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Sample records for blood-oxygenation-level-dependent contrast functional

  1. Functional imaging of the nonhuman primate Placenta with endogenous blood oxygen level-dependent contrast.

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    Schabel, M C; Roberts, V H J; Lo, J O; Platt, S; Grant, K A; Frias, A E; Kroenke, C D

    2016-11-01

    To characterize spatial patterns of T2* in the placenta of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), to correlate these patterns with placental perfusion determined using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), and to evaluate the potential for using the blood oxygen level-dependent effect to quantify placental perfusion without the use of exogenous contrast reagent. MRI was performed on three pregnant rhesus macaques at gestational day 110. Multiecho spoiled gradient echo measurements were used to compute maps of T2*. Spatial maxima in these maps were compared with foci of early enhancement determined by DCE-MRI. Local maxima in T2* maps were strongly correlated with spiral arteries identified by DCE-MRI, with mean spatial separations ranging from 2.34 to 6.11 mm in the three animals studied. Spatial patterns of R2* ( = 1/ T2*) within individual placental lobules can be quantitatively analyzed using a simple model to estimate fetal arterial oxyhemoglobin concentration [Hbo,f] and a parameter viPS/Φ, reflecting oxygen transport to the fetus. Estimated mean values of [Hbo,f] ranged from 4.25 mM to 4.46 mM, whereas viPS/Φ ranged from 2.80 × 10 5 cm -3 to 1.61 × 10 6 cm -3 . Maternal spiral arteries show strong spatial correlation with foci of extended T2* observed in the primate placenta. A simple model of oxygen transport accurately describes the spatial dependence of R2* within placental lobules and enables assessment of placental function and oxygenation without requiring administration of an exogenous contrast reagent. Magn Reson Med 76:1551-1562, 2016. © 2015 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2015 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Impact of physiological noise correction on detecting blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast in the breast

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    Wallace, Tess E.; Manavaki, Roido; Graves, Martin J.; Patterson, Andrew J.; Gilbert, Fiona J.

    2017-01-01

    Physiological fluctuations are expected to be a dominant source of noise in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments to assess tumour oxygenation and angiogenesis. This work investigates the impact of various physiological noise regressors: retrospective image correction (RETROICOR), heart rate (HR) and respiratory volume per unit time (RVT), on signal variance and the detection of BOLD contrast in the breast in response to a modulated respiratory stimulus. BOLD MRI was performed at 3 T in ten volunteers at rest and during cycles of oxygen and carbogen gas breathing. RETROICOR was optimized using F-tests to determine which cardiac and respiratory phase terms accounted for a significant amount of signal variance. A nested regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of RETROICOR, HR and RVT on the model fit residuals, temporal signal-to-noise ratio, and BOLD activation parameters. The optimized RETROICOR model accounted for the largest amount of signal variance ( Δ R\\text{adj}2   =  3.3  ±  2.1%) and improved the detection of BOLD activation (P  =  0.002). Inclusion of HR and RVT regressors explained additional signal variance, but had a negative impact on activation parameter estimation (P  <  0.001). Fluctuations in HR and RVT appeared to be correlated with the stimulus and may contribute to apparent BOLD signal reactivity.

  3. Functional neuroanatomy in depressed patients with sexual dysfunction: blood oxygenation level dependent functional MR imaging

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    Yang, Jong Chul [Chonnam National Univ. Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-15

    To demonstrate the functional neuroanatomy associated with sexual arousal visually evoked in depressed males who have underlying sexual dysfunction using Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent-based fMRI. Ten healthy volunteers (age range 21-55: mean 32.5 years), and 10 depressed subjects (age range 23-51: mean 34.4 years, mean Beck Depression Inventory score of 39.6 {+-} 5.9, mean Hamilton Rating Scale Depression (HAMD)-17 score of 33.5 {+-} 6.0) with sexual arousal dysfunction viewed erotic and neutral video films during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with 1.5 T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon). The fMRI data were obtained from 7 oblique planes using gradient-echo EPI (flip angle/TR/TE=90 .deg. /6000 ms/50 ms). The visual stimulation paradigm began with 60 sec of black screen, 150 sec of neutral stimulation with a documentary video film, 30 sec of black screen, 150 sec of sexual stimulation with an erotic video film followed by 30 sec of black screen. The brain activation maps and their quantification were analyzed by SPM99 program. There was a significant difference of brain activation between two groups during visual sexual stimulation. In depressed subjects, the level of activation during the visually evoked sexual arousal was significantly less than that of healthy volunteers, especially in the cerebrocortical areas of the hypothalamus, thalamus, caudate nucleus, and inferior and superior temporal gyri. On the other hand, the cerebral activation patterns during the neutral condition in both groups showed no significant differences ({rho} < 0.01). This study is the first demonstration of the functional neuroanatomy of the brain associated with sexual dysfunction in depressed patients using fMRI. In order to validate our physiological neuroscience results, further studies that would include patients with other disorders and sexual dysfunction, and depressed patients without sexual dysfunction and their treatment response are needed.

  4. Functional neuroanatomy in depressed patients with sexual dysfunction: blood oxygenation level dependent functional MR imaging

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    Yang, Jong Chul

    2004-01-01

    To demonstrate the functional neuroanatomy associated with sexual arousal visually evoked in depressed males who have underlying sexual dysfunction using Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent-based fMRI. Ten healthy volunteers (age range 21-55: mean 32.5 years), and 10 depressed subjects (age range 23-51: mean 34.4 years, mean Beck Depression Inventory score of 39.6 ± 5.9, mean Hamilton Rating Scale Depression (HAMD)-17 score of 33.5 ± 6.0) with sexual arousal dysfunction viewed erotic and neutral video films during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with 1.5 T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon). The fMRI data were obtained from 7 oblique planes using gradient-echo EPI (flip angle/TR/TE=90 .deg. /6000 ms/50 ms). The visual stimulation paradigm began with 60 sec of black screen, 150 sec of neutral stimulation with a documentary video film, 30 sec of black screen, 150 sec of sexual stimulation with an erotic video film followed by 30 sec of black screen. The brain activation maps and their quantification were analyzed by SPM99 program. There was a significant difference of brain activation between two groups during visual sexual stimulation. In depressed subjects, the level of activation during the visually evoked sexual arousal was significantly less than that of healthy volunteers, especially in the cerebrocortical areas of the hypothalamus, thalamus, caudate nucleus, and inferior and superior temporal gyri. On the other hand, the cerebral activation patterns during the neutral condition in both groups showed no significant differences (ρ < 0.01). This study is the first demonstration of the functional neuroanatomy of the brain associated with sexual dysfunction in depressed patients using fMRI. In order to validate our physiological neuroscience results, further studies that would include patients with other disorders and sexual dysfunction, and depressed patients without sexual dysfunction and their treatment response are needed

  5. Blood oxygen-level dependent functional assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity: Feasibility for intraoperative 3 Tesla MRI.

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    Fierstra, Jorn; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; van Niftrik, Christiaan Hendrik Bas; Piccirelli, Marco; Pangalu, Athina; Kocian, Roman; Neidert, Marian Christoph; Valavanis, Antonios; Regli, Luca; Bozinov, Oliver

    2017-02-01

    To assess the feasibility of functional blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) MRI to evaluate intraoperative cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) at 3 Tesla field strength. Ten consecutive neurosurgical subjects scheduled for a clinical intraoperative MRI examination were enrolled in this study. In addition to the clinical protocol a BOLD sequence was implemented with three cycles of 44 s apnea to calculate CVR values on a voxel-by-voxel basis throughout the brain. The CVR range was then color-coded and superimposed on an anatomical volume to create high spatial resolution CVR maps. Ten subjects (mean age 34.8 ± 13.4; 2 females) uneventfully underwent the intraoperative BOLD protocol, with no complications occurring. Whole-brain CVR for all subjects was (mean ± SD) 0.69 ± 0.42, whereas CVR was markedly higher for tumor subjects as compared to vascular subjects, 0.81 ± 0.44 versus 0.33 ± 0.10, respectively. Furthermore, color-coded functional maps could be robustly interpreted for a whole-brain assessment of CVR. We demonstrate that intraoperative BOLD MRI is feasible in creating functional maps to assess cerebrovascular reactivity throughout the brain in subjects undergoing a neurosurgical procedure. Magn Reson Med 77:806-813, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Multi-regional investigation of the relationship between functional MRI blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD activation and GABA concentration.

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    Ashley D Harris

    Full Text Available Several recent studies have reported an inter-individual correlation between regional GABA concentration, as measured by MRS, and the amplitude of the functional blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD response in the same region. In this study, we set out to investigate whether this coupling generalizes across cortex. In 18 healthy participants, we performed edited MRS measurements of GABA and BOLD-fMRI experiments using regionally related activation paradigms. Regions and tasks were the: occipital cortex with a visual grating stimulus; auditory cortex with a white noise stimulus; sensorimotor cortex with a finger-tapping task; frontal eye field with a saccade task; and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex with a working memory task. In contrast to the prior literature, no correlation between GABA concentration and BOLD activation was detected in any region. The origin of this discrepancy is not clear. Subtle differences in study design or insufficient power may cause differing results; these and other potential reasons for the discrepant results are discussed. This negative result, although it should be interpreted with caution, has a larger sample size than prior positive results, and suggests that the relationship between GABA and the BOLD response may be more complex than previously thought.

  7. Application of language blood oxygenation level dependent functional MRI in the navigating operation of neurosurgery

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    Liu Shuyong; Li Min; Yao Chengjun; Geng Daoying

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To verify the accuracy of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD)-based activation using electrocortical stimulation mapping (ESM) and explore the value of language fMRI in the navigating operation of neurosurgery. Methods: In 8 cases with brain tumors, BOLD-fMRI examinations were done before the operations. Under the state of awake anesthesia,the patients were aroused and ESM was conducted. Point-to-point comparison between the BOLD signal activations and the ESM was carried out under the surveillance of the neuro-navigation technology. In order to observe the sensibility and specificity of BOLD activations, the location of BOLD activations and the point of ESM was compared to calculate the stimulating positive points inside the regions of BOLD signals (real positive), outside BOLD regions (pseudo- negative), the stimulating negative points inside the regions of BOLD signals (pseudo-positive), and outside BOLD region (real negative). Two kinds of criteria for assessment were used. One was that the positive stimulating points were located in BOLD regions, and the other was that the positive stimulating points were located within 1 cm around the range of BOLD regions. Removal of the lesions were conducted with the tissue 1 cm around the language region preserved, and the cortex inside 0.5-1.0 cm distance from the positive points were retained. Results: Of the 8 cases, only 6 finished the tasks. Among them, 3 cases were with astrocytoma of grade 2, 2 were with astrocytoma of grade 3, and one with glioblastoma. The total number of stimulating points was 48, among which the positive points were 11. When the first criteria was applied, the sensitivity was 72.7% (8/11), and the specificity was 81.8% (30/37). When the second criteria was applied, the sensitivity was 82.0% (9/11), and the specificity was 75.6% (28/37). Follow-up after operation showed no aphasia occurred. Conclusions: BOLD-fMRI had a high sensitivity and specificity in displaying the language

  8. Paradigm free mapping with sparse regression automatically detects single-trial functional magnetic resonance imaging blood oxygenation level dependent responses.

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    Caballero Gaudes, César; Petridou, Natalia; Francis, Susan T; Dryden, Ian L; Gowland, Penny A

    2013-03-01

    The ability to detect single trial responses in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies is essential, particularly if investigating learning or adaptation processes or unpredictable events. We recently introduced paradigm free mapping (PFM), an analysis method that detects single trial blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses without specifying prior information on the timing of the events. PFM is based on the deconvolution of the fMRI signal using a linear hemodynamic convolution model. Our previous PFM method (Caballero-Gaudes et al., 2011: Hum Brain Mapp) used the ridge regression estimator for signal deconvolution and required a baseline signal period for statistical inference. In this work, we investigate the application of sparse regression techniques in PFM. In particular, a novel PFM approach is developed using the Dantzig selector estimator, solved via an efficient homotopy procedure, along with statistical model selection criteria. Simulation results demonstrated that, using the Bayesian information criterion to select the regularization parameter, this method obtains high detection rates of the BOLD responses, comparable with a model-based analysis, but requiring no information on the timing of the events and being robust against hemodynamic response function variability. The practical operation of this sparse PFM method was assessed with single-trial fMRI data acquired at 7T, where it automatically detected all task-related events, and was an improvement on our previous PFM method, as it does not require the definition of a baseline state and amplitude thresholding and does not compromise on specificity and sensitivity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Correlation between single-trial visual evoked potentials and the blood oxygenation level dependent response in simultaneously recorded electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging

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    Fuglø, Dan; Pedersen, Henrik; Rostrup, Egill

    2012-01-01

    . The performance of different single-trial EEG regressors was compared in terms of predicting the measured blood oxygenation level dependent response. The EEG-based regressors were the amplitude and latency of the primary positive (P1) and negative (N2) peaks of the visual evoked potential, the combined P1-N2...... amplitude, and the alpha power. Apart from peak latencies, all regressors showed significant positive or negative correlation with the blood oxygenation level dependent response in visual cortex. In addition, several EEG-based regressors were found to predict blood oxygenation level dependent variations...

  10. Mapping of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen using dynamic susceptibility contrast and blood oxygen level dependent MR imaging in acute ischemic stroke

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    Gersing, Alexandra S.; Schwaiger, Benedikt J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ankenbrank, Monika; Toth, Vivien; Bauer, Jan S.; Zimmer, Claus [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Janssen, Insa [Technical University Munich, Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany); Kooijman, Hendrik [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); Wunderlich, Silke [Technical University Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); Preibisch, Christine [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Technical University Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    MR-derived cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen utilization (CMRO{sub 2}) has been suggested to be analogous to PET-derived CMRO{sub 2} and therefore may be used for detection of viable tissue at risk for infarction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR-derived CMRO{sub 2} mapping in acute ischemic stroke in relation to established diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging. In 23 patients (mean age 63 ± 18.7 years, 11 women) with imaging findings for acute ischemic stroke, relative oxygen extraction fraction was calculated from quantitative transverse relaxation times (T2, T2*) and relative cerebral blood volume using a quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) approach in order to detect a local increase of deoxyhemoglobin. Relative CMRO{sub 2} (rCMRO{sub 2}) maps were calculated by multiplying relative oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) by cerebral blood flow, derived from PWI. After co-registration, rCMRO{sub 2} maps were evaluated in comparison with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and time-to-peak (TTP) maps. Mean rCMRO{sub 2} values in areas with diffusion-restriction or TTP/ADC mismatch were compared with rCMRO{sub 2} values in the contralateral tissue. In tissue with diffusion restriction, mean rCMRO{sub 2} values were significantly decreased compared to perfusion-impaired (17.9 [95 % confidence interval 10.3, 25.0] vs. 58.1 [95 % confidence interval 50.1, 70.3]; P < 0.001) and tissue in the contralateral hemisphere (68.2 [95 % confidence interval 61.4, 75.0]; P < 0.001). rCMRO{sub 2} in perfusion-impaired tissue showed no significant change compared to tissue in the contralateral hemisphere (58.1 [95 % confidence interval 50.1, 70.3] vs. 66.7 [95 % confidence interval 53.4, 73.4]; P = 0.34). MR-derived CMRO{sub 2} was decreased within diffusion-restricted tissue and stable within perfusion-impaired tissue, suggesting that this technique may be adequate to reveal different pathophysiological stages in acute stroke. (orig.)

  11. Photoreactivity of the occipital cortex measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging-blood oxygenation level dependent in migraine patients and healthy volunteers: pathophysiological implications.

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    Martín, Helena; Sánchez del Río, Margarita; de Silanes, Carlos López; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández, Juan Antonio; Pareja, Juan A

    2011-01-01

    The brain of migraineurs is hyperexcitable, particularly the occipital cortex, which is probably hypersensitive to light. Photophobia or hypersensitivity to light may be accounted for by an increased excitability of trigeminal, the visual pathways, and the occipital cortex. To study light sensitivity and photophobia by assessing the response to light stimuli with functional magnetic resonance imaging-blood oxygenation level dependent (fMRI-BOLD) of the occipital cortex in migraineurs and in controls. Also, to try to decipher the contribution of the occipital cortex to photophobia and whether the cortical reactivity of migraineurs may be part of a constitutional (defensive) mechanism or represents an acquired (sensitization) phenomenon. Nineteen patients with migraine (7 with aura and 12 without aura) and 19 controls were studied with fMRI-BOLD during 4 increasing light intensities. Eight axial image sections of 0.5 cm that covered the occipital cortex were acquired for each intensity. We measured the extension and the intensity of activation for every light stimuli. Photophobia was estimated according to a 0 to 3 semiquantitative scale of light discomfort. Migraineurs had a significantly higher number of fMRI-activated voxels at low (320.4 for migraineurs [SD = 253.9] and 164.3 for controls [SD = 102.7], P = .027) and medium-low luminance levels (501.2 for migraineurs [SD = 279.5] and 331.1 for controls [SD = 194.3], P = .034) but not at medium-high (579.5 for migraineurs [SD = 201.4] and 510.2 for controls [SD = 239.5], P = .410) and high light stimuli (496.2 for migraineurs [SD = 216.2] and 394.7 for controls [SD = 240], P = .210). No differences were found with respect to the voxel activation intensity (amplitude of the BOLD wave) between migraineurs and controls (8.98 [SD = 2.58] vs 7.99 [SD = 2.57], P = .25; 10.82 [SD = 3.27] vs 9.81 [SD = 3.19], P = .31; 11.90 [SD = 3.18] vs 11.06 [SD = 2.56], P = .62; 11.45 [SD = 2.65] vs 10.25 [SD = 2.22], P = .16). Light

  12. The Effects of Acutely Administered 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine on Spontaneous Brain Function in Healthy Volunteers Measured with Arterial Spin Labeling and Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Resting State Functional Connectivity.

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    Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Murphy, Kevin; Leech, Robert; Erritzoe, David; Wall, Matthew B; Ferguson, Bart; Williams, Luke T J; Roseman, Leor; Brugger, Stefan; De Meer, Ineke; Tanner, Mark; Tyacke, Robin; Wolff, Kim; Sethi, Ajun; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Williams, Tim M; Bolstridge, Mark; Stewart, Lorna; Morgan, Celia; Newbould, Rexford D; Feilding, Amanda; Curran, H Val; Nutt, David J

    2015-10-15

    The compound 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a potent monoamine releaser that produces an acute euphoria in most individuals. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced-order study, MDMA was orally administered to 25 physically and mentally healthy individuals. Arterial spin labeling and seed-based resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) were used to produce spatial maps displaying changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and RSFC after MDMA administration. Participants underwent two arterial spin labeling and two blood oxygen level-dependent scans in a 90-minute scan session; MDMA and placebo study days were separated by 1 week. Marked increases in positive mood were produced by MDMA. Decreased CBF only was observed after MDMA, and this was localized to the right medial temporal lobe (MTL), thalamus, inferior visual cortex, and the somatosensory cortex. Decreased CBF in the right amygdala and hippocampus correlated with ratings of the intensity of global subjective effects of MDMA. The RSFC results complemented the CBF results, with decreases in RSFC between midline cortical regions, the medial prefrontal cortex, and MTL regions, and increases between the amygdala and hippocampus. There were trend-level correlations between these effects and ratings of intense and positive subjective effects. The MTLs appear to be specifically implicated in the mechanism of action of MDMA, but further work is required to elucidate how the drug's characteristic subjective effects arise from its modulation of spontaneous brain activity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Not-So-Global Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Signal.

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    Billings, Jacob; Keilholz, Shella

    2018-04-01

    Global signal regression is a controversial processing step for resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, partly because the source of the global blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal remains unclear. On the one hand, nuisance factors such as motion can readily introduce coherent BOLD changes across the whole brain. On the other hand, the global signal has been linked to neural activity and vigilance levels, suggesting that it contains important neurophysiological information and should not be discarded. Any widespread pattern of coordinated activity is likely to contribute appreciably to the global signal. Such patterns may include large-scale quasiperiodic spatiotemporal patterns, known also to be tied to performance on vigilance tasks. This uncertainty surrounding the separability of the global BOLD signal from concurrent neurological processes motivated an examination of the global BOLD signal's spatial distribution. The results clarify that although the global signal collects information from all tissue classes, a diverse subset of the BOLD signal's independent components contribute the most to the global signal. Further, the timing of each network's contribution to the global signal is not consistent across volunteers, confirming the independence of a constituent process that comprises the global signal.

  14. Detection of Acute Tubular Necrosis Using Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD MRI

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    Frederic Bauer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To date, there is no imaging technique to assess tubular function in vivo. Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI measures tissue oxygenation based on the transverse relaxation rate (R2*. The present study investigates whether BOLD MRI can assess tubular function using a tubule-specific pharmacological maneuver. Methods: Cross sectional study with 28 participants including 9 subjects with ATN-induced acute kidney injury (AKI, 9 healthy controls, and 10 subjects with nephron sparing tumor resection (NSS with clamping of the renal artery serving as a model of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R-induced subclinical ATN (median clamping time 15 min, no significant decrease of eGFR, p=0.14. BOLD MRI was performed before and 5, 7, and 10 min after intravenous administration of 40 mg furosemide. Results: Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin was significantly higher in ATN-induced AKI and NSS subjects than in healthy controls (p=0.03 and p=0.01, respectively. Before administration of furosemide, absolute medullary R2*, cortical R2*, and medullary/cortical R2* ratio did not significantly differ between ATN-induced AKI vs. healthy controls and between NSS-I/R vs. contralateral healthy kidneys (p>0.05 each. Furosemide led to a significant decrease in the medullary and cortical R2* of healthy subjects and NSS contralateral kidneys (p<0.05 each, whereas there was no significant change of R2* in ATN-induced AKI and the NSS-I/R kidneys (p>0.05 each. Conclusion: BOLD-MRI is able to detect even mild tubular injury but necessitates a tubule-specific pharmacological maneuver, e.g. blocking the Na+-K+-2Cl- transporter by furosemide.

  15. Arterial Spin Labeling and Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent MRI Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Cerebrovascular Disease

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    Smeeing, Diederik P J; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Petersen, Esben T

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) results of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI studies performed in patients with cerebrovascular disease (steno-occlusive vascular disease or stroke) were systematically reviewed. SUMMARY: Thirty-one articles...... found a significant lower ASL CVR in the ipsilateral hemispheres of patients compared to controls. KEY MESSAGES: This review brings support for a reduced BOLD and ASL CVR in the ipsilateral hemisphere of patients with cerebrovascular disease. We suggest that future studies will be performed in a uniform...... way so reference values can be established and could be used to guide treatment decisions in patients with cerebrovascular disease....

  16. Vascular Steal Explains Early Paradoxical Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Cerebrovascular Response in Brain Regions with Delayed Arterial Transit Times

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    Julien Poublanc

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD magnetic resonance imaging (MRI during manipulation of inhaled carbon dioxide (CO2 can be used to measure cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR and map regions of exhausted cerebrovascular reserve. These regions exhibit a reduced or negative BOLD response to inhaled CO2. In this study, we sought to clarify the mechanism behind the negative BOLD response by investigating its time delay (TD. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC MRI with the injection of a contrast agent was used as the gold standard in order to provide measurement of the blood arrival time to which CVR TD could be compared. We hypothesize that if negative BOLD responses are the result of a steal phenomenon, they should be synchronized with positive BOLD responses from healthy brain tissue, even though the blood arrival time would be delayed. Methods: On a 3-tesla MRI system, BOLD CVR and DSC images were collected in a group of 19 patients with steno-occlusive cerebrovascular disease. For each patient, we generated a CVR magnitude map by regressing the BOLD signal with the end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PETCO2, and a CVR TD map by extracting the time of maximum cross-correlation between the BOLD signal and PETCO2. In addition, a blood arrival time map was generated by fitting the DSC signal with a gamma variate function. ROI masks corresponding to varying degrees of reactivity were constructed. Within these masks, the mean CVR magnitude, CVR TD and DSC blood arrival time were extracted and averaged over the 19 patients. CVR magnitude and CVR TD were then plotted against DSC blood arrival time. Results: The results show that CVR magnitude is highly correlated to DSC blood arrival time. As expected, the most compromised tissues with the longest blood arrival time have the lowest (most negative CVR magnitude. However, CVR TD shows a noncontinuous relationship with DSC blood arrival time. CVR TD is well correlated to DSC blood arrival time

  17. Decreased Connectivity and Increased Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent Complexity in the Default Mode Network in Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

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    Shan, Zack Y; Finegan, Kevin; Bhuta, Sandeep; Ireland, Timothy; Staines, Donald R; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya M; Barnden, Leighton R

    2018-02-01

    The chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)/myalgic encephalomyelitis is a debilitating disease with unknown pathophysiology and no diagnostic test. This study investigated the default mode network (DMN) to understand the pathophysiology of CFS and to identify potential biomarkers. Using functional MRI (fMRI) collected from 72 subjects (45 CFS and 27 controls) with a temporal resolution of 0.798 sec, we evaluated the DMN using static functional connectivity (FC), dynamic functional connectivity (DFC) and DFC complexity, blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) activation maps, and complexity of activity. General linear model univariate analysis was used for intergroup comparison to account for age and gender differences. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test whether fMRI measures could be used to explain variances of health scores. BOLD signals in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), the driving hub in the DMN, were more complex in CFS in both resting state and task (p network analysis could be potentially used as a diagnostic biomarker for CFS.

  18. Cerebrovascular blood oxygenation level dependent pulsatility at baseline and following acute exercise among healthy adolescents.

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    Theyers, Athena E; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Metcalfe, Arron Ws; Robertson, Andrew D; MacIntosh, Bradley J

    2018-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is linked to cerebral small vessel damage and neurodegeneration, but barriers to accessing deep cerebrovascular anatomy limit our ability to assess the brain. This study describes an adaptation of a cardiac-related scrubbing method as a means of generating blood oxygenation level-dependent pulsatility maps based on the cardiac cycle. We examine BOLD pulsatility at rest, based on the non-parametric deviation from null metric, as well as changes following acute physiological stress from 20 min of moderate-intensity cycling in 45 healthy adolescents. We evaluate the influence of repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE) using simulated and multi-echo empirical data, respectively. There were tissue-specific and voxel-wise BOLD pulsatility decreases 20 min following exercise cessation. BOLD pulsatility detection was comparable over a range of TR and TE values when scan volumes were kept constant; however, short TRs (≤500 ms) and TEs (∼14 ms) acquisitions would yield the most efficient detection. Results suggest cardiac-related BOLD pulsatility may represent a robust and easily adopted method of mapping cerebrovascular pulsatility with voxel-wise resolution.

  19. Methods of Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging Analysis for Evaluating Renal Oxygenation

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    Fen Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI has recently been utilized as a noninvasive tool for evaluating renal oxygenation. Several methods have been proposed for analyzing BOLD images. Regional ROI selection is the earliest and most widely used method for BOLD analysis. In the last 20 years, many investigators have used this method to evaluate cortical and medullary oxygenation in patients with ischemic nephropathy, hypertensive nephropathy, diabetic nephropathy, chronic kidney disease (CKD, acute kidney injury and renal allograft rejection. However, clinical trials of BOLD MRI using regional ROI selection revealed that it was difficult to distinguish the renal cortico-medullary zones with this method, and that it was susceptible to observer variability. To overcome these deficiencies, several new methods were proposed for analyzing BOLD images, including the compartmental approach, fractional hypoxia method, concentric objects (CO method and twelve-layer concentric objects (TLCO method. The compartmental approach provides an algorithm to judge whether the pixel belongs to the cortex or medulla. Fractional kidney hypoxia, measured by using BOLD MRI, was negatively correlated with renal blood flow, tissue perfusion and glomerular filtration rate (GFR in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. The CO method divides the renal parenchyma into six or twelve layers of thickness in each coronal slice of BOLD images and provides a R2* radial profile curve. The slope of the R2* curve associated positively with eGFR in CKD patients. Indeed, each method invariably has advantages and disadvantages, and there is generally no consensus method so far. Undoubtedly, analytic approaches for BOLD MRI with better reproducibility would assist clinicians in monitoring the degree of kidney hypoxia and thus facilitating timely reversal of tissue hypoxia.

  20. Assessment of early renal allograft dysfunction with blood oxygenation level-dependent MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging

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    Park, Sung Yoon [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Kyo, E-mail: chankyokim@skku.edu [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byung Kwan [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Ju; Lee, Sanghoon [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Wooseong [Department of Nephrology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • R2* and ADC in renal allografts are moderately correlated with eGFR. • R2* and ADC are lower in early allograft dysfunction than normal allograft function. • No significant difference between AR and ATN was found in both R2* and ADC. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at 3 T for assessment of early renal allograft dysfunction. Materials and methods: 34 patients with a renal allograft (early dysfunction, 24; normal, 10) were prospectively enrolled. BOLD MRI and DWI were performed at 3 T. R2* and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured in cortex and medulla of the allografts. Correlation between R2* or ADC values and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was investigated. R2* or ADC values were compared among acute rejection (AR), acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and normal function. Results: In all renal allografts, cortical or medullary R2* and ADC values were moderately correlated with eGFR (P < 0.05). Early dysfunction group showed lower R2* and ADC values than normal function group (P < 0.05). AR or ATN had lower R2* values than normal allografts (P < 0.05), and ARs had lower cortical ADC values than normal allografts (P < 0.05). No significant difference of R2* or ADC values was found between AR and ATN (P > 0.05). Conclusion: BOLD MRI and DWI at 3 T may demonstrate early functional state of renal allografts, but may be limited in characterizing a cause of early renal allograft dysfunction. Further studies are needed.

  1. Measuring vascular reactivity with resting-state blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations: A potential alternative to the breath-holding challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Christen, Thomas; Moseley, Michael E; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Wright, Clinton B; Tamura, Manjula K; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2017-07-01

    Measurement of the ability of blood vessels to dilate and constrict, known as vascular reactivity, is often performed with breath-holding tasks that transiently raise arterial blood carbon dioxide (P a CO 2 ) levels. However, following the proper commands for a breath-holding experiment may be difficult or impossible for many patients. In this study, we evaluated two approaches for obtaining vascular reactivity information using blood oxygenation level-dependent signal fluctuations obtained from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data: physiological fluctuation regression and coefficient of variation of the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal. We studied a cohort of 28 older adults (69 ± 7 years) and found that six of them (21%) could not perform the breath-holding protocol, based on an objective comparison with an idealized respiratory waveform. In the subjects that could comply, we found a strong linear correlation between data extracted from spontaneous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal fluctuations and the blood oxygenation level-dependent percentage signal change during breath-holding challenge ( R 2  = 0.57 and 0.61 for resting-state physiological fluctuation regression and resting-state coefficient of variation methods, respectively). This technique may eliminate the need for subject cooperation, thus allowing the evaluation of vascular reactivity in a wider range of clinical and research conditions in which it may otherwise be impractical.

  2. Blood oxygenation level dependent signal and neuronal adaptation to optogenetic and sensory stimulation in somatosensory cortex in awake animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Daniil P; Li, Limin; Miller, Michael J; Wyrwicz, Alice M

    2016-11-01

    The adaptation of neuronal responses to stimulation, in which a peak transient response is followed by a sustained plateau, has been well-studied. The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal has also been shown to exhibit adaptation on a longer time scale. However, some regions such as the visual and auditory cortices exhibit significant BOLD adaptation, whereas other such as the whisker barrel cortex may not adapt. In the sensory cortex a combination of thalamic inputs and intracortical activity drives hemodynamic changes, although the relative contributions of these components are not entirely understood. The aim of this study is to assess the role of thalamic inputs vs. intracortical processing in shaping BOLD adaptation during stimulation in the somatosensory cortex. Using simultaneous fMRI and electrophysiology in awake rabbits, we measured BOLD, local field potentials (LFPs), single- and multi-unit activity in the cortex during whisker and optogenetic stimulation. This design allowed us to compare BOLD and haemodynamic responses during activation of the normal thalamocortical sensory pathway (i.e., both inputs and intracortical activity) vs. the direct optical activation of intracortical circuitry alone. Our findings show that whereas LFP and multi-unit (MUA) responses adapted, neither optogenetic nor sensory stimulation produced significant BOLD adaptation. We observed for both paradigms a variety of excitatory and inhibitory single unit responses. We conclude that sensory feed-forward thalamic inputs are not primarily responsible for shaping BOLD adaptation to stimuli; but the single-unit results point to a role in this behaviour for specific excitatory and inhibitory neuronal sub-populations, which may not correlate with aggregate neuronal activity. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging for detecting pathological patterns in lupus nephritis patients: a preliminary study using a decision tree model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huilan; Jia, Junya; Li, Dong; Wei, Li; Shang, Wenya; Zheng, Zhenfeng

    2018-02-09

    Precise renal histopathological diagnosis will guide therapy strategy in patients with lupus nephritis. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been applicable noninvasive technique in renal disease. This current study was performed to explore whether BOLD MRI could contribute to diagnose renal pathological pattern. Adult patients with lupus nephritis renal pathological diagnosis were recruited for this study. Renal biopsy tissues were assessed based on the lupus nephritis ISN/RPS 2003 classification. The Blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI) was used to obtain functional magnetic resonance parameter, R2* values. Several functions of R2* values were calculated and used to construct algorithmic models for renal pathological patterns. In addition, the algorithmic models were compared as to their diagnostic capability. Both Histopathology and BOLD MRI were used to examine a total of twelve patients. Renal pathological patterns included five classes III (including 3 as class III + V) and seven classes IV (including 4 as class IV + V). Three algorithmic models, including decision tree, line discriminant, and logistic regression, were constructed to distinguish the renal pathological pattern of class III and class IV. The sensitivity of the decision tree model was better than that of the line discriminant model (71.87% vs 59.48%, P patterns.

  4. Blood oxygenation level-dependent MRI of the skeletal muscle during ischemia in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potthast, Silke [Unispital Basel, Inst. fuer Radiologie (Switzerland); Schulte, A. [Univ. Hospital Ulm (Germany). Clinic for Radiation Therapy and Radiooncology; Kos, S.; Bilecen, D. [Unispital Basel, Interventional Radiology (Switzerland); Aschwanden, M. [Unispital Basel (Switzerland). Angiologie

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: to compare calf muscle Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD) response during ischemia in patients suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and age-matched non-PAOD subjects. Materials and methods: PAOD patients with symptoms of intermittent calf claudication and an age-matched control group underwent T2*-weighted single-shot multi-echo planar imaging on a whole-body MR scanner at 1.5 T. The muscle BOLD signal in the calf was acquired during 60 sec of baseline and 240 sec of ischemia induced by cuff compression. T2* time courses in four calf muscles were evaluated. Results: significant differences in the mean T2* values were noted after 150 sec of measurement (p < 0.05). Patients with PAOD revealed a significantly reduced BOLD signal decrease compared to an age-matched control group. Conclusion: potential cause for this observation may be changes in the structure and/or the metabolic turnover of the muscle in PAOD patients. (orig.)

  5. Entrainment of Arteriole Vasomotor Fluctuations by Neural Activity Is a Basis of Blood-Oxygenation-Level-Dependent "Resting-State" Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Celine; Knutsen, Per M; Tsai, Philbert S; Shih, Andy Y; Kleinfeld, David

    2017-11-15

    Resting-state signals in blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) imaging are used to parcellate brain regions and define "functional connections" between regions. Yet a physiological link between fluctuations in blood oxygenation with those in neuronal signaling pathways is missing. We present evidence from studies on mouse cortex that modulation of vasomotion, i.e., intrinsic ultra-slow (0.1 Hz) fluctuations in arteriole diameter, provides this link. First, ultra-slow fluctuations in neuronal signaling, which occur as an envelope over γ-band activity, entrains vasomotion. Second, optogenetic manipulations confirm that entrainment is unidirectional. Third, co-fluctuations in the diameter of pairs of arterioles within the same hemisphere diminish to chance for separations >1.4 mm. Yet the diameters of arterioles in distant (>5 mm), mirrored transhemispheric sites strongly co-fluctuate; these correlations are diminished in acallosal mice. Fourth, fluctuations in arteriole diameter coherently drive fluctuations in blood oxygenation. Thus, entrainment of vasomotion links neuronal pathways to functional connections. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Arterial Spin Labeling and Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent MRI Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Cerebrovascular Disease : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeeing, Diederik P J; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Petersen, Esben T; Donahue, Manus J; de Vis, Jill B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) results of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI studies performed in patients with cerebrovascular disease (steno-occlusive vascular disease or stroke) were systematically reviewed. SUMMARY: Thirty-one articles were

  7. Cerebral Metabolic Rate of Oxygen (CMRO2) Mapping by Combining Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) and Quantitative Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent Imaging (qBOLD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghun; Kee, Youngwook; Spincemaille, Pascal; Nguyen, Thanh D; Zhang, Jingwei; Gupta, Ajay; Zhang, Shun; Wang, Yi

    2018-03-07

    To map the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) by estimating the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) from gradient echo imaging (GRE) using phase and magnitude of the GRE data. 3D multi-echo gradient echo imaging and perfusion imaging with arterial spin labeling were performed in 11 healthy subjects. CMRO 2 and OEF maps were reconstructed by joint quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) to process GRE phases and quantitative blood oxygen level-dependent (qBOLD) modeling to process GRE magnitudes. Comparisons with QSM and qBOLD alone were performed using ROI analysis, paired t-tests, and Bland-Altman plot. The average CMRO 2 value in cortical gray matter across subjects were 140.4 ± 14.9, 134.1 ± 12.5, and 184.6 ± 17.9 μmol/100 g/min, with corresponding OEFs of 30.9 ± 3.4%, 30.0 ± 1.8%, and 40.9 ± 2.4% for methods based on QSM, qBOLD, and QSM+qBOLD, respectively. QSM+qBOLD provided the highest CMRO 2 contrast between gray and white matter, more uniform OEF than QSM, and less noisy OEF than qBOLD. Quantitative CMRO 2 mapping that fits the entire complex GRE data is feasible by combining QSM analysis of phase and qBOLD analysis of magnitude. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. A particular effect of sleep, but not pain or depression, on the blood-oxygen-level dependent response during working memory tasks in patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvemo, Nicolas A; Landrø, Nils I; Borchgrevink, Petter C; Håberg, Asta K

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic pain (CP) are often reported to have deficits in working memory. Pain impairs working memory, but so do depression and sleep problems, which are also common in CP. Depression has been linked to changes in brain activity in CP during working memory tasks, but the effect of sleep problems on working memory performance and brain activity remains to be investigated. Fifteen CP patients and 17 age-, sex-, and education-matched controls underwent blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T while performing block design 0-back, 2-back, and paced visual serial addition test paradigms. Subjects also reported their level of pain (Brief Pain Inventory), depression (Beck Depression Inventory II), and sleep problems (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and were tested outside the scanner with neuropsychological tests of working memory. The CP group reported significantly higher levels of pain, depression, and sleep problems. No significant performance difference was found on the neuropsychological tests in or outside the scanner between the two groups. There were no correlations between level of pain, depression, and sleep problems or between these and the neuropsychological test scores. CP patients exhibited significantly less brain activation and deactivation than controls in parietal and frontal lobes, which are the brain areas that normally show activation and deactivation during working memory tasks. Sleep problems independently and significantly modulated the BOLD response to the complex working memory tasks and were associated with decreased brain activation in task-positive regions and decreased deactivation in the default mode network in the CP group compared to the control group. The pain and depression scores covaried with working memory activation. Sleep problems in CP patients had a significant impact on the BOLD response during working memory tasks, independent of pain level and depression, even when

  9. Effects of Intranasal Oxytocin on the Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent Signal in Food Motivation and Cognitive Control Pathways in Overweight and Obese Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessow, Franziska; Marengi, Dean A; Perry, Sylvia K; Felicione, Julia M; Franklin, Rachel; Holmes, Tara M; Holsen, Laura M; Makris, Nikolaos; Deckersbach, Thilo; Lawson, Elizabeth A

    2018-02-01

    Recent research indicates that the hypothalamic neuropeptide hormone oxytocin is a key central nervous system factor in the regulation of food intake and weight. However, the mechanisms underlying the anorexigenic effects of oxytocin in humans are unknown and critical to study to consider oxytocin as a neurohormonal weight loss treatment. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study with single-dose intranasal oxytocin (24 IU) in ten overweight or obese, otherwise healthy men. Following oxytocin/placebo administration, participants completed an established functional magnetic resonance imaging food motivation paradigm. We hypothesized that oxytocin would reduce the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal to high-calorie food vs non-food visual stimuli in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), the origin of the mesolimbic dopaminergic reward system. Following oxytocin administration, compared to placebo, participants showed bilateral VTA hypoactivation to high-calorie food stimuli. A secondary exploratory whole-brain analysis revealed hypoactivation in additional hedonic (orbitofrontal cortex, insula, globus pallidus, putamen, hippocampus, and amygdala) and homeostatic (hypothalamus) food motivation and hyperactivation in cognitive control (anterior cingulate and frontopolar cortex) brain regions following oxytocin administration vs placebo. Oxytocin administration reduces the BOLD signal in reward-related food motivation brain regions, providing a potential neurobiological mechanism for the anorexigenic oxytocin effects in humans. Furthermore, our data indicate that oxytocin administration reduces activation in homeostatic and increases activation in cognitive control brain regions critically involved in regulating food intake and resolving affective conflict, respectively. Future studies are required to link these changes in brain activation to oxytocin effects on food intake and weight.

  10. Blood oxygenation level-dependent MR imaging as a predictor of therapeutic response to concurrent chemoradiotherapy in cervical cancer: a preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Sung Yoon; Park, Byung Kwan [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    To investigate the value of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a predictor of therapeutic response in cervical cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Thirty consecutive patients with biopsy-proven cervical cancer were examined by BOLD MRI before (preTx) and after CCRT (postTx). The R2* value (s{sup -1}) was calculated in the tumour and normal myometrium for preTx and postTx studies. Final tumour responses, as determined by changes of tumour size or volume on MRI, were correlated with tumour R2* values at preTx. The mean R2* values of tumours at preTx (21.1) were significantly lower than those at postTx (39.4 s{sup -1}) (p < 0.001), while those of normal myometrium were similar between preTx and postTx (p = 0.363). At preTx, tumour R2* values showed significantly negative correlation with final tumour size response (p = 0.022, Spearman's coefficient = -0.415). However, tumour R2* values at preTx were not associated with final tumour volume response (p = 0.069). BOLD MRI at 3 T, as an imaging biomarker, may have the potential to evaluate therapeutic response in cervical cancers. The association between BOLD MRI findings and CCRT responses warrants further validation. (orig.)

  11. Prognostic Significance of Transverse Relaxation Rate (R2* in Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Invasive Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Young Choi

    Full Text Available To examine the relationship between magnetic resonance transverse relaxation rate (R2* and prognostic factors.A total of 159 women with invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs underwent breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI including blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD sequence at 3 T. The distribution of the measured R2* values were analyzed, and the correlation between R2* and various prognostic factors (age, tumor size, histologic grade, lymphovascular invasion, and axillary lymph node status, as well as expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, p53, and Ki-67 were retrospectively assessed using patient medical records.The baseline R2* values of the IDCs were very heterogeneous with wide range among the patients. The mean R2* value was (32.8 ± 14.0 Hz with a median of 29.3 Hz (range 13.5-109.4 Hz. In multivariate analysis, older age was associated with decreased R2* value (P = 0.011 and IDCs with p53-overexpression showed higher R2* values than those without p53-overexpression group (P = 0.031. Other prognostic factors were not significantly correlated with R2* value.In this study, R2* values were significantly correlated with age and expression of p53. Further studies are necessary to determine the prognostic value of BOLD-MRI.

  12. Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging for detecting pathological patterns in patients with lupus nephritis: a preliminary study using gray-level co-occurrence matrix analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huilan; Jia, Junya; Li, Dong; Wei, Li; Shang, Wenya; Zheng, Zhenfeng

    2018-01-01

    Objective Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) is a noninvasive technique useful in patients with renal disease. The current study was performed to determine whether BOLD MRI can contribute to the diagnosis of renal pathological patterns. Methods BOLD MRI was used to obtain functional magnetic resonance parameter R2* values. Gray-level co-occurrence matrixes (GLCMs) were generated for gray-scale maps. Several GLCM parameters were calculated and used to construct algorithmic models for renal pathological patterns. Results Histopathology and BOLD MRI were used to examine 12 patients. Two GLCM parameters, including correlation and energy, revealed differences among four groups of renal pathological patterns. Four Fisher's linear discriminant formulas were constructed using two variables, including the correlation at 45° and correlation at 90°. A cross-validation test showed that the formulas correctly predicted 28 of 36 samples, and the rate of correct prediction was 77.8%. Conclusions Differences in the texture characteristics of BOLD MRI in patients with lupus nephritis may be detected by GLCM analysis. Discriminant formulas constructed using GLCM parameters may facilitate prediction of renal pathological patterns.

  13. Assessment of cerebral blood flow reserve using blood oxygen level-dependent echo planar imaging after acetazolamide administration in patients post-STA-MCA anastomosis surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenke, Kiichiro; Kusunoki, Katsusuke; Saito, Masahiro; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Ohta, Shinsuke; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Sakaki, Saburo; Nagasawa, Kiyoshi

    1998-01-01

    Recently, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) echo planar imaging (EPI) has been used to estimate blood flow changes. Theoretically, a relative decrement of deoxyhemoglobin in cerebral blood supply induces a MR signal change after neuronal stimulation. In the present study, we have attempted to evaluate CBF reserve capacity by the BOLD EPI in patients who had undergone STA-MCA anastomosis surgery. Then, we compared with the signal intensity changes obtained by this procedure with the CBF changes by Xe-SPECT after acetazolamide administration. Six patients, post-STA-MCA anastomosis surgery, were studied. Pre-operatively, MR signal intensity and CBF, by Xe-SPECT, were increased in the intact side after acetazolamide administration in all patients, and MR signal intensities were decreased in low flow regions after acetazolamide administration in all four patients in whom so-called steal phenomenon was demonstrated by Xe-SPECT study. Post-operatively, poor response was shown after acetazolamide administration with both Xe-SPECT and BOLD EPI in the two patients who had unsuccessful anastomoses. In the successfully anastomosed patients, improved vascular reactivity was demonstrated on BOLD EPI after acetazolamide administration in 3 of 4 patients in whom an improvement of vascular reactivity was demonstrated on Xe-SPECT. In one patient, MRI studies were considered to have technical artifacts, because the MR signal intensity did not increase, even in the intact side after acetazolamide administration. In conclusion, BOLD EPI after acetazolamide administration is an useful procedure for the pre- and post-operative of vascular reserve in patients with ischemic stroke. (author)

  14. Quantification of myocardial oxygenation in heart failure using blood-oxygen-level-dependent T2* magnetic resonance imaging: Comparison with cardiopulmonary exercise test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Michinobu; Yamasaki, Yuzo; Kawanami, Satoshi; Kamitani, Takeshi; Sagiyama, Koji; Higo, Taiki; Ide, Tomomi; Takemura, Atsushi; Ishizaki, Umiko; Fukushima, Kenji; Watanabe, Yuji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Quantification of myocardial oxygenation (MO) in heart failure (HF) has been less than satisfactory. This has necessitated the use of invasive techniques to measure MO directly or to determine the oxygen demand during exercise using the cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) test. We propose a new quantification method for MO using blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) myocardial T2* magnetic resonance imaging (M-T2* MRI), and investigate its correlation with CPX results. Thirty patients with refractory HF who underwent cardiac MRI and CPX test for heart transplantation, and 24 healthy, age-matched volunteers as controls were enrolled. M-T2* imaging was performed using a 3-Tesla and multi-echo gradient-echo sequence. M-T2* was calculated by fitting the signal intensity data for the mid-left ventricular septum to a decay curve. M-T2* was measured under room-air (T2*-air) and after inhalation of oxygen for 10min at a flow rate of 10L/min (T2*-oxy). MO was defined as the difference between the two values (ΔT2*). Changes in M-T2* at the two conditions and ΔT2* between the two groups were compared. Correlation between ΔT2* and CPX results was analyzed using the Pearson coefficient. T2*-oxy was significantly greater than T2*-air in patients with HF (29.9±7.3ms vs. 26.7±6.0ms, p<0.001), whereas no such difference was observed in controls (25.5±4.0ms vs. 25.4±4.4ms). ΔT2* was significantly greater for patients with HF than for controls (3.2±4.5ms vs. -0.1±1.3ms, p<0.001). A significant correlation between ΔT2* and CPX results (peak VO 2 , r=-0.46, p<0.05; O 2 pulse, r=-0.54, p<0.005) was observed. ΔT2* is increased T2*-oxy is greater in patients with HF, and is correlated with oxygen metabolism during exercise as measured by the CPX test. Hence, ΔT2* can be used as a surrogate marker of MO instead of CPX test. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Simultaneous dynamic blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging of foot and calf muscles: aging effects at ischemia and postocclusive hyperemia in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Sebastian; Klarhöfer, Markus; Aschwanden, Markus; Scheffler, Klaus; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Bilecen, Deniz

    2009-11-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging of calf and foot muscles and investigate age-related changes of BOLD signal changes during ischemia and postocclusive hyperemia in healthy volunteers. In this study, 15 healthy elderly volunteers (mean age: 69.0 +/- 7.4 years) and 15 healthy young volunteers (mean age: 26.1 +/- 3.9 years) were enrolled. In both legs, simultaneous BOLD imaging of calf and foot muscles was performed at 1.5 Tesla. Short-term ischemia and consecutive reactive hyperemia were provoked by a cuff-compression paradigm. T2*-weighted signal time courses were obtained from foot and calf muscles simultaneously. Ischemia was assessed by T2* minimum ischemic value (MIV) and the time to half ischemic minimum (THIM). Reperfusion was assessed by the time to reach T2* half hyperemia peak (THHP). Reactive hyperemia was characterized by hyperemia peak value (HPV), time to peak (TTP), and relative T2* change from end of ischemia to HPV (deltaS). Parameter differences were assessed using a 2-sided Student t test. Dynamic BOLD measurement of foot and calf muscles was techniqually feasible and successful in all volunteers.In comparison, THIM was significantly longer in elderly than in young volunteers for calf (P muscles (young: 28.9 +/- 3.7 seconds; elderly: 57.8 +/- 31.4 seconds) and foot (P = 0.01) muscles (young: 36.8 +/- 25.5 seconds; elderly: 56.6 +/- 31.7 seconds). MIV relative to baseline T2*-signal was significantly (P calf (young: 96.0% +/- 2.6%; elderly: 91.3% +/- 4.4%) and foot (young: 95.8% +/- 2.5%; elderly: 91.1% +/- 8.2%) muscles. TTP was significantly (calf: P = 0.01; foot: P = 0.02) delayed in the elderly (elderly calf: 103.0 +/- 92.7 seconds and foot: 157.1 +/- 109.9 seconds vs. young calf: 54.8 +/- 42.1 seconds and foot: 95.1 +/- 77.6 seconds). HPV was significantly (calf: P calf: 114.1% +/- 7.2% and foot: 105.8% +/- 3.3% vs. elderly calf: 104.0% +/- 2.1% and foot: 103.9% +/- 3

  16. Cocaine-associated odor cue re-exposure increases blood oxygenation level dependent signal in memory and reward regions of the maternal rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Martha K; Febo, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Cue triggered relapse during the postpartum period can negatively impact maternal care. Given the high reward value of pups in maternal rats, we designed an fMRI experiment to test whether offspring presence reduces the neural response to a cocaine associated olfactory cue. Cocaine conditioned place preference was carried out before pregnancy in the presence of two distinct odors that were paired with cocaine or saline (+Cue and -Cue). The BOLD response to +Cue and -Cue was measured in dams on postpartum days 2-4. Odor cues were delivered to dams in the absence and then the presence of pups. Our data indicate that several limbic and cognitive regions of the maternal rat brain show a greater BOLD signal response to a +Cue versus -Cue. These include dorsal striatum, prelimbic cortex, parietal cortex, habenula, bed nucleus of stria terminalis, lateral septum and the mediodorsal and the anterior thalamic nucleus. Of the aforementioned brain regions, only the parietal cortex of cocaine treated dams showed a significant modulatory effect of pup presence. In this area of the cortex, cocaine exposed maternal rats showed a greater BOLD activation in response to the +Cue in the presence than in the absence of pups. Specific regions of the cocaine exposed maternal rat brain are strongly reactive to drug associated cues. The regions implicated in cue reactivity have been previously reported in clinical imaging work, and previous work supports their role in various motivational and cognitive functions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional Imaging of the Non-Human Primate Placenta With Endogenous BOLD Contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabel, M.C.; Roberts, V.H.J.; Lo, J. O.; Platt, S.; Grant, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To characterize spatial patterns of T2∗ in the rhesus macaque placenta, to correlate these patterns with placental perfusion determined using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI, and to evaluate the potential for using the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) effect to quantify placental perfusion without the use of exogenous contrast reagent. Methods Magnetic resonance imaging was performed on three pregnant rhesus macaques at gestational day 110. Multi-echo spoiled gradient echo measurements were used to compute maps of T2∗. Spatial maxima in these maps were compared with foci of early enhancement determined by DCE-MRI. Results Local maxima in T2∗ maps are strongly correlated with spiral arteries identified by DCE-MRI, with mean spatial separations ranging from 2.34 to 6.11 mm in the three animals studied. Spatial patterns of R2∗(=1∕T2∗) within individual placental lobules can be quantitatively analyzed using a simple model to estimate fetal arterial oxyhemoglobin concentration [Hbo,f] and a parameter viPS/Φ, reflecting oxygen transport to the fetus. Estimated mean values of [Hbo,f] ranged from 4.25 mM to 4.46 mM, while viPS/Φ ranged from 2.80×105 cm−3 to 1.61×106 cm−3. Conclusions Maternal spiral arteries show strong spatial correlation with foci of extended T2∗ observed in the primate placenta. A simple model of oxygen transport accurately describes the spatial dependence of R2∗ within placental lobules and enables assessment of placental function and oxygenation without requiring administration of an exogenous contrast reagent. PMID:26599502

  18. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the frontal eye fields during saccadic eye movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Atsushi; Takagi, Mineo; Abe, Haruki; Nakajima, Takashi; Miyauchi, Satoru.

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated activity-induced signal intensity changes in the human cerebral cortex during horizontal saccadic eye movements using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on the blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast method. Compared with central fixation, significant signal increases were observed bilaterally in the middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 8) during saccadic conditions. The location of the activated area was consistent with that of previously reported frontal eye fields (FEF). These results suggest that fMRI has potential merit for the study of cortical control of eye movements in humans. (author)

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abbreviations used: BOLD, Blood oxygenation level dependent; CBF, cerebral blood flow; fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging; EPI, eco-planar imaging; FOV, field of view; MRI, Magnetic resonance imaging; MRS, magnetic resonance spectroscopy;. PET, position emission tomography; rCBF, regional cerebral ...

  20. An Introduction to Normalization and Calibration Methods in Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Thomas T.; Glover, Gary H.; Mueller, Bryon A.; Greve, Douglas N.; Brown, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal is often interpreted as a measure of neural activity. However, because the BOLD signal reflects the complex interplay of neural, vascular, and metabolic processes, such an interpretation is not always valid. There is growing evidence that changes…

  1. Physiological basis and image processing in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Neuronal and motor activity in brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rakesh

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is recently developing as imaging modality used for mapping hemodynamics of neuronal and motor event related tissue blood oxygen level dependence (BOLD in terms of brain activation. Image processing is performed by segmentation and registration methods. Segmentation algorithms provide brain surface-based analysis, automated anatomical labeling of cortical fields in magnetic resonance data sets based on oxygen metabolic state. Registration algorithms provide geometric features using two or more imaging modalities to assure clinically useful neuronal and motor information of brain activation. This review article summarizes the physiological basis of fMRI signal, its origin, contrast enhancement, physical factors, anatomical labeling by segmentation, registration approaches with examples of visual and motor activity in brain. Latest developments are reviewed for clinical applications of fMRI along with other different neurophysiological and imaging modalities.

  2. Functional MRI of the visual cortex and visual testing in patients with previous optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Frederiksen, J.L.; Rostrup, Egill

    2002-01-01

    of the activated area and the signal change following ON, and compared the results with results of neuroophthalmological testing. We studied nine patients with previous acute ON and 10 healthy persons served as controls using fMRI with visual stimulation. In addition to a reduced activated volume, patients showed...... a reduced blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal increase and a greater asymmetry in the visual cortex, compared with controls. The volume of visual cortical activation was significantly correlated to the result of the contrast sensitivity test. The BOLD signal increase correlated significantly......The volume of cortical activation as detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the visual cortex has previously been shown to be reduced following optic neuritis (ON). In order to understand the cause of this change, we studied the cortical activation, both the size...

  3. Negative BOLD signal changes in ipsilateral primary somatosensory cortex are associated with perfusion decreases and behavioral evidence for functional inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, Katharina; Blankenburg, Felix; Kupers, Ron

    2012-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) to study the negative blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal and its underlying blood flow changes in healthy human subjects. This was combined with psychophysiological measurements to test that t...

  4. Luminance contrast of a visual stimulus modulates the BOLD response more than the cerebral blood flow response in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Christine L.; Ances, Beau M.; Perthen, Joanna E.; Moradi, Farshad; Liau, Joy; Buracas, Giedrius T.; Hopkins, Susan R.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) depends on the evoked changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in response to changes in neural activity. This response is strongly modulated by the CBF/CMRO2 coupling relationship with activation, defined as n, the ratio of the fractional changes. The reliability of the BOLD signal as a quantitative reflection of underlying physiological c...

  5. Subwavelength Hyperlens Resolution With Perfect Contrast Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Repän, Taavi; Zhukovsky, Sergei

    2018-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that plasmonic effects in hyperbolic metamaterials may facilitate overcoming the diffraction limit and enhance the contrast function of an image by filtering background radiation. Unfortunately, the contrast function of such a dark‐field hyperlens degrades in the deep......‐subwavelength regime. We push forward the concept of the contrast function revival in the subwavelength imaging by introduction of the proper phase difference between coherent sources. To study this effect we develop a simplified theory of the wave propagation through a hyperbolic metamaterial and show that......, in principle, two sources standing apart at any subwavelength distance can be distinguished. We suggest two feasible designs, the first of which employs the obliquely incident light, while the second one is based on a properly designed metasurface. The concept can be used in high‐contrast subwavelength...

  6. Methodological Improvements in Combining TMS and Functional MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Moisa, Marius

    2011-01-01

    Since 1997, when Bohning and colleagues demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of interleaving transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with blood oxygenation level dependency functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI), this combination became a very promising techniques to study brain connectivity. However, the implementation of a reliable setup for interleaved TMS/fMRI is still technically challenging. In this thesis, I intended to further explore and develop methodological i...

  7. Variability in functional magnetic resonance imaging : influence of the baseline vascular state and physiological fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Behzadi, Yashar

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become an increasingly important tool for studying the working human brain. The blood oxygenation level dependent signal signal used in most fMRI experiments is an indirect measure of neural activity and reflects local changes in deoxyhemoglobin content, which is a complex function of dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. Although significant progress has been ...

  8. Exploring brain function with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Salle, F.; Formisano, E.; Linden, D.E.J.; Goebel, R.; Bonavita, S.; Pepino, A.; Smaltino, F.; Tedeschi, G.

    1999-01-01

    Since its invention in the early 1990s, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has rapidly assumed a leading role among the techniques used to localize brain activity. The spatial and temporal resolution provided by state-of-the-art MR technology and its non-invasive character, which allows multiple studies of the same subject, are some of the main advantages of fMRI over the other functional neuroimaging modalities that are based on changes in blood flow and cortical metabolism. This paper describes the basic principles and methodology of fMRI and some aspects of its application to functional activation studies. Attention is focused on the physiology of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism and on the acquisition of functional time-series with echo planar imaging (EPI). We also provide an introduction to the current strategies for the correction of signal artefacts and other image processing techniques. In order to convey an idea of the numerous applications of fMRI, we will review some of the recent results in the fields of cognitive and sensorimotor psychology and physiology

  9. Effect of luminance contrast on BOLD-fMRI response in deaf and normal occipital visual cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yanping; Zhai Renyou; Jiang Tao; Cui Yong; Zhou Tiangang; Rao Hengyi; Zhuo Yan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of luminance contrast stimulus by using blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) within deaf occipital visual cortex, and to compare the distribution, extent, and intensity of activated areas between deaf subjects and normal hearing subjects. Methods: Twelve deaf subjects (average age 16.5) and 15 normal hearing subjects (average age 23.7) were stimulated by 4 kinds of luminance contrast (0.7, 2.2, 50.0, 180.0 lm). The fMRI data were collected on GE 1.5 T Signa Horizon LX MRI system and analyzed by AFNI to generate the activation map. Results: Responding to all 4 kinds of stimulus luminance contrast, all deaf and normal subjects showed significant activations in occipital visual cortex. For both deaf and normal subjects, the number of activated pixels increased significantly with increasing luminance contrast (F normal = 4.27, P deaf = 6.41, P 0.05). The local mean activation level for all activated pixels remained constant with increasing luminance contrast. However, there was an increase in the mean activation level for those activated pixels common to all trials as the stimulus luminance contrast was increased, but no significant difference was found within them (F normal = 0.79, P > 0.05; F deaf = 1.6, P > 0.05). Conclusion: The effect of luminance contrast on occipital visual cortex of deaf is similar to but somewhat higher than that of normal hearing subjects. In addition, it also proved that fMRI is a feasible method in the study of the deaf visual cortex

  10. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with contrast dependent on blood oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, S.; Lee, T.M.; Kay, A.R.; Tank, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high yields, the authors demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complement other techniques that are attempting to provide position emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity

  11. Contributions of structural connectivity and cerebrovascular parameters to functional magnetic resonance imaging signals in mice at rest and during sensory paw stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Grandjean, Joanes; Schlegel, Felix; Saab, Bechara J; Rudin, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Previously, we reported widespread bilateral increases in stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging signals in mouse brain to unilateral sensory paw stimulation. We attributed the pattern to arousal-related cardiovascular changes overruling cerebral autoregulation thereby masking specific signal changes elicited by local neuronal activity. To rule out the possibility that interhemispheric neuronal communication might contribute to bilateral functional magnetic resonance imaging responses, we compared stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging responses to unilateral hindpaw stimulation in acallosal I/LnJ, C57BL/6, and BALB/c mice. We found bilateral blood-oxygenation-level dependent signal changes in all three strains, ruling out a dominant contribution of transcallosal communication as reason for bilaterality. Analysis of functional connectivity derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, revealed that bilateral cortical functional connectivity is largely abolished in I/LnJ animals. Cortical functional connectivity in all strains correlated with structural connectivity in corpus callosum as revealed by diffusion tensor imaging. Given the profound influence of systemic hemodynamics on stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging outcomes, we evaluated whether functional connectivity data might be affected by cerebrovascular parameters, i.e. baseline cerebral blood volume, vascular reactivity, and reserve. We found that effects of cerebral hemodynamics on functional connectivity are largely outweighed by dominating contributions of structural connectivity. In contrast, contributions of transcallosal interhemispheric communication to the occurrence of ipsilateral functional magnetic resonance imaging response of equal amplitude to unilateral stimuli seem negligible.

  12. Luminance contrast of a visual stimulus modulates the BOLD response more than the cerebral blood flow response in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Christine L; Ances, Beau M; Perthen, Joanna E; Moradi, Farshad; Liau, Joy; Buracas, Giedrius T; Hopkins, Susan R; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) depends on the evoked changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) in response to changes in neural activity. This response is strongly modulated by the CBF/CMRO(2) coupling relationship with activation, defined as n, the ratio of the fractional changes. The reliability of the BOLD signal as a quantitative reflection of underlying physiological changes depends on the stability of n in response to different stimuli. The effect of visual stimulus contrast on this coupling ratio was tested in 9 healthy human subjects, measuring CBF and BOLD responses to a flickering checkerboard at four visual contrast levels. The theory of the BOLD effect makes a robust prediction-independent of details of the model-that if the CBF/CMRO(2) coupling ratio n remains constant, then the response ratio between the lowest and highest contrast levels should be higher for the BOLD response than the CBF response because of the ceiling effect on the BOLD response. Instead, this response ratio was significantly lower for the BOLD response (BOLD response: 0.23 ± 0.13, mean ± SD; CBF response: 0.42 ± 0.18; p=0.0054). This data is consistent with a reduced dynamic range (strongest/weakest response ratio) of the CMRO(2) response (~1.7-fold) compared to that of the CBF response (~2.4-fold) as luminance contrast increases, corresponding to an increase of n from 1.7 at the lowest contrast level to 2.3 at the highest contrast level. The implication of these results for fMRI studies is that the magnitude of the BOLD response does not accurately reflect the magnitude of underlying physiological processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Letter contrast sensitivity function of the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, H L; Brennan, N A

    1998-06-01

    To provide empirical data of letter CSF for various levels of defocus under controlled conditions of luminance and age. Corrected distance visual acuities were tested at different levels of contrast and defocus. An experiment was conducted using the Medmont visual acuity tester on 10 young subjects and under normal room lighting. Empirical data of visual acuity were obtained for 7 levels of contrast (5, 10, 15, 25, 40, 60, 80%) and defocus levels of 0, +1 and +2D. A mathematical model was derived (R2=0.995) and this can be used to estimate visual acuity at various contrast levels for defocus of < or =+2D. This information is useful for the clinician as normative data and for further development of optical models to predict visual performance of the eye.

  14. Mapping of cognitive functions in chronic intractable epilepsy: Role of fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, Kapil; Kumaran, S Senthil; Chandra, Sarat P; Wadhawan, Ashima Nehra; Tripathi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a non-invasive technique with high spatial resolution and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast, has been applied to localize and map cognitive functions in the clinical condition of chronic intractable epilepsy. fMRI was used to map the language and memory network in patients of chronic intractable epilepsy pre- and post-surgery. After obtaining approval from the institutional ethics committee, six patients with intractable epilepsy with an equal number of age-matched controls were recruited in the study. A 1.5 T MR scanner with 12-channel head coil, integrated with audio-visual fMRI accessories was used. Echo planar imaging sequence was used for BOLD studies. There were two sessions in TLE (pre- and post-surgery). In TLE patients, BOLD activation increased post-surgery in comparison of pre-surgery in inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), middle frontal gyrus (MFG), and superior temporal gyrus (STG), during semantic lexical, judgment, comprehension, and semantic memory tasks. Functional MRI is useful to study the basic concepts related to language and memory lateralization in TLE and guide surgeons for preservation of important brain areas during ATLR. This will help in understanding future directions for the diagnosis and treatment of such disease

  15. Subwavelength Hyperlens Resolution With Perfect Contrast Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Repän, Taavi; Zhukovsky, Sergei

    2018-01-01

    , in principle, two sources standing apart at any subwavelength distance can be distinguished. We suggest two feasible designs, the first of which employs the obliquely incident light, while the second one is based on a properly designed metasurface. The concept can be used in high‐contrast subwavelength...

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: fundamentals and application to the evaluation of the peripheral perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Yaron; Partovi, Sasan; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Amarteifio, Erick; Bäuerle, Tobias; Weber, Marc-André; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Rengier, Fabian

    2014-04-01

    The ability to ascertain information pertaining to peripheral perfusion through the analysis of tissues' temporal reaction to the inflow of contrast agent (CA) was first recognized in the early 1990's. Similar to other functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques such as arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) was at first restricted to studies of the brain. Over the last two decades the spectrum of ailments, which have been studied with DCE-MRI, has been extensively broadened and has come to include pathologies of the heart notably infarction, stroke and further cerebral afflictions, a wide range of neoplasms with an emphasis on antiangiogenic treatment and early detection, as well as investigations of the peripheral vascular and musculoskeletal systems. DCE-MRI possesses an unparalleled capacity to quantitatively measure not only perfusion but also other diverse microvascular parameters such as vessel permeability and fluid volume fractions. More over the method is capable of not only assessing blood flowing through an organ, but in contrast to other noninvasive methods, the actual tissue perfusion. These unique features have recently found growing application in the study of the peripheral vascular system and most notably in the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). The first part of this review will elucidate the fundamentals of data acquisition and interpretation of DCE-MRI, two areas that often remain baffling to the clinical and investigating physician because of their complexity. The second part will discuss developments and exciting perspectives of DCE-MRI regarding the assessment of perfusion in the extremities. Emerging clinical applications of DCE-MRI will be reviewed with a special focus on investigation of physiology and pathophysiology of the microvascular and vascular systems of the extremities.

