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Sample records for blood-retinal barrier cells

  1. Assessment of blood-retinal barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinores, S A

    1995-01-01

    The blood-retinal barrier consists of two components which are comprised of the retinal vascular endothelium and the retinal pigment epithelium, respectively. Its functional integrity can be recognized by tight junctions between these cells with a paucity of endocytic vesicles within them and the presence of the molecules that regulate the ionic and metabolic gradients that constitute the barrier. The barrier is compromised in several disease processes and by a variety of agents, but in most cases the location and mechanism for barrier failure is not understood. Perfusion with a variety of radiolabeled tracer molecules, vitreous fluorophotometry, or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to quantitate blood-retinal barrier leakage. Fluorescein angiography or magnetic resonance imaging can localize sites of leakage in vivo with limited resolution. Evans blue dye can be used to visualize blood-retinal barrier failure in gross pathological specimens and immuno-histochemical labeling of serum proteins such as albumin or fibrinogen can be used to localize sites of blood-retinal barrier breakdown by light microscopy. Tracers such as horseradish peroxidase, microperoxidase, or lanthanum, or the immunocytochemical demonstration of albumin can be used to reveal blood-retinal barrier breakdown at the ultrastructural level and provide insights into the mechanisms involved. This review discusses the advantages and limitations of each of these methods to aid in selection of the appropriate techniques to derive the desired information.

  2. The development of blood-retinal barrier during the interaction of astrocytes with vascular wall cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanling Yao; Tianshi Wang; Jiexin Deng; Ding Liu; Xiaofei Li; Jinbo Deng

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are intimately involved in the formation and development of retinal vessels. Astrocyte dysfunction is a major cause of blood-retinal barrier injury and other retinal vascular diseases. In this study, the development of the retinal vascular system and the formation of the blood-ret-inal barrier in mice were investigated using immunolfuorescence staining, gelatin-ink perfusion, and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the retinal vascular system of mice develops from the optic disc after birth, and radiates out gradually to cover the entire retina, taking the papilla optica as the center. First, the superifcial vasculature is formed on the inner retinal layer;then, the vasculature extends into the inner and outer edges of the retinal inner nuclear layer, forming the deep vasculature that is parallel to the superifcial vasculature. The blood-retinal barrier is mainly composed of endothelium, basal lamina and the end-feet of astrocytes, which become mature during mouse development. Initially, the naive endothelial cells were immature with few organelles and many microvilli. The basal lamina was uniform in thickness, and the glial end-feet surrounded the outer basal lamina incompletely. In the end, the blood-retinal barrier matures with smooth endothelia connected through tight junctions, rela-tively thin and even basal lamina, and relatively thin glial cell end-feet. These ifndings indicate that the development of the vasculature in the retina follows the rules of“center to periphery”and“superifcial layer to deep layers”. Its development and maturation are spatially and tempo-rally consistent with the functional performance of retinal neurons and photosensitivity. The blood-retinal barrier gradually becomes mature via the process of interactions between astro-cytes and blood vessel cells.

  3. Loss of caveolin-1 causes blood-retinal barrier breakdown, venous enlargement, and mural cell alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaowu; Fliesler, Steven J; Zhao, You-Yang; Stallcup, William B; Cohen, Alex W; Elliott, Michael H

    2014-02-01

    Blood-retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown and related vascular changes are implicated in several ocular diseases. The molecules and mechanisms regulating BRB integrity and pathophysiology are not fully elucidated. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) ablation results in loss of caveolae and microvascular pathologies, but the role of Cav-1 in the retina is largely unknown. We examined BRB integrity and vasculature in Cav-1 knockout mice and found a significant increase in BRB permeability, compared with wild-type controls, with branch veins being frequent sites of breakdown. Vascular hyperpermeability occurred without apparent alteration in junctional proteins. Such hyperpermeability was not rescued by inhibiting eNOS activity. Veins of Cav-1 knockout retinas exhibited additional pathological features, including i) eNOS-independent enlargement, ii) altered expression of mural cell markers (eg, down-regulation of NG2 and up-regulation of αSMA), and iii) dramatic alterations in mural cell phenotype near the optic nerve head. We observed a significant NO-dependent increase in retinal artery diameter in Cav-1 knockout mice, suggesting that Cav-1 plays a role in autoregulation of resistance vessels in the retina. These findings implicate Cav-1 in maintaining BRB integrity in retinal vasculature and suggest a previously undefined role in the retinal venous system and associated mural cells. Our results are relevant to clinically significant retinal disorders with vascular pathologies, including diabetic retinopathy, uveoretinitis, and primary open-angle glaucoma.

  4. Zika virus infects cells lining the blood-retinal barrier and causes chorioretinal atrophy in mouse eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Guest, John-Michael; Kanwar, Mamta; Gao, Nan; Juzych, Mark S.; Abrams, Gary W.; Yu, Fu-Shin

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an important pathogen that causes not only neurologic, but also ocular, abnormalities. Thus, it is imperative that models to study ZIKV pathogenesis in the eye are developed to identify potential targets for interventions. Here, we studied ZIKV interactions with human retinal cells and evaluated ZIKV’s pathobiology in mouse eyes. We showed that cells lining the blood-retinal barrier (BRB), the retinal endothelium, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) were highly permissive and susceptible to ZIKV-induced cell death. Direct inoculation of ZIKV in eyes of adult C57BL/6 and IFN-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) KO mice caused chorioretinal atrophy with RPE mottling, a common ocular manifestation of congenital ZIKV infection in humans. This response was associated with induced expression of multiple inflammatory and antiviral (IFNs) response genes in the infected mouse retina. Interestingly, ISG15 KO eyes exhibited severe chorioretinitis, which coincided with increased retinal cell death and higher ZIKV replication. Collectively, our study provides the first evidence to our knowledge that ZIKV causes retinal lesions and infects the cells lining the BRB and that ISG15 plays a role in retinal innate defense against ZIKV infection. Our mouse model can be used to study mechanisms underlying ZIKV-induced chorioretinitis and to gauge ocular antiviral therapies. PMID:28239662

  5. Insulin analogues may accelerate progression of diabetic retinopathy after impairment of inner blood-retinal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Abdullah; Kar, Taner; Aksoy, Yakup; Özalper, Veysel; Başbuğ, Barbaros

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy regresses after spontaneous infarction or surgical ablation of pituitary gland. Growth hormone deficiency seems to be a protective factor for development of diabetic retinopathy in dwarfs. Despite the same glycemic control, development of diabetic retinopathy is significantly higher in pubertal subjects than pre-pubertal subjects. These evidences indicate a strong relationship between growth hormone and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is the most important mediator of effects of growth hormone (GH). It stimulates IGF-1 receptor. Insulin analogues also stimulate IGF-1 receptor. Therefore insulin analogues may show similar effects like growth hormone and deteriorate diabetic retinopathy. However we suggest that impairment degree of inner blood-retinal barrier should be considered for this claim. We hypothesize that insulin analogues have dual effects (beneficial and worsening) depending on stage of impairment of inner blood-retinal barrier. Insulin analogues protect pericytes and blood-retinal barrier by decreasing blood glucose level. Analogues may pass into the retinal tissue in very low amounts when inner blood-retinal barrier is intact. Therefore, insulin analogues may not deteriorate diabetic retinopathy but also have beneficial effect by protecting blood-retinal barrier at this stage. However, they may pass into the retinal tissue in much more amounts when inner blood-retinal barrier impairs. Analogues may deteriorate cellular composition of retina through stimulation of IGF-1 receptors. A number of different cell types, including glia, retinal pigment epithelial cells and fibroblast-like cells have been identified in diabetic epiretinal tissues. Insulin analogues may cause proliferation in these cells. A type of glial cell named Non-astrocytic Inner Retinal Glia-like (NIRG) cell was identified to be stimulated and proliferate by IGF-1. IGF has been reported to generate traction force in retinal

  6. The blood-retinal barrier permeability in diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsaa, B; Lund-Andersen, H; Mehlsen, J

    1981-01-01

    By the of aid an extended corpus vitreum fluorophotometric technique, the blood-retinal barrier permeability for fluorescein was studied in diabetologically well characterized patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. The method, which involves simultaneous determination of the fluoresce...... found in normal volunteers. Simplex retinopathy without macular oedema showed values of 2.5 . 10(-7) cm . sec-1 while simplex retinopathy with macular oedema showed P-values of 10 . 10(-7) cm . sec-1....... concentration in corpus vitreum and plasma, is described and discussed. A clear correlation was found between the degree of retinopathy and permeability (P). Patients with normal visus, ophthalmoscophy, fundus photo and fluorescence angiography exhibited P-values of 1.10(-7) cm . sec-1. This was similar to P-values...

  7. Blood-retinal barrier permeability versus diabetes duration and retinal morphology in insulin dependent diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsaa, B; Lund-Andersen, H; Mehlsen, J;

    1987-01-01

    The blood-retinal barrier permeability to fluorescein was quantitated in 54 patients (22 females and 32 males) with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) of different duration. Correlation was demonstrated between permeability and diabetes duration. A normal permeability was measured...... the pattern. However, the pathologically increased permeability after ten years duration of the disease could not be demonstrated in diabetics with onset of the disease after the age of 30 years. The permeability of the blood-retinal barrier correlated well with changes in retinal morphology as seen...... in patients with up to ten years diabetes duration. A pathologically increased permeability was measured with ten to 15 years diabetes duration and during the next decade the permeability increased rapidly to 5-10 times the normal value. Onset of diabetes in the decade before and after puberty did not change...

  8. Plasmalemma Vesicle-Associated Protein Has a Key Role in Blood-Retinal Barrier Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewska-Kruk, Joanna; van der Wijk, Anne-Eva; van Veen, Henk A; Gorgels, Theo G M F; Vogels, Ilse M C; Versteeg, Danielle; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Klaassen, Ingeborg

    2016-04-01

    Loss of blood-retinal barrier (BRB) properties induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and other factors is an important cause of diabetic macular edema. Previously, we found that the presence of plasmalemma vesicle-associated protein (PLVAP) in retinal capillaries associates with loss of BRB properties and correlates with increased vascular permeability in diabetic macular edema. In this study, we investigated whether absence of PLVAP protects the BRB from VEGF-induced permeability. We used lentiviral-delivered shRNA or siRNA to inhibit PLVAP expression. The barrier properties of in vitro BRB models were assessed by measuring transendothelial electrical resistance, permeability of differently sized tracers, and the presence of endothelial junction complexes. The effect of VEGF on caveolae formation was studied in human retinal explants. BRB loss in vivo was studied in the mouse oxygen-induced retinopathy model. The inhibition of PLVAP expression resulted in decreased VEGF-induced BRB permeability of fluorescent tracers, both in vivo and in vitro. PLVAP inhibition attenuated transendothelial electrical resistance reduction induced by VEGF in BRB models in vitro and significantly increased transendothelial electrical resistance of the nonbarrier human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, PLVAP knockdown prevented VEGF-induced caveolae formation in retinal explants but did not rescue VEGF-induced alterations in endothelial junction complexes. In conclusion, PLVAP is an essential cofactor in VEGF-induced BRB permeability and may become an interesting novel target for diabetic macular edema therapy.

  9. Bloodstream-To-Eye Infections Are Facilitated by Outer Blood-Retinal Barrier Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip S Coburn

    Full Text Available The blood-retinal barrier (BRB functions to maintain the immune privilege of the eye, which is necessary for normal vision. The outer BRB is formed by tightly-associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells which limit transport within the retinal environment, maintaining retinal function and viability. Retinal microvascular complications and RPE dysfunction resulting from diabetes and diabetic retinopathy cause permeability changes in the BRB that compromise barrier function. Diabetes is the major predisposing condition underlying endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis (EBE, a blinding intraocular infection resulting from bacterial invasion of the eye from the bloodstream. However, significant numbers of EBE cases occur in non-diabetics. In this work, we hypothesized that dysfunction of the outer BRB may be associated with EBE development. To disrupt the RPE component of the outer BRB in vivo, sodium iodate (NaIO3 was administered to C57BL/6J mice. NaIO3-treated and untreated mice were intravenously injected with 108 colony forming units (cfu of Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae. At 4 and 6 days postinfection, EBE was observed in NaIO3-treated mice after infection with K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, although the incidence was higher following S. aureus infection. Invasion of the eye was observed in control mice following S. aureus infection, but not in control mice following K. pneumoniae infection. Immunohistochemistry and FITC-dextran conjugate transmigration assays of human RPE barriers after infection with an exoprotein-deficient agr/sar mutant of S. aureus suggested that S. aureus exoproteins may be required for the loss of the tight junction protein, ZO-1, and for permeability of this in vitro barrier. Our results support the clinical findings that for both pathogens, complications which result in BRB permeability increase the likelihood of bacterial transmigration from the bloodstream into the eye. For S. aureus, however, BRB

  10. Bloodstream-To-Eye Infections Are Facilitated by Outer Blood-Retinal Barrier Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Phillip S.; Wiskur, Brandt J.; Miller, Frederick C.; LaGrow, Austin L.; Astley, Roger A.; Elliott, Michael H.; Callegan, Michelle C.

    2016-01-01

    The blood-retinal barrier (BRB) functions to maintain the immune privilege of the eye, which is necessary for normal vision. The outer BRB is formed by tightly-associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells which limit transport within the retinal environment, maintaining retinal function and viability. Retinal microvascular complications and RPE dysfunction resulting from diabetes and diabetic retinopathy cause permeability changes in the BRB that compromise barrier function. Diabetes is the major predisposing condition underlying endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis (EBE), a blinding intraocular infection resulting from bacterial invasion of the eye from the bloodstream. However, significant numbers of EBE cases occur in non-diabetics. In this work, we hypothesized that dysfunction of the outer BRB may be associated with EBE development. To disrupt the RPE component of the outer BRB in vivo, sodium iodate (NaIO3) was administered to C57BL/6J mice. NaIO3-treated and untreated mice were intravenously injected with 108 colony forming units (cfu) of Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae. At 4 and 6 days postinfection, EBE was observed in NaIO3-treated mice after infection with K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, although the incidence was higher following S. aureus infection. Invasion of the eye was observed in control mice following S. aureus infection, but not in control mice following K. pneumoniae infection. Immunohistochemistry and FITC-dextran conjugate transmigration assays of human RPE barriers after infection with an exoprotein-deficient agr/sar mutant of S. aureus suggested that S. aureus exoproteins may be required for the loss of the tight junction protein, ZO-1, and for permeability of this in vitro barrier. Our results support the clinical findings that for both pathogens, complications which result in BRB permeability increase the likelihood of bacterial transmigration from the bloodstream into the eye. For S. aureus, however, BRB permeability is

  11. Bloodstream-To-Eye Infections Are Facilitated by Outer Blood-Retinal Barrier Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Phillip S; Wiskur, Brandt J; Miller, Frederick C; LaGrow, Austin L; Astley, Roger A; Elliott, Michael H; Callegan, Michelle C

    2016-01-01

    The blood-retinal barrier (BRB) functions to maintain the immune privilege of the eye, which is necessary for normal vision. The outer BRB is formed by tightly-associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells which limit transport within the retinal environment, maintaining retinal function and viability. Retinal microvascular complications and RPE dysfunction resulting from diabetes and diabetic retinopathy cause permeability changes in the BRB that compromise barrier function. Diabetes is the major predisposing condition underlying endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis (EBE), a blinding intraocular infection resulting from bacterial invasion of the eye from the bloodstream. However, significant numbers of EBE cases occur in non-diabetics. In this work, we hypothesized that dysfunction of the outer BRB may be associated with EBE development. To disrupt the RPE component of the outer BRB in vivo, sodium iodate (NaIO3) was administered to C57BL/6J mice. NaIO3-treated and untreated mice were intravenously injected with 108 colony forming units (cfu) of Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae. At 4 and 6 days postinfection, EBE was observed in NaIO3-treated mice after infection with K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, although the incidence was higher following S. aureus infection. Invasion of the eye was observed in control mice following S. aureus infection, but not in control mice following K. pneumoniae infection. Immunohistochemistry and FITC-dextran conjugate transmigration assays of human RPE barriers after infection with an exoprotein-deficient agr/sar mutant of S. aureus suggested that S. aureus exoproteins may be required for the loss of the tight junction protein, ZO-1, and for permeability of this in vitro barrier. Our results support the clinical findings that for both pathogens, complications which result in BRB permeability increase the likelihood of bacterial transmigration from the bloodstream into the eye. For S. aureus, however, BRB permeability is

  12. A novel transgenic zebrafish model for blood-brain and blood-retinal barrier development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugimoto Masahiko

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development and maintenance of the blood-brain and blood-retinal barrier is critical for the homeostasis of brain and retinal tissue. Despite decades of research our knowledge of the formation and maintenance of the blood-brain (BBB and blood-retinal (BRB barrier is very limited. We have established an in vivo model to study the development and maintenance of these barriers by generating a transgenic zebrafish line that expresses a vitamin D-binding protein fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (DBP-EGFP in blood plasma, as an endogenous tracer. Results The temporal establishment of the BBB and BRB was examined using this transgenic line and the results were compared with that obtained by injection of fluorescent dyes into the sinus venosus of embryos at various stages of development. We also examined the expression of claudin-5, a component of tight junctions during the first 4 days of development. We observed that the BBB of zebrafish starts to develop by 3 dpf, with expression of claudin-5 in the central arteries preceding it at 2 dpf. The hyaloid vasculature in the zebrafish retina develops a barrier function at 3 dpf, which endows the zebrafish with unique advantages for studying the BRB. Conclusion Zebrafish embryos develop BBB and BRB function simultaneously by 3 dpf, which is regulated by tight junction proteins. The Tg(l-fabp:DBP-EGFP zebrafish will have great advantages in studying development and maintenance of the blood-neural barrier, which is a new application for the widely used vertebrate model.

  13. Imidazole-4-acetic acid, a new lead structure for interaction with the taurine transporter in outer blood-retinal barrier cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valembois, Sophie; Krall, Jacob; Frølund, Bente

    2017-01-01

    )·min). Furthermore, the taurine influx was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by GABA and imidazole-4-acetic acid (IAA), which is a naturally occurring metabolite of histamine. These compounds display similar Ki values of 644.2μM and 658.6μM, respectively. Moreover, IAA...... therapeutic approach. The taurine transporter (TAUT) plays a key role in the retinal transport of GABA and has been previously suggested to display a higher functional activity in the retina compared to the brain. TAUT would therefore stand as a suitable target for the selective delivery of ρ GABAARs ligands...... by testing their ability to inhibit the TAUT-mediated influx of taurine in ARPE-19 cells. Results showed that taurine influx was seven-fold higher when the ARPE-19 cells were cultured under hyperosmotic conditions and was demonstrated to display saturable kinetics (Km=27.7±2.2μM and Jmax=24.2±0.6pmol/cm(2...

  14. Targeted and reversible blood-retinal barrier disruption via focused ultrasound and microbubbles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juyoung Park

    Full Text Available The blood-retinal barrier (BRB prevents most systemically-administered drugs from reaching the retina. This study investigated whether burst ultrasound applied with a circulating microbubble agent can disrupt the BRB, providing a noninvasive method for the targeted delivery of systemically administered drugs to the retina. To demonstrate the efficacy and reversibility of such a procedure, five overlapping targets around the optic nerve head were sonicated through the cornea and lens in 20 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats using a 690 kHz focused ultrasound transducer. For BRB disruption, 10 ms bursts were applied at 1 Hz for 60 s with different peak rarefactional pressure amplitudes (0.81, 0.88 and 1.1 MPa. Each sonication was combined with an IV injection of a microbubble ultrasound contrast agent (Definity. To evaluate BRB disruption, an MRI contrast agent (Magnevist was injected IV immediately after the last sonication, and serial T1-weighted MR images were acquired up to 30 minutes. MRI contrast enhancement into the vitreous humor near targeted area was observed for all tested pressure amplitudes, with more signal enhancement evident at the highest pressure amplitude. At 0.81 MPa, BRB disruption was not detected 3 h post sonication, after an additional MRI contrast injection. A day after sonication, the eyes were processed for histology of the retina. At the two lower exposure levels (0.81 and 0.88 MPa, most of the sonicated regions were indistinguishable from the control eyes, although a few tiny clusters of extravasated erythrocytes (petechaie were observed. More severe retinal damage was observed at 1.1 MPa. These results demonstrate that focused ultrasound and microbubbles can offer a noninvasive and targeted means to transiently disrupt the BRB for ocular drug delivery.

  15. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides reduce neuronal damage, blood-retinal barrier disruption and oxidative stress in retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

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    Suk-Yee Li

    Full Text Available Neuronal cell death, glial cell activation, retinal swelling and oxidative injury are complications in retinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injuries. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP, extracts from the wolfberries, are good for "eye health" according to Chinese medicine. The aim of our present study is to explore the use of LBP in retinal I/R injury. Retinal I/R injury was induced by surgical occlusion of the internal carotid artery. Prior to induction of ischemia, mice were treated orally with either vehicle (PBS or LBP (1 mg/kg once a day for 1 week. Paraffin-embedded retinal sections were prepared. Viable cells were counted; apoptosis was assessed using TUNEL assay. Expression levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, aquaporin-4 (AQP4, poly(ADP-ribose (PAR and nitrotyrosine (NT were investigated by immunohistochemistry. The integrity of blood-retinal barrier (BRB was examined by IgG extravasations. Apoptosis and decreased viable cell count were found in the ganglion cell layer (GCL and the inner nuclear layer (INL of the vehicle-treated I/R retina. Additionally, increased retinal thickness, GFAP activation, AQP4 up-regulation, IgG extravasations and PAR expression levels were observed in the vehicle-treated I/R retina. Many of these changes were diminished or abolished in the LBP-treated I/R retina. Pre-treatment with LBP for 1 week effectively protected the retina from neuronal death, apoptosis, glial cell activation, aquaporin water channel up-regulation, disruption of BRB and oxidative stress. The present study suggests that LBP may have a neuroprotective role to play in ocular diseases for which I/R is a feature.

  16. The blood-retinal barrier permeability to fluorescein in normal subjects and in juvenile diabetics without retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsaa, B; Lund-Andersen, H; Mehlsen, J;

    1986-01-01

    The blood-retinal barrier permeability to fluorescein was determined in 20 eyes from 17 normal volunteers (mean age 31 years) and in 20 eyes from 19 juvenile diabetics without apparent retinopathy (mean age 35 years - mean duration of diabetes 6 years). The permeability was in normal subjects (1...... coefficient in the vitreous body was determined and juvenile diabetics without apparent retinopathy showed a diffusion coefficient of (0.80 +/- 0.25) X 10(-5) cm2/sec (mean +/- 2 X SD), which was the same as in normals where the diffusion coefficient was (0.69 +/- 0.46) X 10(-5) cm2/sec (mean +/- 2 X SD)....

  17. Protection of blood retinal barrier and systemic vasculature by insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3.

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    Yagna P R Jarajapu

    Full Text Available Previously, we showed that insulin growth factor (IGF-1 binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3, independent of IGF-1, reduces pathological angiogenesis in a mouse model of the oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR. The current study evaluates novel endothelium-dependent functions of IGFBP-3 including blood retinal barrier (BRB integrity and vasorelaxation. To evaluate vascular barrier function, either plasmid expressing IGFBP-3 under the regulation of an endothelial-specific promoter or a control plasmid was injected into the vitreous humor of mouse pups (P1 and compared to the non-injected eyes of the same pups undergoing standard OIR protocol. Prior to sacrifice, the mice were given an injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP. IGFBP-3 plasmid-injected eyes displayed near-normal vessel morphology and enhanced vascular barrier function. Further, in vitro IGFBP-3 protects retinal endothelial cells from VEGF-induced loss of junctional integrity by antagonizing the dissociation of the junctional complexes. To assess the vasodilatory effects of IGFBP-3, rat posterior cerebral arteries were examined in vitro. Intraluminal IGFBP-3 decreased both pressure- and serotonin-induced constrictions by stimulating nitric oxide (NO release that were blocked by L-NAME or scavenger receptor-B1 neutralizing antibody (SRB1-Ab. Both wild-type and IGF-1-nonbinding mutant IGFBP-3 (IGFBP-3NB stimulated eNOS activity/NO release to a similar extent in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs. NO release was neither associated with an increase in intracellular calcium nor decreased by Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamKII blockade; however, dephosphorylation of eNOS-Thr(495 was observed. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K activity and Akt-Ser(473 phosphorylation were both increased by IGFBP-3 and selectively blocked by the SRB1-Ab or PI3K blocker LY294002. In conclusion, IGFBP-3 mediates protective effects on BRB integrity and mediates robust NO release to stimulate

  18. Blood-retinal barrier glycerol permeability in diabetic macular edema and healthy eyes: estimations from macular volume changes after peroral glycerol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thornit, Dorte Nellemann; Vinten, Carl Martin; Sander, Birgit;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the changes in macular volume (MV) between healthy subjects and patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) after an osmotic load and to determine the glycerol permeability (P(gly)) of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). METHODS: In this unmasked study, 13 patients with DME and 5...

  19. The biocompatibility of a polyelectrolyte vitreous body substitute on a high resistance in vitro model of the blood-retinal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strotmann, Falko; Wolf, Isabel; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2013-09-01

    The vitreous body can be regarded as a fascinating simple but important tissue, since it represents the main compartment of the eye and plays a crucial role for proper vision. Several diseases require its removal with following substitution using a liquid artificial vitreous body replacement. We explore the biocompatibility of a poly(AMPS-Na(+))-graft-poly(NIPAAm) polyelectrolyte following the innovative concept of thermo-responsive behaviour, exhibiting enhanced shear viscosity at physiological temperatures. As a powerful model for the blood-retinal barrier, we use the well-established in vitro cell culture model based on highly differentiated porcine brain capillary endothelial cells. Via the quantification of the transendothelial electrical resistance and immunocytochemical staining of tight junction proteins, we are able to show that a barrier integrity affecting impact of the polyelectrolyte was only transient and nearly reversible. Furthermore, the polyelectrolyte hydrogel is characterized by the absence of any acute cell morphology, cell vitality or proliferation affecting impacts. It does not trigger acute apoptotic processes, as can be substantiated via caspase-3 activity and DNA fragmentation assays. In view of the results of this study, it is shown that the polyelectrolyte does not affect the vitality parameters of our porcine brain capillary endothelial cells. It can be suggested that the tested thermo-responsive polyelectrolyte does not affect the sensitive retinal barrier integrity. Thus from the cellular tolerance it might serve as a potential liquid artificial vitreous body replacement to overcome the most prominent difficulties of common vitreal endotamponades.

  20. Vasoinhibins regulate the inner and outer blood-retinal barrier and limit retinal oxidative stress

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    David eArredondo Zamarripa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Vasoinhibins are prolactin fragments present in the retina, where they have been shown to prevent the hypervasopermeability associated with diabetes. Enhanced bradykinin (BK production contributes to the increased transport through the blood-retina barrier (BRB in diabetes. Here, we studied if vasoinhibins regulate BRB permeability by targeting the vascular endothelium and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE components of this barrier. Intravitreal injection of BK in male rats increased BRB permeability. Vasoinhibins prevented this effect, as did the B2 receptor antagonist Hoe-140. BK induced a transient decrease in mouse retinal and brain capillary endothelial monolayer resistance that was blocked by vasoinhibins. Both vasoinhibins and the nitric oxide (NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME, but not the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, blocked the transient decrease in bovine umbilical vein endothelial cell (BUVEC monolayer resistance induced by BK; this block was reversed by the NO donor DETANONOate. Vasoinhibins also prevented the BK-induced actin cytoskeleton redistribution, as did L-NAME. BK transiently decreased human RPE (ARPE-19 cell monolayer resistance, and this effect was blocked by vasoinhibins, L-NAME, and NAC. DETANONOate reverted the blocking effect of vasoinhibins. Similar to BK, the radical initiator Luperox induced a reduction in ARPE-19 cell monolayer resistance, which was prevented by vasoinhibins. These effects on RPE resistance coincided with actin cytoskeleton redistribution. Intravitreal injection of vasoinhibins reduced the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS in retinas of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, particularly in the RPE and capillary-containing layers. Thus, vasoinhibins reduce BRB permeability by targeting both its main inner and outer components through NO- and ROS-dependent pathways, offering potential treatment strategies against diabetic retinopathies.

  1. Intravenously administered gold nanoparticles pass through the blood-retinal barrier depending on the particle size, and induce no retinal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yu, Young Suk [Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Seoul Artificial Eye Center, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 151744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyu-Won [NeuroVascular Coordination Research Center, College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung Hun, E-mail: hunin315@paran.com, E-mail: ysyu@snu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-ku, Seoul 120749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-16

    The retina maintains homeostasis through the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). Although it is ideal to deliver the drug to the retina via systemic administration, it is still challenging due to the BRB strictly regulating permeation from blood to the retina. Herein, we demonstrated that intravenously administered gold nanoparticles could pass through the BRB and are distributed in all retinal layers without cytotoxicity. After intravenous injection of gold nanoparticles into C57BL/6 mice, 100 nm nanoparticles were not detected in the retina whereas 20 nm nanoparticles passed through the BRB and were distributed in all retinal layers. 20 nm nanoparticles in the retina were observed in neurons (75 {+-} 5%), endothelial cells (17 {+-} 6%) and peri-endothelial glial cells (8 {+-} 3%), where nanoparticles were bound on the membrane. In the retina, cells containing nanoparticles did not show any structural abnormality and increase of cell death compared to cells without nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles never affected the viability of retinal endothelial cells, astrocytes and retinoblastoma cells. Furthermore, gold nanoparticles never led to any change in expression of representative biological molecules including zonula occludens-1 and glut-1 in retinal endothelial cells, neurofilaments in differentiated retinoblastoma cells and glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes. Therefore, our data suggests that small gold nanoparticles (20 nm) could be an alternative for drug delivery across the BRB, which could be safely applied in vivo.

  2. Chemokine mediated monocyte trafficking into the retina: role of inflammation in alteration of the blood-retinal barrier in diabetic retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampathkumar Rangasamy

    Full Text Available Inflammation in the diabetic retina is mediated by leukocyte adhesion to the retinal vasculature and alteration of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB. We investigated the role of chemokines in the alteration of the BRB in diabetes. Animals were made diabetic by streptozotocin injection and analyzed for gene expression and monocyte/macrophage infiltration. The expression of CCL2 (chemokine ligand 2 was significantly up-regulated in the retinas of rats with 4 and 8 weeks of diabetes and also in human retinal endothelial cells treated with high glucose and glucose flux. Additionally, diabetes or intraocular injection of recombinant CCL2 resulted in increased expression of the macrophage marker, F4/80. Cell culture impedance sensing studies showed that purified CCL2 was unable to alter the integrity of the human retinal endothelial cell barrier, whereas monocyte conditioned medium resulted in significant reduction in cell resistance, suggesting the relevance of CCL2 in early immune cell recruitment for subsequent barrier alterations. Further, using Cx3cr1-GFP mice, we found that intraocular injection of CCL2 increased retinal GFP+ monocyte/macrophage infiltration. When these mice were made diabetic, increased infiltration of monocytes/macrophages was also present in retinal tissues. Diabetes and CCL2 injection also induced activation of retinal microglia in these animals. Quantification by flow cytometry demonstrated a two-fold increase of CX3CR1+/CD11b+ (monocyte/macrophage and microglia cells in retinas of wildtype diabetic animals in comparison to control non-diabetic ones. Using CCL2 knockout (Ccl2-/- mice, we show a significant reduction in retinal vascular leakage and monocyte infiltration following induction of diabetes indicating the importance of this chemokine in alteration of the BRB. Thus, CCL2 may be an important therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetic macular edema.

  3. Consumption of Polyphenol-Rich Zingiber Zerumbet Rhizome Extracts Protects against the Breakdown of the Blood-Retinal Barrier and Retinal Inflammation Induced by Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thing-Fong Tzeng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the amelioration of diabetic retinopathy (DR by Zingiber zerumbet rhizome ethanol extracts (ZZRext in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-diabetic rats. ZZRext contains high phenolic and flavonoid contents. STZ-diabetic rats were treated orally with ZZRext (200, 300 mg/kg per day for three months. Blood-retinal barrier (BRB breakdown and increased vascular permeability were found in diabetic rats, with downregulation of occludin, and claudin-5. ZZRext treatment effectively preserved the expression of occludin, and claudin-5, leading to less BRB breakdown and less vascular permeability. Retinal histopathological observation showed that the disarrangement and reduction in thickness of retinal layers were reversed in ZZRext-treated diabetic rats. Retinal gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, vascular endothelial growth factor, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 were all decreased in ZZRext-treated diabetic rats. Moreover, ZZRext treatment not only inhibited the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB activation, but also downregulated the protein expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK in diabetic retina. In conclusion, the results suggest that the retinal protective effects of ZZRext occur through improved retinal structural change and inhibiting retinal inflammation. The antiretinopathy property of ZZRext might be related to the downregulation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB signal transduction induced by diabetes.

  4. Β-alanine and l-histidine transport across the inner blood-retinal barrier: potential involvement in L-carnosine supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Takuya; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2013-08-01

    The supply of L-carnosine, a bioactive dipeptide of β-alanine and l-histidine, to the retina across the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) was studied. The in vivo and in vitro studies revealed low uptake activities for [(3)H]Gly-Sar, a representative dipeptide, suggesting that l-carnosine transport plays only a minor role at the BRB. The in vivo study using rats showed approximately 18- and 23-fold greater retinal uptake indexes (RUI) for [(3)H]β-alanine and [(3)H]l-histidine compared with that of a paracellular marker, respectively. The RUI of [(3)H]β-alanine was taurine- and γ-aminobutyric acid-sensitive, and the in vitro uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells showed time- concentration- and temperature-dependent [(3)H]β-alanine uptake, suggesting that a carrier-mediated process was involved in β-alanine transport across the inner BRB. [(3)H]β-Alanine uptake was inhibited by taurine and β-guanidinopropionic acid, suggesting that taurine transporter (TAUT/SLC6A6) is responsible for the influx transport of β-alanine across the inner BRB. Regarding l-histidine, the l-leucine-sensitive RUI of [(3)H]l-histidine was identified, and the in vitro [(3)H]l-histidine uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells suggested that a carrier-mediated process was involved in l-histidine transport across the inner BRB. The inhibition profile suggested that L-type amino acid transporter (LAT1/SLC7A5) is responsible for the influx transport of l-histidine across the inner BRB. These results show that the influx transports of β-alanine and l-histidine across the inner BRB is carried out by TAUT and LAT1, respectively, suggesting that the retinal l-carnosine is supplied by enzymatic synthesis from two kinds of amino acids transported across the inner BRB.

  5. Down-regulation of pigment epithelium-derived factor in uveitic lesion associates with focal vascular endothelial growth factor expression and breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeg, Cornelia A; Altmann, Frank; Hauck, Stefanie M; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; Amann, Barbara; Stangassinger, Manfred; Ueffing, Marius

    2007-05-01

    Spontaneous equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is an incurable autoimmune disease affecting the eye. Identifying biological markers or pathways associated with this disease may allow the understanding of its pathogenesis at a molecular level. The vitreous is the body fluid closest to the disease-affected tissue and possibly also an effector of pathological processes relevant for ERU. Surgical removal of vitreous leads to cessation of relapses in spontaneous uveitis of both man and horse, therefore vitreous composites are likely to contribute to disease progression. Uveitic vitreous is likely to contain potential biomarkers in relatively undiluted quantities. With the goal to identify these markers, we systematically compared vitreous from healthy and disease-affected eyes by proteomic profiling. Nine differentially expressed proteins were identified, that are functionally related to immune response, inflammation, and maintenance of the blood-retinal barrier. One of these, pigment epithelium-derived factor, a protein involved in maintaining a proper blood-retina barrier as well as protecting from neoangiogenesis was additionally found to be down-regulated within uveitic retinal lesions whereas, conversely, vascular endothelial growth factor was found to be up-regulated at these sites. Together, these changes point to as of yet undiscovered biological pathways involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease.

  6. Diosmin alleviates retinal edema by protecting the blood-retinal barrier and reducing retinal vascular permeability during ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nianting Tong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Retinal swelling, leading to irreversible visual impairment, is an important early complication in retinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Diosmin, a naturally occurring flavonoid glycoside, has been shown to have antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects against I/R injury. The present study was performed to evaluate the retinal microvascular protective effect of diosmin in a model of I/R injury. METHODS: Unilateral retinal I/R was induced by increasing intraocular pressure to 110 mm Hg for 60 min followed by reperfusion. Diosmin (100 mg/kg or vehicle solution was administered intragastrically 30 min before the onset of ischemia and then daily after I/R injury until the animals were sacrificed. Rats were evaluated for retinal functional injury by electroretinogram (ERG just before sacrifice. Retinas were harvested for HE staining, immunohistochemistry assay, ELISA, and western blotting analysis. Evans blue (EB extravasation was determined to assess blood-retinal barrier (BRB disruption and the structure of tight junctions (TJ was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: Diosmin significantly ameliorated the reduction of b-wave, a-wave, and b/a ratio in ERG, alleviated retinal edema, protected the TJ structure, and reduced EB extravasation. All of these effects of diosmin were associated with increased zonular occluden-1 (ZO-1 and occludin protein expression and decreased VEGF/PEDF ratio. CONCLUSIONS: Maintenance of TJ integrity and reduced permeability of capillaries as well as improvements in retinal edema were observed with diosmin treatment, which may contribute to preservation of retinal function. This protective effect of diosmin may be at least partly attributed to its ability to regulate the VEGF/PEDF ratio.

  7. Cytotoxity of HIV-1 gp120 protein on human blood-retinal barrier ceils%HIV-1 gp120蛋白对人血-视网膜屏障细胞的毒性作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林浩添; 张振平; 余秋蓉; 晏丕松; 汪琪璘; 柏凌

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the mechanism of human blood-retina barrier (BRB) destroyed by HIV- 1 gp120 protein. Methods Human blood-retina barrier cells (HBRBCs) including human retina capillary endothelial cells (HRCECs), human retina capillary perieytes (HRCPCs), human retinal pigment epithelium (HRPE) were primarily cultured. Culture media were regarded as eontrol. MTT method was used to observe the inhibition effect of HIV-1 gp120 protein on eell viability at 7 different concentrations (0.01 to 0.15 mg/L) for 24 h, and at a fixed concentration(0.08 mg/L) for different times (4-72 h). After 0.08, 0.1, 0.12 and 0.15 mg/L HIV- 1 gp120 protein were applied in those cells for 24 h, cell apoptotie rates and membrane potential of mitochondria (△ψm) were measured by flow eytometry. Activation of Cleaved caspase-9 was detected by Western blot. Change of cell mierostructure with 0.08mg/L HIV-1 gp120 protein before and after 24 h was detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results Concentration of HIV-1 gp120 protein less than 0.08 mg/L did not influence cell viability at 24 h. But at the concentration of more than 0.08 mg/L, HIV-1 gp120 protein could obviously inhibit HBRBCs proliferation with a concentration-dependent manner(HRCECs: r=-0.763, P<0.01 ; HRCPCs: r=-0.804, P<0.01 ; HRPE: r=-0.698, P<0.01). HIV-1 gp120 protein(0.08 mg/L) significantly inhibited cells proliferation at 12 h, and this inhibition effect was more stronger at 24,48,72 h with a time-dependent increase (HRCECs: r=-0.833, P<0.01 ; HRCPCs: r=-0.784, P<0.01 ; HRPE: r=-0.701, P<0.01). The relative growth rates were HRCECs: 84%, 70%, 41%, 22% ; HRCPCs: 80%, 69%, 38%, 18% ; HRPE: 86%, 73%, 45%, 26% respectively. Compared with control group, the ratio of apoptotic cells of HBRBCs and expression level of Cleaved caspase-9 protein increased but △ψm decreased at different concentrations with HIV-1 gp120 protein treatment for 24 h. The changes of these indexes were all concentration-dependent manner

  8. Effect of Chinese medicine Qidengmingmu capsule on the STZ induced hyperglycemia rat's blood-retinal barrier%芪灯明目胶囊对高血糖大鼠血视网膜屏障影响的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张富文; 段俊国; 赵凌; 路雪婧; 李强

    2013-01-01

    目的:观察链脲佐菌素(STZ)诱发糖尿病大鼠在造模后血-视网膜屏障(blood-retina barrier,BRB)变化情况,并以阳性药为对照研究中药芪灯明目胶囊对STZ诱发糖尿病大鼠的视网膜血管渗漏影响.方法:采用STZ腹腔注射制作糖尿病大鼠模型,在造模后6mo内各时点(2wk;1,2,3,4,5,6mo)采用伊文思蓝灌注示踪显示血-视网膜的渗漏情况,在造模后3mo开始用中药芪灯明目胶囊(低中高剂量组分别给予125,250,500mg/kg体质量剂量的胶囊内容物灌胃),对照组用安多明胶囊(200mg/kg体质量剂量,相当于10倍成人剂量),灌胃3mo,观察药物对 BRB的影响.结果:STZ糖尿病大鼠在2wk即可出现BRB的损害,并随着高血糖状态的持续而不断加重.对造模3mo STZ糖尿病模型大鼠连续灌胃中药芪灯治疗3mo,结果提示:中药芪灯对STZ糖尿病BRB有保护作用,可明显减少视网膜血管的渗漏.结论:STZ糖尿病模型大鼠在早期即可出现BRB损害,并随着高血糖的持续而加重,中药芪灯明目胶囊可减少高血糖导致的BRB损害.%AIM: To observe retinal vessel leakage of streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rat, and the effect of traditional Chinese medicine on it.METHODS: We induced diabetic rat model by peritoneal injection of STZ, after the blood glucose raised, we used Evans blue to trace the leakage of blood - retina barrier (BRB) every month. After blood glucose rose three months later, we treated the Chinese medicine group diabetic rat with Qidengmingmu capsule. There were three groups of different dose, low dose group of 125mg/kg, middle dose group of 250mg/kg, high dose group of 500mg/kg. The control group was treated with calcium dobesilate (200mg/kg). After three months treated by medicine, the leakage of rat blood - retina barrier was evaluated.RESULTS: The damage of BRB and visual function occurred at two week after the blood glucose rose, and the damage aggravated with the continuing of high diabetic

  9. Plastic Schottky barrier solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, James R.; Cohen, Marshall J.

    1984-01-24

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped, intrinsically p-type organic semiconductor comprising polyacetylene. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a magnesium electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates the magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film.

  10. Nuclear GAPDH: changing the fate of Müller cells in diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Jayaguru, Prathiba; Mohr, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Müller cells, the primary glial cells are a crucial component of the retinal tissue performing a wide range of functions including maintaining the blood-retinal barrier. Several studies suggest that diabetes leads to Müller cell dysfunction and loss. The pathophysiology of hyperglycemia-induced cellular injury of Müller cells remains only poorly understood. Recently, the concept that translocation of the predominantly cytosolic glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH...

  11. Plastic Schottky-barrier solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, J.R.; Cohen, M.J.

    1981-12-30

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped polyacetylene, organic semiconductor. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a metallic area electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates a magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film. With the proper selection and location of elements a photovoltaic cell structure and solar cell are obtained.

  12. Graphene applications in Schottky barrier solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancellotti, L., E-mail: laura.lancellotti@enea.it [ENEA Research Centre Portici, Piazzale E. Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (Napoli) (Italy); Polichetti, T.; Ricciardella, F. [ENEA Research Centre Portici, Piazzale E. Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (Napoli) (Italy); Tari, O., E-mail: orlando.tari@unina.it [University of Naples ' Federico II' , Dept. of Electronic Engineering, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Gnanapragasam, S. [ENEA Research Centre Portici, Piazzale E. Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (Napoli) (Italy); Daliento, S. [University of Naples ' Federico II' , Dept. of Electronic Engineering, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Di Francia, G. [ENEA Research Centre Portici, Piazzale E. Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (Napoli) (Italy)

    2012-11-01

    We report a theoretical study about the performances of graphene on semiconductor Schottky barrier solar cells with the aim to show the potentiality of this kind of device. The simulations are carried by a generalized equivalent circuit model, where the circuital parameters are strictly dependent on the physical properties of the graphene and semiconductor which form the Schottky junction. We have realized graphene samples and characterized them by optical and atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Capacitance-voltage measurements have been made on some 'ad hoc' graphene based devices in order to obtain graphene workfunction, a very essential physical parameter. The estimated value is compatible with four layer graphene. This result is in agreement with the morphological characterizations of our material. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An equivalent circuit model simulates graphene based Schottky barrier solar cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Graphene flakes are identified through Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Workfunction estimation by Capacitance-Voltage (C-V) on graphene based devices Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A multilayered structure is evidenced by morphological and C-V characterization.

  13. InGaP Heterojunction Barrier Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welser, Roger E. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A new solar cell structure called a heterojunction barrier solar cell is described. As with previously reported quantum-well and quantum-dot solar cell structures, a layer of narrow band-gap material, such as GaAs or indium-rich InGaP, is inserted into the depletion region of a wide band-gap PN junction. Rather than being thin, however, the layer of narrow band-gap material is about 400-430 nm wide and forms a single, ultrawide well in the depletion region. Thin (e.g., 20-50 nm), wide band-gap InGaP barrier layers in the depletion region reduce the diode dark current. Engineering the electric field and barrier profile of the absorber layer, barrier layer, and p-type layer of the PN junction maximizes photogenerated carrier escape. This new twist on nanostructured solar cell design allows the separate optimization of current and voltage to maximize conversion efficiency.

  14. Recent key technical barriers in solid oxide fuel cell technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milewski Jarosław

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available High-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs are considered as suitable components of future large-scale clean and efficient power generation systems. However, at its current stage of development some technical barriers exists which limit SOFC’s potential for rapid large-scale deployment. The present article aims at providing solutions to key technical barriers in SOFC technology. The focus is on the solutions addressing thermal resistance, fuel reforming, energy conversion efficiency, materials, design, and fuel utilisation issues.

  15. Cell-penetrating peptides for drug delivery across membrane barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla; Nielsen, Hanne Moerck

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade, cell-penetrating peptides have been investigated for their ability to overcome the plasma membrane barrier of mammalian cells for the intracellular or transcellular delivery of cargoes as diverse as low molecular weight drugs, imaging agents, oligonucleotides, peptides......-penetrating peptides as transmembrane drug delivery agents, according to the recent literature, and discusses critical issues and future challenges in relation to fully understanding the fundamental principles of the cell-penetrating peptide-mediated membrane translocation of cargoes and the exploitation......, proteins and colloidal carriers such as liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles. Their ability to cross biological membranes in a non-disruptive way without apparent toxicity is highly desired for increasing drug bioavailability. This review provides an overview of the application of cell...

  16. Barrier Functionality of Porcine and Bovine Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailar Nakhlband

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To date, isolated cell based blood-brain barrier (BBB models have been widely used for brain drug delivery and targeting, due to their relatively proper bioelectrical and permeability properties. However, primary cultures of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs isolated from different species vary in terms of bioelectrical and permeability properties. Methods: To pursue this, in the current investigation, primary porcine and bovine BCECs (PBCECs and BBCECs, respectively were isolated and used as an in vitro BBB model. The bioelectrical and permeability properties were assessed in BCECs co-cultured with C6 cells with/without hydrocortisone (550 nM. The bioelectrical properties were further validated by means of the permeability coefficients of transcellular and paracellular markers. Results: The primary PBCECs displayed significantly higher trans-endothelial electrical resistance (~900 W.cm2 than BBCECs (~700 W.cm2 - both co-cultured with C6 cells in presence of hydrocortisone. Permeability coefficients of propranolol/diazepam and mannitol/sucrose in PBCECs were ~21 and ~2 (×10-6 cm.sec-1, where these values for BBCECs were ~25 and ~5 (×10-6 cm.sec-1. Conclusion: Upon our bioelectrical and permeability findings, both models display discriminative barrier functionality but porcine BCECs seem to provide a better platform than bovine BCECs for drug screening and brain targeting.

  17. Derivation of blood-brain barrier endothelial cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, Ethan S; Azarin, Samira M; Kay, Jennifer E; Nessler, Randy A; Wilson, Hannah K; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2012-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is crucial to the health of the brain and is often compromised in neurological disease. Moreover, because of its barrier properties, this endothelial interface restricts uptake of neurotherapeutics. Thus, a renewable source of human BBB endothelium could spur brain research and pharmaceutical development. Here we show that endothelial cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) acquire BBB properties when co-differentiated with neural cells that provide relevant cues, including those involved in Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The resulting endothelial cells have many BBB attributes, including well-organized tight junctions, appropriate expression of nutrient transporters and polarized efflux transporter activity. Notably, they respond to astrocytes, acquiring substantial barrier properties as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (1,450 ± 140 Ω cm2), and they possess molecular permeability that correlates well with in vivo rodent blood-brain transfer coefficients.

  18. Cigarette smoke impairs airway epithelial barrier function and cell-cell contact recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, I H; Brandenburg, S M; Postma, D S; van Oosterhout, A J M

    2012-02-01

    Cigarette smoking, the major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), induces aberrant airway epithelial structure and function. The underlying mechanisms are unresolved so far. We studied effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on epithelial barrier function and wound regeneration in human bronchial epithelial 16HBE cells and primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) from COPD patients, nonsmokers and healthy smokers. We demonstrate that CSE rapidly and transiently impairs 16HBE barrier function, largely due to disruption of cell-cell contacts. CSE induced a similar, but stronger and more sustained, defect in PBECs. Application of the specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor AG1478 showed that EGFR activation contributes to the CSE-induced defects in both 16HBE cells and PBECs. Furthermore, our data indicate that the endogenous protease calpain mediates these defects through tight junction protein degradation. CSE also delayed the reconstitution of 16HBE intercellular contacts during wound healing and attenuated PBEC barrier function upon wound regeneration. These findings were comparable between PBECs from smokers, healthy smokers and COPD patients. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that CSE reduces epithelial integrity, probably by EGFR and calpain-dependent disruption of intercellular contacts. This may increase susceptibility to environmental insults, e.g. inhaled pathogens. Thus, EGFR may be a promising target for therapeutic strategies to improve mucosal barrier function in cigarette smoking-related disease.

  19. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferranda Puig

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549 exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml or vehicle (control. Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  20. Lung endothelial cells strengthen, but brain endothelial cells weaken barrier properties of a human alveolar epithelium cell culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Winfried; Samwer, Fabian; Kunzmann, Steffen; Muellenbach, Ralf M; Wirth, Michael; Speer, Christian P; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola Y

    2012-11-01

    The blood-air barrier in the lung consists of the alveolar epithelium, the underlying capillary endothelium, their basement membranes and the interstitial space between the cell layers. Little is known about the interactions between the alveolar and the blood compartment. The aim of the present study was to gain first insights into the possible interplay between these two neighbored cell layers. We established an in vitro Transwell model of the alveolar epithelium based on human cell line H441 and investigated the influence of conditioned medium obtained from human lung endothelial cell line HPMEC-ST1.6R on the barrier properties of the H441 layers. As control for tissue specificity H441 layers were exposed to conditioned medium from human brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Addition of dexamethasone was necessary to obtain stable H441 cell layers. Moreover, dexamethasone increased expression of cell type I markers (caveolin-1, RAGE) and cell type II marker SP-B, whereas decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) in a concentration dependent manner. Soluble factors obtained from the lung endothelial cell line increased the barrier significantly proven by TEER values and fluorescein permeability on the functional level and by the differential expression of tight junctional proteins on the molecular level. In contrast to this, soluble factors derived from brain endothelial cells weakened the barrier significantly. In conclusion, soluble factors from lung endothelial cells can strengthen the alveolar epithelium barrier in vitro, which suggests communication between endothelial and epithelial cells regulating the integrity of the blood-air barrier.

  1. A microfluidic cell culture device with integrated microelectrodes for barrier studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin; Dufva, Martin; Kutter, Jörg P.

    We present an eight cell culture microfluidic device fabricated using thiol-ene ‘click’ chemistry with embedded microelectrodes for evaluating barrier properties of human intestinal epithelial cells. The capability of the microelectrodes for trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measureme......We present an eight cell culture microfluidic device fabricated using thiol-ene ‘click’ chemistry with embedded microelectrodes for evaluating barrier properties of human intestinal epithelial cells. The capability of the microelectrodes for trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER......) measurements was demonstrated by using confluent human colorectal epithelial cells (Caco-2) and rat fibroblast (CT 26) cells cultured in the microfluidic device....

  2. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy. PMID:28243603

  3. Immortalized endothelial cell lines for in vitro blood-brain barrier models: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nurul Adhwa; Rasil, Alifah Nur'ain Haji Mat; Meyding-Lamade, Uta; Craemer, Eva Maria; Diah, Suwarni; Tuah, Ani Afiqah; Muharram, Siti Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial cells play the most important role in construction of the blood-brain barrier. Many studies have opted to use commercially available, easily transfected or immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. Numerous endothelial cell lines are available, but we do not currently have strong evidence for which cell lines are optimal for establishment of such models. This review aimed to investigate the application of immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. The databases used for this review were PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink. A narrative systematic review was conducted and identified 155 studies. As a result, 36 immortalized endothelial cell lines of human, mouse, rat, porcine and bovine origins were found for the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier and brain endothelium models. This review provides a summary of immortalized endothelial cell lines as a guideline for future studies and improvements in the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier models. It is important to establish a good and reproducible model that has the potential for multiple applications, in particular a model of such a complex compartment such as the blood-brain barrier.

  4. Altered expression of talin 1 in peripheral immune cells points to a significant role of the innate immune system in spontaneous autoimmune uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degroote, Roxane L; Hauck, Stefanie M; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Amann, Barbara; Ueffing, Marius; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2012-07-19

    The molecular mechanism which enables activated immune cells to cross the blood-retinal barrier in spontaneous autoimmune uveitis is yet to be unraveled. Equine recurrent uveitis is the only spontaneous animal model allowing us to investigate the autoimmune mediated transformation of leukocytes in the course of this sight threatening disease. Hypothesizing that peripheral blood immune cells change their protein expression pattern in spontaneous autoimmune uveitis, we used DIGE to detect proteins with altered abundance comparing peripheral immune cells of healthy and ERU diseased horses. Among others, we found a significant downregulation of talin 1 in peripheral blood granulocytes of ERU specimen, pointing to changes in β integrin activation and indicating a significant role of the innate immune system in spontaneous autoimmune diseases.

  5. Glycoprotein mucin molecular brush on cancer cell surface acting as mechanical barrier against drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Shah, Aalok A.; Campbell, Robert B.; Wan, Kai-tak

    2010-12-01

    Uptake of cytotoxic drugs by typical tumor cells is limited by the dense dendritic network of oligosaccharide mucin chains that forms a mechanical barrier. Atomic force microscopy is used to directly measure the force needed to pierce the mucin layer to reach the cell surface. Measurements are analyzed by de Gennes' steric reptation theory. Multidrug resistant ovarian tumor cells shows significantly larger penetration load compared to the wide type. A pool of pancreatic, lung, colorectal, and breast cells are also characterized. The chemotherapeutic agent, benzyl-α-GalNac, for inhibiting glycosylation is shown to be effective in reducing the mechanical barrier.

  6. Inhibition of Murine Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Promotes Recovery of Barrier Function under Septic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefeng Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is characterized by injury of the pulmonary microvasculature and the pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC, leading to barrier dysfunction and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Our recent work identified a strong correlation between PMVEC apoptosis and microvascular leak in septic mice in vivo, but the specific role of apoptosis in septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction remains unclear. Thus, we hypothesize that PMVEC apoptosis is likely required for PMVEC barrier dysfunction under septic conditions in vitro. Septic stimulation (mixture of tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, and interferon γ [cytomix] of isolated murine PMVEC resulted in a significant loss of barrier function as early as 4 h after stimulation, which persisted until 24 h. PMVEC apoptosis, as reflected by caspase activation, DNA fragmentation, and loss of membrane polarity, was first apparent at 8 h after cytomix. Pretreatment of PMVEC with the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD significantly decreased septic PMVEC apoptosis and was associated with reestablishment of PMVEC barrier function at 16 and 24 h after stimulation but had no effect on septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction over the first 8 h. Collectively, our data suggest that early septic murine PMVEC barrier dysfunction driven by proinflammatory cytokines is not mediated through apoptosis, but PMVEC apoptosis contributes to late septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction.

  7. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor promotes barrier maturation and wound healing in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Michael; Flemming, Sven; Burkard, Natalie; Bergauer, Lisa; Metzger, Marco; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Schlegel, Nicolas

    2015-10-15

    Recent data suggest that neurotrophic factors from the enteric nervous system are involved in intestinal epithelial barrier regulation. In this context the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was shown to affect gut barrier properties in vivo directly or indirectly by largely undefined processes in a model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We further investigated the potential role and mechanisms of GDNF in the regulation of intestinal barrier functions. Immunostaining of human gut specimen showed positive GDNF staining in enteric neuronal plexus and in enterocytes. In Western blots of the intestinal epithelial cell lines Caco2 and HT29B6, significant amounts of GDNF were detected, suggesting that enterocytes represent an additional source of GDNF. Application of recombinant GDNF on Caco2 and HT29B6 cells for 24 h resulted in significant epithelial barrier stabilization in monolayers with immature barrier functions. Wound-healing assays showed a significantly faster closure of the wounded areas after GDNF application. GDNF augmented cAMP levels and led to significant inactivation of p38 MAPK in immature cells. Activation of p38 MAPK signaling by SB-202190 mimicked GDNF-induced barrier maturation, whereas the p38 MAPK activator anisomycin blocked GDNF-induced effects. Increasing cAMP levels had adverse effects on barrier maturation, as revealed by permeability measurements. However, increased cAMP augmented the proliferation rate in Caco2 cells, and GDNF-induced proliferation of epithelial cells was abrogated by the PKA inhibitor H89. Our data show that enterocytes represent an additional source of GDNF synthesis. GDNF contributes to wound healing in a cAMP/PKA-dependent manner and promotes barrier maturation in immature enterocytes cells by inactivation of p38 MAPK signaling.

  8. Iron serves as diffusion barrier in thermally regenerative galvanic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouthamel, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    Pure iron or iron-coated diaphragm provides a hydrogen diffusion electrode for a thermally regenerative galvanic cell. It allows the gas to diffuse through its interatomic spaces and resists the corrosive action of the cell environment.

  9. Microfluidic-based single cell trapping using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Chen, Zongzheng; Xiang, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Xie, Handi; Qin, Kairong

    2016-06-01

    Single cell trapping in vitro by microfluidic device is an emerging approach for the study of the relationship between single cells and their dynamic biochemical microenvironments. In this paper, a hydrodynamic-based microfluidic device for single cell trapping is designed using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier. The microfluidic device overcomes the weakness of the traditional ones, which have been only based upon either stagnation point flows or physical barriers, and can conveniently load dynamic biochemical signals to the trapped cell. In addition, it can connect with a programmable syringe pump and a microscope to constitute an integrated experimental system. It is experimentally verified that the microfluidic system can trap single cells in vitro even under flow disturbance and conveniently load biochemical signals to the trapped cell. The designed micro-device would provide a simple yet effective experimental platform for further study of the interactions between single cells and their microenvironments.

  10. Psychological Stress-Derived Prolactin Modulates Occludin Expression in Vaginal Epithelial Cells to Compromise Barrier Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyan Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The causative factors of the vaginitis are not fully understood yet. Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of vaginitis. This study aims to investigate the role of prolactin (PRL in the causing the vaginal epithelial barrier dysfunction. Methods: Adult rats were treated with water-avoid-stress. The serum levels of PRL were determined by ELISA. T84 cell (T84 cells; a vaginal epithelial cell line monolayers were prepared to be used assessing the epithelial barrier functions. The expression of occludin in T84 cells was assessed by Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, methylation specifIc PCR, real time quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results: The results showed that psychological stress markedly increased the serum levels of PRL in the rat vaginal epithelia. Exposure of T84 cells to PRL in the culture markedly increased the phosphorylation of STAT3 and suppressed the expression of occludin in the cells; the transepithelial electric resistance was decreased and the permeability to a macromolecular tracer was increased in the T84 monolayers, which was mimicked by blocking STAT3, or abolished by over expression of occludin in the epithelial cells. Conclusions: Psychological stress-derived PRL induces vaginal epithelial barrier dysfunction by inhibiting the expression of occludin.

  11. Tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell with double Schottky barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Hyosun; Park, Jeong Young

    2014-04-03

    We demonstrate a tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell with double Schottky barriers. The tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell is composed of two metal/semiconductor interfaces. Two types of tandem cells were fabricated using TiO2/Au/Si and TiO2/Au/TiO2, and photocurrent enhancement was detected. The double Schottky barriers lead to an additional pathway for harvesting hot electrons, which is enhanced through multiple reflections between the two barriers with different energy ranges. In addition, light absorption is improved by the band-to-band excitation of both semiconductors with different band gaps. Short-circuit current and energy conversion efficiency of the tandem-structured TiO2/Au/Si increased by 86% and 70%, respectively, compared with Au/Si metal/semiconductor nanodiodes, showing an overall solar energy conversion efficiency of 5.3%.

  12. Etk/Bmx activation modulates barrier function in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm-Alvarez, S F; Chang, A; Wang, Y; Jerdeva, G; Lin, H H; Kim, K J; Ann, D K

    2001-06-01

    Etk/Bmx is a member of the Tec family of cytoplasmic non-receptor tyrosine kinases known to express in epithelial cells. We demonstrate herein that Etk activation in stably Etk-transfected epithelial Pa-4 cells resulted in a consistently increased transepithelial resistance (TER). After 24 h of hypoxic (1% O(2)) exposure, the TER and equivalent active ion transport rate (I(eq)) were reduced to <5% of the normoxia control in Pa-4 cells, whereas both TER and I(eq) were maintained at comparable and 60% levels, respectively, relative to their normoxic controls in cells with Etk activation. Moreover, Pa-4 cells exhibited an abundant actin stress fiber network with a diffuse distribution of beta-catenin at the cell periphery. By contrast, Etk-activated cells displayed a redistribution of actin to an exclusively peripheral network, with a discrete band of beta-catenin also concentrated at the cell periphery, and an altered occludin distribution profile. On the basis of these findings, we propose that Etk may be a novel regulator of epithelial junctions during physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  13. BARRIERS TO COMMERCIALIZATION OF PASSIVE DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS: A REVEIW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. SHRIVASTAVA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel cells are electro-chemical reactors which realize the direct conversion of the chemical energy of reactants to electrical energy, with high efficiency and high environmental compatibility. This article is concerned with one of the most advance fuel cells- direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs. We present a comprehensive review on the commercialization barriers of passive DMFCs. The paper also summarizes past research efforts and possible future directions towards these problems.

  14. Effect of heat stress on intestinal barrier function of human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-zhen XIAO

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the heat stress-induced dysfunction of intestinal barrier including intestinal tight junction and apoptosis of epithelial cells. Methods Human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell monolayers, serving as the intestinal barrier model, were exposed to different temperature (37-43℃ for designated time. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER and horseradish peroxidase (HRP flux permeability were measured to evaluate barrier integrity. Level of tight junction (TJ protein occludin was analyzed by Western blotting. Cell apoptosis rate was determined using Annexin V-FITC/PI kit by flow cytometry. Results Compared with the 37℃ group, TEER lowered and the permeability for HRP increased significantly after heat exposure (P<0.01 in 39℃, 41℃ and 43℃ groups. The expression of occludin increased when the temperature was elevated from 37℃ to 41℃, and it reached the maximal level at 41℃. However, its expression gradually decreased with passage of time at 43℃. Cell apoptosis was enhanced with elevation of the temperature (P<0.05 or P<0.01. Conclusion Heat stress can induce damage to tight junction and enhance apoptosis of epithelial cells, thus causing dysfunction of intestinal epithelial barrier.

  15. Recombination barrier layers in solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Roelofs, Katherine E.

    2012-06-01

    By replacing the dye in the dye-sensitized solar cell design with semiconductor quantum dots as the light-absorbing material, solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (ss-QDSSCs) were fabricated. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots (QDs) were grown in situ by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). Aluminum oxide recombination barrier layers were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at the TiO2/hole-conductor interface. For low numbers of ALD cycles, the Al2O3 barrier layer increased open circuit voltage, causing an increase in device efficiency. For thicker Al2O3 barrier layers, photocurrent decreased substantially, leading to a decrease in device efficiency. © 2012 IEEE.

