cord tissue ischemic damage can be found in the literature, but not detailed studies about spinal cord microvasculature damage related to congestion or blood permeability. This study investigates the effect of ischemia and congestion on the spinal cord using an in vivo model. The aorta was clamped as an ischemia model of the spinal cord and the inferior vena cava was clamped as a congestion model at the 6th costal level for 30 min using forceps transpleurally. Measurements of blood flow, partial oxygen pressure, and conduction velocity in the spinal cord were repeated over a period of 1 h after release of clamping. Finally, we examined the status of blood-spinal cord barrier under fluorescence and transmission electron microscope. Immediately after clamping of the inferior vena cava, the central venous pressure increased by about four times. Blood flow, oxygen tension and action potential were more severely affected by the aorta clamping; but this ischemic model did not show any changes of blood permeability in the spinal cord. The intramedullar edema was more easily produced by venous congestion than by arterial ischemia. In conclusions, venous congestion may be a preceding and essential factor of circulatory disturbance in the compressed spinal cord inducing myelopathy.

  2. Relationship of Perceived Barriers to Employment and Return to Work Five Years Later: A Pilot Study among 343 Participants with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, James S.; Pickelsimer, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    The authors identified perceived barriers to employment in 1998 among 343 unemployed participants with spinal cord injury and correlated these data with employment status 5 years later. Actively looking for work was associated with the greatest likelihood of employment. Health factors, not disincentives or resources, were the primary barriers to…

  3. Poly(ethylene glycol) modification enhances penetration of fibroblast growth factor 2 to injured spinal cord tissue from an intrathecal delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Catherine E; Tator, Charles H; Shoichet, Molly S

    2010-05-21

    There is no effective treatment for spinal cord injury and clinical drug delivery techniques are limited by the blood-spinal cord barrier. Our lab has developed an injectable drug delivery system consisting of a biopolymer blend of hyaluronan and methylcellulose (HAMC) that can sustain drug release for up to 24h in the intrathecal space. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) has great potential for treatment of spinal cord injury due to its angiogenic and trophic effects, but previous studies showed no penetration into spinal cord tissue when delivered locally. Conjugation to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is known to improve penetration of proteins into tissue by reducing clearance and providing immunogenic shielding. We investigated conjugation of PEG to FGF2 and compared its distribution relative to unmodified FGF2 in injured spinal cord tissue when delivered intrathecally from HAMC. Importantly, PEG conjugation nearly doubled the concentration of FGF2 in the injured spinal cord when delivered locally and, contrary to previous reports, we show that some FGF2 penetrated into the injured spinal cord using a more sensitive detection technique. Our results suggest that PEGylation of FGF2 enhanced tissue penetration by reducing its rate of elimination.

  4. Nanowired Delivery of Growth Hormone Attenuates Pathophysiology of Spinal Cord Injury and Enhances Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Concentration in the Plasma and the Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muresanu, Dafin F; Sharma, Aruna; Lafuente, José V; Patnaik, Ranjana; Tian, Z Ryan; Nyberg, Fred; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory showed that topical application of growth hormone (GH) induced neuroprotection 5 h after spinal cord injury (SCI) in a rat model. Since nanodelivery of drugs exerts superior neuroprotective effects, a possibility exists that nanodelivery of GH will induce long-term neuroprotection after a focal SCI. SCI induces GH deficiency that is coupled with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) reduction in the plasma. Thus, an exogenous supplement of GH in SCI may enhance the IGF-1 levels in the cord and induce neuroprotection. In the present investigation, we delivered TiO2-nanowired growth hormone (NWGH) after a longitudinal incision of the right dorsal horn at the T10-11 segments in anesthetized rats and compared the results with normal GH therapy on IGF-1 and GH contents in the plasma and in the cord in relation to blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption, edema formation, and neuronal injuries. Our results showed a progressive decline in IGF-1 and GH contents in the plasma and the T9 and T12 segments of the cord 12 and 24 h after SCI. Marked increase in the BSCB breakdown, as revealed by extravasation of Evans blue and radioiodine, was seen at these time points after SCI in association with edema and neuronal injuries. Administration of NWGH markedly enhanced the IGF-1 levels and GH contents in plasma and cord after SCI, whereas normal GH was unable to enhance IGF-1 or GH levels 12 or 24 h after SCI. Interestingly, NWGH was also able to reduce BSCB disruption, edema formation, and neuronal injuries after trauma. On the other hand, normal GH was ineffective on these parameters at all time points examined. Taken together, our results are the first to demonstrate that NWGH is quite effective in enhancing IGF-1 and GH levels in the cord and plasma that may be crucial in reducing pathophysiology of SCI.

  5. The challenges of translating stem cells for spinal cord injury and related disorders: what are the barriers and opportunities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Stephanie M; Fehlings, Lauren N; Messih, Mark; Fehlings, Michael G

    2013-02-01

    Stem cell therapies have significant potential to treat spinal cord injury (SCI), but it remains difficult to translate these therapies from 'bench to bedside'. Identifying barriers to translation and understanding how these barriers are viewed by stakeholders in the field of stem cell research are key steps to clinical translation. The Stem Cell Global Blueprint Conference, held in Toronto (ON, Canada) presented a unique opportunity to analyze the perspectives of multiple stakeholders on the future of stem cell therapies for SCI treatment. This article is an analysis of data collected at the conference, including a consensus-building process and pre- and in-conference questionnaires. The authors used these data to assess current perceptions of stem cell research and compared the findings with the literature. The authors identified the major barriers according to a wide range of stakeholders and what strategies they suggested to overcome these obstacles, with the aim of forwarding discussion on stem cell research. It is not a systematic review of the area, but rather a presentation of expert opinion with literature citations to give context and support to their arguments and suggestions. The authors believe that the international SCI community is ready for larger-scale clinical translation, which will require the continued cooperation of all stakeholders in the stem cell and SCI communities.

  6. Staying physically active after spinal cord injury: a qualitative exploration of barriers and facilitators to exercise participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroll Thilo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While enhancing physical activity has been an essential goal of public health officials, people with physical impairments such as spinal cord injury (SCI are more likely to live a sedentary lifestyle. Exercise has been shown to decrease the risk for many of the secondary conditions associated with SCI, including osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, pressure ulcers, urinary tract infections, diabetes and arthritis, yet this population is rarely a target for health promotion efforts. This paper examines the self-reported exercise experiences of people with SCI using a qualitative-exploratory design. Methods We enrolled 26 individuals with SCI (15 self-described 'exercisers' and 11 'non-exercisers' from a non-random pool of survey responders. Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted to record participants' experiences with exercise pre/post injury, barriers and facilitators to being active and perceived health impact. Results Regardless of exercise status, all participants reported physical activity prior to injury and expressed interest in becoming active or maintaining an active lifestyle. Participants identified a range of both motivational and socio-environmental factors that were either facilitating or constraining of such a lifestyle. Non-exercisers identified barriers to exercise, including a perceived low return on physical investment, lack of accessible facilities, unaffordable equipment, no personal assistance and fear of injury. Exercisers identified facilitators, including personal motivation, independence, availability of accessible facilities and personal assistants, fear of health complications, and weight management. Exercisers associated a greater range of specific health benefits with being active than non-exercisers. Conclusion Despite motivation and interest in being exercise active, people with SCI face many obstacles. Removal of barriers coupled with promotion of facilitating factors, is vital for

  7. Barrier function in the peripheral and central nervous system-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, A K; Rittner, H L

    2017-01-01

    The peripheral (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) are delicate structures, highly sensitive to homeostatic changes-and crucial for basic vital functions. Thus, a selection of barriers ensures the protection of the nervous system from noxious blood-borne or surrounding stimuli. In this chapter, anatomy and functioning of the blood-nerve (BNB), the blood-brain (BBB), and the blood-spinal cord barriers (BSCB) are presented and the key tight junction (TJ) proteins described: claudin-1, claudin-3, claudin-5, claudin-11, claudin-12, claudin-19, occludin, Zona occludens-1 (ZO-1), and tricellulin are by now identified as relevant for nerval barriers. Different diseases can lead to or be accompanied by neural barrier disruption, and impairment of these barriers worsens pathology. Peripheral nerve injury and inflammatory polyneuropathy cause an increased permeability of BNB as well as BSCB, while, e.g., diseases of the CNS such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, or Alzheimer's disease can progress and worsen through barrier dysfunction. Moreover, the complex role and regulation of the BBB after ischemic stroke is described. On the other side, PNS and CNS barriers hamper the delivery of drugs in diseases when the barrier is intact, e.g., in certain neurodegenerative diseases or inflammatory pain. Understanding of the barrier - regulating processes has already lead to the discovery of new molecules as drug enhancers. In summary, the knowledge of all of these mechanisms might ultimately lead to the invention of drugs to control barrier function to help ameliorating or curing neurological diseases.

  8. The Blood-testis-barrier and Male Sexual Dysfunction Following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    blood-testis-barrier; a protective multi-cellular structure that maintains immune privilege of the highly-antigenic sperm and sperm cell -containing...and enhance germ cell and sperm viability over time following SCI. We are preparing to initiate Aim 2 and the subsequent assessment of licofelone...dependent male infertility is characterized by a significant reduction in numbers and quality of functional sperm . The mechanism(s) underlying this

  9. Using a 3-D multicellular simulation of spinal cord injury with live cell imaging to study the neural immune barrier to nanoparticle uptake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alan P.Weightman; Stuart I.Jenkins; Divya M.Chari

    2016-01-01

    Development of nanoparticle (NP) based therapies to promote regeneration in sites of central nervous system (CNS;i.e.brain and spinal cord) pathology relies critically on the availability of experimental models that offer biologically valid predictions of NP fate in vivo.However,there is a major lack of biological models that mimic the pathological complexity of target neural sites in vivo,particularly the responses of resident neural immune cells to NPs.Here,we have utilised a previously developed in vitro model of traumatic spinal cord injury (based on 3-D organotypic slice arrays) with dynamic time lapse imaging to reveal in real-time the acute cellular fate of NPs within injury foci.We demonstrate the utility of our model in revealing the well documented phenomenon of avid NP sequestration by the intrinsic immune cells of the CNS (the microglia).Such immune sequestration is a known translational barrier to the use of NP-based therapeutics for neurological injury.Accordingly,we suggest that the utility of our model in mimicking microglial sequestration behaviours offers a valuable investigative tool to evaluate strategies to overcome this cellular response within a simple and biologically relevant experimental system,whilst reducing the use of live animal neurological injury models for such studies.

  10. Cerebrolysin, a mixture of neurotrophic factors induces marked neuroprotection in spinal cord injury following intoxication of engineered nanoparticles from metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Preeti Kumaran; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Sharma, Aruna; Mössler, Herbert; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2012-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the world's most disastrous disease for which there is no effective treatment till today. Several studies suggest that nanoparticles could adversely influence the pathology of SCI and thereby alter the efficacy of many neuroprotective agents. Thus, there is an urgent need to find suitable therapeutic agents that could minimize cord pathology following trauma upon nanoparticle intoxication. Our laboratory has been engaged for the last 7 years in finding suitable therapeutic strategies that could equally reduce cord pathology in normal and in nanoparticle-treated animal models of SCI. We observed that engineered nanoparticles from metals e.g., aluminum (Al), silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) (50-60 nm) when administered in rats daily for 7 days (50 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in exacerbation of cord pathology after trauma that correlated well with breakdown of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) to serum proteins. The entry of plasma proteins into the cord leads to edema formation and neuronal damage. Thus, future drugs should be designed in such a way to be effective even when the SCI is influenced by nanoparticles. Previous research suggests that a suitable combination of neurotrophic factors could induce marked neuroprotection in SCI in normal animals. Thus, we examined the effects of a new drug; cerebrolysin that is a mixture of different neurotrophic factors e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and other peptide fragments to treat normal or nanoparticle-treated rats after SCI. Our observations showed that cerebrolysin (2.5 ml/kg, i.v.) before SCI resulted in good neuroprotection in normal animals, whereas nanoparticle-treated rats required a higher dose of the drug (5.0 ml/kg, i.v.) to induce comparable neuroprotection in the cord after SCI. Cerebrolysin also reduced spinal cord water content, leakage of plasma proteins

  11. Selective induction of P-glycoprotein at the CNS barriers during symptomatic stage of an ALS animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Gary N Y; Evans, Rebecca A; Banks, David B; Mesev, Emily V; Miller, David S; Cannon, Ronald E

    2017-02-03

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) residing at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) are major obstacles for drug delivery to the Central Nervous System (CNS). Disease-induced changes of these xenobiotic transporters at the CNS barriers have been previously documented. Changes in the functional expression of these transporters at the CNS barriers would limit the clinical efficacy of therapeutic agents targeting the CNS. In this study, we characterized the changes in expression and efflux activity of P-gp, BCRP and MRP2 at the BBB and BSCB of an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) SOD1-G93A transgenic rat model across the three stages of disease progression: pre-onset, onset and symptomatic. Up-regulation of P-gp and BCRP at the BBB and BSCB during disease progression of ALS would reduce drug entry to the CNS, while any decreases in transport activity would increase drug entry. In SOD rats at the ALS symptomatic stage, we observed increases in both P-gp transport activity and expression compared to age-matched wildtypes. BCRP and MRP2 levels were unchanged in these animals. Immunohistochemical analysis in brain and spinal cord capillaries of SOD rats from all three ALS stages and age-matched wildtypes showed no differences in nuclear localization of a known P-gp regulator, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB). It suggests that NFκB may have a limited role during P-gp induction observed in our study and additional signaling pathways could be responsible for this response. Our observations imply that novel pharmacological approaches for treating ALS require selecting drugs that are not P-gp substrates in order to improve therapeutic efficacy in the CNS during ALS progression.

  12. Nanoparticles Exacerbate Both Ubiquitin and Heat Shock Protein Expressions in Spinal Cord Injury: Neuroprotective Effects of the Proteasome Inhibitor Carfilzomib and the Antioxidant Compound H-290/51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Hari S; Muresanu, Dafin F; Lafuente, Jose V; Sjöquist, Per-Ove; Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna

    2015-10-01

    Increased levels of ubiquitin and heat shock protein (HSP) 72 kD are often seen in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, their roles in cell injury or survival are not well known. Thus, we have investigated the possible relationship between ubiquitin and HSP expressions in relation to cell injury in healthy animals, or following nanoparticle (NP) intoxication in SCI animals. A focal SCI was inflicted on the T10-11 segments over the right dorsal horn; animals were allowed to survive from 5 to 8 h after trauma. Separate groups of rats were exposed to SiO2, Ag, or Cu NPs for 7 days and subjected to SCI on the eighth day. A marked increase in ubiquitin or HSP immunoreactive cells occurred in the T9 to T12 segments 5 h after the injury, which further extended to the T4 and L5 after 8 h of survival. At this time, a marked increase in blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) permeability to Evans blue and radioiodine, accompanied by an intense edema formation, was observed. Changes were further exacerbated in NP-treated traumatized rats. The most marked expressions of ubiquitin and HSP in SCI were seen in rats treated with SiO2, followed by Ag, and Cu NPs. Treatment with H-290/51 (50 mg/kg p.o., 30 to 60 min after injury) or carfilzomib (1 mg/kg, i.v., 30 to 60 min after trauma) significantly reduced the ubiquitin or HSP expressions, as well as the BSCB breakdown, the edema formation, and the cell injury in the cord both 5 and 8 h after the injury, in normal animals. However, a double dose of H-290/51 (100 mg/kg) or carfilzomib (2 mg/kg) is needed to reduce cord pathology or ubiquitin and HSP expressions in traumatized animals treated with NPs. H-290/51 showed superior beneficial effects in reducing cord pathology in SCI than carfilzomib. These observations are the first to demonstrate that (i) NP-treated traumatized animals induce a widespread BSCB leakage, edema formation, and cord pathology as well as an overexpression of ubiquitin and HSP, (ii) high doses of antioxidant

  13. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  14. Postulated Role of Vasoactive Neuropeptide-Related Immunopathology of the Blood Brain Barrier and Virchow-Robin Spaces in the Aetiology of Neurological-Related Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Staines, D. R.; E. W. Brenu; Marshall-Gradisnik, S.

    2008-01-01

    Vasoactive neuropeptides (VNs) such as pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) have critical roles as neurotransmitters, vasodilators including perfusion and hypoxia regulators, as well as immune and nociception modulators. They have key roles in blood vessels in the central nervous system (CNS) including maintaining functional integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and blood spinal barrier (BSB). VNs are potent activators of aden...

  15. Microvascular protective role of pericytes in melatonin-treated spinal cord injury in the C57BL/6 mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Yingli; Wu Qingbin; Yuan Xiaochen; Li Bingwei; Liu Mingming; Zhang Xiaoyan; Liu Shuying

    2014-01-01

    Background Pericytes,located on microvessels,help to maintain vascular stability and blood-brain barrier integrity.The influence of pericytes on microvessels after spinal cord injury (SCI) is less clear.Therefore,the aim of this study was to investigate whether pericytes took a protective effect on microvessels in melatonin-treated SCI.Methods C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three groups:sham group,SCI group,and melatonin group (n=27per group).Functional recovery was evaluated using the Basso Mouse Scale.Motor neurons were observed using hematoxylin and eosin staining.Pericyte coverage was analyzed using immunofluorescence.Permeability of blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) was assessed by administration of Evan's Blue.Protein levels of occludin,aquaporin-4 (AQP4),angiopoietin-1 (Ang1),intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1),Bcl-2,and Bax were determined using Western blotting.Mimicking the pathological conditions of SCI,melatonin-treated primary pericytes were subjected to oxygenglucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R).Secretion of Ang1 was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay,and the expression of ICAM-1 was detected by immunofluorescence.Results Melatonin treatment improved locomotor functional outcome and rescued motor neurons.Pericyte coverage was significantly reduced after SCI; melatonin treatment alleviated the loss of pericyte coverage and rescued perfused microvessels 7 days after injury.The permeability of BSCB and loss of occludin were attenuated,and edema formation and upregulation of AQP4 were inhibited,after melatonin treatment.The expression of Ang1 and Bcl-2 was improved,while the expression of ICAM-1 and Bax was inhibited,in melatonin-treated SCl mice.Furthermore,the secretion of Ang1 was increased and the expression of ICAM-1 was inhibited in melatonin-treated pericytes after OGD/R.Conclusions Melatonin ameliorated the loss of blood vessels and disruption of BSCB to exert a protective effect on SCI,which might be

  16. Peripheral nerve injury and TRPV1-expressing primary afferent C-fibers cause opening of the blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salter Michael W

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The blood-brain barrier (BBB plays the crucial role of limiting exposure of the central nervous system (CNS to damaging molecules and cells. Dysfunction of the BBB is critical in a broad range of CNS disorders including neurodegeneration, inflammatory or traumatic injury to the CNS, and stroke. In peripheral tissues, the vascular-tissue permeability is normally greater than BBB permeability, but vascular leakage can be induced by efferent discharge activity in primary sensory neurons leading to plasma extravasation into the extravascular space. Whether discharge activity of sensory afferents entering the CNS may open the BBB or blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB remains an open question. Results Here we show that peripheral nerve injury (PNI produced by either sciatic nerve constriction or transecting two of its main branches causes an increase in BSCB permeability, as assessed by using Evans Blue dye or horseradish peroxidase. The increase in BSCB permeability was not observed 6 hours after the PNI but was apparent 24 hours after the injury. The increase in BSCB permeability was transient, peaking about 24-48 hrs after PNI with BSCB integrity returning to normal levels by 7 days. The increase in BSCB permeability was prevented by administering the local anaesthetic lidocaine at the site of the nerve injury. BSCB permeability was also increased 24 hours after electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at intensity sufficient to activate C-fibers, but not when A-fibers only were activated. Likewise, BSCB permeability increased following application of capsaicin to the nerve. The increase in permeability caused by C-fiber stimulation or by PNI was not anatomically limited to the site of central termination of primary afferents from the sciatic nerve in the lumbar cord, but rather extended throughout the spinal cord and into the brain. Conclusions We have discovered that injury to a peripheral nerve and electrical stimulation of C

  17. Regularity of Spinal Cord Blood Flow Following Radiation-induced Spinal Cord Injury in Rats%大鼠放射性脊髓损伤脊髓血流量变化规律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晶; 魏丽; 孙万良; 章金刚; 游华; 张伟京

    2013-01-01

    目的:放射性脊髓损伤(Radiation spinal cord injury,RSCI)是头颈部、胸部及上腹部肿瘤放射治疗和射线意外照射时的常见并发症,一般认为,白质坏死、脱髓鞘为其主要的病理学变化.然而,越来越多的证据表明血-脊髓屏障破裂和血管通透性增加等血管损伤远早于白质坏死和脱髓鞘改变.所以本文阐明大鼠放射性脊髓损伤病理生理过程中脊髓血流量变化规律.方法:将60只Sprague-Dawley (SD)大鼠随机分为12组,1组为对照,其余11组采用60Co放射治疗机行30 Gy大鼠颈髓C2-T2单次照射,剂量率为153 cGy/min,源皮距为80 cm,照射时长为1153 s,照射范围为2.0× 1.0 cm,对照组大鼠于麻醉后置于60Co放射治疗机下,佯照,照射前及照射后分别采用激光多普勒法测量脊髓血流量,11组大鼠于照射前以及照射后1、3、7、14、21、30、60、90、120、150、180天进行测量,以照射前测量值为基数,各时间点以基数的百分比表示该时间点脊髓血流量.结果:大鼠放射性脊髓损伤后,脊髓血流量在照射早期即有降低,照射后90天达到最低,随后脊髓血流量进入平台期.结论:阐明了大鼠放射性脊髓损伤后脊髓血流量的变化规律.大鼠放射性脊髓损伤可影响脊髓血流量,导致脊髓长期处于持续低灌流、缺血缺氧状态,最终导致脊髓不可逆性损伤.临床上放射性脊髓损伤的病人感到疲乏无力,出现神经系统的症状体征,通常死于脑疝.本文为临床上疲乏无力,出现神经系统的症状体征,死于脑疝放射性脊髓损伤的病人的早期防治提供病理生理基础.%Objective:The central nervous system (CNS) is dose-limiting not only in the treatment of CNS tumors,but also in the treatment of head and neck,thoracic,and upper abdominal malignancies.Generally speaking,white matter necrosis,demyelination is the main pathological changes.However,it is reported that vascular injury such as the blood-spinal

  18. Cord blood stem cell banking and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhot, P S; Nair, V; Swarup, D; Sirohi, D; Ganguli, P

    2003-12-01

    Stem cells have the ability to divide for indefinite periods in culture and to give rise to specialized cells. Cord blood as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has several advantages as it is easily available, involves non-invasive collection procedure and is better tolerated across the HLA barrier. Since the first cord blood transplant in 1988, over 2500 cord blood HSC transplants have been done world wide. Since then, the advantages of cord blood as a source of hematopietic stem cells for transplantation have become clear. Firstly, the proliferative capacity of HSC in cord blood is superior to that of cells in bone marrow or blood from adults. A 100 ml unit of cord blood contains 1/10th the number of nucleated cells and progenitor cells (CD34+ cells) present in 1000 ml of bone marrow, but because they proliferate rapidly, the stem cell in a single unit of cord blood can reconstitute the entire haematopoietic system. Secondly, the use of cord blood reduces the risk of graft vs host disease. Cord Blood Stem Cell banks have been established in Europe and United States to supply HSC for related and unrelated donors. Currently, more than 65,000 units are available and more than 2500 patients have received transplants of cord blood. Results in children have clearly shown that the number of nucleated cells in the infused cord blood influences the speed of recovery of neutrophils and platelets after myeloablative chemotherapy. The optimal dose is about 2 x 10(7) nucleated cells/kg of body weight. The present study was carried out for collection, separation, enumeration and cryopreservation of cord blood HSC and establishing a Cord Blood HSC Bank. 172 samples of cord blood HSC were collected after delivery of infant prior to expulsion of placenta. The average cord blood volume collected was 101.20 ml. Mononuclear cell count ranged from 7.36 to 25.6 x 10(7)/ml. Viability count of mononuclear cells was 98.1%. After 1 year of cryopreservation, the viability count on

  19. Spinal Cord Contusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Ju; Jian Wang; Yazhou Wang; Xianghui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and lim-ited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  20. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  1. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... roots may be cut to relieve pain. In adults, surgery to free (detether) the spinal cord can reduce the size ... is a neurological disorder caused by tissue attachments that limit the movement of the spinal cord ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  3. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal ...

  4. Split Cord Malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurdal Gezercan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Split cord malformations are rare form of occult spinal dysraphism in children. Split cord malformations are characterized by septum that cleaves the spinal canal in sagittal plane within the single or duplicated thecal sac. Although their precise incidence is unknown, split cord malformations are exceedingly rare and represent %3.8-5 of all congenital spinal anomalies. Characteristic neurological, urological, orthopedic clinical manifestations are variable and asymptomatic course is possible. Earlier diagnosis and surgical intervention for split cord malformations is associated with better long-term fuctional outcome. For this reason, diagnostic imaging is indicated for children with associated cutaneous and orthopedic signs. Additional congenital anomalies usually to accompany the split cord malformations. Earlier diagnosis, meticuolus surgical therapy and interdisciplinary careful evaluation and follow-up should be made for good prognosis. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(2.000: 199-207

  5. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  6. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indicated by a total lack of sensory and motor function below the level of injury. People who survive a spinal cord injury will most likely have medical complications such as chronic pain and bladder and bowel ...

  7. Spinal cord abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs The infection often begins in the bone ( osteomyelitis ). The bone infection may cause an epidural abscess ... Boils Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection Epidural abscess Osteomyelitis Pulmonary tuberculosis Sepsis Spinal cord trauma Swelling Review ...

  8. [A Nude Mouse Model for Human Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Jiongcai; Liu, Hongyu; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Chongli; Zhang, Zhimei

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the hematopoietic potentiality and the migration and homing routine of separated as well as cryopreserved umbilical cord blood hematopoietic cells, the BALB/cnu(+) mice were used to establish a murine model. This can prepare for the clinical transplantation and the establishment of a large-scale cord blood bank. The result indicated that the hydroxyethyl starch (HES) sedimentation and DMSO step-by-step cryopreservation procedure resulted in only less losses of hematopoietic progenitor cells and also unharmful to the hematopietic potentiality. We can found evidence for successful transplantation in each mouse which received (1.0 - 2.0) x 10(7) separated or cryopresered hematopoietic cells from cord blood, which lasted for about fifty days. The results demonstrated that (1) HES sedimentation and DMSO cryopreservation procedure can keep the hematopoietic potentiality of cord blood, and so can be used to clinical transplantation or establishment of a cord blood bank; (2) Rich hematopoietic stem cells in human cord blood can cross the xenogenetic barriers and successfully engraft mice; (3) The hematopoietic cells migrated among bone marrow, liver, spleen, lung and kidney in the mice and homed to bone marrow by the end. Cryopreservation may influence the adhesion molecule on the hematopoietic cells and the homing behaviour, but not influence their hematopoietic potentiality.

  9. [Spinal cord infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, N; Shariat, K; Ulmer, S; Stippich, C; Ahlhelm, F J

    2012-05-01

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone.Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord.

  10. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  11. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  12. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide

  13. S_3神经根电刺激改善急性完全性脊髓损伤后肠黏膜屏障功能%Role of electrical stimulation of S_3 nerve root in improvement of intestinal mucosal barrier function after acute complete spinal cord injury in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白春宏; 安洪; 王莎莉; 蒋电明; 范伟; 聂海

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨S_3神经根电刺激对急性完全性脊髓损伤后肠黏膜屏障功能障碍的作用. 方法 建立兔脊髓损伤性截瘫模型,以截瘫后行S_3神经根电刺激为实验组,不做刺激截瘫兔为对照组,正常白兔为正常组.无菌条件下,采集门静脉血进行内毒素定量测定和细菌培养,采集肝、脾、肠系膜淋巴结作细菌培养并进行菌种鉴定.取实验组和对照组各动物的肝、脾、肠系膜淋巴结、小肠进行病理切片HE染色检查,取小肠进行电镜检查. 结果 对照组肠黏膜屏障及其他器官破坏严重,血清内毒素水平较实验组和正常组明显增高,肠道菌群移位发生率较高;实验组电刺激S_3神经根使失神经肠道蠕动增强,排出的肠内容物明显增加,同时肠黏膜破坏较轻,其他脏器损伤也较对照组轻,血清内毒素水平较对照组明显减轻并且与正常组差异无统计学意义,细菌移位率明显下降. 结论 急性脊髓损伤后电刺激S_3神经根能较好地促进肠道蠕动,促进肠内容物的排出,良好地改善肠黏膜屏障功能,进而减轻内毒素血症和肠道细菌移位;有利于减少SIRS和MODS的产生.%Objective To investigate the effect of electrical stimulation of S_3 nerve root on improvement of intestinal mucosal barrier function in rabbits with acute complete spinal cord injury. Methods Model of paraplegia was built by injuring spinal cord in rabbits. Then, the rabbits with electrical stimulation of S_3 nerve root were set as experimental group and those without set as control group. Normal rabbits were set as normal group. Under aseptic condition, portal vein blood was collected for quantitative determination of endotoxin and bacterial culture ; and liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes were collected for bacterial culture and strain identification. Liver, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes and small intestines were collected from experimental group and control group for

  14. Sonography of the umbilical cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudiak, C M; Salomon, C G; Posniak, H V; Olson, M C; Flisak, M E

    1995-09-01

    Knowledge of the development, normal sonographic appearance, and potential abnormalities of the umbilical cord is important in fetal assessment. The umbilical cord can be visualized throughout most of gestation and is detectable sonographically soon after visualization of the fetal pole. The normal umbilical cord is 50-60 cm long and may coil as many as 40 times, usually to the left. Abnormalities in umbilical cord size, degree of coiling, attachment, and position can have important implications for the outcome of the pregnancy. Structural abnormalities of the umbilical cord such as single umbilical artery, knots, cysts, and tumors may be associated with fetal distress or malformations. Color Doppler ultrasound (US) is useful in the identification and evaluation of structural abnormalities of the cord. By allowing measurement of blood flow velocity in the umbilical artery, duplex Doppler US may provide additional information in the evaluation of intrauterine growth retardation and twin-twin transfusion syndrome.

  15. Pain following spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The aims of this thesis were to assess and characterise nociceptive and neuropathic pain, the use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological pain treatment, and the influence of pain on the quality of sleep in a population following spinal cord injury (SCI). This thesis is divided into five separate studies: I. Pain in a Swedish spinal cord injury population. II. Gender related differences in pain in spinal cord injured individuals. III. Use of analgesic drugs in indi...

  16. Synaptic development in the injured spinal cord cavity following co-transplantation of fetal spinal cord cells and autologous activated Schwann cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wendong Ruan; Yuan Xue; Ninghua Li; Xiaotao Zhao; Huajian Zhao; Peng Li

    2010-01-01

    Transplantation of activated transgenic Schwann cells or a fetal spinal cord cell suspension has been widely used to treat spinal cord injury. However, little is known regarding the effects of co-transplantation. In the present study, autologous Schwann cells in combination with a fetal spinal cord cell suspension were transplanted into adult Wistar rats with spinal cord injury, and newly generated axonal connections were observed ultrastructurally. Transmission electron microscopic observations showed that the neuroblast first presented cytoplasmic processes, followed by pre- and postsynaptic membranes with low electron density forming a dense projection. The number and types of synaptic vesicles were increased. Synaptic connections developed from single cell body-dendritic synapses into multiple cell body-dendritic anddendrite-dendritic synapses. In addition, the cell organs of the transplanted neuroblast, oligodendroblast and astroblast matured gradually. The blood-brain barrier appeared subsequently. Moreover, neurofilament, histamine, calcitonin-gene-related peptides, and glial fibrillary acidic protein positive fibers were observed in the transplant region. These findings demonstrate that fetal spinal cord cells in the presence of autologous activated Schwann cells can develop into mature synapses in the cavity of injured spinal cords, suggesting the possibility of information exchange through the reconstructed synapse between fetal spinal cord cells and the host.

  17. Cutting the Cord-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the rear hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting from the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn took place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  18. Cutting the Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting off the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn could take place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  19. Biomarkers in spinal cord injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouw, M.H.; Hosman, A.J.F.; Middendorp, J.J. van; Verbeek, M.M.; Vos, P.E.; Meent, H. van de

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Literature review. OBJECTIVES: In traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), much effort has been put into the evaluation of SCI severity and the prediction of recovery potential. An accurate prediction of the initial damage of the spinal cord that differentiates between the severities of SCI

  20. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  1. Umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hong Hoe; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2012-07-01

    Since the first umbilical cord blood transplantation (CBT) in 1998, cord blood (CB) has now become one of the most commonly used sources of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation. CBT has advantages of easy procurement, no risk to donor, low risk of transmitting infections, immediate availability and immune tolerance allowing successful transplantation despite human leukocyte antigen disparity. Several studies have shown that the number of cells transplanted is the most important factor for engraftment in CBT, and it limits the wide use of CB in adult patients. New strategies for facilitating engraftment and reducing transplantation-related mortality are ongoing in the field of CBT and include the use of a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen, double-unit CBT, ex vivo expansion of CB, and co-transplantation of CB and mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, the results of two international studies with large sample sizes showed that CB is an acceptable alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells for adult recipients who lack human leukocyte antigen-matched adult donors. Along with the intensive researches, development in banking process of CB will amplify the use of CB and offer the chance for cure in more patients.

  2. Umbilical cord blood transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Hoe Koo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the first umbilical cord blood transplantation (CBT in 1998, cord blood (CB has now become one of the most commonly used sources of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation. CBT has advantages of easy procurement, no risk to donor, low risk of transmitting infections, immediate availability and immune tolerance allowing successful transplantation despite human leukocyte antigen disparity. Several studies have shown that the number of cells transplanted is the most important factor for engraftment in CBT, and it limits the wide use of CB in adult patients. New strategies for facilitating engraftment and reducing transplantation-related mortality are ongoing in the field of CBT and include the use of a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen, double-unit CBT, ex vivo expansion of CB, and co-transplantation of CB and mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, the results of two international studies with large sample sizes showed that CB is an acceptable alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells for adult recipients who lack human leukocyte antigen-matched adult donors. Along with the intensive researches, development in banking process of CB will amplify the use of CB and offer the chance for cure in more patients.

  3. Application of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF in individuals with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Vall

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available After spinal cord injury is common functionality is affected. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the functionality of patients with spinal cord injury. METHOD: Cross-sectional study by means of the International Classification of Functionality (ICF. 109 adults with spinal cord injury in the city of Curitiba, Brazil were evaluated. RESULTS: The categories most compromised in body were intestines and bladder, sexuality, energy, sleep, emotion and weight. In the domain activities and participation, there was greater difficulty in tasks of bathing, toilet and dressing, self care and leisure. In the domain environmental factors, the categories classified as facilitators were: medications, orthoses and wheelchair, attitude of family, transport, social foresight and health services. The categories classified as barriers were: attitude of authorities, social attitudes, education and work. CONCLUSION: The application of the ICF in persons with spinal cord injury demonstrated a series of disabilities and limitations.

  4. Reelin inhibits migration of sympathetic preganglionic neurons in the spinal cord of the chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Yee Ping; Zhou, Guangdou; Kubo, Ken-Ichiro; Nakajima, Kazunori; Yip, Joseph W

    2011-07-01

    The present study examined the effects of Reelin in the migration of sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) in the spinal cord of the chick. SPN in the chick first migrate from the neuroepithelium to the ventrolateral spinal cord. They then undergo a secondary migration to cluster adjacent to the central canal, forming the column of Terni (CT). During secondary migration, abundant Reelin is found in large areas of the ventral spinal cord; the only areas devoid of Reelin are areas occupied by SPN or somatic motor neurons and the pathway along which SPN migrate. Ectopic expression of Reelin in the pathway of SPN through electroporation of full-length Reelin DNA stopped SPN migration toward their destination. The spatiotemporal pattern of Reelin expression, along with the inhibition of SPN migration by exogenous Reelin, suggests that Reelin functions as a barrier to SPN migration during normal development of the spinal cord.

  5. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G;

    2015-01-01

    of the completion of the intervention or surgical closure; (6) Surgical procedure-open reduction, (7) Surgical procedure-direct decompression of neural elements, and (8 and 9) Surgical procedure-stabilization and fusion (spinal segment number and level). All variables are coded using numbers or characters. Each...... spinal intervention and procedure is coded (variables 1 through 7) and the spinal segment level is described (variables 8 and 9). Sample clinical cases were developed to illustrate how to complete it. CONCLUSION: The International SCI Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data Set......STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS...

  6. Depression and Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Patient Care Resources Information & Education SCI Empowerment Project Projects & Research FAQ © 2017 University of Washington ... Ave., Seattle WA 98104 Spinal Cord Injury Clinic nurses: 206-744-5862 University of Washington Medical Center ...

  7. Bancos de cordón umbilical Umbilical cord banks

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    La utilización de sangre de cordón como fuente de precursores hematológicos se remonta a 1983 cuando Boyse apuntó el potencial en progenitores existente en la sangre de cordón, realizándose un año más tarde las primeras experiencias sobre modelos murinos. Tuvieron que pasar más de cinco años para que Gluckman realizara la primera experiencia en humanos. Un niño afecto de anemia de Fanconi fue trasplantado con progenitores de sangre de cordón umbilical de su hermana HLA idéntica, realizándose ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Go New to Website Managing Bowel Function After Spinal Cord Injury Resilience, Depression and Bouncing Back after SCI Getting ... the UAB-SCIMS Contact the UAB-SCIMS UAB Spinal Cord Injury Model System Newly Injured Health Daily Living Consumer ...

  9. Suicide in a spinal cord injured population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M;

    1998-01-01

    To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).......To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI)....

  10. The search for novel analgesics: re-examining spinal cord circuits with new tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M Smith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this perspective, we propose the absence of detailed information regarding spinal cord circuits that process sensory information remains a major barrier to advancing analgesia. We highlight recent advances showing that functionally discrete populations of neurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn play distinct roles in processing sensory information. We then discuss new molecular, electrophysiological, and optogenetic techniques that can be employed to understand how dorsal horn circuits process tactile and nociceptive information. We believe this information can drive the development of entirely new classes of pharmacotherapies that target key elements in spinal circuits to selectively modify sensory function and blunt pain.

  11. The search for novel analgesics: re-examining spinal cord circuits with new tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kelly M.; Madden, Jessica F.; Callister, Robert J.; Hughes, David I.; Graham, Brett A.

    2014-01-01

    In this perspective, we propose the absence of detailed information regarding spinal cord circuits that process sensory information remains a major barrier to advancing analgesia. We highlight recent advances showing that functionally discrete populations of neurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn (DH) play distinct roles in processing sensory information. We then discuss new molecular, electrophysiological, and optogenetic techniques that can be employed to understand how DH circuits process tactile and nociceptive information. We believe this information can drive the development of entirely new classes of pharmacotherapies that target key elements in spinal circuits to selectively modify sensory function and blunt pain. PMID:24616699

  12. Timing of Surgery After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Matthew; Schuster, James

    2017-01-01

    Although timing for surgical intervention after spinal cord injury remains controversial, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that early surgery may improve neurologic outcomes, particularly with incomplete spinal cord injury, and may reduce non-neurologic complications and health care resource utilization. Moreover, even in patients with complete spinal cord injury, minor improvement in neurologic function can lead to significant changes in quality of life. This article reviews the experimental and clinical data examining surgical timing after spinal cord injury.

  13. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Zhang; Marong Fang; Haohao Chen; Fangming Gou; Mingxing Ding

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies.

  14. Psychological Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewing literature on the psychological impact of spinal cord injury suggests: (a) depression may not be a precondition for injury adjustment; (b) many persons sustaining cord injury may have experienced psychological disruption prior to injury; and (c) indexes of rehabilitation success need to be developed for the spinal cord injured. (Author)

  15. Spinal cord injury at birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger-Gron, Jesper; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Rasmus G;

    2008-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A case of perinatally acquired spinal cord injury (SCI) is presented. The foetus was vigorous until birth, the breech presented and delivery was performed by a non-traumatic Caesarean section. The infant displayed symptoms of severe SCI but diagnosis was delayed due to severe co...

  16. Men's adjustment to spinal cord injury: the unique contributions of conformity to masculine gender norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Shaun Michael; Hough, Sigmund; Boyd, Briana L; Hill, Justin

    2010-06-01

    Men constitute 82% of the approximately 250,000 people in the United States living with a spinal cord injury. Unfortunately, however, little is known about the impact of men's adherence to gender norms on their adjustment to such injuries. The present investigation examined the utility of masculine norms in explaining variance in depression beyond that accounted for by commonly identified predictors of men's adjustment following spinal cord injury. As hypothesized, results suggested that men's adherence to masculine norms accounted for unique variance in their depression scores beyond that contributed by social support, environmental barriers/access, and erectile functioning. Respondents who adhered to norms stressing the primacy of men's work demonstrated lower rates of depression, whereas those who conformed to norms for self-reliance demonstrated higher depression scores. The authors discuss future research directions and potential psychotherapeutic strategies for working with men with spinal cord injuries.

  17. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-05-06

    Various methods and systems are provided for smart parking barriers. In one example, among others, a smart parking barrier system includes a movable parking barrier located at one end of a parking space, a barrier drive configured to control positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking space and a second position that allows access to the parking space. The parking controller can initiate movement of the movable parking barrier in response to a positive identification of an individual allowed to use the parking space. The parking controller can identify the individual through, e.g., a RFID tag, a mobile device (e.g., a remote control, smartphone, tablet, etc.), an access card, biometric information, or other appropriate identifier.

  18. Mechanical characterization of the injured spinal cord after lateral spinal hemisection injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Tarun; Gilbert, Jeremy; Stelzner, Dennis; Hasenwinkel, Julie

    2012-06-10

    The glial scar formed at the site of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) has been classically hypothesized to be a potent physical and biochemical barrier to nerve regeneration. One longstanding hypothesis is that the scar acts as a physical barrier due to its increased stiffness in comparison to uninjured spinal cord tissue. However, the information regarding the mechanical properties of the glial scar in the current literature is mostly anecdotal and not well quantified. We monitored the mechanical relaxation behavior of injured rat spinal cord tissue at the site of mid-thoracic spinal hemisection 2 weeks and 8 weeks post-injury using a microindentation test method. Elastic moduli were calculated and a modified standard linear model (mSLM) was fit to the data to estimate the relaxation time constant and viscosity. The SLM was modified to account for a spectrum of relaxation times, a phenomenon common to biological tissues, by incorporating a stretched exponential term. Injured tissue exhibited significantly lower stiffness and elastic modulus in comparison to uninjured control tissue, and the results from the model parameters indicated that the relaxation time constant and viscosity of injured tissue were significantly higher than controls. This study presents direct micromechanical measurements of injured spinal cord tissue post-injury. The results of this study show that the injured spinal tissue displays complex viscoelastic behavior, likely indicating changes in tissue permeability and diffusivity.

  19. NEW TRENDS IN STEEL CORD DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vedeneev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of directions of metal cord constructions developments depending on the place of application in tires of different function is carried out. the requirements to metal cord, which are necessary to be taken into account at development of its new type, are given. the peculiarities of perspective types of reinforcing agents for tires, and also advantages of new types of metal cord over the existing ones are shown.

  20. Distinct Presentations of Hernia of Umbilical Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Bilal; Ali, Waqas

    2016-01-01

    Hernia of umbilical cord is a well-known entity which presents with herniation of small bowel into the proximal part of umbilical cord. It has very good prognosis after surgical repair. Occasionally, it can have distinct presentations and varied malformations at the umbilicus which have bearing on the course of treatment and final outcome. Herein, we describe various presentations and malformations associated with hernia of umbilical cord. Embryological extrapolation is attempted for the malformations at umbilicus. PMID:27896161

  1. Spinal cord compression due to ethmoid adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, D R; Sweriduk, S T

    1987-10-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the ethmoid sinus is a rare tumor which has been epidemiologically linked to woodworking in the furniture industry. It has a low propensity to metastasize and has not been previously reported to cause spinal cord compression. A symptomatic epidural spinal cord compression was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan in a former furniture worker with widely disseminated metastases. The clinical features of ethmoid sinus adenocarcinoma and neoplastic spinal cord compression, and the comparative value of MRI scanning in the neuroradiologic diagnosis of spinal cord compression are reviewed.