  17. A Preliminary Study of Functional Brain Activation among Marijuana Users during Performance of a Virtual Water Maze Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tropp Sneider

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have reported neurocognitive impairments associated with chronic marijuana use. Given that the hippocampus contains a high density of cannabinoid receptors, hippocampal-mediated cognitive functions, including visuospatial memory, may have increased vulnerability to chronic marijuana use. Thus, the current study examined brain activation during the performance of a virtual analogue of the classic Morris water maze task in 10 chronic marijuana (MJ users compared to 18 nonusing (NU comparison subjects. Imaging data were acquired using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD functional MRI at 3.0 Tesla during retrieval (hidden platform and motor control (visible platform conditions. While task performance on learning trials was similar between groups, MJ users demonstrated a deficit in memory retrieval. For BOLD fMRI data, NU subjects exhibited greater activation in the right parahippocampal gyrus and cingulate gyrus compared to the MJ group for the Retrieval-Motor Control contrast (NU > MJ. These findings suggest that hypoactivation in MJ users may be due to differences in the efficient utilization of neuronal resources during the retrieval of memory. Given the paucity of data on visuospatial memory function in MJ users, these findings may help elucidate the neurobiological effects of marijuana on brain activation during memory retrieval.

  18. Usefulness and limitation of functional MRI with echo planar imaging using clinical MR apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Katsusuke; Zenke, Kiichiro; Saito, Masahiro; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Ohue, Shiro; Sakaki, Saburo; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki; Nagasawa, Kiyoshi

    1998-01-01

    We studied blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) with EPI sequence in 21 normal volunteers and 8 presurgical clinical patients using a 1.5 T clinical MRI apparatus. To optimize the imaging parameters, we compared the fMRI images obtained by GFE-EPI and by SE-EPI in normal volunteers while each squeezed a sponge ball. We identified the motor cortex in 85.7% of normal volunteers by GFE-EPI in contrast to only 28.6% by SE-EPI. In addition, our clinical MR apparatus, using optimized parameters, maximally provides 15 slices per 5 seconds. In patients with brain tumor close to the sensorimotor cortex, we attempted to identify the motor cortex preoperatively by this procedure and found a significant increase of signal intensity in the motor cortex in 5 of 8 patients. In conclusion, fMRI using EPI may be useful for identifying the motor cortex preoperatively. However, further development of the apparatus is needed to obtain better temporal and spatial resolution for clinical applications. (author)

  19. An illustrated heuristic prototype facilitates scientific inventive problem solving: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Dandan; Li, Wenfu; Tang, Chaoying; Yang, Wenjing; Tian, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Meng; Qiu, Jiang; Liu, Yijun; Zhang, Qinglin

    2015-07-01

    Many scientific inventions (SI) throughout history were inspired by heuristic prototypes (HPs). For instance, an event or piece of knowledge similar to displaced water from a tub inspired Archimedes' principle. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this insightful problem solving are not very clear. Thus, the present study explored the neural correlates used to solve SI problems facilitated by HPs. Each HP had two versions: a literal description with an illustration (LDI) and a literal description with no illustration (LDNI). Thirty-two participants were divided randomly into these two groups. Blood oxygenation level-dependent fMRI contrasts between LDI and LDNI groups were measured. Greater activity in the right middle occipital gyrus (RMOG, BA19), right precentral gyrus (RPCG, BA4), and left middle frontal gyrus (LMFG, BA46) were found within the LDI group as compared to the LDNI group. We discuss these results in terms cognitive functions within these regions related to problem solving and memory retrieval. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In contrast to BOLD: signal enhancement by extravascular water protons as an alternative mechanism of endogenous fMRI signal change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figley, Chase R; Leitch, Jordan K; Stroman, Patrick W

    2010-10-01

    Despite the popularity and widespread application of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in recent years, the physiological bases of signal change are not yet fully understood. Blood oxygen level-dependant (BOLD) contrast - attributed to local changes in blood flow and oxygenation, and therefore magnetic susceptibility - has become the most prevalent means of functional neuroimaging. However, at short echo times, spin-echo sequences show considerable deviations from the BOLD model, implying a second, non-BOLD component of signal change. This has been dubbed "signal enhancement by extravascular water protons" (SEEP) and is proposed to result from proton-density changes associated with cellular swelling. Given that such changes are independent of magnetic susceptibility, SEEP may offer new and improved opportunities for carrying out fMRI in regions with close proximity to air-tissue and/or bone-tissue interfaces (e.g., the prefrontal cortex and spinal cord), as well as regions close to large blood vessels, which may not be ideally suited for BOLD imaging. However, because of the interdisciplinary nature of the literature, there has yet to be a thorough synthesis, tying together the various and sometimes disparate aspects of SEEP theory. As such, we aim to provide a concise yet comprehensive overview of SEEP, including recent and compelling evidence for its validity, its current applications and its future relevance to the rapidly expanding field of functional neuroimaging. Before presenting the evidence for a non-BOLD component of endogenous functional contrast, and to enable a more critical review for the nonexpert reader, we begin by reviewing the fundamental principles underlying BOLD theory. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional MR study of a motor task and the Tower of London task at 1.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boghi, A.; Rampado, O.; Ropolo, R.; Bergui, M.; Coriasco, M.; Bradac, G.B.; Avidano, F.; Manzone, C.; Mortara, P.; Orsi, L.

    2006-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for clinical applications and basic neuroscience is constantly increasing. The discussion about minimum performance requirement for a correct implementation of fMRI is still open, and one of the critical points is the magnetic field strength. We tested the feasibility of fMRI at 1.0 T during motor and cognitive tasks. Fourteen healthy subjects were scanned during a motor task and 12 while performing the Tower of London task. In the activated areas, the percentage signal change due to BOLD (blood oxygenation level dependent) contrast was analysed. To check basic image quality of the acquisition system we measured quality indices in a temporal series of images of a phantom. Motor and cognitive brain activations matched previous results obtained at higher field strengths. The mean percentage change over subjects in the motor task was in the range 1.3-2.6% for the primary motor area and 0.8-6.7% for the cerebellum. In the cognitive task, the mean percentage change over subjects was 0.7-1.2% for a frontal area and 0.6-2.8% for a parietal area. The percentage noise of the phantom temporal series was less than 0.4%. Percentage changes and signal to noise ratio, although lower than that obtained with high-field systems, allowed activation maps to be obtained in all subjects. (orig.)

  2. Caffeine and cognition in functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelstaetter, Florian; Poeppel, Thorsten D; Siedentopf, Christian M; Ischebeck, Anja; Kolbitsch, Christian; Mottaghy, Felix M; Felber, Stephan R; Jaschke, Werner R; Krause, Bernd J

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine has been consumed since ancient times due to its beneficial effects on attention, psychomotor function, and memory. Caffeine exerts its action mainly through an antagonism of cerebral adenosine receptors, although there are important secondary effects on other neurotransmitter systems. Recently, functional MRI (fMRI) entered the field of neuropharmacology to explore the intracerebral sites and mechanisms of action of pharmacological agents. However, as caffeine possesses vasoconstrictive properties it may interfere with the mechanisms underlying the functional contrast in fMRI. Yet, only a limited number of studies dealt with the effect of caffeine on measures in fMRI. Even fewer neuroimaging studies examined the effects that caffeine exerts on cognition: Portas and colleagues used fMRI in an attentional task under different levels of arousal (sleep deprivation or caffeine administration), concluding that the thalamus is involved in mediating the interaction of attention and arousal. Bendlin and colleagues found caffeine to stabilize the extent of neuronal activation in repetitive word stem completion, counteracting the general task practice effect. Recently, Koppelstaetter and colleagues assessed the effect of caffeine on verbal working memory demonstrating a modulatory effect of caffeine on brain regions (medial frontopolar and anterior cingulate cortex) that have been associated with attentional and executive functions. This review surveys and discusses neuroimaging findings on 1) how caffeine affects the contrast underlying fMRI techniques, particularly the blood oxygen level dependent contrast (BOLD fMRI), and 2) how caffeine operates on neuronal activity underlying cognition, to understand the effect of caffeine on behavior and its neurobiological underpinnings.

  3. Laminar microvascular transit time distribution in the mouse somatosensory cortex revealed by Dynamic Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Conrad W; Srinivasan, Vivek J

    2016-01-15

    The transit time distribution of blood through the cerebral microvasculature both constrains oxygen delivery and governs the kinetics of neuroimaging signals such as blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (BOLD fMRI). However, in spite of its importance, capillary transit time distribution has been challenging to quantify comprehensively and efficiently at the microscopic level. Here, we introduce a method, called Dynamic Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography (DyC-OCT), based on dynamic cross-sectional OCT imaging of an intravascular tracer as it passes through the field-of-view. Quantitative transit time metrics are derived from temporal analysis of the dynamic scattering signal, closely related to tracer concentration. Since DyC-OCT does not require calibration of the optical focus, quantitative accuracy is achieved even deep in highly scattering brain tissue where the focal spot degrades. After direct validation of DyC-OCT against dilution curves measured using a fluorescent plasma label in surface pial vessels, we used DyC-OCT to investigate the transit time distribution in microvasculature across the entire depth of the mouse somatosensory cortex. Laminar trends were identified, with earlier transit times and less heterogeneity in the middle cortical layers. The early transit times in the middle cortical layers may explain, at least in part, the early BOLD fMRI onset times observed in these layers. The layer-dependencies in heterogeneity may help explain how a single vascular supply manages to deliver oxygen to individual cortical layers with diverse metabolic needs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Imaging tools to study pharmacology: functional MRI on small rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth eJonckers

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI is an excellent tool to study the effect of pharmacological modulations on brain function in a non-invasive and longitudinal manner. We introduce several blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD fMRI techniques, including resting state (rsfMRI, stimulus-evoked (st-fMRI, and pharmacological MRI (phMRI. Respectively, these techniques permit the assessment of functional connectivity during rest as well as brain activation triggered by sensory stimulation and/or a pharmacological challenge. The first part of this review describes the physiological basis of BOLD fMRI and the hemodynamic response on which the MRI contrast is based. Specific emphasis goes to possible effects of anaesthesia and the animal’s physiological conditions on neural activity and the hemodynamic response. The second part of this review describes applications of the aforementioned techniques in pharmacologically-induced, as well as in traumatic and transgenic disease models and illustrates how multiple fMRI methods can be applied successfully to evaluate different aspects of a specific disorder. For example, fMRI techniques can be used to pinpoint the neural substrate of a disease beyond previously defined hypothesis-driven regions-of-interest (ROIs. In addition, fMRI techniques allow one to dissect how specific modifications (e.g. treatment, lesion etc. modulate the functioning of specific brain areas (st-fMRI, phMRI and how functional connectivity (rsfMRI between several brain regions is affected, both in acute and extended time frames. Furthermore, fMRI techniques can be used to assess/explore the efficacy of novel treatments in depth, both in fundamental research as well as in preclinical settings. In conclusion, by describing several exemplary studies, we aim to highlight the advantages of functional MRI in exploring the acute and long-term effects of pharmacological substances and/or pathology on brain functioning along with

  5. Development of contrast-enhanced rodent imaging using functional CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yun; Stantz, Keith M.; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Steinmetz, Rosemary; Hutchins, Gary D.

    2003-05-01

    Micro-computed tomography (microCT) is capable of obtaining high-resolution images of skeletal tissues. However its image contrast among soft tissues remains inadequate for tumor detection. High speed functional computed tomography will be needed to image tumors by employing x-ray contrast medium. The functional microCT development will not only facilitate the image contrast enhancement among different tissues but also provide information of tumor physiology. To demonstrate the feasibility of functional CT in mouse imaging, sequential computed tomography is performed in mice after contrast material administration using a high-speed clinical CT scanner. Although the resolution of the clinical scanner is not sufficient to dissolve the anatomic details of rodents, bulky physiological parameters in major organs such as liver, kidney, pancreas, and ovaries (testicular) can be examined. For data analysis, a two-compartmental model is employed and implemented to characterize the tissue physiological parameters (regional blood flow, capillary permeability, and relative compartment volumes.) The measured contrast dynamics in kidneys are fitted with the compartmental model to derive the kidney tissue physiology. The study result suggests that it is feasible to extract mouse tissue physiology using functional CT imaging technology.

  6. BOLD contrast fMRI of whole rodent tumour during air or carbogen breathing using echo-planar imaging at 1.5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landuyt, W.; Bogaert, W. van den; Lambin, P. [Lab. of Experimental Radiobiology and Department of Radiotherapy/Oncology,Univ. Hospitals Leuven (Belgium); Hermans, R.; Bosmans, H.; Sunaert, S.; Beatse, E.; Farina, D.; Meijerink, M.; Zhang, H.; Marchal, G. [University Hospital, Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of functional MR imaging (fMRI) at 1.5 T, exploiting blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, for detecting changes in whole-tumour oxygenation induced by carbogen (5% CO{sub 2}+95% O{sub 2}) inhalation of the host. Adult WAG/Rij rats with rhabdomyosarcomas growing subcutaneously in the lower flank were imaged when tumours reached sizes between 1 and 11 cm{sup 3} (n=12). Air and carbogen were alternatively supplied at 2 l/min using a snout mask. Imaging was done on a 1.5-T MR scanner using a T2*-weighted gradient-echo, echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) sequence. Analysis of the whole-tumour EPI images was based on statistical parametric maps. Voxels with and without signal intensity changes (SIC) were recorded. Significance thresholds were set at p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons. In continuous air breathing condition, 3 of 12 tumours showed significant negative SIC and 1 tumour had a clear-cut positive SIC. The remaining tumours showed very little or no change. When switching to carbogen breathing, the SIC were significantly positive in 10 of 12 tumours. Negative SIC were present in 4 tumours, of which three were simultaneously characterised by positive SIC. The overall analysis indicated that 6 of the 12 tumours could be considered as strong positive responders to carbogen. Our research demonstrates the applicability of fMRI GE-EPI at 1.5 T to study whole-tumour oxygenation non-invasively. The observed negative SIC during air condition may reflect the presence of transient hypoxia during these measurements. Selection of tumours on the basis of their individual response to carbogen is possible, indicating a role of such non-invasive measurements for using tailor-made treatments. (orig.)

  7. CONTRAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Krogsgaard

    2007-01-01

    Dette er en afrapportering fra den årlige CONTRAST workshop, der i 2007 blev afholdt i Yaoundé, Cameroon.......Dette er en afrapportering fra den årlige CONTRAST workshop, der i 2007 blev afholdt i Yaoundé, Cameroon....

  8. Functional MRI in human motor control studies and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, Keiichiro

    2002-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been a useful tool for the noninvasive mapping of brain function associated with various motor and cognitive tasks. Because fMRI is based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, it does not directly record neural activity. With the fMRI technique, distinguishing BOLD signals creased by cortical projection neurons from those created by intracortical neurons appears to be difficult. Two major experimental designs are used in fMRI studies: block designs and event-related designs. Block-designed fMRI presupposes the steady state of regional cerebral blood flow and has been applied to examinations of brain activation caused by tasks requiring sustained or repetitive movements. By contrast, the more recently developed event-related fMRI with time resolution of a few seconds allows the mapping of brain activation associated with a single movement according to the transient aspects of the hemodynamic response. Increasing evidence suggests that multiple motor areas are engaged in a networked manner to execute various motor acts. In order to understand functional brain maps, it is important that one understands sequential and parallel organizations of anatomical connections between multiple motor areas. In fMRI studies of complex motor tasks, elementary parameters such as movement length, force, velocity, acceleration and frequency should be controlled, because inconsistency in those parameters may alter the extent and intensity of motor cortical activation, confounding interpretation of the findings obtained. In addition to initiation of movements, termination of movements plays an important role in the successful achievement of complex movements. Brain areas exclusively related to the termination of movements have been, for the first time, uncovered with an event-related fMRI technique. We propose the application of fMRI to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of movement disorders, particularly dystonia

  9. A functional MRI study of happy and sad affective states induced by classical music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterschiffthaler, Martina T; Fu, Cynthia H Y; Dalton, Jeffrey A; Andrew, Christopher M; Williams, Steven C R

    2007-11-01

    The present study investigated the functional neuroanatomy of transient mood changes in response to Western classical music. In a pilot experiment, 53 healthy volunteers (mean age: 32.0; SD = 9.6) evaluated their emotional responses to 60 classical musical pieces using a visual analogue scale (VAS) ranging from 0 (sad) through 50 (neutral) to 100 (happy). Twenty pieces were found to accurately induce the intended emotional states with good reliability, consisting of 5 happy, 5 sad, and 10 emotionally unevocative, neutral musical pieces. In a subsequent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal contrast was measured in response to the mood state induced by each musical stimulus in a separate group of 16 healthy participants (mean age: 29.5; SD = 5.5). Mood state ratings during scanning were made by a VAS, which confirmed the emotional valence of the selected stimuli. Increased BOLD signal contrast during presentation of happy music was found in the ventral and dorsal striatum, anterior cingulate, parahippocampal gyrus, and auditory association areas. With sad music, increased BOLD signal responses were noted in the hippocampus/amygdala and auditory association areas. Presentation of neutral music was associated with increased BOLD signal responses in the insula and auditory association areas. Our findings suggest that an emotion processing network in response to music integrates the ventral and dorsal striatum, areas involved in reward experience and movement; the anterior cingulate, which is important for targeting attention; and medial temporal areas, traditionally found in the appraisal and processing of emotions. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Coupling of functional connectivity and regional cerebral blood flow reveals a physiological basis for network hubs of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xia; Zou, Qihong; He, Yong; Yang, Yihong

    2013-01-29

    Human brain functional networks contain a few densely connected hubs that play a vital role in transferring information across regions during resting and task states. However, the relationship of these functional hubs to measures of brain physiology, such as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), remains incompletely understood. Here, we used functional MRI data of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent and arterial-spin-labeling perfusion contrasts to investigate the relationship between functional connectivity strength (FCS) and rCBF during resting and an N-back working-memory task. During resting state, functional brain hubs with higher FCS were identified, primarily in the default-mode, insula, and visual regions. The FCS showed a striking spatial correlation with rCBF, and the correlation was stronger in the default-mode network (DMN; including medial frontal-parietal cortices) and executive control network (ECN; including lateral frontal-parietal cortices) compared with visual and sensorimotor networks. Moreover, the relationship was connection-distance dependent; i.e., rCBF correlated stronger with long-range hubs than short-range ones. It is notable that several DMN and ECN regions exhibited higher rCBF per unit connectivity strength (rCBF/FCS ratio); whereas, this index was lower in posterior visual areas. During the working-memory experiment, both FCS-rCBF coupling and rCBF/FCS ratio were modulated by task load in the ECN and/or DMN regions. Finally, task-induced changes of FCS and rCBF in the lateral-parietal lobe positively correlated with behavioral performance. Together, our results indicate a tight coupling between blood supply and brain functional topology during rest and its modulation in response to task demands, which may shed light on the physiological basis of human brain functional connectome.

  11. Functional interactions of HIV-infection and methamphetamine dependence during motor programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Sarah L; Jacobson, Mark W; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Ogasawara, Miki; Woods, Steven P; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor; Jernigan, Terry L

    2012-04-30

    Methamphetamine (METH) dependence is frequently comorbid with HIV infection and both have been linked to alterations of brain structure and function. In a previous study, we showed that the brain volume loss characteristic of HIV infection contrasts with METH-related volume increases in striatum and parietal cortex, suggesting distinct neurobiological responses to HIV and METH (Jernigan et al., 2005). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has the potential to reveal functional interactions between the effects of HIV and METH. In the present study, 50 participants were studied in four groups: an HIV+ group, a recently METH-dependent group, a dually affected group, and a group of unaffected community comparison subjects. An fMRI paradigm consisting of motor sequencing tasks of varying levels of complexity was administered to examine blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) changes. Within all groups, activity increased significantly with increasing task complexity in large clusters within sensorimotor and parietal cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum, and cingulate. The task complexity effect was regressed on HIV status, METH status, and the HIV×METH interaction term in a simultaneous multiple regression. HIV was associated with less complexity-related activation in striatum, whereas METH was associated with less complexity-related activation in parietal regions. Significant interaction effects were observed in both cortical and subcortical regions; and, contrary to expectations, the complexity-related activation was less aberrant in dually affected than in single risk participants, in spite of comparable levels of neurocognitive impairment among the clinical groups. Thus, HIV and METH dependence, perhaps through their effects on dopaminergic systems, may have opposing functional effects on neural circuits involved in motor programming. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigating repetition and change in musical rhythm by functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, A; Otnæss, M K; Jensen, J; Williams, S C R; Ostberg, B C

    2014-09-05

    Groove-based rhythm is a basic and much appreciated feature of Western popular music. It is commonly associated with dance, movement and pleasure and is characterized by the repetition of a basic rhythmic pattern. At various points in the musical course, drum breaks occur, representing a change compared to the repeated pattern of the groove. In the present experiment, we investigated the brain response to such drum breaks in a repetitive groove. Participants were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while listening to a previously unheard naturalistic groove with drum breaks at uneven intervals. The rhythmic pattern and the timing of its different parts as performed were the only aspects that changed from the repetitive sections to the breaks. Differences in blood oxygen level-dependent activation were analyzed. In contrast to the repetitive parts, the drum breaks activated the left cerebellum, the right inferior frontal gyrus (RIFG), and the superior temporal gyri (STG) bilaterally. A tapping test using the same stimulus showed an increase in the standard deviation of inter-tap-intervals in the breaks versus the repetitive parts, indicating extra challenges for auditory-motor integration in the drum breaks. Both the RIFG and STG have been associated with structural irregularity and increase in musical-syntactical complexity in several earlier studies, whereas the left cerebellum is known to play a part in timing. Together these areas may be recruited in the breaks due to a prediction error process whereby the internal model is being updated. This concurs with previous research suggesting a network for predictive feed-forward control that comprises the cerebellum and the cortical areas that were activated in the breaks. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adaptive sigmoid function bihistogram equalization for image contrast enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaga-Garcia, Edgar F.; Sanchez-Yanez, Raul E.; Ruiz-Pinales, Jose; Garcia-Hernandez, Ma. de Guadalupe

    2015-09-01

    Contrast enhancement plays a key role in a wide range of applications including consumer electronic applications, such as video surveillance, digital cameras, and televisions. The main goal of contrast enhancement is to increase the quality of images. However, most state-of-the-art methods induce different types of distortion such as intensity shift, wash-out, noise, intensity burn-out, and intensity saturation. In addition, in consumer electronics, simple and fast methods are required in order to be implemented in real time. A bihistogram equalization method based on adaptive sigmoid functions is proposed. It consists of splitting the image histogram into two parts that are equalized independently by using adaptive sigmoid functions. In order to preserve the mean brightness of the input image, the parameter of the sigmoid functions is chosen to minimize the absolute mean brightness metric. Experiments on the Berkeley database have shown that the proposed method improves the quality of images and preserves their mean brightness. An application to improve the colorfulness of images is also presented.

  14. Contrast-transfer-function phase retrieval based on compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Perez, Pablo; Arcadu, Filippo; Cloetens, Peter; Stampanoni, Marco

    2017-03-15

    We report on a new contrast-transfer-function (CTF) phase-retrieval method based on the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMMs), which allows us to exploit any compressed sensing regularization scheme reflecting the sparsity of the investigated object. The proposed iterative algorithm retrieves accurate phase maps from highly noisy single-distance projection microscopy data and is characterized by a stable convergence, not bounded to the prior knowledge of the object support or to the initialization strategy. Experiments on simulated and real datasets show that ADMM-CTF yields reconstructions with a substantial lower amount of artifacts and enhanced signal-to-noise ratio compared to the standard analytical inversion.

  15. Real-time animal functional magnetic resonance imaging and its application to neuropharmacological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hanbing; Yang, Shaolin; Zuo, Yantao; Demny, Steven; Stein, Elliot A; Yang, Yihong

    2008-11-01

    In pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) with anesthetized animals, there is usually only a single time window to observe the dynamic signal change to an acute drug administration since subsequent drug injections are likely to result in altered response properties (e.g., tolerance). Unlike the block-design experiments in which fMRI signal can be elicited with multiple repetitions of a task, these single-event experiments require stable baseline in order to reliably identify drug-induced signal changes. Such factors as subject motion, scanner instability and/or alterations in physiological conditions of the anesthetized animal could confound the baseline signal. The unique feature of such functional MRI (fMRI) studies necessitates a technique that is able to monitor MRI signal in a real-time fashion and to interactively control certain experimental procedures. In the present study, an approach for real-time MRI on a Bruker scanner is presented. The custom software runs on the console computer in parallel with the scanner imaging software, and no additional hardware is required. The utility of this technique is demonstrated in manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) with acute cocaine challenge, in which temporary disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a critical step for MEMRI experiments. With the aid of real-time MRI, we were able to assess the outcome of BBB disruption following bolus injection of hyperosmolar mannitol in a near real-time fashion prior to drug administration, improving experimental success rate. It is also shown that this technique can be applied to monitor baseline physiological conditions in conventional fMRI experiments using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, further demonstrating the versatility of this technique.

  16. The effects of aging vitreous on contrast sensitivity function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Giancarlo A; Khoshnevis, Matin; Yee, Kenneth M P; Nguyen, Justin H; Nguyen-Cuu, Jeannie; Sadun, Alfredo A; Sebag, J

    2018-05-01

    Contrast sensitivity function (CSF) declines with age. When unassociated with cataracts, this is hypothesized to be due to macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) thinning. However, other studies found associations with increased vitreous echodensity and posterior vitreous detachment (PVD). We investigate the relationship between CSF, vitreous echodensity, PVD, and GCC thickness as related to age in the same subjects. Age, CSF (Weber index: %W), vitreous echodensity (quantitative ultrasonography [QUS]), lens status (phakia or pseudophakia), best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and GCC thickness (SD-OCT) were evaluated in 57 eyes of 57 subjects with (n = 32, mean age = 62 years) and without (n = 25, mean age = 44 years) PVD (P PVD (2.98 ± 0.31 %W) compared to no PVD (1.97 ± 0.24 %W; P PVD than those without (P PVD status, vitreous echodensity, and age were the only independent variables demonstrating significant effects on CSF. Lens status, BCVA, and GCC thickness did not demonstrate association with CSF. PVD, vitreous echodensity, and age are determinants of CSF. PVD and increased vitreous echodensity are each associated with diminished CSF, independent of age. Thus, in the absence of GCC thinning and cataracts, vitreous changes may be a cause of decreased CSF with age.

  17. Functional imaging of the human placenta with magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siauve, Nathalie; Chalouhi, Gihad E; Deloison, Benjamin; Alison, Marianne; Clement, Olivier; Ville, Yves; Salomon, Laurent J

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal placentation is responsible for most failures in pregnancy; however, an understanding of placental functions remains largely concealed from noninvasive, in vivo investigations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is safe in pregnancy for magnetic fields of up to 3 Tesla and is being used increasingly to improve the accuracy of prenatal imaging. Functional MRI (fMRI) of the placenta has not yet been validated in a clinical setting, and most data are derived from animal studies. FMRI could be used to further explore placental functions that are related to vascularization, oxygenation, and metabolism in human pregnancies by the use of various enhancement processes. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is best able to quantify placental perfusion, permeability, and blood volume fractions. However, the transplacental passage of Gadolinium-based contrast agents represents a significant safety concern for this procedure in humans. There are alternative contrast agents that may be safer in pregnancy or that do not cross the placenta. Arterial spin labeling MRI relies on magnetically labeled water to quantify the blood flows within the placenta. A disadvantage of this technique is a poorer signal-to-noise ratio. Based on arterial spin labeling, placental perfusion in normal pregnancy is 176 ± 91 mL × min(-1) × 100 g(-1) and decreases in cases with intrauterine growth restriction. Blood oxygen level-dependent and oxygen-enhanced MRIs do not assess perfusion but measure the response of the placenta to changes in oxygen levels with the use of hemoglobin as an endogenous contrast agent. Diffusion-weighted imaging and intravoxel incoherent motion MRI do not require exogenous contrast agents, instead they use the movement of water molecules within tissues. The apparent diffusion coefficient and perfusion fraction are significantly lower in placentas of growth-restricted fetuses when compared with normal pregnancies. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has the ability to extract

  18. Effect of ischemic preconditioning in skeletal muscle measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy: a randomized crossover trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartko Johann

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR imaging and spectroscopy have been applied to assess skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism. Therefore, in-vivo NMR may enable the characterization of ischemia-reperfusion injury. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether NMR could detect the effects of ischemic preconditioning (IPC in healthy subjects. Methods Twenty-three participants were included in two randomized crossover protocols in which the effects of IPC were measured by NMR and muscle force assessments. Leg ischemia was administered for 20 minutes with or without a subsequent impaired reperfusion for 5 minutes (stenosis model. IPC was administered 4 or 48 hours prior to ischemia. Changes in 31phosphate NMR spectroscopy and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signals were recorded. 3-Tesla NMR data were compared to those obtained for isometric muscular strength. Results The phosphocreatine (PCr signal decreased robustly during ischemia and recovered rapidly during reperfusion. In contrast to PCr, the recovery of muscular strength was slow. During post-ischemic stenosis, PCr increased only slightly. The BOLD signal intensity decreased during ischemia, ischemic exercise and post-ischemic stenosis but increased during hyperemic reperfusion. IPC 4 hours prior to ischemia significantly increased the maximal PCr reperfusion signal and mitigated the peak BOLD signal during reperfusion. Conclusions Ischemic preconditioning positively influenced muscle metabolism during reperfusion; this resulted in an increase in PCr production and higher oxygen consumption, thereby mitigating the peak BOLD signal. In addition, an impairment of energy replenishment during the low-flow reperfusion was detected in this model. Thus, functional NMR is capable of characterizing changes in reperfusion and in therapeutic interventions in vivo. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00883467

  19. Functional MRI of the cervical spinal cord on 1.5 T with fingertapping: to what extent is it feasible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govers, N.; Beghin, J.; Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Vandervliet, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Michiels, J.

    2007-01-01

    Until recently, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, was mainly used to study brain physiology. The activation signal measured with fMRI is based upon the changes in the concentration of deoxyhaemoglobin that arise from an increase in blood flow in the vicinity of neuronal firing. Technical limitations have impeded such research in the human cervical spinal cord. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether a reliable fMRI signal can be elicited from the cervical spinal cord during fingertapping, a complex motor activity. Furthermore, we wanted to determine whether the fMRI signal could be spatially localized to the particular neuroanatomical location specific for this task. A group of 12 right-handed healthy volunteers performed the complex motor task of fingertapping with their right hand. T2*-weighted gradient-echo echo-planar imaging on a 1.5-T clinical unit was used to image the cervical spinal cord. Motion correction was applied. Cord activation was measured in the transverse imaging plane, between the spinal cord levels C5 and T1. In all subjects spinal cord responses were found, and in most of them on the left and the right side. The distribution of the activation response showed important variations between the subjects. While regions of activation were distributed throughout the spinal cord, concentrated activity was found at the anatomical location of expected motor innervation, namely nerve root C8, in 6 of the 12 subjects. fMRI of the human cervical spinal cord on an 1.5-T unit detects neuronal activity related to a complex motor task. The location of the neuronal activation (spinal cord segment C5 through T1 with a peak on C8) corresponds to the craniocaudal anatomical location of the neurons that activate the muscles in use. (orig.)

  20. Person deixis in Japanese and English - a Contrastive Functional Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Irgens, Benedicte Mosby

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation is a contrastive analysis of person deixis in English and Japanese. Person deixis is the linguistic reference to discourse participant roles, i.e. expressions referring to the speaker, listener and to other persons, who may or may not be present in the discourse situation. Person deixis may be manifested linguistically in various ways across languages. In English, it is grammaticalized through the pronominal system and verbal agreement inflection. In Japanese, in contrast, p...

  1. The neural correlates of theory of mind and their role during empathy and the game of chess: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Joanne L; Grossi, Davide; Corcoran, Rhiannon; Gobet, Fernand; García-Fiñana, Marta

    2017-07-04

    Chess involves the capacity to reason iteratively about potential intentional choices of an opponent and therefore involves high levels of explicit theory of mind [ToM] (i.e. ability to infer mental states of others) alongside clear, strategic rule-based decision-making. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used on 12 healthy male novice chess players to identify cortical regions associated with chess, ToM and empathizing. The blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) response for chess and empathizing tasks was extracted from each ToM region. Results showed neural overlap between ToM, chess and empathizing tasks in right-hemisphere temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) [BA40], left-hemisphere superior temporal gyrus [BA22] and posterior cingulate gyrus [BA23/31]. TPJ is suggested to underlie the capacity to reason iteratively about another's internal state in a range of tasks. Areas activated by ToM and empathy included right-hemisphere orbitofrontal cortex and bilateral middle temporal gyrus: areas that become active when there is need to inhibit one's own experience when considering the internal state of another and for visual evaluation of action rationality. Results support previous findings, that ToM recruits a neural network with each region sub-serving a supporting role depending on the nature of the task itself. In contrast, a network of cortical regions primarily located within right- and left-hemisphere medial-frontal and parietal cortex, outside the internal representational network, was selectively recruited during the chess task. We hypothesize that in our cohort of novice chess players the strategy was to employ an iterative thinking pattern which in part involved mentalizing processes and recruited core ToM-related regions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Research of cerebral activation in Uygur-speaking and Chinese-speaking participants during verb generation task with functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yanling; Liu, Ling; Hao, Grace; Abudusadike, Zulipinuer; Jiang, Chunhui; Zhang, Junran; Wang, Baolan

    2017-07-01

    The aims are to investigate and compare the activated cerebral regions of Uygur-speaking and Chinese-speaking participants during verb generation task.A total of 31 cases of Uygur and 28 cases of Han healthy volunteers were enrolled. They were requested to take verb generation tasks. Blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) was performed. The fMRI images were collected and activated brain regions were analyzed.In Chinese-speaking participants, the main activated cerebral regions were as follows: the left caudate nucleus, the left occipital gyrus, the left fusiform gyrus, bilateral supplementary motor area (BA8/ 6), the left BA32, left precuneus, the left superior parietal lobule, the left inferior parietal lobule (BA7), the left angular gyrus, the right side of the central gyrus (BA9), the left inferior frontal gyrus triangular section, the right pars opercularis gyri frontalis inferiorista, and bilateral cerebellum. In Uygur-speaking subjects, the main activated cerebral regions included left precentral gyrus (BA9 region), inferior frontal gyrus of left opercular part, inferior frontal gyrus of left triangle part, and left cerebellum. Left caudate nucleus, left orbital frontal gyrus, right caudate nucleus, and bilateral anterior cingulate gyrus (BA32 region) of Chinese group were significantly activated compared with Uygur group. By contrast, Uygur group showed no region that was more activated than Chinese group.The present study demonstrates that activated brain regions in verb generation tasks are different between Uygur and Chinese languages. Processing of Uygur characters is mainly in the left hemisphere of the brain, while the processing of Chinese characters needs more participation by the right hemisphere of the brain.

  3. High functional load inhibits phonological contrast loss: a corpus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedel, Andrew; Kaplan, Abby; Jackson, Scott

    2013-08-01

    For nearly a century, linguists have suggested that diachronic merger is less likely between phonemes with a high functional load--that is, phonemes that distinguish many words in the language in question. However, limitations in data and computational power have made assessing this hypothesis difficult. Here we present the first larger-scale study of the functional load hypothesis, using data from sound changes in a diverse set of languages. Our results support the functional load hypothesis: phoneme pairs undergoing merger distinguish significantly fewer minimal pairs in the lexicon than unmerged phoneme pairs. Furthermore, we show that higher phoneme probability is positively correlated with merger, but that this effect is stronger for phonemes that distinguish no minimal pairs. Finally, within our dataset we find that minimal pair count and phoneme probability better predict merger than change in system entropy at the lexical or phoneme level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Seeing conflict and engaging control: Experience with contrastive language benefits executive function in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebel, Sabine; Zelazo, Philip David

    2016-12-01

    Engaging executive function often requires overriding a prepotent response in favor of a conflicting but adaptive one. Language may play a key role in this ability by supporting integrated representations of conflicting rules. We tested whether experience with contrastive language that could support such representations benefits executive function in 3-year-old children. Children who received brief experience with language highlighting contrast between objects, attributes, and actions showed greater executive function on two of three 'conflict' executive function tasks than children who received experience with contrasting stimuli only and children who read storybooks with the experimenter, controlling for baseline executive function. Experience with contrasting stimuli did not benefit executive function relative to reading books with the experimenter, indicating experience with contrastive language, rather than experience with contrast generally, was key. Experience with contrastive language also boosted spontaneous attention to contrast, consistent with improvements in representing contrast. These findings indicate a role for language in executive function that is consistent with the Cognitive Complexity and Control theory's key claim that coordinating conflicting rules is critical to overcoming perseveration, and suggest new ideas for testing theories of executive function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Contrasting species and functional beta diversity in montane ant assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Tom R; Robertson, Mark P; van Rensburg, Berndt J; Parr, Catherine L

    2015-09-01

    Beta diversity describes the variation in species composition between sites and can be used to infer why different species occupy different parts of the globe. It can be viewed in a number of ways. First, it can be partitioned into two distinct patterns: turnover and nestedness. Second, it can be investigated from either a species identity or a functional-trait point of view. We aim to document for the first time how these two aspects of beta diversity vary in response to a large environmental gradient. Maloti-Drakensberg Mountains, southern Africa. We sampled ant assemblages along an extensive elevational gradient (900-3000 m a.s.l.) twice yearly for 7 years, and collected functional-trait information related to the species' dietary and habitat-structure preferences. We used recently developed methods to partition species and functional beta diversity into their turnover and nestedness components. A series of null models were used to test whether the observed beta diversity patterns differed from random expectations. Species beta diversity was driven by turnover, but functional beta diversity was composed of both turnover and nestedness patterns at different parts of the gradient. Null models revealed that deterministic processes were likely to be responsible for the species patterns but that the functional changes were indistinguishable from stochasticity. Different ant species are found with increasing elevation, but they tend to represent an increasingly nested subset of the available functional strategies. This finding is unique and narrows down the list of possible factors that control ant existence across elevation. We conclude that diet and habitat preferences have little role in structuring ant assemblages in montane environments and that some other factor must be driving the non-random patterns of species turnover. This finding also highlights the importance of distinguishing between different kinds of beta diversity.

  6. Plant functional traits and soil carbon sequestration in contrasting biomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Deyn, G.B.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Bardgett, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Plant functional traits control a variety of terrestrial ecosystem processes, including soil carbon storage which is a key component of the global carbon cycle. Plant traits regulate net soil carbon storage by controlling carbon assimilation, its transfer and storage in belowground biomass, and its

  7. Spatial frequency tuning functions and contrast sensitivity at different eccentricities in the visual field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.W.; Aine, C.J.; Flynn, E.R.; Wood, C.C.

    1996-07-01

    The human luminance spatial frequency contrast sensitivity function (CSF) has been well studied using psychophysical measurements by detecting spatial frequency (SF) grating patterns at threshold. Threshold CSFs at different eccentricities have proven to be quite useful in both basic and clinical vision research. However, near threshold, the CSF is measured at a linear area of the saturating contrast-response curve. In contrast, most of our everyday vision may be at suprathreshold levels, and thus may function most of the time at the nonlinear area of the contrast-response curve. In this study, in order to better characterize the CSF at normal contrast levels, we measured the SF tuning functions as well as the CR functions at different suprathreshold contrast levels and different eccentricities of the visual field using noninvasive MEG techniques. In this study, in addition to peak analysis, we have developed more reliable averaged power analysis methods where the average power can be calculated from the entire waveforms.

  8. Fuzzy cluster analysis of high-field functional MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windischberger, Christian; Barth, Markus; Lamm, Claus; Schroeder, Lee; Bauer, Herbert; Gur, Ruben C; Moser, Ewald

    2003-11-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast today is an established brain research method and quickly gains acceptance for complementary clinical diagnosis. However, neither the basic mechanisms like coupling between neuronal activation and haemodynamic response are known exactly, nor can the various artifacts be predicted or controlled. Thus, modeling functional signal changes is non-trivial and exploratory data analysis (EDA) may be rather useful. In particular, identification and separation of artifacts as well as quantification of expected, i.e. stimulus correlated, and novel information on brain activity is important for both, new insights in neuroscience and future developments in functional MRI of the human brain. After an introduction on fuzzy clustering and very high-field fMRI we present several examples where fuzzy cluster analysis (FCA) of fMRI time series helps to identify and locally separate various artifacts. We also present and discuss applications and limitations of fuzzy cluster analysis in very high-field functional MRI: differentiate temporal patterns in MRI using (a) a test object with static and dynamic parts, (b) artifacts due to gross head motion artifacts. Using a synthetic fMRI data set we quantitatively examine the influences of relevant FCA parameters on clustering results in terms of receiver-operator characteristics (ROC) and compare them with a commonly used model-based correlation analysis (CA) approach. The application of FCA in analyzing in vivo fMRI data is shown for (a) a motor paradigm, (b) data from multi-echo imaging, and (c) a fMRI study using mental rotation of three-dimensional cubes. We found that differentiation of true "neural" from false "vascular" activation is possible based on echo time dependence and specific activation levels, as well as based on their signal time-course. Exploratory data analysis methods in general and fuzzy cluster analysis in particular may

  9. Prevention of radiographic-contrast-agent-induced reductions in renal function by acetylcysteine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tepel, Martin; van der Giet, M; Schwarzfeld, C

    2000-01-01

    Radiographic contrast agents can cause a reduction in renal function that may be due to reactive oxygen species. Whether the reduction can be prevented by the administration of antioxidants is unknown.......Radiographic contrast agents can cause a reduction in renal function that may be due to reactive oxygen species. Whether the reduction can be prevented by the administration of antioxidants is unknown....

  10. Genetic characterization of denitrifier communities with contrasting intrinsic functional traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braker, Gesche; Dörsch, Peter; Bakken, Lars R

    2012-02-01

    Microorganisms capable of denitrification are polyphyletic and exhibit distinct denitrification regulatory phenotypes (DRP), and thus, denitrification in soils could be controlled by community composition. In a companion study (Dörsch et al., 2012) and preceding work, ex situ denitrification assays of three organic soils demonstrated profoundly different functional traits including N(2) O/N(2) ratios. Here, we explored the composition of the underlying denitrifier communities by analyzing the abundance and structure of denitrification genes (nirK, nirS, and nosZ). The relative abundance of nosZ (vs. nirK + nirS) was similar for all communities, and hence, the low N(2) O reductase activity in one of the soils was not because of the lack of organisms with this gene. Similarity in community composition between the soils was generally low for nirK and nirS, but not for nosZ. The community with the most robust denitrification (consistently low N(2) O/N(2) ) had the highest diversity/richness of nosZ and nirK, but not of nirS. Contrary results found for a second soil agreed with impaired denitrification (low overall denitrification activity, high N(2) O/N(2) ). In conclusion, differences in community composition and in the absolute abundance of denitrification genes clearly reflected the functional differences observed in laboratory studies and may shed light on differences in in situ N(2) O emission of the soils. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnostic functional MRI: illustrated clinical applications and decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Andreas Joachim; Homola, György; Biller, Armin; Solymosi, László; Bendszus, Martin

    2006-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a popular research tool, yet its use for diagnostic purposes and actual treatment planning has remained less widespread. The literature yields rather sparse evidence-based data on clinical fMRI applications and accordant decision-making. Notwithstanding, blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD)- and arterial spin labeling (ASL)-fMRI can be judiciously combined with perfusion measurements, electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and fiber tractographies to assist clinical decisions. In this article we provide an overview of clinical fMRI applications based on illustrative examples. Assessment of cochlear implant candidates by fMRI is covered in some detail, and distinct reference is made to particular challenges imposed by brain tumors, other space-occupying lesions, cortical dysplasias, seizure disorders, and vascular malformations. Specific strategies, merits, and pitfalls of analyzing and interpreting diagnostic fMRI studies in individual patients are highlighted. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Link prediction boosted psychiatry disorder classification for functional connectivity network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Mei, Xue; Wang, Hao; Zhou, Yu; Huang, Jiashuang

    2017-02-01

    Functional connectivity network (FCN) is an effective tool in psychiatry disorders classification, and represents cross-correlation of the regional blood oxygenation level dependent signal. However, FCN is often incomplete for suffering from missing and spurious edges. To accurate classify psychiatry disorders and health control with the incomplete FCN, we first `repair' the FCN with link prediction, and then exact the clustering coefficients as features to build a weak classifier for every FCN. Finally, we apply a boosting algorithm to combine these weak classifiers for improving classification accuracy. Our method tested by three datasets of psychiatry disorder, including Alzheimer's Disease, Schizophrenia and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. The experimental results show our method not only significantly improves the classification accuracy, but also efficiently reconstructs the incomplete FCN.

  13. The affects of contrast medium on renal function in selective coronary angiography and intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yueguang; Lv Baojing

    2006-01-01

    Selective coronary angiography and intervention with injection of contrast medium into the coronary arteries has become very common in dealing with coronary cardiac diseases. The excretion of contrast medium through kidneys may lead to acute renal functional insufficiency, especially for those suffering from chronic nephropathy, diabetes and cardiac functional disorder to form the so called 'contrast medium nephropathy' which is considered as the number second drug induced acute renal functional failure. Although routine preventive measure including low osmotic contrast medium and fine hydrotherapy have been taken, 14% incidences still occur with renal functional damage. The majority could be reversible but the minority needs emergent hemodialysis or even with persistent renal functional damage in a few ones. (authors)

  14. Poststroke aphasia recovery assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging and a picture identification task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Eaton, Kenneth; Ball, Angel L; Banks, Christi; Vannest, Jennifer; Allendorfer, Jane B; Page, Stephen; Holland, Scott K

    2011-01-01

    Stroke patients often display deficits in language function, such as correctly naming objects. Our aim was to evaluate the reliability and the patterns of poststroke language recovery using a picture identification task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 4 T. Four healthy subjects and 4 subjects with left middle cerebral artery stroke with chronic (>1 year) aphasia were enrolled in the study. In each subject, 10 fMRI scans were performed over a 10-week period using a picture-identification task. The active condition involved presenting subject with a panel of 4 figures (eg, drawings of 4 animals) every 6 seconds and asking the subject to indicate which figure matched the written name in the center. The control condition was a same/different judgment task with pairs of geometric figures (squares, octagons, or combination) presented every 6 seconds. Thirty-second active/control blocks were repeated 5 times each, and responses were recorded. The stoke subjects and controls had similar demographic characteristics, including age (46 vs 53 years), personal handedness (Edinburg Handedness Inventory, 89 vs 95), familial handedness (93 vs 95), and years of education (14.3 vs 14.8). For the active condition, the controls performed better than the stroke subjects (97.7% vs 89.1%; P R positive blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) activations in frontal and temporal language areas and symmetric retrosplenial and posterior cingulate areas and symmetric negative BOLD activations in bilateral frontotemporal language networks. In contrast, the stroke subjects exhibited positive BOLD activations predominantly in peristroke areas and negative BOLD activations in the unaffected (right) hemisphere. Both groups displayed high activation reliability (as measured by the intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]) in the left frontal and temporal language areas, although in the stroke subjects the ICC in the frontal regions was spread over a much larger peristroke

  15. A functional MRI study of somatotopic representation of somatosensory stimulation in the cerebellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takanashi, M.; Abe, K.; Yanagihara, T.; Sakoda, S. [Dept. of Neurology D4, Osaka Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Suita City, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Hirabuki, N.; Nakamura, H.; Fujita, N. [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Suita City, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    Somatotopic representation in the cerebral cortex of somatosensory stimulation has been widely reported, but that in the cerebellum has not. We investigated the latter in the human cerebellum by functional MRI (fMRI). Using a 1.5 tesla imager, we obtained multislice blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI with single-shot gradient-echo echoplanar imaging in seven right-handed volunteers during electrical stimulation of the left index finger and big toe. In the anterior and posterior cerebellum, activated pixels for the index finger were separate from those for the toe. This suggests that somatosensory stimulation of different parts of the body may involve distinct areas of in the cerebellum as well as the cerebral cortex. (orig.)

  16. Activation of Visuomotor Systems during Visually Guided Movements: A Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellermann, Jutta M.; Siegal, Joel D.; Strupp, John P.; Ebner, Timothy J.; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    1998-04-01

    The dorsal stream is a dominant visuomotor pathway that connects the striate and extrastriate cortices to posterior parietal areas. In turn, the posterior parietal areas send projections to the frontal primary motor and premotor areas. This cortical pathway is hypothesized to be involved in the transformation of a visual input into the appropriate motor output. In this study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the entire brain to determine the patterns of activation that occurred while subjects performed a visually guided motor task. In nine human subjects, fMRI data were acquired on a 4-T whole-body MR system equipped with a head gradient coil and a birdcage RF coil using aT*2-weighted EPI sequence. Functional activation was determined for three different tasks: (1) a visuomotor task consisting of moving a cursor on a screen with a joystick in relation to various targets, (2) a hand movement task consisting of moving the joystick without visual input, and (3) a eye movement task consisting of moving the eyes alone without visual input. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast-based activation maps of each subject were generated using period cross-correlation statistics. Subsequently, each subject's brain was normalized to Talairach coordinates, and the individual maps were compared on a pixel by pixel basis. Significantly activated pixels common to at least four out of six subjects were retained to construct the final functional image. The pattern of activation during visually guided movements was consistent with the flow of information from striate and extrastriate visual areas, to the posterior parietal complex, and then to frontal motor areas. The extensive activation of this network and the reproducibility among subjects is consistent with a role for the dorsal stream in transforming visual information into motor behavior. Also extensively activated were the medial and lateral cerebellar structures, implicating the cortico

  17. The influence of contrast media on kidney function in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Simon Bertram; Harutyunyan, Marina; Mygind, Naja Dam

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the incidence of contrast media-induced nephropathy (CIN) in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) referred for elective coronary intervention following hydration routines. The reversibility of CIN was followed in a 6 month-period. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total...... coronary interventions. Kidney function and the amount of contrast media used was not a predictor of CIN development. The induced CIN was not completely normalized in a 6-month follow-up period....

  18. Can mental imagery functional magnetic resonance imaging predict recovery in patients with disorders of consciousness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Dominik; Markl, Alexandra; Yu, Tao; Kotchoubey, Boris; Lang, Simone; Müller, Friedemann

    2013-10-01

    To determine the potential prognostic value of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify patients with disorders of consciousness, who show potential for recovery. Observational study. Unit for acute rehabilitation care. Patients (N=22) in a vegetative state (VS; n=10) and minimally conscious state (MCS; n=12) during the first 200 days after the initial incident. Not applicable. Further course on the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised. Participants performed a mental imagery fMRI paradigm. They were asked to alternately imagine playing tennis and navigating through their home. In 14 of the 22 examined patients (VS, n=5; MCS, n=9), a significant activation of the regions of interest (ROIs) of the mental imagery paradigm could be found. All 5 patients with activation of a significant blood oxygen level dependent signal, who were in a VS at the time of the fMRI examination, reached at least an MCS at the end of the observation period. In contrast, 5 participants in a VS who failed to show activation in ROIs, did not (sensitivity 100%, specificity 100%). Six of 9 patients in an MCS with activation in ROIs emerged from an MCS. Of 3 patients in an MCS who did not show activation, 2 patients stayed in an MCS and 1 patient emerged from the MCS (sensitivity 85%, specificity 40%). The fMRI paradigm mental imagery displays a high concordance with the further clinical course of patients in a VS. All 5 patients in a VS who showed significant activation of ROIs had a favorable further course until the end of the observation period. We therefore propose the term "functional minimally conscious state" for these patients. They may benefit from rehabilitation treatment. In cases where no significant activation was seen, the method has no prognostic value. Prediction of the clinical course of patients in an MCS by fMRI was considerably less accurate than in patients in a VS. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  19. Carbondioxide-Aided Angiography Decreases Contrast Volume and Preserves Kidney Function in Peripheral Vascular Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Emilia; Tegtmeier, Catharina; Bimpong-Buta, Nana Yaw; Sansone, Roberto; Uhlenbruch, Mark; Richter, Andreas; Stegemann, Berthold; Roden, Michael; Westenfeld, Ralf; Kelm, Malte; Heiss, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a common comorbidity in patients with peripheral artery disease. We investigated the safety and efficacy of carbon dioxide (CO2) as supplemental contrast agent to decrease contrast volume during fluoroscopy-guided peripheral vascular procedures in routine angiological practice. We analyzed 191 consecutive interventions of the lower extremity in claudicants and critical limb ischemia (CLI) that were performed with iodinated contrast media (ICM) alone (n = 154) or with the aided or exclusive use of CO2 (n = 37). The technical success rate, total irradiation, and intervention time were not significantly different between ICM and CO2 No severe procedure-related complications occurred. The contrast volume was lower in CO2 than in ICM. Although kidney function, creatinine, and estimated glomerular filtration rate was lower in CO2 at baseline, the incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy was lower in CO2 compared to ICM. These data support CO2 as an alternative supplemental contrast agent that can be applied safely and efficiently to lower contrast volume during peripheral vascular interventions preventing kidney dysfunction even in patients with disease of the popliteal artery and below the knee and CLI. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Effects of iodinated contrast media on renal function in patients with multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, H.M.

    1980-01-01

    Case histories of 89 patients with definite myoloma of the years 1959 to 1974 were investigated in a retrospective study. 41 intravenous urographies were carried out in 31 of these patients. There was no correlation between deterioration of the renal function and contrast medium application. Relevant literature on the subject has been compiled. By 1979, 19 case studies and 5 general studies had been published which have been summarized in tables in the present study. Analyses of these case histories have shown that acute renal failure was often due to other causes and not to contrast medium application. If these cases are left out of account 8 cases remain in which lethal renal failure occurred after intravenous urography of myeloma patients. The diiodinated contrast media formerly used was less well tolerated than the present triiodinated contrast media. Further risk factors were dehydratation and/or abdominal compression. Both measures are no longer employed in intravenous urography. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Modified Sigmoid Function Based Gray Scale Image Contrast Enhancement Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Harish Kumar; Pal, Sandeep

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of an image enhancement is to improve eminence by maximizing the information content in the test image. Conventional contrast enhancement techniques either often fails to produce reasonable results for a broad variety of low-contrast and high contrast images, or cannot be automatically applied to different images, because they are parameters dependent. Hence this paper introduces a novel hybrid image enhancement approach by taking both the local and global information of an image. In the present work, sigmoid function is being modified on the basis of contrast of the images. The gray image enhancement problem is treated as nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints and solved by particle swarm optimization. The entropy and edge information is included in the objective function as quality measure of an image. The effectiveness of modified sigmoid function based enhancement over conventional methods namely linear contrast stretching, histogram equalization, and adaptive histogram equalization are better revealed by the enhanced images and further validated by statistical analysis of these images.

  2. Attenuation of cortical activity triggering descending pain inhibition in chronic low back pain patients: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yohei; Kurata, Jiro; Sekiguchi, Miho; Yoshida, Katsuhiro; Nikaido, Takuya; Konno, Shin-Ichi

    2017-08-01

    A considerable portion of chronic low back pain (cLBP) patients lack anatomical abnormality, resist conventional therapeutic interventions, and their symptoms are often complicated with psychological and social factors. Such patients have been reported to show cerebral abnormalities both in anatomy and function by neuroimaging studies. Here we examined differences in cerebral reactivity to a simulated low back pain stimulus between cLBP patients and healthy controls by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and their behavioral correlates from a psychophysical questionnaire. Eleven cLBP patients and 13 healthy subjects (HS) were enrolled in this study. After psychophysical evaluation on-going pain with McGill Pain Questionnaire Short Form (MPQ), they underwent whole-brain fMRI in a 3-Tesla MRI scanner while receiving three blocks of 30-s mechanical pain stimuli at the left low back with a 30-s rest in between, followed by a three-dimensional anatomical imaging. Functional images were analyzed with a multi-subject general linear model for blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes associated with pain. Individual BOLD signal amplitudes at activated clusters were examined for correlation with psychophysical variables. Two in the cLBP and five data sets in the HS groups were excluded from analysis because of deficient or artifactual data or mismatch in age. The HS group showed LBP-related activation at the right insular cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and left precuneus; and deactivation in a large area over the parietal and occipital cortices, including the bilateral superior parietal cortex. On the other hand, the cLBP group did not show any significant activation at those cortical areas, but showed similar deactivation at the bilateral superior parietal cortex and part of the premotor area. An HS > cLBP contrast revealed significantly less activity at the ACC and DLPFC in the c

  3. Synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as liver targeting MRI contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Farshad; Fattahi, Bahare; Azizi, Najmodin

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this research was the preparation of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as a liver targeting contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with silica via the Stober method and finally the coated nanoparticles were functionalized with mebrofenin. Formation of crystalline magnetite particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) of the final product showed that silica had been effectively bonded onto the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles and the coated nanoparticles functionalized with mebrofenin. The magnetic resonance imaging of the functional nanoparticles showed that the Fe3O4-SiO2-mebrofenin composite is an effective MRI contrast agent for liver targeting.

  4. Synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as liver targeting MRI contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, Farshad, E-mail: fyazdani@ccerci.ac.ir; Fattahi, Bahare; Azizi, Najmodin

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this research was the preparation of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as a liver targeting contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with silica via the Stober method and finally the coated nanoparticles were functionalized with mebrofenin. Formation of crystalline magnetite particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) of the final product showed that silica had been effectively bonded onto the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles and the coated nanoparticles functionalized with mebrofenin. The magnetic resonance imaging of the functional nanoparticles showed that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–SiO{sub 2}-mebrofenin composite is an effective MRI contrast agent for liver targeting. - Highlights: • Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by simple and economical method. • Preperation of functional MNPs as a MRI contrast agent for liver targeting. • Gaining a good r{sub 2} relaxivity of the coated functional nanoparticles.

  5. System to measure contrast-sensitivity function with a scanning-laser ophthalmoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frambach, Donald A.; Sebag, Jerry; Lawton, Terry; Sadun, Alfredo

    1994-06-01

    A scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) employs an extremely low power laser that is focused to a 10 micron spot on the human retina and scanned across the retina at the same rate and pattern that an electron beam travels across a television screen. An image is acquired by measuring the retina's reflectance along each raster. An acousto-optic modulator, in the path of the laser beam, can be used to write targets directly onto the retina. since the SLO can project targets onto the retina while simultaneously viewing the retina, retinal function at specific locations can be unambiguously assessed. We developed software so that sine wave contrast sensitivity gratings were projected onto subjects' retinas with contrasts ranging from 0 to 63.5%. Subjects determined whether the gratings tilted 45 degree(s) to the right or 45 degree(s) to the left. A staircase protocol using 6 reversals was employed to determine contrast sensitivity at each spatial frequency. In early work with the system, 16 eyes of 11 normal subjects were tested. For 8 eyes the intraclass correlation coefficient of reliability was 0.85. This system yields reproducible measures of contrast sensitivity. It may have advantages over other methods to measure contrast sensitivity because the location of tested retina can be unambiguously assessed and illumination levels from the instrument directly measured and controlled. In addition, the small entrance pupil of the SLO can reduce the effects of cataracts measurements of contrast sensitivity.

  6. Image contrast enhancement through regional application of partitioned iterated function systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsouri, Georgia D.; Economopoulos, Theodore L.; Matsopoulos, George K.

    2013-01-01

    A new technique is presented for enhancing the contrast in digital images, combining the theory of partitioned iterated function system (PIFS) and image segmentation. The image is first segmented through the region growing segmentation technique, and the PIFS enhancement algorithm is applied separately to each image segment. The defined PIFS of each section is modeled by a contractive transformation, which consists of an affine spatial transform, as well as the linear transform of the graylevels of image segment pixels. The transformation of the graylevels is determined by two parameters that adjust the brightness and contrast of the transformed image segment. After the PIFS algorithm is applied to each extracted image segment, a lowpass version of the original image is created. The contrast-enhanced image is obtained by suitably combining the original image with its lowpass version. The proposed regional PIFS approach was applied to numerous test images, ranging from medical data of various modalities to standard images. The obtained quantitative and qualitative results showed superior performance on behalf of the proposed method when compared with three other widely used contrast enhancement methods, namely, contrast stretching, unsharp masking, and contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization.

  7. Microvascular resistance in response to iodinated contrast media in normal and functionally impaired kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Osamu; Takano, Masamichi; Uchiyama, Saori; Fukuizumi, Isamu; Shimura, Tetsuro; Matsushita, Masato; Komiyama, Hidenori; Inami, Toru; Murakami, Daisuke; Munakata, Ryo; Ohba, Takayoshi; Hata, Noritake; Seino, Yoshihiko; Shimizu, Wataru

    2015-12-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is considered to result from intrarenal vasoconstriction, and occurs more frequently in impaired than in normal kidneys. It was hypothesized that iodinated contrast media would markedly change renal blood flow and vascular resistance in functionally impaired kidneys. Thirty-six patients were enrolled (32 men; mean age, 75.3 ± 7.6 years) undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography and were divided into two groups based on the presence of chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of contrast media. The APV and the RI were positively and inversely correlated with the eGFR at baseline, respectively (APV, R = 0.545, P = 0.001; RI, R = -0.627, P contrast media administration in the non-CKD group, but not in the CKD group (APV, P = 0.258; RI, P = 0.707). Although renal arterial resistance was higher in patients with CKD, it was not affected by contrast media administration, suggesting that patients with CKD could have an attenuated response to contrast media. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology Published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Contrasting biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships in phylogenetic and functional diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steudel, Bastian; Hallmann, Christine; Lorenz, Maike; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Prinz, Kathleen; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Martini, Johannes W R; Kessler, Michael

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that ecosystem functioning is positively influenced by biodiversity. Most biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiments have measured biodiversity based on species richness or phylogenetic relationships. However, theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that ecosystem functioning should be more closely related to functional diversity than to species richness. We applied different metrics of biodiversity in an artificial biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiment using 64 species of green microalgae in combinations of two to 16 species. We found that phylogenetic and functional diversity were positively correlated with biomass overyield, driven by their strong correlation with species richness. At low species richness, no significant correlation between overyield and functional and phylogenetic diversity was found. However, at high species richness (16 species), we found a positive relationship of overyield with functional diversity and a negative relationship with phylogenetic diversity. We show that negative phylogenetic diversity-ecosystem functioning relationships can result from interspecific growth inhibition. The opposing performances of facilitation (functional diversity) and inhibition (phylogenetic diversity) we observed at the 16 species level suggest that phylogenetic diversity is not always a good proxy for functional diversity and that results from experiments with low species numbers may underestimate negative species interactions. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Renal function, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and other adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canga, Ana; Kislikova, Maria; Martínez-Gálvez, María; Arias, Mercedes; Fraga-Rivas, Patricia; Poyatos, Cecilio; de Francisco, Angel L M

    2014-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder that affects patients with impaired renal function and is associated with the administration of gadolinium-based contrast media used in MRI. Despite being in a group of drugs that were considered safe, report about this potentially serious adverse reaction was a turning point in the administration guidelines of these contrast media. There has been an attempt to establish safety parameters to identify patients with risk factors of renal failure. The close pharmacovigilance and strict observation of current regulations, with special attention being paid to the value of glomerular filtration, have reduced the published cases involving the use of gadolinium-based contrast media. In a meeting between radiologists and nephrologists we reviewed the most relevant aspects currently and recommendations for its prevention.

  10. Taxonomic and functional composition of arthropod assemblages across contrasting Amazonian forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarre, Greg P A; Hérault, Bruno; Fine, Paul V A; Vedel, Vincent; Lupoli, Roland; Mesones, Italo; Baraloto, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Arthropods represent most of global biodiversity, with the highest diversity found in tropical rain forests. Nevertheless, we have a very incomplete understanding of how tropical arthropod communities are assembled. We conducted a comprehensive mass sampling of arthropod communities within three major habitat types of lowland Amazonian rain forest, including terra firme clay, white-sand and seasonally flooded forests in Peru and French Guiana. We examined how taxonomic and functional composition (at the family level) differed across these habitat types in the two regions. The overall arthropod community composition exhibited strong turnover among habitats and between regions. In particular, seasonally flooded forest habitats of both regions comprised unique assemblages. Overall, 17·7% (26 of 147) of arthropod families showed significant preferences for a particular habitat type. We present a first reproducible arthropod functional classification among the 147 taxa based on similarity among 21 functional traits describing feeding source, major mouthparts and microhabitats inhabited by each taxon. We identified seven distinct functional groups whose relative abundance contrasted strongly across the three habitats, with sap and leaf feeders showing higher abundances in terra firme clay forest. Our novel arthropod functional classification provides an important complement to link these contrasting patterns of composition to differences in forest functioning across geographical and environmental gradients. This study underlines that both environment and biogeographical processes are responsible for driving arthropod taxonomic composition while environmental filtering is the main driver of the variance in functional composition. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  11. Community, trophic structure and functioning in two contrasting Laminaria hyperborea forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Jean-Charles; Riera, Pascal; Laurans, Martial; Leroux, Cédric; Lévêque, Laurent; Davoult, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide kelp forests have been the focus of several studies concerning ecosystem dysfunction in the past decades. Multifactorial kelp threats have been described and include deforestation due to human impact, cascading effects and climate change. Here, we compared community and trophic structure in two contrasting kelp forests off the coasts of Brittany. One has been harvested five years before sampling and shelters abundant omnivorous predators, almost absent from the other, which has been treated as preserved from kelp harvest. δ15N analyses conducted on the overall communities were linked to the tropho-functional structure of different strata featuring these forests (stipe and holdfast of canopy kelp and rock). Our results yielded site-to-site differences of community and tropho-functional structures across kelp strata, particularly contrasting in terms of biomass on the understorey. Similarly, isotope analyses inferred the top trophic position of Marthasterias glacialis and Echinus esculentus which may be considered as strong interactors in the sub-canopy. We interrogate these patterns and propose a series of probable and testable alternative hypotheses to explain them. For instance, we propose that differences of trophic structure and functioning result from confounded effects of contrasting wave dissipation depending on kelp size-density structure and community cascading involving these omnivorous predators. Given the species diversity and complexity of food web highlighted in these habitats, we call for further comprehensive research about the overall strata and tropho-functional groups for conservation management in kelp forests.

  12. Contrasting responses of functional diversity to major losses in taxonomic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edie, Stewart M; Jablonski, David; Valentine, James W

    2018-01-23

    Taxonomic diversity of benthic marine invertebrate shelf species declines at present by nearly an order of magnitude from the tropics to the poles in each hemisphere along the latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG), most steeply along the western Pacific where shallow-sea diversity is at its tropical maximum. In the Bivalvia, a model system for macroevolution and macroecology, this taxonomic trend is accompanied by a decline in the number of functional groups and an increase in the evenness of taxa distributed among those groups, with maximum functional evenness (FE) in polar waters of both hemispheres. In contrast, analyses of this model system across the two era-defining events of the Phanerozoic, the Permian-Triassic and Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinctions, show only minor declines in functional richness despite high extinction intensities, resulting in a rise in FE owing to the persistence of functional groups. We hypothesize that the spatial decline of taxonomic diversity and increase in FE along the present-day LDG primarily reflect diversity-dependent factors, whereas retention of almost all functional groups through the two mass extinctions suggests the operation of diversity-independent factors. Comparative analyses of different aspects of biodiversity thus reveal strongly contrasting biological consequences of similarly severe declines in taxonomic diversity and can help predict the consequences for functional diversity among different drivers of past, present, and future biodiversity loss.

