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Sample records for blood-feeding induces reversible

  1. Blood feeding by the Rocky Mountain spotted fever vector, Dermacentor andersoni, induces interleukin-4 expression by cognate antigen responding CD4+ T cells

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    Wikel Stephen K

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tick modulation of host defenses facilitates both blood feeding and pathogen transmission. Several tick species deviate host T cell responses toward a Th2 cytokine profile. The majority of studies of modulation of T cell cytokine expression by ticks were performed with lymphocytes from infested mice stimulated in vitro with polyclonal T cell activators. Those reports did not examine tick modulation of antigen specific responses. We report use of a transgenic T cell receptor (TCR adoptive transfer model reactive with influenza hemagglutinin peptide (110-120 to examine CD4+ T cell intracellular cytokine responses during infestation with the metastriate tick, Dermacentor andersoni, or exposure to salivary gland extracts. Results Infestation with pathogen-free D. andersoni nymphs or administration of an intradermal injection of female or male tick salivary gland extract induced significant increases of IL-4 transcripts in skin and draining lymph nodes of BALB/c mice as measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, IL-10 transcripts were significantly increased in skin while IL-2 and IFN-γ transcripts were not significantly changed by tick feeding or intradermal injection of salivary gland proteins, suggesting a superimposed Th2 response. Infestation induced TCR transgenic CD4+ T cells to divide more frequently as measured by CFSE dilution, but more notably these CD4+ T cells also gained the capacity to express IL-4. Intracellular levels of IL-4 were significantly increased. A second infestation administered 14 days after a primary exposure to ticks resulted in partially reduced CFSE dilution with no change in IL-4 expression when compared to one exposure to ticks. Intradermal inoculation of salivary gland extracts from both male and female ticks also induced IL-4 expression. Conclusion This is the first report of the influence of a metastriate tick on the cytokine profile of antigen specific CD4+ T cells. Blood feeding

  2. Risperidone-induced reversible neutropenia.

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    Kattalai Kailasam, Vasanth; Chima, Victoria; Nnamdi, Uchechukwu; Sharma, Kavita; Shah, Kairav

    2017-01-01

    This case report presents a 44-year-old man with a history of schizophrenia who developed neutropenia on risperidone therapy. The patient's laboratory reports showed a gradual decline of leukocytes and neutrophils after resolution and rechallenging. This was reversed with the discontinuation of risperidone and by switching to olanzapine. In this case report, we also discuss the updated evidence base for management of risperidone-induced neutropenia.

  3. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Induced by Pazopanib

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    Chelis Leonidas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is a clinical/radiological syndrome characterized by headache, seizures, impaired vision, acute hypertension, and typical magnetic resonance imaging findings. There are several reports in the literature that depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The list of common anticancer and supportive care drugs that predispose to reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is expanding and includes not only a large number of chemotherapeutic agents but also an increased number of new targeted drugs, particularly angiogenesis inhibitors such as bevacizumab,sorefenib and sunitinib. Pazopanib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and c-Kit which after a positive phase III randomized clinical trial in patients with advanced renal cell cancer received FDA approval for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Until now no cases of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome induced by pazopanib have been reported. Case report We present the case of a 40 years old female patient with heavily pre-treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma who received pazopanib as salvage treatment. After 21 days of pazopanib therapy the patient referred to the emergency department with epileptic seizure, impaired vision at both eyes and headache. MRI of the brain revealed subcortical oedema at the occipital and parietal lobes bilaterally. She was treated with anticonvulsants, i.v. administration of mannitol and antihypertensives and she recovered completely from her symptoms and was discharged on the tenth hospital day. A brain MRI performed 3 weeks after showed that the subcortical oedema had been subsided. Conclusion In conclusion this is the first case of pazopanib induced reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Although usually reversible, this syndrome is a serious and

  4. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Induced by Pazopanib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelis, Leonidas; Kakolyris, Stylianos; Souftas, Vasilios; Amarantidis, Kiriakos; Xenidis, Nikolaos; Chamalidou, Eleni; Dimopoulos, Prokopios; Michailidis, Prodromos; Christakidis, Evagelos; Prassopoulos, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    The reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is a clinical/radiological syndrome characterized by headache, seizures, impaired vision, acute hypertension, and typical magnetic resonance imaging findings. There are several reports in the literature that depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The list of common anticancer and supportive care drugs that predispose to reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is expanding and includes not only a large number of chemotherapeutic agents but also an increased number of new targeted drugs, particularly angiogenesis inhibitors such as bevacizumab,sorefenib and sunitinib. Pazopanib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and c-Kit which after a positive phase III randomized clinical trial in patients with advanced renal cell cancer received FDA approval for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Until now no cases of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome induced by pazopanib have been reported. We present the case of a 40 years old female patient with heavily pre-treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma who received pazopanib as salvage treatment. After 21 days of pazopanib therapy the patient referred to the emergency department with epileptic seizure, impaired vision at both eyes and headache. MRI of the brain revealed subcortical oedema at the occipital and parietal lobes bilaterally. She was treated with anticonvulsants, i.v. administration of mannitol and antihypertensives and she recovered completely from her symptoms and was discharged on the tenth hospital day. A brain MRI performed 3 weeks after showed that the subcortical oedema had been subsided. In conclusion this is the first case of pazopanib induced reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Although usually reversible, this syndrome is a serious and potentially life threatening adverse effect, if untreated, that should

  5. The role of cystatins in tick physiology and blood feeding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Valdés, James J.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2012), s. 117-127 ISSN 1877-959X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP502/12/2409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Cystatin * Cysteine proteases * Tick * Immunomodulators * Blood feeding * Midgut * Physiology Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.353, year: 2012

  6. Resveratrol reverses morphine-induced neuroinflammation in morphine-tolerant rats by reversal HDAC1 expression

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    Ru-Yin Tsai

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Resveratrol restores the antinociceptive effect of morphine by reversing morphine infusion-induced spinal cord neuroinflammation and increase in TNFR1 expression. The reversal of the morphine-induced increase in TNFR1 expression by resveratrol is partially due to reversal of the morphine infusion-induced increase in HDAC1 expression. Resveratrol pretreatment can be used as an adjuvant in clinical pain management for patients who need long-term morphine treatment or with neuropathic pain.

  7. N-Acetylcysteine Reverses Cocaine Induced Metaplasticity

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    Moussawi, Khaled; Pacchioni, Alejandra; Moran, Megan; Olive, M. Foster; Gass, Justin T.; Lavin, Antonieta; Kalivas, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by an impaired ability to develop adaptive behaviors that can compete with cocaine seeking, implying a deficit in the ability to induce plasticity in cortico-accumbens circuitry critical for regulating motivated behavior. RWe found that rats withdrawn from cocaine self-administration had a marked in vivo deficit in the ability to develop long-term potentation (LTP) and depression (LTD) in the nucleus accumbens core subregion following stimulation of prefrontal cortex. N-acetylcysteine treatment prevents relapse in animal models and craving in humans by activating cystine-glutamate exchange and thereby stimulating extrasynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR). N-acetylcysteine treatment restored the ability to induce LTP and LTD by indirectly stimulating mGluR2/3 and mGluR5, respectively. Cocaine self-administration induces metaplasticity that inhibits the further induction of synaptic plasticity, and this impairment can be reversed by N-acetylcysteine, a drug that also prevents relapse. PMID:19136971

  8. Multiple blood feeding and host-seeking behavior in Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae).

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    Farjana, Thahsin; Tuno, Nobuko

    2013-07-01

    The body size of mosquitoes can influence a number of bionomic factors, such as their blood-feeding ability, host attack rate, and fecundity. All of these traits are important determinants of their potential to transmit diseases. Among abiotic and biotic factors, high temperature and low nutrition in the developing stages of mosquitoes generally result in small adults. We studied the relationship between body size and multiple feeding in a gonotrophic cycle and some fecundity attributes by using three strains of two competent vector species, Aedes aegypti (L.) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse). We raised small and large mosquitoes under low and high food conditions in the laboratory to measure parameters of fecundity and blood-feeding behavior. Fecundity was positively correlated with body size in both species, whereas the number of bloodmeals, the frequency of host-seeking behavior, and egg retention were negatively correlated with body size in the Ae. albopictus Nagasaki strain. We found that multiple feeding and host-seeking behavior were negatively correlated with body size, i.e., small mosquitoes tended to have more contact with hosts. We found that two mechanisms that inhibit engorged mosquitoes from seeking out hosts, distension-induced and oocyte-induced inhibition, were not strong enough to limit host-seeking behavior, and multiple feeding increased fecundity. Size-dependent multiple feeding and host-seeking behavior affect contact frequency with hosts and should be considered when predicting how changes in mosquito body size affect disease transmission.

  9. Evolution of the salivary apyrases of blood-feeding arthropods.

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    Hughes, Austin L

    2013-09-15

    Phylogenetic analyses of three families of arthropod apyrases were used to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships of salivary-expressed apyrases, which have an anti-coagulant function in blood-feeding arthropods. Members of the 5'nucleotidase family were recruited for salivary expression in blood-feeding species at least five separate times in the history of arthropods, while members of the Cimex-type apyrase family have been recruited at least twice. In spite of these independent events of recruitment for salivary function, neither of these families showed evidence of convergent amino acid sequence evolution in salivary-expressed members. On the contrary, in the 5'-nucleotide family, salivary-expressed proteins conserved ancestral amino acid residues to a significantly greater extent than related proteins without salivary function, implying parallel evolution by conservation of ancestral characters. This unusual pattern of sequence evolution suggests the hypothesis that purifying selection favoring conservation of ancestral residues is particularly strong in salivary-expressed members of the 5'-nucleotidase family of arthropods because of constraints arising from expression within the vertebrate host. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Blood-feeding ecology of mosquitoes in zoos.