  2. Extremal surface barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhardt, Netta; Wall, Aron C. [Department of Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2014-03-13

    We present a generic condition for Lorentzian manifolds to have a barrier that limits the reach of boundary-anchored extremal surfaces of arbitrary dimension. We show that any surface with nonpositive extrinsic curvature is a barrier, in the sense that extremal surfaces cannot be continuously deformed past it. Furthermore, the outermost barrier surface has nonnegative extrinsic curvature. Under certain conditions, we show that the existence of trapped surfaces implies a barrier, and conversely. In the context of AdS/CFT, these barriers imply that it is impossible to reconstruct the entire bulk using extremal surfaces. We comment on the implications for the firewall controversy.

  3. Safety-barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2007-01-01

    are discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed, including situations where safety barriers depend on shared common elements. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk......Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called "bow-tie" diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation with other methods such as fault trees and Bayesian networks...... analysis with operational safety management....

  4. Segmentation of the human spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Taso, Manuel; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Callot, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Segmenting the spinal cord contour is a necessary step for quantifying spinal cord atrophy in various diseases. Delineating gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) is also useful for quantifying GM atrophy or for extracting multiparametric MRI metrics into specific WM tracts. Spinal cord segmentation in clinical research is not as developed as brain segmentation, however with the substantial improvement of MR sequences adapted to spinal cord MR investigations, the field of spinal cord MR segmentation has advanced greatly within the last decade. Segmentation techniques with variable accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper, we review some of the existing methods for cord and WM/GM segmentation, including intensity-based, surface-based, and image-based methods. We also provide recommendations for validating spinal cord segmentation techniques, as it is important to understand the intrinsic characteristics of the methods and to evaluate their performance and limitations. Lastly, we illustrate some applications in the healthy and pathological spinal cord. One conclusion of this review is that robust and automatic segmentation is clinically relevant, as it would allow for longitudinal and group studies free from user bias as well as reproducible multicentric studies in large populations, thereby helping to further our understanding of the spinal cord pathophysiology and to develop new criteria for early detection of subclinical evolution for prognosis prediction and for patient management. Another conclusion is that at the present time, no single method adequately segments the cord and its substructure in all the cases encountered (abnormal intensities, loss of contrast, deformation of the cord, etc.). A combination of different approaches is thus advised for future developments, along with the introduction of probabilistic shape models. Maturation of standardized frameworks, multiplatform availability, inclusion

  5. The Beginning of a New Life Following Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury- Patient’s Experiences One Month Post-Discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Bodil Bjørnshave; Bjerrum, Merete; Angel, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Studies show that individuals having suffered traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) are challenged by barriers and problems in their transition from hospital rehabilitation to home. This study aims to explore patients’ first-hand experiences of returning home and to compare their post......-discharge experiences with their pre-discharge expectations. Method: A qualitative follow-up study using inductive contents analysis. One month post-discharge, we reinterviewed seven Danish TSCI-patients, admitted for initial rehabilitation at the Spinal Cord Injury Centre of Western Denmark. Findings: We identified...

  6. Ambulation and spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Elizabeth C; Kobetic, Rudi; Triolo, Ronald J

    2013-05-01

    Walking is possible for many patients with a spinal cord injury. Avenues enabling walking include braces, robotics and FES. Among the benefits are improved musculoskeletal and mental health, however unrealistic expectations may lead to negative changes in quality of life. Use rigorous assessment standards to gauge the improvement of walking during the rehabilitation process, but also yearly. Continued walking after discharge may be limited by challenges, such as lack of accessibility in and outside the home, and complications, such as shoulder pain or injuries from falls. It is critical to determine the risks and benefits of walking for each patient.

  7. Pulmonary mucormycosis presenting with vocal cord paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gayathri Devi, H. J.; Mohan Rao, K.N.; K M Prathima; Moideen, Riyaz

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary mucormycosis is a relatively uncommon infection. It can present in various forms. Very few cases of pulmonary mucormycosis presenting as vocal cord paralysis have been described in the literature. We report a case of pulmonary mucormycosis presenting as vocal cord paralysis in an uncontrolled diabetic patient.

  8. Galactorrhea: a complication of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarkony, G M; Novick, A K; Roth, E J; Kirschner, K L; Rayner, S; Betts, H B

    1992-09-01

    Galactorrhea, a secretion of milk or milk-like products from the breast in the absence of parturition, has been reported to occur in women with spinal cord injuries in association with amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. Four cases of galactorrhea in association with spinal cord injury are reported. Galactorrhea developed in four spinal cord injured women who had thoracic paraplegia. The onset of galactorrhea was from one month to five months after injury. Although the onset of galactorrhea may have been related to prescribed medications in all four cases, insufficient data exist to draw conclusions. The three women whose galactorrhea persisted declined treatment and galactorrhea continuing for more than two years in one instance. We conclude that galactorrhea with or without amenorrhea may develop after a spinal cord injury and that spinal cord injured women may have an enhanced sensitivity to medication-induced galactorrhea.

  9. Spinal cord ischemia secondary to hypovolemic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jacob Yl; Kapoor, Siddhant; Koh, Roy Km; Yang, Eugene Wr; Hee, Hwan-Tak

    2014-12-01

    A 44-year-old male presented with symptoms of spinal cord compression secondary to metastatic prostate cancer. An urgent decompression at the cervical-thoracic region was performed, and there were no complications intraoperatively. Three hours postoperatively, the patient developed acute bilateral lower-limb paralysis (motor grade 0). Clinically, he was in class 3 hypovolemic shock. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, showing no epidural hematoma. He was managed aggressively with medical therapy to improve his spinal cord perfusion. The patient improved significantly, and after one week, he was able to regain most of his motor functions. Although not commonly reported, spinal cord ischemia post-surgery should be recognized early, especially in the presence of hypovolemic shock. MRI should be performed to exclude other potential causes of compression. Spinal cord ischemia needs to be managed aggressively with medical treatment to improve spinal cord perfusion. The prognosis depends on the severity of deficits, and is usually favorable.

  10. Barriers to screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BRCA) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the USA, and mammography is an effective means for the early detection of BRCA. Identifying the barriers to screening mammography can inform research, policy and practice aiming to increase mammography adherence. A literature review was conducted to determine common barriers to screening mammography adherence. PsycINFO and PubMed databases were searched to identify studies published between 2000 and 2012 that examined barriers associated with reduced mammography adherence. Three thematic groups of barriers, based on social ecology, were identified from the literature: healthcare system-level, social and individual-level barriers. Researchers must consider screening behaviour in context and, therefore, should simultaneously consider each level of barriers when attempting to understand screening behaviour and create interventions to increase mammography adherence.

  11. Traumatic spinal cord injury in mice with human immune systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Randall S; Kigerl, Kristina A; Marbourg, Jessica M; Gaudet, Andrew D; Huey, Devra; Niewiesk, Stefan; Popovich, Phillip G

    2015-09-01

    Mouse models have provided key insight into the cellular and molecular control of human immune system function. However, recent data indicate that extrapolating the functional capabilities of the murine immune system into humans can be misleading. Since immune cells significantly affect neuron survival and axon growth and also are required to defend the body against infection, it is important to determine the pathophysiological significance of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced changes in human immune system function. Research projects using monkeys or humans would be ideal; however, logistical and ethical barriers preclude detailed mechanistic studies in either species. Humanized mice, i.e., immunocompromised mice reconstituted with human immune cells, can help overcome these barriers and can be applied in various experimental conditions that are of interest to the SCI community. Specifically, newborn NOD-SCID-IL2rg(null) (NSG) mice engrafted with human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells develop normally without neurological impairment. In this report, new data show that when mice with human immune systems receive a clinically-relevant spinal contusion injury, spontaneous functional recovery is indistinguishable from that achieved after SCI using conventional inbred mouse strains. Moreover, using routine immunohistochemical and flow cytometry techniques, one can easily phenotype circulating human immune cells and document the composition and distribution of these cells in the injured spinal cord. Lesion pathology in humanized mice is typical of mouse contusion injuries, producing a centralized lesion epicenter that becomes occupied by phagocytic macrophages and lymphocytes and enclosed by a dense astrocytic scar. Specific human immune cell types, including three distinct subsets of human monocytes, were readily detected in the blood, spleen and liver. Future studies that aim to understand the functional consequences of manipulating the neuro-immune axis after SCI

  12. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a ''disease that should not be treated.'' Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life.

  13. Postulated Role of Vasoactive Neuropeptide-Related Immunopathology of the Blood Brain Barrier and Virchow-Robin Spaces in the Aetiology of Neurological-Related Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Staines

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasoactive neuropeptides (VNs such as pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP have critical roles as neurotransmitters, vasodilators including perfusion and hypoxia regulators, as well as immune and nociception modulators. They have key roles in blood vessels in the central nervous system (CNS including maintaining functional integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB and blood spinal barrier (BSB. VNs are potent activators of adenylate cyclase and thus also have a key role in cyclic AMP production affecting regulatory T cell and other immune functions. Virchow-Robin spaces (VRSs are perivascular compartments surrounding small vessels within the CNS and contain VNs. Autoimmunity of VNs or VN receptors may affect BBB and VRS function and, therefore, may contribute to the aetiology of neurological-related conditions including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. VN autoimmunity will likely affect CNS and immunological homeostasis. Various pharmacological and immunological treatments including phosphodiesterase inhibitors and plasmapheresis may be indicated.

  14. Histological and functional benefit following transplantation of motor neuron progenitors to the injured rat spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharyn L Rossi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Motor neuron loss is characteristic of cervical spinal cord injury (SCI and contributes to functional deficit. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to investigate the amenability of the injured adult spinal cord to motor neuron differentiation, we transplanted spinal cord injured animals with a high purity population of human motor neuron progenitors (hMNP derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. In vitro, hMNPs displayed characteristic motor neuron-specific markers, a typical electrophysiological profile, functionally innervated human or rodent muscle, and secreted physiologically active growth factors that caused neurite branching and neuronal survival. hMNP transplantation into cervical SCI sites in adult rats resulted in suppression of intracellular signaling pathways associated with SCI pathogenesis, which correlated with greater endogenous neuronal survival and neurite branching. These neurotrophic effects were accompanied by significantly enhanced performance on all parameters of the balance beam task, as compared to controls. Interestingly, hMNP transplantation resulted in survival, differentiation, and site-specific integration of hMNPs distal to the SCI site within ventral horns, but hMNPs near the SCI site reverted to a neuronal progenitor state, suggesting an environmental deficiency for neuronal maturation associated with SCI. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings underscore the barriers imposed on neuronal differentiation of transplanted cells by the gliogenic nature of the injured spinal cord, and the physiological relevance of transplant-derived neurotrophic support to functional recovery.

  15. Efficient delivery of small interfering RNA into injured spinal cords in rats by photomechanical waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Toyooka, Terushige; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2011-03-01

    In the central nervous system, lack of axonal regeneration leads to permanent functional disabilities. In spinal cord injury (SCI), the over-expressions of intermediate filament (IF) proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are mainly involved in glial scar formation; these proteins work as both physical and biochemical barriers to axonal regeneration. Thus, silencing of these IF proteins would be an attractive strategy to treat SCI. In this study, we first attempted to deliver fluorescent probe-labeled siRNAs into injured spinal cords in rats by applying photomechanical waves (PMWs) to examine the capability of PMWs as a tool for siRNA delivery. Intense fluorescence from siRNAs was observed in much broader regions in the spinal cords with PMW application when compared with those with siRNA injection alone. Based on this result, we delivered siRNAs for GFAP and vimentin into injured spinal tissues in rats by applying PMWs. The treatment resulted in efficient silencing of the proteins at five days after SCI and a decrease of the cavity area in the injured tissue at three weeks after SCI when compared with those with siRNA injection alone. These results demonstrate the capability of PMWs for efficient delivery of siRNAs into injured spinal cords and treatment of SCIs.

  16. Development of a 3D matrix for modeling mammalian spinal cord injury in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Felipe Diaz Quiroz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury affects millions of people around the world, however, limited therapies are available to improve the quality of life of these patients. Spinal cord injury is usually modeled in rats and mice using contusion or complete transection models and this has led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular complexities of the injury. However, it has not to date led to development of successful novel therapies, this is in part due to the complexity of the injury and the difficulty of deciphering the exact roles and interactions of different cells within this complex environment. Here we developed a collagen matrix that can be molded into the 3D tubular shape with a lumen and can hence support cell interactions in a similar architecture to a spinal cord. We show that astrocytes can be successfully grown on this matrix in vitro and when injured, the cells respond as they do in vivo and undergo reactive gliosis, one of the steps that lead to formation of a glial scar, the main barrier to spinal cord regeneration. In the future, this system can be used to quickly assess the effect of drugs on glial scar protein activity or to perform live imaging of labeled cells after exposure to drugs.

  17. Development of a 3D matrix for modeling mammalian spinal cord injury in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Felipe Diaz Quiroz; Yuping Li; Conrado Aparicio; Karen Echeverri

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury affects millions of people around the world, however, limited therapies are available to improve the quality of life of these patients. Spinal cord injury is usually modeled in rats and mice using contusion or complete transection models and this has led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular complexities of the injury. However, it has not to date led to development of successful novel ther-apies, this is in part due to the complexity of the injury and the diffculty of deciphering the exact roles and interactions of different cells within this complex environment. Here we developed a collagen matrix that can be molded into the 3D tubular shape with a lumen and can hence support cell interactions in a similar architecture to a spinal cord. We show that astrocytes can be successfully grown on this matrixin vitro and when injured, the cells respond as they doin vivo and undergo reactive gliosis, one of the steps that lead to formation of a glial scar, the main barrier to spinal cord regeneration. In the future, this system can be used to quickly assess the effect of drugs on glial scar protein activity or to perform live imaging of labeled cells atfer exposure to drugs.

  18. Advances in the management of infertility in men with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Couples with a spinal cord injured male partner require assisted ejaculation techniques to collect semen that can then be further used in various assisted reproductive technology methods to achieve a pregnancy. The majority of men sustaining a spinal cord injury regardless of the cause or the level of injury cannot ejaculate during sexual intercourse. Only a small minority can ejaculate by masturbation. Penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation are the two most common methods used to retrieve sperm. Other techniques such as prostatic massage and the adjunct application of other medications can be used, but the results are inconsistent. Surgical sperm retrieval should be considered as a last resort if all other methods fail. Special attention must be paid to patients with T6 and rostral levels of injury due to the risk of autonomic dysreflexia resulting from stimulation below the level of injury. Bladder preparation should be performed before stimulation if retrograde ejaculation is anticipated. Erectile dysfunction is ubiquitous in the spinal cord injured population but is usually easily managed and does not pose a barrier to semen retrieval in these men. Semen analysis parameters of men with spinal cord injury are unique for this population regardless of the method of retrieval, generally presenting as normal sperm concentration but abnormally low sperm motility and viability. When sperm retrieval is desired in this population, emphasis should be placed on initially trying the simple methods of penile vibratory stimulation or electroejaculation before resorting to more advanced and invasive surgical procedures.

  19. Raman spectroscopic investigation of spinal cord injury in a rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Tarun; Deng, Bin; Stelzner, Dennis; Hasenwinkel, Julie; Chaiken, Joseph

    2011-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to study temporal molecular changes associated with spinal cord injury (SCI) in a rat model. Raman spectra of saline-perfused, injured, and healthy rat spinal cords were obtained and compared. Two injury models, a lateral hemisection and a moderate contusion were investigated. The net fluorescence and the Raman spectra showed clear differences between the injured and healthy spinal cords. Based on extensive histological and biochemical characterization of SCI available in the literature, these differences were hypothesized to be due to cell death, demyelination, and changes in the extracellular matrix composition, such as increased expression of proteoglycans and hyaluronic acid, at the site of injury where the glial scar forms. Further, analysis of difference spectra indicated the presence of carbonyl containing compounds, hypothesized to be products of lipid peroxidation and acid catalyzed hydrolysis of glycosaminoglycan moieties. These results compared well with in vitro experiments conducted on chondroitin sulfate sugars. Since the glial scar is thought to be a potent biochemical barrier to nerve regeneration, this observation suggests the possibility of using near infrared Raman spectroscopy to study injury progression and explore potential treatments ex vivo, and ultimately monitor potential remedial treatments within the spinal cord in vivo.

  20. Development of a 3D matrix for modeling mammalian spinal cord injury in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Quiroz, Juan Felipe; Li, Yuping; Aparicio, Conrado; Echeverri, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury affects millions of people around the world, however, limited therapies are available to improve the quality of life of these patients. Spinal cord injury is usually modeled in rats and mice using contusion or complete transection models and this has led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular complexities of the injury. However, it has not to date led to development of successful novel therapies, this is in part due to the complexity of the injury and the difficulty of deciphering the exact roles and interactions of different cells within this complex environment. Here we developed a collagen matrix that can be molded into the 3D tubular shape with a lumen and can hence support cell interactions in a similar architecture to a spinal cord. We show that astrocytes can be successfully grown on this matrix in vitro and when injured, the cells respond as they do in vivo and undergo reactive gliosis, one of the steps that lead to formation of a glial scar, the main barrier to spinal cord regeneration. In the future, this system can be used to quickly assess the effect of drugs on glial scar protein activity or to perform live imaging of labeled cells after exposure to drugs. PMID:28123426

  1. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    This paper shows that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system. Specifically, we prove converse barrier certificate theorems for a class of structurally stable dynamical systems. Other authors have developed a related result by assuming that the dynamical system has neither sing...

  2. Near infrared Raman spectroscopic study of reactive gliosis and the glial scar in injured rat spinal cords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Tarun; Deng, Bin; Lewis-Clark, Eric; Hoellger, Kyle; Stelzner, Dennis; Hasenwinkel, Julie; Chaiken, Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Comparative Raman spectra of ex vivo, saline-perfused, injured and healthy rat spinal cord as well as experiments using enzymatic digestion suggest that proteoglycan over expression may be observable in injured tissue. Comparison with authentic materials in vitro suggest the occurrence of side reactions between products of cord digestion with chondroitinase (cABC) that produce lactones and similar species with distinct Raman features that are often not overlapped with Raman features from other chemical species. Since the glial scar is thought to be a biochemical and physical barrier to nerve regeneration, this observation suggests the possibility of using near infrared Raman spectroscopy to study disease progression and explore potential treatments ex vivo and if potential treatments can be designed, perhaps to monitor potential remedial treatments within the spinal cord in vivo.

  3. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and the treatment of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Fu-jiang; FENG Shi-qing

    2009-01-01

    Objective To review the recent studies about human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) and advances in the treatment of spinal cord injury, Data sources Published articles (1983-2007) about hUCMSCs and spinal cord injury were selected using Medline. Study selection Articles selected were relevant to development of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for transplantation in spinal cord injury therapy. Of 258 originally identifiied arises 51 were selected that specifically addressed the stated purpose. Results Recent work has revealed that hUCMSCs share most of the characteristics with MSCs derived from bone marrow and are more appropriate to transplantation for cell based therapies. Conclusions Human umbilical cord could be regarded as a source of MSCs for experimental and clinical needs. In addition, as a peculiar source of stem cells, hUCMSCs may play an important role in the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  4. Vocal cord paralysis caused by stingray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh Jin; Park, Jung Je; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2013-11-01

    Foreign bodies in the oral cavity and pharynx are commonly encountered in the emergency room and outpatient departments, and the most frequently observed of these foreign bodies are fish bones. Among the possible complications resulting from a pharyngeal foreign body, vocal cord fixation is extremely rare, with only three cases previously reported in the English literature. The mechanisms of vocal cord fixation can be classified into mechanical articular fixation, direct injury of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, or recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis secondary to inflammation. The case discussed here is different from previous cases. We report a rare case of vocal cord paralysis caused by the venom of a stingray tail in the hypopharynx.

  5. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  6. Vocal cord paralysis in a fighter pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturo, Stephen; Brennan, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    We present in this case report the return to flying duty of a pilot with vocal cord paralysis secondary to removal of a thymoma. We discuss the importance of glottic function as it pertains to the unique aviation environment. We also discuss the anatomy and physiology of the glottis, the evaluation for vocal cord paralysis, and surgical approaches for paralyzed vocal cords. Although the incidence of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis is low in the military aviation community, it is important to recognize that its sequelae can be managed so that the aviator may return to flight duties.

  7. Teaching nonlinear dynamics through elastic cords

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon, R; Galan, C A; Sanchez-Bajo, F, E-mail: rchacon@unex.e [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Escuela de IngenierIas Industriales, Universidad de Extremadura, Apartado Postal 382, E-06071 Badajoz (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    We experimentally studied the restoring force of a length of stretched elastic cord. A simple analytical expression for the restoring force was found to fit all the experimental results for different elastic materials. Remarkably, this analytical expression depends upon an elastic-cord characteristic parameter which exhibits two limiting values corresponding to two nonlinear springs with different Hooke's elastic constants. Additionally, the simplest model of elastic cord dynamics is capable of exhibiting a great diversity of nonlinear phenomena, including bifurcations and chaos, thus providing a suitable alternative model system for discussing the basic essentials of nonlinear dynamics in the context of intermediate physics courses at university level.

  8. Muscle after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Kristensen, Ida Bruun; Kjaer, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    The morphological and contractile changes of muscles below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI) are dramatic. In humans with SCI, a fiber-type transformation away from type I begins 4-7 months post-SCI and reaches a new steady state with predominantly fast glycolytic IIX fibers...... years after the injury. There is a progressive drop in the proportion of slow myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fibers and a rise in the proportion of fibers that coexpress both the fast and slow MHC isoforms. The oxidative enzymatic activity starts to decline after the first few months post-SCI. Muscles...... from individuals with chronic SCI show less resistance to fatigue, and the speed-related contractile properties change, becoming faster. These findings are also present in animals. Future studies should longitudinally examine changes in muscles from early SCI until steady state is reached in order...

  9. Skin barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Renowned experts present the latest knowledge Although a very fragile structure, the skin barrier is probably one of the most important organs of the body. Inward/out it is responsible for body integrity and outward/in for keeping microbes, chemicals, and allergens from penetrating the skin. Since...... the role of barrier integrity in atopic dermatitis and the relationship to filaggrin mutations was discovered a decade ago, research focus has been on the skin barrier, and numerous new publications have become available. This book is an interdisciplinary update offering a wide range of information...... on the subject. It covers new basic research on skin markers, including results on filaggrin and on methods for the assessment of the barrier function. Biological variation and aspects of skin barrier function restoration are discussed as well. Further sections are dedicated to clinical implications of skin...

  10. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord blood

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen Preben D; Heerkens Tammy; Koch Thomas G; Betts Dean H

    2007-01-01

    Background: There are no published studies on stem cells from equine cord blood although commercial storage of equine cord blood for future autologous stem cell transplantations is available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood of humans collected non-invasively at the time of birth and from sheep cord blood collected invasively by a surgical intrauterine approach. Mesenchymal stem cells isolation percentage from frozen-thawed human cord blood is lo...

  11. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of terminal syringomyelia within spinal cord combined with tethered cord syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jing-cheng XIE; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize the clinical manifestations, imaging characteristics and experience of surgical treatment of spinal cord terminal syringomyelia with tethered cord syndrome (TCS).  Methods and Results Clinical data of 10 patients with spinal cord syringomyelia combined with TCS surgically treated under microscope from January 1999 to March 2014 in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. There were 3 males and 7 females with average age of 15.06 years old (ranged from 2 to 35 y...

  12. Prenatal exposure to lead in Spain: Cord blood levels and associated factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llop, Sabrina, E-mail: llop_sab@gva.es [Centre of Public Health Research (CSISP), Av Catalunya 21, 46020, Valencia (Spain); Carlos III Health Institute (ISCIII), 20220 Majadahonda, Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Doctor Aiguader 88, 8003 Barcelona (Spain); Aguinagalde, Xabier [Public Health Laboratory of Alava, Direccion de Salud Publica, Gobierno Vasco, Santiago 11, 01002, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Basque Country (Spain); Vioque, Jesus [CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Doctor Aiguader 88, 8003 Barcelona (Spain); Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Av de Alicante KM 87, 03550, Sant Joan d' Alacant (Spain); Ibarluzea, Jesus [CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Doctor Aiguader 88, 8003 Barcelona (Spain); Departamento de Sanidad Gobierno Vasco, Subdireccion de Salud Publica de Gipuzkoa, Avenida de Navarra 4, 20013 San Sebastian (Spain); Biodonostia, Instituto de Investigacion Biomedica, San Sebastian (Spain); Guxens, Monica [CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Doctor Aiguader 88, 8003 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research of Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Doctor Aiguader 88, 8003 Barcelona (Spain); Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar), Doctor Aiguader 88, 8003 Barcelona (Spain); Casas, Maribel [Centre for Research of Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Doctor Aiguader 88, 8003 Barcelona (Spain); Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar), Doctor Aiguader 88, 8003 Barcelona (Spain); Murcia, Mario [Centre of Public Health Research (CSISP), Av Catalunya 21, 46020, Valencia (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Doctor Aiguader 88, 8003 Barcelona (Spain); Ruiz, Maria [Centre for Research of Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Doctor Aiguader 88, 8003 Barcelona (Spain); Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar), Doctor Aiguader 88, 8003 Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2011-05-01

    Introduction and Objective: Lead is a known neurotoxic. Fetuses and infants are very vulnerable to lead exposure, since their blood-brain barrier is not completely formed. Hence, there is an importance for monitoring of blood lead levels prenatally and during early infancy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prenatal exposure to lead and its association with maternal factors in four population based mother-child cohorts in Spain. The present research was carried out within the framework of the INMA project INfancia y Medio Ambiente (Environment and Childhood). Methods: A total of 1462 pregnant women were recruited between 2004 and 2008. Lead was analyzed in a sample of cord blood by thermal decomposition, amalgation, and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Maternal sociodemographic, lifestyle and dietary factors were obtained by questionnaires during pregnancy. A multivariate logistic regression model was constructed. The dependent variable was a dichotomous lead level variable (detected vs no detected, i.e. {>=} vs < 2 {mu}g/dL). Results: A low percentage of cord blood samples with lead levels {>=} 2 {mu}g/dL were found (5.9%). Geometric mean and maximum were 1.06 {mu}g/dL and 19 {mu}g/dL, respectively. Smoking at the beginning of pregnancy, age, social class, weight gain during pregnancy, gravidity, and place of residence were the maternal factors associated with detectable cord blood lead levels. Mother's diet does not appear to be a determining factor of lead exposure. Nevertheless, daily intake of iron and zinc may act as a protective factor against having cord blood lead levels {>=} 2 {mu}g/dL. Conclusion: In the different regions of Spain taking part in this study, lead levels to which newborns are exposed are low. Mobilization of lead from bones may be the main contributor to the cord blood levels. - Research Highlights: {yields} Pb is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant with harmful effects on neurodevelopment. {yields} Cord blood Pb levels in

  13. Spinal Cord Injury: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... recent tetraplegia. Much as in the general population, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death in persons with spinal cord injury. After the injury, the opportunity to actively exercise large muscles affected by paralysis is limited or ...

  14. APOPTOSIS AFTER SPINAL CORD INJURY IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To confirm the role played by apoptosis in spinal cord injury. Methods 36 rats models of spinal cord injury were made by Allen method. Histological examinations using HE staining and in situ end-labeling were used to observe apoptosis in spinal cord tissues from 1h to 21d after injury. Results HE staining sections showed hemorrhage and necrosis, neuronal degeneration and gliai cell proliferation. In situ end-labeling sections showed the appearance of apoptosis in both gray and white matter as well as in both central and surrounding region. The number of apoptotic cells increased from 12h after injury, increased to the peak at 4d and declined to normal at 21d. Conclu sion The results suggest that apoptosis, especially glial apoptosis, plays a role in the pathogenesis of spinal cord in jury.

  15. The shape of telephone cord blisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yong; Yu, Senjiang; Jiang, Hongyuan; He, Linghui

    2017-01-01

    Formation of telephone cord blisters as a result of buckling delamination is widely observed in many compressed film-substrate systems. Here we report a universal morphological feature of such blisters characterized by their sequential sectional profiles exhibiting a butterfly shape using atomic force microscopy. Two kinds of buckle morphologies, light and heavy telephone cord blisters, are observed and differentiated by measurable geometrical parameters. Based on the Föppl-von Kármán plate theory, the observed three-dimensional features of the telephone cord blister are predicted by the proposed approximate analytical model and simulation. The latter further replicates growth and coalescence of the telephone cord into complex buckling delamination patterns observed in the experiment.

  16. Spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Anil

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury without radiological abnormality is rare in adults. Below we present a case report of 20 yrs old male with isolated cervical cord injury, without accompanying vertebral dislocation or fracture involving the spinal canal rim. He fell down on plain and smooth ground while carrying 40 kg weight overhead and developed quadriparesis with difficulty in respiration. Plain radiographs of the neck revealed no fractures or dislocations. MRI showed bulky spinal cord and an abnormal hyper intense signal on the T2W image from C2 vertebral body level to C3/4 intervertebral disc level predominantly in the anterior aspect of the cord The patient was managed conservatively with head halter traction and invasive ventilatory support for the initial 7 days period in the ICU. In our patient recovery was good and most of the neurological deficit improved over 4 weeks with conservative management.

  17. Investigation of Plasma Eects in Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) Cords

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodoru, Steluta; Kusano, Yukihiro; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    modication for improved wetting and/or adhesion with other polymeric materials. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment is promising for this purpose due to its environmental compatibility, high treatment eects without aecting the textural characteristics of the bulk material, its applicability to a variety......Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been widely used because of its high chemical stabil- ity, high impact strength, exibility and low cost. Its eld of applications includes use in composites, packing for microelectronic components and biomaterials, usually requiring its surface...... of shapes, and easy up-scaling and construction of in-line production processes. An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma is used to study surface modication eect on UHMWPE cords, operated at a frequency of ca. 40 kHz in He, He/O2, O2 and N2 gases. The cords were continuously...

  18. Cytokine and Growth Factor Activation In Vivo and In Vitro after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Cevallos, Jorge; Silva-Garcia, Raul; Ibarra, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury results in a life-disrupting series of deleterious interconnected mechanisms encompassed by the primary and secondary injury. These events are mediated by the upregulation of genes with roles in inflammation, transcription, and signaling proteins. In particular, cytokines and growth factors are signaling proteins that have important roles in the pathophysiology of SCI. The balance between the proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects of these molecules plays a critical role in the progression and outcome of the lesion. The excessive inflammatory Th1 and Th17 phenotypes observed after SCI tilt the scale towards a proinflammatory environment, which exacerbates the deleterious mechanisms present after the injury. These mechanisms include the disruption of the spinal cord blood barrier, edema and ion imbalance, in particular intracellular calcium and sodium concentrations, glutamate excitotoxicity, free radicals, and the inflammatory response contributing to the neurodegenerative process which is characterized by demyelination and apoptosis of neuronal tissue. PMID:27418745

  19. Acute rehabilitation of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    KIDRIČ-SIVEC, Urška; SEDEJ, Bogdana; MAROLT, Melita

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury presents with loss of function of neuromuscular and other systems below the level of injury. Patients may suffer from minor loss of strength to complete quadriplegia with respiratory distress. All the patients with traumatic spinal cord injury who are admitted and treated in University Medical Centre Ljubljana are evaluated after admission and individualized plan of rehabilitation is made. The neurological level of injury is documented with international standa...

  20. Umbilical Cord Segmental Hemorrhage and Fetal Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larciprete, Giovanni; Romanini, Maria Elisabetta; Arduini, Domenico; Cirese, Elio; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta; Kula, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    We describe an unexplained case of umbilical cord segmental hemorrhage linked with meconium-stained amniotic fluid. A severely asphyxiated infant was delivered at term by Caesarean section. There were poor prognostic signs on fetal cardiotocography with rupture of membranes with meconium-stained amniotic fluid. The pathophysiologic mechanism in this case is still unknown, even if we argued a possible role of the umbilical cord shortness. PMID:23674981

  1. Advanced Restoration Therapies in Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    including but not limited to traumatic brain injury , Alzheimer’s disease, cerebrovascular insults, and leukodystrophy. SECTION 2 – KEYWORDS Spinal...Spinal Cord Injury Annual Report to change our proposed anesthesia method from isofluorane to medetomidine. We have made the appropriate changes and...McKinley, W., and Tulsky, D. (2004). Late neurologic recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury . Arch Phys Med Rehabil 85, 1811-1817. Lorenz, D.J

  2. Tuberculosis of the Spermatic Cord: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Benjelloun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The spermatic cord tuberculoma is uncommon, especially in its lower portion. Most cases were described in Japanese literature. We report a case of tuberculosis of the spermatic cord in a sexually active young man, revealed by a scrotal mass mimicking a tumor of the testicle and discuss the suitable diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with preservation of the testes and the other sexual organs.

  3. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  4. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  5. Barriers to Effective Listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert, Jack E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the following barriers which interfere with listening efficiency: content, speaker, medium, distractions, mindset, language, listening speed, and feedback. Suggests ways to combat these obstacles to accurate comprehension. (MM)

  6. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  7. SDF1 in the dorsal corticospinal tract promotes CXCR4+ cell migration after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hosung

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1 and its major signaling receptor, CXCR4, were initially described in the immune system; however, they are also expressed in the nervous system, including the spinal cord. After spinal cord injury, the blood brain barrier is compromised, opening the way for chemokine signaling between these two systems. These experiments clarified prior contradictory findings on normal expression of SDF1 and CXCR4 as well as examined the resulting spinal cord responses resulting from this signaling. Methods These experiments examined the expression and function of SDF1 and CXCR4 in the normal and injured adult mouse spinal cord primarily using CXCR4-EGFP and SDF1-EGFP transgenic reporter mice. Results In the uninjured spinal cord, SDF1 was expressed in the dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST as well as the meninges, whereas CXCR4 was found only in ependymal cells surrounding the central canal. After spinal cord injury (SCI, the pattern of SDF1 expression did not change rostral to the lesion but it disappeared from the degenerating dCST caudally. By contrast, CXCR4 expression changed dramatically after SCI. In addition to the CXCR4+ cells in the ependymal layer, numerous CXCR4+ cells appeared in the peripheral white matter and in the dorsal white matter localized between the dorsal corticospinal tract and the gray matter rostral to the lesion site. The non-ependymal CXCR4+ cells were found to be NG2+ and CD11b+ macrophages that presumably infiltrated through the broken blood-brain barrier. One population of macrophages appeared to be migrating towards the dCST that contains SDF1 rostral to the injury but not towards the caudal dCST in which SDF1 is no longer present. A second population of the CXCR4+ macrophages was present near the SDF1-expressing meningeal cells. Conclusions These observations suggest that attraction of CXCR4+ macrophages is part of a programmed response to injury and that modulation of the

  8. Hedging Double Barriers with Singles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sbuelz, A.

    2000-01-01

    Double barrier options provide risk managers with good-deal flexibility in tailoring portfolio returns.Their hedges offer full protection only if unwound along the barriers.This work provides non-dynamic hedges that project the risk of double barriers on to single barriers.Non-dynamic hedges overcom

  9. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 648: Umbilical Cord Blood Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Once considered a waste product that was discarded with the placenta, umbilical cord blood is now known to contain potentially life-saving hematopoietic stem cells. When used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, umbilical cord blood offers several distinct advantages over bone marrow or peripheral stem cells. However, umbilical cord blood collection is not part of routine obstetric care and is not medically indicated. Umbilical cord blood collection should not compromise obstetric or neonatal care or alter routine practice for the timing of umbilical cord clamping. If a patient requests information on umbilical cord blood banking, balanced and accurate information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of public and private umbilical cord blood banking should be provided. The routine storage of umbilical cord blood as "biologic insurance" against future disease is not recommended.

  10. Committee Opinion No. 648 Summary: Umbilical Cord Blood Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Once considered a waste product that was discarded with the placenta, umbilical cord blood is now known to contain potentially life-saving hematopoietic stem cells. When used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, umbilical cord blood offers several distinct advantages over bone marrow or peripheral stem cells. However, umbilical cord blood collection is not part of routine obstetric care and is not medically indicated. Umbilical cord blood collection should not compromise obstetric or neonatal care or alter routine practice for the timing of umbilical cord clamping. If a patient requests information on umbilical cord blood banking, balanced and accurate information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of public and private umbilical cord blood banking should be provided. The routine storage of umbilical cord blood as "biologic insurance" against future disease is not recommended.

  11. Mechanisms of symptomatic spinal cord ischemia after TEVAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czerny, Martin; Eggebrecht, Holger; Sodeck, Gottfried;

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that simultaneous closure of at least 2 independent vascular territories supplying the spinal cord and/or prolonged hypotension may be associated with symptomatic spinal cord ischemia (SCI) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR)....

  12. Seminal plasma PSA in spinal cord injured men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Sønksen, J; Sommer, P;

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of spinal cord injury on seminal plasma PSA concentration.......The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of spinal cord injury on seminal plasma PSA concentration....

  13. Vocational Rehabilitation of Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poor, Charles R.

    1975-01-01

    Reviews historical development of organized vocational rehabilitation programming for the spinal cord injured in the United States. Significant factors that affect vocational rehabilitation outcomes with spinal cord injured persons are listed and discussed. (Author)

  14. The recurrent true umbilical cord knots: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Naghi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: True umbilical cord knot is one of the abnormalities of the umbilical cord. Active fetal movements create cord knotting. True umbilical cord knots are rare but may be associated with fetal distress and stillbirth. True umbilical cord knots are capable of impeding blood flow to the fetus.Case presentation: A 26-year old primigravid woman was first treated for genital herpes simplex virus (HSV type 2 at 36 weeks of gestational age. She received oral acyclovir (400 mg three times daily for 10 days. At the gestational age of 38 weeks and 5 days, fetal activity decreased and NST was nonreactive. She was delivered by cesarean section and a true umbilical cord knot was found. Four years later, in her second pregnancy, another true knot was seen.Conclusion: Excessively long umbilical cords are more likely to be associated with true knots. Genetics has an important role in determining cord length and occurrence of true knots.

  15. Umbilical cord blood transplantation: the first 25 years and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballen, Karen K; Gluckman, Eliane; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2013-07-25

    Umbilical cord blood is an alternative hematopoietic stem cell source for patients with hematologic diseases who can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Initially, umbilical cord blood transplantation was limited to children, given the low cell dose infused. Both related and unrelated cord blood transplants have been performed with high rates of success for a variety of hematologic disorders and metabolic storage diseases in the pediatric setting. The results for adult umbilical cord blood transplantation have improved, with greater emphasis on cord blood units of sufficient cell dose and human leukocyte antigen match and with the use of double umbilical cord blood units and improved supportive care techniques. Cord blood expansion trials have recently shown improvement in time to engraftment. Umbilical cord blood is being compared with other graft sources in both retrospective and prospective trials. The growth of the field over the last 25 years and the plans for future exploration are discussed.

  16. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Heerkens, Tammy; Thomsen, Preben Dybdahl

    2007-01-01

    Background: There are no published studies on stem cells from equine cord blood although commercial storage of equine cord blood for future autologous stem cell transplantations is available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood of humans collected non......-invasively at the time of birth and from sheep cord blood collected invasively by a surgical intrauterine approach. Mesenchymal stem cells isolation percentage from frozen-thawed human cord blood is low and the future isolation percentage of MSCs from cryopreserved equine cord blood is therefore expectedly low......, for the first time, the isolation of mesenchymal-like stem cells from fresh equine cord blood and their differentiation into osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. This novel isolation of equine cord blood MSCs and their preliminary in vitro differentiation positions the horse as the ideal pre-clinical animal...

  17. Primary multifocal gliosarcoma of the spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh M. Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gliosarcoma (GS is a rare and exceedingly malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system. It displays clinical features similar to glioblastoma, yet is histologically unique as it harbors both gliomatous and sarcomatous cellular components. Involvement of the neuroaxis is predominantly limited to the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. Primary GS of the spinal cord is rarely encountered. We report a case of a 54 year old male who presented with 2 months of progressive, bilateral lower extremity sensory deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neuro-axis revealed multiple intradural lesions involving the cervical and thoracic spinal cord without evidence of intracranial involvement. Surgical resection of a dural based, extramedullary cervical lesion and two exophytic, intramedullary thoracic lesions revealed gliosarcoma, WHO grade IV. The patient died approximately 11 months after presentation. This report confirms that GS is not limited to supratentorial involvement and can primarily affect the spinal cord.

  18. Ependymal variations in the caudal spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltenburg-Didinger, G; Bienentreu, R

    1981-01-01

    The lumbosacral spinal cord including the cauda equina was examined in 100 unselected autopsied cases of infants dying at or near term. A striking finding in 10% of these cases was the occurrence of bilateral collections of ependymal cells lying in rows on the surface of the lumbosacral cord. In another 25% the central canal was forked or duplicate. These foci were not associated with evidence of defective neural tube closure or spina bifida; the central canal was of normal length. There was no relationship between the ependymal structures and systemic clinical or pathological findings. The pathogenesis and significance of these lesions is unclear. Our observations suggest that they occur regularly and are not associated with neurological disturbances. The relationship of the ependymal cell collections to ependymomas of the caudal spinal cord is open to speculation.

  19. Surgical Neurostimulation for Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Aswin; Hentall, Ian D.; Papadopoulos, Marios C.; Pereira, Erlick A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological condition characterized by a constellation of symptoms including paralysis, paraesthesia, pain, cardiovascular, bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction. Current treatment for SCI involves acute resuscitation, aggressive rehabilitation and symptomatic treatment for complications. Despite the progress in scientific understanding, regenerative therapies are lacking. In this review, we outline the current state and future potential of invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation strategies including deep brain stimulation (DBS), spinal cord stimulation (SCS), motor cortex stimulation (MCS), transcutaneous direct current stimulation (tDCS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the context of SCI. We consider the ability of these therapies to address pain, sensorimotor symptoms and autonomic dysregulation associated with SCI. In addition to the potential to make important contributions to SCI treatment, neuromodulation has the added ability to contribute to our understanding of spinal cord neurobiology and the pathophysiology of SCI. PMID:28208601

  20. Carbon dioxide laser enucleation of polypoid vocal cords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, A; Dedo, H H

    1984-06-01

    Polypoid vocal cords have routinely been treated by endoscopic vocal cord stripping, often-times resulting in prolonged hoarseness postoperatively. Submucosal CO2 laser enucleation of the polypoid tissue, with preservation of a mucosal flap on the medial edge of the cord, has proved to be a valuable improvement. The surgical procedure is described and results are presented which suggest that voice quality is better earlier than is the case after vocal cord stripping.

  1. Barriers to cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womeodu, R J; Bailey, J E

    1996-01-01

    Many barriers to cancer screening have been summarized and discussed. Barriers have been documented in all patient populations, but some groups such as ethnic minorities and the elderly face unique barriers. The barriers to cancer screening, are multifactorial, but much of the responsibility for change must lie with health care providers and the health care delivery industry. This is not to free the patient of all responsibility, but some significant barriers are beyond their direct control. Take, for example, socioeconomic status, disease knowledge, and culturally related perceptions and myths about cancer detection and treatment. The health care industry must do a better job identifying and overcoming these barriers. The significant effects of provider counseling and advice must not be underestimated. Patients must first be advised, and then further actions must be taken if they reject the screening advice. Did they refuse adherence to recommendations because they do not view themselves as susceptible, because of overwhelming personal barriers, or because of a fatalistic attitude toward cancer detection and treatment? If that is the case, physicians and health care institutions must attempt to change perceptions, educate, and personalize the message so that patients accept their disease susceptibility [table: see text]. Multiple patient and provider risk factors have been identified that can be used to target patients particularly at high risk for inadequate cancer screening and providers at high risk for performing inadequate screening. Research has clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of interventions to improve tracking of patient and physician compliance with screening recommendations. Further research is needed to show the impact of managed-care penetration and payer status on screening efforts, and incentive schemes need to be tested that reward institutions and third-party payers who develop uniform standards and procedures for cancer screening. The

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einsiedel, H. von; Stepan, R.