  16. Effects of disorder in location and size of fence barriers on molecular motion in cell membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Kalay, Z; Kenkre, V M

    2008-01-01

    The effect of disorder in the energetic heights and in the physical locations of fence barriers encountered by transmembrane molecules such as proteins and lipids in their motion in cell membranes is studied theoretically. The investigation takes as its starting point a recent analysis of a periodic system with constant distances between barriers and constant values of barrier heights, and employs effective medium theory to treat the disorder. The calculations make possible, in principle, the extraction of confinement parameters such as mean compartment sizes and mean intercompartmental transition rates from experimentally reported published observations. The analysis should be helpful both as an unusual application of effective medium theory and as an investigation of observed molecular movements in cell membranes.

  17. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Soon Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER value (as an index of barrier function and ovalbumin (OVA permeation (as an index of permeability to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function.

  18. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock) Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Soon; Jung, Sun Young; Back, Su Yeon; Do, Jeong-Ryong; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value (as an index of barrier function) and ovalbumin (OVA) permeation (as an index of permeability) to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function.

  19. P38丝裂素活化蛋白激酶信号通路阻断对糖尿病鼠早期血视网膜屏障和视网膜节细胞的保护作用%Protective effect of blocking the signal path of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase on blood-retinal barrier and retinal ganglion cells in early diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永浩; 吕林; 陈凌燕; 黄新华; 张静琳; 李石毅; 王祥珪

    2010-01-01

    目的 组织化学法检测视网膜上caspase-3和血管内皮生长因子(VEGF)的荧光表达.糖尿病鼠建模后2周,对实验组行玻璃体腔注射p38 MAPK抑制剂SB203580,注射后6周检测caspase-3和VEGF的荧光表达,caspase-3免疫荧光染色法计数RGC凋亡数量.采用SPSS 13.0应用软件进行统计分析.结果 正常对照组大鼠中,IgG染色局限于血管腔内,几乎没有渗漏的迹象.糖尿病鼠建模后8周,IgG渗漏明显增加.SB203580璃体腔注射6周后的糖尿病鼠IgG渗漏减少明显.荧光免疫组织化学及相对定量分析结果显示,SB203580玻璃体腔注射6周后的糖尿病鼠视网膜上VEGF荧光表达呈下降趋势,VEGF相对荧光量从糖尿病鼠8周时较正常对照组高2.9倍减少到仅高于正常对照组1.8倍,两者比较差异有统计学意义(t=5.203,P16.7 mmol/L indicated that the diabetes model was set up successfully. The rats in the control group underwent peritoneal injection of equivalent sodium citrate solution. IgG leakage method was used to measure the damage of BRB function and vascular leakage. The expression and localization of caspase-3 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in retina of diabetic rats were examined by immunohistochemistry analyses. Two weeks after the establishment of the diabtes model, the rats in diabtes group underwent intravitreal injection with SB203580, a p38 inhibitor; six weeks after the injection, the expression of caspase-3 and VEGF was detected, and the number of apoptosis RGC was counted via immunofluorescence technique. Results In the contral group, IgG staining located in the blood vessels with little leakage; while the IgG leakage was much more obvious in the diabetes group eight weeks after the establishment of the model. Six weeks after intravitreal injection with SB203580, the leakage decreased in diabtes rats. The results of semi-quantitative analysis and fluorescence immunohistochemistry showed that compared with the results in diabetes rats 8 weeks after intravitreal injection (2.9 times much more than that in the control group), the fluorescence expression of VEGF decreased in diabetes rats six weeks after intravitreal injection (1.8 times much more than that in the control group). The apoptisis RGC number in rats 6 weeks after intravitreal injection of SB203580 was much less than that in rats without intravitreal injection (t=5. 731, P<0. 01). Conclusions SB203580 can alleviate the disruption of BRB and apoptosis of RGC in early diabetes rats, which suggests that p38 MAPK pathways appear to be directly involved in the pathogenesis of early diabetic retinopathy.

  20. Inflammatory response to mucosal barrier injury after myeloablative therapy in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijlevens, N.M.A.; Donnelly, J.P.; Pauw, B.E. de

    2005-01-01

    We noted a significant increase of interleukin-8 (IL-8), LBP and CRP mirroring the pattern of mucosal barrier injury as measured by gut integrity (lactulose/rhamnose ratio), daily mucositis score (DMS) and serum citrulline concentrations of 32 haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients fo

  1. Endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier: a target for glucocorticoids and estrogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Jean-Bernard

    2004-01-01

    Adhesion molecules are involved in the leukocyte recruitment of leukocytes at the blood-brain barrier. For this reason, it is important to understand how the regulation of their gene expression controls lymphocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in microvessels. Indeed, due to their specificity and diversity, adhesion molecules involved in extravasation play an essential role in the recruitment of activated leukocytes and activation of inflammation. Multiple sclerosis results from a chronic inflammation of the CNS which is mediated by infiltration of inflammatory cells from the immune system. Administration of glucocorticoids is a routine method to control multiple sclerosis since naturally derived or synthetic glucocorticoids are potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory agents. Glucocorticoids also have beneficial effects in stabilizing the blood-brain barrier, as steroid hormones regulate the expression of adhesion molecule genes in endothelial cells. Other hormones such as estrogens modulate many endothelial cell biological activities, among them adhesion to leukocytes. They regulate expression of adhesion molecules genes on endothelial cells and are useful for the treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model of multiple sclerosis. The effects of glucocorticoids and estrogens on the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells, including microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier, are reviewed in this paper, as well as the involvement of these hormones in the therapy of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis.

  2. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Ida Mosbech; Baker, A; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The human gastrointestinal epithelium makes up the largest barrier separating the body from the external environment. Whereas invasive pathogens cause epithelial barrier disruption, probiotic micro-organisms modulate tight junction regulation and improve epithelial barrier function....... In addition, probiotic strains may be able to reduce epithelial barrier disruption caused by pathogenic species. The aim of this study was to explore non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Benchmarking against established probiotic strains, we evaluated the ability......). In addition, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify K. marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT...

  3. Particle-in-cell modeling of gas-confined barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-04-01

    Gas-confined barrier discharge is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model for the conditions reported by Guerra-Garcia and Martinez-Sanchez [Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 041601 (2015)]. Depending on the applied voltage, two modes of discharge are observed. In the first mode, the discharge develops in the entire interelectrode gap. In the second mode, the discharge is ignited and develops only in the gas layer having smaller breakdown voltage. The one-dimensional model shows that for the conditions considered, there is no streamer stage of breakdown as is typical for a traditional dielectric barrier discharge.

  4. Ring-Shaped Microlanes and Chemical Barriers as a Platform for Probing Single-Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Christoph; Segerer, Felix J.; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2016-01-01

    Quantification and discrimination of pharmaceutical and disease-related effects on cell migration requires detailed characterization of single-cell motility. In this context, micropatterned substrates that constrain cells within defined geometries facilitate quantitative readout of locomotion. Here, we study quasi-one-dimensional cell migration in ring-shaped microlanes. We observe bimodal behavior in form of alternating states of directional migration (run state) and reorientation (rest state). Both states show exponential lifetime distributions with characteristic persistence times, which, together with the cell velocity in the run state, provide a set of parameters that succinctly describe cell motion. By introducing PEGylated barriers of different widths into the lane, we extend this description by quantifying the effects of abrupt changes in substrate chemistry on migrating cells. The transit probability decreases exponentially as a function of barrier width, thus specifying a characteristic penetration depth of the leading lamellipodia. Applying this fingerprint-like characterization of cell motion, we compare different cell lines, and demonstrate that the cancer drug candidate salinomycin affects transit probability and resting time, but not run time or run velocity. Hence, the presented assay allows to assess multiple migration-related parameters, permits detailed characterization of cell motility, and has potential applications in cell biology and advanced drug screening. PMID:27242099

  5. Non-neuronal Cells in ALS: Role of Glial, Immune cells and Blood-CNS Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, Fabiola; Malaspina, Andrea; van Noort, Johannes M; Amor, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    Neurological dysfunction and motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is strongly associated with neuroinflammation reflected by activated microglia and astrocytes in the CNS. In ALS endogenous triggers in the CNS such as aggregated protein and misfolded proteins activate a pathogenic response by innate immune cells. However, there is also strong evidence for a neuroprotective immune response in ALS. Emerging evidence also reveals changes in the peripheral adaptive immune responses as well as alterations in the blood brain barrier that may aid traffic of lymphocytes and antibodies into the CNS. Understanding the triggers of neuroinflammation is key to controlling neuronal loss. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the roles of non-neuronal cells as well as the innate and adaptive immune responses in ALS. Existing ALS animal models, in particular genetic rodent models, are very useful to study the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of motor neuron degeneration. We also discuss the approaches used to target the pathogenic immune responses and boost the neuroprotective immune pathways as novel immunotherapies for ALS.

  6. TGF-beta is required for vascular barrier function, endothelial survival and homeostasis of the adult microvasculature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony E Walshe

    Full Text Available Pericyte-endothelial cell (EC interactions are critical to both vascular development and vessel stability. We have previously shown that TGF-beta signaling between EC and mural cells participates in vessel stabilization in vitro. We therefore investigated the role of TGF-beta signaling in maintaining microvessel structure and function in the adult mouse retinal microvasculature. TGF-beta signaling was inhibited by systemic expression of soluble endoglin (sEng and inhibition was demonstrated by reduced phospho-smad2 in the adult retina. Blockade of TGF-beta signaling led to increased vascular and neural cell apoptosis in the retina, which was associated with decreased retinal function, as measured by electroretinogram (ERG. Perfusion of the inner retinal vasculature was impaired and was accompanied by defective autoregulation and loss of capillary integrity. Fundus angiography and Evans blue permeability assay revealed a breakdown of the blood-retinal-barrier that was characterized by decreased association between the tight junction proteins zo-1 and occludin. Inhibition of TGF-beta signaling in cocultures of EC and 10T1/2 cells corroborated the in vivo findings, with impaired EC barrier function, dissociation of EC from 10T1/2 cells, and endothelial cell death, supporting the role of EC-mesenchymal interactions in TGF-beta signaling. These results implicate constitutive TGF-beta signaling in maintaining the integrity and function of the adult microvasculature and shed light on the potential role of TGF-beta signaling in vasoproliferative and vascular degenerative retinal diseases.

  7. Preparation and characterization of TiO2 barrier layers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yichen; Klankowski, Steven; Yang, Yiqun; Li, Jun

    2014-07-09

    A TiO2 barrier layer is critical in enhancing the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Two methods to prepare the TiO2 barrier layer on fluorine-doped tin dioxide (FTO) surface were systematically studied in order to minimize electron-hole recombination and electron backflow during photovoltaic processes of DSSCs. The film structure and materials properties were correlated with the photovoltaic characteristics and electrochemical properties. In the first approach, a porous TiO2 layer was deposited by wet chemical treatment of the sample with TiCl4 solution for time periods varying from 0 to 60 min. The N719 dye molecules were found to be able to insert into the porous barrier layers. The 20 min treatment formed a nonuniform but intact TiO2 layer of ∼100-300 nm in thickness, which gave the highest open-circuit voltage VOC, short-circuit photocurrent density JSC, and energy conversion efficiency. But thicker TiO2 barrier layers by this method caused a decrease in JSC, possibly limited by lower electrical conductance. In the second approach, a compact TiO2 barrier layer was created by sputter-coating 0-15 nm Ti metal films on FTO/glass and then oxidizing them into TiO2 with thermal treatment at 500 °C in the air for 30 min. The dye molecules were found to only attach at the outer surface of the barrier layer and slightly increased with the layer thickness. These two kinds of barrier layer showed different characteristics and may be tailored for different DSSC studies.

  8. Arsenic compromises conducting airway epithelial barrier properties in primary mouse and immortalized human cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara L Sherwood

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a lung toxicant that can lead to respiratory illness through inhalation and ingestion, although the most common exposure is through contaminated drinking water. Lung effects reported from arsenic exposure include lung cancer and obstructive lung disease, as well as reductions in lung function and immune response. As part of their role in innate immune function, airway epithelial cells provide a barrier that protects underlying tissue from inhaled particulates, pathogens, and toxicants frequently found in inspired air. We evaluated the effects of a five-day exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic {<4μM [~300 μg/L (ppb] as NaAsO2} on airway epithelial barrier function and structure. In a primary mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE cell model we found that both micromolar (3.9 μM and submicromolar (0.8 μM arsenic concentrations reduced transepithelial resistance, a measure of barrier function. Immunofluorescent staining of arsenic-treated MTE cells showed altered patterns of localization of the transmembrane tight junction proteins claudin (Cl Cl-1, Cl-4, Cl-7 and occludin at cell-cell contacts when compared with untreated controls. To better quantify arsenic-induced changes in tight junction transmembrane proteins we conducted arsenic exposure experiments with an immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-. We found that arsenic exposure significantly increased the protein expression of Cl-4 and occludin as well as the mRNA levels of Cl-4 and Cl-7 in these cells. Additionally, arsenic exposure resulted in altered phosphorylation of occludin. In summary, exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic can alter both the function and structure of airway epithelial barrier constituents. These changes likely contribute to the observed arsenic-induced loss in basic innate immune defense and increased infection in the airway.

  9. Spray pyrolysis of doped-ceria barrier layers for solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymczewska, Dagmara; Chrzan, Aleksander; Karczewski, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    of elements. The parameters of the fabrication process are linked to the measured area specific resistances of the symmetrical cells and the efficiency of the fuel cells. Results show, that application of 800 nm thick barrier effectively hinder negative reactions, while 400 nm thick layer is sufficient......Gadolinium doped ceria (Ce0.8Gd0.2O2 − x-CGO) layer fabricated by spray pyrolysis is investigated as the diffusion barrier for solid oxide fuel cell. It is deposited between the La0.6Sr0.4FeO3 − δ cathode and the yttria stabilized zirconia electrolyte to mitigate harmful interdiffusion...

  10. Live cell imaging techniques to study T cell trafficking across the blood-brain barrier in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coisne Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central nervous system (CNS is an immunologically privileged site to which access for circulating immune cells is tightly controlled by the endothelial blood–brain barrier (BBB located in CNS microvessels. Under physiological conditions immune cell migration across the BBB is low. However, in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis, many immune cells can cross the BBB and cause neurological symptoms. Extravasation of circulating immune cells is a multi-step process that is regulated by the sequential interaction of different adhesion and signaling molecules on the immune cells and on the endothelium. The specialized barrier characteristics of the BBB, therefore, imply the existence of unique mechanisms for immune cell migration across the BBB. Methods and design An in vitro mouse BBB model maintaining physiological barrier characteristics in a flow chamber and combined with high magnification live cell imaging, has been established. This model enables the molecular mechanisms involved in the multi-step extravasation of T cells across the in vitro BBB, to be defined with high-throughput analyses. Subsequently these mechanisms have been verified in vivo using a limited number of experimental animals and a spinal cord window surgical technique. The window enables live observation of the dynamic interaction between T cells and spinal cord microvessels under physiological and pathological conditions using real time epifluorescence intravital imaging. These in vitro and in vivo live cell imaging methods have shown that the BBB endothelium possesses unique and specialized mechanisms involved in the multi-step T cell migration across this endothelial barrier under physiological flow. The initial T cell interaction with the endothelium is either mediated by T cell capture or by T cell rolling. Arrest follows, and then T cells polarize and especially CD4+ T cells crawl over long distances against the direction of

  11. Regulation of Thrombin-Induced Lung Endothelial Cell Barrier Disruption by Protein Kinase C Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lishi; Chiang, Eddie T.; Kelly, Gabriel T.; Kanteti, Prasad; Singleton, Patrick A.; Camp, Sara M.; Zhou, Tingting; Dudek, Steven M.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Wang, Ting; Black, Steven M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Protein Kinase C (PKC) plays a significant role in thrombin-induced loss of endothelial cell (EC) barrier integrity; however, the existence of more than 10 isozymes of PKC and tissue–specific isoform expression has limited our understanding of this important second messenger in vascular homeostasis. In this study, we show that PKCδ isoform promotes thrombin-induced loss of human pulmonary artery EC barrier integrity, findings substantiated by PKCδ inhibitory studies (rottlerin), dominant negative PKCδ construct and PKCδ silencing (siRNA). In addition, we identified PKCδ as a signaling mediator upstream of both thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation and Rho GTPase activation affecting stress fiber formation, cell contraction and loss of EC barrier integrity. Our inhibitor-based studies indicate that thrombin-induced PKCδ activation exerts a positive feedback on Rho GTPase activation and contributes to Rac1 GTPase inhibition. Moreover, PKD (or PKCμ) and CPI-17, two known PKCδ targets, were found to be activated by PKCδ in EC and served as modulators of cytoskeleton rearrangement. These studies clarify the role of PKCδ in EC cytoskeleton regulation, and highlight PKCδ as a therapeutic target in inflammatory lung disorders, characterized by the loss of barrier integrity, such as acute lung injury and sepsis. PMID:27442243

  12. Regulation of Thrombin-Induced Lung Endothelial Cell Barrier Disruption by Protein Kinase C Delta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishi Xie

    Full Text Available Protein Kinase C (PKC plays a significant role in thrombin-induced loss of endothelial cell (EC barrier integrity; however, the existence of more than 10 isozymes of PKC and tissue-specific isoform expression has limited our understanding of this important second messenger in vascular homeostasis. In this study, we show that PKCδ isoform promotes thrombin-induced loss of human pulmonary artery EC barrier integrity, findings substantiated by PKCδ inhibitory studies (rottlerin, dominant negative PKCδ construct and PKCδ silencing (siRNA. In addition, we identified PKCδ as a signaling mediator upstream of both thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation and Rho GTPase activation affecting stress fiber formation, cell contraction and loss of EC barrier integrity. Our inhibitor-based studies indicate that thrombin-induced PKCδ activation exerts a positive feedback on Rho GTPase activation and contributes to Rac1 GTPase inhibition. Moreover, PKD (or PKCμ and CPI-17, two known PKCδ targets, were found to be activated by PKCδ in EC and served as modulators of cytoskeleton rearrangement. These studies clarify the role of PKCδ in EC cytoskeleton regulation, and highlight PKCδ as a therapeutic target in inflammatory lung disorders, characterized by the loss of barrier integrity, such as acute lung injury and sepsis.

  13. Tanycyte-Like Cells Form a Blood–Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier in the Circumventricular Organs of the Mouse Brain

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Tanycytes are highly specialized ependymal cells that form a blood–cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier at the level of the median eminence (ME), a circumventricular organ (CVO) located in the tuberal region of the hypothalamus. This ependymal layer harbors well-organized tight junctions, a hallmark of central nervous system barriers that is lacking in the fenestrated portal vessels of the ME. The displacement of barrier properties from the vascular to the ventricular side allows the diffusion o...

  14. Barrier potential design criteria in multiple-quantum-well-based solar-cell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaidat, Jihad M.; Shum, Kai; Wang, W. B.; Alfano, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The barrier potential design criteria in multiple-quantum-well (MQW)-based solar-cell structures is reported for the purpose of achieving maximum efficiency. The time-dependent short-circuit current density at the collector side of various MQW solar-cell structures under resonant condition was numerically calculated using the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The energy efficiency of solar cells based on the InAs/Ga(y)In(1-y)As and GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As MQW structues were compared when carriers are excited at a particular solar-energy band. Using InAs/Ga(y)In(1-y)As MQW structures it is found that a maximum energy efficiency can be achieved if the structure is designed with barrier potential of about 450 meV. The efficiency is found to decline linearly as the barrier potential increases for GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As MQW-structure-based solar cells.

  15. High-efficiency silicon solar-cell design and practical barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokashi, A.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical evaluation technique is used to study the impact of practical barriers, such as heavy doping effects (Auger recombination, band gap narrowing), surface recombination, shadowing losses and minority-carrier lifetime (Tau), on a high efficiency silicon solar cell performance. Considering a high Tau of 1 ms, efficiency of a silicon solar cell of the hypothetical case is estimated to be around 29%. This is comparable with (detailed balance limit) maximum efficiency of a p-n junction solar cell of 30%. Value of Tau is varied from 1 second to 20 micro. Heavy doping effects, and realizable values of surface recombination velocities and shadowing, are then considered in succession and their influence on cell efficiency is evaluated and quantified. These practical barriers cause the cell efficiency to reduce from the maximum value of 29% to the experimentally achieved value of about 19%. Improvement in open circuit voltage V sub oc is required to achieve cell efficiency greater than 20%. Increased value of Tau reduces reverse saturation current and, hence, improves V sub oc. Control of surface recombination losses becomes critical at higher V sub oc. Substantial improvement in Tau and considerable reduction in surface recombination velocities is essential to achieve cell efficiencies greater than 20%.

  16. Microfluidic-based single cell trapping using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Yu; Zongzheng Chen; Cheng Xiang; Bo Liu; Handi Xie; Kairong Qin

    2016-01-01

    Single cell trapping in vitro by microfluidic device is an emerging approach for the study of the rela-tionship between single cells and their dynamic biochemical microenvironments. In this paper, a hydrodynamic-based microfluidic device for single cell trapping is designed using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier. The microfluidic device overcomes the weakness of the tra-ditional ones, which have been only based upon either stag-nation point flows or physical barriers, and can conveniently load dynamic biochemical signals to the trapped cell. In addi-tion, it can connect with a programmable syringe pump and a microscope to constitute an integrated experimental system. It is experimentally verified that the microfluidic system can trap single cells in vitro even under flow disturbance and con-veniently load biochemical signals to the trapped cell. The designed micro-device would provide a simple yet effective experimental platform for further study of the interactions between single cells and their microenvironments.

  17. Selective ablation of the androgen receptor in mouse sertoli cells affects sertoli cell maturation, barrier formation and cytoskeletal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Willems

    Full Text Available The observation that mice with a selective ablation of the androgen receptor (AR in Sertoli cells (SC (SCARKO mice display a complete block in meiosis supports the contention that SC play a pivotal role in the control of germ cell development by androgens. To delineate the physiological and molecular mechanism responsible for this control, we compared tubular development in pubertal SCARKO mice and littermate controls. Particular attention was paid to differences in SC maturation, SC barrier formation and cytoskeletal organization and to the molecular mediators potentially involved. Functional analysis of SC barrier development by hypertonic perfusion and lanthanum permeation techniques and immunohistochemical analysis of junction formation showed that SCARKO mice still attempt to produce a barrier separating basal and adluminal compartment but that barrier formation is delayed and defective. Defective barrier formation was accompanied by disturbances in SC nuclear maturation (immature shape, absence of prominent, tripartite nucleoli and SC polarization (aberrant positioning of SC nuclei and cytoskeletal elements such as vimentin. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to study the transcript levels of genes potentially related to the described phenomena between day 8 and 35. Differences in the expression of SC genes known to play a role in junction formation could be shown from day 8 for Cldn11, from day 15 for Cldn3 and Espn, from day 20 for Cdh2 and Jam3 and from day 35 for ZO-1. Marked differences were also noted in the transcript levels of several genes that are also related to cell adhesion and cytoskeletal dynamics but that have not yet been studied in SC (Actn3, Ank3, Anxa9, Scin, Emb, Mpzl2. It is concluded that absence of a functional AR in SC impedes the remodeling of testicular tubules expected at the onset of spermatogenesis and interferes with the creation of the specific environment needed for germ cell development.

  18. Development of microfluidic cell culture devices towards an in vitro human intestinal barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin

    to enable real-time detection of cell responses, adjustment of cellular stimulation etc. leading to establishment of conditional experiments. In this project, microfluidic systems engineering was leveraged to develop an eight chamber multi-layer microchip for intestinal barrier studies. Sandwiched between...... the layers was a modified Teflon porous membrane for cell culture. The novelty lies in modifying the surface of the porous Teflon support membrane using thiol-ene ‘click’ chemistry, thus allowing the modified Teflon membrane to be bonded between the chip layers to form an enclosed microchip. Successful...... application of the multi-layer microchip was demonstrated by integrating the microchip to an existing cell culture fluidic system to culture the human intestinal epithelial cells, Caco-2, for long term studies. Under the continuous low flow conditions, the cells differentiated into columnar cells displaying...

  19. Modeling the ischemic blood-brain barrier; the effects of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) on endothelial cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Berndt, Philipp;

    Introduction - The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physical, transport and metabolic barrier which plays a key role in preventing uncontrolled exchanges between blood and brain, ensuring an optimal environment for neurons activity. This extent interface is created by the endothelial cells forming ...

  20. Changes in ocular mast cell numbers and histamine distribution during experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C H; Lang, L S; Orr, E L

    1993-01-01

    Choroidal mast cells have been implicated in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), an ocular inflammatory disease induced by S-antigen. Our data confirm that choroidal mast cell numbers decrease with clinical onset of S-antigen-induced EAU in Lewis rats, and establish that the decrease is statistically significant. In addition, we find that the numbers of limbal mast cells also decrease during S-antigen-induced EAU, and that this decrease occurs earlier in the course of the disease than that observed for choroidal mast cells. Activation and degranulation of mast cells, as evidenced by decreases in mast cell number, result in the synthesis and/or release of large quantities of mast cell mediators, such as histamine. Histamine levels in EAU were found to change significantly, decreasing in the anterior portion of the eye and increasing in the choroid and retina, in concert with changes in mast cell number over the course of EAU. Mast cell mediators may actively contribute to the pathogenesis of EAU through direct enhancement of the inflammation, by stimulation of other elements of the immune system, and/or through facilitation of the blood-retinal barrier breakdown that occurs in EAU. Overall, these results add to the evidence for a mast cell role in EAU, and, in addition, show that the mast cell involvement in EAU includes the mast cells of the limbus.

  1. Changes in the permeability of blood brain barrier and endothelial cell damage after cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Liu; Jiansheng Li

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of endothelial cells on the permeability of blood brain barrier (BBB) after brain injury and its effect mechanism.DATA SOURCES: We searched for the articles of permeability of BBB and endothelial cell injury after brain ischemia, which were published between January 1982 and December 2005, with the key words of "cerebral ischemia damage,blood brain barrier ( BBB),permeability,effect of endothelial cell (EC) and its variation mechanism"in English.STUDY SELECTION: The materials were primarily selected. The articles related to the changes in the permeability of BBB and the effect of endothelial cells as well as the change mechanism after cerebral ischemia damage were chosen. Repetitive studies or review articles were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 55 related articles were collected, and 35 were excluded due to repetitive or review articles, finally 20 articles were involved.DATA SYNTHESIS: The content or viewpoints of involved literatures were analyzed. Cerebral ischemia had damage for endothelial cells, such as the inflow of a lot of Ca2+, the production of nitrogen monoxide and oxygen free radical, and aggravated destruction of BBB. After acceptors of inflammatory mediators on cerebrovascular endothelial cell membrane, such as histamine, bradykinin , 5-hydroxytryptamine and so on are activated, endothelial cells shrink and the permeability of BBB increases. Its mechanism involves in the inflow of extracellular Ca2+and the release of intracellular Ca2+ in the cells. Glycocalyx molecule on the surface of endothelial cell, having structural polytropy, is the determinative factor of the permeability of BBB. VEGF, intensively increasing the vasopermeability and mainly effecting on postcapillary vein and veinlet, is the strongest known blood vessel permeation reagent. Its chronic overexpression in the brain can lead the destruction of BBB.CONCLUSION: The injury of endothelial cell participants in the pathological mechanism of BBB

  2. A stable and reproducible human blood-brain barrier model derived from hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Cecchelli

    Full Text Available The human blood brain barrier (BBB is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs, which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes.

  3. Gap junction proteins in the blood-brain barrier control nutrient-dependent reactivation of Drosophila neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spéder, Pauline; Brand, Andrea H

    2014-08-11

    Neural stem cells in the adult brain exist primarily in a quiescent state but are reactivated in response to changing physiological conditions. How do stem cells sense and respond to metabolic changes? In the Drosophila CNS, quiescent neural stem cells are reactivated synchronously in response to a nutritional stimulus. Feeding triggers insulin production by blood-brain barrier glial cells, activating the insulin/insulin-like growth factor pathway in underlying neural stem cells and stimulating their growth and proliferation. Here we show that gap junctions in the blood-brain barrier glia mediate the influence of metabolic changes on stem cell behavior, enabling glia to respond to nutritional signals and reactivate quiescent stem cells. We propose that gap junctions in the blood-brain barrier are required to translate metabolic signals into synchronized calcium pulses and insulin secretion.

  4. Active barrier films of PET for solar cell application: Processing and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Gabriella; Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132 - 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    A preliminary investigation was carried out on the possibility to improve the protective action offered by the standard multilayer structures used to encapsulate photovoltaic devices. With this aim, a commercial active barrier PET-based material, able to absorb oxygen when activated by liquid water, was used to produce flexible and transparent active barrier films, by means of a lab-scale film production plant. The obtained film, tested in terms of thermal, optical and oxygen absorption properties, shows a slow oxygen absorption kinetics, an acceptable transparency and an easy roll-to-roll processability, so proving itself as a good candidate for the development of protective coating for solar cells against the atmospheric degradation agents like the rain.

  5. Breaking down the barriers to commercialization of fuel cells in transportation through Government - industry R&D programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalk, S.G. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Venkateswaran, S.R. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    PEM fuel cell technology is rapidly emerging as a viable propulsion alternative to the internal combustion engine. Fuel cells offer the advantages of low emissions, high efficiency, fuel flexibility, quiet and continuous operation, and modularity. Over the last decade, dramatic advances have been achieved in the performance and cost of PEM fuel cell technologies for automotive applications. However, significant technical barriers remain to making fuel cell propulsion systems viable alternatives to the internal combustion engine. This paper focuses on the progress achieved and remaining technical barriers while highlighting Government-industry R&D efforts that are accelerating fuel cell technology toward commercialization.

  6. CB2 Receptor Activation Inhibits Melanoma Cell Transmigration through the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskó, János; Fazakas, Csilla; Molnár, Judit; Nyúl-Tóth, Ádám; Herman, Hildegard; Hermenean, Anca; Wilhelm, Imola; Persidsky, Yuri; Krizbai, István A.

    2014-01-01

    During parenchymal brain metastasis formation tumor cells need to migrate through cerebral endothelial cells, which form the morphological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The mechanisms of extravasation of tumor cells are highly uncharacterized, but in some aspects recapitulate the diapedesis of leukocytes. Extravasation of leukocytes through the BBB is decreased by the activation of type 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2); therefore, in the present study we sought to investigate the role of CB2 receptors in the interaction of melanoma cells with the brain endothelium. First, we identified the presence of CB1, CB2(A), GPR18 (transcriptional variant 1) and GPR55 receptors in brain endothelial cells, while melanoma cells expressed CB1, CB2(A), GPR18 (transcriptional variants 1 and 2), GPR55 and GPR119. We observed that activation of CB2 receptors with JWH-133 reduced the adhesion of melanoma cells to the layer of brain endothelial cells. JWH-133 decreased the transendothelial migration rate of melanoma cells as well. Our results suggest that changes induced in endothelial cells are critical in the mediation of the effect of CB2 agonists. Our data identify CB2 as a potential target in reducing the number of brain metastastes originating from melanoma. PMID:24815068

  7. CB2 Receptor Activation Inhibits Melanoma Cell Transmigration through the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    János Haskó

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During parenchymal brain metastasis formation tumor cells need to migrate through cerebral endothelial cells, which form the morphological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The mechanisms of extravasation of tumor cells are highly uncharacterized, but in some aspects recapitulate the diapedesis of leukocytes. Extravasation of leukocytes through the BBB is decreased by the activation of type 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2; therefore, in the present study we sought to investigate the role of CB2 receptors in the interaction of melanoma cells with the brain endothelium. First, we identified the presence of CB1, CB2(A, GPR18 (transcriptional variant 1 and GPR55 receptors in brain endothelial cells, while melanoma cells expressed CB1, CB2(A, GPR18 (transcriptional variants 1 and 2, GPR55 and GPR119. We observed that activation of CB2 receptors with JWH-133 reduced the adhesion of melanoma cells to the layer of brain endothelial cells. JWH-133 decreased the transendothelial migration rate of melanoma cells as well. Our results suggest that changes induced in endothelial cells are critical in the mediation of the effect of CB2 agonists. Our data identify CB2 as a potential target in reducing the number of brain metastastes originating from melanoma.

  8. Interface Engineering of Organic Schottky Barrier Solar Cells and Its Application in Enhancing Performances of Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Fangming; Su, Zisheng; Chu, Bei; Cheng, Pengfei; Wang, Junbo; Zhao, Haifeng; Gao, Yuan; Yan, Xingwu; Li, Wenlian

    2016-05-17

    In this work, we describe the performance of organic Schottky barrier solar cells with the structure of ITO/molybdenum oxide (MoOx)/boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/bathophenanthroline (BPhen)/Al. The SubPc-based Schottky barrier solar cells exhibited a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 2.59 mA/cm(2), an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 1.06 V, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.82% under simulated AM1.5 G solar illumination at 100 mW/cm(2). Device performance was substantially enhanced by simply inserting thin organic hole transport material into the interface of MoOx and SubPc. The optimized devices realized a 180% increase in PCE of 2.30% and a peak Voc as high as 1.45 V was observed. We found that the improvement is due to the exciton and electron blocking effect of the interlayer and its thickness plays a vital role in balancing charge separation and suppressing quenching effect. Moreover, applying such interface engineering into MoOx/SubPc/C60 based planar heterojunction cells substantially enhanced the PCE of the device by 44%, from 3.48% to 5.03%. Finally, we also investigated the requirements of the interface material for Schottky barrier modification.

  9. Cigarette smoke impairs airway epithelial barrier function and cell-cell contact recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, I H; Brandenburg, S M; Postma, D S; van Oosterhout, A J M

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking, the major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), induces aberrant airway epithelial structure and function. The underlying mechanisms are unresolved so far. We studied effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on epithelial barrier function and wound regeneration in

  10. Plasticity of Myeloid Cells during Oral Barrier Wound Healing and the Development of Bisphosphonate-related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujie; Kaur, Kawaljit; Kanayama, Keiichi; Morinaga, Kenzo; Park, Sil; Hokugo, Akishige; Kozlowska, Anna; McBride, William H; Li, Jun; Jewett, Anahid; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2016-09-23

    Injury to the barrier tissue initiates a rapid distribution of myeloid immune cells from bone marrow, which guide sound wound healing. Bisphosphonates, a widely used anti-bone resorptive drug with minimal systemic side effects, have been linked to an abnormal wound healing in the oral barrier tissue leading to, in some cases, osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). Here we report that the development of ONJ may involve abnormal phenotypic plasticity of Ly6G+/Gr1+ myeloid cells in the oral barrier tissue undergoing tooth extraction wound healing. A bolus intravenous zoledronate (ZOL) injection to female C57Bl/6 mice followed by maxillary first molar extraction resulted in the development of ONJ-like lesion during the second week of wound healing. The multiplex assay of dissociated oral barrier cells exhibited the secretion of cytokines and chemokines, which was significantly modulated in ZOL mice. Tooth extraction-induced distribution of Ly6G+/Gr1+ cells in the oral barrier tissue increased in ZOL mice at week 2. ONJ-like lesion in ZOL mice contained Ly6G+/Gr1+ cells with abnormal size and morphology as well as different flow cytometric staining intensity. When anti-Ly6G (Gr1) antibody was intraperitoneally injected for 5 days during the second week of tooth extraction, CD11b+GR1(hi) cells in bone marrow and Ly6G+ cells in the oral barrier tissue were depleted, and the development of ONJ-like lesion was significantly attenuated. This study suggests that local modulation of myeloid cell plasticity in the oral barrier tissue may provide the basis for pathogenesis and thus therapeutic as well as preventive strategy of ONJ.

  11. Schottky barrier enhancement on n-InP solar cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Thomas; Leistiko, Otto

    1994-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the Schottky barrier height on n-type InP can be enhanced to values close to the energy bandgap (1.35 eV) by employing a AuZnCr metallization. The process is simple and requires only mild and fast annealing sequences with temperatures not exceeding 500°C. Also, no critical...... epitaxial growth step of junctions is needed, making the process fairly cheap. Thus, prospects for an efficient and simple solar cell device structure for space application purposes based on highly radiant-resistant InP are greatly improved...

  12. Effects of Carbon Nanotubes in Barrier Epithelial Cells via Effects on Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Shanta

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the most common nanoparticles (NP) found in workplace air. Therefore, there is a strong chance that these NP will enter the human body. They have similar physical properties to asbestos, a known toxic material, yet there is limited evidence showing that CNTs may be hazardous to human barrier epithelia. In previous studies done in our laboratory, the effects of CNTs on the barrier function in the human airway epithelial cell line (Calu-3) were measured. Measurements were done using electrophysiology, a technique which measures both transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), a measure of monolayer integrity, and short circuit current (SCC) which is a measure of vectorial ion transport across the cell monolayer. The research findings showed that select physiologically relevant concentrations of long single-wall (SW) and multi-wall (MW) CNTs significantly decreased the stimulated SCC of the Calu-3 cells compared to untreated cultures. Calu-3 cells showed decreases in TEER when incubated for 48 hours (h) with concentrations of MWCNT ranging from 4microg/cm2 to 0.4ng/cm2 and SWCNT ranging from 4microg/cm2 to 0.04ng/cm2. The impaired cellular function, despite sustained cell viability, led us to investigate the mechanism by which the CNTs were affecting the cell membrane. We investigated the interaction of short MWCNTs with model lipid membranes using an ion channel amplifier, Planar Bilayer Workstation. Membranes were synthesized using neutral diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) and negatively charged diphytanoylphosphatidylserine (DPhPS) lipids. Gramicidin A (GA), an ion channel reporter protein, was used to measure changes in ion channel conductance due to CNT exposures. Synthetic membranes exposed to CNTs allowed bursts of currents to cross the membrane when they were added to the membrane buffer system. When added to the membrane in the presence of GA, they distorted channel formation and reduced membrane stability.

  13. Barriers to Infection of Human Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus: Insights into Resistance to Zoonosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna; Naseer, Asif; Levy, Laura S.; Ahmad, Shamim; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Cameron, Ewan; Wilson, Sam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human genome displays a rich fossil record of past gammaretrovirus infections, yet no current epidemic is evident, despite environmental exposure to viruses that infect human cells in vitro. Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) rank high on this list, but neither domestic nor workplace exposure has been associated with detectable serological responses. Nonspecific inactivation of gammaretroviruses by serum factors appears insufficient to explain these observations. To investigate further, we explored the susceptibilities of primary and established human cell lines to FeLV-B, the most likely zoonotic variant. Fully permissive infection was common in cancer-derived cell lines but was also a feature of nontransformed keratinocytes and lung fibroblasts. Cells of hematopoietic origin were generally less permissive and formed discrete groups on the basis of high or low intracellular protein expression and virion release. Potent repression was observed in primary human blood mononuclear cells and a subset of leukemia cell lines. However, the early steps of reverse transcription and integration appear to be unimpaired in nonpermissive cells. FeLV-B was subject to G→A hypermutation with a predominant APOBEC3G signature in partially permissive cells but was not mutated in permissive cells or in nonpermissive cells that block secondary viral spread. Distinct cellular barriers that protect primary human blood cells are likely to be important in protection against zoonotic infection with FeLV. IMPORTANCE Domestic exposure to gammaretroviruses such as feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) occurs worldwide, but the basis of human resistance to infection remains incompletely understood. The potential threat is evident from the human genome sequence, which reveals many past epidemics of gammaretrovirus infection, and from recent cross-species jumps of gammaretroviruses from rodents to primates and marsupials. This study examined resistance to infection at the cellular level

  14. Sodium caprate transiently opens claudin-5-containing barriers at tight junctions of epithelial and endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Vecchio, Giovanna; Tscheik, Christian; Tenz, Kareen

    2012-01-01

    Claudin-5 is a tight junction (TJ) protein which limits the diffusion of small hydrophilic molecules. Thus, it represents a potential pharmacological target to improve drug delivery to the tissues protected by claudin-5-dependent barriers. Sodium caprate is known as an absorption enhancer which...... opens the paracellular space acting on TJ proteins and actin cytoskeleton. Its action on claudin-5 is not understood so far. Epithelial and endothelial systems were used to evaluate the effect of caprate on claudin-5 in TJ-free cells and on claudin-5 fully integrated in TJ. To this aim, confocal...... of endothelial and epithelial cells. In conclusion, the study further elucidates the cellular effects of caprate at the tight junctions....

  15. Impact of secondary barriers on copper-indium-gallium-selenide solar-cell operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudov, Alexei O.

    Thin-film solar cells based on CuInSe2 (CIS) absorber with a band gap of Eg = 1.0 eV and also based on CuIn1-x GaxSe2 (CIGS) alloy absorbers with a band-gap range of Eg = 1.0--1.67 eV are investigated in this work. Intermediate "buffer" semiconductor layers in p-n junctions of CIGS solar cells often improve photodiode properties of the devices. The primary goal of the thesis is to study secondary barriers in the conduction band at the buffer/absorber interface, which may limit current transport and thus reduce the efficiency of the solar cells. The secondary goal is to explore alternative wide-bandgap buffers in CIGS cell structures. CIGS cells with standard CdS buffer layers, and alternative ZnS(O,OH) and InS(O,OH) buffer layers were studied. CdS/CuIn1-xGaxSe2 solar cells with variable Ga content have a range of conduction-band offsets (DeltaEc) in the junction from moderately positive (spike offsets) in CdS/CuInSe2 to moderately negative (cliff offsets) in CdS/CuGaSe 2. Moderate conduction-band spikes in CdS/CIS and low-Ga CdS/CIGS are expected to cause distortions in diode current-voltage (J-V) curves of such solar cells under "red" illumination (hnu < Eg(buffer)); no J-V distortions are expected for high-Ga CdS/CIGS with cliff offsets. These predictions were confirmed in experiments: the distortions were absent for cells with Eg above 1.2--1.3 eV, at which CdS/CIGS DeltaE c is near zero. Experiments and numerical simulations showed that one approach to reduce secondary barriers and J-V distortions in low-Ga high-spike cells is to thin the buffer layer(s). Blue photons (hnu above Eg(buffer)) in the solar spectrum induce photoconductivity in the otherwise compensated buffers, which also results in lowering of the secondary barriers. It was shown that CIGS cells with CdS, InS(O,OH), and ZnS(O,OH) buffers have a similar response to "blue" photons: J-V distortion, if present under red light, is reduced or entirely disappears with blue-light exposure within minutes

  16. Migration of tumor cells and leukocytes in extracellular matrix : proteolytic and nonproteolytic strategies for overcoming tissue barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Katarina

    2003-01-01

    The extracellular matrix within connective tissues represents a structural scaffold as well as a barrier for motile cells, such as invading tumor cells or passenger leukocytes. It remains unclear how different cell types utilize matrix-degrading enzymes for proteolytic migration strategies and, on the other hand, non-proteolytic strategies to overcome 3D fibrillar matrix networks. To monitor cell migration, a 3D collagen model in vitro or the mouse dermis in vivo were used, in combination wit...

  17. Manipulating Somatic Cells to Remove Barriers in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Development leads unidirectionally towards a more restricted cell fate that is usually stable. However, it has been proven that developmental systems are reversible by the success of animal cloning of a differentiated somatic genome through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Recently, reprogramming of somatic cells to a pluripotent embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like state by introducing defined transcripton factor has been achieved, resulting in the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells...

  18. Induction of apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cells by remote exposure of resistive barrier cold plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Anderson, Heather; Gonzales, Xavier F

    2014-03-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), an ambient temperature ionized gas, is gaining extensive interest as a promising addition to anti-tumor therapy primarily due to the ability to generate and control delivery of electrons, ions, excited molecules, UV photons, and reactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to a specific site. The heterogeneous composition of CAP offers the opportunity to mediate several signaling pathways that regulate tumor cells. Consequently, the array of CAP generated products has limited the identification of the mechanisms of action on tumor cells. The aim of this work is to assess the cell death response of human myeloid leukemia cells by remote exposure to CAP generated RNS by utilizing a novel resistive barrier discharge system that primarily produces RNS. The effect of variable treatments of CAP generated RNS was tested in THP-1 cell (human monocytic leukemia cell line), a model for hematological malignancy. The number of viable cells was evaluated with erythrosine-B staining, while apoptosis and necrosis was assessed by endonuclease cleavage observed by agarose gel electrophoresis and detection of cells with the exclusionary dye propidium iodide and fluorescently labeled annexin-V by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Our observations indicate that treatment dosage levels of 45 s of exposure to CAP emitted RNS-induced apoptotic cell death and for higher dosage conditions of ≥50 s of exposure to CAP induced necrosis. Overall the results suggest that CAP emitted RNS play a significant role in the anti-tumor potential of CAP.

  19. Xanthohumol attenuates tumour cell-mediated breaching of the lymphendothelial barrier and prevents intravasation and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Katharina; Kopf, Sabine; Rarova, Lucie; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan; Kretschy, Nicole; Teichmann, Mathias; Vonach, Caroline; Atanasov, Atanas G; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Huttary, Nicole; Raab, Ingrid; Krieger, Sigurd; Strnad, Miroslav; de Martin, Rainer; Saiko, Philipp; Szekeres, Thomas; Knasmüller, Siegfried; Dirsch, Verena M; Jäger, Walter; Grusch, Michael; Dolznig, Helmut; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Krupitza, Georg

    2013-07-01

    Health beneficial effects of xanthohumol have been reported, and basic research provided evidence for anti-cancer effects. Furthermore, xanthohumol was shown to inhibit the migration of endothelial cells. Therefore, this study investigated the anti-metastatic potential of xanthohumol. MCF-7 breast cancer spheroids which are placed on lymphendothelial cells (LECs) induce "circular chemorepellent-induced defects" (CCIDs) in the LEC monolayer resembling gates for intravasating tumour bulks at an early step of lymph node colonisation. NF-κB reporter-, EROD-, SELE-, 12(S)-HETE- and adhesion assays were performed to investigate the anti-metastatic properties of xanthohumol. Western blot analyses were used to elucidate the mechanisms inhibiting CCID formation. Xanthohumol inhibited the activity of CYP, SELE and NF-kB and consequently, the formation of CCIDs at low micromolar concentrations. More specifically, xanthohumol affected ICAM-1 expression and adherence of MCF-7 cells to LECs, which is a prerequisite for CCID formation. Furthermore, markers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and of cell mobility such as paxillin, MCL2 and S100A4 were suppressed by xanthohumol. Xanthohumol attenuated tumour cell-mediated defects at the lymphendothelial barrier and inhibited EMT-like effects thereby providing a mechanistic explanation for the anti-intravasative/anti-metastatic properties of xanthohumol.

  20. Cell invasion through basement membrane: the anchor cell breaches the barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Elliott J; Sherwood, David R

    2011-10-01

    Cell invasion through basement membrane (BM) is a specialized cellular behavior critical to many normal developmental events, immune surveillance, and cancer metastasis. A highly dynamic process, cell invasion involves a complex interplay between cell-intrinsic elements that promote the invasive phenotype, and cell-cell and cell-BM interactions that regulate the timing and targeting of BM transmigration. The intricate nature of these interactions has made it challenging to study cell invasion in vivo and model in vitro. Anchor cell invasion in Caenorhabditis elegans is emerging as an important experimental paradigm for comprehensive analysis of BM invasion, revealing the gene networks that specify invasive behavior and the interactions that occur at the cell-BM interface.

  1. Flavonoid transport across RBE4 cells: A blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Ana; Pestana, Diogo; Teixeira, Diana; Azevedo, Joana; De Freitas, Victor; Mateus, Nuno; Calhau, Conceição

    2010-06-01

    There is a growing interest in dietary therapeutic strategies to combat oxidative stress-induced damage to the Central Nervous System (CNS), which is associated with a number of pathophysiological processes, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and cerebrovascular diseases. Identifying the mechanisms associated with phenolic neuroprotection has been delayed by the lack of information concerning the ability of these compounds to enter the CNS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the transmembrane transport of flavonoids across RBE-4 cells (an immortalized cell line of rat cerebral capillary endothelial cells) and the effect of ethanol on this transport. The detection and quantification of all of the phenolic compounds in the studied samples (basolateral media) was performed using a HPLC-DAD (Diode Array Detector). All of the tested flavonoids (catechin, quercetin and cyanidin-3-glucoside) passed across the RBE-4 cells in a time-dependent manner. This transport was not influenced by the presence of 0.1% ethanol. In conclusion, the tested flavonoids were capable of crossing this blood-brain barrier model.

  2. Stepwise DNA Methylation Changes Are Linked to Escape from Defined Proliferation Barriers and Mammary Epithelial Cell Immortalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Petr; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-04-20

    The timing and progression of DNA methylation changes during carcinogenesis are not completely understood. To develop a timeline of aberrant DNA methylation events during malignant transformation, we analyzed genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in an isogenic human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) culture model of transformation. To acquire immortality and malignancy, the cultured finite lifespan HMEC must overcome two distinct proliferation barriers. The first barrier, stasis, is mediated by the retinoblastoma protein and can be overcome by loss of p16(INK4A) expression. HMEC that escape stasis and continue to proliferate become genomically unstable before encountering a second more stringent proliferation barrier, telomere dysfunction due to telomere attrition. Rare cells that acquire telomerase expression may escape this barrier, become immortal, and develop further malignant properties. Our analysis of HMEC transitioning from finite lifespan to malignantly transformed showed that aberrant DNA methylation changes occur in a stepwise fashion early in the transformation process. The first aberrant DNA methylation step coincides with overcoming stasis, and results in few to hundreds of changes, depending on how stasis was overcome. A second step coincides with immortalization and results in hundreds of additional DNA methylation changes regardless of the immortalization pathway. A majority of these DNA methylation changes are also found in malignant breast cancer cells. These results show that large-scale epigenetic remodeling occurs in the earliest steps of mammary carcinogenesis, temporally links DNA methylation changes and overcoming cellular proliferation barriers, and provides a bank of potential epigenetic biomarkers that mayprove useful in breast cancer risk assessment.

  3. Cardiotoxic drugs Herceptin and doxorubicin inhibit cardiac microvascular endothelial cell barrier formation resulting in increased drug permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L. Wilkinson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiotoxicity induced by anti-cancer therapeutics is a severe, and potentially fatal, adverse reaction of the heart in response to certain drugs. Current in vitro approaches to assess cardiotoxicity have focused on analysing cardiomyocytes. More recently it has become apparent that non-cardiomyocyte cells of the heart can potentially contribute to cardiotoxicity. Herceptin and doxorubicin are known to induce cardiotoxicity in the clinic. The effect of these drugs on the endothelial tight junction barrier was tested by analysing tight junction formation and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1 levels, revealing that Herceptin and doxorubicin are able to induce barrier perturbment and decrease barrier function in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs leading to increased permeability. Herceptin treatment had no effect on the tight junction barrier function in human dermal and human brain microvascular endothelial cells. HCMECs showed detectable levels of HER2 compared with the other endothelial cells suggesting that Herceptin binding to HER2 in these cells may interfere with tight junction formation. Our data suggests that doxorubicin and Herceptin can affect tight junction formation in the cardiac microvasculature leading to increased drug permeability and adverse effects on the cardiac myocytes.

  4. Selective HDAC6 inhibition prevents TNF-α-induced lung endothelial cell barrier disruption and endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinyan; Ma, Zhongsen; Shetty, Sreerama; Ma, Mengshi; Fu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Lung endothelial damage contributes to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. New strategies against lung endothelial barrier dysfunction may provide therapeutic benefits against lung vascular injury. Cell-cell junctions and microtubule cytoskeleton are basic components in maintaining endothelial barrier integrity. HDAC6, a deacetylase primarily localized in the cytoplasm, has been reported to modulate nonnuclear protein function through deacetylation. Both α-tubulin and β-catenin are substrates for HDAC6. Here, we examined the effects of tubastatin A, a highly selective HDAC6 inhibitor, on TNF-α induced lung endothelial cell barrier disruption and endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema. Selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A blocked TNF-α-induced lung endothelial cell hyperpermeability, which was associated with increased α-tubulin acetylation and microtubule stability. Tubastatin A pretreatment inhibited TNF-α-induced endothelial cell contraction and actin stress fiber formation with reduced myosin light chain phosphorylation. Selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A also induced β-catenin acetylation in human lung endothelial cells, which was associated with increased membrane localization of β-catenin and stabilization of adherens junctions. HDAC6 knockdown by small interfering RNA also prevented TNF-α-induced barrier dysfunction and increased α-tubulin and β-catenin acetylation in endothelial cells. Furthermore, in a mouse model of endotoxemia, tubastatin A was able to prevent endotoxin-induced deacetylation of α-tubulin and β-catenin in lung tissues, which was associated with reduced pulmonary edema. Collectively, our data indicate that selective HDAC6 inhibition by tubastatin A is a potent approach against lung endothelial barrier dysfunction.

  5. Retinoic acid and hydrocortisone strengthen the barrier function of human RPMI 2650 cells, a model for nasal epithelial permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürti, Levente; Veszelka, Szilvia; Bocsik, Alexandra; Ozsvári, Béla; Puskás, László G; Kittel, Agnes; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Deli, Mária A

    2013-05-01

    The nasal pathway represents an alternative route for non-invasive systemic administration of drugs. The main advantages of nasal drug delivery are the rapid onset of action, the avoidance of the first-pass metabolism in the liver and the easy applicability. In vitro cell culture systems offer an opportunity to model biological barriers. Our aim was to develop and characterize an in vitro model based on confluent layers of the human RPMI 2650 cell line. Retinoic acid, hydrocortisone and cyclic adenosine monophosphate, which influence cell attachment, growth and differentiation have been investigated on the barrier formation and function of the nasal epithelial cell layers. Real-time cell microelectronic sensing, a novel label-free technique was used for dynamic monitoring of cell growth and barrier properties of RPMI 2650 cells. Treatments enhanced the formation of adherens and tight intercellular junctions visualized by electron microscopy, the presence and localization of junctional proteins ZO-1 and β-catenin demonstrated by fluorescent immunohistochemistry, and the barrier function of nasal epithelial cell layers. The transepithelial resistance of the RPMI 2650 cell model reached 50 to 200 Ω × cm(2), the permeability coefficient for 4.4 kDa FITC-dextran was 9.3 to 17 × 10(-6) cm/s, in agreement with values measured on nasal mucosa from in vivo and ex vivo experiments. Based on these results human RPMI 2650 cells seem to be a suitable nasal epithelial model to test different pharmaceutical excipients and various novel formulations, such as nanoparticles for toxicity and permeability.

  6. Collagen I but not Matrigel matrices provide an MMP-dependent barrier to ovarian cancer cell penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Theodore J

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The invasive potential of cancer cells is usually assessed in vitro using Matrigel as a surrogate basement membrane. Yet cancer cell interaction with collagen I matrices is critical, particularly for the peritoneal metastatic route undertaken by several cancer types including ovarian. Matrix metalloprotease (MMP activity is important to enable cells to overcome the barrier constraints imposed by basement membranes and stromal matrices in vivo. Our objective was to compare matrices reconstituted from collagen I and Matrigel as representative barriers for ovarian cancer cell invasion. Methods The requirement of MMP activity for ovarian cancer cell penetration of Matrigel and collagen matrices was assessed in 2D transwell and 3D spheroid culture systems. Results The broad range MMP inhibitor GM6001 completely prevented cell perforation of polymerised collagen I-coated transwell membranes. In contrast, GM6001 decreased ES-2 cell penetration of Matrigel by only ~30% and had no effect on HEY cell Matrigel penetration. In 3D culture, ovarian cancer cells grown as spheroids also migrated into surrounding Matrigel matrices despite MMP blockade. In contrast, MMP activity was required for invasion into 3D matrices of collagen I reconstituted from acid-soluble rat-tail collagen I, but not from pepsin-extracted collagen I (Vitrogen/Purecol, which lacks telopeptide regions. Conclusion Matrigel does not form representative barriers to ovarian cancer cells in either 2D or 3D culture systems. Our findings support the use of collagen I rather than Matrigel as a matrix barrier for invasion studies to better approximate critical interactions and events associated with peritoneal metastasis.

  7. The challenges of translating stem cells for spinal cord injury and related disorders: what are the barriers and opportunities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Stephanie M; Fehlings, Lauren N; Messih, Mark; Fehlings, Michael G

    2013-02-01

    Stem cell therapies have significant potential to treat spinal cord injury (SCI), but it remains difficult to translate these therapies from 'bench to bedside'. Identifying barriers to translation and understanding how these barriers are viewed by stakeholders in the field of stem cell research are key steps to clinical translation. The Stem Cell Global Blueprint Conference, held in Toronto (ON, Canada) presented a unique opportunity to analyze the perspectives of multiple stakeholders on the future of stem cell therapies for SCI treatment. This article is an analysis of data collected at the conference, including a consensus-building process and pre- and in-conference questionnaires. The authors used these data to assess current perceptions of stem cell research and compared the findings with the literature. The authors identified the major barriers according to a wide range of stakeholders and what strategies they suggested to overcome these obstacles, with the aim of forwarding discussion on stem cell research. It is not a systematic review of the area, but rather a presentation of expert opinion with literature citations to give context and support to their arguments and suggestions. The authors believe that the international SCI community is ready for larger-scale clinical translation, which will require the continued cooperation of all stakeholders in the stem cell and SCI communities.

  8. Magnetron sputtered gadolinia-doped ceria diffusion barriers for metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderby, Steffen; Klemensø, Trine; Christensen, Bjarke H.;

    2014-01-01

    and substrate bias voltage. A GDC layer thickness of 0.6 μm is found to effectively block Sr diffusion when bias voltage and deposition temperature is tuned to promote dense coatings. The adatom mobility has a large influence on the film density. Low temperature and bias voltage result in underdense column......Gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) thin films are deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering in an industrial-scale setup and implemented as barrier layers between the cathode and electrolyte in metal-based solid oxide fuel cells consisting of a metal support, an electrolyte of ZrO2 co-doped with Sc2O3...... and Y2O3 (ScYSZ) and a Sr-doped lanthanum cobalt oxide cathode. In order to optimize the deposition of GDC to obtain high electrochemical performance of the cells, the influence of film thickness and adatom mobility is studied. The adatom mobility is varied by tuning the deposition temperature...

  9. Peanut Allergens Alter Intestinal Barrier Permeability and Tight Junction Localisation in Caco-2 Cell Cultures1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwan B. Price

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Allergen absorption by epithelia may play an important role in downstream immune responses. Transport mechanisms that can bypass Peyer's patches include transcellular and paracellular transport. The capacity of an allergen to cross via these means can modulate downstream processing of the allergen by the immune system. The aim of this study was to investigate allergen-epithelial interactions of peanut allergens with the human intestinal epithelium. Methods: We achieved this using the human Caco-2 cell culture model, exposed to crude peanut extract. Western and immunofluorescence analysis were used to identify the cellular and molecular changes of peanut extract on the intestinal epithelium. Results: Following exposure of Caco-2 cells to peanut extract, binding of the peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 to the apical cellular membrane and transcytosis across the monolayers were observed. Additionally, the co-localisation of the transmembrane tight junction proteins occludin, JAM-A and claudin-1, with the intracellular adhesion protein ZO-1 was modified. Conclusion: Disruption of Caco-2 barrier integrity through tight junction disruption may enable movement of peanut proteins across the intestinal epithelium. This accounts for peanut's increased allergenicity, compared to other food allergens, and provides an explanation for the potency of peanut allergens in immune response elicitation.

  10. ST6GALNAC5 Expression Decreases the Interactions between Breast Cancer Cells and the Human Blood-Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolez, Aurore; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Delannoy, Clément Philippe; Dewald, Justine Hélène; Gosselet, Fabien; Cecchelli, Romeo; Julien, Sylvain; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Delannoy, Philippe; Mysiorek, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The ST6GALNAC5 gene that encodes an α2,6-sialyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of α-series gangliosides, was previously identified as one of the genes that mediate breast cancer metastasis to the brain. We have shown that the expression of ST6GALNAC5 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells resulted in the expression of GD1α ganglioside at the cell surface. By using a human blood-brain barrier in vitro model recently developed, consisting in CD34+ derived endothelial cells co-cultivated with pericytes, we show that ST6GALNAC5 expression decreased the interactions between the breast cancer cells and the human blood-brain barrier. PMID:27529215

  11. Study on AlxNiy Alloys as Diffusion Barriers in Flexible Thin Film Solar Cells%Study on AlxNiy Alloys as Diffusion Barriers in Flexible Thin Film Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳红云; 吴爱民; 秦福文; 李廷举

    2011-01-01

    Co-sputtered AlxNiy thin films were used as diffusion barriers between aluminum and hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) for flexible thin film solar cells. The stoichiometric ratio of AlxNiy showed a significant effect on the structures of the films. The obtained Al3Ni2 film was amorphous, while polycrystalline films were obtained when the ratio of aluminum to nickel was 1:1 and 2:3. An auger electron spectroscope and four-point probe system were applied to test the resistance to the interdiffusion between aluminum and silicon, as well as the conductivities of the AlxNiy barriers. The data of auger depth profile showed that the content of silicon was the minimum in the aluminum layer after sputtering for 4 min using AlNi thin film as the barrier layer. Compared to other AlxNiy alloys, the AlNi thin film possessed the lowest sheet resistance.

  12. Remodeling of Tight Junctions and Enhancement of Barrier Integrity of the CACO-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Layer by Micronutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzano, Mary Carmen; DiGuilio, Katherine; Mercado, Joanna; Teter, Mimi; To, Julie; Ferraro, Brendan; Mixson, Brittany; Manley, Isabel; Baker, Valerissa; Moore, Beverley A; Wertheimer, Joshua; Mullin, James M

    2015-01-01

    The micronutrients zinc, quercetin, butyrate, indole and berberine were evaluated for their ability to induce remodeling of epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and enhance barrier integrity in the CACO-2 gastrointestinal epithelial cell culture model. All five of these chemically very diverse micronutrients increased transepithelial electrical resistance (Rt) significantly, but only berberine also improved barrier integrity to the non-electrolyte D-mannitol. Increases of Rt as much as 200% of untreated controls were observed. Each of the five micronutrients also induced unique, signature-like changes in TJ protein composition, suggesting multiple pathways (and TJ arrangements) by which TJ barrier function can be enhanced. Decreases in abundance by as much as 90% were observed for claudin-2, and increases of over 300% could be seen for claudins -5 and -7. The exact effects of the micronutrients on barrier integrity and TJ protein composition were found to be highly dependent on the degree of differentiation of the cell layer at the time it was exposed to the micronutrient. The substratum to which the epithelial layer adheres was also found to regulate the response of the cell layer to the micronutrient. The implications of these findings for therapeutically decreasing morbidity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease are discussed.

  13. Efficient, air-stable colloidal quantum dot solar cells encapsulated using atomic layer deposition of a nanolaminate barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Ip, Alexander H.