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    Tuten, H C; Bridges, W C; Paul, K S; Adler, P H

    2012-12-01

    To determine if the unique host assemblages in zoos influence blood-feeding by mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae), a sampling programme was conducted in Greenville and Riverbanks Zoos, South Carolina, U.S.A., from April 2009 to October 2010. A total of 4355 female mosquitoes of 14 species were collected, of which 106 individuals of nine species were blood-fed. The most common taxa were Aedes albopictus (Skuse), Aedes triseriatus (Say), Anopheles punctipennis (Say), Culex erraticus (Dyar & Knab), Culex pipiens complex (L.) and Culex restuans (Theobald). Molecular analyses (cytochrome b) of bloodmeals revealed that mosquitoes fed on captive animals, humans and wildlife, and took mixed bloodmeals. Host species included one amphibian, 16 birds, 10 mammals (including humans) and two reptiles. Minimum dispersal distances after feeding on captive hosts ranged from 15.5 m to 327.0 m. Mosquito-host associations generally conformed to previous accounts, indicating that mosquito behaviour inside zoos reflects that outside zoos. However, novel variation in host use, including new, exotic host records, warrants further investigation. Zoos, thus, can be used as experiment environments in which to study mosquito behaviour, and the findings extrapolated to non-zoo areas, while providing medical and veterinary benefits to zoo animals, employees and patrons. © 2012 The Authors. Medical and Veterinary Entomology © 2012 The Royal Entomological Society.

  11. Adult mortality and blood feeding behavioral effects of α-amyrin acetate, a novel bioactive compound on in vivo exposed females of Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenniappan, Kuppusamy; Kadarkari, Murugan

    2012-06-01

    The effect of α-amyrin acetate on mortality and blood feeding behavior in females of Anopheles stephensi was assessed by in vivo exposure on treated guinea pig skin. In vivo exposure to α-amyrin acetate caused mosquito knock down in the form of rapidly and normally reversible paralysis and the subsequent record at the end of a 24 h, revealed mortality rates of females increased from 0.0% (Control) to 76.9% at 1.6% α-amyrin acetate, the highest concentration which implies the contact toxicity of the α-amyrin acetate received through the sensitive parts of test species. The mean probing time responses significantly increased (P blood feeding rates and the mean engorgement times were significantly shorter when compared to the control. The mean blood feeding rates of exposed females decreased from 91.7% (control) to 41.5% at 0.8% α-amyrin acetate concentrations, the mean engorgement time also decreased from 278.6 s (Control) to 158.7 s at 0.8% α-amyrin acetate concentrations. Mean blood feeding rates and mean engorgement time were statistically significant (P blood meal size have played a more important role in decline of fecundity. In vivo exposure to α-amyrin acetate caused increased mean probing time, decreased blood engorgement time and feeding rate and declined fecundity which reduce the overall survival and reproductive capacity of the malaria vector A. stephensi.

  12. N-Acetylcysteine Reverses Cocaine Induced Metaplasticity

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    Moussawi, Khaled; Pacchioni, Alejandra; Moran, Megan; Olive, M. Foster; Gass, Justin T.; Lavin, Antonieta; Kalivas, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by an impaired ability to develop adaptive behaviors that can compete with cocaine seeking, implying a deficit in the ability to induce plasticity in cortico-accumbens circuitry critical for regulating motivated behavior. RWe found that rats withdrawn from cocaine self-administration had a marked in vivo deficit in the ability to develop long-term potentation (LTP) and depression (LTD) in the nucleus accumbens core subregion following stimulation of prefront...

  13. Effect of photoperiod on blood feeding activity of female hybrids between Culex pipiens pipiens and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Kurokawa, Kenji; Yoshii, Manabu; Oda, Tsutomu; Kato, Katsutomo; Uchida, Keikichi; Eshita, Yuki; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Mine, Mariko; Ogawa, Yasunori

    2004-01-01

    Blood feeding activity was examined in females of hybrids (F1) between Culex pipiens pipiens and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus in long and short photoperiods at 2l℃ to examine the effect of photoperiod on blood feeding rate. Blood feeding rates (F1) were lower in short photoperiods than in long photoperiods. From this, it seems that the hybrids show diapause.

  14. Pridopidine Reverses Phencyclidine-Induced Memory Impairment.

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    Sahlholm, Kristoffer; Valle-León, Marta; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Ciruela, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    Pridopidine is in clinical trials for Huntington's disease treatment. Originally developed as a dopamine D 2 receptor (D 2 R) ligand, pridopidine displays about 100-fold higher affinity for the sigma-1 receptor (sigma-1R). Interestingly, pridopidine slows disease progression and improves motor function in Huntington's disease model mice and, in preliminarily reports, Huntington's disease patients. The present study examined the anti-amnesic potential of pridopidine. Thus, memory impairment was produced in mice by administration of phencyclidine (PCP, 10 mg/kg/day) for 10 days, followed by 14 days' treatment with pridopidine (6 mg/kg/day), or saline. Finally, novel object recognition performance was assessed in the animals. Mice receiving PCP and saline exhibited deficits in novel object recognition, as expected, while pridopidine treatment counteracted PCP-induced memory impairment. The effect of pridopidine was attenuated by co-administration of the sigma receptor antagonist, NE-100 (10 mg/kg). Our results suggest that pridopidine exerts anti-amnesic and potentially neuroprotective actions. These data provide new insights into the therapeutic potential of pridopidine as a pro-cognitive drug.

  15. Idarucizumab for Reversing Dabigatran-Induced Anticoagulation: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Nathan; Morrill, Amanda M; Willett, Kristine C

    The approval of the oral direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate, gave patients an alternative to oral anticoagulation with warfarin. Like all anticoagulants, the primary adverse event (AE) associated with dabigatran is bleeding. Until the FDA approval of idarucizumab, there had been no reversal agent for dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in patients with life-threatening or uncontrollable bleeding, or those requiring emergent procedures. The primary purpose of this review is to summarize the safety and efficacy of idarucizumab, a monoclonal antibody fragment, and its use as a reversal agent for dabigatran. A literature search was conducted through MEDLINE (1946 to November week 1 2015) and Embase (1980-2015 week 46) using the search term idarucizumab. Clinicaltrials.gov was consulted for a comprehensive list of ongoing and completed studies. Additional studies were identified through bibliographical citations. Clinical trials in animals and humans published in English evaluating the safety and efficacy of idarucizumab for reversal of anticoagulant treatment with dabigatran were included for review. Idarucizumab has been shown to significantly reverse the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran in both healthy volunteers and patients requiring a reversal agent because of either overt bleeding or an emergency surgery or invasive procedure. The most common AEs were headache, nasopharyngitis, back pain, skin irritation, hypokalemia, delirium, constipation, pyrexia, and pneumonia. Deaths reported in idarucizumab studies were attributed to either the index event or a preexisting comorbidity. Most adverse effects were minor, but 21 serious AEs have been reported in the published data including thrombotic events. Given the increased use of direct oral anticoagulants, such as dabigatran, a need for specific reversal agents exists. Idarucizumab has been shown to be safe and effective in the reversal of dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in patients requiring emergent

  16. Light-induced reversible expansion of individual gold nanoplates

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    Jinsheng Lu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Light-induced mechanical response of materials has been extensively investigated and widely utilized to convert light energy into mechanical energy directly. The metallic nanomaterials have excellent photothermal properties and show enormous potential in micromechanical actuators, etc. However, the photo-thermo-mechanical properties of individual metallic nanostructures have yet to be well investigated. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a way to realize light-induced reversible expansion of individual gold nanoplates on optical microfibers. The light-induced thermal expansion coefficient is obtained as 21.4 ± 4.6 ∼ 31.5 ± 4.2 μ·K-1 when the light-induced heating temperature of the gold nanoplates is 240 ∼ 490 °C. The photo-thermo-mechanical response time of the gold nanoplates is about 0.3 ± 0.1 s. This insight into the photo-thermo-mechanical properties of the gold nanoplates could deepen the understanding of the light-induced reversible expansion behavior in nanoscale and pave the way for applications based on this piezoelectric-like response, such as light-driven metallic micromotors.

  17. Quaternary naltrexone reverses radiogenic and morphine-induced locomotor hyperactivity

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    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; Galbraith, J.A.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    The present study attempted to determine the relative role of the peripheral and central nervous system in the production of morphine-induced or radiation-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the mouse. Toward this end, we used a quaternary derivative of an opiate antagonist (naltrexone methobromide), which presumably does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Quaternary naltrexone was used to challenge the stereotypic locomotor response observed in these mice after either an i.p. injection of morphine or exposure to 1500 rads /sup 60/Co. The quaternary derivative of naltrexone reversed the locomotor hyperactivity normally observed in the C57BL/6J mouse after an injection of morphine. It also significantly attenuated radiation-induced locomotion. The data reported here support the hypothesis of endorphin involvement in radiation-induced and radiogenic behaviors. However, these conclusions are contingent upon further research which more fully evaluates naltrexone methobromide's capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  18. Reversal of aflatoxin induced liver damage by turmeric and curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, K B; Rajan, A; Kuttan, R

    1992-09-30

    The effect of certain food additives on aflatoxin production by Aspergillus parasiticus has been studied in vitro. Extracts of turmeric (Curcuma longa), garlic (Allium sativum) and asafoetida (Ferula asafoetida) inhibited the aflatoxin production considerably (more than 90%) at concentrations of 5-10 mg/ml. Similar results were also seen using butylated hydroxytoluene, butylated hydroxyanisole and ellagic acid at concentration 0.1 mM. Curcumin, the antioxidant principle from Curcuma longa did not have any effect on aflatoxin production. Turmeric and curcumin were also found to reverse the aflatoxin induced liver damage produced by feeding aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) (5 micrograms/day per 14 days) to ducklings. Fatty changes, necrosis and biliary hyperplasia produced by AFB1 were considerably reversed by these food additives.