    1985-05-01

    Thirty-four patients with intramedullary space-occupying lesions or cord compression syndromes were examined with a resistive and two different superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imaging units. Studies were done primarily by the spin-echo (SE) technique and in the majority of patients different pulse sequences were used. Images with short echo-time (TE) and short recovery-time (TR) were best for demonstration of spinal cord anatomy, for depicting cystic portions in intramedullary tumours and for showing syringomyelia. Solid intramedullary tumours showed normal cord signal intensity. Images with prolonged TE and TR predominantly enhanced CSF signal intensity and, to a more considerable extent, solid intramedullary tumours. Thus, the diameter of the subarachnoid space and the presence of a solid intramedullary tumour, not concomittant with a significant enlargement of the spinal cord, could only be recognized on these prolonged SE images. Major advantages of MR in comparison to CT are that the spinal cord can be imaged in the sagittal plane and that beam hardening artifacts do not occur; in comparison to myelography the cord can be imaged directly by MR. Partial volume is a major limitation of MR, not only in the preferably applied sagittal plane. The choice of slice thickness adequate to the diameter of the lesion and straight positioning of the patient for sagittal single slice midline images are fundamental for reliable MR investigations. Another limitation to MR is that cortical bone gives no signal. The actual diameter of the spinal canal therefore cannot be correctly appreciated and consequently it was difficult or impossible to assess spinal stenosis.

  3. Anti-TPO Antibodies Diffusion through the Placental Barrier during Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Jérémy Seror; Gaëlle Amand; Jean Guibourdenche; Pierre-François Ceccaldi; Dominique Luton

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hashimoto's thyroiditis is the principal aetiology of hypothyroidism with presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO). The association between anti-TPO and foeto-placental complications has been observed in previous studies. To go further in the understanding, the current study compares the level of anti-TPO in maternal blood and in the cord blood of her fetus at the moment of childbirth to demonstrate the passage of anti-TPO through the placenta barrier. METHODS AND FI...

  4. The Roach muscle bundle and umbilical cord coiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Monique W. M.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; Franx, Arie; Visser, Gerard H. A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine if presence of the Roach muscle, a small muscle bundle tying just beside the umbilical artery, contributes to umbilical cord coiling. Methods: 251 umbilical cords were examined. The umbilical coiling index (UCI) was calculated as the number of coils divided by the cord length

  5. Levetiracetam in spinal cord injury pain: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, N B; Grydehøj, J; Bing, J;

    2009-01-01

    . OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was primarily to evaluate the efficacy of the anticonvulsant levetiracetam in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) at- and below-level pain and secondarily to evaluate the effect on spasm severity. SETTING: Outpatients at two spinal cord units and a pain center...... severity following spinal cord injury....

  6. Pathologic approach to spinal cord infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tihan, Tarik

    2015-05-01

    The pathologic evaluation of spinal cord infections requires comprehensive clinical, radiological, and laboratory correlation, because the histologic findings in acute, chronic, or granulomatous infections rarely provide clues for the specific cause. This brief review focuses on the pathologic mechanisms as well as practical issues in the diagnosis and reporting of infections of the spinal cord. Examples are provided of the common infectious agents and methods for their diagnosis. By necessity, discussion is restricted to the infections of the medulla spinalis proper and its meninges, and not bone or soft tissue infections.

  7. Technology for spinal cord injury rehabilitation and its application to youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryden, Anne M; Ancans, Jennifer; Mazurkiewicz, Jennifer; McKnight, Ashley; Scholtens, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in a sudden, devastating loss of function. SCI is particularly challenging for the pediatric and adolescent populations who, under normal circumstances, are still achieving developmental milestones, but following SCI face additional barriers posed by paralysis and the accompanying secondary complications. Advancing technology in rehabilitation is changing the course of how people with spinal cord injury participate in rehabilitation. Technology plays an ever-increasing role in both restorative and compensatory rehabilitative interventions. While the practical or functional needs of the pediatric patient may differ from those of the adult, technology can and does play a role in restoring function for this population. Applications of technology span broad areas, providing improved options for care in grasp and manipulation, seating and mobility, augmentative and alternative communication, electronic aids to daily living, and computer access and use. This article reviews select applications of technology that have great impact on the functional needs of people with spinal cord injury (SCI): therapeutic and functional stimulation, EMG biofeedback and EMG-triggered stimulation, assistive technology for computer access, and implanted functional electrical stimulation systems. Some of these technologies are already in use in the pediatric population, while some are not - yet have great potential for restoring function in this group. The challenges and potential solutions for implementing these technologies in the pediatric population are discussed.

  8. Organochlorine pesticide levels in umbilical cord blood of newborn in Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Mercado, Margarita; Waliszewski, S M; Caba, M; Martínez-Valenzuela, C; Hernández-Chalate, F

    2010-10-01

    Organochlorine pesticides accumulate in lipid rich compartments of organisms. During pregnancy, the compounds pass through the placental barrier appear in cord blood. The aim of this study was to monitor the levels of organochlorine pesticides in 70 umbilical cord blood samples taken during deliveries in Veracruz in 2009. For organochlorine pesticides, only the presence β-HCH (4%, 3.9 μg/L median concentration on wet weight), pp'DDE (100%, 0.7 μg/L) and pp'DDT (4%, 1.4 μg/L) were detected. The total pool of samples divided according to sex of new born babies, showed no statistical differences among median concentrations. The number of deliveries considered as a determinant contamination factor affirmed there were no statistical differences among median concentrations; however pp'DDE levels increased from the one to two childbirth groups. Age of pregnant women as a discriminate factor manifests in a significant increase in contamination levels among first, second and third tertile. In general, umbilical cord blood samples in Veracruz contained organochlorine pesticides, especially pp'DDE, confirming the presence of these compounds in the environment and their transfer from the mother to the developing fetus.

  9. Overcoming Language Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Buda, Yvonne

    1976-01-01

    Many family physicians in Canada experience language and cultural barriers between themselves and their patients. Several aspects of the ensuing problems are described and some practical suggestions for solutions are made. The importance of health education for new Canadians in the family physician's office as well as through the media and community projects is stressed. Imagesp68-ap68-bp70-a PMID:21308059

  10. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Samantha Jane Hindle; Roland Jerome Bainton

    2014-01-01

    The invertebrate blood-brain barrier field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through GPCR signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate blood-brain barrier has recently been shown to require coordinated funct...

  11. Symptomatic epidural lipomatosis of the spinal cord in a child: MR demonstration of spinal cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, 505 Parnassus Av, L-371, University of California-San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States); Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Seccion de Neurorradiologia, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barkovich, James A. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, 505 Parnassus Av, L-371, University of California-San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States); Mateos, Fernando; Simon, Rogelio [Seccion de Neurpediatria, Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , 28041 Madrid (Spain)

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of symptomatic epidural lipomatosis in an 8-year-old girl with Cushing's syndrome secondary to longstanding high-dose steroid therapy for Crohn's disease. MR imaging of the spine revealed massive diffuse epidural fat compressing the entire spinal cord with T2 prolongation in the central gray matter of the cord suggesting ischemic myelopathy. This finding has not been previously demonstrated on imaging. A proposed mechanism underlying these findings is discussed. (orig.)

  12. Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch Therapy on Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    atrophy. Interestingly, there is a clinical phenomenon that stretching can lead to muscle fiber hypertrophy , but that doesn’t appear to be...specific muscle groups) on functional recovery after spinal cord injury in a rat model. We have undertaken these studies because of an observation we...spinal cord injury, locomotor recovery, physical therapy, muscle stretch, joint range- of-motion, rat. Overall Project Summary: In this, the

  13. Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch Therapy on Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    2. Shown are stereotypic patterns of clonus (1) and spasms (2) recorded from muscles in the limb contralateral to the one being stretched. The clonus...therapy maneuvers involving force or torque applied to specific muscle groups) on functional recovery after spinal cord injury in a rat model. We have...situation. Key Words: spinal cord injury, locomotor recovery, physical therapy, muscle stretch, joint range- of-motion, rat. Overall Project Summary

  14. Spinal cord infarction: a rare cause of paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sonali; Naidoo, Khimara; Thomas, Peter

    2014-06-25

    Spinal cord infarction is rare and represents a diagnostic challenge for many physicians. There are few reported cases worldwide with a prevalence of 1.2% of all strokes. Circulation to the spinal cord is supplied by a rich anastomosis. The anterior spinal artery supplies the anterior two thirds of the spinal cord and infarction to this area is marked by paralysis, spinothalamic sensory deficit and loss of sphincter control depending on where the lesion is. Treatment of spinal cord infarction focuses on rehabilitation with diverse outcomes. This report presents a case of acute spinal cord infarction with acquisition of MRI to aid diagnosis.

  15. Imaging diagnosis--spinal cord histiocytic sarcoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Amanda; Eichelberger, Bunita; Hodo, Carolyn; Cooper, Jocelyn; Porter, Brian

    2015-01-01

    A 12-year-old mixed breed dog was presented for evaluation of progressive paraparesis and ataxia. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed and identified multifocal intradural spinal cord mass lesions. The lesions were hyperintense in T2-weighted sequences, isointense to mildly hyperintense in T1-weighted sequences with strong contrast enhancement of the intradural lesions and spinal cord meninges. Spinal cord neoplasia was suspected. A diagnosis of intramedullary spinal cord histiocytic sarcoma, confined to the central nervous system, was confirmed histopathologically. Spinal cord histiocytic sarcoma is a rare neoplasm, but should be included in the differential diagnosis for dogs with clinical signs of myelopathy.

  16. Melatonin lowers edema after spinal cord injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Li; Xiao Chen; Suchi Qiao; Xinwei Liu; Chang Liu; Degang Zhu; Jiacan Su; Zhiwei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin has been shown to diminish edema in rats. Melatonin can be used to treat spinal cord injury. This study presumed that melatonin could relieve spinal cord edema and examined how it might act. Our experiments found that melatonin (100 mg/kg, i.p.) could reduce the water content of the spinal cord, and suppress the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial ifbrillary acidic protein after spinal cord injury. This suggests that the mechanism by which melatonin alleviates the damage to the spinal cord by edema might be related to the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial ifbrillary acidic protein.

  17. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

  18. Programmed management of acute cervical cord trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R J; Bryk, J P; Yashon, D; Albin, M S; Demian, Y K

    Results in ten patients admitted with the diagnosis of complete traumatic quadriplegia and with fracture-dislocation of the cervical spine are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on aggressive emergency surgical treatment of these lesions such as tracheostomy, laminectomy and cord cooling, incorporated into a detailed protocol of overall management.

  19. Thyroid carcinoma with spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, L D; Ditchek, N T

    1981-03-06

    Characteristics of cases of spinal cord compression from metastatic thyroid carcinoma show that this rare complication is not necessarily a preterminal event. It seems to have some propensity to occur during withdrawal of thyroid suppressive therapy in preparation for radioactive iodine treatment.

  20. Cord entanglement in monoamniotic twin pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyndrup, J; Schouenborg, Lars Øland

    1987-01-01

    Monoamniotic twin pregnancy involves a heavy risk of fatal umbilical cord entanglement. Two cases are reported. In the first case, both twins were found dead in the 36th week, and the monoamnionicity was recognized at birth. In the second case, the monoamnionicity was discovered during...

  1. Spinal cord stimulation in chronic pain syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Vaarwerk, IAM; Staal, MJ

    1998-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used for more than 30 years now, and although it has shown to be effective under certain well-described conditions of chronic pain, conclusive evidence on its effectiveness is still sparse. There is a need for more prospective and methodological good studies, i

  2. Histamine release from cord blood basophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bent Windelborg; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg; Herlin, Troels

    1990-01-01

    The histamine release (HR) after challenge with anti-IgE, concanavalin A, N-formyl-met-leu-phe and the calcium ionophore A23187 from 97 cord blood samples was determined by a microfiber-based assay. Maximum HR with anti-IgE showed great inter-individual variation (median: 20.5; range: 1-104 ng...

  3. Schwann cells for spinal cord repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oudega M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex nature of spinal cord injury appears to demand a multifactorial repair strategy. One of the components that will likely be included is an implant that will fill the area of lost nervous tissue and provide a growth substrate for injured axons. Here we will discuss the role of Schwann cells (SCs in cell-based, surgical repair strategies of the injured adult spinal cord. We will review key studies that showed that intraspinal SC grafts limit injury-induced tissue loss and promote axonal regeneration and myelination, and that this response can be improved by adding neurotrophic factors or anti-inflammatory agents. These results will be compared with several other approaches to the repair of the spinal cord. A general concern with repair strategies is the limited functional recovery, which is in large part due to the failure of axons to grow across the scar tissue at the distal graft-spinal cord interface. Consequently, new synaptic connections with spinal neurons involved in motor function are not formed. We will highlight repair approaches that did result in growth across the scar and discuss the necessity for more studies involving larger, clinically relevant types of injuries, addressing this specific issue. Finally, this review will reflect on the prospect of SCs for repair strategies in the clinic.

  4. Spinal cord grey matter segmentation challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, Ferran; Ashburner, John; Blaiotta, Claudia; Brosch, Tom; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Cardoso, Manuel Jorge; Conrad, Benjamin N; Datta, Esha; Dávid, Gergely; Leener, Benjamin De; Dupont, Sara M; Freund, Patrick; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M Gandini; Grussu, Francesco; Henry, Roland; Landman, Bennett A; Ljungberg, Emil; Lyttle, Bailey; Ourselin, Sebastien; Papinutto, Nico; Saporito, Salvatore; Schlaeger, Regina; Smith, Seth A; Summers, Paul; Tam, Roger; Yiannakas, Marios C; Zhu, Alyssa; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-03-07

    An important image processing step in spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging is the ability to reliably and accurately segment grey and white matter for tissue specific analysis. There are several semi- or fully-automated segmentation methods for cervical cord cross-sectional area measurement with an excellent performance close or equal to the manual segmentation. However, grey matter segmentation is still challenging due to small cross-sectional size and shape, and active research is being conducted by several groups around the world in this field. Therefore a grey matter spinal cord segmentation challenge was organised to test different capabilities of various methods using the same multi-centre and multi-vendor dataset acquired with distinct 3D gradient-echo sequences. This challenge aimed to characterize the state-of-the-art in the field as well as identifying new opportunities for future improvements. Six different spinal cord grey matter segmentation methods developed independently by various research groups across the world and their performance were compared to manual segmentation outcomes, the present gold-standard. All algorithms provided good overall results for detecting the grey matter butterfly, albeit with variable performance in certain quality-of-segmentation metrics. The data have been made publicly available and the challenge web site remains open to new submissions. No modifications were introduced to any of the presented methods as a result of this challenge for the purposes of this publication.

  5. Arrest—Individual Treatment with Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jensen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Each year, thousands of children incur brain damage that results in lifelong sequelae. Therefore, based on experimental evidence, we explored the therapeutic potential of human cord blood, known to contain stem cells, to examine the functional neuroregeneration in a child with cerebral palsy after cardiac arrest. The boy, whose cord blood was stored at birth, was 2.5 years old and normally developed when global ischemic brain damage occurred resulting in a persistent vegetative state. Nine weeks later, he received autologous cord blood (91.7 mL, cryopreserved, 5.75×10e8 mononuclear cells intravenously. Active rehabilitation (physio- and ergotherapy was provided daily, follow-up at 2, 5, 12, 24, 30, and 40 months. At 2-months follow-up the boy’s motor control improved, spastic paresis was largely reduced, and eyesight was recovered, as did the electroencephalogram. He smiled when played with, was able to sit and to speak simple words. At 40 months, independent eating, walking in gait trainer, crawling, and moving from prone position to free sitting were possible, and there was significantly improved receptive and expressive speech competence (four-word sentences, 200 words. This remarkable functional neuroregeneration is difficult to explain by intense active rehabilitation alone and suggests that autologous cord blood transplantation may be an additional and causative treatment of pediatric cerebral palsy after brain damage.

  6. Sleep disordered breathing following spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Jennum, Poul; Laub, Michael

    2009-01-01

    with SCI, especially with regard to obstructive sleep apnea. In addition, there is a correlation between the incidence of sleep disturbances and the spinal cord level injured, age, body mass index, neck circumference, abdominal girth, and use of sedating medications. Regulation of respiration is dependent...

  7. Vocational perspectives after spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonherr, MC; Groothoff, JW; Mulder, GA; Eisma, WH; Schönherr, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To give insight into the vocational situation several years after a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and describe the personal experiences and unmet needs; to give an overview of health and functional status per type of SCI and their relationship with employment status. Design: Descript

  8. In-vivo spinal cord deformation in flexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing; Dougherty, Lawrence; Margulies, Susan S.

    1997-05-01

    Traumatic mechanical loading of the head-neck complex results cervical spinal cord injury when the distortion of the cord is sufficient to produce functional or structural failure of the cord's neural and/or vascular components. Characterizing cervical spinal cord deformation during physiological loading conditions is an important step to defining a comprehensive injury threshold associated with acute spinal cord injury. In this study, in vivo quasi- static deformation of the cervical spinal cord during flexion of the neck in human volunteers was measured using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of motion with spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM). A custom-designed device was built to guide the motion of the neck and enhance more reproducibility. the SPAMM pulse sequence labeled the tissue with a series of parallel tagging lines. A single- shot gradient-recalled-echo sequence was used to acquire the mid-sagittal image of the cervical spine. A comparison of the tagged line pattern in each MR reference and deformed image pair revealed the distortion of the spinal cord. The results showed the cervical spinal cord elongates during head flexion. The elongation experienced by the spinal cord varies linearly with head flexion, with the posterior surface of the cord stretching more than the anterior surface. The maximal elongation of the cord is about 12 percent of its original length.

  9. Spinal cord injury reveals multilineage differentiation of ependymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meletis, Konstantinos; Barnabé-Heider, Fanie; Carlén, Marie; Evergren, Emma; Tomilin, Nikolay; Shupliakov, Oleg; Frisén, Jonas

    2008-07-22

    Spinal cord injury often results in permanent functional impairment. Neural stem cells present in the adult spinal cord can be expanded in vitro and improve recovery when transplanted to the injured spinal cord, demonstrating the presence of cells that can promote regeneration but that normally fail to do so efficiently. Using genetic fate mapping, we show that close to all in vitro neural stem cell potential in the adult spinal cord resides within the population of ependymal cells lining the central canal. These cells are recruited by spinal cord injury and produce not only scar-forming glial cells, but also, to a lesser degree, oligodendrocytes. Modulating the fate of ependymal progeny after spinal cord injury may offer an alternative to cell transplantation for cell replacement therapies in spinal cord injury.

  10. Spinal cord injury reveals multilineage differentiation of ependymal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Meletis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury often results in permanent functional impairment. Neural stem cells present in the adult spinal cord can be expanded in vitro and improve recovery when transplanted to the injured spinal cord, demonstrating the presence of cells that can promote regeneration but that normally fail to do so efficiently. Using genetic fate mapping, we show that close to all in vitro neural stem cell potential in the adult spinal cord resides within the population of ependymal cells lining the central canal. These cells are recruited by spinal cord injury and produce not only scar-forming glial cells, but also, to a lesser degree, oligodendrocytes. Modulating the fate of ependymal progeny after spinal cord injury may offer an alternative to cell transplantation for cell replacement therapies in spinal cord injury.

  11. Klatskin tumor with spermatic cord metastasis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Hsu; Chuang, Cheng-Keng; Ng, Kwai-Fong; Liao, Shuen-Kuei

    2009-01-01

    Malignant spermatic cord tumor is quite uncommon. Metastatic spermatic cord tumor is even rarer. Here we report a case of metastatic spermatic cord tumor from a common hepatic duct tumor (Klatskin tumor). A 38-year-old man presented with right scrotal enlargement and chronic testicular pain. He had a Klatskin tumor (cholangiocarcinoma) stage IIIa, and underwent an extended right hepatectomy with resection of the extrahepatic bile duct, and portal vein and reconstruction by Roux-en-y hepatico-jejunostomy one year before this presentation. Scrotal ultrasound revealed a moderate hydrocele with clean content. Scrotal exploration showed turbid fluid and a fibrotic hyperemic spermatic cord. Excision biopsy of the spermatic cord was done, and the pathology revealed adenocarcinoma. The primary cholangiocarcinoma tumor and the spermatic cord tumor showed identical histologic patterns. Klatskin tumor with spermatic cord metastasis was diagnosed. To our knowledge, this case represents the first such report in the literature.

  12. Cortical gene expression in spinal cord injury and repair: insight into the functional complexity of the neural regeneration program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eKruse

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI results in the formation of a fibrous scar acting as a growth barrier for regenerating axons at the lesion site. We have previously shown (Klapka et al., 2005 that transient suppression of the inhibitory lesion scar in rat spinal cord leads to long distance axon regeneration, retrograde rescue of axotomized cortical motoneurons and improvement of locomotor function. Here we applied a systemic approach to investigate for the first time specific and dynamic alterations in the cortical gene expression profile following both thoracic SCI and regeneration-promoting anti-scarring treatment (AST. In order to monitor cortical gene expression we carried out microarray analyses using total RNA isolated from layer V/VI of rat sensorimotor cortex at 1-60 days post-operation (dpo. We demonstrate that cortical neurons respond to injury by massive changes in gene expression, starting as early as 1 dpo. AST, in turn, results in profound modifications of the lesion-induced expression profile. The treatment attenuates SCI-triggered transcriptional changes of genes related to inhibition of axon growth and impairment of cell survival, while upregulating the expression of genes associated with axon outgrowth, cell protection and neural development. Thus, AST not only modifies the local environment impeding spinal cord regeneration by reduction of fibrous scarring in the injured spinal cord, but, in addition, strikingly changes the intrinsic capacity of cortical pyramidal neurons towards enhanced cell maintenance and axonal regeneration.

  13. Thermal barrier coating materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Clarke

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Improved thermal barrier coatings (TBCs will enable future gas turbines to operate at higher gas temperatures. Considerable effort is being invested, therefore, in identifying new materials with even better performance than the current industry standard, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ. We review recent progress and suggest that an integrated strategy of experiment, intuitive arguments based on crystallography, and simulation may lead most rapidly to the development of new TBC materials.

  14. Meningeal cells and glia establish a permissive environment for axon regeneration after spinal cord injury in newts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odelberg Shannon J

    2011-01-01

    uncover an important role for meningeal and glial cells in facilitating axon regeneration. Given that these cell types interact to form inhibitory barriers in mammals, identifying the mechanisms underlying their permissive behaviors in the newt will provide new insights for improving spinal cord regeneration in mammals.

  15. Spinal Cord Blood Flow after Ischemic Preconditioning in a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Zvara

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord blood flow after ischemic preconditioning is poorly characterized. This study is designed to evaluate spinal cord blood flow patterns in animals after acute ischemic preconditioning. Experiment 1: After a laminectomy and placement of a laser Doppler probe over the lumbar spinal cord to measure spinal cord blood flow, 16 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups: ischemic preconditioning (IPC, n = 8, and control (CTRL, n = 8. Rats in the CTRL and the IPC groups were subjected to 12 min of ischemia directly followed by 60 min of reperfusion. IPC rats received 3 min of IPC and 30 min of reperfusion prior to the 12-min insult period. Experiment 2: After instrumentation, the rats were randomized into three groups: control (CTRL, n = 7, ischemic preconditioning (IPC, n = 7, and time control (TC, n = 4. Rats in the CTRL and the IPC groups were subjected to the same ischemia and reperfusion protocol as above. The TC group was anesthetized for the same time period as the CTRL and the IPC groups, but had no ischemic intervention. Microspheres were injected at baseline and at 15 and 60 min into the final reperfusion. All rats were euthanized and tissue harvested for spinal cord blood flow analysis. In Experiment 1, there was a slight, significant difference in spinal cord blood flow during the ischemic period; however, this difference soon disappeared during reperfusion. In experiment 2, there was no difference in blood flow at any experimental time. The results of these experiments demonstrate that IPC slightly enhances blood flow to the spinal cord during ischemia; however, this effect is not sustained during the reperfusion period.

  16. Expectations, Worries and Wishes: The Challenges of Returning to Home after Initial Hospital Rehabilitation for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Bodil Bjørnshave; Bjerrum, Merete; Angel, Sanne

    2014-01-01

    Literature highlights the barriers and problems that individuals who sustain traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) meet when they attempt to resume everyday life after hospital rehabilitation. However, what do patients think about before returning home, and what should professionals encourage...... patients to address while the patient is hospitalized in order to balance the patient’s expectations and to reveal what is of importance to the patient. This qualitative study explores the expectations, wishes and worries patients have before they return home after hospital rehabilitation due to TSCI....... Eight Danish residents aged 25-75 years, admitted for initial rehabilitation at the Spinal Cord Injury Center of Western Denmark, participated in an individual interview before returning home. The transcribed interviews were analyzed according to inductive content analysis. Transversal analyses revealed...

  17. Barriers to and facilitators of sports participation for people with physical disabilities: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaarsma, E A; Dijkstra, P U; Geertzen, J H B; Dekker, R

    2014-12-01

    Most people with physical disabilities do not participate in sports regularly, which could increase the chances of developing secondary health conditions. Therefore, knowledge about barriers to and facilitators of sports participation is needed. Barriers and facilitators for people with physical disabilities other than amputation or spinal cord injuries (SCI) are unknown. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the literature focusing on barriers to and facilitators of sports participation for all people with various physical disabilities. Four databases were searched using MeSH terms and free texts up to April 2012. The inclusion criteria were articles focusing on people with physical disabilities, sports and barriers and/or facilitators. The exclusion criteria were articles solely focusing on people with cognitive disabilities, sensory impairments or disabilities related to a recent organ transplant or similar condition. Fifty-two articles were included in this review, with 27 focusing on people with SCI. Personal barriers were disability and health; environmental barriers were lack of facilities, transport and difficulties with accessibility. Personal facilitators were fun and health, and the environmental facilitator was social contacts. Experiencing barriers to and facilitators of sports participation depends on age and type of disability and should be considered when advising people about sports. The extent of sports participation for people with physical disabilities also increases with the selection of the most appropriate sport.

  18. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Jane Hindle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The invertebrate blood-brain barrier field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through GPCR signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate blood-brain barrier has recently been shown to require coordinated function of all layers of the compound barrier structure, analogous to signaling between the layers of the vertebrate neurovascular unit. These findings strengthen the notion that many blood-brain barrier mechanisms are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest that novel findings in invertebrate model organisms will have a significant impact on the understanding of vertebrate BBB functions. In this vein, important roles in coordinating localized and systemic signaling to dictate organism development and growth are beginning to show how the blood-brain barrier can govern whole animal physiologies. This includes novel functions of blood-brain barrier gap junctions in orchestrating synchronized neuroblast proliferation, and of blood-brain barrier secreted antagonists of insulin receptor signaling. These advancements and others are pushing the field forward in exciting new directions. In this review, we provide a synopsis of invertebrate blood-brain barrier anatomy and physiology, with a focus on insights from the past 5 years, and highlight important areas for future study.

  19. Relationship between Spinal Cord Volume and Spinal Cord Injury due to Spinal Shortening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qiu

    Full Text Available Vertebral column resection is associated with a risk of spinal cord injury. In the present study, using a goat model, we aimed to investigate the relationship between changes in spinal cord volume and spinal cord injury due to spinal shortening, and to quantify the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height in order to clarify a safe limit for shortening. Vertebral column resection was performed at T10 in 10 goats. The spinal cord was shortened until the somatosensory-evoked potential was decreased by 50% from the baseline amplitude or delayed by 10% relative to the baseline peak latency. A wake-up test was performed, and the goats were observed for two days postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the spinal cord volume, T10 height, disc height, osteotomy segment height, and spinal segment height pre- and postoperatively. Two of the 10 goats were excluded, and hence, only data from eight goats were analyzed. The somatosensory-evoked potential of these eight goats demonstrated meaningful changes. With regard to neurologic function, five and three goats were classified as Tarlov grades 5 and 4 at two days postoperatively. The mean shortening distance was 23.6 ± 1.51 mm, which correlated with the d-value (post-pre of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment (r = 0.95, p < 0.001 and with the height of the T10 body (r = 0.79, p = 0.02. The mean d-value (post-pre of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment was 142.87 ± 0.59 mm3 (range, 142.19-143.67 mm3. The limit for shortening was approximately 106% of the vertebral height. The mean volumes of the osteotomy and spinal segments did not significantly change after surgery (t = 0.310, p = 0.765 and t = 1.241, p = 0.255, respectively. Thus, our results indicate that the safe limit for shortening can be calculated using the change in spinal cord volume per 1-mm height.

  20. Experimental study on spinal cord injury treated by embryonic spinal cord transplantation and greater omental transposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Dingjun(郝定均); Zheng Yonghong(郑永宏); Yuan Fuyong(袁福镛); He Liming; Wang Rong; Yuan Yong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical efficacy of the embryonic spinal cellular transplantation and greater omental transposition for treatment of the spinal cord injury in 24 mongrel dogs. Methods: 24 adult mongrel dogs, weighing 10 ~ 13kg,bryonic spinal cellular transplantation and greater omental transposition group (group D). Each group consisted of 6 dogs. SEP(somatosensory evoked potential) and MEP (motor evoked potential) of the spinal cord were examed prior to the spinal cord injury and 2 months after the treatment to observe the changes of the animals' behavior. All dogs were killed 2 months after surgery and the spinal cord sections were obtained from T12 to L1 level for pathological analysis and observation under the electron microscope.Results: There was an obvious difference in the spinal somatosensory evoked potential and the motor evoked potential between the group D and the other three groups (group A, B, and C). Recovery of the behavior was noted. The spinal cells had survived for two months following the transplantation. Conclusion: Transplantation of the embryonic spinal cell and greater omentum for treatment of the spinal cord injury in dogs can gain a better outcome than the other groups in behavior and spinal somatosensory and motor evoked potential, but the further study is still essential to confirm its clinical efficacy.

  1. Spinal cord stimulation: Background and clinical application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain refractory to conventional treatment. SCS treatment consists of one or more leads implanted in the epidural space of the spinal canal, connected to an implantable pulse generator (IPG). Each lead carries...... for the treatment include pregnancy, coagulopathy, severe addiction to psychoactive substances, and lack of ability to cooperate (e.g. due to active psychosis or cognitive impairment). Most common complications to the treatment include lead migration, lead breakage, infection, pain over the implant, and dural...... is described in detail and illustrated with a series of intraoperative pictures. Finally, indications for SCS are discussed along with some of the controversies surrounding the therapy. Implications The reader is presented with a broad overview of spinal cord stimulation, including the historical...

  2. Transient oedema of the cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartoretti-Schefer, S.; Kollias, S.; Valavanis, A. [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2000-04-01

    Transient but very intense oedema of the cervical spinal cord was observed in two patients with obstruction of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pathways. Both presented with hydrocephalus, one due to an infratentorial obstructing mass and the other due to postmeningitic adhesive obstruction of the outlet foramina of the fourth ventricle. In animal experiments with obstruction of CSF pathways (due to outlet foramina obstruction or to downward tentorial herniation) flattening and stretching of the ependymal cells along the central canal is observed, followed by disruption and splitting of the ependymal lining and then by extracellular oedema of the subependymal tissue. Without treatment, frank cavity formation develops in a fourth stage. In our two patients, however, most probably because of appropriate decompressive therapy, the oedema disappeared completely without a residual spinal cord lesion. (orig.)

  3. Metastatic carcinoid tumour with spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Si; Antwi-Yeboah, Y; Bucur, Sd

    2012-07-01

    Carcinoid tumours are rare with an incidence of 5.25/100,000. They predominantly originate in the gastrointestinal tract (50-60%) or bronchopulmonary system (25-30%). Common sites of metastasis are lymph nodes, liver, lungs and bone. Spinal metastasis are rare, but has been reported in patients with symptoms of spinal cord compression including neurological deficits. We report a rare case of carcinoid metastasis with spinal cord compression, in a 63-year-old man, presenting with a one-year history of back pain without any neurological symptoms. The patient underwent a two-level decompressive laminectomy of T10 and T11 as well as piecemeal tumour resection. Post-operatively the patient made a good recovery without complications.

  4. Percutaneous ultrasound guided umbilical cord blood sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hyup; Choi, B. I.; Kim, C. W.; Youn, B. H.; Shin, H. C.; Kim, S. O. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    This report describes a technique and the result of percutaneous ultrasound-guided umbilical cord blood sampling and its potential use in the management of diagnostic problems in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. This method has been employed in the prenatal assessment of 19 fetuses at risk for chromosomal disorders, fetal hypoxia and hematologic disorders. This simple and rapid procedure offers a safe access to the fetal circulation

  5. Spinal Cord Ischemia Secondary to Hypovolemic Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Jacob YL; Kapoor, Siddhant; Koh, Roy KM; Yang, Eugene WR; Hee, Hwan-Tak

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old male presented with symptoms of spinal cord compression secondary to metastatic prostate cancer. An urgent decompression at the cervical-thoracic region was performed, and there were no complications intraoperatively. Three hours postoperatively, the patient developed acute bilateral lower-limb paralysis (motor grade 0). Clinically, he was in class 3 hypovolemic shock. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, showing no epidural hematoma. He was managed aggressi...

  6. Technical barrier challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李思佳

    2014-01-01

    according to a famouse report,the foreign Technical Barriers to Trade(TBT)have some effects on the exports of the People’s Republic of China.Major findings are as follows:(1)TBT makes it more difficult for China to export;(2)TBT increases the costs of Chinese export commodities;(3)TBT causes friction and confilicts in the international trade;(4)SOME developed countries have moved their phase-outs to China and other developing countries,which have become victims of TBT.

  7. Support or Barrier?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum; Lønsmann, Dorte

    This study offers a critical look at how corporate-level language management influences front-line language practices among employees in three multinational corporations (MNCs) headquartered in Scandinavia. Based on interview and document data, we examine, firstly, what front-line practices...... employees use to cross language boundaries in their everyday work, and, secondly, how these practices relate to top-down language management in the case companies. Our findings show that employees are often dependent on ad hoc and informal solutions in cross- language situations, which leads us...... to a discussion of how a company’s language policy may be seen as both support and a barrier....

  8. [Barrier methods of contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, A; Edelman, D A

    1982-01-01

    Vaginal methods of contraception were the earliest types used and some references to them date back to antiquity. Most of the vaginal contraceptive agents identified by the ancient Greeks, Indians, Japanese, and Chinese have been found in modern laboratory tests to have spermicidal properties, but it is doubtful that the methods were fully reliable or were used by many people. During the 19th century the condom, vaginal spermicides, and diaphragm became available. The development of nonoxynol-9 and other nonirritating but effective spermicidal agents improved vaginal contraceptives greatly by the 1950s, but starting in the 1960s newer methods began to replace the vaginal methods. Interest in barrier methods has been reawakened somewhat by concern about the health effects of hormonal methods. At present all barrier methods leave something to be desired. Failure rates of 3-30% for barrier methods in general have been estimated, but the higher rates are believed due to incorrect or inconsistent use. Theoretical failure rates of condoms and diaphragms have been estimated at 3/100 women-years, but in actual use failure rates may reach 15 for condoms and 13 for diaphragms used with spermicides. Use-effectiveness rates are greatly influenced by motivation. For a variety of reasons, the acceptability of barrier methods is low, especially in developing countries. New developments in spermicidal agents include sperm inhibitors, which impede the fertilizing capacity of sperm rather than attempting a spermicidal effect; a number of such agents have been studied and have proven more effective in animal tests than conventional spermicides. Neosampoon, a new spermicidal foam, has attracted an increasing number of users, especially in developing countries. A new condom, made of thin polymers and containing a standard dose of nonoxynol-9, has been designed to dissolve in the vaginal fluid. Further studies are needed of its acceptability, efficacy, and side effects before it becomes

  9. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Taweel W

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.Keywords: neurogenic bladder, spinal cord injury, urodynamics, intestine, intermittent catheterization

  10. Hydrocele of the spermatic cord; Ultrasonographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Byoung Hee; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Cho, Byung Jae [Samsung Cheil Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ki, Won Woo [Samsung Cheil Hospital, CL women' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    To evaluate the ultrasonographic findings of hydrocele of the spermatic cord. Ultrasonographic findings of twenty patients with surgically (n=7), clinically and ultrasonographically (n=13) proven hydrocele of the spermatic cord were retrospectively analyzed from April 1998 to February 2000. The location size, shape, thickness and regularity of the outer wall, and internal echo of the hydroceles were evaluated. Hydroceles were located on the left side in eleven cases and on the right side in nine cases. Fourteen of 20 hydroceles were situated superior to the testis while the remaining six cases were in the inguinal area. Shapes included oval (n=13) or elongated shape (n=7) with the tapered end toward the inguinal area. The thickness of walls of hydroceles was thin in all cases, but two of 20 hydroceles had irregular walls. Internal echo was anechoic in twelve cases while there were internal echoes in the remaining eight cases, showing septa like echoes in five cases, diffusely hypoechoic in two cases and debris with linear echoes in one case. All hydroceles showed separation from the testis and epididymis. In three cases, change in size during palpation was noted, but there was no ultrasonographic evidence of connection with the peritoneal cavity. There was one other case which showed change in size during ultrasonographic examination. Spermatic cord hydrocele can be effectively diagnosed by ultrasonography based on its specific location and shape. Furthermore, ultrasonography can be useful to exclude hernia, enlargement of the lymph node, or other solid masses.

  11. Umbilical cord blood mercury levels in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiqin Wu,; Chonghuai Yan; Jian Xu; Wei Wu; Hui Li; Xin Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a well-known neurotoxicant.Hg exposure at high levels can harm individuals of all ages.Even low level exposure to Hg can damage the brain of fetuses and young children,and affect their central nervous system and cognitive development.The aims of our study were to measure total Hg levels in infant umbilical cord blood and to investigate the risk factors associated with total Hg cord blood levels in various cities in China.Our goal was to provide clues for the prevention of Hg exposure in utero.The results indicated that the average cord blood mercury levels (CBMLs) were (1.81 ± 1.93) μg/L,which were lower than those found in most previous studies.The concentrations also differed according to geographic region.The CBMLs were not only associated with family economic and living conditions,but also with diet in pregnant women,especially the intake of marine fish,shellfish,poultry,formula milk and fruits.

  12. Evidence-based pathology: umbilical cord coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, T Y

    2010-12-01

    The generation of a pathology test result must be based on criteria that are proven to be acceptably reproducible and clinically relevant to be evidence-based. This review de-constructs the umbilical cord coiling index to illustrate how it can stray from being evidence-based. Publications related to umbilical cord coiling were retrieved and analysed with regard to how the umbilical coiling index was calculated, abnormal coiling was defined and reference ranges were constructed. Errors and other influences that can occur with the measurement of the length of the umbilical cord or of the number of coils can compromise the generation of the coiling index. Definitions of abnormal coiling are not consistent in the literature. Reference ranges defining hypocoiling or hypercoiling have not taken those potential errors or the possible effect of gestational age into account. Even the way numerical test results in anatomical pathology are generated, as illustrated by the umbilical coiling index, warrants a critical analysis into its evidence base to ensure that they are reproducible or free from errors.

  13. Vocal cord hemangioma in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Kanlıkama

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioma is one of the most common benign tumors in the head and neck region. Laryngeal hemangiomas are benign vascular tumors of unknown etiology that arise from subglottic region with stridor in infants. This type also known as congenital laryngeal hemangioma, is the more common. Congenital hemangiomas occur usually in subglottic region and more frequent in girls. Laryngeal hemangioma in adults is a very rare condition and main symptom is hoarseness and breathing difficulties. Adult hemangiomas can be seen in different locations such as the epiglottis, aryepiglottic folds, arytenoids and false and true vocal cords. They are more often of cavernous form and cause hoarseness. In this report we present an adult patient with hemangioma of the left vocal fold and review the literature. Diagnostic investigation revealed a pink-purple mass which was extended from the anterior comissure to the posterior part of true vocal cord and false vocal cord, filling the ventricule and extending to supraglottic region. Direct laryngoscopy was performed, but the lesion was not excised because of its widespread extension in the larynx. J Clin Exp Invest 2010; 2(3: 323-326.

  14. Vocal cord hemangioma in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Kanlıkama

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioma is one of the most common benign tumorsin the head and neck region. Laryngeal hemangiomasare benign vascular tumors of unknown etiology thatarise from subglottic region with stridor in infants. Thistype also known as congenital laryngeal hemangioma, isthe more common. Congenital hemangiomas occur usuallyin subglottic region and more frequent in girls. Laryngealhemangioma in adults is a very rare conditionand main symptom is hoarseness and breathing difficulties.Adult hemangiomas can be seen in different locationssuch as the epiglottis, aryepiglottic folds, arytenoidsand false and true vocal cords. They are more oftenof cavernous form and cause hoarseness. In this reportwe present an adult patient with hemangioma ofthe left vocal fold and review the literature. Diagnosticinvestigation revealed a pink-purple mass which was extendedfrom the anterior comissure to the posterior partof true vocal cord and false vocal cord, filling the ventriculeand extending to supraglottic region. Directlaryngoscopy was performed, but the lesion was not excisedbecause of its widespread extension in the larynx. JClin Exp Invest 2010; 2(1: 91-94

  15. Imaging evaluation of vocal cord paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Magalhaes, Fabiana Pizanni; Dadalto, Gabriela Bijos; Moura, Marina Vimieiro Timponi de [Axial Centro de Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: marcelomgarcia@superig.com.br, e-mail: ce@axialmg.com.br

    2009-09-15

    Vocal cord paralysis is a common cause of hoarseness. It may be secondary to many types of lesions along the cranial nerve X pathway and its branches, particularly the laryngeal recurrent nerves. Despite the idiopathic nature of a great number of cases, imaging methods play a very significant role in the investigation of etiologic factors, such as thyroid and esophagus neoplasias with secondary invasion of the laryngeal recurrent nerves. Other conditions such as aortic and right subclavian artery aneurysms also may be found. The knowledge of local anatomy and related diseases is of great importance for the radiologist, so that he can tailor the examination properly to allow an appropriate diagnosis and therapy planning. Additionally, considering that up to 35% of patients with vocal cord paralysis are asymptomatic, the recognition of radiological findings indicative of this condition is essential for the radiologist who must warn the referring physician on the imaging findings. In the present study, the authors review the anatomy and main diseases related to vocal cord paralysis, demonstrating them through typical cases evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, besides describing radiological findings of laryngeal abnormalities indicative of this condition. (author)

  16. The Blood-Testis Barrier and Male Sexual Dysfunction following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    gavage for 14 days starting 3 hours post-SCI) produced an attenuation of PGE2 production when analyzed at 72 hours post-injury. This effect was... gavage once per day for 10 days starting 3 hours after injury with either 0 (vehicle), 10, 50, or 100 mg/kg of licofelone. To get a representative

  17. Overcoming the Practical Barriers to Spinal Cord Cell Transplantation for ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    anesthesia recovery. Next, animals are transferred to individual cages and monitored at least once daily for food consumption , defecation, and micturition...and Care / Histology Effort: 50% Name: Juanmarco Gutierrez, MD Project Role: MS Student / Lab Associate Contribution to Project: Surgeon...Surgical Assistant / Animal Treatment and Care / Histology Effort: 100% Name: Jason Lamanna Project Role: MD/PhD Student / Lab Associate Contribution to

  18. Overcoming the Practical Barriers to Spinal Cord Cell Transplantation for ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Requirements……………………………………..……5 9. Appendices……………………………………………………………….……6 1 INTRODUCTION: “The present application refines critical details...Emory University, Atlanta, GA 5. Histocompatibility and Cytogenetics Laboratory, Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, GA Introduction: Clinical

  19. The Blood Testis Barrier and Male Sexual Dysfunction following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Abdominal imaging. 2003;28(1):87-91. Epub 2002/12/17. doi: 10.1007/s00261- 001-0180-y. PubMed PMID: 12483393. 5. Hofmann AF. The continuing importance of...Quad chart. NOTE: TRAINING OR FELLOWSHIP AWARDS: Nothing to report COLLABORATIVE AWARDS: For collaborative awards, independent reports are...overload from either SCI induced mild liver toxicity or muscle tissue loss can not be ruled out. Similar changes in bile acid metabolism could

  20. Overcoming the Practical Barriers to Spinal Cord Cell Transplantation for ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    proliferation marker bromodeoxyuridine (brdU; green) in vitro following 60 days in culture. Cell nuclei are counterstained with ethidium bromide (red) (B-G... remove virally inserted DNA after reprogramming. We attempted this with adult Yucatan minipig fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Amaxa Dermal Fibroblast...vertebrae overlying C3-C5 or L2-L4 segments are removed using rongeurs and a surgical drill. 5. Placement of the Spinal Derrick We call Spinal Derrick

  1. Control of demyelination for recovery of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bo; REN Xian-jun

    2008-01-01

    Since loss of of oligodendrocytes and consequent demyelination of spared axons severely impair the functional recovery of injured spinal cord,it is reasonably expected that the reduction of oligodendroglial death and enhanced remyelination of demyelinated axons will have a therapeutic potential to treat spinal cord injury.Amelioration of axonal myelination in the injured spinal cord is valuable for recovery of the neural function of incompletely injured patients.Here,this article presents an overview about the pathophysiology and mechanism of axonal demyelination in spinal cord injury and discusses its therapeutic significance in the treatment of spinal cord injury.Moreover,it further introduces the recent strategies to improve the axonal myeliantion to facilitate functional recovery of spinal cord injury.