    2013-12-23

    Atomic layer deposition was used to encapsulate colloidal quantum dot solar cells. A nanolaminate layer consisting of alternating alumina and zirconia films provided a robust gas permeation barrier which prevented device performance degradation over a period of multiple weeks. Unencapsulated cells stored in ambient and nitrogen environments demonstrated significant performance losses over the same period. The encapsulated cell also exhibited stable performance under constant simulated solar illumination without filtration of harsh ultraviolet photons. This monolithically integrated thin film encapsulation method is promising for roll-to-roll processed high efficiency nanocrystal solar cells. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  14. Cell-Penetrating Peptides Selectively Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Stalmans

    Full Text Available Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs are a group of peptides, which have the ability to cross cell membrane bilayers. CPPs themselves can exert biological activity and can be formed endogenously. Fragmentary studies demonstrate their ability to enhance transport of different cargoes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB. However, comparative, quantitative data on the BBB permeability of different CPPs are currently lacking. Therefore, the in vivo BBB transport characteristics of five chemically diverse CPPs, i.e. pVEC, SynB3, Tat 47-57, transportan 10 (TP10 and TP10-2, were determined. The results of the multiple time regression (MTR analysis revealed that CPPs show divergent BBB influx properties: Tat 47-57, SynB3, and especially pVEC showed very high unidirectional influx rates of 4.73 μl/(g × min, 5.63 μl/(g × min and 6.02 μl/(g × min, respectively, while the transportan analogs showed a negligible to low brain influx. Using capillary depletion, it was found that 80% of the influxed peptides effectively reached the brain parenchyma. Except for pVEC, all peptides showed a significant efflux out of the brain. Co-injection of pVEC with radioiodinated bovine serum albumin (BSA did not enhance the brain influx of radiodionated BSA, indicating that pVEC does not itself significantly alter the BBB properties. A saturable mechanism could not be demonstrated by co-injecting an excess dose of non-radiolabeled CPP. No significant regional differences in brain influx were observed, with the exception for pVEC, for which the regional variations were only marginal. The observed BBB influx transport properties cannot be correlated with their cell-penetrating ability, and therefore, good CPP properties do not imply efficient brain influx.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide improves colonic barrier integrity in DSS-induced inflammation in Caco-2 cells and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyu; Yan, Rui; Zhou, Xiaogang; Ji, Fang; Zhang, Bing

    2016-10-01

    Intestinal barrier involves in the pathogeny of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to improve intestinal barrier integrity. Thus, this study investigated the effects of GYY4137, a slow-release H2S donor, on DSS-induced inflammation and intestinal dysfunction. In vitro model, cellular permeability was significantly increased and expression of tight junctions (ZO-1, Cauldin4, and Occludin) was downregulated in Caco-2 cells. GYY4137 treatment markedly attenuated DSS-induced inflammation and barrier dysfunction. Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS)-siRNA transfection further demonstrated that endogenous H2S system involves in DSS-induced inflammation and mediates barrier function. In vivo model, DSS exposure caused colonic inflammation and injury in mice and GYY4137 injection alleviated inflammatory response and improved intestinal barrier via reducing intestinal permeability and upregulating of tight junctions. In conclusion, endogenous H2S system involves in DSS-induced inflammation and H2S addition alleviated inflammation and intestinal dysfunction in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Ceramic barrier layers for flexible thin film solar cells on metallic substrates: a laboratory scale study for process optimization and barrier layer properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Sanchez, Jose-Maria; Guilera, Nuria; Francesch, Laia; Alba, Maria D; Lopez, Laura; Sanchez, Emilio

    2014-11-12

    Flexible thin film solar cells are an alternative to both utility-scale and building integrated photovoltaic installations. The fabrication of these devices over electrically conducting low-cost foils requires the deposition of dielectric barrier layers to flatten the substrate surface, provide electrical isolation between the substrate and the device, and avoid the diffusion of metal impurities during the relatively high temperatures required to deposit the rest of the solar cell device layers. The typical roughness of low-cost stainless-steel foils is in the hundred-nanometer range, which is comparable or larger than the thin film layers comprising the device and this may result in electrical shunts that decrease solar cell performance. This manuscript assesses the properties of different single-layer and bilayer structures containing ceramics inks formulations based on Al2O3, AlN, or Si3N4 nanoparticles and deposited over stainless-steel foils using a rotogravure printing process. The best control of the substrate roughness was achieved for bilayers of Al2O3 or AlN with mixed particle size, which reduced the roughness and prevented the diffusion of metals impurities but AlN bilayers exhibited as well the best electrical insulation properties.

  17. Temperature-dependent Schottky barrier in high-performance organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; He, Dan; Zhou, Qing; Mao, Peng; Cao, Jiamin; Ding, Liming; Wang, Jizheng

    2017-01-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) have attracted great attention in the past 30 years, and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) now reaches around 10%, largely owning to the rapid material developments. Meanwhile with the progress in the device performance, more and more interests are turning to understanding the fundamental physics inside the OSCs. In the conventional bulk-heterojunction architecture, only recently it is realized that the blend/cathode Schottky junction serves as the fundamental diode for the photovoltaic function. However, few researches have focused on such junctions, and their physical properties are far from being well-understood. In this paper based on PThBDTP:PC71BM blend, we fabricated OSCs with PCE exceeding 10%, and investigated temperature-dependent behaviors of the junction diodes by various characterization including current-voltage, capacitance-voltage and impedance measurements between 70 to 290 K. We found the Schottky barrier height exhibits large inhomogeneity, which can be described by two sets of Gaussian distributions.

  18. Expression changes and novel interaction partners of talin 1 in effector cells of autoimmune uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degroote, Roxane L; Hauck, Stefanie M; Treutlein, Gudrun; Amann, Barbara; Fröhlich, Kristina J H; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Merl, Juliane; Stangassinger, Manfred; Ueffing, Marius; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2013-12-06

    Autoimmune uveitis is characterized by crossing of blood-retinal barrier (BRB) by autoaggressive immune cells. Equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is a valuable spontaneous model for autoimmune uveitis and analyses of differentially expressed proteins in ERU unraveled changed protein clusters in target tissues and immune system. Healthy eyes are devoid of leukocytes. In ERU, however, leukocytes enter the inner eye and subsequently destroy it. Molecular mechanisms enabling cell migration through BRB still remain elusive. Previously, we detected decreased talin 1 expression in blood-derived granulocytes of ERU cases, linking the innate immune system to ERU. Because changes in leukocyte protein expression pattern may play a role in pathological abnormalities leading to migration ability, we aimed at identifying interactors of talin 1 in leukocytes with immunoprecipitation, followed by LC-MS/MS for candidate identification. This enabled us to identify CD90 (Thy1) as novel interactor of talin 1 besides several other interactors. In blood-derived granulocytes from healthy individuals, CD90 was highly abundant and significantly reduced in ERU, especially in effector cells. Connection between talin 1 and CD90 and their expression differences in inflammation is an interesting novel finding allowing deeper insight into immune response of innate immune system and granulocyte migration ability in this organ-specific autoimmune disease.

  19. Retinal Mueller glial cells trigger the hallmark inflammatory process in autoimmune uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Stefanie M; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; Amann, Barbara; Stangassinger, Manfred; Gerhards, Hartmut; Ueffing, Marius; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2007-06-01

    Spontaneous equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is an incurable autoimmune disease affecting the eye. Although retinal-autoantigen specific T-helper 1 cells have been demonstrated to trigger disease progression and relapses, the molecular processes leading to retinal degeneration and consequent blindness remain unknown. To elucidate such processes, we studied changes in the total retinal proteome of ERU-diseased horses compared to healthy controls. Severe changes in the retinal proteome were found for several markers for blood-retinal barrier breakdown and whose emergence depended upon disease severity. Additionally, uveitic changes in the retina were accompanied by upregulation of aldose 1-epimerase, selenium-binding protein 1, alpha crystallin A chain, phosphatase 2A inhibitor (SET), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), the latter indicating an involvement of retinal Mueller glial cells (RMG) in disease process. To confirm this, we screened for additional RMG-specific markers and could demonstrate that, in uveitic retinas, RMG concomitantly upregulate vimentin and GFAP and downregulate glutamine synthetase. These expression patterns suggest for an activated state of RMG, which further downregulate the expression of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and begin expressing interferon-gamma, a pro-inflammatory cytokine typical for T-helper 1 cells. We thus propose that RMG may play a fatal role in uveitic disease progression by directly triggering inflammatory processes through the expression and secretion of interferon-gamma.

  20. Efficiency enhancement of solid-state PbS quantum dot-sensitized solar cells with Al2O3 barrier layer

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to grow both PbS quantum dots and Al2O3 barrier layers in a solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC). Barrier layers grown prior to quantum dots resulted in a near-doubling of device efficiency (0.30% to 0.57%) whereas barrier layers grown after quantum dots did not improve efficiency, indicating the importance of quantum dots in recombination processes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Providencia alcalifaciens causes barrier dysfunction and apoptosis in tissue cell culture: potent role of lipopolysaccharides on diarrheagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Momose, Yoshika; Ryu, C-H; Kasuga, Fumiko; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Kumagai, Susumu; Igimi, Shizunobu

    2013-01-01

    Providencia alcalifaciens is a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family that occasionally causes diarrheagenic illness in humans via the intake of contaminated foods. Despite the epidemiological importance of P. alcalifaciens, little is known about its pathobiology. Here we report that P. alcalifaciens causes barrier dysfunction in Caco-2 cell monolayers and induces apoptosis in calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells. P. alcalifaciens infection caused a 30% reduction in transepithelial resistance in Caco-2 cell monolayers, which was greater than that for cells infected with Shigella flexneri or non-pathogenic Escherichia coli. As with viable bacteria, bacterial lysates treated with heat, benzonase or proteinase, but not with polymixin B, were also involved in the cellular response. TLR4 antibody neutralisation significantly restored the P. alcalifaciens-induced transepithelial resistance reduction in Caco-2 cells, suggesting that lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) might play a central role in this cellular response. Western blotting further indicated that P. alcalifaciens LPSs reduced occludin levels, whereas LPSs from Shigella or E. coli did not. Although the viability of Caco-2 cells was not altered significantly, the calf pulmonary artery endothelial cell line was highly sensitive to P. alcalifaciens infection. This sensitivity was indeed dependent on LPS, which induced rapid apoptosis. Together, these data show that P. alcalifaciens LPSs participate in epithelial barrier dysfunction and endothelial apoptosis. The findings give insight into the LPS-dependent cell signal events affecting diarrheagenicity during infection with P. alcalifaciens.

  2. Baicalein induces CD4+Foxp3+ T cells and enhances intestinal barrier function in a mouse model of food allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Min-Jung; Shin, Hee Soon; See, Hye-Jeong; Jung, Sun Young; Kwon, Da-Ae; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of food allergy, which is triggered by allergen permeation of the gastrointestinal tract followed by a T-helper (Th) 2-mediated immune response, has been increasing annually worldwide. We examined the effects of baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), a flavonoid from Scutellaria baicalensis used in oriental herbal medicine, on regulatory T (Treg) cell induction and intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions in a mouse model of food allergy. An allergic response was induced by oral challenge with ovalbumin, and the incidence of allergic symptoms and T cell-related activity in the mesenteric lymph nodes were analyzed with and without the presence of baicalein. Our results demonstrated that the administration of baicalein ameliorated the symptoms of food allergy and attenuated serum IgE and effector T cells. However, Treg-related factors were up-regulated by baicalein. Furthermore, baicalein was shown to enhance intestinal barrier function through the regulation of tight junctions. We also found that baicalein treatment induced the differentiation of Treg cells via aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs). Thus, the action of baicalein as an agonist of AhR can induce Treg differentiation and enhance barrier function, suggesting that baicalein might serve as an effective immune regulator derived from foods for the treatment of food allergy. PMID:27561877

  3. Regulation of Stem Cell Properties of Müller Glia by JAK/STAT and MAPK Signaling in the Mammalian Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista M. Beach

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In humans and other mammals, the neural retina does not spontaneously regenerate, and damage to the retina that kills retinal neurons results in permanent blindness. In contrast to embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and embryonic/fetal retinal stem cells, Müller glia offer an intrinsic cellular source for regenerative strategies in the retina. Müller glia are radial glial cells within the retina that maintain retinal homeostasis, buffer ion flux associated with phototransduction, and form the blood/retinal barrier within the retina proper. In injured or degenerating retinas, Müller glia contribute to gliotic responses and scar formation but also show regenerative capabilities that vary across species. In the mammalian retina, regenerative responses achieved to date remain insufficient for potential clinical applications. Activation of JAK/STAT and MAPK signaling by CNTF, EGF, and FGFs can promote proliferation and modulate the glial/neurogenic switch. However, to achieve clinical relevance, additional intrinsic and extrinsic factors that restrict or promote regenerative responses of Müller glia in the mammalian retina must be identified. This review focuses on Müller glia and Müller glial-derived stem cells in the retina and phylogenetic differences among model vertebrate species and highlights some of the current progress towards understanding the cellular mechanisms regulating their regenerative response.

  4. Regulation of Stem Cell Properties of Müller Glia by JAK/STAT and MAPK Signaling in the Mammalian Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Krista M; Wang, Jianbo; Otteson, Deborah C

    2017-01-01

    In humans and other mammals, the neural retina does not spontaneously regenerate, and damage to the retina that kills retinal neurons results in permanent blindness. In contrast to embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and embryonic/fetal retinal stem cells, Müller glia offer an intrinsic cellular source for regenerative strategies in the retina. Müller glia are radial glial cells within the retina that maintain retinal homeostasis, buffer ion flux associated with phototransduction, and form the blood/retinal barrier within the retina proper. In injured or degenerating retinas, Müller glia contribute to gliotic responses and scar formation but also show regenerative capabilities that vary across species. In the mammalian retina, regenerative responses achieved to date remain insufficient for potential clinical applications. Activation of JAK/STAT and MAPK signaling by CNTF, EGF, and FGFs can promote proliferation and modulate the glial/neurogenic switch. However, to achieve clinical relevance, additional intrinsic and extrinsic factors that restrict or promote regenerative responses of Müller glia in the mammalian retina must be identified. This review focuses on Müller glia and Müller glial-derived stem cells in the retina and phylogenetic differences among model vertebrate species and highlights some of the current progress towards understanding the cellular mechanisms regulating their regenerative response.

  5. A viable circulating tumor cell isolation device with high retrieval efficiency using a reversibly deformable membrane barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonji; Bu, Jiyoon; Cho, Young-Ho; Son, Il Tae; Kang, Sung-Bum

    2017-02-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) contain prognostic information of the tumor, since they shed from the primary tumor and invade into the bloodstream. Therefore, the viable isolation is necessary for a consequent analysis of CTCs. Here, we present a device for the viable isolation and efficient retrieval of CTCs using slanted slot filters, formed by a reversibly deformable membrane barrier. Conventional filters have difficulties in retrieving captured cells, since they easily clog the slots. Moreover, large stress concentration at the sharp edges of squared slots, causes cell lysis. In contrast, the present device shows over 94% of high retrieval efficiency, since the slots can be opened simply by relieving the pressure. Furthermore, the inflated membrane barrier naturally forms the slanted slots, thus reducing the cell damage. By using cancer cell lines, we verified that the present device successfully isolate targeted cells, even at an extremely low concentrations (~10 cells/0.1 ml). In the clinical study, 85.7% of patients initially showed CTC positive while the numbers generally decreased after the surgery. We have also proved that the number of CTCs were highly correlated with tumour invasiveness. Therefore, the present device has potential for use in cancer diagnosis, surgical validation, and invasiveness analysis.

  6. HYDROGEN-RICH MEDIUM AMELIORATES LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED BARRIER DYSFUNCTION VIA RHOA-MDIA1 SIGNALING IN CACO-2 CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Wang, Lu; Sun, Ruiqiang; Chen, Hongguang; Zhang, Hongtao; Yu, Yang; Wang, Yanyan; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Yonghao; Xie, Keliang

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal barrier dysfunction is associated with the severity and prognosis of sepsis. Hydrogen gas (H2) can ameliorate multiple organ damage in septic animals. Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) and mammalian diaphanous-related formin 1 (mDia1) are important to regulate tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ), both of which determine the integrity of the intestinal barrier. This study was aimed to investigate whether H2 could modulate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated dysfunction of the intestinal barrier and whether RhoA-mDia1 signaling is involved. Caco-2 cells were exposed to different concentrations of LPS (1 μg/mL-1 mg/mL). The permeability of the intestinal barrier was evaluated by transepithelial resistance (TER) and fluorescein-isothiocyanate-dextran flux. Expression and distribution of occludin and E-cadherin were analyzed by Western blot and immunofluorescence. RhoA activity was measured by G-Lisa assay, and mDia1 expression was assessed by Western blot. LPS (100 μg/mL) decreased TER and increased fluorescein-isothiocyanate-dextran flux, which were alleviated by H2-rich medium. Also, H2 down-regulated LPS-induced oxidative stress. Moreover, H2 improved the down-regulated expression and redistribution of occludin and E-cadherin caused by LPS. Additionally, H2 alleviated LPS-caused RhoA activation, and the beneficial effects of H2 on barrier were counteracted by RhoA agonist CN03. Rho inhibitor C3 exoenzyme mitigated LPS-induced barrier breakdown. Furthermore, H2-rich medium increased mDia1 expression, and mDia1 knockdown abolished protections of H2 on barrier permeability. mDia1 knockdown eliminated H2-induced benefits for occludin and E-cadherin. These findings suggest that H2 improves LPS-induced hyperpermeability of the intestinal barrier and disruptions of TJ and AJ by moderating RhoA-mDia1 signaling.

  7. Initial contact of glioblastoma cells with existing normal brain endothelial cells strengthen the barrier function via fibroblast growth factor 2 secretion: a new in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Keisuke; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Nakagawa, Shinsuke; Thuy, Dinh Ha Duy; Ujifuku, Kenta; Kamada, Kensaku; Hayashi, Kentaro; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Niwa, Masami

    2013-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells invade along the existing normal capillaries in brain. Normal capillary endothelial cells function as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that limits permeability of chemicals into the brain. To investigate whether GBM cells modulate the BBB function of normal endothelial cells, we developed a new in vitro BBB model with primary cultures of rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs), pericytes, and astrocytes. Cells were plated on a membrane with 8 μm pores, either as a monolayer or as a BBB model with triple layer culture. The BBB model consisted of RBEC on the luminal side as a bottom, and pericytes and astrocytes on the abluminal side as a top of the chamber. Human GBM cell line, LN-18 cells, or lung cancer cell line, NCI-H1299 cells, placed on either the RBEC monolayer or the BBB model increased the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) values against the model, which peaked within 72 h after the tumor cell application. The TEER value gradually returned to baseline with LN-18 cells, whereas the value quickly dropped to the baseline in 24 h with NCI-H1299 cells. NCI-H1299 cells invaded into the RBEC layer through the membrane, but LN-18 cells did not. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) strengthens the endothelial cell BBB function by increased occludin and ZO-1 expression. In our model, LN-18 and NCI-H1299 cells secreted FGF-2, and a neutralization antibody to FGF-2 inhibited LN-18 cells enhanced BBB function. These results suggest that FGF-2 would be a novel therapeutic target for GBM in the perivascular invasive front.

  8. Protective effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on epithelial barrier disruption caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunpeng; Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Weina; Ma, Xianyong; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuefen; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-04-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) play an important role in maintaining the mucosal barrier function and gastrointestinal health of animals. Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) was reported to protect the intestinal barrier function of early-weaned piglets against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 challenge; however, the underlying cellular mechanism of this protection was unclear. Here, an established intestinal porcine epithelia cell (IPEC-J2) model was used to investigate the protective effects and related mechanisms of L. plantarum on epithelial barrier damages induced by ETEC K88. Epithelial permeability, expression of inflammatory cytokines, and abundance of TJ proteins, were determined. Pre-treatment with L. plantarum for 6h prevented the reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) (Pplantarum were higher (Pplantarum was shown to regulate proteins of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. These results indicated that L. plantarum may improve epithelial barrier function by maintenance of TEER, inhibiting the reduction of TJ proteins, and reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines induced by ETEC K88, possibly through modulation of TLRs, NF-κB and MAPK pathways.

  9. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from the BC1 iPS Cell Line Exhibit a Blood-Brain Barrier Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Katt, Moriah E.; Xu, Zinnia S.; Gerecht, Sharon; Searson, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells that form capillaries in the brain are highly specialized, with tight junctions that minimize paracellular transport and an array of broad-spectrum efflux pumps that make drug delivery to the brain extremely challenging. One of the major limitations in blood-brain barrier research and the development of drugs to treat central nervous system diseases is the lack of appropriate cell lines. Recent reports indicate that the derivation of human brain microvascular endothelial...

  10. Origins and consequences of hyperosmolar stress in retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willermain, François; Libert, Sarah; Motulsky, Elie; Salik, Dany; Caspers, Laure; Perret, Jason; Delporte, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is composed of retinal pigmented epithelial cells joined by tight junctions and represents the outer blood-retinal barrier (BRB). The inner BRB is made of endothelial cells joined by tight junctions and glial extensions surrounding all the retinal blood vessels. One of the functions of the RPE is to maintain an osmotic transepithelial gradient created by ionic pumps and channels, avoiding paracellular flux. Under such physiological conditions, transcellular water movement follows the osmotic gradient and flows normally from the retina to the choroid through the RPE. Several diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, are characterized by the BRB breakdown leading to leakage of solutes, proteins, and fluid from the retina and the choroid. The prevailing hypothesis explaining macular edema formation during diabetic retinopathy incriminates the inner BRB breakdown resulting in increased osmotic pressure leading in turn to massive water accumulation that can affect vision. Under these conditions, it has been hypothesized that RPE is likely to be exposed to hyperosmolar stress at its apical side. This review summarizes the origins and consequences of osmotic stress in the RPE. Ongoing and further research advances will clarify the mechanisms, at the molecular level, involved in the response of the RPE to osmotic stress and delineate potential novel therapeutic targets and tools.

  11. Tetramethylpyrazine Protects Retinal Capillary Endothelial Cells (TR-iBRB2 against IL-1β-Induced Nitrative/Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Zhu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Blood-retinal barrier (BRB breakdown is one of the primary causes of diabetic retinopathy (DR. The pro-inflammatory factor interleukin-1β (IL-1β was reported to be involved in the induction of BRB breakdown during the pathogenesis of DR. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP, a major active component of the traditional herb Ligusticum chuanxiong, on IL-1β-induced cell death of the rat retinal capillary endothelial TR-iBRB2 cells. Our results showed that IL-1β-induced cell dysfunction in TR-iBRB2 cells via inducing nitrative/oxidative stress; however, such effect was attenuated with the pre-treatment of TMP. The cellular protective effect of TMP was likely to be mediated through the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression and leukostasis as well as suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, mitochondrial dysfunction and MAPKs activation. These findings significantly contribute to a better understanding of the protective effect of TMP in DR and form the basis of the therapeutic development of TMP in treating such disease in the future.

  12. Breaking the Blood-Brain Barrier With Mannitol to Aid Stem Cell Therapeutics in the Chronic Stroke Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Naoki; Lee, Jea Young; Acosta, Sandra; Sanberg, Paul R; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeabilizers, such as mannitol, can facilitate peripherally delivered stem cells to exert therapeutic benefits on the stroke brain. Although this BBB permeation-aided stem cell therapy has been demonstrated in the acute stage of stroke, such BBB permeation in the chronic stage of the disease remains to be examined. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats initially received sham surgery or experimental stroke via the 1-h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model. At 1 month after the MCAo surgery, stroke animals were randomly assigned to receive human umbilical cord stem cells only (2 million viable cells), mannitol only (1.1 mol/L mannitol at 4°C), combined human umbilical cord stem cells (200,000 viable cells) and mannitol (1.1 mol/L mannitol at 4°C), and vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) only. Stroke animals that received human umbilical cord blood cells alone or combined human umbilical cord stem cells and mannitol exhibited significantly improved motor performance and significantly better brain cell survival in the peri-infarct area compared to stroke animals that received vehicle or mannitol alone, with mannitol treatment reducing the stem cell dose necessary to afford functional outcomes. Enhanced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone accompanied the combined treatment of human umbilical cord stem cells and mannitol. We showed that BBB permeation facilitates the therapeutic effects of a low dose of peripherally transplanted stem cells to effectively cause functional improvement and increase neurogenesis in chronic stroke.

  13. Uptake mechanism of ApoE-modified nanoparticles on brain capillary endothelial cells as a blood-brain barrier model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Wagner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The blood-brain barrier (BBB represents an insurmountable obstacle for most drugs thus obstructing an effective treatment of many brain diseases. One solution for overcoming this barrier is a transport by binding of these drugs to surface-modified nanoparticles. Especially apolipoprotein E (ApoE appears to play a major role in the nanoparticle-mediated drug transport across the BBB. However, at present the underlying mechanism is incompletely understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, the uptake of the ApoE-modified nanoparticles into the brain capillary endothelial cells was investigated to differentiate between active and passive uptake mechanism by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, different in vitro co-incubation experiments were performed with competing ligands of the respective receptor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study confirms an active endocytotic uptake mechanism and shows the involvement of low density lipoprotein receptor family members, notably the low density lipoprotein receptor related protein, on the uptake of the ApoE-modified nanoparticles into the brain capillary endothelial cells. This knowledge of the uptake mechanism of ApoE-modified nanoparticles enables future developments to rationally create very specific and effective carriers to overcome the blood-brain barrier.

  14. The function of breast cancer resistance protein in epithelial barriers, stem cells and milk secretion of drugs and xenotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Herwaarden, Antonius E; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2006-01-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein [BCRP (also known as ABCG2)] belongs to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) family of transmembrane drug transporters. BCRP has a broad substrate specificity and actively extrudes a wide variety of drugs, carcinogens and dietary toxins from cells. Situated in the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells of the small and large intestine and renal proximal tubules and in the bile canalicular membrane of hepatocytes, BCRP decreases the oral availability and systemic exposure of its substrates. In several blood-tissue barriers BCRP reduces tissue penetration of its substrates and it protects haematopoietic stem cells from cytotoxic substrates. Moreover, BCRP is expressed in mammary gland alveolar epithelial cells during pregnancy and lactation, where it actively secretes a variety of drugs, toxins and carcinogens into milk. In apparent contradiction with the detoxifying role of BCRP in mothers, this contamination of milk exposes suckling infants and dairy consumers to xenotoxins. BCRP thus affects many important aspects of pharmacology and toxicology.

  15. Oxygen- and water-induced degradation of an inverted polymer solar cell: the barrier effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterager Madsen, Morten; Norrman, Kion; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    , the barrier effect is reported in both a dry oxygen atmosphere and an oxygen-free humid atmosphere. The devices under study are comprised of a bulk heterojunction formed by poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester sandwiched between a layer of zinc oxide (electron transporting...

  16. Dielectric and diffusion barrier multilayer for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells integration on stainless steel sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amouzou, Dodji, E-mail: dodji.amouzou@fundp.ac.be [Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles, 61, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Guaino, Philippe; Fourdrinier, Lionel; Richir, Jean-Baptiste; Maseri, Fabrizio [CRM-Group, Boulevard de Colonster, B 57, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Sporken, Robert [Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles, 61, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2013-09-02

    For the fabrication of monolithically integrated flexible Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2}, CIGS modules on stainless steel, individual photovoltaic cells must be insulated from metal substrates by a barrier layer that can sustain high thermal treatments. In this work, a combination of sol–gel (organosilane-sol) and sputtered SiAlxOy forming thin diffusion barrier layers (TDBL) was prepared on stainless steel substrates. The deposition of organosilane-sol dielectric layers on the commercial stainless steel (maximal roughness, Rz = 500 nm and Root Mean Square roughness, RMS = 56 nm) induces a planarization of the surface (RMS = 16.4 nm, Rz = 176 nm). The DC leakage current through the dielectric layers was measured for the metal-insulator-metal (MIM) junctions that act as capacitors. This method allowed us to assess the quality of our TDBL insulating layer and its lateral uniformity. Indeed, evaluating a ratio of the number of valid MIM capacitors to the number of tested MIM capacitors, a yield of ∼ 95% and 50% has been reached respectively with non-annealed and annealed samples based on sol–gel double layers. A yield of 100% was achieved for sol–gel double layers reinforced with a sputtered SiAlxOy coating and a third sol–gel monolayer. Since this yield is obtained on several samples, it can be extrapolated to any substrate size. Furthermore, according to Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy measurements, these barrier layers exhibit excellent barrier properties against the diffusion of undesired atoms which could otherwise spoil the electronic and optical properties of CIGS photovoltaic cells. - Highlights: • We functionalize steel for monolithically integrated Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells • Thin dielectric and diffusion barrier layers (TDDBL) prepared on steel • Reliability and breakdown voltage of dielectric layers have been studied. • Investigation of thermal treatment effect on dielectric

  17. Actin related protein complex subunit 1b controls sperm release, barrier integrity and cell division during adult rat spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anita; Dumasia, Kushaan; Deshpande, Sharvari; Gaonkar, Reshma; Balasinor, N H

    2016-08-01

    Actin remodeling is a vital process for signaling, movement and survival in all cells. In the testes, extensive actin reorganization occurs at spermatid-Sertoli cell junctions during sperm release (spermiation) and at inter Sertoli cell junctions during restructuring of the blood testis barrier (BTB). During spermiation, tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs), rich in branched actin networks, ensure recycling of spermatid-Sertoli cell junctional molecules. Similar recycling occurs during BTB restructuring around the same time as spermiation occurs. Actin related protein 2/3 complex is an essential actin nucleation and branching protein. One of its subunits, Arpc1b, was earlier found to be down-regulated in an estrogen-induced rat model of spermiation failure. Also, Arpc1b was found to be estrogen responsive through estrogen receptor beta in seminiferous tubule culture. Here, knockdown of Arpc1b by siRNA in adult rat testis led to defects in spermiation caused by failure in TBC formation. Knockdown also compromised BTB integrity and caused polarity defects of mature spermatids. Apart from these effects pertaining to Sertoli cells, Arpc1b reduction perturbed ability of germ cells to enter G2/M phase thus hindering cell division. In summary, Arpc1b, an estrogen responsive gene, is a regulator of spermiation, mature spermatid polarity, BTB integrity and cell division during adult spermatogenesis.

  18. Inhibition of Adhesion, Proliferation, and Invasion of Primary Endometriosis and Endometrial Stromal and Ovarian Carcinoma Cells by a Nonhyaluronan Adhesion Barrier Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan P. Renner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a chronic disease of women in the reproductive age, defined as endometrial cells growing outside of the uterine cavity and associated with relapses. Relapses are hypothesized to correlate with incomplete surgical excision or result from nonrandom implantation of new endometrial implants in adjacent peritoneum. Thus, surgical excision could lead to free endometriotic cells or tissue residues, which readhere, grow, and invade into recurrent lesions. Barrier agents are frequently used to prevent postoperative adhesions. We tested if the absorbable cell adhesion barrier gel Intercoat consisting of polyethylene oxide and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose could inhibit cellular adhesion, proliferation, and invasion of primary endometriosis and endometrial cells. Due to an association of endometriosis with ovarian carcinoma, we tested two ovarian carcinoma cell lines. Prior to cell seeding, a drop of the barrier gel was placed in cell culture wells in order to test inhibition of adherence and proliferation or coated over a polymerized collagen gel to assay for prevention of invasion. Results showed that the barrier gel significantly inhibited cell adherence, proliferation, and invasion of endometriosis and endometrial stromal cells as well as ovarian carcinoma cells in culture. Our findings could help to prevent local cell growth/invasion and possible consequent recurrences.

  19. Amine-containing film deposited in pulsed dielectric barrier discharge at a high pressure and its cell adsorption behaviours

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Wen-Juan; Xie Fen-Yan; Chen Qiang; Weng Jing

    2009-01-01

    With monomer allylamine, amine-containing functional films were prepared in alternative current pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at a high pressure. This paper analyses in detail the film properties and structures, such as hydrophilicity, compounds and microstructures as well as amine density by the water contact angle, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and ultraviolet-visible measurement. The influence of discharge param-eters, in particular applied power, on amine density was investigated. As an application the cell adsorption behaviours on plasma polymerization films was performed in-vitro. The results show that at a high pressure pulsed DBD plasma can polymerize films with sufficient amine group on surface, through which the very efficient cell adsorption behaviours was demonstrated, and the high rate of cell proliferation was visualized.

  20. Loss of EP2 Receptor Subtype in Colonic Cells Compromise Epithelial Barrier Integrity by Altering Claudin-4

    OpenAIRE

    Manigandan Lejeune; France Moreau; Kris Chadee

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a bioactive lipid mediator that exerts its biological function through interaction with four different subtypes of E-Prostanoid receptor namely EP1, EP2, EP3 and EP4. It has been known that EP2 receptor is differentially over-expressed in the epithelia of inflamed human colonic mucosa. However, the significance of the differential expression in altering epithelial barrier function is not known. In this study, we used Caco-2 cells expressing EP2 receptor, either high...

  1. Structure and barrier properties of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells are affected by extracellular matrix protein coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkio, Anni; Hongisto, Heidi; Kaarniranta, Kai; Uusitalo, Hannu; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Skottman, Heli

    2014-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions play a vital role in cell morphology, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of cells. We investigated the role of ECM proteins on the structure and function of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells during their differentiation and maturation from hESCs into RPE cells in adherent differentiation cultures on several human ECM proteins found in native human Bruch's membrane, namely, collagen I, collagen IV, laminin, fibronectin, and vitronectin, as well as on commercial substrates of xeno-free CELLstart™ and Matrigel™. Cell pigmentation, expression of RPE-specific proteins, fine structure, as well as the production of basal lamina by hESC-RPE on different protein coatings were evaluated after 140 days of differentiation. The integrity of hESC-RPE epithelium and barrier properties on different coatings were investigated by measuring transepithelial resistance. All coatings supported the differentiation of hESC-RPE cells as demonstrated by early onset of cell pigmentation and further maturation to RPE monolayers after enrichment. Mature RPE phenotype was verified by RPE-specific gene and protein expression, correct epithelial polarization, and phagocytic activity. Significant differences were found in the degree of RPE cell pigmentation and tightness of epithelial barrier between different coatings. Further, the thickness of self-assembled basal lamina and secretion of the key ECM proteins found in the basement membrane of the native RPE varied between hESC-RPE cultured on compared protein coatings. In conclusion, this study shows that the cell culture substrate has a major effect on the structure and basal lamina production during the differentiation and maturation of hESC-RPE potentially influencing the success of cell integrations and survival after cell transplantation.

  2. The role of the spray pyrolysed Al2O3 barrier layer in achieving high efficiency solar cells on flexible steel substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, Sophie E.; Zykov, Anton; Rissom, Thorsten; Caballero, Raquel; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Fischer, Christian-Herbert; Lux-Steiner, Martha; Efimova, Varvara; Hoffmann, Volker; Oswald, Steffen

    2011-07-01

    Thin film chalcopyrite solar cells grown on light-weight, flexible steel substrates are poised to enter the photovoltaic market. To guarantee good solar cell performance, the diffusion of iron from the steel into the CIGSe absorber material must be hindered during layer deposition. A barrier layer is thus required to isolate the solar module from the metal substrate, both electronically and chemically. Ideally the barrier layer would be deposited by a cheap roll-to-roll process suitable to coat flexible steel substrates. Aluminium oxide deposited by spray pyrolysis matches the criteria. The coating is homogeneous over rough substrates allowing comparatively thin barrier layers to be utilized. In this article, solar cell results are presented contrasting the device performance made with a barrier layer to that without a barrier layer. Secondary Ion Mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements show that the spray pyrolysed barrier layer diminishes iron diffusion to the chalcopyrite absorber layer. The role of sodium, imperative for the growth of high efficiency chalcopyrite solar cells, and how it interacts with Al2O3 is discussed.

  3. Treatment of poly(ethylene terephthalate) foils by atmospheric pressure air dielectric barrier discharge and its influence on cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminova, Anna [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Vandrovcová, Marta [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Shelemin, Artem [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Kylián, Ondřej, E-mail: ondrej.kylian@gmail.com [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Choukourov, Andrei; Hanuš, Jan [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Bačáková, Lucie [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Slavínská, Danka; Biederman, Hynek [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Effect of atmospheric pressure DBD plasma on PET foils was investigated. • DBD treatment causes increase in surface density of O-containing functional groups. • DBD plasma causes increase of wettability, roughness and complex modulus of PET. • DBD treatment positively influences cells growth on PET. • Enhancement of cell growth on treated PET depends on the cell type. - Abstract: In this contribution an effect of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) sustained in air at atmospheric pressure on surface properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) foils is studied. It is found that exposure of PET to DBD plasma leads to rapid changes of surface chemical composition, wettability, surface morphology as well as mechanical properties of PET surface. In addition, based on biological tests that were performed using two cell types (Saos-2 human osteoblast-like cells and HUVEC human umbilical vein endothelial cells), it may be concluded that DBD plasma treatment positively influences cell growth on PET. This effect was found to be connected predominantly with increased surface energy and oxygen content of the surface of treated PET foils.

  4. 闭孔泡沫铝声屏障设计%Design of Closed-Cell Aluminum Foam Sound Barriers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁李斯; 姚广春; 穆永亮; 华中胜

    2011-01-01

    为改变高速路两侧噪声污染严重,为设计性能更加优越的公路声屏障,结合沈阳市东西快速干道高架桥声屏障建设的工程要求,设计闭孔泡沫铝材的吸声共振型声屏障.使用噪声频谱分析仪实地测量噪声污染情况,利用驻波管法测试打孔闭孔泡沫铝板的吸声系数值.设计的声屏障主要吸声结构为密度0.3 g/cm3,厚度10 mm,打孔率3%的闭孔泡沫铝吸声板,背后设置30 mm厚空腔,其吸声特性为:吸声主频率为300~400 Hz,对500 Hz以下的低频噪声吸声率可达到60 %~90 %.%To reduce noise pollution of expressway and design better-performance sound barriers, an acoustic resonance type sound barrier is designed using closed-cell aluminum foam.The noise spectrum analyzer is used to measure the noise pollution.The sound absorption coefficient is measured using stationary-wave method.The closed-cell aluminum foam panel with 0.3g/cm3 mass density, 10mm thickness and 3% perforation rate are used for the noise barrier.A 30mm thick cavity is designed on its back.The results of measurement show that the main sound absorption frequency range is from 300 to 400Hz, the sound absorption coefficient can reach 60%-90% for the noise frequencies lower than 500Hz.

  5. Silica-sol-based spin-coating barrier layer against phosphorous diffusion for crystalline silicon solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzum, Abdullah; Fukatsu, Ken; Kanda, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Yutaka; Tanimoto, Kenji; Yoshinaga, Seiya; Jiang, Yunjian; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ito, Seigo

    2014-01-01

    The phosphorus barrier layers at the doping procedure of silicon wafers were fabricated using a spin-coating method with a mixture of silica-sol and tetramethylammonium hydroxide, which can be formed at the rear surface prior to the front phosphorus spin-on-demand (SOD) diffusion and directly annealed simultaneously with the front phosphorus layer. The optimization of coating thickness was obtained by changing the applied spin-coating speed; from 2,000 to 8,000 rpm. The CZ-Si p-type silicon solar cells were fabricated with/without using the rear silica-sol layer after taking the sheet resistance measurements, SIMS analysis, and SEM measurements of the silica-sol material evaluations into consideration. For the fabrication of solar cells, a spin-coating phosphorus source was used to form the n(+) emitter and was then diffused at 930°C for 35 min. The out-gas diffusion of phosphorus could be completely prevented by spin-coated silica-sol film placed on the rear side of the wafers coated prior to the diffusion process. A roughly 2% improvement in the conversion efficiency was observed when silica-sol was utilized during the phosphorus diffusion step. These results can suggest that the silica-sol material can be an attractive candidate for low-cost and easily applicable spin-coating barrier for any masking purpose involving phosphorus diffusion.

  6. Target or barrier? The cell wall of early- and later- diverging plants vs cadmium toxicity: differences in the response mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eParrotta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing industrialization and urbanization result in emission of pollutants in the environment including toxic heavy metals, as cadmium and lead. Among the different heavy metals contaminating the environment, cadmium raises great concern, as it is ecotoxic and as such can heavily impact ecosystems. The cell wall is the first structure of plant cells to come in contact with heavy metals. Its composition, characterized by proteins, polysaccharides and in some instances lignin and other phenolic compounds, confers the ability to bind non-covalently and/or covalently heavy metals via functional groups. A strong body of evidence in the literature has shown the role of the cell wall in heavy metal response: it sequesters heavy metals, but at the same time its synthesis and composition can be severely affected. The present review analyzes the dual property of plant cell walls, i.e. barrier and target of heavy metals, by taking Cd toxicity as example. Following a summary of the known physiological and biochemical responses of plants to Cd, the review compares the wall-related mechanisms in early- and later-diverging land plants, by considering the diversity in cell wall composition. By doing so, common as well as unique response mechanisms to metal/cadmium toxicity are identified among plant phyla and discussed. After discussing the role of hyperaccumulators’ cell walls as a particular case, the review concludes by considering important aspects for plant engineering.

  7. Immunogenicity of in vitro maintained and matured populations: potential barriers to engraftment of human pluripotent stem cell derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chad; Weissman, Irving L; Drukker, Micha

    2013-01-01

    The potential to develop into any cell type makes human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) one of the most promising sources for regenerative treatments. Hurdles to their clinical applications include (1) formation of heterogeneously differentiated cultures, (2) the risk of teratoma formation from residual undifferentiated cells, and (3) immune rejection of engrafted cells. The recent production of human isogenic (genetically identical) induced PSCs (hiPSCs) has been proposed as a "solution" to the histocompatibility barrier. In theory, differentiated cells derived from patient-specific hiPSC lines should be histocompatible to their donor/recipient. However, propagation, maintenance, and non-physiologic differentiation of hPSCs in vitro may produce other, likely less powerful, immune responses. In light of recent progress towards the clinical application of hPSCs, this review focuses on two antigen presentation phenomena that may lead to rejection of isogenic hPSC derivates: namely, the expression of aberrant antigens as a result of long-term in vitro maintenance conditions or incomplete somatic cell reprogramming, and the unbalanced presentation of receptors and ligands involved in immune recognition due to accelerated differentiation. Finally, we discuss immunosuppressive approaches that could potentially address these immunological concerns.

  8. Study of Nickel Silicide as a Copper Diffusion Barrier in Monocrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kale, Abhijit; Beese, Emily; Saenz, Theresa; Warren, Emily; Nemeth, William; Young, David; Marshall, Alexander; Florent, Karine; Kurinec, Santosh K.; Agarwal, Sumit; Stradins, Pauls

    2016-11-21

    NiSi as a conductive diffusion barrier to silicon has been studied. We demonstrate that the NiSi films formed using the single step annealing process are as good as the two step process using XRD and Raman. Quality of NiSi films formed using e-beam Ni and electroless Ni process has been compared. Incomplete surface coverage and presence of constituents other than Ni are the main challenges with electroless Ni. We also demonstrate that Cu reduces the thermal stability of NiSi films. The detection of Cu has proven to be difficult due to temperature limitations.

  9. Dysfunctions at human intestinal barrier by water-borne protozoan parasites: lessons from cultured human fully differentiated colon cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2013-06-01

    Some water-borne protozoan parasites induce diseases through their membrane-associated functional structures and virulence factors that hijack the host cellular molecules and signalling pathways leading to structural and functional lesions in the intestinal barrier. In this Microreview we analyse the insights on the mechanisms of pathogenesis of Entamoeba intestinalis, Giardia and Cryptosporidium observed in the human colon carcinoma fully differentiated colon cancer cell lines, cell subpopulations and clones expressing the structural and functional characteristics of highly specialized fully differentiated epithelial cells lining the intestinal epithelium and mimicking structurally and functionally an intestinal barrier.

  10. Contaminant resistant molten carbonate fuel cell: Annual report, June 1986--June 1987. [Ni hydrogen-permeablel barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remick, R.J.; Jewulski, J.R.; Lu, S.H.

    1987-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of a year-long program evaluating the application of solid nickel foils as hydrogen-permeable barriers to contaminants (H/sub 2/S, HCl, NH/sub 3/) in molten carbonate fuel cells. A parametric study was conducted using 2.5 to 7.5 ..mu..m thick nickel foils in both laboratory-scale and bench-scale fuel cell tests. Two design configurations were evaluated, one in which the foil was placed adjacent to the electrolyte matrix and one in which the foil was placed between two porous metal plaques. In both cases the foil served as a barrier for contaminants. Post-test analysis of electrolyte matrices indicated that both configurations retarded or prevented contaminants from reaching the electrolyte. However, problems were encountered with the first configuration in that gaseous products built up on the electrolyte side of the anode, substantially increasing cell polarization. The second configuration performed significantly better than the first, delivering a performance nearly equal to that of a standard porous metal anode structure. However, the flux of hydrogen crossing the foil in this configuration proved to be sensitive to sulfur contaminants in the fuel. As a consequence, a reduction in current density at constant cell voltage was observed when H/sub 2/S was present in the fuel, despite the fact that no H/sub 2/S reached the three-phase region where electrode, fuel, and electrolyte meet. This behavior, however, may be overcome by using a foil other than pure nickel. 36 refs., 30 figs., 22 tabs.

  11. Impairment of intestinal barrier and secretory function as well as egg excretion during intestinal schistosomiasis occur independently of mouse mast cell protease-1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rychter, J.; van Nassauw, L.; Brown, J.K.; van Marck, E.; Knight, P.A.; Miller, H.R.P.; Kroese, A.; Timmermans, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Deposition of Schistosoma mansoni eggs in the intestinal mucosa is associated with recruitment of mucosal mast cells (MMC) expressing mouse mast cell protease-1 (mMCP-1). We investigated the involvement of mMCP-1 in intestinal barrier disruption and egg excretion by examining BALB/c mice lacking mMC

  12. Transcriptional profiling of human brain endothelial cells reveals key properties crucial for predictive in vitro blood-brain barrier models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Urich

    Full Text Available Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BEC constitute the blood-brain barrier (BBB which forms a dynamic interface between the blood and the central nervous system (CNS. This highly specialized interface restricts paracellular diffusion of fluids and solutes including chemicals, toxins and drugs from entering the brain. In this study we compared the transcriptome profiles of the human immortalized brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 and human primary BEC. We identified transcriptional differences in immune response genes which are directly related to the immortalization procedure of the hCMEC/D3 cells. Interestingly, astrocytic co-culturing reduced cell adhesion and migration molecules in both BECs, which possibly could be related to regulation of immune surveillance of the CNS controlled by astrocytic cells within the neurovascular unit. By matching the transcriptome data from these two cell lines with published transcriptional data from freshly isolated mouse BECs, we discovered striking differences that could explain some of the limitations of using cultured BECs to study BBB properties. Key protein classes such as tight junction proteins, transporters and cell surface receptors show differing expression profiles. For example, the claudin-5, occludin and JAM2 expression is dramatically reduced in the two human BEC lines, which likely explains their low transcellular electric resistance and paracellular leakiness. In addition, the human BEC lines express low levels of unique brain endothelial transporters such as Glut1 and Pgp. Cell surface receptors such as LRP1, RAGE and the insulin receptor that are involved in receptor-mediated transport are also expressed at very low levels. Taken together, these data illustrate that BECs lose their unique protein expression pattern outside of their native environment and display a more generic endothelial cell phenotype. A collection of key genes that seems to be highly regulated by the local

  13. A dual functional fluorescent probe for glioma imaging mediated by blood-brain barrier penetration and glioma cell targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongwei; Gao, Zhiyong; Yu, Panfeng; Shen, Shun; Liu, Yongmei; Xu, Bainan

    2014-06-20

    Glioma is a huge threat for human being because it was hard to be completely removed owing to both the infiltrating growth of glioma cells and integrity of blood brain barrier. Thus effectively imaging the glioma cells may pave a way for surgical removing of glioma. In this study, a fluorescent probe, Cy3, was anchored onto the terminal of AS1411, a glioma cell targeting aptamer, and then TGN, a BBB targeting peptide, was conjugated with Cy3-AS1411 through a PEG linker. The production, named AsT, was characterized by gel electrophoresis, (1)H NMR and FTIR. In vitro cellular uptake and glioma spheroid uptake demonstrated the AsT could not only be uptaken by both glioma and endothelial cells, but also penetrate through endothelial cell monolayer and uptake by glioma spheroids. In vivo, AsT could effectively target to glioma with high intensity. In conclusion, AsT could be used as an effective glioma imaging probe.

  14. Cell Phones in the Classroom: Teachers' Perspectives of Inclusion, Benefits, and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kevin M.; O'Bannon, Blanche W.; Bolton, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Historically viewed as a disruption by teachers, cell phones have been banned from 69% of classrooms (Common Sense Media, 2009). The increased ubiquity and instructional features of cell phones have prompted some teachers to re-evaluate the ban and consider the benefits associated with allowing cell phones in the classroom. This study surveyed 79…

  15. Cell Phones in the Classroom: Teachers' Perspectives of Inclusion, Benefits, and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kevin M.; O'Bannon, Blanche W.; Bolton, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Historically viewed as a disruption by teachers, cell phones have been banned from 69% of classrooms (Common Sense Media, 2009). The increased ubiquity and instructional features of cell phones have prompted some teachers to re-evaluate the ban and consider the benefits associated with allowing cell phones in the classroom. This study surveyed 79…

  16. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from the BC1 iPS Cell Line Exhibit a Blood-Brain Barrier Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katt, Moriah E; Xu, Zinnia S; Gerecht, Sharon; Searson, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells that form capillaries in the brain are highly specialized, with tight junctions that minimize paracellular transport and an array of broad-spectrum efflux pumps that make drug delivery to the brain extremely challenging. One of the major limitations in blood-brain barrier research and the development of drugs to treat central nervous system diseases is the lack of appropriate cell lines. Recent reports indicate that the derivation of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a solution to this problem. Here we demonstrate the derivation of hBMECs extended to two new human iPSC lines: BC1 and GFP-labeled BC1. These hBMECs highly express adherens and tight junction proteins VE-cadherin, ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. The addition of retinoic acid upregulates VE-cadherin expression, and results in a significant increase in transendothelial electrical resistance to physiological values. The permeabilities of tacrine, rhodamine 123, and Lucifer yellow are similar to values obtained for MDCK cells. The efflux ratio for rhodamine 123 across hBMECs is in the range 2-4 indicating polarization of efflux transporters. Using the rod assay to assess cell organization in small vessels and capillaries, we show that hBMECs resist elongation with decreasing diameter but show progressive axial alignment. The derivation of hBMECs with a blood-brain barrier phenotype from the BC1 cell line highlights that the protocol is robust. The expression of GFP in hBMECs derived from the BC1-GFP cell line provides an important new resource for BBB research.

  17. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Oxidative Stress in Guinea Pig after Systemic Exposure to Modified Cell-Free Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Omer I.; Buehler, Paul W.; D'Agnillo, Felice

    2011-01-01

    Systemic exposure to cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) or its breakdown products after hemolysis or with the use of Hb-based oxygen therapeutics may alter the function and integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Using a guinea pig exchange transfusion model, we investigated the effect of a polymerized cell-free Hb (HbG) on the expression of endothelial tight junction proteins (zonula occludens 1, claudin-5, and occludin), astrocyte activation, IgG extravasation, heme oxygenase (HO), iron deposition, oxidative end products (4-hydroxynonenal adducts and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine), and apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3). Reduced zonula occludens 1 expression was observed after HbG transfusion as evidenced by Western blot and confocal microscopy. Claudin-5 distribution was altered in small- to medium-sized vessels. However, total expression of claudin-5 and occludin remained unchanged except for a notable increase in occludin 72 hours after HbG transfusion. HbG-transfused animals also showed increased astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein expression and IgG extravasation after 72 hours. Increased HO activity and HO-1 expression with prominent enhancement of HO-1 immunoreactivity in CD163-expressing perivascular cells and infiltrating monocytes/macrophages were also observed. Consistent with oxidative stress, HbG increased iron deposition, 4-hydroxynonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine immunoreactivity, and cleaved caspase-3 expression. Systemic exposure to an extracellular Hb triggers blood-brain barrier disruption and oxidative stress, which may have important implications for the use of Hb-based therapeutics and may provide indirect insight on the central nervous system vasculopathies associated with excessive hemolysis. PMID:21356382

  18. Analysis of Al diffusion processes in TiN barrier layers for the application in silicon solar cell metallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumm, J.; Samadi, H.; Chacko, R. V.; Hartmann, P.; Wolf, A.

    2016-07-01

    An evaporated Al layer is known as an excellent rear metallization for highly efficient solar cells, but suffers from incompatibility with a common solder process. To enable solar cell-interconnection and module integration, in this work the Al layer is complemented with a solder stack of TiN/Ti/Ag or TiN/NiV/Ag, in which the TiN layer acts as an Al diffusion barrier. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove that diffusion of Al through the stack and the formation of an Al2O3 layer on the stack's surface are responsible for a loss of solderability after a strong post-metallization anneal, which is often mandatory to improve contact resistance and passivation quality. An optimization of the reactive TiN sputter process results in a densification of the TiN layer, which improves its barrier quality against Al diffusion. However, measurements with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy show that small grains with vertical grain boundaries persist, which still offer fast diffusion paths. Therefore, the concept of stuffing is introduced. By incorporating oxygen into the grain boundaries of the sputtered TiN layer, Al diffusion is strongly reduced as confirmed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy profiles. A quantitative analysis reveals a one order of magnitude lower Al diffusion coefficient for stuffed TiN layers. This metallization system maintains its solderability even after strong post-metallization annealing at 425 °C for 15 min. This paper thus presents an industrially feasible, conventionally solderable, and long-term stable metallization scheme for highly efficient silicon solar cells.

  19. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  20. Human oral isolate Lactobacillus fermentum AGR1487 reduces intestinal barrier integrity by increasing the turnover of microtubules in Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel C Anderson

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus fermentum is found in fermented foods and thought to be harmless. In vivo and clinical studies indicate that some L. fermentum strains have beneficial properties, particularly for gastrointestinal health. However, L. fermentum AGR1487 decreases trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER, a measure of intestinal barrier integrity. The hypothesis was that L. fermentum AGR1487 decreases the expression of intestinal cell tight junction genes and proteins, thereby reducing barrier integrity. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Caco-2 cells (model of human intestinal epithelial cells treated with L. fermentum AGR1487 were used to obtain a global view of the effect of the bacterium on intestinal epithelial cells. Specific functional characteristics by which L. fermentum AGR1487 reduces intestinal barrier integrity were examined using confocal microscopy, cell cycle progression and adherence bioassays. The effects of TEER-enhancing L. fermentum AGR1485 were investigated for comparison. L. fermentum AGR1487 did not alter the expression of Caco-2 cell tight junction genes (compared to L. fermentum AGR1485 and tight junction proteins were not able to be detected. However, L. fermentum AGR1487 increased the expression levels of seven tubulin genes and the abundance of three microtubule-associated proteins, which have been linked to tight junction disassembly. Additionally, Caco-2 cells treated with L. fermentum AGR1487 did not have defined and uniform borders of zona occludens 2 around each cell, unlike control or AGR1485 treated cells. L. fermentum AGR1487 cells were required for the negative effect on barrier integrity (bacterial supernatant did not cause a decrease in TEER, suggesting that a physical interaction may be necessary. Increased adherence of L. fermentum AGR1487 to Caco-2 cells (compared to L. fermentum AGR1485 was likely to facilitate this cell-to-cell interaction. These findings illustrate that bacterial strains of the

  1. Galectin-1 suppresses methamphetamine induced neuroinflammation in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: Neuroprotective role in maintaining blood brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Neil U; Aalinkeel, R; Reynolds, J L; Nair, B B; Sykes, D E; Mammen, M J; Schwartz, S A; Mahajan, S D

    2015-10-22

    Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse can lead to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity leading to compromised CNS function. The role of Galectins in the angiogenesis process in tumor-associated endothelial cells (EC) is well established; however no data are available on the expression of Galectins in normal human brain microvascular endothelial cells and their potential role in maintaining BBB integrity. We evaluated the basal gene/protein expression levels of Galectin-1, -3 and -9 in normal primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) that constitute the BBB and examined whether Meth altered Galectin expression in these cells, and if Galectin-1 treatment impacted the integrity of an in-vitro BBB. Our results showed that BMVEC expressed significantly higher levels of Galectin-1 as compared to Galectin-3 and -9. Meth treatment increased Galectin-1 expression in BMVEC. Meth induced decrease in TJ proteins ZO-1, Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 was reversed by Galectin-1. Our data suggests that Galectin-1 is involved in BBB remodeling and can increase levels of TJ proteins ZO-1 and Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 which helps maintain BBB tightness thus playing a neuroprotective role. Galectin-1 is thus an important regulator of immune balance from neurodegeneration to neuroprotection, which makes it an important therapeutic agent/target in the treatment of drug addiction and other neurological conditions.

  2. A retinoic acid-enhanced, multicellular human blood-brain barrier model derived from stem cell sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, Ethan S.; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Azarin, Samira M.; Palecek, Sean P.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2014-02-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) models are often used to investigate BBB function and screen brain-penetrating therapeutics, but it has been difficult to construct a human model that possesses an optimal BBB phenotype and is readily scalable. To address this challenge, we developed a human in vitro BBB model comprising brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), pericytes, astrocytes and neurons derived from renewable cell sources. First, retinoic acid (RA) was used to substantially enhance BBB phenotypes in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived BMECs, particularly through adherens junction, tight junction, and multidrug resistance protein regulation. RA-treated hPSC-derived BMECs were subsequently co-cultured with primary human brain pericytes and human astrocytes and neurons derived from human neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to yield a fully human BBB model that possessed significant tightness as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (~5,000 Ωxcm2). Overall, this scalable human BBB model may enable a wide range of neuroscience studies.

  3. Disruption of colonic barrier function and induction of mediator release by strains of Campylobacter jejuni that invade epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johannes Beltinger; Jo del Buono; Maeve M Skelly; John Thornley; Robin C Spiller; William A Stack; Christopher J Hawkey

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To study the mechanisms by which Campylobacter jejuni (C.jejuni) causes inflammation and diarrhea.In particular,direct interactions with intestinal epithelial cells and effects on barrier function are poorly understood.METHODS:To model the initial pathogenic effects of C.jejuni on intestinal epithelium,polarized human colonic HCA-7 monolayerswere grown on permeabilized filters and infected apically with clinical isolates of C.jejuni.Integrity of the monolayer was monitored by changes in monolayer resistance,release of lactate dehydrogenase,mannitol fluxes and electron microscopy.Invasion of HCA-7 cells was assessed by a modified gentamicin protection assay,translocation by counting colony forming units in the basal chamber,stimulation of mediator release by immunoassays and secretory responses in monolayers stimulated by bradykinin in an Ussing chamber.RESULTS:All strains translocated across monolayers but only a minority invaded HCA-7 cells.Strains that invaded HCA-7 cells destroyed rnonolayer resistance over 6 h,accompanied by increased release of lactate dehydrogenase,a four-fold increase in permeability to [3H] mannitol,and ultrastructural disruption of tight junctions,with rounding and lifting of cells off the filter membrane.Synthesis of interleukin (IL)-8 and prostaglandin E2 was increased with strains that invaded the rnonolayer but not with those that did not.CONCLUSION:These data demonstrate two distinct effects of C.jejuni on colonic epithelial cells and provide an informative model for further investigation of initial host cell responses to C.jejuni.

  4. Crossing barriers: the new dimension of 2D cell migration assays.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horssen, R. van; Hagen, T.L.M. ten

    2011-01-01

    In our body cells move in three dimensions, embedded in an extracellular matrix that varies in composition, density and stiffness, and this movement is fundamental to life. Next to 3D cell migration assays, representing these physiological circumstances, still we need 2D migrations assays to perform

  5. Intestinal Mucus Gel and Secretory Antibody are Barriers to Campylobacter jejuni Adherence to INT 407 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    An in vitro mucus assay was developed to study the role of mucus gel and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) in preventing attachment of Campylobacter ... jejuni to INT 407 cells. An overlay of rabbit small intestinal mucus was found to impede the attachment of C. jejuni to a monolayer of INT 407 cells

  6. Locally advanced oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: Barriers related to effective treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Lakshmaiah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral cavity cancer is a significant health problem in India. Majority of patients present with locally advanced disease requiring multimodality treatment. Compliance to recommended treatment is an important factor affecting outcome. Aims: The aim was to evaluate the outcome of locally advanced oral cavity cancer patients with regards to treatment adherence and to assess reasons of noncompliance. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study. We included patients referred to Department of Medical Oncology for induction chemotherapy in view of locally advanced oral cavity cancer. Results: Only 15 (26% patients completed planned treatment schedule. Their 1 year overall survival was 93%. The remaining 43 patients who received inadequate treatment had a dismal 21% 1 year overall survival. Illiteracy, poverty, long waiting list for surgery, prolonged delay for health scheme treatment plan approval and dissatisfaction with attitude of hospital staffs are major barriers related to effective treatment of these patients. Conclusions: A detailed discussion with patient and their relatives regarding recommended treatment, proper implementation of health schemes, increasing trained manpower to avoid long waiting list for surgery, provision of additional financial support for family member accompanying the patient and a sympathetic approach toward patients are needed to help these patients overcome the battle.

  7. Bone morphogenetic protein receptor II regulates pulmonary artery endothelial cell barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Victoria J; Ciuclan, Loredana I; Holmes, Alan M; Rodman, David M; Walker, Christoph; Budd, David C

    2011-01-06

    Mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor II (BMPR-II) underlie most heritable cases of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, less than half the individuals who harbor mutations develop the disease. Interestingly, heterozygous null BMPR-II mice fail to develop PAH unless an additional inflammatory insult is applied, suggesting that BMPR-II plays a fundamental role in dampening inflammatory signals in the pulmonary vasculature. Using static- and flow-based in vitro systems, we demonstrate that BMPR-II maintains the barrier function of the pulmonary artery endothelial monolayer suppressing leukocyte transmigration. Similar findings were also observed in vivo using a murine model with loss of endothelial BMPR-II expression. In vitro, the enhanced transmigration of leukocytes after tumor necrosis factor α or transforming growth factor β1 stimulation was CXCR2 dependent. Our data define how loss of BMPR-II in the endothelial layer of the pulmonary vasculature could lead to a heightened susceptibility to inflammation by promoting the extravasation of leukocytes into the pulmonary artery wall. We speculate that this may be a key mechanism involved in the initiation of the disease in heritable PAH that results from defects in BMPR-II expression.

  8. Endothelial cell laminin isoforms, laminins 8 and 10, play decisive roles in T cell recruitment across the blood-brain barrier in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixt, M; Engelhardt, B; Pausch, F; Hallmann, R; Wendler, O; Sorokin, L M

    2001-05-28

    An active involvement of blood-brain barrier endothelial cell basement membranes in development of inflammatory lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) has not been considered to date. Here we investigated the molecular composition and possible function of the extracellular matrix encountered by extravasating T lymphocytes during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Endothelial basement membranes contained laminin 8 (alpha4beta1gamma1) and/or 10 (alpha5beta1gamma1) and their expression was influenced by proinflammatory cytokines or angiostatic agents. T cells emigrating into the CNS during EAE encountered two biochemically distinct basement membranes, the endothelial (containing laminins 8 and 10) and the parenchymal (containing laminins 1 and 2) basement membranes. However, inflammatory cuffs occurred exclusively around endothelial basement membranes containing laminin 8, whereas in the presence of laminin 10 no infiltration was detectable. In vitro assays using encephalitogenic T cell lines revealed adhesion to laminins 8 and 10, whereas binding to laminins 1 and 2 could not be induced. Downregulation of integrin alpha6 on cerebral endothelium at sites of T cell infiltration, plus a high turnover of laminin 8 at these sites, suggested two possible roles for laminin 8 in the endothelial basement membrane: one at the level of the endothelial cells resulting in reduced adhesion and, thereby, increased penetrability of the monolayer; and secondly at the level of the T cells providing direct signals to the transmigrating cells.

  9. Immune challenge by intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide directs gene expression in distinct blood-brain barrier cells toward enhanced prostaglandin E(2) signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilache, Ana Maria; Qian, Hong; Blomqvist, Anders

    2015-08-01

    The cells constituting the blood-brain barrier are critical for the transduction of peripheral immune signals to the brain, but hitherto no comprehensive analysis of the signaling events that occur in these cells in response to a peripheral inflammatory stimulus has been performed. Here, we examined the inflammatory transcriptome in blood-brain barrier cells, including endothelial cells, pericytes, and perivascular macrophages, which were isolated by fluorescent-activated cell sorting, from non-immune-challenged mice and from mice stimulated by bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide. We show that endothelial cells and perivascular macrophages display distinct transcription profiles for inflammatory signaling and respond in distinct and often opposing ways to the immune stimulus. Thus, endothelial cells show induced PGE2 synthesis and transport with attenuation of PGE2 catabolism, increased expression of cytokine receptors and down-stream signaling molecules, and downregulation of adhesion molecules. In contrast, perivascular macrophages show downregulation of the synthesis of prostanoids other than PGE2 and of prostaglandin catabolism, but upregulation of interleukin-6 synthesis. Pericytes were largely unresponsive to the immune stimulation, with the exception of downregulation of proteins involved in pericyte-endothelial cell communication. While the endothelial cells account for most of the immune-induced gene expression changes in the blood-brain barrier, the response of the endothelial cells occurs in a concerted manner with that of the perivascular cells to elevate intracerebral levels of PGE2, hence emphasizing the critical role of PGE2 in immune-induced signal transduction across the blood-brain barrier.