  19. The effect of multiple blood-feeding on the longevity and insecticide resistant phenotype in the major malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Shüné V; Brooke, Basil D

    2014-08-23

    Anopheles arabiensis is a major malaria vector in Africa. Adult females are likely to imbibe multiple blood meals during their lifetime. This results in regular exposure to potential toxins and blood-meal induced oxidative stress. Defence responses to these stressors may affect other factors of epidemiological significance, such as insecticide resistance and longevity. The aims of this study were to examine the effect of multiple blood-feeding on insecticide tolerance/resistance with increasing age, to assess the underlying biochemical mechanisms for the responses recorded, and to assess the effect of multiple blood-feeding on the life histories of adult females drawn from insecticide resistant and susceptible laboratory reared An. arabiensis. Laboratory reared An. arabiensis females from an insecticide resistant and an insecticide susceptible colony were offered either a single blood meal or multiple blood meals at 3-day intervals. Their tolerance or resistance to insecticide was then monitored by WHO bioassay four hours post blood-feeding. The biochemical basis of the phenotypic response was assessed by examining the effect of blood on detoxification enzyme activity and the effect of blood-meals on detoxification enzyme activity in ageing mosquitoes. Control cohorts that were not offered any blood meals showed steadily decreasing levels of insecticide tolerance/resistance with age, whereas a single blood meal significantly increased tolerance/resistance primarily at the age of three days. The expression of resistance/tolerance in those cohorts fed multiple blood meals generally showed the least variation with age. These results were consistent following exposure to DDT and pyrethroids but not to malathion. Multiple blood-meals also maintained the DDT and permethrin resistant phenotype, even after treatment females had stopped taking blood-meals. Biochemical analysis suggests that this phenotypic effect in resistant females may be mediated by the maintenance of

  20. Treatment with pioglitazone induced significant, reversible mitral regurgitation.

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    Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Dencker, Magnus; Frid, Anders

    2008-04-30

    There has in recent years been great concern about possible cardiac side effects of thiazolidinediones (TZDs). We present a case-report of a 60 year-old male who developed significant mitral regurgitation during six months treatment with pioglitazone in parallel with laboratory indications of fluid retention. Echocardiography six months after discontinuation of medication showed regression of mitral regurgitation and the laboratory parameters were also normalized. It is noteworthy that six months treatment with pioglitazone could induce significant valve dysfunction, which was reversible, and this underlines the importance of carefully monitoring patients when placing them on treatment with TZDs.

  1. Treatment with pioglitazone induced significant, reversible mitral regurgitation

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    Frid Anders

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There has in recent years been great concern about possible cardiac side effects of thiazolidinediones (TZDs. We present a case-report of a 60 year-old male who developed significant mitral regurgitation during six months treatment with pioglitazone in parallel with laboratory indications of fluid retention. Echocardiography six months after discontinuation of medication showed regression of mitral regurgitation and the laboratory parameters were also normalized. It is noteworthy that six months treatment with pioglitazone could induce significant valve dysfunction, which was reversible, and this underlines the importance of carefully monitoring patients when placing them on treatment with TZDs.

  2. Reversible catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy due to pheochromocytoma: case report.

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    Satendra, Milan; de Jesus, Cláudia; Bordalo e Sá, Armando L; Rosário, Luís; Rocha, José; Bicha Castelo, Henrique; Correia, Maria José; Nunes Diogo, António

    2014-03-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor originating from chromaffin tissue. It commonly presents with symptoms and signs of catecholamine excess, such as hypertension, tachycardia, headache and sweating. Cardiovascular manifestations include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, which may present as severe left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure. We report a case of pheochromocytoma which was diagnosed following investigation of dilated cardiomyopathy. We highlight the dramatic symptomatic improvement and reversal of cardiomyopathy, with recovery of left ventricular function after treatment. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteolytic system of blood-feeding ticks: An update on protein structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Zuzana; Hobizalová, Radka; Žebrakovská, Iva; Brynda, Jiří; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Horn, Martin; Mareš, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 43-44 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology. Annual Meeting of the Czech Society for Structural Biology /13./. 19.03.2015-21.03.2015, Nové Hrady] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : blood-feeding ticks * protein structure * proteolytic system Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  4. Colonization of Lutzomyia shannoni (Diptera: Psychodidae) utilizing an artificial blood feeding technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Rajinder S; Kaufman, Phillip E

    2010-12-01

    Laboratory colonization of hematophagous insects must include an efficient method of blood feeding, preferably by artificial means. Strict rules for obtaining animal use permits, extensive animal maintenance costs, and indirect anesthesia effects on animal health warrant the development of an artificial membrane feeding technique for sand fly colonization in laboratories. An attempt was made to colonize Lutzomyia shannoni using an artificial blood feeding membrane to replace the use of live animals commonly used for sand fly blood-feeding purposes. Lutzomyia shannoni readily fed through a pig intestine membrane exposed at an angle of 45°. However, it did not feed through a chicken skin membrane. Olfactory attractants were unable to improve blood-feeding efficiency. Plaster of Paris was the most suitable oviposition substrate. Female L. shannoni adults laid no eggs on moist sand substrate. Sand fly adults held in groups of ten or more laid higher numbers of eggs than did individually maintained sand flies. Inclusion of the L. longipalpis oviposition hormone dodecanoic acid or the presence of previously laid eggs did not stimulate L. shannoni oviposition. The average L. shannoni egg, larval, and pupal duration were 9.3, 36.7, and 17.8 days, respectively. The addition of a 20% sugar solution improved adult female longevity. Females survived longer (14.8 days) than males (11.9 days). Lutzomyia shannoni was successfully colonized in the laboratory for up to four generations using this artificial membrane technique. © 2010 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  5. Human Blood Feeding Activity of Female Hybrids between Culex pipiens pipiens and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus(Diptera: Culicidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshii, Manabu; Mine, Mariko; Kurokawa, Kenji; Oda, Tsutomu; Kato, Katsutomo; Ogawa, Yasunori; Eshita, Yuuki; Uchida, Keikichi

    2007-01-01

    Human blood feeding activity was examined in females of hybrids between Culex pipiens pipiens and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus during long photoperiod at 25℃. Blood feeding rates of hybrids were lower than in Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus and Culex pipiens pallens, and higher than in Culex pipiens pipiens, because no females fed on human blood in Culex pipiens pipiens.

  6. Inducing sex reversal of the urogenital system of marsupials.

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    Renfree, Marilyn B; Chew, Keng Yih; Shaw, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    Marsupials differ from eutherian mammals in their reproductive strategy of delivering a highly altricial young after a short gestation. The young, with its undeveloped organ systems completes its development post-natally, usually within a pouch. The young is dependent on milk with a composition that varies through lactation to support its growth and changing needs as it matures over a lengthy period. Gonadal differentiation occurs after birth, providing a unique opportunity to examine the effects of hormonal manipulations on its sexual differentiation of the highly accessible young. In marsupials a difference in the migration of the urinary ducts around the genital ducts from eutherian mammals results in the unique tammar reproductive tract which has three vaginae and two cervices, and two distinctly separate uteri. In the tammar wallaby, a small member of the kangaroo family, we showed that virilisation of the Wolffian duct, prostate and phallus depends on an alternate androgen pathway, which has now been shown to be important for virilisation in humans. Through hormonal manipulations over differing time periods we have achieved sex reversal of both ovaries and testes, germ cells, genital ducts, prostate and phallus. Whilst we understand many of the mechanisms behind sexual differentiation there are still many lessons to be learned from understanding how sex reversal is achieved by using a model such as the tammar wallaby. This will help guide investigations into the major questions of how and why sex determination is achieved in other species. This review discusses the control and development of the marsupial urogenital system, largely drawn from our studies in the tammar wallaby and our ability to manipulate this system to induce sex reversal. Copyright © 2013 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. N-Acetylcysteine reverses cocaine-induced metaplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussawi, Khaled; Pacchioni, Alejandra; Moran, Megan; Olive, M Foster; Gass, Justin T; Lavin, Antonieta; Kalivas, Peter W

    2009-02-01

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by an impaired ability to develop adaptive behaviors that can compete with cocaine seeking, implying a deficit in the ability to induce plasticity in cortico-accumbens circuitry crucial for regulating motivated behavior. We found that rats withdrawn from cocaine self-administration had a marked in vivo deficit in the ability to develop long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in the nucleus accumbens core subregion after stimulation of the prefrontal cortex. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment prevents relapse in animal models and craving in humans by activating cystine-glutamate exchange and thereby stimulating extrasynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR). NAC treatment of rats restored the ability to induce LTP and LTD by indirectly stimulating mGluR2/3 and mGluR5, respectively. Our findings show that cocaine self-administration induces metaplasticity that inhibits further induction of synaptic plasticity, and this impairment can be reversed by NAC, a drug that also prevents relapse.

  8. Reversible metronidazole-induced neurotoxicity after 10 weeks of therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlDhaleei, Wafa; AlMarzooqi, Ayesha; Gaber, Nouran

    2018-04-20

    Metronidazole is a commonly used antimicrobial worldwide. The most common side effects that have been reported are nausea, vomiting and hypersensitivity reactions. However, neurotoxicity has been reported with the use of metronidazole but rather rare. The most common neurological manifestation is peripheral neuropathy involvement in the form of sensory loss. It is worth mentioning that central neurotoxicity is a rare side effect of metronidazole use but reversible. The manifestations vary from a headache, altered mental status to focal neurological deficits. The diagnosis is mainly by neuroimaging in the setting of acute neurological change in the patient status. Here, we report a case of metronidazole-induced neurotoxicity in a 38-year-old male patient who was admitted with a brain abscess and was started on metronidazole for more than 10 weeks. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. The immunomodulatory protein RH36 is relating to blood-feeding success and oviposition in hard ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Lu, Xiaojuan; Guo, Fengxun; Gong, Haiyan; Zhang, Houshuang; Zhou, Yongzhi; Cao, Jie; Zhou, Jinlin

    2017-06-15

    An immunomodulatory protein designated RH36 was identified in the tick Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides. The cDNA sequence of RH36 has 844bp and encodes a deduced protein with a predicted molecular weight of 24kDa. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that RH36 presented a degree of similarity of 34.36% with the immunomodulatory protein p36 from the tick Dermacentor andersoni. The recombinant RH36 (rRH36) expressed in Sf9 insect cells suppressed the T-lymphocyte mitogen-driven in vitro proliferation of splenocytes and the expression of several cytokines such as IL-2, IL-12, and TNF-α. Furthermore, the proliferation of splenocytes isolated from rRH36-inoculated mice was significantly lower than that in control mice, suggesting that rRH36 could directly suppress immune responses in vivo. In addition, microarray analysis of splenocytes indicated that the expression of several immunomodulatory genes was downregulated by rRH36. The silencing of the RH36 gene by RNAi led to a 37.5% decrease in the tick attachment rate 24h after placement into the rabbit ears, whereas vaccination with RH36 caused a 53.06% decrease in the tick engorgement rate. Unexpectedly, RNAi induced a significant decrease in the oviposition rate, ovary weight at day 12 after engorgement, and egg-hatching rate. The effects of RH36 on blood feeding and oviposition were further confirmed by vaccination tests using the recombinant protein. These results indicate that RH36 is a novel member of immunosuppressant proteins and affects tick blood feeding and oviposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sindbis virus infection alters blood feeding responses and DEET repellency in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, Whitney A; Day, Jonathan F; Xue, Rui-De; Bowers, Doria F

    2012-03-01

    Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) female mosquitoes infected systemically with Sindbis virus (SINV) took longer than uninfected mosquitoes to locate and fully engorge on blood. On days 7 and 14 postexposure, blood feeding took 1.3 and 1.5 times longer in mosquitoes with a disseminated SINV infection, respectively. SINV dissemination did not affect the average weight of unfed Ae. aegypti, but did result in a 10 and 12% increase in blood imbibed compared with mosquitoes without a positive SINV dissemination and non-SINV-exposed mosquitoes, respectively. Ae. aegypti mosquitoes with a disseminated SINV infection fed an average of 4 h sooner than uninfected mosquitoes when offered a bloodmeal contained inside a DEET (N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide) saturated (30%) bovine sausage casing. Together, these results indicate that behavioral changes in mosquito host-seeking, blood feeding and sensitivity to DEET occurred in mosquitoes after SINV infection and dissemination.