  2. Effect of human neural progenitor cells on injured spinal cord

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guang-hui; BAI Jin-zhu; CAI Qin-lin; LI Xiao-xia; LI Ling-song; SHEN Li

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study whether human neural progenitor cells can differentiate into neural cells in vivo and improve the recovery of injured spinal cord in rats.Methods: Human neural progenitor cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord and the functional recovery of the rats with spinal cord contusion injury was evaluated with Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scale and motor evoked potentials. Additionally, the differentiation of human neural progenitor cells was shown by immunocytochemistry.Results: Human neural progenitor cells developed into functional cells in the injured spinal cord and improved the recovery of injured spinal cord in both locomotor scores and electrophysiological parameters in rats.Conclusions: Human neural progenitor cells can treat injured spinal cord, which may provide a new cell source for research of clinical application.

  3. Umbilical cord blood transplantation: A review of atricles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadi Amoly F

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Interest in umbilical cord blood as an alternative source of hematopietic stem cells is growing rapidly. Umbilical cord blood offers the clinician a source of hematopoietic stem cells that are readily available and rarely contaminated by latent viruses. Moreover, the collection of umbilical cord blood poses no risk to the donor. There is no need for general anesthesia or blood replacement and the procedure causes no discomfort. Current clinical experience suggests that the incidence of GVHD in umbilical cord blood transplantation is low. These results and associated laboratory findings pose intriguing possibilities for the future of umbilical cord blood stem cells in the setting of unrelated donor transplantation. There are other intriguing possibilities for example cord blood may be an optimal source of pluripotential stem cells for use in genetherapy.

  4. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of terminal syringomyelia within spinal cord combined with tethered cord syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-cheng XIE

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical manifestations, imaging characteristics and experience of surgical treatment of spinal cord terminal syringomyelia with tethered cord syndrome (TCS.  Methods and Results Clinical data of 10 patients with spinal cord syringomyelia combined with TCS surgically treated under microscope from January 1999 to March 2014 in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. There were 3 males and 7 females with average age of 15.06 years old (ranged from 2 to 35 years old. The course of disease ranged from 3 months to 20 years (average 42.17 months. Among those patients, one patient presented hydromyelia, 8 patients suffered from meningeal cyst within the sacral canal, and one patient were concurrent with sacral dermal sinus. The weakness of lower extremities, especially distal limbs, was the main clinical manifestation. Five patients were accompanied with bowel and bladder dysfunction and 5 patients with sensory disturbance below the level of syringomyelia, especially hypesthesia. Preoperative MRI showed conus medullaris disappeared at the end of spinal cord, and there was fluid signal in the lower spinal cord with hypo-intensity signal in T1WI and hyper-intensity signal in T2WI without enhancement. All patients underwent surgical procedures. Under microscope, filum terminale was cut off, drainage was performed, meningeal cyst within the sacral canal was removed, and tethered cord was released. The success rate of operations was 100%. The duration of surgery ranged from 1.52 to 3.07 h (average 2.15 h, with average intraoperative blood loss 220 ml (ranged from 100 to 410 ml. The tethering filum had been totally resected and histological examination showed typical filum tissue in all cases. No operative complication was found. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS score was decreased, and the lower limbs weakness as well as bowel and bladder dysfunction was gradually relieved after operation. The period of follow-up was ranged from 6

  5. Phrenic nerve afferents elicited cord dorsum potential in the cat cervical spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davenport Paul W

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diaphragm has sensory innervation from mechanoreceptors with myelinated axons entering the spinal cord via the phrenic nerve that project to the thalamus and somatosensory cortex. It was hypothesized that phrenic nerve afferent (PnA projection to the central nervous system is via the spinal dorsal column pathway. Results A single N1 peak of the CDP was found in the C4 and C7 spinal segments. Three peaks (N1, N2, and N3 were found in the C5 and C6 segments. No CDP was recorded at C8 dorsal spinal cord surface in cats. Conclusion These results demonstrate PnA activation of neurons in the cervical spinal cord. Three populations of myelinated PnA (Group I, Group II, and Group III enter the cat's cervical spinal segments that supply the phrenic nerve

  6. Vocal Cord Paralysis and its Etiologies: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Javad Seyed Toutounchi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vocal cord paralysis is a common symptom of numerous diseases and it may be due to neurogenic or mechanical fixation of the cords. Paralysis of the vocal cords is just a symptom of underlying disease in some cases; so, clinical diagnosis of the underlying cause leading to paralysis of the vocal cords is important. This study evaluates the causes of vocal cord paralysis.Methods: In a prospective study, 45 patients with paralyzed vocal cord diagnosis were examined by tests such as examination of the pharynx, larynx, esophagus, thyroid, cervical, lung, and mediastinum, brain and heart by diagnostic imaging to investigate the cause vocal cord paralysis. The study was ended by diagnosing the reason of vocal cord paralysis at each stage of the examination and the clinical studies.Results: The mean duration of symptoms was 18.95±6.50 months. The reason for referral was phonation changes (97.8% and aspiration (37.8% in the subjects. There was bilateral paralysis in 6.82%, left paralysis in 56.82% and right in 63.36% of subjects. The type of vocal cord placement was midline in 52.8%, paramedian in 44.4% and lateral in 2.8% of the subjects. The causes of vocal cords paralysis were idiopathic paralysis (31.11%, tumors (31.11%, surgery (28.89%, trauma, brain problems, systemic disease and other causes (2.2%.Conclusion: An integrated diagnostic and treatment program is necessary for patients with vocal cord paralysis. Possibility of malignancy should be excluded before marking idiopathic reason to vocal cord paralysis.

  7. Extensive Spinal Cord Injury following Staphylococcus aureus Septicemia and Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas De Schryver

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis is rarely complicated by spinal cord involvement in adults. We report a case of Staphylococcus aureus septicemia complicated by meningitis and extensive spinal cord injury, leading to ascending brain stem necrosis and death. This complication was investigated by magnetic resonance imaging which demonstrated intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted images and by multimodality evoked potentials. Postmortem microscopic examination confirmed that the extensive spinal cord injury was of ischemic origin, caused by diffuse leptomeningitis and endarteritis.

  8. Umbilical cord blood transplantation: A review of atricles

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Interest in umbilical cord blood as an alternative source of hematopietic stem cells is growing rapidly. Umbilical cord blood offers the clinician a source of hematopoietic stem cells that are readily available and rarely contaminated by latent viruses. Moreover, the collection of umbilical cord blood poses no risk to the donor. There is no need for general anesthesia or blood replacement and the procedure causes no discomfort. Current clinical experience suggests that the incidence of GVHD i...

  9. Nanomedicine Faces Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Debbage

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted nanoparticles have the potential to improve drug delivery efficiencies by more than two orders of magnitude, from the ~ 0.1% which is common today. Most pharmacologically agents on the market today are small drug molecules, which diffuse across the body’s blood-tissue barriers and distribute not only into the lesion, but into almost all organs. Drug actions in the non-lesion organs are an inescapable part of the drug delivery principle, causing “side-effects” which limit the maximally tolerable doses and result in inadequate therapy of many lesions. Nanoparticles only cross barriers by design, so side-effects are not built into their mode of operation. Delivery rates of almost 90% have been reported. This review examines the significance of these statements and checks how far they need qualification. What type of targeting is required? Is a single targeting sufficient? What new types of clinical challenge, such as immunogenicity, might attend the use of targeted nanoparticles?

  10. Higgs vacua behind barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Tamarit, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Scenarios in which the Higgs vacuum arises radiatively and separated from the origin by a potential barrier at zero temperature are known to be attainable in models with extra singlet scalars, which in the limit of zero barrier height give rise to Coleman-Weinberg realizations of electroweak symmetry breaking. However, this requires large values of Higgs-portal couplings or a large number N of singlets. This is quantified in detail by considering, for varying N, the full two-loop effective potential at zero temperature, as well as finite temperature effects including the dominant two-loop corrections due to the singlets. Despite the large couplings, two-loop effects near the electroweak scale are under control, and actually better behaved in models with larger couplings yet fewer singlets. Strong first-order phase transitions are guaranteed even in the Coleman-Weinberg scenarios. Cubic Higgs couplings and Higgs associated-production cross sections exhibit deviations from the Standard Model predictions which c...

  11. Spinal cord decompression reduces rat neural cell apoptosis secondary to spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kan XU; Qi-xin CHEN; Fang-cai LI; Wei-shan CHEN; Min LIN; Qiong-hua WET

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether spinal cord decompression plays a role in neural cell apoptosis after spinal cord injury. Study design: We used an animal model of compressive spinal cord injury with incomplete paraparesis to evaluate neural cell apoptosis after decompression. Apoptosis and cellular damage were assessed by staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labelling (TUNEL) and immunostaining for caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Bax. Methods: Experiments were conducted in male Spragne-Dawley rats (n=78) weighing 300-400 g. The spinal cord was compressed posteriorly at T10 level using a custom-made screw for 6 h, 24 h or continuously, followed by decompression by removal of the screw. The rats were sacrificed on Day 1 or 3 or in Week 1 or 4 post-decompression. The spinal cord was removed en bloc and examined at lesion site, rostral site and caudal site (7.5 mm away from the lesion). Results: The numbers of TUNEL-positive cells were significantly lower at the site of decompression on Day l, and also at the rostral and caudal sites between Day 3 and Week 4 post-decompression, compared with the persistently compressed group. The numbers of cells between Day 1 and Week 4 were immunoreactive to caspase-3 and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)-associated X-protein (Bax), but not to Bcl-2, correlated with those of TUNEL-positive cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that decompression reduces neural cell apoptosis following spinal cord injury.

  12. Effects of Yishendaluo decoction on blood-brain barrier integrity in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanqing Wu; Ying Gao; Lingqun Zhu; Yonghong Gao; Dongmei Zhang; Lixia Lou; Yanfang Yan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of Yishendaluo decoction on the loss of blood-brain barrier integrity in mice exhibiting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.To this end,we used real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR to measure the levels of mRNAs specific to the T cell markers CD4 and CD8,and the monocyte marker CD11b.In addition,we used Evans blue dye extravasation in the spinal cord and brain tissues to assess blood-brain barrier permeability.The results indicated that an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability was associated with an increase in CD4,CD8 and CD11b mRNA expression in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.Yishendaluo decoction administration significantly reversed inflammatory cell accumulation in cerebral tissues of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

  13. Synthetic Eelgrass Oil Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, T. G.

    2013-05-01

    Although surviving in situ micro-organisms eventually consume spilled oil, extensive inundation of shore biota by oil requires cleanup to enable ecological recovery within normal time scales. Although effective in calm seas and quiet waters, oil is advected over and under conventional curtain oil booms by wave actions and currents when seas are running. Most sorbent booms are not reusable, and are usually disposed of in landfills, creating excessive waste. A new concept is proposed for a floating oil barrier, to be positioned off vulnerable coasts, to interdict, contain, and sequester spilled oil, which can then be recovered and the barrier reused. While conventional oil boom designs rely principally on the immiscibility of oil in water and its relative buoyancy, the new concept barrier avoids the pitfalls of the former by taking advantage of the synergistic benefits of numerous fluid and material properties, including: density, buoyancy, elasticity, polarity, and surface area to volume ratio. Modeled after Zostera marina, commonly called eelgrass, the new barrier, referred to as synthetic eelgrass (SE), behaves analogously. Eelgrass has very long narrow, ribbon-like, leaves which support periphyton, a complex matrix of algae and heterotrophic microbes, which position themselves there to extract nutrients from the seawater flowing past them. In an analogous fashion, oil on, or in, seawater, which comes in contact with SE, is adsorbed on the surface and sequestered there. Secured to the bottom, in shoal waters, SE rises to the surface, and, if the tide is low enough, floats on the sea surface down wind, or down current to snare floating oil. The leaves of SE, called filaments, consist of intrinsically buoyant strips of ethylene methyl acrylate, aka EMA. EMA, made of long chain, saturated, hydrocarbon molecules with nearly homogeneous electron charge distributions, is a non-polar material which is oleophilic and hydrophobic. Oil must be in close proximity to the

  14. Linfangioma de cordão espermático Lymphangioma of the spermatic cord

    OpenAIRE

    Antônio Carlos Ligocki Campos; Marco Aurélio Raeder da Costa; Paolo Rogério de Oliveira Salvalaggio; Luiz Fernando Bleggi Torres; Júlio Cézar Uili Coelho

    1998-01-01

    We describe a case of a 22-year-old man that had been submitted to a left herniorraphy 11 years previously to the present admission. He returned to our hospital with another mass in the same side of the groin. At operation, several small cysts linked to the spermatic cord were demonstrated. At this time, an histological exam demonstrated the presence of conective tissue. The final histology report confirmed the diagnosis of lymphangioma of the spermatic cord in the groin region. The patient w...

  15. GIANT LIPOMA OF THE SPERMATIC CORD: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipoma is a common soft tissue benign tumor. Lipomas of the spermatic cord are rare. We present here a case of giant lipoma of the spermatic cord presented as an irreducible inguinal hernia and its surgical management. The giant lipoma was completely excised and removed in toto. Giant lipoma of the spermatic cord is a large, irreducible, complete, sac-less and indirect fatty inguinal hernia. So, to avoid medico-legal consequences, giant lipoma of the spermatic cord should also be considered as hernias. [Natl J Med Res 2014; 4(2.000: 170-171

  16. Measurement of normal cervical spinal cord in metrizamide CT myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Fumio; Koyama, Tsunemaro; Aii, Heihachirou

    1985-04-01

    The shape of the spinal cord is the most important factor in diagnosis of spinal disorders by metrizamide CT myelography (met. CT). Even in cases where the spinal cord looks normal in shape its size might be abnormal, for example in cases with spinal cord atrophy, syringomyelia, intramedullary tumor and several other conditions. In detecting the slightest abnormality in such cases, it is absolutely necessary to have in hand the knowledge of the nomal size of the spinal cord at each level. We measured, therefore, the sagittal and transverse diameters of the cervical spinal cord in 55 patients with no known lesions on met. CT. Comparing our results with those by others, we found some differences as to the size of the spinal cord. We assume that these differences are due to the differences in resolution of the CT scanners used. The size of the spinal cord tends to measure larger with a CT scanner with high resolution than with others. Previous authors reported that the size of the spinal cord would vary by window center settings. Our experimental results indicate, however, that window center settings do not significantly affect the measurements. It is concluded that the normal values of the spinal cord dimensions at each level somewhat differ by CT equipments used. One should have normal values with one's own equipment in hand in order to take full advantage of this sophisticated diagnostic technique. (author).

  17. Does repair of spinal cord injury follow the evolutionary theory?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhicheng Zhang; Fang Li; Tiansheng Sun

    2012-01-01

    Lower vertebrates, such as fish and amphibians, and higher vertebrates in embryonic development can acquire complete regeneration of complex body structures, including the spinal cord, an important part of the central nervous system. However, with species evolution and development, this regenerative capacity gradually weakens and even disappears, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We explored the differences in mechanisms of spinal cord regeneration capability between lower and higher vertebrates, investigated differences in their cellular and molecular mechanisms and between the spinal cord structures of lower vertebrates and mammals, such as rat and monkey, to search for theoretical evidence and therapeutic targets for nerve regeneration in human spinal cord.

  18. Cord blood transplantation: can we make it better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leland eMetheny

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord blood is an established source of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation. It enjoys several advantages over bone marrow or peripheral blood, including increased tolerance for Human Leukocyte Antigen mismatches, decreased incidence of graft-versus-host disease, and easy availability. Unrelated cord blood does have limitations, however, especially in the treatment of adults. In the 24 years since the first umbilical cord blood transplant was performed, significant progress has been made, but delayed hematopoietic engraftment and increased treatment related mortality remain obstacles to widespread use. Here we summarize the latest results of unrelated cord blood transplants, and review strategies under investigation to improve clinical outcomes.

  19. Sex cord-gonadal stromal tumor of the rete testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Kamran P; Dalton, Rory R; Brown, James A

    2009-01-01

    A 34-year-old tetraplegic patient with suppurative epididymitis was found on follow-up examination and ultrasonography to have a testicular mass. The radical orchiectomy specimen contained an undifferentiated spindled sex cord-stromal tumor arising in the rete testis. Testicular sex cord-stromal tumors are far less common than germ cell neoplasms and are usually benign. The close relationship between sex cords and ductules of the rete testis during development provides the opportunity for these uncommon tumors to arise anatomically within the rete tesis. This undifferentiated sex cord-stromal tumor, occurring in a previously unreported location, is an example of an unusual lesion mimicking an intratesticular malignant neoplasm.

  20. Optical monitoring and detection of spinal cord ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rickson C Mesquita

    Full Text Available Spinal cord ischemia can lead to paralysis or paraparesis, but if detected early it may be amenable to treatment. Current methods use evoked potentials for detection of spinal cord ischemia, a decades old technology whose warning signs are indirect and significantly delayed from the onset of ischemia. Here we introduce and demonstrate a prototype fiber optic device that directly measures spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. This technical advance in neurological monitoring promises a new standard of care for detection of spinal cord ischemia and the opportunity for early intervention. We demonstrate the probe in an adult Dorset sheep model. Both open and percutaneous approaches were evaluated during pharmacologic, physiological, and mechanical interventions designed to induce variations in spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. The induced variations were rapidly and reproducibly detected, demonstrating direct measurement of spinal cord ischemia in real-time. In the future, this form of hemodynamic spinal cord diagnosis could significantly improve monitoring and management in a broad range of patients, including those undergoing thoracic and abdominal aortic revascularization, spine stabilization procedures for scoliosis and trauma, spinal cord tumor resection, and those requiring management of spinal cord injury in intensive care settings.

  1. Congenital malformations of the spinal cord without early symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffie, D; Stefanko, S Z; Makkink, B

    1986-01-01

    Description of 11 patients with congenital malformations of the spinal cord. Six of them were males, five females and the age varied from 7 to 70 years. Most of these cases produced clinical neurological signs indicating spinal cord disease in later life during an intercurrent disease. It was thought that changes in the bloodvessels and/or perfusion of the area of the spinal cord malformation was the ultimate cause of the neurological symptoms. An exact explanation of the origin of these developmental disturbances of the spinal cord remains unknown. Different hypotheses proposed in the literature, concerning these malformations, are not satisfactory.

  2. The spinal cord: a review of functional neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bican, Orhan; Minagar, Alireza; Pruitt, Amy A

    2013-02-01

    The spinal cord controls the voluntary muscles of the trunk and limbs and receives sensory input from these areas. It extends from the medulla oblongata to the lower border of the first lumbar vertebra. A basic knowledge of spinal cord anatomy is essential for interpretation of clinical signs and symptoms and for understanding of pathologic processes involving the spinal cord. In this article, anatomic structures are correlated with relevant clinical signs and symptoms and a step-wise approach to spinal cord diagnosis is outlined.

  3. A tumor cord model for Doxorubicin delivery and dose optimization in solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eikenberry Steffen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Doxorubicin is a common anticancer agent used in the treatment of a number of neoplasms, with the lifetime dose limited due to the potential for cardiotoxocity. This has motivated efforts to develop optimal dosage regimes that maximize anti-tumor activity while minimizing cardiac toxicity, which is correlated with peak plasma concentration. Doxorubicin is characterized by poor penetration from tumoral vessels into the tumor mass, due to the highly irregular tumor vasculature. I model the delivery of a soluble drug from the vasculature to a solid tumor using a tumor cord model and examine the penetration of doxorubicin under different dosage regimes and tumor microenvironments. Methods A coupled ODE-PDE model is employed where drug is transported from the vasculature into a tumor cord domain according to the principle of solute transport. Within the tumor cord, extracellular drug diffuses and saturable pharmacokinetics govern uptake and efflux by cancer cells. Cancer cell death is also determined as a function of peak intracellular drug concentration. Results The model predicts that transport to the tumor cord from the vasculature is dominated by diffusive transport of free drug during the initial plasma drug distribution phase. I characterize the effect of all parameters describing the tumor microenvironment on drug delivery, and large intercapillary distance is predicted to be a major barrier to drug delivery. Comparing continuous drug infusion with bolus injection shows that the optimum infusion time depends upon the drug dose, with bolus injection best for low-dose therapy but short infusions better for high doses. Simulations of multiple treatments suggest that additional treatments have similar efficacy in terms of cell mortality, but drug penetration is limited. Moreover, fractionating a single large dose into several smaller doses slightly improves anti-tumor efficacy. Conclusion Drug infusion time has a significant

  4. Adult spinal cord ependymal layer: A promising pool of quiescent stem cells to treat spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Stavros eMalas; Elena ePanayiotou

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major health burden and currently there is no effective medical intervention. Research performed over the last decade revealed that cells surrounding the central canal of the adult spinal cord and forming the ependymal layer acquire stem cell properties either in vitro or in response to injury. Following spinal cord injury activated ependymal cells generate progeny cells which migrate to the injury site but fail to produce the appropriate type of cells in sufficient nu...

  5. Barriers for recess physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many children, in particular girls, do not reach the recommended amount of daily physical activity. School recess provides an opportunity for both boys and girls to be physically active, but barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. This study explores gender...... differences in children's perceptions of barriers to recess physical activity. Based on the socio-ecological model four types of environmental barriers were distinguished: natural, social, physical and organizational environment. METHODS: Data were collected through 17 focus groups (at 17 different schools...... this study, we recommend promoting recess physical activity through a combination of actions, addressing barriers within the natural, social, physical and organizational environment....

  6. Spinal Cord Injuries in Wave-Riding Sports: The Influence of Environmental and Sport-Specific Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconi, Audrey; Flick, David; Ferguson, Jason; Glorioso, John E

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a nonfatal, catastrophic consequence of wave-riding sports. With surfing at the core, a multitude of activities have evolved that attempt to harness the power of ocean waves. The unique qualities of each wave-riding sport, in combination with the environmental factors of the ocean, define the risk for potential injuries. As wave-riding sports have become more advanced, athletes continue to push physical barriers. Taller waves are attempted while incorporating aerial maneuvers, all without protective equipment.

  7. Expression of neurotrophic factors in injured spinal cord after transplantation of human-umbilical cord blood stem cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyo-jin; Chung, Wook-hun; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Dai-Jung; Yang, Wo-Jong; Lee, A-Jin; Choi, Chi-Bong; Chang, Hwa-Seok; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Suh, Hyun Jung; Lee, Dong-Hun; Hwang, Soo-Han; Do, Sun Hee; Kim, Hwi-Yool

    2016-03-01

    We induced percutaneous spinal cord injuries (SCI) using a balloon catheter in 45 rats and transplanted human umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) at the injury site. Locomotor function was significantly improved in hUCB-MSCs transplanted groups. Quantitative ELISA of extract from entire injured spinal cord showed increased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3). Our results show that treatment of SCI with hUCB-MSCs can improve locomotor functions, and suggest that increased levels of BDNF, NGF and NT-3 in the injured spinal cord were the main therapeutic effect.

  8. Pulse wave myelopathy: An update of an hypothesis highlighting the similarities between syringomyelia and normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Grant A

    2015-12-01

    Most hypotheses trying to explain the pathophysiology of idiopathic syringomyelia involve mechanisms whereby CSF is pumped against a pressure gradient, from the subarachnoid space into the cord parenchyma. On review, these theories have universally failed to explain the disease process. A few papers have suggested that the syrinx fluid may originate from the cord capillary bed itself. However, in these papers, the fluid is said to accumulate due to impaired fluid drainage out of the cord. Again, there is little evidence to substantiate this. This proffered hypothesis looks at the problem from the perspective that syringomyelia and normal pressure hydrocephalus are almost identical in their manifestations but only differ in their site of effect within the neuraxis. It is suggested that the primary trigger for syringomyelia is a reduction in the compliance of the veins draining the spinal cord. This reduces the efficiency of the pulse wave dampening, occurring within the cord parenchyma, increasing arteriolar and capillary pulse pressure. The increased capillary pulse pressure opens the blood-spinal cord barrier due to a direct effect upon the wall integrity and interstitial fluid accumulates due to an increased secretion rate. An increase in arteriolar pulse pressure increases the kinetic energy within the cord parenchyma and this disrupts the cytoarchitecture allowing the fluid to accumulate into small cystic regions in the cord. With time the cystic regions coalesce to form one large cavity which continues to increase in size due to the ongoing interstitial fluid secretion and the hyperdynamic cord vasculature.

  9. Breaking the Blood-Brain Barrier With Mannitol to Aid Stem Cell Therapeutics in the Chronic Stroke Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Naoki; Lee, Jea Young; Acosta, Sandra; Sanberg, Paul R; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeabilizers, such as mannitol, can facilitate peripherally delivered stem cells to exert therapeutic benefits on the stroke brain. Although this BBB permeation-aided stem cell therapy has been demonstrated in the acute stage of stroke, such BBB permeation in the chronic stage of the disease remains to be examined. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats initially received sham surgery or experimental stroke via the 1-h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model. At 1 month after the MCAo surgery, stroke animals were randomly assigned to receive human umbilical cord stem cells only (2 million viable cells), mannitol only (1.1 mol/L mannitol at 4°C), combined human umbilical cord stem cells (200,000 viable cells) and mannitol (1.1 mol/L mannitol at 4°C), and vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) only. Stroke animals that received human umbilical cord blood cells alone or combined human umbilical cord stem cells and mannitol exhibited significantly improved motor performance and significantly better brain cell survival in the peri-infarct area compared to stroke animals that received vehicle or mannitol alone, with mannitol treatment reducing the stem cell dose necessary to afford functional outcomes. Enhanced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone accompanied the combined treatment of human umbilical cord stem cells and mannitol. We showed that BBB permeation facilitates the therapeutic effects of a low dose of peripherally transplanted stem cells to effectively cause functional improvement and increase neurogenesis in chronic stroke.

  10. Linguistic Barriers and Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    and intercultural communication, this article analyses interviews with 31 employees from two highly ethnically diverse Danish workplaces. The article shows how linguistic barriers such as different levels of majority language competence and their consequent misunderstandings breed mistrust and hostility, whilst......The influence of language on social capital in low-skill and ethnically diverse workplaces has thus far received very limited attention within the sociology of work. As the ethnically diverse workplace is an important social space for the construction of social relations bridging different social...... groups, the sociology of work needs to develop a better understanding of the way in which linguistic diversity influences the formation of social capital, i.e. resources such as the trust and reciprocity inherent in social relations in such workplaces. Drawing on theories about intergroup contact...

  11. Countermeasures and barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Johannes [Oersted - DTU, Automation, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2005-10-01

    In 1973 Haddon proposed ten strategies for reducing and avoiding damages based on a model of potential harmful energy transfer (Haddon, 1973). The strategies apply to a large variety of unwanted phenomena. Haddon's pioneering work on countermeasures has had a major influence on later thinking about safety. Considering its impact it is remarkable that the literature offers almost no discussions related to the theoretical foundations of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. The present report addresses a number of theoretical issues related to Haddon's countermeasure strategies, which are: 1) A reformulation and formalization of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. 2) An identification and description of some of the problems associated with the term 'barrier'. 3) Suggestions for a more precise terminology based on the causal structure of countermeasures. 4) Extending the scope of countermeasures to include sign-based countermeasures. (au)

  12. Expansion duroplasty improves intraspinal pressure, spinal cord perfusion pressure, and vascular pressure reactivity index in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury: injured spinal cord pressure evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phang, Isaac; Werndle, Melissa C; Saadoun, Samira; Varsos, Georgios; Czosnyka, Marek; Zoumprouli, Argyro; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2015-06-15

    We recently showed that, after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), laminectomy does not improve intraspinal pressure (ISP), spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP), or the vascular pressure reactivity index (sPRx) at the injury site sufficiently because of dural compression. This is an open label, prospective trial comparing combined bony and dural decompression versus laminectomy. Twenty-one patients with acute severe TSCI had re-alignment of the fracture and surgical fixation; 11 had laminectomy alone (laminectomy group) and 10 had laminectomy and duroplasty (laminectomy+duroplasty group). Primary outcomes were magnetic resonance imaging evidence of spinal cord decompression (increase in intradural space, cerebrospinal fluid around the injured cord) and spinal cord physiology (ISP, SCPP, sPRx). The laminectomy and laminectomy+duroplasty groups were well matched. Compared with the laminectomy group, the laminectomy+duroplasty group had greater increase in intradural space at the injury site and more effective decompression of the injured cord. In the laminectomy+duroplasty group, ISP was lower, SCPP higher, and sPRx lower, (i.e., improved vascular pressure reactivity), compared with the laminectomy group. Laminectomy+duroplasty caused cerebrospinal fluid leak that settled with lumbar drain in one patient and pseudomeningocele that resolved completely in five patients. We conclude that, after TSCI, laminectomy+duroplasty improves spinal cord radiological and physiological parameters more effectively than laminectomy alone.

  13. Ultrasonographic detection of nuchal cord: required or not

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayata Sangwan

    2014-06-01

    Methods: This is a retrospective study conducted in the department of obstetrics and gynecology in a rural tertiary health care centre in one year duration. All the patients having nuchal cord at the time of delivery or caesarean section were included in the study. The case reports were anslysed retrospectively for neonatal outcome and progress of labour. Results: The incidence of nuchal cord was 6.63%, irrespective of number of loops. The incidence of single loop was 5.32% double loop was 1.14% three loop was 0.17%. One patient had four loops of cord around neck and one patient had true knot in the cord but neonatal outcome was absolutely normal in both patients. The profile of patients was discussed in Table 1. A total of 85% patients were less than 30 year age group with literacy level of 65% and 55% patients were primigravida.20 patients developed prolonged labour, 13 patients among these responded to oxytocin and delivered normally and rest 07 underwent lower segment caesarean section for non-progress of labour or fetal distress. The duration of labour was found prolonged in patients w and triple nuchal cords. 53 (27.60% fetus had unfavourable APGAR at birth, among these 20 had single tight loop of cord around neck, recovered soon as the cord was clamped and cut. Among rest 33 fetus 03 had three loops of cord around neck, 07 had two tight loops of cord around neck, in rest 23 fetus loops of cord were present besides that other factors like prematurity (11, severe preeclampsia (06, chorioamnionits (02 , antepartum hemorrhage (04 were also present, may be responsible for fetal distress. Conclusions: Routine ultrasonographic nuchal cord detection is not required and should not alter obstetric management of the patient. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(3.000: 507-511

  14. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen Preben D

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no published studies on stem cells from equine cord blood although commercial storage of equine cord blood for future autologous stem cell transplantations is available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have been isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood of humans collected non-invasively at the time of birth and from sheep cord blood collected invasively by a surgical intrauterine approach. Mesenchymal stem cells isolation percentage from frozen-thawed human cord blood is low and the future isolation percentage of MSCs from cryopreserved equine cord blood is therefore expectedly low. The hypothesis of this study was that equine MSCs could be isolated from fresh whole equine cord blood. Results Cord blood was collected from 7 foals immediately after foaling. The mononuclear cell fraction was isolated by Ficoll density centrifugation and cultured in a DMEM low glucose based media at 38.5°C in humidified atmosphere containing 5% CO2. In 4 out of 7 samples colonies with MSC morphology were observed. Cellular morphology varied between monolayers of elongated spindle-shaped cells to layered cell clusters of cuboidal cells with shorter cytoplasmic extensions. Positive Alizarin Red and von Kossa staining as well as significant calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase activity confirmed osteogenesis. Histology and positive Safranin O staining of matrix glycosaminoglycans illustrated chondrogenesis. Oil Red O staining of lipid droplets confirmed adipogenesis. Conclusion We here report, for the first time, the isolation of mesenchymal-like stem cells from fresh equine cord blood and their differentiation into osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. This novel isolation of equine cord blood MSCs and their preliminary in vitro differentiation positions the horse as the ideal pre-clinical animal model for proof-of-principle studies of cord blood derived MSCs.

  15. Surviving spinal cord injury in low income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Øderud

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mortality rates from injuries are higher for people from poorer economic backgrounds than those with higher incomes (according to the World Health Organization [WHO], and health care professionals and organisations dealing with people with disabilities experience that individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI in low income countries face serious challenges in their daily lives.Objectives: The aims of this study were to explore life expectancy (life expectancy is the average remaining years of life of an individual and the situation of persons living with SCI in low income settings.Method: Literature studies and qualitative methods were used. Qualitative data was collected through semi-structured interviews with 23 informants from four study sites in Zimbabwe representing persons with SCI, their relatives and rehabilitation professionals.Results: There are few publications available about life expectancy and the daily life of persons with SCI in low income countries. Those few publications identified and the study findings confirm that individuals with SCI are experiencing a high occurrence of pressure sores and urinary tract infections leading to unnecessary suffering, often causing premature death. Pain and depression are frequently reported and stigma and negative attitudes are experienced in society. Lack of appropriate wheelchairs and services, limited knowledge about SCI amongst health care staff, limited access to health care and rehabilitation services, loss of employment and lack of financial resources worsen the daily challenges.Conclusion: The study indicates that life expectancy for individuals with SCI in low income settings is shorter than for the average population and also with respect to individuals with SCI in high income countries. Poverty worsened the situation for individuals with SCI, creating barriers that increase the risk of contracting harmful pressure sores and infections leading to premature death. Further

  16. Cord blood banking activity in Iran National Cord Blood Bank: a two years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Mostafa; Atarodi, Kamran; Nakhlestani, Mozhdeh; Abolghasemi, Hasan; Sadegh, Hosein; Faranoosh, Mohammad; Golzade, Khadije; Fadai, Razieh; Niknam, Fereshte; Zarif, Mahin Nikougoftar

    2014-02-01

    Today umbilical cord blood (UCB) has known as a commonly used source of hematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic transplantation and many cord blood banks have been established around the world for collection and cryopreservation of cord blood units. Herein, we describe our experience at Iran National Cord Blood Bank (INCBB) during 2 years of activity. From November 2010 to 2012, UCBs were collected from 5 hospitals in Tehran. All the collection, processing, testing, cryopreservation and storage procedures were done according to standard operation procedures. Total nucleated cells (TNC) count, viability test, CD34+ cell count, colony forming unit (CFU) assay, screening tests and HLA typing were done on all banked units. Within 3770 collected units, only 32.9% fulfilled banking criteria. The mean volume of units was 105.2 ml and after volume reduction the mean of TNC, viability, CD34+ cells and CFUs was 10.76×10(8), 95.2%, 2.99×10(6) and 7.1×10(5), respectively. One unit was transplanted at Dec 2012 to a 5-year old patient with five of six HLA compatibilities. In our country banking of UCB is new and high rate of hematopoietic stem cell transplants needs expanding CB banks capacity to find more matching units, optimization of methods and sharing experiences to improve biological characterization of units.

  17. Effect of fetal spinal cord graft with different methods on axonal pathology after spinal cord contusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of fetal spinal cord (FSC) graft with different methods on axonal pathology and neurological function recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI).   Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. In Group A, the spinal cord was injured and hemisected. In Group B, fetal spinal cord (FSC) was transferred into the injured site. In Group C, after having done as Group B, the upper and lower spinal nerve roots were anastomosed. And in Group D, after having done as Group B, the pedicled omentum was transferred into the hemisection cavity. At 6 weeks after operation, light and electronic microscopes were used to examine the axonal pathology. The neurological function was assessed with inclined plane tests in the open field. The number of axons was quantitated by a computer image analysis system.   Results: A greater loss of axons was observed in Group A than that of other groups at 6 weeks. The sequence of the reduced rate of the axons was as following, Group A>Group B>Group C>Group D (P<0.05). The remaining axons were paralleled with the significant improvement in neurological function recovery of the rats.   Conclusions: It indicates that FSC and pedicled omentum grafts after SCI can protect the axons and promote the neurological function recovery of the rats.

  18. Cord Blood Transplantation Study (COBLT): cord blood bank standard operating procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, J K; Cairo, M S; Wagner, E L; McCurdy, P R; Baxter-Lowe, L A; Carter, S L; Kernan, N A; Lill, M C; Slone, V; Wagner, J E; Wallas, C H; Kurtzberg, J

    1998-12-01

    In 1995, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) solicited requests for a proposal (RFP) entitled "Transplant Centers for Clinical Research on Transplantation of Umbilical Cord Stem and Progenitor Cells." Three banks, six transplant centers, and one medical coordinating center (MCC) (Table 1) were funded with the overall goal of banking cord blood units (CBU) using a single manual of operations. Furthermore, the clinical protocols to evaluate the transplant outcome for adult and pediatric recipients of these well-characterized CBU would be analyzed in a uniform fashion. Because of the intense interest of the transplantation community in the policies and procedures for cord blood collection and processing, the principal investigators of the cord blood banks (CBB) and NHLBI elected to submit for publication the rationale and an abridged, but detailed, version of the standard operating procedures (SOP) developed between October 1996 and July 1998 prior to the initiation of the clinical protocols to be performed with these CBU. As the SOP will be refined over time, the complete SOP and subsequent amendments will be published and continually updated on the websites from the MCC-The EMMES Corporation (www.EMMES.com). All forms referred to in this document may be obtained from the EMMES website. It is hoped that the publication of this document will lay down a framework that will not only facilitate the development of other CBB but also help us more rapidly define what constitutes an "acceptable" CBU product.

  19. Blood-CNS Barrier Impairment in ALS Patients versus an Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana eGarbuzova-Davis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a severe neurodegenerative disease with a compli-cated and poorly understood pathogenesis. Recently, alterations in the blood-Central Nervous System barrier (B-CNS-B have been recognized as a key factor possibly aggravating motor neuron damage. The majority of findings on ALS microvascular pathology have been deter-mined in mutant SOD1 rodent models, identifying barrier damage during disease develop-ment which might similarly occur in familial ALS patients carrying the SOD1 mutation. However, our knowledge of B-CNS-B competence in sporadic ALS (SALS has been limited. We recently showed structural and functional impairment in postmortem gray and white mat-ter microvessels of medulla and spinal cord tissue from SALS patients, suggesting pervasive barrier damage. Although numerous signs of barrier impairment (endothelial cell degenera-tion, capillary leakage, perivascular edema, downregulation of tight junction proteins, and microhemorrhages are indicated in both mutant SOD1 animal models of ALS and SALS pa-tients, other pathogenic barrier alterations have as yet only been identified in SALS patients. Pericyte degeneration, perivascular collagen IV expansion, and white matter capillary abnor-malities in SALS patients are significant barrier related pathologies yet to be noted in ALS SOD1 animal models. In the current review, these important differences in blood-CNS barrier damage between ALS patients and animal models, which may signify altered barrier transport mechanisms, are discussed. Understanding discrepancies in barrier condition between ALS patients and animal models may be crucial for developing effective therapies.

  20. Barriers to Women in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    The Presiding Officer of the National Assembly for Wales, Rosemary Butler AM, has put the issue of barriers to women in public life at the top of the political agenda in Wales. She has held sessions with women across Wales to find out what those barriers are and how they can be tackled. On International Women's Day in February, she invited…

  1. Spanning trees crossing few barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asano, T.; Berg, M. de; Cheong, O.; Guibas, L.J.; Snoeyink, J.; Tamaki, H.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the problem of finding low-cost spanning trees for sets of n points in the plane, where the cost of a spanning tree is defined as the total number of intersections of tree edges with a given set of m barriers. We obtain the following results: (i) if the barriers are possibly intersecting

  2. BARRIERS OF STRATEGIC ALLIANCES ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav M. Sannikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available General barriers of organization of different types of strategic alliances have beenconsidered in the article. There are several recommendations for overcoming themin cases of international alliances, and in case of work in one state. The article also identified goals and tasks of single coordination center of alliance to overcome organization barriers.

  3. Informal export barriers and poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Porto, Guido G.

    2004-01-01

    The author investigates the poverty impacts of informal export barriers like transport costs, cumbersome customs practices, costly regulations, and bribes. He models these informal barriers as export taxes that distort the efficient allocation of resources. In low-income agricultural economies, this distortion lowers wages and household agricultural income, thereby leading to higher pover...

  4. The problem of cord blood banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shved A. D.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The review considers the literature data on issues of cord blood (CB banking in different countries and regions. The existing forms of banks are private, mixed and public, the latter is preferred by most clinicians who are experienced in stem cell transplantation. All the researchers admit the need for development of CB banks, but they note that the progress depends on several factors: the deficit of government financial support and poor people’s awareness of the possibilities of stem cell therapy, the appropriateness and relevance of public resources of CB units in National Banks.

  5. Primary primitive neuroectodermal tumor of spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Das Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primarily spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumors are rare neoplasm. A 28-year-old female presented with complaints of pain in lower back, radiating to both lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging scan of the lumbosacral spine showed an intradural extramedullary space-occupying lesion. The patient underwent L2–L5 laminectomy with excision of the lesion. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry reports confirmed the diagnosis of primitive neuroectodermal tumor while a thorough metastatic workup ruled out secondary to the spinal cord. The patient developed recurrence at local site within a month after surgery, even before the adjuvant treatment could be started. She is being treated with chemotherapy (human resources protocol.

  6. Immunotherapy strategies for spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Tang; Lu, Xiu-Min; Chen, Kai-Ting; Shu, Ya-Hai; Qiu, Chun-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) of adult mammalian after traumatic injury is limited, which often causes permanent functional motor and sensory loss. After spinal cord injury (SCI), the lack of regeneration is mainly attributed to the presence of a hostile microenvironment, glial scarring, and cavitation. Besides, inflammation has also been proved to play a crucial role in secondary degeneration following SCI. The more prominent treatment strategies in experimental models focus mainly on drugs and cell therapies, however, only a few strategies applied in clinical studies and therapies still have only limited effects on the repair of SCI. Recently, the interests in immunotherapy strategies for CNS are increasing in number and breadth. Immunotherapy strategies have made good progresses in treating many CNS degenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), stroke, and multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the strategies begin to be considered to the treatment of SCI and other neurological disorders in recent years. Besides anti-inflamatory therapy, immunization with protein vaccines and DNA vaccines has emerged as a novel therapy strategy because of the simplicity of preparation and application. An inflammatory response followed by spinal cord injury, and is controled by specific signaling molecules, such as some cytokines playing a crucial role. As a result, appropriate immunoregulation, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines may be an effective therapy strategy for earlier injury of spinal cord. In addition, myelinassociated inhibitors (MAIs) in the injured spinal cord, such as Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and oligodendrocyte- myelin glycoprotein (OMgp) are known to prevent axonal regeneration through their co-receptors, and to trigger demyelinating autoimmunity through T cell-mediated harmful autoimmune response. The antagonism of the MAIs through vaccinating with

  7. Somatostatin in the caudal spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of somatostatin in the rat spinal cord was studied immunohistochemically with particular reference to the localization in the caudal centers that innervate the pelvic organs. For detailed studies of the laminar distribution of somatostatin the combination of immunohistochemistry...... was particularly low in the motoneuron neuropil. However, a dense somatostatin network was found in the sixth lumbar segment in relation to the neurons in Onuf's nucleus X complex, the nucleus that innervates the small pelvic muscles including the striated sphincters. It is concluded that somatostatin, besides...