  10. CD34 expression modulates tube-forming capacity and barrier properties of peripheral blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasev, Dimitar; Konijnenberg, Lara S F; Amado-Azevedo, Joana; van Wijhe, Michiel H; Koolwijk, Pieter; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) are grown from circulating CD34(+) progenitors present in adult peripheral blood, but during in vitro expansion part of the cells lose CD34. To evaluate whether the regulation of CD34 characterizes the angiogenic phenotypical features of PB-ECFCs, we investigated the properties of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs with respect to their ability to form capillary-like tubes in 3D fibrin matrices, tip-cell gene expression, and barrier integrity. Selection of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs from subcultured ECFCs was accomplished by magnetic sorting (FACS: CD34(+): 95 % pos; CD34(-): 99 % neg). Both fractions proliferated at same rate, while CD34(+) ECFCs exhibited higher tube-forming capacity and tip-cell gene expression than CD3(4-) cells. However, during cell culture CD34(-) cells re-expressed CD34. Cell-seeding density, cell-cell contact formation, and serum supplements modulated CD34 expression. CD34 expression in ECFCs was strongly suppressed by newborn calf serum. Stimulation with FGF-2, VEGF, or HGF prepared in medium supplemented with 3 % albumin did not change CD34 mRNA or surface expression. Silencing of CD34 with siRNA resulted in strengthening of cell-cell contacts and increased barrier function of ECFC monolayers as measured by ECIS. Furthermore, CD34 siRNA reduced tube formation by ECFC, but did not affect tip-cell gene expression. These findings demonstrate that CD34(+) and CD34(-) cells are different phenotypes of similar cells and that CD34 (1) can be regulated in ECFC; (2) is positively involved in capillary-like sprout formation; (3) is associated but not causally related to tip-cell gene expression; and (4) can affect endothelial barrier function.

  11. A 3D self-organizing multicellular epidermis model of barrier formation and hydration with realistic cell morphology based on EPISIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sütterlin, Thomas; Tsingos, Erika; Bensaci, Jalil; Stamatas, Georgios N.; Grabe, Niels

    2017-01-01

    The epidermis and the stratum corneum (SC) as its outermost layer have evolved to protect the body from evaporative water loss to the environment. To morphologically represent the extremely flattened cells of the SC - and thereby the epidermal barrier - in a multicellular computational model, we developed a 3D biomechanical model (BM) based on ellipsoid cell shapes. We integrated the BM in the multicellular modelling and simulation platform EPISIM. We created a cell behavioural model (CBM) with EPISIM encompassing regulatory feedback loops between the epidermal barrier, water loss to the environment, and water and calcium flow within the tissue. This CBM allows a small number of stem cells to initiate self-organizing epidermal stratification, yielding the spontaneous emergence of water and calcium gradients comparable to experimental data. We find that the 3D in silico epidermis attains homeostasis most quickly at high ambient humidity, and once in homeostasis the epidermal barrier robustly buffers changes in humidity. Our model yields an in silico epidermis with a previously unattained realistic morphology, whose cell neighbour topology is validated with experimental data obtained from in vivo images. This work paves the way to computationally investigate how an impaired SC barrier precipitates disease. PMID:28262741

  12. Radiation induces progenitor cell death, microglia activation, and blood-brain barrier damage in the juvenile rat cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai; Boström, Martina; Ek, C. Joakim; Li, Tao; Xie, Cuicui; Xu, Yiran; Sun, Yanyan; Blomgren, Klas; Zhu, Changlian

    2017-01-01

    Posterior fossa tumors are the most common childhood intracranial tumors, and radiotherapy is one of the most effective treatments. However, irradiation induces long-term adverse effects that can have significant negative impacts on the patient’s quality of life. The purpose of this study was to characterize irradiation-induced cellular and molecular changes in the cerebellum. We found that irradiation-induced cell death occurred mainly in the external germinal layer (EGL) of the juvenile rat cerebellum. The number of proliferating cells in the EGL decreased, and 82.9% of them died within 24 h after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiation induced oxidative stress, microglia accumulation, and inflammation in the cerebellum. Interestingly, blood-brain barrier damage and blood flow reduction was considerably more pronounced in the cerebellum compared to other brain regions. The cerebellar volume decreased by 39% and the migration of proliferating cells to the internal granule layer decreased by 87.5% at 16 weeks after irradiation. In the light of recent studies demonstrating that the cerebellum is important not only for motor functions, but also for cognition, and since treatment of posterior fossa tumors in children typically results in debilitating cognitive deficits, this differential susceptibility of the cerebellum to irradiation should be taken into consideration for future protective strategies. PMID:28382975

  13. Role of majority and minority carrier barriers silicon/organic hybrid heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Sushobhan; Lee, Stephanie; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Sturm, James C

    2011-12-22

    A hybrid approach to solar cells is demonstrated in which a silicon p-n junction, used in conventional silicon-based photovoltaics, is replaced by a room-temperature fabricated silicon/organic heterojunction. The unique advantage of silicon/organic heterojunction is that it exploits the cost advantage of organic semiconductors and the performance advantages of silicon to enable potentially low-cost, efficient solar cells.

  14. Butyrate enhances the intestinal barrier by facilitating tight junction assembly via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Luying; Li, Zhong-Rong; Green, Robert S; Holzman, Ian R; Lin, Jing

    2009-09-01

    Butyrate, one of the SCFA, promotes the development of the intestinal barrier. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the butyrate regulation of the intestinal barrier are unknown. To test the hypothesis that the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier is mediated by the regulation of the assembly of tight junctions involving the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), we determined the effect of butyrate on the intestinal barrier by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and inulin permeability in a Caco-2 cell monolayer model. We further used a calcium switch assay to study the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and determined the effect of butyrate on the assembly of epithelial tight junctions and AMPK activity. We demonstrated that the butyrate treatment increased AMPK activity and accelerated the assembly of tight junctions as shown by the reorganization of tight junction proteins, as well as the development of TER. AMPK activity was also upregulated by butyrate during calcium switch-induced tight junction assembly. Compound C, a specific AMPK inhibitor, inhibited the butyrate-induced activation of AMPK. The facilitating effect of butyrate on the increases in TER in standard culture media, as well as after calcium switch, was abolished by compound C. We conclude that butyrate enhances the intestinal barrier by regulating the assembly of tight junctions. This dynamic process is mediated by the activation of AMPK. These results suggest an intriguing link between SCFA and the intracellular energy sensor for the development of the intestinal barrier.

  15. DNA-AuNP networks on cell membranes as a protective barrier to inhibit viral attachment, entry and budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun Mei; Zheng, Lin Ling; Yang, Xiao Xi; Wan, Xiao Yan; Wu, Wen Bi; Zhen, Shu Jun; Li, Yuan Fang; Luo, Ling Fei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections have caused numerous diseases and deaths worldwide. Due to the emergence of new viruses and frequent virus variation, conventional antiviral strategies that directly target viral or cellular proteins are limited because of the specificity, drug resistance and rapid clearance from the human body. Therefore, developing safe and potent antiviral agents with activity against viral infection at multiple points in the viral life cycle remains a major challenge. In this report, we propose a new modality to inhibit viral infection by fabricating DNA conjugated gold nanoparticle (DNA-AuNP) networks on cell membranes as a protective barrier. The DNA-AuNPs networks were found, via a plaque formation assay and viral titers, to have potent antiviral ability and protect host cells from human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Confocal immunofluorescence image analysis showed 80 ± 3.8% of viral attachment, 91.1 ± 0.9% of viral entry and 87.9 ± 2.8% of viral budding were inhibited by the DNA-AuNP networks, which were further confirmed by real-time fluorescence imaging of the RSV infection process. The antiviral activity of the networks may be attributed to steric effects, the disruption of membrane glycoproteins and limited fusion of cell membrane bilayers, all of which play important roles in viral infection. Therefore, our results suggest that the DNA-AuNP networks have not only prophylactic effects to inhibit virus attachment and entry, but also therapeutic effects to inhibit viral budding and cell-to-cell spread. More importantly, this proof-of-principle study provides a pathway for the development of a universal, broad-spectrum antiviral therapy.

  16. Hemorheological alterations of red blood cells induced by non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongho; Kim, Jae Hyung; Chang, Boksoon; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been introduced in various applications such as wound healing, sterilization of infected tissues, blood coagulation, delicate surgeries, and so on. The non-thermal plasma generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), including ozone. Various groups have reported that the produced ROS influence proliferation and differentiation of cells, as well as apoptosis and growth arrest of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of non-thermal plasma on rheological characteristics of red blood cells (RBC). We experimentally measured the extent of hemolysis, deformability, and aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) with respect to exposure times of non-thermal plasma. RBC morphology was also examined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The absorbance of hemoglobin released from the RBCs increased with increasing exposure time of the non-thermal plasma. Values of the elongation index and aggregation index were shown to decrease significantly with increasing plasma exposure times. Therefore, hemorheological properties of RBCs could be utilized to assess the performance of various non-thermal plasmas.

  17. Na+/K+-ATPase α1 identified as an abundant protein in the blood-labyrinth barrier that plays an essential role in the barrier integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Yang

    Full Text Available The endothelial-blood/tissue barrier is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis. The ear harbors a unique endothelial-blood/tissue barrier which we term "blood-labyrinth-barrier". This barrier is critical for maintaining inner ear homeostasis. Disruption of the blood-labyrinth-barrier is closely associated with a number of hearing disorders. Many proteins of the blood-brain-barrier and blood-retinal-barrier have been identified, leading to significant advances in understanding their tissue specific functions. In contrast, capillaries in the ear are small in volume and anatomically complex. This presents a challenge for protein analysis studies, which has resulted in limited knowledge of the molecular and functional components of the blood-labyrinth-barrier. In this study, we developed a novel method for isolation of the stria vascularis capillary from CBA/CaJ mouse cochlea and provided the first database of protein components in the blood-labyrinth barrier as well as evidence that the interaction of Na(+/K(+-ATPase α1 (ATP1A1 with protein kinase C eta (PKCη and occludin is one of the mechanisms of loud sound-induced vascular permeability increase.Using a mass-spectrometry, shotgun-proteomics approach combined with a novel "sandwich-dissociation" method, more than 600 proteins from isolated stria vascularis capillaries were identified from adult CBA/CaJ mouse cochlea. The ion transporter ATP1A1 was the most abundant protein in the blood-labyrinth barrier. Pharmacological inhibition of ATP1A1 activity resulted in hyperphosphorylation of tight junction proteins such as occludin which increased the blood-labyrinth-barrier permeability. PKCη directly interacted with ATP1A1 and was an essential mediator of ATP1A1-initiated occludin phosphorylation. Moreover, this identified signaling pathway was involved in the breakdown of the blood-labyrinth-barrier resulting from loud sound trauma.The results presented here provide a novel method for

  18. Src tyrosine kinase regulates the stem cell factor–induced breakdown of the blood–retinal barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Ji-Eun; Song, Sun-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stem cell factor (SCF) has been recently acknowledged as a novel endothelial permeability factor. However, the mechanisms by which SCF-induced activation of the SCF cognate receptor, cKit, enhances endothelial permeability have not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the role of Src in SCF-induced breakdown of the blood–retinal barrier (BRB). Methods In vitro endothelial permeability and in vivo retinal vascular permeability assays were performed to investigate the role of Src in SCF-induced breakdown of the BRB. Immunofluorescence staining experiments were performed to analyze the cellular distribution of phosphorylated Src and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. Results SCF markedly reduced electric resistance across the human retinal vascular endothelial monolayer in vitro and enhanced extravasation of dyes in murine retinal vasculature in vivo. Inhibition of cKit activation using cKit mutant mice and chemical inhibitor substantially diminished the ability of SCF to increase endothelial permeability and retinal vascular leakage. In human retinal vascular endothelial cells, SCF induced strong phosphorylation of Src and distinct localization of phosphorylated Src in the plasma membrane. Inhibition of Src activation using chemical inhibitors abolished the SCF-induced hyperpermeability of human retinal vascular endothelial cells and retinal vascular leakage in mice. In addition, treatment with Src inhibitors restored junctional expression of VE-cadherin that disappeared in SCF-treated retinal endothelial cells and retinal vasculature. Conclusions These results showed the important role of Src in mediating SCF-induced breakdown of the BRB and retinal vascular leakage. Given that increased retinal vascular permeability is a common manifestation of various ocular diseases, the SCF/cKit/Src signaling pathway may be involved in the development of the hyperpermeable retinal vasculature in many ocular disorders.

  19. All solution processing of ITO-free organic solar cell modules directly on barrier foil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angmo, Dechan; Hösel, Markus; Krebs, Frederik C

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate fully solution processed semi-transparent silver electrodes on flexible substrates having a sheet resistance as low as 5Ω/□ and transmittance of ∼30% at 550nm. We demonstrate the use of this electrode as a substitute for ITO in an inverted organic solar cell (OSC...... and processing cost and is a cost-effective alternative to ITO for low-cost organic solar cells.......) with the layer sequence, PET/Ag/ZnO/P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS/Ag where illumination is achieved through the first Ag layer. Power conversion efficiency of up to 1.6% under 1 sun illumination (100mWcm−2 and AM1.5G) is achieved for small area (1cm2) test devices. We further demonstrate scalability of the semi-transparent...

  20. Overcoming the Practical Barriers to Spinal Cord Cell Transplantation for ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    proliferation marker bromodeoxyuridine (brdU; green) in vitro following 60 days in culture. Cell nuclei are counterstained with ethidium bromide (red) (B-G... remove virally inserted DNA after reprogramming. We attempted this with adult Yucatan minipig fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Amaxa Dermal Fibroblast...vertebrae overlying C3-C5 or L2-L4 segments are removed using rongeurs and a surgical drill. 5. Placement of the Spinal Derrick We call Spinal Derrick

  1. Development of Screen-Printed Texture-Barrier Paste for Single-Side Texturization of Interdigitated Back-Contact Silicon Solar Cell Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Chi-Cheng Chen; Chin-Lung Cheng; Thou-Jen Whang; Yu-Shun Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Continuous cost reduction of silicon-based solar cells is needed to lower the process time and increase efficiency. To achieve lower costs, screen-printed texture-barrier (SPTB) paste was first developed for single-side texturization (ST) of the interdigitated back-contact (IBC) for silicon-based solar cell applications. The SPTB paste was screen-printed on silicon substrates. The SPTB paste was synthesized from intermixed silicate glass (75 wt %), a resin binder (ethyl cellulose ethoce: 20 w...

  2. An experimentally supported model for the origin of charge transport barrier in Zn(O,S)/CIGSSe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chua, Rou Hua [Energy Research Institute @ NTU - ERI@N, Interdisciplinary Graduate School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Robert Bosch (SEA) Pte Ltd, 11 Bishan St. 21, Singapore 573943 (Singapore); Li, Xianglin [Energy Research Institute @ NTU - ERI@N, Interdisciplinary Graduate School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Walter, Thomas [Hochschule Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 55, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Teh, Lay Kuan [Robert Bosch (SEA) Pte Ltd, 11 Bishan St. 21, Singapore 573943 (Singapore); Hahn, Thomas; Hergert, Frank [Bosch Solar CISTech GmbH, Münstersche Str. 24, 14772 Brandenburg an der Havel (Germany); Mhaisalkar, Subodh; Wong, Lydia Helena, E-mail: lydiawong@ntu.edu.sg [Energy Research Institute @ NTU - ERI@N, Interdisciplinary Graduate School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2016-01-25

    Zinc oxysulfide buffer layers with [O]:[S] of 1:0, 6:1, 4:1, 2:1, and 1:1 ratios were deposited by atomic layer deposition on Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} absorbers and made into finished solar cells. We demonstrate using Time-Resolved Photoluminescence that the minority carrier lifetime of Zn(O,S) buffered solar cells is dependent on the sulfur content of the buffer layer. τ{sub 1} for devices with [O]:[S] of 1:0–4:1 are <10 ns, indicating efficient charge separation in devices with low sulfur content. An additional τ{sub 2} is observed for relaxed devices with [O]:[S] of 2:1 and both relaxed and light soaked devices with [O]:[S] of 1:1. Corroborated with one-dimensional electronic band structure simulation results, we attribute this additional decay lifetime to radiative recombination in the absorber due to excessive acceptor-type defects in sulfur-rich Zn(O,S) buffer layer that causes a buildup in interface-barrier for charge transport. A light soaking step shortens the carrier lifetime for the moderately sulfur-rich 2:1 device when excess acceptors are passivated in the buffer, reducing the crossover in the dark and illuminated I-V curves. However, when a high concentration of excess acceptors exist in the buffer and cannot be passivated by light soaking, as with the sulfur-rich 1:1 device, then cell efficiency of the device will remain low.

  3. Monolayers of IEC-18 cells as an in vitro model for screening the passive transcellular and paracellular transport across the intestinal barrier: Comparison of active and passive transport with the human colon carcinoma Caco-2 cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versantvoort, C.H.M.; Ondrewater, R.C.A.; Duizer, E.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Gilde, A.J.; Groten, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: previous studies have shown that the rat small intestinal cell line IEC-18 provides a size-selective barrier for paracellularly transported hydrophilic macromolecules. In order to determine the utility of IEC-18 cells as an in vitro model to screen the passive paracellular and transcellular

  4. Sphingosine 1 Phosphate at the Blood Brain Barrier: Can the Modulation of S1P Receptor 1 Influence the Response of Endothelial Cells and Astrocytes to Inflammatory Stimuli?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona F Spampinato

    Full Text Available The ability of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB to maintain proper barrier functions, keeping an optimal environment for central nervous system (CNS activity and regulating leukocytes' access, can be affected in CNS diseases. Endothelial cells and astrocytes are the principal BBB cellular constituents and their interaction is essential to maintain its function. Both endothelial cells and astrocytes express the receptors for the bioactive sphingolipid S1P. Fingolimod, an immune modulatory drug whose structure is similar to S1P, has been approved for treatment in multiple sclerosis (MS: fingolimod reduces the rate of MS relapses by preventing leukocyte egress from the lymph nodes. Here, we examined the ability of S1P and fingolimod to act on the BBB, using an in vitro co-culture model that allowed us to investigate the effects of S1P on endothelial cells, astrocytes, and interactions between the two. Acting selectively on endothelial cells, S1P receptor signaling reduced cell death induced by inflammatory cytokines. When acting on astrocytes, fingolimod treatment induced the release of a factor, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF that reduced the effects of cytokines on endothelium. In an in vitro BBB model incorporating shear stress, S1P receptor modulation reduced leukocyte migration across the endothelial barrier, indicating a novel mechanism that might contribute to fingolimod efficacy in MS treatment.

  5. c-Yes regulates cell adhesion at the blood-testis barrier and the apical ectoplasmic specialization in the seminiferous epithelium of rat testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2011-04-01

    During spermatogenesis, extensive junction restructuring takes place at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) and the Sertoli cell-spermatid interface known as the apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES, a testis-specific adherens junction) in the seminiferous epithelium. However, the mechanism(s) that regulates these critical events in the testis remains unknown. Based on the current concept in the field, changes in the phosphorylation status of integral membrane proteins at these sites can induce alterations in protein endocytosis and recycling, causing junction restructuring. Herein, c-Yes, a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, was found to express abundantly at the BTB and apical ES stage-specifically, coinciding with junction restructuring events at these sites during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. c-Yes also structurally associated with adhesion proteins at the BTB (e.g., occludin and N-cadherin) and the apical ES (e.g., β1-integrin, laminins β3 and γ3), possibly to regulate phosphorylation status of proteins at these sites. SU6656, a selective c-Yes inhibitor, was shown to perturb the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier in vitro, which is mediated by changes in the distribution of occludin and N-cadherin at the cell-cell interface, moving from cell surface to cytosol, thereby destabilizing the tight junction-barrier. However, this disruptive effect of SU6656 on the barrier was blocked by testosterone. Furthermore, c-Yes is crucial to maintain the actin filament network in Sertoli cells since a blockade of c-Yes by SU6656 induced actin filament disorganization. In summary, c-Yes regulates BTB and apical ES integrity by maintaining proper distribution of integral membrane proteins and actin filament organization at these sites.

  6. Graphite oxide incorporated crosslinked polyvinyl alcohol and sulfonated styrene nanocomposite membrane as separating barrier in single chambered microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Ruchira; Kumar, Vikash; Pramanik, Nilkamal; Kundu, Patit Paban

    2017-02-01

    Different membranes with varied molar concentrations of graphite oxide (GO), 'in situ' polymerized sulfonated polystyrene (SS) and glutaraldehyde (GA) cross linked polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), have been analyzed as an effective and low cost nanocomposite barrier in single chambered microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The synthesized composite membranes, namely GO0.2, GO0.4 and GO0.6 exhibited comparatively better results with reduced water uptake (WU) and swelling ratios (SR) over the native PVA. The variation in properties is illustrated with membrane analyses, where GO0.4 showed an increased proton conductivity (PC) and ion exchange capacity (IEC) of 0.128 S cm-1 and 0.33 meq g-1 amongst all of the used membranes. In comparison, reduced oxygen diffusivity with lower water uptake showed a two-fold decrease in GO0.4 over pure PVA membrane (∼2.09 × 10-4 cm s-1). A maximum power density of 193.6 mW m-2 (773.33 mW m-3) with a current density of 803.33 mA m-2 were observed with GO0.4 fitted MFC, where ∼81.89% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was removed using mixed firmicutes, as biocatalyst, in 25 days operation. In effect, the efficacy of GO incorporated crosslinked PVA and SS nanocomposite membrane has been evaluated as a polymer electrolyte membrane for harnessing bio-energy from single chambered MFCs.

  7. Particle-in-Cell Simulation for the Control of Electron Energy Distribution of Dielectric Barrier Discharges at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyo Won; Yel Lee, Jung; Lee, Ho-Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2011-10-01

    Recently, atmospheric pressure plasmas attract lots of interests for the useful applications such as surface modification and bio-medical treatment. In this study, a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) simulation was adopted to investigate the discharge characteristics of a planar micro dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with a driving frequency from 1 MHz to 50 MHz and with a gap distance from 60 to 500 micrometers. The variation of control parameters such as the gap distance, the driving wave form, and the applied voltage results in the change in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). Through the relation between the ionization mean free path and the gap size, a significant change of EEDFs is achievable with the decrease of gap distance. Therefore, it is possible to categorize the operation range of DBDs for its applications by controlling the interactions between plasmas and neutral gas for the generation of preferable radicals. This work was supported by the Human Resources Development of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No. 20104010100670).

  8. Induction of p16(INK4a) is the major barrier to proliferation when Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transforms primary B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalska, Lenka; White, Robert E; Parker, Gillian A; Turro, Ernest; Sinclair, Alison J; Paschos, Kostas; Allday, Martin J

    2013-02-01

    To explore the role of p16(INK4a) as an intrinsic barrier to B cell transformation by EBV, we transformed primary B cells from an individual homozygous for a deletion in the CDKN2A locus encoding p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF). Using recombinant EBV-BAC viruses expressing conditional EBNA3C (3CHT), we developed a system that allows inactivation of EBNA3C in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) lacking active p16(INK4a) protein but expressing a functional 14(ARF)-fusion protein (p14/p16). The INK4a locus is epigenetically repressed by EBNA3C--in cooperation with EBNA3A--despite the absence of functional p16(INK4a). Although inactivation of EBNA3C in LCLs from normal B cells leads to an increase in p16(INK4a) and growth arrest, EBNA3C inactivation in the p16(INK4a)-null LCLs has no impact on the rate of proliferation, establishing that the repression of INK4a is a major function of EBNA3C in EBV-driven LCL proliferation. This conditional LCL system allowed us to use microarray analysis to identify and confirm genes regulated specifically by EBNA3C, independently of proliferation changes modulated by the p16(INK4a)-Rb-E2F axis. Infections of normal primary B cells with recombinant EBV-BAC virus from which EBNA3C is deleted or with 3CHT EBV in the absence of activating ligand 4-hydroxytamoxifen, revealed that EBNA3C is necessary to overcome an EBV-driven increase in p16(INK4a) expression and concomitant block to proliferation 2-4 weeks post-infection. If cells are p16(INK4a)-null, functional EBNA3C is dispensable for the outgrowth of LCLs.

  9. Induction of p16(INK4a is the major barrier to proliferation when Epstein-Barr virus (EBV transforms primary B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Skalska

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To explore the role of p16(INK4a as an intrinsic barrier to B cell transformation by EBV, we transformed primary B cells from an individual homozygous for a deletion in the CDKN2A locus encoding p16(INK4a and p14(ARF. Using recombinant EBV-BAC viruses expressing conditional EBNA3C (3CHT, we developed a system that allows inactivation of EBNA3C in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs lacking active p16(INK4a protein but expressing a functional 14(ARF-fusion protein (p14/p16. The INK4a locus is epigenetically repressed by EBNA3C--in cooperation with EBNA3A--despite the absence of functional p16(INK4a. Although inactivation of EBNA3C in LCLs from normal B cells leads to an increase in p16(INK4a and growth arrest, EBNA3C inactivation in the p16(INK4a-null LCLs has no impact on the rate of proliferation, establishing that the repression of INK4a is a major function of EBNA3C in EBV-driven LCL proliferation. This conditional LCL system allowed us to use microarray analysis to identify and confirm genes regulated specifically by EBNA3C, independently of proliferation changes modulated by the p16(INK4a-Rb-E2F axis. Infections of normal primary B cells with recombinant EBV-BAC virus from which EBNA3C is deleted or with 3CHT EBV in the absence of activating ligand 4-hydroxytamoxifen, revealed that EBNA3C is necessary to overcome an EBV-driven increase in p16(INK4a expression and concomitant block to proliferation 2-4 weeks post-infection. If cells are p16(INK4a-null, functional EBNA3C is dispensable for the outgrowth of LCLs.

  10. The role of the intestinal microvasculature in inflammatory bowel disease: studies with a modified Caco-2 model including endothelial cells resembling the intestinal barrier in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper JY

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Y Kasper,1 Maria Iris Hermanns,1 Christian Cavelius,2 Annette Kraegeloh,2 Thomas Jung,3 Rolf Danzebrink,3 Ronald E Unger,1 Charles James Kirkpatrick1 1Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center, Mainz, 2Leibniz Institute for New Materials, 3NanoGate AG, Goettelborn, Saarbrücken, Germany Abstract: The microvascular endothelium of the gut barrier plays a crucial role during inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. We have modified a commonly used intestinal cell model based on the Caco-2 cells by adding microvascular endothelial cells (ISO-HAS-1. Transwell filters were used with intestinal barrier-forming Caco-2 cells on top and the ISO-HAS-1 on the bottom of the filter. The goal was to determine whether this coculture mimics the in vivo situation more closely, and whether the model is suitable to evaluate interactions of, for example, prospective nanosized drug vehicles or contrast agents with this coculture in a physiological and inflamed state as it would occur in inflammatory bowel disease. We monitored the inflammatory responsiveness of the cells (release of IL-8, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and soluble E-selectin after exposure to inflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β and a nanoparticle (Ba/Gd: coprecipitated BaSO4 and Gd(OH3, generally used as contrast agents. The barrier integrity of the coculture was evaluated via the determination of transepithelial electrical resistance and the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp of NaFITC. The behavior of the coculture Caco-1/ISO-HAS-1 was compared to the respective monocultures Caco-2 and ISO-HAS-1. Based on transepithelial electrical resistance, the epithelial barrier integrity of the coculture remained stable during incubation with all stimuli, whereas the Papp decreased after exposure to the cytokine mixture (TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β, and Ba/Gd. Both the endothelial and epithelial monocultures showed a high inflammatory response in

  11. Effect of Al 2 O 3 Recombination Barrier Layers Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition in Solid-State CdS Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Roelofs, Katherine E.

    2013-03-21

    Despite the promise of quantum dots (QDs) as a light-absorbing material to replace the dye in dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) efficiencies remain low, due in part to high rates of recombination. In this article, we demonstrate that ultrathin recombination barrier layers of Al2O3 deposited by atomic layer deposition can improve the performance of cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dot-sensitized solar cells with spiro-OMeTAD as the solid-state hole transport material. We explored depositing the Al2O3 barrier layers either before or after the QDs, resulting in TiO2/Al2O3/QD and TiO 2/QD/Al2O3 configurations. The effects of barrier layer configuration and thickness were tracked through current-voltage measurements of device performance and transient photovoltage measurements of electron lifetimes. The Al2O3 layers were found to suppress dark current and increase electron lifetimes with increasing Al 2O3 thickness in both configurations. For thin barrier layers, gains in open-circuit voltage and concomitant increases in efficiency were observed, although at greater thicknesses, losses in photocurrent caused net decreases in efficiency. A close comparison of the electron lifetimes in TiO2 in the TiO2/Al2O3/QD and TiO2/QD/Al2O3 configurations suggests that electron transfer from TiO2 to spiro-OMeTAD is a major source of recombination in ss-QDSSCs, though recombination of TiO2 electrons with oxidized QDs can also limit electron lifetimes, particularly if the regeneration of oxidized QDs is hindered by a too-thick coating of the barrier layer. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  12. Novel Morphologic and Genetic Analysis of Cancer Cells in a 3D Microenvironment Identifies STAT3 as a Regulator of Tumor Permeability Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Chul; Jeong, Hyobin; Son, Sung Hwa; Kim, YounHa; Han, Daeyoung; Goughnour, Peter C; Kang, Taehee; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Moon, Hyo Eun; Paek, Sun Ha; Hwang, Daehee; Seol, Ho Jun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-03-01

    Tumor permeability is a critical determinant of drug delivery and sensitivity, but systematic methods to identify factors that perform permeability barrier functions in the tumor microenvironment are not yet available. Multicellular tumor spheroids have become tractable in vitro models to study the impact of a three-dimensional (3D) environment on cellular behavior. In this study, we characterized the spheroid-forming potential of cancer cells and correlated the resulting spheroid morphologies with genetic information to identify conserved cellular processes associated with spheroid structure. Spheroids generated from 100 different cancer cell lines were classified into four distinct groups based on morphology. In particular, round and compact spheroids exhibited highly hypoxic inner cores and permeability barriers against anticancer drugs. Through systematic and correlative analysis, we reveal JAK-STAT signaling as one of the signature pathways activated in round spheroids. Accordingly, STAT3 inhibition in spheroids generated from the established cancer cells and primary glioblastoma patient-derived cells altered the rounded morphology and increased drug sensitivity. Furthermore, combined administration of the STAT3 inhibitor and 5-fluorouracil to a mouse xenograft model markedly reduced tumor growth compared with monotherapy. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the ability to integrate 3D culture and genetic profiling to determine the factors underlying the integrity of the permeability barrier in the tumor microenvironment, and may help to identify and exploit novel mechanisms of drug resistance.

  13. Fatty acid ethyl esters induce intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction via a reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanism in a three-dimensional cell culture model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhaseen Elamin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Evidence is accumulating that ethanol and its oxidative metabolite, acetaldehyde, can disrupt intestinal epithelial integrity, an important factor contributing to ethanol-induced liver injury. However, ethanol can also be metabolized non-oxidatively generating phosphatidylethanol and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs. This study aims to investigate the effects of FAEEs on barrier function, and to explore the role of oxidative stress as possible mechanism. METHODS: Epithelial permeability was assessed by paracellular flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated dextran using live cell imaging. Cell integrity was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase release. Localization and protein levels of ZO-1 and occludin were analyzed by immunofluorescence and cell-based ELISA, respectively. Intracellular oxidative stress and cellular ATP levels were measured by dichlorofluorescein and luciferase driven bioluminescence, respectively. RESULTS: In vitro, ethyl oleate and ethyl palmitate dose dependently increased permeability associated with disruption and decreased ZO-1 and occludin protein levels, respectively, and increased intracellular oxidative stress without compromising cell viability. These effects could partially be attenuated by pretreatment with the antioxidant, resveratrol, pointing to the role of oxidative stress in the FAEEs-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: These findings show that FAEEs can induce intestinal barrier dysfunction by disrupting the tight junctions, most likely via reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanism.

  14. c-Yes regulates cell adhesion at the apical ectoplasmic specialization-blood-testis barrier axis via its effects on protein recruitment and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, C Yan

    2013-01-15

    During spermatogenesis, extensive restructuring takes place at the cell-cell interface since developing germ cells migrate progressively from the basal to the adluminal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium. Since germ cells per se are not motile cells, their movement relies almost exclusively on the Sertoli cell. Nonetheless, extensive exchanges in signaling take place between these cells in the seminiferous epithelium. c-Yes, a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase belonging to the Src family kinases (SFKs) and a crucial signaling protein, was recently shown to be upregulated at the Sertoli cell-cell interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) at stages VIII-IX of the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. It was also highly expressed at the Sertoli cell-spermatid interface known as apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES) at stage V to early stage VIII of the epithelial cycle during spermiogenesis. Herein, it was shown that the knockdown of c-Yes by RNAi in vitro and in vivo affected both Sertoli cell adhesion at the BTB and spermatid adhesion at the apical ES, causing a disruption of the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier function, germ cell loss from the seminiferous epithelium, and also a loss of spermatid polarity. These effects were shown to be mediated by changes in distribution and/or localization of adhesion proteins at the BTB (e.g., occludin, N-cadherin) and at the apical ES (e.g., nectin-3) and possibly the result of changes in the underlying actin filaments at the BTB and the apical ES. These findings implicate that c-Yes is a likely target of male contraceptive research.

  15. Postarrest stalling rather than crawling favors CD8(+) over CD4(+) T-cell migration across the blood-brain barrier under flow in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Henriette; Klopstein, Armelle; Gruber, Isabelle; Blatti, Claudia; Lyck, Ruth; Engelhardt, Britta

    2016-09-01

    Although CD8(+) T cells have been implied in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), the molecular mechanisms mediating CD8(+) T-cell migration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) into the central nervous system (CNS) are ill defined. Using in vitro live cell imaging, we directly compared the multistep extravasation of activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells across primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (pMBMECs) as a model for the BBB under physiological flow. Significantly higher numbers of CD8(+) than CD4(+) T cells arrested on pMBMECs under noninflammatory and inflammatory conditions. While CD4(+) T cells polarized and crawled prior to their diapedesis, the majority of CD8(+) T cells stalled and readily crossed the pMBMEC monolayer preferentially via a transcellular route. T-cell arrest and crawling were independent of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. Rather, absence of endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 abolished increased arrest of CD8(+) over CD4(+) T cells and abrogated T-cell crawling, leading to the efficient reduction of CD4(+) , but to a lesser degree of CD8(+) , T-cell diapedesis across ICAM-1(null) /ICAM-2(-/-) pMBMECs. Thus, cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating the multistep extravasation of activated CD8(+) T cells across the BBB are distinguishable from those involved for CD4(+) T cells.

  16. Effects of Lead and Cadmium on Brain Endothelial Cell Survival, Monolayer Permeability, and Crucial Oxidative Stress Markers in an in Vitro Model of the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakila Tobwala

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, which is the loss of balance between antioxidant defense and oxidant production in the cells, is implicated in the molecular mechanism of heavy metal-induced neurotoxicity. Given the key role of lead (Pb and cadmium (Cd in inducing oxidative stress, we investigated their role in disrupting the integrity and function of immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3. To study this, hCMEC/D3 cells were exposed to control media or to media containing different concentrations of Pb or Cd. Those exposed to Pb or Cd showed significantly higher oxidative stress than the untreated group, as indicated by cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS, glutathione (GSH levels, and catalase enzyme activity. Pb also induced oxidative stress-related disruption of the hCMEC/D3 cell monolayer, as measured by trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER, the dextran permeability assay, and the level of tight junction protein, zona occluden protein (ZO-2. However, no significant disruption in the integrity of the endothelial monolayer was seen with cadmium at the concentrations used. Taken together, these results show that Pb and Cd induce cell death and dysfunction in hCMEC/D3 cells and, in the case of Pb, barrier disruption. This suggests blood brain barrier (BBB dysfunction as a contributing mechanism in Pb and Cd neurotoxicities.

  17. The pH-sensing receptor OGR1 improves barrier function of epithelial cells and inhibits migration in an acidic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vallière, Cheryl; Vidal, Solange; Clay, Ieuan; Jurisic, Giorgia; Tcymbarevich, Irina; Lang, Silvia; Ludwig, Marie-Gabrielle; Okoniewski, Michal; Eloranta, Jyrki J; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Wagner, Carsten A; Rogler, Gerhard; Seuwen, Klaus

    2015-09-15

    The pH-sensing receptor ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1; GPR68) is expressed in the gut. Inflammatory bowel disease is typically associated with a decrease in local pH, which may lead to altered epithelial barrier function and subsequent gastrointestinal repair involving epithelial cell adhesion and migration. As the mechanisms underlying the response to pH changes are not well understood, we have investigated OGR1-mediated, pH-dependent signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells stably overexpressing OGR1 were created and validated as tools to study OGR1 signaling. Barrier function, migration, and proliferation were measured using electric cell-substrate impedance-sensing technology. Localization of the tight junction proteins zonula occludens protein 1 and occludin and the rearrangement of cytoskeletal actin were examined by confocal microscopy. Paracellular permeability and protein and gene expression analysis using DNA microarrays were performed on filter-grown Caco-2 monolayers. We report that an acidic pH shift from pH 7.8 to 6.6 improved barrier function and stimulated reorganization of filamentous actin with prominent basal stress fiber formation. Cell migration and proliferation during in vitro wound healing were inhibited. Gene expression analysis revealed significant upregulation of genes related to cytoskeleton remodeling, cell adhesion, and growth factor signaling. We conclude that acidic extracellular pH can have a signaling function and impact the physiology of intestinal epithelial cells. The deconstruction of OGR1-dependent signaling may aid our understanding of mucosal inflammation mechanisms.

  18. Multi-scale analysis of the diffusion barrier layer of gadolinia-doped ceria in a solid oxide fuel cell operated in a stack for 3000 h

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, M.; Miguel-Pérez, V.; Tarancón, A.; Slodczyk, A.; Torrell, M.; Ballesteros, B.; Ouweltjes, J. P.; Bassat, J. M.; Montinaro, D.; Morata, A.

    2017-03-01

    The state-of-the-art materials for SOFCs are yttria-stabilized zirconia as electrolyte and lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite as cathode. However, the formation of insulating phases between them requires the use of diffusion barriers, typically made of gadolinia doped ceria. The study of the stability of this layer during the fabrication and in operando is currently one of the major goals of the SOFC industry. In this work, the cation inter-diffusion at the cathode/barrier layer/electrolyte region is analysed for an anode-supported cell industrially fabricated by conventional techniques, assembled in a short-stack and tested under real operation conditions for 3000 h. A comprehensive study of this cell, and an equivalent non-operated one, is performed in order to understand the inter-diffusion mechanisms with possible effects on the final performance. The analyses evidence that the cation diffusion is occurring during the fabrication process. Despite the significant diffusion of Ce,Gd, Zr, Y and Sr cations, the formation of typically reported CGO-YSZ solid solution is not observed while the presence of isolated grains of SrZrO3 is proved. All in all, this study presents new insights into the stability of the typically employed diffusion barriers for solid oxide cells that will guide future strategies to improve their performance and durability.

  19. Mycotoxins modify the barrier function of Caco-2 cells through differential gene expression of specific claudin isoforms: Protective effect of illite mineral clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Alejandro; Ares, Irma; Ramos, Eva; Castellano, Víctor; Martínez, Marta; Martínez-Larrañaga, María-Rosa; Anadón, Arturo; Martínez, María-Aránzazu

    2016-04-15

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), fumonisin B1 (FB1), ochratoxin A (OTA) and T-2 toxin (T2) are mycotoxins that commonly contaminate the food chain and cause various toxicological effects. Their global occurrence is regarded as an important risk factor for human and animal health. In this study, the results demonstrate that, in human Caco-2 cells, AFB1, FB1, OTA and T2 origin cytotoxic effects, determining cell viability through MTT assay and LDH leakage, and decrease trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER). The decrease in barrier properties is concomitant with a reduction in the expression levels of the tight junction constituents claudin-3, claudin-4 and occludin. The protective effect of mineral clays (diosmectite, montmorillonite and illite) on alterations in cell viability and epithelial barrier function induced by the mycotoxins was also evaluated. Illite was the best clay to prevent the mycotoxin effects. Illite plus mycotoxin co-treatment completely abolished AFB1 and FB1-induced cytotoxicity. Also, the decreases in the gene expression of claudins and the reduction of TEER induced by mycotoxins were reversed by the illite plus mycotoxin co-treatment. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that mycotoxins AFB1, FB1, T2 and OTA disrupt the intestinal barrier permeability by a mechanism involving reduction of claudin isoform expressions, and illite counteracts this disruption.

  20. The role of the intestinal microvasculature in inflammatory bowel disease: studies with a modified Caco-2 model including endothelial cells resembling the intestinal barrier in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Jennifer Y; Hermanns, Maria Iris; Cavelius, Christian; Kraegeloh, Annette; Jung, Thomas; Danzebrink, Rolf; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    The microvascular endothelium of the gut barrier plays a crucial role during inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. We have modified a commonly used intestinal cell model based on the Caco-2 cells by adding microvascular endothelial cells (ISO-HAS-1). Transwell filters were used with intestinal barrier-forming Caco-2 cells on top and the ISO-HAS-1 on the bottom of the filter. The goal was to determine whether this coculture mimics the in vivo situation more closely, and whether the model is suitable to evaluate interactions of, for example, prospective nanosized drug vehicles or contrast agents with this coculture in a physiological and inflamed state as it would occur in inflammatory bowel disease. We monitored the inflammatory responsiveness of the cells (release of IL-8, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and soluble E-selectin) after exposure to inflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β) and a nanoparticle (Ba/Gd: coprecipitated BaSO4 and Gd(OH)3), generally used as contrast agents. The barrier integrity of the coculture was evaluated via the determination of transepithelial electrical resistance and the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of NaFITC. The behavior of the coculture Caco-1/ISO-HAS-1 was compared to the respective monocultures Caco-2 and ISO-HAS-1. Based on transepithelial electrical resistance, the epithelial barrier integrity of the coculture remained stable during incubation with all stimuli, whereas the Papp decreased after exposure to the cytokine mixture (TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β, and Ba/Gd). Both the endothelial and epithelial monocultures showed a high inflammatory response in both the upper and lower transwell-compartments. However, in the coculture, inflammatory mediators were only detected on the epithelial side and not on the endothelial side. Thus in the coculture, based on the Papp, the epithelial barrier appears to prevent a potential inflammatory overreaction in the underlying endothelial cells

  1. The effect of acetaminophen on the expression of BCRP in trophoblast cells impairs the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazquez, Alba G., E-mail: albamgb@usal.es [Laboratory of Experimental Hepatology and Drug Targeting (HEVEFARM), IBSAL, University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); CIBERehd, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Briz, Oscar, E-mail: obriz@usal.es [Laboratory of Experimental Hepatology and Drug Targeting (HEVEFARM), IBSAL, University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); CIBERehd, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester, E-mail: u60343@usal.es [Laboratory of Experimental Hepatology and Drug Targeting (HEVEFARM), IBSAL, University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); Perez, Maria J., E-mail: mjperez@usal.es [Laboratory of Experimental Hepatology and Drug Targeting (HEVEFARM), IBSAL, University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); University Hospital of Salamanca, IECSCYL-IBSAL, Salamanca (Spain); CIBERehd, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Ghanem, Carolina I., E-mail: cghanem@ffyb.uba.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones Farmacologicas, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, CONICET, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Marin, Jose J.G., E-mail: jjgmarin@usal.es [Laboratory of Experimental Hepatology and Drug Targeting (HEVEFARM), IBSAL, University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); CIBERehd, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    Acetaminophen is used as first-choice drug for pain relief during pregnancy. Here we have investigated the effect of acetaminophen at subtoxic doses on the expression of ABC export pumps in trophoblast cells and its functional repercussion on the placental barrier during maternal cholestasis. The incubation of human choriocarcinoma cells (JAr, JEG-3 and BeWo) with acetaminophen for 48 h resulted in no significant changes in the expression and/or activity of MDR1 and MRPs. In contrast, in JEG-3 cells, BCRP mRNA, protein, and transport activity were reduced. In rat placenta, collected at term, acetaminophen administration for the last three days of pregnancy resulted in enhanced mRNA, but not protein, levels of Mrp1 and Bcrp. In fact, a decrease in Bcrp protein was found. Using in situ perfused rat placenta, a reduction in the Bcrp-dependent fetal-to-maternal bile acid transport after treating the dams with acetaminophen was found. Complete biliary obstruction in pregnant rats induced a significant bile acid accumulation in fetal serum and tissues, which was further enhanced when the mothers were treated with acetaminophen. This drug induced increased ROS production in JEG-3 cells and decreased the total glutathione content in rat placenta. Moreover, the NRF2 pathway was activated in JEG-3 cells as shown by an increase in nuclear NRF2 levels and an up-regulation of NRF2 target genes, NQO1 and HMOX-1, which was not observed in rat placenta. In conclusion, acetaminophen induces in placenta oxidative stress and a down-regulation of BCRP/Bcrp, which may impair the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis. - Highlights: • Acetaminophen induces changes in placental BCRP expression in vitro. • This drug reduces the ability of placental cells to export BCRP substrates. • Acetaminophen induces changes in Bcrp expression in rat placenta. • Placental barrier to bile acids is impaired in rats treated with this drug.

  2. Improved Voltage and Fill Factor by Using Zinc Oxide Thin Film as a Barrier Layer in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng; WANG Li-Duo; LI Bin; QIU Yong

    2005-01-01

    @@ A series of dye-sensitized solar cells based on ZnO-modified TiO2 nano-porous films have been prepared. The current-voltage characteristics of the cells show that the ZnO-modification can improve the open-circuit voltage and the fill factor but can decrease the short-circuit current. Dark current and transient photovoltage measurements are used to study the back reaction. It is indicated that the recombination process is suppressed by blocking the hole transporting from the nano-porous TiO2 since the surface of the semiconductor is almost fully covered with ZnO as a barrier layer.

  3. Differential roles for endothelial ICAM-1, ICAM-2, and VCAM-1 in shear-resistant T cell arrest, polarization, and directed crawling on blood-brain barrier endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Oliver; Coisne, Caroline; Cecchelli, Roméo; Boscacci, Rémy; Deutsch, Urban; Engelhardt, Britta; Lyck, Ruth

    2010-10-15

    Endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 were shown to be essential for T cell diapedesis across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro under static conditions. Crawling of T cells prior to diapedesis was only recently revealed to occur preferentially against the direction of blood flow on the endothelial surface of inflamed brain microvessels in vivo. Using live cell-imaging techniques, we prove that Th1 memory/effector T cells predominantly crawl against the direction of flow on the surface of BBB endothelium in vitro. Analysis of T cell interaction with wild-type, ICAM-1-deficient, ICAM-2-deficient, or ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 double-deficient primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells under physiological flow conditions allowed us to dissect the individual contributions of endothelial ICAM-1, ICAM-2, and VCAM-1 to shear-resistant T cell arrest, polarization, and crawling. Although T cell arrest was mediated by endothelial ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, T cell polarization and crawling were mediated by endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 but not by endothelial VCAM-1. Therefore, our data delineate a sequential involvement of endothelial ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in mediating shear-resistant T cell arrest, followed by endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 in mediating T cell crawling to sites permissive for diapedesis across BBB endothelium.

  4. Development of Screen-Printed Texture-Barrier Paste for Single-Side Texturization of Interdigitated Back-Contact Silicon Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Cheng Chen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Continuous cost reduction of silicon-based solar cells is needed to lower the process time and increase efficiency. To achieve lower costs, screen-printed texture-barrier (SPTB paste was first developed for single-side texturization (ST of the interdigitated back-contact (IBC for silicon-based solar cell applications. The SPTB paste was screen-printed on silicon substrates. The SPTB paste was synthesized from intermixed silicate glass (75 wt %, a resin binder (ethyl cellulose ethoce: 20 wt %, and a dispersing agent (fatty acid: 5 wt %. The silicate glass is a necessity for contact formation during firing. A resin binder and a dispersing agent determine the rheology of the SPTB paste. In this work, by modulating various parameters, including post SPTB firing, alkali texturing, and removal of the SPTB, the ST of IBC silicon solar cells was achieved. Since the advantages of the SPTB paste include low toxicity and prompt formation of the texture-barrier, SPTB is potentially suited for simple fabrication at low-cost for solar cell applications. The cost of the SPTB is around $100/kg which is lower than the SiH4/NH3 gas ambient used in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD. Thus, the expensive Si3N4 film deposited by PECVD using SiH4 and NH3 gas ambient for silicon solar cells can be replaced by this SPTB.

  5. Photovoltaic performance of bithiazole-bridged dyes-sensitized solar cells employing semiconducting quantum dot CuInS2 as barrier layer material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fuling; He, Jinxiang; Li, Jing; Wu, Wenjun; Hang, Yandi; Hua, Jianli

    2013-10-15

    In this work, the quantum dot CuInS2 layer was deposited on TiO2 film using successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) method, and then two bithiazole-bridged dyes (BTF and BTB) were sensitized on the CuInS2/TiO2 films to form dye/CuInS2/TiO2 photoanodes for DSSCs. It was found that the quantum dots CuInS2 as an energy barrier layer not only could effectively improve open-circuit voltage (Voc) of solar cell, but also increase short-circuit photocurrent (Jsc) compared to the large decrease in Jsc of ZnO as energy barrier layer. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement showed that the CuInS2 formed a barrier layer to suppress the recombination from injection electron to the electrolyte and improve open-circuit voltage. Finally, the open-circuit voltage increased about 22 and 27mV for BTF and BTB-/CuInS2/TiO2-based cells, the overall conversion efficiencies also reached to 7.20% and 6.74%, respectively.

  6. Intestinal barrier dysfunction develops at the onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and can be induced by adoptive transfer of auto-reactive T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Nouri

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with a pathogenesis involving a dysfunctional blood-brain barrier and myelin-specific, autoreactive T cells. Although the commensal microbiota seems to affect its pathogenesis, regulation of the interactions between luminal antigens and mucosal immune elements remains unclear. Herein, we investigated whether the intestinal mucosal barrier is also targeted in this disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the prototypic animal model of MS, was induced either by active immunization or by adoptive transfer of autoreactive T cells isolated from these mice. We show increased intestinal permeability, overexpression of the tight junction protein zonulin and alterations in intestinal morphology (increased crypt depth and thickness of the submucosa and muscularis layers. These intestinal manifestations were seen at 7 days (i.e., preceding the onset of neurological symptoms and at 14 days (i.e., at the stage of paralysis after immunization. We also demonstrate an increased infiltration of proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cells and a reduced regulatory T cell number in the gut lamina propria, Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. Adoptive transfer to healthy mice of encephalitogenic T cells, isolated from EAE-diseased animals, led to intestinal changes similar to those resulting from the immunization procedure. Our findings show that disruption of intestinal homeostasis is an early and immune-mediated event in EAE. We propose that this intestinal dysfunction may act to support disease progression, and thus represent a potential therapeutic target in MS. In particular, an increased understanding of the regulation of tight junctions at the blood-brain barrier and in the intestinal wall may be crucial for design of future innovative therapies.

  7. Effect of the interfacial tension and ionic strength on the thermodynamic barrier associated to the benzocaine insertion into a cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Cascales, J J; Oliveira Costa, S D

    2013-02-01

    The insertion of local anaesthetics into a cell membrane is a key aspect for explaining their activity at a molecular level. It has been described how the potency and response time of local anaesthetics is improved (for clinical applications) when they are dissolved in a solution of sodium bicarbonate. With the aim of gaining insight into the physico-chemical principles that govern the action mechanism of these drugs at a molecular level, simulations of benzocaine in binary lipid bilayers formed by DPPC/DPPS were carried out for different ionic strengths of the aqueous solution. From these molecular dynamic simulations, we observed how the thermodynamic barrier associated with benzocaine insertion into the lipid bilayers diminished exponentially as the fraction of DPPS in the bilayer increased, especially when the ionic strength of the aqueous solution increased. In line with these results, we also observed how this thermodynamic barrier diminished exponentially with the phospholipid/water interfacial tension.

  8. Antitumorigenic effect of atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge on human colorectal cancer cells via regulation of Sp1 transcription factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Duksun; Cho, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Ra Ham; Bang, Woong; Park, Kyungho; Kim, Minseok S.; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Chae, Jung-Il; Moon, Se Youn

    2017-02-01

    Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HT29 and HCT116) were exposed to dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure to investigate the anticancer capacity of the plasma. The dose- and time-dependent effects of DBDP on cell viability, regulation of transcription factor Sp1, cell-cycle analysis, and colony formation were investigated by means of MTS assay, DAPI staining, propidium iodide staining, annexin V–FITC staining, Western blot analysis, RT-PCR analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and anchorage-independent cell transformation assay. By increasing the duration of plasma dose times, significant reductions in the levels of both Sp1 protein and Sp1 mRNA were observed in both cell lines. Also, expression of negative regulators related to the cell cycle (such as p53, p21, and p27) was increased and of the positive regulator cyclin D1 was decreased, indicating that the plasma treatment led to apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. In addition, the sizes and quantities of colony formation were significantly suppressed even though two cancer promoters, such as TPA and epidermal growth factor, accompanied the plasma treatment. Thus, plasma treatment inhibited cell viability and colony formation by suppressing Sp1, which induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in these two human colorectal cancer cell lines.

  9. Endothelial cells derived from the blood-brain barrier and islets of Langerhans differ in their response to the effects of bilirubin on oxidative stress under hyperglycemic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime eKapitulnik

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB is a neurotoxic degradation product of heme. Its toxic effects include induction of apoptosis, and ultimately neuronal cell death. However, at low concentrations, UCB is a potent antioxidant that may protect cells and tissues against oxidative stress by neutralizing toxic metabolites such as reactive oxygen species (ROS. High glucose levels (hyperglycemia generate reactive metabolites. Endothelial cell dysfunction, an early vascular complication in diabetes, has been associated with hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Both glucose and UCB are substrates for transport proteins in microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. In the current study we show that UCB (1-40 M induces apoptosis and reduces survival of bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain endothelial cell line which serves as an in vitro model of the BBB. These deleterious effects of UCB were enhanced in the presence of high glucose (25 mM levels. Interestingly, the bEnd3 cells exhibited an increased sensitivity to the apoptotic effects of UCB when compared to the MS1 microcapillary endothelial cell line. MS1 cells originate from murine pancreatic islets of Langherans, and are devoid of the barrier characteristics of BBB-derived endothelial cells. ROS production was increased in both bEnd3 and MS1 cells exposed to high glucose, as compared with cells exposed to normal (5.5 mM glucose levels. While UCB (0.1-40 M did not alter ROS production in cells exposed to normal glucose, relatively low ('physiological' UCB concentrations (0.1-5 M attenuated ROS generation in both cell lines exposed to high glucose levels. Most strikingly, higher UCB concentrations (20-40 M increased ROS generation in bEnd3 cells exposed to high glucose, but not in similarly treated MS1 cells. These results may be of critical importance for understanding the vulnerability of the BBB endothelium upon exposure to increasing UCB levels under hyperglycemic conditions.

  10. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant promotes intestinal barrier function, balances Treg and TH17 cells and ameliorates hepatic injury in a mouse model of chronic-binge alcohol feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Cong; Xu, Lan-Man; Du, Shan-Jie; Huang, Si-Si; Wu, He; Dong, Jia-Jia; Huang, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Wen-Ke; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-22

    Impaired intestinal barrier function plays a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and the subsequent excessive absorbed endotoxin and bacterial translocation activate the immune response that aggravates the liver injury. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) has been suggested to improve intestinal barrier function and alleviate the liver injury induced by chronic and binge alcohol consumption, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In this study, chronic-binge alcohol fed model was used to determine the effects of LGG-s on the prevention of alcoholic liver disease in C57BL/6 mice and investigate underlying mechanisms. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 10 days, and one dose of alcohol was gavaged on Day 11. In one group, LGG-s was supplemented along with alcohol. Control mice were fed isocaloric diet. Nine hours later the mice were sacrificed for analysis. Chronic-binge alcohol exposure induced an elevation in liver enzymes, steatosis and morphology changes, while LGG-s supplementation attenuated these changes. Treatment with LGG-s significantly improved intestinal barrier function reflected by increased mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and villus-crypt histology in ileum, and decreased Escherichia coli (E. coli) protein level in liver. Importantly, flow cytometry analysis showed that alcohol reduced Treg cell population while increased TH17 cell population as well as IL-17 secretion, which was reversed by LGG-s administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate that LGG-s is effective in preventing chronic-binge alcohol exposure-induced liver injury and shed a light on the importance of the balance of Treg and TH17 cells in the role of LGG-s application.

  11. Fabrication of double barrier structures in single layer c-Si-QDs/a-SiOx films for realization of energy selective contacts for hot carrier solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Debjit; Das, Debajyoti

    2017-01-01

    Thin films of c-Si-QDs embedded in an a-SiOx dielectric matrix forming arrays of double barrier structures have been fabricated by reactive rf-magnetron sputtering at ˜400 °C, without post-deposition annealing. The formation of larger size c-Si-QDs of reduced number density in homogeneous distribution within a less oxygenated a-SiOx matrix at higher plasma pressure introduces systematic widening of the average periodic distance between the adjacent `c-Si-QDs in a-SiOx', as obtained by X-ray reflectivity and transmission electron microscopy studies. A wave-like pattern in the J-E characteristics identifies the formation of periodic double-barrier structures along the path of the movement of charge carriers across the QDs and that those are originated by the a-SiOx dielectric matrix around the c-Si-QDs. A finite distribution of the size of c-Si-QDs introduces a broadening of the current density peak and simultaneously originates the negative differential resistance-like characteristics, which have suitable applications in the energy selective contacts that act as energy filters for hot carrier solar cells. A simple yet effective process technology has been demonstrated. Further initiative on tuning the energy selectivity by reducing the size and narrowing the size-distribution of Si-QDs can emerge superior energy selective contacts for hot carrier solar cells, paving ground for accomplishing all-Si solar cells.

  12. Electron Barrier Formation at the Organic-Back Contact Interface is the First Step in Thermal Degradation of Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sachs-Quintana, I. T.

    2014-03-24

    Long-term stability of polymer solar cells is determined by many factors, one of which is thermal stability. Although many thermal stability studies occur far beyond the operating temperature of a solar cell which is almost always less than 65 °C, thermal degradation is studied at temperatures that the solar cell would encounter in real-world operating conditions. At these temperatures, movement of the polymer and fullerenes, along with adhesion of the polymer to the back contact, creates a barrier for electron extraction. The polymer barrier can be removed and the performance can be restored by peeling off the electrode and depositing a new one. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements reveal a larger amount of polymer adhered to electrodes peeled from aged devices than electrodes peeled from fresh devices. The degradation caused by hole-transporting polymer adhering to the electrode can be suppressed by using an inverted device where instead of electrons, holes are extracted at the back metal electrode. The problem can be ultimately eliminated by choosing a polymer with a high glass transition temperature. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. To attach importance of basic research in Müller cell of diabetic retinopathy%重视Müller细胞在糖尿病视网膜病变中作用的基础研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎晓新; 白玉婧

    2015-01-01

    视网膜是经典的“神经-血管耦合”组织,将神经生物活性与血流调节融为一体.Müller细胞作为贯穿整个视网膜中的重要神经胶质细胞,连接着视网膜神经元和血视网膜屏障,在糖尿病视网膜病变的发病过程中扮演重要角色.但近年来关于Müller细胞在糖尿病视网膜病变神经损伤与微循环调节障碍中的关键作用的临床及基础研究较少.故本文将这一重要科学问题再次重申以期引起科研人员的重视.%Retina is the classic "neurovascular coupling" tissue,and coordinate the bioactivity of neurobiology and retinal blood flow.Mü ller glia cells span the entire thickness of the tissue,and ensheath all retinal neurons and microvascular of the retina.This morphological relationship is reflected by a multitude of functional interactions between neurons and blood-retinal barrier,and play fundamental roles in diabetic retinopathy.However,in recent studies,the mechanisms of Müller glia cells in retinal neurodegeneration and microcirculatory abnormalities of diabetic retinopathy are underestimating.Therefore,the present article reaffirms the interrelationship between Müller glia cells and diabetic retinopathy to draw the attentions of researchers.

  14. Oxidative stress pathways involved in cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on cells constitutive of alveolo-capillary barrier in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanot-Roy, Maïté; Tubeuf, Emilie; Guilbert, Ariane; Bado-Nilles, Anne; Vigneron, Pascale; Trouiller, Bénédicte; Braun, Anne; Lacroix, Ghislaine

    2016-06-01

    The health risks of nanoparticles remain a serious concern given their prevalence from industrial and domestic use. The primary route of titanium dioxide nanoparticle exposure is inhalation. The extent to which nanoparticles contribute to cellular toxicity is known to associate induction of oxidative stress. To investigate this problem further, the effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles was examined on cell lines representative of alveolo-capillary barrier. The present study showed that all nanoparticle-exposed cell lines displayed ROS generation. Macrophage-like THP-1 and HPMEC-ST1.6R microvascular cells were sensitive to endogenous redox changes and underwent apoptosis, but not alveolar epithelial A549 cells. Genotoxic potential of titanium dioxide nanoparticles was investigated using the activation of γH2AX, activation of DNA repair proteins and cell cycle arrest. In the sensitive cell lines, DNA damage was persistent and activation of DNA repair pathways was observed. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that specific pathways associated with cellular stress response were activated concomitantly with DNA repair or apoptosis. Nanoparticles-induced oxidative stress is finally signal transducer for further physiological effects including genotoxicity and cytotoxicity. Within activated pathways, HSP27 and SAPK/JNK proteins appeared as potential biomarkers of intracellular stress and of sensitivity to endogenous redox changes, respectively, enabling to predict cell behavior.

  15. The Deubiquitinating Enzyme Cylindromatosis Dampens CD8+ T Cell Responses and Is a Critical Factor for Experimental Cerebral Malaria and Blood–Brain Barrier Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Ursula; Stenzel, Werner; Koschel, Josephin; Raptaki, Maria; Wang, Xu; Naumann, Michael; Matuschewski, Kai; Schlüter, Dirk; Nishanth, Gopala

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a severe complication of human malaria and may lead to death of Plasmodium falciparum-infected individuals. Cerebral malaria is associated with sequestration of parasitized red blood cells within the cerebral microvasculature resulting in damage of the blood–brain barrier and brain pathology. Although CD8+ T cells have been implicated in the development of murine experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), several other studies have shown that CD8+ T cells confer protection against blood-stage infections. Since the role of host deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) in malaria is yet unknown, we investigated how the DUB cylindromatosis (CYLD), an important inhibitor of several cellular signaling pathways, influences the outcome of ECM. Upon infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) sporozoites or PbA-infected red blood cells, at least 90% of Cyld−/− mice survived the infection, whereas all congenic C57BL/6 mice displayed signatures of ECM, impaired parasite control, and disruption of the blood–brain barrier integrity. Cyld deficiency prevented brain pathology, including hemorrhagic lesions, enhanced activation of astrocytes and microglia, infiltration of CD8+ T cells, and apoptosis of endothelial cells. Furthermore, PbA-specific CD8+ T cell responses were augmented in the blood of Cyld−/− mice with increased production of interferon-γ and granzyme B and elevated activation of protein kinase C-θ and nuclear factor “kappa light-chain enhancer” of activated B cells. Importantly, accumulation of CD8+ T cells in the brain of Cyld−/− mice was significantly reduced compared to C57BL/6 mice. Bone marrow chimera experiments showed that the absence of ECM signatures in infected Cyld−/− mice could be attributed to hematopoietic and radioresistant parenchymal cells, most likely endothelial cells that did not undergo apoptosis. Together, we were able to show that host deubiqutinating enzymes play an important role in ECM and that CYLD promotes

  16. Protection of retinal ganglion cells and retinal vasculature by Lycium barbarum polysaccharides in a mouse model of acute ocular hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Song Mi

    Full Text Available Acute ocular hypertension (AOH is a condition found in acute glaucoma. The purpose of this study is to investigate the protective effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP and its protective mechanisms in the AOH insult. LBP has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effect in the chronic ocular hypertension (COH experiments. AOH mouse model was induced in unilateral eye for one hour by introducing 90 mmHg ocular pressure. The animal was fed with LBP solution (1 mg/kg or vehicle daily from 7 days before the AOH insult till sacrifice at either day 4 or day 7 post insult. The neuroprotective effects of LBP on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs and blood-retinal-barrier (BRB were evaluated. In control AOH retina, loss of RGCs, thinning of IRL thickness, increased IgG leakage, broken tight junctions, and decreased density of retinal blood vessels were observed. However, in LBP-treated AOH retina, there was less loss of RGCs with thinning of IRL thickness, IgG leakage, more continued structure of tight junctions associated with higher level of occludin protein and the recovery of the blood vessel density when compared with vehicle-treated AOH retina. Moreover, we found that LBP provides neuroprotection by down-regulating RAGE, ET-1, Aβ and AGE in the retina, as well as their related signaling pathways, which was related to inhibiting vascular damages and the neuronal degeneration in AOH insults. The present study suggests that LBP could prevent damage to RGCs from AOH-induced ischemic injury; furthermore, through its effects on blood vessel protection, LBP would also be a potential treatment for vascular-related retinopathy.