  11. Wolbachia Infection Reduces Blood-Feeding Success in the Dengue Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    OpenAIRE

    Turley, Andrew P.; Moreira, Luciano A.; O'Neill, Scott L.; McGraw, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mosquito Aedes aegypti was recently transinfected with a life-shortening strain of the endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis (wMelPop) as the first step in developing a biocontrol strategy for dengue virus transmission. In addition to life-shortening, the wMelPop-infected mosquitoes also exhibit increased daytime activity and metabolic rates. Here we sought to quantify the blood-feeding behaviour of Wolbachia-infected females as an indicator of any virulence or energetic drain asso...

  12. Wolbachia infection reduces blood-feeding success in the dengue fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Andrew P; Moreira, Luciano A; O'Neill, Scott L; McGraw, Elizabeth A

    2009-09-15

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti was recently transinfected with a life-shortening strain of the endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis (wMelPop) as the first step in developing a biocontrol strategy for dengue virus transmission. In addition to life-shortening, the wMelPop-infected mosquitoes also exhibit increased daytime activity and metabolic rates. Here we sought to quantify the blood-feeding behaviour of Wolbachia-infected females as an indicator of any virulence or energetic drain associated with Wolbachia infection. In a series of blood-feeding trials in response to humans, we have shown that Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes do not differ in their response time to humans, but that as they age they obtain fewer and smaller blood meals than Wolbachia-uninfected controls. Lastly, we observed a behavioural characteristic in the Wolbachia infected mosquitoes best described as a "bendy" proboscis that may explain the decreased biting success. Taken together the evidence suggests that wMelPop infection may be causing tissue damage in a manner that intensifies with mosquito age and that leads to reduced blood-feeding success. These behavioural changes require further investigation with respect to a possible physiological mechanism and their role in vectorial capacity of the insect. The selective decrease of feeding success in older mosquitoes may act synergistically with other Wolbachia-associated traits including life-shortening and viral protection in biocontrol strategies.

  13. Wolbachia infection reduces blood-feeding success in the dengue fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P Turley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mosquito Aedes aegypti was recently transinfected with a life-shortening strain of the endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis (wMelPop as the first step in developing a biocontrol strategy for dengue virus transmission. In addition to life-shortening, the wMelPop-infected mosquitoes also exhibit increased daytime activity and metabolic rates. Here we sought to quantify the blood-feeding behaviour of Wolbachia-infected females as an indicator of any virulence or energetic drain associated with Wolbachia infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a series of blood-feeding trials in response to humans, we have shown that Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes do not differ in their response time to humans, but that as they age they obtain fewer and smaller blood meals than Wolbachia-uninfected controls. Lastly, we observed a behavioural characteristic in the Wolbachia infected mosquitoes best described as a "bendy" proboscis that may explain the decreased biting success. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together the evidence suggests that wMelPop infection may be causing tissue damage in a manner that intensifies with mosquito age and that leads to reduced blood-feeding success. These behavioural changes require further investigation with respect to a possible physiological mechanism and their role in vectorial capacity of the insect. The selective decrease of feeding success in older mosquitoes may act synergistically with other Wolbachia-associated traits including life-shortening and viral protection in biocontrol strategies.

  14. A transient ischemic environment induces reversible compaction of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmes, Ina; Szczurek, Aleksander; Prakash, Kirti; Charapitsa, Iryna; Heiser, Christina; Musheev, Michael; Schock, Florian; Fornalczyk, Karolina; Ma, Dongyu; Birk, Udo; Cremer, Christoph; Reid, George

    2015-11-05

    Cells detect and adapt to hypoxic and nutritional stress through immediate transcriptional, translational and metabolic responses. The environmental effects of ischemia on chromatin nanostructure were investigated using single molecule localization microscopy of DNA binding dyes and of acetylated histones, by the sensitivity of chromatin to digestion with DNAseI, and by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of core and linker histones. Short-term oxygen and nutrient deprivation of the cardiomyocyte cell line HL-1 induces a previously undescribed chromatin architecture, consisting of large, chromatin-sparse voids interspersed between DNA-dense hollow helicoid structures 40-700 nm in dimension. The chromatin compaction is reversible, and upon restitution of normoxia and nutrients, chromatin transiently adopts a more open structure than in untreated cells. The compacted state of chromatin reduces transcription, while the open chromatin structure induced upon recovery provokes a transitory increase in transcription. Digestion of chromatin with DNAseI confirms that oxygen and nutrient deprivation induces compaction of chromatin. Chromatin compaction is associated with depletion of ATP and redistribution of the polyamine pool into the nucleus. FRAP demonstrates that core histones are not displaced from compacted chromatin; however, the mobility of linker histone H1 is considerably reduced, to an extent that far exceeds the difference in histone H1 mobility between heterochromatin and euchromatin. These studies exemplify the dynamic capacity of chromatin architecture to physically respond to environmental conditions, directly link cellular energy status to chromatin compaction and provide insight into the effect ischemia has on the nuclear architecture of cells.

  15. Optimization of sugar and blood feeding regimen in Anopheles gambiae mass production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedofia, B. K

    2013-07-01

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) is being developed for the control of malaria transmitting mosquitoes. Critical to the success of applying the SIT is the establishment of standardized mass production systems for the target species. As part of efforts to develop standardised mass production systems for malaria vectors, this project sought to optimize adult blood and sugar feeding in a mass production system. Different sugar types (glucose, sucrose and honey) were evaluated at 6% and 10% concentrations in water to determine the best sugar diet and concentration for feeding adult An. gambiae. Different blood feeding methods, restrained Guinea pig, anaesthetised Guinea pig and human arm feeding were evaluated. Adult survival, female insemination and egg production were used as criteria to determine optimum sugar and blood feeding. The effect of anaesthetics on blood feeding response and egg production of female An. gambiae was determined by comparing feeding response and egg production of females fed with anaesthetised Guinea pigs as against physically restrained Guinea pigs (Control). The specific effect of different anaesthetic agents on blood feeding response and egg production of female mosquitoes were was also determined by comparing the feeding response and egg production of females fed with either Ketamine/Xylazine anaesthetised Guinea pigs or Ketamine/Diazepam anaesthetised Guinea pigs. Effects due to sugar types and concentrations on percentage survival of male and female mosquitoes were observed to be significant at (p 0.05). However, human ann feeding (HAP) method and Ketamine/Xylazine (KX) anaesthetics fed for 25 minutes recorded higher percentage feeding (76.0% and 68.0% respectively) and egg production of 19.0% and 20.8% respectively. Anaesthetised Guinea pig feeding (AGF) of adults for 15 minutes followed closely with 60.0% and 15.1% blood feeding and egg production respectively whilst restrained Guinea pig feeding (RGF) method and Ketamine

  16. Reverse 201Tl myocardial redistribution induced by coronary artery spasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Dingcheng; Yin Jilin; Gong Zhihua; Xie Zhenhong; Zhang Jinhe; Wen Yanfei; Yi Shaodong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of reverse redistribution (RR) on dipyridamole 201 Tl myocardial perfusion studies in the patients with coronary artery spasm. Methods: Twenty-six patients with coronary artery spasm and presented as RR on dipyridamole 201 Tl myocardial perfusion studies were enlisted as RR group, while other 16 patients with no coronary artery stenosis nor RR were enlisted as control group. Dipyridamole test was repeated during coronary angiography. Corrected thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count (CTFC) and TIMI myocardial perfusion grade (TMPG) were measured at RR related and non-RR related coronary arteries before and after dipyridamole infusion respectively. All of the data were analyzed by Student's t-test or χ 2 -test and correlation analysis. Results: Coronary artery angiography showed slower blood flow and lower myocardial perfusion in RR related vessels when compared with non-RR related vessels in RR group, but there was no significant difference among the main coronary arteries in control group. The perfusion defects of RR area at rest were positively related to slower blood velocity at corresponding coronary arteries (r = 0.79, t =10.18, P 0.05). Conclusion: RR is related to the decreased blood flow and myocardial perfusion induced by coronary artery spasm at rest, which may be improved by stress test such as intravenous dipyridamole infusion. (authors)

  17. Reversal of rocuronium-induced profound neuromuscular block by sugammadex in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, H.D. de; Egmond, J. van; Booij, L.H.D.J.; Driessen, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    A case is reported in which a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy received a dose of sugammadex to reverse a rocuronium-induced profound neuromuscular block. Sugammadex is the first selective relaxant binding agent and reverses rocuronium- and vecuronium-induced neuromuscular block. A fast and

  18. Identification of Salivary Gland Proteins Depleted after Blood Feeding in the Malaria Vector Anopheles campestris-like Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Sor-suwan, Sriwatapron; Jariyapan, Narissara; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Paemanee, Atchara; Phumee, Atchara; Phattanawiboon, Benjarat; Intakhan, Nuchpicha; Chanmol, Wetpisit; Bates, Paul A.; Saeung, Atiporn; Choochote, Wej

    2014-01-01

    Malaria sporozoites must invade the salivary glands of mosquitoes for maturation before transmission to vertebrate hosts. The duration of the sporogonic cycle within the mosquitoes ranges from 10 to 21 days depending on the parasite species and temperature. During blood feeding salivary gland proteins are injected into the vertebrate host, along with malaria sporozoites in the case of an infected mosquito. To identify salivary gland proteins depleted after blood feeding of female Anopheles ca...