  13. Resist-based measurement of contrast transfer function in a 0.3-NA microfield optic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, Jason P.; Naulleau, Patrick; Spanos, Costas J.

    2005-01-01

    Although extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography offers the possibility of very high-resolution patterning, the projection optics must be of extremely high quality in order to meet this potential. One key metric of the projection optic quality is the contrast transfer function (CTF), which is a measure of the aerial image contrast as a function of pitch. A static microfield exposure tool based on the 0.3-NA MET optic and operating at a wavelength of 13.5 nm has been installed at the Advanced Light Source, a synchrotron facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This tool provides a platform for a wide variety of research into EUV lithography. In this work we present resist-based measurements of the contrast transfer function for the MET optic. These measurements are based upon line/space patterns printed in several different EUV photoresists. The experimental results are compared with the CTF in aerial-image simulations using the aberrations measured in the projection optic using interferometry. In addition, the CTF measurements are conducted for both bright-field and dark-field mask patterns. Finally, the orientation dependence of the CTF is measured in order to evaluate the effect of non-rotationally symmetric lens aberrations. These measurements provide valuable information in interpreting the results of other experiments performed using the MET and similar systems

  14. The value of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD MR imaging in differentiation of renal solid mass and grading of renal cell carcinoma (RCC: analysis based on the largest cross-sectional area versus the entire whole tumour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Yu Wu

    Full Text Available To study the value of assessing renal masses using different methods in parameter approaches and to determine whether BOLD MRI is helpful in differentiating RCC from benign renal masses, differentiating clear-cell RCC from renal masses other than clear-cell RCC and determining the tumour grade.Ninety-five patients with 139 renal masses (93 malignant and 46 benign who underwent abdominal BOLD MRI were enrolled. R2* values were derived from the largest cross-section (R2*largest and from the whole tumour (R2*whole. Intra-observer and inter-observer agreements were analysed based on two measurements by the same observer and the first measurement from each observer, respectively, and these agreements are reported with intra-class correlation coefficients and 95% confidence intervals. The diagnostic value of the R2* value in the evaluation was assessed with receiver-operating characteristic analysis.The intra-observer agreement was very good for R2*largest and R2*whole (all > 0.8. The inter-observer agreement of R2*whole (0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.69~0.79 was good and was significantly improved compared with the R2*largest (0.61, 95% confidence interval: 0.52~0.68, as there was no overlap in the 95% confidence interval of the intra-class correlation coefficients. The diagnostic value in differentiating renal cell carcinoma from benign lesions with R2*whole (AUC=0.79/0.78[observer1/observer2] and R2*largest (AUC=0.75[observer1] was good and significantly higher (p=0.01 for R2*largest[observer2] vs R2*whole[observer2], p 0.7 and were not significantly different (p=0.89/0.93 for R2*largest vs R2*whole[observer1/observer2], 0.96 for R2*whole[observer1] vs R2*largest[observer2] and 0.96 for R2*whole [observer2] vs R2*largest[observer1].BOLD MRI could provide a feasible parameter for differentiating renal cell carcinoma from benign renal masses and for predicting clear-cell renal cell carcinoma grading. Compared with the largest cross-section, assessing the whole tumour provides better inter-observer agreement in parameter measurement for differentiating renal cell carcinoma from benign renal masses.

  15. Development of New Contrast Agents for Imaging Function and Metabolism by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Carvalho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes are interesting nanosystems with a wide range of medical application. One particular application is their ability to enhance contrast in magnetic resonance images; when properly loaded with magnetic/superparamagnetic nanoparticles, this means to act as contrast agents. The design of liposomes loaded with magnetic particles, magnetoliposomes, presents a large number of possibilities depending on the application from image function to metabolism. More interesting is its double function application as theranostics (diagnostics and therapy. The synthesis, characterization, and possible medical applications of two types of magnetoliposomes are reviewed. Their performance will be compared, in particular, their efficiency as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, measured by their relaxivities r 1 and r 2 relating to their particular composition. One of the magnetoliposomes had 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (soy as the main phospholipid component, with and without cholesterol, varying its phospholipid to cholesterol molar ratios. The other formulation is a long-circulating liposome composed of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (egg, cholesterol, and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoethanolamine- N -[methoxy(polyethylene glycol-2000]. Both nanosystems were loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different sizes and coatings.

  16. Functional analysis of third ventriculostomy patency with phase-contrast MRI velocity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev, S.; Bhadelia, R.A.; Estin, D.; Heilman, C.B.; Wolpert, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to explore the utility of cine phase-contrast MRI velocity measurements in determining the functional status of third ventriculostomies, and to correlate the quantitative velocity data with clinical follow-up. We examined six patients with third ventriculostomies and 12 normal subjects by phase-contrast MRI. The maximum craniocaudal to maximum caudocranial velocity range was measured at regions of interest near the third ventricular floor, and in cerebrospinal fluid anterior to the upper pons and spinal cord on midline sagittal images. Ratios of the velocities of both the third ventricle and prepontine space to the space anterior to the spinal cord were obtained. The velocities near the third ventricular floor and in the pontine cistern were significantly higher in patients than in normal subjects, but the velocity anterior to the spinal cord was similar between the groups. The velocity ratios, used to normalize individual differences, were also higher in patients than in controls. Two patients had lower velocity ratios than their fellows at the third ventricular floor and in the pontine cistern; one required a shunt 11 months later, while in the other, who had a third ventricular/thalamic tumor, the lower values probably reflect distortion of the third ventricular floor. We conclude that phase-contrast MR velocity measurements, specifically the velocity ratio between the high pontine cistern and the space anterior to the spinal cord, can help determine the functional status of third ventriculostomies. (orig.)

  17. Effects of detomidine on equine oesophageal function as studied by contrast radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, T.D.G.; Sullivan, M.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of sedation with detomidine on oesophageal function were assessed by contrast radiography in 10 healthy adult thoroughbred horses. Barium swallows were monitored by means of image intensification, first without sedation and then after the intravenous administration of detomidine at doses of 10 and 20 micrograms/kg bodyweight. The transit time of contrast agent to the oesophageal hiatus was recorded and each swallow was scored for markers of oesophageal dysfunction. Analysis of the data indicated that there were highly significant dose dependent increases in the transit time, the retention of barium within the longitudinal mucosal folds, and retrograde peristalsis and pooling of contrast agent within the oesophagus at both the thoracic inlet and caudal to the base of the heart. The degree of gastrooesophageal reflux was not affected at either dosage. These changes in oesophageal function were similar to those recorded from cases of grass sickness and indicate that care should be taken in the interpretation of studies of swallowing in animals that have been given detomidine before a radiographic examination

  18. Designing a new test for contrast sensitivity function measurement with iPad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vallejo, Manuel; Remón, Laura; Monsoriu, Juan A; Furlan, Walter D

    2015-01-01

    To introduce a new application (ClinicCSF) to measure Contrast Sensitivity Function (CSF) with tablet devices, and to compare it against the Functional Acuity Contrast Test (FACT). A total of 42 subjects were arranged in two groups of 21 individuals. Different versions of the ClinicCSF (.v1 and .v2) were used to measure the CSF of each group with the same iPad and the results were compared with those measured with the FACT. The agreements between ClinicCSF and FACT for spatial frequencies of 3, 6, 12 and 18 cycles per degree (cpd) were represented by Bland-Altman plots. Statistically significant differences in CSF of both groups were found due to the change of the ClinicCSF version (piPad retina showed no significant differences with FACT test when the same contrast sensitivity steps were used. In addition, it is shown that the accurateness of a vision screening could be improved with the use of an appropriate psychophysical method. Copyright © 2014 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimization of Photosynthetic Productivity in Contrasting Environments by Regulons Controlling Plant Form and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Demmig-Adams

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We review the role of a family of transcription factors and their regulons in maintaining high photosynthetic performance across a range of challenging environments with a focus on extreme temperatures and water availability. Specifically, these transcription factors include CBFs (C-repeat binding factors and DREBs (dehydration-responsive element-binding, with CBF/DREB1 primarily orchestrating cold adaptation and other DREBs serving in heat, drought, and salinity adaptation. The central role of these modulators in plant performance under challenging environments is based on (i interweaving of these regulators with other key signaling networks (plant hormones and redox signals as well as (ii their function in integrating responses across the whole plant, from light-harvesting and sugar-production in the leaf to foliar sugar export and water import and on to the plant’s sugar-consuming sinks (growth, storage, and reproduction. The example of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes from geographic origins with contrasting climates is used to describe the links between natural genetic variation in CBF transcription factors and the differential acclimation of plant anatomical and functional features needed to support superior photosynthetic performance in contrasting environments. Emphasis is placed on considering different temperature environments (hot versus cold and light environments (limiting versus high light, on trade-offs between adaptations to contrasting environments, and on plant lines minimizing such trade-offs.

  20. Assessing sensory versus optogenetic network activation by combining (o)fMRI with optical Ca2+ recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Florian; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Schwalm, Miriam; Prouvot, Pierre-Hugues; Jubal, Eduardo Rosales; Fois, Consuelo; Pramanik, Gautam; Zimmer, Claus; Stroh, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Encoding of sensory inputs in the cortex is characterized by sparse neuronal network activation. Optogenetic stimulation has previously been combined with fMRI (ofMRI) to probe functional networks. However, for a quantitative optogenetic probing of sensory-driven sparse network activation, the level of similarity between sensory and optogenetic network activation needs to be explored. Here, we complement ofMRI with optic fiber-based population Ca2+ recordings for a region-specific readout of neuronal spiking activity in rat brain. Comparing Ca2+ responses to the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal upon sensory stimulation with increasing frequencies showed adaptation of Ca2+ transients contrasted by an increase of blood oxygenation level-dependent responses, indicating that the optical recordings convey complementary information on neuronal network activity to the corresponding hemodynamic response. To study the similarity of optogenetic and sensory activation, we quantified the density of cells expressing channelrhodopsin-2 and modeled light propagation in the tissue. We estimated the effectively illuminated volume and numbers of optogenetically stimulated neurons, being indicative of sparse activation. At the functional level, upon either sensory or optogenetic stimulation we detected single-peak short-latency primary Ca2+ responses with similar amplitudes and found that blood oxygenation level-dependent responses showed similar time courses. These data suggest that ofMRI can serve as a representative model for functional brain mapping. PMID:26661247

  1. Assessing sensory versus optogenetic network activation by combining (o)fMRI with optical Ca2+ recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Florian; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Schwalm, Miriam; Prouvot, Pierre-Hugues; Jubal, Eduardo Rosales; Fois, Consuelo; Pramanik, Gautam; Zimmer, Claus; Faber, Cornelius; Stroh, Albrecht

    2016-11-01

    Encoding of sensory inputs in the cortex is characterized by sparse neuronal network activation. Optogenetic stimulation has previously been combined with fMRI (ofMRI) to probe functional networks. However, for a quantitative optogenetic probing of sensory-driven sparse network activation, the level of similarity between sensory and optogenetic network activation needs to be explored. Here, we complement ofMRI with optic fiber-based population Ca 2+ recordings for a region-specific readout of neuronal spiking activity in rat brain. Comparing Ca 2+ responses to the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal upon sensory stimulation with increasing frequencies showed adaptation of Ca 2+ transients contrasted by an increase of blood oxygenation level-dependent responses, indicating that the optical recordings convey complementary information on neuronal network activity to the corresponding hemodynamic response. To study the similarity of optogenetic and sensory activation, we quantified the density of cells expressing channelrhodopsin-2 and modeled light propagation in the tissue. We estimated the effectively illuminated volume and numbers of optogenetically stimulated neurons, being indicative of sparse activation. At the functional level, upon either sensory or optogenetic stimulation we detected single-peak short-latency primary Ca 2+ responses with similar amplitudes and found that blood oxygenation level-dependent responses showed similar time courses. These data suggest that ofMRI can serve as a representative model for functional brain mapping. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Multiscale finite element methods for high-contrast problems using local spectral basis functions

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we study multiscale finite element methods (MsFEMs) using spectral multiscale basis functions that are designed for high-contrast problems. Multiscale basis functions are constructed using eigenvectors of a carefully selected local spectral problem. This local spectral problem strongly depends on the choice of initial partition of unity functions. The resulting space enriches the initial multiscale space using eigenvectors of local spectral problem. The eigenvectors corresponding to small, asymptotically vanishing, eigenvalues detect important features of the solutions that are not captured by initial multiscale basis functions. Multiscale basis functions are constructed such that they span these eigenfunctions that correspond to small, asymptotically vanishing, eigenvalues. We present a convergence study that shows that the convergence rate (in energy norm) is proportional to (H/Λ*)1/2, where Λ* is proportional to the minimum of the eigenvalues that the corresponding eigenvectors are not included in the coarse space. Thus, we would like to reach to a larger eigenvalue with a smaller coarse space. This is accomplished with a careful choice of initial multiscale basis functions and the setup of the eigenvalue problems. Numerical results are presented to back-up our theoretical results and to show higher accuracy of MsFEMs with spectral multiscale basis functions. We also present a hierarchical construction of the eigenvectors that provides CPU savings. © 2010.

  3. Application of a logistic function to the analysis of contrast-detail curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumma, C.G.; Prince, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A general logistic function has been applied to the regression analysis of radioscintigraphic contrast-detail (CD) curves obtained in the authors' laboratory and to previously published results in assorted imaging modalities. Regression analysis is based on the logistic function: d/sub min/ = d/sub min//sup sat/(1 - EXP - (K + CX)), where d/sub min/ is the minimum perceptible detail diameter at a primary contrast X, and d/sub min//sup sat/ is the saturation value of d/sub min/. K and C are regression parameters. Logistic regression in assorted imaging modalities yielded r 2 values ranging from 0.95 to 0.99. A figure of merit (FOM), the area under the CD curve (AUC), is obtained by integrating the logistic function over mathematically and clinically acceptable limits. For count densities of 200 countscm 2 and 1,000 countscm 2 , the AUC differed approximately by a factor of 2. Thus, the AUC may be a sensitive FOM

  4. Effect on renal function of an iso-osmolar contrast agent in patients with monoclonal gammopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preda, Lorenzo; Agazzi, Alberto; Martinelli, Giovanni; Raimondi, Sara; Lanfranchi, Carla Federica; Passerini, Rita; Calvetta, Albania; Bellomi, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    To assess the safety of the non-ionic iso-osmolar contrast agent iodixanol on renal function in patients with monoclonal gammopathies undergoing CT. We explored the effect of iodixanol on renal function in 30 patients with monoclonal gammopathies and 20 oncological patients with a normal electrophoretic profile (control group). The parameters used to estimate renal function were: serum creatinine, eGFR (determined 24 h before and 48 h after the administration of iodixanol), and urinary excretion of Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL) determined 2 h and 24 h after. Serum creatinine was also determined 1 month after the administration of iodixanol. No significant increase in serum creatinine values were observed in the monoclonal gammopathies group and in 19/20 patients in the control group. Only 1 patient in the control group developed a transient contrast agent-induced nephropathy. We found no statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding the percentage variation from baseline values of serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, NGAL 2 h after, and eGFR. Whereas NGAL at 24 h showed a statistically significant increase in patients with Monoclonal gammopathies. The use of iodixanol appears to be safe in patients with monoclonal gammopathies and an eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 mq. (orig.)

  5. Effect on renal function of an iso-osmolar contrast agent in patients with monoclonal gammopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preda, Lorenzo [Division of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); Agazzi, Alberto; Martinelli, Giovanni [Division of Haematology, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); Raimondi, Sara [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Occupational Medicin ' ' Clinica del Lavoro Luigi Devoto' ' Section of Medical Statistics and Biometry ' ' GA Maccacaro' ' , Milan (Italy); Lanfranchi, Carla Federica [University of Milan, IRCCS, School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); Passerini, Rita [Unit of Laboratory Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); Calvetta, Albania [Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, Istituto Clinico Humanitas, IRCCS, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Bellomi, Massimo [Division of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, IRCCS, School of Medicine, Milan (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    To assess the safety of the non-ionic iso-osmolar contrast agent iodixanol on renal function in patients with monoclonal gammopathies undergoing CT. We explored the effect of iodixanol on renal function in 30 patients with monoclonal gammopathies and 20 oncological patients with a normal electrophoretic profile (control group). The parameters used to estimate renal function were: serum creatinine, eGFR (determined 24 h before and 48 h after the administration of iodixanol), and urinary excretion of Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL) determined 2 h and 24 h after. Serum creatinine was also determined 1 month after the administration of iodixanol. No significant increase in serum creatinine values were observed in the monoclonal gammopathies group and in 19/20 patients in the control group. Only 1 patient in the control group developed a transient contrast agent-induced nephropathy. We found no statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding the percentage variation from baseline values of serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, NGAL 2 h after, and eGFR. Whereas NGAL at 24 h showed a statistically significant increase in patients with Monoclonal gammopathies. The use of iodixanol appears to be safe in patients with monoclonal gammopathies and an eGFR {>=} 60 ml/min/1.73 mq. (orig.)

  6. [Iodinated contrast in pregnant women and neonatal thyroid function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, P; Terral, D; Colombier, M; Mulliez, A; Suarez, C; Brunhes, A; Gallot, D

    2016-12-01

    There is a theoretical risk for neonatal hypothyroidism after prenatal exposure to iodinated contrast media. Current recommendations are in favour of neonatal thyroid function assessment. Our aim was to check if recommendations were observed, and if neonatal evaluation demonstrated anomalies. Over the period from 01/01/2010 to 01/08/2015, maternal and newborn records were retrospectively reviewed. All pregnant women who underwent a computed tomography and their newborns were included. We collected thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroxine (T4) and tri-iodothyronine (T3) levels. A total of 101 maternal and newborn records were reviewed. Mean gestational age at CT scan was 29.3±7.2 weeks. The mean dose of total iodine administered was 82.6±19.1mL. Only 21 newborns had a biological analysis (20.8%). All newborns had normal TSH and T4 levels at birth. Only 7 newborns had a T3 level above the upper threshold value, but according to expert opinion none have been considered pathological. Our study revealed that recommendations for neonatal thyroid function assessment after prenatal exposure to iodinated contrast media were not observed. This exposure seemed unlikely to have an important effect on thyroid function at birth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy of neural vision therapy to enhance contrast sensitivity function and visual acuity in low myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Donald T H; Fong, Allan

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of neural vision enhancement technology (NVC, NeuroVision, Inc.) to improve visual acuity and contrast sensitivity function in eyes with low myopia. Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore, Singapore. This noncomparative interventional case series comprised 20 Asian adults between 19 and 53 years of age with low myopia (cycloplegic spherical equivalence [SE] from -0.5 diopter [D] to -1.5 D in the worst eye; astigmatism not exceeding 0.5 D in either eye; uncorrected visual acuity [UCVA] myopia.

  8. Cognitive control associated with irritability induction: an autobiographical recall fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Carlos T; Almeida, Jorge R C; Sato, João R; Gorenstein, Clarice; Gentil, Valentim; Leite, Claudia C; Amaro, Edson; Busatto, Geraldo F

    2010-06-01

    Despite the relevance of irritability emotions to the treatment, prognosis and classification of psychiatric disorders, the neurobiological basis of this emotional state has been rarely investigated to date. We assessed the brain circuitry underlying personal script-driven irritability in healthy subjects (n = 11) using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes were recorded during auditory presentation of personal scripts of irritability in contrast to scripts of happiness or neutral emotional content. Self-rated emotional measurements and skin conductance recordings were also obtained. Images were acquired using a 1,5T magnetic resonance scanner. Brain activation maps were constructed from individual images, and between-condition differences in the mean power of experimental response were identified by using cluster-wise nonparametric tests. Compared to neutral scripts, increased blood oxygen level-dependent signal during irritability scripts was detected in the left subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, and in the left medial, anterolateral and posterolateral dorsal prefrontal cortex (cluster-wise p-value < 0.05). While the involvement of the subgenual cingulate and dorsal anterolateral prefrontal cortices was unique to the irritability state, increased blood oxygen level-dependent signal in dorsomedial and dorsal posterolateral prefrontal regions were also present during happiness induction. Irritability induction is associated with functional changes in a limited set of brain regions previously implicated in the mediation of emotional states. Changes in prefrontal and cingulate areas may be related to effortful cognitive control aspects that gain salience during the emergence of irritability.

  9. Comparison of arterial input functions measured from ultra-fast dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and dynamic contrast enhanced computed tomography in prostate cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyang; Lu, Zhengfeng; Fan, Xiaobing; Medved, Milica; Jiang, Xia; Sammet, Steffen; Yousuf, Ambereen; Pineda, Federico; Oto, Aytekin; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of arterial input functions (AIFs) measured from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI following a low dose of contrast media injection. The AIFs measured from DCE computed tomography (CT) were used as ‘gold standard’. A total of twenty patients received CT and MRI scans on the same day. Patients received 120 ml Iohexol in DCE-CT and a low dose of (0.015 mM kg-1) of gadobenate dimeglumine in DCE-MRI. The AIFs were measured in the iliac artery and normalized to the CT and MRI contrast agent doses. To correct for different temporal resolution and sampling periods of CT and MRI, an empirical mathematical model (EMM) was used to fit the AIFs first. Then numerical AIFs (AIFCT and AIFMRI) were calculated based on fitting parameters. The AIFMRI was convolved with a ‘contrast agent injection’ function (AIFMRICON ) to correct for the difference between MRI and CT contrast agent injection times (~1.5 s versus 30 s). The results show that the EMMs accurately fitted AIFs measured from CT and MRI. There was no significant difference (p  >  0.05) between the maximum peak amplitude of AIFs from CT (22.1  ±  4.1 mM/dose) and MRI after convolution (22.3  ±  5.2 mM/dose). The shapes of the AIFCT and AIFMRICON were very similar. Our results demonstrated that AIFs can be accurately measured by MRI following low dose contrast agent injection.

  10. Simultaneous inferences on the contrast of two hazard functions with censored observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Peter B; Wei, L J; Kosorok, Michael R; Clemens, John D

    2002-12-01

    In survival analysis, often times the pattern of instantaneous risk over time is more interesting than that of the cumulative risk. For this case, a nonparametric hazard function estimate is more appropriate for summarizing the risk experience of a group of patients than the corresponding Kaplan-Meier estimate. In comparing a new treatment with a standard therapy, it is important to know if the treatment loses it potency during the follow-up period, and if it does, one would like to know when it becomes ineffective. Unfortunately, with a plot of the differences of two Kaplan-Meier curves, it is rather difficult to capture such temporal trends. In this article, we propose simple procedures for constructing confidence bands for the contrast of two hazard functions with censored data. The simultaneous interval estimates are quite useful for identifying possible values of the contrast over time with a certain degree of confidence. The new proposals are illustrated with an example and a small simulation study.

  11. Association Between Brain Activation and Functional Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Dardo; Volkow, Nora D

    2018-04-13

    The origin of the "resting-state" brain activity recorded with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is still uncertain. Here we provide evidence for the neurovascular origins of the amplitude of the low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) and the local functional connectivity density (lFCD) by comparing them with task-induced blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses, which are considered a proxy for neuronal activation. Using fMRI data for 2 different tasks (Relational and Social) collected by the Human Connectome Project in 426 healthy adults, we show that ALFF and lFCD have linear associations with the BOLD response. This association was significantly attenuated by a novel task signal regression (TSR) procedure, indicating that task performance enhances lFCD and ALFF in activated regions. We also show that lFCD predicts BOLD activation patterns, as was recently shown for other functional connectivity metrics, which corroborates that resting functional connectivity architecture impacts brain activation responses. Thus, our findings indicate a common source for BOLD responses, ALFF and lFCD, which is consistent with the neurovascular origin of local hemodynamic synchrony presumably reflecting coordinated fluctuations in neuronal activity. This study also supports the development of task-evoked functional connectivity density mapping.

  12. Facile Synthesis of Gd-Functionalized Gold Nanoclusters as Potential MRI/CT Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Le

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Multi-modal imaging plays a key role in the earlier detection of disease. In this work, a facile bioinspired method was developed to synthesize Gd-functionalized gold nanoclusters (Gd-Au NCs. The Gd-Au NCs exhibit a uniform size, with an average size of 5.6 nm in dynamic light scattering (DLS, which is a bit bigger than gold clusters (3.74 nm, DLS, while the fluorescent properties of Gd-Au NCs are almost the same as that of Au NCs. Moreover, the Gd-Au NCs exhibit a high longitudinal relaxivity value (r1 of 22.111 s−1 per mM of Gd in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, which is six times higher than that of commercial Magnevist (A complex of gadolinium with a chelating agent, diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid, Gd-DTPA, r1 = 3.56 mM−1·s−1. Besides, as evaluated by nano single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and computed tomography (CT the Gd-Au NCs have a potential application as CT contrast agents because of the Au element. Finally, the Gd-Au NCs show little cytotoxicity, even when the Au concentration is up to 250 μM. Thus, the Gd-Au NCs can act as multi-modal imaging contrast agents.

  13. Quantitative functional lung imaging with synchrotron radiation using inhaled xenon as contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, S; Le Duc, G; Porra, L; Berruyer, G; Nemoz, C; Monfraix, S; Fiedler, S; Thomlinson, W; Suortti, P; Standertskjöld-Nordenstam, C G; Sovijärvi, A R

    2001-12-01

    Small airways play a key role in the distribution of ventilation and in the matching of ventilation to perfusion. The purpose of this study was to introduce an imaging method that allows measurement of regional lung ventilation and evaluation of the function of airways with a small diameter. The experiments were performed at the Medical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Monochromatic synchrotron radiation beams were used to obtain quantitative respiration-gated images of lungs and airways in two anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated rabbits using inhaled stable xenon (Xe) gas as a contrast agent. Two simultaneous images were acquired at two different energies, above and below the K-edge of Xe. Logarithmic subtraction of the two images yields absolute Xe concentrations. This technique is known as K-edge subtraction (KES) radiography. Two-dimensional planar and CT images were obtained showing spatial distribution of Xe concentrations within the airspaces, as well as the dynamics of filling with Xe. Bronchi down to 1 mm in diameter were visible both in the subtraction radiographs and in tomographic images. Absolute concentrations of Xe gas were calculated within the tube carrying the inhaled gas mixture, small and large bronchi, and lung tissue. Local time constants of ventilation with Xe were obtained by following the evolution of gas concentration in sequential computed tomography images. The results of this first animal study indicate that KES imaging of lungs with Xe gas as a contrast agent has great potential in studies of the distribution of ventilation within the lungs and of airway function, including airways with a small diameter.

  14. Statistically significant contrasts between EMG waveforms revealed using wavelet-based functional ANOVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, J. Lucas; Welch, Torrence D. J.; Vidakovic, Brani

    2013-01-01

    We developed wavelet-based functional ANOVA (wfANOVA) as a novel approach for comparing neurophysiological signals that are functions of time. Temporal resolution is often sacrificed by analyzing such data in large time bins, increasing statistical power by reducing the number of comparisons. We performed ANOVA in the wavelet domain because differences between curves tend to be represented by a few temporally localized wavelets, which we transformed back to the time domain for visualization. We compared wfANOVA and ANOVA performed in the time domain (tANOVA) on both experimental electromyographic (EMG) signals from responses to perturbation during standing balance across changes in peak perturbation acceleration (3 levels) and velocity (4 levels) and on simulated data with known contrasts. In experimental EMG data, wfANOVA revealed the continuous shape and magnitude of significant differences over time without a priori selection of time bins. However, tANOVA revealed only the largest differences at discontinuous time points, resulting in features with later onsets and shorter durations than those identified using wfANOVA (P < 0.02). Furthermore, wfANOVA required significantly fewer (∼¼×; P < 0.015) significant F tests than tANOVA, resulting in post hoc tests with increased power. In simulated EMG data, wfANOVA identified known contrast curves with a high level of precision (r2 = 0.94 ± 0.08) and performed better than tANOVA across noise levels (P < <0.01). Therefore, wfANOVA may be useful for revealing differences in the shape and magnitude of neurophysiological signals (e.g., EMG, firing rates) across multiple conditions with both high temporal resolution and high statistical power. PMID:23100136

  15. Effect of n-acetylcysteine on deranged renal functions in patient receiving non ionic radio contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faisal, A.; Kamal, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) on deranged renal functions in patients receiving non-ionic contrast. Study Design: Quasi- experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted in the Department of Radiology, DHQ Hospital Rawalpindi, RMC and Allied hospitals from August 2011 to January 2012. Methodology: Eighty consecutive patients with deranged renal function tests (RFTs) (creatinine level > 1.3 mg/dl and 50 mg/dl) were included in this study. These patients were advised to take at-least eight sachets of NAC to talling to 1,600 mg (one sachets is 200 mg) within two days with good hydration (6 to 8 glasses of water) prior to Contrast Enhanced Computer Tomographic (CECT) scan. After completion of NAC recommended dose, the RFTs are repeated to confirm the controlled range. The patients are allowed for CECT, if the serum urea level > 50 mg/dl (reference range 0-50 mg/dl) and serum creatinine level < 1.3 mg/dl (reference range 0.2-1.2 mg/dl). Results: The mean age of the patient is 53.98+-15.4 years. The use of NAC extensively improves the serum urea level of 73 out of 80 patients (91.3%) with a significance of 0.0001 to a normal level (<50 mg/dl). Similarly, serum creatinine level of 71 out of 80 patients (88.8%) with a significance of 0.0001 has an improved from reference range ( <=1. 2 mg/dl). Conclusion: Use of NAC resulted in improved serum urea and creatinine levels in the majority of patients. (author)

  16. Notch ligands with contrasting functions: Jagged1 and Delta1 in the mouse inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Rachael; Hozumi, Katsuto; Lewis, Julian

    2006-04-01

    Each of the sensory patches in the epithelium of the inner ear is a mosaic of hair cells and supporting cells. Notch signalling is thought to govern this pattern of differentiation through lateral inhibition. Recent experiments in the chick suggest, however, that Notch signalling also has a prior function - inductive rather than inhibitory - in defining the prosensory patches from which the differentiated cells arise. Several Notch ligands are expressed in each patch, but their individual roles in relation to the two functions of Notch signalling are unclear. We have used a Cre-LoxP approach to knock out two of these ligands, Delta1 (Dll1) and Jagged1 (Jag1), in the mouse ear. In the absence of Dll1, auditory hair cells develop early and in excess, in agreement with the lateral inhibition hypothesis. In the absence of Jag1, by contrast, the total number of these cells is strongly reduced, with complete loss of cochlear outer hair cells and some groups of vestibular hair cells, indicating that Jag1 is required for the prosensory inductive function of Notch. The number of cochlear inner hair cells, however, is almost doubled. This correlates with loss of expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p27(Kip1) (Cdkn1b), suggesting that signalling by Jag1 is also needed to limit proliferation of prosensory cells, and that there is a core part of this population whose prosensory character is established independently of Jag1-Notch signalling. Our findings confirm that Notch signalling in the ear has distinct prosensory and lateral-inhibitory functions, for which different ligands are primarily responsible.

  17. Responses of Contrasting Tree Functional Types to Air Warming and Drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Martínez-Sancho

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Climate change-induced rise of air temperatures and the increase of extreme climatic events, such as droughts, will largely affect plant growth and hydraulics, leading to mortality events all over the globe. In this study, we investigated the growth and hydraulic responses of seedlings of contrasting functional types. Pinus sylvestris, Quercus spp. and Castanea sativa seedlings were grown in a common garden experiment under four treatments: control, air warming, drought and their combination during two consecutive growing periods. Height and diameter increments, stomatal conductance and stem water potentials were measured during both growing seasons. Additionally, hydraulic parameters such as xylem-specific native and maximum hydraulic conductivities, and native percentage of loss of conductivity were measured at the end of the entire experiment. Our results clearly pointed to different adaptive strategies of the studied species. Scots pine displayed a relatively isohydric behavior with a strict stomata control prohibiting native embolism whereas sweet chestnut and oak as relatively anisohydric species displayed an increased loss of native conductivity as a results of low water potentials. Seasonal timing of shoot and diameter growth also differed among functional types influencing drought impacts. Additionally, the possibility of embolism reversal seemed to be limited under the study conditions.

  18. A theoretical framework for determining cerebral vascular function and heterogeneity from dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digernes, Ingrid; Bjørnerud, Atle; Vatnehol, Svein Are S; Løvland, Grete; Courivaud, Frédéric; Vik-Mo, Einar; Meling, Torstein R; Emblem, Kyrre E

    2017-06-01

    Mapping the complex heterogeneity of vascular tissue in the brain is important for understanding cerebrovascular disease. In this translational study, we build on previous work using vessel architectural imaging (VAI) and present a theoretical framework for determining cerebral vascular function and heterogeneity from dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our tissue model covers realistic structural architectures for vessel branching and orientations, as well as a range of hemodynamic scenarios for blood flow, capillary transit times and oxygenation. In a typical image voxel, our findings show that the apparent MRI relaxation rates are independent of the mean vessel orientation and that the vortex area, a VAI-based parameter, is determined by the relative oxygen saturation level and the vessel branching of the tissue. Finally, in both simulated and patient data, we show that the relative distributions of the vortex area parameter as a function of capillary transit times show unique characteristics in normal-appearing white and gray matter tissue, whereas tumour-voxels in comparison display a heterogeneous distribution. Collectively, our study presents a comprehensive framework that may serve as a roadmap for in vivo and per-voxel determination of vascular status and heterogeneity in cerebral tissue.

  19. Functional connectivity and brain activation: a synergistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Ruiliang; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D

    2014-10-01

    Traditional functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies exploit endogenous brain activity for mapping brain activation during "periodic" cognitive/emotional challenges or brain functional connectivity during the "resting state". Previous studies demonstrated that these approaches provide a limited view of brain function which can be complemented by each other. We hypothesized that graph theory functional connectivity density (FCD) mapping would demonstrate regional FCD decreases between resting-state scan and a continuous "task-state" scan. Forty-five healthy volunteers underwent functional connectivity MRI during resting-state as well as a continuous visual attention task, and standard fMRI with a blocked version of the visual attention task. High-resolution data-driven FCD mapping was used to measure task-related connectivity changes without a priori hypotheses. Results demonstrate that task performance was associated with FCD decreases in brain regions weakly activated/deactivated by the task. Furthermore, a pronounced negative correlation between blood oxygen level-dependent-fMRI activation and task-related FCD decreases emerged across brain regions that also suggest the disconnection of task-irrelevant networks during task performance. The correlation between improved accuracy and stronger FCD decreases further suggests the disconnection of task-irrelevant networks during task performance. Functional connectivity can potentiate traditional fMRI studies and offer a more complete picture of brain function. Published by Oxford University Press 2013. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. Brain activation studies with PET and functional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Fukui Medical Univ., Matsuoka (Japan). Biomedical Imaging Research Center; Sadato, Norihiro [Okazaki National Research Inst., Aichi (Japan). National Inst. for Physiological Sciences

    2002-01-01

    Application of PET and functional MRI in brain activation studies is reviewed. 3D-PET images obtained repeatedly after intravenous injection of about 370 MBq of H{sub 2}{sup 15}O can detect a faint blood flow change in the brain. Functional MRI can also detect the blood flow change in the brain due to blood oxygen level-dependent effect. Echo-planar imaging is popular in MRI with 1.5 or 3 T. Images are analyzed by statistical parametric mapping with correction of cerebral regions, anatomical normalization and statistics. PET data give the blood flow change by the H{sub 2}{sup 15}O incorporation into the brain and MRI data, by the scarce tissue oxygen consumption despite the change. Actual images during the cognition task-performance and of frequent artifacts are given. PET is suitable for studies of brain functions like sensibility and emotion and functional MRI, like cortex functions and clinical practices in identification of functional regions prior to surgery and evaluation of functional recovery of damaged brain. (K.H.)

  1. A BASIC program for an IBM PC compatible computer for drawing the weak phase object contrast transfer function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, A.; Skjerpe, P.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes a computer program which is useful in high resolution microscopy. The program is written in EBASIC and calculates the weak phase object contrast transfer function as function of instrumental and imaging parameters. The function is plotted on the PC graphics screen, and by a Print Screen command the function can be copied to the printer. The program runs on both the Hercules graphic card and the IBM CGA card. 2 figs

  2. Comparing Fourier optics and contrast transfer function modeling of image formation in low energy electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K M; Locatelli, A; Altman, M S

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical understanding of image formation in cathode lens microscopy can facilitate image interpretation. We compare Fourier Optics (FO) and Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) approaches that were recently adapted from other realms of microscopy to model image formation in low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). Although these two approaches incorporate imaging errors from several sources similarly, they differ in the way that the image intensity is calculated. The simplification that is used in the CTF calculation advantageously leads to its computational efficiency. However, we find that lens aberrations, and spatial and temporal coherence may affect the validity of the CTF approach to model LEEM image formation under certain conditions. In particular, these effects depend strongly on the nature of the object being imaged and also become more pronounced with increasing defocus. While the use of the CTF approach appears to be justified for objects that are routinely imaged with LEEM, comparison of theory to experimental observations of a focal image series for rippled, suspended graphene reveals one example where FO works, but CTF does not. This work alerts us to potential pitfalls and guides the effective use of FO and CTF approaches. It also lays the foundation for quantitative image evaluation using these methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Liver Function Assessment Using Parenchyma-Specific Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyung; Cho, Jinhan; Kwon, Heejin; Kang, Myongjin; Lee, Sangyun; Roh, Young-hoon; Kim, Kwan Woo; Lee, Sung Wook

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess hepatic functional reserve by analyzing the hepatic parenchyma enhancement curve of parenchyma-specific contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS). Fifty-two patients with cirrhosis who underwent CEUS and indocyanine green tests (ICG) because of a focal liver lesion were enrolled. We evaluated the hemodynamic-related parameters of the time-intensity curve and compared these findings with the ICG retention rate at 15 min (ICG R15). The correlation between the time from peak to one half (s) and ICG R15 was statistically significant and was relatively proportional to the ICG R15. A cut-off value of 149 s was determined for the time from peak to one half for abnormal ICG R15 (>14). The sensitivity and specificity were 85.7% and 92.3%, respectively, for the detection of abnormal ICG R15. In conclusion, the time from peak to one half of the time-intensity curve of parenchyma-specific CEUS of the liver can be a useful parameter to predict the hepatic reserve in liver cirrhosis. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Automatic detection of arterial input function in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI based on affinity propagation clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lin; Wang, Defeng; Liu, Wen; Fang, Kui; Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Huang, Wenhua; King, Ann D; Heng, Pheng Ann; Ahuja, Anil T

    2014-05-01

    To automatically and robustly detect the arterial input function (AIF) with high detection accuracy and low computational cost in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). In this study, we developed an automatic AIF detection method using an accelerated version (Fast-AP) of affinity propagation (AP) clustering. The validity of this Fast-AP-based method was proved on two DCE-MRI datasets, i.e., rat kidney and human head and neck. The detailed AIF detection performance of this proposed method was assessed in comparison with other clustering-based methods, namely original AP and K-means, as well as the manual AIF detection method. Both the automatic AP- and Fast-AP-based methods achieved satisfactory AIF detection accuracy, but the computational cost of Fast-AP could be reduced by 64.37-92.10% on rat dataset and 73.18-90.18% on human dataset compared with the cost of AP. The K-means yielded the lowest computational cost, but resulted in the lowest AIF detection accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated that both the AP- and Fast-AP-based methods were insensitive to the initialization of cluster centers, and had superior robustness compared with K-means method. The Fast-AP-based method enables automatic AIF detection with high accuracy and efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Determination of arterial input function in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI using group independent component analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.; Liu, H.-L.; Yang Yihong; Hsu, Y.-Y.; Chuang, K.-S.

    2006-01-01

    Quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires the determination of the arterial input function (AIF). The segmentation of surrounding tissue by manual selection is error-prone due to the partial volume artifacts. Independent component analysis (ICA) has the advantage in automatically decomposing the signals into interpretable components. Recently group ICA technique has been applied to fMRI study and showed reduced variance caused by motion artifact and noise. In this work, we investigated the feasibility and efficacy of the use of group ICA technique to extract the AIF. Both simulated and in vivo data were analyzed in this study. The simulation data of eight phantoms were generated using randomized lesion locations and time activity curves. The clinical data were obtained from spin-echo EPI MR scans performed in seven normal subjects. Group ICA technique was applied to analyze data through concatenating across seven subjects. The AIFs were calculated from the weighted average of the signals in the region selected by ICA. Preliminary results of this study showed that group ICA technique could not extract accurate AIF information from regions around the vessel. The mismatched location of vessels within the group reduced the benefits of group study

  6. Effects of arterial input function selection on kinetic parameters in brain dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Vera C; Mädler, Burkhard; Gieseke, Jürgen; Fimmers, Rolf; Hattingen, Elke; Schild, Hans H; Hadizadeh, Dariusch R

    2017-07-01

    Kinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) were suggested as a possible instrument for multi-parametric lesion characterization, but have not found their way into clinical practice yet due to inconsistent results. The quantification is heavily influenced by the definition of an appropriate arterial input functions (AIF). Regarding brain tumor DCE-MRI, there are currently several co-existing methods to determine the AIF frequently including different brain vessels as sources. This study quantitatively and qualitatively analyzes the impact of AIF source selection on kinetic parameters derived from commonly selected AIF source vessels compared to a population-based AIF model. 74 patients with brain lesions underwent 3D DCE-MRI. Kinetic parameters [transfer constants of contrast agent efflux and reflux K trans and k ep and, their ratio, v e, that is used to measure extravascular-extracellular volume fraction and plasma volume fraction v p ] were determined using extended Tofts model in 821 ROI from 4 AIF sources [the internal carotid artery (ICA), the closest artery to the lesion, the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), the population-based Parker model]. The effect of AIF source alteration on kinetic parameters was evaluated by tissue type selective intra-class correlation (ICC) and capacity to differentiate gliomas by WHO grade [area under the curve analysis (AUC)]. Arterial AIF more often led to implausible v e >100% values (pkinetic parameters (pkinetic parameters of different AIF sources and tissues were variable (0.08-0.87) and only consistent >0.5 between arterial AIF derived kinetic parameters. Differentiation between WHO III and II glioma was exclusively possible with v p derived from an AIF in the SSS (p=0.03; AUC 0.74). The AIF source has a significant impact on absolute kinetic parameters in DCE-MRI, which limits the comparability of kinetic parameters derived from different AIF sources. The effect is also tissue-dependent. The SSS

  7. Compensatory recombination phenomena of neurological functions in central dysphagia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-dong Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We speculate that cortical reactions evoked by swallowing activity may be abnormal in patients with central infarction with dysphagia. The present study aimed to detect functional imaging features of cerebral cortex in central dysphagia patients by using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The results showed that when normal controls swallowed, primary motor cortex (BA4, insula (BA13, premotor cortex (BA6/8, supramarginal gyrus (BA40, and anterior cingulate cortex (BA24/32 were activated, and that the size of the activated areas were larger in the left hemisphere compared with the right. In recurrent cerebral infarction patients with central dysphagia, BA4, BA13, BA40 and BA6/8 areas were activated, while the degree of activation in BA24/32 was decreased. Additionally, more areas were activated, including posterior cingulate cortex (BA23/31, visual association cortex (BA18/19, primary auditory cortex (BA41 and parahippocampal cortex (BA36. Somatosensory association cortex (BA7 and left cerebellum in patients with recurrent cerebral infarction with central dysphagia were also activated. Experimental findings suggest that the cerebral cortex has obvious hemisphere lateralization in response to swallowing, and patients with recurrent cerebral infarction with central dysphagia show compensatory recombination phenomena of neurological functions. In rehabilitative treatment, using the favorite food of patients can stimulate swallowing through visual, auditory, and other nerve conduction pathways, thus promoting compensatory recombination of the central cortex functions.

  8. Functional MRI neurofeedback training on connectivity between two regions induces long-lasting changes in intrinsic functional network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuda eMegumi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Motor or perceptual learning is known to influence functional connectivity between brain regions and induce short-term changes in the intrinsic functional networks revealed as correlations in slow blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD signal fluctuations. However, no cause-and-effect relationship has been elucidated between a specific change in connectivity and a long-term change in global networks. Here, we examine the hypothesis that functional connectivity (i.e. temporal correlation between two regions is increased and preserved for a long time when two regions are simultaneously activated or deactivated. Using the connectivity-neurofeedback training paradigm, subjects successfully learned to increase the correlation of activity between the lateral parietal and primary motor areas, regions that belong to different intrinsic networks and negatively correlated before training under the resting conditions. Furthermore, whole-brain hypothesis-free analysis as well as functional network analyses demonstrated that the correlation in the resting state between these areas as well as the correlation between the intrinsic networks that include the areas increased for at least two months. These findings indicate that the connectivity-neurofeedback training can cause long-term changes in intrinsic connectivity and that intrinsic networks can be shaped by experience-driven modulation of regional correlation.

  9. [The value of double contrast arthrotomography combined with cinematography in the diagnosis of functional and structural TMJ alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, W; Grossniklaus, B; Sailer, H F

    1991-01-01

    Double contrast arthrotomography combined with cinematography as a diagnostic instrument establishing functional and structural TMJ alterations is evaluated for its diagnostic value and reliability within the chain of diagnostic measures applied. In 131 patients double-contrast arthrotomography was followed by a comprehensive history of joint problems, and verification of the clinical findings as well as the arthrographic diagnosis and the post-arthrographic TMJ alterations. Our interest was focussed, among others, on the question whether arthrography alone would have any therapeutic effect or produce an alteration in TMJ function.

  10. Expression of functional traits during seedling establishment in two populations of Pinus ponderosa from contrasting climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Kelly L; Meinzer, Frederick C; McCulloh, Katherine A; Woodruff, David R; Marias, Danielle E

    2015-05-01

    First-year tree seedlings represent a particularly vulnerable life stage and successful seedling establishment is crucial for forest regeneration. We investigated the extent to which Pinus ponderosa P. & C. Lawson populations from different climate zones exhibit differential expression of functional traits that may facilitate their establishment. Seeds from two populations from sites with contrasting precipitation and temperature regimes east (PIPO dry) and west (PIPO mesic) of the Oregon Cascade mountains were sown in a common garden experiment and grown under two water availability treatments (control and drought). Aboveground biomass accumulation, vegetative phenology, xylem anatomy, plant hydraulic architecture, foliar stable carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C), gas exchange and leaf water relations characteristics were measured. No treatment or population-related differences in leaf water potential were detected. At the end of the first growing season, aboveground biomass was 74 and 44% greater in PIPO mesic in the control and drought treatments, respectively. By early October, 73% of PIPO dry seedlings had formed dormant buds compared with only 15% of PIPO mesic seedlings. Stem theoretical specific conductivity, calculated from tracheid dimensions and packing density, declined from June through September and was nearly twice as high in PIPO mesic during most of the growing season, consistent with measured values of specific conductivity. Intrinsic water-use efficiency based on δ(13)C values was higher in PIPO dry seedlings for both treatments across all sampling dates. There was a negative relationship between values of δ(13)C and leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity across populations and treatments, consistent with greater stomatal constraints on gas exchange with declining seedling hydraulic capacity. Integrated growing season assimilation and stomatal conductance estimated from foliar δ(13)C values and photosynthetic CO2-response curves were 6 and 28

  11. Functional connectivity in cortical regions in dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Eva R; Blamire, Andrew M; Firbank, Michael J; O'Brien, John T

    2012-02-01

    Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, spontaneous low-frequency fluctuations in the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal were measured to investigate connectivity between key brain regions hypothesized to be differentially affected in dementia with Lewy bodies compared with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls. These included connections of the hippocampus, because of its role in learning, and parietal and occipital areas involved in memory, attention and visual processing. Connectivity was investigated in 47 subjects aged 60 years and over: 15 subjects with dementia with Lewy bodies, 16 subjects with Alzheimer's disease and 16 control subjects. Subjects were scanned using a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system. The mean blood oxygenation level-dependent signal time series was extracted from seed regions in the hippocampus, posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus and primary visual cortex and correlated with all other brain voxels to determine functional connectivity. Both subjects with dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease showed greater connectivity than control subjects. Compared with controls, the dementia with Lewy bodies group had greater connectivity between the right posterior cingulate cortex and other brain areas. In dementia with Lewy bodies, there were no significant differences in hippocampal connectivity compared with controls, but in Alzheimer's disease left hippocampal connectivity was greater compared with controls. There were no significant differences between groups for precuneus or primary visual cortex connectivity. No seed regions showed significantly less connectivity in subjects with dementia with Lewy bodies or Alzheimer's disease compared with controls. We found greater connectivity with the posterior cingulate in dementia with Lewy bodies and with the hippocampus in Alzheimer's disease. Consistent with the known relative preservation of memory in dementia with Lewy bodies compared with Alzheimer

  12. Differences in resting corticolimbic functional connectivity in bipolar I euthymia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Salvatore; Moody, Teena D; Vizueta, Nathalie; Thomason, Moriah E; Monti, Martin M; Townsend, Jennifer D; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Altshuler, Lori L

    2012-01-01

    Objective We examined resting state functional connectivity in the brain between key emotion regulation regions in bipolar I disorder to delineate differences in coupling from healthy subjects. Methods Euthymic subjects with bipolar I disorder (n = 20) and matched healthy subjects (n = 20) participated in a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Low frequency fluctuations in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal were correlated in the six connections between four anatomically-defined nodes: left and right amygdala and left and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC). Seed-to-voxel connectivity results were probed for commonly coupled regions. Following this, an identified region was included in a mediation analysis to determine the potential of mediation. Results The bipolar I disorder group exhibited significant hyperconnectivity between right amygdala and right vlPFC relative to healthy subjects. The connectivity between these regions in the bipolar I disorder group was partially mediated by activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Conclusions Greater coupling between right amygdala and right vlPFC and their partial mediation by the ACC were found in bipolar I disorder subjects in remission and in the absence of a psychological task. These findings have implications for a trait-related and clinically-important imaging biomarker. PMID:23347587

  13. A computer-assisted test for the electrophysiological and psychophysical measurement of dynamic visual function based on motion contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wist, E R; Ehrenstein, W H; Schrauf, M; Schraus, M

    1998-03-13

    A new test is described that allows for electrophysiological and psychophysical measurement of visual function based on motion contrast. In a computer-generated random-dot display, completely camouflaged Landolt rings become visible only when dots within the target area are moved briefly while those of the background remain stationary. Thus, detection of contours and the location of the gap in the ring rely on motion contrast (form-from-motion) instead of luminance contrast. A standard version of this test has been used to assess visual performance in relation to age, in screening professional groups (truck drivers) and in clinical groups (glaucoma patients). Aside from this standard version, the computer program easily allows for various modifications. These include the option of a synchronizing trigger signal to allow for recording of time-locked motion-onset visual-evoked responses, the reversal of target and background motion, and the displacement of random-dot targets across stationary backgrounds. In all instances, task difficulty is manipulated by changing the percentage of moving dots within the target (or background). The present test offers a short, convenient method to probe dynamic visual functions relying on surprathreshold motion-contrast stimuli and complements other routine tests of form, contrast, depth, and color vision.

  14. Changes in Renal Function in Elderly Patients Following Intravenous Iodinated Contrast Administration: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alsafi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN is a recognised complication of intravascular administration of iodinated contrast media (ICM. Previous studies suggest a higher incidence in the elderly, but no large study has assessed this to date. We set out to assess changes in creatinine in elderly inpatients following computed tomography (CT examination and compare those who received intravenous contrast to those who did not. Methods. Using the Radiology Information System in two teaching hospitals, inpatients over the age of seventy who had a CT examination and a baseline creatinine were identified and their follow-up creatinine levels were analysed. Elderly inpatients who underwent a noncontrast CT over the same period were used as controls. Results. 677 elderly inpatients who received ICM were compared with 487 controls. 9.2% of patients who received ICM developed acute kidney injury (AKI compared to 3.5% of inpatient controls (P<0.0001. Patients with higher baseline eGFR had a higher incidence of post-CT AKI. Conclusions. The incidence of post-CT AKI is higher in patients who received IV ICM compared to those who did not; the difference may be partly attributable to contrast-induced nephropathy. This suggests that the incidence of CIN in the elderly may not be as high as previously thought.

  15. Spatial contrasts in air pollution and the effects on lung function in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eeftens, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of the ESCAPE project (European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects), we aimed to characterize and explain spatial contrasts in ambient air pollution within and between European study areas. Following a standard protocol, project partners selected “street” and

  16. Time elapsed after contrast injection is crucial to determine infarct transmurality and myocardial functional recovery after an acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Palomares, José F; Ortiz-Pérez, José T; Lee, Daniel C; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara; Tejedor, Paula; Bonow, Robert O; Wu, Edwin

    2015-05-30

    In acute myocardial infarction (MI), late Gadolinium enhancement (LGE) has been proposed to include the infarcted myocardium and area at risk. However, little information is available on the optimal timing after contrast injection to differentiate these 2 areas. Our aim was to determine in acute and chronic MI whether imaging time after contrast injection influences the LGE size that better predicts infarct size and functional recovery. Subjects were evaluated by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) the first week (n = 60) and 3 months (n = 47) after a percutaneously revascularized STEMI. Inversion-recovery single-shot (ss-IR) imaging was acquired at multiple time points following contrast administration and compared to segmented inversion-recovery (seg-IR) sequences. Inversion time was properly adjusted and images were blinded, randomized and measured for LGE volumes. In acute MI, LGE volume decreased over several minutes (p = 0.005) with the greatest volume occurring at 3 minutes and the smallest at 25 minutes post-contrast injection; however, LGE volume remained constant over time in chronic MI (p = 0.886). Depending on the imaging time, in acute phase, a change in the transmurality index was also observed. A transmural infarction (>75%) at 25 minutes better predicted the absence of improvement in the wall motion score index (WMSI), a higher increase in left ventricular volumes and a lower ejection fraction compared to 10 minutes. A change was observed in LGE volume in the minutes following contrast administration in acute but not in chronic MI. Infarct transmurality 25 minutes post-contrast injection better predicted infarct size and functional recovery at follow-up.

  17. Combined Cognitive-Psychological-Physical Intervention Induces Reorganization of Intrinsic Functional Brain Architecture in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence suggests that enriched mental, physical, and socially stimulating activities are beneficial for counteracting age-related decreases in brain function and cognition in older adults. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to demonstrate the functional plasticity of brain activity in response to a combined cognitive-psychological-physical intervention and investigated the contribution of the intervention-related brain changes to individual performance in healthy older adults. The intervention was composed of a 6-week program of combined activities including cognitive training, Tai Chi exercise, and group counseling. The results showed improved cognitive performance and reorganized regional homogeneity of spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signals in the superior and middle temporal gyri, and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum, in the participants who attended the intervention. Intriguingly, the intervention-induced changes in the coherence of local spontaneous activity correlated with the improvements in individual cognitive performance. Taken together with our previous findings of enhanced resting-state functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe regions following a combined intervention program in older adults, we conclude that the functional plasticity of the aging brain is a rather complex process, and an effective cognitive-psychological-physical intervention is helpful for maintaining a healthy brain and comprehensive cognition during old age.

  18. Change in functional connectivity in tinnitus and its relation with tinnitus laterality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Eun Jee; Kim, Eui Jong; Choi, Woo Suk; Ryu, Chang Woo; Jahang, Geon Ho; Park, Moon Suh; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Soon Chan

    2016-01-01

    To identify potential differences in resting-state networks according to laterality of tinnitus using resting-state functional MRI (fMRI). A total of 83 age-matched subjects consisting of 19 patients with right-sided tinnitus (Rt-T), 22 patients with left-sided tinnitus (Lt-T), 22 patients with bilateral tinnitus (Bil-T), and 20 healthy controls underwent resting-state blood oxygenation-level dependent fMRI scans. Independent component analysis was used to obtain the functional connectivities in the auditory network (AN) and the default mode network (DMN), which were compared between each group using the voxel-wise one-way ANOVA. In addition, lateralization of the auditory cortex was assessed within each group using a region of interest (ROI). Comparisons between tinnitus groups showed unusual clusters with different functional connectivities in the AN and the DMN. The Rt-T group had large clusters with higher functional connectivity in the right middle temporal gyrus and temporopolar area compared with the Lt-/Bil-T and control groups. ROI analysis showed that the Rt-/Lt-T groups had dominant functional connectivity in the right auditory cortex and the Bil-T and control groups had left-dominant auditory connectivity. These results suggest that chronic tinnitus is related to aberrant laterality of the auditory cortex. These findings help clarify the neural mechanism of tinnitus and specify the targets for localization of treatment

  19. Change in functional connectivity in tinnitus and its relation with tinnitus laterality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Eun Jee; Kim, Eui Jong; Choi, Woo Suk [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Chang Woo; Jahang, Geon Ho; Park, Moon Suh; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Soon Chan [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To identify potential differences in resting-state networks according to laterality of tinnitus using resting-state functional MRI (fMRI). A total of 83 age-matched subjects consisting of 19 patients with right-sided tinnitus (Rt-T), 22 patients with left-sided tinnitus (Lt-T), 22 patients with bilateral tinnitus (Bil-T), and 20 healthy controls underwent resting-state blood oxygenation-level dependent fMRI scans. Independent component analysis was used to obtain the functional connectivities in the auditory network (AN) and the default mode network (DMN), which were compared between each group using the voxel-wise one-way ANOVA. In addition, lateralization of the auditory cortex was assessed within each group using a region of interest (ROI). Comparisons between tinnitus groups showed unusual clusters with different functional connectivities in the AN and the DMN. The Rt-T group had large clusters with higher functional connectivity in the right middle temporal gyrus and temporopolar area compared with the Lt-/Bil-T and control groups. ROI analysis showed that the Rt-/Lt-T groups had dominant functional connectivity in the right auditory cortex and the Bil-T and control groups had left-dominant auditory connectivity. These results suggest that chronic tinnitus is related to aberrant laterality of the auditory cortex. These findings help clarify the neural mechanism of tinnitus and specify the targets for localization of treatment.

  20. Atypically diffuse functional connectivity between caudate nuclei and cerebral cortex in autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Katherine C

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting sociocommunicative behavior, but also sensorimotor skill learning, oculomotor control, and executive functioning. Some of these impairments may be related to abnormalities of the caudate nuclei, which have been reported for autism. Methods Our sample was comprised of 8 high-functioning males with autism and 8 handedness, sex, and age-matched controls. Subjects underwent functional MRI scanning during performance on simple visuomotor coordination tasks. Functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI effects were identified as interregional blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signal cross-correlation, using the caudate nuclei as seed volumes. Results In the control group, fcMRI effects were found in circuits with known participation of the caudate nuclei (associative, orbitofrontal, oculomotor, motor circuits. Although in the autism group fcMRI effects within these circuits were less pronounced or absent, autistic subjects showed diffusely increased connectivity mostly in pericentral regions, but also in brain areas outside expected anatomical circuits (such as visual cortex. Conclusion These atypical connectivity patterns may be linked to developmental brain growth disturbances recently reported in autism and suggest inefficiently organized functional connectivity between caudate nuclei and cerebral cortex, potentially accounting for stereotypic behaviors and executive impairments.

  1. Venous refocusing for volume estimation: VERVE functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanovic, Bojana; Pike, G Bruce

    2005-02-01

    A novel, noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging-based method for measuring changes in venous cerebral blood volume (CBV(v)) is presented. Venous refocusing for volume estimation (VERVE) exploits the dependency of the spin-spin relaxation rate of deoxygenated blood on the refocusing interval. Interleaved CPMG EPI acquisitions following a train of either tightly or sparsely spaced hard refocusing pulses (every 3.7 or 30 msec, respectively) at matched echo time were used to isolate the blood signal while minimizing the intravascular blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal contribution. The technique was employed to determine the steady-state increase in the CBV(v) in the visual cortex (VC) in seven healthy adult volunteers during flickering checkerboard photic stimulation. A functional activation model and a set of previously collected in vitro human whole blood relaxometry data were used to evaluate the intravascular BOLD effect on the VERVE signal. The average VC venous blood volume change was estimated to be 16 +/- 2%. This method has the potential to provide efficient and continuous monitoring of venous cerebral blood volume, thereby enabling further exploration of the mechanism underlying BOLD signal changes upon physiologic, pathophysiologic, and pharmacologic perturbations.

  2. Dynamics in Microbial Composition and Functionality over a Season in Two Contrasting Estuarine Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traving, Sachia; Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Mantikci, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    In aquatic microbial ecology it remains unclear how bacterial community composition and dynamics are coupled to functionality, and whether this putative coupling varies over the season. In this study we address the questions if bacterial community composition can be linked to community function, ...

  3. Successional changes in functional composition contrast for dry and wet tropical forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohbeck, M.W.M.; Poorter, L.; Lebrija-Trejos, E.E.; Martinez-Ramos, M.; Meave, J.A.; Paz, H.; Perez-Garcia, E.A.; Romero-Perez, I.E.; Tauro, A.; Bongers, F.

    2013-01-01

    We tested whether and how functional composition changes with succession in dry deciduous and wet evergreen forests of Mexico. We hypothesized that compositional changes during succession in dry forest were mainly determined by increasing water availability leading to community functional changes

  4. STM contrast of a CO dimer on a Cu(1 1 1) surface: a wave-function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Alexander; Paulsson, Magnus

    2017-12-01

    We present a method used to intuitively interpret the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) contrast by investigating individual wave functions originating from the substrate and tip side. We use localized basis orbital density functional theory, and propagate the wave functions into the vacuum region at a real-space grid, including averaging over the lateral reciprocal space. Optimization by means of the method of Lagrange multipliers is implemented to perform a unitary transformation of the wave functions in the middle of the vacuum region. The method enables (i) reduction of the number of contributing tip-substrate wave function combinations used in the corresponding transmission matrix, and (ii) to bundle up wave functions with similar symmetry in the lateral plane, so that (iii) an intuitive understanding of the STM contrast can be achieved. The theory is applied to a CO dimer adsorbed on a Cu(1 1 1) surface scanned by a single-atom Cu tip, whose STM image is discussed in detail by the outlined method.

  5. Structural architecture supports functional organization in the human aging brain at a regionwise and network level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Joelle; Ritter, Petra; Shen, Kelly; Rothmeier, Simon; Schirner, Michael; McIntosh, Anthony R

    2016-07-01

    Functional interactions in the brain are constrained by the underlying anatomical architecture, and structural and functional networks share network features such as modularity. Accordingly, age-related changes of structural connectivity (SC) may be paralleled by changes in functional connectivity (FC). We provide a detailed qualitative and quantitative characterization of the SC-FC coupling in human aging as inferred from resting-state blood oxygen-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging in a sample of 47 adults with an age range of 18-82. We revealed that SC and FC decrease with age across most parts of the brain and there is a distinct age-dependency of regionwise SC-FC coupling and network-level SC-FC relations. A specific pattern of SC-FC coupling predicts age more reliably than does regionwise SC or FC alone (r = 0.73, 95% CI = [0.7093, 0.8522]). Hence, our data propose that regionwise SC-FC coupling can be used to characterize brain changes in aging. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2645-2661, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Neural Changes following Behavioral Activation for a Depressed Breast Cancer Patient: A Functional MRI Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Gawrysiak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging is an innovative but at this stage underutilized method to assess the efficacy of psychotherapy for depression. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used in this case study to examine changes in brain activity in a depressed breast cancer patient receiving an 8-session Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD, based on the work of Hopko and Lejuez (2007. A music listening paradigm was used during fMRI brain scans to assess reward responsiveness at pre- and posttreatment. Following treatment, the patient exhibited attenuated depression and changes in blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD response in regions of the prefrontal cortex and the subgenual cingulate cortex. These preliminary findings outline a novel means to assess psychotherapy efficacy and suggest that BATD elicits functional brain changes in areas implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Further research is necessary to explore neurobiological mechanisms of change in BATD, particularly the potential mediating effects of reward responsiveness and associated brain functioning.

  7. Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M.O.; Orton, M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, B. [Univ. of Leicester, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Tofts, P.S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Univ. of Sussex, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Sussex (United Kingdom); Buckley, D.L. [University of Leeds, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Huang, W. [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Advanced Imaging Research Centre, Portland, OR (United States); Horsfield, M.A. [Medical Physics Section, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leicester (United Kingdom); Chenevert, T.L. [Univ. of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, D.J. [Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jackson, A. [Univ. of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Withington, Manchester, M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Lomas, D. [Univ. of Cambridge, Dept. of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Whitcher, B. [Unit 2 Greenways Business Park, Mango Solutions, Chippenham (United Kingdom); Clarke, L. [Cancer Imaging Program, Imaging Technology Development Branch, Rockville, MD (United States); Plummer, R. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne, The Medical School, Medical Oncology, Northern Inst. for Cancer Research, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Judson, I. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jones, R. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alonzi, R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Brunner, T. [Gray Inst. for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Koh, D.M. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Diagnostic Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2012-07-15

    Many therapeutic approaches to cancer affect the tumour vasculature, either indirectly or as a direct target. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important means of investigating this action, both pre-clinically and in early stage clinical trials. For such trials, it is essential that the measurement process (i.e. image acquisition and analysis) can be performed effectively and with consistency among contributing centres. As the technique continues to develop in order to provide potential improvements in sensitivity and physiological relevance, there is considerable scope for between-centre variation in techniques. A workshop was convened by the Imaging Committee of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) to review the current status of DCE-MRI and to provide recommendations on how the technique can best be used for early stage trials. This review and the consequent recommendations are summarised here. (orig.)

  8. Sexually dimorphic functional connectivity in response to high vs. low energy-dense food cues in obese humans: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalayer, Deniz; Pantazatos, Spiro P; Gibson, Charlisa D; McOuatt, Haley; Puma, Lauren; Astbury, Nerys M; Geliebter, Allan

    2014-10-15

    Sexually-dimorphic behavioral and biological aspects of human eating have been described. Using psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis, we investigated sex-based differences in functional connectivity with a key emotion-processing region (amygdala, AMG) and a key reward-processing area (ventral striatum, VS) in response to high vs. low energy-dense (ED) food images using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in obese persons in fasted and fed states. When fed, in response to high vs. low-ED food cues, obese men (vs. women) had greater functional connectivity with AMG in right subgenual anterior cingulate, whereas obese women had greater functional connectivity with AMG in left angular gyrus and right primary motor areas. In addition, when fed, AMG functional connectivity with pre/post-central gyrus was more associated with BMI in women (vs. men). When fasted, obese men (vs. women) had greater functional connectivity with AMG in bilateral supplementary frontal and primary motor areas, left precuneus, and right cuneus, whereas obese women had greater functional connectivity with AMG in left inferior frontal gyrus, right thalamus, and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. When fed, greater functional connectivity with VS was observed in men in bilateral supplementary and primary motor areas, left postcentral gyrus, and left precuneus. These sex-based differences in functional connectivity in response to visual food cues may help partly explain differential eating behavior, pathology prevalence, and outcomes in men and women. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Radiological functional analysis of the vascular system contrast media, methods, results

    CERN Document Server

    1983-01-01

    Scientists and engineers have been involved in medical radiology from the very beginning. At times advances in this field occur at a tremen­ dously fast pace. Developments in radiological diagnostics have - technologically and medically speaking - focused on morphology. At present, computer-aided tomography (CAT) is at a high point in deve1opment, medical application, and validation. The preconditions for this success were rapid advances in electronics and computer technology - in hardware and in software - and an unexpected cost reduction in these fields; the co operation of various scientific disci­ plines was also essential. Functional radiological diagnosis has been neglected in part, owing to the emphasis on morphology, but alone the synthesis of morphology and function prornises further advances. Apart from the limited capabilities ofuItrasonic techniques there is no way other than using X-rays to carry out functional studies of organs and their systems through an intact body surface. It is frequently...