  8. Open Access Platforms in Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, John L K; Geisler, Fred; Ramer, Leanne; Plunet, Ward; Cragg, Jacquelyn J

    2017-01-01

    Recovery from acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by extensive heterogeneity, resulting in uncertain prognosis. Reliable prediction of recovery in the acute phase benefits patients and their families directly, as well as improves the likelihood of detecting efficacy in clinical trials. This issue of heterogeneity is not unique to SCI. In fields such as traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, one approach to understand variability in recovery has been to make clinical trial data widely available to the greater research community. We contend that the SCI community should adopt a similar approach in providing open access clinical trial data.

  9. Transplante de sangue de cordão umbilical - SCU Umbilical cord blood transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso A. Rodrigues

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A frequente utilização de sangue de cordão umbilical - SCU como fonte de células- tronco hematopoéticas - CTH, tanto em crianças, como em adultos, que não dispõem de doador na família, tem levado ao estabelecimento da padronização de critérios em sua seleção, objetivando a obtenção de melhores resultados. A escolha da unidade de SCU deve basear-se no número total de células nucleadas e no número de diferenças de antígenos leucocitários humanos (HLA. Diante de uma unidade com celularidade mínima, deve-se considerar a possibilidade da utilização de duplo cordão. Frente a mais de uma unidade com características semelhantes, a realização da contagem de células CD34 e da compatibilidade ABO, assim como a qualidade e a rapidez para obtenção da unidade, podem definir a escolha.The frequent use of umbilical cord blood as the source of hematopoietic stem cells, both in children and adults who do not have related donors, has led to the establishment of a better standardization of selection criteria aiming at improving the results. The choice of the umbilical cord blood unit should be based on the total number of nucleated cells and the number of differences in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA system. When a unit has minimal cellularity, the use of a double cord blood transplant should be considered. When two or more units have similar characteristics, the choice may be determined by the CD34 count, ABO compatibility and the quality and speed to obtain the unit.

  10. The Spinal Cord Injury-Interventions Classification System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Langeveld, A.H.B.

    2010-01-01

    Title: The Spinal Cord Injury-Interventions Classification System: development and evaluation of a documentation tool to record therapy to improve mobility and self-care in people with spinal cord injury. Background: Many rehabilitation researchers have emphasized the need to examine the actual cont

  11. International spinal cord injury cardiovascular function basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krassioukov, A; Alexander, M S; Karlsson, Anders Hans;

    2010-01-01

    To create an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Cardiovascular Function Basic Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets.......To create an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Cardiovascular Function Basic Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets....

  12. International Spinal Cord Injury Male Sexual Function Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, M S; Biering-Sørensen, F; Elliott, S;

    2011-01-01

    To create the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Male Sexual Function Basic Data Set within the International SCI Data Sets.......To create the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Male Sexual Function Basic Data Set within the International SCI Data Sets....

  13. [Marrow donor registration and cord blood banking: current issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Minoko

    2016-03-01

    Marrow donor registration and cord blood banking are essential components of the infrastructure required for unrelated haemopoietic stem cell transplantations. We now have a new law to support and regulate the Marrow Donor Coordination Agency, Cord Blood Banks and the Haematopoietic Stem Cell Provision Support Organization. We also need to have a specific goal for bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell donor registration, a minimum cord blood bank size, and the demographic data to back the medical needs for unrelated haemopoietic stem cell transplantations. To improve bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell transplantations, we need to recruit younger adults for marrow registration and make greater efforts to shorten the coordinating period. For cord blood transplantations, uniting and empowering the cord blood collection sites is needed, to encourage and motivate obstetricians and other staff, as the quality of cord blood units is primarily determined during collection. Also, the cord blood banks must work cooperatively to provide cord blood internationally, which includes coordinating with international agencies and their regulations.

  14. Personal Adjustment Training for the Spinal Cord Injured

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Richard; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This article describes experiences with Personal Achievement Skills (PAS), a group counseling process in a spinal cord injury project, emphasizing training in communication and goal setting in the context of group process. Issues in conducting such training and providing comprehensive service to the spinal cord injured are discussed in detail.…

  15. Bone marrow stromal cell : mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic f

  16. Spinal Cord Injured College Students: Counseling and Guidance Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Anne Louise

    1979-01-01

    Physical, psychological, academic, and career problems of spinal cord injured college students plus counselor knowledge, attitudes, and skills that help in solving these problems are cited. Community and commercial resources are identified. Programs that enhance faculty and employer sensitivity and cord injured student development are described.…

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord injury in chronic stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobimatsu, Haruki; Nihei, Ryuichi; Kimura, Tetsuhiko; Yano, Hideo; Touyama, Tetsuo; Tobimatsu, Yoshiko; Suyama, Naoto; Yoshino, Yasumasa (National Rehabilitation Center for the Disabled, Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan))

    1991-10-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a total of 195 patients with cervical (125) or thoracic (70) spinal cord injury were reviewed. The imaging studies of the spinal cord lesions were correlated with clinical manifestations. Sequential MR imaging revealed hypointensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) in all patients, except for five patients showing no signal changes and two showing isointensity, suggesting gliosis, myelomalacia, and syringomyelia. Spinal cord lesions were classified into four types: small lesions, large lesions, complete transverse, and longitudinal rupture. These lesions were well correlated with the severity of injury and paralysis. Complete paralysis was frequently associated with enlarged, complete transverse for cervical spinal cord injury, and longitudinal ruptured or thinned complete transverse for thoracic spinal cord injury. The height of paralysis was well in agreement with that of lesions. For incomplete paralysis, localized lesions were seen within the spinal cord, coinciding with the paralysis or severity. Traumatic syringomyelia was seen in 17 patients (8.7%)-- for the cervical site (10 patients, 8%) and the thoracic site (7 patients, 10%). When homogeneous and marginally clear hypointensity is shown on T1-weighted images and vacuolated hyperintensity is shown on T2-weighted images, in addition to lesions spreading two or more cords or 1.5 or more cords above the nervous root level of paralysis, traumatic syringomyelia is strongly suspected, requiring the follow up observation. (N.K.).

  18. What's the Difference Between Vocal Cord Dysfunction and Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... T C Li, M.D., Ph.D. Both asthma and vocal cord dysfunction can make breathing difficult. Signs and symptoms of either condition can include coughing, wheezing, throat tightness and hoarseness, but they're two separate ... motion. Like asthma, vocal cord dysfunction can be triggered by breathing ...

  19. Pharmacological management of hemodynamic complications following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Deanna; Tutt, Matthew; Cook, Aaron M

    2009-05-01

    Damage from spinal cord injury (SCI) may be complicated by concomitant hemodynamic alterations within hours to months of the initial insult. Neurogenic shock, symptomatic bradycardia, autonomic dysreflexia, and orthostatic hypotension are specific conditions occurring commonly with SCI. Early recognition and appropriate management of each disorder may minimize secondary injury to the cord, avert systemic complications, and help alleviate patient discomfort.

  20. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard;

    2002-01-01

    Here we present evidence for spontaneous and long-lasting regeneration of CNS axons after spinal cord lesions in adult rats. The length of 200 kD neurofilament (NF)-immunolabeled axons was estimated after photochemically induced ischemic spinal cord lesions using a stereological tool. The total l...

  1. Liposarcoma of the spermatic cord: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambel, Murat; Demirbas, Murat; Yalcin, Omer; Erdogan, Abdullah; Oner, Sedat; Kilic, Metin; Aydos, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Spermatic cord liposarcoma is very rare and characterized by a painless inguinal or scrotal mass. This is a case report of a 66-year-old man presenting with a mass in his left scrotum. Inguinal orchiectomy was performed and the histopathological examination revealed a liposarcoma of the spermatic cord. PMID:26279732

  2. Peripherally-derived BDNF promotes regeneration of ascending sensory neurons after spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Yun Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The blood brain barrier (BBB and truncated trkB receptor on astrocytes prevent the penetration of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF applied into the peripheral (PNS and central nervous system (CNS thus restrict its application in the treatment of nervous diseases. As BDNF is anterogradely transported by axons, we propose that peripherally derived and/or applied BDNF may act on the regeneration of central axons of ascending sensory neurons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present study aimed to test the hypothesis by using conditioning lesion of the sciatic nerve as a model to increase the expression of endogenous BDNF in sensory neurons and by injecting exogenous BDNF into the peripheral nerve or tissues. Here we showed that most of regenerating sensory neurons expressed BDNF and p-CREB but not p75NTR. Conditioning-lesion induced regeneration of ascending sensory neuron and the increase in the number of p-Erk positive and GAP-43 positive neurons was blocked by the injection of the BDNF antiserum in the periphery. Enhanced neurite outgrowth of dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons in vitro by conditioning lesion was also inhibited by the neutralization with the BDNF antiserum. The delivery of exogenous BDNF into the sciatic nerve or the footpad significantly increased the number of regenerating DRG neurons and regenerating sensory axons in the injured spinal cord. In a contusion injury model, an injection of BDNF into the footpad promoted recovery of motor functions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that endogenous BDNF in DRG and spinal cord is required for the enhanced regeneration of ascending sensory neurons after conditioning lesion of sciatic nerve and peripherally applied BDNF may have therapeutic effects on the spinal cord injury.

  3. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, W T; Callaghan, G M; Ruckstuhl, L E

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers.

  4. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, William T.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Ruckstuhl, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers. PMID:22478314

  5. RhoA/Rho kinase in spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangbing Wu; Xiao-ming Xu

    2016-01-01

    A spinal cord injury refers to an injury to the spinal cord that is caused by a trauma instead of diseases. Spinal cord injury includes a primary mechanical injury and a much more complex secondary injury pro-cess involving inlfammation, oxidation, excitotoxicity, and cell death. During the secondary injury, many signal pathways are activated and play important roles in mediating the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury. Among them, the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway plays a particular role in mediating spinal degeneration and regeneration. In this review, we will discuss the role and mechanism of RhoA/Rho kinase-mediated spinal cord pathogenesis, as well as the potential of targeting RhoA/Rho kinase as a strategy for promoting both neuroprotection and axonal regeneration.

  6. Motoneuron differentiation of immortalized human spinal cord cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R; Thode, S; Zhou, J; Richard, N; Pardinas, J; Rao, M S; Sah, D W

    2000-02-01

    Human motoneuron cell lines will be valuable tools for spinal cord research and drug discovery. To create such cell lines, we immortalized NCAM(+)/neurofilament(+) precursors from human embryonic spinal cord with a tetracycline repressible v-myc oncogene. Clonal NCAM(+)/neurofilament(+) cell lines differentiated exclusively into neurons within 1 week. These neurons displayed extensive processes, exhibited immunoreactivity for mature neuron-specific markers such as tau and synaptophysin, and fired action potentials upon current injection. Moreover, a clonal precursor cell line gave rise to multiple types of spinal cord neurons, including ChAT(+)/Lhx3(+)/Lhx4(+) motoneurons and GABA(+) interneurons. These neuronal restricted precursor cell lines will expedite the elucidation of molecular mechanisms that regulate the differentiation, maturation and survival of specific subsets of spinal cord neurons, and the identification and validation of novel drug targets for motoneuron diseases and spinal cord injury.

  7. Cord Wood Testing in a Non-Catalytic Wood Stove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trojanowski, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wei, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-06-30

    EPA Method 28 and the current wood stove regulations have been in-place since 1988. Recently, EPA proposed an update to the existing NSPS for wood stove regulations which includes a plan to transition from the current crib wood fuel to cord wood fuel for certification testing. Cord wood is seen as generally more representative of field conditions while the crib wood is seen as more repeatable. In any change of certification test fuel, there are questions about the impact on measured results and the correlation between tests with the two different fuels. The purpose of the work reported here is to provide data on the performance of a noncatalytic stove with cord wood. The stove selected has previously been certified with crib wood which provides a basis for comparison with cord wood. Overall, particulate emissions were found to be considerably higher with cord wood.

  8. Umbilical Cord Serum Erythropoietin Levels and Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner Sazak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect of maternal smoking during pregnancy on levels of umbilical cord erythropoietin. Methods. Erythropoietin levels were measured in umbilical cord sera of 60 newborns who were delivered vaginally at term. There were 20 (33% smoking and 40 (67% nonsmoking mothers. Results. Mean cord serum erythropoietin levels were significantly lower in the nonsmokers (nonsmokers, 24 ± 9 IU/L; smokers, 61 ± 46 IU/L; P<.001. There was a significant positive correlation between the number of cigarettes smoked per day and cord serum erythropoietin levels (r, 0.58; P≤.05. Conclusions. Smoking during pregnancy is associated with increased levels of umbilical cord erythropoietin at birth. This may indicate a risk of fetal hypoxia and growth restriction. Education and encouragement of cessation of smoking during pregnancy are important to avoid associated fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality.

  9. Rabbit IgG distribution in skin, spinal cord and DRG following systemic injection in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonra, J R; Mendell, L M

    1997-12-01

    In order to determine the distribution of antibodies such as anti-NGF following systemic injection in neonates, immunocytochemical techniques were used to examine the localization of rabbit IgG in rat skin, DRG, and spinal cord after treatments with normal rabbit serum or purified rabbit IgG. Daily subcutaneous injections beginning on postnatal day 2 or on day 15 were given for three days. On the fourth day the animals were sacrificed and tissues were processed for rabbit IgG-IR. In the dorsal and ventral spinal cord, staining intensities suggest a substantial increase in the blood-brain barrier during the first two weeks after birth. Staining intensity in the epidermis of the glabrous skin from the hindpaw was substantially lower than in the adjacent dermis. In addition, IgG infrequently accumulated intracellularly in intensely stained patches in the epidermis. IgG was also able to reach relatively high intracellular concentrations in a small number of sensory neurons. The IgG staining pattern in the skin was similar when anti-NGF itself was administered to the animals. The results are discussed in the context of the effects of anti-NGF on the development of nociceptive afferents.

  10. Tamoxifen: an FDA approved drug with neuroprotective effects for spinal cord injury recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Colón

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a condition without a cure, affecting sensory and/or motor functions. The physical trauma to the spinal cord initiates a cascade of molecular and cellular events that generates a non-permissive environment for cell survival and axonal regeneration. Among these complex set of events are damage of the blood-brain barrier, edema formation, inflammation, oxidative stress, demyelination, reactive gliosis and apoptosis. The multiple events activated after SCI require a multi-active drug that could target most of these events and produce a permissive environment for cell survival, regeneration, vascular reorganization and synaptic formation. Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is an FDA approved drug with several neuroprotective properties that should be considered for the treatment of this devastating condition. Various investigators using different animal models and injury parameters have demonstrated the beneficial effects of this drug to improve functional locomotor recovery after SCI. Results suggest that the mechanism of action of Tamoxifen administration is to modulate anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-gliotic responses. A gap of knowledge exists regarding the sex differences in response to Tamoxifen and the therapeutic window available to administer this treatment. In addition, the effects of Tamoxifen in axonal outgrowth or synapse formation needs to be investigated. This review will address some of the mechanisms activated by Tamoxifen after SCI and the results recently published by investigators in the field.

  11. Role of Melatonin in Traumatic Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehar Naseem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain and spinal cord are implicated in incidences of two of the most severe injuries of central nervous system (CNS. Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a devastating neurological deficit involving primary and secondary injury cascades. The primary and secondary mechanisms include complex consequences of activation of proinflammatory cytokines, cerebral edema, upregulation of NF-κβ, disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB, and oxidative stress. Spinal cord injury (SCI includes primary and secondary injury cascades. Primary injury leads to secondary injury in which generation of free radicals and oxidative or nitrative damage play an important pathophysiological role. The indoleamine melatonin is a hormone secreted or synthesized by pineal gland in the brain which helps to regulate sleep and wake cycle. Melatonin has been shown to be a versatile hormone having antioxidative, antiapoptotic, neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory properties. It has a special characteristic of crossing BBB. Melatonin has neuroprotective role in the injured part of the CNS after TBI and SCI. A number of studies have successfully shown its therapeutic value as a neuroprotective agent in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Here in this review we have compiled the literature supporting consequences of CNS injuries, TBI and SCI, and the protective role of melatonin in it.

  12. Tamoxifen:an FDA approved drug with neuroprotective effects for spinal cord injur y recover y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer M. Colón; Jorge D. Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition without a cure, affecting sensory and/or motor functions. The physical trauma to the spinal cord initiates a cascade of molecular and cellular events that generates a non-permissive environment for cell survival and axonal regeneration. Among these complex set of events are damage of the blood-brain barrier, edema formation, inlfammation, oxidative stress, demyelination, reactive gliosis and apoptosis. The multiple events activated after SCI require a multi-active drug that could target most of these events and produce a permissive environment for cell survival, regeneration, vascular reorganization and syn-aptic formation. Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is an FDA approved drug with several neuroprotective properties that should be considered for the treatment of this devastating condition. Various investigators using different animal models and injury parameters have demonstrated the beneifcial effects of this drug to improve functional locomotor recovery after SCI. Results suggest that the mechanism of action of Tamoxifen administration is to modulate anti-oxidant, anti-inlfammatory and anti-gliotic responses. A gap of knowledge exists regarding the sex differences in response to Tamoxifen and the therapeutic window available to administer this treatment. In addition, the effects of Tamoxifen in axonal outgrowth or synapse formation needs to be investigated. This review will address some of the mechanisms activated by Tamoxifen after SCI and the results recently published by investigators in the ifeld.

  13. Development of engineered barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kim, Seung Soo; Kang, Mu Ja

    1999-03-01

    Engineered barrier development was carried out into the three research fields : waste form, disposal container, and buffer. The waste form field dealt with long-term leaching tests with borosilicate waste glasses surrounded by compacted bentonite. The leach rate decreased with increasing time, and was higher for the waste specimen rich in U and Na. In the container field, preliminary concepts of disposal containers were recommended by conducting structural analysis, thermal analysis, and shielding analysis, and major properties of stainless steel, copper, and titanium as a container material were surveyed. The sensitization degrees of SUS 316 and316L were lower than those of SUS 304 and 304L, respectively. The crevice corrosion of sensitized stainless steel was sensitive to the content of salt. Researches into the buffer included establishment of its performance criteria followed by investigating major properties of buffer using potential material in Korea. Experiments were made for measuring hydraulic conductivities, swelling properties, mechanical properties, thermal conductivities, pore-water chemistry properties, and adsorption properties was also investigated. (author)

  14. Clean home-delivery in rural Southern Tanzania: barriers, influencers, and facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamba, Donat D; Schellenberg, Joanna; Penfold, Suzanne C; Mashasi, Irene; Mrisho, Mwifadhi; Manzi, Fatuma; Marchant, Tanya; Tanner, Marcel; Mshinda, Hassan; Schellenberg, David; Hill, Zelee

    2013-03-01

    The study explored the childbirth-related hygiene and newborn care practices in home-deliveries in Southern Tanzania and barriers to and facilitators of behaviour change. Eleven home-birth narratives and six focus group discussions were conducted with recently-delivering women; two focus group discussions were conducted with birth attendants. The use of clean cloth for delivery was reported as common in the birth narratives; however, respondents did not link its use to newborn's health. Handwashing and wearing of gloves by birth attendants varied and were not discussed in terms of being important for newborn's health, with few women giving reasons for this behaviour. The lack of handwashing and wearing of gloves was most commonly linked to the lack of water, gloves, and awareness. A common practice was the insertion of any family member's hands into the vagina of delivering woman to check labour progress before calling the birth attendant. The use of a new razor blade to cut the cord was near-universal; however, the cord was usually tied with a used thread due to the lack of knowledge and the low availability of clean thread. Applying something to the cord was near-universal and was considered essential for newborn's health. Three hygiene practices were identified as needing improvement: family members inserting a hand into the vagina of delivering woman before calling the birth attendant, the use of unclean thread, and putting substances on the cord. Little is known about families conducting internal checks of women in labour, and more research is needed before this behaviour is targeted in interventions. The use of clean thread as cord-tie appears acceptable and can be addressed, using the same channels and methods that were used for successfully encouraging the use of new razor blade.

  15. Effects of Epidural Spinal Cord Stimulation and Treadmill Training on Locomotion Function and Ultrastructure of Spinal Cord Anterior Horn after Moderate Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yizhao; HUANG Xiaolin; XU Jiang; XU Tao; FANG Zhengyu; XU Qi; TU Xikai; YANG Peipei

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS) and treadmill training on the locomotion function and ultrastructure of spinal cord anterior horn after moderate spinal cord injury in rats. (IT, n=3). All rats received a moderate spinal cord injury surgery. Four weeks after surgery, rats in SE group received an electrode implantation procedure, with the electrode field covering spinal cord segments L2-S1. Four weeks after electrode implantation, rats received subthreshold ESCS for 30 min/d. Rats in TY group received 4cm/s treadmill training for 30min/d. Rats in SI group received no intervention, as a control group. All procedures in these three groups lasted four weeks.The open field Basso,Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) scale was used before and after intervention to evaluate rats' hindlimb motor function. Result:After four weeks intervention, rats in TT group improved their open field locomotion scores to 20. In contrast, no significant improvement was observed in groups SI and SE. The morphology of synapses and neurons were similar regardless of whether rats had undergone ESCS, treadmill training or not. Conclusion:ESCS alone was not sufficient to improve the walking ability of spinal cord injured rats. ESCS or treadmill training alone might not contribute to the changes of ultrastructure in anterior horn of spinal cord that underlie the recovery of walking ability. Further research is needed to understand the contributions of combination of ESCS and treadmill training to the rehabilitation of spinal cord injured rats.

  16. Tethered Cord Syndrome Secondary to the Unusual Constellation of a Split Cord Malformation, Lumbar Myelomeningocele, and Coexisting Neurenteric Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humphrey Okechi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a seminal case report of a child with a tethered cord syndrome secondary to the unusual constellation of a split cord malformation, lumbar myelomeningocele, and coexisting neurenteric cyst. A 17-year-old adolescent girl with a several-month history of myelopathy and urinary incontinence was examined whose spinal MRI scan demonstrated a type II split cord malformation with a large bone spur and an intradural neurenteric cyst in addition to lumbar myelomeningocele. Untethering of the spinal cord was achieved via a lumbar laminectomy. Pathological examination confirmed the intradural cyst to be a neurenteric cyst. Postoperatively there was stabilization of the neurological symptoms. Prophylactic surgery with total resection of the neurenteric cyst when feasible and spinal cord un-tethering appears to be associated with excellent outcomes.

  17. Penetration through the Skin Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Benfeldt, Eva; Holmgaard, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    The skin is a strong and flexible organ with barrier properties essential for maintaining homeostasis and thereby human life. Characterizing this barrier is the ability to prevent some chemicals from crossing the barrier while allowing others, including medicinal products, to pass at varying rates......-through diffusion cells) as well as in vivo methods (microdialysis and microperfusion). Then follows a discussion with examples of how different characteristics of the skin (age, site and integrity) and of the penetrants (size, solubility, ionization, logPow and vehicles) affect the kinetics of percutaneous...

  18. A LOOK AT CULTURAL BARRIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A. VRÂNCEANU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the global market allows each individual to work in foreign countries. This fact is a great opportunity for business development, but also puts into light the problem of cultural barriers. Ineffective cross-cultural communication and collaboration can harm employees, customers, and other stakeholders. A company with employees from different cultures must acknowledge and understand these barriers in order to overcome them and to obtain the desired performance. The present study aims to expose the cultural barriers encountered by foreigners in a multinational company from Romania.

  19. Recruitment of beneficial M2 macrophages to injured spinal cord is orchestrated by remote brain choroid plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Ravid; Miller, Omer; Yovel, Gili; Rosenzweig, Neta; London, Anat; Ruckh, Julia; Kim, Ki-Wook; Klein, Eugenia; Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Bendel, Peter; Lira, Sergio A; Jung, Steffen; Schwartz, Michal

    2013-03-21

    Monocyte-derived macrophages are essential for recovery after spinal cord injury, but their homing mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we show that although of common origin, the homing of proinflammatory (M1) and the "alternatively activated" anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages to traumatized spinal cord (SC) was distinctly regulated, neither being through breached blood-brain barrier. The M1 macrophages (Ly6c(hi)CX3CR1(lo)) derived from monocytes homed in a CCL2 chemokine-dependent manner through the adjacent SC leptomeninges. The resolving M2 macrophages (Ly6c(lo)CX3CR1(hi)) derived from monocytes trafficked through a remote blood-cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) barrier, the brain-ventricular choroid plexus (CP), via VCAM-1-VLA-4 adhesion molecules and epithelial CD73 enzyme for extravasation and epithelial transmigration. Blockage of these determinants, or mechanical CSF flow obstruction, inhibited M2 macrophage recruitment and impaired motor-function recovery. The CP, along with the CSF and the central canal, provided an anti-inflammatory supporting milieu, potentially priming the trafficking monocytes. Overall, our finding demonstrates that the route of monocyte entry to central nervous system provides an instructional environment to shape their function.

  20. Vocal cord palsy: An uncommon presenting feature of myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethi Prahlad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vocal cord palsy can have myriad causes. Unilateral vocal cord palsy is common and frequently asymptomatic. Trauma, head, neck and mediastinal tumors as well as cerebrovascular accidents have been implicated in causing unilateral vocal cord palsy. Viral neuronitis accounts for most idiopathic cases. Bilateral vocal cord palsy, on the other hand, is much less common and is a potentially life-threatening condition. Myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disorder caused by antibodies targeting the post-synaptic acetylcholine receptor, has been infrequently implicated in its causation. We report here a case of bilateral vocal cord palsy developing in a 68-year-old man with no prior history of myasthenia gravis 2 months after he was operated on for diverticulitis of the large intestine. Delay in considering the diagnosis led to endotracheal intubation and prolonged mechanical ventilation with attendant complications. Our case adds to the existing literature implicating myasthenia gravis as an infrequent cause of bilateral vocal cord palsy. Our case is unusual as, in our patient, acute-onset respiratory distress and stridor due to bilateral vocal cord palsy was the first manifestation of a myasthenic syndrome.

  1. Localization of Brain Natriuretic Peptide Immunoreactivity in Rat Spinal Cord

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    Essam M Abdelalim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP exerts its functions through natriuretic peptide receptors. Recently, BNP has been shown to be involved in a wide range of functions. Previous studies reported BNP expression in the sensory afferent fibers in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. However, BNP expression and function in the neurons of the central nervous system are still controversial. Therefore, in this study, we investigated BNP expression in the rat spinal cord in detail using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. RT-PCR analysis showed that BNP mRNA was present in the spinal cord and DRG. BNP immunoreactivity was observed in different structures of the spinal cord, including the neuronal cell bodies and neuronal processes. BNP immunoreactivity was observed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and in the neurons of the intermediate column and ventral horn. Double-immunolabeling showed a high level of BNP expression in the afferent fibers (laminae I-II labeled with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, suggesting BNP involvement in sensory function. In addition, BNP was co-localized with CGRP and choline acetyltransferase in the motor neurons of the ventral horn. Together, these results indicate that BNP is expressed in sensory and motor systems of the spinal cord, suggesting its involvement in several biological actions on sensory and motor neurons via its binding to NPR-A and/or NPR-B in the DRG and spinal cord.

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves local microenvironment after spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Wang; Shuquan Zhang; Min Luo; Yajun Li

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves motor function in patients with spinal cord injury. In the present study, we explored the mechanisms associated with the recovery of neurological function after hyperbaric oxygen therapy in a rat model of spinal cord injury. We established an acute spinal cord injury model using a modiifcation of the free-falling object method, and treated the animals with oxygen at 0.2 MPa for 45 minutes, 4 hours after injury. The treatment was administered four times per day, for 3 days. Compared with model rats that did not receive the treatment, rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen had fewer apoptotic cells in spinal cord tissue, lower expression levels of aquaporin 4/9 mRNA and protein, and more NF-200 positive nerve ifbers. Furthermore, they had smaller spinal cord cavities, rapid recovery of somatosensory and motor evoked potentials, and notably better recovery of hindlimb motor function than model rats. Our ifndings indicate that hyperbaric oxygen therapy reduces apop-tosis, downregulates aquaporin 4/9 mRNA and protein expression in injured spinal cord tissue, improves the local microenvironment for nerve regeneration, and protects and repairs the spinal cord after injury.

  3. Epidemiologic evidence of spinal cord injury in Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelamegan Sridharan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal cord injury is a fearsome disability leading to increased rate of morbidity and mortality. Information about the incidence of spinal cord injury may provide support for the healthcare advancements. The aim of the present study is to investigate the epidemiology of spinal cord injury. Methods: The present study was carried out in Rajiv Gandhi government general hospital, Chennai, India. The study design was approved by the institutional human ethical committee. Questionnaire was used to collect the information from the patients in a prospective manner. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA scoring systems was used to evaluate the severity of spinal cord injury. Results: A total of 245 cases of spinal injury were studied. Among them, 88 % (n=216 were male and 12% (n=29 were female. Spinal cord injuries of falls from height were prominent over the road traffic accident. Cervical level injuries are widespread in males and dorsal level Injuries are common in females. Conclusion: Hence awareness of the spinal cord injury and availability of healthcare facilities may minimise the consequences of spinal cord injury. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(1.000: 220-223

  4. Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and requirements will be discussed. An experimental approach is established to monitor in real time the thermal conductivity of the coating systems subjected to high-heat-flux, steady-state and cyclic temperature gradients. Advanced low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have also been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability. The durability and erosion resistance of low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have been improved utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, in conjunction with more sophisticated modeling and design tools.

  5. Coastal Structures and Barriers 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset is a compilation of the UCSC Sand Retention Structures, MC Barriers, and USACE Coastal Structures. UCSC Sand Retention Structures originate from a...

  6. Guided tissue regeneration. Absorbable barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H L; MacNeil, R L

    1998-07-01

    Over the past 15 years, techniques aimed at regeneration of lost periodontal tissue have become widely used and accepted in clinical practice. Among these techniques are those which use the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR), wherein barriers (i.e., membranes) are used to control cell and tissue repopulation of the periodontal wound. A variety of non-absorbable and absorbable barriers have been developed and used for this purpose, with a trend in recent years toward increased use of absorbable GTR materials. This article describes the evolution of absorbable barrier materials and overview materials available for clinical use today. In addition, advantages and disadvantages of these materials are discussed, as well as possible new developments in barrier-based GTR therapy.

  7. The role of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in glial scar formation following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Hong; Sung, Chun-Sung; Huang, Shi-Ying; Feng, Chien-Wei; Hung, Han-Chun; Yang, San-Nan; Chen, Nan-Fu; Tai, Ming-Hong; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Wu-Fu

    2016-04-01

    Several studies suggest that glial scars pose as physical and chemical barriers that limit neurite regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI). Evidences suggest that the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway is involved in glial scar formation. Therefore, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway may beneficially attenuate glial scar formation after SCI. Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) negatively regulates the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Therefore, we hypothesized that the overexpression of PTEN in the spinal cord will have beneficial effects after SCI. In the present study, we intrathecally injected a recombinant adenovirus carrying the pten gene (Ad-PTEN) to cause overexpression of PTEN in rats with contusion injured spinal cords. The results suggest overexpression of PTEN in spinal cord attenuated glial scar formation and led to improved locomotor function after SCI. Overexpression of PTEN following SCI attenuated gliosis, affected chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expression, and improved axon regeneration into the lesion site. Furthermore, we suggest that the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in astrocytes at 3 days after SCI may be involved in glial scar formation. Because delayed treatment with Ad-PTEN enhanced motor function recovery more significantly than immediate treatment with Ad-PTEN after SCI, the results suggest that the best strategy to attenuate glial scar formation could be to introduce 3 days after SCI. This study's findings thus have positive implications for patients who are unable to receive immediate medical attention after SCI.

  8. Systemic administration of an antagonist of the ATP-sensitive receptor P2X7 improves recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weiguo; Cotrina, Maria L; Han, Xiaoning; Yu, Hongmei; Bekar, Lane; Blum, Livnat; Takano, Takahiro; Tian, Guo-Feng; Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2009-07-28

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is characterized by an immediate, irreversible loss of tissue at the lesion site, as well as a secondary expansion of tissue damage over time. Although secondary injury should, in principle, be preventable, no effective treatment options currently exist for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Excessive release of ATP by the traumatized tissue, followed by activation of high-affinity P2X7 receptors, has previously been implicated in secondary injury, but no clinically relevant strategy by which to antagonize P2X7 receptors has yet, to the best of our knowledge, been reported. Here we have tested the neuroprotective effects of a systemically administered P2X7R antagonist, Brilliant blue G (BBG), in a weight-drop model of thoracic SCI in rats. Administration of BBG 15 min after injury reduced spinal cord anatomic damage and improved motor recovery without evident toxicity. Moreover, BBG treatment directly reduced local activation of astrocytes and microglia, as well as neutrophil infiltration. These observations suggest that BBG not only protected spinal cord neurons from purinergic excitotoxicity, but also reduced local inflammatory responses. Importantly, BBG is a derivative of a commonly used blue food color (FD&C blue No. 1), which crosses the blood-brain barrier. Systemic administration of BBG may thus comprise a readily feasible approach by which to treat traumatic SCI in humans.

  9. Nonlocal reflection by photonic barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Vetter, R. -M.; A. Haibel; Nimtz, G.

    2001-01-01

    The time behaviour of microwaves undergoing partial reflection by photonic barriers was measured in the time and in the frequency domain. It was observed that unlike the duration of partial reflection by dielectric layers, the measured reflection duration of barriers is independent of their length. The experimental results point to a nonlocal behaviour of evanescent modes at least over a distance of some ten wavelengths. Evanescent modes correspond to photonic tunnelling in quantum mechanics.

  10. Schooling Inequality and Language Barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Susan W.; Rubalcava, Luis; Teruel, Graciela

    2005-01-01

    This article estimates the impact of language barriers on school achievement and the potential ameliorating role of bilingual education. Using large household data sets from poor rural communities in Mexico, we find that parental language (failure to speak Spanish) represents an important barrier to the schooling of indigenous children. We provide an empirical test suggesting that this largely reflects parental human capital related to culture/language, rather than unobserved wealth effects. ...

  11. Epidural spinal cord stimulation for recovery from spinal cord injury: its place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques L

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Line Jacques, Michael Safaee Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA Abstract: This paper is a review of some of the current research focused on using existing epidural spinal cord stimulation technologies in establishing the effectiveness in the recovery of independent standing, ambulation, or intentional movement of spinal cord injury patients. From a clinician’s perspective, the results have been intriguing, from a restorative perspective they are promising, and from a patient’s perspective they are hopeful. The outcomes, although still in the experimental phase, show some proof of theory and support further research. From a high volume university based clinician’s perspective, the resources needed to integrate this type of restorative care into a busy clinical practice are highly challenging without a well-structured and resource rich institutional restorative program. Patient selection is profoundly critical due to the extraordinary resources needed, and the level of motivation required to participate in such an intense and arduous rehabilitation process. Establishing an algorithmic approach to patient selection and treatment will be paramount to effectively utilize scarce resources and optimize outcomes. Further research is warranted, and the development of dedicated technological hardware and software for this therapeutic treatment versus using traditional spinal cord stimulation devices may yield more robust and efficacious outcomes. Keywords: independent standing, ambulation, intentional movement, recovery, rehabilitation, locomotion

  12. Economic alternatives for containment barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson, P.J.; Jasperse, B.H.; Fisher, M.J. [Geo-Con, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Fixation, barriers, and containment of existing landfills and other disposal areas are often performed by insitu auger type soil mixing and jet grouting. Cement or other chemical reagents are mixed with soil to form both vertical and horizontal barriers. Immobilization of contaminants can be economically achieved by mixing soil and the contaminants with reagents that solidify or stabilize the contaminated area. Developed in Japan, and relatively new to the United States, the first large scale application was for a vertical barrier at the Jackson Lake Dam project in 1986. This technology has grown in both the civil and environmental field since. The paper describes current United States practice for Deep Soil Mixing (over 12 meters in depth), and Shallow Soil Mixing for vertical barriers and stabilization/solidification, and Jet Grouting for horizontal and vertical barriers. Creating very low permeability barriers at depth with minimal surface return often makes these techniques economical when compared to slurry trenches. The paper will discuss equipment, materials, soil and strength parameters, and quality control.

  13. MR imaging of diseases of the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarae, Satoshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2002-11-01

    Spinal cord lesions are infrequently encountered in daily diagnostic imaging practice, although the spinal cord can be affected by various diseases. MR findings of diseases that can affect the spinal cord, including syringomyelia, vascular diseases, arteriovenous malformation, and demyelinating and inflammatory diseases, are reviewed. Because intramedullary lesions can be visualized on MR images, that imaging modality plays an important role in the diagnosis of these diseases. However, MR findings are sometimes nonspecific. Therefore integration of clinical history and laboratory data with MR findings is essential in making the final diagnosis. (author)

  14. Procedure for action in the donation of umbilical cord blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Herrera Gómez

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are candidates for donation and transplantation in certain diseases, such as treatment of choice. Stem cells from umbilical cord blood are of particular interest as a gift, for many reasons. It should be noted that the umbilical cord blood is a single, limited source of hematopoietic progenitor cells, and the eventual success of a transplant, cellular viability and retained sample are critical, so the extraction process transport and cryopreservation must be performed under strict quality control criteria. Objective: To describe the procedure extacción umbilical cord blood to be carried out in units of delivery, to ensure quality results.

  15. Clinical diagnosis analysis in 21 cases of spinal cord disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong

    2000-01-01

    21 cases of spinal cord disease were clinically analyzed of which 14 cases were male. 7 female, aged from 30 to 69, weraged 50.9. This group contained 2 cases of consciusness dysfunction. 2l of sensational dysfunction. 19 of morion dysrunction, 11 of aotonomic nerve dysrunction, 2 of, sexual dysfunction. 2 of Brown-Sequrd syndrome. llhad been chrmcally sympromatic for more than two months. the other were of acute for sub acute onset. The segments of the diseases were found mainly at cervical and thoracic ones. to which more attention should be pazd clincally. The incidences of intramedullary lesions were a bit more than that of extramedullary ones. Of the 11 extramendullary cases, 8 arised srorn verteoral body (72.7%), of which 6 cases arisen form the intervertebral dies, or 75%. On which emphasis should be laid clinically Foci in brain and spinal cord were found synchronically in 5 cases (23.8%). They were Wernick cerebral disease, metastetic cerebral tumor, cerebral infarction, polioencephalomyelitis. So possibility of brain disease should also be considerod when diagnosing spinai cord disease, especially in stenosis of cervical canal. Oppressed spinal cord was accodiated with cerebellopontine angle tumor. Disease in brain was negiected because of concermng spinal cord disease and cerehellopontine angie giant meningiona was discovered 5 yeas laaer. There are several methods to diagnose spinal cord disease, including X-rays photography, CSF test, CT, and MRI, etc. X-rays photography should be used for involved vertebral body in lateral and P-A position at first when to suspect spinal cord disease. It should be avoided that neglecting X-rays photography and using CT or MRIfirst. It should be noted when taking segments examination by CT or MRI, thut the actual vertebral body is usually located 7'- 14 segments below the spinal cord involved. Otherwise, misdiagnosis would be resulted. 4 c ases of oppressive spinal cord disease of this group were treated with operating

  16. Partial agonistic action of endomorphins in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, H; Wu, H E; Narita, M

    2001-09-07

    The partial agonistic properties of endogenous mu-opioid peptides endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 for G-protein activation were determined in the mouse spinal cord, monitoring the increases in guanosine-5'-o-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding. The G-protein activation induced by endogenous opioid peptide beta-endorphin in the spinal cord was significantly, but partially, attenuated by co-incubation with endomorphin-1 or endomorphin-2. The data indicates that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 are endogenous partial agonists for mu-opioid receptor in the mouse spinal cord.

  17. Cardiac arrhythmias associated with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hector, Sven Magnus; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Krassioukov, Andrei;

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT/OBJECTIVES: To review the current literature to reveal the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and its relation to spinal cord injury (SCI). METHODS: Data source: MEDLINE database, 304 hits, and 32 articles were found to be relevant. The relevant articles all met the inclusion criteria: (1......) contained original data (2) on cardiac arrhythmias (3) in humans with (4) traumatic SCI. RESULTS: In the acute phase of SCI (1-14 days after injury) more cranial as well as more severe injuries seemed to increase the incidence of bradycardia. Articles not covering the first 14 days after injury, thus...... as during procedures such as penile vibro-stimulation and tracheal suction. These episodes of bradycardia were seen more often in individuals with cervical injuries. Longitudinal studies with continuous electrocardiogram recordings are needed to uncover the true relation between cardiac arrhythmias and SCI....

  18. Early elective colostomy following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Michelle

    Elective colostomy is an accepted method of bowel management for patients who have had a spinal cord injury (SCI). Approximately 2.4% of patients with SCI have a colostomy, and traditionally it is performed as a last resort several years after injury, and only if bowel complications persist when all other methods have failed. This is despite evidence that patients find a colostomy easier to manage and frequently report wishing it had been performed earlier. It was noticed in the author's spinal unit that increasing numbers of patients were requesting colostomy formation during inpatient rehabilitation following SCI. No supporting literature was found for this; it appears to be an emerging and untested practice. This article explores colostomy formation as a method of bowel management in patients with SCI, considers the optimal time for colostomy formation after injury and examines issues for health professionals.

  19. How to improve cord blood engraftment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral eBeksac

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Various factors make cord blood (CB a significant source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC, including ease of procurement and lack of donor attrition, with the ability to process and store the donor cells long term. Importantly, high proliferative potential of the immature HSCs allows one log less use of cells compared to bone marrow (BM or peripheral blood stem cells. As total nucleated cell (TNC and CD34 + cell content of CB grafts are correlated with engraftment rate and speed, strategies to expand HSC and homing have been developed. This chapter will focus on modalities such as intra-bone administration, fucosylation, CD26 inhibition, Prostaglandin G2 derivative or complement 3 exposure and SDF-1/CXCR4/CXCL-12 pathway interventions that have been experimented successfully. Furthermore increasing evidence in line with better recognition of CB progenitors that are involved in engraftment and homing will also be addressed.

  20. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging and tractography of the lower spinal cord: application to diastematomyelia and tethered cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, Christopher G.; Gonyea, Jay V.; Linnell, Grant [University of Vermont College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fletcher Allen Healthcare, Burlington, VT (United States); Andrews, Trevor [University of Vermont College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fletcher Allen Healthcare, Burlington, VT (United States); Philips Healthcare, Highland Heights, OH (United States); Cauley, Keith A. [University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    To investigate the feasibility of routine clinical DTI of the lower spinal cord using high-field-strength MRI and parallel imaging, and to evaluate the utility of diffusion tensor imaging and tractography as tools for study of lower cord pathology. Three patients with diastematomyelia, one patient with tethered cord, and six normal volunteers underwent MR imaging of the lower spine at 3 T. A 15-channel spine coil and parallel imaging were used with a six-direction single-shot echo-planar gradient echo technique. In normal volunteers, tractography delineated the conus and cauda equina. Tractography software permitted assessment of fractional anisotropy of the distal cord and nerve roots. In cases of tethered cord, tractography correlated with anatomical imaging. Tractography also correlated with the anatomical pathological findings in cases of diastematomyelia. The methods described enable routine DTI and tractography of the lower spinal cord at 3 T. Compared with conventional imaging, tractography offers additional information that may prove useful in the characterization and surgical planning for congenital lesions involving the lower spinal cord. (orig.)

  1. Changes of intracellular calcium and the correlation with functional damage of the spinal cord after spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章亚东; 侯树勋; 吴叶

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To observe dynamic changes of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) after spinal cord injury, and to study the relationship between the changes of [Ca2+]i and the functional damage of the spinal cord.   Methods: The rats were subjected to a spinal cord contusion by using a modified Allens method. The [Ca2+]i in the injured segment of the spinal cord was measured by the technique of La3+ blockage and atomic absorption spectroscopy at 1, 4, 8, 24, 72, and 168 hours after injury. The motor function on the inclined plane was measured at the same time.   Results: The spinal cord [Ca2+]i increased significantly (P<0.05 or P<0.01) after spinal cord injury. There was a significant correlation (P<0.05) between the changes of [Ca2+]i and the motor function.   Conclusions: [Ca2+]i overload may play an important role in the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury.