  19. Visualizing non infectious and infectious Anopheles gambiae blood feedings in naive and saliva-immunized mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Choumet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anopheles gambiae is a major vector of malaria and lymphatic filariasis. The arthropod-host interactions occurring at the skin interface are complex and dynamic. We used a global approach to describe the interaction between the mosquito (infected or uninfected and the skin of mammals during blood feeding. METHODS: Intravital video microscopy was used to characterize several features during blood feeding. The deposition and movement of Plasmodium berghei sporozoites in the dermis were also observed. We also used histological techniques to analyze the impact of infected and uninfected feedings on the skin cell response in naive mice. RESULTS: The mouthparts were highly mobile within the skin during the probing phase. Probing time increased with mosquito age, with possible effects on pathogen transmission. Repletion was achieved by capillary feeding. The presence of sporozoites in the salivary glands modified the behavior of the mosquitoes, with infected females tending to probe more than uninfected females (86% versus 44%. A white area around the tip of the proboscis was observed when the mosquitoes fed on blood from the vessels of mice immunized with saliva. Mosquito feedings elicited an acute inflammatory response in naive mice that peaked three hours after the bite. Polynuclear and mast cells were associated with saliva deposits. We describe the first visualization of saliva in the skin by immunohistochemistry (IHC with antibodies directed against saliva. Both saliva deposits and sporozoites were detected in the skin for up to 18 h after the bite. CONCLUSION: This study, in which we visualized the probing and engorgement phases of Anopheles gambiae blood meals, provides precise information about the behavior of the insect as a function of its infection status and the presence or absence of anti-saliva antibodies. It also provides insight into the possible consequences of the inflammatory reaction for blood feeding and pathogen

  20. Visualizing non infectious and infectious Anopheles gambiae blood feedings in naive and saliva-immunized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choumet, Valerie; Attout, Tarik; Chartier, Loïc; Khun, Huot; Sautereau, Jean; Robbe-Vincent, Annie; Brey, Paul; Huerre, Michel; Bain, Odile

    2012-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae is a major vector of malaria and lymphatic filariasis. The arthropod-host interactions occurring at the skin interface are complex and dynamic. We used a global approach to describe the interaction between the mosquito (infected or uninfected) and the skin of mammals during blood feeding. Intravital video microscopy was used to characterize several features during blood feeding. The deposition and movement of Plasmodium berghei sporozoites in the dermis were also observed. We also used histological techniques to analyze the impact of infected and uninfected feedings on the skin cell response in naive mice. The mouthparts were highly mobile within the skin during the probing phase. Probing time increased with mosquito age, with possible effects on pathogen transmission. Repletion was achieved by capillary feeding. The presence of sporozoites in the salivary glands modified the behavior of the mosquitoes, with infected females tending to probe more than uninfected females (86% versus 44%). A white area around the tip of the proboscis was observed when the mosquitoes fed on blood from the vessels of mice immunized with saliva. Mosquito feedings elicited an acute inflammatory response in naive mice that peaked three hours after the bite. Polynuclear and mast cells were associated with saliva deposits. We describe the first visualization of saliva in the skin by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with antibodies directed against saliva. Both saliva deposits and sporozoites were detected in the skin for up to 18 h after the bite. This study, in which we visualized the probing and engorgement phases of Anopheles gambiae blood meals, provides precise information about the behavior of the insect as a function of its infection status and the presence or absence of anti-saliva antibodies. It also provides insight into the possible consequences of the inflammatory reaction for blood feeding and pathogen transmission.

  1. Seasonal blood-feeding behavior of Culex tarsalis (Diptera: Culicidae) in Weld County, Colorado, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Rebekah; Juliusson, Lara; Weissmann, Michael; Evans, Sara; Komar, Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    Studies on Culex tarsalis Coquillett in Colorado have shown marked seasonal variation in the proportion of blood meals from birds and mammals. However, limitations in the specificity of antibodies used in the precipitin test and lack of vertebrate host availability data warrant revisiting Cx. tarsalis blood feeding behavior in the context of West Nile virus (WNV) transmission. We characterized the host preference of Cx. tarsalis during peak WNV transmission season in eastern Colorado and estimated the relative contribution of different avian species to WNV transmission. Cx. tarsalis preferred birds to mammals each month, although the proportion of blood meals from mammals increased in July and August. The distribution of blood meals differed significantly across months, in part because of changes in the proportion of blood meals from American robins, a preferred host. The estimated proportion of WNV-infectious vectors derived from American robins declined from 60 to 1% between June and August. The majority of avian blood meals came from doves, preferred hosts that contributed 25-40% of the WNV-infectious mosquitoes each month. Active WNV transmission was observed in association with a large house sparrow communal roost. These data show how seasonal patterns in Cx. tarsalis blood feeding behavior relate to WNV transmission in eastern Colorado, with the American robin contributing greatly to early-season virus transmission and a communal roost of sparrows serving as a focus for late-season amplification.

  2. Emerging roles of aquaporins in relation to the physiology of blood-feeding arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Joshua B; Hansen, Immo A; Szuter, Elise M; Drake, Lisa L; Burnett, Denielle L; Attardo, Geoffrey M

    2014-10-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are proteins that span plasma membranes allowing the movement of water and small solutes into or out of cells. The type, expression levels and activity of AQPs play a major role in the relative permeability of each cell to water or other solutes. Research on arthropod AQPs has expanded in the last 10 years due to the completion of several arthropod genome projects and the increased availability of genetic information accessible through other resources such as de novo transcriptome assemblies. In particular, there has been significant advancement in elucidating the roles that AQPs serve in relation to the physiology of blood-feeding arthropods of medical importance. The focus of this review is upon the significance of AQPs in relation to hematophagy in arthropods. This will be accomplished via a narrative describing AQP functions during the life history of hematophagic arthropods that includes the following critical phases: (1) Saliva production necessary to blood feeding, (2) Intake and excretion of water during blood digestion, (3) Reproduction and egg development and (4) Off-host environmental stress tolerance. The concentration on these phases will highlight known vulnerabilities in the biology of hematophagic arthropods that could be used to develop novel control strategies as well as research topics that have yet to be examined.

  3. Aminocaproic Acid and Tranexamic Acid Fail to Reverse Dabigatran-Induced Coagulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Michael; Huang, Margaret; Henderson, Sean O; Carmelli, Guy; Thomas, Stephen H

    In recent years, dabigatran has emerged as a popular alternative to warfarin for treatment of atrial fibrillation. If rapid reversal is required, however, no reversal agent has clearly been established. The primary purpose of this manuscript was to evaluate the efficacy of tranexamic acid and aminocaproic acid as agents to reverse dabigatran-induced coagulopathy. Rats were randomly assigned to 6 groups. Each rat received either dabigatran or oral placebo, followed by saline, tranexamic acid, or aminocaproic acid. An activated clotting test was used to measure the coagulopathy. Neither tranexamic acid nor aminocaproic acid successfully reversed dabigatran-induced coagulopathy. In this rodent model of dabigatran-induced coagulopathy, neither tranexamic acid nor aminocaproic acid were able to reverse the coagulopathy.

  4. Sugammadex, a new reversal agent for neuromuscular block induced by rocuronium in the anaesthetized Rhesus monkey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, H.D. de; Egmond, J. van; Pol, F. van de; Bom, A.; Booij, L.H.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Binding of the steroidal molecule of rocuronium by a cyclodextrin is a new concept for reversal of neuromuscular block. The present study evaluated the ability of Sugammadex Org 25969, a synthetic gamma-cyclodextrin derivative, to reverse constant neuromuscular block of about 90% induced

  5. Countercurrent heat exchange and thermoregulation during blood-feeding in kissing bugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahondère, Chloé; Insausti, Teresita C; Paim, Rafaela Mm; Luan, Xiaojie; Belev, George; Pereira, Marcos H; Ianowski, Juan P; Lazzari, Claudio R

    2017-11-21

    Blood-sucking insects experience thermal stress at each feeding event on endothermic vertebrates. We used thermography to examine how kissing-bugs Rhodnius prolixus actively protect themselves from overheating. During feeding, these bugs sequester and dissipate the excess heat in their heads while maintaining an abdominal temperature close to ambient. We employed a functional-morphological approach, combining histology, µCT and X-ray-synchrotron imaging to shed light on the way these insects manage the flow of heat across their bodies. The close alignment of the circulatory and ingestion systems, as well as other morphological characteristics, support the existence of a countercurrent heat exchanger in the head of R. prolixus , which decreases the temperature of the ingested blood before it reaches the abdomen. This kind of system has never been described before in the head of an insect. For the first time, we show that countercurrent heat exchange is associated to thermoregulation during blood-feeding.

  6. La Crosse virus infection alters blood feeding behavior in Aedes triseriatus and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Bryan T; Brewster, Carlyle C; Paulson, Sally L

    2012-11-01

    The effects of La Crosse virus (LACV) infection on blood feeding behavior in Aedes triseriatus (Say) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse) were investigated in the laboratory by measuring the size of the bloodmeal imbibed and the extent of refeeding by virus-infected and uninfected mosquitoes. LACV-infected Ae. triseriatus and Ae. albopictus took significantly less blood compared with uninfected mosquitoes. Twice as many virus-infected Ae. triseriatus mosquitoes refed compared with uninfected individuals (18 vs. 9%; P < 0.05); however, virus infection had no significant effect on the refeeding rate of Ae. albopictus. Reduction in bloodmeal size followed by an increased avidity for refeeding may lead to enhanced horizontal transmission of the LACV by its principal vector, Ae. triseriatus.