  17. Selection of a Relevant In Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Model to Investigate Pro-Metastatic Features of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolez, Aurore; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Julien, Sylvain; Gosselet, Fabien; Burchell, Joy; Cecchelli, Roméo; Delannoy, Philippe; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Mysiorek, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Around 7-17% of metastatic breast cancer patients will develop brain metastases, associated with a poor prognosis. To reach the brain parenchyma, cancer cells need to cross the highly restrictive endothelium of the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB). As treatments for brain metastases are mostly inefficient, preventing cancer cells to reach the brain could provide a relevant and important strategy. For that purpose an in vitro approach is required to identify cellular and molecular interaction mechanisms between breast cancer cells and BBB endothelium, notably at the early steps of the interaction. However, while numerous studies are performed with in vitro models, the heterogeneity and the quality of BBB models used is a limitation to the extrapolation of the obtained results to in vivo context, showing that the choice of a model that fulfills the biological BBB characteristics is essential. Therefore, we compared pre-established and currently used in vitro models from different origins (bovine, mice, human) in order to define the most appropriate tool to study interactions between breast cancer cells and the BBB. On each model, the BBB properties and the adhesion capacities of breast cancer cell lines were evaluated. As endothelial cells represent the physical restriction site of the BBB, all the models consisted of endothelial cells from animal or human origins. Among these models, only the in vitro BBB model derived from human stem cells both displayed BBB properties and allowed measurement of meaningful different interaction capacities of the cancer cell lines. Importantly, the measured adhesion and transmigration were found to be in accordance with the cancer cell lines molecular subtypes. In addition, at a molecular level, the inhibition of ganglioside biosynthesis highlights the potential role of glycosylation in breast cancer cells adhesion capacities.

  18. Penetration through the Skin Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Benfeldt, Eva; Holmgaard, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    The skin is a strong and flexible organ with barrier properties essential for maintaining homeostasis and thereby human life. Characterizing this barrier is the ability to prevent some chemicals from crossing the barrier while allowing others, including medicinal products, to pass at varying rates......-through diffusion cells) as well as in vivo methods (microdialysis and microperfusion). Then follows a discussion with examples of how different characteristics of the skin (age, site and integrity) and of the penetrants (size, solubility, ionization, logPow and vehicles) affect the kinetics of percutaneous...

  19. CpG DNA assists the whole inactivated H9N2 influenza virus in crossing the intestinal epithelial barriers via transepithelial uptake of dendritic cell dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Y; Qin, T; Wang, X; Lin, J; Yu, Q; Yang, Q

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal mucosa remains a pivotal barrier for the oral vaccine absorption of H9N2 whole inactivated influenza virus (WIV). However, CpG DNA, as an adjuvant, can effectively improve relevant mucosal and systemic immunity. The downstream mechanism is well confirmed, yet the evidence of CpG DNA assisting H9N2 WIV in transepithelial delivery is lacking. Here, we reported both in vitro and in vivo that CpG DNA combined with H9N2 WIV was capable of recruiting additional dendritic cells (DCs) to the intestinal epithelial cells (ECs) to form transepithelial dendrites (TEDs) for luminal viral uptake. Both CD103(+) and CD103(-) DCs participated in this process. The engagement of the chemokine CCL20 from the apical ECs and the DCs drove DC recruitment and TED formation. Virus-loaded CD103(+) but not CD103(-) DCs also quickly migrated into mesenteric lymph nodes within 2 h. Moreover, the mechanism of CpG DNA was independent of epithelial transcytosis and disruption of the epithelial barriers. Finally, the subsequent phenotypic and functional maturation of DCs was also enhanced. Our findings indicated that CpG DNA improved the delivery of H9N2 WIV via TEDs of intestinal DCs, and this may be an important mechanism for downstream effective antigen-specific immune responses.

  20. A novel hypothesis of blood-brain barrier (BBB development and in vitro BBB model: neural stem cell is the driver of BBB formation and maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Lu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an ongoing effort to develop in vitro models for the blood-brain barrier (BBB research and the central nervous system (CNS drug screening. But the phenotypes of the existing in vitro models are still very remote from those found in vivo. The trouble in establishing in vitro BBB models comes from the unclear mechanism of the BBB formation and maintenance. The astrocytes have been found to be responsible for the maintenance of the BBB, but the studies of the CNS development have shown that the BBB formation starts largely before the gliogenesis. We hypothesize here that the neural stem cell is the real driver of the BBB formation, development and maintenance. The formation of the BBB is initiated by the neural stem cells during the earliest stage of CNS angiogenesis. The maintenance of the BBB is driven by the soluble signals produced by the neural stem cells which exist in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone throughout the life. The brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC-pericyte complex is the anatomical basis of the BBB. Based on our hypothesis we suggest using the neural stem cells to induce the BMEC-pericyte complex to establish in vitro BBB models. The further research on the role of the neural stem cells in the BBB formation and maintenance may elucidate the mechanism of the BBB development. [J Exp Integr Med 2012; 2(1.000: 39-43

  1. The relation between doses or post-plasma time points and apoptosis of leukemia cells induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD plasma was applied to induce apoptosis of LT-12 leukemia cells. Plasma effects on cell death was evaluated by MTT assay and FCM apoptosis assay with Annexin V/PI double staining, suggesting that plasma killing cells rate and inducing cell apoptosis rate both positively were related to the plasma doses or the post-plasma time points. The cell death rates increased from 15.2% to 33.1% and the apoptosis rate raise from 23.8% to 28% when the dose raise from 60s to 120 s at 8 h post-plasma, while they increased from 15.4% to 34.9% and from 48% to 55.3% respectively at the same doses at 12 h post-plasma. Furthermore, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members were measured for exploring the related apoptotic mechanisms phenomenon. We found ROS immediately increased to 1.24 times of the original amount, then increasing to 5.39-fold at 20 h after treatment. The gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members are very active at 8-12 h post-plasma. Our results demonstrate that DBD plasma can effectively induce tumor cell death through primarily related apoptotic mechanisms.

  2. Oxygen-glucose deprivation increases the enzymatic activity and the microvesicle-mediated release of ectonucleotidases in the cells composing the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruti, Stefania; Colombo, Laura; Magni, Giulia; Viganò, Francesca; Boccazzi, Marta; Deli, Mária A; Sperlágh, Beáta; Abbracchio, Maria P; Kittel, Agnes

    2011-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), the dynamic interface between the nervous tissue and the blood, is composed by endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes. Extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides and their receptors (the purinergic system) constitute a widely diffused signaling system involved in many pathophysiological processes. However, the role of this system in controlling BBB functions is still largely unknown. By using cultures of these three cell types grown separately and a BBB in vitro model consisting of triple co-cultures, we studied for the first time the expression and distribution of the ecto-enzymes nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases, the enzymes which hydrolyze extracellular nucleotides) under control and ischemic (oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro; OGD) conditions. NTPDase1 was detected in all three cell types, whereas NTPDase2 was expressed by astrocytes and pericytes and, to a lesser extent, by endothelial cells. Endothelial cells were extremely susceptible to cell death when OGD was applied to mimic in vitro the cytotoxicity induced by ischemia, whereas astrocytes and pericytes were more resistant. A semi-quantitative assay highlighted markedly increased e-ATPase activity following exposure to OGD in all three cell types, either when grown separately or when co-cultured together to resemble the composition of the BBB. Moreover, electron microscopy analysis showed that both endothelial cells and astrocytes shed microvesicles containing NTPDases from their membrane, which may suggest a novel mechanism to increase the breakdown of ATP released to toxic levels by damaged BBB cells. We hypothesize that this phenomenon could have a protective and/or modulatory effect for brain parenchymal cells. This in vitro model is therefore useful to study the role of extracellular nucleotides in modulating BBB responses to ischemic events, and to develop new effective purinergic-based approaches for brain ischemia.

  3. Transgenic over-expression of slit2 enhances disruption of blood-brain barrier and increases cell death after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Li, Hang; He, Xiao-Fei; Li, Ge; Zhang, Qun; Liang, Feng-Ying; Jia, Huan-Huan; Li, Jiang-Chao; Huang, Ren; Pei, Zhong; Wang, Li-Jing; Zhang, Yu

    2016-09-19

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of mortality and disability among male adolescents and young adults; and mild traumatic brain injury is the most common type of traumatic brain injury. The disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in brain trauma. Previously, we have found that slit2, a member of slit protein family, increases permeability of BBB. In the present study, we examined the role of slit2 in the pathogenesis of mild TBI in a mouse model of micro TBI. Rhodamine BandPI (PropidiumIodide) staining were used to detect the permeability of BBB and cell death, respectively. The leakage of Rhodamine B and cell death were significantly increased in Slit2-Tg mice than in C57 control mice after micro TBI. The present results suggest that over expression of slit2 plays a detrimental role in the pathophysiology of mild TBI.

  4. Bright/Arid3A Acts as a Barrier to Somatic Cell Reprogramming through Direct Regulation of Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Popowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We show here that singular loss of the Bright/Arid3A transcription factor leads to reprograming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs and enhancement of standard four-factor (4F reprogramming. Bright-deficient MEFs bypass senescence and, under standard embryonic stem cell (ESC culture conditions, spontaneously form clones that in vitro express pluripotency markers, differentiate to all germ lineages, and in vivo form teratomas and chimeric mice. We demonstrate that BRIGHT binds directly to the promoter/enhancer regions of Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog to contribute to their repression in both MEFs and ESCs. Thus, elimination of the BRIGHT barrier may provide an approach for somatic cell reprogramming.

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon dots with real-time live-cell imaging and blood–brain barrier penetration capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shousi; Guo, Shanshan; Xu, Pingxiang; Li, Xiaorong; Zhao, Yuming; Gu, Wei; Xue, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) were synthesized using a one-pot hydrothermal treatment with citric acid in the presence of polyethylenimine. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the N-CDs were monodispersed and quasi-spherical with an average size of ~2.6 nm. Under ultraviolet irradiation the N-CDs emitted a strong blue luminescence with a quantum yield as high as 51%. Moreover, the N-CDs exhibited a negligible cytotoxicity and could be applied as efficient nanoprobes for real-time imaging of live cells. In addition, the ability of the N-CDs to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in a concentration-dependent manner was demonstrated using an in vitro BBB model. Therefore, these PEI-passivated N-CDs with real-time live-cell imaging and BBB-penetration capabilities hold promise for traceable drug delivery to the brain. PMID:27932880

  6. The permeation of dynorphin A 1-6 across the blood brain barrier and its effect on bovine brain microvessel endothelial cell monolayer permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Courtney D Kuhnline; Audus, Kenneth L; Aldrich, Jane V; Lunte, Susan M

    2012-12-01

    Dynorphin A 1-17 (Dyn A 1-17) is an endogenous neuropeptide known to act at the kappa opioid receptor; it has been implicated in a number of neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain, stress, depression, and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The investigation of Dyn A 1-17 metabolism at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is important since the metabolites exhibit unique biological functions compared to the parent compound. In this work, Dyn A 1-6 is identified as a metabolite of Dyn A 1-17 in the presence of bovine brain microvessel endhothelial cells (BBMECs), using LC-MS/MS. The transport of Dyn A 1-6 at the BBB was examined using this in vitro cell culture model of the BBB. Furthermore, the permeation of the BBB by the low molecular weight permeability marker fluorescein was characterized in the presence and absences of Dyn A 1-6.

  7. Peptide gH625 enters into neuron and astrocyte cell lines and crosses the blood–brain barrier in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiante S

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Valiante,1,* Annarita Falanga,2,3,* Luisa Cigliano,1 Giuseppina Iachetta,1 Rosa Anna Busiello,1 Valeria La Marca,1 Massimiliano Galdiero,4 Assunta Lombardi,1 Stefania Galdiero1,2 1Department of Biology, 2Department of Pharmacy, 3DFM Scarl, University of Naples Federico II, 4Department of Experimental Medicine, II University of Naples, Naples, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this paper and are considered joint first authors Abstract: Peptide gH625, derived from glycoprotein H of herpes simplex virus type 1, can enter cells efficiently and deliver a cargo. Nanoparticles armed with gH625 are able to cross an in vitro model of the blood–brain barrier (BBB. In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to investigate whether gH625 can enter and accumulate in neuron and astrocyte cell lines. The ability of gH625 to cross the BBB in vivo was also evaluated. gH625 was administered in vivo to rats and its presence in the liver and in the brain was detected. Within 3.5 hours of intravenous administration, gH625 can be found beyond the BBB in proximity to cell neurites. gH625 has no toxic effects in vivo, since it does not affect the maximal oxidative capacity of the brain or the mitochondrial respiration rate. Our data suggest that gH625, with its ability to cross the BBB, represents a novel nanocarrier system for drug delivery to the central nervous system. These results open up new possibilities for direct delivery of drugs into patients in the field of theranostics and might address the treatment of several human diseases. Keywords: drug delivery, neurons, astrocytes, blood–brain barrier, peptide

  8. Highly efficient ZnO/Au Schottky barrier dye-sensitized solar cells: Role of gold nanoparticles on the charge-transfer process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanujjal Bora

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods decorated with gold (Au nanoparticles have been synthesized and used to fabricate dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC. The picosecond-resolved, time-correlated single-photon-count (TCSPC spectroscopy technique was used to explore the charge-transfer mechanism in the ZnO/Au-nanocomposite DSSC. Due to the formation of the Schottky barrier at the ZnO/Au interface and the higher optical absorptions of the ZnO/Au photoelectrodes arising from the surface plasmon absorption of the Au nanoparticles, enhanced power-conversion efficiency (PCE of 6.49% for small-area (0.1 cm2 ZnO/Au-nanocomposite DSSC was achieved compared to the 5.34% efficiency of the bare ZnO nanorod DSSC. The TCSPC studies revealed similar dynamics for the charge transfer from dye molecules to ZnO both in the presence and absence of Au nanoparticles. A slower fluorescence decay associated with the electron recombination process, observed in the presence of Au nanoparticles, confirmed the blocking of the electron transfer from ZnO back to the dye or electrolyte by the Schottky barrier formed at the ZnO/Au interface. For large area DSSC (1 cm2, ~130% enhancement in PCE (from 0.50% to 1.16% was achieved after incorporation of the Au nanoparticles into the ZnO nanorods.

  9. Polarization Energies at Organic-Organic Interfaces: Impact on the Charge Separation Barrier at Donor-Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryno, Sean M; Fu, Yao-Tsung; Risko, Chad; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2016-06-22

    We probe the energetic landscape at a model pentacene/fullerene (C60) interface to investigate the interactions between positive and negative charges, which are critical to the processes of charge separation and recombination in organic solar cells. Using a polarizable force field, we find that polarization energy, i.e., the stabilization a charge feels due to its environment, is larger at the interface than in the bulk for both a positive and a negative charge. The combination of the charge being more stabilized at the interface and the Coulomb attraction between the charges results in a barrier to charge separation at the pentacene/C60 interface that can be in excess of 0.7 eV for static configurations of the donor and acceptor locations. However, the impact of molecular motions, i.e., the dynamics, at the interface at room temperature results in a distribution of polarization energies and in charge separation barriers that can be significantly reduced. The dynamic nature of the interface is thus critical, with the polarization energy distributions indicating that sites along the interface shift in time between favorable and unfavorable configurations for charge separation.

  10. Polarization Energies at Organic–Organic Interfaces: Impact on the Charge Separation Barrier at Donor–Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-05-31

    We probe the energetic landscape at a model pentacene/fullerene-C60 interface to investigate the interactions between positive and negative charges, which are critical to the processes of charge separation and recombination in organic solar cells. Using a polarizable force field, we find that polarization energy, i.e. the stabilization a charge feels due to its environment, is larger at the interface than in the bulk for both a positive and a negative charge. The combination of the charge being more stabilized at the interface and the Coulomb attraction between the charges, results in a barrier to charge separation at the pentacene-C60 interface that can be in excess of 0.7 eV for static configurations of the donor and acceptor locations. However, the impact of molecular motions, i.e., the dynamics, at the interface at room temperature results in a distribution of polarization energies and in charge separation barriers that can be significantly reduced. The dynamic nature of the interface is thus critical, with the polarization energy distributions indicating that sites along the interface shift in time between favorable and unfavorable configurations for charge separation.

  11. Part I: Minicircle vector technology limits DNA size restrictions on ex vivo gene delivery using nanoparticle vectors: Overcoming a translational barrier in neural stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alinda R; Chari, Divya M

    2016-09-28

    Genetically engineered neural stem cell (NSC) transplant populations offer key benefits in regenerative neurology, for release of therapeutic biomolecules in ex vivo gene therapy. NSCs are 'hard-to-transfect' but amenable to 'magnetofection'. Despite the high clinical potential of this approach, the low and transient transfection associated with the large size of therapeutic DNA constructs is a critical barrier to translation. We demonstrate for the first time that DNA minicircles (small DNA vectors encoding essential gene expression components but devoid of a bacterial backbone, thereby reducing construct size versus conventional plasmids) deployed with magnetofection achieve the highest, safe non-viral DNA transfection levels (up to 54%) reported so far for primary NSCs. Minicircle-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-mediated gene delivery also resulted in sustained gene expression for up to four weeks. All daughter cell types of engineered NSCs (neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) were transfected (in contrast to conventional plasmids which usually yield transfected astrocytes only), offering advantages for targeted cell engineering. In addition to enhancing MNP functionality as gene delivery vectors, minicircle technology provides key benefits from safety/scale up perspectives. Therefore, we consider the proof-of-concept of fusion of technologies used here offers high potential as a clinically translatable genetic modification strategy for cell therapy.

  12. Guided tissue regeneration. Absorbable barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H L; MacNeil, R L

    1998-07-01

    Over the past 15 years, techniques aimed at regeneration of lost periodontal tissue have become widely used and accepted in clinical practice. Among these techniques are those which use the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR), wherein barriers (i.e., membranes) are used to control cell and tissue repopulation of the periodontal wound. A variety of non-absorbable and absorbable barriers have been developed and used for this purpose, with a trend in recent years toward increased use of absorbable GTR materials. This article describes the evolution of absorbable barrier materials and overview materials available for clinical use today. In addition, advantages and disadvantages of these materials are discussed, as well as possible new developments in barrier-based GTR therapy.

  13. CD47-signal regulatory protein-alpha (SIRP alpha) interactions form a barrier for antibody-mediated tumor cell destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Xi Wen; van Beek, Ellen M.; Schornagel, Karin; Van der Maaden, Hans; Van Houdt, Michel; Otten, Marielle A.; Finetti, Pascal; Van Egmond, Marjolein; Matozaki, Takashi; Kraal, Georg; Birnbaum, Daniel; van Elsas, Andrea; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Bertucci, Francois; van den Berg, Timo K.

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are among the most promising therapeutic agents for treating cancer. Therapeutic cancer antibodies bind to tumor cells, turning them into targets for immune-mediated destruction. We show here that this antibody-mediated killing of tumor cells is limited by a mechanism involving

  14. Endogenous activated protein C limits cancer cell extravasation through sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1-mediated vascular endothelial barrier enhancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.L. van Sluis; T.M.H. Niers; C.T. Esmon; W. Tigchelaar; D.J. Richel; H.R. Buller; C.J.F. van Noorden; C.A. Spek

    2009-01-01

    Activated protein C (APC) has both anticoagulant activity and direct cell-signaling properties. APC has been reported to promote cancer cell migration/invasion and to inhibit apoptosis and therefore may exacerbate metastasis. Opposing these activities, APC signaling protects the vascular endothelial

  15. Highly efficient betanin dye based ZnO and ZnO/Au Schottky barrier solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thankappan, Aparna, E-mail: aparna.subhash@gmail.com [International School of Photonics (ISP), Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi (India); Inter University Centre for Nanomaterials and Devices (IUCND), Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi (India); Divya, S.; Augustine, Anju K.; Girijavallaban, C.P.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Thomas, Sheenu; Nampoori, V.P.N. [International School of Photonics (ISP), Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi (India)

    2015-05-29

    Performance of dye sensitized solar cells based on betanin natural dye from red beets with various nanostructured photoanodes on transparent conducting glass has been investigated. In four different electrolyte systems cell efficiency of 2.99% and overall photon to current conversion efficiency of 20% were achieved using ZnO nanosheet electrode with iodide based electrolyte in acetonitrile solution. To enhance solar harvesting in organic solar cells, uniform sized metal nanoparticles (gold (Au) of ~ 8 nm) synthesized via microwave irradiation method were incorporated into the device consisting of ZnO. Enhanced power conversion efficiency of 1.71% was achieved with ZnO/Au nanocomposite compared to the 0.868% efficiency of the bare ZnO nanosheet cell with ferrocene based electrolyte. - Highlights: • The influence of electrolytes has been studied. • Cell efficiency of 2.99% was achieved by ZnO. • Enhancement of efficiency with incorporation of Au nano.

  16. Impact of a probiotic Bacillus cereus strain on the jejunal epithelial barrier and on the NKG2D expressing immune cells during the weaning phase of piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmeyer, Sara; Kröger, Susan; Vahjen, Wilfried; Zentek, Jürgen; Scharek-Tedin, Lydia

    2014-09-15

    In a feeding experiment, the probiotic Bacillus cereus var. Toyoi was fed to sows and piglets in order to test whether it influences the stress response of enterocytes, thereby causing intestinal immune activation, possibly accompanied by an impairment of the epithelial integrity. The impact of B. cereus on the piglets' intestinal enterocytes (EC) and on the communicating intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) was investigated during the weaning phase where significant immunological changes might be expected. The expression of the stress-induced MHC class I-related molecule 2 (MIC2) and the UL16 binding protein (ULBP) was measured in jejunal EC and the frequencies of the main present IEL populations in the jejunum were monitored. To find out which of the IEL populations can be activated by the stress-induced molecules the sorted IEL were tested for the expression of the activating natural killer receptor 2D (NKG2D). The piglets fed with B. cereus showed an impaired intestinal barrier function shortly after weaning. However, a significant impact on the expression of stress-induced molecules was not observed. The mRNA expression of NKG2D was confirmed in intraepithelial CD5+ γδ T cells. The ratio of IEL (CD45+) to EC was lower in the B. cereus treated group, which could be explained by lower frequencies of CD8αβ+ T cells in the jejunal epithelium (p ≤ 0.005 for ages 32 and 34). Although a consistently increased expression of stress-induced MHC class I-related molecules was not found, this study suggests a negative impact of B. cereus on the intestinal barrier function and supports immune-modulating properties of the probiotic feed supplement.

  17. Oxidative and pro-inflammatory impact of regular and denicotinized cigarettes on blood brain barrier endothelial cells: is smoking reduced or nicotine-free products really safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Both active and passive tobacco smoke (TS) potentially impair the vascular endothelial function in a causative and dose-dependent manner, largely related to the content of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nicotine, and pro-inflammatory activity. Together these factors can compromise the restrictive properties of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and trigger the pathogenesis/progression of several neurological disorders including silent cerebral infarction, stroke, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. Based on these premises, we analyzed and assessed the toxic impact of smoke extract from a range of tobacco products (with varying levels of nicotine) on brain microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3), a well characterized human BBB model. Results Initial profiling of TS showed a significant release of reactive oxygen (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in full flavor, nicotine-free (NF, “reduced-exposure” brand) and ultralow nicotine products. This release correlated with increased oxidative cell damage. In parallel, membrane expression of endothelial tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin were significantly down-regulated suggesting the impairment of barrier function. Expression of VE-cadherin and claudin-5 were also increased by the ultralow or nicotine free tobacco smoke extract. TS extract from these cigarettes also induced an inflammatory response in BBB ECs as demonstrated by increased IL-6 and MMP-2 levels and up-regulation of vascular adhesion molecules, such as VCAM-1 and PECAM-1. Conclusions In summary, our results indicate that NF and ultralow nicotine cigarettes are potentially more harmful to the BBB endothelium than regular tobacco products. In addition, this study demonstrates that the TS-induced toxicity at BBB ECs is strongly correlated to the TAR and NO levels in the cigarettes rather than the nicotine content. PMID:24755281

  18. Opiates Upregulate Adhesion Molecule Expression in Brain MicroVascular Endothelial Cells (BMVEC: Implications for Altered Blood Brain Barrier (BBB Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavan P.N. Nair

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB is an intricate cellular system composed of vascular endothelial cells and perivascular astrocytes that restrict the passage of immunocompetent cells into the central nervous system (CNS. Expression of the adhesion molecules, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC and their interaction with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 viral proteins may help enhance viral adhesion and virus-cell fusion resulting in increased infectivity. Additionally, transmigration through the BBB is facilitated by both endothelial and monocyte/macrophage-derived nitric oxide (NO. Dysregulated production of NO by BMVEC due to opiates and HIV-1 viral protein interactions play a pivotal role in brain endothelial injury, resulting in the irreversible loss of BBB integrity, which may lead to enhanced infiltration of virus-carrying cells across the BBB. Opioids act as co-factors in the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 by facilitating BBB dysfunction however, no studies have been done to investigate the role of opiates alone or in combination with HIV-1 viral proteins on adhesion molecule expression in BMVEC. We hypothesize that opiates such as heroin and morphine in conjunction with the HIV-1 viral protein gp120 increase the expression of adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and these effects are mediated via the modulation of NO. Results show that opiates alone and in synergy with gp120 increase both the genotypic and phenotypic expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 by BMVEC, additionally, these opiate induced effects may be the result of increased NO production. These studies will provide a better understanding of how opiate abuse in conjunction with HIV-1 infection facilitates the breakdown of the BBB and exacerbates the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1. Elucidation of the mechanisms of BBB modulation will provide new therapeutic approaches to maintain BBB integrity

  19. Classical activation of microglia in CD200-deficient mice is a consequence of blood brain barrier permeability and infiltration of peripheral cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denieffe, Stephanie; Kelly, Ronan J; McDonald, Claire; Lyons, Anthony; Lynch, Marina A

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between CD200, expressed on several cell types, and its receptor CD200R, expressed on cells of the myeloid lineage, has been shown to be an important factor in modulating inflammation in macrophage function in several conditions including colitis and arthritis. More recently its modulatory effect on microglial activation has been identified and CD200-deficiency has been associated with increased microglial activation accompanied by increased production of inflammatory cytokines. The response of glia prepared from CD200-deficient mice to stimuli like lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is markedly greater than the response of cells prepared from wildtype mice and, consistent with this, is the recent observation that expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 and signalling through NFκB are increased in microglia prepared from CD200-deficient mice. Here we show that glia from CD200-deficient mice are also more responsive to interferon-γ (IFNγ) which triggers classical activation of microglia. We investigated the effects of CD200-deficiency in vivo and report that there is an increase in expression of several markers of microglial activation including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, which is a hallmark of classically-activated microglia. These changes are accompanied by increased IFNγ, and the evidence suggests that this is produced by infiltrating cells including T cells and macrophages. We propose that these cells enter the brain as a consequence of increased blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability in CD200-deficient mice and that infiltration is assisted by increased expression of the chemokines, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), IFNγ-induced protein-10 (IP-10) and RANTES. This may have implications in neurodegenerative diseases where BBB permeability is compromised.

  20. 骨髓间充质干细胞对糖尿病视网膜病变大鼠血糖及视网膜功能影响%Study the differentiated features and function of mesenchymal stem cells in rat model with diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    利焕廉; 周金文; 蔡晓华

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨尾静脉注射骨髓间充质干细胞对糖尿病视网膜病变大鼠血糖及视网膜功能的影响。方法:48只健康大鼠随机选取10只为正常对照组,38只建立糖尿病视网膜病变大鼠模型后,20只采用尾静脉注射间充质干细胞,18只注射等量安慰剂。观察间充质干细胞在肝、脾、肾、胰腺和眼球的分布以及在视网膜的分化特点,监测注射后1、2、3、4wk血糖变化,观察血-视网膜屏障破坏修复情况。结果:BMSCS在肝、脾、肾、胰腺、肺等组织中均有分布,视网膜外核层可见到大量密集的BMSCs重叠存在。实验组大鼠的血糖水平均随干预时间延长逐渐下降,注射后第1 wk血糖差异即有统计学意义。EB渗漏量较基线明显减少。结论:BMSCs可降低糖尿病视网膜病变大鼠血糖,使血-视网膜屏障得到一定程度修复。%Objective:To discussion the influence of blood glucose in diabetic retinopathy and retinal function in rats when injected the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on tail vein. Methods:Selecting 10 from the 48 rats randomly to be as normal control group, 38 rats after the establishment of diabetic retinopathy lesions, 20 using tail vein injection of mesenchymal stem cells and 18 the same amount of a placebo injection. Charge distribution was observed between mesenchymal stem cells in the liver, spleen, kidney, pancreas, and the characteristics of the eye and the retina differentiation. Observing the blood-retinal barrier breakdown repair the situation after1,2,3,4 weeks’ injection of blood glucose monitoring. Results:BMSCS are distributed in the liver, spleen, kidney, pancreas, and a large number of overlapping dense BMSCs can be seen in outer nuclear layer of the retina. Blood glucose average experimental rats gradually decreased with prolonged intervention, 1 week after injection blood sugar difference that is statistically signiifcant. EB leakage was signiifcantly

  1. Peptide gH625 enters into neuron and astrocyte cell lines and crosses the blood–brain barrier in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiante, Salvatore; Falanga, Annarita; Cigliano, Luisa; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Busiello, Rosa Anna; La Marca, Valeria; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Lombardi, Assunta; Galdiero, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Peptide gH625, derived from glycoprotein H of herpes simplex virus type 1, can enter cells efficiently and deliver a cargo. Nanoparticles armed with gH625 are able to cross an in vitro model of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to investigate whether gH625 can enter and accumulate in neuron and astrocyte cell lines. The ability of gH625 to cross the BBB in vivo was also evaluated. gH625 was administered in vivo to rats and its presence in the liver and in the brain was detected. Within 3.5 hours of intravenous administration, gH625 can be found beyond the BBB in proximity to cell neurites. gH625 has no toxic effects in vivo, since it does not affect the maximal oxidative capacity of the brain or the mitochondrial respiration rate. Our data suggest that gH625, with its ability to cross the BBB, represents a novel nanocarrier system for drug delivery to the central nervous system. These results open up new possibilities for direct delivery of drugs into patients in the field of theranostics and might address the treatment of several human diseases. PMID:25792823

  2. Peptide gH625 enters into neuron and astrocyte cell lines and crosses the blood-brain barrier in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiante, Salvatore; Falanga, Annarita; Cigliano, Luisa; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Busiello, Rosa Anna; La Marca, Valeria; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Lombardi, Assunta; Galdiero, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Peptide gH625, derived from glycoprotein H of herpes simplex virus type 1, can enter cells efficiently and deliver a cargo. Nanoparticles armed with gH625 are able to cross an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to investigate whether gH625 can enter and accumulate in neuron and astrocyte cell lines. The ability of gH625 to cross the BBB in vivo was also evaluated. gH625 was administered in vivo to rats and its presence in the liver and in the brain was detected. Within 3.5 hours of intravenous administration, gH625 can be found beyond the BBB in proximity to cell neurites. gH625 has no toxic effects in vivo, since it does not affect the maximal oxidative capacity of the brain or the mitochondrial respiration rate. Our data suggest that gH625, with its ability to cross the BBB, represents a novel nanocarrier system for drug delivery to the central nervous system. These results open up new possibilities for direct delivery of drugs into patients in the field of theranostics and might address the treatment of several human diseases.

  3. Higher molecular weight polyethylene glycol increases cell proliferation while improving barrier function in an in vitro colon cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Shruthi; Vishnubhotla, Ramana; Shan, Sun; Chauhan, Chinmay; Cho, Michael; Glover, Sarah C

    2011-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) has been previously shown to protect against enteric pathogens and prevent colon cancer invasion. To determine if PEG could indeed protect against previously observed pro-invasive effects of commensal E. coli and EPEC, Caco-2 cells grown in an in vitro model of colon cancer were infected with strains of human commensal E. coli or EPEC and treated with 10% PEG 3350, PEG 8000, and PEG 20,000, respectively. At 24 hours after infection, MMP-1 and MMP-13 activities, cell cluster thickness, depth of invasion, and proliferation were determined using standard molecular biology techniques and advanced imaging. We found that higher molecular weight PEG, especially PEG 8000 and 20,000, regardless of bacterial infection, increased proliferation and depth of invasion although a decrease in cellular density and MMP-1 activity was also noted. Maximum proliferation and depth of invasion of Caco-2 cells was observed in scaffolds treated with a combination of commensal E. coli strain, HS4 and PEG 8000. In conclusion, we found that PEG 8000 increased cell proliferation and led to the preservation of cell density in cells treated with commensal bacteria. This is important, because the preservation of a proliferative response in colon cancer results in a more chemo-responsive tumor.

  4. Encapsulation of Cu(InGa)Se{sub 2} solar cell with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin-film moisture barrier grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carcia, P.F.; McLean, R.S. [DuPont Research and Development, Experimental Station, Wilmington, DE 19880-0400 (United States); Hegedus, Steven [Institute of Energy Conversion, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716-3820 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We compared the moisture sensitivity of a Cu(InGa)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) photovoltaic cell protected by 55 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), with equivalent CIGS cells protected with a glass or a polyester lid. Aging studies for more than 1000 h at 85 C/85% relative humidity with simulated solar illumination showed that the ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin-film barrier provided superior moisture protection for the CIGS cell, i.e. no reduction in open circuit voltage or fill factor occurred, compared to cells protected with a glass or plastic lid. We concluded that a moisture barrier grown by ALD could have broad applicability as a strategy for extending the lifetime of flexible CIGS cells. (author)

  5. Loss of occludin expression and impairment of blood-testis barrier permeability in rats with autoimmune orchitis: effect of interleukin 6 on Sertoli cell tight junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Cecilia Valeria; Sobarzo, Cristian Marcelo; Jacobo, Patricia Verónica; Pellizzari, Eliana Herminia; Cigorraga, Selva Beatriz; Denduchis, Berta; Lustig, Livia

    2012-11-01

    Inflammation of the male reproductive tract is accepted as being an important etiological factor of infertility. Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is characterized by interstitial lymphomononuclear cell infiltration and severe damage of seminiferous tubules with germ cells that undergo apoptosis and sloughing. Because the blood-testis barrier (BTB) is relevant for the protection of haploid germ cells against immune attack, the aim of this study was to analyze BTB permeability and the expression of tight junction proteins (occludin, claudin 11, and tight junction protein 1 [TJP1]) in rats during development of autoimmune orchitis. The role of IL6 as modulator of tight junction dynamics was also evaluated because intratesticular content of this cytokine is increased in EAO rats. Orchitis was induced in Sprague-Dawley adult rats by active immunization with testicular homogenate and adjuvants. Control rats (C) were injected with saline solution and adjuvants. Untreated (N) rats were also studied. Concomitant with early signs of germ cell sloughing, a reduced expression of occludin and delocalization of claudin 11 and TJP1 were detected in the testes of rats with EAO compared to C and N groups. The use of tracers showed increased BTB permeability in EAO rats. Intratesticular injection of IL6 induced focal testicular inflammation, which is associated with damaged seminiferous tubules. Rat Sertoli cells cultured in the presence of IL6 exhibited a redistribution of tight junction proteins and reduced transepithelial electrical resistance. These data indicate the possibility that IL6 might be involved in the downregulation of occludin expression and in the modulation of BTB permeability that occur in rats undergoing autoimmune orchitis.

  6. Toll-like receptor 2 activation by β2→1-fructans protects barrier function of t84 human intestinal epithelial cells in a chain length-dependent manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, L.M.; Meyer, D.; Pullens, G.; Faas, M.M.; Venema, K.; Ramasamy, U.; Schols, H.A.; Vos, P. de

    2014-01-01

    Dietary fiber intake is associated with lower incidence and mortality from disease, but the underlying mechanisms of these protective effects are unclear.We hypothesized that β2→1-fructan dietary fibers confer protection on intestinal epithelial cell barrier function via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2),

  7. Filaggrin and Skin Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezic, Sanja; Jakasa, Ivone

    2016-01-01

    The skin barrier function is greatly dependent on the structure and composition of the uppermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum (SC), which is made up of flattened anucleated cells surrounded by highly organized and continuous lipid matrix. The interior of the corneocytes consists mainly of keratin filaments aggregated by filaggrin (FLG) protein. Next, together with several other proteins, FLG is cross-linked into a mechanically robust cornified cell envelope providing a scaffold for the extracellular lipid matrix. In addition to its role for the SC structural and mechanical integrity, FLG degradation products account in part for the water-holding capacity and maintenance of acidic pH of the SC, both crucial for the epidermal barrier homoeostasis by regulating activity of multiple enzymes that control desquamation, lipid synthesis and inflammation. The major determinant of FLG expression in the skin are loss-of-function mutations in FLG, the strongest genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD), an inflammatory skin disease characterized by a reduced skin barrier function. The prevalence of FLG mutations varies greatly among different populations and ranges from about 10% in Northern Europeans to less than 1% in the African populations. An impaired skin barrier facilitates absorption of potentially hazardous chemicals, which might cause adverse effects in the skin, such as contact dermatitis, or systemic toxicity after their passage into blood. In another direction, a leaky epidermal barrier will lead to enhanced loss of water from the skin. A recent study has shown that even subtle increase in epidermal water loss in newborns increases the risk for AD. Although there are multiple modes of action by which FLG might affect skin barrier it is still unclear whether and how FLG deficiency leads to the reduced skin barrier function. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge in this field obtained from clinical studies, and animal and in vitro models

  8. TiO 2 Conduction Band Modulation with In 2 O 3 Recombination Barrier Layers in Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2013-11-21

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to grow subnanometer indium oxide recombination barriers in a solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) based on the spiro-OMeTAD hole-transport material (HTM) and the WN1 donor-π-acceptor organic dye. While optimal device performance was achieved after 3-10 ALD cycles, 15 ALD cycles (∼2 Å of In2O 3) was observed to be optimal for increasing open-circuit voltage (VOC) with an average improvement of over 100 mV, including one device with an extremely high VOC of 1.00 V. An unexpected phenomenon was observed after 15 ALD cycles: the increasing VOC trend reversed, and after 30 ALD cycles VOC dropped by over 100 mV relative to control devices without any In2O3. To explore possible causes of the nonmonotonic behavior resulting from In2O3 barrier layers, we conducted several device measurements, including transient photovoltage experiments and capacitance measurements, as well as density functional theory (DFT) studies. Our results suggest that the VOC gains observed in the first 20 ALD cycles are due to both a surface dipole that pulls up the TiO2 conduction band and recombination suppression. After 30 ALD cycles, however, both effects are reversed: the surface dipole of the In2O3 layer reverses direction, lowering the TiO 2 conduction band, and mid-bandgap states introduced by In 2O3 accelerate recombination, leading to a reduced V OC. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. The cell line NCl-H441 is a useful in vitro model for transport studies of human distal lung epithelial barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Johanna J; Muchitsch, Viktoria E; Gausterer, Julia C; Schwagerus, Elena; Huwer, Hanno; Daum, Nicole; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Ehrhardt, Carsten

    2014-03-03

    The lack of a well characterized, continuously growing in vitro model of human distal lung epithelial phenotype constitutes a serious limitation in the area of inhalation biopharmaceutics, particularly in the context of transepithelial transport studies. Here, we investigated if a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, NCl-H441, has potential to serve as an in vitro model of human distal lung epithelium. The development of barrier properties was studied by immunocytochemistry (ICC) against the junction proteins zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) and E-cadherin and measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). Moreover, transport studies with the paracellular marker compounds fluorescein sodium and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextrans of molecular weights ranging from 4 to 70 kDa were carried out. The expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1) and organic cation transporters (OCT/Ns; SLC22A1-A5) was investigated by ICC and immunoblot. P-gp function was assessed by monolayer release and bidirectional transport studies using rhodamine 123 (Rh123) and the inhibitors verapamil and LY335979. Uptake of 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)) was measured, in order to assess organic cation transporter function in vitro. Furthermore, the inhibitory potential of several organic cations on ASP(+) uptake was studied. NCl-H441 cells, when grown under liquid-covered conditions, formed confluent, electrically tight monolayers with peak TEER values of approximately 1000 Ω·cm(2), after 8-12 days in culture. These monolayers were able to differentiate paracellularly transported substrates according to their molecular weight. Presence of P-gp, OCT1, OCT2, OCT3, OCTN1, and OCTN2 was confirmed by Western blot and ICC and was similar to data from freshly isolated human alveolar epithelial cells in primary culture. Rh123 release from NCI-H441 monolayers was time-dependent and showed low, albeit significant attenuation by both inhibitors

  10. Effect of uranium on proliferation and mortality of the major constitutive cell types of the skin: influence on skin barrier integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitot, F.; Spessotto, S.; Paquet, F. [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Lab. de Radiotoxicologie Experimentale, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/LRTOX, Site du Tricastin - Pierrelatte (France)

    2005-07-01

    The skin is the initial barrier against mechanical, chemical or biological external stresses. It is a complex, multilayered organ. The upper layer is the epidermis that is mainly constituted by keratinocytes. The fibroblast is the major cell type of the dermis which is underlying the epidermis. In the case of an external contamination, uranium is able to diffuse through the skin [1-3] and can affect skin barrier integrity after chronic topical exposure[1, 3]. Our study tried to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to this skin alteration after uranyl nitrate contamination. Proliferation rate and mortality of primary cultures of rat skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes contaminated in vitro with different concentration of depleted-uranyl nitrate or 233-uranyl nitrate were measured. The huge difference between {sup 233}U and depleted-U specific activities, respectively 3.57 x 10{sup 8}Bq.g{sup -1} and 1.45 x 10{sup 4}Bq.g{sup -1}', allowed to distinguish cellular radiotoxicity and chemotoxicity of uranium. Concerning fibroblasts, a significant radiotoxicity of the emitted alpha particles of {sup 233}U was observed with no chemotoxicity for the lowest concentrations, i.e. 2{mu}M and 4{mu}M, of uranyl nitrate. Keratinocytes were more sensitive to both uranium radiotoxicity and chemotoxicity than fibroblasts. This can be explained by the about three times higher ability of keratinocytes to incorporate uranium compared to fibroblasts. This greater capacity of epidermal cells than dermal cells to incorporate uranium was confirmed in vivo for the hairless rat following a uranyl nitrate topical contamination. As a conclusion, the important toxic effect of uranium on keratinocyte demonstrated in our study can explain the previous observations [1, 3] that epidermis was atrophied and so skin permeability increased after an in vivo chronic topical exposure of rat skin to uranyl nitrate. These results are of great importance concerning radiation protection of exposed

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon dots with real-time live-cell imaging and blood–brain barrier penetration capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu SS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Shousi Lu,1,2 Shanshan Guo,1 Pingxiang Xu,1 Xiaorong Li,1 Yuming Zhao,1 Wei Gu,3 Ming Xue1 1Department of Pharmacology, Beijing Laboratory for Biomedical Detection Technology and Instrument, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Capital Medical University, 2China Rehabilitation Research Center, 3Department of Chemistry and Biology, School of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China Abstract: Nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs were synthesized using a one-pot hydrothermal treatment with citric acid in the presence of polyethylenimine. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the N-CDs were monodispersed and quasi-spherical with an average size of ~2.6 nm. Under ultraviolet irradiation the N-CDs emitted a strong blue luminescence with a quantum yield as high as 51%. Moreover, the N-CDs exhibited a negligible cytotoxicity and could be applied as efficient nanoprobes for real-time imaging of live cells. In addition, the ability of the N-CDs to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB in a concentration-dependent manner was demonstrated using an in vitro BBB model. Therefore, these PEI-passivated N-CDs with real-time live-cell imaging and BBB-penetration capabilities hold promise for traceable drug delivery to the brain. Keywords: hydrothermal synthesis, nitrogen-doped carbon dots, bioimaging

  12. Structural Elucidation of the Cell-Penetrating Penetratin Peptide in Model Membranes at the Atomic Level: Probing Hydrophobic Interactions in the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Swapna; Kar, Rajiv K; Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-09-06

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have shown promise in nonpermeable therapeutic drug delivery, because of their ability to transport a variety of cargo molecules across the cell membranes and their noncytotoxicity. Drosophila antennapedia homeodomain-derived CPP penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), being rich in positively charged residues, has been increasingly used as a potential drug carrier for various purposes. Penetratin can breach the tight endothelial network known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), permitting treatment of several neurodegenerative maladies, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. However, a detailed structural understanding of penetratin and its mechanism of action is lacking. This study defines structural features of the penetratin-derived peptide, DK17 (DRQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), in several model membranes and describes a membrane-induced conformational transition of the DK17 peptide in these environments. A series of biophysical experiments, including high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, provides the three-dimensional structure of DK17 in different membranes mimicking the BBB or total brain lipid extract. Molecular dynamics simulations support the experimental results showing preferential binding of DK17 to particular lipids at atomic resolution. The peptide conserves the structure of the subdomain spanning residues Ile6-Arg11, despite considerable conformational variation in different membrane models. In vivo data suggest that the wild type, not a mutated sequence, enters the central nervous system. Together, these data highlight important structural and functional attributes of DK17 that could be utilized in drug delivery for neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. Adhesion, resistivity and structural, optical properties of molybdenum on steel sheet coated with barrier layer done by sol–gel for CIGS solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amouzou, Dodji, E-mail: dodji.amouzou@fundp.ac.be [Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Dumont, Jacques [Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Fourdrinier, Lionel; Richir, Jean-Baptiste; Maseri, Fabrizio [CRM-Group, Boulevard de Colonster, B 57, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Sporken, Robert [Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2013-03-01

    Molybdenum films are investigated on stainless steel substrates coated with polysilazane based sol–gel and SiO{sub x} layers for flexible CIGS solar cell applications. Thermal stability of the multilayer has been studied. The thickness of polysilazane films are significantly reduced (17%) after heat treatment suggesting a thermal degradation. Four different microstructures were found for Mo films by varying argon total pressure from 2.6 × 10{sup −1} Pa to 2.6 Pa. It was shown that continuous films, low sheet resistance (0.5 Ω/□) and well facetted grains can be achieved when Mo films are deposited on heated substrates at homologous temperature, T of 0.2. - Highlights: ► Steel sheet is functionalized for Cu[Inx,Ga(1 − x)Se2] solar cells. ► Varying deposition pressure impacts the microstructure of Mo films. ► High thermal stability of the sol gel based barrier layer has been investigated. ► Low sheet resistance and continuous Mo films have been obtained at 550°C. ► Thermal stability of functionalized steel sheets at 550°C has been investigated.

  14. Cell-Based in Vitro Blood–Brain Barrier Model Can Rapidly Evaluate Nanoparticles’ Brain Permeability in Association with Particle Size and Surface Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanshiro Hanada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of nanoparticle (NP uptake to the human central nervous system is a major concern. Recent reports showed that in animal models, nanoparticles (NPs passed through the blood–brain barrier (BBB. For the safe use of NPs, it is imperative to evaluate the permeability of NPs through the BBB. Here we used a commercially available in vitro BBB model to evaluate the permeability of NPs for a rapid, easy and reproducible assay. The model is reconstructed by culturing both primary rat brain endothelial cells and pericytes to support the tight junctions of endothelial cells. We used the permeability coefficient (Papp to determine the permeability of NPs. The size dependency results, using fluorescent silica NPs (30, 100, and 400 nm, revealed that the Papp for the 30 nm NPs was higher than those of the larger silica. The surface charge dependency results using Qdots® (amino-, carboxyl-, and PEGylated-Qdots, showed that more amino-Qdots passed through the model than the other Qdots. Usage of serum-containing buffer in the model resulted in an overall reduction of permeability. In conclusion, although additional developments are desired to elucidate the NPs transportation, we showed that the BBB model could be useful as a tool to test the permeability of nanoparticles.

  15. Cell-based in vitro blood-brain barrier model can rapidly evaluate nanoparticles' brain permeability in association with particle size and surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Sanshiro; Fujioka, Kouki; Inoue, Yuriko; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2014-01-24

    The possibility of nanoparticle (NP) uptake to the human central nervous system is a major concern. Recent reports showed that in animal models, nanoparticles (NPs) passed through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). For the safe use of NPs, it is imperative to evaluate the permeability of NPs through the BBB. Here we used a commercially available in vitro BBB model to evaluate the permeability of NPs for a rapid, easy and reproducible assay. The model is reconstructed by culturing both primary rat brain endothelial cells and pericytes to support the tight junctions of endothelial cells. We used the permeability coefficient (P(app)) to determine the permeability of NPs. The size dependency results, using fluorescent silica NPs (30, 100, and 400 nm), revealed that the Papp for the 30 nm NPs was higher than those of the larger silica. The surface charge dependency results using Qdots® (amino-, carboxyl-, and PEGylated-Qdots), showed that more amino-Qdots passed through the model than the other Qdots. Usage of serum-containing buffer in the model resulted in an overall reduction of permeability. In conclusion, although additional developments are desired to elucidate the NPs transportation, we showed that the BBB model could be useful as a tool to test the permeability of nanoparticles.

  16. The interaction between plasma filaments in dielectric barrier discharges and liquid covered wounds: electric fields delivered to model platelets and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Tian, Wei; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of wounds by atmospheric pressure plasmas in the context of plasma medicine typically proceeds through a liquid layer covering exposed cells. The wounds and their liquid covering often have irregular shapes with electrical properties (i.e. conductivity and permittivities) that may differ not only from wound-to-wound but also for a single wound as healing proceeds. The differing shapes and electrical properties extend into the liquid within the wound that typically contains cellular materials such as blood platelets. The plasma, wound, liquid and intra-liquid cellular components represent an interacting system of mutual dependence. In this paper, we discuss the results from a computational investigation of the treatment of small, liquid-covered wounds by filamentary dielectric barrier discharges. The sizes of the wounds are of the order of the plasma filaments and the liquid within the wound, an approximation of blood serum, contains idealized blood platelets. We find that the electrical properties of a wound can have significant effects on the spreading of the plasma on its surface by virtue of the deformation of the vacuum electric fields due to the shape, the effective capacitance of the wound and the discontinuities in electrical permittivity. This in turn effects the penetration of the electric field to cells under the liquid. The orientation and permittivity of the platelets relative to the liquid determines the electric fields that may stimulate the platelets.

  17. Using a 3-D multicellular simulation of spinal cord injury with live cell imaging to study the neural immune barrier to nanoparticle uptake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alan P.Weightman; Stuart I.Jenkins; Divya M.Chari

    2016-01-01

    Development of nanoparticle (NP) based therapies to promote regeneration in sites of central nervous system (CNS;i.e.brain and spinal cord) pathology relies critically on the availability of experimental models that offer biologically valid predictions of NP fate in vivo.However,there is a major lack of biological models that mimic the pathological complexity of target neural sites in vivo,particularly the responses of resident neural immune cells to NPs.Here,we have utilised a previously developed in vitro model of traumatic spinal cord injury (based on 3-D organotypic slice arrays) with dynamic time lapse imaging to reveal in real-time the acute cellular fate of NPs within injury foci.We demonstrate the utility of our model in revealing the well documented phenomenon of avid NP sequestration by the intrinsic immune cells of the CNS (the microglia).Such immune sequestration is a known translational barrier to the use of NP-based therapeutics for neurological injury.Accordingly,we suggest that the utility of our model in mimicking microglial sequestration behaviours offers a valuable investigative tool to evaluate strategies to overcome this cellular response within a simple and biologically relevant experimental system,whilst reducing the use of live animal neurological injury models for such studies.

  18. Interleukin 7 from maternal milk crosses the intestinal barrier and modulates T-cell development in offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Aspinall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breastfeeding protects against illnesses and death in hazardous environments, an effect partly mediated by improved immune function. One hypothesis suggests that factors within milk supplement the inadequate immune response of the offspring, but this has not been able to account for a series of observations showing that factors within maternally derived milk may supplement the development of the immune system through a direct effect on the primary lymphoid organs. In a previous human study we reported evidence suggesting a link between IL-7 in breast milk and the thymic output of infants. Here we report evidence in mice of direct action of maternally-derived IL-7 on T cell development in the offspring. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We have used recombinant IL-7 labelled with a fluorescent dye to trace the movement in live mice of IL-7 from the stomach across the gut and into the lymphoid tissues. To validate the functional ability of maternally derived IL-7 we cross fostered IL-7 knock-out mice onto normal wild type mothers. Subsets of thymocytes and populations of peripheral T cells were significantly higher than those found in knock-out mice receiving milk from IL-7 knock-out mothers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study provides direct evidence that interleukin 7, a factor which is critical in the development of T lymphocytes, when maternally derived can transfer across the intestine of the offspring, increase T cell production in the thymus and support the survival of T cells in the peripheral secondary lymphoid tissue.

  19. Dendritic cell CNS recruitment correlates with disease severity in EAE via CCL2 chemotaxis at the blood–brain barrier through paracellular transmigration and ERK activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Divya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmigration of circulating dendritic cells (DCs into the central nervous system (CNS across the blood–brain barrier (BBB has not thus far been investigated. An increase in immune cell infiltration across the BBB, uncontrolled activation and antigen presentation are influenced by chemokines. Chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 is a potent chemoattractant known to be secreted by the BBB but has not been implicated in the recruitment of DCs specifically at the BBB. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice by injection of MOG35–55 peptide and pertussis toxin intraperitoneally. Animals with increasing degree of EAE score were sacrificed and subjected to near-infrared and fluorescence imaging analysis to detect and localize the accumulation of CD11c+-labeled DCs with respect to CCL2 expression. To further characterize the direct effect of CCL2 in DC trafficking at the BBB, we utilized an in vitro BBB model consisting of human brain microvascular endothelial cells to compare migratory patterns of monocyte-derived dendritic cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Further, this model was used to image transmigration using fluorescence microcopy and to assess specific molecular signaling pathways involved in transmigration. Results Near-infrared imaging of DC transmigration correlated with the severity of inflammation during EAE. Ex vivo histology confirmed the presence of CCL2 in EAE lesions, with DCs emerging from perivascular spaces. DCs exhibited more efficient transmigration than T cells in BBB model studies. These observations correlated with transwell imaging, which indicated a paracellular versus transcellular pattern of migration by DCs and T cells. Moreover, at the molecular level, CCL2 seems to facilitate DC transmigration in an ERK1/2-dependent manner. Conclusion CNS recruitment of DCs correlates with disease severity in EAE via CCL2 chemotaxis and paracellular transmigration across the BBB

  20. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-05-06

    Various methods and systems are provided for smart parking barriers. In one example, among others, a smart parking barrier system includes a movable parking barrier located at one end of a parking space, a barrier drive configured to control positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking space and a second position that allows access to the parking space. The parking controller can initiate movement of the movable parking barrier in response to a positive identification of an individual allowed to use the parking space. The parking controller can identify the individual through, e.g., a RFID tag, a mobile device (e.g., a remote control, smartphone, tablet, etc.), an access card, biometric information, or other appropriate identifier.

  1. Reactivation of Endogenous Genes and Epigenetic Remodeling Are Barriers for Generating Transgene-Free Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Pig.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Hwan Choi

    Full Text Available Cellular reprogramming of committed cells into a pluripotent state can be induced by ectopic expression of genes such as OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and MYC. Reprogrammed cells can be maintained by activating endogenous pluripotent networks without transgene expression. Although various research groups have attempted to generate pig induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, authentic iPSCs have not be obtained, instead showing dependence on transgene expression. In this study, iPSCs were derived from porcine fetal fibroblasts via drug-inducible vectors carrying human transcription factors (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and MYC. Therefore, this study investigated characteristics of iPSCs and reprogramming mechanisms in pig. The iPSCs were stably maintained over an extended period with potential in vitro differentiation into three germ layers. In addition, the pluripotent state of iPSCs was regulated by modulating culture conditions. They showed naive- or primed-like pluripotent states in LIF or bFGF supplemented culture conditions, respectively. However, iPSCs could not be maintained without ectopic expression of transgenes. The cultured iPSCs expressed endogenous transcription factors such as OCT4 and SOX2, but not NANOG (a known gateway to complete reprogramming. Endogenous genes related to mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (DPPA2, CDH1, EPCAM, and OCLN were not sufficiently reactivated, as measured by qPCR. DNA methylation analysis for promoters of OCT4, NANOG, and XIST showed that epigenetic reprogramming did not occur in female iPSCs. Based on our results, expression of exogenous genes could not sufficiently activate the essential endogenous genes and remodel the epigenetic milieu to achieve faithful pluripotency in pig. Accordingly, investigating iPSCs could help us improve and develop reprogramming methods by understanding reprogramming mechanisms in pig.

  2. Endothelial Barrier Protection by Local Anesthetics: Ropivacaine and Lidocaine Block Tumor Necrosis Factor-α–induced Endothelial Cell Src Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegeler, Tobias; Votta-Velis, E. Gina; Bakhshi, Farnaz R.; Mao, Mao; Carnegie, Graeme; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Schwartz, David E.; Borgeat, Alain; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Minshall, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction mediated in part by Src-kinase activation plays a crucial role in acute inflammatory disease. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), activate Src via phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt-dependent nitric oxide generation, a process initiated by recruitment of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase regulatory subunit p85 to TNF-receptor-1. Because amide-linked local anesthetics have well-established anti-inflammatory effects, the authors hypothesized that ropivacaine and lidocaine attenuate inflammatory Src signaling by disrupting the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase–Akt–nitric oxide pathway, thus blocking Src-dependent neutrophil adhesion and endothelial hyperpermeability. Methods Human lung microvascular endothelial cells, incubated with TNFα in the absence or presence of clinically relevant concentrations of ropivacaine and lidocaine, were analyzed by Western blot, probing for phosphorylated/activated Src, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, Akt, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and caveolin-1. The effect of ropivacaine on TNFα-induced nitric oxide generation, co-immunoprecipitation of TNF-receptor-1 with p85, neutrophil adhesion, and endothelial barrier disruption were assessed. Results Ropivacaine and lidocaine attenuated TNFα-induced Src activation (half-maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 8.611 × 10−10 M for ropivacaine; IC50 = 5.864 × 10−10 M for lidocaine) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation (IC50 = 7.572 × 10−10 M for ropivacaine; IC50 = 6.377 × 10−10 M for lidocaine). Akt activation (n = 7; P = 0.006) and stimulus-dependent binding of TNF-receptor-1 and p85 (n = 6; P = 0.043) were blocked by 1 nM of ropivacaine. TNFα-induced neutrophil adhesion and disruption of endothelial monolayers via Src-dependent intercellular adhesion molecule-1- and caveolin-1-phosphorylation, respectively, were also attenuated. Conclusions Ropivacaine and lidocaine

  3. Inflammation Modulates RLIP76/RALBP1 Electrophile-Glutathione Conjugate Transporter and Housekeeping Genes in Human Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bennani-Baiti

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells are often present at inflammation sites. This is the case of endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB of patients afflicted with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, or multiple sclerosis, as well as in cases of bacterial meningitis, trauma, or tumor-associated ischemia. Inflammation is a known modulator of gene expression through the activation of transcription factors, mostly NF-κB. RLIP76 (a.k.a. RALBP1, an ATP-dependent transporter of electrophile-glutathione conjugates, modulates BBB permeability through the regulation of tight junction function, cell adhesion, and exocytosis. Genes and pathways regulated by RLIP76 are transcriptional targets of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α pro-inflammatory molecule, suggesting that RLIP76 may also be an inflammation target. To assess the effects of TNF-α on RLIP76, we faced the problem of choosing reference genes impervious to TNF-α. Since such genes were not known in human BBB endothelial cells, we subjected these to TNF-α, and measured by quantitative RT-PCR the expression of housekeeping genes commonly used as reference genes. We find most to be modulated, and analysis of several inflammation datasets as well as a metaanalysis of more than 5000 human tissue samples encompassing more than 300 cell types and diseases show that no single housekeeping gene may be used as a reference gene. Using three different algorithms, however, we uncovered a reference geneset impervious to TNF-α, and show for the first time that RLIP76 expression is induced by TNF-α and follows the induction kinetics of inflammation markers, suggesting that inflammation can influence RLIP76 expression at the BBB. We also show that MRP1 (a.k.a. ABCC1, another electrophile-glutathione transporter, is not modulated in the same cells and conditions, indicating that RLIP76 regulation by TNF-α is not a general property of glutathione transporters. The reference geneset

  4. Inflammation Modulates RLIP76/RALBP1 Electrophile-Glutathione Conjugate Transporter and Housekeeping Genes in Human Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennani-Baiti, Barbara; Toegel, Stefan; Viernstein, Helmut; Urban, Ernst; Noe, Christian R; Bennani-Baiti, Idriss M

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells are often present at inflammation sites. This is the case of endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of patients afflicted with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, or multiple sclerosis, as well as in cases of bacterial meningitis, trauma, or tumor-associated ischemia. Inflammation is a known modulator of gene expression through the activation of transcription factors, mostly NF-κB. RLIP76 (a.k.a. RALBP1), an ATP-dependent transporter of electrophile-glutathione conjugates, modulates BBB permeability through the regulation of tight junction function, cell adhesion, and exocytosis. Genes and pathways regulated by RLIP76 are transcriptional targets of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) pro-inflammatory molecule, suggesting that RLIP76 may also be an inflammation target. To assess the effects of TNF-α on RLIP76, we faced the problem of choosing reference genes impervious to TNF-α. Since such genes were not known in human BBB endothelial cells, we subjected these to TNF-α, and measured by quantitative RT-PCR the expression of housekeeping genes commonly used as reference genes. We find most to be modulated, and analysis of several inflammation datasets as well as a metaanalysis of more than 5000 human tissue samples encompassing more than 300 cell types and diseases show that no single housekeeping gene may be used as a reference gene. Using three different algorithms, however, we uncovered a reference geneset impervious to TNF-α, and show for the first time that RLIP76 expression is induced by TNF-α and follows the induction kinetics of inflammation markers, suggesting that inflammation can influence RLIP76 expression at the BBB. We also show that MRP1 (a.k.a. ABCC1), another electrophile-glutathione transporter, is not modulated in the same cells and conditions, indicating that RLIP76 regulation by TNF-α is not a general property of glutathione transporters. The reference geneset uncovered herein should

  5. Skin Barrier Function and Allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, Kristiane Aasen; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2016-01-01

    The skin is an important barrier protecting us from mechanical insults, microorganisms, chemicals and allergens, but, importantly, also reducing water loss. A common hallmark for many dermatoses is a compromised skin barrier function, and one could suspect an elevated risk of contact sensitization...... and skin barrier status. Psoriasis has traditionally been regarded a Th1-dominated disease, but the discovery of Th17 cells and IL-17 provides new and interesting information regarding the pathogenesis of the disease. Research suggests an inverse relationship between psoriasis and CA, possibly due......) and Th2 (AD) have been proposed as an explanation. Finally, there is convincing evidence that exposure to irritants increases the risk of CS, and patients with ICD are, therefore, at great risk of developing CA. Skin irritation leads to the release of IL-1 and TNF-α, which affects the function of antigen...