  2. Vascular dysfunctions following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Constantin; Popa, Florian; Grigorean, Valentin Titus; Onose, Gelu; Sandu, Aurelia Mihaela; Popescu, Mihai; Burnei, Gheorghe; Strambu, Victor; Sinescu, Crina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the vascular dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Vascular dysfunctions are common complications of SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. Neuroanatomy and physiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, is reviewed. SCI implies disruption of descendent pathways from central centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating in intermediolateral nuclei of T1-L2 cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant vascular dysfunction. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and it is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life-threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5-T6). Arterial hypotension with orthostatic hypotension occurs in both acute and chronic phases. The etiology is multifactorial. We described a few factors influencing the orthostatic hypotension occurrence in SCI: sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, low plasma catecholamine levels, rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone activity, peripheral alpha-adrenoceptor hyperresponsiveness, impaired function of baroreceptors, hyponatremia and low plasmatic volume, cardiovascular deconditioning, morphologic changes in sympathetic neurons, plasticity within spinal circuits, and motor deficit leading to loss of skeletal muscle pumping activity. Additional associated cardiovascular concerns in SCI, such as deep vein

  3. CORRELATION OF UMBILICAL CORD LENGTH WITH FOETAL A ND MATERNAL OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The cord disposition and length of umbilical cord in the amniotic cavity remain unrecognised till the birth of the ba by.Cord complications remain one of the major causes of foetal death. OBJECTIVES: To study 1. Length of umbilical cord in new-born babies 2. The outcome of pregnancy with abnormal length of umb ilical cord 3. The relation between umbilical cord length and cord abnormalities 4. Relation between umbilical cord abnormalities and pe rinatal outcome METHODS: This study of 200 cases was carried out in S.R.T.R. Medical College, Ambajogai over a period of 6 months from Jan 2011 to Jun 2011. 100 cases belonged to control group (cord length 50-60 cm. Study group had short cord (i.e. c ord length less than 50 cm comprising 20 cases and long cord (i.e. cord length above 60 cm comprising 80 cases. Apgar score at 1 and 5 minutes after birth were recorded. Birth weight and sex of all babies were noted. Number of loops of cord and position noted. Cord loop tight or l oose noted (only for LSCS cases. RESULTS: Maximum numbers of cases were from age group 20-24 years. Parity was not found to affect cord length. Maximum cases (31.25% of fo etal distress were found in group with cord length more than 60 cm. Significantly low APGAR sco re at 5 mins noted in long cord group (15% than control group. Cord length in control and study group in relation to the sex of the foetus was found to be statistically insignificant. 30 cases from long cord group required caesarean section and most of them for foetal distr ess. Cord entanglement (88.75% was the most common complication in long cord group. CONCLUSION: Minimum observed cord length in this study was 28 c m and maximum cord length was 98 cm. There was no relation between mat ernal age, parity, sex of the foetus with the umbilical cord length. Cord abnormalities were obse rved in long cord group only. Higher percentage of caesarean section and perinatal mortali ty was more in long

  4. Comparing the Effect of Topical Application of Human Milk and Dry Cord Care on Umbilical Cord Separation Time in Healthy Newborn Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Aghamohammadi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Comparing the effect of topical human milk application and dry cord care on cord separation time.Methods: This research was a randomized clinical trial study on 130 singleton and mature newborns.Newborns were placed randomly in groups of topical application of human milk and dry cord care. Theumbilical separation time was compared in the two groups. Data was analyzed by SPSS software. Independent Samples t-Test, χ2, Fisher were used in this study.Findings: Median time of cord separation in human milk application group (150.95±28.68 hours was significantly shorter than dry cord care group (180.93±37.42 hours (P<0.001.Conclusion: Topical application of human milk on the remaining part of the cord reduces the cord separation time and it can be used as an easy, cheap and non invasive way for cord care.

  5. Filaggrin and Skin Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezic, Sanja; Jakasa, Ivone

    2016-01-01

    The skin barrier function is greatly dependent on the structure and composition of the uppermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum (SC), which is made up of flattened anucleated cells surrounded by highly organized and continuous lipid matrix. The interior of the corneocytes consists mainly of keratin filaments aggregated by filaggrin (FLG) protein. Next, together with several other proteins, FLG is cross-linked into a mechanically robust cornified cell envelope providing a scaffold for the extracellular lipid matrix. In addition to its role for the SC structural and mechanical integrity, FLG degradation products account in part for the water-holding capacity and maintenance of acidic pH of the SC, both crucial for the epidermal barrier homoeostasis by regulating activity of multiple enzymes that control desquamation, lipid synthesis and inflammation. The major determinant of FLG expression in the skin are loss-of-function mutations in FLG, the strongest genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD), an inflammatory skin disease characterized by a reduced skin barrier function. The prevalence of FLG mutations varies greatly among different populations and ranges from about 10% in Northern Europeans to less than 1% in the African populations. An impaired skin barrier facilitates absorption of potentially hazardous chemicals, which might cause adverse effects in the skin, such as contact dermatitis, or systemic toxicity after their passage into blood. In another direction, a leaky epidermal barrier will lead to enhanced loss of water from the skin. A recent study has shown that even subtle increase in epidermal water loss in newborns increases the risk for AD. Although there are multiple modes of action by which FLG might affect skin barrier it is still unclear whether and how FLG deficiency leads to the reduced skin barrier function. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge in this field obtained from clinical studies, and animal and in vitro models

  6. Diabetes and diet: Managing dietary barriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friele, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports on the barriers diabetic patients experience with their diet, and the ways they cope with these barriers. A dietary barrier is a hinderance to a person's well-being, induced by being advised a diet. First inventories were made of possible dietary barriers and ways of coping with

  7. Saving the leftovers: models for banking cord blood stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, Kimberly J

    2009-01-01

    Each year there are over four million live births in the United States. Each birth produces umbilical cord blood stem cells, which are usually discarded. The author argues that rather than discarding the umbilical cord, this valuable resource of cord blood should be banked and used for research and therapeutic purposes. Umbilical cord blood could provide a solution to the critical need to find matching donors for hematopoietic transplants in patients who have no matching bone marrow donors. Creating a system of universal donation to a public bank will greatlyincrease the number of donors and therefore, the number of matches for patients. Such a system will facilitate the development and use of new technologies and transplant procedures, while providing an opportunity for treatment to individuals who would otherwise not be able to find suitable donors.

  8. Sex Cord-Gonadal Stromal Tumor of the Rete Testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran P. Sajadi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 34-year-old tetraplegic patient with suppurative epididymitis was found on follow-up examination and ultrasonography to have a testicular mass. The radical orchiectomy specimen contained an undifferentiated spindled sex cord-stromal tumor arising in the rete testis. Testicular sex cord-stromal tumors are far less common than germ cell neoplasms and are usually benign. The close relationship between sex cords and ductules of the rete testis during development provides the opportunity for these uncommon tumors to arise anatomically within the rete tesis. This undifferentiated sex cord-stromal tumor, occurring in a previously unreported location, is an example of an unusual lesion mimicking an intratesticular malignant neoplasm.

  9. Inhibitory zinc-enriched terminals in mouse spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danscher, G; Jo, S M; Varea, E;

    2001-01-01

    The ultrastructural localization of zinc transporter-3, glutamate decarboxylase and zinc ions in zinc-enriched terminals in the mouse spinal cord was studied by zinc transporter-3 and glutamate decarboxylase immunohistochemistry and zinc selenium autometallography, respectively.The distribution...

  10. Umbilical cord clamping. An analysis of a usual neonatological conduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagno, L

    1998-01-01

    Here we described a critical analysis of the neonatological procedure of early cord clamping, meaning this, within 40 seconds after birth. Fifty three cases are here analysed, in which this practice was not performed, but instead a late umbilical cord clamping was done after birth or after the cord had stopped beating. Variations in hematocrito values within 24 to 36 hours after birth were studied. A transitory polycithemia, with a maximum peak 12 hours post-delivery was observed. These values returned to normal levels between 24 and 36 hours after birth. K vitamin was not administered to any of the newborns. No pathology appeared related to this transitory polycithemia. In can be concluded that the late umbilical cord clamping represents no risk to the new-born and that the pathological phenomena described under these circumstances may be attributed to the increase in K vitamin dependent coagulation factors that are induced by the routinary administration of phitonadione to all normal newborns.

  11. What Are Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells in the brain. They transmit chemical and electric signals that determine thought, memory, emotion, speech, muscle movement, ... brain and spinal cord. This helps neurons send electric signals through the axons. Tumors starting in these cells ...

  12. How Are Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumor. This still requires making an incision and drilling a small hole into the skull. The biopsy ... requests, please see our Content Usage Policy . Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Brain and Spinal Cord ...

  13. Comparing the Effect of Topical Application of Human Milk and Dry Cord Care on Umbilical Cord Separation Time in Healthy Newborn Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Aghamohammadi, Azar; Zafari, Mandana; Moslemi, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Objective Comparing the effect of topical human milk application and dry cord care on cord separation time. Methods This research was a randomized clinical trial study on 130 singleton and mature newborns. Newborns were placed randomly in groups of topical application of human milk and dry cord care. The umbilical separation time was compared in the two groups. Data was analyzed by SPSS software. Independent Samples t-Test, χ2, Fisher were used in this study. Findings Median time of cord sepa...

  14. Caesarean section in a parturient with a spinal cord stimulator.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sommerfield, D

    2010-01-01

    A 35-year-old G2P1 parturient at 32 weeks of gestation with an implanted spinal cord stimulator was admitted for urgent caesarean section. Spinal anaesthesia was performed below the spinal cord stimulator leads at the L4-5 level, and a healthy female infant was delivered. A basic description of the technology and resulting implications for the parturient are discussed.

  15. Robust, accurate and fast automatic segmentation of the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Kadoury, Samuel; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2014-09-01

    Spinal cord segmentation provides measures of atrophy and facilitates group analysis via inter-subject correspondence. Automatizing this procedure enables studies with large throughput and minimizes user bias. Although several automatic segmentation methods exist, they are often restricted in terms of image contrast and field-of-view. This paper presents a new automatic segmentation method (PropSeg) optimized for robustness, accuracy and speed. The algorithm is based on the propagation of a deformable model and is divided into three parts: firstly, an initialization step detects the spinal cord position and orientation using a circular Hough transform on multiple axial slices rostral and caudal to the starting plane and builds an initial elliptical tubular mesh. Secondly, a low-resolution deformable model is propagated along the spinal cord. To deal with highly variable contrast levels between the spinal cord and the cerebrospinal fluid, the deformation is coupled with a local contrast-to-noise adaptation at each iteration. Thirdly, a refinement process and a global deformation are applied on the propagated mesh to provide an accurate segmentation of the spinal cord. Validation was performed in 15 healthy subjects and two patients with spinal cord injury, using T1- and T2-weighted images of the entire spinal cord and on multiecho T2*-weighted images. Our method was compared against manual segmentation and against an active surface method. Results show high precision for all the MR sequences. Dice coefficients were 0.9 for the T1- and T2-weighted cohorts and 0.86 for the T2*-weighted images. The proposed method runs in less than 1min on a normal computer and can be used to quantify morphological features such as cross-sectional area along the whole spinal cord.

  16. Spinal cord injury reveals multilineage differentiation of ependymal cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Meletis; Fanie Barnabé-Heider; Marie Carlén; Emma Evergren; Nikolay Tomilin; Oleg Shupliakov; Jonas Frisén

    2008-01-01

    Author Summary Spinal cord injuries occur in more than 30.000 individuals each year worldwide and result in significant morbidity, with patients requiring long physical and medical care. The recent identification of resident stem cells in the adult spinal cord has opened up for the possibility of pharmacological manipulation of these cells to produce cell types promoting recovery after injury. We have employed genetic tools to specifically address the identity and reaction to injury of a spin...

  17. International spinal cord injury musculoskeletal basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Burns, A S; Curt, A;

    2012-01-01

    To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Musculoskeletal Basic Data Set as part of the International SCI Data Sets to facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic musculoskeletal findings in the SCI population.Setting:International.......To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Musculoskeletal Basic Data Set as part of the International SCI Data Sets to facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic musculoskeletal findings in the SCI population.Setting:International....

  18. International spinal cord injury pulmonary function basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Krassioukov, A; Alexander, M S;

    2012-01-01

    To develop the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Pulmonary Function Basic Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets in order to facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic bronchopulmonary findings in the SCI population.......To develop the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Pulmonary Function Basic Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets in order to facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic bronchopulmonary findings in the SCI population....

  19. Bilirubin dosage in cord blood: could it predict neonatal hyperbilirubinemia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adélia Jeha Nasser Bernaldo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: With early discharge, many newborns have to be readmitted to hospital for hyperbilirubinemia to be treated, and this has been held responsible for the reappearance of kernicterus. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether bilirubin levels in cord blood could predict neonatal hyperbilirubinemia that would require treatment, in full-term newborns up to their third day of life. TYPE OF STUDY: Prospective study. SETTING: Neonatal Unit of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: 380 full-term newborns considered normal: with or without ABO/Rh blood group incompatibility and without other complications. PROCEDURES: Blood was taken from the umbilical cord for analysis of conjugated, unconjugated and total bilirubin serum levels. The newborns were followed up until discharge, and unconjugated bilirubin that required phototherapy was compared to the cord bilirubin assay. Discriminant analysis was used to classify newborns: with or without risk of needing phototherapy by the third day of life. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Bilirubin assay in cord blood; mother's and newborn's blood groups; phototherapy indication. RESULTS: The mean value for unconjugated bilirubin in cord blood was significantly higher in newborns whose unconjugated bilirubin required phototherapy. The presence of ABO blood group incompatibility was a significant variable in relation to unconjugated bilirubin that required phototherapy. The most useful cutoff point for unconjugated bilirubin in cord blood was 2.0 mg/100 ml. DISCUSSION: Cord blood could be collected, stored and used for further analysis of unconjugated bilirubin levels as a means for considering whether or not to discharge a moderately jaundiced child from hospital, in association with other resources. CONCLUSIONS: Blood incompatibility between mother and child was a predictor for the appearance of hyperbilirubinemia that required treatment. Considering a cutoff point of 2.0 mg/100 ml, it could be concluded

  20. Surgical Outcomes of High-Grade Spinal Cord Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Syunsuke; Aoyama, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Izumi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to obtain useful information for establishing the guidelines for treating high-grade spinal cord gliomas. Overview of Literature The optimal management of high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains controversial. We report the outcomes of the surgical management of 14 high-grade spinal glioma. Methods We analyzed the outcomes of 14 patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas who were surgically treated between 1989 and 2012. Survival was charted with the Kaplan-Meier plots and comparisons were made with the log-rank test. Results None of the patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas underwent total resection. Subtotal resection was performed in two patients, partial resection was performed in nine patients, and open biopsy was performed in three patients. All patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy and six patients further underwent radiation cordotomy. The median survival time for patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas was 15 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 22.2%. The median survival time for patients with World Health Organization grade III tumors was 25.5 months, whereas the median survival time for patients with glioblastoma multiforme was 12.5 months. Both univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models demonstrated a significant effect only in the group that did not include cervical cord lesion as a factor associated with survival (p=0.04 and 0.03). Conclusions The surgical outcome of patients diagnosed with high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains poor. Notably, only the model which excluded cervical cord lesions as a factor significantly predicted survival. PMID:26713128

  1. Comparison of Upright Gait with Supine Bungee-Cord Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Wanda L.; Hargens, Alan R.; Campbell, J. A.; Yang, C.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Running on a treadmill with bungee-cord resistance is currently used on the Russian space station MIR as a countermeasure for the loss of bone and muscular strength which occurs during spaceflight. However, it is unknown whether ground reaction force (GRF) at the feet using bungee-cord resistance is similar to that which occurs during upright walking and running on Earth. We hypothesized-that the DRAMs generated during upright walking and running are greater than the DRAMs generated during supine bungee-cord gait. Eleven healthy subjects walked (4.8 +/- 0.13 km/h, mean +/- SE) and ran (9.1 +/- 0.51 km/h) during upright and supine bungee-cord exercise on an active treadmill. Subjects exercised for 3 min in each condition using a resistance of 1 body weight calibrated during an initial, stationary standing position. Data were sampled at a frequency of 500Hz and the mean of 3 trials was analyzed for each condition. A repeated measures analysis of variance tested significance between the conditions. Peak DRAMs during upright walking were significantly greater (1084.9 +/- 111.4 N) than during supine bungee-cord walking (770.3 +/- 59.8 N; p less than 0.05). Peak GRFs were also significantly greater for upright running (1548.3 +/- 135.4 N) than for supine bungee-cord running (1099.5 +/- 158.46 N). Analysis of GRF curves indicated that forces decreased throughout the stance phase for bungee-cord gait but not during upright gait. These results indicate that bungee-cord exercise may not create sufficient loads at the feet to counteract the loss of bone and muscular strength that occurs during long-duration exposure to microgravity.

  2. International Spinal Cord Injury Urinary Tract Infection Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetz, L L; Cardenas, D D; Kennelly, M

    2013-01-01

    To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Basic Data Set presenting a standardized format for the collection and reporting of a minimal amount of information on UTIs in daily practice or research.......To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Basic Data Set presenting a standardized format for the collection and reporting of a minimal amount of information on UTIs in daily practice or research....

  3. Serotonergic signaling inhibits hyperalgesia induced by spinal cord damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Hideki; Ogata, Tadanori; Morino, Tadao; Takeba, Jun; Yamamoto, Haruyasu

    2003-02-14

    Although dysesthesia is one of the most serious problems in patients with spinal cord injury, most of them being unresponsive to conventional treatments. In this study, we established a rat thoracic spinal cord mild-compression model that revealed thermal hyperalgesia in the hind limb. The thoracic spinal cord was compressed gently, using a 20 g weight for 20 min. The withdrawal latency of the thermal stimulation of the bilateral hind-limb was monitored using Hargreaves' Plantar test apparatus. In this model, thermal-hyperalgesia was observed for 1 week after the injury. The spinal cord injury-induced thermal-hyperalgesia was mimicked by the intrathecal application of metergoline, a non-selective 5-HT antagonist, 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-[4-(2-phthalimido) butyl]-piperazine hydrobromide (NAN190), a selective 5-HT1 antagonist, and 3-tropanyl-3,5-dichlorobenzoate (MDL72222), a selective 5-HT3 antagonist. Intraperitoneal application of fluvoxamine maleate, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, reduced the intensity of hyperalgesia induced by spinal cord injury. The inhibitory effect of fluvoxamine maleate on thermal hyperalgesia was prevented by the application of the aforementioned nonselective or selective 5-HT receptor antagonists. Intrathecal application of fluvoxamine maleate and selective 5-HT receptor agonists, i.e., 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-proplyamino)-tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT: 5HT-1 selective) and 2-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine maleate (2-m-5-HT: 5HT-3 selective), inhibited the spinal cord injury-induced hyperalgesia. These results suggest that the change in the descending serotonergic signal plays an important role in hyperalgesia after the spinal cord injury, and that the application of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors will be one of the candidates for new therapeutic methods against post-spinal cord injury dysesthesia.

  4. Transcutaneous electrical spinal-cord stimulation in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Gerasimenko, Yury; Gorodnichev, Ruslan; Moshonkina, Tatiana; Sayenko, Dimitry; Gad, Parag; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2015-01-01

    Locomotor behavior is controlled by specific neural circuits called central pattern generators primarily located at the lumbosacral spinal cord. These locomotor-related neuronal circuits have a high level of automaticity; that is, they can produce a “stepping” movement pattern also seen on electromyography (EMG) in the absence of supraspinal and/or peripheral afferent inputs. These circuits can be modulated by epidural spinal-cord stimulation and/or pharmacological intervention. Such interven...

  5. Complex split-cord malformation associated with situs inversus totalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Agrawal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Although meningoceles are known to be associated with split cord malformations, the association of dextrocardia is extremely rare. The authors report a case of a 15 day male child who had an atretic meningocele in the lumbosacral region along with dextrocardia and a split cord malformation with a posterior spur. This importance of preoperative MRI for proper management of such patients is highlighted in this report.

  6. Lineage specification of neuronal precursors in the mouse spinal cord.

    OpenAIRE

    L.J. Richards; Murphy, M.; Dutton, R; Kilpatrick, T J; Puche, A. C.; Key, B; Tan, S S; Talman, P S; Bartlett, P. F.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the differentiation potential of precursor cells within the developing spinal cord of mice and have shown that spinal cord cells from embryonic day 10 specifically give rise to neurons when plated onto an astrocytic monolayer, Ast-1. These neurons had the morphology of motor neurons and > 83% expressed the motor neuron markers choline acetyltransferase, peripherin, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and L-14. By comparison, < 10% of the neurons arising on monolayers of othe...

  7. Myelin water fraction in human cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yijing; Alexander, Andrew L; Fleming, John O; Duncan, Ian D; Field, Aaron S

    2006-01-01

    The noninvasive discrimination of myelin disease from axonal loss and other pathologic confounds remains an unsolved problem in multiple sclerosis but may be possible through magnetic resonance quantitation of the intramyelinic water compartment. Technical challenges have limited the study of this approach in the spinal cord, a common site of involvement in multiple sclerosis. This technical note reports the test-retest reproducibility of a short T2-based estimate of myelin content in human spinal cord in vivo.

  8. The Prediction of Mobility Gains in Cervical Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Technical Information Service AD-A027 771 THE PREDICTION OF MOBILITY GAINS IN CERVICAL SPINAL CORD INJURIES ...The treatment of spinal cord injuries is a controversial subject among physicians 8,10 The choice of a particular procedure depends ~on the...location and severity of the injury as well as ffhe physical condition of the patient. The effectiveness of the treatment is usually rrasured in terms of

  9. Heterogeneity of Opioid Binding Sites in Guinea Pig Spinal Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-30

    neuron . Thalamic projection neurons that receive enkephalin contacts in lamina V of the spinal cord are multipolar cells that received enkephalin...opioid terminals on thalamic projection neurons may have a functional organization was shown in recent work by Ruda and co-workers (1984). In this work...thalamic projection neurons in lamina I of spinal cord receive immunoreactive enkephalin staining contacts on the soma or proximal dendrites of the

  10. Cylindrical air flow reversal barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woznica, C.; Rodziewicz, M.

    1988-06-01

    Describes an innovative design introduced in the ZMP mine in Zory for quick reversal of ventilation air flow. Geologic mining conditions at the 705 m deep horizon, where the barrier was built, are described. According to the design used until now, a reversal system consisted of safety barriers, ventilation air locks, a ventilation bridge and stopping needed in case of a fire when air flow direction must be reversed. Nine air locks and an expensive concrete ventilation bridge were needed and the air locks had to be operated at 8 points of the region to effect reversal. The new design consists of a 2-storey cylindrical barrier which also fulfills the function of a ventilation bridge. It can be manually or remotely operated by a mechanical or pneumatic system. Tests showed that the new barrier permits immediate air flow reversal while retaining 60% of the original air, which is important in the case of fire and methane hazards. It permits improved seam panelling and splitting of pillars and brings an economy of about 40 million zlotys in construction cost. Design and operation of the barrier is illustrated and ventilation air circulation is explained. 7 figs.

  11. Comparing the Effect of Topical Application of Maternal Milk, 96% Ethyl Alcohol, and Dry Cord Care on Umbilical Cord Separation Time in Healthy Full-Term Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Eghbalian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Umbilical cord infections are of main causes for neonatal morbidities and mortalities. Different methods are used for umbilical cord care with multifarious efficien-cies. The aim of this study was to compare three methods of local use of maternal milk, local use of 96% ethyl alcohol, and dry cord care. Materials & Methods: In this prospective, randomized, clinical trial, 207 healthy full-term neo-nates were randomly assigned to three groups. In the first and second groups, mothers rubbed her milk and 96% ethyl alcohol on umbilical cord until two days after its separation, respec-tively. In the third group, they only kept the cord clean and dry. The length of umbilical cord separation was compared among the groups with ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests. Results: The difference among lengths of umbilical cord separation in three groups was statis-tically significant. For alcohol users group, this time was significantly longer than that for the other two groups. The difference between cord separation time in maternal milk users and dry cord care groups was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Usage of maternal milk on umbilical cord and keeping the cord dry are acceptable methods but alcohol is not recommended for cord care in healthy term neonates with home care and in normal state. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2015; 22 (1:5-10

  12. Comparison of the effect of topical application of human milk and dry cord care on the bacterial colonization of umbilical cord in newborn infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Abbaszadeh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast milk contains significant amounts of compounds that act as natural antimicrobial agents. This study was conducted to compare the effect of topical application of human milk and dry cord care on bacterial colonization in the umbilical cord of newborn infants. Methods: This clinical trial study was carried out on 174 infants in Kashan. The newborns were randomized to mother's milk group and dry cord care group from the birth. In group 1, the mother rubbed her own milk on the cord stump every 12 hours from 3 hours after birth to 2 days after the umbilical cord separation. In group 2, the mother was recommended not to use any material on the cord. Then, the cord samples were taken four times; 3hours after birth, at days 3 and 7, and 2 days after the umbilical cord separation. Results: The findings of the culture two days after umbilical cord separation indicated that low percentage of neonates in the breast milk (23.1% and dry cord care (28.8% groups had bacterial colonization. Moreover, no significant difference was found between the two groups in terms of growth of pathogenic organisms and normal flora of the skin (P>0.05. Conclusion: Given the low prevalence of pathogenic microorganisms in the two groups, it seems using breast milk and dry cord care are equally effective methods of taking care of umbilical cord.

  13. A Surgery Protocol for Adult Zebrafish Spinal Cord Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Fang; Jin-Fei Lin; Hong-Chao Pan; Yan-Qin Shen; Melitta Schachner

    2012-01-01

    Adult zebrafish has a remarkable capability to recover from spinal cord injury,providing an excellent model for studying neuroregeneration.Here we list equipment and reagents,and give a detailed protocol for complete transection of the adult zebrafish spinal cord.In this protocol,potential problems and their solutions are described so that the zebrafish spinal cord injury model can be more easily and reproducibly performed.In addition,two assessments are introduced to monitor the success of the surgery and functional recovery:one test to assess free swimming capability and the other test to assess extent of neuroregeneration by in vivo anterograde axonal tracing.In the swimming behavior test,successful complete spinal cord transection is monitored by the inability of zebrafish to swim freely for 1 week after spinal cord injury,followed by the gradual reacquisition of full locomotor ability within 6 weeks after injury.As a morphometric correlate,anterograde axonal tracing allows the investigator to monitor the ability of regenerated axons to cross the lesion site and increasingly extend into the gray and white matter with time after injury,confirming functional recovery.This zebrafish model provides a paradigm for recovery from spinal cord injury,enabling the identification of pathways and components of neuroregeneration.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal-cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takahisa; Iwata, Kinjiro (Aichi Medical Univ., Nagakute (Japan)); Okumura, Terufumi; Hoshino, Daisaku

    1992-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a noninvasive and very important method of investigating spinal-cord injuries. By means of MRI we examined 36 patients with spinal injuries, 34 of them in the acute stage. 19 cases had complete spinal-cord injury with paraplegia, while 17 cases had incomplete spinal-cord injury. MRI showed the injured spinal-cord in the acute stage to be partially swollen, with a high signal intensity in the T[sub 2]-weighted images. In the chronic stage, the injured cord may show atrophic changes with a post-traumatic cavity or myelomalacia, which appears as a high-signal-intensity lesion in the T[sub 2]-weighted images and as a low-signal intensity in the T[sub 1]-weighted images. The cases with complete spinal injuries showed a high signal intensity at the wide level, and these prognoses were poor. The cases with incomplete injuries showed normal findings or a high-signal-intensity spot. In the Gd-DTPA enhanced images, the injured cords were enhanced very well in the subchronic stage. MRI is thus found to be useful in the diagnosis of spinal injuries; it also demonstrates a potential for predicting the neurological prognosis. (author).

  15. Effects of smoking on the elderly people's vocal cords dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasconcelos, Sandrelli Virginio de

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Smoking is highly aggressive and the vocal tract is one of the main risk factors for cancer of the larynx. The tobacco may lead to irritation of the vocal tract, edema in the vocal cords, hoarseness, coughing, increased secretion and infections. Objective: To evaluate the dimensions of the vocal cords in elderly smokers and male non-smokers. Method: We studied 15 male corpses, aged from 60 to 90 years, 8 of whom were non-smokers and 7 smokers. For data collection, four sequential steps were followed: 1st Clinical history of the corpse; 2nd Removal of the larynx, 3rd Dissection of the larynx and 4th Morphometry of the vocal cords dimensions. Results: There was no statistically significant difference as for the morphology of the vocal cords dimensions between elderly smokers and nonsmokers, and the length (p = 0.58, width (p = 0.72 and thickness (p = 0.65 were equivalent between both groups. Conclusion: We confirmed it's macroscopically impossible to find differences caused by smoking in the three dimensions of the vocal cords, however, in the histology, smokers are proved to be more susceptible to findings regarding dysplasia and neoplasms in the vocal cords tissue with problems in voice quality.

  16. Adult spinal cord ependymal layer: A promising pool of quiescent stem cells to treat spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros eMalas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury is a major health burden and currently there is no effective medical intervention. Research performed over the last decade revealed that cells surrounding the central canal of the adult spinal cord and forming the ependymal layer acquire stem cell properties either in vitro or in response to injury. Following spinal cord injury activated ependymal cells generate progeny cells which migrate to the injury site but fail to produce the appropriate type of cells in sufficient number to limit the damage, rendering this physiological response mainly ineffective. Research is now focusing on the manipulation of ependymal cells to produce cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage which are primarily lost in such a situation leading to secondary neuronal degeneration. Thus, there is a need for a more focused approach to understand the molecular properties of adult ependymal cells in greater detail and develop effective strategies for guiding their response during spinal cord injury.

  17. Independent spinal cord atrophy measures correlate to motor and sensory deficits in individuals with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Hans Magnus Henrik; Barthelemy, Dorothy; Skimminge, A.;

    2011-01-01

    to sensory and motor outcome in individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI).Setting:Danish study on human SCI.Methods:We included 19 individuals with chronic incomplete SCI and 16 healthy controls. Participants underwent MRI and a neurological examination including sensory testing for light......Study design:Cross-sectional descriptive analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical outcome.Objectives:The aim of this study was to present anatomically consistent and independent spinal cord atrophy measures based on standard MRI material and analyze their specific relations...... touch and pinprick, and muscle strength. Antero-posterior width (APW), left-right width (LRW) and cross-sectional spinal cord area (SCA) were extracted from MRI at the spinal level of C2. The angular variation of the spinal cord radius over the full circle was also extracted and compared...

  18. Cerebral activation is correlated to regional atrophy of the spinal cord and functional motor disability in spinal cord injured individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Christensen, Mark Schram; Barthélemy, Dorothy;

    2011-01-01

    Recovery of function following lesions in the nervous system requires adaptive changes in surviving circuitries. Here we investigate whether changes in cerebral activation are correlated to spinal cord atrophy and recovery of functionality in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). 19...... to the width of the spinal cord in the left-right direction, where the corticospinal tract is located, but not in the antero-posterior direction. There was a tendency for a negative correlation between cerebral activation in ipsilateral S1, M1 and PMC and the amplitude of motor evoked potentials...... in the tibialis anterior muscle elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation, but this did not reach statistical significance. There was no correlation between motor score or spinal cord dimensions and the volume of the cortical motor areas. The observations show that lesion of descending tracts in the lateral...

  19. Structure information from fusion barriers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S V S Sastry; S Santra

    2000-06-01

    It is shown that the analysis of fusion barrier distributions is not always an unambiguous test or a ‘fingerprint’ of the structure information of the colliding nuclei. Examples are presented with same fusion barrier distributions for nuclei having different structures. The fusion excitation functions for 16O+208Pb, using the coupled reaction channel (CRC) method and correct structure information, have been analysed. The barrier distributions derived from these excitation functions including many of the significant channels are featureless, although these channels have considerable effects on the fusion excitation function. However, a simultaneous analysis of the fusion, elastic and quasi-elastic channels would fix the structure and the reaction unambiguously

  20. Skin Barrier Function and Allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, Kristiane Aasen; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2016-01-01

    The skin is an important barrier protecting us from mechanical insults, microorganisms, chemicals and allergens, but, importantly, also reducing water loss. A common hallmark for many dermatoses is a compromised skin barrier function, and one could suspect an elevated risk of contact sensitization...... and skin barrier status. Psoriasis has traditionally been regarded a Th1-dominated disease, but the discovery of Th17 cells and IL-17 provides new and interesting information regarding the pathogenesis of the disease. Research suggests an inverse relationship between psoriasis and CA, possibly due......) and Th2 (AD) have been proposed as an explanation. Finally, there is convincing evidence that exposure to irritants increases the risk of CS, and patients with ICD are, therefore, at great risk of developing CA. Skin irritation leads to the release of IL-1 and TNF-α, which affects the function of antigen...

  1. Quality of Red Blood Cells Isolated from Umbilical Cord Blood Stored at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariia Zhurova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cells (RBCs from cord blood contain fetal hemoglobin that is predominant in newborns and, therefore, may be more appropriate for neonatal transfusions than currently transfused adult RBCs. Post-collection, cord blood can be stored at room temperature for several days before it is processed for stem cells isolation, with little known about how these conditions affect currently discarded RBCs. The present study examined the effect of the duration cord blood spent at room temperature and other cord blood characteristics on cord RBC quality. RBCs were tested immediately after their isolation from cord blood using a broad panel of quality assays. No significant decrease in cord RBC quality was observed during the first 65 hours of storage at room temperature. The ratio of cord blood to anticoagulant was associated with RBC quality and needs to be optimized in future. This knowledge will assist in future development of cord RBC transfusion product.

  2. Transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promotes functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury in Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, L.P. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Neurociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Iglesias, D. [Laboratório de Hematologia e Células-Tronco, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Nicola, F.C. [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Steffens, D. [Laboratório de Hematologia e Células-Tronco, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Valentim, L.; Witczak, A.; Zanatta, G. [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Achaval, M. [Departamento de Ciências Morfológicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pranke, P. [Laboratório de Hematologia e Células-Tronco, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Netto, C.A. [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2011-12-23

    Cell transplantation is a promising experimental treatment for spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood in promoting functional recovery when transplanted after a contusion spinal cord injury. Female Wistar rats (12 weeks old) were submitted to spinal injury with a MASCIS impactor and divided into 4 groups: control, surgical control, spinal cord injury, and one cell-treated lesion group. Mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood of human male neonates were transplanted in two experiments: a) 1 h after surgery, into the injury site at a concentration of 5 x 10{sup 6} cells diluted in 10 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 8-10 per group); b) into the cisterna magna, 9 days after lesion at a concentration of 5 x 10{sup 6} cells diluted in 150 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 12-14 per group). The transplanted animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin-A (10 mg/kg per day). The BBB scale was used to evaluate motor behavior and the injury site was analyzed with immunofluorescent markers to label human transplanted cells, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes. Spinal cord injury rats had 25% loss of cord tissue and cell treatment did not affect lesion extension. Transplanted cells survived in the injured area for 6 weeks after the procedure and both transplanted groups showed better motor recovery than the untreated ones (P < 0.05). The transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promoted functional recovery with no evidence of cell differentiation.

  3. Adult spinal cord ependymal layer: a promising pool of quiescent stem cells to treat spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Panayiotou, Elena; Malas, Stavros

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major health burden and currently there is no effective medical intervention. Research performed over the last decade revealed that cells surrounding the central canal of the adult spinal cord and forming the ependymal layer acquire stem cell properties either in vitro or in response to injury. Following SCI activated ependymal cells generate progeny cells which migrate to the injury site but fail to produce the appropriate type of cells in sufficient number to l...

  4. Transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promotes functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell transplantation is a promising experimental treatment for spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood in promoting functional recovery when transplanted after a contusion spinal cord injury. Female Wistar rats (12 weeks old were submitted to spinal injury with a MASCIS impactor and divided into 4 groups: control, surgical control, spinal cord injury, and one cell-treated lesion group. Mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood of human male neonates were transplanted in two experiments: a 1 h after surgery, into the injury site at a concentration of 5 x 10(6 cells diluted in 10 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 8-10 per group; b into the cisterna magna, 9 days after lesion at a concentration of 5 x 10(6 cells diluted in 150 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 12-14 per group. The transplanted animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin-A (10 mg/kg per day. The BBB scale was used to evaluate motor behavior and the injury site was analyzed with immunofluorescent markers to label human transplanted cells, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes. Spinal cord injury rats had 25% loss of cord tissue and cell treatment did not affect lesion extension. Transplanted cells survived in the injured area for 6 weeks after the procedure and both transplanted groups showed better motor recovery than the untreated ones (P < 0.05. The transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promoted functional recovery with no evidence of cell differentiation.

  5. Influence of Spinal Cord Integrity on Gait Control in Human Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awai, Lea; Bolliger, Marc; Ferguson, Adam R; Courtine, Grégoire; Curt, Armin

    2016-07-01

    Background Clinical trials in spinal cord injury (SCI) primarily rely on simplified outcome metrics (ie, speed, distance) to obtain a global surrogate for the complex alterations of gait control. However, these assessments lack sufficient sensitivity to identify specific patterns of underlying impairment and to target more specific treatment interventions. Objective To disentangle the differential control of gait patterns following SCI beyond measures of time and distance. Methods The gait of 22 individuals with motor-incomplete SCI and 21 healthy controls was assessed using a high-resolution 3-dimensional motion tracking system and complemented by clinical and electrophysiological evaluations applying unbiased multivariate analysis. Results Motor-incomplete SCI patients showed varying degrees of spinal cord integrity (spinal conductivity) with severe limitations in walking speed and altered gait patterns. Principal component (PC) analysis applied on all the collected data uncovered robust coherence between parameters related to walking speed, distortion of intralimb coordination, and spinal cord integrity, explaining 45% of outcome variance (PC 1). Distinct from the first PC, the modulation of gait-cycle variables (step length, gait-cycle phases, cadence; PC 2) remained normal with respect to regained walking speed, whereas hip and knee ranges of motion were distinctly altered with respect to walking speed (PC 3). Conclusions In motor-incomplete SCI, distinct clusters of discretely controlled gait parameters can be discerned that refine the evaluation of gait impairment beyond outcomes of walking speed and distance. These findings are specifically different from that in other neurological disorders (stroke, Parkinson) and are more discrete at targeting and disentangling the complex effects of interventions to improve walking outcome following motor-incomplete SCI.

  6. Sound propagation over curved barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Allan D.; Main, Geoffrey L.; Kearns, James A.; Hsieh, H.-A.

    1986-01-01

    Wide barriers with curved tops are studied with emphasis placed on circumstances whereby the local radius of curvature R of the barrier is continuous along the surface and is large compared to a wavelength. Results analogous to those given by Hayek et al. (1978) are reviewed and extended to cases where the radius of curvature and the surface impedance may vary with position. Circumstances not easily interpreted within the framework of the model proposed by Keller (1956) and Hayek et al. are also considered.

  7. [Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with unrelated cord blood: report of three cases from the Chilean cord blood bank].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Francisco; Wietstruck, Angélica; Rojas, Nicolás; Bertin, Pablo; Pizarro, Isabel; Carmona, Amanda; Guilof, Alejandro; Rojas, Iván; Oyarzún, Enrique

    2013-08-01

    Public cord blood banks are a source of hematopoietic stem cells for patients with hematological diseases who lack a family donor and need allogeneic transplantation. In June 2007 we started a cord blood bank with units donated in three maternity wards in Santiago, Chile. We report the first three transplants done with cord blood units form this bank. Cord blood units were obtained by intrauterine collection at delivery. They were depleted of plasma and red cells and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tests for total nucleated cells, CD34 cell content, viral serology, bacterial cultures and HLA A, B and DRB1 were done. Six hundred cord blood units were stored by March 2012. Three patients received allogeneic transplant with cord blood from our bank, two with high risk lymphoblastic leukemia and one with severe congenital anemia. They received conditioning regimens according to their disease and usual supportive care for unrelated donor transplantation until full hematopoietic and immune reconstitution was achieved. The three patients had early engraftment of neutrophils and platelets. The child corrected his anemia and the leukemia patients remain in complete remission. The post-transplant course was complicated with Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and BK virus infection. Two patients are fully functional 24 and 33 months after transplant, the third is still receiving immunosuppression.

  8. In Vivo Measurement of Cervical Spinal Cord Deformation During Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in a Rodent Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Tim; Liu, Jie; Yung, Andrew; Cripton, Peter A; Kozlowski, Piotr; Oxland, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The spinal cord undergoes physical deformation during traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), which results in biological damage. This study demonstrates a novel approach, using magnetic resonance imaging and image registration techniques, to quantify the three-dimensional deformation of the cervical spinal cord in an in vivo rat model. Twenty-four male rats were subjected to one of two clinically relevant mechanisms of TSCI (i.e. contusion and dislocation) inside of a MR scanner using a novel apparatus, enabling imaging of the deformed spinal cords. The displacement fields demonstrated qualitative differences between injury mechanisms. Three-dimensional Lagrangian strain fields were calculated, and the results from the contusion injury mechanism were deemed most reliable. Strain field error was assessed using a Monte Carlo approach, which showed that simulated normal strain error experienced a bias, whereas shear strain error did not. In contusion injury, a large region of dorso-ventral compressive strain was observed under the impactor which extended into the ventral region of the spinal cord. High tensile lateral strains under the impactor and compressive lateral strains in the lateral white matter were also observed in contusion. The ability to directly observe and quantify in vivo spinal cord deformation informs our knowledge of the mechanics of TSCI.

  9. Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

    1980-09-01

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed.

  10. Anti-TPO antibodies diffusion through the placental barrier during pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Seror

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hashimoto's thyroiditis is the principal aetiology of hypothyroidism with presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO. The association between anti-TPO and foeto-placental complications has been observed in previous studies. To go further in the understanding, the current study compares the level of anti-TPO in maternal blood and in the cord blood of her fetus at the moment of childbirth to demonstrate the passage of anti-TPO through the placenta barrier. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This study was realised in a maternity ward located in the Northern district of Paris, France from 2006 to 2007. Women with normal pregnancy were included in a first study and only women with no abnormal thyroid dosage at baseline and tested positive with anti-TPO were prospectively enrolled. Maternal blood samples were collected in the third trimester and at the arrival to the ward when patients came to deliver. After delivery, cord blood sample was collected. Pearson's correlation coefficient was computed. 5941 patients delivered in the ward during the study, 33 pregnant women were included. We found a correlation between the anti-TPO levels in maternal and in the cord blood of their fetus with a correlation coefficient of 0.98 and a p-value<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first demonstration of the free passage through the placental barrier of anti-TPO from the mother to the fetus at the moment of childbirth. These findings can be extrapolated all along pregnancy and open the door to a direct action of the anti-TPO on fetus and to a possible action on the fetal thyroid.

  11. Toxoplasmosis in cord blood transplantation recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, G; Ramos, A; Forés, R; Regidor, C; Ruiz, E; de Laiglesia, A; Navarro, B; Bravo, J; Portero, F; Sanjuan, I; Fernández, M N; Cabrera, R

    2012-10-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a devastating opportunistic infection that can affect immunocompromised patients such as cord blood transplantation (CBT) recipients. The clinical characteristics of 4 toxoplasmosis CBT patients treated at our institution are reviewed, together with 5 cases collected from the literature. The rate of toxoplasmosis in our hospital was 6% in CBT recipients and 0.2% in other types of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (P < 0.001). Five patients (56%) presented disseminated toxoplasmosis and 4 patients (44%) had localized infection in the central nervous system. In 5 of the 9 patients considered (56%), cytomegalovirus viral replication had been detected before the clinical onset of toxoplasmosis. Seven patients (78%) had previously developed graft-versus-host disease. All patients who exhibited disseminated disease died due to Toxoplasma infection. Pre-transplant serology was positive in 1 patient, negative in 3 patients, and not performed in another. Only 1 of these 5 patients with disseminated disease had received Toxoplasma prophylaxis with cotrimoxazole. It could be concluded that mortality in CBT patients with disseminated toxoplasmosis is unacceptably high. The negative results of serology in the majority of these cases, and its unspecific clinical presentation, makes diagnosis exceedingly difficult. Better diagnostic tests and prophylaxis strategy are needed in CBT recipients.