  7. Comparative studies on the biology and filarial susceptibility of selected blood-feeding and autogenous Aedes togoi sub-colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuluck Junkum

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood-feeding and autogenous sub-colonies were selected from a laboratory, stock colony of Aedes togoi, which was originally collected from Koh Nom Sao, Chanthaburi province, Southeast Thailand. Comparative biology and filarial susceptibility between the two sub-colonies (blood-feeding: F11, F13; autogeny: F38, F40 were investigated to evaluate their viability and vectorial capacity. The results of comparison on biology revealed intraspecific differences, i.e., the average egg deposition/gravid female (F11/F38; F13/F40, embryonation rate (F13/F40, hatchability rate (F11/F38; F13/F40, egg width (F11/F38, wing length of females (F13/F40, and wing length and width of males (F11/F38 in the blood-feeding sub-colony were significantly greater than that in the autogenous sub-colony; and egg length (F11/F38 and width (F13/F40, and mean longevity of adult females (F11/F38 and males (F13/F40 in the blood-feeding sub-colony were significantly less than that in the autogenous sub-colony. The results of comparison on filarial susceptibility demonstrated that both sub-colonies yielded similar susceptibilities to Brugia malayi [blood-feeding/autogeny = 56.7% (F11/53.3%(F38, 60%(F13/83.3%(F40] and Dirofilaria immitis [blood-feeding/autogeny = 85.7%(F11/75%(F38, 45%(F13/29.4%(F40], suggesting autogenous Ae. togoi sub-colony was an efficient laboratory vector in study of filariasis.

  8. Effects of temperature on development, mortality, mating and blood feeding behavior of Culiseta incidens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, T; Mulla, M S

    2001-06-01

    Culiseta incidens Thomson is distributed over most of the western USA and Canada northward to Alaska. Because this mosquito is difficult to colonize, its biology has not been well investigated. We colonized this species in 1998 and studied the effects of temperature on various aspects of its life cycle. The time required for egg melanization and the duration of the egg stage were negatively correlated with temperature. The proportion of fertile egg rafts was temperature-independent. An inverse relationship existed between temperature and egg hatch. Molting and stadium duration after hatching were temperature-dependent, with higher temperature accelerating development and molting. Larvae and pupae experienced lower mortality and higher molting success at lower temperatures. Survivorship of adult mosquitoes fed on sugar solution was inversely proportional to temperature, lethal times for 50% mortality (LT50) were greater at the lower temperature than at the higher temperature. Females survived longer than did males at all test temperatures. Because this species is eurygamous, mating only occurred in large cages. Mating success was also affected by temperature. At the test temperatures, 20 degrees C, 25 degrees C and 30 degrees C, mating started from 3-5 days after emergence and reached a peak on days 13-15 after emergence. Maximum mating rates at 20 degrees C and 25 degrees C were higher than at 30 degrees C. Blood feeding, as indicated by cumulative feeding rates, was affected by cage size, mosquito age and temperature. Mosquitoes in large cages exhibited a much higher feeding rate than in small cages. With age, the cumulative blood feeding rate increased, with the highest rate at 25 degrees C, followed by 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C. At all temperatures tested, most of the blood fed females were mated.

  9. First interactions between hydrogen and stress-induced reverse transformation of Ni-Ti superelastic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Hashimoto, Tatsuki; Sakai, Jun'ichi

    2017-11-01

    The first dynamic interactions between hydrogen and the stress-induced reverse transformation have been investigated by performing an unloading test on a Ni-Ti superelastic alloy subjected to hydrogen charging under a constant applied strain in the elastic deformation region of the martensite phase. Upon unloading the specimen, charged with a small amount of hydrogen, no change in the behaviour of the stress-induced reverse transformation is observed in the stress-strain curve, although the behaviour of the stress-induced martensite transformation changes. With increasing amount of hydrogen charging, the critical stress for the reverse transformation markedly decreases. Eventually, for a larger amount of hydrogen charging, the reverse transformation does not occur, i.e. there is no recovery of the superelastic strain. The residual martensite phase on the side surface of the unloaded specimen is confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Upon training before the unloading test, the properties of the reverse transformation slightly recover after ageing in air at room temperature. The present study indicates that to change the behaviour of the reverse transformation a larger amount of hydrogen than that for the martensite transformation is necessary. In addition, it is likely that a substantial amount of hydrogen in solid solution more strongly suppresses the reverse transformation than hydrogen trapped at defects, thereby stabilising the martensite phase.

  10. Piracetam reverses haloperidol-induced catalepsy in mice

    OpenAIRE

    SALAM, Omar Abdel; NADA, Somaia

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the memory-enhancing drugs piracetam, vinpocetine, and ginkgo biloba for their ability to reduce catalepsy in mice treated with haloperidol. Haloperidol is a classic neuroleptic drug that induces motor abnormalities and cognitive impairment due to a blockade of dopamine D2 receptors in the striatum. Materials and methods: Catalepsy was induced by intraperitoneal haloperidol (2 mg/kg) administration. The drugs being tested were either administered intraperitoneally (IP) along ...

  11. Reversal of Stress-Induced Social Interaction Deficits by Buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Caroline A; Falcon, Edgardo; Robinson, Shivon A; Berton, Olivier; Lucki, Irwin

    2018-02-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder frequently report persistent problems with social interactions, emerging after a traumatic experience. Chronic social defeat stress is a widely used rodent model of stress that produces robust and sustained social avoidance behavior. The avoidance of other rodents can be reversed by 28 days of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, the only pharmaceutical class approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating post-traumatic stress disorder. In this study, the sensitivity of social interaction deficits evoked by 10 days of chronic social defeat stress to prospective treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder was examined. The effects of acute and repeated treatment with a low dose of buprenorphine (0.25 mg/kg/d) on social interaction deficits in male C57BL/6 mice by chronic social defeat stress were studied. Another cohort of mice was used to determine the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/d), the NMDA antagonist ketamine (10 mg/kg/d), and the selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist CERC-501 (1 mg/kg/d). Changes in mRNA expression of Oprm1 and Oprk1 were assessed in a separate cohort. Buprenorphine significantly reversed social interaction deficits produced by chronic social defeat stress following 7 days of administration, but not after acute injection. Treatment with fluoxetine for 7 days, but not 24 hours, also reinstated social interaction behavior in mice that were susceptible to chronic social defeat. In contrast, CERC-501 and ketamine failed to reverse social avoidance. Gene expression analysis found: (1) Oprm1 mRNA expression was reduced in the hippocampus and increased in the frontal cortex of susceptible mice and (2) Oprk1 mRNA expression was reduced in the amygdala and increased in the frontal cortex of susceptible mice compared to non-stressed controls and stress-resilient mice. Short-term treatment with buprenorphine and fluoxetine

  12. 3, 4-methylenedioximethamphetamin reverses anxiety induced by chronic mild stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Andrea León A

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the effects of subchronic 3, 4 methylenedioximethamphetamine (MDMA on the elevated plusmaze, a widely used animal model of anxiety. Rats exposed to a mild chronic stress (MCS protocol received intracerebroventricular microinjections of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI – fluoxetine (2.0 ug/ul or MDMA, (2.0 ug/ul for seven days. On the eighth day rats were tested in the elevated plus-maze. Our results showed that sub chronic MDMA interacted with MCS leading to a decrease in anxiety related behaviors including: percentage of open arms entries (F [2, 26] = 4.00; p = 0.031, time spent in the open arms (F [2, 26] = 3.656; p = 0.040 and time spent in the open arms extremities (F [2, 26] = 5.842; p = 0.008. These results suggest a potential effect of MDMA in the reversion of the emotional significance of aversive stimuli.

  13. Naringin Reverses Hepatocyte Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress Associated with HIV-1 Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors-Induced Metabolic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwafeyisetan O. Adebiyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs have not only improved therapeutic outcomes in the treatment of HIV infection but have also led to an increase in associated metabolic complications of NRTIs. Naringin’s effects in mitigating NRTI-induced complications were investigated in this study. Wistar rats, randomly allotted into seven groups (n = 7 were orally treated daily for 56 days with 100 mg/kg zidovudine (AZT (groups I, II III, 50 mg/kg stavudine (d4T (groups IV, V, VI and 3 mL/kg of distilled water (group VII. Additionally, rats in groups II and V were similarly treated with 50 mg/kg naringin, while groups III and VI were treated with 45 mg/kg vitamin E. AZT or d4T treatment significantly reduced body weight and plasma high density lipoprotein concentrations but increased liver weights, plasma triglycerides and total cholesterol compared to controls, respectively. Furthermore, AZT or d4T treatment significantly increased oxidative stress, adiposity index and expression of Bax protein, but reduced Bcl-2 protein expression compared to controls, respectively. However, either naringin or vitamin E significantly mitigated AZT- or d4T-induced weight loss, dyslipidemia, oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis compared to AZT- or d4T-only treated rats. Our results suggest that naringin reverses metabolic complications associated with NRTIs by ameliorating oxidative stress and apoptosis. This implies that naringin supplements could mitigate lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia associated with NRTI therapy.

  14. Early reversal of profound rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex in a randomized multicenter study - Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparr, Harald J.; Vermeyen, Karel M.; Beaufort, Anton M.; Rietbergen, Henk; Proost, Johannes H.; Saldien, Vera; Velik-Salchner, Corinna; Wierda, J. Mark K. H.

    Background: Sugammadex reverses the neuromuscular blocking effects of rocuronium by chemical encapsulation. The efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of sugammadex for reversal of profound rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade were evaluated. Methods: Ninety-eight male adult patients were

  15. Studies on the post-oviposition blood-feeding behaviour of Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadee, D D

    2012-11-01

    The blood-feeding behaviour of the Trinidad strain of Aedes aegypti was studied, under laboratory conditions, using one female per cage and monitoring blood feeding immediately, 12, and 24 hours after oviposition. To get large numbers of females that had newly completed their first gonotrophic cycle, the diel oviposition periodicity was conducted using single females per cage and monitoring at 2-hour intervals. The diel oviposition periodicity showed a small morning peak (8%) during the first 2 hours of the photophase after which oviposition declined: during the second half of the photophase, oviposition increased reaching a peak comprising 56% of eggs (G = 59·9, P>0·01) between 16:00 and 18:00 hours. At post-oviposition hour 0, only five (10%) of the females accepted a blood meal but at post-oviposition hour 12, significantly more (G = 46·98, P>0·02) females, 35 (70%) accepted a blood meal. This pattern was consistently observed when females were offered blood meals at 12 and 24 hours after completing their first gonotrophic cycle. Multiple feeding was observed among the blood-feeding females and the results of this study are discussed in the context of disease transmission patterns and physiological mechanisms which control their blood-feeding behaviours.

  16. Memantine reverses social withdrawal induced by ketamine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Ezequiel; Landaeta, José; Wix, Richard; Eblen, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of memantine on schizophrenia-like symptoms in a ketamine-induced social withdrawal model in rats. We examined therapeutic effects of memantine, an NMDA antagonist, and haloperidol, a classic antipsychotic drug, on this behavioral model. Administration of memantine (10 or 15 mg·kg(-1)) significantly reduced ketamine-induced social withdrawal, and this effect was more effective than that of haloperidol (0.25 mg·kg(-1)) by restoring the social interaction between rats with no modification in general motor activity. These results suggest that memantine could have a therapeutic potential for schizophrenia.