  10. Functionally distinct amygdala subregions identified using DTI and high-resolution fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderston, Nicholas L.; Schultz, Douglas H.; Hopkins, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Although the amygdala is often directly linked with fear and emotion, amygdala neurons are activated by a wide variety of emotional and non-emotional stimuli. Different subregions within the amygdala may be engaged preferentially by different aspects of emotional and non-emotional tasks. To test this hypothesis, we measured and compared the effects of novelty and fear on amygdala activity. We used high-resolution blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) imaging and streamline tractography to subdivide the amygdala into three distinct functional subunits. We identified a laterobasal subregion connected with the visual cortex that responds generally to visual stimuli, a non-projecting region that responds to salient visual stimuli, and a centromedial subregion connected with the diencephalon that responds only when a visual stimulus predicts an aversive outcome. We provide anatomical and functional support for a model of amygdala function where information enters through the laterobasal subregion, is processed by intrinsic circuits in the interspersed tissue, and is then passed to the centromedial subregion, where activation leads to behavioral output. PMID:25969533

  11. Is Rest Really Rest? Resting State Functional Connectivity during Rest and Motor Task Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkiewicz, Michael T; Crawley, Adrian P; Mikulis, David J

    2018-04-18

    Numerous studies have identified the default mode network (DMN) within the brain of healthy individuals, which has been attributed to the ongoing mental activity of the brain during the wakeful resting-state. While engaged during specific resting-state fMRI paradigms, it remains unclear as to whether traditional block-design simple movement fMRI experiments significantly influence the default mode network or other areas. Using blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI we characterized the pattern of functional connectivity in healthy subjects during a resting-state paradigm and compared this to the same resting-state analysis performed on motor task data residual time courses after regressing out the task paradigm. Using seed-voxel analysis to define the DMN, the executive control network (ECN), and sensorimotor, auditory and visual networks, the resting-state analysis of the residual time courses demonstrated reduced functional connectivity in the motor network and reduced connectivity between the insula and the ECN compared to the standard resting-state datasets. Overall, performance of simple self-directed motor tasks does little to change the resting-state functional connectivity across the brain, especially in non-motor areas. This would suggest that previously acquired fMRI studies incorporating simple block-design motor tasks could be mined retrospectively for assessment of the resting-state connectivity.

  12. Temporal assessment of vascular reactivity and functionality using MRI during postischemic proangiogenenic vascular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hsiang; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Siow, Tiing-Yee; Hsu, Yi-Hua; Chen, Chiao-Chi V; Lin, Teng-Nan; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chang, Chen

    2015-09-01

    Postischemic angiogenesis is an important recovery mechanism. Both arteries and veins are upregulated during angiogenesis, but eventually there are more angiogenic veins than arteries in terms of number and length. It is critical to understand how the veins are modulated after ischemia and then transitioned into angiogenic vessels during the proangiogenic stage to finally serve as a restorative strength to the injured area. Using a rat model of transient focal cerebral ischemia, the hypercapnic blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response was used to evaluate vascular reactivity, while the hyperoxic BOLD and tissue oxygen level-dependent (TOLD) responses were used to evaluate the vascular functionality at 1, 3, and 7days after ischemia. Vessel-like venous signals appeared on R2* maps on days 3 and 7, but not on day 1. The large hypercapnic BOLD responses on days 3 and 7 indicated that these areas have high vascular reactivity. The temporal correlation between vascular reactivity and the immunoreactivity to desmin and VEGF further indicates that the integrity of vascular reactivity is associated with the pericyte coverage as regulated by the VEGF level. Vascular functionality remained low on days 1, 3, and 7, as reflected by the small hyperoxic BOLD and large hyperoxic TOLD responses, indicating the low oxygen consumption of the ischemic tissues. These functional changes in proangiogenic veins may be critical for angiogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Unified Approach to Functional Principal Component Analysis and Functional Multiple-Set Canonical Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Yeh; Hwang, Heungsun; Yamamoto, Michio; Jung, Kwanghee; Woodward, Todd S

    2017-06-01

    Functional principal component analysis (FPCA) and functional multiple-set canonical correlation analysis (FMCCA) are data reduction techniques for functional data that are collected in the form of smooth curves or functions over a continuum such as time or space. In FPCA, low-dimensional components are extracted from a single functional dataset such that they explain the most variance of the dataset, whereas in FMCCA, low-dimensional components are obtained from each of multiple functional datasets in such a way that the associations among the components are maximized across the different sets. In this paper, we propose a unified approach to FPCA and FMCCA. The proposed approach subsumes both techniques as special cases. Furthermore, it permits a compromise between the techniques, such that components are obtained from each set of functional data to maximize their associations across different datasets, while accounting for the variance of the data well. We propose a single optimization criterion for the proposed approach, and develop an alternating regularized least squares algorithm to minimize the criterion in combination with basis function approximations to functions. We conduct a simulation study to investigate the performance of the proposed approach based on synthetic data. We also apply the approach for the analysis of multiple-subject functional magnetic resonance imaging data to obtain low-dimensional components of blood-oxygen level-dependent signal changes of the brain over time, which are highly correlated across the subjects as well as representative of the data. The extracted components are used to identify networks of neural activity that are commonly activated across the subjects while carrying out a working memory task.

  14. Functional brain imaging; Funktionelle Hirnbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizewski, E.R. [Medizinische Universitaet Innsbruck, Universitaetsklinik fuer Neuroradiologie, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive method that has become one of the major tools for understanding human brain function and in recent years has also been developed for clinical applications. Changes in hemodynamic signals correspond to changes in neuronal activity with good spatial and temporal resolution in fMRI. Using high-field MR systems and increasingly dedicated statistics and postprocessing, activated brain areas can be detected and superimposed on anatomical images. Currently, fMRI data are often combined in multimodal imaging, e. g. with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequences. This method is helping to further understand the physiology of cognitive brain processes and is also being used in a number of clinical applications. In addition to the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals, this article deals with the construction of fMRI investigations, selection of paradigms and evaluation in the clinical routine. Clinically, this method is mainly used in the planning of brain surgery, analyzing the location of brain tumors in relation to eloquent brain areas and the lateralization of language processing. As the BOLD signal is dependent on the strength of the magnetic field as well as other limitations, an overview of recent developments is given. Increases of magnetic field strength (7 T), available head coils and advances in MRI analytical methods have led to constant improvement in fMRI signals and experimental design. Especially the depiction of eloquent brain regions can be done easily and quickly and has become an essential part of presurgical planning. (orig.) [German] Mittlerweile ist die funktionelle MRT (fMRT) eine Methode, die nicht mehr nur in der neurowissenschaftlichen Routine verwendet wird. Die fMRT ermoeglicht die nichtinvasive Darstellung der Hirnaktivitaet in guter raeumlicher und zeitlicher Aufloesung unter Ausnutzung der Durchblutungsaenderung aufgrund der erhoehten Nervenzellaktivitaet. Unter

  15. Successional changes in functional composition contrast for dry and wet tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohbeck, Madelon; Poorter, Lourens; Lebrija-Trejos, Edwin; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Meave, Jorge A; Paz, Horacio; Pérez-García, Eduardo A; Romero-Pérez, I Eunice; Tauro, Alejandra; Bongers, Frans

    2013-06-01

    We tested whether and how functional composition changes with succession in dry deciduous and wet evergreen forests of Mexico. We hypothesized that compositional changes during succession in dry forest were mainly determined by increasing water availability leading to community functional changes from conservative to acquisitive strategies, and in wet forest by decreasing light availability leading to changes from acquisitive to conservative strategies. Research was carried out in 15 dry secondary forest plots (5-63 years after abandonment) and 17 wet secondary forest plots (dry forest than in wet forest and largely characterized by different traits. During dry forest succession, conservative traits related to drought tolerance and drought avoidance decreased, as predicted. Unexpectedly acquisitive leaf traits also decreased, whereas seed size and dependence on biotic dispersal increased. In wet forest succession, functional composition changed from acquisitive to conservative leaf traits, suggesting light availability as the main driver of changes. Distinct suites of traits shape functional composition changes in dry and wet forest succession, responding to different environmental filters.

  16. Brief Report: Contrasting Profiles of Everyday Executive Functioning in Smith-Magenis Syndrome and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Lucy; Oliver, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Everyday executive function (EF) was examined in Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), associated with high risk of behaviour disorder, and Down syndrome (DS), associated with relatively low risk of behaviour disorder. Caregivers of 13 children with SMS and 17 with DS rated everyday EF using the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive…

  17. Value of MR phase-contrast flow measurements for functional assessment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley, Sebastian; Mereles, Derliz; Gruenig, Ekkehard; Puderbach, Michael; Schoeck, Helena; Eichinger, Monika; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Fink, Christian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Goals of our study were to compare the pulmonary hemodynamics between healthy volunteers and patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and correlate MR flow measurements with echocardiography. Twenty-five patients with PAH and 25 volunteers were examined at 1.5 T. Phase-contrast flow measurements were performed in the ascending aorta and pulmonary trunk, resulting in the following parameters: peak velocity (cm/s), average blood flow (l/min), time to peak velocity (ms), velocity rise gradient and pulmonary distensibility (cm 2 ). The bronchosystemic shunt was calculated. In PAH patients transthoracic echocardiography and right-heart catheterization (RHC) served as the gold standard. In comparison to volunteers, the PAH patients showed significantly reduced pulmonary velocities (P = 0.002), blood flow (P = 0.002) and pulmonary distensibility (P = 0.008). In patients, the time to peak velocity was shorter (P<0.001), and the velocity rise gradient was steeper (P = 0.002) than in volunteers. While in volunteers the peak velocity in the aorta was reached earlier, it was the reverse in patients. Patients showed a significant bronchosystemic shunt (P = 0.01). No meaningful correlation was found between MRI measurements and echocardiography or RHC. MRI is a feasible technique for the differentiation between PAH and volunteers. Further studies have to be conducted for the absolute calculation of pressure estimates. (orig.)

  18. Methods for Contrasting Gap Time Hazard Functions: Application to Repeat Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xu; Schaubel, Douglas E

    2017-12-01

    In studies featuring a sequence of ordered events, gap times between successive events are often of interest. Despite the rich literature in this area, very few methods for comparing gap times have been developed. We propose methods for estimating a hazard ratio connecting the first and second gap times. Specifically, a two-stage procedure is developed based on estimating equations. At the first stage, a proportional hazards model is fitted for the first gap time. Weighted estimating equations are then solved at the second stage to estimate the hazard ratio between the first and second gap times. The proposed estimator has a closed form and, being analogous to a standardized mortality ratio, is easy to interpret. Large sample properties of the proposed estimators are derived, with simulation studies used to evaluate finite sample characteristics. Extension of the approach to accommodate a piecewise constant hazard ratio is considered. The proposed methods are applied to contrast repeat (second) versus primary (first) liver transplants with respect to graft failure, based on national registry data.

  19. Global Functional Connectivity Differences between Sleep-Like States in Urethane Anesthetized Rats Measured by fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Zhurakovskaya

    Full Text Available Sleep is essential for nervous system functioning and sleep disorders are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. However, the macroscale connectivity changes in brain networking during different sleep states are poorly understood. One of the hindering factors is the difficulty to combine functional connectivity investigation methods with spontaneously sleeping animals, which prevents the use of numerous preclinical animal models. Recent studies, however, have implicated that urethane anesthesia can uniquely induce different sleep-like brain states, resembling rapid eye movement (REM and non-REM (NREM sleep, in rodents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess changes in global connectivity and topology between sleep-like states in urethane anesthetized rats, using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging. We detected significant changes in corticocortical (increased in NREM-like state and corticothalamic connectivity (increased in REM-like state. Additionally, in graph analysis the modularity, the measure of functional integration in the brain, was higher in NREM-like state than in REM-like state, indicating a decrease in arousal level, as in normal sleep. The fMRI findings were supported by the supplementary electrophysiological measurements. Taken together, our results show that macroscale functional connectivity changes between sleep states can be detected robustly with resting-state fMRI in urethane anesthetized rats. Our findings pave the way for studies in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases where sleep abnormalities are often one of the first markers for the disorder development.

  20. Transient global amnesia and functional retrograde amnesia: contrasting examples of episodic memory loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Kritchevsky, M; Zouzounis, J; Squire, L R

    1997-01-01

    We studied 11 patients with transient global amnesia (TGA) and ten patients with functional retrograde amnesia (FRA). Patients with TGA had a uniform clinical picture: a severe, relatively isolated amnesic syndrome that started suddenly, persisted for 4-12 h, and then gradually improved to essentially normal over the next 12-24 h. During the episode, the patients had severe anterograde amnesia for verbal and non-verbal material and retrograde amnesia that typically covered at least two decade...

  1. Spectral contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography for improved detection of tumor microvasculature and functional imaging of lymphatic drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    SoRelle, Elliott D.; Liba, Orly; Sen, Debasish; de la Zerda, Adam

    2017-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well-suited to study in vivo dynamics of blood circulation and lymphatic flow because of the technique's combination of rapid image acquisition, micron spatial resolution, and penetration depth in turbid tissues. However, OCT has been historically constrained by a dearth of contrast agents that are readily distinguished from the strong scattering intrinsic to biological tissues. In this study, we demonstrate large gold nanorods (LGNRs) as optimized contrast agents for OCT. LGNRs produce 32-fold greater backscattering than GNRs previously tested for contrast-enhanced OCT. Furthermore, LGNRs exhibit 110-fold stronger spectral signal than conventional GNRs when coupled with custom spectral detection algorithms. This signal enhancement enables picomolar OCT detection sensitivity in vivo and single-particle detection against optically-clear backgrounds. Moreover, the ability to synthesize LGNRs with tunable spectral peaks provides a viable platform for multiplexed imaging studies. To explore the advantages of LGNRs as OCT contrast agents, we implemented them for noninvasive 3D imaging of tumor blood supply and active lymphatic drainage in mice. Spectral detection of LGNRs enabled 100% improvement in imaging depth for detecting microvasculature (vessels 20 μm in diameter) in U87MG glioblastoma xenografts in mice pinnae. We also demonstrated our approach's ability to map the spatial dependence of lymph drainage and flow directionality within lymphatic capillaries. Using LGNRs with distinct spectra, we further identified the functional states of individual lymphatic valves in vivo. Thus, this approach provides a powerful new platform for functional imaging that may be extended for future molecular imaging studies with OCT.

  2. Functional connectivity analysis of the brain network using resting-state fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Toshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Spatial patterns of spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals reflect the underlying neural architecture. The study of the brain network based on these self-organized patterns is termed resting-state functional MRI (fMRI). This review article aims at briefly reviewing a basic concept of this technology and discussing its implications for neuropsychological studies. First, the technical aspects of resting-state fMRI, including signal sources, physiological artifacts, image acquisition, and analytical methods such as seed-based correlation analysis and independent component analysis, are explained, followed by a discussion on the major resting-state networks, including the default mode network. In addition, the structure-function correlation studied using diffuse tensor imaging and resting-state fMRI is briefly discussed. Second, I have discussed the reservations and potential pitfalls of 2 major imaging methods: voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping and task fMRI. Problems encountered with voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping can be overcome by using resting-state fMRI and evaluating undamaged brain networks in patients. Regarding task fMRI in patients, I have also emphasized the importance of evaluating the baseline brain activity because the amplitude of activation in BOLD fMRI is hard to interpret as the same baseline cannot be assumed for both patient and normal groups. (author)

  3. The effects of caffeine ingestion on cortical areas: functional imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-A; Kang, Chang-Ki; Son, Young-Don; Choi, Eun-Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Oh, Seung-Taek; Kim, Young-Bo; Park, Chan-Woong; Cho, Zang-Hee

    2014-05-01

    The effect of caffeine as a cognitive enhancer is well known; however, caffeine-induced changes in the cortical regions are still not very clear. Therefore, in this study, we conducted an investigation of the activation and deactivation with blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and of metabolic activity change with positron emission tomography (PET) in the human brain. Fourteen healthy subjects performed a visuomotor task inducing attention with 3T MRI, and PET imaging was also carried out in seven subjects to determine the cerebral glucose metabolic changes of caffeine at rest. The result by fMRI showed increased BOLD activation in the left cerebellum, putamen, insula, thalamus and the right primary motor cortex, and decreased BOLD deactivation in the posterior medial and the left posterior lateral cortex. Also, the resting state PET data showed reduced metabolic activity in the putamen, caudate nucleus, insula, pallidum and posterior medial cortex. The common cortical regions between fMRI and PET, such as putamen, insula and posterior medial cortex, where significant changes occurred after caffeine ingestion, are well known to play an important role in cognitive function like attention. This result suggests that the effect of caffeine as a cognitive enhancer is derived by modulating the attentional areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Resting-state functional connectivity and nicotine addiction: prospects for biomarker development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedota, John R; Stein, Elliot A

    2015-09-01

    Given conceptual frameworks of addiction as a disease of intercommunicating brain networks, examinations of network interactions may provide a holistic characterization of addiction-related dysfunction. One such methodological approach is the examination of resting-state functional connectivity, which quantifies correlations in low-frequency fluctuations of the blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging signal between disparate brain regions in the absence of task performance. Here, evidence of differentiated effects of chronic nicotine exposure, which reduces the efficiency of network communication across the brain, and acute nicotine exposure, which increases connectivity within specific limbic circuits, is discussed. Several large-scale resting networks, including the salience, default, and executive control networks, have also been implicated in nicotine addiction. The dynamics of connectivity changes among and between these large-scale networks during nicotine withdrawal and satiety provide a heuristic framework with which to characterize the neurobiological mechanism of addiction. The ability to simultaneously quantify effects of both chronic (trait) and acute (state) nicotine exposure provides a platform to develop a neuroimaging-based addiction biomarker. While such development remains in its early stages, evidence of coherent modulations in resting-state functional connectivity at various stages of nicotine addiction suggests potential network interactions on which to focus future addiction biomarker development. Published 2015. This article is U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Functional MRI study of verbal working memory in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Youran; Geng Daoying; Feng Xiaoyuan; Du Yasong; Zhao Zhimin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the verbal working memory of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as well as to explore the characteristics of functional areas of verbal working memory with blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Method: Eighteen children were selected in the study. There were 9 ADHD children with inattention subtype and 9 healthy subjects. All patients and healthy subjects completed the cognitive examination and the block- designed N-block verbal working memory task using a GE 3.0 T MR. Data were analyzed by AFNI software. Result: The neural activations of ADHD's children are lower than that of control under verbal working memory. Especially in the areas of bilateral middle frontal gyri and inferior frontal gyri, bilateral superior parietal lobules and inferior parietal lobules, right basal ganglia in the 1-BACK task. And bilateral middle frontal gyri and inferior frontal gyri, bilateral superior parietal lobules, left cortex inferior parietallobule, right basal ganglia, anterior cingulatecortex in the 2-BACK task. Conclusion: The hypofunctional areas of verbal working memory (including bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex) can be seen in the ADHD children especially who also has lower activation of anterior cingulate cortex under 2-BACK task. (authors)

  6. Effect of midazolam on memory: a study of process dissociation procedure and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, S Y; Zou, L; Quan, X; Zhang, Y; Xue, F S; Ye, T H

    2010-06-01

    To assess the effects of midazolam on explicit and implicit memories, 12 volunteers were randomly divided into the two groups: one with an Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation score of 3 (mild sedation) and one with a score of 1 (deep sedation). Blood oxygen-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging was measured before and during an auditory stimulus, then with midazolam sedation, and then during a second auditory stimulus with continuous midazolam sedation. After 4 h, explicit and implicit memories were assessed. There was no evidence of explicit memory at the two levels of midazolam sedation. Implicit memory was retained at a mild level of midazolam sedation but absent at a deep level of midazolam sedation. At a mild level of midazolam sedation, activation of all brain areas by auditory stimulus (as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging) was uninhibited. However, a deep level of midazolam sedation depressed activation of the superior temporal gyrus by auditory stimulus. We conclude that midazolam does not abolish implicit memory at a mild sedation level, but can abolish both explicit and implicit memories at a deep sedation level. The superior temporal gyrus may be one of the target areas.

  7. Resting-state functional connectivity in late-life depression: higher global connectivity and more long distance connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwo Jerzy Bohr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI recordings in the resting-state (RS from the human brain are characterized by spontaneous low-frequency fluctuations (SLFs in the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signal that reveal functional connectivity (FC via their spatial synchronicity. This RS study applied network analysis to compare FC between late-life depression (LLD patients and control subjects. Raw cross-correlation matrices (CM for LLD were characterized by higher functional connectivity. We analysed aggregate topology metrics of networks composed of 110 brain regions and also investigated properties of connectivity in the basal ganglia. Topological network measures showed no significant differences between groups. The composition of top hubs was similar between LLD and control subjects, however in the LLD group posterior medial parietal regions were more highly connected compared to controls. In LLD, a number of brain regions showed connections with more distant neighbours leading to an increase of the average Euclidean distance between connected regions compared to controls. In addition, right caudate nucleus connectivity was more diffuse in LLD. In this study, LLD was associated with overall functional connectivity strength and changes in the average distance between connected nodes, but did not lead to global changes in small-world or modular organization.

  8. Functional neuroanatomy associated with the interaction between emotion and cognition in explicit memory tasks in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chung-Man; Yang, Jong-Chul; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2017-01-01

    The functional neuroanatomy for explicit memory in conjunction with the major anxiety symptoms in patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has not yet been clearly identified. To investigate the brain activation patterns on the interaction between emotional and cognitive function during the explicit memory tasks, as well as its correlation with clinical characteristics in GAD. The participants comprised GAD patients and age-matched healthy controls. The fMR images were obtained while the participants performed an explicit memory task with neutral and anxiety-inducing words. Patients showed significantly decreased functional activities in the putamen, head of the caudate nucleus, hippocampus, and middle cingulate gyrus during the memory tasks with the neutral and anxiety-inducing words, whereas the precentral gyrus and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly increased only in the memory tasks with the anxiety-inducing words. Also, the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes in the hippocampus were positively correlated with the recognition accuracy for both neutral and anxiety-inducing words. This study identified the brain areas associated with the interaction between emotional regulation and cognitive function in the explicit memory tasks in patients with GAD. These findings would be helpful to understand the neural mechanism on the explicit memory-related cognitive deficits and emotional dysfunction with GAD symptoms. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2016.

  9. Contrasting results of tests of peripheral vestibular function in patients with bilateral large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Juan; Wu, Yong-Zhen; Cong, Ning; Yu, Jing; Gu, Jun; Wang, Jing; Chi, Fang-Lu

    2017-08-01

    To analyze and summarize the effect of bilateral large vestibular aqueducts in peripheral vestibular organ function. Eighteen patients with bilateral large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS; Study Group) and 18 healthy volunteers (Control Group) were investigated using audiometry, caloric test, sensory organization test (SOT), and vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) tests. All 18 patients (36 ears) exhibited sensorineural hearing loss. For cervical VEMP (cVEMP), the Study Group showed lower thresholds (Study Group vs. 71.4vs. 75.3dBnHL; p=0.006), N1 latencies (24.1vs. 25.2ms; p=0.026) and shorter P1 (15.3vs. 16.6ms; p=0.003), and higher amplitudes (400.7vs. 247.2µV; pvestibular test in otolithic organs and the hypofunction of vestibular test in semicircular canals, as well as the dysfunction in the balance test were demonstrated in patients with LVAS. Our findings can help clinicians gain a better understanding of the characteristics of vestibular organ function in patients with LVAS, which can facilitate optimal targeted treatment. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Muscle endurance and mitochondrial function after chronic normobaric hypoxia: contrast of respiratory and limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, Jorge L; Andrade, Francisco H

    2012-02-01

    Skeletal muscle adaptation to chronic hypoxia includes loss of oxidative capacity and decrease in fiber size. However, the diaphragm may adapt differently since its activity increases in response to hypoxia. Thus, we hypothesized that chronic hypoxia would not affect endurance, mitochondrial function, or fiber size in the mouse diaphragm. Adult male mice were kept in normoxia (control) or hypoxia (hypoxia, FIO(2) = 10%) for 4 weeks. After that time, muscles were collected for histological, biochemical, and functional analyses. Hypoxia soleus muscles fatigued faster (fatigue index higher in control, 21.5 ± 2.6% vs. 13.4 ± 2.4%, p muscles, but it was 25% smaller in diaphragm (p muscles were lower: state 2 decreased 19%, state 3 31%, and state 4 18% vs. control, p muscle mitochondria had lower content of complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), while diaphragm mitochondria had higher content of complexes IV and V (F (1)/F (0) ATP synthase) and less uncoupling protein 3 (UCP-3). These data demonstrate that diaphragm retains its endurance during chronic hypoxia, apparently due to a combination of morphometric changes and optimization of mitochondrial energy production.

  11. Contrasting Ecological Processes and Functional Compositions Between Intestinal Bacterial Community in Healthy and Diseased Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinyong; Dai, Wenfang; Qiu, Qiongfen; Dong, Chunming; Zhang, Jinjie; Xiong, Jinbo

    2016-11-01

    Intestinal bacterial communities play a pivotal role in promoting host health; therefore, the disruption of intestinal bacterial homeostasis could result in disease. However, the effect of the occurrences of disease on intestinal bacterial community assembly remains unclear. To address this gap, we compared the multifaceted ecological differences in maintaining intestinal bacterial community assembly between healthy and diseased shrimps. The neutral model analysis shows that the relative importance of neutral processes decreases when disease occurs. This pattern is further corroborated by the ecosphere null model, revealing that the bacterial community assembly of diseased samples is dominated by stochastic processes. In addition, the occurrence of shrimp disease reduces the complexity and cooperative activities of species-to-species interactions. The keystone taxa affiliated with Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria in healthy shrimp gut shift to Gammaproteobacteria species in diseased shrimp. Changes in intestinal bacterial communities significantly alter biological functions in shrimp. Within a given metabolic pathway, the pattern of enrichment or decrease between healthy and deceased shrimp is correlated with its functional effects. We propose that stressed shrimp are more prone to invasion by alien strains (evidenced by more stochastic assembly and higher migration rate in diseased shrimp), which, in turn, disrupts the cooperative activity among resident species. These findings greatly aid our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that govern shrimp intestinal community assembly between health statuses.

  12. MRI with intrathecal MRI gadolinium contrast medium administration: a possible method to assess glymphatic function in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Ringstad, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the “glymphatic system” of the brain has been discovered in rodents, which is a paravascular, transparenchymal route for clearance of excess brain metabolites and distribution of compounds in the cerebrospinal fluid. It has already been demonstrated that intrathecally administered gadolinium (Gd) contrast medium distributes along this route in rats, but so far not in humans. A 27-year-old woman underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with intrathecal administration of gadobutrol, which distributed throughout her entire brain after 1 and 4.5 h. MRI with intrathecal Gd may become a tool to study glymphatic function in the human brain

  13. [The function of analogies in natural sciences, also in contrast to metaphors and models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    This introduction surveys the various functions of analogies in science, medicine and technology. The focus is on their heuristic importance. The productiveness of analogies is linked to the systematic depth and breadth of the established connections. Various examples are presented from different periods in the history of science, most notably Galileo; such late-Victorian Maxwellians as George Francis FitzGerald and Oliver Lodge; and Heinrich HERTZ and Niels BOHR. These examples are examined in terms of the specific differing temporal ranges of their claimed validities. They serve as evidence or counterevidence for various systematic analyses of analogies as put forward by various philosophers of science, most notably Francis Bacon, John Stuart Mill, Ernst Mach, Harald Høffding, Ernest Nagel, Mary Hesse and Peter Achinstein. The analytic framework for analogies supported here is what the cognitive scientist Dedre Gentner has termed structure-mapping.

  14. Time-Evolution Contrast of Target MRI Using High-Stability Antibody Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles: An Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. W. Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, high-quality antibody functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles are synthesized. Such physical characterizations as particle morphology, particle size, stability, and relaxivity of magnetic particles are investigated. The immunoreactivity of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles is examined by utilizing immunomagnetic reduction. The results show that the mean diameter of antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles is around 50 nm, and the relaxivity of the magnetic particles is 145 (mM·s−1. In addition to characterizing the magnetic nanoparticles, the feasibility of using the antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for the contrast medium of target magnetic resonance imaging is investigated. These antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles are injected into mice bearing with tumor. The tumor magnetic-resonance image becomes darker after the injection and then recovers 50 hours after the injection. The tumor magnetic-resonance image becomes the darkest at around 20 hours after the injection. Thus, the observing time window for the specific labeling of tumors with antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles was found to be 20 hours after injecting biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles into mice. The biopsy of tumor is stained after the injection to prove that the long-term darkness of tumor magnetic-resonance image is due to the specific anchoring of antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles at tumor.

  15. Nanotoxic Profiling of Novel Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Functionalized with Perchloric Acid and SiPEG as a Radiographic Contrast Medium

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    Muhamad Idham Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging syntheses and findings of new metallic nanoparticles (MNPs have become an important aspect in various fields including diagnostic imaging. To date, iodine has been utilized as a radiographic contrast medium. However, the raise concern of iodine threats on iodine-intolerance patient has led to search of new contrast media with lower toxic level. In this animal modeling study, 14 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs with silane-polyethylene glycol (SiPEG and perchloric acid have been assessed for toxicity level as compared to conventional iodine. The nanotoxicity of IONPs was evaluated in liver biochemistry, reactive oxygen species production (ROS, lipid peroxidation mechanism, and ultrastructural evaluation using transmission electron microscope (TEM. The hematological analysis and liver function test (LFT revealed that most of the liver enzymes were significantly higher in iodine-administered group as compared to those in normal and IONPs groups P<0.05. ROS production assay and lipid peroxidation indicator, malondialdehyde (MDA, also showed significant reductions in comparison with iodine group P<0.05. TEM evaluation yielded the aberration of nucleus structure of iodine-administered group as compared to those in control and IONPs groups. This study has demonstrated the less toxic properties of IONPs and it may postulate that IONPs are safe to be applied as radiographic contrast medium.

  16. Blocked-micropores, surface functionalized, bio-compatible and silica-coated iron oxide nanocomposites as advanced MRI contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darbandi, Masih; Laurent, Sophie; Busch, Martin; Li Zian; Yuan Ying; Krüger, Michael; Farle, Michael; Winterer, Markus; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N.; Wende, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles have been found promising in several biomedical applications for tagging, imaging, sensing and separation in recent years. In this article, a systematic study of the design and development of surface-modification schemes for silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) via a one-pot, in situ method at room temperature is presented. Silica-coated IONP were prepared in a water-in-oil microemulsion, and subsequently the surface was modified via addition of organosilane reagents to the microemulsion system. The structure and the morphology of the as synthesized nanoparticles have been investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and measurement of N 2 adsorption–desorption. Electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images of the nanoparticles showed the highly crystalline nature of the IONP structures. Nitrogen adsorption indicates microporous and blocked-microporous structures for the silica-coated and amine functionalized silica-coated IONP, respectively which could prove less cytotoxicity of the functionalized final product. Besides, the colloidal stability of the final product and the presence of the modified functional groups on top of surface layer have been proven by zeta-potential measurements. Owing to the benefit from the inner IONP core and the hydrophilic silica shell, the as-synthesized nanocomposites were exploited as an MRI contrast enhancement agent. Relaxometric results prove that the surface functionalized IONP have also signal enhancement properties. These surface functionalized nanocomposites are not only potential candidates for highly efficient contrast agents for MRI, but could also be used as ultrasensitive biological-magnetic labels, because they are in nanoscale size, having magnetic properties, blocked-microporous and are well dispersible in biological environment.

  17. Comparison of language cortex reorganization patterns between cerebral arteriovenous malformations and gliomas: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Long; Wang, Bo; Wang, Shuo; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Rong; Wang, Jia; Zhao, Jizong

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are congenital malformations that may grow in the language cortex but usually do not lead to aphasia. In contrast, language dysfunction is a common presentation for patients with a glioma that involves language areas. The authors attempted to demonstrate the difference in patterns of language cortex reorganization between cerebral AVMs and gliomas by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) evaluation. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed clinical and imaging data of 63 patients with an unruptured cerebral AVM (AVM group) and 38 patients with a glioma (glioma group) who underwent fMRI. All the patients were right handed, and all their lesions were located in the left cerebral hemisphere. Patients were further categorized into 1 of the 2 following subgroups according to their lesion location: the BA subgroup (overlying or adjacent to the inferior frontal or the middle frontal gyri [the Broca area]) and the WA subgroup (overlying or adjacent to the supramarginal, angular, or superior temporal gyri [the Wernicke area]). Lateralization indices of BOLD signal activations were calculated separately for the Broca and Wernicke areas. Statistical analysis was performed to identify the difference in patterns of language cortex reorganization between the 2 groups. RESULTS In the AVM group, right-sided lateralization of BOLD signal activations was observed in 23 patients (36.5%), including 6 with right-sided lateralization in the Broca area alone, 12 in the Wernicke area alone, and 5 in both areas. More specifically, in the 34 patients in the AVM-BA subgroup, right-sided lateralization of the Broca area was detected in 9 patients (26.5%), and right-sided lateralization of the Wernicke area was detected in 4 (11.8%); in the 29 patients in the AVM-WA subgroup, 2 (6.9%) had right-sided lateralization of the Broca area, and 13 (44.8%) had right-sided lateralization of the Wernicke area. In the glioma group

  18. Central sensitization-related changes of effective and functional connectivity in the rat inflammatory trigeminal pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spisák, Tamás; Pozsgay, Zsófia; Aranyi, Csaba; Dávid, Szabolcs; Kocsis, Pál; Nyitrai, Gabriella; Gajári, Dávid; Emri, Miklós; Czurkó, András; Kincses, Zsigmond Tamás

    2017-03-06

    Central sensitization is a key mechanism in the pathology of several neuropathic pain disorders. We aimed to investigate the underlying brain connectivity changes in a rat model of chronic pain. Non-noxious whisker stimulation was used to evoke blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) responses in a block-design functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) experiment on 9.4T. Measurements were repeated two days and one week after injecting complete Freund's adjuvant into the rats' whisker pad. We found that acute pain reduced activation in the barrel cortex, most probably due to a plateau effect. After one week, increased activation of the anterior cingulate cortex was found. Analyses of effective connectivity driven by stimulus-related activation revealed that chronic pain-related central sensitization manifested as a widespread alteration in the activity of the somatosensory network. Changes were mainly mediated by the anterior cingulate cortex and the striatum and affected the somatosensory and motor cortices and the superior colliculus. Functional connectivity analysis of nested BOLD oscillations justified that the anterior cingular-somatosensory interplay is a key element of network changes. Additionally, a decreased cingulo-motor functional connectivity implies that alterations also involve the output tract of the network. Our results extend the knowledge about the role of the cingulate cortex in the chronification of pain and indicate that integration of multiple connectivity analysis could be fruitful in studying the central sensitization in the pain matrix. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. No difference in frontal cortical activity during an executive functioning task after acute doses of aripiprazole and haloperidol

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    Ingeborg eBolstad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aripiprazole is an atypical antipsychotic drug that is characterized by partial dopamine D2 receptor agonism. Its pharmacodynamic profile is proposed to be beneficial in the treatment of cognitive impairment, which is prevalent in psychotic disorders. This study compared brain activation characteristics produced by aripiprazole with that of haloperidol, a typical D2 receptor antagonist, during a task targeting executive functioning.Methods: Healthy participants received an acute oral dose of haloperidol, aripiprazole or placebo before performing an executive functioning task while blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was carried out. Results: There was a tendency towards reduced performance in the aripiprazole group compared to the two other groups. The image analysis yielded a strong task-related BOLD-fMRI response within each group. An uncorrected between-group analysis showed that aripiprazole challenge resulted in stronger activation in the frontal and temporal gyri and the putamen compared with haloperidol challenge, but after correcting for multiple testing there was no significant group difference. Conclusion: No significant group differences between aripiprazole and haloperidol in frontal cortical activation were obtained when corrected for multiple comparisons.This study is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: 2009-016222-14; https://clinicaltrials.gov/.

  20. Changes in thyroid function following iodine-containing contrast administration in patients in an endemic goitre area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grehn, S.; Steidle, B.; Seif, F.J.; Tuebingen Univ.

    1981-01-01

    A prospective study of thyroid function after the administration of iodine-containing radiographic contrast media was carried out on 119 patients from an area where goitres are endemic. Eighteen patients had a negative TRH test after 28 days. 27.9% of patients after oral cholecystography, 15.1% of patients after intravenous cholangiography and 5.3% of patients after infusion urography, showed hyperthyroid function. In these patients, thyroxin and triiodothyronin levels were higher than in euthyroid patients. Thyroid stimulating antibodies could not be demonstrated. Induction of hyperthyroidism by iodine is considered to be due to autonomy of the thyroid gland parenchyma. For this reason the risk of iodine-induced hyperthyroidism is greater in patients from a goitre endemic region (by a factor of 1.3 to 17.1). (orig.) [de

  1. Functionalized multimodal ZnO@Gd2O3 nanosystems to use as perspective contrast agent for MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayevska, Nataliya; Florczak, Patryk; Woźniak-Budych, Marta; Jarek, Marcin; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Tomasz; Jurga, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    The main aim of this research was the synthesis of the multimodal hybrid ZnO@Gd2O3 nanostructures as prospective contrast agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for bio-medical applications. The nanoparticles surface was functionalized by organosilicon compounds (OSC) then, by folic acid (FA) as targeting agent and doxorubicin (Dox) as chemotherapeutic agent. Doxorubicin and folic acid were attached to the nanoparticles surface by amino groups as well as due to attractive physical interactions. The morphology and crystallography of the nanostructures were studied by HRTEM and SAXS techniques. After ZnO nanoparticles surface modification by Gd3+ and annealing at 900 °C, ZnO@Gd2O3 nanostructures are polydispersed with size 30-100 nm. NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) studies of ZnO@Gd2O3 were performed on fractionated particles with size up to 50 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential measurements and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) showed that functional groups have been effectively bonded onto the nanoparticles surface. The high adsorption capacity of folic acid (up to 20%) and doxorubicin (up to 40%) on nanoparticles was reached upon 15 min of adsorption process in a temperature-dependent manner. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements confirmed that the obtained ZnO@Gd2O3 nanostructures could be good contrast agents, useful for magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Gadolinium based contrast agents in current practice: Risks of accumulation and toxicity in patients with normal renal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Ranga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite being decked as the most prized compounds in the nugget box of contrast agents for clinical radiologists, and carrying an indisputable tag of safety of the US Food and Drug Administration for close to three decades, all may not be seemingly well with the family of gadolinium compounds. If the first signs of violations of primum non nocere in relation to gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs appeared in the millennium year with the first published report of skin fibrosis in patients with compromised renal function, the causal relationship between the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF and GBCAs, first proposed by two European groups in 2006, further precluded their use in renocompromised patients. The toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of GBCAs, however, has come under hawk-eyed scrutiny with recent reports that gadolinium tends to deposit cumulatively in the brain of patients with normal hepatobiliary function and intact blood–brain barrier. While the jury on the long-term hazard significance of this critical scientific finding is still out, the use of GBCAs must be guided by due clinical diligence, avoidance of repeated doses, and preferring GBCAs with the best safety profiles.

  3. Impact of Virtual and Augmented Reality Based on Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Functional Neuronavigation in Glioma Surgery Involving Eloquent Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guo-Chen; Wang, Fei; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Yu, Xin-Guang; Ma, Xiao-Dong; Zhou, Ding-Biao; Zhu, Ru-Yuan; Xu, Bai-Nan

    2016-12-01

    The utility of virtual and augmented reality based on functional neuronavigation and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for glioma surgery has not been previously investigated. The study population consisted of 79 glioma patients and 55 control subjects. Preoperatively, the lesion and related eloquent structures were visualized by diffusion tensor tractography and blood oxygen level-dependent functional MRI. Intraoperatively, microscope-based functional neuronavigation was used to integrate the reconstructed eloquent structure and the real head and brain, which enabled safe resection of the lesion. Intraoperative MRI was used to verify brain shift during the surgical process and provided quality control during surgery. The control group underwent surgery guided by anatomic neuronavigation. Virtual and augmented reality protocols based on functional neuronavigation and intraoperative MRI provided useful information for performing tailored and optimized surgery. Complete resection was achieved in 55 of 79 (69.6%) glioma patients and 20 of 55 (36.4%) control subjects, with average resection rates of 95.2% ± 8.5% and 84.9% ± 15.7%, respectively. Both the complete resection rate and average extent of resection differed significantly between the 2 groups (P virtual and augmented reality based on functional neuronavigation and intraoperative MRI can facilitate resection of gliomas involving eloquent areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Heterogenous migraine aura symptoms correlate with visual cortex functional magnetic resonance imaging responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Hougaard, Anders; Ahmadi, Khazar; Vestergaard, Mark Bitsch; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Larsson, Henrik Bo Wiberg; Olesen, Jes; Hoffmann, Michael B; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-12-01

    Migraine aura is sparsely studied due to the highly challenging task of capturing patients during aura. Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is likely the underlying phenomenon of aura. The possible correlation between the multifaceted phenomenology of aura symptoms and the effects of CSD on the brain has not been ascertained. Five migraine patients were studied during various forms of aura symptoms induced by hypoxia, sham hypoxia, or physical exercise with concurrent photostimulation. The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal response to visual stimulation was measured in retinotopic mapping-defined visual cortex areas V1 to V4. We found reduced BOLD response in patients reporting scotoma and increased response in patients who only experienced positive symptoms. Furthermore, patients with bilateral visual symptoms had corresponding bihemispherical changes in BOLD response. These findings suggest that different aura symptoms reflect different types of cerebral dysfunction, which correspond to specific changes in BOLD signal reactivity. Furthermore, we provide evidence of bilateral CSD recorded by fMRI during bilateral aura symptoms. Ann Neurol 2017;82:925-939. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  5. The effects of sleep deprivation on brain functioning in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almklov, Erin L; Drummond, Sean P A; Orff, Henry; Alhassoon, Omar M

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) on cognitive performance and brain activation using functional MRI (fMRI) in older adults. The current study examines blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activation in older adults and younger adults during the sustained attention (GO) and response inhibition (NOGO) portions of a GO-NOGO cognitive task following 36 hr of total sleep deprivation. No significant performance differences were observed between the groups on the behavioral outcome measures of total hits and false alarms. Neuroimaging results, however, revealed a significant interaction between age-group and sleep-deprivation status. Specifically, older adults showed greater BOLD activation as compared to younger adults after 36 hours total sleep deprivation in brain regions typically associated with attention and inhibitory processes. These results suggest in order for older adults to perform the GO-NOGO task effectively after sleep deprivation, they rely on compensatory recruitment of brain regions that aide in the maintenance of cognitive performance.

  6. Principles of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and its Applications in Cognitive Neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şule Tınaz

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a neuroimaging technique that provides brain activation maps with a spatial resolution of a few millimeters. The BOLD (blood oxygenation level dependent fMRI method is the most commonly used technique. It measures the hemodynamic response to neural activity. The BOLD fMRI signal is based on the magnetic properties of the oxygenated / deoxygenated hemoglobin which is the oxygen carrier in blood. FMRI is noninvasive, and unlike in positron emission tomography (PET individuals are not exposed to radiation. This allows data collection from the same individual over multiple sessions. The relatively high temporal resolution of fMRI compared to PET provides flexibility in experimental designs of cognitive tasks. In this paper we review the key principles of MRI physics, and the underlying metabolic, hemodynamic, and electrophysiological mechanisms of BOLD signal. We introduce frequently used experimental design paradigms and present examples. Next, we give an overview of theoretical considerations and applications of analysis methods in fMRI time series. Neural network modeling based on fMRI data is also discussed. Finally, we present an ongoing study in our laboratory to demonstrate the application of design types and analysis methods

  7. Neural correlates of simple unimanual discrete and continuous movements: a functional imaging study at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Christophe; Cabanis, Emmanuel A. [Hopital des Quinze-Vingts, UPMC Paris 6, Service de NeuroImagerie, Paris (France)

    2008-04-15

    The cerebral and cerebellar network involved in unimanual continuous and discrete movements was studied in blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3 T. Seven healthy right-handed volunteers were scanned (1) while drawing a circle with the tip of the right index finger (continuous motor task), and (2) while drawing a triangle with the tip of the right index finger (discrete motor task). In both motor tasks, extensive activations were observed in the sensorimotor (M1/S1), parietal, prefrontal, insular, lateral occipital (LOC) and anterior cerebellar cortices. Subcortical activations within red, thalamic and lentiform nuclei were also detected. However, discrete movements were specifically followed by the recruitment of the left orbitofrontal cortex, right dentate nucleus and the second cerebellar homunculus (HVIII), and bilateral and stronger activation of the sensorimotor cortical areas, whereas continuous movements specifically activated the right prefrontal cortex and the lateral hemispherical part of the neocerebellum (crus 1). We confirm the findings of previous studies showing partly distinct neural networks involved in monitoring continuous and discrete movements, but we found new differential neural relays within the prefrontal, insular and neocerebellar cortices. (orig.)

  8. Robust preprocessing for stimulus-based functional MRI of the moving fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Wonsang; Evangelou, Iordanis E; Zun, Zungho; Andescavage, Nickie; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    Fetal motion manifests as signal degradation and image artifact in the acquired time series of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. We present a robust preprocessing pipeline to specifically address fetal and placental motion-induced artifacts in stimulus-based fMRI with slowly cycled block design in the living fetus. In the proposed pipeline, motion correction is optimized to the experimental paradigm, and it is performed separately in each phase as well as in each region of interest (ROI), recognizing that each phase and organ experiences different types of motion. To obtain the averaged BOLD signals for each ROI, both misaligned volumes and noisy voxels are automatically detected and excluded, and the missing data are then imputed by statistical estimation based on local polynomial smoothing. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed pipeline was effective in mitigating the motion-induced artifacts in stimulus-based fMRI data of the fetal brain and placenta.

  9. Associations between polygenic risk for schizophrenia and brain function during probabilistic learning in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Thomas M; Ihssen, Niklas; Brindley, Lisa M; Tansey, Katherine E; Mantripragada, Kiran; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J; Linden, David E J

    2016-02-01

    A substantial proportion of schizophrenia liability can be explained by additive genetic factors. Risk profile scores (RPS) directly index risk using a summated total of common risk variants weighted by their effect. Previous studies suggest that schizophrenia RPS predict alterations to neural networks that support working memory and verbal fluency. In this study, we apply schizophrenia RPS to fMRI data to elucidate the effects of polygenic risk on functional brain networks during a probabilistic-learning neuroimaging paradigm. The neural networks recruited during this paradigm have previously been shown to be altered to unmedicated schizophrenia patients and relatives of schizophrenia patients, which may reflect genetic susceptibility. We created schizophrenia RPS using summary data from the Psychiatric Genetic Consortium (Schizophrenia Working Group) for 83 healthy individuals and explore associations between schizophrenia RPS and blood oxygen level dependency (BOLD) during periods of choice behavior (switch-stay) and reflection upon choice outcome (reward-punishment). We show that schizophrenia RPS is associated with alterations in the frontal pole (PWHOLE-BRAIN-CORRECTED  = 0.048) and the ventral striatum (PROI-CORRECTED  = 0.036), during choice behavior, but not choice outcome. We suggest that the common risk variants that increase susceptibility to schizophrenia can be associated with alterations in the neural circuitry that support the processing of changing reward contingencies. Hum Brain Mapp 37:491-500, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Factors related to the magnitude of T2* MR signal changes during functional imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krings, T. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of the Technical University Aachen (Germany); Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of the Technical University Aachen (Germany); Interdisciplinary Centre for Clinical Research - Central Nervous System, University Hospital of the Technical University Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Reinges, M.H.T.; Gilsbach, J.M. [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of the Technical University Aachen (Germany); Willmes, K.; Nuerk, H.C. [Section of Neuropsychology, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of the Technical University Aachen (Germany); Meister, I.G. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital of the Technical University Aachen (Germany); Thron, A. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of the Technical University Aachen (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    Our aim was to determine whether age, sex, the degree of weakness, anticonvulsants, the histology of the underlying lesion(s), the presence of oedema or the distance of the lesion from the motor region have an impact on the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal strength and therefore on the validity of functional MRI (fMRI). We studied 98 patients with masses near the central region imaged for surgical planning at 1.5 tesla, employing a BOLD sequence during a motor task. We calculated percentage signal change in the primary motor cortex between rest and activation and carried out multiple linear regression to examine the impact of the above factors on signal strength. Using a stepwise analysis strategy, the distance of the lesion from the motor region had the strongest influence (r=0.653, P<0.001). The factor with largest uncorrelated additional impact on signal change was the presence of oedema. Both predictors together formed a highly significant multiple r=0.739 (P<0.001). No other predictive factor was identified (all P>0.20). Disturbances of cerebral blood flow and metabolism induced by the tumour were presumed to be the causes of a decrease in signal in the adjacent cortex. (orig.)

  11. Abnormal ventromedial prefrontal cortex function in children with psychopathic traits during reversal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Elizabeth C; Marsh, Abigail A; Mitchell, Derek G; Reid, Marguerite E; Sims, Courtney; Budhani, Salima; Kosson, David S; Chen, Gang; Towbin, Kenneth E; Leibenluft, Ellen; Pine, Daniel S; Blair, James R

    2008-05-01

    Children and adults with psychopathic traits and conduct or oppositional defiant disorder demonstrate poor decision making and are impaired in reversal learning. However, the neural basis of this impairment has not previously been investigated. Furthermore, despite high comorbidity of psychopathic traits and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, to our knowledge, no research has attempted to distinguish neural correlates of childhood psychopathic traits and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. To determine the neural regions that underlie the reversal learning impairments in children with psychopathic traits plus conduct or oppositional defiant disorder. Case-control study. Government clinical research institute. Forty-two adolescents aged 10 to 17 years: 14 with psychopathic traits and oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder, 14 with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder only, and 14 healthy controls. Blood oxygenation level-dependent signal as measured via functional magnetic resonance imaging during a probabilistic reversal task. Children with psychopathic traits showed abnormal responses within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 10) during punished reversal errors compared with children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and healthy children (P children with psychopathic traits and demonstrates this dysfunction was not attributable to comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. These findings suggest that reversal learning impairments in patients with developmental psychopathic traits relate to abnormal processing of reinforcement information.

  12. Language processing of auditory cortex revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging in presbycusis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianming; Wang, Maoxin; Deng, Yihong; Liang, Yonghui; Li, Jianzhong; Chen, Shiyan

    2016-01-01

    Contralateral temporal lobe activation decreases with aging, regardless of hearing status, with elderly individuals showing reduced right ear advantage. Aging and hearing loss possibly lead to presbycusis speech discrimination decline. To evaluate presbycusis patients' auditory cortex activation under verbal stimulation. Thirty-six patients were enrolled: 10 presbycusis patients (mean age = 64 years, range = 60-70), 10 in the healthy aged group (mean age = 66 years, range = 60-70), and 16 young healthy volunteers (mean age = 25 years, range = 23-28). These three groups underwent simultaneous 1 kHz and 90 dB single-syllable word stimuli and (blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging) BOLD fMRI examinations. The main activation regions were superior temporal and middle temporal gyrus. For all aged subjects, the right region of interest (ROI) activation volume was decreased compared with the young group. With left ear stimulation, bilateral ROI activation intensity held. With right ear stimulation, the aged group's activation intensity was higher. Using monaural stimulation in the young group, contralateral temporal lobe activation volume and intensity were higher vs ipsilateral, while they were lower in the aged and presbycusis groups. On left and right ear auditory tasks, the young group showed right ear advantage, while the aged and presbycusis groups showed reduced right ear advantage.

  13. Propofol and memory: a study using a process dissociation procedure and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, X; Yi, J; Ye, T H; Tian, S Y; Zou, L; Yu, X R; Huang, Y G

    2013-04-01

    Thirty volunteers randomly received either mild or deep propofol sedation, to assess its effect on explicit and implicit memory. Blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance during sedation examined brain activation by auditory word stimulus and a process dissociation procedure was performed 4 h after scanning. Explicit memory formation did not occur in either group. Implicit memories were formed during mild but not deep sedation (p = 0.04). Mild propofol sedation inhibited superior temporal gyrus activation (Z value 4.37, voxel 167). Deep propofol sedation inhibited superior temporal gyrus (Z value 4.25, voxel 351), middle temporal gyrus (Z value 4.39, voxel 351) and inferior parietal lobule (Z value 5.06, voxel 239) activation. Propofol only abolishes implicit memory during deep sedation. The superior temporal gyrus is associated with explicit memory processing, while the formation of both implicit and explicit memories is associated with superior and middle temporal gyri and inferior parietal lobule activation. Anaesthesia © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  14. The effects of nicotine and non-nicotine smoking factors on working memory and associated brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClernon, Francis Joseph; Froeliger, Brett; Rose, Jed E; Kozink, Rachel V; Addicott, Merideth A; Sweitzer, Maggie M; Westman, Eric C; Van Wert, Dana M

    2016-07-01

    Smoking abstinence impairs executive function, which may promote continued smoking behavior and relapse. The differential influence of nicotine and non-nicotine (i.e. sensory, motor) smoking factors and related neural substrates is not known. In a fully factorial, within-subjects design, 33 smokers underwent fMRI scanning following 24 hours of wearing a nicotine or placebo patch while smoking very low nicotine content cigarettes or remaining abstinent from smoking. During scanning, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal was acquired while participants performed a verbal N-back task. Following 24-hour placebo (versus nicotine) administration, accuracy on the N-back task was significantly worse and task-related BOLD signal lower in dorsomedial frontal cortex. These effects were observed irrespective of smoking. Our data provide novel evidence that abstinence-induced deficits in working memory and changes in underlying brain function are due in large part to abstinence from nicotine compared with non-nicotine factors. This work has implications both for designing interventions that target abstinence-induced cognitive deficits and for nicotine-reduction policy. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  15. Vagal nerve stimulation triggers widespread responses and alters large-scale functional connectivity in the rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayue Cao

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS is a therapy for epilepsy and depression. However, its efficacy varies and its mechanism remains unclear. Prior studies have used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to map brain activations with VNS in human brains, but have reported inconsistent findings. The source of inconsistency is likely attributable to the complex temporal characteristics of VNS-evoked fMRI responses that cannot be fully explained by simplified response models in the conventional model-based analysis for activation mapping. To address this issue, we acquired 7-Tesla blood oxygenation level dependent fMRI data from anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats receiving electrical stimulation at the left cervical vagus nerve. Using spatially independent component analysis, we identified 20 functional brain networks and detected the network-wise activations with VNS in a data-driven manner. Our results showed that VNS activated 15 out of 20 brain networks, and the activated regions covered >76% of the brain volume. The time course of the evoked response was complex and distinct across regions and networks. In addition, VNS altered the strengths and patterns of correlations among brain networks relative to those in the resting state. The most notable changes in network-network interactions were related to the limbic system. Together, such profound and widespread effects of VNS may underlie its unique potential for a wide range of therapeutics to relieve central or peripheral conditions.

  16. Automated Determination of Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI from Regions around Arteries Using Independent Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF measurement using dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC- MRI requires accurate estimation of the arterial input function (AIF. The present work utilized the independent component analysis (ICA method to determine the AIF in the regions adjacent to the middle cerebral artery (MCA by the alleviated confounding of partial volume effect. Materials and Methods. A series of spin-echo EPI MR scans were performed in 10 normal subjects. All subjects received 0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA contrast agent. AIFs were calculated by two methods: (1 the region of interest (ROI selected manually and (2 weighted average of each component selected by ICA (weighted-ICA. The singular value decomposition (SVD method was then employed to deconvolve the AIF from the tissue concentration time curve to obtain quantitative CBF values. Results. The CBF values calculated by the weighted-ICA method were 41.1 ± 4.9 and 22.1 ± 2.3 mL/100 g/min for cortical gray matter (GM and deep white matter (WM regions, respectively. The CBF values obtained based on the manual ROIs were 53.6 ± 12.0 and 27.9 ± 5.9 mL/100 g/min for the same two regions, respectively. Conclusion. The weighted-ICA method allowed semiautomatic and straightforward extraction of the ROI adjacent to MCA. Through eliminating the partial volume effect to minimum, the CBF thus determined may reflect more accurate physical characteristics of the T2⁎ signal changes induced by the contrast agent.

  17. Functional analysis of third ventriculostomy patency by quantification of CSF stroke volume by using cine phase-contrast MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargalló, Núria; Olondo, Lourdes; Garcia, Ana I; Capurro, Sebastian; Caral, Luis; Rumia, Jordi

    2005-01-01

    Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is increasingly used as alternative treatment for obstructive hydrocephalus. The aim of this study was to determine the utility of quantitative and qualitative examinations with cine phase-contrast MR imaging to determine the efficacy of ventriculostomy across time and whether CSF pulsation is restored after ETV. Thirty-eight patients treated with ETV were evaluated with cine phase-contrast MR within 1 month after surgery. Follow-up studies were performed after 1 year in 25 patients and after 2 years in 12. We evaluated flow void changes in the floor of the third ventricle and quantified the stroke volume at the site of the ventriculostomy. We also recorded changes in ventricular size and clinical outcome. To determine the restoration of CSF pulsation, we compared the CSF waveform at the ventriculostomy with the CSF waveform at the aqueduct in a healthy control group. After ventriculostomy, restoration of pulsate motion characteristics of CSF circulation was observed. The stroke volume registered at ventriculostomy was maintained with time. There was a statistically significant relationship between clinical outcome and stroke volume. Overall flow magnitude was the most effective variable to determine which patients would improve after surgery. Values >75 mm3 showed a sensitivity of 76.7% and a specificity of 87.5% There was no relationship between ventricular size changes and clinical outcome. Patients with primary aqueduct stenosis had the best response to surgery, whereas patients with Arnold Chiari malformation or communicating hydrocephalus had the worst response. Quantitative analysis with phase-contrast MR imaging indicates that ETV is an efficient technique for restoring CSF pulsation, with efficacy being maintained during the follow-up controls. Quantification of stroke volume at ventriculostomy is a good indicator of the functional status of ETV, and a high stroke volume in the ventriculostomy appears to be a positive

  18. Simultaneous determination of arterial input function of the internal carotid and middle cerebral arteries for dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholdei, R.; Wenz, F.; Fuss, M.; Essig, M.; Knopp, M.V.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The determination of the arterial input function (AIF) is necessary for absolute quantification of the regional cerebral blood volume and blood flow using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI. The suitability of different vessels (ICA-internal carotid artery, MCA-middle cerebral artery) for AIF determination was compared in this study. Methods: A standard 1.5 T MR system and a simultaneous dual FLASH sequence (TR/TE1/TE2/α=32/15/25/10 ) were used to follow a bolus of contrast agent. Slice I was chosen to cut the ICA perpendicularly. Slice II included the MCA. Seventeen data sets from ten subjects were evaluated. Results: The number of AIF-relevant pixels, the area under the AIF and the maximum concentration were all lower when the AIF was determined from the MCA compared to the ICA. Additionally, the mean transit time (MTT) and the time to maximum concentration (TTM) were longer in the MCA, complicating the computerized identification of AIF-relevant pixels. Data from one subject, who was examined five times, demonstrated that the intraindividual variance of the measured parameters was markedly lower than the interpersonal variance. Conclusions: It appears to be advantageous to measure the AIF in the ICA rather than the MCA. (orig.) [de

  19. A Functional Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Modified with PLA-PEG-DG as Tumor-Targeted MRI Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fei; Hu, Ke; Yu, Haoli; Zhou, Lijun; Song, Lina; Zhang, Yu; Shan, Xiuhong; Liu, Jianping; Gu, Ning

    2017-08-01

    Tumor targeting could greatly promote the performance of magnetic nanomaterials as MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) agent for tumor diagnosis. Herein, we reported a novel magnetic nanoparticle modified with PLA (poly lactic acid)-PEG (polyethylene glycol)-DG (D-glucosamine) as Tumor-targeted MRI Contrast Agent. In this work, we took use of the D-glucose passive targeting on tumor cells, combining it on PLA-PEG through amide reaction, and then wrapped the PLA-PEG-DG up to the Fe 3 O 4 @OA NPs. The stability and anti phagocytosis of Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG-DG was tested in vitro; the MRI efficiency and toxicity was also detected in vivo. These functional magnetic nanoparticles demonstrated good biocompatibility and stability both in vitro and in vivo. Cell experiments showed that Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG-DG nanoparticles exist good anti phagocytosis and high targetability. In vivo MRI images showed that the contrast effect of Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG-DG nanoparticles prevailed over the commercial non tumor-targeting magnetic nanomaterials MRI agent at a relatively low dose. The DG can validly enhance the tumor-targetting effect of Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG nanoparticle. Maybe MRI agents with DG can hold promise as tumor-targetting development in the future.

  20. Improving the arterial input function in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI by fitting the signal in the complex plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, Frank F J; Sbrizzi, Alessandro; Beld, Ellis; Lagendijk, Jan J W; van den Berg, Cornelis A T

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging is a widely used technique in oncologic imaging. An essential prerequisite for obtaining quantitative values from DCE-MRI is the determination of the arterial input function (AIF). However, it is very challenging to accurately estimate the AIF using MR. A comprehensive model, which uses complex data instead of either magnitude or phase, was developed to improve AIF estimation. The model was first applied to simulated data. Subsequently, the accuracy of the estimated contrast agent concentration was validated in a phantom. Finally the method was applied to existing DCE scans of 13 prostate cancer patients. The complex signal method combines the complementary strengths of the magnitude and phase method, increasing the precision and accuracy of concentration estimation in simulated and phantom data. The in vivo AIFs show a good agreement between arterial voxels (standard deviation in the peak and tail equal 0.4 mM and 0.12 mM, respectively). Furthermore, the dynamic behavior closely followed the AIF obtained with DCE-CT in the same patients (mean correlation coefficient: 0.92). By using the complex signal, the AIF estimation becomes more accurate and precise. This might enable patient specific AIFs, thereby improving the quantitative values obtained from DCE-MRI. Magn Reson Med 76:1236-1245, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Estimating the arterial input function from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data with compensation for flow enhancement (I): Theory, method, and phantom experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, Jeroen J. N.; Lavini, Cristina; van Vliet, Lucas J.; Vos, Frans M.

    2017-01-01

    The arterial input function (AIF) represents the time-dependent arterial contrast agent (CA) concentration that is used in pharmacokinetic modeling. To develop a novel method for estimating the AIF from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI data, while compensating for flow enhancement. Signal

  2. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion MRI of High Grade Brain Gliomas Obtained with Arterial or Venous Waveform Input Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filice, Silvano; Crisi, Girolamo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion estimates of high-grade brain gliomas (HGG) due to the use of an input function (IF) obtained respectively from arterial (AIF) and venous (VIF) approaches by two different commercially available software applications. This prospective study includes 20 patients with pathologically confirmed diagnosis of high-grade gliomas. The data source was processed by using two DCE dedicated commercial packages, both based on the extended Toft model, but the first customized to obtain input function from arterial measurement and the second from sagittal sinus sampling. The quantitative parametric perfusion maps estimated from the two software packages were compared by means of a region of interest (ROI) analysis. The resulting input functions from venous and arterial data were also compared. No significant difference has been found between the perfusion parameters obtained with the two different software packages (P-value < .05). The comparison of the VIFs and AIFs obtained by the two packages showed no statistical differences. Direct comparison of DCE-MRI measurements with IF generated by means of arterial or venous waveform led to no statistical difference in quantitative metrics for evaluating HGG. However, additional research involving DCE-MRI acquisition protocols and post-processing would be beneficial to further substantiate the effectiveness of venous approach as the IF method compared with arterial-based IF measurement. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  3. Evaluation of higher brain function by MRI. Flow measurement in the superior sagittal sinus using phase contrast method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Mototsugu

    1997-01-01

    To assess the higher brain function, flow measurement in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) was performed noninvasively using a phase contrast MRI in 76 patients with suspicious of impaired higher brain function including dementias (senile dementia of Alzheimer type; SDAT and multi-infarct dementia; MID), strokes, and others. Thirty-one normal controls were consisted of 18 healthy volunteers and 13 patients with tension headache whose higher brain function was proved be normal. Mean flow velocity was measured in the distal portion of the SSS adjoining to the occipital lobes and was multiplied by cross-sectional area of the SSS at the measuring point to obtain mean flow volume. For intellectual index, cross-cultural cognitive examination (CCCE) was applied to all cases excluding volunteers. Normal value of SSS flow volume measured by MRI was 6.92±0.66 ml/s. Significant differences in both SSS flow and CCCE score from normal controls were found in SDAT group, MID group, and non-dementia group. No substantial differences between SDAT group and MID group were noted in both CCCE score and SSS flow. In normal controls, there was no correlation between SSS flow and age, whereas, significant inverse correlation of SSS flow with age was found in all cases. Between CCCE score and SSS flow, there were nearly linear relationships in all cases, SDAT group, MID group, and non-dementia group. Significant but relatively poor correlation was found in normals. (K.H.)

  4. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging on acupuncturing Yuan-Source and He-Sea acupoints of stomach Meridian of Foot-Yangming].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang-Bin; Liu, Cheng; Wu, Le-Bin; Yan, Bin; Gao, Shu-Zhong; Shao, Guang-Rui; Lü, Qing-Chao

    2009-04-01

    To explore the functional brain localization with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after acupuncturing the Yuan-Source and He-Sea acupoints of Stomach Meridian of Foot-Yangming (ST). The study was performed in 30 healthy volunteers who underwent acupuncture at Yuan-Source acupoint (Chongyang, ST42) and He-Sea acupoint (Zusanli, ST36) (ST group). Ten of these were also underwent acupuncture at the non-acupoints as the control group. Blood oxygenation level dependent functional MRI was performed. In the ST group, signal increasing areas were demonstrated in bilateral superior temporal gyri (Broadmann 22), bilateral supramarginal gyri (Broadmann 40), bilateral cerebellar hemispheres, bilateral cingulate gyri and isthmus of cingulate gyri (Broadmann 32, 30), bilateral superior parietal lobules (Broadmann 7); signal decreasing areas were shown in bilateral orbital gyri (Broadmann 11), bilateral temporal pole (Broadmann 38), right inferior frontal gyrus (Broadmann 47) and right medial occipitotemporal gyrus (Broadmann 36). In the control group, signal increases areas were demonstrated in superior temporal gyri, precentral gyri, cingulate gyri, thalamus, insula and cerebellum. The size, signal intensity and number of increasing areas in control group are less than in ST group. Combined acupuncture of Yuan-Source and He-Sea acupoints of ST can activate and decrease the multiple brain regions of "splanchnic brain" and thus reach a new functional balance to relieve pain.