  12. Imaging in spine and spinal cord malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Biancheri, Roberta; Cama, Armando; Piatelli, Gianluca; Ravegnani, Marcello; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2004-05-01

    Spinal and spinal cord malformations are collectively named spinal dysraphisms. They arise from defects occurring in the early embryological stages of gastrulation (weeks 2-3), primary neurulation (weeks 3-4), and secondary neurulation (weeks 5-6). Spinal dysraphisms are categorized into open spinal dysraphisms (OSDs), in which there is exposure of abnormal nervous tissues through a skin defect, and closed spinal dysraphisms (CSD), in which there is a continuous skin coverage to the underlying malformation. Open spinal dysraphisms basically include myelomeningocele and other rare abnormalities such as myelocele and hemimyelo(meningo)cele. Closed spinal dysraphisms are further categorized based on the association with low-back subcutaneous masses. Closed spinal dysraphisms with mass are represented by lipomyelocele, lipomyelomeningocele, meningocele, and myelocystocele. Closed spinal dysraphisms without mass comprise simple dysraphic states (tight filum terminale, filar and intradural lipomas, persistent terminal ventricle, and dermal sinuses) and complex dysraphic states. The latter category further comprises defects of midline notochordal integration (basically represented by diastematomyelia) and defects of segmental notochordal formation (represented by caudal agenesis and spinal segmental dysgenesis). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the preferred modality for imaging these complex abnormalities. The use of the aforementioned classification scheme is greatly helpful to make the diagnosis.

  13. Imaging in spine and spinal cord malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Andrea E-mail: a.rossi@panet.itandrearossi@ospedale-gaslini.ge.it; Biancheri, Roberta; Cama, Armando; Piatelli, Gianluca; Ravegnani, Marcello; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2004-05-01

    Spinal and spinal cord malformations are collectively named spinal dysraphisms. They arise from defects occurring in the early embryological stages of gastrulation (weeks 2-3), primary neurulation (weeks 3-4), and secondary neurulation (weeks 5-6). Spinal dysraphisms are categorized into open spinal dysraphisms (OSDs), in which there is exposure of abnormal nervous tissues through a skin defect, and closed spinal dysraphisms (CSD), in which there is a continuous skin coverage to the underlying malformation. Open spinal dysraphisms basically include myelomeningocele and other rare abnormalities such as myelocele and hemimyelo(meningo)cele. Closed spinal dysraphisms are further categorized based on the association with low-back subcutaneous masses. Closed spinal dysraphisms with mass are represented by lipomyelocele, lipomyelomeningocele, meningocele, and myelocystocele. Closed spinal dysraphisms without mass comprise simple dysraphic states (tight filum terminale, filar and intradural lipomas, persistent terminal ventricle, and dermal sinuses) and complex dysraphic states. The latter category further comprises defects of midline notochordal integration (basically represented by diastematomyelia) and defects of segmental notochordal formation (represented by caudal agenesis and spinal segmental dysgenesis). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the preferred modality for imaging these complex abnormalities. The use of the aforementioned classification scheme is greatly helpful to make the diagnosis.

  14. Symptomatic spinal cord metastasis from cerebral oligodendroglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elefante, A; Peca, C; Del Basso De Caro, M L; Russo, C; Formicola, F; Mariniello, G; Brunetti, A; Maiuri, F

    2012-06-01

    Spinal subarachnoid spread is not uncommon in brain oligodendrogliomas; on the other hand, symptomatic involvement of the spinal cord and cauda is very rare, with only 16 reported cases. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who underwent resection of a low-grade frontal oligodendroglioma 4 years previously. He was again observed because of bilateral sciatic pain followed by left leg paresis. A spine MRI showed an intramedullary T12-L1 tumor with root enhancement. At operation, an intramedullary anaplastic oligodendroglioma with left exophytic component was found and partially resected. Two weeks later, a large left frontoparietal anaplastic oligodendroglioma was diagnosed and completely resected. The patient was neurologically stable for 8 months and died 1 year after the spinal surgery because of diffuse brain and spinal leptomeningeal spread. The review of the reported cases shows that spinal symptomatic metastases can occur in both low-grade and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, even many years after surgery of the primary tumor; however, they exceptionally occur as first clinical manifestation or as anaplastic progression. The spinal seeding represents a negative event leading to a short survival.

  15. An update on spinal cord injury research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-Qi Cao; Er-Dan Dong

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can have a range of debilitating effects and permanently alter the capabilities and quality of life of survivors.The first specialized centers of care for SCI were established in 1944 and since then an increasing amount of research has been carried out in this area.Despite this,the present treatment and care levels for SCI are not comparable to those in other areas of medicine.In the clinic,the aim of SCI treatment is primarily to limit secondary damage by reducing compression in trauma spots and stabilizing the spinal column.Currently,no effective strategy for functional recovery is offered.In this review,we focus on research progress on the molecular mechanisms underlying SCI,and assess the treatment outcomes of SCI in animal models,i.e.,neurotrophins and stem cells are discussed as pre-clinical therapies in animal models.We also assess the resources available and national research projects carried out on SCI in China in recent years,as well as making recommendations for the future allocation of funds in this area.

  16. Therapeutic effects of NogoA vaccine and olfactory ensheathing glial cell implantation on acute spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Z

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Zhicheng Zhang, Fang Li, Tiansheng Sun, Dajiang Ren, Xiumei Liu PLA Institute of Orthopedics, Beijing Army General Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China Background: Many previous studies have focused on the effects of IN-1, a monoclonal antibody that neutralizes Nogo (a neurite growth inhibitory protein, on neurologic regeneration in spinal cord injury (SCI. However, safety problems and the short half-life of the exogenous antibody are still problematic. In the present study, the NogoA polypeptide was used as an antigen to make a therapeutic NogoA vaccine. Rats were immunized with this vaccine and were able to secrete the polyclonal antibody before SCI. The antibody can block NogoA within the injured spinal cord when the antibody gains access to the spinal cord due to a compromised blood–spinal cord barrier. Olfactory ensheathing glial cell transplantation has been used in a spinal cord contusion model to promote the recovery of SCI. The present study was designed to verify the efficacy and safety of NogoA polypeptide vaccine, the effects of immunotherapy with this vaccine, and the synergistic effects of the vaccine and olfactory ensheathing glial cells in repair of SCI. Methods: A 13-polypeptide fragment of NogoA was synthesized. This fragment was then coupled with keyhole limpet hemocyanin to improve the immunogenicity of the polypeptide vaccine. Immunization via injection into the abdominal cavity was performed in rats before SCI. The serum antibody level and ability of the vaccine to bind with Nogo were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The safety of the vaccine was evaluated according to the incidence and severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Olfactory ensheathing glia cells were obtained, purified, and subsequently implanted into a Wistar rat model of thoracic spinal cord contusion injury. The rats were divided into four groups, ie, an SCI model group, an olfactory ensheathing glia group, a vaccine

  17. Detection of gene expression pattern in the early stage after spinal cord injury by gene chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成龙; 靳安民; 童斌辉

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of the gene expression pattern of spinal cord tissues in the early stage after injury by DNA microarray (gene chip). Methods: The contusion model of rat spinal cord was established according to Allen's falling strike method and the gene expression patterns of normal and injured spinal cord tissues were studied by gene chip. Results: The expression of 45 genes was significantly changed in the early stage after spinal cord injury, in which 22 genes up-regulated and 23 genes down-regulated. Conclusions: The expression of some genes changes significantly in the early stage after spinal cord injury, which indicates the complexity of secondary spinal cord injury.

  18. Characterization of early and terminal complement proteins associated with polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro and in vivo after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvan Manuel D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complement system has been suggested to affect injury or disease of the central nervous system (CNS by regulating numerous physiological events and pathways. The activation of complement following traumatic CNS injury can also result in the formation and deposition of C5b-9 membrane attack complex (C5b-9/MAC, causing cell lysis or sublytic effects on vital CNS cells. Although complement proteins derived from serum/blood-brain barrier breakdown can contribute to injury or disease, infiltrating immune cells may represent an important local source of complement after injury. As the first immune cells to infiltrate the CNS within hours post-injury, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs may affect injury through mechanisms associated with complement-mediated events. However, the expression/association of both early and terminal complement proteins by PMNs has not been fully characterized in vitro, and has not observed previously in vivo after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI. Method We investigated the expression of complement mRNAs using rt-PCR and the presence of complement proteins associated with PMNs using immunofluroescence and quantitative flow cytometry. Results Stimulated or unstimulated PMNs expressed mRNAs encoding for C1q, C3, and C4, but not C5, C6, C7 or C9 in culture. Complement protein C1q or C3 was also detected in less than 30% of cultured PMNs. In contrast, over 70% of PMNs that infiltrated the injured spinal cord were associated with C1q, C3, C7 and C5b-9/MAC 3 days post-SCI. The localization/association of C7 or C5b-9/MAC with infiltrating PMNs in the injured spinal cord suggests the incorporation or internalization of C7 or C5b-9/MAC bound cellular debris by infiltrating PMNs because C7 and C5b-9/MAC were mostly localized to granular vesicles within PMNs at the spinal cord epicenter region. Furthermore, PMN presence in the injured spinal cord was observed for many weeks post-SCI, suggesting that this

  19. Efficacy of a metalloproteinase inhibitor in spinal cord injured dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jonathan M; Cohen, Noah D; Heller, Michael; Fajt, Virginia R; Levine, Gwendolyn J; Kerwin, Sharon C; Trivedi, Alpa A; Fandel, Thomas M; Werb, Zena; Modestino, Augusta; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is elevated within the acutely injured murine spinal cord and blockade of this early proteolytic activity with GM6001, a broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, results in improved recovery after spinal cord injury. As matrix metalloproteinase-9 is likewise acutely elevated in dogs with naturally occurring spinal cord injuries, we evaluated efficacy of GM6001 solubilized in dimethyl sulfoxide in this second species. Safety and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in naïve dogs. After confirming safety, subsequent pharmacokinetic analyses demonstrated that a 100 mg/kg subcutaneous dose of GM6001 resulted in plasma concentrations that peaked shortly after administration and were sustained for at least 4 days at levels that produced robust in vitro inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-9. A randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled study was then conducted to assess efficacy of GM6001 given within 48 hours of spinal cord injury. Dogs were enrolled in 3 groups: GM6001 dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (n = 35), dimethyl sulfoxide (n = 37), or saline (n = 41). Matrix metalloproteinase activity was increased in the serum of injured dogs and GM6001 reduced this serum protease activity compared to the other two groups. To assess recovery, dogs were a priori stratified into a severely injured group and a mild-to-moderate injured group, using a Modified Frankel Scale. The Texas Spinal Cord Injury Score was then used to assess long-term motor/sensory function. In dogs with severe spinal cord injuries, those treated with saline had a mean motor score of 2 (95% CI 0-4.0) that was significantly (Pinjured cord.

  20. Diffusion tensor tractography of the lower spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Fujikawa, Akira; Honya, Keita; Nitatori, Toshiaki [Kyorin University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Yuriko [Philips Medical Systems, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-03-15

    We employed a diffusion-tensor (DT) imaging technique involving a single-shot echo-planar sequence in combination with parallel imaging for tractography of the lower spinal cord and assessed the feasibility of this technique. Images were obtained at 1.5 T using a five-channel receiver coil. We used a single-shot echo-planar sequence with parallel imaging to acquire diffusion-weighted (DW) images in the axial plane with phase encoding in the right-left direction. A motion-probing gradient was applied in six directions with a b-value of 1,000 s/mm{sup 2}. The scan time was 5 min 15 s. On a reconstructed DW image in the sagittal plane, the spinal cord was included in a single region-of-interest to generate a tractogram of the entire cord in seven volunteers and nine patients with spinal canal stenosis or vertebral metastasis. In each subject, although the conus medullaris and cauda equina were continuously visualized, the cord was demonstrated as a bundle of tracts color-coded in the z-axis. Nerve roots were depicted showing color-coding in the x- and y-axes. In the patient group, displacement of the cord was depicted showing changes in the color of the cord. Displacement of the proximal nerve roots was also depicted in the two patients with vertebral metastasis. DT imaging using parallel imaging shows potential as a method for routine tractography of the lower spinal cord. (orig.)

  1. Functional barriers: Properties and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feigenbaum, A.; Dole, P.; Aucejo, S.; Dainelli, D.; Cruz Garcia, C. de la; Hankemeier, T.; N'Gono, Y.; Papaspyrides, C.D.; Paseiro, P.; Pastorelli, S.; Pavlidou, S.; Pennarun, P.Y.; Saillard, P.; Vidal, L.; Vitrac, O.; Voulzatis, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Functional barriers are multilayer structures deemed to prevent migration of some chemicals released by food-contact materials into food. In the area of plastics packaging, different migration behaviours of mono- and multilayer structures are assessed in terms of lag time and of their influence of t

  2. Barrier/Cu contact resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, J.S.; Nicolet, M.A. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Angyal, M.S.; Lilienfeld, D.; Shacham-Diamand, Y. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Smith, P.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-17

    The specific contact resistivity of Cu with ({alpha} + {beta})-Ta, TiN, {alpha}-W, and amorphous-Ta{sub 36}Si{sub 14}N{sub 50} barrier films is measured using a novel four-point-probe approach. Geometrically, the test structures consist of colinear sets of W-plugs to act as current and voltage probes that contact the bottom of a planar Cu/barrier/Cu stack. Underlying Al interconnects link the plugs to the current source and voltmeter. The center-to-center distance of the probes ranges from 3 to 200 {micro}m. Using a relation developed by Vu et al., a contact resistivity of roughly 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} {Omega} cm{sup 2} is obtained for all tested barrier/Cu combinations. By reflective-mode small-angle X-ray scattering, the similarity in contact resistivity among the barrier films may be related to interfacial impurities absorbed from the deposition process.

  3. Planar doped barrier subharmonic mixers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. H.; East, J. R.; Haddad, G. I.

    1992-01-01

    The Planar Doped Barrier (PDB) diode is a device consisting of a p(+) doping spike between two intrinsic layers and n(+) ohmic contacts. This device has the advantages of controllable barrier height, diode capacitance and forward to reverse current ratio. A symmetrically designed PDB has an anti-symmetric current vs. voltage characteristic and is ideal for use as millimeter wave subharmonic mixers. We have fabricated such devices with barrier heights of 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 volts from GaAs and InGaAs using a multijunction honeycomb structure with junction diameters between one and ten microns. Initial RF measurements are encouraging. The 0.7 volt barrier height 4 micron GaAs devices were tested as subharmonic mixers at 202 GHz with an IF frequency of 1 GHz and had 18 dB of conversion loss. The estimated mismatch loss was 7 dB and was due to higher diode capacitance. The LO frequency was 100.5 GHz and the pump power was 8 mW.

  4. FX barriers with smile dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, Glyn; Beneder, Reimer; Zilber, Alex

    2004-01-01

    Our mandate in this work has been to isolate the features of smile consistent models that are most relevant to the pricing of barrier options. We consider the two classical approaches of stochastic and (parametric) local volatility. Although neither has been particularly successful in practice their

  5. Plastic Schottky barrier solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, James R.; Cohen, Marshall J.

    1984-01-24

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped, intrinsically p-type organic semiconductor comprising polyacetylene. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a magnesium electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates the magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film.

  6. PDE 7 inhibitors: new potential drugs for the therapy of spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Paterniti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary traumatic mechanical injury to the spinal cord (SCI causes the death of a number of neurons that to date can neither be recovered nor regenerated. During the last years our group has been involved in the design, synthesis and evaluation of PDE7 inhibitors as new innovative drugs for several neurological disorders. Our working hypothesis is based on two different facts. Firstly, neuroinflammation is modulated by cAMP levels, thus the key role for phosphodiesterases (PDEs, which hydrolyze cAMP, is undoubtedly demonstrated. On the other hand, PDE7 is expressed simultaneously on leukocytes and on the brain, highlighting the potential crucial role of PDE7 as drug target for neuroinflammation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present two chemically diverse families of PDE7 inhibitors, designed using computational techniques such as virtual screening and neuronal networks. We report their biological profile and their efficacy in an experimental SCI model induced by the application of vascular clips (force of 24 g to the dura via a four-level T5-T8 laminectomy. We have selected two candidates, namely S14 and VP1.15, as PDE7 inhibitors. These compounds increase cAMP production both in macrophage and neuronal cell lines. Regarding drug-like properties, compounds were able to cross the blood brain barrier using parallel artificial membranes (PAMPA methodology. SCI in mice resulted in severe trauma characterized by edema, neutrophil infiltration, and production of a range of inflammatory mediators, tissue damage, and apoptosis. Treatment of the mice with S14 and VP1.15, two PDE7 inhibitors, significantly reduced the degree of spinal cord inflammation, tissue injury (histological score, and TNF-α, IL-6, COX-2 and iNOS expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: All these data together led us to propose PDE7 inhibitors, and specifically S14 and VP1.15, as potential drug candidates to be further studied for the treatment of SCI.

  7. Infraclavicular brachial plexus block: Comparison of posterior cord stimulation with lateral or medial cord stimulation, a prospective double blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushyant Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus sheath provides anesthesia for surgery on the distal arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand. It has been found that evoked distal motor response or radial nerve-type motor response has influenced the success rate of single-injection infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Aim: We conducted this study to compare the extent and effectiveness of infraclavicular brachial plexus block achieved by injecting a local anesthetic drug after finding specific muscle action due to neural stimulator guided posterior cord stimulation and lateral cord/medial cord stimulation. Methods: After ethical committee approval, patients were randomly assigned to one of the two study groups of 30 patients each. In group 1, posterior cord stimulation was used and in group 2 lateral/medial cord stimulation was used for infraclavicular brachial plexus block. The extent of motor block and effectiveness of sensory block were assessed. Results: All four motor nerves that were selected for the extent of block were blocked in 23 cases (76.7% in group 1 and in 15 cases (50.0% in group 2 (P:0.032. The two groups did not differ significantly in the number of cases in which 0, 1, 2, and 3 nerves were blocked (P>0.05. In group 1, significantly lesser number of patients had pain on surgical manipulation compared with patients of group 2 (P:0.037. Conclusion: Stimulating the posterior cord guided by a nerve stimulator before local anesthetic injection is associated with greater extent of block (in the number of motor nerves blocked and effectiveness of block (in reporting no pain during the surgery than stimulation of either the lateral or medial cord.

  8. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in spinal cord ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurnher, Majda M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Section, Vienna (Austria); Bammer, Roland [Stanford University, Lucas MRS/I Center, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Spinal cord infarction is a rare clinical diagnosis characterized by a sudden onset of paralysis, bowel and bladder dysfunction, and loss of pain and temperature perception, with preservation of proprioception and vibration sense. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) usually demonstrates intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted MR images with cord enlargement. However, in approximately 45% of patients, MR shows no abnormality. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) has been widely used for the evaluation of a variety of brain disorders, especially for acute stroke. Preliminary data suggest that DWI has the potential to be useful in the early detection of spinal infarction. We performed DWI, using navigated, interleaved, multishot echo planar imaging (IEPI), in a series of six patients with a clinical suspicion of acute spinal cord ischemia. In all patients, high signal was observed on isotropic DWI images with low ADC values (0.23 and 0.86 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/s), indicative of restricted diffusion. We analyzed the imaging findings from conventional MR sequences and diffusion-weighted MR sequences in six patients with spinal cord infarction, compared the findings with those in published series, and discuss the value of DWI in spinal cord ischemia based on current experience. Although the number of patients with described DWI findings totals only 23, the results of previously published studies and those of our study suggest that DWI has the potential to be a useful and feasible technique for the detection of spinal infarction. (orig.)

  9. Neuroprotection and its molecular mechanism following spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nai-Kui Liu; Xiao-Ming Xu

    2012-01-01

    Acute spinal cord injury initiates a complex cascade of molecular events termed 'secondary injury', which leads to progressive degeneration ranging from early neuronal apoptosis at the lesion site to delayed degeneration of intact white matter tracts, and, ultimately, expansion of the initial injury. These secondary injury processes include, but are not limited to, inflammation, free radical-induced cell death, glutamate excitotoxicity, phospholipase A2 activation, and induction of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, which are important targets in developing neuroprotective strategies for treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, a number of studies have shown promising results on neuroprotection and recovery of function in rodent models of spinal cord injury using treatments that target secondary injury processes including inflammation, phospholipase A2 activation, and manipulation of the PTEN-Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The present review outlines our ongoing research on the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection in experimental spinal cord injury and briefly summarizes our earlier findings on the therapeutic potential of pharmacological treatments in spinal cord injury.

  10. Early protective effects of Iloprost after experimental spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, A; Tuna, H; Sargon, M F; Yüceer, N; Türker, R K; Egemen, N

    1998-06-01

    This investigation was undertaken to study the early protective effects of Iloprost, a stable analogue of prostacyclin, after spinal cord injury in rabbit. Sixteen adult male rabbits (New Zealand Albino) were injured by application of epidural aneurysm clip. Eight rabbits received an intravenous (i.v.) infusion of 30 micrograms kg-1 Iloprost, and eight rabbits received an infusion of saline (SF). Treatment with Iloprost started immediately after spinal cord injury and continued for one hour. Evoked potentials were recorded for each rabbit at one, 15, and 60 minutes after the spinal cord injury. Twenty-four hours later, all the rabbits were deeply anesthetized and spinal cords were removed for histopathological examinations. There was no meaningful statistical difference between cortical somatosensorial evoked potentials (CSEP) of the saline and Iloprost group. However, light and electron microscopic studies showed that the Iloprost treated group had moderate protection of myelin and axons; and limited edema. These results suggest that intravenous Iloprost treatment after spinal cord injury has a highly protective effect without any side effects.

  11. Cervical spinal cord injury without radiological abnormality in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatoe H

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury occurring without concomitant radiologically demonstrable trauma to the skeletal elements of the spinal canal rim, or compromise of the spinal canal rim without fracture, is a rare event. Though documented in children, the injury is not very well reported in adults. We present seventeen adult patients with spinal cord injury without accompanying fracture of the spinal canal rim, or vertebral dislocation, seen over seven years. None had preexisting spinal canal stenosis or cervical spondylosis. Following trauma, these patients had weakness of all four limbs. They were evaluated by MRI (CT scan in one patient, which showed hypo / isointense lesion in the cord on T1 weighted images, and hyperintensity on T2 weighted images, suggesting cord contusion or oedema. MRI was normal in two patients. With conservative management, fifteen patients showed neurological improvement, one remained quadriplegic and one died. With increasing use of MRI in the evaluation of traumatic myelopathy, such injuries will be diagnosed more often. The mechanism of injury is probably acute stretching of the cord as in flexion and torsional strain. Management is essentially conservative and prognosis is better than that seen in patients with fracture or dislocation of cervical spine.

  12. Spinal cord evolution in early Homo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marc R; Haeusler, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery at Nariokotome of the Homo erectus skeleton KNM-WT 15000, with a narrow spinal canal, seemed to show that this relatively large-brained hominin retained the primitive spinal cord size of African apes and that brain size expansion preceded postcranial neurological evolution. Here we compare the size and shape of the KNM-WT 15000 spinal canal with modern and fossil taxa including H. erectus from Dmanisi, Homo antecessor, the European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, and Pan troglodytes. In terms of shape and absolute and relative size of the spinal canal, we find all of the Dmanisi and most of the vertebrae of KNM-WT 15000 are within the human range of variation except for the C7, T2, and T3 of KNM-WT 15000, which are constricted, suggesting spinal stenosis. While additional fossils might definitively indicate whether H. erectus had evolved a human-like enlarged spinal canal, the evidence from the Dmanisi spinal canal and the unaffected levels of KNM-WT 15000 show that unlike Australopithecus, H. erectus had a spinal canal size and shape equivalent to that of modern humans. Subadult status is unlikely to affect our results, as spinal canal growth is complete in both individuals. We contest the notion that vertebrae yield information about respiratory control or language evolution, but suggest that, like H. antecessor and European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, early Homo possessed a postcranial neurological endowment roughly commensurate to modern humans, with implications for neurological, structural, and vascular improvements over Pan and Australopithecus.

  13. [Neurogenic bladder caused by spinal cord traction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garat, J M; Aragona, F; Martinez, E

    1985-01-01

    A neurogenic bladder was the presenting syndrome in three cases of spinal cord traction. Of the typical symptomatic triad: neuro-orthopedic, cutaneous and urologic, the latter was of primary importance. Symptoms in the first case were incomplete bladder retention with distention of upper urinary tract, right-sided vesicorenal reflux and renal insufficiency. Six months after excision of a sacral lipoma and freeing of the filum terminale, micturition had become normal without residue, and renal function normalized. Right-sided reflux was corrected by submucosal advancement surgery with good results. The clinical history was more suggestive in the second case. Although inaugural symptoms were mictional, there was foot paralysis and a retrosacral lipoma above an abnormal hairy tuft in the upper part of the gluteal cleft. Operation revealed the presence of a dermoid cyst and a lipoma. Their excision combined with section of the filum terminale allowing ascension of the medullary cone. Marked clinical and urodynamic improvement was obtained with normal micturition and disappearance of incontinence. An anti-reflux operation suppressed residual reflux with good urographic results. Marked improvement in mictional disorders was obtained also in the 3rd case after excision of a sacral extradural lipoma and section of the filum terminale, allowing objective ascension of the medullary cone by 4 cm. A very detailed analysis was conducted of similar cases reported in the literature, about 2% of neurogenic bladders in children being affected. The importance of early diagnosis is emphasized as well as the essential need to establish a precise diagnosis of the lipoma of cauda equina and of medullary fixation. Early neurosurgery is justified by the high frequency of improvement in cases treated in this way.

  14. Patient advocacy: barriers and facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikravesh Mansoure

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the two recent decades, advocacy has been a topic of much debate in the nursing profession. Although advocacy has embraced a crucial role for nurses, its extent is often limited in practice. While a variety of studies have been generated all over the world, barriers and facilitators in the patient advocacy have not been completely identified. This article presents the findings of a study exploring the barriers and facilitators influencing the role of advocacy among Iranian nurses. Method This study was conducted by grounded theory method. Participants were 24 Iranian registered nurses working in a large university hospital in Tehran, Iran. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and simultaneously Constant comparative analysis was used according to the Strauss and Corbin method. Results Through data analysis, several main themes emerged to describe the factors that hindered or facilitated patient advocacy. Nurses in this study identified powerlessness, lack of support, law, code of ethics and motivation, limited communication, physicians leading, risk of advocacy, royalty to peers, and insufficient time to interact with patients and families as barriers to advocacy. As for factors that facilitated nurses to act as a patient advocate, it was found that the nature of nurse-patient relationship, recognizing patients' needs, nurses' responsibility, physician as a colleague, and nurses' knowledge and skills could be influential in adopting the advocacy role. Conclusion Participants believed that in this context taking an advocacy role is difficult for nurses due to the barriers mentioned. Therefore, they make decisions and act as a patient's advocate in any situation concerning patient needs and status of barriers and facilitators. In most cases, they can not act at an optimal level; instead they accept only what they can do, which we called 'limited advocacy' in

  15. Microtubule stabilization reduces scarring and causes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Hellal (Farida); A. Hurtado (Andres); J. Ruschel (Jörg); K.C. Flynn (Kevin); C.J. Laskowski (Claudia); M. Umlauf (Martina); L.C. Kapitein (Lukas); D. Strikis (Dinara); V. Lemmon (Vance); J. Bixby (John); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper); F. Bradke (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHypertrophic scarring and poor intrinsic axon growth capacity constitute major obstacles for spinal cord repair. These processes are tightly regulated by microtubule dynamics. Here, moderate microtubule stabilization decreased scar formation after spinal cord injury in rodents through va

  16. PROBLEMS OF WIRES MIGRATION OF INLAYS OF METAL CORD OF COMPACT STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vedeneyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that at manufacture of metal cord of compact constructions there is a possibility to control by various processing methods the inclination of metal cord layers to migration.

  17. Estimation of the total number of mast cells in the human umbilical cord. A methodological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg Damsgaard, T M; Windelborg Nielsen, B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1992-01-01

    disector and fractionated sampling. The mast cell of the human umbilical cord was found in Wharton's jelly, most frequently in close proximity to the three blood vessels. No consistent pattern of variation in mast cell numbers from the fetal end of the umbilical cord towards the placenta was seen......The aim of the present study was to estimate the total number of mast cells in the human umbilical cord. Using 50 microns-thick paraffin sections, made from a systematic random sample of umbilical cord, the total number of mast cells per cord was estimated using a combination of the optical....... The total number of mast cells found in the umbilical cord was 5,200,000 (median), range 2,800,000-16,800,000 (n = 7), that is 156,000 mast cells per gram umbilical cord (median), range 48,000-267,000. Thus, the umbilical cord constitutes an adequate source of mast cells for further investigation...

  18. 2009 review and revisions of the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waring, William P; Biering-Sorensen, Fin; Burns, Stephen;

    2010-01-01

    The International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) were recently reviewed by the ASIA's Education and Standards Committees, in collaboration with the International Spinal Cord Society's Education Committee. Available educational materials for the ISNCSCI...

  19. The spinal cord supports of vertebrae in the crown-group salamanders (Caudata, Urodela).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skutschas, Pavel P; Baleeva, Nataly V

    2012-09-01

    The development of spinal cord supports (bony thickenings which extend into the vertebral canal of vertebrae) in primitive (Salamandrella keyserlingii) and derived (Lissotriton vulgaris) salamanders were described. The spinal cord supports develop as the protuberances of periostal bone of the neural arches in the anteroproximal part of the septal collagenous fibers which connect a transverse myoseptum with the notochord and spinal cord, in the septal bundle inside the vertebral canal. Spinal cord supports were also found in some teleostean (Salmo salar, Oncorhynchus mykiss) and dipnoan (Protopterus sp.) fishes. The absence of the spinal cord supports in vertebrates with cartilaginous vertebrae (lampreys, chondrichthyan, and chondrostean fishes) corresponds to the fact that the spinal cord supports are bone structures. The absence of the spinal cord supports in frogs correlates with the lack of the well developed septal bundles inside the vertebral canal. The spinal cord supports are, presumably, a synapomorphic character for salamanders which originated independently of those observed in teleostean and dipnoan fishes.

  20. How Do I Deal with Depression and Adjustment to My Spinal Cord Injury?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... yourself with information on what a spinal cord injury is, and what it means in terms of ... thoughts. Depression is common in the spinal cord injury population -- affecting about 1 in 5 people. There ...

  1. Dielectric barrier discharges applied for optical spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, S.; Schütz, A.; Klute, F. D.; Kratzer, J.; Franzke, J.

    2016-09-01

    The present review reflects the importance of dielectric barrier discharges for optical spectrometric detection in analytical chemistry. In contrast to usual discharges with a direct current the electrodes are separated by at least one dielectric barrier. There are two main features of the dielectric barrier discharges: they can serve as dissociation and excitation devices as well as ionization sources, respectively. This article portrays various application fields of dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry used for elemental and molecular detection with optical spectrometry.

  2. Alteration of blood-brain barrier integrity by retroviral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe V Afonso

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB, which forms the interface between the blood and the cerebral parenchyma, has been shown to be disrupted during retroviral-associated neuromyelopathies. Human T Lymphotropic Virus (HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with BBB breakdown. The BBB is composed of three cell types: endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes. Although astrocytes have been shown to be infected by HTLV-1, until now, little was known about the susceptibility of BBB endothelial cells to HTLV-1 infection and the impact of such an infection on BBB function. We first demonstrated that human cerebral endothelial cells express the receptors for HTLV-1 (GLUT-1, Neuropilin-1 and heparan sulfate proteoglycans, both in vitro, in a human cerebral endothelial cell line, and ex vivo, on spinal cord autopsy sections from HAM/TSP and non-infected control cases. In situ hybridization revealed HTLV-1 transcripts associated with the vasculature in HAM/TSP. We were able to confirm that the endothelial cells could be productively infected in vitro by HTLV-1 and that blocking of either HSPGs, Neuropilin 1 or Glut1 inhibits this process. The expression of the tight-junction proteins within the HTLV-1 infected endothelial cells was altered. These cells were no longer able to form a functional barrier, since BBB permeability and lymphocyte passage through the monolayer of endothelial cells were increased. This work constitutes the first report of susceptibility of human cerebral endothelial cells to HTLV-1 infection, with implications for HTLV-1 passage through the BBB and subsequent deregulation of the central nervous system homeostasis. We propose that the susceptibility of cerebral endothelial cells to retroviral infection and subsequent BBB dysfunction is an important aspect of HAM/TSP pathogenesis and should be considered in the design of future therapeutics strategies.

  3. Nursing rehabilitation of patients with spin and spinal cord injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavrou V.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The injury of the Spine cord is a major problem because of the high mortality and morbidity in patients. Despite the advanced medical care and specialized rehabilitation the life expectancy of people with injuries of the spinal cord is lower than the general population. Hospitalization in modern rehabilitation centers reduces the mortality and severity of the complications with comprehensive programs which include the prevention of complications. It also educates the patient and his carer with psychological and social support. The nursing interventions have perhaps the most significant impact on the area of functional independence, rehabilitation and the quality of the patients life. The development of better rehabilitation programs will improve the life of people with injury of the spine and Spinal Cord.

  4. Hydraulic spinal cord and cauda equina nerve injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Hydraulic spinal cord and cauda equina nerve injuries are very uncommon. Since 19 96, we have received and treated 4 patients with hydraulic spinal cord and cauda equina injuries. This report gives a detail description. Four patients with hydraulic spinal cord and cauda equina nerve injuries, male: 3, female: 1, aging 13-56 years have been treated in our hospital since 1996. E xtradural blocking injury was in 1 patient, extradural anaesthesia injury in 1 p atient and intraspinal canal myelography injury in 2 patients; the segments of i ntraspinal canal were L2-3 and L3-4. One patient was accompanied b y femoral fracture, 2 patients by intraspinal tumor and 1 patient had operat ion because of prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc.

  5. Optical measurement of blood flow changes in spinal cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J P; Kyriacou, P A [Biomedical Engineering Research Group, City University London, Northampton Square, London (United Kingdom); George, K J [Neuroscience Centre, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End, London (United Kingdom); Langford, R M, E-mail: justin.phillips.1@city.ac.u [Pain and Anaesthesia Research Centre, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Little is known about cell death in spinal cord tissue following compression injury, despite compression being a key component of spinal injuries. Currently models are used to mimic compression injury in animals and the effects of the compression evaluated by observing the extent and duration of recovery of normal motor function in the days and weeks following the injury. A fibreoptic photoplethysmography system was used to investigate whether pulsation of the small arteries in the spinal cord occurred before, during and after compressive loads were applied to the tissue. It was found that the signal amplitudes were reduced and this reduction persisted for at least five minutes after the compression ceased. It is hoped that results from this preliminary study may improve knowledge of the mechanism of spinal cord injury.

  6. Cardiovascular response during urodynamics in individuals with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, N; Zhou, M-W; Biering-Sørensen, F;

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. OBJECTIVES: To establish the frequency and severity of autonomic dysreflexia (AD) during urodynamics among individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) and to investigate the possible effect of the number of years since SCI on the severity of AD...... was more severe in individuals with complete (American Spinal Cord Association (ASIA) impairment scale (AIS) A) injuries, worse with greater time after SCI. CONCLUSION: Individuals with cervical SCI, DSD, poor bladder compliance or >2 years after SCI were associated with a higher possibility of developing...... AD during urodynamics. Furthermore, AD was more severe in complete (AIS A) individuals and was exacerbated with time after injury.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 2 August 2016; doi:10.1038/sc.2016.110....

  7. Vocal Cord Dysfunction Masquerading as Astma Like Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Ozturk

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD is a nonorganic disorder of the larynx that involves unintentional paradoxical adduction of the vocal cords while breathing. VCD is a relatively rare condition that may mimic asthma or upper airway obstruction. VCD often coexists with asthma, and should be suspected in any patient in whom asthma treatment fails. Confirming the diagnosis involves direct visualization of abnormal vocal cord motion, and this usually only occurs during symptoms. In this report, we describe a 65-years-old male patient who has psychological problems due to a relative loss, and a military collage student who experiencing respiratory problems during vigorous exercises. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(2.000: 148-150

  8. Microglia and Spinal Cord Synaptic Plasticity in Persistent Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Taves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are regarded as macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS and play an important role in neuroinflammation in the CNS. Microglial activation has been strongly implicated in neurodegeneration in the brain. Increasing evidence also suggests an important role of spinal cord microglia in the genesis of persistent pain, by releasing the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα, Interleukine-1beta (IL-1β, and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. In this review, we discuss the recent findings illustrating the importance of microglial mediators in regulating synaptic plasticity of the excitatory and inhibitory pain circuits in the spinal cord, leading to enhanced pain states. Insights into microglial-neuronal interactions in the spinal cord dorsal horn will not only further our understanding of neural plasticity but may also lead to novel therapeutics for chronic pain management.

  9. Double-level Incomplete Spinal Cord Injuries: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Bin Ayaz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Brown-Séquard Syndrome is a type of Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury characterized by a relatively greater ipsilateral loss of proprioception and motor function, with contralateral loss of pain and temperature sensations. The residual deficits in balance produced by such injury may render a person liable to fall that may result in vertebral fracture and another injury to the spinal cord. We present here a case who initially had Brown-Séquard Syndrome due to penetrating knife injury to the neck and later on developed Cauda Equina Syndrome (another Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury due to fractured LV1 following a fall. The fracture was fixed through Pedicle Screws and the patient underwent effective rehabilitation to gain maximum achievable independence in functional activities. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(2.000: 392-398

  10. Syphilitic myelitis with diffuse spinal cord abnormality on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, E.Y.K.; Lai, K.F.; Chan, J.H.M. [Department of Radiology, Tuen Mun Hospital, Tuen Mun (Hong Kong); Ng, S.H.; Chow, L. [Department of Medicine, Tuen Mun Hospital, Tuen Mun (Hong Kong); Fong, D. [Department of Neurosurgery, Tuen Mun Hospital, Tuen Mun (Hong Kong)

    2002-12-01

    Syphilitic myelitis is a very rare manifestation of neurosyphilis. The MRI appearance of syphilitic myelitis is not well documented and only a few cases have been reported. We present a 52-year-old woman with acute onset of paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine showed diffuse high signal intensity in the whole spinal cord on T2-weighted images. Focal enhancement was observed in the dorsal aspect of the thoracic cord on T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced images. To our knowledge, diffuse spinal cord abnormality in syphilitic myelitis has not been reported in the international literature. Disappearance of the diffuse high-signal lesions with residual focal enhancement was noted after antibiotic therapy. The patient suffered significant neurological deficit despite improvement in the MR images. In this article we present the imaging findings and review the literature of this rare condition. (orig.)

  11. The CORD Academy for scholarship in education in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamantia, Joseph; Kuhn, Gloria J; Searle, Nancy S

    2010-10-01

    In 2010 the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) established an Academy for Scholarship in Education in Emergency Medicine to define, promote, recognize, and reward excellence in education, education research, and education leadership in emergency medicine. In this article we describe the mission and aims of the Academy. Academies for medical educators are widespread in medical schools today and have produced many benefits both for faculty and for educational programs. Little effort, however, has been devoted to such a model in graduate medical education specialty societies. While CORD and other emergency medicine organizations have developed numerous initiatives to advance excellence in education, we believe that this effort will be accelerated if housed in the form of an Academy that emphasizes scholarship in teaching and other education activities. The CORD Academy for Scholarship in Education in Emergency Medicine is a new model for promoting excellence in education in graduate medical education specialty societies.

  12. The International Spinal Cord Injury Pain Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widerstrom-Noga, E.; Bryce, T.; Cardenas, D.D.;

    2008-01-01

    core questions about clinically relevant information concerning SCI-related pain that can be collected by health-care professionals with expertise in SCI in various clinical settings. The questions concern pain severity, physical and emotional function and include a pain-intensity rating, a pain...... classification and questions related to the temporal pattern of pain for each specific pain problem. The impact of pain on physical, social and emotional function, and sleep is evaluated for each pain.Spinal Cord (2008) 46, 818-823; doi:10.1038/sc.2008.64; published online 3 June 2008 Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12......Objective:To develop a basic pain data set (International Spinal Cord Injury Basic Pain Data Set, ISCIPDS:B) within the framework of the International spinal cord injury (SCI) data sets that would facilitate consistent collection and reporting of pain in the SCI population...

  13. Neuron-specific enolase: reference values in cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintzel, K; Sonntag, J; Strauss, E; Obladen, M

    1998-04-01

    With foetal sonography prenatal detection of tumours has become more frequent. To evaluate and treat these infants it is necessary to identify the tumour postnatally. Elevated neuron-specific enolase is a biochemical marker of neuroblastoma. Since conditions during birth may influence neuron-specific enolase concentration in foetal serum, specific reference values in cord blood are required. Cord blood samples were taken from 192 healthy term newborns and concentration of neuron-specific enolase was measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Median neuron-specific enolase concentration in the reference group was 8.0 micrograms/l and the 5th-95th percentiles were 4.8-19.4 micrograms/l. No differences between male and female newborns were detected (p = 0.13). Measurement of neuron-specific enolase in cord blood, in comparison with our reference values, offers an early postnatal possibility of confirming the diagnosis of neuroblastoma.

  14. Stem cell-based therapies for spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandoe Tewarie, Rishi S; Hurtado, Andres; Bartels, Ronald H; Grotenhuis, Andre; Oudega, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in loss of nervous tissue and consequently loss of motor and sensory function. There is no treatment available that restores the injury-induced loss of function to a degree that an independent life can be guaranteed. Transplantation of stem cells or progenitors may support spinal cord repair. Stem cells are characterized by self-renewal and their ability to become any cell in an organism. Promising results have been obtained in experimental models of SCI. Stem cells can be directed to differentiate into neurons or glia in vitro, which can be used for replacement of neural cells lost after SCI. Neuroprotective and axon regeneration-promoting effects have also been credited to transplanted stem cells. There are still issues related to stem cell transplantation that need to be resolved, including ethical concerns. This paper reviews the current status of stem cell application for spinal cord repair.

  15. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0013 TITLE: DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE- INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY...2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY 5b...controlled spinal cord impactor for use in large animal models of SCI in order to more reliably recreate the human injury. A custom designed spinal cord

  16. MR imaging findings in subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Jun; Lee, Jae Hee; Lee, Sung Yong; Chung, Sung Woo [Our Lady of Mercy Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause neurologic complications in the spinal cord, brain, and optic and peripheral nerves. Subacute combined degeneration is a rare disease of demyelinating lesions of the spinal cord, affecting mainly the posterior and lateral columns of the thoracic cord. We report the MR imaging findings of a case of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord in a patient with vitamin B12 deficiency and mega loblastic anemia. (author)

  17. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  18. Barriers to Mammography among Inadequately Screened Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Carolyn R. T.; Roberts, Summer; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Crayton, Eloise V.; Jackson, Sherrill; Politi, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Mammography use has increased over the past 20 years, yet more than 30% of women remain inadequately screened. Structural barriers can deter individuals from screening, however, cognitive, emotional, and communication barriers may also prevent mammography use. This study sought to identify the impact of number and type of barriers on mammography…

  19. Design of the Muong Chuoi Barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vliegen, K.; Van Oorschot, N.; Meinen, N.; Van Dijk, S.; Reimert, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Ho Chi Minh City has to deal with severe flooding in the rainy season. To prevent the city from this flooding, MARD set up plan 1547. The main idea of the plan is to build a ring dike around HCMC in combination with several movable tidal barriers. One of these barriers is the Muong Chuoi Barrier. I

  20. Market barriers to welfare product innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binnekamp, M.H.A.; Ingenbleek, P.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    New products that are based on higher animal welfare standards encounter several barriers on the road to market acceptance. The authors focus on the Dutch poultry sector and distinguish between retailer and consumer barriers. Retailer barriers include the powerful position of retailers, the price co

  1. Mast cells promote scar remodeling and functional recovery after spinal cord injury via mouse mast cell protease 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangansewinkel, Tim; Geurts, Nathalie; Quanten, Kirsten; Nelissen, Sofie; Lemmens, Stefanie; Geboes, Lies; Dooley, Dearbhaile; Vidal, Pia M; Pejler, Gunnar; Hendrix, Sven

    2016-05-01

    An important barrier for axon regeneration and recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is attributed to the scar that is formed at the lesion site. Here, we investigated the effect of mouse mast cell protease (mMCP) 6, a mast cell (MC)-specific tryptase, on scarring and functional recovery after a spinal cord hemisection injury. Functional recovery was significantly impaired in both MC-deficient and mMCP6-knockout (mMCP6(-/-)) mice after SCI compared with wild-type control mice. This decrease in locomotor performance was associated with an increased lesion size and excessive scarring at the injury site. Axon growth-inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and the extracellular matrix components fibronectin, laminin, and collagen IV were significantly up-regulated in MC-deficient and mMCP6(-/-) mice, with an increase in scar volume between 23 and 32%. A degradation assay revealed that mMCP6 directly cleaves fibronectin and collagen IV in vitro In addition, gene expression levels of the scar components fibronectin, aggrecan, and collagen IV were increased up to 6.8-fold in mMCP6(-/-) mice in the subacute phase after injury. These data indicate that endogenous mMCP6 has scar-suppressing properties after SCI via indirect cleavage of axon growth-inhibitory scar components and alteration of the gene expression profile of these factors.-Vangansewinkel, T., Geurts, N., Quanten, K., Nelissen, S., Lemmens, S., Geboes, L., Dooley, D., Vidal, P. M., Pejler, G., Hendrix, S. Mast cells promote scar remodeling and functional recovery after spinal cord injury via mouse mast cell protease 6.