  6. Blue-photon modification of nonstandard diode barrier in CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisgruber, I.L.; Granata, J.E.; Sites, J.R. [Physics Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Hou, J. [Electronic Materials and Processing Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA 16801 (United States); Kessler, J. [Solarex, 826 Newtown-Yardley Road, Newtown, PA 18940 (United States)

    1998-06-10

    The current-voltage curves of many ZnO/CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells display significant distortion when only red light illumination is employed. This distortion generally disappears or partially disappears for a period of time following illumination with blue light. Similarly, the dark diode curve shortly after illumination containing blue light is shifted significantly from the equilibrium dark curve. This effect is more common than generally realized and indicates a mechanism that is potentially detrimental to photovoltaic efficiency. A model is presented that is based on a low free-electron concentration and a high concentration of deep levels in the CdS window layer. This model is consistent with observed variations in current-voltage, capacitance, and laser scan data with illumination wavelength and history

  7. Short-Chain Fatty Acids Activate AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Ameliorate Ethanol-Induced Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eamin, E.E.; Masclee, A.A.; Dekker, J.; Pieters, H.J.; Jonkers, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have been shown to promote intestinal barrier function, but their protective effects against ethanol-induced intestinal injury and underlying mechanisms remain essentially unknown. The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of SCFAs on ethanol-induced barrier d

  8. Role of the Endothelium during Tumor Cell Metastasis: Is the Endothelium a Barrier or a Promoter for Cell Invasion and Metastasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tanja Mierke

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The malignancy of cancer disease depends on the ability of the primary tumor to metastasize to distant organs. The process of the metastasis formation has largely been analyzed, but still main pathways regarding the extravasation step at the end of the metastasis formation process are controversially discussed. An agreement has been reached about the importance of the endothelium to promote metastasis formation either by enhancing the growth of the primary tumor or by homing (targeting the tumor cells to blood or lymph vessels. The mechanical properties of the invading tumor cells become the focus of several studies, but the endothelial cell mechanical properties are still elusive. This paper describes the different roles of the endothelium in the process of metastasis formation and focuses on a novel role of the endothelium in promoting tumor cell invasion. It discusses how novel biophysical tools and in vivo animal models help to determine the role of the endothelium in the process of tumor cell invasion. Evidence is provided that cell mechanical properties, for example, contractile force generation of tumor cells, are involved in the process of tumor cell invasion.

  9. Understanding the role of silica nanospheres with their light scattering and energy barrier properties in enhancing the photovoltaic performance of ZnO based solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Avishek; Ansari, Mohammad Shaad; Sahu, Tushar Kanta; Qureshi, Mohammad

    2016-10-12

    The present study discusses the design and development of a dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) using a hybrid composite of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NP) and silica nanospheres (SiO2 NS). A ≈22% enhancement in the overall power conversion efficiency (PCE, η) was observed for the device fabricated with a binary hybrid composite of 1 wt% SiO2 NS and ZnO NP compared to the pristine ZnO NP device. A systematic investigation revealed the dual function of the silica nanospheres in enhancing the device efficacy compared to the bare ZnO NP based device. Sub-micron sized SiO2 NS can boost the light harvesting efficiency of the photoanode by optical confinement, resulting in increased propagation length of the incident light by multiple internal reflections, which was confirmed by UV-Vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) analysis showed a reduced recombination of photo-generated electrons to the I(-)/I3(-) redox shuttle in the case of the composite photoanode. The higher recombination resistance (Rct) in the case of a 1 wt% composite indicates that the SiO2 NS serves as a partial energy barrier layer to retard the interfacial recombination (back transfer) of photo-generated electrons at the working electrode/electrolyte interface, increasing the device efficiency.

  10. Transport of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor into Liposomes across the Blood-Brain Barrier: In Vitro and in Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoling Wu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF was encapsulated into liposomes in order to protect it from enzyme degradation in vivo and promote its permeability across the blood-brain barrier (BBB. In this study, GDNF conventional liposomes (GDNF-L and GDNF target sterically stabilized liposomes (GDNF-SSL-T were prepared. The average size of liposomes was below 90 nm. A primary model of BBB was established and evaluated by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER and permeability. This BBB model was employed to study the permeability of GDNF liposomes in vitro. The results indicated that the liposomes could enhance transport of GDNF across the BBB and GDNF-SSL-T had achieved the best transport efficacy. The distribution of GDNF liposomes was studied in vivo. Free GDNF and GDNF-L were eliminated rapidly in the circulation. GDNF-SSL-T has a prolonged circulation time in the blood and favorable brain delivery. The values of the area under the curve (AUC(0–1 h in the brain of GDNF-SSL-T was 8.1 times and 6.8 times more than that of free GDNF and GDNF-L, respectively. These results showed that GDNF-SSL-T realized the aim of targeted delivery of therapeutic proteins to central nervous system.

  11. Transport of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor into liposomes across the blood-brain barrier: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaoling; Li, Guoqi; Li, Xiao; Lin, Caina; Yu, Ding; Luan, Shuo; Ma, Chao

    2014-02-27

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was encapsulated into liposomes in order to protect it from enzyme degradation in vivo and promote its permeability across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In this study, GDNF conventional liposomes (GDNF-L) and GDNF target sterically stabilized liposomes (GDNF-SSL-T) were prepared. The average size of liposomes was below 90 nm. A primary model of BBB was established and evaluated by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability. This BBB model was employed to study the permeability of GDNF liposomes in vitro. The results indicated that the liposomes could enhance transport of GDNF across the BBB and GDNF-SSL-T had achieved the best transport efficacy. The distribution of GDNF liposomes was studied in vivo. Free GDNF and GDNF-L were eliminated rapidly in the circulation. GDNF-SSL-T has a prolonged circulation time in the blood and favorable brain delivery. The values of the area under the curve (AUC(0-1 h)) in the brain of GDNF-SSL-T was 8.1 times and 6.8 times more than that of free GDNF and GDNF-L, respectively. These results showed that GDNF-SSL-T realized the aim of targeted delivery of therapeutic proteins to central nervous system.

  12. A novel peptide delivers plasmids across blood-brain barrier into neuronal cells as a single-component transfer vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailing Fu

    Full Text Available There is no data up to now to show that peptide can deliver plasmid into brain as a single-component transfer vector. Here we show that a novel peptide, RDP (consisted of 39 amino acids, can be exploited as an efficient plasmid vector for brain-targeting delivery. The plasmids containing Lac Z reporter gene (pVAX-Lac Z and BDNF gene (pVAX-BDNF are complexed with RDP and intravenously injected into mice. The results of gel retardation assay show that RDP enables to bind DNA in a dose-dependent manner, and the X-Gal staining identity that Lac Z is specifically expressed in the brain. Also, the results of Western blot and immunofluorescence staining of BDNF indicate that pVAX-BDNF complexed with RDP can be delivered into brain, and show neuroprotective properties in experimental Parkinson's disease (PD model. The results demonstrate that RDP enables to bind and deliver DNA into the brain, resulting in specific gene expression in the neuronal cells. This strategy provides a novel, simple and effective approach for non-viral gene therapy of brain diseases.

  13. A novel peptide delivers plasmids across blood-brain barrier into neuronal cells as a single-component transfer vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ailing; Zhang, Miaomiao; Gao, Feiyan; Xu, Xingran; Chen, Zhangbao

    2013-01-01

    There is no data up to now to show that peptide can deliver plasmid into brain as a single-component transfer vector. Here we show that a novel peptide, RDP (consisted of 39 amino acids), can be exploited as an efficient plasmid vector for brain-targeting delivery. The plasmids containing Lac Z reporter gene (pVAX-Lac Z) and BDNF gene (pVAX-BDNF) are complexed with RDP and intravenously injected into mice. The results of gel retardation assay show that RDP enables to bind DNA in a dose-dependent manner, and the X-Gal staining identity that Lac Z is specifically expressed in the brain. Also, the results of Western blot and immunofluorescence staining of BDNF indicate that pVAX-BDNF complexed with RDP can be delivered into brain, and show neuroprotective properties in experimental Parkinson's disease (PD) model. The results demonstrate that RDP enables to bind and deliver DNA into the brain, resulting in specific gene expression in the neuronal cells. This strategy provides a novel, simple and effective approach for non-viral gene therapy of brain diseases.

  14. Inflammatory Response and Barrier Dysfunction by Different e-Cigarette Flavoring Chemicals Identified by Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry in e-Liquids and e-Vapors on Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloff, Janice; Sundar, Isaac K.; Freter, Robert; Sekera, Emily R.; Friedman, Alan E.; Robinson, Risa; Pagano, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies suggest that electronic cigarette (e-cig) flavors can be harmful to lung tissue by imposing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. The potential inflammatory response by lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts exposed to e-cig flavoring chemicals in addition to other risk-anticipated flavor enhancers inhaled by e-cig users is not known. The goal of this study was to evaluate the release of the proinflammatory cytokine (interleukin-8 [IL-8]) and epithelial barrier function in response to different e-cig flavoring chemicals identified in various e-cig e-liquid flavorings and vapors by chemical characterization using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis. Flavorings, such as acetoin (butter), diacetyl, pentanedione, maltol (malt), ortho-vanillin (vanilla), coumarin, and cinnamaldehyde in comparison with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), were used in this study. Human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas2B), human mucoepidermoid carcinoma epithelial cells (H292), and human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) were treated with each flavoring chemical for 24 hours. The cells and conditioned media were then collected and analyzed for toxicity (viability %), lung epithelial barrier function, and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 release. Cell viability was not significantly affected by any of the flavoring chemicals tested at a concentration of 10 μM to 1 mM. Acetoin and diacetyl treatment induced IL-8 release in Beas2B cells. Acetoin- and pentanedione-treated HFL-1 cells produced a differential, but significant response for IL-8 release compared to controls and TNFα. Flavorings, such as ortho-vanillin and maltol, induced IL-8 release in Beas2B cells, but not in H292 cells. Of all the flavoring chemicals tested, acetoin and maltol were more potent inducers of IL-8 release than TNFα in Beas2B and HFL-1 cells. Flavoring chemicals rapidly impaired epithelial barrier function in human bronchial epithelial cells (16-HBE) as measured by electric cell

  15. Mast Cell Tryptase Reduces Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Implications for the Mechanisms of Barrier Dysfunction in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilcz-Villega, Ewa M

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how mast cell tryptase may influence intestinal permeability and tight junction (TJ) proteins in vitro and explore translation to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  16. Differential effects of c-Src and c-Yes on the endocytic vesicle-mediated trafficking events at the Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D; Wong, Elissa W P; Lee, Will M; Han, Daishu; Wong, Chris K C; Cheng, C Yan

    2014-10-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers in the mammalian body. However, it undergoes cyclic restructuring during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis in which the "old" BTB located above the preleptotene spermatocytes being transported across the immunological barrier is "disassembled," whereas the "new" BTB found behind these germ cells is rapidly "reassembled," i.e., mediated by endocytic vesicle-mediated protein trafficking events. Thus, the immunological barrier is maintained when preleptotene spermatocytes connected in clones via intercellular bridges are transported across the BTB. Yet the underlying mechanism(s) in particular the involving regulatory molecules that coordinate these events remains unknown. We hypothesized that c-Src and c-Yes might work in contrasting roles in endocytic vesicle-mediated trafficking, serving as molecular switches, to effectively disassemble and reassemble the old and the new BTB, respectively, to facilitate preleptotene spermatocyte transport across the BTB. Following siRNA-mediated specific knockdown of c-Src or c-Yes in Sertoli cells, we utilized biochemical assays to assess the changes in protein endocytosis, recycling, degradation and phagocytosis. c-Yes was found to promote endocytosed integral membrane BTB proteins to the pathway of transcytosis and recycling so that internalized proteins could be effectively used to assemble new BTB from the disassembling old BTB, whereas c-Src promotes endocytosed Sertoli cell BTB proteins to endosome-mediated protein degradation for the degeneration of the old BTB. By using fluorescence beads mimicking apoptotic germ cells, Sertoli cells were found to engulf beads via c-Src-mediated phagocytosis. A hypothetical model that serves as the framework for future investigation is thus proposed.

  17. Extremal surface barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhardt, Netta; Wall, Aron C. [Department of Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2014-03-13

    We present a generic condition for Lorentzian manifolds to have a barrier that limits the reach of boundary-anchored extremal surfaces of arbitrary dimension. We show that any surface with nonpositive extrinsic curvature is a barrier, in the sense that extremal surfaces cannot be continuously deformed past it. Furthermore, the outermost barrier surface has nonnegative extrinsic curvature. Under certain conditions, we show that the existence of trapped surfaces implies a barrier, and conversely. In the context of AdS/CFT, these barriers imply that it is impossible to reconstruct the entire bulk using extremal surfaces. We comment on the implications for the firewall controversy.

  18. Safety-barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2007-01-01

    are discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed, including situations where safety barriers depend on shared common elements. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk......Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called "bow-tie" diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation with other methods such as fault trees and Bayesian networks...... analysis with operational safety management....

  19. The Glomerular Filtration Barrier: Components and Crosstalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav C. Menon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The glomerular filtration barrier is a highly specialized blood filtration interface that displays a high conductance to small and midsized solutes in plasma but retains relative impermeability to macromolecules. Its integrity is maintained by physicochemical and signalling interplay among its three core constituents—the glomerular endothelial cell, the basement membrane and visceral epithelial cell (podocyte. Understanding the pathomechanisms of inherited and acquired human diseases as well as experimental injury models of this barrier have helped to unravel this interdependence. Key among the consequences of interference with the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier is the appearance of significant amounts of proteins in the urine. Proteinuria correlates with kidney disease progression and cardiovascular mortality. With specific reference to proteinuria in human and animal disease phenotypes, the following review explores the roles of the endothelial cell, glomerular basement membrane, and the podocyte and attempts to highlight examples of essential crosstalk within this barrier.

  20. Synthetic Eelgrass Oil Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, T. G.

    2013-05-01

    surface of filaments because the physical, van der Waals, forces, the basis for their adhesion to the surface, are weak and act over only a short distance. SE can be deployed in a fashion similar to a demersal fishing "longline". Oil can be "caught" by replacing baited hooks and snoods with closely spaced filaments of EMA. Adsorption of floating oil requires the filaments be long enough to reach the surface, and float, as eelgrass at low tide, on the surface for some distance. Laying multiple, parallel, lines of SE offshore, makes it possible to recover each, one at a time, and replace it without breeching the barrier to oil that they form. As EMA is tough and elastic, with a large surface area to volume ratio, by virtue of being formed as an open-cell foam, considerable oil is adsorbed and can be recovered by squeezing the oil out of the filaments. Lines of SE can be redeployed and do not have to be discarded.

  1. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avsenik Jernej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with pathologies such as acute stroke, tumors, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Avsenik Jernej; Bisdas Sotirios; Popovic Katarina Surlan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with patholog...

  3. Influence of puerarin, paeoniflorin, and menthol on structure and barrier function of tight junctions in MDCK and MDCK-MDR1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Menthol but not puerarin and paeoniflorin may enhance paracellular transport and improve drug penetration of the BBB by disrupting the structure and, thereby, weakening the barrier function of TJs.

  4. Trafficking of adeno-associated virus vectors across a model of the blood-brain barrier; a comparative study of transcytosis and transduction using primary human brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Steven F; Andrews, Allison M; Lutton, Evan M; Mu, Dakai; Hudry, Eloise; Hyman, Bradley T; Maguire, Casey A; Ramirez, Servio H

    2017-01-01

    Developing therapies for central nervous system (CNS) diseases is exceedingly difficult because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Notably, emerging technologies may provide promising new options for the treatment of CNS disorders. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) has been shown to transduce cells in the CNS following intravascular administration in rodents, cats, pigs, and non-human primates. These results suggest that AAV9 is capable of crossing the BBB. However, mechanisms that govern AAV9 transendothelial trafficking at the BBB remain unknown. Furthermore, possibilities that AAV9 may transduce brain endothelial cells or affect BBB integrity still require investigation. Using primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells as a model of the human BBB, we performed transduction and transendothelial trafficking assays comparing AAV9 to AAV2, a serotype that does not cross the BBB or transduce endothelial cells effectively in vivo. Results of our in vitro studies indicate that AAV9 penetrates brain microvascular endothelial cells barriers more effectively than AAV2, but has reduced transduction efficiency. In addition, our data suggest that (i) AAV9 penetrates endothelial barriers through an active, cell-mediated process, and (ii) AAV9 fails to disrupt indicators of BBB integrity such as transendothelial electrical resistance, tight junction protein expression/localization, and inflammatory activation status. Overall, this report shows how human brain endothelial cells configured in BBB models can be utilized for evaluating transendothelial movement and transduction kinetics of various AAV capsids. Importantly, the use of a human in vitro BBB model can provide import insight into the possible effects that candidate AVV gene therapy vectors may have on the status of BBB integrity. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on page 192.

  5. Quantifying water flow within aquatic ecosystems using load cell sensors: a profile of currents experienced by coral reef organisms around Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Jacob L

    2014-01-01

    Current velocity in aquatic environments has major implications for the diversity, abundance and ecology of aquatic organisms, but quantifying these currents has proven difficult. This study utilises a simple and inexpensive instrument (reef system around Lizard Island (Great Barrier Reef, Australia) at a spatial and temporal scale relevant to the ecology of individual benthos and fish. The instrument uses load-cell sensors to provide a correlation between sensor output and ambient current velocity of 99%. Each instrument is able to continuously record current velocities to >500 cms⁻¹ and wave frequency to >100 Hz over several weeks. Sensor data are registered and processed at 16 MHz and 10 bit resolution, with a measuring precision of 0.06±0.04%, and accuracy of 0.51±0.65% (mean ±S.D.). Each instrument is also pressure rated to 120 m and shear stresses ≤20 kNm⁻² allowing deployment in harsh environments. The instrument was deployed across 27 coral reef sites covering the crest (3 m), mid-slope (6 m) and deep-slope (9 m depth) of habitats directly exposed, oblique or sheltered from prevailing winds. Measurements demonstrate that currents over the reef slope and crest varies immensely depending on depth and exposure: currents differ up to 9-fold within habitats only separated by 3 m depth and 15-fold between exposed, oblique and sheltered habitats. Comparisons to ambient weather conditions reveal that currents around Lizard Island are largely wind driven. Zero to 22.5 knot winds correspond directly to currents of 0 to >82 cms⁻¹, while tidal currents rarely exceed 5.5 cms⁻¹. Rather, current velocity increases exponentially as a function of wave height (0 to 1.6 m) and frequency (0.54 to 0.20 Hz), emphasizing the enormous effect of wind and waves on organisms in these shallow coral reef habitats.

  6. The Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of Lignans and Malabaricones from the Seeds of Myristica fragrans in the MDCK-pHaMDR Cell Monolayer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability of twelve lignans and three phenolic malabaricones from the seeds of Myristica fragrans (nutmeg were studied with the MDCK-pHaMDR cell monolayer model. The samples were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and the apparent permeability coefficients (Papp were calculated. Among the fifteen test compounds, benzonfuran-type, dibenzylbutane-type and arylnaphthalene-type lignans showed poor to moderate permeabilities with Papp values at 10−8–10−6 cm/s; those of 8-O-4′-neolignan and tetrahydrofuran-lignan were at 10−6–10−5 cm/s, meaning that their permeabilities are moderate to high; the permeabilities of malabaricones were poor as their Papp values were at 10−8–10−7 cm/s. To 5-methoxy-dehydrodiisoeugenol (2, erythro-2-(4-allyl-2,6-dimethoxyphenoxy-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl-propan-1-ol acetate (6, verrucosin (8, and nectandrin B (9, an efflux way was involved and the main transporter for 6, 8 and 9 was demonstrated to be P-glycoprotein. The time and concentration dependency experiments indicated the main transport mechanism for neolignans dehydrodiisoeugenol (1, myrislignan (7 and 8 was passive diffusion. This study summarized the relationship between the BBB permeability and structure parameters of the test compounds, which could be used to preliminarily predict the transport of a compound through BBB. The results provide a significant molecular basis for better understanding the potential central nervous system effects of nutmeg.

  7. Ablation of CD11c(hi) dendritic cells exacerbates Japanese encephalitis by regulating blood-brain barrier permeability and altering tight junction/adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Hossain, Ferdaus Mohd Altaf; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John-Hwa; Kim, Bumseok; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2016-10-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE), characterized by extensive neuroinflammation following infection with neurotropic JE virus (JEV), is becoming a leading cause of viral encephalitis due to rapid changes in climate and demography. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in restricting neuroinvasion of peripheral leukocytes and virus, thereby regulating the progression of viral encephalitis. In this study, we explored the role of CD11c(hi) dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating BBB integrity and JE progression using a conditional depletion model of CD11c(hi) DCs. Transient ablation of CD11c(hi) DCs resulted in markedly increased susceptibility to JE progression along with highly increased neuro-invasion of JEV. In addition, exacerbated JE progression in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated hosts was closely associated with increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and CC chemokines (CCL2, CCL3, CXCL2) in the brain. Moreover, our results revealed that the exacerbation of JE progression in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated hosts was correlated with enhanced BBB permeability and reduced expression of tight junction and adhesion molecules (claudin-5, ZO-1, occluding, JAMs). Ultimately, our data conclude that the ablation of CD11c(hi) DCs provided a subsidiary impact on BBB integrity and the expression of tight junction/adhesion molecules, thereby leading to exacerbated JE progression. These findings provide insight into the secondary role of CD11c(hi) DCs in JE progression through regulation of BBB integrity and the expression of tight junction/adhesion molecules.

  8. A large-scale electrophoresis- and chromatography-based determination of gene expression profiles in bovine brain capillary endothelial cells after the re-induction of blood-brain barrier properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duban-Deweer Sophie

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs form the physiological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The barrier function is (at least in part due to well-known proteins such as transporters, tight junctions and metabolic barrier proteins (e.g. monoamine oxidase, gamma glutamyltranspeptidase and P-glycoprotein. Our previous 2-dimensional gel proteome analysis had identified a large number of proteins and revealed the major role of dynamic cytoskeletal remodelling in the differentiation of bovine BCECs. The aim of the present study was to elaborate a reference proteome of Triton X-100-soluble species from bovine BCECs cultured in the well-established in vitro BBB model developed in our laboratory. Results A total of 215 protein spots (corresponding to 130 distinct proteins were identified by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, whereas over 350 proteins were identified by a shotgun approach. We classified around 430 distinct proteins expressed by bovine BCECs. Our large-scale gene expression analysis enabled the correction of mistakes referenced into protein databases (e.g. bovine vinculin and constitutes valuable evidence for predictions based on genome annotation. Conclusions Elaboration of a reference proteome constitutes the first step in creating a gene expression database dedicated to capillary endothelial cells displaying BBB characteristics. It improves of our knowledge of the BBB and the key proteins in cell structures, cytoskeleton organization, metabolism, detoxification and drug resistance. Moreover, our results emphasize the need for both appropriate experimental design and correct interpretation of proteome datasets.

  9. Barriers to screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BRCA) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the USA, and mammography is an effective means for the early detection of BRCA. Identifying the barriers to screening mammography can inform research, policy and practice aiming to increase mammography adherence. A literature review was conducted to determine common barriers to screening mammography adherence. PsycINFO and PubMed databases were searched to identify studies published between 2000 and 2012 that examined barriers associated with reduced mammography adherence. Three thematic groups of barriers, based on social ecology, were identified from the literature: healthcare system-level, social and individual-level barriers. Researchers must consider screening behaviour in context and, therefore, should simultaneously consider each level of barriers when attempting to understand screening behaviour and create interventions to increase mammography adherence.

  10. Investigation of enzyme-sensitive lipid nanoparticles for delivery of siRNA to blood–brain barrier and glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruun J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jonas Bruun,1 Trine B Larsen,1 Rasmus I Jølck,1 Rasmus Eliasen,1 René Holm,2 Torben Gjetting,1 Thomas L Andresen11Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Center for Nanomedicine and Theranostics, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Lyngby, Denmark; 2H Lundbeck A/S, Biologics and Pharmaceutical Science, Valby, DenmarkAbstract: Clinical applications of siRNA for treating disorders in the central nervous system require development of systemic stable, safe, and effective delivery vehicles that are able to cross the impermeable blood–brain barrier (BBB. Engineering nanocarriers with low cellular interaction during systemic circulation, but with high uptake in targeted cells, is a great challenge and is further complicated by the BBB. As a first step in obtaining such a delivery system, this study aims at designing a lipid nanoparticle (LNP able to efficiently encapsulate siRNA by a combination of titratable cationic lipids. The targeted delivery is obtained through the design of a two-stage system where the first step is conjugation of angiopep to the surface of the LNP for targeting the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 expressed on the BBB. Second, the positively charged LNPs are masked with a negatively charged PEGylated (poly(ethylene glycol cleavable lipopeptide, which contains a recognition sequence for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, a class of enzymes often expressed in the tumor microenvironment and inflammatory BBB conditions. Proteolytic cleavage induces PEG release, including the release of four glutamic acid residues, providing a charge switch that triggers a shift of the LNP charge from weakly negative to positive, thus favoring cellular endocytosis and release of siRNA for high silencing efficiency. This work describes the development of this two-stage nanocarrier-system and evaluates the performance in brain endothelial and glioblastoma cells with respect to uptake and gene silencing efficiency. The

  11. Mucus as a Barrier to Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Marie; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2015-01-01

    barrier to drug delivery. Current knowledge of mucus characteristics and barrier properties, as achieved by state-of-the-art methodologies, is the topic of this MiniReview emphasizing the gastrointestinal mucus and an overall focus on oral drug delivery. Cell culture-based in vitro models are well......, studies of peptide and protein drug diffusion in and through mucus and studies of mucus-penetrating nanoparticles are included to illustrate the mucus as a potentially important barrier to obtain sufficient bioavailability of orally administered drugs, and thus an important parameter to address...

  12. The importance of dye chemistry and TiCl4 surface treatment in the behavior of Al2O3 recombination barrier layers deposited by atomic layer deposition in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to fabricate Al 2O 3 recombination barriers in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSSCs) employing an organic hole transport material (HTM) for the first time. Al 2O 3 recombination barriers of varying thickness were incorporated into efficient ss-DSSCs utilizing the Z907 dye adsorbed onto a 2 μm-thick nanoporous TiO 2 active layer and the HTM spiro-OMeTAD. The impact of Al 2O 3 barriers was also studied in devices employing different dyes, with increased active layer thicknesses, and with substrates that did not undergo the TiCl 4 surface treatment. In all instances, electron lifetimes (as determined by transient photovoltage measurements) increased and dark current was suppressed after Al 2O 3 deposition. However, only when the TiCl 4 treatment was eliminated did device efficiency increase; in all other instances efficiency decreased due to a drop in short-circuit current. These results are attributed in the former case to the similar effects of Al 2O 3 ALD and the TiCl 4 surface treatment whereas the insulating properties of Al 2O 3 hinder charge injection and lead to current loss in TiCl 4-treated devices. The impact of Al 2O 3 barrier layers was unaffected by doubling the active layer thickness or using an alternative ruthenium dye, but a metal-free donor-π-acceptor dye exhibited a much smaller decrease in current due to its higher excited state energy. We develop a model employing prior research on Al 2O 3 growth and dye kinetics that successfully predicts the reduction in device current as a function of ALD cycles and is extendable to different dye-barrier systems. © This journal is the Owner Societies 2012.

  13. Outer Membrane Vesicles and Soluble Factors Released by Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and Commensal ECOR63 Enhance Barrier Function by Regulating Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Carina-Shianya; Badia, Josefa; Bosch, Manel; Giménez, Rosa; Baldomà, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelial layer forms a physical and biochemical barrier that maintains the segregation between host and intestinal microbiota. The integrity of this barrier is critical in maintaining homeostasis in the body and its dysfunction is linked to a variety of illnesses, especially inflammatory bowel disease. Gut microbes, and particularly probiotic bacteria, modulate the barrier integrity by reducing gut permeability and reinforcing tight junctions. Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a good colonizer of the human gut with proven therapeutic efficacy in the remission of ulcerative colitis in humans. EcN positively modulates the intestinal epithelial barrier through upregulation and redistribution of the tight junction proteins ZO-1, ZO-2 and claudin-14. Upregulation of claudin-14 has been attributed to the secreted protein TcpC. Whether regulation of ZO-1 and ZO-2 is mediated by EcN secreted factors remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore whether outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by EcN strengthen the epithelial barrier. This study includes other E. coli strains of human intestinal origin that contain the tcpC gene, such as ECOR63. Cell-free supernatants collected from the wild-type strains and from the derived tcpC mutants were fractionated into isolated OMVs and soluble secreted factors. The impact of these extracellular fractions on the epithelial barrier was evaluated by measuring transepithelial resistance and expression of several tight junction proteins in T-84 and Caco-2 polarized monolayers. Our results show that the strengthening activity of EcN and ECOR63 does not exclusively depend on TcpC. Both OMVs and soluble factors secreted by these strains promote upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, and down-regulation of claudin-2. The OMVs-mediated effects are TcpC-independent. Soluble secreted TcpC contributes to the upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, but this protein has no effect on the transcriptional

  14. Hexavalent chromium at low concentration alters Sertoli cell barrier and connexin 43 gap junction but not claudin-11 and N-cadherin in the rat seminiferous tubule culture model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carette, Diane [INSERM U 1065, Team 5 “Physiopathology of Germ Cell Control: Genomic and Non Genomic Mechanisms” C3M, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Perrard, Marie-Hélène, E-mail: marie-helene.durand@ens-lyon.fr [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Prisant, Nadia [University of Versailles/St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Gilleron, Jérome; Pointis, Georges [INSERM U 1065, Team 5 “Physiopathology of Germ Cell Control: Genomic and Non Genomic Mechanisms” C3M, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Segretain, Dominique [University of Versailles/St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Durand, Philippe [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Kallistem SAS Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to toxic metals, specifically those belonging to the nonessential group leads to human health defects and among them reprotoxic effects. The mechanisms by which these metals produce their negative effects on spermatogenesis have not been fully elucidated. By using the Durand's validated seminiferous tubule culture model, which mimics the in vivo situation, we recently reported that concentrations of hexavalent chromium, reported in the literature to be closed to that found in the blood circulation of men, increase the number of germ cell cytogenetic abnormalities. Since this metal is also known to affect cellular junctions, we investigated, in the present study, its potential influence on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins present at this level such as connexin 43, claudin-11 and N-cadherin. Cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers expressed the three junctional proteins and ZO-1 for at least 12 days. Exposure to low concentrations of chromium (10 μg/l) increased the trans-epithelial resistance without major changes of claudin-11 and N-cadherin expressions but strongly delocalized the gap junction protein connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells. The possibility that the hexavalent chromium-induced alteration of connexin 43 indirectly mediates the effect of the toxic metal on the blood–testis barrier dynamic is postulated. - Highlights: ► Influence of Cr(VI) on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins ► Use of cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers ► Low concentrations of Cr(VI) (10 μg/l) altered the trans-epithelial resistance. ► Cr(VI) did not alter claudin-11 and N-cadherin. ► Cr(VI) delocalized connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells.

  15. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    This paper shows that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system. Specifically, we prove converse barrier certificate theorems for a class of structurally stable dynamical systems. Other authors have developed a related result by assuming that the dynamical system has neither sing...

  16. Skin barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Renowned experts present the latest knowledge Although a very fragile structure, the skin barrier is probably one of the most important organs of the body. Inward/out it is responsible for body integrity and outward/in for keeping microbes, chemicals, and allergens from penetrating the skin. Since...... the role of barrier integrity in atopic dermatitis and the relationship to filaggrin mutations was discovered a decade ago, research focus has been on the skin barrier, and numerous new publications have become available. This book is an interdisciplinary update offering a wide range of information...... on the subject. It covers new basic research on skin markers, including results on filaggrin and on methods for the assessment of the barrier function. Biological variation and aspects of skin barrier function restoration are discussed as well. Further sections are dedicated to clinical implications of skin...

  17. Investigation of enzyme-sensitive lipid nanoparticles for delivery of siRNA to blood–brain barrier and glioma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jonas; Larsen, Trine Bjørnbo; Jølck, Rasmus Irming

    2015-01-01

    Clinical applications of siRNA for treating disorders in the central nervous system require development of systemic stable, safe, and effective delivery vehicles that are able to cross the impermeable blood–brain barrier (BBB). Engineering nanocarriers with low cellular interaction during systemi...

  18. Toward guided tissue and bone regeneration: morphology, attachment, proliferation, and migration of cells cultured on collagen barrier membranes. A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behring, J.; Junker, R.; Walboomers, X.F.; Chessnut, B.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Collagen barrier membranes are frequently used in both guided tissue regeneration (GTR) and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Collagen used for these devices is available from different species and is often processed to alter the properties of the final product. This is necessary because unprocessed c

  19. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  20. Barriers to Effective Listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert, Jack E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the following barriers which interfere with listening efficiency: content, speaker, medium, distractions, mindset, language, listening speed, and feedback. Suggests ways to combat these obstacles to accurate comprehension. (MM)

  1. Protein kinase C-α signals P115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation in TNF-α-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Xiaolu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, is capable of activating the small GTPase RhoA, which in turn contributes to endothelial barrier dysfunction. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms remained undefined. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of protein kinase C (PKC isozymes in the mechanism of RhoA activation and in signaling TNF-α-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMEC barrier dysfunction. Methods Bend.3 cells, an immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, were exposed to TNF-α (10 ng/mL. RhoA activity was assessed by pull down assay. PKC-α activity was measured using enzyme assasy. BMEC barrier function was measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (TER. p115RhoGEF phosphorylation was detected by autoradiography followed by western blotting. F-actin organization was observed by rhodamine-phalloidin staining. Both pharmacological inhibitors and knockdown approaches were employed to investigate the role of PKC and p115RhoGEF in TNF-α-induced RhoA activation and BMEC permeability. Results We observed that TNF-α induces a rapid phosphorylation of p115RhoGEF, activation of PKC and RhoA in BMECs. Inhibition of conventional PKC by Gö6976 mitigated the TNF-α-induced p115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation. Subsequently, we found that these events are regulated by PKC-α rather than PKC-β by using shRNA. In addition, P115-shRNA and n19RhoA (dominant negative mutant of RhoA transfections had no effect on mediating TNF-α-induced PKC-α activation. These data suggest that PKC-α but not PKC-β acts as an upstream regulator of p115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation in response to TNF-α. Moreover, depletion of PKC-α, of p115RhoGEF, and inhibition of RhoA activation also prevented TNF-α-induced stress fiber formation and a decrease in TER. Conclusions Taken together, our results show that PKC-α phosphorylation of p115RhoGEF mediates TNF

  2. Enhancing Anticancer Effect of Gefitinib across the Blood-Brain Barrier Model Using Liposomes Modified with One α-Helical Cell-Penetrating Peptide or Glutathione and Tween 80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Hong, Shu-Ting; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Lo, Yu-Li; Lin, Anya Maan-Yuh; Yang, James Chih-Hsin

    2016-11-29

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), such as gefitinib, have been demonstrated to effectively treat the patients of extracranial non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, these patients often develop brain metastasis (BM) during their disease course. The major obstacle to treat BM is the limited penetration of anticancer drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, we utilized gefitinib-loaded liposomes with different modifications to improve gefitinib delivery across the in vitro BBB model of bEnd.3 cells. Gefitinib was encapsulated in small unilamellar liposomes modified with glutathione (GSH) and Tween 80 (SUV-G+T; one ligand plus one surfactant) or RF (SUV-RF; one α-helical cell-penetrating peptide). GSH, Tween 80, and RF were tested by the sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay to find their non-cytotoxic concentrations on bEnd.3 cells. The enhancement on gefitinib across the BBB was evaluated by cytotoxicity assay on human lung adenocarcinoma PC9 cells under the bEnd.3 cells grown on the transwell inserts. Our findings showed that gefitinib incorporated in SUV-G+T or SUV-RF across the bEnd.3 cells significantly reduced the viability of PC9 cells more than that of free gefitinib. Furthermore, SUV-RF showed no cytotoxicity on bEnd.3 cells and did not affect the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transendothelial permeability of sodium fluorescein across the BBB model. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy were employed to evaluate the endocytosis pathways of SUV-RF. The results indicated that the uptake into bEnd.3 cells was mainly through adsorptive-mediated mechanism via electrostatic interaction and partially through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In conclusion, cell penetrating peptide-conjugated SUV-RF shed light on improving drug transport across the BBB via modulating the transcytosis pathway(s).

  3. Hedging Double Barriers with Singles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sbuelz, A.

    2000-01-01

    Double barrier options provide risk managers with good-deal flexibility in tailoring portfolio returns.Their hedges offer full protection only if unwound along the barriers.This work provides non-dynamic hedges that project the risk of double barriers on to single barriers.Non-dynamic hedges overcom

  4. Overcoming Biological Barriers with Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Dhaval; Gupta, Roohi; Mohan, Praveena; Monson, Kenneth; Rapoport, Natalya

    2011-01-01

    Effect of ultrasound on the permeability of blood vessels and cell membranes to macromolecules and nanodroplets was investigated using mouse carotid arteries and tumor cells. Model macromolecular drug, FITC-dextran with molecular weight of 70,000 Da was used in experiments with carotid arteries. The effect of unfocused 1-MHz ultrasound and and perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether nanodroplets stabilized with the poly(ethylene oxide)-co-poly(D,L-lactide) block copolymer shells was studied. In cell culture experiments, ovarian carcinoma cells and Doxorubicin (DOX) loaded poly(ethylene oxide)-co-polycaprolactone nanodroplets were used. The data showed that the application of ultrasound resulted in permeabilization of all biological barriers tested. Under the action of ultrasound, not only FITC-dextran but also nanodroplets effectively penetrated through the arterial wall; the effect of continuous wave ultrasound was stronger than that of pulsed ultrasound. In cell culture experiments, ultrasound triggered DOX penetration into cell nuclei, presumably due to releasing the drug from the carrier. Detailed mechanisms of the observed effects require further study. PMID:24839333

  5. Breakdown of blood-brain barrier function in the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection mediated by virus-specific CD8+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, I H; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1991-01-01

    . It was demonstrated that Thy-1+, CD8+ class I-restricted T cells were mandatory for the increase in BBB permeability as well as for mortality. In addition, depletion of class II-restricted CD4+ cells significantly weakened both effects of cell transfer. These results support the idea of a causal relationship between...... virus-specific T cell activity, BBB dysfunction, and fatal disease. Furthermore, the data indicate that T helper cells augment the response of LCMV-specific CD8+ effector cells....

  6. Barriers to cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womeodu, R J; Bailey, J E

    1996-01-01

    Many barriers to cancer screening have been summarized and discussed. Barriers have been documented in all patient populations, but some groups such as ethnic minorities and the elderly face unique barriers. The barriers to cancer screening, are multifactorial, but much of the responsibility for change must lie with health care providers and the health care delivery industry. This is not to free the patient of all responsibility, but some significant barriers are beyond their direct control. Take, for example, socioeconomic status, disease knowledge, and culturally related perceptions and myths about cancer detection and treatment. The health care industry must do a better job identifying and overcoming these barriers. The significant effects of provider counseling and advice must not be underestimated. Patients must first be advised, and then further actions must be taken if they reject the screening advice. Did they refuse adherence to recommendations because they do not view themselves as susceptible, because of overwhelming personal barriers, or because of a fatalistic attitude toward cancer detection and treatment? If that is the case, physicians and health care institutions must attempt to change perceptions, educate, and personalize the message so that patients accept their disease susceptibility [table: see text]. Multiple patient and provider risk factors have been identified that can be used to target patients particularly at high risk for inadequate cancer screening and providers at high risk for performing inadequate screening. Research has clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of interventions to improve tracking of patient and physician compliance with screening recommendations. Further research is needed to show the impact of managed-care penetration and payer status on screening efforts, and incentive schemes need to be tested that reward institutions and third-party payers who develop uniform standards and procedures for cancer screening. The

  7. Brain pericytes increase the lipopolysaccharide-enhanced transcytosis of HIV-1 free virus across the in vitro blood–brain barrier: evidence for cytokine-mediated pericyte-endothelial cell crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enters the brain by crossing the blood–brain barrier (BBB) as both free virus and within infected immune cells. Previous work showed that activation of the innate immune system with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) enhances free virus transport both in vivo and across monolayer monocultures of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) in vitro. Methods Here, we used monocultures and co-cultures of brain pericytes and brain endothelial cells to examine the crosstalk between these cell types in mediating the LPS-enhanced permeation of radioactively-labeled HIV-1 (I-HIV) across BMEC monolayers. Results We found that brain pericytes when co-cultured with BMEC monolayers magnified the LPS-enhanced transport of I-HIV without altering transendothelial electrical resistance, indicating that pericytes affected the transcytotic component of HIV-1 permeation. As LPS crosses the BBB poorly if at all, and since pericytes are on the abluminal side of the BBB, we postulated that luminal LPS acts indirectly on pericytes through abluminal secretions from BMECs. Consistent with this, we found that the pattern of secretion of cytokines by pericytes directly exposed to LPS was different than when the pericytes were exposed to the abluminal fluid from LPS-treated BMEC monolayers. Conclusion These results are evidence for a cellular crosstalk in which LPS acts at the luminal surface of the brain endothelial cell, inducing abluminal secretions that stimulate pericytes to release substances that enhance the permeability of the BMEC monolayer to HIV. PMID:23816186

  8. The Glomerular Filtration Barrier: Components and Crosstalk

    OpenAIRE

    Madhav C. Menon; Chuang, Peter Y.; Cijiang John He

    2012-01-01

    The glomerular filtration barrier is a highly specialized blood filtration interface that displays a high conductance to small and midsized solutes in plasma but retains relative impermeability to macromolecules. Its integrity is maintained by physicochemical and signalling interplay among its three core constituents—the glomerular endothelial cell, the basement membrane and visceral epithelial cell (podocyte). Understanding the pathomechanisms of inherited and acquired human diseases as well...

  9. Mechanism of Striation in Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Shuo; HE Feng; OUYANG Ji-Ting

    2007-01-01

    @@ The mechanism of striations in dielectric barrier discharge in pure neon is studied by a two-dimensional particlein-cell/Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model. It is shown that the striations appear in the plasma background,and non-uniform electrical field resulting from ionization and the negative wall charge appear on the dielectric layer above the anode. The sustainment of striations is a non-local kinetic effect of electrons in a stratified field controlled by non-elastic impact with neutral gases. The striations in the transient dielectric barrier discharge are similar to those in dc positive column discharge.

  10. Overcoming Language Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Buda, Yvonne

    1976-01-01

    Many family physicians in Canada experience language and cultural barriers between themselves and their patients. Several aspects of the ensuing problems are described and some practical suggestions for solutions are made. The importance of health education for new Canadians in the family physician's office as well as through the media and community projects is stressed. Imagesp68-ap68-bp70-a PMID:21308059

  11. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Samantha Jane Hindle; Roland Jerome Bainton

    2014-01-01

    The invertebrate blood-brain barrier field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through GPCR signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate blood-brain barrier has recently been shown to require coordinated funct...

  12. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor (EGF is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health.

  14. Intestinal barrier homeostasis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goll, Rasmus; van Beelen Granlund, Atle

    2015-01-01

    The single-cell thick intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) lining with its protective layer of mucus is the primary barrier protecting the organism from the harsh environment of the intestinal lumen. Today it is clear that the balancing act necessary to maintain intestinal homeostasis is dependent on the coordinated action of all cell types of the IEC, and that there are no passive bystanders to gut immunity solely acting as absorptive or regenerative cells: Mucin and antimicrobial peptides on the epithelial surface are continually being replenished by goblet and Paneth's cells. Luminal antigens are being sensed by pattern recognition receptors on the enterocytes. The enteroendocrine cells sense the environment and coordinate the intestinal function by releasing neuropeptides acting both on IEC and inflammatory cells. All this while cells are continuously and rapidly being regenerated from a limited number of stem cells close to the intestinal crypt base. This review seeks to describe the cell types and structures of the intestinal epithelial barrier supporting intestinal homeostasis, and how disturbance in these systems might relate to inflammatory bowel disease.

  15. Control of an interfacial MoSe2 layer in Cu2ZnSnSe4 thin film solar cells: 8.9% power conversion efficiency with a TiN diffusion barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Byungha; Zhu, Yu; Bojarczuk, Nestor A.; Jay Chey, S.; Guha, Supratik

    2012-07-01

    We have examined Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) solar cells prepared by thermal co-evaporation on Mo-coated glass substrates followed by post-deposition annealing under Se ambient. We show that the control of an interfacial MoSe2 layer thickness and the introduction of an adequate Se partial pressure (PSe) during annealing are essential to achieve high efficiency CZTSe solar cells—a reverse correlation between device performance and MoSe2 thickness is observed, and insufficient PSe leads to the formation of defects within the bandgap as revealed by photoluminescence measurements. Using a TiN diffusion barrier, we demonstrate 8.9% efficiency CZTSe devices with a long lifetime of photo-generated carriers.

  16. "Targeted disruption of the epithelial-barrier by Helicobacter pylori"

    OpenAIRE

    Wroblewski Lydia E; Peek Richard M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human gastric epithelium and induces chronic gastritis, which can lead to gastric cancer. Through cell-cell contacts the gastric epithelium forms a barrier to protect underlying tissue from pathogenic bacteria; however, H. pylori have evolved numerous strategies to perturb the integrity of the gastric barrier. In this review, we summarize recent research into the mechanisms through which H. pylori disrupts intercellular junctions and disrupts the gas...

  17. A permeability barrier surrounds taste buds in lingual epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Robin; Pereira, Elizabeth; Kurian, Mani; Barro-Soria, Rene; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are characterized by specialized cell-cell junctions, typically localized to the apical regions of cells. These junctions are formed by interacting membrane proteins and by cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components. Within the lingual epithelium, tight junctions join the apical tips of the gustatory sensory cells in taste buds. These junctions constitute a selective barrier that limits penetration of chemosensory stimuli into taste buds (Michlig et al. J Comp Neurol 502: 1003-1011, 2007). We tested the ability of chemical compounds to permeate into sensory end organs in the lingual epithelium. Our findings reveal a robust barrier that surrounds the entire body of taste buds, not limited to the apical tight junctions. This barrier prevents penetration of many, but not all, compounds, whether they are applied topically, injected into the parenchyma of the tongue, or circulating in the blood supply, into taste buds. Enzymatic treatments indicate that this barrier likely includes glycosaminoglycans, as it was disrupted by chondroitinase but, less effectively, by proteases. The barrier surrounding taste buds could also be disrupted by brief treatment of lingual tissue samples with DMSO. Brief exposure of lingual slices to DMSO did not affect the ability of taste buds within the slice to respond to chemical stimulation. The existence of a highly impermeable barrier surrounding taste buds and methods to break through this barrier may be relevant to basic research and to clinical treatments of taste.

  18. Thermal barrier coating materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Clarke

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Improved thermal barrier coatings (TBCs will enable future gas turbines to operate at higher gas temperatures. Considerable effort is being invested, therefore, in identifying new materials with even better performance than the current industry standard, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ. We review recent progress and suggest that an integrated strategy of experiment, intuitive arguments based on crystallography, and simulation may lead most rapidly to the development of new TBC materials.

  19. 5'-Ectonucleotidase/CD73 expression on lymph-circulating lymphocytes and lymphatic endothelial cells offers new paths to explore barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidibé, Adama; Imhof, Beat A

    2015-02-01

    5'-Nucleotidase/CD73 is a key enzyme in the regulation of purinergic signaling, hydrolyzing extracellular AMP to produce adenosine, which is critical in the blood vascular system and in immunosuppression. CD73 is expressed by both blood endothelial cells and lymphatic endothelial cells. Although the role of CD73 on blood endothelial cells in controlling vascular permeability and leukocyte trafficking has been studied, the role of lymphatic CD73 has thus far remained unknown. In this issue of European Journal of Immunology, Yegutkin et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 562-573] compare CD73 activity in the endothelia of lymphatics and blood vessels and investigate the CD73(+) lymphocyte subpopulations possibly involved in immunoregulation. This Commentary will discuss how the authors' work sheds light on the differential use of CD73 by these two cell populations to control endothelial permeability and sprouting.

  20. Targeted liposomes for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooy, I.

    2011-01-01

    Our brain is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This barrier is formed by specialized endothelial cells of the brain vasculature and prevents toxic substances from entering the brain. The downside of this barrier is that many drugs that have been developed to cure brain diseases cannot cros

  1. Intestinal Cell Tight Junctions Limit Invasion of Candida albicans through Active Penetration and Endocytosis in the Early Stages of the Interaction of the Fungus with the Intestinal Barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Goyer

    Full Text Available C. albicans is a commensal yeast of the mucous membranes in healthy humans that can also cause disseminated candidiasis, mainly originating from the digestive tract, in vulnerable patients. It is necessary to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the interaction of C. albicans with enterocytes to better understand the basis of commensalism and pathogenicity of the yeast and to improve the management of disseminated candidiasis. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of tight junction (TJ formation in parallel with the invasion of C. albicans into the Caco-2 intestinal cell line. Using invasiveness assays on Caco-2 cells displaying pharmacologically altered TJ (i.e. differentiated epithelial cells treated with EGTA or patulin, we were able to demonstrate that TJ protect enterocytes against invasion of C. albicans. Moreover, treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of endocytosis decreased invasion of the fungus into Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, suggesting that facilitating access of the yeast to the basolateral side of intestinal cells promotes endocytosis of C. albicans in its hyphal form. These data were supported by SEM observations of differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, which highlighted membrane protrusions engulfing C. albicans hyphae. We furthermore demonstrated that Als3, a hypha-specific C. albicans invasin, facilitates internalization of the fungus by active penetration and induced endocytosis by differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ. However, our observations failed to demonstrate binding of Als3 to E-cadherin as the trigger mechanism of endocytosis of C. albicans into differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ.

  2. Dietary Yeast Cell Wall Extract Alters the Proteome of the Skin Mucous Barrier in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar): Increased Abundance and Expression of a Calreticulin-Like Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Giulia; Cash, Phillip; Fernandes, Jorge M O; Rajan, Binoy; Tinsley, John W; Bickerdike, Ralph; Martin, Samuel A M; Bowman, Alan S

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve fish health and reduce use of chemotherapeutants in aquaculture production, the immunomodulatory effect of various nutritional ingredients has been explored. In salmon, there is evidence that functional feeds can reduce the abundance of sea lice. This study aimed to determine if there were consistent changes in the skin mucus proteome that could serve as a biomarker for dietary yeast cell wall extract. The effect of dietary yeast cell wall extract on the skin mucus proteome of Atlantic salmon was examined using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Forty-nine spots showed a statistically significant change in their normalised volumes between the control and yeast cell wall diets. Thirteen spots were successfully identified by peptide fragment fingerprinting and LC-MS/MS and these belonged to a variety of functions and pathways. To assess the validity of the results from the proteome approach, the gene expression of a selection of these proteins was studied in skin mRNA from two different independent feeding trials using yeast cell wall extracts. A calreticulin-like protein increased in abundance at both the protein and transcript level in response to dietary yeast cell wall extract. The calreticulin-like protein was identified as a possible biomarker for yeast-derived functional feeds since it showed the most consistent change in expression in both the mucus proteome and skin transcriptome. The discovery of such a biomarker is expected to quicken the pace of research in the application of yeast cell wall extracts.

  3. Dietary Yeast Cell Wall Extract Alters the Proteome of the Skin Mucous Barrier in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar): Increased Abundance and Expression of a Calreticulin-Like Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Giulia; Cash, Phillip; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.; Rajan, Binoy; Tinsley, John W.; Bickerdike, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve fish health and reduce use of chemotherapeutants in aquaculture production, the immunomodulatory effect of various nutritional ingredients has been explored. In salmon, there is evidence that functional feeds can reduce the abundance of sea lice. This study aimed to determine if there were consistent changes in the skin mucus proteome that could serve as a biomarker for dietary yeast cell wall extract. The effect of dietary yeast cell wall extract on the skin mucus proteome of Atlantic salmon was examined using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Forty-nine spots showed a statistically significant change in their normalised volumes between the control and yeast cell wall diets. Thirteen spots were successfully identified by peptide fragment fingerprinting and LC-MS/MS and these belonged to a variety of functions and pathways. To assess the validity of the results from the proteome approach, the gene expression of a selection of these proteins was studied in skin mRNA from two different independent feeding trials using yeast cell wall extracts. A calreticulin-like protein increased in abundance at both the protein and transcript level in response to dietary yeast cell wall extract. The calreticulin-like protein was identified as a possible biomarker for yeast-derived functional feeds since it showed the most consistent change in expression in both the mucus proteome and skin transcriptome. The discovery of such a biomarker is expected to quicken the pace of research in the application of yeast cell wall extracts. PMID:28046109

  4. The Blood-Brain Barrier and Methamphetamine: Open Sesame?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patric eTurowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemical and electrical microenvironment of neurons within the central nervous system is protected and segregated from the circulation by the vascular blood–brain barrier. This barrier operates on the level of endothelial cells and includes regulatory crosstalk with neighbouring pericytes, astrocytes and neurons. Within this neurovascular unit, the endothelial cells form a formidable, highly regulated barrier through the presence of inter-endothelial tight junctions, the absence of fenestrations, and the almost complete absence of fluid-phase transcytosis. The potent psychostimulant drug methamphetamine transiently opens the vascular blood–brain barrier through either or both the modulation of inter-endothelial junctions and the induction of fluid-phase transcytosis. Direct action of methamphetamine on the vascular endothelium induces acute opening of the blood-brain barrier. In addition, striatal effects of methamphetamine and resultant neuroinflammatory signalling can indirectly lead to chronic dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier may exacerbate the neuronal damage that occurs during methamphetamine abuse. However, this process also constitutes a rare example of agonist-induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and the adjunctive use of methamphetamine may present an opportunity to enhance delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the underlying neural tissue.

  5. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Jane Hindle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The invertebrate blood-brain barrier field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through GPCR signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate blood-brain barrier has recently been shown to require coordinated function of all layers of the compound barrier structure, analogous to signaling between the layers of the vertebrate neurovascular unit. These findings strengthen the notion that many blood-brain barrier mechanisms are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest that novel findings in invertebrate model organisms will have a significant impact on the understanding of vertebrate BBB functions. In this vein, important roles in coordinating localized and systemic signaling to dictate organism development and growth are beginning to show how the blood-brain barrier can govern whole animal physiologies. This includes novel functions of blood-brain barrier gap junctions in orchestrating synchronized neuroblast proliferation, and of blood-brain barrier secreted antagonists of insulin receptor signaling. These advancements and others are pushing the field forward in exciting new directions. In this review, we provide a synopsis of invertebrate blood-brain barrier anatomy and physiology, with a focus on insights from the past 5 years, and highlight important areas for future study.

  6. Pathogenic E. coli exploits SslE mucinase activity to translocate through the mucosal barrier and get access to host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valeri

    Full Text Available SslE is a zinc-metalloprotease involved in the degradation of mucin substrates and recently proposed as a potential vaccine candidate against pathogenic E. coli. In this paper, by exploiting a human in vitro model of mucus-secreting cells, we demonstrated that bacteria expressing SslE have a metabolic benefit which results in an increased growth rate postulating the importance of this antigen in enhancing E. coli fitness. We also observed that SslE expression facilitates E. coli penetration of the mucus favouring bacteria adhesion to host cells. Moreover, we found that SslE-mediated opening of the mucosae contributed to the activation of pro-inflammatory events. Indeed, intestinal cells infected with SslE-secreting bacteria showed an increased production of IL-8 contributing to neutrophil recruitment. The results presented in this paper conclusively designate SslE as an important colonization factor favouring E. coli access to both metabolic substrates and target cells.

  7. Technical barrier challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李思佳

    2014-01-01

    according to a famouse report,the foreign Technical Barriers to Trade(TBT)have some effects on the exports of the People’s Republic of China.Major findings are as follows:(1)TBT makes it more difficult for China to export;(2)TBT increases the costs of Chinese export commodities;(3)TBT causes friction and confilicts in the international trade;(4)SOME developed countries have moved their phase-outs to China and other developing countries,which have become victims of TBT.

  8. Support or Barrier?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum; Lønsmann, Dorte

    This study offers a critical look at how corporate-level language management influences front-line language practices among employees in three multinational corporations (MNCs) headquartered in Scandinavia. Based on interview and document data, we examine, firstly, what front-line practices...... employees use to cross language boundaries in their everyday work, and, secondly, how these practices relate to top-down language management in the case companies. Our findings show that employees are often dependent on ad hoc and informal solutions in cross- language situations, which leads us...... to a discussion of how a company’s language policy may be seen as both support and a barrier....

  9. [Barrier methods of contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, A; Edelman, D A

    1982-01-01

    Vaginal methods of contraception were the earliest types used and some references to them date back to antiquity. Most of the vaginal contraceptive agents identified by the ancient Greeks, Indians, Japanese, and Chinese have been found in modern laboratory tests to have spermicidal properties, but it is doubtful that the methods were fully reliable or were used by many people. During the 19th century the condom, vaginal spermicides, and diaphragm became available. The development of nonoxynol-9 and other nonirritating but effective spermicidal agents improved vaginal contraceptives greatly by the 1950s, but starting in the 1960s newer methods began to replace the vaginal methods. Interest in barrier methods has been reawakened somewhat by concern about the health effects of hormonal methods. At present all barrier methods leave something to be desired. Failure rates of 3-30% for barrier methods in general have been estimated, but the higher rates are believed due to incorrect or inconsistent use. Theoretical failure rates of condoms and diaphragms have been estimated at 3/100 women-years, but in actual use failure rates may reach 15 for condoms and 13 for diaphragms used with spermicides. Use-effectiveness rates are greatly influenced by motivation. For a variety of reasons, the acceptability of barrier methods is low, especially in developing countries. New developments in spermicidal agents include sperm inhibitors, which impede the fertilizing capacity of sperm rather than attempting a spermicidal effect; a number of such agents have been studied and have proven more effective in animal tests than conventional spermicides. Neosampoon, a new spermicidal foam, has attracted an increasing number of users, especially in developing countries. A new condom, made of thin polymers and containing a standard dose of nonoxynol-9, has been designed to dissolve in the vaginal fluid. Further studies are needed of its acceptability, efficacy, and side effects before it becomes

  10. Radioisotope battery using Schottky barrier devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manasse, F.K. (Drexel Univ., Philadelphia); Tse, A.N.

    1976-05-01

    Based on the well-known betavoltaic effect, a new nuclear battery, which uses a Schottky barrier, has been used in place of the more standard p-n junction diode, along with /sup 147/Pm metal film rather than Pm/sub 2/O/sub 3/ oxide, as in the commercially available Betacel. Measurement of absorption, conversion efficiency, thickness, etc., as functions of resistivity and other cell parameters, and assessment of performance are being researched to design a prototype battery.

  11. Angiopoietin-like protein 3 modulates barrier properties of human glomerular endothelial cells through a possible signaling pathway involving phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/protein kinase B and integrin α V β 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunling Li; Li Sun; Hong Xu; Zhengyu Fang; Wantong Yao; Wei Guo; Jia Rao; Xiliang Zha

    2008-01-01

    Podocytes can influence glomerular endothelial cell (GEnC) barrier properties and take part in the development of proteinuria by some molecules. Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (Angptl3), secreted by podocytes, is a member of the angiopoietin-like protein family that has important biological functions in endothelial cells. In our previous studies, we showed that mRNA expression of Angptl3 increased significantly in kidneys of children with minimal change nephrotic syndrome. And the mRNA level of Angptl3 was increased in the glomerulus of adriamycin rats with the development of proteinuria. It was also found that Angptl3 was expressed in the cytoplasm of cultured podocytes. Thus, Angptl3 might influence the biological functions of GEnCs in a paracrine manner. In this study, we found that Angptl3 could increase the permeability of GEnCs and increase the level of protein kinase B phosphorylation in cultured GEnCs in vitro. LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitor, could prevent the increase of permeability of GEnCs induced by Angptl3. Our results also indicated that the integrin α V β 3 antibody (LM609) could block the Angptl3-induced protein kinase B phosphorylation.

  12. Nanomedicine Faces Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Debbage

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted nanoparticles have the potential to improve drug delivery efficiencies by more than two orders of magnitude, from the ~ 0.1% which is common today. Most pharmacologically agents on the market today are small drug molecules, which diffuse across the body’s blood-tissue barriers and distribute not only into the lesion, but into almost all organs. Drug actions in the non-lesion organs are an inescapable part of the drug delivery principle, causing “side-effects” which limit the maximally tolerable doses and result in inadequate therapy of many lesions. Nanoparticles only cross barriers by design, so side-effects are not built into their mode of operation. Delivery rates of almost 90% have been reported. This review examines the significance of these statements and checks how far they need qualification. What type of targeting is required? Is a single targeting sufficient? What new types of clinical challenge, such as immunogenicity, might attend the use of targeted nanoparticles?

  13. Higgs vacua behind barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Tamarit, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Scenarios in which the Higgs vacuum arises radiatively and separated from the origin by a potential barrier at zero temperature are known to be attainable in models with extra singlet scalars, which in the limit of zero barrier height give rise to Coleman-Weinberg realizations of electroweak symmetry breaking. However, this requires large values of Higgs-portal couplings or a large number N of singlets. This is quantified in detail by considering, for varying N, the full two-loop effective potential at zero temperature, as well as finite temperature effects including the dominant two-loop corrections due to the singlets. Despite the large couplings, two-loop effects near the electroweak scale are under control, and actually better behaved in models with larger couplings yet fewer singlets. Strong first-order phase transitions are guaranteed even in the Coleman-Weinberg scenarios. Cubic Higgs couplings and Higgs associated-production cross sections exhibit deviations from the Standard Model predictions which c...

  14. A quasi-Delphi study on technological barriers to the uptake of hydrogen as a fuel for transport applications-Production, storage and fuel cell drivetrain considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, David; Anghel, Alexandra T.; Huijsmans, Joep; Vuille, François

    The introduction of hydrogen in transport, particularly using fuel cell vehicles, faces a number of technical and non-technical hurdles. However, their relative importance is unclear, as are the levels of concern accorded them within the expert community conducting research and development within this area. To understand what issues are considered by experts working in the field to have significant potential to slow down or prevent the introduction of hydrogen technology in transport, a study was undertaken, primarily during 2007. Three key technology areas within hydrogen transport were selected - hydrogen storage, fuel cell drivetrains, and small-scale hydrogen production - and interviews with selected experts conducted. Forty-nine experts from 34 organisations within the fuel cell, automotive, industrial gas and other related industries participated, in addition to some key academic and government figures. The survey was conducted in China, Japan, North America and Europe, and analysed using conventional mathematical techniques to provide weighted and averaged rankings of issues viewed as important by the experts. It became clear both from the interviews and the subsequent analysis that while a primary concern in China was fundamental technical performance, in the other regions cost and policy were rated more highly. Although a few individual experts identified possible technical showstoppers, the overall message was that pre-commercial hydrogen fuel cell vehicles could realistically be on the road in tens of thousands within 5 years, and that full commercialisation could take place within 10-15 years, without the need for radical technical breakthroughs. Perhaps surprisingly, the performance of hydrogen storage technologies was not viewed as a showstopper, though cost was seen as a significant challenge. Overall, however, coherent policy development was more frequently identified as a major issue to address.

  15. A quasi-Delphi study on technological barriers to the uptake of hydrogen as a fuel for transport applications : production, storage and fuel cell drivetrain considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, David; Anghel, Alexandra T.; Huijsmans, Joep; Vuille, François

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of hydrogen in transport, particularly using fuel cell vehicles, faces a number of technical and non-technical hurdles. However, their relative importance is unclear, as are the levels of concern accorded them within the expert community conducting research and development within this area. To understand what issues are considered by experts working in the field to have significant potential to slow down or prevent the introduction of hydrogen technology in transport, a study...

  16. The immunological barriers to xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadori, M; Cozzi, E

    2015-10-01

    The availability of cells, tissues and organs from a non-human species such as the pig could, at least in theory, meet the demand of organs necessary for clinical transplantation. At this stage, the important goal of getting over the first year of survival has been reported for both cellular and solid organ xenotransplantation in relevant preclinical primate models. In addition, xenotransplantation is already in the clinic as shown by the broad use of animal-derived medical devices, such as bioprosthetic heart valves and biological materials used for surgical tissue repair. At this stage, however, prior to starting a wide-scale clinical application of xenotransplantation of viable cells and organs, the important obstacle represented by the humoral immune response will need to be overcome. Likewise, the barriers posed by the activation of the innate immune system and coagulative pathway will have to be controlled. As far as xenogeneic nonviable xenografts, increasing evidence suggests that considerable immune reactions, mediated by both innate and adaptive immunity, take place and influence the long-term outcome of xenogeneic materials in patients, possibly precluding the use of bioprosthetic heart valves in young individuals. In this context, the present article provides an overview of current knowledge on the immune processes following xenotransplantation and on the possible therapeutic interventions to overcome the immunological drawbacks involved in xenotransplantation.