  17. Differential expression of Ixodes ricinus tick genes induced by blood feeding or Borrelia burgdorferi infection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rudenko, Natalia; Golovchenko, Maryna; Edwards, M. J.; Grubhoffer, Libor

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 1 (2005), s. 36-41 ISSN 0022-2585 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6022306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Ixodes ricinus * Borrelia burgdorferi * subtractive hybridization Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.489, year: 2005

  18. Melatonin reverses type 2 diabetes-induced cognitive deficits via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the protective effect of melatonin on diabetes-induced cognitive dysfunction. Methods: Rats ... suggests that melatonin may be useful for the management of cognitive dysfunction in patients suffering ... as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease ..... with the inhibitory kappa beta (Iκβ) family.

  19. Blood-feeding patterns of Anopheles mosquitoes in a malaria-endemic area of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar Kabirul

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood-feeding patterns of mosquitoes are crucial for incriminating malaria vectors. However, little information is available on the host preferences of Anopheles mosquitoes in Bangladesh. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine the hematophagic tendencies of the anophelines inhabiting a malaria-endemic area of Bangladesh. Methods Adult Anopheles mosquitoes were collected using light traps (LTs, pyrethrum spray (PS, and human bait (HB from a malaria-endemic village (Kumari, Bandarban, Bangladesh during the peak months of malaria transmission (August-September. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and polymerase chain reaction (PCR were performed to identify the host blood meals of Anopheles mosquitoes. Results In total, 2456 female anopheline mosquitoes representing 21 species were collected from the study area. Anopheles vagus Doenitz (35.71% was the dominant species followed by An. philippinensis Ludlow (26.67% and An. minimus s.l. Theobald (5.78%. All species were collected by LTs set indoors (n = 1094, 19 species were from outdoors (n = 784, whereas, six by PS (n = 549 and four species by HB (n = 29. Anopheline species composition significantly differed between every possible combination of the three collection methods (χ2 test, P Anopheles samples belonging to 17 species. Values of the human blood index (HBI of anophelines collected from indoors and outdoors were 6.96% and 11.73%, respectively. The highest values of HBI were found in An. baimai Baimaii (80%, followed by An. minimus s.l. (43.64% and An. annularis Van den Wulp (37.50%. Anopheles baimai (Bi = 0.63 and An. minimus s.l. (Bi = 0.24 showed strong relative preferences (Bi for humans among all hosts (human, bovine, goats/sheep, and others. Anopheles annularis, An. maculatus s.l. Theobald, and An. pallidus Theobald exhibited opportunistic blood-feeding behavior, in that they fed on either humans or animals, depending on whichever was

  20. GRAVES’ DISEASE INDUCED REVERSIBLE SEVERE RIGHT HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathyayani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A middle aged man presented with evidence of right - sided heart failure in atrial fibrillation (AF and was found to have severe Tricuspid Regurgitation (TR with pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH, with normal left ventricular function. The common possible seconda ry causes of PAH were ruled out, but during investigation he was found to have elevated thyroid function tests compatible with the diagnosis of Graves’ disease. The treatment of Graves’ disease was started with anti - thyroid drugs and associated with a sign ificant reduction in the pulmonary arterial pressure. This case report is presented to highlight one of the rare and underdiagnosed presentations of Graves’ disease. Thyrotoxicosis can present with profound cardiovascular complications. In recent times, th ere have been few reports of secondary PAH with TR in patients with hyperthyroidism. Previously asymptomatic Graves’ disease having the signs and symptoms of right heart failure is a rare presentation and the association could be easily missed. This case p resentation emphasizes that the diagnosis of thyroid heart disease with heart failure secondary to Graves’ disease should be considered in any patient regardless of age, gender with clinical features of heart failure of unknown etiology and timely initiation of anti - thyroid drugs is necessary to treat these reversible cardiac failures.

  1. The Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensite Reverse Transformation in AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cios, G.; Tokarski, T.; Żywczak, A.; Dziurka, R.; Stępień, M.; Gondek, Ł.; Marciszko, M.; Pawłowski, B.; Wieczerzak, K.; Bała, P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study on the strain-induced martensitic transformation and reversion transformation of the strain-induced martensite in AISI 304 stainless steel using a number of complementary techniques such as dilatometry, calorimetry, magnetometry, and in-situ X-ray diffraction, coupled with high-resolution microstructural transmission Kikuchi diffraction analysis. Tensile deformation was applied at temperatures between room temperature and 213 K (-60 °C) in order to obtain a different volume fraction of strain-induced martensite (up to 70 pct). The volume fraction of the strain-induced martensite, measured by the magnetometric method, was correlated with the total elongation, hardness, and linear thermal expansion coefficient. The thermal expansion coefficient, as well as the hardness of the strain-induced martensitic phase was evaluated. The in-situ thermal treatment experiments showed unusual changes in the kinetics of the reverse transformation (α' → γ). The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the reverse transformation may be stress assisted—strains inherited from the martensitic transformation may increase its kinetics at the lower annealing temperature range. More importantly, the transmission Kikuchi diffraction measurements showed that the reverse transformation of the strain-induced martensite proceeds through a displacive, diffusionless mechanism, maintaining the Kurdjumov-Sachs crystallographic relationship between the martensite and the reverted austenite. This finding is in contradiction to the results reported by other researchers for a similar alloy composition.

  2. Population pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic analysis for sugammadex-mediated reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijn, Huub J; Zollinger, Daniel P; van den Heuvel, Michiel W; Kerbusch, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    AIMS An integrated population pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic model was developed with the following aims: to simultaneously describe pharmacokinetic behaviour of sugammadex and rocuronium; to establish the pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic model for rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade and reversal by sugammadex; to evaluate covariate effects; and to explore, by simulation, typical covariate effects on reversal time. METHODS Data (n = 446) from eight sugammadex clinical studies covering men, women, non-Asians, Asians, paediatrics, adults and the elderly, with various degrees of renal impairment, were used. Modelling and simulation techniques based on physiological principles were applied to capture rocuronium and sugammadex pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and to identify and quantify covariate effects. RESULTS Sugammadex pharmacokinetics were affected by renal function, bodyweight and race, and rocuronium pharmacokinetics were affected by age, renal function and race. Sevoflurane potentiated rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. Posterior predictive checks and bootstrapping illustrated the accuracy and robustness of the model. External validation showed concordance between observed and predicted reversal times, but interindividual variability in reversal time was pronounced. Simulated reversal times in typical adults were 0.8, 1.5 and 1.4 min upon reversal with sugammadex 16 mg kg−1 3 min after rocuronium, sugammadex 4 mg kg−1 during deep neuromuscular blockade and sugammadex 2 mg kg−1 during moderate blockade, respectively. Simulations indicated that reversal times were faster in paediatric patients and slightly slower in elderly patients compared with adults. Renal function did not affect reversal time. CONCLUSIONS Simulations of the therapeutic dosing regimens demonstrated limited impact of age, renal function and sevoflurane use, as predicted reversal time in typical subjects was always <2 min. PMID:21535448

  3. Stress-induced antinociception in fish reversed by naloxone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Patrícia Bejo Wolkers

    Full Text Available Pain perception in non-mammalian vertebrates such as fish is a controversial issue. We demonstrate that, in the fish Leporinus macrocephalus, an imposed restraint can modulate the behavioral response to a noxious stimulus, specifically the subcutaneous injection of 3% formaldehyde. In the first experiment, formaldehyde was applied immediately after 3 or 5 min of the restraint. Inhibition of the increase in locomotor activity in response to formaldehyde was observed, which suggests a possible restraint-induced antinociception. In the second experiment, the noxious stimulus was applied 0, 5, 10 and 15 min after the restraint, and both 3 and 5 min of restraint promoted short-term antinociception of approximately 5 min. In experiments 3 and 4, an intraperitoneal injection of naloxone (30 mg.kg(-1 was administered 30 min prior to the restraint. The 3- minute restraint-induced antinociception was blocked by pretreatment with naloxone, but the corresponding 5-minute response was not. One possible explanation for this result is that an opioid and a non-preferential μ-opioid and/or non-opioid mechanism participate in this response modulation. Furthermore, we observed that both the 3- and 5- minutes restraint were severely stressful events for the organism, promoting marked increases in serum cortisol levels. These data indicate that the response to a noxious stimulus can be modulated by an environmental stressor in fish, as is the case in mammals. To our knowledge, this study is the first evidence for the existence of an endogenous antinociceptive system that is activated by an acute standardized stress in fish. Additionally, it characterizes the antinociceptive response induced by stress in terms of its time course and the opioid mediation, providing information for understanding the evolution of nociception modulation.

  4. Seasonal abundance and blood feeding activity of Anopheles minimus Theobald (Diptera: Culicidae) in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap; Prabaripai, Atchariya; Bangs, Michael J; Aum-Aung, Boonserm

    2003-11-01

    Anopheline mosquito larvae and adults were sampled at Ban Pu Teuy, Tri-Yok District, Kanchanaburi Province, western Thailand, from January 2000 to December 2001. Over the period of 2 yr, Anopheles minimus sensu lato was the most commonly collected species, followed by Anopheles swadiwongporni and Anopheles dirus sensu lato; all three species are important vectors of malaria in Thailand. Attempted blood feeding by An. minimus occurred throughout the night, with two distinct feeding peaks: strong activity immediately after sunset (1800-2100 hours), followed by a second, less pronounced, rise before sunrise (0300-0600 hours). Anopheles minimus were more abundant during the wet season compared with the dry and hot seasons, although nocturnal adult feeding patterns were similar. Anopheles minimus fed readily on humans inside and outside of houses, showing a slight preference for exophagy. The human-biting peak of An. minimus in our study area differed from other localities sampled in Thailand, indicating the possible existence of site-specific populations of An. minimus exhibiting different host-seeking behavior. These results underscore the importance of conducting site-specific studies to accurately determine vector larval habitats and adult activity patterns and linking their importance in malaria transmission in a given area.