  5. The Effect of Depo Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (DMPA) on Cerebral Food Motivation Centers: A Pilot Study using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Tania; Bao, Pinglei; Lerner, Alexander; Anderson, Lindsey; Page, Kathleen; Stanczyk, Frank; Mishell, Daniel; Segall-Gutierrez, Penina

    2016-10-01

    The primary objective is to examine activation of food motivation centers in the brain before and 8 weeks after depo medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) administration. This prospective experimental pilot study examined the effects of DMPA on food motivation centers utilizing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in eight nonobese, ovulatory subjects. fMRI blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal was measured using a 3-Tesla Scanner while participants viewed images of high-calorie foods, low-calorie foods and nonfood objects. fMRI scans were performed at baseline and 8 weeks after participants received one intramuscular dose of DMPA 150 mg. fMRI data were analyzed using the FMRIB Software Library. Changes in adiposity and circulating leptin and ghrelin levels were also measured. There was a greater BOLD signal response to food cues in brain regions associated with food motivation (anterior cingulate gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex) 8 weeks after DMPA administration compared to baseline (z>2.3, pfood motivation may guide the development of interventions to prevent weight gain in DMPA users. These data support a neural origin as one of the mechanisms underlying weight gain in DMPA users and may guide future research examining weight gain and contraception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nonlinear response of the anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia as a function of variable attentional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, Giuseppe; Taurisano, Paolo; Papazacharias, Apostolos; Caforio, Grazia; Romano, Raffaella; Lobianco, Luciana; Fazio, Leonardo; Di Giorgio, Annabella; Latorre, Valeria; Sambataro, Fabio; Popolizio, Teresa; Nardini, Marcello; Mattay, Venkata S; Weinberger, Daniel R; Bertolino, Alessandro

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies have reported abnormal prefrontal and cingulate activity during attentional control processing in schizophrenia. However, it is not clear how variation in attentional control load modulates activity within these brain regions in this brain disorder. The aim of this study in schizophrenia is to investigate the impact of increasing levels of attentional control processing on prefrontal and cingulate activity. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses of 16 outpatients with schizophrenia were compared with those of 21 healthy subjects while performing a task eliciting increasing levels of attentional control during event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T. Results showed reduced behavioral performance in patients at greater attentional control levels. Imaging data indicated greater prefrontal activity at intermediate attentional control levels in patients but greater prefrontal and cingulate responses at high attentional control demands in controls. The BOLD activity profile of these regions in controls increased linearly with increasing cognitive loads, whereas in patients, it was nonlinear. Correlation analysis consistently showed differential region and load-specific relationships between brain activity and behavior in the 2 groups. These results indicate that varying attentional control load is associated in schizophrenia with load- and region-specific modification of the relationship between behavior and brain activity, possibly suggesting earlier saturation of cognitive capacity.

  7. Temporal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging activation of heterosexual couples for visual stimuli of loved partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won; Kim, Seungyeon; Jeong, Jaeseung; Lee, Kyung-Uk; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Chung, Yong-An; Hong, Keun-Young; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2009-03-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies on romantic love have focused on determining how the visual stimuli that serve as a representation of loved ones induce the neural activation patterns of romantic love. The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal changes in romantic love over a period of 6 months and their correlated neurophysiological changes. Five heterosexual couples (n=10, mean age 21.1+/-1.97) who started dating not less than 100 days previously were recruited to measure their blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while showing them pictures of their loved ones and their previously identified, opposite-sex friends. Subsequently, the subjects were scanned under the same experimental conditions to assess possible changes in their brain activities after 180 days. WE FOUND THAT THEIR PASSIONATE LOVE SCORE (PLS) VALUES (M: 118.6+/-9.1, F: 120.2+/-7.0) were significantly reduced after 6 months (M: 110.8+/-4.0, F: 106.2+/-3.0). Furthermore, significantly increased activations were found in the cingulate gyri, inferior frontal gyri, supramarginal gyri, etc., after 6 months, whereas the head and tail of the right caudate nucleus were deactivated, which is indicative of the inhibition of expression and sensory neglect. These findings suggest that dynamic neural processes in the cortical-subcortical regions are involved in temporal changes in romantic love.

  8. Robust deep brain stimulation functional MRI procedures in rats and mice using an MR-compatible tungsten microwire electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hsin-Yi; Albaugh, Daniel L; Kao, Yu-Chieh Jill; Younce, John R; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian

    2015-03-01

    To develop a series of robust and readily adoptable protocols for the application of deep brain stimulation (DBS)-functional MRI (fMRI) in rodents. DBS-fMRI procedures were conducted in rat and mouse under varying anesthetic conditions (isoflurane in rat and mouse, α-chloralose in rat). A homemade two-channel tungsten microwire electrode was used to minimize magnetic susceptibility artifacts, and was targeted to the ventral posteromedial (VPM) thalamus for DBS-fMRI scanning procedures. Compared with a commercially available MR-compatible electrode, the tungsten microwire generated greatly reduced magnetic-susceptibility artifacts. In the rat, VPM-DBS using the microwire electrode resulted in robust positive blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal changes in somatosensory cortex that were relatively independent of anesthetic type. In the mouse, VPM-DBS similarly generated large, positive neurovascular responses in somatosensory cortex that were detected using cerebral blood volume measurements. Collectively, this work describes reasonable and easily adoptable procedures for conducting DBS-fMRI studies in rodent models. The protocols developed herein may be extended to study DBS effects under numerous experimental conditions and at varying stimulation targets. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Differences and similarities on neuronal activities of people being happily and unhappily in love: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoessel, Christina; Stiller, Juliane; Bleich, Stefan; Bönsch, Dominikus; Boensch, Dominikus; Doerfler, Arnd; Garcia, Meritxell; Richter-Schmidinger, Tanja; Kornhuber, Johannes; Forster, Clemens

    2011-01-01

    Brain activity was studied in grief following frustrated love compared to romantic love, and it was hypothesized that unhappy lovers compared to happy lovers would have decreased brain activity in regions specific to emotional and reward circuits, such as frontal brain areas, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), bilateral insula or posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Twelve volunteers intensely in love and 12 volunteers recently separated from their romantic partners were scanned performing 3 runs of functional magnetic resonance imaging acquisition. Subjects viewed partner pictures versus erotic pictures during the first run of the scanning process, autobiographical pictures versus neutral pictures during the second and autobiographical texts versus neutral texts during the third run. The Passionate Love Scale (PLS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were additionally recorded. Decreased brain activity in unhappy lovers compared to happy lovers occurred in frontal areas, ACC and PCC and bilateral insula. Unhappy lovers also revealed clinical depressive symptoms in the BDI. Unhappy lovers compared to happy lovers exhibited clinical depressive symptoms and reduced blood oxygen level dependency changes in a brain network which has been described as being involved in major depression. This might be a cue for the close relationship between grief and depression. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Use of cardiac output to improve measurement of input function in quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jeff L; Rusinek, Henry; Bokacheva, Louisa; Chen, Qun; Storey, Pippa; Lee, Vivian S

    2009-09-01

    To validate a new method for converting MR arterial signal intensity versus time curves to arterial input functions (AIFs). The method constrains AIF with patient's cardiac output (Q). Monte Carlo simulations of MR renography and tumor perfusion protocols were carried out for comparison with two alternative methods: direct measurement and population-averaged input function. MR renography was performed to assess the method's inter- and intraday reproducibility for renal parameters. In simulations of tumor perfusion, the precision of the parameters (K(trans) and v(e)) computed using the proposed method was improved by at least a factor of three compared to direct measurement. Similar improvements were obtained in simulations of MR renography. Volunteer study for testing interday reproducibility confirmed the improvement of precision in renal parameters when using the proposed method compared to conventional methods. In another patient study (two injections within one session), the proposed method significantly increased the correlation coefficient (R) between GFR of the two exams (0.92 vs. 0.83) compared to direct measurement. A new method significantly improves the precision of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) parameters. The method may be especially useful for analyzing repeated DCE examinations, such as monitoring tumor therapy or angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor renography.

  11. Quantitative estimation of renal function with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using a modified two-compartment model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chen

    Full Text Available To establish a simple two-compartment model for glomerular filtration rate (GFR and renal plasma flow (RPF estimations by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI.A total of eight New Zealand white rabbits were included in DCE-MRI. The two-compartment model was modified with the impulse residue function in this study. First, the reliability of GFR measurement of the proposed model was compared with other published models in Monte Carlo simulation at different noise levels. Then, functional parameters were estimated in six healthy rabbits to test the feasibility of the new model. Moreover, in order to investigate its validity of GFR estimation, two rabbits underwent acute ischemia surgical procedure in unilateral kidney before DCE-MRI, and pixel-wise measurements were implemented to detect the cortical GFR alterations between normal and abnormal kidneys.The lowest variability of GFR and RPF measurements were found in the proposed model in the comparison. Mean GFR was 3.03±1.1 ml/min and mean RPF was 2.64±0.5 ml/g/min in normal animals, which were in good agreement with the published values. Moreover, large GFR decline was found in dysfunction kidneys comparing to the contralateral control group.Results in our study demonstrate that measurement of renal kinetic parameters based on the proposed model is feasible and it has the ability to discriminate GFR changes in healthy and diseased kidneys.

  12. Application of 3DAC (3D anisotropy contrast) imaging to predict motor function outcome of patients with cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igase, Keiji; Matsubara, Ichiro; Arai, Masamori; Goishi, Jyunji; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    ThreeDAC (3D anisotropy contrast) image can depict neuronal fibers in 3 dimensions and the way those anatomical structures exist. However, despite its sophistication, quantitative analysis of 3DAC image has been performed poorly, probably, due to difficulties collecting numerical factors, thus we have tried to evaluate a feasible quantitative 3DAC image technique to predict motor function outcome in patients with cerebral infarction. Twenty-five patients with a acute cerebral infarctions, who underwent 3DAC procedure with 3 tesla MRI within 1 week after the onset, were enrolled in this study. To assess motor function, we applied manual muscle testing (MMT) score, which was modified by designating from 1 to 13 points corresponding to MMT, during both the onset and 3 months later. 3DAC image was created through the procedure assigning each direction to red, green and blue (RGB) colors after obtaining rare 3DAC images. On the slice showing the maximally injured region, Injured Fiber Ratio (IFR), defined as the ratio of injured area on horizontal fibers shown as blue area to the area of whole horizontal fibers in a healthy side, was calculated and compared with MMT score. Although MMT score at the onset did not correlate significantly with IFR, each MMT score of the arm and leg 3 months later revealed a significant correlation with IFR(R 2 =0.47 and R 2 =0.67, respectively). Given these results, by exploiting the IFR obtained from 3DAC image a motor function outcome in patients with cerebral infarction might be predicted even in a very acute stage and 3DAC image could be a feasible modality for analyzing a neuronal injury in cerebral infarction patients. (author)

  13. Review of functional MRI in HIV : effects of aging and medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hakkers, C. S.; Arends, J. E.; Barth, R. E.; du Plessis, S.; Hoepelman, A. I M; Vink, M.

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is a frequently occurring comorbidity of HIV infection. Evidence suggests this condition starts subclinical before a progression to a symptomatic stage. Blood oxygenated level dependent (BOLD) fMRI has shown to be a sensitive tool to detect abnormal

  14. Functional MRI in Patients with Intracranial Lesions near Language Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakyemez, B; Erdogan, C; Yildirim, N; Bora, I; Bekar, A; Parlak, M

    2006-06-30

    We aimed to depict Broca's area and Wernicke's area by word generation and sentence formation paradigms in patients with various intracranial lesions adjacent to language areas using functional MRI technique and to evaluate the ability of functional MRI to lateralize the hemispheric dominance for language. Twenty-three right-handed patients were included in this study. Lesions were classified as low-grade glioma (n=8), high-grade glioma (n=9), metastasis (n=1), meningioma (n=1), arteriovenous malformation (n=2) and mesial temporal sclerosis (n=2). We performed blood-oxygenated-level-dependant functional MRI using a 1.5-T unit. Word generation and sentence formation tasks were used to activate language areas. Language areas were defined as Brodmann 44, 45 (Broca's area) and Brodmann 22 area (Wernicke's area). Laterality index was used to show the dominant hemisphere. Two poorly cooperative patients showed no activation and were excluded from the study. Broca's area was localized in 21 patients (100 %). Wernicke's area, on the other hand, could only be localized in eight of the 21 patients (38 %).The left hemisphere was dominant in 86% of patients while atypical language lateralization (right or bilateral) was demonstrated in 14% of the patients. Bilateral activation areas were shown in 10% of those patients while right cerebral hemisphere was dominant in 4% of the patients. Word generation and sentence formation tasks are especially helpful in localizing Broca's area. Wernicke's area could also be demonstrated in some of the cases. Functional MRI can be used as an important and useful means of demonstrating language areas in patients with lesions adjacent to those areas and depicting the hemispheric dominance.

  15. BOLD signal and functional connectivity associated with loving kindness meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R Todd; Brewer, Judson A

    2014-05-01

    Loving kindness is a form of meditation involving directed well-wishing, typically supported by the silent repetition of phrases such as "may all beings be happy," to foster a feeling of selfless love. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the neural substrate of loving kindness meditation in experienced meditators and novices. We first assessed group differences in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal during loving kindness meditation. We next used a relatively novel approach, the intrinsic connectivity distribution of functional connectivity, to identify regions that differ in intrinsic connectivity between groups, and then used a data-driven approach to seed-based connectivity analysis to identify which connections differ between groups. Our findings suggest group differences in brain regions involved in self-related processing and mind wandering, emotional processing, inner speech, and memory. Meditators showed overall reduced BOLD signal and intrinsic connectivity during loving kindness as compared to novices, more specifically in the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PCu), a finding that is consistent with our prior work and other recent neuroimaging studies of meditation. Furthermore, meditators showed greater functional connectivity during loving kindness between the PCC/PCu and the left inferior frontal gyrus, whereas novices showed greater functional connectivity during loving kindness between the PCC/PCu and other cortical midline regions of the default mode network, the bilateral posterior insula lobe, and the bilateral parahippocampus/hippocampus. These novel findings suggest that loving kindness meditation involves a present-centered, selfless focus for meditators as compared to novices.

  16. Automatic determination of the arterial input function in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI: comparison of different reproducible clustering algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Jiandong; Yang, Jiawen; Guo, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Arterial input function (AIF) plays an important role in the quantification of cerebral hemodynamics. The purpose of this study was to select the best reproducible clustering method for AIF detection by comparing three algorithms reported previously in terms of detection accuracy and computational complexity. First, three reproducible clustering methods, normalized cut (Ncut), hierarchy (HIER), and fast affine propagation (FastAP), were applied independently to simulated data which contained the true AIF. Next, a clinical verification was performed where 42 subjects participated in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) scanning. The manual AIF and AIFs based on the different algorithms were obtained. The performance of each algorithm was evaluated based on shape parameters of the estimated AIFs and the true or manual AIF. Moreover, the execution time of each algorithm was recorded to determine the algorithm that operated more rapidly in clinical practice. In terms of the detection accuracy, Ncut and HIER method produced similar AIF detection results, which were closer to the expected AIF and more accurate than those obtained using FastAP method; in terms of the computational efficiency, the Ncut method required the shortest execution time. Ncut clustering appears promising because it facilitates the automatic and robust determination of AIF with high accuracy and efficiency. (orig.)

  17. Spatial functional distribution in the corticospinal tract at the corona radiata. A three-dimensional anisotropy contrast study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Takashi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki

    2001-06-01

    The spatial functional distribution of the nerve fibers was investigated in the corticospinal tract at the level of the corona radiata. Thirteen patients with corona radiata infarction underwent axial single-shot echo planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging using a 1.5 Tesla scanner. Image analysis used the three-dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) method to demarcate the nerve fibers in the corticospinal tract. Axial 3DAC images demonstrated the corticospinal tract as a distinct area indicating nerve fiber integrity in all normal hemispheres and infraction as a dark or black area in affected hemispheres. Seven patients with upper extremity-dominant motor dysfunction had infarction located in the middle one third of the corticospinal tract. A patient with lower extremity-dominant motor dysfunction had infarction in the posterior one third. Five patients with equal motor dysfunction in the upper and lower extremities had infarction in both the middle and posterior one thirds of the corticospinal tract. The recovery of motor dysfunction at one month follow up correlated with the location of the corticospinal; tract injury on the initial 3DAC images. The findings of the 3DAC images provide an indicator of the pattern and the recovery from acute and chronic motor dysfunction in patients with corona radiata infarction. (author)

  18. Genomewide discovery of DNA polymorphisms in rice cultivars with contrasting drought and salinity stress response and their functional relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mukesh; Moharana, Kanhu Charan; Shankar, Rama; Kumari, Romika; Garg, Rohini

    2014-02-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies provide opportunities to understand the genetic basis of phenotypic differences, such as abiotic stress response, even in the closely related cultivars via identification of large number of DNA polymorphisms. We performed whole-genome resequencing of three rice cultivars with contrasting responses to drought and salinity stress (sensitive IR64, drought-tolerant Nagina 22 and salinity-tolerant Pokkali). More than 356 million 90-bp paired-end reads were generated, which provided about 85% coverage of the rice genome. Applying stringent parameters, we identified a total of 1 784 583 nonredundant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 154 275 InDels between reference (Nipponbare) and the three resequenced cultivars. We detected 401 683 and 662 509 SNPs between IR64 and Pokkali, and IR64 and N22 cultivars, respectively. The distribution of DNA polymorphisms was found to be uneven across and within the rice chromosomes. One-fourth of the SNPs and InDels were detected in genic regions, and about 3.5% of the total SNPs resulted in nonsynonymous changes. Large-effect SNPs and InDels, which affect the integrity of the encoded protein, were also identified. Further, we identified DNA polymorphisms present in the differentially expressed genes within the known quantitative trait loci. Among these, a total of 548 SNPs in 232 genes, located in the conserved functional domains, were identified. The data presented in this study provide functional markers and promising target genes for salinity and drought tolerance and present a valuable resource for high-throughput genotyping and molecular breeding for abiotic stress traits in rice. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. New coil positioning method for interleaved transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)/functional MRI (fMRI) and its validation in a motor cortex study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisa, Marius; Pohmann, Rolf; Ewald, Lars; Thielscher, Axel

    2009-01-01

    To develop and test a novel method for coil placement in interleaved transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)/functional MRI (fMRI) studies. Initially, a desired TMS coil position at the subject's head is recorded using a neuronavigation system. Subsequently, a custom-made holding device is used for coil placement inside the MR scanner. The parameters of the device corresponding to the prerecorded position are automatically determined from a fast structural image acquired directly before the experiment. The spatial accuracy of our method was verified on a phantom. Finally, in a study on five subjects, the coil was placed above the cortical representation of a hand muscle in M1 and the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses to short repetitive TMS (rTMS) trains were assessed using echo-planar imaging (EPI) recordings. The spatial accuracy of our method is in the range of 2.9 +/- 1.3 (SD) mm. Motor cortex stimulation resulted in robust BOLD activations in motor- and auditory related brain areas, with the activation in M1 being localized in the hand knob. We present a user-friendly method for TMS coil positioning in the MR scanner that exhibits good spatial accuracy and speeds up the setup of the experiment. The motor-cortex study proves the viability of the approach and validates our interleaved TMS/fMRI setup.

  20. Functional Laterality of Task-Evoked Activation in Sensorimotor Cortex of Preterm Infants: An Optimized 3 T fMRI Study Employing a Customized Neonatal Head Coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheef, Lukas; Nordmeyer-Massner, Jurek A; Smith-Collins, Adam Pr; Müller, Nicole; Stegmann-Woessner, Gaby; Jankowski, Jacob; Gieseke, Jürgen; Born, Mark; Seitz, Hermann; Bartmann, Peter; Schild, Hans H; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Heep, Axel; Boecker, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in neonates has been introduced as a non-invasive method for studying sensorimotor processing in the developing brain. However, previous neonatal studies have delivered conflicting results regarding localization, lateralization, and directionality of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses in sensorimotor cortex (SMC). Amongst the confounding factors in interpreting neonatal fMRI studies include the use of standard adult MR-coils providing insufficient signal to noise, and liberal statistical thresholds, compromising clinical interpretation at the single subject level. Here, we employed a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil adapted and optimized to the head size of a newborn in order to improve robustness, reliability and validity of neonatal sensorimotor fMRI. Thirteen preterm infants with a median gestational age of 26 weeks were scanned at term-corrected age using a prototype 8-channel neonatal head coil at 3T (Achieva, Philips, Best, NL). Sensorimotor stimulation was elicited by passive extension/flexion of the elbow at 1 Hz in a block design. Analysis of temporal signal to noise ratio (tSNR) was performed on the whole brain and the SMC, and was compared to data acquired with an 'adult' 8 channel head coil published previously. Task-evoked activation was determined by single-subject SPM8 analyses, thresholded at p lateralization of SMC activation, as found in children and adults, is already present in the newborn period.

  1. Suggestions to Reduce Clinical Fibromyalgia Pain and Experimentally Induced Pain Produce Parallel Effects on Perceived Pain but Divergent Functional MRI-Based Brain Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbyshire, Stuart W G; Whalley, Matthew G; Seah, Stanley T H; Oakley, David A

    Hypnotic suggestion is an empirically validated form of pain control; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Thirteen fibromyalgia patients received suggestions to alter their clinical pain, and 15 healthy controls received suggestions to alter experimental heat pain. Suggestions were delivered before and after hypnotic induction with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activity measured concurrently. Across groups, suggestion produced substantial changes in pain report (main effect of suggestion, F2, 312 = 585.8; p pain report in regions previously associated with pain, including thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex. In controls, BOLD response decreased with pain report. All changes were greater after induction. Region-of-interest analysis revealed largely linear patient responses with increasing pain report. Control responses, however, were higher after suggestion to increase or decrease pain from baseline. Based on behavioral report alone, the mechanism of suggestion could be interpreted as largely similar regardless of the induction or type of pain experience. The functional magnetic resonance imaging data, however, demonstrated larger changes in brain activity after induction and a radically different pattern of brain activity for clinical pain compared with experimental pain. These findings imply that induction has an important effect on underlying neural activity mediating the effects of suggestion, and the mechanism of suggestion in patients altering clinical pain differs from that in controls altering experimental pain. Patient responses imply that suggestions altered pain experience via corresponding changes in pain-related brain regions, whereas control responses imply suggestion engaged cognitive control.

  2. A Novel Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Paradigm for the Preoperative Assessment of Auditory Perception in a Musician Undergoing Temporal Lobe Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Matthew D; Zaman, Arshad; Morrall, Matthew C H J; Chumas, Paul; Maguire, Melissa J

    2018-03-01

    Presurgical evaluation for temporal lobe epilepsy routinely assesses speech and memory lateralization and anatomic localization of the motor and visual areas but not baseline musical processing. This is paramount in a musician. Although validated tools exist to assess musical ability, there are no reported functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigms to assess musical processing. We examined the utility of a novel fMRI paradigm in an 18-year-old left-handed pianist who underwent surgery for a left temporal low-grade ganglioglioma. Preoperative evaluation consisted of neuropsychological evaluation, T1-weighted and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and fMRI. Auditory blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI was performed using a dedicated auditory scanning sequence. Three separate auditory investigations were conducted: listening to, humming, and thinking about a musical piece. All auditory fMRI paradigms activated the primary auditory cortex with varying degrees of auditory lateralization. Thinking about the piece additionally activated the primary visual cortices (bilaterally) and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Humming demonstrated left-sided predominance of auditory cortex activation with activity observed in close proximity to the tumor. This study demonstrated an fMRI paradigm for evaluating musical processing that could form part of preoperative assessment for patients undergoing temporal lobe surgery for epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in an animal model of brain metastases: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linfeng Zheng

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis is a common disease with a poor prognosis. The purpose of this study is to test feasibility and safety of the animal models for brain metastases and to use dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI to enhance detection of brain metastases.With approval from the institutional animal ethics committee, 18 New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: Group A received an intra-carotid infusion (ICI of mannitol followed by VX2 cells; group B received successive ICI of mannitol and heparin followed by VX2 cells; and group C received an ICI of normal saline. The survival rate and clinical symptoms were recorded after inoculation. After two weeks, conventional MRI and DCE-MRI were performed using 3.0 Tesla scanner. The number of tumors and detection rate were analyzed. After MRI measurements, the tumors were stained with hematoxylin-eosin.No rabbits died during the procedure. The rabbits had common symptoms, including loss of appetite, lassitude and lethargy, etc. at 10.8±1.8 days and 8.4±1.5 days post-inoculation in group A and B, respectively. Each animal in groups A and B re-gained the lost weight within 14 days. Brain metastases could be detected by MRI at 14 days post-inoculation in both groups A and B, with metastases manifesting as nodules in the brain parenchyma and thickening in the meninges. DCE-MRI increased the total detection of tumors compared to non-contrast MRI (P<0.05. The detection rates of T1-weighted image, T2-weighted image and DCE-MRI were 12%, 32% and 100%, respectively (P<0.05. Necropsy revealed nodules or thickening meninges in the gross samples and VX2 tumor cytomorphologic features in the slides, which were consistent with the MRI results.The VX2 rabbit model of brain metastases is feasible, as verified by MRI and pathologic findings, and may be a suitable platform for future studies of brain metastases. Functional DCE-MRI can be used to evaluate brain metastases in a

  4. Functional cardiac MR imaging with true fast imaging with steady-state free precession before and after intravenous injection of contrast medium: comparison of image quality and accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krombach, Gabriele A. [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); University Hospital Giessen, Department of Radiology, Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Giessen (Germany); Plum, Thorsten; Kraemer, Nils A.; Guenther, Rolf W.; Schoth, Felix [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Koos, Ralf; Hoffmann, Rainer; Altiok, Ertunc [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Cardiology, Aachen (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    To compare image quality and accuracy of left ventricular function of cine SSFP (steady-state free precession) images before and after injection of Gd-DTPA. In 30 patients T1 times of LV blood and myocardium were measured before and after injection of 0.2 mmol/kg body weight Gd-DTPA. Signal intensity of myocardium and left ventricular blood were measured on SSFP images and the contrast calculated. In 20 additional patients short axis images completely covering the left ventricle were acquired before and after injection of Gd-DTPA and parameters of left ventricular function compared. Image quality and regional function were assessed using the 17-segment model. Image quality after injection of contrast medium did not significantly change compared with unenhanced images. Contrast between myocardium and LV blood decreased from 0.6 {+-} 0.01 to 0.4 {+-} 0.03 after injection while the T1 value of myocardium decreased from 1121 {+-} 21 ms to 389 {+-} 14 ms (blood 1413 {+-} 48 ms to 222 {+-} 8 ms). Assessment of regional and global left ventricular function revealed similar results before and after the injection of contrast medium. Cine SSFP can be obtained after injection of contrast medium without loss of accuracy for regional and global LV ventricular function. This protocol can be used to decrease imaging time for thorough cardiac examination. (orig.)

  5. Anatomical and functional assemblies of brain BOLD oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baria, Alexis T.; Baliki, Marwan N.; Parrish, Todd; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2011-01-01

    Brain oscillatory activity has long been thought to have spatial properties, the details of which are unresolved. Here we examine spatial organizational rules for the human brain oscillatory activity as measured by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD). Resting state BOLD signal was transformed into frequency space (Welch’s method), averaged across subjects, and its spatial distribution studied as a function of four frequency bands, spanning the full bandwidth of BOLD. The brain showed anatomically constrained distribution of power for each frequency band. This result was replicated on a repository dataset of 195 subjects. Next, we examined larger-scale organization by parceling the neocortex into regions approximating Brodmann Areas (BAs). This indicated that BAs of simple function/connectivity (unimodal), vs. complex properties (transmodal), are dominated by low frequency BOLD oscillations, and within the visual ventral stream we observe a graded shift of power to higher frequency bands for BAs further removed from the primary visual cortex (increased complexity), linking frequency properties of BOLD to hodology. Additionally, BOLD oscillation properties for the default mode network demonstrated that it is composed of distinct frequency dependent regions. When the same analysis was performed on a visual-motor task, frequency-dependent global and voxel-wise shifts in BOLD oscillations could be detected at brain sites mostly outside those identified with general linear modeling. Thus, analysis of BOLD oscillations in full bandwidth uncovers novel brain organizational rules, linking anatomical structures and functional networks to characteristic BOLD oscillations. The approach also identifies changes in brain intrinsic properties in relation to responses to external inputs. PMID:21613505

  6. Interictal functional connectivity of human epileptic networks assessed by intracerebral EEG and BOLD signal fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelle Bettus

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to demonstrate whether spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal derived from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI reflect spontaneous neuronal activity in pathological brain regions as well as in regions spared by epileptiform discharges. This is a crucial issue as coherent fluctuations of fMRI signals between remote brain areas are now widely used to define functional connectivity in physiology and in pathophysiology. We quantified functional connectivity using non-linear measures of cross-correlation between signals obtained from intracerebral EEG (iEEG and resting-state functional MRI (fMRI in 5 patients suffering from intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Functional connectivity was quantified with both modalities in areas exhibiting different electrophysiological states (epileptic and non affected regions during the interictal period. Functional connectivity as measured from the iEEG signal was higher in regions affected by electrical epileptiform abnormalities relative to non-affected areas, whereas an opposite pattern was found for functional connectivity measured from the BOLD signal. Significant negative correlations were found between the functional connectivities of iEEG and BOLD signal when considering all pairs of signals (theta, alpha, beta and broadband and when considering pairs of signals in regions spared by epileptiform discharges (in broadband signal. This suggests differential effects of epileptic phenomena on electrophysiological and hemodynamic signals and/or an alteration of the neurovascular coupling secondary to pathological plasticity in TLE even in regions spared by epileptiform discharges. In addition, indices of directionality calculated from both modalities were consistent showing that the epileptogenic regions exert a significant influence onto the non epileptic areas during the interictal period. This study shows that functional

  7. On the dependence of centre-to-limb contrast function of the photospheric faculae on their brightness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, L.A.; Belkina, I.L.; Dyatel, N.P.

    1988-01-01

    The photometric aspect of the facular model with horizontal inhomogeneities is considered. The modeling of such inhomogeneities can be represented by a relative shift along the sun radius of neighbouring in heliocentric angle Θ photospheric regions by the value of the optical depth Δτ. It is found that the calculated faculae contrast curve in continuum (λ ≅ 5000 A) depends sensitively on the size ratio of rising and sinking elements and on their relative shift in the optical depth. This causes the change of the peak in the contrast curve and in its intensity. The size of elements influences th contrast curve but slightly. The calculated contrast curve for Δτ=0,8 and for the size ratio of rising and sinking elements equal to 1 is in a good agreement with the observed contrast curve for strong faculae. The observed contrast curve for faint faculae gives a good fit to the calculated contrast curve for Δτ=0,4 and for the size ratio of rising and sinking structures equal to 1/5

  8. Effects of Intensified Vasodilatory Antihypertensive Treatment on Renal Function, Blood supply and Oxygenation in Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khatir, Dinah Sherzad; Pedersen, Michael; Ivarsen, Per

    2015-01-01

    -blocker metoprolol). At baseline and following 18 months of therapy we determined forearm resistance by venous occlusion plethysmography. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) renal artery blood flow was measured for calculation of RVR, and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) MRI was used as a marker of renal...

  9. Comparison of infrared thermography and laser speckle contrast imaging for the dynamic assessment of digital microvascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauling, J D; Shipley, J A; Raper, S; Watson, M L; Ward, S G; Harris, N D; McHugh, N J

    2012-03-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a novel non-invasive microvascular imaging modality. The present study evaluates the validity and reliability of LSCI by comparison with infrared thermography (IRT) for the dynamic assessment of digital microvascular function in healthy volunteers. Subjects attended on 3 occasions. Simultaneous assessment of cutaneous perfusion at 3 distinct regions of interest (ROI) within the hands was undertaken using LSCI and infrared thermography (IRT) at baseline, and at 13s intervals over 15 min following a standardised local cold challenge. Endpoints for evaluation included absolute measurements at baseline and following cold stress, in addition to the characteristics of the re-warming curves (maximum % recovery and maximum gradient). Visits 1 and 2 were undertaken in identical conditions (ambient temperature 23°C) to assess reproducibility, whereas visit 3 was undertaken at a lower ambient room temperature of 18°C to evaluate responsiveness to reduction in ambient room temperature. Fourteen healthy participants completed the study. There was greater variability in the data generated using LSCI compared with the highly damped IRT, reflecting greater sensitivity of LSCI to physiological variation and movement artefact. LSCI and IRT correlated well at baseline and following cold challenge for all endpoints (r(s) for pooled data between 0.5 and 0.65, p0.75) for absolute assessments but lower for re-warming curve characteristics. LSCI provides greater spatial resolution than IRT identifying variation in cutaneous perfusion within the hands most likely associated with the presence of arteriovenous anastamoses. Both techniques were responsive to reduction in ambient room temperature. Effect sizes were greatest for IRT than LSCI (e.g. -1.17 vs. -0.85 at ROI 1 at baseline) although this may represent heat transfer rather than altered vascular perfusion. In the dynamic assessment of digital vascular perfusion, LSCI correlates well with IRT

  10. Aging effects on functional auditory and visual processing using fMRI with variable sensory loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Michael; Joyce, Dan W; Lamar, Melissa; Dannhauser, Thomas; Tracy, Derek K; Shergill, Sukhwinder S

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, studies investigating the functional implications of age-related structural brain alterations have focused on higher cognitive processes; by increasing stimulus load, these studies assess behavioral and neurophysiological performance. In order to understand age-related changes in these higher cognitive processes, it is crucial to examine changes in visual and auditory processes that are the gateways to higher cognitive functions. This study provides evidence for age-related functional decline in visual and auditory processing, and regional alterations in functional brain processing, using non-invasive neuroimaging. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), younger (n=11; mean age=31) and older (n=10; mean age=68) adults were imaged while observing flashing checkerboard images (passive visual stimuli) and hearing word lists (passive auditory stimuli) across varying stimuli presentation rates. Younger adults showed greater overall levels of temporal and occipital cortical activation than older adults for both auditory and visual stimuli. The relative change in activity as a function of stimulus presentation rate showed differences between young and older participants. In visual cortex, the older group showed a decrease in fMRI blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal magnitude as stimulus frequency increased, whereas the younger group showed a linear increase. In auditory cortex, the younger group showed a relative increase as a function of word presentation rate, while older participants showed a relatively stable magnitude of fMRI BOLD response across all rates. When analyzing participants across all ages, only the auditory cortical activation showed a continuous, monotonically decreasing BOLD signal magnitude as a function of age. Our preliminary findings show an age-related decline in demand-related, passive early sensory processing. As stimulus demand increases, visual and auditory cortex do not show increases in activity in older

  11. Functional brain imaging of episodic memory decline in ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, L

    2017-01-01

    The episodic long-term memory system supports remembering of events. It is considered to be the most age-sensitive system, with an average onset of decline around 60 years of age. However, there is marked interindividual variability, such that some individuals show faster than average change and others show no or very little change. This variability may be related to the risk of developing dementia, with elevated risk for individuals with accelerated episodic memory decline. Brain imaging with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signalling or positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to reveal the brain bases of declining episodic memory in ageing. Several studies have demonstrated a link between age-related episodic memory decline and the hippocampus during active mnemonic processing, which is further supported by studies of hippocampal functional connectivity in the resting state. The hippocampus interacts with anterior and posterior neocortical regions to support episodic memory, and alterations in hippocampus-neocortex connectivity have been shown to contribute to impaired episodic memory. Multimodal MRI studies and more recently hybrid MRI/PET studies allow consideration of various factors that can influence the association between the hippocampal BOLD signal and memory performance. These include neurovascular factors, grey and white matter structural alterations, dopaminergic neurotransmission, amyloid-Β and glucose metabolism. Knowledge about the brain bases of episodic memory decline can guide interventions to strengthen memory in older adults, particularly in those with an elevated risk of developing dementia, with promising results for combinations of cognitive and physical stimulation. © 2016 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  12. A close link between metabolic activity and functional connectivity in the resting human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passow, Susanne; Specht, Karsten; Adamsen, Tom Christian; Biermann, Martin; Brekke, Njål; Craven, Alexander Richard; Ersland, Lars; Grüner, Renate; Kleven-Madsen, Nina; Kvernenes, Ole-Heine; Schwarzlmüller, Thomas; Olesen, Rasmus; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Default-mode network (DMN) functional connectivity and its task-dependent down-regulation have attracted a lot of attention in the field of neuroscience. Nevertheless, the exact underlying mechanisms of DMN functional connectivity, or more specifically, the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal, are still not completely understood. To investigate more directly the association between local glucose consumption, local glutamatergic neurotransmission and DMN functional connectivity during rest, the present study combined for the first time 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoroglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). Seed-based correlation analyses, using a key region of the DMN i.e. the dorsal posterior cingulate cortex as seed, revealed overall striking spatial similarities between fluctuations in FDG-uptake and the BOLD signal. More specifically, a conjunction analysis across both modalities showed that DMN areas as the inferior parietal lobe, angular gyrus, precuneus, middle and medial frontal gyrus were positively correlated with the dorsal posterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that local glucose consumption in the medial frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex and left angular gyrus was associated with functional connectivity within the DMN. We did not find a relationship between glutamatergic neurotransmission and functional connectivity. In line with very recent findings, our results provide further evidence for a close association between local metabolic activity and functional connectivity and enable further insights towards a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of the BOLD signal.

  13. A close link between metabolic activity and functional connectivity in the resting human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passow, Susanne [Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen (Norway); NORMENT Center of Excellence, University of Oslo (Norway); Specht, Karsten [Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen (Norway); Department of Clinical Engineering, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Adamsen, Tom Christian [Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Department of Chemistry, University of Bergen (Norway); Biermann, Martin; Brekke, Njål [Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology and Medical Physics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Craven, Alexander Richard [Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen (Norway); NORMENT Center of Excellence, University of Oslo (Norway); Ersland, Lars [Department of Clinical Engineering, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); NORMENT Center of Excellence, University of Oslo (Norway); Grüner, Renate [Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen (Norway); NORMENT Center of Excellence, University of Oslo (Norway); Kleven-Madsen, Nina [Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen (Norway); Kvernenes, Ole-Heine [Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Schwarzlmüller, Thomas [Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen (Norway); Olesen, Rasmus [Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience and MINDLab, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Hugdahl, Kenneth [Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen (Norway); Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); NORMENT Center of Excellence, University of Oslo (Norway)

    2015-05-18

    Default-mode network (DMN) functional connectivity and its task-dependent down-regulation have attracted a lot of attention in the field of neuroscience. Nevertheless, the exact underlying mechanisms of DMN functional connectivity, or more specifically, the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal, are still not completely understood. To investigate more directly the association between local glucose consumption, local glutamatergic neurotransmission and DMN functional connectivity during rest, the present study combined for the first time 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoroglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). Seed-based correlation analyses, using a key region of the DMN i.e. the dorsal posterior cingulate cortex as seed, revealed overall striking spatial similarities between fluctuations in FDG-uptake and the BOLD signal. More specifically, a conjunction analysis across both modalities showed that DMN areas as the inferior parietal lobe, angular gyrus, precuneus, middle and medial frontal gyrus were positively correlated with the dorsal posterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that local glucose consumption in the medial frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex and left angular gyrus was associated with functional connectivity within the DMN. We did not find a relationship between glutamatergic neurotransmission and functional connectivity. In line with very recent findings, our results provide further evidence for a close association between local metabolic activity and functional connectivity and enable further insights towards a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of the BOLD signal.

  14. Automated left ventricular diastolic function evaluation from phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance and comparison with Doppler echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladouceur Magalie

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early detection of diastolic dysfunction is crucial for patients with incipient heart failure. Although this evaluation could be performed from phase-contrast (PC cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR data, its usefulness in clinical routine is not yet established, mainly because the interpretation of such data remains mostly based on manual post-processing. Accordingly, our goal was to develop a robust process to automatically estimate velocity and flow rate-related diastolic parameters from PC-CMR data and to test the consistency of these parameters against echocardiography as well as their ability to characterize left ventricular (LV diastolic dysfunction. Results We studied 35 controls and 18 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and preserved LV ejection fraction who had PC-CMR and Doppler echocardiography exams on the same day. PC-CMR mitral flow and myocardial velocity data were analyzed using custom software for semi-automated extraction of diastolic parameters. Inter-operator reproducibility of flow pattern segmentation and functional parameters was assessed on a sub-group of 30 subjects. The mean percentage of overlap between the transmitral flow segmentations performed by two independent operators was 99.7 ± 1.6%, resulting in a small variability ( 0.71 and receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis revealed their ability to separate patients from controls, with sensitivity > 0.80, specificity > 0.80 and accuracy > 0.85. Slight superiority in terms of correlation with echocardiography (r = 0.81 and accuracy to detect LV abnormalities (sensitivity > 0.83, specificity > 0.91 and accuracy > 0.89 was found for the PC-CMR flow-rate related parameters. Conclusions A fast and reproducible technique for flow and myocardial PC-CMR data analysis was successfully used on controls and patients to extract consistent velocity-related diastolic parameters, as well as flow rate-related parameters. This technique

  15. Structural connectivity in schizophrenia and its impact on the dynamics of spontaneous functional networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Joana; Fernandes, Henrique M.; Van Hartevelt, Tim J.; Kringelbach, Morten L.; James, Anthony C.; Deco, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The neuropathology of schizophrenia remains unclear. Some insight has come from modern neuroimaging techniques, which offer an unparalleled opportunity to explore in vivo the structure and function of the brain. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, it has been found that the large-scale resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) in schizophrenia — measured as the temporal correlations of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal — exhibit altered network topology, with lower small-world index. The origin of these rsFC alterations and link with the underlying structural connectivity remain unclear. In this work, we used a computational model of spontaneous large-scale brain activity to explore the role of the structural connectivity in the large-scale dynamics of the brain in health and schizophrenia. The structural connectomes from 15 adolescent patients with early-onset schizophrenia and 15 age- and gender-matched controls were built from diffusion tensor imaging data to detect the white matter tracts between 90 brain areas. Brain areas, simulated using a reduced dynamic mean-field model, receive excitatory input from other areas in proportion to the number of fibre tracts between them. The simulated mean field activity was transformed into BOLD signal, and the properties of the simulated functional networks were analyzed. Our results suggest that the functional alterations observed in schizophrenia are not directly linked to alterations in the structural topology. Instead, subtly randomized and less small-world functional networks appear when the brain operates with lower global coupling, which shifts the dynamics from the optimal healthy regime

  16. Structural connectivity in schizophrenia and its impact on the dynamics of spontaneous functional networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Joana; Fernandes, Henrique M.; Van Hartevelt, Tim J.; James, Anthony C.; Kringelbach, Morten L.; Deco, Gustavo

    2013-12-01

    The neuropathology of schizophrenia remains unclear. Some insight has come from modern neuroimaging techniques, which offer an unparalleled opportunity to explore in vivo the structure and function of the brain. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, it has been found that the large-scale resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) in schizophrenia — measured as the temporal correlations of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal — exhibit altered network topology, with lower small-world index. The origin of these rsFC alterations and link with the underlying structural connectivity remain unclear. In this work, we used a computational model of spontaneous large-scale brain activity to explore the role of the structural connectivity in the large-scale dynamics of the brain in health and schizophrenia. The structural connectomes from 15 adolescent patients with early-onset schizophrenia and 15 age- and gender-matched controls were built from diffusion tensor imaging data to detect the white matter tracts between 90 brain areas. Brain areas, simulated using a reduced dynamic mean-field model, receive excitatory input from other areas in proportion to the number of fibre tracts between them. The simulated mean field activity was transformed into BOLD signal, and the properties of the simulated functional networks were analyzed. Our results suggest that the functional alterations observed in schizophrenia are not directly linked to alterations in the structural topology. Instead, subtly randomized and less small-world functional networks appear when the brain operates with lower global coupling, which shifts the dynamics from the optimal healthy regime.

  17. Structural connectivity in schizophrenia and its impact on the dynamics of spontaneous functional networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Joana [Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience Group, Center of Brain and Cognition, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona 08018 (Spain); Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7JX (United Kingdom); Fernandes, Henrique M.; Van Hartevelt, Tim J.; Kringelbach, Morten L. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7JX (United Kingdom); Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience (CFIN), Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); James, Anthony C. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7JX (United Kingdom); Highfield Unit, Warneford Hospital, Oxford OX3 7JX (United Kingdom); Deco, Gustavo [Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience Group, Center of Brain and Cognition, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona 08018 (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Barcelona 08010 (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    The neuropathology of schizophrenia remains unclear. Some insight has come from modern neuroimaging techniques, which offer an unparalleled opportunity to explore in vivo the structure and function of the brain. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, it has been found that the large-scale resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) in schizophrenia — measured as the temporal correlations of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal — exhibit altered network topology, with lower small-world index. The origin of these rsFC alterations and link with the underlying structural connectivity remain unclear. In this work, we used a computational model of spontaneous large-scale brain activity to explore the role of the structural connectivity in the large-scale dynamics of the brain in health and schizophrenia. The structural connectomes from 15 adolescent patients with early-onset schizophrenia and 15 age- and gender-matched controls were built from diffusion tensor imaging data to detect the white matter tracts between 90 brain areas. Brain areas, simulated using a reduced dynamic mean-field model, receive excitatory input from other areas in proportion to the number of fibre tracts between them. The simulated mean field activity was transformed into BOLD signal, and the properties of the simulated functional networks were analyzed. Our results suggest that the functional alterations observed in schizophrenia are not directly linked to alterations in the structural topology. Instead, subtly randomized and less small-world functional networks appear when the brain operates with lower global coupling, which shifts the dynamics from the optimal healthy regime.

  18. Functional MRI study of cerebral cortical activation during volitional swallowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasa, Toru; Aiga, Hideki; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Kawai, Noriko; Sugimoto, Tomosada; Kuboki, Takuo; Kishi, Kanji

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the somatotropic distribution and lateralization of motor and sensory cortical activity during swallowing in healthy adult human subjects using functional MR imaging. Nine healthy right-handed adult volunteers (6 men, 3 women; ages 22-38) were examined. Their cortical activities were evoked by having them swallow, five times, a small bolus of water (3 ml) supplied through a plastic catheter. As a positive control, the subjects performed five repetitions of right-handed grasping tasks. Blood oxygenation level-dependent images were obtained using a 1.5 Tesla MR system (Magnetom Vision, Siemens Germany; repetition time/echo time (TR/TE)=0.96/0.66, flip angle (FA)=90 deg). T1 weighted anatomical images were obtained for the same slices in each subject. Cerebral activity was observed most notably in the primary motor cortex and primary somatosensory cortex, followed by the premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, frontal operculum, and insula. The hand-grasping task activated relatively superior parts of the primary motor and somatosensory cortices. The swallowing task, on the other hand, activated the inferior parts of the pre- and postcentral gyri. The hand-grasping activation of motor and sensory cortices was localized absolutely on the contralateral side, whereas swallowing activated the motor cortex either bilaterally or unilaterally. Swallowing activated the sensory cortex almost always bilaterally. This study suggested that fMRI could be used to identify the specific areas of cortical activation caused by various tasks, and to differentiate the locations of cortical activation between tasks. (author)

  19. Brain functional effects of psychopharmacological treatments in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidi, Charles; Houenou, Josselin

    2016-11-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have contributed to the understanding of bipolar disorder. However the effect of medication on brain activation remains poorly understood. We conducted an extensive literature review on PubMed and ScienceDirect to investigate the influence of medication in fMRI studies, including both longitudinal and cross-sectional studies, which aimed at assessing this influence. Although we reported all reviewed studies, we gave greater emphasis to studies with the most robust methodology. One hundred and forty studies matched our inclusion criteria and forty-seven studies demonstrated an effect of pharmacological treatment on fMRI blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in adults and children with bipolar disorder. Out of these studies, nineteen were longitudinal. Most of cross-sectional studies suffered from methodological bias, due to post-hoc analyses performed on a limited number of patients and did not find any effect of medication. However, both longitudinal and cross-sectional studies showing an impact of treatment tend to suggest that medication prescribed to patients with bipolar disorder mostly influenced brain activation in prefrontal regions, when measured by tasks involving emotional regulation and processing as well as non-emotional cognitive tasks. FMRI promises to elucidate potential new biomarkers in bipolar disorder and could be used to evaluate the effect of new therapeutic compounds. Further research is needed to disentangle the effect of medication and the influence of the changes in mood state on brain activation in patients with bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional MRI study of cerebral cortical activation during volitional swallowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakasa, Toru; Aiga, Hideki; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Kawai, Noriko; Sugimoto, Tomosada; Kuboki, Takuo; Kishi, Kanji [Okayama Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine and Dentistry

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the somatotropic distribution and lateralization of motor and sensory cortical activity during swallowing in healthy adult human subjects using functional MR imaging. Nine healthy right-handed adult volunteers (6 men, 3 women; ages 22-38) were examined. Their cortical activities were evoked by having them swallow, five times, a small bolus of water (3 ml) supplied through a plastic catheter. As a positive control, the subjects performed five repetitions of right-handed grasping tasks. Blood oxygenation level-dependent images were obtained using a 1.5 Tesla MR system (Magnetom Vision, Siemens Germany; repetition time/echo time (TR/TE)=0.96/0.66, flip angle (FA)=90 deg). T1 weighted anatomical images were obtained for the same slices in each subject. Cerebral activity was observed most notably in the primary motor cortex and primary somatosensory cortex, followed by the premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, frontal operculum, and insula. The hand-grasping task activated relatively superior parts of the primary motor and somatosensory cortices. The swallowing task, on the other hand, activated the inferior parts of the pre- and postcentral gyri. The hand-grasping activation of motor and sensory cortices was localized absolutely on the contralateral side, whereas swallowing activated the motor cortex either bilaterally or unilaterally. Swallowing activated the sensory cortex almost always bilaterally. This study suggested that fMRI could be used to identify the specific areas of cortical activation caused by various tasks, and to differentiate the locations of cortical activation between tasks. (author)

  1. A novel effective method for the assessment of microvascular function in male patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study using laser speckle contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, J.P.; Lopes, G.O.; Verri, V.; Coelho, M.P.; Nascimento, P.M.C.; Kopiler, D.A.; Tibirica, E.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function is essential for investigating the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although laser speckle contrast imaging technology is well accepted as a noninvasive methodology for assessing microvascular endothelial function, it has never been used to compare male patients with coronary artery disease with male age-matched healthy controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether laser speckle contrast imaging could be used to detect differences in the systemic microvascular functions of patients with established cardiovascular disease (n=61) and healthy age-matched subjects (n=24). Cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the skin of the forearm using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of acetylcholine and post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. The maximum increase in skin blood flow induced by acetylcholine was significantly reduced in the cardiovascular disease patients compared with the control subjects (74 vs 116%; P<0.01). With regard to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia-induced vasodilation, the patients also presented reduced responses compared to the controls (0.42±0.15 vs 0.50±0.13 APU/mmHg; P=0.04). In conclusion, laser speckle contrast imaging can identify endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions in male individuals with cardiovascular disease. Thus, this technology appears to be an efficient non-invasive technique for evaluating systemic microvascular and endothelial functions, which could be valuable as a peripheral marker of atherothrombotic diseases in men

  2. A novel effective method for the assessment of microvascular function in male patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study using laser speckle contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, J.P. [Laboratório de Atividade Física e Promoção è Saúde, Departamento de Desporto Coletivo, Instituto de Educação Física e Desportos, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, G.O. [Laboratório de Atividade Física e Promoção è Saúde, Departamento de Desporto Coletivo, Instituto de Educação Física e Desportos, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Verri, V.; Coelho, M.P.; Nascimento, P.M.C.; Kopiler, D.A. [Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Tibirica, E. [Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratório de Investigação Cardiovascular, Departamento Osório de Almeida, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function is essential for investigating the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although laser speckle contrast imaging technology is well accepted as a noninvasive methodology for assessing microvascular endothelial function, it has never been used to compare male patients with coronary artery disease with male age-matched healthy controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether laser speckle contrast imaging could be used to detect differences in the systemic microvascular functions of patients with established cardiovascular disease (n=61) and healthy age-matched subjects (n=24). Cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the skin of the forearm using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of acetylcholine and post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. The maximum increase in skin blood flow induced by acetylcholine was significantly reduced in the cardiovascular disease patients compared with the control subjects (74 vs 116%; P<0.01). With regard to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia-induced vasodilation, the patients also presented reduced responses compared to the controls (0.42±0.15 vs 0.50±0.13 APU/mmHg; P=0.04). In conclusion, laser speckle contrast imaging can identify endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions in male individuals with cardiovascular disease. Thus, this technology appears to be an efficient non-invasive technique for evaluating systemic microvascular and endothelial functions, which could be valuable as a peripheral marker of atherothrombotic diseases in men.

  3. Estimating the arterial input function from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data with compensation for flow enhancement (II): Applications in spine diagnostics and assessment of crohn's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, Jeroen J. N.; Lavini, Cristina; van Vliet, Lucas J.; Kramer, Gem; Pieters-van den Bos, Indra; Marcus, J. T.; Stoker, Jaap; Vos, Frans M.

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models can describe microvascular density and integrity. An essential component of PK models is the arterial input function (AIF) representing the time-dependent concentration of contrast agent (CA) in the blood plasma supplied to a tissue. To evaluate a novel method for

  4. Neural Correlates of Sevoflurane-induced Unconsciousness Identified by Simultaneous Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranft, Andreas; Golkowski, Daniel; Kiel, Tobias; Riedl, Valentin; Kohl, Philipp; Rohrer, Guido; Pientka, Joachim; Berger, Sebastian; Thul, Alexander; Maurer, Max; Preibisch, Christine; Zimmer, Claus; Mashour, George A; Kochs, Eberhard F; Jordan, Denis; Ilg, Rüdiger

    2016-11-01

    The neural correlates of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness have yet to be fully elucidated. Sedative and anesthetic states induced by propofol have been studied extensively, consistently revealing a decrease of frontoparietal and thalamocortical connectivity. There is, however, less understanding of the effects of halogenated ethers on functional brain networks. The authors recorded simultaneous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography in 16 artificially ventilated volunteers during sevoflurane anesthesia at burst suppression and 3 and 2 vol% steady-state concentrations for 700 s each to assess functional connectivity changes compared to wakefulness. Electroencephalographic data were analyzed using symbolic transfer entropy (surrogate of information transfer) and permutation entropy (surrogate of cortical information processing). Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were analyzed by an independent component analysis and a region-of-interest-based analysis. Electroencephalographic analysis showed a significant reduction of anterior-to-posterior symbolic transfer entropy and global permutation entropy. At 2 vol% sevoflurane concentrations, frontal and thalamic networks identified by independent component analysis showed significantly reduced within-network connectivity. Primary sensory networks did not show a significant change. At burst suppression, all cortical networks showed significantly reduced functional connectivity. Region-of-interest-based thalamic connectivity at 2 vol% was significantly reduced to frontoparietal and posterior cingulate cortices but not to sensory areas. Sevoflurane decreased frontal and thalamocortical connectivity. The changes in blood oxygenation level dependent connectivity were consistent with reduced anterior-to-posterior directed connectivity and reduced cortical information processing. These data advance the understanding of sevoflurane-induced unconsciousness and contribute to a

  5. Functional load and the lexicon: Evidence that syntactic category and frequency relationships in minimal lemma pairs predict the loss of phoneme contrasts in language change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedel, Andrew; Jackson, Scott; Kaplan, Abby

    2013-09-01

    All languages use individually meaningless, contrastive categories in combination to create distinct words. Despite their central role in communication, these "phoneme" contrasts can be lost over the course of language change. The century-old functional load hypothesis proposes that loss of a phoneme contrast will be inhibited in relation to the work that it does in distinguishing words. In a previous work we showed for the first time that a simple measure of functional load does significantly predict patterns of contrast loss within a diverse set of languages: the more minimal word pairs that a phoneme contrast distinguishes, the less likely those phonemes are to have merged over the course of language change. Here, we examine several lexical properties that are predicted to influence the uncertainty between word pairs in usage. We present evidence that (a) the lemma rather than surface-form count of minimal pairs is more predictive of merger; (b) the count of minimal lemma pairs that share a syntactic category is a stronger predictor of merger than the count of those with divergent syntactic categories, and (c) that the count of minimal lemma pairs with members of similar frequency is a stronger predictor of merger than that of those with more divergent frequencies. These findings support the broad hypothesis that properties of individual utterances influence long-term language change, and are consistent with findings suggesting that phonetic cues are modulated in response to lexical uncertainty within utterances.

  6. A Cross-Cultural Analysis of English Newspaper Editorials: A Systemic-Functional View of Text for Contrastive Rhetoric Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansary, Hasan; Babaii, Esmat

    2009-01-01

    It is true that analyses of English language texts dominate the literature. It is equally true that a flourishing field of "Contrastive Rhetoric" (CR) research has begun to address the way various text types and/or "genres" may differ across cultures and languages (see Connor 1996, 2003). Very much in line with these…

  7. Effects of a dimeric vs a monomeric nonionic contrast medium on renal function in patients with mild to moderate renal insufficiency: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraro, M.; Malalan, F.; Antonione, R.; Faccini, L. [Institute of Medicina Clinica, Ospedale di Cattinara, University of Trieste, Strada di Fiume 447, I-34 149 Trieste (Italy); Stacul, F.; Cova, M.; Petz, S.; Assante, M.; Dalla Palma, L. [Institute of Radiology, Ospedale di Cattinara, University of Trieste, Strada di Fiume 447, I-34 149 Trieste (Italy); Grynne, B.; Haider, T. [Nycomed Imaging AS, Nycoveien 1-2, N-0401 Oslo (Norway)

    1998-02-01

    The efficacy and safety of nonionic dimeric contrast media in subjects with impaired renal function is largely unknown. The present study was aimed at determining the risk of tubular nephrotoxicity in patients with mild to moderate renal insufficiency who underwent intravenous urography (IVU) with the nonionic dimeric contrast agent iodixanol (Visipaque, Nycomed Imaging, Oslo, Norway). In a double-blind protocol 64 patients (55 males; mean age 68.3 years) with serum creatinine between 135 and 265 {mu}mol/l who were to undergo IVU were randomized to receive iodixanol (a nonionic dimer) or iopromide (a nonionic monomer), 600 mg I/kg b. w. Renal function was evaluated before and 1 h, 6 h, 24 h, 48 h and 7 days after IVU with analysis of serum creatinine, urinary enzymes alanylaminopeptidase and N-acetyl-{beta}-glucosaminidase, and urinary microproteins {alpha}-1-microglobulin and albumin. Renal function remained stable in both contrast medium groups during the follow-up period. No statistically significant differences were observed between the monomer and the dimer in terms of urinary enzyme and microprotein excretion or serum creatinine. Transient radiocontrast-induced nephropathy developed in 1 patient who had received iodixanol. The administration of the nonionic dimeric contrast medium iodixanol, or of the nonionic monomer iopromide, entailed a low nephrotoxic potential in patients with mild to moderate renal insufficiency undergoing excretory urography. (orig.) With 2 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs.

  8. Brain functional networks. Correlation analysis with clinical indexes in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Hui; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Su; Wang, Ximing; Li, Yonggang; Hu, Chunhong [The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Department of Radiology, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China); Lai, Lillian [LAC+USC Medical Center, Department of Neuroradiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Shen, Hailin [Suzhou Kowloon Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-11-15

    The relationship between parameters of brain functional networks and clinical indexes is unclear so far in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR). This paper is to investigate this. Twenty-one patients with different grades of DR and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled from August 2012 to September 2014. The clinical indexes recorded included DR grade, duration of diabetes, HbA1c, diabetic foot screen, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, Homa-β, Homa-IR, insulin sensitive index (ISI), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and patient sex and age. Subjects were scanned using 3-T MR with blood-oxygen-level-dependent and 3D-FSPGR sequences. MR data was analyzed via preprocessing and functional network construction, and quantified indexes of network (clustering coefficient, characteristic path length, global efficiency, degree distribution, and small worldness) were evaluated. Statistics consisted of ANOVA and correlation. There were significant differences between patients and controls among clustering coefficient, characteristic path length, degree distribution, and small worldness parameters (P < 0.05). MMSE scores negatively correlated with characteristic path length, and Hb1Ac negatively correlated with small worldness. MMSE, duration of diabetes, diabetic foot screen, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, Homa-β, Homa-IR, ISI, DR grade, and patient age, except from Hb1Ac, correlated with degree distribution in certain brain areas. Brain functional networks are altered, specifically in the areas of visual function and cognition, and these alterations may reflect the severity of visual weakness and cognitive decline in DR patients. Moreover, the brain networks may be affected both by long-standing and instant clinical factors. (orig.)

  9. Altered nigrostriatal and nigrocortical functional connectivity in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellmore, Timothy M; Castriotta, Richard J; Hendley, Katie L; Aalbers, Brian M; Furr-Stimming, Erin; Hood, Ashley J; Suescun, Jessika; Beurlot, Michelle R; Hendley, Roy T; Schiess, Mya C

    2013-12-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a condition closely associated with Parkinson disease (PD). RBD is a sleep disturbance that frequently manifests early in the development of PD, likely reflecting disruption in normal functioning of anatomical areas affected by neurodegenerative processes. Although specific neuropathological aspects shared by RBD and PD have yet to be fully documented, further characterization is critical to discovering reliable biomarkers that predict PD onset. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis of altered functional connections of the substantia nigra (SN) in patients in whom RBD was diagnosed. Between-groups, single time point imaging. UTHSC-H 3 telsa MRI center. Ten patients with RBD, 11 patients with PD, and 10 age-matched controls. NA. We measured correlations of SN time series using resting state blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) in patients with idiopathic RBD who were at risk for developing PD, patients in whom PD was diagnosed, and age-matched controls. Using voxelwise analysis of variance, different correlations (P < 0.01, whole-brain corrected) between left SN and left putamen were found in patients with RBD compared with controls and patients with PD. SN correlations with right cuneus/precuneus and superior occipital gyrus were significantly different for patients with RBD compared with both controls and patients with PD. The results suggest that altered nigrostriatal and nigrocortical connectivity characterizes rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder before onset of obvious motor impairment. The functional changes are discussed in the context of degeneration in dopaminergic and cognition-related networks.

  10. Brain functional networks. Correlation analysis with clinical indexes in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Hui; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Su; Wang, Ximing; Li, Yonggang; Hu, Chunhong; Lai, Lillian; Shen, Hailin

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between parameters of brain functional networks and clinical indexes is unclear so far in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR). This paper is to investigate this. Twenty-one patients with different grades of DR and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled from August 2012 to September 2014. The clinical indexes recorded included DR grade, duration of diabetes, HbA1c, diabetic foot screen, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, Homa-β, Homa-IR, insulin sensitive index (ISI), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and patient sex and age. Subjects were scanned using 3-T MR with blood-oxygen-level-dependent and 3D-FSPGR sequences. MR data was analyzed via preprocessing and functional network construction, and quantified indexes of network (clustering coefficient, characteristic path length, global efficiency, degree distribution, and small worldness) were evaluated. Statistics consisted of ANOVA and correlation. There were significant differences between patients and controls among clustering coefficient, characteristic path length, degree distribution, and small worldness parameters (P < 0.05). MMSE scores negatively correlated with characteristic path length, and Hb1Ac negatively correlated with small worldness. MMSE, duration of diabetes, diabetic foot screen, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, Homa-β, Homa-IR, ISI, DR grade, and patient age, except from Hb1Ac, correlated with degree distribution in certain brain areas. Brain functional networks are altered, specifically in the areas of visual function and cognition, and these alterations may reflect the severity of visual weakness and cognitive decline in DR patients. Moreover, the brain networks may be affected both by long-standing and instant clinical factors. (orig.)

  11. Graph Theoretical Analysis of BOLD Functional Connectivity during Human Sleep without EEG Monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Lv

    Full Text Available Functional brain networks of human have been revealed to have small-world properties by both analyzing electroencephalogram (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI time series.In our study, by using graph theoretical analysis, we attempted to investigate the changes of paralimbic-limbic cortex between wake and sleep states. Ten healthy young people were recruited to our experiment. Data from 2 subjects were excluded for the reason that they had not fallen asleep during the experiment. For each subject, blood oxygen level dependency (BOLD images were acquired to analyze brain network, and peripheral pulse signals were obtained continuously to identify if the subject was in sleep periods. Results of fMRI showed that brain networks exhibited stronger small-world characteristics during sleep state as compared to wake state, which was in consistent with previous studies using EEG synchronization. Moreover, we observed that compared with wake state, paralimbic-limbic cortex had less connectivity with neocortical system and centrencephalic structure in sleep.In conclusion, this is the first study, to our knowledge, has observed that small-world properties of brain functional networks altered when human sleeps without EEG synchronization. Moreover, we speculate that paralimbic-limbic cortex organization owns an efficient defense mechanism responsible for suppressing the external environment interference when humans sleep, which is consistent with the hypothesis that the paralimbic-limbic cortex may be functionally disconnected from brain regions which directly mediate their interactions with the external environment. Our findings also provide a reasonable explanation why stable sleep exhibits homeostasis which is far less susceptible to outside world.

  12. Graph Theoretical Analysis of BOLD Functional Connectivity during Human Sleep without EEG Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jun; Liu, Dongdong; Ma, Jing; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Jue

    2015-01-01

    Functional brain networks of human have been revealed to have small-world properties by both analyzing electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time series. In our study, by using graph theoretical analysis, we attempted to investigate the changes of paralimbic-limbic cortex between wake and sleep states. Ten healthy young people were recruited to our experiment. Data from 2 subjects were excluded for the reason that they had not fallen asleep during the experiment. For each subject, blood oxygen level dependency (BOLD) images were acquired to analyze brain network, and peripheral pulse signals were obtained continuously to identify if the subject was in sleep periods. Results of fMRI showed that brain networks exhibited stronger small-world characteristics during sleep state as compared to wake state, which was in consistent with previous studies using EEG synchronization. Moreover, we observed that compared with wake state, paralimbic-limbic cortex had less connectivity with neocortical system and centrencephalic structure in sleep. In conclusion, this is the first study, to our knowledge, has observed that small-world properties of brain functional networks altered when human sleeps without EEG synchronization. Moreover, we speculate that paralimbic-limbic cortex organization owns an efficient defense mechanism responsible for suppressing the external environment interference when humans sleep, which is consistent with the hypothesis that the paralimbic-limbic cortex may be functionally disconnected from brain regions which directly mediate their interactions with the external environment. Our findings also provide a reasonable explanation why stable sleep exhibits homeostasis which is far less susceptible to outside world.

  13. Resting-State Functional Connectivity in the Infant Brain: Methods, Pitfalls, and Potentiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandler R. L. Mongerson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Early brain development is characterized by rapid growth and perpetual reconfiguration, driven by a dynamic milieu of heterogeneous processes. Postnatal brain plasticity is associated with increased vulnerability to environmental stimuli. However, little is known regarding the ontogeny and temporal manifestations of inter- and intra-regional functional connectivity that comprise functional brain networks. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI has emerged as a promising non-invasive neuroinvestigative tool, measuring spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal at rest that reflect baseline neuronal activity. Over the past decade, its application has expanded to infant populations providing unprecedented insight into functional organization of the developing brain, as well as early biomarkers of abnormal states. However, many methodological issues of rs-fMRI analysis need to be resolved prior to standardization of the technique to infant populations. As a primary goal, this methodological manuscript will (1 present a robust methodological protocol to extract and assess resting-state networks in early infancy using independent component analysis (ICA, such that investigators without previous knowledge in the field can implement the analysis and reliably obtain viable results consistent with previous literature; (2 review the current methodological challenges and ethical considerations associated with emerging field of infant rs-fMRI analysis; and (3 discuss the significance of rs-fMRI application in infants for future investigations of neurodevelopment in the context of early life stressors and pathological processes. The overarching goal is to catalyze efforts toward development of robust, infant-specific acquisition, and preprocessing pipelines, as well as promote greater transparency by researchers regarding methods used.