  17. Gut barrier in health and disease: focus on childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggiano, D; Ianiro, G; Vanella, G; Bibbò, S; Bruno, G; Simeone, G; Mele, G

    2015-01-01

    The gut barrier is a functional unit, organized as a multi-layer system, made up of two main components: a physical barrier surface, which prevents bacterial adhesion and regulates paracellular diffusion to the host tissues, and a deep functional barrier, that is able to discriminate between pathogens and commensal microorganisms, organizing the immune tolerance and the immune response to pathogens. Other mechanisms, such as gastric juice and pancreatic enzymes (which both have antibacterial properties) participate in the luminal integrity of the gut barrier. From the outer layer to the inner layer, the physical barrier is composed of gut microbiota (that competes with pathogens to gain space and energy resources, processes the molecules necessary to mucosal integrity and modulates the immunological activity of deep barrier), mucus (which separates the intraluminal content from more internal layers and contains antimicrobial products and secretory IgA), epithelial cells (which form a physical and immunological barrier) and the innate and adaptive immune cells forming the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (which is responsible for antigen sampling and immune responses). Disruption of the gut barrier has been associated with many gastrointestinal diseases, but also with extra-intestinal pathological condition, such as type 1 diabetes mellitus, allergic diseases or autism spectrum disorders. The maintenance of a healthy intestinal barrier is therefore of paramount importance in children, for both health and economic reasons. Many drugs or compounds used in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders act through the restoration of a normal intestinal permeability. Several studies have highlighted the role of probiotics in the modulation and reduction of intestinal permeability, considering the strong influence of gut microbiota in the modulation of the function and structure of gut barrier, but also on the immune response of the host. To date, available weapons for the

  18. Effect of diffusely adherent Escherichia coli strains isolated from diarrhoeal patients and healthy carriers on IL-8 secretion and tight junction barrier integrity of Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yoshihiko; Arikawa, Kentaro; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-03-15

    The pathogenesis of diffusely adherent Escherichia coli (DAEC) remains to be elucidated. Previously, we found that afimbrial adhesin gene (afa)-positive motile DAEC strains isolated from patients with diarrhoea induce high levels of IL-8 secretion in Caco-2 cells via toll-like receptor 5 (TLR-5), while non-motile strains did not. The aim of this study was to compare virulence properties, including the phylogenetic groups, afa subtypes, IL-8 secretion levels, and the effects on tight junctions, of DAEC strains isolated from healthy persons with those isolated from patients with diarrhoea. Induction of IL-8 secretion in Caco-2 cells was examined for a total of 36 afa-positive strains: 19 from diarrhoeal patients and 17 from healthy carriers. Irrespective of the source, all strains were classified into the phylogenetic group B2 or D, with the exception of two strains. All 7 motile strains isolated from diarrhoeal patients induced high levels of IL-8 secretion, while only 6 of 15 motile strains from healthy carriers induced IL-8 secretion to the same levels as the diarrhoeal strains. We speculated that additional virulence factors other than afa and motility cause the loosening of tight junctions that allows flagellin to reach TLR-5 located on the basolateral side of the epithelium. However, no differences in the TER and dextran permeability were observed between cells infected with diarrhoeal strains and those from healthy persons. Thus, diarrhoeagenic DAEC seems to possess additional factors, in addition to adhesin and flagellin, which can induce high IL-8 secretion.

  19. Barriers for recess physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many children, in particular girls, do not reach the recommended amount of daily physical activity. School recess provides an opportunity for both boys and girls to be physically active, but barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. This study explores gender...... differences in children's perceptions of barriers to recess physical activity. Based on the socio-ecological model four types of environmental barriers were distinguished: natural, social, physical and organizational environment. METHODS: Data were collected through 17 focus groups (at 17 different schools...... this study, we recommend promoting recess physical activity through a combination of actions, addressing barriers within the natural, social, physical and organizational environment....

  20. EGb761 provides a protective effect against Aβ1-42 oligomer-induced cell damage and blood-brain barrier disruption in an in vitro bEnd.3 endothelial model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-bin Wan

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common form of senile dementia which is characterized by abnormal amyloid beta (Aβ accumulation and deposition in brain parenchyma and cerebral capillaries, and leads to blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption. Despite great progress in understanding the etiology of AD, the underlying pathogenic mechanism of BBB damage is still unclear, and no effective treatment has been devised. The standard Ginkgo biloba extract EGb761 has been widely used as a potential cognitive enhancer for the treatment of AD. However, the cellular mechanism underlying the effect remain to be clarified. In this study, we employed an immortalized endothelial cell line (bEnd.3 and incubation of Aβ(1-42 oligomer, to mimic a monolayer BBB model under conditions found in the AD brain. We investigated the effect of EGb761 on BBB and found that Aβ1-42 oligomer-induced cell injury, apoptosis, and generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, were attenuated by treatment with EGb761. Moreover, treatment of the cells with EGb761 decreased BBB permeability and increased tight junction scaffold protein levels including ZO-1, Claudin-5 and Occludin. We also found that the Aβ(1-42 oligomer-induced upregulation of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE, which mediates Aβ cytotoxicity and plays an essential role in AD progression, was significantly decreased by treatment with EGb761. To our knowledge, we provide the first direct in vitro evidence of an effect of EGb761 on the brain endothelium exposed to Aβ(1-42 oligomer, and on the expression of tight junction (TJ scaffold proteins and RAGE. Our results provide a new insight into a possible mechanism of action of EGb761. This study provides a rational basis for the therapeutic application of EGb761 in the treatment of AD.

  1. Linguistic Barriers and Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    and intercultural communication, this article analyses interviews with 31 employees from two highly ethnically diverse Danish workplaces. The article shows how linguistic barriers such as different levels of majority language competence and their consequent misunderstandings breed mistrust and hostility, whilst......The influence of language on social capital in low-skill and ethnically diverse workplaces has thus far received very limited attention within the sociology of work. As the ethnically diverse workplace is an important social space for the construction of social relations bridging different social...... groups, the sociology of work needs to develop a better understanding of the way in which linguistic diversity influences the formation of social capital, i.e. resources such as the trust and reciprocity inherent in social relations in such workplaces. Drawing on theories about intergroup contact...

  2. Countermeasures and barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Johannes [Oersted - DTU, Automation, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2005-10-01

    In 1973 Haddon proposed ten strategies for reducing and avoiding damages based on a model of potential harmful energy transfer (Haddon, 1973). The strategies apply to a large variety of unwanted phenomena. Haddon's pioneering work on countermeasures has had a major influence on later thinking about safety. Considering its impact it is remarkable that the literature offers almost no discussions related to the theoretical foundations of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. The present report addresses a number of theoretical issues related to Haddon's countermeasure strategies, which are: 1) A reformulation and formalization of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. 2) An identification and description of some of the problems associated with the term 'barrier'. 3) Suggestions for a more precise terminology based on the causal structure of countermeasures. 4) Extending the scope of countermeasures to include sign-based countermeasures. (au)

  3. Importance of the Reorganization Energy Barrier in Computational Design of Porphyrin-Based Solar Cells with Cobalt-Based Redox Mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnsø, Kristian Baruël; Jónsson, Elvar Örn; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2015-01-01

    , and this limits the achievable efficiency. Here we show that the large driving force is a direct consequence of the large reorganization energy of the dye regeneration reaction. The reorganization energies for charge transfer between a simple zinc porphyrin dye and two popular cobalt-based redox mediators......The shift from iodide-based redox mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells toward octahedral cobalt complexes has led to a significant increase in the efficiency. However, due to the nature of this type of complexes the driving force required for the regeneration of the dye is very high...... to identify already known highperformance dyes in addition to a number of even better candidates. Our analysis shows that the large internal reorganization energy of the Co-based redox mediators is an obstacle for achieving higher efficiencies....

  4. Effects of dietary clays on performance and intestinal mucus barrier of broiler chicks challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and on goblet cell function in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, J A S; Ponnuraj, N P; Lee, J J; Utterback, P; Gaskins, H R; Dilger, R N; Pettigrew, J E

    2014-04-01

    In vivo and in vitro experiments were conducted to test for beneficial effects of dietary clays on broiler chicks challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and to explore potential mechanisms. First, two hundred forty 1-d-old male broilers (initial BW: 41.6 ± 0.4 g) were allotted in a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement in a randomized complete block design. There were 2 infection treatments (with or without Salmonella) and 4 diets: basal (BAS), 0.3% smectite A (SMA), 0.3% smectite B, and 0.3% zeolite. The Salmonella reduced (P clay largely restored it (challenge × diet interaction, P clays (P clays restored the growth depression caused by Salmonella, and changes in goblet cell function may contribute to the benefits of one of the clays, specifically SMA.

  5. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase may decrease intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and improve intestinal epithelial barrier function after ischemia- reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Yun Zheng; Xiao-Bing Fu; Jian-Guo Xu; Jing-Yu Zhao; Tong-Zhu Sun; Wei Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in rat small intestine after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)insult and the relationship between activation of p38 MAPK and apoptotic cell death of intestine.METHODS: Ninety Wistar rats were divided randomly into three groups, namely sham-operated group (C), I/R vehicle group (R) and SB203580 pre-treated group(S).In groups R and S, the superior mesenteric artery(SMA)was separated and occluded for 45 min, then released for reperfusion for0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h. In group C, SMA was separated without occlusion. Plasma D-lactate levels were examined and histological changes were observed under a light microscope. The activity of p38 MAPK was determined by Western immunoblotting and apoptotic cells were detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUDP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL).RESULTS: Intestinal ischemia followed by reperfusion activated p38 MAPK, and the maximal level of activation (7.3-fold vs sham-operated group) was reached 30 min after I/R. Treatment with SB 203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor,reduced intestinal apoptosis (26.72±3.39% vs62.50±3.08%in I/R vehicle, P<0.01) and decreased plasma D-lactate level (0.78±0.15 mmol/L in I/R vehicle vs0.42±0.17 mmol/L in SB-treated group) and improved post-ischemic intestinal histological damage.CONCLUSION: p38 MAPK plays a crucial role in the signal transduction pathway mediating post-ischemic intestinal apoptosis, and inhibition of p38 MAPK may attenuate ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  6. Cathode-Electrolyte Interfaces with CGO Barrier Layers in SOFC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knibbe, Ruth; Hjelm, Johan; Menon, Mohan

    2010-01-01

    Electron microscopy characterization across the cathode–electrolyte interface of two different types of intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFC) is performed to understand the origin of the cell performance disparity. One IT-SOFC cell had a sprayed-cosintered Ce0.90Gd0.01O1.95 (CGO......10) barrier layer, the other had a barrier layer deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) CGO10. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) investigations conclude that the major source of the cell performance difference...... is attributed to CGO–YSZ interdiffusion in the sprayed-cosintered barrier layer. From TEM and EBSD work, a dense CGO10 PLD layer is found to be deposited epitaxially on the 8YSZ electrolyte substrate—permitting a small amount of SrZrO3 formation and minimizing CGO–YSZ interdiffusion....

  7. Investigation of Schottky Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    gallium site was favored; this is consistent with the earlier tight-binding treatment[13]. In addition, the total energy difference per primitive cell (each... primitive cell contained one aluminum adatom) was 0.36 eV. The tight-binding energy differ- ence was 0.30 eV[15]. The agreement between the two...the gallium and arsenic sites) and two interstitial sites in every primitive cell . We have performed the calculations for several different coverages

  8. Filaggrin and the great epidermal barrier grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, John A

    2008-05-01

    One of the principal functions of human skin is to form an effective mechanical barrier against the external environment. This involves the maturation and death of epidermal keratinocytes as well as the assembly of a complex network of differentially and spatially expressed proteins, glycoproteins and lipids into the keratinocyte cell membrane and surrounding extracellular space. In 2006, the key role of the granular cell layer protein filaggrin (filament-aggregating protein) in maintaining the skin barrier was determined with the identification of loss-of-function mutations in the profilaggrin gene (FLG). These mutations have been shown to be the cause of ichthyosis vulgaris and a major risk factor for the development of atopic dermatitis, asthma associated with atopic dermatitis as well as systemic allergies. Mutations in the FLG gene are extremely common, occurring in approximately 9% of individuals from European populations. The remarkable discovery of these widespread mutations is expected to have a major impact on the classification and management of many patients with ichthyosis and atopic disease. It is also hoped that the genetic discovery of FLG mutations will lead to the future development of more specific, non-immunosuppressive treatments capable of restoring effective skin barrier function and alleviating or preventing disease in susceptible individuals.

  9. Barriers to Women in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    The Presiding Officer of the National Assembly for Wales, Rosemary Butler AM, has put the issue of barriers to women in public life at the top of the political agenda in Wales. She has held sessions with women across Wales to find out what those barriers are and how they can be tackled. On International Women's Day in February, she invited…

  10. Spanning trees crossing few barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asano, T.; Berg, M. de; Cheong, O.; Guibas, L.J.; Snoeyink, J.; Tamaki, H.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the problem of finding low-cost spanning trees for sets of n points in the plane, where the cost of a spanning tree is defined as the total number of intersections of tree edges with a given set of m barriers. We obtain the following results: (i) if the barriers are possibly intersecting

  11. BARRIERS OF STRATEGIC ALLIANCES ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav M. Sannikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available General barriers of organization of different types of strategic alliances have beenconsidered in the article. There are several recommendations for overcoming themin cases of international alliances, and in case of work in one state. The article also identified goals and tasks of single coordination center of alliance to overcome organization barriers.

  12. Informal export barriers and poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Porto, Guido G.

    2004-01-01

    The author investigates the poverty impacts of informal export barriers like transport costs, cumbersome customs practices, costly regulations, and bribes. He models these informal barriers as export taxes that distort the efficient allocation of resources. In low-income agricultural economies, this distortion lowers wages and household agricultural income, thereby leading to higher pover...

  13. Role of the intestinal barrier in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mike G Laukoetter; Porfirio Nava; Asma Nusrat

    2008-01-01

    A critical function of the intestinal mucosa is to form a barrier that separates luminal contents from the interstitium. The single layer of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) serves as a dynamic interface between the host and its environment. Cell polarity and structural properties of the epithelium is complex and is important in the development of epithelial barrier function. Epithelial cells associate with each other via a series of intercellular junctions. The apical most intercellular junctional complex referred to as the Apical Junction Complex (AJC) is important in not only cell-cell recognition, but also in the regulation of paracellular movement of fluid and solutes. Defects in the intestinal epithelial barrier function have been observed in a number of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is now becoming evident that an aberrant epithelial barrier function plays a central role in the pathophysiology of IBD. Thus, a better understanding of the intestinal epithelial barrier structure and function in healthy and disease states such as IBD will foster new ideas for the development of therapies for such chronic disorders.

  14. Interactions between antiparkinsonian drugs and ABCB1/P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in a rat brain endothelial cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautier, Sarah; Milane, Aline; Fernandez, Christine; Buyse, Marion; Chacun, Helene; Farinotti, Robert

    2008-09-05

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that requires treatment by dopaminergic agonists, which may be responsible for central side effects. We hypothesized that the efflux transporter ABCB1/P-glycoprotein played a role in brain disposition of antiparkinsonian drugs and could control central toxicity. We aimed to evaluate antiparkinsonian drugs as ABCB1 substrates and/or inhibitors in rat brain endothelial cells GPNT, in order to predict potential clinical drug-drug interactions. Among the antiparkinsonian drugs tested, levodopa, bromocriptine, pergolide and pramipexole were ABCB1 substrates. However, only bromocriptine could inhibit ABCB1 functionality with an IC(50) of 6.71 microM on Rhodamine 123 uptake and an IC(50) of 1.71 microM on digoxine uptake. Thus, bromocriptine at 100 microM is responsible for an increase of levodopa intracellular transport of about 2.05-fold versus control. Therefore, we can conclude that bromocriptine is a potent drug for medicinal interactions in vitro. Hence, in patients with Parkinson's disease, these results may be considered to optimise treatments individually.

  15. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, W T; Callaghan, G M; Ruckstuhl, L E

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers.

  16. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, William T.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Ruckstuhl, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers. PMID:22478314

  17. Guided bone regeneration : the influence of barrier membranes on bone grafts and bone defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielkens, Pepijn Frans Marie

    2008-01-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) can be described as the use of a barrier membrane to provide a space available for new bone formation in a bony defect. The barrier membrane protects the defect from in-growth of soft tissue cells and allows bone progenitor cells to develop bone within a blood clot tha

  18. Transport of monocarboxylic acids at the blood-brain barrier: Studies with monolayers of primary cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terasaki, T.; Takakuwa, S.; Moritani, S.; Tsuji, A. (Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University (Japan))

    1991-09-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the transport of monocarboxylic acids (MCAs) were studied by using primary cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells. Concentration-dependent uptake of acetic acid was observed, and the kinetic parameters were estimated as follows: the Michaelis constant, Kt, was 3.41 {plus minus} 1.87 mM, the maximum uptake rate, Jmax, was 144.7 {plus minus} 55.7 nmol/mg of protein/min and the nonsaturable first-order rate constant, Kd, was 6.66 {plus minus} 1.98 microliters/mg of protein/min. At medium pH below 7.0, the uptake rate of (3H)acetic acid increased markedly with decreasing medium pH, whereas pH-independent uptake was observed in the presence of 10 mM acetic acid. An energy requirement for (3H)acetic acid uptake was also demonstrated, because metabolic inhibitors (2,4-dinitrophenol and rotenone) reduced significantly the uptake rate (P less than .05). Carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoro-methoxyphenylhydrazone, a protonophore, inhibited significantly the uptake of (3H)acetic acid at medium pH of 5.0 and 6.0, whereas 4,4{prime}-diisothiocyanostilben-2,2{prime}-disulfonic acid did not. Several MCAs inhibited significantly the uptake rate of (3H)acetic acid, whereas di- and tricarboxylic acids did not. The uptake of (3H)acetic acid was competitively inhibited by salicylic acid, with an inhibition constant, Ki, of 3.60 mM, suggesting a common transport system between acetic acid and salicylic acid. Moreover, at the medium pH of 7.4, salicylic acid and valproic acid inhibited significantly the uptake of (3H)acetic acid, demonstrating that the transport of MCA drugs could also be ascribed to the MCA transport system at the physiologic pH.

  19. There are many barriers to species' migrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J Feeley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature-change trajectories are being used to identify the geographic barriers and thermal ‘cul-de-sacs’ that will limit the ability of many species to track climate change by migrating. We argue that there are many other potential barriers to species’ migrations. These include stable ecotones, discordant shifts in climatic variables, human land use, and species’ limited dispersal abilities. To illustrate our argument, for each 0.5° latitude/longitude grid cell of the Earth’s land surface, we mapped and tallied the number of cells for which future (2060–2080 climate represents an analog of the focal cell’s current climate. We compared results when only considering temperature with those for which both temperature and total annual precipitation were considered in concert. We also compared results when accounting for only geographic barriers (no cross-continental migration with those involving both geographic and potential ecological barriers (no cross-biome migration. As expected, the number of future climate analogs available to each pixel decreased markedly with each added layer of complexity (e.g. the proportion of the Earth’s land surface without any available future climate analogs increased from 3% to more than 36% with the inclusion of precipitation and ecological boundaries. While including additional variables can increase model complexity and uncertainty, we must strive to incorporate the factors that we know will limit species’ ranges and migrations if we hope to predict the effects of climate change at a high-enough degree of accuracy to guide management decisions.

  20. Double-transduced MDCKII cells to study human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) interplay in drug transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poller, Birk; Wagenaar, Els; Tang, Seng Chuan; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2011-04-04

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) combination knockout mice display disproportionately increased brain penetration of shared substrates, including topotecan and several tyrosine kinase inhibitors, compared to mice deficient for only one transporter. To better study the interplay of both transporters also in vitro, we generated a transduced polarized MDCKII cell line stably coexpressing substantial levels of human ABCB1 and ABCG2 (MDCKII-ABCB1/ABCG2). Next, we measured concentration-dependent transepithelial transport of topotecan, sorafenib and sunitinib. By blocking either one or both of the transporters simultaneously, using specific inhibitors, we aimed to mimic the ABCB1-ABCG2 interplay at the blood-brain barrier in wild-type, single or combination knockout mice. ABCB1 and ABCG2 contributed to similar extents to topotecan transport, which was only partly saturable. For sorafenib transport, ABCG2 was the major determinant at low concentrations. However, saturation of ABCG2-mediated transport occurred at higher sorafenib concentrations, where ABCB1 was still fully active. Furthermore, sunitinib was transported equally by ABCB1 and ABCG2 at low concentrations, but ABCG2-mediated transport became saturated at lower concentrations than ABCB1-mediated transport. The relative impact of these transporters can thus be affected by the applied drug concentrations. A comparison of the in vitro observed (inverse) transport ratios and cellular accumulation of the drugs at low concentrations with in vivo brain penetration data from corresponding Abcb1a/1b⁻/⁻, Abcg2⁻/⁻ and Abcb1a/1b;Abcg2⁻/⁻ mouse strains revealed very similar qualitative patterns for each of the tested drugs. MDCKII-ABCB1/ABCG2 cells thus present a useful in vitro model to study the interplay of ABCB1 and ABCG2.

  1. Role of SiNx Barrier Layer on the Performances of Polyimide Ga2O3-doped ZnO p-i-n Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Thin Film Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Hsing Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, silicon nitride (SiNx thin films were deposited on polyimide (PI substrates as barrier layers by a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD system. The gallium-doped zinc oxide (GZO thin films were deposited on PI and SiNx/PI substrates at room temperature (RT, 100 and 200 °C by radio frequency (RF magnetron sputtering. The thicknesses of the GZO and SiNx thin films were controlled at around 160 ± 12 nm and 150 ± 10 nm, respectively. The optimal deposition parameters for the SiNx thin films were a working pressure of 800 × 10−3 Torr, a deposition power of 20 W, a deposition temperature of 200 °C, and gas flowing rates of SiH4 = 20 sccm and NH3 = 210 sccm, respectively. For the GZO/PI and GZO-SiNx/PI structures we had found that the GZO thin films deposited at 100 and 200 °C had higher crystallinity, higher electron mobility, larger carrier concentration, smaller resistivity, and higher optical transmittance ratio. For that, the GZO thin films deposited at 100 and 200 °C on PI and SiNx/PI substrates with thickness of ~1000 nm were used to fabricate p-i-n hydrogenated amorphous silicon (α-Si thin film solar cells. 0.5% HCl solution was used to etch the surfaces of the GZO/PI and GZO-SiNx/PI substrates. Finally, PECVD system was used to deposit α-Si thin film onto the etched surfaces of the GZO/PI and GZO-SiNx/PI substrates to fabricate α-Si thin film solar cells, and the solar cells’ properties were also investigated. We had found that substrates to get the optimally solar cells’ efficiency were 200 °C-deposited GZO-SiNx/PI.

  2. Development of engineered barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kim, Seung Soo; Kang, Mu Ja

    1999-03-01

    Engineered barrier development was carried out into the three research fields : waste form, disposal container, and buffer. The waste form field dealt with long-term leaching tests with borosilicate waste glasses surrounded by compacted bentonite. The leach rate decreased with increasing time, and was higher for the waste specimen rich in U and Na. In the container field, preliminary concepts of disposal containers were recommended by conducting structural analysis, thermal analysis, and shielding analysis, and major properties of stainless steel, copper, and titanium as a container material were surveyed. The sensitization degrees of SUS 316 and316L were lower than those of SUS 304 and 304L, respectively. The crevice corrosion of sensitized stainless steel was sensitive to the content of salt. Researches into the buffer included establishment of its performance criteria followed by investigating major properties of buffer using potential material in Korea. Experiments were made for measuring hydraulic conductivities, swelling properties, mechanical properties, thermal conductivities, pore-water chemistry properties, and adsorption properties was also investigated. (author)

  3. 肥大细胞在急性应激性肠黏膜屏障损伤中的作用机制%Mechanism of Mast Cells in Acute Stress Induced Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐宇; 马洪升

    2013-01-01

    背景:应激所致肠黏膜屏障损伤的机制以及肥大细胞(MC)在其中的作用尚未明确.目的:探讨肠黏膜MC(IMMC)在急性应激性肠黏膜屏障损伤中的作用机制.方法:Sprague-Dawley(SD)大鼠随机分为正常对照组(N组)、应激组(S组),S组给予急性冷束缚应激建立模型,按照应激结束后处死时间进一步分为S2h、S4h、S8h、S16h、S24h组.取回肠末端观察组织病理学改变,以Chiu's评分评估肠黏膜组织损伤程度,以甲苯胺蓝染色计数IMMC,以透射电镜观察肠黏膜组织和IMMC超微结构,以ELISA法检测肠黏膜组织组胺含量.结果:S组的Chiu's评分均显著高于N组(P0.05).IMMC计数与Chiu's评分无相关性(P>0.05).S组肠黏膜超微结构破坏明显,IMMC胞质大量脱颗粒.S2h、S4h、S8h 组的肠黏膜组织组胺含量较N组显著降低(P0.05).肠黏膜组织组胺含量与Chiu's评分呈负相关(P=0.03).结论:急性应激状态下,IMMC脱颗粒释放炎性介质是导致肠黏膜屏障损伤的重要机制.%Background: The mechanism of stress induced intestinal barrier injury and the mechanistic role of mast cells ( MC ) have not yet been clarified. Aims: To investigate the mechanistic role of intestinal mucosal MC ( IMMC ) in acute stress induced intestinal mucosal barrier injury. Methods: Sprague-Dawley ( SD ) rats were randomly divided into normal control group ( N group ) and stress group ( S group ). Rats in S group were given acute cold/restraint stress and were further divided into S2h, S4h, S8h, S16h and S24h subgroups according to the time point of sacrificing after stress. Histological change of terminal ileum tissue was observed and the degree of damage was evaluated by Chiu s scoring system. IMMC number was counted by toluidine blue staining. The ultrastructure of intestinal tissue and IMMC was observed by transmission electron microscopy. The content of histamine in intestinal tissue was determined by ELISA. Results: Chiu s score in S

  4. A LOOK AT CULTURAL BARRIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A. VRÂNCEANU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the global market allows each individual to work in foreign countries. This fact is a great opportunity for business development, but also puts into light the problem of cultural barriers. Ineffective cross-cultural communication and collaboration can harm employees, customers, and other stakeholders. A company with employees from different cultures must acknowledge and understand these barriers in order to overcome them and to obtain the desired performance. The present study aims to expose the cultural barriers encountered by foreigners in a multinational company from Romania.

  5. Investigation of endothelial growth using a sensors-integrated microfluidic system to simulate physiological barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajabi Taleieh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a microfluidic system based on transparent biocompatible polymers with a porous membrane as substrate for various cell types which allows the simulation of various physiological barriers under continuous laminar flow conditions at distinct tunable shear rates. Besides live cell and fluorescence microscopy, integrated electrodes enable the investigation of the permeability and barrier function of the cell layer as well as their interaction with external manipulations using the Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS method.

  6. The barrier within: endothelial transport of hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolka, Cathryn M; Bergman, Richard N

    2012-08-01

    Hormones are involved in a plethora of processes including development and growth, metabolism, mood, and immune responses. These essential functions are dependent on the ability of the hormone to access its target tissue. In the case of endocrine hormones that are transported through the blood, this often means that the endothelium must be crossed. Many studies have shown that the concentrations of hormones and nutrients in blood can be very different from those surrounding the cells on the tissue side of the blood vessel endothelium, suggesting that transport across this barrier can be rate limiting for hormone action. This transport can be regulated by altering the surface area of the blood vessel available for diffusion through to the underlying tissue or by the permeability of the endothelium. Many hormones are known to directly or indirectly affect the endothelial barrier, thus affecting their own distribution to their target tissues. Dysfunction of the endothelial barrier is found in many diseases, particularly those associated with the metabolic syndrome. The interrelatedness of hormones may help to explain why the cluster of diseases in the metabolic syndrome occur together so frequently and suggests that treating the endothelium may ameliorate defects in more than one disease. Here, we review the structure and function of the endothelium, its contribution to the function of hormones, and its involvement in disease.

  7. Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glick, S. H.; delCueto, J. A.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

    2005-11-01

    Dielectric thin-film barrier and adhesion-promoting layers consisting of silicon oxynitride materials (SiOxNy, with various stoichiometry) were investigated. For process development, films were applied to glass (TCO, conductive SnO2:F; or soda-lime), polymer (PET, polyethylene terephthalate), aluminized soda-lime glass, or PV cell (a-Si, CIGS) substrates. Design strategy employed de-minimus hazard criteria to facilitate industrial adoption and reduce implementation costs for PV manufacturers or suppliers. A restricted process window was explored using dilute compressed gases (3% silane, 14% nitrous oxide, 23% oxygen) in nitrogen (or former mixtures, and 11.45% oxygen mix in helium and/or 99.999% helium dilution) with a worst-case flammable and non-corrosive hazard classification. Method employed low radio frequency (RF) power, less than or equal to 3 milliwatts per cm2, and low substrate temperatures, less than or equal to 100 deg C, over deposition areas less than or equal to 1000 cm2. Select material properties for barrier film thickness (profilometer), composition (XPS/FTIR), optical (refractive index, %T and %R), mechanical peel strength and WVTR barrier performance are presented.

  8. Protection of the blood-brain barrier by pentosan against amyloid-β-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, Mária A; Veszelka, Szilvia; Csiszár, Boglárka; Tóth, Andrea; Kittel, Agnes; Csete, Mária; Sipos, Aron; Szalai, Anikó; Fülöp, Lívia; Penke, Botond; Abrahám, Csongor S; Niwa, Masami

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cells of brain capillaries forming the blood-brain barrier play an important role in the pathogenesis and therapy of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are key pathological elements in the development of the disease. A blood-brain barrier model, based on primary rat brain endothelial cells was used in which the barrier properties were induced by glial cells. The effects of amyloid peptides have been tested on cell viability and barrier functions. Aβ showed toxic effects on primary rat brain endothelial cells measured by MTT dye conversion and the lactate dehydrogenase release. Morphologically cytoplasmic vacuolization, disruption of the structure of cytoplasmic organelles and tight junctions could be observed in brain endothelial cells. Treatment with Aβ1-42 decreased the electrical resistance, and increased the permeability of brain endothelial cell monolayers for both fluorescein and albumin. Serum amyloid P component which stabilizes Aβ fibrils in cortical amyloid plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits significantly potentiated the barrier-weakening effect of Aβ1-42. Sulfated polysaccharide pentosan could decrease the toxic effects of Aβ peptides in brain endothelial cells. It could also significantly protect the barrier integrity of monolayers from damaging actions of peptides. Pentosan modified the size, and significantly decreased the number of amyloid aggregates demonstrated by atomic force microscopy. The present data further support the toxic effects of amyloid peptides on brain endothelial cells, and can contribute to the development of molecules protecting the blood-brain barrier in Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Probiotics the Good Neighbor: Guarding the Gut Mucosal Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Rao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The disruption of gut barrier function plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of not only gastrointestinal diseases, but also the diseases of liver and other organs. Mucosal protective factors that preserve the gut barrier integrity are beneficial in the prevention and treatment of such diseases. Probiotics is a group of helpful bacteria that protect the gastrointestinal mucosa from a variety of insults. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of probiotic-mediated protection of gut barrier function is an important area of investigation. Approach: Several studies had addressed the role of probiotics in the protection of gut barrier integrity. In a recent study, we investigated the role of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and two soluble proteins, p40 and p75, in the protection of gut barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayer, a model of the intestinal epithelium. Results: Studies demonstrated that live or dead Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG prevents oxidative stress-induced disruption of tight junctions and barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The isolated soluble proteins of this probiotic, p40 and p75, also prevent hydrogen peroxide-induced tight junction disruption. This protective effect of probiotic proteins was mediated by the activation of ERK1/2 and protein kinase C isoforms, PKCβI and PKCε. Conclusion: Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG prevent oxidative stress-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions and barrier function, suggesting that preservation of epithelial barrier function is one of the mechanisms involved in the mucosal protective role of probiotics in the gut.

  10. Subversion of mucosal barrier polarity by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne eEngel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The lumenal surfaces of human body are lined by a monolayer of epithelia that together with mucus secreting cells and specialized immune cells form the mucosal barrier. This barrier is one of the most fundamental components of the innate immune system, protecting organisms from the vast environmental microbiota. The mucosal epithelium is comprised of polarized epithelial cells with distinct apical and basolateral surfaces that are defined by unique set of protein and lipid composition and are separated by tight junctions. The apical surface serves as a barrier to the outside world and is specialized for the exchange of materials with the lumen. The basolateral surface is adapted for interaction with other cells and for exchange with the bloodstream. A wide network of proteins and lipids regulates the formation and maintenance of the epithelium polarity. Many human pathogens have evolved virulence mechanisms that target this network and interfere with epithelial polarity to enhance binding to the apical surface, enter into cells, and/or cross the mucosal barrier. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of how Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic human pathogen that preferentially infects damaged epithelial tissues, exploits the epithelial cell polarization machinery to enhance infection.

  11. Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and requirements will be discussed. An experimental approach is established to monitor in real time the thermal conductivity of the coating systems subjected to high-heat-flux, steady-state and cyclic temperature gradients. Advanced low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have also been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability. The durability and erosion resistance of low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have been improved utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, in conjunction with more sophisticated modeling and design tools.

  12. Coastal Structures and Barriers 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset is a compilation of the UCSC Sand Retention Structures, MC Barriers, and USACE Coastal Structures. UCSC Sand Retention Structures originate from a...

  13. Small-scale experimental tests of tandem mirror machines with thermal barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, R.P.

    1979-09-01

    A summary is given of current physical understanding of tandem mirrors with thermal barriers. Physicists who understand tandem mirrors can use this document as a preliminary guide to the physical issues and experimental problems involved. This report will focus upon the issues that can be tested experimentally, and on the areas needing experimental and theoretical inventions. The next section discusses the plasma potentials and plasma confinement which correspond to a tandem mirror with thermal barriers, assuming the barriers exist in steady-state. The creation of a barrier is discussed, i.e., the natural tendency of the barrier cell to fill with plasma must be countered by pumping ions out of the barrier. The design of a barrier-pumping experiment for TMX is described.

  14. Nonlocal reflection by photonic barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Vetter, R. -M.; A. Haibel; Nimtz, G.

    2001-01-01

    The time behaviour of microwaves undergoing partial reflection by photonic barriers was measured in the time and in the frequency domain. It was observed that unlike the duration of partial reflection by dielectric layers, the measured reflection duration of barriers is independent of their length. The experimental results point to a nonlocal behaviour of evanescent modes at least over a distance of some ten wavelengths. Evanescent modes correspond to photonic tunnelling in quantum mechanics.

  15. Schooling Inequality and Language Barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Susan W.; Rubalcava, Luis; Teruel, Graciela

    2005-01-01

    This article estimates the impact of language barriers on school achievement and the potential ameliorating role of bilingual education. Using large household data sets from poor rural communities in Mexico, we find that parental language (failure to speak Spanish) represents an important barrier to the schooling of indigenous children. We provide an empirical test suggesting that this largely reflects parental human capital related to culture/language, rather than unobserved wealth effects. ...

  16. Economic alternatives for containment barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson, P.J.; Jasperse, B.H.; Fisher, M.J. [Geo-Con, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Fixation, barriers, and containment of existing landfills and other disposal areas are often performed by insitu auger type soil mixing and jet grouting. Cement or other chemical reagents are mixed with soil to form both vertical and horizontal barriers. Immobilization of contaminants can be economically achieved by mixing soil and the contaminants with reagents that solidify or stabilize the contaminated area. Developed in Japan, and relatively new to the United States, the first large scale application was for a vertical barrier at the Jackson Lake Dam project in 1986. This technology has grown in both the civil and environmental field since. The paper describes current United States practice for Deep Soil Mixing (over 12 meters in depth), and Shallow Soil Mixing for vertical barriers and stabilization/solidification, and Jet Grouting for horizontal and vertical barriers. Creating very low permeability barriers at depth with minimal surface return often makes these techniques economical when compared to slurry trenches. The paper will discuss equipment, materials, soil and strength parameters, and quality control.

  17. Release kinetics of prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors from collagen barrier membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Omar; Pensch, Manuela; Agis, Hermann

    2015-03-01

    Collagen barrier membranes are used in guided tissue regeneration to support healing. This strategy, however, relies on the healing capacity of the tissue. Pharmacological inhibitors of prolyl hydroxylases can support regeneration by enhancing angiogenesis and are therefore a promising tool for periodontology. Here we evaluate the release kinetics of the prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors dimethyloxalylglycine and L-mimosine from collagen barrier membranes. Dimethyloxalylglycine and L-mimosine were lyophilized onto the collagen barrier membranes. The morphology of the collagen barrier membranes was analysed using scanning electron microscopy. The release of prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors was assessed by colorimetric and spectroscopic methods. Their ability to induce a cellular response was assessed in bioassays with gingival and periodontal ligament fibroblasts based on vascular endothelial growth factor production, proliferation, and metabolic activity of the cells. We found that loading of collagen barrier membranes with prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors did not change the overall membrane morphology. Assessment of the release kinetics by direct measurements and based on vascular endothelial growth factor production showed that supernatants obtained from the collagen barrier membranes in the first 6 hours had a sufficient level of prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors to induce vascular endothelial growth factor production. A similar kinetic was found when cell proliferation was assessed. Changes in metabolic activity did not reach the level of significance in the MTT assay. In conclusion, collagen barrier membranes can release prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors thereby increasing the pro-angiogenic capacity of periodontal cells in vitro. These findings provide the basis for preclinical studies to evaluate the regenerative capacity of prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors in periodontology and oral surgery.

  18. 脑缺血发生后 IP-10趋化 NK 细胞通过血脑屏障%Chemotactic effect of IP-10 to natural killer cells getting through blood brain barrier after cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑶; 冯涛; 祝鸿雁; 王广友; 王丹丹; 李呼伦

    2014-01-01

    Objective To research the chemotactic effect of IP-10 on natural killer cells after cerebral ischemia .Methods Experiments in vivo: NK infiltration and IP-10 and CXCR3 ex-pression in pMCAO mouse brain were detected by immunofluorescence;NK infiltration in pM-CAO brains was detected by flowcytometry;IP-10 total expression level in brain were investiga-ted by RT-PCR.Experiments in vitro:Established blood brain barrier ( B.B.B.) in vitro;IP-10 expression of the supernatant from brain microvascular endothclial cell ( BMVEC ) and neu-ral cells after oxygen-gluoose depriuation ( OGD) were detected by ELISA; B.B.B.in vitro were separated into NK , NK+IP-10 blockade two groups , after OGD 6 h, NK cells migration counts were detected by flowcytometry;NK cells were cultured together with IP -10 ( 10 ng/mL), IP-10 (50 ng/mL), IP-10(100 ng/mL), then CXCR3 geomean.MFI value were de-tected by flowcytometry .Results Experiments in vivo:NK cells were found in pMCAO brain section and expressing CXCR 3 and IP-10; NK cells infiltration were higher in ischemia-hemi-sphere , and got a peak at 12 h ( P<0.05 );NK cells had anobviously increase by 12 h at in-filtration frequency (P<0.01 );IP-10 had a highest level at 12 h ( P<0.001 ) .Experiments in vitro:Neural cell had higher expression of IP-10 after OGD than BMVEC ( P <0.001 );Compared with group NK , group NK+IP-10 blockade had lower NK cells migration counts ( P<0.05 ) and permeability ( P<0.001 ) .Conclusion ①NK cells plays an important role dur-ing cerebral ischemia;②IP-10 can absorb NK cells across B .B.B.when ischemia happens by combined with its receptor CXCR 3 and has dose dependent .%目的:探讨脑缺血发生后 IP-10对NK细胞的趋化作用。方法体内实验:免疫荧光染色观察永久性大脑中动脉栓塞小鼠模型( pMCAO)脑组织中NK细胞浸润情况以及IP-10、CXCR3表达情况;流式细胞术检测pMCAO小鼠模型脑中NK细胞浸润数目;RT-PCR

  19. Elucidation of Transport Mechanism of Paeoniflorin and the Influence of Ligustilide, Senkyunolide I and Senkyunolide A on Paeoniflorin Transport through Mdck-Mdr1 Cells as Blood-Brain Barrier in Vitro Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng-Yi; Liu, Dan; Zheng, Qin; Wu, Qing; Tang, Yu; Yang, Ming

    2016-03-02

    The objectives of the present investigation were to: (1) elucidate the transport mechanism of paeoniflorin (PF) across MDCK-MDR1 monolayers; and (2) evaluate the effect of ligustilide (LIG), senkyunolide I (SENI) and senkyunolide A (SENA) on the transport of PF through blood-brain barrier so as to explore the enhancement mechanism. Transport studies of PF were performed in both directions, from apical to basolateral side (A→B) and from basolateral to apical sides (B→A). Drug concentrations were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. PF showed relatively poor absorption in MDCK-MDR1 cells, apparent permeability coefficients (Papp) ranging from 0.587 × 10(-6) to 0.705 × 10(-6) cm/s. In vitro experiments showed that the transport of PF in both directions was concentration dependent and not saturable. The B→A/A→B permeability ER of PF was more than 2 in the MDCK-MDR1 cells, which indicated that the transport mechanism of PF might be passive diffusion as the dominating process with the active transportation mediated mechanism involved. The increased Papp of PF in A→B direction by EDTA-Na₂ suggested that PF was absorbed via the paracellular route. The P-gp inhibitor verapamil could significantly increase the transport of PF in A→B direction, and ER decreased from 2.210 to 0.690, which indicated that PF was P-gp substance. The transport of PF in A→B direction significantly increased when co-administrated with increasing concentrations of LIG, SENI and SENA. An increased cellular accumulation of Rho 123 and Western blot analysis indicated that LIG, SENI and SENA had increased the transport of PF in the BBB models attribute to down-regulate P-gp expression. A decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) during the permeation experiment can be explained by the modulation and opening of the tight junctions caused by the permeation enhancer LIG, SENI and SENA.

  20. Diabetes and diet: Managing dietary barriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friele, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports on the barriers diabetic patients experience with their diet, and the ways they cope with these barriers. A dietary barrier is a hinderance to a person's well-being, induced by being advised a diet. First inventories were made of possible dietary barriers and ways of coping with

  1. The Blood-Brain Barrier: An Engineering Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eWong

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been more than 100 years since Paul Ehrlich reported that various water-soluble dyes injected into the circulation did not enter the brain. Since Ehrlich’s first experiments, only a small number of molecules, such as alcohol and caffeine have been found to cross the blood-brain barrier, and it remains the major roadblock to treatment of many central nervous system diseases. At the same time, many central nervous system diseases are associated with disruption of the blood-brain barrier that can lead to changes in permeability, modulation of immune cell transport, and trafficking of pathogens into the brain. Therefore advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the blood-brain barrier are key to advances in treatment of a wide range of central nervous system diseases. Over the past 10 years it has become recognized that the blood-brain barrier is a complex dynamic system that involves biomechanical and biochemical signaling between the vascular system and the brain. Here we reconstruct the structure, function, and transport properties of the blood-brain barrier from an engineering perspective. New insight into the physics of the blood-brain barrier could ultimately lead to clinical advances in the treatment of central nervous system diseases.

  2. Interleukin-13 promotes expression of Alix to compromise renal tubular epithelial barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Sun, Guangdong; Yang, Jie; Sun, Qianmei; Tong, Zhaohui

    2015-05-01

    The epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in a number of kidney diseases. The mechanism is unclear. Alix is a protein involving in protein degradation in epithelial cells. This study aims to investigate that interleukin (IL)-13 inhibits Alix to compromise the kidney epithelial barrier function. In this study, the murine collecting duct cell line (M-1) was cultured in Transwell inserts to investigate the significance of Alix in compromising the epithelial barrier functions. T cell (Teff cells) proliferation assay was employed to assess the antigenicity of ovalbumin (OVA) that was transported across the M-1 monolayer barrier. The results showed that M-1 cells express Alix. Exposure to interleukin (IL)-13 markedly decreased the expression of Alix in M-1 cells, which compromised the M-1 monolayer barrier functions by showing the increases in the permeability to OVA. Over-expression of Alix abolished the IL-13-induced M-1 monolayer barrier dysfunction. Knockdown of Alix significantly increased M-1 monolayer permeability. The OVA collected from the Transwell basal chambers induced the OVA-specific T cell proliferation. We conclude that IL-13 compromises M-1 epithelial barrier functions via inhibiting Alix expression.

  3. Cylindrical air flow reversal barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woznica, C.; Rodziewicz, M.

    1988-06-01

    Describes an innovative design introduced in the ZMP mine in Zory for quick reversal of ventilation air flow. Geologic mining conditions at the 705 m deep horizon, where the barrier was built, are described. According to the design used until now, a reversal system consisted of safety barriers, ventilation air locks, a ventilation bridge and stopping needed in case of a fire when air flow direction must be reversed. Nine air locks and an expensive concrete ventilation bridge were needed and the air locks had to be operated at 8 points of the region to effect reversal. The new design consists of a 2-storey cylindrical barrier which also fulfills the function of a ventilation bridge. It can be manually or remotely operated by a mechanical or pneumatic system. Tests showed that the new barrier permits immediate air flow reversal while retaining 60% of the original air, which is important in the case of fire and methane hazards. It permits improved seam panelling and splitting of pillars and brings an economy of about 40 million zlotys in construction cost. Design and operation of the barrier is illustrated and ventilation air circulation is explained. 7 figs.

  4. Structure information from fusion barriers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S V S Sastry; S Santra

    2000-06-01

    It is shown that the analysis of fusion barrier distributions is not always an unambiguous test or a ‘fingerprint’ of the structure information of the colliding nuclei. Examples are presented with same fusion barrier distributions for nuclei having different structures. The fusion excitation functions for 16O+208Pb, using the coupled reaction channel (CRC) method and correct structure information, have been analysed. The barrier distributions derived from these excitation functions including many of the significant channels are featureless, although these channels have considerable effects on the fusion excitation function. However, a simultaneous analysis of the fusion, elastic and quasi-elastic channels would fix the structure and the reaction unambiguously

  5. Barrier Membrane, a Device for Regeneration: Properties and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Soheilifar; Bidgoli; Torkzaban

    2014-01-01

    Context This article reviews the available evidence about the barrier membranes utilized in Guided Tissue Regeneration process to prevent the migration of unfavorable cells to the wound area. Evidence Acquisition Available evidence about membranes properties and their different uses were reviewed, and the results of clinical and animal studies and systematic reviews were gathered. Results ...

  6. Epithelial IL-18 Equilibrium Controls Barrier Function in Colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nowarski, Roni; Jackson, Ruaidhrí; Gagliani, Nicola; de Zoete, Marcel R; Palm, Noah W; Bailis, Will; Low, Jun Siong; Harman, Christian C D; Graham, Morven; Elinav, Eran; Flavell, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal mucosal barrier controlling the resident microbiome is dependent on a protective mucus layer generated by goblet cells, impairment of which is a hallmark of the inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis. Here, we show that IL-18 is critical in driving the pathologic breakdown of

  7. A detailed study of the effect of Schottky barrier on the dark current density-voltage characteristics of CdS/CdTe solar cells*%肖特基势垒对CdS/CdTe薄膜电池J-V 暗性能的影响*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵守仁; 黄志鹏; 孙雷; 孙朋超; 张传军; 邬云华; 曹鸿; 王善力; 褚君浩

    2013-01-01

      采用数学模拟方法分析了不同背接触势垒高度(ϕb )对于CdS/CdTe薄膜电池的J-V (电流密度-电压)方程的影响,得出了势垒高度与roll-over的变化对应关系。采用相应Cu/Mo背电极的CdS/CdTe薄膜电池在220-300 K的变温J-V 曲线的数值分析与理论分析相对照,分析了背势垒对于J-V 曲线拟合参数的影响。修正了ϕb与反向饱和电流(Jb0)关系式,理论与实验符合得非常好。%Numerical modeling is used to obtain insight into the details of the effect of back contact barrier height (ϕb ) on the dark current density-voltage characteristics of CdS/CdTe solar cell. And relation between the roll-over and the barrier height is obtained. Analytic simulations are fitted to the measured current density-voltage curve in a temperature range from 220 to 300 K. And the influence of barrier height on J-V of the CdS/CdTe thin film solar cell with Cu/Mo back contact fitted parameters is discussed. The equation between back contact barrier height (ϕb) and the reverse saturation current density (Jb0) is revised and the experimental data are consistent with the simulation results very well.

  8. Sound propagation over curved barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Allan D.; Main, Geoffrey L.; Kearns, James A.; Hsieh, H.-A.

    1986-01-01

    Wide barriers with curved tops are studied with emphasis placed on circumstances whereby the local radius of curvature R of the barrier is continuous along the surface and is large compared to a wavelength. Results analogous to those given by Hayek et al. (1978) are reviewed and extended to cases where the radius of curvature and the surface impedance may vary with position. Circumstances not easily interpreted within the framework of the model proposed by Keller (1956) and Hayek et al. are also considered.

  9. Physics parameter calculations for a Tandem Mirror Reactor with thermal barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boghosian, B.M.; Lappa, D.A.; Logan, B.G.

    1979-11-06

    Thermal barriers are localized reductions in potential between the plugs and the central cell, which effectively insulate trapped plug electrons from the central cell electrons. By then applying electron heating in the plug, it is possible to obtain trapped electron temperatures that are much greater than those of the central cell electrons. This, in turn, effects an increase in the plug potential and central cell confinement with a concomitant decrease in plug density and injection power. Ions trapped in the barrier by collisions are removed by the injection of neutral beams directed inside the barrier cell loss cone; these beam neutrals convert trapped barrier ions to neutrals by charge exchange permitting their escape. We describe a zero-dimensional physics model for this type of reactor, and present some preliminary results for Q.

  10. Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

    1980-09-01

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed.

  11. Evidence for the Existence of a Bone Marrow Blood Barrier for the Passage of Specific Committed Stem Cells in Human and Canine and Their Physical Separation from Lymphocytes and Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-12

    Transplantation of marrow from an unrelated donor to a patient with acute leukemia . N. Eng. J. Med. 303:565-567, 1980. HaskiU, J. S., McNeiUe, T. A. and Moore...oq o O CO Oi CO eo ’ ^ ^ CO O CO cd oo »— r^ O eri CO CO r - CO r » CO ^ o B 96 granulocytic precursor cells, i.e., promyelocytes ...Chest Cold 2. Sastro-intestinal Upset 3. Skin Infections 4. Antibiotic Treatment Within 2 Weeks 5. Pregnancy Within 6 Months 6, Recent Operation

  12. Functional barriers: Properties and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feigenbaum, A.; Dole, P.; Aucejo, S.; Dainelli, D.; Cruz Garcia, C. de la; Hankemeier, T.; N'Gono, Y.; Papaspyrides, C.D.; Paseiro, P.; Pastorelli, S.; Pavlidou, S.; Pennarun, P.Y.; Saillard, P.; Vidal, L.; Vitrac, O.; Voulzatis, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Functional barriers are multilayer structures deemed to prevent migration of some chemicals released by food-contact materials into food. In the area of plastics packaging, different migration behaviours of mono- and multilayer structures are assessed in terms of lag time and of their influence of t

  13. Barrier/Cu contact resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, J.S.; Nicolet, M.A. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Angyal, M.S.; Lilienfeld, D.; Shacham-Diamand, Y. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Smith, P.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-17

    The specific contact resistivity of Cu with ({alpha} + {beta})-Ta, TiN, {alpha}-W, and amorphous-Ta{sub 36}Si{sub 14}N{sub 50} barrier films is measured using a novel four-point-probe approach. Geometrically, the test structures consist of colinear sets of W-plugs to act as current and voltage probes that contact the bottom of a planar Cu/barrier/Cu stack. Underlying Al interconnects link the plugs to the current source and voltmeter. The center-to-center distance of the probes ranges from 3 to 200 {micro}m. Using a relation developed by Vu et al., a contact resistivity of roughly 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} {Omega} cm{sup 2} is obtained for all tested barrier/Cu combinations. By reflective-mode small-angle X-ray scattering, the similarity in contact resistivity among the barrier films may be related to interfacial impurities absorbed from the deposition process.

  14. Planar doped barrier subharmonic mixers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. H.; East, J. R.; Haddad, G. I.

    1992-01-01

    The Planar Doped Barrier (PDB) diode is a device consisting of a p(+) doping spike between two intrinsic layers and n(+) ohmic contacts. This device has the advantages of controllable barrier height, diode capacitance and forward to reverse current ratio. A symmetrically designed PDB has an anti-symmetric current vs. voltage characteristic and is ideal for use as millimeter wave subharmonic mixers. We have fabricated such devices with barrier heights of 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 volts from GaAs and InGaAs using a multijunction honeycomb structure with junction diameters between one and ten microns. Initial RF measurements are encouraging. The 0.7 volt barrier height 4 micron GaAs devices were tested as subharmonic mixers at 202 GHz with an IF frequency of 1 GHz and had 18 dB of conversion loss. The estimated mismatch loss was 7 dB and was due to higher diode capacitance. The LO frequency was 100.5 GHz and the pump power was 8 mW.

  15. FX barriers with smile dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, Glyn; Beneder, Reimer; Zilber, Alex

    2004-01-01

    Our mandate in this work has been to isolate the features of smile consistent models that are most relevant to the pricing of barrier options. We consider the two classical approaches of stochastic and (parametric) local volatility. Although neither has been particularly successful in practice their

  16. Stem cell heterogeneity revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne S; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    The skin forms a protective, water-impermeable barrier consisting of heavily crosslinked epithelial cells. However, the specific role of stem cells in sustaining this barrier remains a contentious issue. A detailed analysis of the interfollicular epidermis now proposes a model for how a composite...... of cells with different properties are involved in its maintenance....

  17. Collagen based barrier membranes for periodontal guided bone regeneration applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Zeeshan; Qureshi, Javairia; Alshahrani, Abdullah M; Nassar, Heba; Ikeda, Yuichi; Glogauer, Michael; Ganss, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Certain cell populations within periodontal tissues possess the ability to induce regeneration, provided they have the opportunity to populate the wound or defect. Guided regeneration techniques have been investigated for regenerating periodontal tissues and such therapies usually utilize barrier membranes. Various natural and synthetic barrier membranes have been fabricated and tested to prevent epithelial and connective tissue cells from invading while allowing periodontal cells to selectively migrate into the defect. This paper focuses on the literature relevant to the use and potential of resorbable collagen membranes in GBR procedures, sites of periodontal and intrabony defects, in cases of socket and alveolar ridge preservation and at implant sites. The results of their use in GBR procedures has shown them to be effective and comparable with non-resorbable membranes with regards to clinical attachment gain, probing depth reduction and defect bone filling. They have also shown to prevent epithelial ingrowth into the defect space during the initial wound healing phase postsurgically. Collagen membranes have also been used for root coverage and GBR procedures and have shown good success rates comparable to subepithelial connective tissue grafts and expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) membranes. The future for periodontal tissue engineering is very exciting with the use of barrier membranes expected to continue playing a critical role. However, long-term clinical trials are required to further evaluate and confirm the efficacy of the available collagen barrier membranes for periodontal and bone regeneration use.

  18. Epstein Barr Virus and Blood Brain Barrier in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, autoimmune neurodegenerative disease. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with MS pathogenesis. However, mechanism for the EBV-MS connection is unclear. The blood brain barrier (BBB) is a separation of circulating blood and the brain extracellular fluid in the central nervous system. BBB contains both endothelial cells as well as astrocytes. Interestingly EBV is able to infect both kinds of cells. Because EBV is able to transfer infection from one cell type to another cell type, it is thus hypothesized that EBV uses

  19. Surface pre-treatment for barrier coatings on polyethylene terephthalate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahre, H.; Bahroun, K.; Behm, H.; Steves, S.; Awakowicz, P.; Böke, M.; Hopmann, Ch; Winter, J.

    2013-02-01

    Polymers have favourable properties such as light weight, flexibility and transparency. Consequently, this makes them suitable for food packaging, organic light-emitting diodes and flexible solar cells. Nonetheless, raw plastics do not possess sufficient barrier functionality against oxygen and water vapour, which is of paramount importance for most applications. A widespread solution is to deposit thin silicon oxide layers using plasma processes. However, silicon oxide layers do not always fulfil the requirements concerning adhesion and barrier performance when deposited on films. Thus, plasma pre-treatment is often necessary. To analyse the influence of a plasma-based pre-treatment on barrier performance, different plasma pre-treatments on three reactor setups were applied to a very smooth polyethylene terephthalate film before depositing a silicon oxide barrier layer. In this paper, the influence of oxygen and argon plasma pre-treatments towards the barrier performance is discussed examining the chemical and topological change of the film. It was observed that a short one-to-ten-second plasma treatment can reduce the oxygen transmission rate by a factor of five. The surface chemistry and the surface topography change significantly for these short treatment times, leading to an increased surface energy. The surface roughness rises slowly due to the development of small spots in the nanometre range. For very long treatment times, surface roughness of the order of the barrier layer's thickness results in a complete loss of barrier properties. During plasma pre-treatment, the trade-off between surface activation and roughening of the surface has to be carefully considered.

  20. TREM-1 Promotes Pancreatitis-Associated Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengchun Dang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP can cause intestinal barrier dysfunction (IBD, which significantly increases the disease severity and risk of mortality. We hypothesized that the innate immunity- and inflammatory-related protein-triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1 contributes to this complication of SAP. Thus, we investigated the effect of TREM-1 pathway modulation on a rat model of pancreatitis-associated IBD. In this study we sought to clarify the role of TREM-1 in the pathophysiology of intestinal barrier dysfunction in SAP. Specifically, we evaluated levels of serum TREM-1 and membrane-bound TREM-1 in the intestine and pancreas from an animal model of experimentally induced SAP. TREM-1 pathway blockade by LP17 treatment may suppress pancreatitis-associated IBD and ameliorate the damage to the intestinal mucosa barrier.

  1. Interaction of Botulinum Toxin with the Epithelial Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukako Fujinaga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT is a protein toxin (~150 kDa, which possesses a metalloprotease activity. Food-borne botulism is manifested when BoNT is absorbed from the digestive tract to the blood stream and enters the peripheral nerves, where the toxin cleaves core proteins of the neuroexocytosis apparatus and elicits the inhibition of neurotransmitter release. The initial obstacle to orally ingested BoNT entering the body is the epithelial barrier of the digestive tract. Recent cell biology and molecular biology studies are beginning to elucidate the mechanism by which this large protein toxin crosses the epithelial barrier. In this review, we provide an overview of the structural features of botulinum toxins (BoNT and BoNT complex and the interaction of these toxins with the epithelial barrier.

  2. Microtubule dynamics control HGF-induced lung endothelial barrier enhancement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyong Tian

    Full Text Available Microtubules (MT play a vital role in many cellular functions, but their role in peripheral actin cytoskeletal dynamics which is essential for control of endothelial barrier and monolayer integrity is less understood. We have previously described the enhancement of lung endothelial cell (EC barrier by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF which was associated with Rac1-mediated remodeling of actin cytoskeleton. This study investigated involvement of MT-dependent mechanisms in the HGF-induced enhancement of EC barrier. HGF-induced Rac1 activation was accompanied by phosphorylation of stathmin, a regulator of MT dynamics. HGF also stimulated MT peripheral growth monitored by time lapse imaging and tracking analysis of EB-1-decorated MT growing tips, and increased the pool of acetylated tubulin. These effects were abolished by EC pretreatment with HGF receptor inhibitor, downregulation of Rac1 pathway, or by expression of a stathmin-S63A phosphorylation deficient mutant. Expression of stathmin-S63A abolished the HGF protective effects against thrombin-induced activation of RhoA cascade, permeability increase, and EC barrier dysfunction. These results demonstrate a novel MT-dependent mechanism of HGF-induced EC barrier regulation via Rac1/PAK1/stathmin-dependent control of MT dynamics.

  3. Hormones and the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampl, Richard; Bičíková, Marie; Sosvorová, Lucie

    2015-03-01

    Hormones exert many actions in the brain, and brain cells are also hormonally active. To reach their targets in brain structures, hormones must overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is a unique device selecting desired/undesired molecules to reach or leave the brain, and it is composed of endothelial cells forming the brain vasculature. These cells differ from other endothelial cells in their almost impermeable tight junctions and in possessing several membrane structures such as receptors, transporters, and metabolically active molecules, ensuring their selection function. The main ways how compounds pass through the BBB are briefly outlined in this review. The main part concerns the transport of major classes of hormones: steroids, including neurosteroids, thyroid hormones, insulin, and other peptide hormones regulating energy homeostasis, growth hormone, and also various cytokines. Peptide transporters mediating the saturable transport of individual classes of hormones are reviewed. The last paragraph provides examples of how hormones affect the permeability and function of the BBB either at the level of tight junctions or by various transporters.

  4. Liposome-siRNA-peptide complexes cross the blood-brain barrier and significantly decrease PrP on neuronal cells and PrP in infected cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Pulford

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent advances toward an effective therapy for prion diseases employ RNA interference to suppress PrP(C expression and subsequent prion neuropathology, exploiting the phenomenon that disease severity and progression correlate with host PrP(C expression levels. However, delivery of lentivirus encoding PrP shRNA has demonstrated only modest efficacy in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a new siRNA delivery system incorporating a small peptide that binds siRNA and acetylcholine receptors (AchRs, acting as a molecular messenger for delivery to neurons, and cationic liposomes that protect siRNA-peptide complexes from serum degradation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Liposome-siRNA-peptide complexes (LSPCs delivered PrP siRNA specifically to AchR-expressing cells, suppressed PrP(C expression and eliminated PrP(RES formation in vitro. LSPCs injected intravenously into mice resisted serum degradation and delivered PrP siRNA throughout the brain to AchR and PrP(C-expressing neurons. These data promote LSPCs as effective vehicles for delivery of PrP and other siRNAs specifically to neurons to treat prion and other neuropathological diseases.

  5. Monocytes form a vascular barrier and participate in vessel repair after brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glod, John; Kobiler, David; Noel, Martha; Koneru, Rajeth; Lehrer, Shoshana; Medina, Daniel; Maric, Dragan; Fine, Howard A.

    2006-01-01

    Subpopulations of bone marrow-derived cells can be induced to assume a number of endothelial properties in vitro. However, their ability to form a functional vascular barrier has not been demonstrated. We report that human CD14+ peripheral blood monocytes cultured under angiogenic conditions develop a number of phenotypic and functional properties similar to brain microvascular endothelial cells. These cells express the tight junction proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and occludin and form a barrier with a transcellular electrical resistance (TCER) greater than 100 ohm cm2 and low permeability to 4 kDa and 20 kDa dextrans. The TCER of the cellular barrier is decreased by bradykinin and histamine. We also demonstrate that these cells associate with repairing vasculature in areas of brain and skin injury. Our data suggest that CD14+ peripheral blood monocytes participate in the repair of the vascular barrier after brain injury. PMID:16204319

  6. Patient advocacy: barriers and facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikravesh Mansoure

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the two recent decades, advocacy has been a topic of much debate in the nursing profession. Although advocacy has embraced a crucial role for nurses, its extent is often limited in practice. While a variety of studies have been generated all over the world, barriers and facilitators in the patient advocacy have not been completely identified. This article presents the findings of a study exploring the barriers and facilitators influencing the role of advocacy among Iranian nurses. Method This study was conducted by grounded theory method. Participants were 24 Iranian registered nurses working in a large university hospital in Tehran, Iran. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and simultaneously Constant comparative analysis was used according to the Strauss and Corbin method. Results Through data analysis, several main themes emerged to describe the factors that hindered or facilitated patient advocacy. Nurses in this study identified powerlessness, lack of support, law, code of ethics and motivation, limited communication, physicians leading, risk of advocacy, royalty to peers, and insufficient time to interact with patients and families as barriers to advocacy. As for factors that facilitated nurses to act as a patient advocate, it was found that the nature of nurse-patient relationship, recognizing patients' needs, nurses' responsibility, physician as a colleague, and nurses' knowledge and skills could be influential in adopting the advocacy role. Conclusion Participants believed that in this context taking an advocacy role is difficult for nurses due to the barriers mentioned. Therefore, they make decisions and act as a patient's advocate in any situation concerning patient needs and status of barriers and facilitators. In most cases, they can not act at an optimal level; instead they accept only what they can do, which we called 'limited advocacy' in

  7. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells maintain intestinal epithelial stem cells after tissue damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Aparicio-Domingo (Patricia); M. Romera-Hernandez (Monica); J.J. Karrich (Julien J.); F.H.J. Cornelissen (Ferry); N. Papazian (Natalie); D.J. Lindenbergh-Kortleve (Dicky); J.A. Butler (James A.); L. Boon (Louis); M. Coles (Mark); J.N. Samsom (Janneke); T. Cupedo (Tom)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDisruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier allows bacterial translocation and predisposes to destructive inflammation. To ensure proper barrier composition, crypt-residing stem cells continuously proliferate and replenish all intestinal epithelial cells within days. As a consequence

  8. The blood-nerve barrier: structure and functional significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasuriya, Ananda; Mizisin, Andrew P

    2011-01-01

    The blood-nerve barrier (BNB) defines the physiological space within which the axons, Schwann cells, and other associated cells of a peripheral nerve function. The BNB consists of the endoneurial microvessels within the nerve fascicle and the investing perineurium. The restricted permeability of these two barriers protects the endoneurial microenvironment from drastic concentration changes in the vascular and other extracellular spaces. It is postulated that endoneurial homeostatic mechanisms regulate the milieu intérieur of peripheral axons and associated Schwann cells. These mechanisms are discussed in relation to nerve development, Wallerian degeneration and nerve regeneration, and lead neuropathy. Finally, the putative factors responsible for the cellular and molecular control of BNB permeability are discussed. Given the dynamic nature of the regulation of the permeability of the perineurium and endoneurial capillaries, it is suggested that the term blood-nerve interface (BNI) better reflects the functional significance of these structures in the maintenance of homeostasis within the endoneurial microenvironment.