  2. Vocal Cord Actinomycosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Khademi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Actinomycosis is a systemic chronic bacterial infection caused by Actinomyces Israelii, an anaerobic organism normally resident in the human mouth. However, the actinomycosis of the larynx is very rare, and only about 15 cases have been reported in the literature so far. Most of the cases reported occurred in patients who had previously undergone radiotherapy for laryngeal cancer. Case Report: Here we report a case of actinomycosis of the larynx in a 14-year-old shepherd boy who was not immunocompromised but had a history of tooth extraction two months prior to admission to the hospital and severe laryngitis one year prior to admission. Conclusion:        Laryngeal actinomycosis might be related to poor oral hygiene and mucosal barrier disruption, as well as to being immunocompromised.

  3. Decorin treatment of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maryam Esmaeili; Martin Berry; Ann Logan; Zubair Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    The scarring response after a penetrant central nervous system injury results from the interaction between invading leptominingeal/pericyte-derived ifbroblasts and endogenous reactive astrocytes about the wound margin. Extracellular matrix and scar-derived axon growth inhibitory mole-cules ifll the lesion site providing both a physical and chemical barrier to regenerating axons. Dec orin, a small leucine-rich chondroitin-dermatan sulphate proteoglycan expressed by neurons and astrocytes in the central nervous system, is both anti-ifbrotic and anti-inlfammatory and attenu-ates the formation and partial dissolution of established and chronic scars. Here, we discuss the potential of using Decorin to antagonise scarring in the central nervous system.

  4. Overcome barriers to career success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raudsepp, E.

    1983-04-01

    A test is given to determine if an engineer suffers from one of the three barriers to technical success: fear of success, fear of failure, or perfectionism. As in most such tests, the middle way is best. Successful engineers know that perfection cannot be attained, that they don't have time to worry about failure or success, and that by aiming and perservering in doing things well, success can be achieved.

  5. Wet Work and Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartasch, Manigé

    2016-01-01

    Wet work defined as unprotected exposure to humid environments/water; high frequencies of hand washing procedures or prolonged glove occlusion is believed to cause irritant contact dermatitis in a variety of occupations. This review considers the recent studies on wet-work exposure and focuses on its influence on barrier function. There are different methods to study the effect of wet work on barrier function. On the one hand, occupational cohorts at risk can be monitored prospectively by skin bioengineering technology and clinical visual scoring systems; on the other hand, experimental test procedures with defined application of water, occlusion and detergents are performed in healthy volunteers. Both epidemiological studies and the results of experimental procedures are compared and discussed. A variety of epidemiological studies analyze occupational cohorts at risk. The measurement of transepidermal water loss, an indicator of the integrity of the epidermal barrier, and clinical inspection of the skin have shown that especially the frequencies of hand washing and water contact/contact to aqueous mixtures seem to be the main factors for the occurrence of barrier alterations. On the other hand, in a single cross-sectional study, prolonged glove wearing (e.g. occlusion for 6 h per shift in clean-room workers) without exposure to additional hazardous substances seemed not to affect the skin negatively. But regarding the effect of occlusion, there is experimental evidence that previously occluded skin challenged with sodium lauryl sulfate leads to an increased susceptibility to the irritant with an aggravation of the irritant reaction. These findings might have relevance for the real-life situation in so far as after occupational glove wearing, the skin is more susceptible to potential hazards to the skin even during leisure hours.

  6. Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

  7. Flexible pile thermal barrier insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. E.; Fell, D. M.; Tesinsky, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible pile thermal barrier insulator included a plurality of upstanding pile yarns. A generally planar backing section supported the upstanding pile yarns. The backing section included a plurality of filler yarns forming a mesh in a first direction. A plurality of warp yarns were looped around said filler yarns and pile yarns in the backing section and formed a mesh in a second direction. A binder prevented separation of the yarns in the backing section.

  8. Lake Borgne Surge Barrier Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Savant , and Darla C. McVan September 2010 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CHL TR-10-10 September 2010 Lake...Borgne Surge Barrier Study S. Keith Martin, Gaurav Savant , and Darla C. McVan Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer Research and...conducted by Keith Martin, Dr. Gaurav Savant , and Darla C. McVan. This work was conducted at the Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CHL) of the

  9. Spinal cord compression in two related Ursus arctos horribilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomovsky, Stephanie A; Chen, Annie V; Roberts, Greg R; Schmidt, Carrie E; Layton, Arthur W

    2012-09-01

    Two 15-yr-old grizzly bear littermates were evaluated within 9 mo of each other with the symptom of acute onset of progressive paraparesis and proprioceptive ataxia. The most significant clinical examination finding was pelvic limb paresis in both bears. Magnetic resonance examinations of both bears showed cranial thoracic spinal cord compression. The first bear had left-sided extradural, dorsolateral spinal cord compression at T3-T4. Vertebral canal stenosis was also observed at T2-T3. Images of the second bear showed lateral spinal cord compression from T2-T3 to T4-T5. Intervertebral disk disease and associated spinal cord compression was also observed at T2-T3 and T3-T4. One grizzly bear continued to deteriorate despite reduced exercise, steroid, and antibiotic therapy. The bear was euthanized, and a necropsy was performed. The postmortem showed a spinal ganglion cyst that caused spinal cord compression at the level of T3-T4. Wallerian-like degeneration was observed from C3-T6. The second bear was prescribed treatment that consisted of a combination of reduced exercise and steroid therapy. He continued to deteriorate with these medical therapies and was euthanized 4 mo after diagnosis. A necropsy showed hypertrophy and protrusion of the dorsal longitudinal ligament at T2-T3 and T3-T4, with resulting spinal cord compression in this region. Wallerian-like degeneration was observed from C2-L1. This is one of few case reports that describes paresis in bears. It is the only case report, to the authors' knowledge, that describes spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings in a grizzly bear and also the only report that describes a cranial thoracic myelopathy in two related grizzly bears with neurologic signs.

  10. Spinal cord lesions and disability in Hispanics with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amezcua, L; Lerner, A; Ledezma, K; Conti, D; Law, M; Weiner, L; Langer-Gould, A

    2013-11-01

    Longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (LESCLs) are believed to occur predominantly with opticospinal multiple sclerosis (OSMS) and are associated with disability. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and patterns of spinal cord lesions in Hispanics with multiple sclerosis (MS) and OSMS and their association with disability. A cross-sectional study of 164 patients with complete MRIs was used. In each case the spinal cord was classified: LESCLs, scattered spinal cord lesions (sSCLs) or no spinal cord lesions (noSCLs). Clinical course was defined as classical MS or OSMS. Risk of disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale ≥4.0) was adjusted for age, disease duration and sex using logistic regression. A total of 125/164 (73 %) MS patients had spinal cord lesions (sSCLs, 57 %; LESCLs, 19 %), but only 11 (7 %) had OSMS. LESCLs were associated with disability (p < 0.0001), longer disease duration (p < 0.0001) and MS (n = 21 vs. n = 10 OSMS; p < 0.0001). LESCLs were also associated with the greatest risk to disability (OR 7.3, 95 % CIs 1.9-26.5; p = 0.003; sSCLs OR 2.5, 95 % CIs 0.9-7.1; p = 0.09) compared with noSCLs. LESCLs are more common than OSMS and are associated with worse disability even in patients with MS. These results suggest that LESCLs are a more important marker of disability in MS than OSMS and may be an early indicator of more aggressive disease in this population.

  11. Electrophysiological and Anatomical Correlates of Spinal Cord Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario E Giardini

    Full Text Available Despite the continuous improvement in medical imaging technology, visualizing the spinal cord poses severe problems due to structural or incidental causes, such as small access space and motion artifacts. In addition, positional guidance on the spinal cord is not commonly available during surgery, with the exception of neuronavigation techniques based on static pre-surgical data and of radiation-based methods, such as fluoroscopy. A fast, bedside, intraoperative real-time imaging, particularly necessary during the positioning of endoscopic probes or tools, is an unsolved issue. The objective of our work, performed on experimental rats, is to demonstrate potential intraoperative spinal cord imaging and probe guidance by optical coherence tomography (OCT. Concurrently, we aimed to demonstrate that the electromagnetic OCT irradiation exerted no particular effect at the neuronal and synaptic levels. OCT is a user-friendly, low-cost and endoscopy-compatible photonics-based imaging technique. In particular, by using a Fourier-domain OCT imager, operating at 850 nm wavelength and scanning transversally with respect to the spinal cord, we have been able to: 1 accurately image tissue structures in an animal model (muscle, spine bone, cerebro-spinal fluid, dura mater and spinal cord, and 2 identify the position of a recording microelectrode approaching and inserting into the cord tissue 3 check that the infrared radiation has no actual effect on the electrophysiological activity of spinal neurons. The technique, potentially extendable to full three-dimensional image reconstruction, shows prospective further application not only in endoscopic intraoperative analyses and for probe insertion guidance, but also in emergency and adverse situations (e.g. after trauma for damage recognition, diagnosis and fast image-guided intervention.

  12. Clinical classification and treatment of leukokeratosis of the vocal cords

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Li-jing; WANG Jun; XIAO Yang; YE Jing-ying; XU Wen; YANG Qing-wen

    2013-01-01

    Background Leukokeretosis of the vocal cords is a clinical descriptive diagnosis,which includes a group of squamous intraepithelial lesions of the vocal cord mucosa.We investigated the clinical classification and treatment efficacy of leukokeratosis of the vocal cords.Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of the medical history,laryngoscopic examinations,morphological features under a surgical microscope,and pathology results of 360 cases of leukokeratosis of the vocal cords to examine correlations among treatment modalities,therapeutic effects,and clinical features.Results All cases were divided into four types based on symptoms,examination results,and treatment efficacies as follows:21 patients had type Ⅰ inflammatory leukoplakia and their vocal cord morphology and voice quality recovered after conservative therapies; 76 patients had type Ⅱ frictional polyps and received CO2 laser submucosal cordectomy;68 patients had type Ⅲ sulcus vocalis and received mucosal slicing with dredging; and 195 cases had type Ⅳ simple leukokeratosis and received partial subligamental cordectomy with CO2 lasers or transmuscular cordectomy.Our treatment achieved a surgical cure rate of 90.9% (308/339),with a recurrence rate of 9.1% (31/339) and malignant transformation rate of 6.5% (22/339).All cancerous transformations occurred in type Ⅳ patients.Conclusion Choosing conservative or CO2 laser surgery based on the morphological characteristics of squamous epithelial lesions of keratinized vocal cord mucosa can maximally protect voice quality,reduce complications,and improve the cure rate.

  13. Antioxidation of melatonin against spinal cord injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘锦波; 唐天驷; 杨惠林; 肖德生

    2004-01-01

    Background The iron catalyzed lipid peroxidation plays an important role in the autodestruction of the injured spinal cord. This study was to detect the antioxidation of melatonin against spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats.Methods Sity Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: group A (n = 15) for laminectomyanly, group B (n = 15) for laminectomy with SCI, group C (n = 15) for SCI and intraperitoneal injection of a bolus of 100 mg/kg melatonin, and group D (n = 15) for SCI and intraperitoneal injection of saline containing 5% ethanol. The SCI of animal model was made using modified Allen's method on T12. Six rats of each group were sacrificed 4 hours after injury, and the levels of free iron and malondialdehyde (MDA) of the involved spinal cord segments were measured by the bleomycin assay and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) separately. Functional recovery of the spinal cord was assessed by Modified Tarlov's scale and the inclined plane method at 1,3, 7, 14, 21 days after SCI. The histologic changes of the damaged spinal cord were also examined at 7 days after SCl.Results After SCI, the levels of free iron and MDA were increased significantly and the modified Tarlov's score and inclined plane angle decreased significantly in groups B and D. In group C, the Tarlov's score and inclined plane angle were increased significantly at 7, 14 and 21 days, with histological improvement.Conclusion: Melatonin can reduce the level of lipid peroxidation and prevent damage to the spinal cord of rat.

  14. Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Seth D. Messinger...SUBTITLE Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service- Social Reintegration of Service Me Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord...communities and cultural identities that is key to long-term success . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Spinal Cord Injury, Community Reintegration , Qualitative

  15. Spinal cord stimulation for refractory angina in a patient implanted with a cardioverter defibrillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Paolo; Grimaldi, Roberto; Massa, Riccardo; Chiribiri, Amedeo; De Luca, Anna; Castellano, Maddalena; Cardano, Paola; Trevi, Gian Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation is currently used to treat refractory angina. Some concerns may arise about the possible interaction concerning the spinal cord stimulator in patients already implanted with a pacemaker or a cardioverter defibrillator. We are going to describe the successful implantation of a spinal cord stimulator in a patient previously implanted with a cardioverter defibrillator.

  16. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_Spinal_Cord [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_Spinal_Cord [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_Spinal_Cord [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_Spinal_Cord [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_Spinal_Cord [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_Spinal_Cord [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. Production of dopamine by aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase cells after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Liqun; Wienecke, Jacob; Hultborn, Hans;

    2016-01-01

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) cells are widely distributed in the spinal cord and their functions are largely unknown. We have previously found that AADC cells in the spinal cord could increase their ability to produce serotonin from 5-hydroxytryptophan after spinal cord injury (SCI)...

  17. Traumatic spinal cord injury in MR imaging; Urazowe przerwanie ciaglosci rdzenia kregowego w obrazie MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronarski, J.; Wozniak, E. [Stoleczne Centrum Rehabilitacji, Konstancin (Poland)]|[Inst. Psychiatrii i Neurologii, Warsaw (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    Spinal cord injuries in tetraplegics were briefly discussed on the basis of MR imaging. It was found that severe cervical spine trauma usually results in concussion - the complete transection of the cord is rare. A case of 19 years old male with total cord transection confirmed by MR imaging is described. (author). 5 refs, 3 figs.

  18. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator... severe intractable pain. The stimulator consists of an implanted receiver with electrodes that are...

  19. Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Single Vocal Cord Irradiation in Early Glottic Cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.O.S. Osman (Sarah)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe larynx anatomy is graphically presented in figure 1.1 . The vocal cords in the center of the larynx are muscular bands covered by thin mucosa layers. Together, the right and left vocal cords have a V-shape, when viewed from cranial. The vocal cords play key roles in the control of th

  20. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Umbilical_cord_blood [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. Linfangioma de cordão espermático

    OpenAIRE

    CAMPOS,Antônio Carlos Ligocki; Costa, Marco Aurélio Raeder da; Salvalaggio, Paolo Rogério de Oliveira; Torres, Luiz Fernando Bleggi; COELHO Júlio Cézar Uili

    1998-01-01

    We describe a case of a 22-year-old man that had been submitted to a left herniorraphy 11 years previously to the present admission. He returned to our hospital with another mass in the same side of the groin. At operation, several small cysts linked to the spermatic cord were demonstrated. At this time, an histological exam demonstrated the presence of conective tissue. The final histology report confirmed the diagnosis of lymphangioma of the spermatic cord in the groin region. The patient w...

  4. Alfa-fetoprotein secreting ovarian sex cord-stromal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusum D Jashnani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors are relatively infrequent neoplasms that account for approximately 8% of all primary ovarian tumors. They are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms composed of cells derived from gonadal sex cords (granulosa and Sertoli cells, specialized gonadal stroma (theca and Leydig cells, and fibroblasts. They may show androgenic or estrogenic manifestations. We report such a tumor associated with markedly raised serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP levels in a young female presenting with a mass and defeminising symptoms. Serum AFP levels returned to normal on removal of tumor.

  5. Umbilical Cord Blood Lead Levels and Neonatal Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. de Cáceres

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative correlations have been found between cord blood lead levels and scores on the Brazelton Neonatal Behaviour Assessment in 30 otherwise healthy newborns. Items in the Habituation, Orientation and Regulation of state clusters, particularly those items related to self-regulatory, self-quieting and auditory habituation, showed lower scores (worse performance in those newborns with higher cord blood lead levels. These disturbances are potentially important since this type of behavior may interfere with the normal process of adaptation to their environment, leading to a less than optimal bonding between newborns and their carers.

  6. Cell therapy for spinal cord injury informed by electromagnetic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, Jack; Ye, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury devastates the CNS, besetting patients with symptoms including but not limited to: paralysis, autonomic nervous dysfunction, pain disorders and depression. Despite the identification of several molecular and genetic factors, a reliable regenerative therapy has yet to be produced for this terminal disease. Perhaps the missing piece of this puzzle will be discovered within endogenous electrotactic cellular behaviors. Neurons and stem cells both show mediated responses (growth rate, migration, differentiation) to electromagnetic waves, including direct current electric fields. This review analyzes the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury, the rationale for regenerative cell therapy and the evidence for directing cell therapy via electromagnetic waves shown by in vitro experiments.

  7. Spinal cord injury following chiropractic manipulation to the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraverty, Julian; Curtis, Olivia; Hughes, Tom; Hourihan, Margaret

    2011-12-01

    Spinal cord injury is a rare complication of chiropractic treatment. This case report describes a 50-year-old man who developed neurological symptoms a few hours after manipulation (high velocity low amplitude [HVLA] technique) of the cervical spine. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the cervical spine revealed intramedullary high signal at the C2/3 level of the right side of the cervical cord on the T2-weighted images. The potential mechanism of injury and causes of the radiological appearance are discussed.

  8. International urodynamic basic spinal cord injury data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craggs, M.; Kennelly, M.; Schick, E.;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To create the International Urodynamic Basic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets. SETTING: International working group. METHODS: The draft of the data set was developed by a working group consisting of members appointed...... by the Neurourology Committee of the International Continence Society, the European Association of Urology, the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) and a representative of the Executive Committee of the International SCI Standards and Data Sets. The final version...

  9. International bowel function extended spinal cord injury data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, K; Perkash, I; Stiens, S A;

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: International expert working group.Objective:To develop an International Bowel Function Extended Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Data Set presenting a standardized format for the collection and reporting of an extended amount of information on bowel function. SETTING: Working group...... consisting of members appointed by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) and the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS). METHODS: A draft prepared by the working group was reviewed by Executive Committee of the International SCI Standards and Data Sets and later by the ISCoS Scientific Committee...

  10. International bowel function basic spinal cord injury data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, K; Perkash, I; Stiens, S A;

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: International expert working group. OBJECTIVE: To develop an International Bowel Function Basic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Data Set presenting a standardized format for the collection and reporting of a minimal amount of information on bowel function in daily practice or in research....... SETTING: Working group consisting of members appointed by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) and the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS). METHODS: A draft prepared by the working group was reviewed by Executive Committee of the International SCI Standards and Data Sets, and later by ISCo...

  11. Exercise and sport for persons with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Jörgensen, Sophie; Stapleton, Jessica

    2012-11-01

    This review article provides an overview of the evidence that links exercise and sports participation to physical and psychological well-being among people with spinal cord injury. Two aspects of physical well-being are examined, including the prevention of chronic disease and the promotion of physical fitness. Multiple aspects of psychosocial well-being are discussed, including mental health, social participation, and life satisfaction. The review concludes with future research recommendations and a discussion of challenges and opportunities for using exercise and sports to promote health and well-being among people living with spinal cord injury.

  12. Abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Faaborg, Pia Møller; Krogh, Klaus;

    2008-01-01

    /discomfort. There was no relation of abdominal pain to other types of pain.Conclusion:Chronic pain located in the abdomen is frequent in patients with long-term SCI. The delayed onset following SCI and the relation to constipation suggest that constipation plays an important role for this type of pain in the spinal cord injured.......Objectives:To describe the prevalence and character of chronic abdominal pain in a group of patients with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess predictors of abdominal pain.Study design:Postal survey.Setting:Members of the Danish Paraplegic Association.Methods:We mailed a questionnaire...

  13. Tethered spinal cord syndrome with symptomatic onset in adulthood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Shi-sheng; ZHAO Ying-chuan; SHI Zhi-cai; LI Ming; HOU Tie-sheng; ZHANG Ye; WU Yun-gang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Tethered spinal cord syndrome(TCS)is a condition of overstretching or compression of the caudal part of the spinal cord caused by various spinal lesions,such as a tight filum terminale or an intraspinal lipoma.~(1-9) Though it is a well-recognized cause of neurological deterioration in childhood,its symptomatic onset in adulthood is uncommon.~(10-23) Eleven cases of TCS are presented here.In addition,their related clinical features,surgical procedures and outcomes are investigated.

  14. [Capillary hemangioma of the spinal cord: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Maurus Marques de Almeida; Sarmento, Stênio Abrantes; Andrade, Rodrigo Vasconcelos Correia Lima de; Nóbrega, Evaldo de Sousa; Silva, José Alberto Gonçalves da

    2004-06-01

    We report a rare case of spinal cord capillary hemangioma in a 79-year-old woman, presented with paraparesia that had progressed within 8 months. Radiologically, the lesion resemble other vascular spinal cord tumors. The patient underwent surgery and the outcome was good. Histologically, the lesion resembled capillary hemangioma of skin or soft tissue, composed of lobules of small capillaries with associated feeding vessels, all enveloped by a delicate fibrous capsule. A review of the published cases in the literature is provided as well as a discussion of the clinical, radiological and histological aspects of the lesion and the differential diagnosis. Knowledge of its existence may avoid misdiagnosis of this benign lesion.

  15. Idiopathic dural herniation of the thoracic spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausmann, O.N. [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom). Lysholm Radiological Dept.; Moseley, I.F. [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom). Lysholm Radiological Dept.

    1996-08-01

    Symptomatic anterior or anterolateral dural herniation of the spinal cord is rare, and not uncommonly misdiagnosed, both clinically and radiologically. We present four patients with a radiological diagnosis of herniation of the thoracic spinal cord, and review the current literature. All affected patients have been adults, typcially presenting with long-standing, unexplained sensory symptoms and eventually developing a Brown-Sequard syndrome, with or without motor changes. Herniation occurs in the upper or midthoracic region, between the T2 and T8 levels. (orig.)

  16. Common data elements for spinal cord injury clinical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Alai, S; Anderson, K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a comprehensive set of common data elements (CDEs), data definitions, case report forms and guidelines for use in spinal cord injury (SCI) clinical research, as part of the CDE project at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) of the US National...... with and cross-referenced to development of the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) International SCI Data Sets. The recommendations were compiled, subjected to internal review and posted online for external public comment. The final version was reviewed by all working groups and the NINDS CDE team before...

  17. Dielectric properties of human placenta, umbilical cord and amniotic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyman, A [Physical Dosimetry Department, Health Protection Agency, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Gabriel, C [MCL-P, Newbury RG14 5PY, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Benedickter, H R; Froehlich, J, E-mail: Azadeh.peyman@hpa.org.uk [Electromagnetic Fields and Microwave Electronics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-04-07

    The dielectric properties of freshly delivered human placenta, umbilical cord and amniotic fluid have been acquired at 37 deg. C and in the frequency range of 200 MHz-10 GHz. The experimental data were fitted to a Cole-Cole expression. The results show that dielectric properties of the umbilical cord are significantly higher than placenta due to the presence of high water content Wharton's jelly. The results also demonstrate large differences in the dielectric properties of amniotic and cerebrospinal fluids. The data presented can be used in numerical simulations of the exposure of pregnant women to electromagnetic fields. (note)

  18. Dielectric properties of human placenta, umbilical cord and amniotic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyman, A.; Gabriel, C.; Benedickter, H. R.; Fröhlich, J.

    2011-04-01

    The dielectric properties of freshly delivered human placenta, umbilical cord and amniotic fluid have been acquired at 37 °C and in the frequency range of 200 MHz-10 GHz. The experimental data were fitted to a Cole-Cole expression. The results show that dielectric properties of the umbilical cord are significantly higher than placenta due to the presence of high water content Wharton's jelly. The results also demonstrate large differences in the dielectric properties of amniotic and cerebrospinal fluids. The data presented can be used in numerical simulations of the exposure of pregnant women to electromagnetic fields.

  19. Protective effect of sodium valproate on motor neurons in the spinal cord following sciatic nerve injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Wu; Danmou Xing; Zhengren Peng; Wusheng Kan

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sodium valproate (VPA) is used to be an effective anti-epileptic drug. VPA possesses the characteristics of penetrating rapidly through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and increasing levels of Bcl-2 and growth cone-associated protein (GAP) 43 in spinal cord.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of VPA on Bcl-2 expression and motor neuronal apoptosis in spinal cord of rats following sciatic nerve transection.DESIGN: Randomized controlled experiment.SETTING: Department of Hand Surgery and Microsurgery, Wuhan Puai Hospital.MATERIALS: A total of 30 male healthy SD rats of olean grade and with the body mass of 180-220 g were provided by Experimental Animal Center of Medical College of Wuhan University. Sodium Valproate Tablets were purchases from Hengrui Pharmaceutical Factory, Jiangsu.METHODS: The experiment was performed in the Central Laboratory of Wuhan Puai Hospital and Medical College of Wuhan University from February to May 2006. Totally 30 rats were randomly divided into two groups:treatment group (n =15) and model group (n =15). Longitudinal incision along backside of right hind limbs of rats was made to expose sciatic nerves, which were sharply transected 1 cm distal to the inferior margin of piriform muscle after nerve liberation under operation microscope to establish sciatic nerve injury rat models.Sodium Valproate Tablets were pulverized and diluted into 50 g/L suspension with saline. On the day of operation, the rats in the treatment group received 6 Ml/kg VPA suspension by gastric perfusion, once a day,whereas model group received 10 Ml/kg saline by gastric perfusion, once a day. L4-6 spinal cords were obtained at days 1, 4, 7, 14 and 28 after operation, respectively. Terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated Dutp-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) technique and immunohistochemical method (SP method) were used to detect absorbance (A) of neurons with positive Bcl-2 expression. Apoptotic rate of cells (number of apoptotic cells

  20. The Function of FGFR1 Signalling in the Spinal Cord: Therapeutic Approaches Using FGFR1 Ligands after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Lawrence D. F.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive research is ongoing that concentrates on finding therapies to enhance CNS regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to cure paralysis. This review sheds light on the role of the FGFR pathway in the injured spinal cord and discusses various therapies that use FGFR activating ligands to promote regeneration after SCI. We discuss studies that use peripheral nerve grafts or Schwann cell grafts in combination with FGF1 or FGF2 supplementation. Most of these studies show evidence that these therapies successfully enhance axon regeneration into the graft. Further they provide evidence for partial recovery of sensory function shown by electrophysiology and motor activity evidenced by behavioural data. We also present one study that indicates that combination with additional, synergistic factors might further drive the system towards functional regeneration. In essence, this review summarises the potential of nerve and cell grafts combined with FGF1/2 supplementation to improve outcome even after severe spinal cord injury. PMID:28197342

  1. Diffraction of sound by nearly rigid barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, W. J., Jr.; Pierce, A. D.

    1976-01-01

    The diffraction of sound by barriers with surfaces of large, but finite, acoustic impedance was analyzed. Idealized source-barrier-receiver configurations in which the barriers may be considered as semi-infinite wedges are discussed. Particular attention is given to situations in which the source and receiver are at large distances from the tip of the wedge. The expression for the acoustic pressure in this limiting case is compared with the results of Pierce's analysis of diffraction by a rigid wedge. An expression for the insertion loss of a finite impedance barrier is compared with insertion loss formulas which are used extensively in selecting or designing barriers for noise control.

  2. Mathematical modeling of complex noise barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayek, S.I.

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of the noise reduction efficiency of highway noise barriers depends on the shape and absorptivity of the barrier, the influence of the impedance of the ground under the receiver, the atmospheric conditions as well as traffic details. The mathematical model for a barrier's noise reduction requires the knowledge of point-to-point acoustic diffraction models. In many instances, the shape of the barrier is simple; such as thin wall (edge), sharp wedge, and cylindrically topped berms. However, new designs of more efficient barriers have been investigated recently.

  3. Affinity for, and localization of, PEG-functionalized silica nanoparticles to sites of damage in an ex vivo spinal cord injury model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bojun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI leads to serious neurological and functional deficits through a chain of pathophysiological events. At the molecular level, progressive damage is initially revealed by collapse of plasma membrane organization and integrity produced by breaches. Consequently, the loss of its role as a semi-permeable barrier that generally mediates the regulation and transport of ions and molecules eventually results in cell death. In previous studies, we have demonstrated the functional recovery of compromised plasma membranes can be induced by the application of the hydrophilic polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG after both spinal and brain trauma in adult rats and guinea pigs. Additionally, efforts have been directed towards a nanoparticle-based PEG application. The in vivo and ex vivo applications of PEG-decorated silica nanoparticles following CNS injury were able to effectively and efficiently enhance resealing of damaged cell membranes. Results The possibility for selectivity of tetramethyl rhodamine-dextran (TMR dye-doped, PEG-functionalized silica nanoparticles (TMR-PSiNPs to damaged spinal cord was evaluated using an ex vivo model of guinea pig SCI. Crushed and nearby undamaged spinal cord tissues exhibited an obvious difference in both the imbibement and accumulation of the TMR-PSiNPs, revealing selective labeling of compression-injured tissues. Conclusions These data show that appropriately functionalized nanoparticles can be an efficient means to both 1. carry drugs, and 2. apply membrane repair agents where they are needed in focally damaged nervous tissue.

  4. Investigation of the spinal cord as a natural receptor antenna for incident electromagnetic waves and possible impact on the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguru, Sevaiyan; Uppal, Rajan; Vaid, Ravinder Pal; Kumar, Balasubramaniam Preetham

    2012-06-01

    The effects of electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure on biological systems have been studied for many years, both as a source of medical therapy and also for potential health risks. In particular, the mechanisms of EMF absorption in the human or animal body is of medical/engineering interest, and modern modelling techniques, such as the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD), can be utilized to simulate the voltages and currents induced in different parts of the body. The simulation of one particular component, the spinal cord, is the focus of this article, and this study is motivated by the fact that the spinal cord can be modelled as a linear conducting structure, capable of generating a significant amount of voltage from incident EMF. In this article, we show, through a FDTD simulation analysis of an incoming electromagnetic field (EMF), that the spinal cord acts as a natural antenna, with frequency dependent induced electric voltage and current distribution. The multi-frequency (100-2400 MHz) simulation results show that peak voltage and current response is observed in the FM radio range around 100 MHz, with significant strength to potentially cause changes in the CNS. This work can contribute to the understanding of the mechanism behind EMF energy leakage into the CNS, and the possible contribution of the latter energy leakage towards the weakening of the blood brain barrier (BBB), whose degradation is associated with the progress of many diseases, including Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

  5. Sparing of descending axons rescues interneuron plasticity in the lumbar cord to allow adaptive learning after thoracic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Nelson Hansen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the role of spared axons on structural and behavioral neuroplasticity in the lumbar enlargement after a thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI. Previous work has demonstrated that recovery in the presence of spared axons after an incomplete lesion increases behavioral output after a subsequent complete spinal cord transection (TX. This suggests that spared axons direct adaptive changes in below-level neuronal networks of the lumbar cord. In response to spared fibers, we postulate that lumbar neuron networks support behavioral gains by preventing aberrant plasticity. As such, the present study measured histological and functional changes in the isolated lumbar cord after complete TX or incomplete contusion (SCI. To measure functional plasticity in the lumbar cord, we used an established instrumental learning paradigm. In this paradigm, neural circuits within isolated lumbar segments demonstrate learning by an increase in flexion duration that reduces exposure to a noxious leg shock. We employed this model using a proof-of-principle design to evaluate the role of sparing on lumbar learning and plasticity early (7 days or late (42 days after midthoracic SCI in a rodent model. Early after SCI or TX at 7d, spinal learning was unattainable regardless of whether the animal recovered with or without axonal substrate. Failed learning occurred alongside measures of cell soma atrophy and aberrant dendritic spine expression within interneuron populations responsible for sensorimotor integration and learning. Alternatively, exposure of the lumbar cord to a small amount of spared axons for 6 weeks produced near-normal learning late after SCI. This coincided with greater cell soma volume and fewer aberrant dendritic spines on interneurons. Thus, an opportunity to influence activity-based learning in locomotor networks depends on spared axons limiting maladaptive plasticity. Together, this work identifies a time dependent interaction between

  6. Sparing of Descending Axons Rescues Interneuron Plasticity in the Lumbar Cord to Allow Adaptive Learning After Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christopher N; Faw, Timothy D; White, Susan; Buford, John A; Grau, James W; Basso, D Michele

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of spared axons on structural and behavioral neuroplasticity in the lumbar enlargement after a thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI). Previous work has demonstrated that recovery in the presence of spared axons after an incomplete lesion increases behavioral output after a subsequent complete spinal cord transection (TX). This suggests that spared axons direct adaptive changes in below-level neuronal networks of the lumbar cord. In response to spared fibers, we postulate that lumbar neuron networks support behavioral gains by preventing aberrant plasticity. As such, the present study measured histological and functional changes in the isolated lumbar cord after complete TX or incomplete contusion (SCI). To measure functional plasticity in the lumbar cord, we used an established instrumental learning paradigm (ILP). In this paradigm, neural circuits within isolated lumbar segments demonstrate learning by an increase in flexion duration that reduces exposure to a noxious leg shock. We employed this model using a proof-of-principle design to evaluate the role of sparing on lumbar learning and plasticity early (7 days) or late (42 days) after midthoracic SCI in a rodent model. Early after SCI or TX at 7 days, spinal learning was unattainable regardless of whether the animal recovered with or without axonal substrate. Failed learning occurred alongside measures of cell soma atrophy and aberrant dendritic spine expression within interneuron populations responsible for sensorimotor integration and learning. Alternatively, exposure of the lumbar cord to a small amount of spared axons for 6 weeks produced near-normal learning late after SCI. This coincided with greater cell soma volume and fewer aberrant dendritic spines on interneurons. Thus, an opportunity to influence activity-based learning in locomotor networks depends on spared axons limiting maladaptive plasticity. Together, this work identifies a time dependent interaction between spared

  7. Dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C; Müller, S; Gurevich, E L; Franzke, J

    2011-06-21

    The present review reflects the importance of dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry. Special about this discharge is-and in contrast to usual discharges with direct current-that the plasma is separated from one or two electrodes by a dielectric barrier. This gives rise to two main features of the dielectric barrier discharges; it can serve as dissociation and excitation device and as ionization mechanism, respectively. The article portrays the various application fields for dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry, for example the use for elemental detection with optical spectrometry or as ionization source for mass spectrometry. Besides the introduction of different kinds of dielectric barrier discharges used for analytical chemistry from the literature, a clear and concise classification of dielectric barrier discharges into capacitively coupled discharges is provided followed by an overview about the characteristics of a dielectric barrier discharge concerning discharge properties and the ignition mechanism.

  8. Avoiding barriers in control of mowing robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Bai-jing; QIAN Guo-hong; XIANG Zhong-ping; LI Zuo-peng

    2006-01-01

    Due to complicated barriers,it is difficult to track the path of the mowing robot and to avoid barriers.In order to solve the problem,a method based on distance-measuring sensors and fuzzy control inputs was proposed.Its track was composed of beelines and was easy to tail.The fuzzy control inputs were based on the front barrier distance and the difference between the left and right barrier distance measured by ultrasonic sensors;the output was the direction angle.The infrared sensors around the robot improved its safety in avoiding barriers.The result of the method was feasible,agile,and stable.The distance between the robot and the barriers could be changed by altering the inputs and outputs of fuzzy control and the length of the beelines.The disposed sensors can fulfill the need of the robot in avoiding barriers.

  9. Metabolic profile of injured human spinal cord determined using surface microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Suliang; Phang, Isaac; Zoumprouli, Argyro; Papadopoulos, Marios C; Saadoun, Samira

    2016-12-01

    The management of patients having traumatic spinal cord injury would benefit from understanding and monitoring of spinal cord metabolic states. We hypothesized that the metabolism of the injured spinal cord could be visualized using Kohonen self-organizing maps. Sixteen patients with acute, severe spinal cord injuries were studied. Starting within 72 h of the injury, and for up to a week, we monitored the injury site hourly for tissue glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, and glycerol using microdialysis as well as intraspinal pressure and spinal cord perfusion pressure. A Kohonen map, which is an unsupervised, self-organizing topology-preserving neural network, was used to analyze 3366 h of monitoring data. We first visualized the different spinal cord metabolic states. Our data show that the injured cord assumes one or more of four metabolic states. On the basis of their metabolite profiles, we termed these states near-normal, ischemic, hypermetabolic, and distal. We then visualized how patients' intraspinal pressure and spinal cord perfusion pressure affect spinal cord metabolism. This revealed that for more than 60% of the time, spinal cord metabolism is patient-specific; periods of high intraspinal pressure or low perfusion pressure are not associated with specific spinal cord metabolic patterns. Finally, we determined relationships between spinal cord metabolism and neurological status. Patients with complete deficits have shorter periods of near-normal spinal cord metabolic states (7 ± 4% vs. 58 ± 12%, p injured spinal cord and may thus aid us in treating patients with acute spinal cord injuries.

  10. Frequency and Risk Factors Associated with Cord Graft Failure after Transplant with Single-Unit Umbilical Cord Cells Supplemented by Haploidentical Cells with Reduced-Intensity Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Stephanie B; Liu, Hongtao; Shore, Tsiporah; Fan, Yun; Bishop, Michael; Cushing, Melissa M; Gergis, Usama; Godley, Lucy; Kline, Justin; Larson, Richard A; Martinez, Guadalupe; Mayer, Sebastian; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Stock, Wendy; Wickrema, Amittha; van Besien, Koen; Artz, Andrew S

    2016-06-01

    Delayed engraftment and cord graft failure (CGF) are serious complications after unrelated cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), particularly when using low-cell-dose UCB units. The haplo-cord HSCT approach allows the use of a lower dose single UCB unit by co-infusion of a CD34(+) selected haploidentical graft, which provides early transient engraftment while awaiting durable UCB engraftment. We describe the frequency, complications, and risk factors of CGF after reduced-intensity conditioning haplo-cord HSCT. Among 107 patients who underwent haplo-cord HSCT, 94 were assessable for CGF, defined as risk of CGF. We conclude that assessing chimerism at day 30 may foretell impending CGF, and avoidance of high haploidentical cell doses may reduce risk of CGF after haplo-cord HSCT. However, long-term survival is possible after CGF because of predominant haploidentical or mixed chimerism and hematopoietic function.

  11. MRI monitoring of pathological changes in the spinal cord in patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gass, Achim; Rocca, Maria A; Agosta, Federica;

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord is a clinically important site that is affected by pathological changes in most patients with multiple sclerosis; however, imaging of the spinal cord with conventional MRI can be difficult. Improvements in MRI provide a major advantage for spinal cord imaging, with better signal......, functional MRI, and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, can detect non-focal, spinal cord pathological changes in patients with multiple sclerosis. Additionally, functional MRI can reveal changes in the response pattern to sensory stimulation in patients with multiple sclerosis. Through use...... with cord atrophy markers seem to be the most robust and meaningful biomarkers to monitor disease evolution in early multiple sclerosis....

  12. A review on the cords & plies reinforcement of elastomeric polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, S. S.; Husin, H.; Mat-Shayuti, M. S.; Hassan, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Steel, polyester, nylon and rayon are the main materials of cords & plies that have been reinforced in the natural rubber to produce quality tyres but there is few research reported on cord and plies reinforcement in silicone rubber. Taking the innovation of tyres as inspiration, this review's first objective is to compile the comprehensive studies about the cords & plies reinforcement in elastomeric polymer matrix. The second objective is to gather information about silicone rubber that has a high potential as a matrix phase for cords and plies reinforcement. All the tests and findings are gathered and compiled in sections namely processing preparation, curing, physical and mechanical properties, and adhesion between cords-polymer.

  13. Acute Scrotum Following Traumatic Spermatic Cord Hematoma: A Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Pepe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute scrotum constitutes the most common urological emergency secondary to spermatic cord torsion, testicular trauma, orchiepididymitis and hernias. We report a very rare case of unique traumatic spermatic cord hematoma following scrotum injury occurred during a football match. Clinical exam showed an increased volume of the left spermatic cord; the color Doppler ultrasound (CDU demonstrated left testicular ischemia secondary to a large spermatic cord hematoma that needs surgical exploration. Spermatic cord hematoma rarely induces acute scrotum, however it could be treated conservatively surgery is mandatory when pain is persistent or testicular ischemia is confirmed by CDU.

  14. Segmental hypersensitivity and spinothalamic function in spinal cord injury pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Sørensen, Leif Hougaard; Biering-Sørensen, Fin;

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying central pain following spinal cord injury (SCI) are unsettled. The purpose of the present study was to examine differences in spinothalamic tract function below injury level and evoked pain in incomplete SCI patients with neuropathic pain below injury level (central pain...

  15. Vocational reintegration following spinal cord injury : expectations, participation and interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönherr, M.C.; Groothoff, J.W.; Mulder, G.A.; Schoppen, T.; Eisma, W.H.

    2004-01-01

    Study design: Survey. Objectives: To explore the process of reintegration in paid work following a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), including the role of early expectations of individual patients regarding return to work, indicators of success of job reintegration and a description of reintegrati

  16. Expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Chu, Pat; Hwang, William; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-10-08

    A recent Science paper reported a purine derivative that expands human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells in culture (Boitano et al., 2010) by antagonizing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Major problems need to be overcome before ex vivo HSC expansion can be used clinically.

  17. Endoscopic CO2-Laser Surgery for Vocal Cord Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Czigner

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study is reported on endoscopic CO2-laser microsurgery in 69 patients with histologically verified early vocal cord cancer. A flexible nasopharyngolaryngoscope (STORZ Co was used for preoperative assessment and occasionally for postoperative follow-up.

  18. Electrode contact configuration and energy consumption in spinal cord stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de Cecile C.; Hilgerink, Marjolein P.; Buschman, Hendrik P.J.; Holsheimer, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that in spinal cord stimulation, in contrast to an increase of the number of anodes which reduces energy consumption per pulse, an increase of the number of cathodes raises the energy per pulse. Methods: Patients with an Itrel 3 pulse generator and a Pisces Quad qu

  19. Race-Ethnicity, Education, and Employment after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, James S.; Saunders, Lee; Staten, David

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article was to identify the relationship between race-ethnicity and employment after spinal cord injury (SCI), while evaluating interrelationships with gender, injury severity, and education. The authors used a cohort design using the most current status from a post-injury interview from the National SCI Statistical Center.…

  20. Quality of Life in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Eksioglu, Emel; Cakci, Aytul

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors. Secondary objectives were to determine the effects of various sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on QoL. This cross-sectional study included 54 patients with SCI. The Turkish version of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey was…