  14. Functional amygdala-hippocampus connectivity during anticipation of aversive events is associated with Gray's trait "sensitivity to punishment".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Tim; Dresler, Thomas; Plichta, Michael M; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Ernst, Lena H; Markulin, Falko; Polak, Thomas; Blaimer, Martin; Deckert, Jürgen; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Jakob, Peter M; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2010-09-01

    The reinforcement sensitivity theory postulates a behavioral inhibition system that modulates reaction to stimuli indicating aversive events. Gray's dimension of anxiety, reflecting human trait sensitivity to aversive events, determines the extent to which stimuli activate the behavioral inhibition system. Although structural brain imaging has previously identified the amygdala and the hippocampus as two major components related to the behavioral inhibition system, the functional dynamics of the responses in these structures remain unclear. In this study, we examined the event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging blood oxygen level-dependent response in the hippocampus and amygdala as well as the functional connectivity of the two regions during anticipation of monetary loss in 45 healthy human subjects. Anticipation of loss elicited activation in the hippocampus as well as in the amygdala. Additionally, substantial functional connectivity between the two areas was observed. Furthermore, this functional connectivity was significantly correlated with individual differences in Gray's trait sensitivity to aversive events. Specifically, higher trait sensitivity to aversive events was associated with increased functional connectivity following cues indicating potential loss. In summary, we show that individual differences regarding Gray's trait sensitivity to aversive events as defined by the reinforcement sensitivity theory are associated with the neural dynamics of the amygdala-hippocampal circuit during anticipation of aversive events. In particular, evidence is provided for a relationship between functional brain imaging data and a psychometric approach specifically measuring Gray's trait sensitivity to aversive events, thereby potentially identifying the neural substrate of the behavioral inhibition system. Copyright 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Phase contrast image synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new method is presented for synthesizing arbitrary intensity patterns based on phase contrast imaging. The concept is grounded on an extension of the Zernike phase contrast method into the domain of full range [0; 2 pi] phase modulation. By controlling the average value of the input phase funct...... function and by choosing appropriate phase retardation at the phase contrast filter, a pure phase to intensity imaging is accomplished. The method presented is also directly applicable in dark field image synthesis....

  16. Contrast Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a red blood cell— and have a high degree of "echogenicity", or ability to reflect ultrasound waves. ... and radiologist to understand the potential risks and benefits of the contrast-enhanced scan. For MR imaging, ...

  17. Alterations in functional connectivity of resting state networks during experimental endotoxemia - An exploratory study in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrenz, Franziska; Wrede, Karsten; Forsting, Michael; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Benson, Sven

    2016-05-01

    Systemic inflammation impairs mood and cognitive functions, and seems to be involved in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies revealed altered task-related blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) responses during experimental endotoxemia, but little is known about effects of systemic inflammation on resting-state activity of the brain. Thus, we conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled study in healthy men receiving an intravenous injection of either low-dose (0.4 ng/kg) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (N=20) or placebo (N=25). Resting state activity was measured at baseline and 3.5h post-injection. Based on a two (condition) × two (group) design, we used multi-subject independent component analysis (ICA) to decompose and estimate functional connectivity within resting-state networks (RSNs). Seed-based analyses were applied to investigate the effect of LPS on the functional coupling for a priori-defined regions-of-interest (ROIs). ICA analyses identified 13 out of 35 components displaying common RSNs. Seed based analysis revealed greater functional connectivity between the left thalamus and the cerebellum after LPS compared to placebo administration, while the functional coupling between seeds within the amygdala, insula, and cingulate cortex and various brain regions including parieto-frontal networks was significantly reduced. Within the LPS group, endotoxin-induced increases in Interleukin (IL)-6 were significantly associated with resting-state connectivity between the left thalamus and left precuneus as well as the right posterior cingulate cortex. In summary, this exploratory study provides first evidence that systemic inflammation affects the coupling and regulation of multiple networks within the human brain at rest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The extended functional neuroanatomy of emotional processing biases for masked faces in major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa A Victor

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD is associated with a mood-congruent processing bias in the amygdala toward face stimuli portraying sad expressions that is evident even when such stimuli are presented below the level of conscious awareness. The extended functional anatomical network that maintains this response bias has not been established, however.To identify neural network differences in the hemodynamic response to implicitly presented facial expressions between depressed and healthy control participants.Unmedicated-depressed participants with MDD (n=22 and healthy controls (HC; n=25 underwent functional MRI as they viewed face stimuli showing sad, happy or neutral face expressions, presented using a backward masking design. The blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD signal was measured to identify regions where the hemodynamic response to the emotionally valenced stimuli differed between groups.The MDD subjects showed greater BOLD responses than the controls to masked-sad versus masked-happy faces in the hippocampus, amygdala and anterior inferotemporal cortex. While viewing both masked-sad and masked-happy faces relative to masked-neutral faces, the depressed subjects showed greater hemodynamic responses than the controls in a network that included the medial and orbital prefrontal cortices and anterior temporal cortex.Depressed and healthy participants showed distinct hemodynamic responses to masked-sad and masked-happy faces in neural circuits known to support the processing of emotionally valenced stimuli and to integrate the sensory and visceromotor aspects of emotional behavior. Altered function within these networks in MDD may establish and maintain illness-associated differences in the salience of sensory/social stimuli, such that attention is biased toward negative and away from positive stimuli.

  19. Graph-based network analysis of resting-state functional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI measures of brain activity have attracted considerable attention. Based on changes in the blood oxygen level-dependent signal, R-fMRI offers a novel way to assess the brain’s spontaneous or intrinsic (i.e., task-free activity with both high spatial and temporal resolutions. The properties of both the intra- and inter-regional connectivity of resting-state brain activity have been well documented, promoting our understanding of the brain as a complex network. Specifically, the topological organization of brain networks has been recently studied with graph theory. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in graph-based brain network analyses of R-fMRI signals, both in typical and atypical populations. Application of these approaches to R-fMRI data has demonstrated non-trivial topological properties of functional networks in the human brain. Among these is the knowledge that the brain’s intrinsic activity is organized as a small-world, highly efficient network, with significant modularity and highly connected hub regions. These network properties have also been found to change throughout normal development, aging and in various pathological conditions. The literature reviewed here suggests that graph-based network analyses are capable of uncovering system-level changes associated with different processes in the resting brain, which could provide novel insights into the understanding of the underlying physiological mechanisms of brain function. We also highlight several potential research topics in the future.

  20. Transcutaneous Spinal Direct Current Stimulation Alters Resting-State Functional Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Lauren; Meyer-Frießem, Christine H; Zahn, Peter K; Tegenthoff, Martin; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias

    2017-08-01

    Transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) is a noninvasive method that can modulate spinal reflexes, sensory afferent conduction, and even pain perception. Although neurophysiological evidence suggests that tsDCS alters somatosensory and nociceptive afferent conduction to the cortex, its supraspinal effects have not yet been investigated by using functional imaging to investigate tsDCS-induced alterations in intrinsic functional connectivity (FC). Therefore, we hypothesize that tsDCS-induced changes in neurophysiological measures might also be reflected in spontaneous brain activity. We investigated tsDCS-induced changes in somatosensory cortical connectivity by using seed-to-voxel-based analyses from the bilateral primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and the thalamus in a double-blind, crossover study design. Resting state FC was measured by using blood oxygenation level-dependent, functional magnetic resonance imaging (3T Philips) before and after anodal, cathodal, and sham tsDCS (20 min, 2.5 mA, active electrode centered over T11 spinous process, reference electrode over left shoulder blade) in a double-blind, crossover study of 20 healthy men (24 ± 0.7 years). As compared with sham, anodal tsDCS resulted in a decreased connectivity between the S1 and the ipsilateral posterior insula for both left and right hemispheres. Anodal tsDCS also resulted in decreased thalamic connectivity with the anterior cingulate cortex, and increased connectivity between S1 and the thalamus. Cathodal tsDCS showed increased FC between the right thalamus and both left and right posterior insulae, and decreased connectivity between the S1 seeds and the occipital cortex. Our results provide evidence of supraspinal effects of tsDCS and suggest that tsDCS may provide a noninvasive intervention that is able to target cortical sensory networks.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of PVP-functionalized superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles as an MRI contrast agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The magnetite (Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MNPs coated with poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone (PVP via covalent bonds were prepared as T2 contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The surface of MNPs was first coated with 3-(trimethoxysilyl propyl methacrylate (silan A by a silanization reaction to introduce reactive vinyl groups onto the surface, then poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone was grafted onto the surface of modified-MNPs via surface-initiated radical polymerization. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, XRD (X-ray diffraction, TEM (transmission electron microscopy, VSM (vibrating sample magnetometer, and TGA (thermogravimetric analysis. The MNPs had an average size of 14 nm and exhibited superparamagnetism and high saturation magnetization at room temperature. T2-weighted MRI images of PVP-grafted MNPs showed that the magnetic resonance signal is enhanced significantly with increasing nanoparticle concentration in water. The r1 and r2 values per millimole Fe, and r2/r1 value of the PVP-grafted MNPs were calculated to be 2.6 , 72.1, and 28.1(mmol/l–1•s–1, respectively. These results indicate that the PVP-grafted MNPs have great potential for application in MRI as a T2 contrast agent.

  2. Acessibilidade e paralelismo na interpretação do pronome sujeito e o contraste pro/pronome em português Accessibility, parallel function and the pro/pronoun contrast in Portuguese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Maria Sicuro CORRÊA

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available O contraste pro/pronome em orações coordenadas em português é aqui explorado de modo a distinguirem-se os procedimentos através dos quais formas pronominais sujeito são interpretadas em diferentes contextos sintáticos e discursivos — através de estratégias de seleção de um antecedente lingüístico ou da recuperação "automática" de uma representação mantida particularmente ativada na memória de trabalho. Dois experimentos são relatados. O primeiro testa a hipótese de que o vínculo sintático entre a oração que contém a forma pronominal e a que contém seus possíveis antecedentes define condições de processamento que favorecem o uso de um ou de outro procedimento de interpretação. O segundo testa a hipótese de que o grau de ativação de uma dada representação na memória de trabalho (definido em relação a um sistema que opera em três níveis afeta o modo como o sujeito pronominal de orações independentes é interpretado no discurso. Verifica-se que o contraste pro/ pronome pode ser re-estabelecido fora do âmbito de sentenças complexas uma vez que haja alteração local do foco da referência. A natureza deste contraste é discutida levando-se em conta as condições de processamento nas quais este se manifesta.The contrastive interpretation of pro and pronoun in co-ordinate sentences by Portuguese speakers is explored here, as a means of distinguishing the procedures whereby pronominal forms are interpreted in different syntactic/discourse contexts - by means of a search-identification strategy (such as the parallel function strategy or by means of the "automatic" recovery of a representation which is maintained particularly activated in working memory. Two experiments are reported. The first one tests the hypothesis that the kind of syntactic relationship that holds between the clause containing the pronominal form and the one containing possible antecedents defines processing conditions that favour one

  3. Multidetector computed tomography with triple-bolus contrast medium administration protocol for preoperative anatomical and functional assessment of potential living renal donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, Matthew K.; Rivers-Bowerman, Michael D.; Bardgett, Harry P.; Cowan, Nigel C.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) with a triple-bolus contrast administration protocol for preoperative anatomical and functional assessment of living renal donors. Fifty-five potential living renal donors underwent MDCT of which 27 proceeded to donor nephrectomy. A triple-bolus contrast administration protocol was used for simultaneous acquisition of arterial, nephrographic, and excretory phases. MDCT images were independently reviewed in random order by two radiologists blinded to surgical anatomy findings. Diagnostic accuracy for anatomical variants was quantified by sensitivity and specificity. Differential renal function (DRF) was derived from MDCT for 54 patients and compared with technetium-99 m dimercaptosuccinic acid renography (Tc-99 m DMSA). All triple-bolus MDCT examinations were technically adequate. Accessory renal arteries and veins were identified at surgery in 33% (n = 9/27) and 22% (n = 6/27) of donor kidneys. The mean difference between MDCT-derived DRF and DMSA was 0.8% (95% CI 0.1-1.6) with 95% limits of agreement of -4.6% (95% CI -3.3 to -5.9) to 6.3% (95% CI 5.0-7.6). MDCT delivered a mean (SD, range) radiation dose of 9.5 (3.6, 3.6-17.3) mSv. MDCT with a triple-bolus contrast administration provides accurate anatomical and functional evaluation of living renal donors. (orig.)

  4. Resting-state functional connectivity in animal models: modulations by exsanguination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Bharat B; Kannurpatti, Sridhar S

    2009-01-01

    We studied the spatiotemporal characteristics of the resting state low frequency fluctuations in functional MRI (fMRI), blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. fMRI-BOLD measurements at 9.4 Telsa were made during normal and exsanguinated condition previously known to alter cerebral blood flow (CBF) fluctuations in anesthetized rats. fMRI signal time series were low-pass filtered and studied by spectral analysis. During normal conditions, baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP) was 110 +/- 10 mm Hg and low-frequency fluctuations in BOLD signal were observed in the frequency range of 0.01 - 0.125 Hz. Following blood withdrawal (exsanguination), MAP decreased to 68 +/- 7 mm Hg, resulting in an increase in the amplitude of the low-frequency fluctuations in BOLD signal time series and an increase in power at several frequencies between 0.01 and 0.125 Hz. Spatially, the BOLD fluctuations were confined to the cortex and thalamus spanning both hemispheres with sparse presence in the caudate putamen and hippocampus during both normal and exsanguinated states. Spatial distribution of the low frequency fluctuations in BOLD signal, from cross correlation analysis, indicates substantial inter-hemispheric synchrony similar to that observed in the conscious human brain. The behavior of the resting state BOLD signal fluctuations similar to CBF fluctuations during exsanguination indicates a myogenic dependence. Also, a high inter-hemispheric synchrony combined with different phase characteristics of the low frequency BOLD fluctuations particularly in the hippocampus relative to the cortex emphasizes distinct functional networks.

  5. Resting state functional MRI in Parkinson's disease: the impact of deep brain stimulation on 'effective' connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Joshua; Urner, Maren; Moran, Rosalyn; Flandin, Guillaume; Marreiros, Andre; Mancini, Laura; White, Mark; Thornton, John; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Limousin, Patricia; Friston, Karl; Foltynie, Tom

    2014-04-01

    Depleted of dopamine, the dynamics of the parkinsonian brain impact on both 'action' and 'resting' motor behaviour. Deep brain stimulation has become an established means of managing these symptoms, although its mechanisms of action remain unclear. Non-invasive characterizations of induced brain responses, and the effective connectivity underlying them, generally appeals to dynamic causal modelling of neuroimaging data. When the brain is at rest, however, this sort of characterization has been limited to correlations (functional connectivity). In this work, we model the 'effective' connectivity underlying low frequency blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations in the resting Parkinsonian motor network-disclosing the distributed effects of deep brain stimulation on cortico-subcortical connections. Specifically, we show that subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation modulates all the major components of the motor cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical loop, including the cortico-striatal, thalamo-cortical, direct and indirect basal ganglia pathways, and the hyperdirect subthalamic nucleus projections. The strength of effective subthalamic nucleus afferents and efferents were reduced by stimulation, whereas cortico-striatal, thalamo-cortical and direct pathways were strengthened. Remarkably, regression analysis revealed that the hyperdirect, direct, and basal ganglia afferents to the subthalamic nucleus predicted clinical status and therapeutic response to deep brain stimulation; however, suppression of the sensitivity of the subthalamic nucleus to its hyperdirect afferents by deep brain stimulation may subvert the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation. Our findings highlight the distributed effects of stimulation on the resting motor network and provide a framework for analysing effective connectivity in resting state functional MRI with strong a priori hypotheses.

  6. A Functional Imaging Study of Self-Regulatory Capacities in Persons Who Stutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Zhishun; Huo, Yuankai; Davidson, Stephanie M.; Klahr, Kristin; Herder, Carl L.; Sikora, Chamonix O.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental stuttering is a disorder of speech fluency with an unknown pathogenesis. The similarity of its phenotype and natural history with other childhood neuropsychiatric disorders of frontostriatal pathology suggests that stuttering may have a closely related pathogenesis. We investigated in this study the potential involvement of frontostriatal circuits in developmental stuttering. We collected functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 46 persons with stuttering and 52 fluent controls during performance of the Simon Spatial Incompatibility Task. We examined differences between the two groups of blood-oxygen-level-dependent activation associated with two neural processes, the resolution of cognitive conflict and the context-dependent adaptation to changes in conflict. Stuttering speakers and controls did not differ on behavioral performance on the task. In the presence of conflict-laden stimuli, however, stuttering speakers activated more strongly the cingulate cortex, left anterior prefrontal cortex, right medial frontal cortex, left supplementary motor area, right caudate nucleus, and left parietal cortex. The magnitude of activation in the anterior cingulate cortex correlated inversely in stuttering speakers with symptom severity. Stuttering speakers also showed blunted activation during context-dependent adaptation in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, a brain region that mediates cross-temporal contingencies. Frontostriatal hyper-responsivity to conflict resembles prior findings in other disorders of frontostriatal pathology, and therefore likely represents a general mechanism supporting functional compensation for an underlying inefficiency of neural processing in these circuits. The reduced activation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex likely represents the inadequate readiness of stuttering speakers to execute a sequence of motor responses. PMID:24587104

  7. Central pain processing in chronic chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine G Boland

    Full Text Available Life expectancy in multiple myeloma has significantly increased. However, a high incidence of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN can negatively influence quality of life during this period. This study applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to compare areas associated with central pain processing in patients with multiple myeloma who had chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (MM-CIPN with those from healthy volunteers (HV. Twenty-four participants (n = 12 MM-CIPN, n = 12 HV underwent Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent (BOLD fMRI at 3T whilst noxious heat-pain stimuli were applied to the foot and then thigh. Patients with MM-CIPN demonstrated greater activation during painful stimulation in the precuneus compared to HV (p = 0.014, FWE-corrected. Patients with MM-CIPN exhibited hypo-activation of the right superior frontal gyrus compared to HV (p = 0.031, FWE-corrected. Significant positive correlation existed between the total neuropathy score (reduced version and activation in the frontal operculum (close to insular cortex during foot stimulation in patients with MM-CIPN (p = 0.03, FWE-corrected; adjusted R2 = 0.87. Painful stimuli delivered to MM-CIPN patients evoke differential activation of distinct cortical regions, reflecting a unique pattern of central pain processing compared with healthy volunteers. This characteristic activation pattern associated with pain furthers the understanding of the pathophysiology of painful chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy. Functional MRI provides a tool for monitoring cerebral changes during anti-cancer and analgesic treatment.

  8. A functional imaging study of self-regulatory capacities in persons who stutter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Liu

    Full Text Available Developmental stuttering is a disorder of speech fluency with an unknown pathogenesis. The similarity of its phenotype and natural history with other childhood neuropsychiatric disorders of frontostriatal pathology suggests that stuttering may have a closely related pathogenesis. We investigated in this study the potential involvement of frontostriatal circuits in developmental stuttering. We collected functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 46 persons with stuttering and 52 fluent controls during performance of the Simon Spatial Incompatibility Task. We examined differences between the two groups of blood-oxygen-level-dependent activation associated with two neural processes, the resolution of cognitive conflict and the context-dependent adaptation to changes in conflict. Stuttering speakers and controls did not differ on behavioral performance on the task. In the presence of conflict-laden stimuli, however, stuttering speakers activated more strongly the cingulate cortex, left anterior prefrontal cortex, right medial frontal cortex, left supplementary motor area, right caudate nucleus, and left parietal cortex. The magnitude of activation in the anterior cingulate cortex correlated inversely in stuttering speakers with symptom severity. Stuttering speakers also showed blunted activation during context-dependent adaptation in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, a brain region that mediates cross-temporal contingencies. Frontostriatal hyper-responsivity to conflict resembles prior findings in other disorders of frontostriatal pathology, and therefore likely represents a general mechanism supporting functional compensation for an underlying inefficiency of neural processing in these circuits. The reduced activation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex likely represents the inadequate readiness of stuttering speakers to execute a sequence of motor responses.

  9. Functional MRI study of the brain with malformations of cortical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Zhou Wenjing; Jin Zhen; Li Ke; Zhang Chaoli

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the patterns of motor and linguistic activation in cortical and its correlations with abnormal gray matter in patients with malformations of cortical development (MCD) and epilepsy. Methods: Seven MCD patients with epilepsy (2 patients with focal cortical dysplasia, 2 heterotopia, 2 schizencephaly, and 1 polymicrogyria) underwent blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) in a 3 T MR scanner when practicing bilateral fingers tapping,toes twisting, verb generation, and picture naming.Functional images were post-processed by using SPM 5 software based on a general linear model (GLM) to generate activations above a uniform threshold with the cluster size (≥30 voxels, P<0.001 corrected). The activations were recognized and classified by two experienced neuroradiologists, and then compared with that in abnormal gray matter. Results: The clusters and intensities of motor activations were mainly located in the sensormotor cortex (SMC) and premotor area (PMA). In linguistic tasks, activations produced by verb generation were found in language-associated cortical regions and PMA with higher activation in Wernicke area, picture naming significantly in the visual cortex, and language in Broca area. Combination of the two linguistic tasks produced significant clusters and intensities in language cortex. For MCD patients with abnormal cortical abnormalities, motor and language task could produce neuronal activities within normal as well as abnormal cortex regions. In 6 patients who underwent respective surgery, epileptic seizures decreased significantly, and the follow-up images demonstrated no new neurological dysfunctions and cognitive impairments. Conclusions: fMRI can visualize neuronal activities in patients with MCD and epilepsy and demonstrate the motor and linguistic activations occurring in normal and abnormal gray matter. It should be cautious for surgery in patient with MCD and epilepsy. (authors)

  10. Dialysis and contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcos, Sameh K.; Thomsen, Henrik S.; Webb, Judith A.W.

    2002-01-01

    In a previous survey we revealed uncertainty among responders about (a) whether or not to perform hemodialysis in patients with severely reduced renal function who had received contrast medium; and (b) when to perform hemodialysis in patients on regular treatment with hemodialysis or continuous ambulatory dialysis who received contrast medium. Therefore, the Contrast Media Safety Committee of The European Society of Urogenital Radiology decided to review the literature and to issue guidelines. The committee performed a Medline search. Based on this, a report and guidelines were prepared. The report was discussed at the Ninth European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Genoa, Italy. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis safely remove both iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast media. The effectiveness of hemodialysis depends on many factors including blood and dialysate flow rate, permeability of dialysis membrane, duration of hemodialysis and molecular size, protein binding, hydrophilicity, and electrical charge of the contrast medium. Generally, several hemodialysis sessions are needed to removal all contrast medium, whereas it takes 3 weeks for continuous ambulatory dialysis to remove the agent completely. There is no need to schedule the dialysis in relation to the injection of iodinated or MR contrast media or the injection of contrast agent in relation to the dialysis program. Hemodialysis does not protect poorly functioning kidneys against contrast-medium-induced nephrotoxicity. Simple guidelines are given. (orig.)

  11. Dialysis and contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcos, Sameh K. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Sheffield S5 7AU (United Kingdom); Thomsen, Henrik S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology 54E2, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Herlev Ringvej 75, 2730 Herlev (Denmark); Webb, Judith A.W. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, London EC1A 7BE (United Kingdom)

    2002-12-01

    In a previous survey we revealed uncertainty among responders about (a) whether or not to perform hemodialysis in patients with severely reduced renal function who had received contrast medium; and (b) when to perform hemodialysis in patients on regular treatment with hemodialysis or continuous ambulatory dialysis who received contrast medium. Therefore, the Contrast Media Safety Committee of The European Society of Urogenital Radiology decided to review the literature and to issue guidelines. The committee performed a Medline search. Based on this, a report and guidelines were prepared. The report was discussed at the Ninth European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Genoa, Italy. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis safely remove both iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast media. The effectiveness of hemodialysis depends on many factors including blood and dialysate flow rate, permeability of dialysis membrane, duration of hemodialysis and molecular size, protein binding, hydrophilicity, and electrical charge of the contrast medium. Generally, several hemodialysis sessions are needed to removal all contrast medium, whereas it takes 3 weeks for continuous ambulatory dialysis to remove the agent completely. There is no need to schedule the dialysis in relation to the injection of iodinated or MR contrast media or the injection of contrast agent in relation to the dialysis program. Hemodialysis does not protect poorly functioning kidneys against contrast-medium-induced nephrotoxicity. Simple guidelines are given. (orig.)

  12. Dual-energy micro-CT functional imaging of primary lung cancer in mice using gold and iodine nanoparticle contrast agents: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Jeffrey R; Clark, Darin P; Moding, Everett J; Ghaghada, Ketan; Kirsch, David G; West, Jennifer L; Badea, Cristian T

    2014-01-01

    To provide additional functional information for tumor characterization, we investigated the use of dual-energy computed tomography for imaging murine lung tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability were quantified using gold and iodine nanoparticles. This approach was compared with a single contrast agent/single-energy CT method. Ex vivo validation studies were performed to demonstrate the accuracy of in vivo contrast agent quantification by CT. Primary lung tumors were generated in LSL-Kras(G12D); p53(FL/FL) mice. Gold nanoparticles were injected, followed by iodine nanoparticles two days later. The gold accumulated in tumors, while the iodine provided intravascular contrast. Three dual-energy CT scans were performed-two for the single contrast agent method and one for the dual contrast agent method. Gold and iodine concentrations in each scan were calculated using a dual-energy decomposition. For each method, the tumor fractional blood volume was calculated based on iodine concentration, and tumor vascular permeability was estimated based on accumulated gold concentration. For validation, the CT-derived measurements were compared with histology and inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy measurements of gold concentrations in tissues. Dual-energy CT enabled in vivo separation of gold and iodine contrast agents and showed uptake of gold nanoparticles in the spleen, liver, and tumors. The tumor fractional blood volume measurements determined from the two imaging methods were in agreement, and a high correlation (R(2) = 0.81) was found between measured fractional blood volume and histology-derived microvascular density. Vascular permeability measurements obtained from the two imaging methods agreed well with ex vivo measurements. Dual-energy CT using two types of nanoparticles is equivalent to the single nanoparticle method, but allows for measurement of fractional blood volume and permeability with a single scan. As confirmed by ex

  13. The value of ultrasound contrast for assessing cancer cell proliferation and invasion function as well as angiogenesis in lesions of in patients with gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the value of ultrasound contrast for assessing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as angiogenesis in lesions of in patients with gastric cancer. Methods: A total of 39 patients with gastric cancer and 48 patients with gastric ulcer who were treated in our hospital between August 2012 and May 2016 were included in gastric cancer group and gastric ulcer group respectively, and 50 healthy subjects who accepted gastroscopy in our hospital during the same period were included in normal control group. The day after admission, color Doppler diasonograph was used to test the gastric ultrasound contrast parameters; fluorescence quantitative PCR method was used to detect the proliferation and invasion gene mRNA expression in stomach tissue; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to detect the serum angiogenesis index levels. Results: Ultrasound contrast parameters ET and TTP levels of gastric cancer group and gastric ulcer group were significantly lower than those of normal control group, and ultrasound contrast parameters ET and TTP levels of gastric cancer group were significantly lower than those of gastric ulcer group; Stat3, Survivin, Bcl-2, 毬-catenin, eIF4E, CD44, UHRF1 and c-met mRNA expression in tissue as well as VEGF, EGFR, HIF-毩 and Ang-2 levels in serum of gastric cancer group were higher than those of gastric ulcer group and normal control group while E-cadherin mRNA expression in tissue was lower than those of gastric ulcer group and normal control group; Spearman correlation analysis showed that ultrasound contrast parameters ET and TTP levels were correlated with the cancer cell proliferation and invasion function as well as angiogenesis indexes in lesions. Conclusion: Ultrasound contrast parameters can accurately assess the malignant degree of gastric cancer, and is expected to become the reliable means for early diagnosis and treatment guidance of gastric cancer in the future.

  14. Application of BOLD MRI and DTI for the evaluation of renal effect related to viscosity of iodinated contrast agent in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Ren, Ke; Liu, Yi; Sun, Wen-Ge; Wang, Jia-Huan; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Cheng-Hua

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of viscosity of contrast agent (CA) on intrarenal oxygenation and diffusion as measured by blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in a rat model. Radiocontrast iodixanol formulated in three viscosities were designated 270, 320, and 350 (mg iodine/mL). Sixty-three male Wistar rats were divided into four groups. Saline and iodixanol (4 g iodine/kg) were administered. MR images were acquired on a 3.0T scanner at baseline and at 1 hour, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours postinjection of solutions. BOLD-MRI was performed with a multiple gradient-recalled-echo sequence. The changes in R2*, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), histology, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) immunoexpression were evaluated. The R2*, ADC, and FA values were normalized to baseline to calculate ΔR2*, ΔADC, and ΔFA. Compared with baseline levels, distinct elevation of ΔR2* (P < 0.05) and obvious decrease in ΔADC (P < 0.01) and ΔFA (P < 0.05) were observed in all the anatomical compartments at 1 hour after administration of CA. The absolute values in ΔR2*, ΔADC, and ΔFA increased with increases in CA viscosity, and differed significantly between the CA groups in renal cortex (CO), outer stripe of outer medulla (OSOM), and inner stripe of outer medulla (ISOM) (all P < 0.05). A significant positive correlation was observed between ΔR2* and HIF-1α expression (P < 0.001, r = 0.75). Significant negative correlations were observed between ΔADC, ΔFA, and pathologies in CO, OSOM, ISOM (all P < 0.001, r = -0.68-0.87; all P < 0.001, r = -0.60-0.66). The effect of CA viscosity on intrarenal oxygenation and diffusion was viscosity-dependent, and was identified using BOLD-MRI and DTI. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1320-1331. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Absence of functional renal effects of uro-angiographic contrast media on post-ischemic rat kidneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbaeys, A.; Maele, G. van; Sy, W. de; Ringoir, S.; Lameire, N.; University Hospital, Ghent; University Hospital, Ghent

    1991-01-01

    Water soluble ionic contrast media (CM) and glucose 5% were administered to Sprague-Dawley rats 36 hours after bilateral warm renal ischemia for 45 min. In all animals (n=28) the renal ischemia caused a decrease of the absolute urinary creatinine output. Intraarterial injection of glucose 5% or CM did not produce different patterns of absolute urinary creatinine output. The serum creatinine increased after 36 hours of reflow. When compared by means of a Mann-Whitney U-test to a normal median serum creatinine obtained in a separate group of 22 normal rats, the increase was statistically significant (p≤0.01). The serum creatinine medians returned to a normal level after 24 hours. It seems therefore that 45 min of warm renal ischemia and 36 hours of reflow is an insufficient challenge to the rat kidney for the detection of the nephrotoxic properties of CM as opposed to when CM are injected during ischemia. (orig.)

  16. Integration and Segregation of Default Mode Network Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Transition-Age Males with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Gagan; Arnold Anteraper, Sheeba; Patil, Kaustubh R; Semwal, Meha; Goldin, Rachel L; Furtak, Stephannie L; Chai, Xiaoqian Jenny; Saygin, Zeynep M; Gabrieli, John D E; Biederman, Joseph; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the resting-state functional connectivity (RsFc) profile of the default mode network (DMN) in transition-age males with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Resting-state blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired from adolescent and young adult males with high-functioning ASD (n = 15) and from age-, sex-, and intelligence quotient-matched healthy controls (HCs; n = 16). The DMN was examined by assessing the positive and negative RsFc correlations of an average of the literature-based conceptualized major DMN nodes (medial prefrontal cortex [mPFC], posterior cingulate cortex, bilateral angular, and inferior temporal gyrus regions). RsFc data analysis was performed using a seed-driven approach. ASD was characterized by an altered pattern of RsFc in the DMN. The ASD group exhibited a weaker pattern of intra- and extra-DMN-positive and -negative RsFc correlations, respectively. In ASD, the strength of intra-DMN coupling was significantly reduced with the mPFC and the bilateral angular gyrus regions. In addition, the polarity of the extra-DMN correlation with the right hemispheric task-positive regions of fusiform gyrus and supramarginal gyrus was reversed from typically negative to positive in the ASD group. A wide variability was observed in the presentation of the RsFc profile of the DMN in both HC and ASD groups that revealed a distinct pattern of subgrouping using pattern recognition analyses. These findings imply that the functional architecture profile of the DMN is altered in ASD with weaker than expected integration and segregation of DMN RsFc. Future studies with larger sample sizes are warranted.

  17. A pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging study probing the interface of cognitive and emotional brain systems in pediatric bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuluri, Mani N; Passarotti, Alessandra M; Parnes, Stephanie A; Fitzgerald, Jacklynn M; Sweeney, John A

    2010-10-01

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated the effects of pharmacotherapy on brain function underlying affect dysregulation and cognitive function in pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD). Healthy controls (HC) (n=14; mean age =14.1 ± 2.4 years) and unmedicated PBD patients with manic or hypomanic episodes (n=17; mean age =14.3 ± 1.1 years) were matched on intelligence quotient (IQ) and demographic factors. The fMRI studies were performed at baseline and after 14 weeks, during which PBD patients were treated initially with second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) followed by lamotrigine monotherapy. The pediatric affective color-matching task was used where subjects matched the color of a positive, negative, or neutral word with one of the two colored circles below in each of the trials. There were five blocks of each emotional word type, with 10 trials per block. Behavioral data showed that the PBD group was modestly slower and less accurate than the HC, regardless of condition or treatment status. The blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal activity was reduced with treatment in the PBD group relative to the HC group during the negative versus neutral condition in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), right posterior cingulate gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, and inferior parietal lobule, but increased in left ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC). Similarly, during the positive versus neutral condition, the PBD group, relative to HC, showed reduced activity in right DLPFC, precuneus, and inferior parietal lobule and increased activity in the right VMPFC. However, within the PBD group, there was treatment related decrease in VMPFC and DLPFC. Improvement on Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) score significantly correlated with the decreased activity in VMPFC within the patient group. Pharmacotherapy in PBD patients led to differential effort with persistently increased activity in the affective regions and decreased activity in the

  18. A functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation of motor control in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome during imagined and executed movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapparoli, Laura; Porta, Mauro; Gandola, Martina; Invernizzi, Paola; Colajanni, Valeria; Servello, Domenico; Zerbi, Alberto; Banfi, Giuseppe; Paulesu, Eraldo

    2016-02-01

    The current study investigated the neural correlates of voluntary motor control in 24 adult Gilles de la Tourette (GTS) patients. We examined whether imagination and the execution of the same voluntary movement - finger oppositions with either hand - were associated with specific patterns of activation. We also explored whether these patterns correlated with the severity of the syndrome, as measured by the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) for motor tics. The presence of brain morphometric abnormalities was also assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Crucial to our experiment was the manipulation of the presence of an explicit motor outflow in the tasks. We anticipated a reduction in the ticking manifestation during the explicit motor task and brain activation differences between GTS patients and 24 age/gender-matched normal controls. The anticipated differences were all evident in the form of hyperactivations in the GTS patients in the premotor and prefrontal areas for both motor tasks for both hands; however, the motor imagery hyperactivations also involved rostral pre-frontal and temporo-parietal regions of the right hemisphere. The blood oxygen level-dependent responses of the premotor cortices during the motor imagery task were significantly correlated with the YGTSS scores. In contrast, no significant brain morphometric differences were found. This study provides evidence of a different neurofunctional organisation of motor control between adult patients with GTS and healthy controls that is independent from the actual execution of motor acts. The presence of an explicit motor outflow in GTS mitigates the manifestation of tics and the need for compensatory brain activity in the brain regions showing task-dependent hyperactivations. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effect of parallel radiofrequency transmission on arterial input function selection in dynamic contrast-enhanced 3 Tesla pelvic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafi, Hatim; Elias, Saba N; Nguyen, Huyen T; Friel, Harry T; Knopp, Michael V; Guo, BeiBei; Heymsfield, Steven B; Jia, Guang

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate whether parallel radiofrequency transmission (mTX) can improve the symmetry of the left and right femoral arteries in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of prostate and bladder cancer. Eighteen prostate and 24 bladder cancer patients underwent 3.0 Tesla DCE-MRI scan with a single transmission channel coil. Subsequently, 21 prostate and 21 bladder cancer patients were scanned using the dual channel mTX upgrade. The precontrast signal ( S0) and the maximum enhancement ratio (MER) were measured in both the left and the right femoral arteries. Within the patient cohort, the ratio of S0 and MER in the left artery to that in the right artery ( S0_LR, MER_LR) was calculated with and without the use of mTX. Left to right asymmetry indices for S0 ( S0_LRasym) and MER ( MER_LRasym) were defined as the absolute values of the difference between S0_LR and 1, and the difference between MER_LR and 1, respectively. S0_LRasym, and MER_LRasym were 0.21 and 0.19 for prostate cancer patients with mTX, and 0.43 and 0.45 for the ones imaged without it (P enhancement. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Road work on memory lane--functional and structural alterations to the learning and memory circuit in adults born very preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvan, Piergiorgio; Froudist Walsh, Seán; Allin, Matthew P G; Walshe, Muriel; Murray, Robin M; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; McGuire, Philip K; Williams, Steven C R; Nosarti, Chiara

    2014-11-15

    Very preterm (VPT) birth is considered a risk factor not only for neurological impairment, but also for reduced function in several cognitive domains in childhood and later in life. Individuals who were born VPT are more likely to demonstrate learning and memory difficulties compared to term-born controls. These problems contribute to more VPT-born children repeating grades and underachieving in school. This, in turn, affects their prospects in adult life. Here we aimed to 1) study how the VPT-born adult brain functionally recruited specific areas during learning, i.e. encoding and recall across four repeated blocks of verbal stimuli, and to investigate how these patterns of activation differed from term-born subjects; and 2) probe the microstructural differences of white-matter tracts connecting these areas to other parts of the learning and memory network. To investigate these functional-structural relationships we analyzed functional and diffusion-weighted MRI. Functional-MRI and a verbal paired associate learning (VPAL) task were used to extract Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) activity in 21 VPT-born adults (learning in key structures of the learning and memory network, including anterior cingulate and caudate body during encoding and thalamus/parahippocampal gyrus during cued recall. Altered activation in thalamus/parahippocampal gyrus may be explained by reduced connections between these areas and the hippocampus, which may be a direct consequence of neonatal hypoxic/ischemic injury. These results could reflect the effect of adaptive plastic processes associated with high-order cognitive functions, at least when the cognitive load remains relatively low, as ex-preterm young adults displayed unimpaired performance in completing the verbal paired associate learning task. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional connectivity of the human rostral and caudal cingulate motor areas in the brain resting state at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Christophe [CHNO des Quinze-Vingts, UPMC Paris 6, Service de NeuroImagerie, Paris (France)

    2010-01-15

    Three cingulate motor areas have been described in monkeys, the rostral, dorsal, and ventral cingulate motor areas, and would control limbic-related motor activity. However, little anatomical data are available in human about the functional networks these cingulate areas underlie. Therefore, networks anchored in the rostral and caudal cingulate motor areas (rCMA and cCMA, respectively) were studied in human using functional connectivity during the brain resting state. Since the rCMA and cCMA are located just under the pre-supplementary and supplementary motor areas (pre-SMA and SMA), the pre-SMA- and SMA-centered networks were also studied to ensure that these four circuits were correctly dissociated. Data from 14 right-handed healthy volunteers were acquired at rest and analyzed by region of interest (ROI)-based functional connectivity. The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations of separate ROIs located in rCMA, cCMA, pre-SMA, and SMA were successively used to identify significant temporal correlations with BOLD signal fluctuations of other brain regions. Low-frequency BOLD signal of the CMA was correlated with signal fluctuations in the prefrontal, cingulate, insular, premotor, motor, medial and inferior parietal cortices, putamen and thalamus, and anticorrelated with the default-mode network. rCMA was more in relation with prefrontal, orbitofrontal, and language-associated cortices than cCMA more related to sensory cortex. These cingulate networks were very similar to the pre-SMA- and SMA-centered networks, although pre-SMA and SMA showed stronger correlation with the prefrontal and inferior parietal cortices and with the cerebellum and the superior parietal cortex, respectively. The human cingulate motor areas constitute an interface between sensorimotor, limbic and executive systems, sharing common cortical, striatal, and thalamic relays with the overlying premotor medial areas. (orig.)

  2. Resting-state functional MRI as a tool for evaluating brain hemodynamic responsiveness to external stimuli in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasonen, Jaakko; Salo, Raimo A; Huttunen, Joanna K; Gröhn, Olli

    2017-09-01

    Anesthesia is a major confounding factor in functional MRI (fMRI) experiments attributed to its effects on brain function. Recent evidence suggests that parameters obtained with resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) are coupled with anesthetic depth. Therefore, we investigated whether parameters obtained with rs-fMRI, such as functional connectivity (FC), are also directly related to blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) responses. A simple rs-fMRI protocol was implemented in a pharmacological fMRI study to evaluate the coupling between hemodynamic responses and FC under five anesthetics (α-chloralose, isoflurane, medetomidine, thiobutabarbital, and urethane). Temporal change in the FC was evaluated at 1-hour interval. Supplementary forepaw stimulation experiments were also conducted. Under thiobutabarbital anesthesia, FC was clearly coupled with nicotine-induced BOLD responses. Good correlation values were also obtained under isoflurane and medetomidine anesthesia. The observations in the thiobutabarbital group were supported by forepaw stimulation experiments. Additionally, the rs-fMRI protocol revealed significant temporal changes in the FC in the α-chloralose, thiobutabarbital, and urethane groups. Our results suggest that FC can be used to estimate brain hemodynamic responsiveness to stimuli and evaluate the level and temporal changes of anesthesia. Therefore, analysis of the fMRI baseline signal may be highly valuable tool for controlling the outcome of preclinical fMRI experiments. Magn Reson Med 78:1136-1146, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of working memory in youth after sports-related concussion: is it still working?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keightley, Michelle L; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Chen, Jen-Kai; Gagnon, Isabelle; Leonard, Gabriel; Petrides, Michael; Ptito, Alain

    2014-03-01

    Abstract In children, the importance of detecting deficits after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion has grown with the increasing popularity of leisure physical activities and contact sports. Whereas most postconcussive symptoms (PCS) are similar for children and adults, the breadth of consequences to children remains largely unknown. To investigate the effect of mTBI on brain function, we compared working memory performance and related brain activity using blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 15 concussed youths and 15 healthy age-matched control subjects. Neuropsychological tests, self-perceived PCS, and levels of anxiety and depression were also assessed. Our results showed that, behaviorally, concussed youths had significantly worse performances on the working memory tasks, as well as on the Rey figure delayed recall and verbal fluency. fMRI results revealed that, compared to healthy children, concussed youths had significantly reduced task-related activity in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, and left superior parietal lobule during performance of verbal and nonverbal working memory tasks. Additionally, concussed youths also showed less activation than healthy controls in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, left thalamus, and left caudate nucleus during the nonverbal task. Regression analysis indicated that BOLD signal changes in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly correlated with performance such that greater activities in these regions, relative to the control condition, were associated with greater accuracy. Our findings confirmed functional alterations in brain activity after concussion in youths, a result similar to that observed in adults. However, significant differences were noted. In particular, the observation of reduced working memory accuracy suggests that youths may be unable to engage compensatory

  4. Imaging human reward processing with positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Nina B L; Slifstein, Mark; Meda, Shashwath; Xu, Xiaoyan; Ayoub, Rawad; Medina, Olga; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Krystal, John H; Abi-Dargham, Anissa

    2012-05-01

    Functional neuroimaging (fMRI) studies show activation in mesolimbic circuitry in tasks involving reward processing, like the Monetary Incentive Delay Task (MIDT). In voltammetry studies in animals, mesolimbic dopamine release is associated with reward salience. This study examined the relationship between fMRI activation and magnitude of dopamine release measured with Positron emission tomography study (PET) in the same subjects using MIDT in both modalities to test if fMRI activation is related to dopamine release. Eighteen healthy subjects were scanned with [¹¹C]raclopride PET at baseline and after MIDT. Binding potential (BP(ND)) was derived by equilibrium analysis in striatal subregions and percent change across conditions (∆BP(ND)) was measured. Blood oxygen level dependence (BOLD) signal changes with MIDT were measured during fMRI using voxelwise analysis and ROI analysis and correlated with ∆BP(ND). ∆BP(ND) was not significant in the ventral striatum (VST) but reached significance in the posterior caudate. The fMRI BOLD activation was highest in VST. No significant associations between ∆BP(ND) and change in fMRI BOLD were observed with VST using ROI analysis. Voxelwise analysis showed positive correlation between BOLD activation in anticipation of the highest reward and ∆BP(ND) in VST and precommissural putamen. Our study indicates that endogenous dopamine release in VST is of small magnitude and is related to BOLD signal change during performance of the MIDT in only a few voxels when rewarding and nonrewarding conditions are interspersed. The lack of correlation at the ROI level may be due to the small magnitude of release or to the particular dependence of BOLD on glutamatergic signaling.

  5. Neural correlates of the popular music phenomenon: evidence from functional MRI and PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Qiaozhen; Zhang, Ying; Hou, Haifeng; Du, Fenglei; Wu, Shuang; Chen, Lin; Shen, Yehua; Chao, Fangfang; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei; Chung, June-key

    2017-01-01

    Music can induce different emotions. However, its neural mechanism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and position emission tomography (PET) imaging for mapping of neural changes under the most popular music in healthy volunteers. Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI and monoamine receptor PET imaging with 11 C-N-methylspiperone ( 11 C-NMSP) were conducted under the popular music Gangnam Style and light music A Comme Amour in healthy subjects. PET and fMRI images were analyzed by using the Statistical Parametric Mapping software (SPM). Significantly increased fMRI BOLD signals were found in the bilateral superior temporal cortices, left cerebellum, left putamen and right thalamus cortex. Monoamine receptor availability was increased significantly in the left superior temporal gyrus and left putamen, but decreased in the bilateral superior occipital cortices under the Gangnam Style compared with the light music condition. Significant positive correlation was found between 11 C-NMSP binding and fMRI BOLD signals in the left temporal cortex. Furthermore, increased 11 C-NMSP binding in the left putamen was positively correlated with the mood arousal level score under the Gangnam Style condition. Popular music Gangnam Style can arouse pleasure experience and strong emotional response. The left putamen is positively correlated with the mood arousal level score under the Gangnam Style condition. Our results revealed characteristic patterns of brain activity associated with Gangnam Style, and may also provide more general insights into the music-induced emotional processing. (orig.)

  6. Assessment of language lateralization with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salagierska-Barwinska, A.; Goraj, B.

    2004-01-01

    fMRI offers powerful methods to delineate which brain regions are engaged in language processing in the intact brain. Until now hemisphere dominance for language has been usually assessed by means of the intraoperative methods: the Wada test or electrocortical stimulation mapping. Recently functional MRI becomes the valuable method in determining hemisphere dominance for language. fMRI study was proved to be concordant with invasive measures. fMRI was carried out in 30 healthy selected participants (15 females: 10 strongly right-handed and 5 strongly left-handed; 15 males: 10 strongly right-handed and 5 strongly left-handed). The subject's handedness was assessed by standardized psychological tests inter alia the 'lateralization inventory'. Two different language tasks were used: a verb generation task and a phonological task. Subjects were scanned,while performing experimental block. The block contained alternately 8 active (language task) and 8 control conditions. Statistical analysis of evoked blood oxygenation level-dependent BOLD) responses, measured with echo planar imagining (1.5 T) were used. During a verb generation task in strongly right or left handed subjects the inferior frontal region was activated on the side opposite to the subject's handedness determined by the psychological test. Our fMRI studies demonstrated no gender effects on brain during these language tasks. Our study suggests that fMRI is a good device for the study of the language organization. The advantage of fMRI is its capacity for exact localization of activated areas. fMRI together with adequate neurolinguistic test could be promising routine preoperative tool in identification hemisphere dominance for language. These results encourage to further investigation for evaluating correlation in patients with brain injuries. (author)

  7. Neural correlates of the popular music phenomenon: evidence from functional MRI and PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiaozhen [The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhang, Ying; Hou, Haifeng; Du, Fenglei; Wu, Shuang; Chen, Lin; Shen, Yehua; Chao, Fangfang; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei [Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Chung, June-key [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Music can induce different emotions. However, its neural mechanism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and position emission tomography (PET) imaging for mapping of neural changes under the most popular music in healthy volunteers. Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI and monoamine receptor PET imaging with {sup 11}C-N-methylspiperone ({sup 11}C-NMSP) were conducted under the popular music Gangnam Style and light music A Comme Amour in healthy subjects. PET and fMRI images were analyzed by using the Statistical Parametric Mapping software (SPM). Significantly increased fMRI BOLD signals were found in the bilateral superior temporal cortices, left cerebellum, left putamen and right thalamus cortex. Monoamine receptor availability was increased significantly in the left superior temporal gyrus and left putamen, but decreased in the bilateral superior occipital cortices under the Gangnam Style compared with the light music condition. Significant positive correlation was found between {sup 11}C-NMSP binding and fMRI BOLD signals in the left temporal cortex. Furthermore, increased {sup 11}C-NMSP binding in the left putamen was positively correlated with the mood arousal level score under the Gangnam Style condition. Popular music Gangnam Style can arouse pleasure experience and strong emotional response. The left putamen is positively correlated with the mood arousal level score under the Gangnam Style condition. Our results revealed characteristic patterns of brain activity associated with Gangnam Style, and may also provide more general insights into the music-induced emotional processing. (orig.)

  8. Neural correlates of the popular music phenomenon: evidence from functional MRI and PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiaozhen; Zhang, Ying; Hou, Haifeng; Du, Fenglei; Wu, Shuang; Chen, Lin; Shen, Yehua; Chao, Fangfang; Chung, June-Key; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2017-06-01

    Music can induce different emotions. However, its neural mechanism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and position emission tomography (PET) imaging for mapping of neural changes under the most popular music in healthy volunteers. Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI and monoamine receptor PET imaging with 11 C-N-methylspiperone ( 11 C-NMSP) were conducted under the popular music Gangnam Style and light music A Comme Amour in healthy subjects. PET and fMRI images were analyzed by using the Statistical Parametric Mapping software (SPM). Significantly increased fMRI BOLD signals were found in the bilateral superior temporal cortices, left cerebellum, left putamen and right thalamus cortex. Monoamine receptor availability was increased significantly in the left superior temporal gyrus and left putamen, but decreased in the bilateral superior occipital cortices under the Gangnam Style compared with the light music condition. Significant positive correlation was found between 11 C-NMSP binding and fMRI BOLD signals in the left temporal cortex. Furthermore, increased 11 C-NMSP binding in the left putamen was positively correlated with the mood arousal level score under the Gangnam Style condition. Popular music Gangnam Style can arouse pleasure experience and strong emotional response. The left putamen is positively correlated with the mood arousal level score under the Gangnam Style condition. Our results revealed characteristic patterns of brain activity associated with Gangnam Style, and may also provide more general insights into the music-induced emotional processing.

  9. Functional Neuroimaging Correlates of Burnout among Internal Medicine Residents and Faculty Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durning, Steven J; Costanzo, Michelle; Artino, Anthony R; Dyrbye, Liselotte N; Beckman, Thomas J; Schuwirth, Lambert; Holmboe, Eric; Roy, Michael J; Wittich, Christopher M; Lipner, Rebecca S; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-01-01

    Burnout is prevalent in residency training and practice and is linked to medical error and suboptimal patient care. However, little is known about how burnout affects clinical reasoning, which is essential to safe and effective care. The aim of this study was to examine how burnout modulates brain activity during clinical reasoning in physicians. Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), brain activity was assessed in internal medicine residents (n = 10) and board-certified internists (faculty, n = 17) from the Uniformed Services University (USUHS) while they answered and reflected upon United States Medical Licensing Examination and American Board of Internal Medicine multiple-choice questions. Participants also completed a validated two-item burnout scale, which includes an item assessing emotional exhaustion and an item assessing depersonalization. Whole brain covariate analysis was used to examine blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal during answering and reflecting upon clinical problems with respect to burnout scores. Higher depersonalization scores were associated with less BOLD signal in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and middle frontal gyrus during reflecting on clinical problems and less BOLD signal in the bilateral precuneus while answering clinical problems in residents. Higher emotional exhaustion scores were associated with more right posterior cingulate cortex and middle frontal gyrus BOLD signal in residents. Examination of faculty revealed no significant influence of burnout on brain activity. Residents appear to be more susceptible to burnout effects on clinical reasoning, which may indicate that residents may need both cognitive and emotional support to improve quality of life and to optimize performance and learning. These results inform our understanding of mental stress, cognitive control as well as cognitive load theory.

  10. Effects of ketamine on brain function during smooth pursuit eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, M; Becker, B; Neumann, C; Kasparbauer, A M; Meyhöfer, I; Weber, B; Mehta, M A; Hurlemann, R; Ettinger, U

    2016-11-01

    The uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine has been proposed to model symptoms of psychosis. Smooth pursuit eye movements (SPEM) are an established biomarker of schizophrenia. SPEM performance has been shown to be impaired in the schizophrenia spectrum and during ketamine administration in healthy volunteers. However, the neural mechanisms mediating SPEM impairments during ketamine administration are unknown. In a counter-balanced, placebo-controlled, double-blind, within-subjects design, 27 healthy participants received intravenous racemic ketamine (100 ng/mL target plasma concentration) on one of two assessment days and placebo (intravenous saline) on the other. Participants performed a block-design SPEM task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3 Tesla field strength. Self-ratings of psychosis-like experiences were obtained using the Psychotomimetic States Inventory (PSI). Ketamine administration induced psychosis-like symptoms, during ketamine infusion, participants showed increased ratings on the PSI dimensions cognitive disorganization, delusional thinking, perceptual distortion and mania. Ketamine led to robust deficits in SPEM performance, which were accompanied by reduced blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in the SPEM network including primary visual cortex, area V5 and the right frontal eye field (FEF), compared to placebo. A measure of connectivity with V5 and FEF as seed regions, however, was not significantly affected by ketamine. These results are similar to the deviations found in schizophrenia patients. Our findings support the role of glutamate dysfunction in impaired smooth pursuit performance and the use of ketamine as a pharmacological model of psychosis, especially when combined with oculomotor biomarkers. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4047-4060, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effects of resting state condition on reliability, trait specificity, and network connectivity of brain function measured with arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengjun; Vidorreta, Marta; Katchmar, Natalie; Alsop, David C; Wolf, Daniel H; Detre, John A

    2018-06-01

    Resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) provides imaging biomarkers of task-independent brain function that can be associated with clinical variables or modulated by interventions such as behavioral training or pharmacological manipulations. These biomarkers include time-averaged regional brain function as manifested by regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured using arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI and correlated temporal fluctuations of function across brain networks with either ASL or blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI. Resting-state studies are typically carried out using just one of several prescribed state conditions such as eyes closed (EC), eyes open (EO), or visual fixation on a cross-hair (FIX), which may affect the reliability and specificity of rs-fMRI. In this study, we collected test-retest ASL MRI data during 4 resting-state task conditions: EC, EO, FIX and PVT (low-frequency psychomotor vigilance task), and examined the effects of these task conditions on reliability and reproducibility as well as trait specificity of regional brain function. We also acquired resting-state BOLD fMRI under FIX and compared the network connectivity reliabilities between the four ASL conditions and the BOLD FIX condition. For resting-state ASL data, EC provided the highest CBF reliability, reproducibility, trait specificity, and network connectivity reliability, followed by EO, while FIX was lowest on all of these measures. PVT demonstrated lower CBF reliability, reproducibility and trait specificity than EO and EC. Overall network connectivity reliability was comparable between ASL and BOLD. Our findings confirm ASL CBF as a reliable, stable, and consistent measure of resting-state regional brain function and support the use of EC or EO over FIX and PVT as the resting-state condition. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Polytellurophenes provide imaging contrast towards unravelling the structure–property–function relationships in semiconductor:insulator polymer blends

    KAUST Repository

    Jahnke, Ashlee A.

    2015-02-27

    Polymer blends are broadly important in chemical science and chemical engineering and have led to a wide range of commercial products, however their precise structure and phase morphology is often not well understood. Here we show for the first time that π-conjugated polytellurophenes and high-density polyethylene form blends that can serve as active layers in field-effect transistor devices and can be characterized by a variety of element-specific imaging techniques such as STEM and EDX. Changing the hydrocarbon content and degree of branching on the polytellurophene side-chain leads to a variety of blend structures, and these variations can be readily visualized. Characterization by electron microscopy is complemented by topographic and X-ray methods to establish a nano- to micro-scale picture of these systems. We find that blends that possess microscale networks function best as electronic devices; however, contrary to previous notions a strong correlation between nanofiber formation and electrical performance is not observed. Our work demonstrates that use of organometallic polymers assists in clarifying relevant structure–property–function relationships in multicomponent systems such as semiconductor:insulator blends and sheds light on the structure development in polymer:polymer blends including crystallization, phase separation, and formation of supramolecular arrangements.

  13. Contrasting Patterns of Species Richness and Functional Diversity in Bird Communities of East African Cloud Forest Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Werner; Lens, Luc; Tobias, Joseph A; Habel, Jan C

    2016-01-01

    Rapid fragmentation and degradation of large undisturbed habitats constitute major threats to biodiversity. Several studies have shown that populations in small and highly isolated habitat patches are prone to strong environmental and demographic stochasticity and increased risk of extinction. Based on community assembly theory, we predict recent rapid forest fragmentation to cause a decline in species and functional guild richness of forest birds combined with a high species turnover among habitat patches, and well defined dominance structures, if competition is the major driver of community assembly. To test these predictions, we analysed species co-occurrence, nestedness, and competitive strength to infer effects of interspecific competition, habitat structure, and species' traits on the assembly of bird species communities from 12 cloud forest fragments in southern Kenya. Our results do not point to a single ecological driver of variation in species composition. Interspecific competition does not appear to be a major driver of species segregation in small forest patches, while its relative importance appears to be higher in larger ones, which may be indicative for a generic shift from competition-dominated to colonisation-driven community structure with decreasing fragment size. Functional trait diversity was independent of fragment size after controlling for species richness. As fragmentation effects vary among feeding guilds and habitat generalists, in particular, tend to decline in low quality forest patches, we plead for taking species ecology fully into account when predicting tropical community responses to habitat change.

  14. Contrasting Patterns of Species Richness and Functional Diversity in Bird Communities of East African Cloud Forest Fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Ulrich

    Full Text Available Rapid fragmentation and degradation of large undisturbed habitats constitute major threats to biodiversity. Several studies have shown that populations in small and highly isolated habitat patches are prone to strong environmental and demographic stochasticity and increased risk of extinction. Based on community assembly theory, we predict recent rapid forest fragmentation to cause a decline in species and functional guild richness of forest birds combined with a high species turnover among habitat patches, and well defined dominance structures, if competition is the major driver of community assembly. To test these predictions, we analysed species co-occurrence, nestedness, and competitive strength to infer effects of interspecific competition, habitat structure, and species' traits on the assembly of bird species communities from 12 cloud forest fragments in southern Kenya. Our results do not point to a single ecological driver of variation in species composition. Interspecific competition does not appear to be a major driver of species segregation in small forest patches, while its relative importance appears to be higher in larger ones, which may be indicative for a generic shift from competition-dominated to colonisation-driven community structure with decreasing fragment size. Functional trait diversity was independent of fragment size after controlling for species richness. As fragmentation effects vary among feeding guilds and habitat generalists, in particular, tend to decline in low quality forest patches, we plead for taking species ecology fully into account when predicting tropical community responses to habitat change.

  15. Functionalized multimodal ZnO@Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanosystems to use as perspective contrast agent for MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babayevska, Nataliya, E-mail: natbab@amu.edu.pl; Florczak, Patryk; Woźniak-Budych, Marta; Jarek, Marcin; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Tomasz; Jurga, Stefan

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The multimodal ZnO@Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures were obtained by wet chemistry methods. • FA and Dox have been effectively bonded onto the ZnO nanoparticles surface. • Functionalized ZnO@Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs are good contrast agents, useful for MR imaging. - Abstract: The main aim of this research was the synthesis of the multimodal hybrid ZnO@Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures as prospective contrast agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for bio-medical applications. The nanoparticles surface was functionalized by organosilicon compounds (OSC) then, by folic acid (FA) as targeting agent and doxorubicin (Dox) as chemotherapeutic agent. Doxorubicin and folic acid were attached to the nanoparticles surface by amino groups as well as due to attractive physical interactions. The morphology and crystallography of the nanostructures were studied by HRTEM and SAXS techniques. After ZnO nanoparticles surface modification by Gd{sup 3+} and annealing at 900 °C, ZnO@Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures are polydispersed with size 30–100 nm. NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) studies of ZnO@Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} were performed on fractionated particles with size up to 50 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV–vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential measurements and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) showed that functional groups have been effectively bonded onto the nanoparticles surface. The high adsorption capacity of folic acid (up to 20%) and doxorubicin (up to 40%) on nanoparticles was reached upon 15 min of adsorption process in a temperature-dependent manner. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements confirmed that the obtained ZnO@Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures could be good contrast agents, useful for magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Single session imaging of cerebellum at 7 Tesla: obtaining structure and function of multiple motor subsystems in individual subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Batson

    Full Text Available The recent increase in the use of high field MR systems is accompanied by a demand for acquisition techniques and coil systems that can take advantage of increased power and accuracy without being susceptible to increased noise. Physical location and anatomical complexity of targeted regions must be considered when attempting to image deeper structures with small nuclei and/or complex cytoarchitechtonics (i.e. small microvasculature and deep nuclei, such as the brainstem and the cerebellum (Cb. Once these obstacles are overcome, the concomitant increase in signal strength at higher field strength should allow for faster acquisition of MR images. Here we show that it is technically feasible to quickly and accurately detect blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal changes and obtain anatomical images of Cb at high spatial resolutions in individual subjects at 7 Tesla in a single one-hour session. Images were obtained using two high-density multi-element surface coils (32 channels in total placed beneath the head at the level of Cb, two channel transmission, and three-dimensional sensitivity encoded (3D, SENSE acquisitions to investigate sensorimotor activations in Cb. Two classic sensorimotor tasks were used to detect Cb activations. BOLD signal changes during motor activity resulted in concentrated clusters of activity within the Cb lobules associated with each task, observed consistently and independently in each subject: Oculomotor vermis (VI/VII and CrusI/II for pro- and anti-saccades; ipsilateral hemispheres IV-VI for finger tapping; and topographical separation of eye- and hand- activations in hemispheres VI and VIIb/VIII. Though fast temporal resolution was not attempted here, these functional patches of highly specific BOLD signal changes may reflect small-scale shunting of blood in the microvasculature of Cb. The observed improvements in acquisition time and signal detection are ideal for individualized investigations such as

  17. The natural hallucinogen 5-MeO-DMT, component of Ayahuasca, disrupts cortical function in rats: reversal by antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riga, Maurizio S; Soria, Guadalupe; Tudela, Raúl; Artigas, Francesc; Celada, Pau

    2014-08-01

    5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) is a natural hallucinogen component of Ayahuasca, an Amazonian beverage traditionally used for ritual, religious and healing purposes that is being increasingly used for recreational purposes in US and Europe. 5MeO-DMT is of potential interest for schizophrenia research owing to its hallucinogenic properties. Two other psychotomimetic agents, phencyclidine and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo-phenylisopropylamine (DOI), markedly disrupt neuronal activity and reduce the power of low frequency cortical oscillations (<4 Hz, LFCO) in rodent medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Here we examined the effect of 5-MeO-DMT on cortical function and its potential reversal by antipsychotic drugs. Moreover, regional brain activity was assessed by blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). 5-MeO-DMT disrupted mPFC activity, increasing and decreasing the discharge of 51 and 35% of the recorded pyramidal neurons, and reducing (-31%) the power of LFCO. The latter effect depended on 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor activation and was reversed by haloperidol, clozapine, risperidone, and the mGlu2/3 agonist LY379268. Likewise, 5-MeO-DMT decreased BOLD responses in visual cortex (V1) and mPFC. The disruption of cortical activity induced by 5-MeO-DMT resembles that produced by phencyclidine and DOI. This, together with the reversal by antipsychotic drugs, suggests that the observed cortical alterations are related to the psychotomimetic action of 5-MeO-DMT. Overall, the present model may help to understand the neurobiological basis of hallucinations and to identify new targets in antipsychotic drug development.

  18. Brain activation areas of sexual arousal with olfactory stimulation in men: a preliminary study using functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Joon; Park, Kwangsung; Hwang, In Sang; Jung, Seung Il; Kim, Hyeong-Jung; Chung, Tae-Woong; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2008-03-01

    There have been extensive studies evaluating the functional neuroanatomy of the brain during visual sexual stimulation. However, little data exist concerning the role of olfactory stimulation in human sexuality. This preliminary study intended to elucidate the brain areas responding to an olfactory sexual stimulus using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Eight healthy right-handed heterosexual male volunteers (20-35 years of age), having normal olfaction and no brain diseases, were recruited. During fMRI, a women's perfume was given as an olfactory sexual stimulant in an alternating block design with a 30-second stimulation period followed by a 30-second rest. After the fMRI sessions, the participants provided ratings for both the odorant's intensity and perceived arousal. The study subjects rated the odorant stimulation and perceived sexual arousal response by Likert-type rating scales. Brain activation maps were made by blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD)-based fMRI with an echo-planar imaging pulse sequence. Two out of eight subjects experienced "strong" sexual arousal, and three subjects experienced "moderate" arousal during olfactory stimulation, resulting in a mean score of 2.25 on a 4-point scale. The common brain areas activated in response to the odor stimulus in all eight subjects included the insula, the inferior and middle frontal gyrus, and the hypothalamus. The median cingulate gyrus, thalamus, angular gyrus, lingual gyrus, and cerebellar cortex were activated in subjects who had moderate or strong sexual arousal response. Olfactory stimulation with women's perfume produces the activation of specific brain areas in men. The brain areas activated differed according to the degree of perceived sexual arousal response. Further studies are needed to elucidate brain activation response according to the different kinds and intensities of olfactory stimulation.

  19. Resting state functional MRI in Parkinson’s disease: the impact of deep brain stimulation on ‘effective’ connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Joshua; Urner, Maren; Moran, Rosalyn; Flandin, Guillaume; Marreiros, Andre; Mancini, Laura; White, Mark; Thornton, John; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Limousin, Patricia; Friston, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Depleted of dopamine, the dynamics of the parkinsonian brain impact on both ‘action’ and ‘resting’ motor behaviour. Deep brain stimulation has become an established means of managing these symptoms, although its mechanisms of action remain unclear. Non-invasive characterizations of induced brain responses, and the effective connectivity underlying them, generally appeals to dynamic causal modelling of neuroimaging data. When the brain is at rest, however, this sort of characterization has been limited to correlations (functional connectivity). In this work, we model the ‘effective’ connectivity underlying low frequency blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations in the resting Parkinsonian motor network—disclosing the distributed effects of deep brain stimulation on cortico-subcortical connections. Specifically, we show that subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation modulates all the major components of the motor cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical loop, including the cortico-striatal, thalamo-cortical, direct and indirect basal ganglia pathways, and the hyperdirect subthalamic nucleus projections. The strength of effective subthalamic nucleus afferents and efferents were reduced by stimulation, whereas cortico-striatal, thalamo-cortical and direct pathways were strengthened. Remarkably, regression analysis revealed that the hyperdirect, direct, and basal ganglia afferents to the subthalamic nucleus predicted clinical status and therapeutic response to deep brain stimulation; however, suppression of the sensitivity of the subthalamic nucleus to its hyperdirect afferents by deep brain stimulation may subvert the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation. Our findings highlight the distributed effects of stimulation on the resting motor network and provide a framework for analysing effective connectivity in resting state functional MRI with strong a priori hypotheses. PMID:24566670

  20. Describing contrast across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Sohaib Ali; Iqbal, Muhammad Zafar; Riaz, Muhammad Mohsin

    2017-06-01

    Due to its sensitive nature against illumination and noise distributions, contrast is not widely used for image description. On the contrary, the human perception of contrast along different spatial frequency bandwidths provides a powerful discriminator function that can be modeled in a robust manner against local illumination. Based upon this observation, a dense local contrast descriptor is proposed and its potential in different applications of computer vision is discussed. Extensive experiments reveal that this simple yet effective description performs well in comparison with state of the art image descriptors. We also show the importance of this description in multiresolution pansharpening framework.