  9. Gliomas and the vascular fragility of the blood brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gustavo eDubois

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, members of the glial family, interact through the exchange of soluble factors or by directly contacting neurons and other brain cells, such as microglia and endothelial cells. Astrocytic projections interact with vessels and act as additional elements of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB. By mechanisms not fully understood, astrocytes can undergo oncogenic transformation and give rise to gliomas. The tumors take advantage of the BBB to ensure survival and continuous growth. A glioma can develop into a very aggressive tumor, the glioblastoma (GBM, characterized by a highly heterogeneous cell population (including tumor stem cells, extensive proliferation and migration. Nevertheless, gliomas can also give rise to slow growing tumors and in both cases, the afflux of blood, via BBB is crucial. Glioma cells migrate to different regions of the brain guided by the extension of blood vessels, colonizing the healthy adjacent tissue. In the clinical context, GBM can lead to tumor-derived seizures, which represent a challenge to patients and clinicians, since drugs used for its treatment must be able to cross the BBB. Uncontrolled and fast growth also leads to the disruption of the chimeric and fragile vessels in the tumor mass resulting in peritumoral edema. Although hormonal therapy is currently used to control the edema, it is not always efficient. In this review we comment the points cited above, considering the importance of the blood brain barrier and the concerns that arise when this barrier is affected.

  10. Dielectric barrier discharges applied for optical spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, S.; Schütz, A.; Klute, F. D.; Kratzer, J.; Franzke, J.

    2016-09-01

    The present review reflects the importance of dielectric barrier discharges for optical spectrometric detection in analytical chemistry. In contrast to usual discharges with a direct current the electrodes are separated by at least one dielectric barrier. There are two main features of the dielectric barrier discharges: they can serve as dissociation and excitation devices as well as ionization sources, respectively. This article portrays various application fields of dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry used for elemental and molecular detection with optical spectrometry.

  11. Long-term reliable physically unclonable function based on oxide tunnel barrier breakdown on two-transistors two-magnetic-tunnel-junctions cell-based embedded spin transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Satoshi; Tanamoto, Tetsufumi; Noguchi, Hiroki; Ikegami, Kazutaka; Abe, Keiko; Fujita, Shinobu

    2017-04-01

    Among the diverse applications of spintronics, security for internet-of-things (IoT) devices is one of the most important. A physically unclonable function (PUF) with a spin device (spin transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory, STT-MRAM) is presented. Oxide tunnel barrier breakdown is used to realize long-term stability for PUFs. A secure PUF has been confirmed by evaluating the Hamming distance of a 32-bit STT-MRAM-PUF fabricated using 65 nm CMOS technology.

  12. Stratum corneum barrier lipids in cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, V; Halkier-Sørensen, L; Rasmussen, G;

    2000-01-01

    Specimens from primary cholesteatomas were examined under the electron microscope using a lipid-retaining method that is best suited for intracellular lipids and a method that is best for intercellular lipids. In the stratum granulosum of the squamous epithelium, a large number of Odland bodies...... emerged. When the corneocyte reaches the transitional stage to the stratum corneum, the Odland bodies accumulate near the cell membrane and discharge their contents of lipid and enzymes. The lipids are reorganized into multiple long sheets of lamellar structures that embrace the keratinized corneocytes......, as seen in the formation and maintenance of the cutaneous permeability barrier. In this study we draw the attention to the facts that the cholesteatoma epithelium is capable of producing not only cholesterol, but also several lipids, and that the lipid molecules are organized in multilamellar structures...

  13. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  14. Barriers to Mammography among Inadequately Screened Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Carolyn R. T.; Roberts, Summer; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Crayton, Eloise V.; Jackson, Sherrill; Politi, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Mammography use has increased over the past 20 years, yet more than 30% of women remain inadequately screened. Structural barriers can deter individuals from screening, however, cognitive, emotional, and communication barriers may also prevent mammography use. This study sought to identify the impact of number and type of barriers on mammography…

  15. Design of the Muong Chuoi Barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vliegen, K.; Van Oorschot, N.; Meinen, N.; Van Dijk, S.; Reimert, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Ho Chi Minh City has to deal with severe flooding in the rainy season. To prevent the city from this flooding, MARD set up plan 1547. The main idea of the plan is to build a ring dike around HCMC in combination with several movable tidal barriers. One of these barriers is the Muong Chuoi Barrier. I

  16. Market barriers to welfare product innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binnekamp, M.H.A.; Ingenbleek, P.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    New products that are based on higher animal welfare standards encounter several barriers on the road to market acceptance. The authors focus on the Dutch poultry sector and distinguish between retailer and consumer barriers. Retailer barriers include the powerful position of retailers, the price co

  17. Overcome barriers to career success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raudsepp, E.

    1983-04-01

    A test is given to determine if an engineer suffers from one of the three barriers to technical success: fear of success, fear of failure, or perfectionism. As in most such tests, the middle way is best. Successful engineers know that perfection cannot be attained, that they don't have time to worry about failure or success, and that by aiming and perservering in doing things well, success can be achieved.

  18. Wet Work and Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartasch, Manigé

    2016-01-01

    Wet work defined as unprotected exposure to humid environments/water; high frequencies of hand washing procedures or prolonged glove occlusion is believed to cause irritant contact dermatitis in a variety of occupations. This review considers the recent studies on wet-work exposure and focuses on its influence on barrier function. There are different methods to study the effect of wet work on barrier function. On the one hand, occupational cohorts at risk can be monitored prospectively by skin bioengineering technology and clinical visual scoring systems; on the other hand, experimental test procedures with defined application of water, occlusion and detergents are performed in healthy volunteers. Both epidemiological studies and the results of experimental procedures are compared and discussed. A variety of epidemiological studies analyze occupational cohorts at risk. The measurement of transepidermal water loss, an indicator of the integrity of the epidermal barrier, and clinical inspection of the skin have shown that especially the frequencies of hand washing and water contact/contact to aqueous mixtures seem to be the main factors for the occurrence of barrier alterations. On the other hand, in a single cross-sectional study, prolonged glove wearing (e.g. occlusion for 6 h per shift in clean-room workers) without exposure to additional hazardous substances seemed not to affect the skin negatively. But regarding the effect of occlusion, there is experimental evidence that previously occluded skin challenged with sodium lauryl sulfate leads to an increased susceptibility to the irritant with an aggravation of the irritant reaction. These findings might have relevance for the real-life situation in so far as after occupational glove wearing, the skin is more susceptible to potential hazards to the skin even during leisure hours.

  19. Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

  20. Flexible pile thermal barrier insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. E.; Fell, D. M.; Tesinsky, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible pile thermal barrier insulator included a plurality of upstanding pile yarns. A generally planar backing section supported the upstanding pile yarns. The backing section included a plurality of filler yarns forming a mesh in a first direction. A plurality of warp yarns were looped around said filler yarns and pile yarns in the backing section and formed a mesh in a second direction. A binder prevented separation of the yarns in the backing section.

  1. Lake Borgne Surge Barrier Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Savant , and Darla C. McVan September 2010 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CHL TR-10-10 September 2010 Lake...Borgne Surge Barrier Study S. Keith Martin, Gaurav Savant , and Darla C. McVan Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer Research and...conducted by Keith Martin, Dr. Gaurav Savant , and Darla C. McVan. This work was conducted at the Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CHL) of the

  2. Mesoscale geomorphic change on low energy barrier islands in Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. Andrew G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of decadal (mesoscale) geomorphic change on sandy barrier islands in the fetch-limited environment of Chesapeake Bay. Low energy barrier islands exist in two settings: on the fringe of marshes and in open water and this analysis shows the various types of barrier island to be genetically related. Barrier islands that face the dominant wind and wave direction (E or W) retreat via barrier translation, preserving the barrier island volume. Those that exist in re-entrants are dominated by longshore transport processes, are strongly affected by sediment supply and are subject to disintegration. Marsh fringe barrier islands are perched on or draped over the surface of the underlying marsh. They migrate landwards via barrier translation during periodic high water events accompanied by large waves (hurricanes and northeasters). The underlying marsh surface erodes under all water levels and the rate of retreat of the barrier island and underlying marsh may take place at different rates, leading to various configurations from perched barrier islands several metres landward of the marsh edge, to barrier islands that have a sandy shoreface extending into the subtidal zone. The coastal configuration during landward retreat of marsh fringe barrier islands is subject to strong local control exerted by the underyling marsh topography. As erosion of marsh promontories occurs and marsh creeks are intersected and bypassed, the configuration is subject to rapid change. Periodic sediment influxes cause spits to develop at re-entrants in the marsh. The spits are initiated as extensions of adjacent marsh fringe barrier islands, but as the sediment volume is finite, the initial drift-aligned spits become sediment-starved and begin to develop a series of swash-aligned cells as they strive for morphodynamic equilibrium. The individual cells are stretched until breaches form in the barrier islands, creating inlets with tidal deltas. At this stage the low

  3. Pathophysiology of the cochlear intrastrial fluid-blood barrier (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaorui

    2016-08-01

    The blood-labyrinth barrier (BLB) in the stria vascularis is a highly specialized capillary network that controls exchanges between blood and the intrastitial space in the cochlea. The barrier shields the inner ear from blood-born toxic substances and selectively passes ions, fluids, and nutrients to the cochlea, playing an essential role in the maintenance of cochlear homeostasis. Anatomically, the BLB is comprised of endothelial cells (ECs) in the strial microvasculature, elaborated tight and adherens junctions, pericytes (PCs), basement membrane (BM), and perivascular resident macrophage-like melanocytes (PVM/Ms), which together form a complex "cochlear-vascular unit" in the stria vascularis. Physical interactions between the ECs, PCs, and PVM/Ms, as well as signaling between the cells, is critical for controlling vascular permeability and providing a proper environment for hearing function. Breakdown of normal interactions between components of the BLB is seen in a wide range of pathological conditions, including genetic defects and conditions engendered by inflammation, loud sound trauma, and ageing. In this review, we will discuss prevailing views of the structure and function of the strial cochlear-vascular unit (also referred to as the "intrastrial fluid-blood barrier"). We will also discuss the disrupted homeostasis seen in a variety of hearing disorders. Therapeutic targeting of the strial barrier may offer opportunities for improvement of hearing health and amelioration of auditory disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled .

  4. Diffraction of sound by nearly rigid barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, W. J., Jr.; Pierce, A. D.

    1976-01-01

    The diffraction of sound by barriers with surfaces of large, but finite, acoustic impedance was analyzed. Idealized source-barrier-receiver configurations in which the barriers may be considered as semi-infinite wedges are discussed. Particular attention is given to situations in which the source and receiver are at large distances from the tip of the wedge. The expression for the acoustic pressure in this limiting case is compared with the results of Pierce's analysis of diffraction by a rigid wedge. An expression for the insertion loss of a finite impedance barrier is compared with insertion loss formulas which are used extensively in selecting or designing barriers for noise control.

  5. Mathematical modeling of complex noise barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayek, S.I.

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of the noise reduction efficiency of highway noise barriers depends on the shape and absorptivity of the barrier, the influence of the impedance of the ground under the receiver, the atmospheric conditions as well as traffic details. The mathematical model for a barrier's noise reduction requires the knowledge of point-to-point acoustic diffraction models. In many instances, the shape of the barrier is simple; such as thin wall (edge), sharp wedge, and cylindrically topped berms. However, new designs of more efficient barriers have been investigated recently.

  6. Dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C; Müller, S; Gurevich, E L; Franzke, J

    2011-06-21

    The present review reflects the importance of dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry. Special about this discharge is-and in contrast to usual discharges with direct current-that the plasma is separated from one or two electrodes by a dielectric barrier. This gives rise to two main features of the dielectric barrier discharges; it can serve as dissociation and excitation device and as ionization mechanism, respectively. The article portrays the various application fields for dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry, for example the use for elemental detection with optical spectrometry or as ionization source for mass spectrometry. Besides the introduction of different kinds of dielectric barrier discharges used for analytical chemistry from the literature, a clear and concise classification of dielectric barrier discharges into capacitively coupled discharges is provided followed by an overview about the characteristics of a dielectric barrier discharge concerning discharge properties and the ignition mechanism.

  7. Avoiding barriers in control of mowing robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Bai-jing; QIAN Guo-hong; XIANG Zhong-ping; LI Zuo-peng

    2006-01-01

    Due to complicated barriers,it is difficult to track the path of the mowing robot and to avoid barriers.In order to solve the problem,a method based on distance-measuring sensors and fuzzy control inputs was proposed.Its track was composed of beelines and was easy to tail.The fuzzy control inputs were based on the front barrier distance and the difference between the left and right barrier distance measured by ultrasonic sensors;the output was the direction angle.The infrared sensors around the robot improved its safety in avoiding barriers.The result of the method was feasible,agile,and stable.The distance between the robot and the barriers could be changed by altering the inputs and outputs of fuzzy control and the length of the beelines.The disposed sensors can fulfill the need of the robot in avoiding barriers.

  8. Pectin as a barrier and nutrient source for fungal plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Fungi that interact with plants gain access to host tissues by actively passing the surface through the cuticle and/or cell wall. Cell walls provide plant tissue strength and structure, and form a barrier against microbial invasion. Plants invest substantial resources in constructing the cell wall a

  9. In vitro models of the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Abbott, N Joan; Burek, Malgorzata;

    2016-01-01

    components of plasma and xenobiotics. This "blood-brain barrier" function is a major hindrance for drug uptake into the brain parenchyma. Cell culture models, based on either primary cells or immortalized brain endothelial cell lines, have been developed, in order to facilitate in vitro studies of drug...

  10. Characterization of an in vitro Rhesus Macaque Blood-Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Andrew G.; Orandle, Marlene S.; MacKey, John; Williams, Kenneth C.; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier has been modeled in vitro in a number of species, including rat, cow and human. Coculture of multiple cell types is required for the correct expression of tight junction proteins by microvascular brain endothelial cells (MBEC). Markers of inflammation, especially MHC-II, and cell adhesion molecules, such as VCAM-1, are not expressed on the luminal surface of the barrier under resting conditions. The rhesus macaque model has been used to study early events of HIV-neuropathogenesis in vivo, but a suitable in vitro model has not been available for detailed mechanistic studies. Here we describe an in vitro rhesus macaque blood-brain barrier (BBB) that utilizes autologous MBEC and astrocytes. We believe that this model is highly relevant for examining immunological events at the blood-brain barrier and demonstrate its potential usefulness for examining early events in AIDS neuropathogenesis. PMID:12458041

  11. Intestinal barrier loss as a critical pathogenic link between inflammatory bowel disease and graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalle, S C; Turner, J R

    2015-07-01

    Compromised intestinal barrier function is a prominent feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, links between intestinal barrier loss and disease extend much further, including documented associations with celiac disease, type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. Intestinal barrier loss has also been proposed to have a critical role in the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a serious, potentially fatal consequence of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Experimental evidence has begun to support this view, as barrier loss and its role in initiating and establishing a pathogenic inflammatory cycle in GVHD is emerging. Here we discuss similarities between IBD and GVHD, mechanisms of intestinal barrier loss in these diseases, and the crosstalk between barrier loss and the immune system, with a special focus on natural killer (NK) cells. Unanswered questions and future research directions on the topic are discussed along with implications for treatment.

  12. A neurovascular blood-brain barrier in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehendner, Christoph M; White, Robin; Hedrich, Jana; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2014-01-01

    The cerebral microvasculature possesses certain cellular features that constitute the blood-brain barrier (BBB) (Abbott et al., Neurobiol Dis 37:13-25, 2010). This dynamic barrier separates the brain parenchyma from peripheral blood flow and is of tremendous clinical importance: for example, BBB breakdown as in stroke is associated with the development of brain edema (Rosenberg and Yang, Neurosurg Focus 22:E4, 2007), inflammation (Kuhlmann et al., Neurosci Lett 449:168-172, 2009; Coisne and Engelhardt, Antioxid Redox Signal 15:1285-1303, 2011), and increased mortality. In vivo, the BBB consists of brain endothelial cells (BEC) that are embedded within a precisely regulated environment containing astrocytes, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, and glial cells. These cells experience modulation by various pathways of intercellular communication and by pathophysiological processes, e.g., through neurovascular coupling (Attwell et al., Nature 468:232-243, 2010), cortical spreading depression (Gursoy-Ozdemir et al., J Clin Invest 113:1447-1455, 2004), or formation of oxidative stress (Yemisci et al., Nat Med 15:1031-1037, 2009). Hence, this interdependent assembly of cells is referred to as the neurovascular unit (NVU) (Zlokovic, Nat Med 16:1370-1371, 2010; Zlokovic, Neuron 57:178-201, 2008). Experimental approaches to investigate the BBB in vitro are highly desirable to study the cerebral endothelium in health and disease. However, due to the complex interactions taking place within the NVU in vivo, it is difficult to mimic this interplay in vitro.Here, we describe a murine blood-brain barrier coculture model consisting of cortical organotypic slice cultures and brain endothelial cells that includes most of the cellular components of the NVU including neurons, astrocytes, and brain endothelial cells. This model allows the experimental analysis of several crucial BBB parameters such as transendothelial electrical resistance or tight junction protein localization by

  13. Transport barriers made of cutin, suberin and associated waxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Lukas

    2010-10-01

    Cutinized leaf epidermal cells and suberized root cell walls form important lipophilic interfaces between the plant and its environment, significantly contributing to the regulation of water uptake and the transport of solutes in and out of the plant. A wealth of new molecular information on the genes and enzymes contributing to cutin, suberin and wax biosynthesis have become available within the past few years, which is examined in the context of the functional properties of these barriers in terms of transport and permeability. Recent progress made in measuring transport properties of cutinized and suberized barriers in plants is reviewed, and promising approaches obtained with Arabidopsis and potato that might link the molecular information with transport properties are suggested.

  14. Tunneling without barriers with gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro

    2012-01-01

    We consider the vacuum decay of the flat Minkowski space to an anti-de Sitter space. We find a one-parameter family of potentials that allow exact, analytical instanton solutions describing tunneling without barriers in the presence of gravity. In the absence of gravity such instantons were found and discussed by Lee and Weinberg more than a quarter of a century ago. The bounce action is also analytically computed. We discuss possible implications of these new instantons to cosmology in the context of the string theory landscape.

  15. A microphysiological model of the human placental barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Cassidy; Tess, Emily R; Schanzer, Ariana S R; Coutifaris, Christos; Su, Emily J; Parry, Samuel; Huh, Dongeun

    2016-08-02

    During human pregnancy, the fetal circulation is separated from maternal blood in the placenta by two cell layers - the fetal capillary endothelium and placental trophoblast. This placental barrier plays an essential role in fetal development and health by tightly regulating the exchange of endogenous and exogenous materials between the mother and the fetus. Here we present a microengineered device that provides a novel platform to mimic the structural and functional complexity of this specialized tissue in vitro. Our model is created in a multilayered microfluidic system that enables co-culture of human trophoblast cells and human fetal endothelial cells in a physiologically relevant spatial arrangement to replicate the characteristic architecture of the human placental barrier. We have engineered this co-culture model to induce progressive fusion of trophoblast cells and to form a syncytialized epithelium that resembles the syncytiotrophoblast in vivo. Our system also allows the cultured trophoblasts to form dense microvilli under dynamic flow conditions and to reconstitute expression and physiological localization of membrane transport proteins, such as glucose transporters (GLUTs), critical to the barrier function of the placenta. To provide a proof-of-principle for using this microdevice to recapitulate native function of the placental barrier, we demonstrated physiological transport of glucose across the microengineered maternal-fetal interface. Importantly, the rate of maternal-to-fetal glucose transfer in this system closely approximated that measured in ex vivo perfused human placentas. Our "placenta-on-a-chip" platform represents an important advance in the development of new technologies to model and study the physiological complexity of the human placenta for a wide variety of applications.

  16. Alterations of Blood Brain Barrier Function in Hyperammonemia: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia is a neurotoxin involved in the pathogenesis of neurological conditions associated with hyperammonemia, including hepatic encephalopathy, a condition associated with acute—(ALF) or chronic liver failure. This article reviews evidence that apart from directly affecting the metabolism and function of the central nervous system cells, ammonia influences the passage of different molecules across the blood brain barrier (BBB). A brief description is provided of the tight junctions, which c...

  17. Changes in intestinal mucosal immune barrier in rats with endotoxemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Liu; Ang Li; Yi-Bing Weng; Mei-Li Duan; Bao-En Wang; Shu-Wen Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the dysfunction of the immunological barrier of the intestinal mucosa during endotoxemia and to elucidate the potential mechanism of this dysfunction. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into two groups: control group and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group. Endotoxemia was induced by a single caudal venous injection of LPS. Animals were sacrificed in batches 2, 6, 12 and 24 h after LPS infusion. The number of microfold (M)-cells, dendritic cells (DCs), CD4~+ T cells, CD8~+ T cells, regulatory T (Tr) cells and IgA~+ B cells in the intestinal mucosa were counted after immunohistochemical staining. Apoptotic lymphocytes were counted after TUNEL staining. The levels of interleukin (IL)-4, interferon (IFN)-γ and forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) in mucosal homogenates were measured by ELISA. The secretory IgA (sIgA) content in the total protein of one milligram of small intestinal mucus was detected using a radioimmunological assay. RESULTS: This research demonstrated that LPS LPSinduced endotoxemia results in small intestinal mucosa injury. The number of M-cells, DCs, CD8~+ T cells, and IgA~+ B cells were decreased while Tr cell and apoptotic lymphocyte numbers were increased significantly. The number of CD4~+ T cells increased in the early stages and then slightly decreased by 24 h. The level of IL-4 significantly increased in the early stages and then reversed by the end of the study period. The level of IFN-γ increased slightly in the early stages and then decreased markedly by the 24 h time point. Level of Foxp3 increased whereas sIgA level decreased. CONCLUSION: Mucosal immune dysfunction forms part of the intestinal barrier injury during endotoxemia. The increased number and function of Tr cells as well as lymphocyte apoptosis result in mucosal immunode- ficiency.

  18. Exogenous sphingomyelinase causes impaired intestinal epithelial barrier function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To test the hypothesis that hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide changes the composition of tight junctions (TJs) with increasing permeability of the intestinal epithelium.METHODS: Monolayers of Caco-2 cells were used as an in vitro model for the intestinal barrier. Permeability was determined by quantification of transepithelial flux and transepithelial resistance. Sphingolipid-rich membrane microdomains were isolated by a discontinuous sucrose gradient and characterized by Western-blot. Lipid content of microdomains was analysed by tandem mass spectrometry. Ceramide was subcellularly localized by immunofluorescent staining.RESULTS: Exogenous sphingomyelinase increased transepithelial permeability and decreased transepithelial resistance at concentrations as low as 0.01 U/mL.Lipid analysis showed rapid accumulation of ceramide in the membrane fractions containing occludin and claudin-4, representing TJs. In these fractions we observed a concomitant decrease of sphingomyelin and cholesterol with increasing concentrations of ceramide.Immunofluorescent staining confirmed clustering of ceramide at the sites of cell-cell contacts. Neutralization of surface ceramide prevented the permeability-increase induced by platelet activating factor.CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that changes in lipid composition of TJs impair epithelial barrier functions. Generation of ceramide by sphingomyelinases might contribute to disturbed barrier function seen in diseases such as inflammatory, infectious, toxic or radiogenic bowel disease.

  19. Silicon Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Cueto, J. A.; Glick, S. H.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

    2006-10-03

    Dielectric, adhesion-promoting, moisture barriers comprised of silicon oxynitride thin film materials (SiOxNy with various material stoichiometric compositions x,y) were applied to: 1) bare and pre-coated soda-lime silicate glass (coated with transparent conductive oxide SnO2:F and/or aluminum), and polymer substrates (polyethylene terephthalate, PET, or polyethylene napthalate, PEN); plus 2) pre- deposited photovoltaic (PV) cells and mini-modules consisting of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film PV technologies. We used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process with dilute silane, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide/oxygen gas mixtures in a low-power (< or = 10 milliW per cm2) RF discharge at ~ 0.2 Torr pressure, and low substrate temperatures < or = 100(degrees)C, over deposition areas ~ 1000 cm2. Barrier properties of the resulting PV cells and coated-glass packaging structures were studied with subsequent stressing in damp-heat exposure at 85(degrees)C/85% RH. Preliminary results on PV cells and coated glass indicate the palpable benefits of the barriers in mitigating moisture intrusion and degradation of the underlying structures using SiOxNy coatings with thicknesses in the range of 100-200 nm.

  20. Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

  1. Overcoming Barriers in Unhealthy Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K. Lemke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the phenomenon of sustained health-supportive behaviors among long-haul commercial truck drivers, who belong to an occupational segment with extreme health disparities. With a focus on setting-level factors, this study sought to discover ways in which individuals exhibit resiliency while immersed in endemically obesogenic environments, as well as understand setting-level barriers to engaging in health-supportive behaviors. Using a transcendental phenomenological research design, 12 long-haul truck drivers who met screening criteria were selected using purposeful maximum sampling. Seven broad themes were identified: access to health resources, barriers to health behaviors, recommended alternative settings, constituents of health behavior, motivation for health behaviors, attitude toward health behaviors, and trucking culture. We suggest applying ecological theories of health behavior and settings approaches to improve driver health. We also propose the Integrative and Dynamic Healthy Commercial Driving (IDHCD paradigm, grounded in complexity science, as a new theoretical framework for improving driver health outcomes.

  2. PWM Converter Power Density Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Johann W.; Drofenik, Uwe; Biela, Juergen; Heldwein, Marcelo; Ertl, Hans; Friedli, Thomas; Round, Simon

    Power density of power electronic converters has roughly doubled every 10 years since 1970. Behind this trajectory is the continuous advancement of power semiconductor devices, which has increased the converter switching frequencies by a factor of 10 every decade. However, today's cooling concepts and passive components are major barriers for a continuation of this trend. To identify such technological barriers, this paper investigates the volume of the cooling system and passive components as a function of the switching frequency for power electronic converters and determines the switching frequency that minimizes the total volume. A power density limit of 28kW/dm3 at 300kHz is calculated for an isolated DC-DC converter, 44kW/dm3 at 820kHz for a three-phase unity power factor PWM rectifier, and 26kW/dm3 at 21kHz for a sparse matrix converter. For single-phase AC-DC conversion a general limit of 35kW/dm3 results from the DC link capacitor. These power density limits highlight the need to broaden the scope of power electronics research to include cooling systems, high frequency electromagnetics, interconnection and packaging technology, and multi-domain modelling and simulation to ensure further advancement along the power density trajectory.

  3. Barriers to medical error reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Poorolajal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was conducted to explore the prevalence of medical error underreporting and associated barriers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed from September to December 2012. Five hospitals, affiliated with Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, in Hamedan,Iran were investigated. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Participants consisted of physicians, nurses, midwives, residents, interns, and staffs of radiology and laboratory departments. Results: Overall, 50.26% of subjects had committed but not reported medical errors. The main reasons mentioned for underreporting were lack of effective medical error reporting system (60.0%, lack of proper reporting form (51.8%, lack of peer supporting a person who has committed an error (56.0%, and lack of personal attention to the importance of medical errors (62.9%. The rate of committing medical errors was higher in men (71.4%, age of 50-40 years (67.6%, less-experienced personnel (58.7%, educational level of MSc (87.5%, and staff of radiology department (88.9%. Conclusions: This study outlined the main barriers to reporting medical errors and associated factors that may be helpful for healthcare organizations in improving medical error reporting as an essential component for patient safety enhancement.

  4. A double barrier memristive device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, M.; Ziegler, M.; Kolberg, L.; Soni, R.; Dirkmann, S.; Mussenbrock, T.; Kohlstedt, H.

    2015-09-01

    We present a quantum mechanical memristive Nb/Al/Al2O3/NbxOy/Au device which consists of an ultra-thin memristive layer (NbxOy) sandwiched between an Al2O3 tunnel barrier and a Schottky-like contact. A highly uniform current distribution for the LRS (low resistance state) and HRS (high resistance state) for areas ranging between 70 μm2 and 2300 μm2 were obtained, which indicates a non-filamentary based resistive switching mechanism. In a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis we show evidence that resistive switching originates from oxygen diffusion and modifications of the local electronic interface states within the NbxOy layer, which influences the interface properties of the Au (Schottky) contact and of the Al2O3 tunneling barrier, respectively. The presented device might offer several benefits like an intrinsic current compliance, improved retention and no need for an electric forming procedure, which is especially attractive for possible applications in highly dense random access memories or neuromorphic mixed signal circuits.

  5. Relativistic Double Barrier Problem with Three Sub-Barrier Transmission Resonance Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Alhaidari, A D; Jellal, A

    2010-01-01

    We obtain exact scattering solutions of the Dirac equation in 1+1 dimensions for a double square barrier vector potential. The potential floor between the two barriers is higher than 2mc^2 whereas the top of the barriers is at least 2mc^2 above the floor. The relativistic version of the conventional double barrier transmission resonance is obtained for energies within + or - mc^2 from the height of the barriers. However, we also find two more (sub-barrier) transmission resonance regions below the conventional one. Both are located within the two Klein energy zones and characterized by resonances that are broader than the conventional ones.

  6. Barrier experiment: Shock initiation under complex loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The barrier experiments are a variant of the gap test; a detonation wave in a donor HE impacts a barrier and drives a shock wave into an acceptor HE. The question we ask is: What is the trade-off between the barrier material and threshold barrier thickness to prevent the acceptor from detonating. This can be viewed from the perspective of shock initiation of the acceptor subject to a complex pressure drive condition. Here we consider key factors which affect whether or not the acceptor undergoes a shock-to-detonation transition. These include the following: shock impedance matches for the donor detonation wave into the barrier and then the barrier shock into the acceptor, the pressure gradient behind the donor detonation wave, and the curvature of detonation front in the donor. Numerical simulations are used to illustrate how these factors affect the reaction in the acceptor.

  7. Alteration of blood-brain barrier integrity by retroviral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe V Afonso

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB, which forms the interface between the blood and the cerebral parenchyma, has been shown to be disrupted during retroviral-associated neuromyelopathies. Human T Lymphotropic Virus (HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with BBB breakdown. The BBB is composed of three cell types: endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes. Although astrocytes have been shown to be infected by HTLV-1, until now, little was known about the susceptibility of BBB endothelial cells to HTLV-1 infection and the impact of such an infection on BBB function. We first demonstrated that human cerebral endothelial cells express the receptors for HTLV-1 (GLUT-1, Neuropilin-1 and heparan sulfate proteoglycans, both in vitro, in a human cerebral endothelial cell line, and ex vivo, on spinal cord autopsy sections from HAM/TSP and non-infected control cases. In situ hybridization revealed HTLV-1 transcripts associated with the vasculature in HAM/TSP. We were able to confirm that the endothelial cells could be productively infected in vitro by HTLV-1 and that blocking of either HSPGs, Neuropilin 1 or Glut1 inhibits this process. The expression of the tight-junction proteins within the HTLV-1 infected endothelial cells was altered. These cells were no longer able to form a functional barrier, since BBB permeability and lymphocyte passage through the monolayer of endothelial cells were increased. This work constitutes the first report of susceptibility of human cerebral endothelial cells to HTLV-1 infection, with implications for HTLV-1 passage through the BBB and subsequent deregulation of the central nervous system homeostasis. We propose that the susceptibility of cerebral endothelial cells to retroviral infection and subsequent BBB dysfunction is an important aspect of HAM/TSP pathogenesis and should be considered in the design of future therapeutics strategies.

  8. Identification of Key Barriers in Workforce Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the identification of key barriers in the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed under a Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration grant. Many barriers exist that prevent the development of an adequate number of propertly trained national security personnel. Some barriers can be eliminated in a short-term manner, whereas others will involve a long-term strategy that takes into account public policy.

  9. Altered permeability barrier structure in cholesteatoma matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, Viggo; Halkier-Sørensen, Lars; Rasmussen, Gurli

    2002-01-01

    The stratum corneum of the cholesteatoma epithelium comprises the greater part of the cholesteatoma matrix. The permeability barrier that militates against diffusion and penetration of infectious and toxic agents into and through the epithelium is situated here. The multiple long sheets of lamellar...... lipid structures filling the intercellular spaces mainly control the barrier function. The barrier in cholesteatoma epithelium is several times thicker than in unaffected skin but presents distinctive features of a defective barrier as seen in other scaling skin diseases. The intercellular spaces appear...

  10. Barriers Approach to Innovation in Academic Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Hsuan Chuang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Innovation in academic libraries is not a brand new issue. Academic libraries can benefit from successful innovation, since innovation is a key contributor to gaining and sustaining competitive advantage for survival. Building on two case studies, 28 participants from leadership teams to practitioners are involved, the qualitative findings identified the specific two types of barriers that academic libraries face by applying a barriers approach to innovation, that’s, environmental and organizational barriers. Especially, seven dimensions of two types of barriers to innovation are found.

  11. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard

    2016-12-20

    The present invention includes an integrated planar, series connected fuel cell system having electrochemical cells electrically connected via interconnects, wherein the anodes of the electrochemical cells are protected against Ni loss and migration via an engineered porous anode barrier layer.

  12. Transcriptome analysis of the ependymal barrier during murine neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Pramod

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central nervous system (CNS barriers play a pivotal role in the protection and homeostasis of the CNS by enabling the exchange of metabolites while restricting the entry of xenobiotics, blood cells and blood-borne macromolecules. While the blood–brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (CSF control the interface between the blood and CNS, the ependyma acts as a barrier between the CSF and parenchyma, and regulates hydrocephalic pressure and metabolic toxicity. Neurocysticercosis (NCC is an infection of the CNS caused by the metacestode (larva of Taenia solium and a major cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. The common clinical manifestations of NCC are seizures, hydrocephalus and symptoms due to increased intracranial pressure. The majority of the associated pathogenesis is attributed to the immune response against the parasite. The properties of the CNS barriers, including the ependyma, are affected during infection, resulting in disrupted homeostasis and infiltration of leukocytes, which correlates with the pathology and disease symptoms of NCC patients. Results In order to characterize the role of the ependymal barrier in the immunopathogenesis of NCC, we isolated ependymal cells using laser capture microdissection from mice infected or mock-infected with the closely related parasite Mesocestoides corti, and analyzed the genes that were differentially expressed using microarray analysis. The expression of 382 genes was altered. Immune response-related genes were verified by real-time RT-PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA software was used to analyze the biological significance of the differentially expressed genes, and revealed that genes known to participate in innate immune responses, antigen presentation and leukocyte infiltration were affected along with the genes involved in carbohydrate, lipid and small molecule biochemistry. Further, MHC class II molecules and chemokines, including CCL12, were found

  13. Engineered Barrier Testing at the INEEL Engineered Barriers Test Facility: FY-1997 and FY-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, K. N.; Porro, I.

    1998-09-01

    Engineered barriers of two designs are being tested at the Engineered Barriers Test Facility (EBTF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report describes the test facility, barrier designs, and instruments used to monitor the test plots. Wetting tests conducted on the test plots in FY-97 are described and data collected from monitoring the test plots before, during and after the wetting tests are used to evaluate the performance of the covers during FY-97 and FY-98. Replicates of two engineered barrier designs were constructed in the EBTF cells. The first design comprises a thick, vegetated soil cover. The second design incorporates a capillary/biobarrier within the vegtated soil cover. The capillary barrier uses the textural break between an upper, fine textured soil and a lower, coarser-textured gravel layer to inhibit drainage under unsaturated conditions while increasing soil moisture storage in the root zone. Evaporation and transpiration by plants (although the test plots have not yet been vegetated) are used to recycle water stored in the soil back to the atmosphere. A geotextile fabric is used to maintain separation of the soil and gravel layers. A thick layer of cobbles beneath the gravel layer serves as a biobarrier to prevent intrusion of plant roots and burrowing animals into underlying waste (there is no waste in the test plots). Each test plot was instrumented with time domain reflectometry probes and neutron probe access tubes to measure moisture contents, tensiometers, heat dissipation sensors, and thermocouple psychrometers to measure matric potentials, thermocouples to measure soil temperature, and ion-exchange resin beads to monitor tracer movement. Each drainage sump is equipped with a tipping bucket instrument and pressure transducer to measure drainage. Precipitation is measured using a heated rain gauge located at the EBTF. Instrument calibration equation coefficients are presented, and data reduction

  14. Pratt & Whitney thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornstein, N. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States); Marcin, J. [Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Co., East Hartford, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to develop ultra-high efficient, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems. The operating profiles of these industrial gas turbines are long, less cyclic with fewer transients-compared with those for aircraft gas turbine engines. Therefore, creep rather than thermal fatigue, becomes primary life-limiting for hot section components. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will be used to achieve the objectives of the program. TBCs allow surface temperatures to increase without compromising the structural properties of the alloy. TBCs typically consist of a ceramic insulating layer, deposited onto the substrate with an intervening metallic layer, which imparts oxidation protection to the substrate and provides a surface to which the ceramic layer can adhere.

  15. Religious culture as a barrier?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Sine

    2016-01-01

    Political interventions, media coverage and research often refer to the underrepresentation of ethnic minorities, particularly girls and women, participating in physical activity and organised sports. In both public and academic debates, reference is made to the religious culture as a particular...... barrier to participation in sports among Muslim girls and women. This article aims to provide a counter-narrative by focusing on young Muslim girls who simultaneously practice their religion and sports. The main research question was: How do young Danish Muslim girls align participation in sports...... religion as hegemonic, embodied and dynamic cultural phenomena, the analysis points to the diversity through which Muslim girls and women participate and engage in sports. Finally, the article discusses the extent to which counter-narratives may contribute to changing perspectives on so-called hard...

  16. Numerical evaluation of the thermal performances of roof-mounted radiant barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Miranville, Frédéric; Boyer, Harry; Lucas, Franck; Johan, Seriacaroupin

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This paper deals with the thermal performances of roof-mounted radiant barriers. Using dynamic simulations of a mathematical model of a whole test cell including a radiant barrier installed between the roof top and the ceiling, the thermal performance of the roof is calculated. The mean method is more particularly used to assess the thermal resistance of the building component and lead to a value which is compared to the one obtained for a mass insulation product such ...

  17. Characterization of an in vitro Rhesus Macaque Blood-Brain Barrier

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier has been modeled in vitro in a number of species, including rat, cow and human. Coculture of multiple cell types is required for the correct expression of tight junction proteins by microvascular brain endothelial cells (MBEC). Markers of inflammation, especially MHC-II, and cell adhesion molecules, such as VCAM-1, are not expressed on the luminal surface of the barrier under resting conditions. The rhesus macaque model has been used to study early events of HIV-neurop...

  18. Gliomas and the vascular fragility of the blood brain barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Luiz Gustavo; Campanati, Loraine; Righy, Cassia; D’Andrea-Meira, Isabella; Spohr, Tania Cristina Leite de Sampaio e; Porto-Carreiro, Isabel; Pereira, Claudia Maria; Balça-Silva, Joana; Kahn, Suzana Assad; DosSantos, Marcos F.; Oliveira, Marcela de Almeida Rabello; Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Faveret, Eduardo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes, members of the glial family, interact through the exchange of soluble factors or by directly contacting neurons and other brain cells, such as microglia and endothelial cells. Astrocytic projections interact with vessels and act as additional elements of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB). By mechanisms not fully understood, astrocytes can undergo oncogenic transformation and give rise to gliomas. The tumors take advantage of the BBB to ensure survival and continuous growth. A glioma can develop into a very aggressive tumor, the glioblastoma (GBM), characterized by a highly heterogeneous cell population (including tumor stem cells), extensive proliferation and migration. Nevertheless, gliomas can also give rise to slow growing tumors and in both cases, the afflux of blood, via BBB is crucial. Glioma cells migrate to different regions of the brain guided by the extension of blood vessels, colonizing the healthy adjacent tissue. In the clinical context, GBM can lead to tumor-derived seizures, which represent a challenge to patients and clinicians, since drugs used for its treatment must be able to cross the BBB. Uncontrolled and fast growth also leads to the disruption of the chimeric and fragile vessels in the tumor mass resulting in peritumoral edema. Although hormonal therapy is currently used to control the edema, it is not always efficient. In this review we comment the points cited above, considering the importance of the BBB and the concerns that arise when this barrier is affected. PMID:25565956

  19. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin reduces human alveolar epithelial barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

    2012-12-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness.

  20. Astrocytic modulation of blood brain barrier: perspectives on Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, Ricardo; Avila, Marcos; Gonzalez, Janneth; El-Bachá, Ramon Santos; Báez, Eliana; García-Segura, Luis Miguel; Jurado Coronel, Juan Camilo; Capani, Francisco; Cardona-Gomez, Gloria Patricia; Barreto, George E

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a tightly regulated interface in the Central Nervous System (CNS) that regulates the exchange of molecules in and out from the brain thus maintaining the CNS homeostasis. It is mainly composed of endothelial cells (ECs), pericytes and astrocytes that create a neurovascular unit (NVU) with the adjacent neurons. Astrocytes are essential for the formation and maintenance of the BBB by providing secreted factors that lead to the adequate association between the cells of the BBB and the formation of strong tight junctions. Under neurological disorders, such as chronic cerebral ischemia, brain trauma, Epilepsy, Alzheimer and Parkinson's Diseases, a disruption of the BBB takes place, involving a lost in the permeability of the barrier and phenotypical changes in both the ECs and astrocytes. In this aspect, it has been established that the process of reactive gliosis is a common feature of astrocytes during BBB disruption, which has a detrimental effect on the barrier function and a subsequent damage in neuronal survival. In this review we discuss the implications of astrocyte functions in the protection of the BBB, and in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD) and related disorders. Additionally, we highlight the current and future strategies in astrocyte protection aimed at the development of restorative therapies for the BBB in pathological conditions.

  1. Crash barrier research in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flury, F.C. & Paar, H.G.

    1973-01-01

    Research by the SWOV has led to the development of a series of crash barriers of basically the same design but with varying degrees of resistance to lateral deflection. Requirements to which in general a crash barrier should fulfill are presented.

  2. Message maps for Safety Barrier Awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    All people are exposed to risks in every-day life, but they seldom experience accidents. Therefore people often believe that these accidents will never happen, and they will see the risks no more. By increasing the ability to notice risks, to see safety barriers, and to assess the safety barriers...

  3. Fracture mechanism of a thermal barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilenko, V. M.; Ravilov, R. G.; Drevnyak, V. V.; Petrova, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    The fracture mechanism of the thermal barrier coating of gas turbine blades is studied. The causes of the fracture of the ceramic layer are discussed and the possible ways to increase the fatigue life of the thermal barrier coating are considered.

  4. Barriers to adherence in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf

    2012-01-01

    Danish patients with cystic fibrosis aged 14 to 25 years and their parents. Conclusions: The present study showed that the majority of adolescents with CF and their parents experienced barriers to treatment adherence. Patients and parents agreed that the three most common barriers encountered lack...

  5. Storm impacts on small barrier islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroon, Aart; Fruergaard, Mikkel

    The shorelines of the Baltic Sea and the inner coastal waters in Denmark consist of many barrier islands. These sandy barrier islands were mainly formed in the Holocene and are still very dynamic. The present day changes in the morphology are dominantly governed by storm waves and associated high...

  6. Nurses' barriers to learning: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marion C

    2012-07-01

    This integrative review of the literature describes nurses' barriers to learning. Five major themes emerged: time constraints, financial constraints, workplace culture, access/relevance, and competency in accessing electronic evidence-based practice literature. The nurse educator must address these barriers for the staff to achieve learning and competency.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides, Infections and the Skin Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Agner, Tove

    2016-01-01

    The skin serves as a strong barrier protecting us from invading pathogens and harmful organisms. An important part of this barrier comes from antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are small peptides expressed abundantly in the skin. AMPs are produced in the deeper layers of the epidermis...

  8. Bacillus cereus induces permeability of an in vitro blood-retina barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, A L; Ramadan, R T; Thurman, J; Burroughs, A; Callegan, M C

    2008-04-01

    Most Bacillus cereus toxin production is controlled by the quorum-sensing-dependent, pleiotropic global regulator plcR, which contributes to the organism's virulence in the eye. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of B. cereus infection and plcR-regulated toxins on the barrier function of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, the primary cells of the blood-retina barrier. Human ARPE-19 cells were apically inoculated with wild-type or quorum-sensing-deficient B. cereus, and cytotoxicity was analyzed. plcR-regulated toxins were not required for B. cereus-induced RPE cytotoxicity, but these toxins did increase the rate of cell death, primarily by necrosis. B. cereus infection of polarized RPE cell monolayers resulted in increased barrier permeability, independent of plcR-regulated toxins. Loss of both occludin and ZO-1 expression occurred by 8 h postinfection, but alterations in tight junctions appeared to precede cytotoxicity. Of the several proinflammatory cytokines analyzed, only interleukin-6 was produced in response to B. cereus infection. These results demonstrate the deleterious effects of B. cereus infection on RPE barrier function and suggest that plcR-regulated toxins may not contribute significantly to RPE barrier permeability during infection.

  9. A novel dual-flow bioreactor simulates increased fluorescein permeability in epithelial tissue barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Serena; Sbrana, Tommaso; La Marca, Margherita; Di Patria, Valentina; Martinucci, Valentina; Tirella, Annalisa; Domenici, Claudio; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2014-09-01

    Permeability studies across epithelial barriers are of primary importance in drug delivery as well as in toxicology. However, traditional in vitro models do not adequately mimic the dynamic environment of physiological barriers. Here, we describe a novel two-chamber modular bioreactor for dynamic in vitro studies of epithelial cells. The fluid dynamic environment of the bioreactor was characterized using computational fluid dynamic models and measurements of pressure gradients for different combinations of flow rates in the apical and basal chambers. Cell culture experiments were then performed with fully differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model of the intestinal epithelium, comparing the effect of media flow applied in the bioreactor with traditional static transwells. The flow increases barrier integrity and tight junction expression of Caco-2 cells with respect to the static controls. Fluorescein permeability increased threefold in the dynamic system, indicating that the stimulus induced by flow increases transport across the barrier, closely mimicking the in vivo situation. The results are of interest for studying the influence of mechanical stimuli on cells, and underline the importance of developing more physiologically relevant in vitro tissue models. The bioreactor can be used to study drug delivery, chemical, or nanomaterial toxicity and to engineer barrier tissues.

  10. Intracellular ascorbate tightens the endothelial permeability barrier through Epac1 and the tubulin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, William H; Rhea, Elizabeth Meredith; Qu, Zhi-Chao; Hecker, Morgan R; May, James M

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, both tightens the endothelial permeability barrier in basal cells and also prevents barrier leak induced by inflammatory agents. Barrier tightening by ascorbate in basal endothelial cells requires nitric oxide derived from activation of nitric oxide synthase. Although ascorbate did not affect cyclic AMP levels in our previous study, there remains a question of whether it might activate downstream cyclic AMP-dependent pathways. In this work, we found in both primary and immortalized cultured endothelial cells that ascorbate tightened the endothelial permeability barrier by ∼30%. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells, this occurred at what are likely physiologic intracellular ascorbate concentrations. In so doing, ascorbate decreased measures of oxidative stress and also flattened the cells to increase cell-to-cell contact. Inhibition of downstream cyclic AMP-dependent proteins via protein kinase A did not prevent ascorbate from tightening the endothelial permeability barrier, whereas inhibition of Epac1 did block the ascorbate effect. Although Epac1 was required, its mediator Rap1 was not activated. Furthermore, ascorbate acutely stabilized microtubules during depolymerization induced by colchicine and nocodazole. Over several days in culture, ascorbate also increased the amount of stable acetylated α-tubulin. Microtubule stabilization was further suggested by the finding that ascorbate increased the amount of Epac1 bound to α-tubulin. These results suggest that physiologic ascorbate concentrations tighten the endothelial permeability barrier in unstimulated cells by stabilizing microtubules in a manner downstream of cyclic AMP that might be due both to increasing nitric oxide availability and to scavenging of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species.

  11. Building lipid barriers: biosynthesis of cutin and suberin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Mike; Beisson, Fred; Li, Yonghua; Ohlrogge, John B

    2008-05-01

    Cutin and suberin are the polymer matrices for lipophilic cell wall barriers. These barriers control the fluxes of gases, water and solutes, and also play roles in protecting plants from biotic and abiotic stresses and in controlling plant morphology. Although they are ubiquitous, cutin and suberin are the least understood of the major plant extracellular polymers. The use of forward and reverse genetic approaches in Arabidopsis has led to the identification of oxidoreductase and acyltransferase genes involved in the biosynthesis of these polymers. However, major questions about the underlying polymer structure, biochemistry, and intracellular versus extracellular assembly remain to be resolved. The analysis of plant lines with modified cutins and suberins has begun to reveal the inter-relationships between the composition and function of these polymers.

  12. Unlocking tumor vascular barriers with CXCR3: Implications for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikucki, Maryann E; Skitzki, Joseph J; Frelinger, John G; Odunsi, Kunle; Gajewski, Thomas F; Luster, Andrew D; Evans, Sharon S

    2016-05-01

    Promising cancer immunotherapeutics depend on mobilization of cytotoxic T cells across tumor vascular barriers through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Recently, we discovered that the CXCR3 chemokine receptor uniquely functions as the master-regulator of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell extravasation and tumor control despite the multiplicity of chemokines available in the tumor landscape.

  13. Advancements in subsurface barrier wall technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutch, R.D. Jr.; Ash, R.E. IV; Caputi, J.R. [Eckenfelder Inc., Mahwah, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Subsurface barrier walls have been an important component of site remediation efforts for nearly thirty years. However, until the last decade, limited design options were available for barrier wall construction. Most barrier walls were constructed using traditional technologies such as soil-bentonite slurry trench and, in some instances, conventional compacted clay. While other technologies certainly existed, such as vibrating beam and sheet pile walls, they represented a minor share of the remediation market. Today the remediation engineer considering a subsurface barrier wall-based remediation is confronted with a baffling array, of new technologies and permutations of these technologies. Moreover, new technologies are entering the marketplace seemingly on a monthly basis. A partial listing of available barrier wall technologies is presented.

  14. Barriers to physical activity among working mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Jill J

    2011-04-01

    Working mothers experience several barriers to physical activity. If these barriers can be identified by occupational health nurses and they can partner with working mothers to reduce these perceived barriers, the health of these workers can be improved and chronic disease risk prevented. The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of self-regulatory efficacy on physical activity among working mothers and to describe specific barriers to physical activity. The Barriers Specific Self-Efficacy Scale (BARSE) and the Kaiser Physical Activity Survey (KPAS) were used to measure the variables. Self-regulatory efficacy was found to be a strong predictor of physical activity in a diverse sample of working mothers who did not meet current recommendations for physical activity. Occupational health nurses can use these findings to design programs for groups and for counseling individuals.

  15. Intracellular Ascorbate Prevents Endothelial Barrier Permeabilization by Thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, William H; Qu, Zhi-chao; May, James M

    2015-08-28

    Intracellular ascorbate (vitamin C) has previously been shown to tighten the endothelial barrier and maintain barrier integrity during acute inflammation in vitro. However, the downstream effectors of ascorbate in the regulation of endothelial permeability remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated ascorbate as a mediator of thrombin-induced barrier permeabilization in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and their immortalized hybridoma line, EA.hy926. We found that the vitamin fully prevented increased permeability to the polysaccharide inulin by thrombin in a dose-dependent manner, and it took effect both before and after subjection to thrombin. Thrombin exposure consumed intracellular ascorbate but not the endogenous antioxidant GSH. Likewise, the antioxidants dithiothreitol and tempol did not reverse permeabilization. We identified a novel role for ascorbate in preserving cAMP during thrombin stimulation, resulting in two downstream effects. First, ascorbate maintained the cortical actin cytoskeleton in a Rap1- and Rac1-dependent manner, thus preserving stable adherens junctions between adjacent cells. Second, ascorbate prevented actin polymerization and formation of stress fibers by reducing the activation of RhoA and phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Although ascorbate and thrombin both required calcium for their respective effects, ascorbate did not prevent thrombin permeabilization by obstructing calcium influx. However, preservation of cAMP by ascorbate was found to depend on both the production of nitric oxide by endothelial nitric-oxide synthase, which ascorbate is known to activate, and the subsequent generation cGMP by guanylate cyclase. Together, these data implicate ascorbate in the prevention of inflammatory endothelial barrier permeabilization and explain the underlying signaling mechanism.

  16. Overexpression of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Exacerbates Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The mechanisms involved in endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by hypoxia are incompletely understood. There is debate about the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α in endothelial barrier disruption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of genetic overexpression of HIF-1α on barrier function and the underlying mechanisms in hypoxic endothelial cells. Methods: The plasmid pcDNA3.1/V5-His-HIF-1α was stably transfected into human endothelial cells. The cells were exposed to normoxia or hypoxia. The mRNA and protein expressions of HIF-1α were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot respectively. The barrier function was assessed by measuring the transendothelial electrical resistance (TER. The Western blot analysis was used to determine the protein expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1, zonular occludens-1 (ZO-1, occludin, and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK in endothelial cells. The mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines was detected by qRT-PCR. Results: Genetic overexpression of HIF-1α significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1α in endothelial cells. The overexpression of HIF-1α enhanced the hypoxia-induced increase of HIF-1α and GLUT-1 protein expression. HIF-1α overexpression not only exacerbated hypoxia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction but also augmented hypoxia-induced up-regulation of MLCK protein expression. HIF-1α overexpression also enhanced IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression. Conclusion: We provide evidence that genetic overexpression of HIF-1α aggravates the hypoxia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction via enhancing the up-regulation of MLCK protein expression caused by hypoxia, suggesting a potential role for HIF-1α in the pathogenesis of endothelial barrier dysfunction in hypoxia.

  17. Transport in the barrier billiard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi Fathi, S. M.; Ettoumi, W.; Courbage, M.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate transport properties of an ensemble of particles moving inside an infinite periodic horizontal planar barrier billiard. A particle moves among bars and elastically reflects on them. The motion is a uniform translation along the bars' axis. When the tangent of the incidence angle, α , is fixed and rational, the second moment of the displacement along the orthogonal axis at time n , , is either bounded or asymptotic to K n2 , when n →∞ . For irrational α , the collision map is ergodic and has a family of weakly mixing observables, the transport is not ballistic, and autocorrelation functions decay only in time average, but may not decay for a family of irrational α 's. An exhaustive numerical computation shows that the transport may be superdiffusive or subdiffusive with various rates or bounded strongly depending on the values of α . The variety of transport behaviors sounds reminiscent of well-known behavior of conservative systems. Considering then an ensemble of particles with nonfixed α , the system is nonergodic and certainly not mixing and has anomalous diffusion with self-similar space-time properties. However, we verified that such a system decomposes into ergodic subdynamics breaking self-similarity.

  18. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, M. R.; Reardon, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems consist of partially stabilized zirconia coatings plasma sprayed over a MCrAlY bond coat. Although these systems have excellent thermal shock properties, they have shown themselves to be deficient for a number of diesel and aircraft applications. Two ternary ceramic plasma coatings are discussed with respect to their possible use in TBC systems. Zirconia-ceria-yttria (ZCY) coatings were developed with low thermal conductivities, good thermal shock resistance and improved resistance to vanadium containing environments, when compared to the baseline yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings. In addition, dense zirconia-titania-yttria (ZTY) coatings were developed with particle erosion resistance exceeding conventional stabilized zirconia coatings. Both coatings were evaluated in conjunction with a NiCr-Al-Co-Y2O3 bond coat. Also, multilayer or hybrid coatings consisting of the bond coat with subsequent coatings of zirconia-ceria-yttria and zirconia-titania-yttria were evaluated. These coatings combine the enhanced performance characteristics of ZCY with the improved erosion resistance of ZTY coatings. Improvement in the erosion resistance of the TBC system should result in a more consistent delta T gradient during service. Economically, this may also translate into increased component life simply because the coating lasts longer.

  19. Sensing of EGTA Mediated Barrier Tissue Disruption with an Organic Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherrine Tria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Barrier tissue protects the body against external factors by restricting the passage of molecules. The gastrointestinal epithelium is an example of barrier tissue with the primary purpose of allowing the passage of ions and nutrients, while restricting the passage of pathogens and toxins. It is well known that the loss of barrier function can be instigated by a decrease in extracellular calcium levels, leading to changes in protein conformation and an increase in paracellular transport. In this study, ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid (EGTA, a calcium chelator, was used to disrupt the gastrointestinal epithelial barrier. The effect of EGTA on barrier tissue was monitored by a novel label-free method based on an organic electrochemical transistor (OECT integrated with living cells and validated against conventional methods for measuring barrier tissue integrity. We demonstrate that the OECT can detect breaches in barrier tissue upon exposure to EGTA with the same sensitivity as existing methods but with increased temporal resolution. Due to the potential of low cost processing techniques and the flexibility in design associated with organic electronics, the OECT has great potential for high-throughput, disposable sensing and diagnostics.

  20. Improved epidermal barrier formation in human skin models by chitosan modulated dermal matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieremet, Arnout; Rietveld, Marion; Absalah, Samira; van Smeden, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Full thickness human skin models (FTMs) contain an epidermal and a dermal equivalent. The latter is composed of a collagen dermal matrix which harbours fibroblasts. Current epidermal barrier properties of FTMs do not fully resemble that of native human skin (NHS), which makes these human skin models less suitable for barrier related studies. To further enhance the resemblance of NHS for epidermal morphogenesis and barrier formation, we modulated the collagen dermal matrix with the biocompatible polymer chitosan. Herein, we report that these collagen-chitosan FTMs (CC-FTMs) possess a well-organized epidermis and maintain both the early and late differentiation programs as in FTMs. Distinctively, the epidermal cell activation is reduced in CC-FTMs to levels observed in NHS. Dermal-epidermal interactions are functional in both FTM types, based on the formation of the basement membrane. Evaluation of the barrier structure by the organization of the extracellular lipid matrix of the stratum corneum revealed an elongated repeat distance of the long periodicity phase. The ceramide composition exhibited a higher resemblance of the NHS, based on the carbon chain-length distribution and subclass profile. The inside-out barrier functionality indicated by the transepidermal water loss is significantly improved in the CC-FTMs. The expression of epidermal barrier lipid processing enzymes is marginally affected, although more restricted to a single granular layer. The novel CC-FTM resembles the NHS more closely, which makes them a promising tool for epidermal barrier related studies. PMID:28333992

  1. Potential in vitro model for testing the effect of exposure to nanoparticles on the lung alveolar epithelial barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Derk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary barrier function plays a pivotal role in protection from inhaled particles. However, some nano-scaled particles, such as carbon nanotubes (CNT, have demonstrated the ability to penetrate this barrier in animal models, resulting in an unusual, rapid interstitial fibrosis. To delineate the underlying mechanism and specific bio-effect of inhaled nanoparticles in respiratory toxicity, models of lung epithelial barriers are required that allow accurate representation of in vivo systems; however, there is currently a lack of consistent methods to do so. Thus, this work demonstrates a well-characterized in vitro model of pulmonary barrier function using Calu-3 cells, and provides the experimental conditions required for achieving tight junction complexes in cell culture, with trans-epithelial electrical resistance measurement used as a biosensor for proper barrier formation and integrity. The effects of cell number and serum constituents have been examined and we found that changes in each of these parameters can greatly affect barrier formation. Our data demonstrate that use of 5.0 × 104 Calu-3 cells/well in the Transwell cell culture system, with 10% serum concentrations in culture media is optimal for assessing epithelial barrier function. In addition, we have utilized CNT exposure to analyze the dose-, time-, and nanoparticle property-dependent alterations of epithelial barrier permeability as a means to validate this model. Such high throughput in vitro cell models of the epithelium could be used to predict the interaction of other nanoparticles with lung epithelial barriers to mimic respiratory behavior in vivo, thus providing essential tools and bio-sensing techniques that can be uniformly employed.

  2. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, C.E. [Univ. of Wollongong (Australia); Stormont, J.C. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  3. HgCdTe barrier infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytko, M.; Rogalski, A.

    2016-05-01

    In the last decade, new strategies to achieve high-operating temperature (HOT) detectors have been proposed, including barrier structures such as nBn devices, unipolar barrier photodiodes, and multistage (cascade) infrared detectors. The ability to tune the positions of the conduction and valence band edges independently in a broken-gap type-II superlattices is especially helpful in the design of unipolar barriers. This idea has been also implemented in HgCdTe ternary material system. However, the implementation of this detector structure in HgCdTe material system is not straightforward due to the existence of a valence band discontinuity (barrier) at the absorber-barrier interface. In this paper we present status of HgCdTe barrier detectors with emphasis on technological progress in fabrication of MOCVD-grown HgCdTe barrier detectors achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology. Their performance is comparable with state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. From the perspective of device fabrication their important technological advantage results from less stringent surface passivation requirements and tolerance to threading dislocations.

  4. Advances in research on labyrinth membranous barriers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenfang Sun; Wuqing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Integrity of the membranous labyrinth barrier system is of critical importance, which promotes inner ear homeostasis and maintains its features. The membranous labyrinth barrier system is divided into several subsets of barriers which, although independent from each other, are interrelated. The same substance may demonstrate different permeability characteristics through different barriers and under different conditions, while different substances can have different permeability features even in the same barrier under the same condition. All parts of the mem-branous labyrinth barrier structure, including their morphology, enzymes and channel proteins, and theirs permeability characteristics under various physiological and pathological conditions are reviewed in this paper. Infections, noise exposure, ototoxicity may all increase perme-ability of the barriers and lead to disturbances in inner ear homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production & hosting by Elsevier (Singapore) Pte Ltd On behalf of PLA General Hospital Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  5. Histamine Induces Vascular Hyperpermeability by Increasing Blood Flow and Endothelial Barrier Disruption In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashina, Kohei; Tsubosaka, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Omori, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Koji; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Murata, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a mediator of allergic inflammation released mainly from mast cells. Although histamine strongly increases vascular permeability, its precise mechanism under in vivo situation remains unknown. We here attempted to reveal how histamine induces vascular hyperpermeability focusing on the key regulators of vascular permeability, blood flow and endothelial barrier. Degranulation of mast cells by antigen-stimulation or histamine treatment induced vascular hyperpermeability and tissue swelling in mouse ears. These were abolished by histamine H1 receptor antagonism. Intravital imaging showed that histamine dilated vasculature, increased blood flow, while it induced hyperpermeability in venula. Whole-mount staining showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier formation of venula indicated by changes in vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) localization at endothelial cell junction. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis (NOS) by L-NAME or vasoconstriction by phenylephrine strongly inhibited the histamine-induced blood flow increase and hyperpermeability without changing the VE-cadherin localization. In vitro, measurements of trans-end