  1. A novel approach to map induced activation of neuronal networks using chemogenetics and functional neuroimaging in rats: A proof-of-concept study on the mesocorticolimbic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Theresia J M; Verharen, Jeroen P H; van Tilborg, Geralda A F; Boekhoudt, Linde; van der Toorn, Annette; de Jong, Johannes W; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; Otte, Willem M; Adan, Roger A H; Dijkhuizen, Rick M

    2017-08-01

    Linking neural circuit activation at whole-brain level to neuronal activity at cellular level remains one of the major challenges in neuroscience research. We set up a novel functional neuroimaging approach to map global effects of locally induced activation of specific midbrain projection neurons using chemogenetics (Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADD)-technology) combined with pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) in the rat mesocorticolimbic system. Chemogenetic activation of DREADD-targeted mesolimbic or mesocortical pathways, i.e. projections from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) or medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), respectively, induced significant blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses in areas with DREADD expression, but also in remote defined neural circuitry without DREADD expression. The time-course of brain activation corresponded with the behavioral output measure, i.e. locomotor (hyper)activity, in the mesolimbic pathway-targeted group. Chemogenetic activation specifically increased neuronal activity, whereas functional connectivity assessed with resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) remained stable. Positive and negative BOLD responses distinctively reflected simultaneous ventral pallidum activation and substantia nigra pars reticulata deactivation, respectively, demonstrating the concept of mesocorticolimbic network activity with concurrent activation of the direct and indirect pathways following stimulation of specific midbrain projection neurons. The presented methodology provides straightforward and widely applicable opportunities to elucidate relationships between local neuronal activity and global network activity in a controllable manner, which will increase our understanding of the functioning and dysfunctioning of large-scale neuronal networks in health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Open label smoking cessation with varenicline is associated with decreased glutamate levels and functional changes in anterior cingulate cortex: preliminary findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriah Dawn Wheelock

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Varenicline, the most effective single agent for smoking cessation, is a partial agonist at α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Increasing evidence implicates glutamate in the pathophysiology of addiction and one of the benefits of treatment for smoking cessation is the ability to regain cognitive control. Objective: To evaluate the effects of 12 week varenicline administration on glutamate levels in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC and functional changes within the cognitive control network.Methods: We used single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS in the dACC and functional MRI (fMRI during performance of a Stroop color-naming task before and after smoking cessation with varenicline in 11 healthy smokers (open label design. Using the dACC as a seed region, we evaluated functional connectivity changes using a psychophysiological interaction (PPI analysis. Results: We observed a significant decrease in dACC glutamate + glutamine (Glx/Cr levels as well as significant blood oxygen level-dependent signal (BOLD decreases in the rostral ACC/medial orbitofrontal cortex and precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex. These BOLD changes are suggestive of alterations in default mode network (DMN function and are further supported by the results of the PPI analysis that revealed changes in connectivity between the dACC and regions of the DMN. Baseline measures of nicotine dependence and craving positively correlated with baseline Glx/Cr levels.Conclusions: These results suggest possible mechanisms of action for varenicline such as reduction in Glx levels in dACC and shifts in BOLD activities between large scale brain networks. They also suggest a role for ACC Glx in the modulation of behavior. Due to the preliminary nature of this study (lack of control group and small sample size, future studies are needed to replicate these findings.

  3. Long-term carbon exclusion alters soil microbial function but not community structure across forests of contrasting productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, S. C.; Dove, N. C.; Stark, J.

    2017-12-01

    While it is well-documented that distinct heterotrophic microbial communities emerge under different conditions of carbon (C) availability, the response of soil microbial communities and their function to long-term conditions of C exclusion in situ has yet to be investigated. We evaluated the role of C in controlling soil microbial communities and function by experimentally excluding plant C inputs for nine years at four forest sites along a productivity gradient in Oregon, USA. Carbon exclusion treatments were implemented by root trenching to a depth of 30 cm using 25-cm diameter steel pipe, and minimizing aboveground inputs as plant litter by covering the pipe with a 1-mm mesh screen. After nine years, we measured rates of gross and net nitrogen (N) transformations and microbial respiration in situ in the upper 15-cm of mineral soil in both C excluded plots and undisturbed control soils. We measured the soil total C and N concentration and potential extracellular enzyme activities. We used phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis to determine potential changes in the microbial community structure. Nine years of C exclusion reduced soil total C by about 20%, except at the highest productivity site where no statistically significant change was observed. Although PLFA community structure and microbial C were unchanged, microbial respiration was reduced by 15-45% at all sites. Similarly, specific extracellular enzyme activities for all enzymes increased at these sites with C exclusion, suggesting that the microbial communities were substrate-limited. Although gross N mineralization decreased under C exclusion, decreases in gross N immobilization were greater, resulting in increased net N mineralization rates in all but the lowest productivity site. Furthermore, C exclusion only increased net nitrification in the highest productivity site. Although these field-based results are largely consistent with previous laboratory studies indicating a strong coupling between C

  4. Effects of viruses on bacterial functions under contrasting nutritional conditions for four species of bacteria isolated from Hong Kong waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Yuan, Xiangcheng; Xu, Jie; Harrison, Paul J.; He, Lei; Yin, Kedong

    2015-09-01

    Free living viruses are ubiquitous in marine waters and concentrations are usually several times higher than the bacterial abundance. These viruses are capable of lysing host bacteria and therefore, play an important role in the microbial loop in oligotrophic waters. However, few studies have been conducted to compare the role of viruses in regulating bacterial abundance and heterotrophic activities between natural oligotrophic waters and anthropogenic influenced eutrophic waters. In this study, we examined viral effects on bacterial functions of four single bacterial species incubated with natural viral assemblages in seawater samples from eutrophic and oligotrophic waters. The viral-lysis of bacteria was significantly higher in eutrophic than oligotrophic waters. This suggests that viruses were capable of controlling bacterial abundance, respiration and production in the eutrophic waters. Cellular bacterial respiration and production was higher with viruses than without viruses, which was more evident in the oligotrophic waters. These results indicate that viruses can slow down bacterial consumption of oxygen and reduce bacteria-induced eutrophication effects in anthropogenic eutrophic waters, but switch to the role of sustaining the bacterial population when nutrients are limiting. There were bacterial species differences in resisting viral attack, which can influence the dominance and biodiversity of bacterial species in coastal waters.

  5. The Effects of Age, from Young to Middle Adulthood, and Gender on Resting State Functional Connectivity of the Dopaminergic Midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Andrew C; Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Sien; Chao, Herta H; Li, Chiang-Shan R

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of the dopaminergic ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) is implicated in psychiatric disorders including attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), addiction, schizophrenia and movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Although the prevalence of these disorders varies by age and sex, the underlying neural mechanism is not well understood. The objective of this study was to delineate the distinct resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the VTA and SNc and examine the effects of age, from young to middle-adulthood, and sex on the rsFC of these two dopaminergic structures in a data set of 250 healthy adults (18-49 years of age, 104 men). Using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals, we correlated the time course of the VTA and SNc to the time courses of all other brain voxels. At a corrected threshold, paired t -test showed stronger VTA connectivity to bilateral angular gyrus and superior/middle and orbital frontal regions and stronger SNc connectivity to the insula, thalamus, parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) and amygdala. Compared to women, men showed a stronger VTA/SNc connectivity to the left posterior orbital gyrus. In linear regressions, men but not women showed age-related changes in VTA/SNc connectivity to a number of cortical and cerebellar regions. Supporting shared but also distinct cerebral rsFC of the VTA and SNc and gender differences in age-related changes from young and middle adulthood in VTA/SNc connectivity, these new findings help advance our understanding of the neural bases of many neuropsychiatric illnesses that implicate the dopaminergic systems.

  6. Role of ongoing, intrinsic activity of neuronal populations for quantitative neuroimaging of functional magnetic resonance imaging-based networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Fahmeed; Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G; Coman, Daniel; Blumenfeld, Hal; Rothman, Douglas L

    2011-01-01

    A primary objective in neuroscience is to determine how neuronal populations process information within networks. In humans and animal models, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is gaining increasing popularity for network mapping. Although neuroimaging with fMRI-conducted with or without tasks-is actively discovering new brain networks, current fMRI data analysis schemes disregard the importance of the total neuronal activity in a region. In task fMRI experiments, the baseline is differenced away to disclose areas of small evoked changes in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal. In resting-state fMRI experiments, the spotlight is on regions revealed by correlations of tiny fluctuations in the baseline (or spontaneous) BOLD signal. Interpretation of fMRI-based networks is obscured further, because the BOLD signal indirectly reflects neuronal activity, and difference/correlation maps are thresholded. Since the small changes of BOLD signal typically observed in cognitive fMRI experiments represent a minimal fraction of the total energy/activity in a given area, the relevance of fMRI-based networks is uncertain, because the majority of neuronal energy/activity is ignored. Thus, another alternative for quantitative neuroimaging of fMRI-based networks is a perspective in which the activity of a neuronal population is accounted for by the demanded oxidative energy (CMR(O2)). In this article, we argue that network mapping can be improved by including neuronal energy/activity of both the information about baseline and small differences/fluctuations of BOLD signal. Thus, total energy/activity information can be obtained through use of calibrated fMRI to quantify differences of ΔCMR(O2) and through resting-state positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements for average CMR(O2).

  7. Effects of patellar taping on brain activity during knee joint proprioception tests using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Michael J; McKie, Shane; Richardson, Paul; Oldham, Jacqueline A

    2012-06-01

    Patellar taping is a common treatment modality for physical therapists managing patellofemoral pain. However, the mechanisms of action remain unclear, with much debate as to whether its efficacy is due to a change in patellar alignment or an alteration in sensory input. The purpose of this study was to investigate the sensory input hypothesis using functional magnetic resonance imaging when taping was applied to the knee joint during a proprioception task. This was an observational study with patellar taping intervention. Eight male volunteers who were healthy and right-leg dominant participated in a motor block design study. Each participant performed 2 right knee extension repetitive movement tasks: one simple and one proprioceptive. These tasks were performed with and without patellar taping and were auditorally paced for 400 seconds at 72 beats/min (1.2 Hz). The proprioception task without patellar taping caused a positive blood oxygenation level-dependant (BOLD) response bilaterally in the medial supplementary motor area, the cingulate motor area, the basal ganglion, and the thalamus and medial primary sensory motor cortex. For the proprioception task with patellar taping, there was a decreased BOLD response in these regions. In the lateral primary sensory cortex, there was a negative BOLD response with less activity for the proprioception task with taping. Limitations This study may have been limited by the small sample size, a possible learning effect due to a nonrandom order of tasks, and use of a single-joint knee extension task. This study demonstrated that patellar taping modulates brain activity in several areas of the brain during a proprioception knee movement task.

  8. Synaesthetic colour in the brain: beyond colour areas. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of synaesthetes and matched controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa M van Leeuwen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In synaesthesia, sensations in a particular modality cause additional experiences in a second, unstimulated modality (e.g., letters elicit colour. Understanding how synaesthesia is mediated in the brain can help to understand normal processes of perceptual awareness and multisensory integration. In several neuroimaging studies, enhanced brain activity for grapheme-colour synaesthesia has been found in ventral-occipital areas that are also involved in real colour processing. Our question was whether the neural correlates of synaesthetically induced colour and real colour experience are truly shared. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, in a free viewing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI experiment, we located main effects of synaesthesia in left superior parietal lobule and in colour related areas. In the left superior parietal lobe, individual differences between synaesthetes (projector-associator distinction also influenced brain activity, confirming the importance of the left superior parietal lobe for synaesthesia. Next, we applied a repetition suppression paradigm in fMRI, in which a decrease in the BOLD (blood-oxygenated-level-dependent response is generally observed for repeated stimuli. We hypothesized that synaesthetically induced colours would lead to a reduction in BOLD response for subsequently presented real colours, if the neural correlates were overlapping. We did find BOLD suppression effects induced by synaesthesia, but not within the colour areas. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Because synaesthetically induced colours were not able to suppress BOLD effects for real colour, we conclude that the neural correlates of synaesthetic colour experience and real colour experience are not fully shared. We propose that synaesthetic colour experiences are mediated by higher-order visual pathways that lie beyond the scope of classical, ventral-occipital visual areas. Feedback from these areas, in which the left parietal

  9. Effect of propofol on the medial temporal lobe emotional memory system: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, K O; Root, J C; Mehta, M; Stern, E; Pan, H; Veselis, R A; Silbersweig, D A

    2015-07-01

    Subclinical doses of propofol produce anterograde amnesia, characterized by an early failure of memory consolidation. It is unknown how propofol affects the amygdala-dependent emotional memory system, which modulates consolidation in the hippocampus in response to emotional arousal and neurohumoral stress. We present an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study of the effects of propofol on the emotional memory system in human subjects. Thirty-five healthy subjects were randomized to receive propofol, at an estimated brain concentration of 0.90 μg ml(-1), or placebo. During drug infusion, emotionally arousing and neutral images were presented in a continuous recognition task, while blood-oxygen-level-dependent activation responses were acquired. After a drug-free interval of 2 h, subsequent memory for successfully encoded items was assessed. Imaging analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping and behavioural analysis using signal detection models. Propofol had no effect on the stereotypical amygdalar response to emotional arousal, but caused marked suppression of the hippocampal response. Propofol caused memory performance to become uncoupled from amygdalar activation, but it remained correlated with activation in the posterior hippocampus, which decreased in proportion to amnesia. Propofol is relatively ineffective at suppressing amygdalar activation at sedative doses, but abolishes emotional modulation and causes amnesia via mechanisms that commonly involve hyporesponsiveness of the hippocampus. These findings raise the possibility that amygdala-dependent fear systems may remain intact even when a patient has diminished memory of events. This may be of clinical importance in the perioperative development of fear-based psychopathologies, such as post-traumatic stress disorder. NCT00504894. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  10. Role of Ongoing, Intrinsic Activity of Neuronal Populations for Quantitative Neuroimaging of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Based Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Coman, Daniel; Blumenfeld, Hal; Rothman, Douglas L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A primary objective in neuroscience is to determine how neuronal populations process information within networks. In humans and animal models, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is gaining increasing popularity for network mapping. Although neuroimaging with fMRI—conducted with or without tasks—is actively discovering new brain networks, current fMRI data analysis schemes disregard the importance of the total neuronal activity in a region. In task fMRI experiments, the baseline is differenced away to disclose areas of small evoked changes in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal. In resting-state fMRI experiments, the spotlight is on regions revealed by correlations of tiny fluctuations in the baseline (or spontaneous) BOLD signal. Interpretation of fMRI-based networks is obscured further, because the BOLD signal indirectly reflects neuronal activity, and difference/correlation maps are thresholded. Since the small changes of BOLD signal typically observed in cognitive fMRI experiments represent a minimal fraction of the total energy/activity in a given area, the relevance of fMRI-based networks is uncertain, because the majority of neuronal energy/activity is ignored. Thus, another alternative for quantitative neuroimaging of fMRI-based networks is a perspective in which the activity of a neuronal population is accounted for by the demanded oxidative energy (CMRO2). In this article, we argue that network mapping can be improved by including neuronal energy/activity of both the information about baseline and small differences/fluctuations of BOLD signal. Thus, total energy/activity information can be obtained through use of calibrated fMRI to quantify differences of ΔCMRO2 and through resting-state positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements for average CMRO2. PMID:22433047

  11. Difference of language cortex reorganization between cerebral arteriovenous malformations, cavernous malformations, and gliomas: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaofeng; Xu, Long; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Bo; Wang, Shuo; Zhao, Yuanli; Cao, Yong; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Rong; Ye, Xun; Wu, Jun; Zhao, Jizong

    2016-04-01

    The authors attempted to demonstrate the difference in language cortex reorganization between cerebral malformations (AVMs), cavernous malformations (CMs), and gliomas by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging. Clinical and imaging data of 27 AVM patients (AVM-L group), 29 CM patients (CM-L group), and 20 glioma patients (Glioma-L group) were retrospectively reviewed, with lesions overlying the left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca area). As a control, patients with lesions involving the right inferior frontal gyrus were also enrolled, including 14 AVM patients (AVM-R group), 20 CM patients (CM-R group), and 14 glioma patients (Glioma-R group). All patients were right-handed. Lateralization indices (LI) of BOLD signal activations were calculated separately for Broca and Wernicke areas. In AVM-L group, right-sided lateralization of BOLD signals was observed in 10 patients (37.0%), including 6 in the Broca area alone, 1 in the Wernicke area alone, and 3 in both areas. Three patients (10.3%) of CM-L group showed right-sided lateralization in both Broca and Wernicke areas, and 1 patient (5.0%) of Glioma-L group had right-sided lateralization in the Wernicke area alone. A significant difference of right-sided lateralization was observed between the AVM-L group and CM-L group (P = 0.018) and also between the AVM-L group and Glioma-L group (P = 0.027). No patient in AVM-R, CM-R, or Glioma-R groups showed right-sided lateralization. Language cortex reorganization may occur in AVM, CM, and glioma patients when the traditional language cortex was involved by lesions, but the potential of reorganization for CM and glioma patients seems to be insufficient compared with AVM patients.

  12. Functional cortical and subcortical abnormalities in pedophilia: a combined study using a choice reaction time task and fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeppl, Timm B; Nitschke, Joachim; Dombert, Beate; Santtila, Pekka; Greenlee, Mark W; Osterheider, Michael; Mokros, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Pedophiles show sexual interest in prepubescent children but not in adults. Research into the neurofunctional mechanisms of paraphilias has gathered momentum over the last years. To elucidate the underlying neural processing of sexual interest among pedophiles and to highlight the differences in comparison with nonparaphilic sexual interest in adults. Nine pedophilic patients and 11 nonpedophilic control subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while viewing pictures of nude (prepubescents, pubescents, and adults) and neutral content, as well as performing a concomitant choice reaction time task (CRTT). Brain blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals and response latencies in the CRTT during exposure to each picture category. Analysis of behavioral data showed group differences in reaction times regarding prepubescent and adult but not pubescent stimuli. During stimulation with pictures displaying nude prepubescents, pedophiles showed increased BOLD response in brain areas known to be involved in processing of visual sexual stimuli. Comparison of pedophilic patients with the control group discovered differences in BOLD responses with respect to prepubescent and adult but not to pubescent stimuli. Differential effects in particular occurred in the cingulate gyrus and insular region. The brain response of pedophiles to visual sexual stimulation by images of nude prepubescents is comparable with previously described neural patterns of sexual processing in nonpedophilic human males evoked by visual stimuli depicting nude adults. Nevertheless, group differences found in the cingulate gyrus and the insular region suggest an important role of these brain areas in pedophilic sexual interest. Furthermore, combining attention-based methods like CRTT with fMRI may be a viable option for future diagnostic procedures regarding pedophilia. © 2011 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  13. Influence of electroencephalograph bionic electrical stimulation on neuronal activities in patients with Alzheimer's disease: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liling Jiang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the influence of electroencephalograph bionic electrical stimulation on neuronal activity in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD using resting-state blood oxygen level dependent functional MRI (BOLD-fMRI and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF and fraction ALFF (fALFF analysis. Methods: 42 AD patients were divided into two groups in accordance with the randomized double blind principle, every group was 21. Treatment group received electroencephalograph bionic electrical stimulation. Both groups received resting-state BOLD-fMRI scanning before and after treatment and comparing differences in ALFF and fALFF in each group by statistical methods. Correlation analysis was performed between ALFF or fALFF images and neuropsychological tests scale after treatment. Results: Post-therapy brain regions with higher ALFF included left cerebellum posterior lobe, right cerebellum posterior lobe, left hippocampus/parahippocampus, left posterior cingulated cortex, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right inferior parietal lobule in treatment group. Higher fALFF was observed in the right inferior parietal lobule. In the placebo group lower ALFF was observed in bilateral cerebellum posterior lobe and left posterior cingulated cortex. Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive section was closely correlated with ALFF in left cerebellum posterior lobe and right cerebellum posterior lobe. Conclusion: These results indicated improved neuronal activity in some brain areas could be achieved in AD after treatment of electroencephalograph bionic electrical stimulation. The change of BOLD-fMRI signal might provide a potential imaging strategy for studying neural mechanisms of electroencephalograph bionic electrical stimulation for AD. Keywords: Electroencephalograph bionic electrical stimulation, Alzheimer's disease, Low-frequency fluctuation, Fraction low-frequency fluctuation

  14. The integration of functional brain activity from adolescence to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prantik; Benson, Brenda E; Rosen, Dana; Frangou, Sophia; Leibenluft, Ellen; Luh, Wen-Ming; Bandettini, Peter A; Pine, Daniel S; Ernst, Monique

    2018-02-27

    Age-related changes in human functional neuroanatomy are poorly understood. This is partly due to the limits to interpretation of standard fMRI. These limits relate to age-related variation in noise levels across subjects, and the frequent need for standard adult parcellations in developmental studies. Here we used an emerging MRI approach called multi-echo (ME)-fMRI to characterize functional brain changes with age. ME-fMRI acquires blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals while also quantifying T2* signal decay. This newly enables reliable analysis of BOLD components at the subject level. We hypothesized that BOLD components of the resting state are not stable with age, and would decrease in number from adolescence to adulthood. This runs counter to the current assumptions in neurodevelopmental analyses of brain connectivity that the number of components is a random effect. From resting state ME-fMRI of 51 healthy subjects of both sexes, between ages of 8.3 and 46.2 y, we found a highly significant (R=-0.55, p[dlt]0.001) exponential decrease in the number of BOLD components with age. The number of BOLD components were halved from adolescence to the fifth decade of life, stabilizing in middle adulthood. The regions driving this change were dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, parietal cortex, and cerebellum. The functional network of these regions centered on the cerebellum. We conclude that age-related decrease in BOLD component number concurs with the hypothesis of neurodevelopmental integration of functional brain activity. We show evidence that the cerebellum may play a key role in this process. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Human brain development is ongoing to at least age 30. Functional MRI (fMRI) is key for studying the change in brain function with development. However, developmental fMRI studies have relied on reference maps of brain organization derived from adult data. This may limit sensitivity to major differences in younger brains. We created an f

  15. Screening for impaired renal function in outpatients before iodinated contrast injection: Comparing the Choyke questionnaire with a rapid point-of-care-test

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    Too, C.W., E-mail: toochowwei@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, Singapore 169608 (Singapore); Ng, W.Y., E-mail: ng.wai.yoong@sgh.com.sg [Department of Pathology, Singapore General Hospital, 20 College Road, Academia, Singapore 169856 (Singapore); Tan, C.C., E-mail: tan.chin.chong@sgh.com.sg [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, Singapore 169608 (Singapore); Mahmood, M.I., E-mail: muhd.illyyas.mahmood@sgh.com.sg [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, Singapore 169608 (Singapore); Tay, K.H., E-mail: tay.kiang.hiong@sgh.com.sg [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, Singapore 169608 (Singapore)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Iodinated intravenous contrast carries a low risk of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN). • Patients with eGFR less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2} are particularly at risk for CIN. • The Choyke questionnaire is used to screen for impaired renal function in outpatients. • Choyke questionnaire is a good screening tool for eGFR less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}. • Point of care test (POCT) for serum creatinine can reduce waiting time. - Abstract: Rationale and purpose: To determine the usefulness of the Choyke questionnaire with a creatinine point-of-care test (POCT) to detect impaired renal function amongst outpatients receiving intravenous iodinated contrast in a tertiary centre. Materials and methods: Between July and December 2012, 1361 outpatients had their serum creatinine determined by POCT and answered the Chokye questionnaire just before their examination. Results: Four hundred and eighty (35.2%) patients had at least one ‘Yes’ response. Forty-four patients (3.2%) had estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2} and 14 patients (1.0%) have eGFR <45 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the Choyke criteria in detecting patients with eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2} are respectively: 65.9%, 65.8%, 6.0% and 98.3% and to detect eGFR <45 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}: 92.9%, 65.3%, 2.7% and 99.9%. Only ‘Yes’ responses to ‘Have you ever been told you have renal problems?’ and ‘Do you have diabetes mellitus?’ were statistically significant in predicting eGFR <45 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}, with odds ratio 98.7 and 4.4 respectively. Conclusion: The Choyke questionnaire has excellent sensitivity and moderate-to-good specificity in detecting patients with <45 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}, below this level it has been shown that risk of contrast induced nephropathy increases significantly, making it an effective screening tool. Also the use of POCT can potentially

  16. Contrasting effects of Elg1–RFC and Ctf18–RFC inactivation in the absence of fully functional RFC in fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Robertson, Kathryn; Mylonas, Katie J. L.; Gray, Fiona C.; Charapitsa, Iryna; MacNeill, Stuart A.

    2005-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen loading onto DNA by replication factor C (RFC) is a key step in eukaryotic DNA replication and repair processes. In this study, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit of fission yeast RFC is shown to be essential for its function in vivo. Cells carrying a temperature-sensitive mutation in the CTD, rfc1-44, arrest with incompletely replicated chromosomes, are sensitive to DNA damaging agents, are synthetically lethal with other DNA replication mutants, and can be suppressed by mutations in rfc5. To assess the contribution of the RFC-like complexes Elg1–RFC and Ctf18–RFC to the viability of rfc1-44, genes encoding the large subunits of these complexes have been deleted and overexpressed. Inactivation of Ctf18–RFC by the deletion of ctf18+, dcc1+ or ctf8+ is lethal in an rfc1-44 background showing that full Ctf18–RFC function is required in the absence of fully functional RFC. In contrast, rfc1-44 elg1Δ cells are viable and overproduction of Elg1 in rfc1-44 is lethal, suggesting that Elg1–RFC plays a negative role when RFC function is inhibited. Consistent with this, the deletion of elg1+ is shown to restore viability to rfc1-44 ctf18Δ cells. PMID:16040599

  17. Contrasting effects of Elg1-RFC and Ctf18-RFC inactivation in the absence of fully functional RFC in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Robertson, Kathryn; Mylonas, Katie J L; Gray, Fiona C; Charapitsa, Iryna; MacNeill, Stuart A

    2005-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen loading onto DNA by replication factor C (RFC) is a key step in eukaryotic DNA replication and repair processes. In this study, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit of fission yeast RFC is shown to be essential for its function in vivo. Cells carrying a temperature-sensitive mutation in the CTD, rfc1-44, arrest with incompletely replicated chromosomes, are sensitive to DNA damaging agents, are synthetically lethal with other DNA replication mutants, and can be suppressed by mutations in rfc5. To assess the contribution of the RFC-like complexes Elg1-RFC and Ctf18-RFC to the viability of rfc1-44, genes encoding the large subunits of these complexes have been deleted and overexpressed. Inactivation of Ctf18-RFC by the deletion of ctf18+, dcc1+ or ctf8+ is lethal in an rfc1-44 background showing that full Ctf18-RFC function is required in the absence of fully functional RFC. In contrast, rfc1-44 elg1Delta cells are viable and overproduction of Elg1 in rfc1-44 is lethal, suggesting that Elg1-RFC plays a negative role when RFC function is inhibited. Consistent with this, the deletion of elg1+ is shown to restore viability to rfc1-44 ctf18Delta cells.

  18. MRI sensing of neurotransmitters with a crown ether appended Gd(3+) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukhatar, Fatima; Même, Sandra; Même, William; Szeremeta, Frédéric; Logothetis, Nikos K; Angelovski, Goran; Tóth, Éva

    2015-02-18

    Molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches that detect biomarkers associated with neural activity would allow more direct observation of brain function than current functional MRI based on blood-oxygen-level-dependent contrast. Our objective was to create a synthetic molecular platform with appropriate recognition moieties for zwitterionic neurotransmitters that generate an MR signal change upon neurotransmitter binding. The gadolinium complex (GdL) we report offers ditopic binding for zwitterionic amino acid neurotransmitters, via interactions (i) between the positively charged and coordinatively unsaturated metal center and the carboxylate function and (ii) between a triazacrown ether and the amine group of the neurotransmitters. GdL discriminates zwitterionic neurotransmitters from monoamines. Neurotransmitter binding leads to a remarkable relaxivity change, related to a decrease in hydration number. GdL was successfully used to monitor neural activity in ex vivo mouse brain slices by MRI.

  19. Quantitative contrast-enhanced first-pass cardiac perfusion MRI at 3 tesla with accurate arterial input function and myocardial wall enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Elodie; Kim, Daniel; Chung, Sohae; Axel, Leon

    2011-09-01

    To develop, and validate in vivo, a robust quantitative first-pass perfusion cardiovascular MR (CMR) method with accurate arterial input function (AIF) and myocardial wall enhancement. A saturation-recovery (SR) pulse sequence was modified to sequentially acquire multiple slices after a single nonselective saturation pulse at 3 Tesla. In each heartbeat, an AIF image is acquired in the aortic root with a short time delay (TD) (50 ms), followed by the acquisition of myocardial images with longer TD values (∼150-400 ms). Longitudinal relaxation rates (R(1) = 1/T(1)) were calculated using an ideal saturation recovery equation based on the Bloch equation, and corresponding gadolinium contrast concentrations were calculated assuming fast water exchange condition. The proposed method was validated against a reference multi-point SR method by comparing their respective R(1) measurements in the blood and left ventricular myocardium, before and at multiple time-points following contrast injections, in 7 volunteers. R(1) measurements with the proposed method and reference multi-point method were strongly correlated (r > 0.88, P < 10(-5)) and in good agreement (mean difference ±1.96 standard deviation 0.131 ± 0.317/0.018 ± 0.140 s(-1) for blood/myocardium, respectively). The proposed quantitative first-pass perfusion CMR method measured accurate R(1) values for quantification of AIF and myocardial wall contrast agent concentrations in 3 cardiac short-axis slices, in a total acquisition time of 523 ms per heartbeat. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Early modifications of hepatic perfusion measured by functional CT in a rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma using a blood pool contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Laure S.; Cuenod, Charles Andre; Bazelaire, Cedric de; Siauve, Nathalie; Frija, Guy; Clement, Olivier; Rosty, Christophe; Tran, Phuong Lan

    2004-01-01

    Macromolecular contrast-enhanced functional CT was performed to characterize early perfusion changes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Fourteen rats with chemically induced primary liver tumors ranging pathologically from hyperplasia to HCC and 15 control rats were investigated. Two dynamic CT scans using an experimental macromolecular contrast agent were performed on a single slice 11 and 18 weeks after tumor induction followed by pathological examination. A deconvolution mathematical model was applied, yielding the hepatic perfusion index (HPI), mean transit time (MTT), liver distribution volume (LDV) and arterial, portal and total blood flows (FA, FP, FT). Analysis was performed on one slice per rat, containing overall two hyperplasia, six dysplasia and 15 HCC. On the first scans, HCC at an early pathological stage had a low FP (-30%, P=0.002) but a normal arterial-portal balance. On the scan contemporary to pathology, HCC perfusion parameters showed an inversion of the arterial-portal balance (HPI +212%, P<0.0001), with a high FA (+56%, P=0.002) and a low FP (-69%, P<0.0001). Sensitivity and specificity of detection of HCC by perfusion CT were high (87 and 80%) on late scans; but also on the earlier scans (86 and 65%), even though only one (7%) was visible to the eye. Perfusion-CT allowed early detection of HCC. This technique could contribute in the detection and characterization of liver lesions in clinical studies. (orig.)

  1. Presurgical Identification of the Central Sulcus Using GE EPI Sequences in Combination with 3D Reconstruction is a Useful and Easy Technique for Functional Identification of the Sensorimotor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüttich, A; Parrilla, G; Espinosa, M; Zamarro, J; Larrea, J A; Moreno, A

    2012-03-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a noninvasive neuroimaging technique that enables the visualization of vascular changes originating in the cortex on the execution of a simple motor task. We aimed to assess the usefulness of sensorimotor fMRI using echo-planar imaging (EPI) techniques and assess its clinical usefulness in the identification of the central sulcus. We studied 32 candidates for neurosurgery who had centrally located space-occupying lesions with fMRI using EPI images with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) gradient-echo (GE) sequences acquired on a 1.5T scanner while patients repeatedly opened and closed their hands. Statistical activation images (t images) corresponding to the movements of the right and left hands were compared using cancellation analysis. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the cranium and brain of each patient showed the relative position of the expansive lesion and of non-damaged cortical tissue. Reproducible and selective functional sensorimotor activation was observed in 32 patients. Validation was carried out by intraoperative mapping in 19 patients. Based on intraoperative confirmation data we assumed that functional MR imaging (fMRI) is a valid method for identifying the motor cortex. Nevertheless, a limitation to our study is that not all the patients received invasive cortical stimulation. It is also relevant to indicate that fMRI and intraoperative procedures coincide in the sulcus identified as the sensorimotor cortex. Neurological examination did not reveal postoperative motor/sensitive deterioration in the remaining patients. fMRI using GE EPI sequences in combination with three-dimensional reconstruction is a useful and easy technique for functional identification of the sensorimotor cortex.

  2. Glucose-functionalized gold nanoparticles as a metabolically targeted CT contrast agent for distinguishing tumors from non-malignant metabolically active processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreifuss, Tamar; Motiei, Menachem; Betzer, Oshra; Popovtzer, Aron; Abourbeh, Galith; Mishani, Eyal; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2017-02-01

    The highly used cancer imaging technique, [18F]FDG-PET, is based on the increased glucose metabolic activity in tumors. However, since there are other biological processes that exhibit increased metabolic activity, in particular inflammation, this methodology is prone to non-specificity for cancer. Herein we describe the development of a novel nanoparticle-based approach, utilizes Glucose-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles (GF-GNPs) as a metabolically targeted CT contrast agent. Our method has demonstrated specific tumor targeting and has successfully differentiated between cancer and inflammation in a combined tumor-inflammation mouse model, due to dissimilarities in vasculatures in different pathologic conditions. This novel approach provides new capabilities in cancer imaging, and can be applicable to a wide range of cancers.

  3. Impact of continuation of metformin prior to elective coronary angiography on acute contrast nephropathy in patients with normal or mildly impaired renal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Veysel; Calpar Çıralı, İlknur; Sinan, Ümit Yaşar; Yıldız, Ahmet; Ersanlı, Murat Kazım

    2017-10-31

    Discontinuation of metformin treatment in patients scheduled for elective coronary angiography (CAG) is controversial because of post-procedural risks including acute contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) and lactic acidosis (LA). This study aims to discuss the safety of continuing metformin treatment in patients undergoing elective CAG with normal or mildly impaired renal functions. Our study was designed as a single-centered, randomized, and observational study including 268 patients undergoing elective CAG with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of >60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Of these patients, 134 continued metformin treatment during angiography, whereas 134 discontinued it 24 h before the procedure. CIN was defined as either a 25% relative increase in serum creatinine levels from the baseline or a 0.5 mg/dL increase in the absolute value that measured 48 h after CAG. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of CIN and LA after CAG. Both groups were comparable in terms of demographics and laboratory values. CIN at 48 h was 8% (11/134) in the metformin continued group and 6% (8/134) in the metformin discontinued group (p=0.265). Patients in neither of the groups developed metformin-induced LA. Based on multiple regression analysis, the ejection fraction [p=0.029, OR: 0.760; 95% CI (0.590-0.970)] and contrast volume [p=0.016, OR: 0.022 95% CI (0.010-0.490)] were independent predictors of CIN. Patients scheduled for elective CAG with normal or mildly impaired renal functions and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (>40%) may safely continue metformin treatment.

  4. Enhanced control of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex neurophysiology with real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback training and working memory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Matthew S; Kane, Jessica H; Weisend, Michael P; Parker, Jason G

    2016-01-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback can be used to train localized, conscious regulation of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals. As a therapeutic technique, rt-fMRI neurofeedback reduces the symptoms of a variety of neurologic disorders. To date, few studies have investigated the use of self-regulation training using rt-fMRI neurofeedback to enhance cognitive performance. This work investigates the utility of rt-fMRI neurofeedback as a tool to enhance human cognition by training healthy individuals to consciously control activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). A cohort of 18 healthy participants in the experimental group underwent rt-fMRI neurofeedback from the left DLPFC in five training sessions across two weeks while 7 participants in the control group underwent similar training outside the MRI and without rt-fMRI neurofeedback. Working memory (WM) performance was evaluated on two testing days separated by the five rt-fMRI neurofeedback sessions using two computerized tests. We investigated the ability to control the BOLD signal across training sessions and WM performance across the two testing days. The group with rt-fMRI neurofeedback demonstrated a significant increase in the ability to self-regulate the BOLD signal in the left DLPFC across sessions. WM performance showed differential improvement between testing days one and two across the groups with the highest increases observed in the rt-fMRI neurofeedback group. These results provide evidence that individuals can quickly gain the ability to consciously control the left DLPFC, and this training results in improvements of WM performance beyond that of training alone. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of contrast morphogenetic features of urban constructed soils on the functioning of Moscow green lawn urban ecosystems: analysis based on the field model experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epikhina, Anna; Vizirskaya, Mariya; Mazirov, Ilya; Vasenev, Vyacheslav; Vasenev, Ivan; Valentini, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    Green lawns are the key element of the urban environment. They occupy a considerable part of the city area and locate in different urban functional zones. Urban constructed soils under green lawns have a unique spatial variability in chemical and morphogenetic features. So far, there is lack of information on the influence of morphogenetic features of urban soils on the functioning of the green lawn ecosystems especially in Moscow - the biggest megalopolis in Europe. Urban lawns perform a number of principal functions including both aesthetic and environmental. The role of the green lawn ecosystems in global carbon cycle is one of their main environmental functions. It is traditionally assessed through carbon stocks and fluxes in the basic ecosystem components. So far, such a data for the urban lawn ecosystems of the Moscow megapolis is lacking. In addition to environmental functions, green lawns perform an important ornamental role, which is also a critical criterion of their optimal functioning. Considering the variability of driving factors, influencing green lawns in urban environment, we carry out the model experiment in order to analyze "pure" effect of soil morphogenetic features. The current study aimed to analyze the influence of contrast morphogenetic features of urban constructed soils on the environmental and aesthetic functions of lawn ecosystems in Moscow megapolis basing in the model experiment. We carry out the model experiment located at the experimental field of the Russian State Agrarian University. Special transparent containers developed for the experiment, provided an option to observe soil morphogenetic features dynamics, including the depth and material of the organic transformation. At the same soil body inside the containers was united with the outside environment through the system of holes in the bottom and walls. The set of urban constructed soils includ four contrast types of the top soil (turf (T), turf-sand (TSa), turf-soil (TSo) and

  6. Pre-procedural renal resistive index accurately predicts contrast-induced acute kidney injury in patients with preserved renal function submitted to coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybraniec, Maciej T; Bożentowicz-Wikarek, Maria; Chudek, Jerzy; Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna

    2017-05-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the clinical utility of ultrasonographic intra-renal blood flow parameters, together with the wide range of different risk factors, for the prediction of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) in patients with preserved renal function, referred for coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary interventions (CA/PCI). This prospective study covered 95 consecutive patients (69.5% men; median age 65 years) subject to elective or urgent CA/PCI. Data regarding 128 peri-procedural variables were collected. Ultrasonographic intra-renal blood flow parameters, including renal resistive index (RRI) and pulsatility index (RPI), were acquired directly before the procedure. CI-AKI was defined as ≥50% relative or ≥0.3 mg/dL absolute increase of serum creatinine 48 h after procedure. CI-AKI was confirmed in nine patients (9.5%). Patients with CI-AKI had higher SYNTAX score (p = 0.0002), higher rate of left main disease (p  0.69 had 78% sensitivity and 81% specificity in CI-AKI prediction. High pre-procedural RRI seems to be a useful novel risk factor for CI-AKI in patients with preserved renal function. Coronary, peripheral and renal vascular pathology contribute to the development of CI-AKI following CA/PCI.

  7. Functional lung MRI in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: comparison of T1 mapping, oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertram J Jobst

    Full Text Available Monitoring of regional lung function in interventional COPD trials requires alternative endpoints beyond global parameters such as FEV1. T1 relaxation times of the lung might allow to draw conclusions on tissue composition, blood volume and oxygen fraction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential value of lung Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping for the assessment of COPD patients in comparison with contrast enhanced perfusion MRI.20 COPD patients (GOLD I-IV underwent a coronal 2-dimensional inversion recovery snapshot flash sequence (8 slices/lung at room air and during inhalation of pure oxygen, as well as dynamic contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion imaging. Regional distribution of T1 at room air (T1, oxygen-induced T1 shortening (ΔT1 and peak enhancement were rated by 2 chest radiologists in consensus using a semi-quantitative 3-point scale in a zone-based approach.Abnormal T1 and ΔT1 were highly prevalent in the patient cohort. T1 and ΔT1 correlated positively with perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.81 and r = 0.80; p&0.001, and with each other (r = 0.80; p<0.001. In GOLD stages I and II ΔT1 was normal in 16/29 lung zones with mildly abnormal perfusion (15/16 with abnormal T1. The extent of T1 (r = 0.45; p<0.05, ΔT1 (r = 0.52; p<0.05 and perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.52; p<0.05 showed a moderate correlation with GOLD stage.Native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping correlated with lung perfusion deficits and severity of COPD. Under the assumption that T1 at room air correlates with the regional pulmonary blood pool and that oxygen-enhanced T1 reflects lung ventilation, both techniques in combination are principally suitable to characterize ventilation-perfusion imbalance. This appears valuable for the assessment of regional lung characteristics in COPD trials without administration of i.v. contrast.

  8. Effect of hypoxia on BOLD fMRI response and total cerebral blood flow in migraine with aura patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Hougaard, Anders; Schytz, Henrik W

    2018-01-01

    was measured in the visual cortex ROIs V1-V5. Total cerebral blood flow (CBF) was calculated by measuring the blood velocity in the internal carotid arteries and the basilar artery using phase-contrast mapping (PCM) MRI. Hypoxia induced a greater decrease in BOLD response to visual stimulation in V1-V4 in MA......Experimentally induced hypoxia triggers migraine and aura attacks in patients suffering from migraine with aura (MA). We investigated the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal response to visual stimulation during hypoxia in MA patients and healthy volunteers. In a randomized double......-blind crossover study design, 15 MA patients were allocated to 180 min of normobaric poikilocapnic hypoxia (capillary oxygen saturation 70-75%) or sham (normoxia) on two separate days and 14 healthy volunteers were exposed to hypoxia. The BOLD functional MRI (fMRI) signal response to visual stimulation...

  9. Effects of parietal TMS on visual and auditory processing at the primary cortical level -- a concurrent TMS-fMRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitão, Joana; Thielscher, Axel; Werner, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that multisensory interactions emerge already at the primary cortical level. Specifically, auditory inputs were shown to suppress activations in visual cortices when presented alone but amplify the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses to concurrent visual...... inputs (and vice versa). This concurrent transcranial magnetic stimulation-functional magnetic resonance imaging (TMS-fMRI) study applied repetitive TMS trains at no, low, and high intensity over right intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and vertex to investigate top-down influences on visual and auditory...... cortices under 3 sensory contexts: visual, auditory, and no stimulation. IPS-TMS increased activations in auditory cortices irrespective of sensory context as a result of direct and nonspecific auditory TMS side effects. In contrast, IPS-TMS modulated activations in the visual cortex in a state...

  10. Ten kilometer vertical Moho offset and shallow velocity contrast along the Denali fault zone from double-difference tomography, receiver functions, and fault zone head waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, A. A.; Schulte-Pelkum, V.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Tape, C.; Ruppert, N.; Ross, Z. E.

    2017-11-01

    We examine the structure of the Denali fault system in the crust and upper mantle using double-difference tomography, P-wave receiver functions, and analysis (spatial distribution and moveout) of fault zone head waves. The three methods have complementary sensitivity; tomography is sensitive to 3D seismic velocity structure but smooths sharp boundaries, receiver functions are sensitive to (quasi) horizontal interfaces, and fault zone head waves are sensitive to (quasi) vertical interfaces. The results indicate that the Mohorovičić discontinuity is vertically offset by 10 to 15 km along the central 600 km of the Denali fault in the imaged region, with the northern side having shallower Moho depths around 30 km. An automated phase picker algorithm is used to identify 1400 events that generate fault zone head waves only at near-fault stations. At shorter hypocentral distances head waves are observed at stations on the northern side of the fault, while longer propagation distances and deeper events produce head waves on the southern side. These results suggest a reversal of the velocity contrast polarity with depth, which we confirm by computing average 1D velocity models separately north and south of the fault. Using teleseismic events with M ≥ 5.1, we obtain 31,400 P receiver functions and apply common-conversion-point stacking. The results are migrated to depth using the derived 3D tomography model. The imaged interfaces agree with the tomography model, showing a Moho offset along the central Denali fault and also the sub-parallel Hines Creek fault, a suture zone boundary 30 km to the north. To the east, this offset follows the Totschunda fault, which ruptured during the M7.9 2002 earthquake, rather than the Denali fault itself. The combined results suggest that the Denali fault zone separates two distinct crustal blocks, and that the Totschunda and Hines Creeks segments are important components of the fault and Cretaceous-aged suture zone structure.

  11. Quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: correlations with pulmonary function test and CT volumetric parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yu; Xia, Yi; Fan, Li; Liu, Shi-yuan; Yu, Hong; Li, Bin; Zhao, Li-ming; Li, Bing

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary function test (PFT) is commonly used to help diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other lung diseases. However, it cannot be used to evaluate regional function and morphological abnormalities. To quantitatively evaluate pulmonary perfusion imaging using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) computed tomography (CT) and observe its correlations with PFT and CT volumetric parameters in COPD patients. PFT and CT pulmonary perfusion examination were performed in 63 COPD patients. Perfusion defects were quantitated by calculating the CT value ratio (RHU) between perfusion defects (HUdefect) and normal lung (HUnormal). Volumetric CT data were used to calculate emphysema index (EI), total lung volume (TLV), and total emphysema volume (TEV). Emphysematous parenchyma was defined as the threshold of lung area lower than -950 HU. Correlations between RHU and TLV, TEV, EI, and PFT were assessed using Spearman correlation analysis. The positive rate of perfusion defects on CT perfusion images was higher than that of emphysema on CT mask images (χ(2) = 17.027, P < 0.001). The Spearman correlation test showed that RHU was positively correlated with FEV1 (R = 0.59, P < 0.001), FEV1% Predicted (R = 0.61, P < 0.001), FVC (R = 0.47, P = 0.002), and FEV1/FVC (R = 0.65, P < 0.001), and negatively correlated with EI (R = -0.67, P < 0.001). CT perfusion imaging is more sensitive in detecting emphysema that is inconspicuous on CT images. RHU is correlated with PFT and CT volumetric parameters, suggesting that it is more sensitive in detecting early COPD changes and may prove to be a potential predictor of focal lung function. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Semiautomatic determination of arterial input functions for quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Julius; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Yoo Na; Yi, Chin A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a semiautomatic detection method for the arterial input functions (AIFs) using Kendall coefficient of concordance (KCC) for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in non-small cell lung cancer patients. We prospectively enrolled 28 patients (17 men, 11 women; mean age, 62 years) who had biopsy-proven non-small cell lung cancer. All enrolled patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the entire thorax. For the quantitative measurement of pharmacokinetic parameters, K and ve, of the lung cancers, AIFs were determined in 2 different ways: a manual method that involved 3 independent thoracic radiologists selecting a region of interest (ROI) within the aortic arch in the 2D coronal plane and a semiautomatic method that used in-house software to establish a KCC score, which provided a measure of similarity to typical AIF pattern. Three independent readers selected voxel clusters with high KCC scores calculated 3-dimensionally across planes in the data set. K and ve were correlated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and Bland-Altman plots were used to examine agreement across methods and reproducibility within a method. Arterial input functions were determined using the data from ROI volumes that were significantly larger in the semiautomatic method (mean ± SD, 3360 ± 768 mm) than in the manual method (677 ± 380 mm) (P < 0.001). K showed very strong agreement (ICC, 0.927) and ve showed moderately strong agreement (ICC, 0.718) between the semiautomatic and manual methods. The reproducibility for K (ICCmanual, 0.813 and ICCsemiautomatic, 0.998; P < 0.001) and ve (ICCmanual, 0.455 and ICCsemiautomatic, 0.985, P < 0.001) was significantly better with the semiautomatic method than the manual method. We found semiautomated detection using KCC to be a robust method for determining the AIF. This method allows for larger ROIs specified in 3D across planes

  13. Visual cortex reactivity in sedated children examined with perfusion MRI (FAIR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, A P; Rostrup, E; Miranda, M J

    2002-01-01

    Sleeping and sedated children can respond to visual stimulation with a decrease in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI signal response. The contribution of metabolic and hemodynamic parameters to this inverse signal response is incompletely understood. It has been hypothesized...

  14. Cortical deactivation induced by visual stimulation in human slow-wave sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Law, Ian; Lund, Torben E

    2002-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that sleeping and sedated young children respond with a paradoxical decrease in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal in the rostro-medial occipital visual cortex during visual stimulation. It is unreso...

  15. Non-white noise in fMRI: Does modelling have an impact?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Torben Ellegaard; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Sidaros, Karam

    2006-01-01

    The sources of non-white noise in Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are many. Familiar sources include low-frequency drift due to hardware imperfections, oscillatory noise due to respiration and cardiac pulsation and residual movement artefacts ...

  16. Oral glucose intake inhibits hypothalamic neuronal activity more effectively than glucose infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Vidarsdottir, S.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Viergever, M.A.; Pijl, H.; Grond, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    We previously showed that hypothalamic neuronal activity, as measured by the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI signal, declines in response to oral glucose intake. To further explore the mechanism driving changes in hypothalamic neuronal activity in response to an oral glucose load,

  17. Cortical and brain stem changes in neural activity during static handgrip and postexercise ischemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Mikael; Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2010-01-01

    , and to differentiate between central command and reflex inputs, we used blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) of the whole brain (3 T). Subjects performed submaximal static handgrip exercise for 2 min followed by 6 min of PEI; MSNA was recorded on a separate day. During the contraction phase...

  18. Hypercapnic normalization of BOLD fMRI: comparison across field strengths and pulse sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Eric R.; Rostrup, Egill; Sidaros, Karam

    2004-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal response to neural stimulation is influenced by many factors that are unrelated to the stimulus. These factors are physiological, such as the resting venous cerebral blood volume (CBV(v)) and vessel s...

  19. Use of Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging to Assess Digital Microvascular Function in Primary Raynaud Phenomenon and Systemic Sclerosis: A Comparison Using the Raynaud Condition Score Diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauling, John D; Shipley, Jacqueline A; Hart, Darren J; McGrogan, Anita; McHugh, Neil J

    2015-07-01

    Evaluate objective assessment of digital microvascular function using laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) in a cross-sectional study of patients with primary Raynaud phenomenon (RP) and systemic sclerosis (SSc), comparing LSCI with both infrared thermography (IRT) and subjective assessment using the Raynaud Condition Score (RCS) diary. Patients with SSc (n = 25) and primary RP (n = 18) underwent simultaneous assessment of digital perfusion using LSCI and IRT with a cold challenge on 2 occasions, 2 weeks apart. The RCS diary was completed between assessments. The relationship between objective and subjective assessments of RP was evaluated. Reproducibility of LSCI/IRT was assessed, along with differences between primary RP and SSc, and the effect of sex. There was moderate-to-good correlation between LSCI and IRT (Spearman rho 0.58-0.84, p 0.05 for all analyses). Reproducibility of IRT and LSCI was moderate at baseline (ICC 0.51-0.63) and immediately following cold challenge (ICC 0.56-0.86), but lower during reperfusion (ICC 0.3-0.7). Neither subjective nor objective assessments differentiated between primary RP and SSc. Men reported lower median daily frequency of RP attacks (0.82 vs 1.93, p = 0.03). Perfusion using LSCI/IRT was higher in men for the majority of assessments. Objective and subjective methods provide differing information on microvascular function in RP. There is good convergent validity of LSCI with IRT and acceptable reproducibility of both modalities. Neither subjective nor objective assessments could differentiate between primary RP and SSc. Influence of sex on subjective and objective assessment of RP warrants further evaluation.

  20. Estimating the arterial input function from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data with compensation for flow enhancement (I): Theory, method, and phantom experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Jeroen J N; Lavini, Cristina; van Vliet, Lucas J; Vos, Frans M

    2018-05-01

    The arterial input function (AIF) represents the time-dependent arterial contrast agent (CA) concentration that is used in pharmacokinetic modeling. To develop a novel method for estimating the AIF from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI data, while compensating for flow enhancement. Signal simulation and phantom measurements. Time-intensity curves (TICs) were simulated for different numbers of excitation pulses modeling flow effects. A phantom experiment was performed in which a solution (without CA) was passed through a straight tube, at constant flow velocity. Dynamic fast spoiled gradient echo (FSPGRs) at 3T MRI, both in the simulations and in the phantom experiment. TICs were generated for a duration of 373 seconds and sampled at intervals of 1.247 seconds (300 timepoints). The proposed method first estimates the number of pulses that spins have received, and then uses this knowledge to accurately estimate the CA concentration. The difference between the median of the estimated number of pulses and the true value was determined, as well as the interquartile range (IQR) of the estimations. The estimated CA concentrations were evaluated in the same way. The estimated number of pulses was also used to calculate flow velocity. The difference between the median estimated and reference number of pulses varied from -0.005 to -1.371 (corresponding IQRs: 0.853 and 48.377) at true values of 10 and 180 pulses, respectively. The difference between the median estimated CA concentration and the reference value varied from -0.00015 to 0.00306 mmol/L (corresponding IQRs: 0.01989 and 1.51013 mmol/L) at true values of 0.5 and 8.0 mmol/l, respectively, at an intermediate value of 100 pulses. The estimated flow velocities in the phantom were within 10% of the reference value. The proposed method accurately corrects the MRI signal affected by the inflow effect. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:1190-1196. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic

  1. Simultaneous measurement of kidney function by dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and FITC-sinistrin clearance in rats at 3 tesla: initial results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank G Zöllner

    Full Text Available Glomerular filtration rate (GFR is an essential parameter of kidney function which can be measured by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-GFR and transcutaneous approaches based on fluorescent tracer molecules (optical-GFR. In an initial study comparing both techniques in separate measurements on the same animal, the correlation of the obtained GFR was poor. The goal of this study was to investigate if a simultaneous measurement was feasible and if thereby, the discrepancies in MRI-GFR and optical-GFR could be reduced. For the experiments healthy and unilateral nephrectomised (UNX Sprague Dawley (SD rats were used. The miniaturized fluorescent sensor was fixed on the depilated back of an anesthetized rat. A bolus of 5 mg/100 g b.w. of FITC-sinistrin was intravenously injected. For dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion imaging (DCE-MRI a 3D time-resolved angiography with stochastic trajectories (TWIST sequence was used. By means of a one compartment model the excretion half-life (t1/2 of FITC-sinistrin was calculated and converted into GFR. GFR from DCE-MRI was calculated by fitting pixel-wise a two compartment renal filtration model. Mean cortical GFR and GFR by FITC-sinistrin were compared by Bland-Altman plots and pair-wise t-test. Results show that a simultaneous GFR measurement using both techniques is feasible. Mean optical-GFR was 4.34 ± 2.22 ml/min (healthy SD rats and 2.34 ± 0.90 ml/min (UNX rats whereas MRI-GFR was 2.10 ± 0.64 ml/min (SD rats and 1.17 ± 0.38 ml/min (UNX rats. Differences between healthy and UNX rats were significant (p<0.05 and almost equal percentage difference (46.1% and 44.3% in mean GFR were assessed with both techniques. Overall mean optical-GFR values were approximately twice as high compared to MRI-GFR values. However, compared to a previous study, our results showed a higher agreement. In conclusion, the possibility to use the transcutaneous method in MRI may have a huge impact in

  2. The effect of blood inflow and B(1)-field inhomogeneity on measurement of the arterial input function in axial 3D spoiled gradient echo dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Caleb; Little, Ross; Watson, Yvonne; Zhao, Sha; Buckley, David L; Parker, Geoff J M

    2011-01-01

    A major potential confound in axial 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging studies is the blood inflow effect; therefore, the choice of slice location for arterial input function measurement within the imaging volume must be considered carefully. The objective of this study was to use computer simulations, flow phantom, and in vivo studies to describe and understand the effect of blood inflow on the measurement of the arterial input function. All experiments were done at 1.5 T using a typical 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging sequence, and arterial input functions were extracted for each slice in the imaging volume. We simulated a set of arterial input functions based on the same imaging parameters and accounted for blood inflow and radiofrequency field inhomogeneities. Measured arterial input functions along the vessel length from both in vivo and the flow phantom agreed with simulated arterial input functions and show large overestimations in the arterial input function in the first 30 mm of the vessel, whereas arterial input functions measured more centrally achieve accurate contrast agent concentrations. Use of inflow-affected arterial input functions in tracer kinetic modeling shows potential errors of up to 80% in tissue microvascular parameters. These errors emphasize the importance of careful placement of the arterial input function definition location to avoid the effects of blood inflow. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Assessment of renal function after conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy by functional 1H-MRI and 23Na-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haneder, S.; Michaely, H.J.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Konstandin, S.; Schad, L.R.; Siebenlist, K.; Wertz, H.; Wenz, F.; Lohr, F.; Boda-Heggemann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCHT) improves survival of patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. Conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) results in ablative doses to a significant amount of the left kidney, while image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) provides excellent target coverage with improved kidney sparing. Few long-term results on IMRT for gastric cancer, however, have been published. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3.0 T including blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and, for the first time, 23 Na imaging was used to evaluate renal status after radiotherapy with 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT. Patients and methods Four disease-free patients (2 after 3D-CRT and 2 after IMRT; FU for all patients > 5 years) were included in this feasibility study. Morphological sequences, axial DWI images, 2D-gradient echo (GRE)-BOLD images, and 23 Na images were acquired. Mean values/standard deviations for ( 23 Na), the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and R2 * values were calculated for the upper/middle/lower parts of both kidneys. Corticomedullary 23 Na-concentration gradients were determined. Results: Surprisingly, IG-IMRT patients showed no morphological alterations and no statistically significant differences of ADC and R2 * values in all renal parts. Values for mean corticomedullary 23 Na-concentration matched those for healthy volunteers. Results were similar in 3D-CRT patients, except for the cranial part of the left kidney. This was atrophic and presented significantly reduced functional parameters (p = 0.001 - p = 0.033). Reduced ADC values indicated reduced cell density and reduced extracellular space. Cortical and medullary R2 * values of the left cranial kidney in the 3D-CRT group were higher, indicating more deoxygenated hemoglobin due to reduced blood flow/oxygenation. ( 23 Na) of the renal cranial parts in the 3D-CRT group was significantly reduced

  4. Evaluation on changes of early renal function in patients with diabetic nephropathy with contrast-enhanced ultrasound and its clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xinmin; Jin Hong; Pan Liwen; Chen Hui; Liu Wei; Quan Xianyue

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To quantitatively assess the parameter alteration of renal blood flow in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) with the contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), and to evaluate value of the technique in diagnosis of early renal function changes of DN patients. Methods: 40 diabetic patients were equally divided into two group according to Mogensen's staging criteria: normal albuminuria group (group Ⅰ) and early DN group (group Ⅱ); and 15 cases of healthy volunteers were used as control group (N group) (n=15). All subjects were performed renal CEUS perfusion imaging, and QontraXt image analysis software was applied to select the region of interest (ROI) in the renal cortex. Then the time intensity curve (TIC) and kidney blood perfusion parameters were collected. Results: The renal blood perfusion was clearly shown in real time CEUS; compared with N group, the time to peak (TTP), regional blood volume (RBV), and mean transit time (MTT) of the patients in group Ⅰ were increased, there were significant differences (P<0.05); but there were no significant differences of derived peak intensity (DPI) and regional blood flow (RBF) between two groups (P>0.05). Compared with group Ⅰ and N group, the RBV, TTP and MTT of the patients were increased, the DPI and RBF were reduced in group Ⅱ, there were significant differences (P<0.05). Conclusion: The CEUS technical analysis can be used in evaluating renal abnormality of the DN patients in early period by showing the changes of renal perfusion parameters. (authors)

  5. Functional mapping of language networks in the normal brain using a word-association task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Shantanu; Basu, Amrita; Kumaran, Senthil S; Khushu, Subash

    2010-01-01

    Language functions are known to be affected in diverse neurological conditions, including ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and brain tumors. Because language networks are extensive, interpretation of functional data depends on the task completed during evaluation. The aim was to map the hemodynamic consequences of word association using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in normal human subjects. Ten healthy subjects underwent fMRI scanning with a postlexical access semantic association task vs lexical processing task. The fMRI protocol involved a T2*-weighted gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) sequence (TR 4523 ms, TE 64 ms, flip angle 90°) with alternate baseline and activation blocks. A total of 78 scans were taken (interscan interval = 3 s) with a total imaging time of 587 s. Functional data were processed in Statistical Parametric Mapping software (SPM2) with 8-mm Gaussian kernel by convolving the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal with an hemodynamic response function estimated by general linear method to generate SPM{t} and SPM{F} maps. Single subject analysis of the functional data (FWE-corrected, P≤0.001) revealed extensive activation in the frontal lobes, with overlaps among middle frontal gyrus (MFG), superior, and inferior frontal gyri. BOLD activity was also found in the medial frontal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus (MOG), anterior fusiform gyrus, superior and inferior parietal lobules, and to a smaller extent, the thalamus and right anterior cerebellum. Group analysis (FWE-corrected, P≤0.001) revealed neural recruitment of bilateral lingual gyri, left MFG, bilateral MOG, left superior occipital gyrus, left fusiform gyrus, bilateral thalami, and right cerebellar areas. Group data analysis revealed a cerebellar–occipital–fusiform–thalamic network centered around bilateral lingual gyri for word association, thereby indicating how these areas facilitate language comprehension by activating a semantic

  6. Evaluation of contrast sensitivity and other visual function outcomes in diabetic macular edema patients following treatment switch to aflibercept from ranibizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Donald R; Flinn, Nicholas Ap

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to investigate changes in contrast sensitivity (CS), visual acuity (VA), central retinal thickness (CRT), and vision-related quality of life in subjects with recalcitrant diabetic macular edema switched from long-term ranibizumab treatment to aflibercept. In this prospective, investigator-masked, single-center study, 40 patients with persistent fluid, despite previous ranibizumab treatment, were switched to aflibercept with 5 consecutive monthly doses. The primary outcome was mean change from baseline to week 20 in Pelli-Robson CS. Secondary outcomes were mean change from baseline in best-corrected VA (BCVA), CRT, and National Eye Institute 25-Item Visual Function Questionnaire score. Fifty eyes (baseline VA >6/30) were evaluated. A median of 21.1±11.9 (range 5-55) ranibizumab injections were administered prior to initiation of aflibercept. Mean CS improved from 1.40±0.14 log units at baseline to 1.46±0.15 log units at week 20 ( P <0.001). VA improved with mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution BCVA of 0.33±0.19 at baseline compared with logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution BCVA of 0.28±0.16 at week 20 ( P =0.0016). Mean CRT decreased from 324±85 to 289±61 µm ( P <0.001). Twenty-two (55%) patients experienced an overall improvement in National Eye Institute 25-Item Visual Function Questionnaire score. Interestingly, an association was found between changes in CS and change in CRT ( r 2 =0.385, P <0.001) and between changes in BCVA and change in CRT ( r 2 =0.092, P =0.032). Switching from ranibizumab to aflibercept in patients with recalcitrant diabetic macular edema resulted in an improvement in all measured metrics, including CS, VA, and CRT. A majority of patients also indicated an improvement in vision-related quality of life. The finding of a stronger relationship between changes in CRT and CS compared with changes in CRT and BCVA suggests that the inclusion of CS as an endpoint may yield a more complete understanding

  7. Assessment of pedophilia using hemodynamic brain response to sexual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponseti, Jorge; Granert, Oliver; Jansen, Olav; Wolff, Stephan; Beier, Klaus; Neutze, Janina; Deuschl, Günther; Mehdorn, Hubertus; Siebner, Hartwig; Bosinski, Hartmut

    2012-02-01

    Accurately assessing sexual preference is important in the treatment of child sex offenders. Phallometry is the standard method to identify sexual preference; however, this measure has been criticized for its intrusiveness and limited reliability. To evaluate whether spatial response pattern to sexual stimuli as revealed by a change in the blood oxygen level-dependent signal facilitates the identification of pedophiles. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, pedophilic and nonpedophilic participants were briefly exposed to same- and opposite-sex images of nude children and adults. We calculated differences in blood oxygen level-dependent signals to child and adult sexual stimuli for each participant. The corresponding contrast images were entered into a group analysis to calculate whole-brain difference maps between groups. We calculated an expression value that corresponded to the group result for each participant. These expression values were submitted to 2 different classification algorithms: Fisher linear discriminant analysis and κ -nearest neighbor analysis. This classification procedure was cross-validated using the leave-one-out method. Section of Sexual Medicine, Medical School, Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany. We recruited 24 participants with pedophilia who were sexually attracted to either prepubescent girls (n = 11) or prepubescent boys (n = 13) and 32 healthy male controls who were sexually attracted to either adult women (n = 18) or adult men (n = 14). Sensitivity and specificity scores of the 2 classification algorithms. The highest classification accuracy was achieved by Fisher linear discriminant analysis, which showed a mean accuracy of 95% (100% specificity, 88% sensitivity). Functional brain response patterns to sexual stimuli contain sufficient information to identify pedophiles with high accuracy. The automatic classification of these patterns is a promising objective tool to clinically diagnose

  8. Superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles from solid-state synthesis – Their functionalization towards peroral MRI contrast agent and magnetic carrier for trypsin immobilization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kluchová, K.; Zbořil, R.; Tuček, J.; Pečová, M.; Zajoncová, L.; Šafařík, Ivo; Mašláň, M.; Marková, I.; Jančík, D.; Šebela, M.; Bartoňková, H.; Bellesi, V.; Novák, P.; Petridis, D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, - (2009), s. 2855-2863 ISSN 0142-9612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : maghemite * contrast agent * composites Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 7.365, year: 2009

  9. Functional connectivity of paired default mode network subregions in primary insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nie X

    2015-12-01

    =0.026, and between the left medial temporal lobe and the left inferior parietal cortices (t=-3.32, P=0.001. The abnormal FC strengths between the DMN subregions did not correlate with the clinical features.Conclusion: PIs showed disrupted FC within the DMN subregions. Keywords: insomnia, functional connectivity, default mode network, functional magnetic resonance imaging, resting-state, blood oxygenation level dependent

  10. Impact of arterial input function selection on the accuracy of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI quantitative analysis for the diagnosis of clinically significant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azahaf, Mustapha; Haberley, Marc; Betrouni, Nacim; Ernst, Olivier; Behal, Hélène; Duhamel, Alain; Ouzzane, Adil; Puech, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Using a limited temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dataset to assess the impact of the arterial input function (AIF) choice on the transfer constant (K(trans) ) to distinguish prostate carcinoma (PCa) from benign tissue. Thirty-eight patients with clinically important peripheral PCa (≥0.5 cc) were retrospectively studied. These patients underwent 1.5T multiparametric prostate MR with PCa and benign regions of interest (ROIs) selected using a visual registration with morphometric reconstruction obtained from radical prostatectomy. Using three pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis software programs, the mean K(trans) of ROIs was computed using three AIFs: an individual AIF (Ind-AIF) and two literature population average AIFs of Weinmann (W-AIF) and of Fritz-Hansen (FH-AIF). A pairwise comparison of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROCC) obtained with different AIFs was performed. AUROCCs obtained with W-AIF (ranging from 0.801 to 0.843) were significantly higher than FH-AIF (ranging from 0.698 to 0.780, 0.002 ≤ P ≤ 0.045) and similar to or higher than Ind-AIF (ranging from 0.591 to 0.839, 0.014 ≤ P ≤ 0.9). Ind-AIF and FH-AIF provided similar AUROCC (0.34 ≤ P ≤ 0.81). The pairwise correlation of K(trans) values was moderate to very strong when comparing W-AIF with FH-AIF (the Spearman's correlation coefficients [SCCs] ranged from 0.55 to 0.93) and very weak to moderate when comparing W-AIF with Ind-AIF (the SCCs ranged from 0.018 to 0.59) or FH-AIF with Ind-AIF (the SCCs ranged from 0.30 to 0.51). W-AIF yielded a higher performance than FH-AIF and a similar or higher performance than Ind-AIF in distinguishing PCa from benign tissue. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Estimating the arterial input function from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data with compensation for flow enhancement (II): Applications in spine diagnostics and assessment of crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Jeroen J N; Lavini, Cristina; van Vliet, Lucas J; Kramer, Gem; Pieters-van den Bos, Indra; Marcus, J T; Stoker, Jaap; Vos, Frans M

    2018-05-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models can describe microvascular density and integrity. An essential component of PK models is the arterial input function (AIF) representing the time-dependent concentration of contrast agent (CA) in the blood plasma supplied to a tissue. To evaluate a novel method for subject-specific AIF estimation that takes inflow effects into account. Retrospective study. Thirteen clinical patients referred for spine-related complaints; 21 patients from a study into luminal Crohn's disease with known Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity (CDEIS). Dynamic fast spoiled gradient echo (FSPGR) at 3T. A population-averaged AIF, AIFs derived from distally placed regions of interest (ROIs), and the new AIF method were applied. Tofts' PK model parameters (including v p and K trans ) obtained with the three AIFs were compared. In the Crohn's patients K trans was correlated to CDEIS. The median values of the PK model parameters from the three methods were compared using a Mann-Whitney U-test. The associated variances were statistically assessed by the Brown-Forsythe test. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was computed to test the correlation of K trans to CDEIS. The median v p was significantly larger when using the distal ROI approach, compared to the two other methods (P < 0.05 for both comparisons, in both applications). Also, the variances in v p were significantly larger with the ROI approach (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). In the Crohn's disease study, the estimated K trans parameter correlated better with the CDEIS (r = 0.733, P < 0.001) when the proposed AIF was used, compared to AIFs from the distal ROI method (r = 0.429, P = 0.067) or the population-averaged AIF (r = 0.567, P = 0.011). The proposed method yielded realistic PK model parameters and improved the correlation of the K trans parameter with CDEIS, compared to existing approaches. 3 Technical Efficacy Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:1197-1204. © 2017

  12. Multimodality functional imaging of spontaneous canine tumors using 64CU-ATSM and 18FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders E; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Law, Ian

    2012-01-01

    To compare the distribution and uptake of the hypoxia tracer (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) PET/CT, FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT (DCE-pCT) in spontaneous canine tumors. In addition (64)Cu-ATSM distribution over time was evaluated.......To compare the distribution and uptake of the hypoxia tracer (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) PET/CT, FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT (DCE-pCT) in spontaneous canine tumors. In addition (64)Cu-ATSM distribution over time was evaluated....

  13. Development of contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, W.

    1993-01-01

    Description of all contrast media (ionic and nonionic monomers, ionic and nonionic dimers) was presented. Chemotoxicity, osmolality and viscosity of some contrast agents were analyzed. The main adverse reactions to ionic and nonionic contrast media were described

  14. Disentangling resting-state BOLD variability and PCC functional connectivity in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöller, Daniela; Schaer, Marie; Scariati, Elisa; Padula, Maria Carmela; Eliez, Stephan; Van De Ville, Dimitri

    2017-04-01

    Although often ignored in fMRI studies, moment-to-moment variability of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals reveals important information about brain function. Indeed, higher brain signal variability has been associated with better cognitive performance in young adults compared to children and elderly adults. Functional connectivity, a very common approach in resting-state fMRI analysis, is scaled for variance. Thus, alterations might be confounded or driven by BOLD signal variance alterations. Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is associated with a vast cognitive and clinical phenotype. To date, several resting-state fMRI studies reported altered functional connectivity in 22q11.2DS, however BOLD signal variance has not yet been analyzed. Here, we employed PLS correlation analysis to reveal multivariate patterns of diagnosis-related alterations and age-relationship throughout the cortex of 50 patients between 9 and 25 years old and 50 healthy controls in the same age range. To address how functional connectivity in the default mode network is influenced by BOLD signal fluctuations, we conducted the same analysis on seed-to-voxel connectivity of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and compared resulting brain patterns. BOLD signal variance was lower mainly in regions of the default mode network and in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, but higher in large parts of the temporal lobes. In those regions, BOLD signal variance was correlated with age in healthy controls, but not in patients, suggesting deviant developmental trajectories from child- to adulthood. Positive connectivity of the PCC within the default mode network as well as negative connectivity towards the frontoparietal network were weaker in patients with 22q11.2DS. We furthermore showed that lower functional connectivity of the PCC was not driven by higher BOLD signal variability. Our results confirm the strong implication of BOLD

  15. Radiographic contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golman, K.; Holtz, E.; Almen, T.

    1987-01-01

    Contrast media are used in diagnostic radiology to enhance the X-ray attenuation between a body structure of interest and the surrounding tissue. A detail becomes perceptible on a roentgenogram only when its contrast exceeds a minimum value in relation to the background. Small areas of interest must have higher contrast than the background. The contrast effect depends on concentration of the contrast media with the body. A high contrast media concentration difference thus gives rise to more morphological details in the radiographs. Contrast media can be divided into negative contrast media such as air and gas which attenuate X-rays less than the body tissues, and positive contrast materials which attenuate X-rays more than the body tissues. The positive contrast media all contain either iodine (atomic number 53) or barium (atomic number 56) and can be divided into water-insoluble and water-soluble contrast media

  16. A functional MRI study of the brain in stroke patients with upper-limb paralysis treated with constraint-induced movement therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Bo; Ma Lin; Weng Changshui; Zheng Zhixin; Sun Tong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and compare the activation patterns of stroke patients with upper-limb paralysis using functional MRI before and after treatment with constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) so as to explore the mechanism of CIMT. Methods: Six patients in chronic stage of brain infarction who have functional disturbance in right upper-limb and 9 normal controls were entered into the study. All of the patients were asked to perform the thumb-to-index finger tapping task and underwent functional MRI before and two weeks after CIMT. The controls underwent fMRI of same protocol once. The patients' upper-limb function scores before and after CIMT were analyzed with SPSS 11.5 by paired t test. The fMRI data were analyzed with analysis of functional neurolmages (AFNI) software. The percentage of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal change for the normal control was analyzed by one-sample t test to indentify the activated brain regions. The percentage change of BOLD signal for the patients before and after CIMT was compared to control's data by independent-samples t test. The percentage change of BOLD signal for the patients before and after CIMT was analyzed by paired-samples t test. The significant difference level was set P<0.05. Results: The fMRI showed the patients' activated brain regions before CIMT were similar to that of the controls', while the activation level was lower. There were wide areas activated to compensate the impaired function especially for the fight upper-limb. Before CIMT, the patients' score for fight upper-limb on the action research arm test was 27±4. After CIMT, the patients' score was 40±3, and the difference was significant (t=14.626, P<0.05), which indicated the improved function. These subjects also displayed cortical reorganization after CIMT on fMRI. The areas responsible for the right hand movement showed increased activation and the activation level at bilateral corpora striata thalami, and cerebella increased

  17. Joint brain connectivity estimation from diffusion and functional MRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shu-Hsien; Lenglet, Christophe; Parhi, Keshab K.

    2015-03-01

    Estimating brain wiring patterns is critical to better understand the brain organization and function. Anatomical brain connectivity models axonal pathways, while the functional brain connectivity characterizes the statistical dependencies and correlation between the activities of various brain regions. The synchronization of brain activity can be inferred through the variation of blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal from functional MRI (fMRI) and the neural connections can be estimated using tractography from diffusion MRI (dMRI). Functional connections between brain regions are supported by anatomical connections, and the synchronization of brain activities arises through sharing of information in the form of electro-chemical signals on axon pathways. Jointly modeling fMRI and dMRI data may improve the accuracy in constructing anatomical connectivity as well as functional connectivity. Such an approach may lead to novel multimodal biomarkers potentially able to better capture functional and anatomical connectivity variations. We present a novel brain network model which jointly models the dMRI and fMRI data to improve the anatomical connectivity estimation and extract the anatomical subnetworks associated with specific functional modes by constraining the anatomical connections as structural supports to the functional connections. The key idea is similar to a multi-commodity flow optimization problem that minimizes the cost or maximizes the efficiency for flow configuration and simultaneously fulfills the supply-demand constraint for each commodity. In the proposed network, the nodes represent the grey matter (GM) regions providing brain functionality, and the links represent white matter (WM) fiber bundles connecting those regions and delivering information. The commodities can be thought of as the information corresponding to brain activity patterns as obtained for instance by independent component analysis (ICA) of fMRI data. The concept of information

  18. Contrast-induced nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, P.B. [Inst. of Physiology, Humboldt Univ., Medizinische Fakultaet (Charite), Berlin (Germany)

    2005-11-15

    How contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN) comes about is not fully understood, although CIN constitutes a leading cause of renal failure. Here, a short review of clinical trials and a more thorough outline of mechanisms thought to cause CIN are outlined. Osmolality is only one of several physicochemical properties of contrast media (CM). Iso-osmolar CM are dimers, not monomers. Thus, they have physicochemical features different from other CM, e. g., in terms of viscosity (which is over fivefold greater than plasma viscosity). This may be of considerable pathophysiologic and clinical importance. There are studies providing evidence for a greater perturbation in renal functions by iso-osmolar CM in comparison to nonionic low-osmolar CM. Conversely, some previous clinical trials indicate an advantage of the iso-osmolar CM. This review highlights altered rheological properties, perturbation of renal hemodynamics, regional hypoxia, auto- and paracrine factors (adenosine, endothelin, reactive oxygen species) and direct cytotoxic effects, which are all thought to participate in causing CIN. It is concluded that the use of CM in general, and high viscous iso-osmolar CM in particular, can be deleterious to the kidney due to augmented resistance in the renal tubules. (orig.)

  19. Multiband multi-echo simultaneous ASL/BOLD for task-induced functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D Cohen

    Full Text Available Typical simultaneous blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD and arterial spin labeling (ASL sequences acquire two echoes, one perfusion-sensitive and one BOLD-sensitive. However, for ASL, spatial resolution and brain coverage are limited due to the T1 decay of the labeled blood. This study applies a sequence combining a multiband acquisition with four echoes for simultaneous BOLD and pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL echo planar imaging (MBME ASL/BOLD for block-design task-fMRI. A multiband acceleration of four was employed to increase brain coverage and reduce slice-timing effects on the ASL signal. Multi-echo independent component analysis (MEICA was implemented to automatically denoise the BOLD signal by regressing non-BOLD components. This technique led to increased temporal signal-to-noise ratio (tSNR and BOLD sensitivity. The MEICA technique was also modified to denoise the ASL signal by regressing artifact and BOLD signals from the first echo time-series. The MBME ASL/BOLD sequence was applied to a finger-tapping task functional MRI (fMRI experiment. Signal characteristics and activation were evaluated using single echo BOLD, combined ME BOLD, combined ME BOLD after MEICA denoising, perfusion-weighted (PW, and perfusion-weighted after MEICA denoising time-series. The PW data was extracted using both surround subtraction and high-pass filtering followed by demodulation. In addition, the CBF/BOLD response ratio and CBF/BOLD coupling were analyzed. Results showed that the MEICA denoising procedure significantly improved the BOLD signal, leading to increased BOLD sensitivity, tSNR, and activation statistics compared to conventional single echo BOLD data. At the same time, the denoised PW data showed increased tSNR and activation statistics compared to the non-denoised PW data. CBF/BOLD coupling was also increased using the denoised ASL and BOLD data. Our preliminary data suggest that the MBME ASL/BOLD sequence can be employed to collect whole

  20. Urinary ET-1 excretion after exposure to radio-contrast media in diabetic patients and patients with preexisting mild impaired renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heunisch, Fabian; von Einem, Gina; Alter, Markus; Weist, Andreas; Dschietzig, Thomas; Kretschmer, Axel; Hocher, Berthold

    2014-11-24

    Contrast media-induced nephropathy (CIN) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The renal endothelin system has been associated with disease progression of various acute and chronic renal diseases. However, robust data coming from adequately powered prospective clinical studies analyzing the short and long-term impacts of the renal ET system in patients with CIN are missing so far. We thus performed a prospective study addressing this topic. We included 327 patients with diabetes or renal impairment undergoing coronary angiography. Blood and spot urine were collected before and 24 h after contrast media (CM) application. Patients were followed for 90 days for major clinical events like need for dialysis, unplanned rehospitalization or death. The concentration of ET-1 and the urinary ET-1/creatinine ratio decreased in spot urine after CM application (ET-1 concentration: 0.91±1.23 pg/ml versus 0.63±1.03 pg/ml, pcontrast media exposure. However, the urinary ET-1 concentration and the urinary ET-1/creatinine ratio after CM application were higher in those patients who had a decrease of GFR of at least 25% after 90 days of follow-up. In general the ET-1 system in the kidney seems to be down-regulated after contrast media application in patients with moderate CIN risk. Major long-term complications of CIN (need for dialysis, rehospitalization or death) are not associated with the renal ET system. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hak, Sjoerd; Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only...... kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging...

  2. Importance of Collateralization in Patients With Large Artery Intracranial Occlusive Disease: Long-Term Longitudinal Assessment of Cerebral Hemodynamic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa McKetton

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Patients with large artery intracranial occlusive disease (LAICOD are at risk for both acute ischemia and chronic hypoperfusion. Collateral circulation plays an important role in prognosis, and imaging plays an essential role in diagnosis, treatment planning, and prognosis of patients with LAICOD. In addition to standard structural imaging, assessment of cerebral hemodynamic function is important to determine the adequacy of collateral supply. Among the currently available methods of assessment of cerebral hemodynamic function, measurement of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD MRI and precisely controlled CO2 has shown to be a safe, reliable, reproducible, and clinically useful method for long-term assessment of patients. Here, we report a case of long-term follow-up in a 28-year-old Caucasian female presented to the neurology clinic with a history of TIAs and LAICOD of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA. Initial structural MRI showed a right MCA stenosis and a small right coronal radiate lacunar infarct. Her CVR study showed a large area of impaired CVR with a paradoxical decrease in BOLD signal with hypercapnia involving the right MCA territory indicating intracerebral steal. The patient was managed medically with anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy and was followed-up for over 9 years with both structural and functional imaging. Cortical thickness (CT measures were longitudinally assessed from a region of interest that was applied to subsequent time points in the cortical region exhibiting steal physiology and in the same region of the contralateral healthy hemisphere. In the long-term follow-up, the patient exhibited improvement in her CVR as demonstrated by the development of collaterals with negligible changes to CT. Management of patients with LAICOD remains challenging since no revascularization strategies have shown efficacy except in patients with moyamoya disease. Management is well

  3. Synthesis and functionalization of NaGdF4:Yb,Er@NaGdF4 core–shell nanoparticles for possible application as multimodal contrast agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dovile Baziulyte-Paulaviciene

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs are promising, new imaging probes capable of serving as multimodal contrast agents. In this study, monodisperse and ultrasmall core and core–shell UCNPs were synthesized via a thermal decomposition method. Furthermore, it was shown that the epitaxial growth of a NaGdF4 optical inert layer covering the NaGdF4:Yb,Er core effectively minimizes surface quenching due to the spatial isolation of the core from the surroundings. The mean diameter of the synthesized core and core–shell nanoparticles was ≈8 and ≈16 nm, respectively. Hydrophobic UCNPs were converted into hydrophilic ones using a nonionic surfactant Tween 80. The successful coating of the UCNPs by Tween 80 has been confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, photoluminescence (PL spectra and magnetic resonance (MR T1 relaxation measurements were used to characterize the size, crystal structure, optical and magnetic properties of the core and core–shell nanoparticles. Moreover, Tween 80-coated core–shell nanoparticles presented enhanced optical and MR signal intensity, good colloidal stability, low cytotoxicity and nonspecific internalization into two different breast cancer cell lines, which indicates that these nanoparticles could be applied as an efficient, dual-modal contrast probe for in vivo bioimaging.

  4. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: first-pass arterial enhancement as a function of gadolinium-chelate concentration, and the saline chaser volume and injection rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husarik, Daniela B; Bashir, Mustafa R; Weber, Paul W; Nichols, Eli B; Howle, Laurens E; Merkle, Elmar M; Nelson, Rendon C

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of the contrast medium (CM) concentration and the saline chaser volume and injection rate on first-pass aortic enhancement characteristics in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography using a physiologic flow phantom. Imaging was performed on a 3.0-T magnetic resonance system (MAGNETOM Trio, Siemens Healthcare Solutions, Inc, Erlangen, Germany) using a 2-dimensional fast low angle shot T1-weighted sequence (repetition time, 500 milliseconds; echo time, 1.23 milliseconds; flip angle, 8 degrees; 1 frame/s × 60 seconds). The following CM concentrations injected at 2 mL/s were used with 3 different contrast agents (gadolinium [Gd]-BOPTA, Gd-HP-DO3A, Gd-DTPA): 20 mL of undiluted CM (100%) and 80%, 40%, 20%, 10%, 5%, and 2.5% of the full amount, all diluted in saline to a volume of 20 mL to ensure equal bolus volume. The CM was followed by saline chasers of 20 to 60 mL injected at 2 mL/s and 6 mL/s. Aortic signal intensity (SI) was measured, and normalized SI versus time (SI/Tn) curves were generated. The maximal SI (SI(max)), bolus length, and areas under the SI/Tn curve were calculated. Decreasing the CM concentration from 100% to 40% resulted in a decrease of SI(max) to 86.1% (mean). Further decreasing the CM concentration to 2.5% decreased SI(max) to 5.1% (mean). Altering the saline chaser volume had no significant effect on SI(max). Increasing the saline chaser injection rate had little effect (mean increase, 2.2%) on SI(max) when using ≥40% of CM. There was a larger effect (mean increase, 19.6%) when ≤20% of CM were used. Bolus time length was significantly shorter (P < 0.001), and area under the SI/T(n) curve was significantly smaller (P < 0.01) for the CM protocols followed by a saline chaser injected at 6 mL/s compared with a saline chaser injected at 2 mL/s. With 40% of CM and a fast saline chaser, SImax close to that with undiluted CM can be achieved. An increased saline chaser injection rate has a more pronounced effect on

  5. Real-time phase-contrast x-ray imaging: a new technique for the study of animal form and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters James S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite advances in imaging techniques, real-time visualization of the structure and dynamics of tissues and organs inside small living animals has remained elusive. Recently, we have been using synchrotron x-rays to visualize the internal anatomy of millimeter-sized opaque, living animals. This technique takes advantage of partially-coherent x-rays and diffraction to enable clear visualization of internal soft tissue not viewable via conventional absorption radiography. However, because higher quality images require greater x-ray fluxes, there exists an inherent tradeoff between image quality and tissue damage. Results We evaluated the tradeoff between image quality and harm to the animal by determining the impact of targeted synchrotron x-rays on insect physiology, behavior and survival. Using 25 keV x-rays at a flux density of 80 μW/mm-2, high quality video-rate images can be obtained without major detrimental effects on the insects for multiple minutes, a duration sufficient for many physiological studies. At this setting, insects do not heat up. Additionally, we demonstrate the range of uses of synchrotron phase-contrast imaging by showing high-resolution images of internal anatomy and observations of labeled food movement during ingestion and digestion. Conclusion Synchrotron x-ray phase contrast imaging has the potential to revolutionize the study of physiology and internal biomechanics in small animals. This is the only generally applicable technique that has the necessary spatial and temporal resolutions, penetrating power, and sensitivity to soft tissue that is required to visualize the internal physiology of living animals on the scale from millimeters to microns.

  6. Perforations during contrast enema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Steinkamp, U.; Grabbe, E.; Allgemeines Krankenhaus Ochsenzoll, Hamburg

    1983-01-01

    During contrast enema, perforation into the retroperitoneal space can be differentiated from perforation into the peritoneum and perforation into the intestinal wall associated with formation of barium granulomas or submucosal spreading of the contrast medium. Other special forms are perforation with contrast medium embolism of diverticula; of the processus vermiformis; penetration of contrast medium into fistulous systems and from the operated areas. Risk factors are: balloon catheter, intestinal tubes with a hard tip, preternatural anus, excessive enema pressure, contrast medium additions, preceding manipulations, intestinal diseases, advanced age and delegation of manipulations to assistants and unskilled staff. Children are particularly at risk. (orig.) [de

  7. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 1999 guidelines on contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the definition of CIN, the choice of contrast medium, the prophylactic me....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR = 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  8. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 1999 guidelines on contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the definition of CIN, the choice of contrast medium, the prophylactic me....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  9. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 1999 guidelines on contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the definition of CIN, the choice of contrast medium, the prophylactic...... measures used to reduce the incidence of CIN, and the management of patients receiving metformin. Key Points • Definition, risk factors and prevention of contrast medium induced nephropathy are reviewed. • CIN risk is lower with intravenous than intra-arterial iodinated contrast medium. • eGFR of 45 ml....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR = 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  10. Changes in Male Rat Sexual Behavior and Brain Activity Revealed by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Response to Chronic Mild Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guotao; Yang, Baibing; Chen, Jianhuai; Zhu, Leilei; Jiang, Hesong; Yu, Wen; Zang, Fengchao; Chen, Yun; Dai, Yutian

    2018-02-01

    Non-organic erectile dysfunction (noED) at functional imaging has been related to abnormal brain activity and requires animal models for further research on the associated molecular mechanisms. To develop a noED animal model based on chronic mild stress and investigate brain activity changes. We used 6 weeks of chronic mild stress to induce depression. The sucrose consumption test was used to assess the hedonic state. The apomorphine test and sexual behavior test were used to select male rats with ED. Rats with depression and ED were considered to have noED. Blood oxygen level-dependent-based resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies were conducted on these rats, and the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and functional connectivity were analyzed to determine brain activity changes. The sexual behavior test and resting-state fMRI were used for outcome measures. The induction of depression was confirmed by the sucrose consumption test. A low intromission ratio and increased mount and intromission latencies were observed in male rats with depression. No erection was observed in male rats with depression during the apomorphine test. Male rats with depression and ED were considered to have noED. The possible central pathologic mechanism shown by fMRI involved the amygdaloid body, dorsal thalamus, hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, cingulate gyrus, insular cortex, visual cortex, sensory cortex, motor cortex, and cerebellum. Similar findings have been found in humans. The present study provided a novel noED rat model for further research on the central mechanism of noED. The present study developed a novel noED rat model and analyzed brain activity changes based at fMRI. The observed brain activity alterations might not extend to humans. The present study developed a novel noED rat model with brain activity alterations related to sexual arousal and erection, which will be helpful for further research involving the central mechanism of noED. Chen

  11. Contrastes de Forma: Contrastes de ilusiones (I)

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador González, José María

    1986-01-01

    Primera parte del análisis crítico de los principales movimientos artísticos representados en la Exposición Contrastes de Forma, organizada por varios museos de Nueva York en el Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Caracas.

  12. Contrasting effects of Elg1?RFC and Ctf18?RFC inactivation in the absence of fully functional RFC in fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jiyoung; Robertson, Kathryn; Mylonas, Katie J. L.; Gray, Fiona C.; Charapitsa, Iryna; MacNeill, Stuart A.

    2005-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen loading onto DNA by replication factor C (RFC) is a key step in eukaryotic DNA replication and repair processes. In this study, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit of fission yeast RFC is shown to be essential for its function in vivo. Cells carrying a temperature-sensitive mutation in the CTD, rfc1-44, arrest with incompletely replicated chromosomes, are sensitive to DNA damaging agents, are synthetically lethal with other DNA replication mutan...

  13. Functional cortical changes in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis at amplitude configuration: a resting-state fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu H

    2016-11-01

    showed high degrees of sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing patients with RRMS from HCs. The EDSS score showed a significant negative Pearson correlation with the beta value of the caudate head (r=-0.474, P=0.047. Conclusion: RRMS is associated with disturbances in spontaneous regional brain activity in specific areas, and these specific abnormalities may provide important information about the neural mechanisms underlying behavioral impairment in RRMS. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation, receiver operating characteristic, functional magnetic resonance imaging, blood oxygen level dependent, resting state

  14. Functional evaluation of therapeutic response of HCC827 lung cancer to bevacizumab and erlotinib targeted therapy using dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Fang; Yuan, Ang; Cho, Kuan-Hung; Lu, Yi-Chien; Kuo, Mark Yen-Ping; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Chang, Yeun-Chung

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic responses of lung cancer mice models with adenocarcinoma HCC827 (gefitinib sensitive) and HCC827R (gefitinib resistant) to the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib alone and in combination with the anti-angiogenesis agent bevacizumab using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) and diffusion-weighted MRI. In the HCC827 model, temporal changes in DCE-MRI derived parameters (Ktrans, kep, and iAUC90) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were significantly correlated with tumor size. Ktrans and iAUC90 significantly decreased at week 2 in the groups receiving erlotinib alone and in combination with bevacizumab, whereas kep decreased at week 1 and 2 in both treatment groups. In addition, there was a significant difference in iAUC90 between the treatment groups at week 1. Compared to the control group of HCC827, there was a significant reduction in microvessel density and increased tumor apoptosis in the two treatment group. ADC value increased in the erlotinib alone group at week 1 and week 2, and in the erlotinib combined with bevacizumab group at week 2. Enlarged areas of central tumor necrosis were associated with a higher ADC value. However, progressive enlargement of the tumors but no significant differences in DCE parameters or ADC were noted in the HCC827R model. These results showed that both erlotinib alone and in combination with bevacizumab could effectively inhibit tumor growth in the gefitinib-sensitive lung cancer mice model, and that this was associated with decreased vascular perfusion, increased ADC percentage, decreased microvessel density, and increased tumor apoptosis with a two-week treatment cycle.

  15. Functional evaluation of therapeutic response of HCC827 lung cancer to bevacizumab and erlotinib targeted therapy using dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Fang Chen

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic responses of lung cancer mice models with adenocarcinoma HCC827 (gefitinib sensitive and HCC827R (gefitinib resistant to the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib alone and in combination with the anti-angiogenesis agent bevacizumab using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE and diffusion-weighted MRI. In the HCC827 model, temporal changes in DCE-MRI derived parameters (Ktrans, kep, and iAUC90 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were significantly correlated with tumor size. Ktrans and iAUC90 significantly decreased at week 2 in the groups receiving erlotinib alone and in combination with bevacizumab, whereas kep decreased at week 1 and 2 in both treatment groups. In addition, there was a significant difference in iAUC90 between the treatment groups at week 1. Compared to the control group of HCC827, there was a significant reduction in microvessel density and increased tumor apoptosis in the two treatment group. ADC value increased in the erlotinib alone group at week 1 and week 2, and in the erlotinib combined with bevacizumab group at week 2. Enlarged areas of central tumor necrosis were associated with a higher ADC value. However, progressive enlargement of the tumors but no significant differences in DCE parameters or ADC were noted in the HCC827R model. These results showed that both erlotinib alone and in combination with bevacizumab could effectively inhibit tumor growth in the gefitinib-sensitive lung cancer mice model, and that this was associated with decreased vascular perfusion, increased ADC percentage, decreased microvessel density, and increased tumor apoptosis with a two-week treatment cycle.

  16. The application of preoperative functional MRI in neurosurgical treatment of intraoperative electrical stimulation for gliomas involving motor areas at 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zixiao; Dai Jianping; Li Shaowu; Li Changhong; Gao Peiyi; Jiang Tao; Sun Yilin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of preoperative blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) 3 T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify motor cortical areas in neurosurgical treatment of intraoperative electrical stimulation for gliomas involving motor areas. Methods: The study included 26 consecutive preoperative BOLD-fMRI sessions in patients with brain gliomas in or near senorimotor cortices. The bilateral hand movement fMRI paradigm was preformed in all patients. The BOLD data were analyzed by the workstation (Leonardo Syngo 2003A, Siemens)to obtain the BOLD-fMRI images, which were used to guide the preoperative neurosurgical planning. With guidance of preoperative mapping, all patients received microsurgery under anaesthesia retaining consciousness using intraoperative motor functional brain mapping with the method of direct electrical stimulations. The brain lesions were removed as far as possible in the case of eloquent areas preservation. The preoperative and postoperative KPS of all patients were operated to evaluate the state of patients. Results: The preoperative mappings of the hand area on primary sensorimotor cortex using BOLD-fMRI were obtained successfully in twenty-three of twenty-six patients. Under anaesthesia retaining consciousness, the primary motor area was monitored by the method of direct electrical stimulations with the guidance of preoperative BOLD-fMRI. There was good correlation between preoperative fMRI findings and intraoperative cortical stimulation. Furthermore, the preoperative mappings could make up for the un-monitored areas during operative cortical stimulation. For the 21 patients of the pre-KPS from 80.0 to 90.0, the pre-KPS and post-KPS are 85.7 and 95.2 respectively, and for the 5 patients of the pre-KPS from 40. 0 to 70.0, the pre-KPS and post-KPS are 68.0 and 90.0 respectively. Conclusion: The preoperative mapping of the hand area on primary sensorimotor cortex using BOLD-fMRI could non-invasively localize the

  17. Impaired functional connectivity within and between frontostriatal circuits and its association with compulsive drug use and trait impulsivity in cocaine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuzheng; Salmeron, Betty Jo; Gu, Hong; Stein, Elliot A; Yang, Yihong

    2015-06-01

    Converging evidence has long identified both impulsivity and compulsivity as key psychological constructs in drug addiction. Although dysregulated striatal-cortical network interactions have been identified in cocaine addiction, the association between these brain networks and addiction is poorly understood. To test the hypothesis that cocaine addiction is associated with disturbances in striatal-cortical communication as captured by resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC), measured from coherent spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signal, and to explore the relationships between striatal rsFC, trait impulsivity, and uncontrolled drug use in cocaine addiction. A case-control, cross-sectional study was conducted at the National Institute on Drug Abuse Intramural Research Program outpatient magnetic resonance imaging facility. Data used in the present study were collected between December 8, 2005, and September 30, 2011. Participants included 56 non-treatment-seeking cocaine users (CUs) (52 with cocaine dependence and 3 with cocaine abuse) and 56 healthy individuals serving as controls (HCs) matched on age, sex, years of education, race, estimated intelligence, and smoking status. Voxelwise statistical parametric analysis testing the rsFC strength differences between CUs and HCs in brain regions functionally connected to 6 striatal subregions defined a priori. Increased rsFC strength was observed predominantly in striatal-frontal circuits; decreased rsFC was found between the striatum and cingulate, striatal, temporal, hippocampal/amygdalar, and insular regions in the CU group compared with the HCs. Increased striatal-dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex connectivity strength was positively correlated with the amount of recent cocaine use (uncorrected P addiction is associated with disturbed rsFC in several specific striatal-cortical circuits. Specifically, compulsive cocaine use, a defining

  18. General perceptual contrast metric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberg, Anna; Hasler, David

    2003-06-01

    A combined achromatic and chromatic contrast metric for digital images and video is presented in this paper. Our work is aimed at tuning any parametric rendering algorithm in an automated way by computing how much details an observer perceives in a rendered scene. The contrast metric is based on contrast analysis in spatial domain of image sub-bands constructed by pyramidal decomposition of the image. The proposed contrast metric is the sum of the perceptual contrast of every pixel in the image at different detail levels corresponding to different viewing distances. The novel metric shows high correlation with subjective experiments. Important applications involve optimal parameter set of any image rendering and contrast enhancement technique or auto exposure of an image capturing device.

  19. Multimodality Functional Imaging in Radiation Therapy Planning: Relationships between Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, Diffusion-Weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Mera Iglesias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Biologically guided radiotherapy needs an understanding of how different functional imaging techniques interact and link together. We analyse three functional imaging techniques that can be useful tools for achieving this objective. Materials and Methods. The three different imaging modalities from one selected patient are ADC maps, DCE-MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT, because they are widely used and give a great amount of complementary information. We show the relationship between these three datasets and evaluate them as markers for tumour response or hypoxia marker. Thus, vascularization measured using DCE-MRI parameters can determine tumour hypoxia, and ADC maps can be used for evaluating tumour response. Results. ADC and DCE-MRI include information from 18F-FDG, as glucose metabolism is associated with hypoxia and tumour cell density, although 18F-FDG includes more information about the malignancy of the tumour. The main disadvantage of ADC maps is the distortion, and we used only low distorted regions, and extracellular volume calculated from DCE-MRI can be considered equivalent to ADC in well-vascularized areas. Conclusion. A dataset for achieving the biologically guided radiotherapy must include a tumour density study and a hypoxia marker. This information can be achieved using only MRI data or only PET/CT studies or mixing both datasets.

  20. Contrasting effects of Elg1-RFC and Ctf18-RFC inactivation in the absence of fully functional RFC in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Robertson, Kathryn; Mylonas, Katie J.

    2005-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen loading onto DNA by replication factor C (RFC) is a key step in eukaryotic DNA replication and repair processes. In this study, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit of fission yeast RFC is shown to be essential for its function in vivo. Cells carrying...... a temperature-sensitive mutation in the CTD, rfc1-44, arrest with incompletely replicated chromosomes, are sensitive to DNA damaging agents, are synthetically lethal with other DNA replication mutants, and can be suppressed by mutations in rfc5. To assess the contribution of the RFC-like complexes Elg1-RFC...... and Ctf18-RFC to the viability of rfc1-44, genes encoding the large subunits of these complexes have been deleted and overexpressed. Inactivation of Ctf18-RFC by the deletion of ctf18+, dcc1+ or ctf8+ is lethal in an rfc1-44 background showing that full Ctf18-RFC function is required in the absence...

  1. Multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuylsteke, Pieter; Schoeters, Emile P.

    1994-05-01

    This article presents a novel approach to the problem of detail contrast enhancement, based on multiresolution representation of the original image. The image is decomposed into a weighted sum of smooth, localized, 2D basis functions at multiple scales. Each transform coefficient represents the amount of local detail at some specific scale and at a specific position in the image. Detail contrast is enhanced by non-linear amplification of the transform coefficients. An inverse transform is then applied to the modified coefficients. This yields a uniformly contrast- enhanced image without artefacts. The MUSICA-algorithm is being applied routinely to computed radiography images of chest, skull, spine, shoulder, pelvis, extremities, and abdomen examinations, with excellent acceptance. It is useful for a wide range of applications in the medical, graphical, and industrial area.

  2. Principal States of Dynamic Functional Connectivity Reveal the Link Between Resting-State and Task-State Brain: An fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lin; Zhu, Yang; Sun, Junfeng; Deng, Lifu; He, Naying; Yang, Yang; Ling, Huawei; Ayaz, Hasan; Fu, Yi; Tong, Shanbao

    2018-01-25

    Task-related reorganization of functional connectivity (FC) has been widely investigated. Under classic static FC analysis, brain networks under task and rest have been demonstrated a general similarity. However, brain activity and cognitive process are believed to be dynamic and adaptive. Since static FC inherently ignores the distinct temporal patterns between rest and task, dynamic FC may be more a suitable technique to characterize the brain's dynamic and adaptive activities. In this study, we adopted [Formula: see text]-means clustering to investigate task-related spatiotemporal reorganization of dynamic brain networks and hypothesized that dynamic FC would be able to reveal the link between resting-state and task-state brain organization, including broadly similar spatial patterns but distinct temporal patterns. In order to test this hypothesis, this study examined the dynamic FC in default-mode network (DMN) and motor-related network (MN) using Blood-Oxygenation-Level-Dependent (BOLD)-fMRI data from 26 healthy subjects during rest (REST) and a hand closing-and-opening (HCO) task. Two principal FC states in REST and one principal FC state in HCO were identified. The first principal FC state in REST was found similar to that in HCO, which appeared to represent intrinsic network architecture and validated the broadly similar spatial patterns between REST and HCO. However, the second FC principal state in REST with much shorter "dwell time" implied the transient functional relationship between DMN and MN during REST. In addition, a more frequent shifting between two principal FC states indicated that brain network dynamically maintained a "default mode" in the motor system during REST, whereas the presence of a single principal FC state and reduced FC variability implied a more temporally stable connectivity during HCO, validating the distinct temporal patterns between REST and HCO. Our results further demonstrated that dynamic FC analysis could offer unique

  3. How Hot Are They? Neural Correlates of Genital Arousal: An Infrared Thermographic and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Sexual Arousal in Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada, Mayte; Gérard, Marina; Larcher, Kevin; Dagher, Alain; Binik, Yitzchak M

    2018-02-01

    The few studies that have examined the neural correlates of genital arousal have focused on men and are methodologically hard to compare. To investigate the neural correlates of peripheral physiologic sexual arousal using identical methodology for men and women. 2 groups (20 men, 20 women) viewed movie clips (erotic, humor) while genital temperature was continuously measured using infrared thermal imaging. Participants also continuously evaluated changes in their subjective arousal and answered discrete questions about liking the movies and wanting sexual stimulation. Brain activity, indicated by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response, was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. BOLD responses, genital temperature, and subjective sexual arousal. BOLD activity in a number of brain regions was correlated with changes in genital temperature in men and women; however, activation in women appeared to be more extensive than in men, including the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, right cerebellum, insula, frontal operculum, and paracingulate gyrus. Examination of the strength of the correlation between BOLD response and genital temperature showed that women had a stronger brain-genital relation compared with men in a number of regions. There were no brain regions in men with stronger brain-genital correlations than in women. Our findings shed light on the neurophysiologic processes involved in genital arousal for men and women. Further research examining the specific brain regions that mediate our findings is necessary to pave the way for clinical application. A strength of the study is the use of thermography, which allows for a direct comparison of the neural correlates of genital arousal in men and women. This study has the common limitations of most laboratory-based sexual arousal research, including sampling bias, lack of ecologic validity, and equipment limitations, and those common to neuroimaging research, including BOLD signal

  4. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals differences in brain activation in response to thermal stimuli in diabetic patients with and without diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Zhang, Wanying; Wang, Xia; Yuan, Tangmi; Liu, Peiyao; Wang, Tao; Shen, Le; Huang, Yuguang; Li, Naishi; You, Hui; Xiao, Tixian; Feng, Feng; Ma, Chao

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes affects both the peripheral and central nervous systems. The aim of this study was to explore the changes in brain activity in response to thermal stimuli in diabetic patients with and without diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A total of 36 right-handed volunteers were enrolled: eight patients with Type-2 diabetes mellitus and DPN, 13 patients with Type-2 diabetes mellitus lacking DPN (NDPN patients), and 15 healthy volunteers (HV). Blood oxygenation level-dependent baseline scans were performed, first without any stimuli, and then with four sessions of thermal stimuli (0, 10, 34, and 44°C, in a random order) applied to the lateral side of the right lower extremity. There was a 240-s rest interval between each thermal stimulation. Each stimulation session consisted of three cycles of 30 s of stimulation followed by 30 s of rest. After each stimuli session, the participant rated pain and itch perception on a visual analog scale. The fMRI data series were analyzed by using Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 and Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI. In response to temperature stimuli, DPN patients showed stronger activation than HV and NDPN patients, not only in brain areas that participate in somatosensory pathways (right insula, left caudate nucleus, frontal gyrus, and cingulate cortex), but also in the cognition-related cerebral areas (right temporal lobe, left hippocampus, and left fusiform gyrus). Activation of vermis 1-3 was greater in NDPN patients than in HV in response to 0°C stimulation. fMRI may be useful for the early detection of central nervous system impairment caused by DPN. Our results indicate that central nervous system impairment related to diabetic neuropathy may not be limited to motion- and sensation-related cortical regions. Cognition-associated cerebral regions such as the hippocampus and fusiform gyrus are also affected by functional changes caused by DPN. This

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals differences in brain activation in response to thermal stimuli in diabetic patients with and without diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    Full Text Available Diabetes affects both the peripheral and central nervous systems. The aim of this study was to explore the changes in brain activity in response to thermal stimuli in diabetic patients with and without diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI.A total of 36 right-handed volunteers were enrolled: eight patients with Type-2 diabetes mellitus and DPN, 13 patients with Type-2 diabetes mellitus lacking DPN (NDPN patients, and 15 healthy volunteers (HV. Blood oxygenation level-dependent baseline scans were performed, first without any stimuli, and then with four sessions of thermal stimuli (0, 10, 34, and 44°C, in a random order applied to the lateral side of the right lower extremity. There was a 240-s rest interval between each thermal stimulation. Each stimulation session consisted of three cycles of 30 s of stimulation followed by 30 s of rest. After each stimuli session, the participant rated pain and itch perception on a visual analog scale. The fMRI data series were analyzed by using Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 and Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI.In response to temperature stimuli, DPN patients showed stronger activation than HV and NDPN patients, not only in brain areas that participate in somatosensory pathways (right insula, left caudate nucleus, frontal gyrus, and cingulate cortex, but also in the cognition-related cerebral areas (right temporal lobe, left hippocampus, and left fusiform gyrus. Activation of vermis 1-3 was greater in NDPN patients than in HV in response to 0°C stimulation.fMRI may be useful for the early detection of central nervous system impairment caused by DPN. Our results indicate that central nervous system impairment related to diabetic neuropathy may not be limited to motion- and sensation-related cortical regions. Cognition-associated cerebral regions such as the hippocampus and fusiform gyrus are also affected by functional changes caused by DPN

  6. Functional Laterality of Task-Evoked Activation in Sensorimotor Cortex of Preterm Infants: An Optimized 3 T fMRI Study Employing a Customized Neonatal Head Coil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Scheef

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in neonates has been introduced as a non-invasive method for studying sensorimotor processing in the developing brain. However, previous neonatal studies have delivered conflicting results regarding localization, lateralization, and directionality of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD responses in sensorimotor cortex (SMC. Amongst the confounding factors in interpreting neonatal fMRI studies include the use of standard adult MR-coils providing insufficient signal to noise, and liberal statistical thresholds, compromising clinical interpretation at the single subject level.Here, we employed a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil adapted and optimized to the head size of a newborn in order to improve robustness, reliability and validity of neonatal sensorimotor fMRI. Thirteen preterm infants with a median gestational age of 26 weeks were scanned at term-corrected age using a prototype 8-channel neonatal head coil at 3T (Achieva, Philips, Best, NL. Sensorimotor stimulation was elicited by passive extension/flexion of the elbow at 1 Hz in a block design. Analysis of temporal signal to noise ratio (tSNR was performed on the whole brain and the SMC, and was compared to data acquired with an 'adult' 8 channel head coil published previously. Task-evoked activation was determined by single-subject SPM8 analyses, thresholded at p < 0.05, whole-brain FWE-corrected.Using a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil, we found significant positive BOLD responses in contralateral SMC after unilateral passive sensorimotor stimulation in all neonates (analyses restricted to artifact-free data sets = 8/13. Improved imaging characteristics of the neonatal MR-coil were evidenced by additional phantom and in vivo tSNR measurements: phantom studies revealed a 240% global increase in tSNR; in vivo studies revealed a 73% global and a 55% local (SMC increase in tSNR, as compared to the 'adult' MR-coil.Our findings strengthen the

  7. Edaphic, structural and physiological contrasts across Amazon Basin forest–savanna ecotones suggest a role for potassium as a key modulator of tropical woody vegetation structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lloyd

    2015-11-01

    C / N ratios than nearby forest plots. These soil differences were also reflected in canopy averaged leaf traits with savanna trees typically having higher leaf mass per unit area but lower mass-based nitrogen (Nm and potassium (Km. Both Nm and Km also increased with declining mean annual precipitation (PA, but most area-based leaf traits such as leaf photosynthetic capacity showed no systematic variation with PA or vegetation type. Despite this invariance, when taken in conjunction with other measures such as mean canopy height, area-based soil exchangeable potassium content, [K]sa , proved to be an excellent predictor of several photosynthetic properties (including 13C isotope discrimination. Moreover, when considered in a multivariate context with PA and soil plant available water storage capacity (θP as covariates, [K]sa also proved to be an excellent predictor of stand-level canopy area, providing drastically improved fits as compared to models considering just PA and/or θP. Neither calcium, nor magnesium, nor soil pH could substitute for potassium when tested as alternative model predictors (ΔAIC > 10. Nor for any model could simple soil texture metrics such as sand or clay content substitute for either [K]sa or θP. Taken in conjunction with recent work in Africa and the forests of the Amazon Basin, this suggests – in combination with some newly conceptualised interacting effects of PA and θP also presented here – a critical role for potassium as a modulator of tropical vegetation structure and function.

  8. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  9. Função de Sensibilidade ao Contraste: Indicador da Percepção Visual da Forma e da Resolução Espacial Contrast Sensitivity Function: Indicator of the Visual Perception of Form and of the Spatial Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natanael Antonio dos Santos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho discute a função de sensibilidade ao contraste, FSC, em três seções. A primeira descreve alguns aspectos teóricos e experimentais da FSC relacionados à pesquisa básica e aplicada. A segunda discute alguns estímulos espaciais utilizados para caracterizar a FSC ou a resposta do sistema visual humano. A terceira apresenta algumas considerações finais sobre a FSC e estímulos espaciais elementares. Um dos objetivos deste trabalho é discutir a FSC que junto com a acuidade visual parecem formar os principais indicadores dos aspectos críticos da percepção visual da forma e da resolução espacial. A FSC geralmente estima a percepção de qualquer padrão em função de sua freqüência espacial.This work discusses the contrast sensitivity function (CSF in three sections. The first describes some theoretical and experimental questions of the CSF related to basic and hard-working research. The second section discusses some elementary spatial stimuli used to characterize the CSF or the response of the human visual system. The third section shows some final considerations about CSF and spatial elementary stimuli. One of the goals of this paper is to discuss the CSF that together with visual acuity appear to form important indicators of the critical aspects of the visual perception of form and of the spatial resolution. The CSF normally is an estimate of the visibility of any pattern in function of the spatial frequency.

  10. Multi-step contrast sensitivity gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Enrico C; Thompson, Kyle R; Moore, David G; Heister, Jack D; Poland, Richard W; Ellegood, John P; Hodges, George K; Prindville, James E

    2014-10-14

    An X-ray contrast sensitivity gauge is described herein. The contrast sensitivity gauge comprises a plurality of steps of varying thicknesses. Each step in the gauge includes a plurality of recesses of differing depths, wherein the depths are a function of the thickness of their respective step. An X-ray image of the gauge is analyzed to determine a contrast-to-noise ratio of a detector employed to generate the image.

  11. MRI-based cerebrovascular reactivity using transfer function analysis reveals temporal group differences between patients with sickle cell disease and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Jackie; Duffin, James; Fisher, Joseph A; Kassner, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) measures the ability of cerebral blood vessels to change their diameter and, hence, their capacity to regulate regional blood flow in the brain. High resolution quantitative maps of CVR can be produced using blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with a carbon dioxide stimulus, and these maps have become a useful tool in the clinical evaluation of cerebrovascular disorders. However, conventional CVR analysis does not fully characterize the BOLD response to a stimulus as certain regions of the brain are slower to react to the stimulus than others, especially in disease. Transfer function analysis (TFA) is an alternative technique that can account for dynamic temporal relations between signals and has recently been adapted for CVR computation. We investigated the application of TFA in data on children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and healthy controls, and compared them to results derived from conventional CVR analysis. Data from 62 pediatric patients with SCD and 34 age-matched healthy controls were processed using conventional CVR analysis and TFA. BOLD data were acquired on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner while a carbon dioxide stimulus was quantified by sampling the end-tidal partial pressures of each exhaled breath. In addition, T1 weighted structural imaging was performed to identify grey and white matter regions for analysis. The TFA method generated maps representing both the relative magnitude change of the BOLD signal in response to the stimulus (Gain), as well as the BOLD signal speed of response (Phase) for each subject. These were compared to CVR maps calculated from conventional analysis. The effect of applying TFA on data from SCD patients versus controls was also examined. The Gain measures derived from TFA were significantly higher than CVR values based on conventional analysis in both SCD patients and healthy controls, but the difference was greater in the SCD data. Moreover

  12. Generalized Phase Contrast

    CERN Document Server

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than the restrictive assumptions of conventional Zernike phase contrast analysis and achieves an expanded range of validity beyond weak phase perturbations. The generalized analysis yields design criteria for tuning experimental parameters to achieve optimal performance in terms of accuracy, fidelity and light efficiency. Optimization can address practical issues, such as finding an optimal spatial filter for the chosen application, ...

  13. Mamografia Espectral de Contraste

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Inês Santiago; Pereira, Inês; Pacheco, Hugo Pisco; Moutinho, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    A mamografia de contraste é uma aplicação recente possível com a mamografia digital directa, que utiliza contraste iodado endovenoso tendo como princípio a neovascularização induzida no cancro da mama, permitindo obter informação morfológica e funcional. Na mamografia espectral de contraste realiza-se uma aquisição simultânea com alta e baixa energia para cada incidência após administração de contraste iodado endovenoso. É depois feita uma imagem recombinada em que são realçadas as áreas que ...

  14. Generalized phase contrast:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than......Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast...... efficiency. Optimization can address practical issues, such as finding an optimal spatial filter for the chosen application, and can even enable a Reverse Phase Contrast mode where intensity patterns are converted into a phase modulation....

  15. Aspiration of Barium Contrast

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes Santos, Cristina; Steen, Bárbara

    2014-01-01

    The aspiration of barium contrast is a rare complication that may occur during studies of the digestive tract. Barium is an inert material that can cause anywhere from an asymptomatic mechanical obstruction to serious symptoms of respiratory distress that can result in patient death. We present the case of a 79-year-old male patient in whom we observed the presence of contrast medium residue in the lung parenchyma as an incidental finding during hospitalization. When the patient’s medical fil...

  16. Tactile and non-tactile sensory paradigms for fMRI and neurophysiologic studies in rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Bailey, Christopher J.; Herman, Peter; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a popular functional imaging tool for human studies. Future diagnostic use of fMRI depends, however, on a suitable neurophysiologic interpretation of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal change. This particular goal is best achieved in animal models primarily due to the invasive nature of other methods used and/or pharmacological agents applied to probe different nuances of neuronal (and glial) activity coupled to the BOLD...

  17. Functional imaging of the lung using a gaseous contrast agent: {sup 3}Helium-magnetic resonance imaging; Funktionelle Bildgebung der Lunge mit gasfoermigem Kontrastmittel: {sup 3}Helium-Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gast, K.K.; Heussel, C.P. [Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Klinikum der Johannes Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany); Schreiber, W.G. [AG Medizinische Physik, Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Klinikum der Johannes Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany); Kauczor, H.U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Current imaging methods of the lung concentrate on morphology as well as on the depiction of the pulmonary parenchyma. The need of an advanced and more subtle imaging technology compared to conventional radiography is met by computed topograhy as the method of choice. Nevertheless, computed tomography yields very limited functional information. This is to be derived from arterial blood gas analysis, spirometry and body plethysmography. These methods, however, lack the scope for regional allocation of any pathology. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lung has been advanced by the use of hyperpolarised {sup 3}Helium as an inhaled gaseous contrast agent. The inhalation of the gas provides functional data by distribution, diffusion and relaxation of its hyperpolarised state. Because anatomical landmarks of the lung can be visualised as well, functional information can be linked with regional information. Furthermore, the method provides high spatial and temporal resolution and lacks the potential side-effects of ionising radiation. Four different modalities have been established: 1. Spin density imaging studies the distribution of gas, normally after a single inhalation of contrast gas in inspiratory breath hold. 2. Dynamic cine imaging studies the distribution of gas with respect to regional time constants of pulmonary gas inflow. 3. Diffusion weighted imaging can exhibit the presence and severity of pulmonary airspace enlargement, as in pulmonary emphysema. 4. Oxygen sensitive imaging displays intrapulmonary oxygen partial pressure and its distribution. Currently, the method is limited by comparably high costs and limited availability. As there have been recent developments which might bring this modality closer to clinical use, this review article will comprise the methodology as well as the current state of the art and standard of knowledge of magnetic resonance imaging of the lung using hyperpolarised {sup 3}Helium. (orig.)

  18. Color contrasting in radioscopy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopaev, V.P.; Pavlov, S.V.; Nazarenko, V.G.

    1979-01-01

    Transformation principles for achromatic radioscopy control systems to color ones have been considered. Described is the developed ''Gamma 1'' roentgen-TV facility with color contrasting, which is based on the principle of analog conversion of brightness signal to a hue. By means of color channels amplifiers realized are the special amplitude characteristics, permitting in comparison with the common method of analogous transformation to obtain the greater number of hues within the identical range of brightnesses of image under investigation due to introducing purple colors. The investigation of amplitude resolution capability of color contrasting device has shown, that in the case of color contrasting of image the amplitude resolution is 1.7-1.8 time higher than in the case of achromatic one. Defectoscopic sensitivity during the testing of 5-20 mm thick steel products in the process of experimental-production tests turned out to be 1.1-1.3 time higher when using color contrasting of radioscopic image. Realization simplicity, high resolution, noise stability and wide functional possibilities of the facility show the prospects for its using during the quality control of welded joints in products of power engineering

  19. Functionalized synchrotron in-line phase-contrast computed tomography: a novel approach for simultaneous quantification of structural alterations and localization of barium-labelled alveolar macrophages within mouse lung samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullin, Christian; dal Monego, Simeone; Larsson, Emanuel; Mohammadi, Sara; Krenkel, Martin; Garrovo, Chiara; Biffi, Stefania; Lorenzon, Andrea; Markus, Andrea; Napp, Joanna; Salditt, Tim; Accardo, Agostino; Alves, Frauke; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized computed tomography (CT) in combination with labelled cells is virtually non-existent due to the limited sensitivity of X-ray-absorption-based imaging, but would be highly desirable to realise cell tracking studies in entire organisms. In this study we applied in-line free propagation X-ray phase-contrast CT (XPCT) in an allergic asthma mouse model to assess structural changes as well as the biodistribution of barium-labelled macrophages in lung tissue. Alveolar macrophages that were barium-sulfate-loaded and fluorescent-labelled were instilled intratracheally into asthmatic and control mice. Mice were sacrificed after 24 h, lungs were kept in situ, inflated with air and scanned utilizing XPCT at the SYRMEP beamline (Elettra Synchrotron Light Source, Italy). Single-distance phase retrieval was used to generate data sets with ten times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than absorption-based CT (in our setup), thus allowing to depict and quantify structural hallmarks of asthmatic lungs such as reduced air volume, obstruction of airways and increased soft-tissue content. Furthermore, we found a higher concentration as well as a specific accumulation of the barium-labelled macrophages in asthmatic lung tissue. It is believe that XPCT will be beneficial in preclinical asthma research for both the assessment of therapeutic response as well as the analysis of the role of the recruitment of macrophages to inflammatory sites.

  20. Aspiration of Barium Contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Fuentes Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aspiration of barium contrast is a rare complication that may occur during studies of the digestive tract. Barium is an inert material that can cause anywhere from an asymptomatic mechanical obstruction to serious symptoms of respiratory distress that can result in patient death. We present the case of a 79-year-old male patient in whom we observed the presence of contrast medium residue in the lung parenchyma as an incidental finding during hospitalization. When the patient’s medical file was reviewed, images were found of a barium swallow study that the patient had undergone months earlier, and we were able to observe the exact moment of the aspiration of the contrast material. The patient had been asymptomatic since the test.

  1. Phase Contrast Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a prescribed intensity pattern based on phase contrast imaging that is not based on the assumption of prior art methods that the pahase shift phi is less than 1 radian. An improved method based on a simple imaging operation with a si......The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a prescribed intensity pattern based on phase contrast imaging that is not based on the assumption of prior art methods that the pahase shift phi is less than 1 radian. An improved method based on a simple imaging operation...

  2. Caffeine differentially alters cortical hemodynamic activity during working memory: a near infrared spectroscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Heilbronner, Urs; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Zaehle, Tino

    2015-01-01

    Background Caffeine is a widely used stimulant with potentially beneficial effects on cognition as well as vasoconstrictive properties. In functional magnetic imaging research, caffeine has gained attention as a potential enhancer of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response. In order to clarify changes of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin (HbO and HbR) induced by caffeine during a cognitive task, we investigated a working memory (WM) paradigm (visual 2-back) using near-infrared spectrosco...

  3. The time-course of cortico-limbic neural responses to air hunger

    OpenAIRE

    Binks, Andrew P.; Evans, Karleyton C.; Reed, Jeffrey D.; Moosavi, Shakeeb H.; Banzett, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have mapped brain regions associated with acute dyspnea perception. However, the time-course of brain activity during sustained dyspnea is unknown. Our objective was to determine the time-course of neural activity when dyspnea is sustained. Eight healthy subjects underwent brain blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic imaging (BOLD-fMRI) during mechanical ventilation with constant mild hypercapnia (~45 mmHg). Subjects rated dyspnea (air hunger) via visual analog scale...

  4. Human brain activity associated with painful mechanical stimulation to muscle and bone

    OpenAIRE

    Maeda, Lynn; Ono, Mayu; Koyama, Tetsuo; Oshiro, Yoshitetsu; Sumitani, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi; Shibata, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to elucidate the central processing of painful mechanical stimulation to muscle and bone by measuring blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Methods Twelve healthy volunteers were enrolled. Mechanical pressure on muscle and bone were applied at the right lower leg by an algometer. Intensities were adjusted to cause weak and strong pain sensation at either target site in preliminary testing. Brain ac...

  5. Breakdown of long-range temporal dependence in default mode and attention networks during deep sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliazucchi, Enzo; von Wegner, Frederic; Morzelewski, Astrid; Brodbeck, Verena; Jahnke, Kolja; Laufs, Helmut

    2013-09-17

    The integration of segregated brain functional modules is a prerequisite for conscious awareness during wakeful rest. Here, we test the hypothesis that temporal integration, measured as long-term memory in the history of neural activity, is another important quality underlying conscious awareness. For this aim, we study the temporal memory of blood oxygen level-dependent signals across the human nonrapid eye movement sleep cycle. Results reveal that this property gradually decreases from wakefulness to deep nonrapid eye movement sleep and that such decreases affect areas identified with default mode and attention networks. Although blood oxygen level-dependent spontaneous fluctuations exhibit nontrivial spatial organization, even during deep sleep, they also display a decreased temporal complexity in specific brain regions. Conversely, this result suggests that long-range temporal dependence might be an attribute of the spontaneous conscious mentation performed during wakeful rest.

  6. The 64-MSCT study of relationship between renal corticomedullary differentiation, contrast between renal cortex and medulla, renal cortex and medulla CT peak value with the single renal function in hydronephrotic kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yunhua; Hou Weiwei; Liu Ruihong; He Jianjun; Zhi Ke

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study 64-MSCT perfusion imaging features about renal corticomedullary differentiation, contrast between renal cortex and medulla (CMC), renal cortex and medulla CT peak value in normal and hydronephrotic kidneys, and to explore the relationship between them and the unilateral renal function. Methods: Thirty-six patients with obstructive nephrohydrosis underwent 64-MSCT perfusion scanning. The split renal glomerular filtration rates (GFR) of their kidneys were measured by SPECT renal dynamic imaging. The 72 kidneys were divided into groups of normal renal function group, mild and severe renal impairment groups according to GFR. Renal corticomedullary differentiation on CT images was graded as clear, obscure, part clear. The CT intensity of cortex and medulla was measured in order to calculate contrast between renal cortex and medulla (CMC). Using Pearson correlation test, the correlation between them and renal GFR were examined. Results: (1) In the 24 kidneys of normal group, all kidneys showed clear CMD. In the 21 kidneys of mild renal impairment group, 14 kidneys showed clear CMD, 2 showed obscure CMD and 5 showed part clear of CMD. In the 27 kidneys of severe renal impairment group, 7 kidneys showed clear CMD, 5 showed obscure CMD and 15 showed part clear of CMD. (2)The CMC of normal group was 0.62 ± 0.20, while it was 0.52 ± 0.14 and 0.37 ± 0.11 for mild renal impairment group and severe renal impairment group CMC respectively. The CMC had positive linear correlation with GFR (r=0.536,P<0.05). (3) The renal cortex and medulla CT peak value of normal group were (133 ± 22) and (104 ± 16) HU; The renal cortex and medulla CT peak value of mild renal impairment group were (91 ± 29) and (76 ± 25) HU; The renal cortex and medulla CT peak value of severe renal impairment group were (68 ± 24) and (57 ± 21) HU(F=42.76 and 32.68,P<0.05). The renal cortex and medulla CT peak value had positive linear correlation with GFR (r=0.672 and 0.623, P<0

  7. Iodinated contrast media nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyrier, A.

    1994-01-01

    In the late seventies, iodinated contrast agents (ICA) were considered to be a major cause of acute iatrogenic renal failure. Over the last decade new contrast agents have been synthesized, nonionic and less hyperosmolar. The incidence of acute renal failure due to ICAs, varies from 3.7 to 70% of cases according to the series, with an average figure of 10.2%. The pathophysiology of ICA nephrotoxicity was mainly studied in laboratory animal models. Three main factors are involved in an inducing ICA-mediated decrease in glomerular filtration rate: reduction of the renal plasma flow, a direct cytotoxic effect on renal tubular cells and erythrocyte alteration leading to intra-renal sludge. Excluding dysglobulinemias with urinary excretion of immunoglobulin light chains, which represent a special case of maximum nephrotoxicity, 4 main risk factors of renal toxicity have been identified in nondiabetic subjects: previous renal failure with serum creatinine levels greater than 140 μmol per liter, extracellular dehydration, age over 60 and use of high doses of ICA and/or repeated ICA injections before serum creatinine levels return to baseline. Preventive measures for avoiding ICA nephrotoxicity are threefold: maintain or restore adequate hydration with saline infusion, stop NSAID treatment several days before ICA administration, and allow a 5 day interval before repeating contrast media injections. New, nonionic and moderately hyperosmolar contrast agents appear to be much less nephrotoxic than conventional ICAs in laboratory animals and in high-risk patients. It is advisable to select such contrast media for investigating high-risk patients. This approach was recently substantiated in well designed, randomized clinical studies which included more than 2 000 patients. (author)

  8. A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study to Investigate the Utility of a Picture Imagination Task in Investigating Neural Responses in Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain to Daily Physical Activity Photographs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M Taylor

    Full Text Available Pain-related anxiety and fear are associated with increased difficulties in attention, increased awareness of pain, impaired disengagement from pain, and can moderate the effects of attentional coping attempts. Accurately assessing the direct impact of pain-related anxiety and fear on pain behavior has proved difficult. Studies have demonstrated no or limited influence of pain-related fear and anxiety on behavior but this may be due to inherent problems with the scales used. Neuroimaging has improved the understanding of neural processes underlying the factors that influence pain perception. This study aimed to establish if a Picture and Imagination Task (PIT, largely developed from the Photographs of Daily Activity (PHODA assessment tool, could help explore how people living with chronic pain process information about daily activities. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used to compare brain responses in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMSKP (n = 15 and healthy controls (n = 15. Subjects were asked to imagine how they would feel mentally and physically if asked to perform daily activities illustrated in PIT. The results found that a number of regions involved in pain processing saw increased BOLD activation in patients compared with controls when undertaking the task and included the insula, anterior cingulate cortex, thalamus and inferior and superior parietal cortices. Similarly, increased BOLD responses in patients compared to controls in the frontal pole, paracingulate and the supplementary motor cortex may be suggestive of a memory component to the responses The amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, substantia nigra/ventral tegmentum, putamen, thalamus, pallidum, inferior parietal (supramarginal and angular gyrus and cingulate cortex were also seen to have greater differences in BOLD signal changes in patients compared with controls and many of these regions are also associated

  9. Mamografia com contraste

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista, Rita; Silva, Carina; Reis, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    O estudo pretendeu apresentar as indicações clínicas, vantagens e princípios da mamografia com contraste, identificar as evoluyções tecnológicas para a mamografia com contraste e caracterizar as práticas e os desafios dos técnicos de radiologia do Hospital de Santarém (único no país a utilizar esta técnica). O cancro da mama é uma das principais causas de morte nas mulheres, em todo o mundo, mas principalmente nos Estados Unidos da América, Canadá, Europa Ocidental e Austrália. Em Portugal, e...

  10. Current iodinated contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacul, F.

    2001-01-01

    The number of scientific papers on iodinated contrast media is declining. Indeed, comparative trials between high-osmolality and low-osmolality agents largely showed the higher safety and tolerability of the latter, and this is no longer a matter of discussion. Only financial constraints could prevent a total conversion to low-osmolality agents. Research comparing low-osmolality (nonionic monomers, ionic dimer) and iso-osmolality contrast media (nonionic dimers) are still ongoing. Both classes of nonionic compounds proved safer than the ionic dimer. The relative merits of nonionic monomers and nonionic dimers are a matter for debate, and criteria for a selective use of different agents for different procedures could be discussed. (orig.)

  11. Quantifying dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis using an arterial input function (AIF) extracted from popliteal artery enhancement, and the effect of the choice of the AIF on the kinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workie, Dagnachew W; Dardzinski, Bernard J

    2005-09-01

    Quantification of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI based on pharmacokinetic modeling requires specification of the arterial input function (AIF). A full representation of the plasma concentration data, including the initial rise and decay parts, considering the delay and dispersion of the bolus contrast is important. This work deals with modeling of DCE-MRI data from the knees of children with a history of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) by using an AIF extracted from the signal enhancement data from the nearby popliteal artery. Three models for the AIFs were considered: a triexponential (AIF1), a gamma-variate plus a biexponential (AIF2), and a biexponential (AIF3). The pharmacokinetic parameters obtained from the model were Ktrans', kep, and V'p. The results from AIF1 and AIF2 showed no statistically significant difference. However, some statistically significant differences were seen with AIF3, particularly for parameters Ktrans' and V'p in the synovium (SNVM). These results suggest the importance of obtaining an appropriate AIF representation in pharmacokinetic modeling of JRA. Specifically, the initial rising part of the AIF should be incorporated for optimal pharmacokinetic modeling results. The pharmacokinetic parameters (mean+/-SD) derived from AIF1, using the average plasma concentration data, were as follows: SNVM Ktrans'(min-1)=0.52+/-0.34, kep(min-1)=0.71+/-0.39, and V'p=0.33+/-0.16, and for the distal femoral physis (DFP) Ktrans'(min-1)=1.83+/-1.78, kep(min-1)=2.65+/-1.80, and V'p=0.46+/-0.31. The pharmacokinetic parameters in the SNVM may be useful for investigating activity and therapeutic efficacy in studies of JRA. Longitudinal studies are necessary to find or demonstrate the parameter that is more sensitive to disease activity. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, A.; Reischig, P.; Adrien, J.; Peetermans, S.; Ludwig, W.

    2014-01-01

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented

  13. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm 2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  14. Determination of contrast media administration to achieve a targeted contrast enhancement in CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Li, Yuan; Segars, Paul; Marin, Daniele; Nelson, Rendon; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-03-01

    Contrast enhancement is a key component of CT imaging and offer opportunities for optimization. The design and optimization of new techniques however requires orchestration with the scan parameters and further a methodology to relate contrast enhancement and injection function. In this study, we used such a methodology to develop a method, analytical inverse method, to predict the required injection function to achieve a desired contrast enhancement in a given organ by incorporation of a physiologically based compartmental model. The method was evaluated across 32 different target contrast enhancement functions for aorta, kidney, stomach, small intestine, and liver. The results exhibited that the analytical inverse method offers accurate performance with error in the range of 10% deviation between the predicted and desired organ enhancement curves. However, this method is incapable of predicting the injection function based on the liver enhancement. The findings of this study can be useful in optimizing contrast medium injection function as well as the scan timing to provide more consistency in the way that the contrast enhanced CT examinations are performed. To our knowledge, this work is one of the first attempts to predict the contrast material injection function for a desired organ enhancement curve.

  15. BODIPY derivatives as molecular photoacoustic contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoui, Samir; Bag, Seema; Dantiste, Olivier; Frenette, Mathieu; Hatamimoslehabadi, Maryam; Bellinger-Buckley, Stephanie; Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Rochford, Jonathan; Yelleswarapu, Chandra

    2014