  5. Blood-feeding patterns of the Culex pipiens complex in Sacramento and Yolo Counties, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Matthew J; Thiemann, Tara; Macedo, Paula; Brown, David A; Scott, Thomas W

    2011-03-01

    Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex are competent vectors of West Nile virus (WNV; family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus) in the laboratory, and field-collected mosquitoes have tested positive for the virus in California and elsewhere. A better understanding of Cx. pipiens complex blood-feeding patterns will help define the threat that these mosquitoes pose to human health and their role in WNV amplification in northern California. We collected blood-engorged Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes from resting sites near and away from human habitation in Sacramento and Yolo Counties. Cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene sequences were used to identify the vertebrate species from which blood meals were taken. Of 330 engorged mosquitoes collected at 28 sites from June through August 2007 and May through August 2008, >99% fed on an avian host. Three mosquitoes contained bovine blood and none had fed on a human. American Robins (Turdus migratorius) were bitten most often, and the proportion of American Robin blood meals increased significantly over the summer. Other important avian hosts included House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus), Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica), Western Meadowlarks (Sturnella neglecta), and Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura). In rural areas, Barn Swallows, Brewer's Blackbirds (Euphagus cyanocephalus), and House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) were frequent hosts. In settings near human habitation, Mourning Doves and Western Meadowlarks were common hosts. Our data indicate that in north central California mosquitoes in the Cx. pipiens complex may be more important as epiornitic than epidemic vectors of WNV.

  6. Molecular Detection of Bartonella Species in Blood-Feeding Bat Flies from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskaluk, Alexandra E; Stuckey, Matthew J; Jaffe, David A; Kasten, Rickie W; Aguilar-Setién, Alvaro; Olave-Leyva, José Ignacio; Galvez-Romero, Guillermo; Obregón-Morales, Cirani; Salas-Rojas, Mónica; García-Flores, María Martha; Aréchiga-Ceballos, Nidia; García-Baltazar, Anahí; Chomel, Bruno B

    2018-05-01

    Bartonellae are emerging blood-borne bacteria that have been recovered from a wide range of mammalian species and arthropod vectors around the world. Bats are now recognized as a potential wildlife reservoir for a diverse number of Bartonella species, including the zoonotic Candidatus B. mayotimonensis. These bat-borne Bartonella species have also been detected in the obligate ectoparasites of bats, such as blood-feeding flies, which could transmit these bacteria within bat populations. To better understand this potential for transmission, we investigated the relatedness between Bartonella detected or isolated from bat hosts sampled in Mexico and their ectoparasites. Bartonella spp. were identified in bat flies collected on two bat species, with the highest prevalence in Trichobius parasiticus and Strebla wiedemanni collected from common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus). When comparing Bartonella sequences from a fragment of the citrate synthase gene (gltA), vector-associated strains were diverse and generally close to, but distinct from, those recovered from their bacteremic bat hosts in Mexico. Complete Bartonella sequence concordance was observed in only one bat-vector pair. The diversity of Bartonella strains in bat flies reflects the frequent host switch by bat flies, as they usually do not live permanently on their bat host. It may also suggest a possible endosymbiotic relationship with these vectors for some of the Bartonella species carried by bat flies, whereas others could have a mammalian host.

  7. Functional anatomy of vagina muscles in the blood-feeding insect, Rhodnius prolixus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, R G; O'Donnell, M J

    2009-11-01

    The physiology of the muscles associated with the vagina in the blood-feeding insect, Rhodnius prolixus Stal, was investigated with the use of Methylene Blue staining to visualize the anatomy, and a micro force transducer to record spontaneous and neurally-evoked contractions. The vagina is associated with a dorsal muscle and a set of paired lateral muscles. The dorsal muscle extends from the base of the common oviduct to apodemes located laterally on sternite VIII, the first genital segment. The lateral muscles extend from a medially-located apodeme on the posterior edge of sternite VI around each side of the common oviduct to travel posteriorly along the side of the vagina before inserting laterally on apodemes on sternite VIII. The vagina muscles display spontaneous and neurally-evoked contractions that are prolonged but transient. The response to evoked contractions shows that the muscles are innervated by both excitatory and inhibitory motor axons. The degree of tension generated by evoked contractions is dependent on the frequency of stimulation with maximal tension being generated at 20-30Hz. This tension, which often exceeds 400mg, is transient and returns to a baseline within 1 to 2min during continuous stimulation. These results, which are the first to describe this chamber in this well-studied insect, are discussed with respect to the act of egg laying.

  8. Arginase Inhibition Reverses Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jung

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is a heterogeneous disorder associated with a poor prognosis. Thus, the development of novel treatment strategies is of great interest. The enzyme arginase (Arg is emerging as important player in PH development. The aim of the current study was to determine the expression of ArgI and ArgII as well as the effects of Arg inhibition in a rat model of PH. PH was induced in 35 Sprague–Dawley rats by monocrotaline (MCT, 60 mg/kg as single-dose. There were three experimental groups: sham-treated controls (control group, n = 11, MCT-induced PH (MCT group, n = 11 and MCT-induced PH treated with the Arg inhibitor Nω-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine (nor-NOHA; MCT/NorNoha group, n = 13. ArgI and ArgII expression was determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Right ventricular systolic pressure (RVPsys was measured and lung tissue remodeling was determined. Induction of PH resulted in an increase in RVPsys (81 ± 16 mmHg compared to the control group (41 ± 15 mmHg, p = 0.002 accompanied by a significant elevation of histological sum-score (8.2 ± 2.4 in the MCT compared to 1.6 ± 1.6 in the control group, p < 0.001. Both, ArgI and ArgII were relevantly expressed in lung tissue and there was a significant increase in the MCT compared to the control group (p < 0.01. Arg inhibition resulted in a significant reduction of RVPsys to 52 ± 19 mmHg (p = 0.006 and histological sum-score to 5.8 ± 1.4 compared to the MCT group (p = 0.022. PH leads to increased expression of Arg. Arg inhibition leads to reduction of RVPsys and diminished lung tissue remodeling and therefore represents a potential treatment strategy in PH.

  9. Clinically Relevant Pharmacological Strategies That Reverse MDMA-Induced Brain Hyperthermia Potentiated by Social Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Ren, Suelynn; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2016-01-01

    MDMA-induced hyperthermia is highly variable, unpredictable, and greatly potentiated by the social and environmental conditions of recreational drug use. Current strategies to treat pathological MDMA-induced hyperthermia in humans are palliative and marginally effective, and there are no specific pharmacological treatments to counteract this potentially life-threatening condition. Here, we tested the efficacy of mixed adrenoceptor blockers carvedilol and labetalol, and the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, in reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia. We injected rats with a moderate non-toxic dose of MDMA (9 mg/kg) during social interaction, and we administered potential treatment drugs after the development of robust hyperthermia (>2.5 °C), thus mimicking the clinical situation of acute MDMA intoxication. Brain temperature was our primary focus, but we also simultaneously recorded temperatures from the deep temporal muscle and skin, allowing us to determine the basic physiological mechanisms of the treatment drug action. Carvedilol was modestly effective in attenuating MDMA-induced hyperthermia by moderately inhibiting skin vasoconstriction, and labetalol was ineffective. In contrast, clozapine induced a marked and immediate reversal of MDMA-induced hyperthermia via inhibition of brain metabolic activation and blockade of skin vasoconstriction. Our findings suggest that clozapine, and related centrally acting drugs, might be highly effective for reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia in emergency clinical situations, with possible life-saving results.

  10. Photon-Induced Magnetization Reversal in Single Molecule Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Mustafa

    2005-03-01

    Single-molecule magnets (SMM) have been the subject of intensive research for more than a decade now because of their unique properties such as macroscopic quantum tunneling. Recent work in this area is focused on whether SMM are potential qubits, as proposed theoretically [1]. We use continuous millimeter wave radiation to manipulate the populations of the energy levels of a single crystal molecular magnet Fe8 [2]. When radiation is in resonance with the transitions between energy levels, the steady state magnetization exhibits dips. As expected, the magnetic field locations of these dips vary linearly with the radiation frequency. We will describe our experimental results, which provide a lower bound of 0.17 ns for transverse relaxation time. Transitions between excited states are found even though these states have negligible population at the experimental temperature. We find evidence that the sample heating is significant when the resonance condition is satisfied. Recent experiments are concentrated on the spin dynamics of Fe8 induced by pulsed radiation and results of these studies will also be presented. [1] Leuenberger, M. N. and Loss, D., Nature 410, 789 (2001). [2] M. Bal et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 100408(R) (2004).

  11. Reversible cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, E.L.; Firestein, G.S.; Weiss, J.L.; Heuser, R.R.; Leitl, G.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Brinker, J.A.; Ciuffo, A.A.; Becker, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of peripheral cold exposure on myocardial perfusion and function were studied in 13 patients with scleroderma without clinically evident myocardial disease. Ten patients had at least one transient, cold-induced, myocardial perfusion defect visualized by thallium-201 scintigraphy, and 12 had reversible, cold-induced, segmental left ventricular hypokinesis by two-dimensional echocardiography. The 10 patients with transient perfusion defects all had anatomically corresponding ventricular wall motion abnormalities. No one in either of two control groups (9 normal volunteers and 7 patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms) had cold-induced abnormalities. This study is the first to show the simultaneous occurrence of cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in patients with scleroderma. The results suggest that cold exposure in such patients may elicit transient reflex coronary vasoconstriction resulting in reversible myocardial ischemia and dysfunction. Chronic recurrent episodes of coronary spasm may lead to focal myocardial fibrosis

  12. Seizure-induced brain lesions: A wide spectrum of variably reversible MRI abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cianfoni, A.; Caulo, M.; Cerase, A.; Della Marca, G.; Falcone, C.; Di Lella, G.M.; Gaudino, S.; Edwards, J.; Colosimo, C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction MRI abnormalities in the postictal period might represent the effect of the seizure activity, rather than its structural cause. Material and Methods Retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging charts of 26 patients diagnosed with seizure-related MR-signal changes. All patients underwent brain-MRI (1.5-Tesla, standard pre- and post-contrast brain imaging, including DWI-ADC in 19/26) within 7 days from a seizure and at least one follow-up MRI, showing partial or complete reversibility of the MR-signal changes. Extensive clinical work-up and follow-up, ranging from 3 months to 5 years, ruled out infection or other possible causes of brain damage. Seizure-induced brain-MRI abnormalities remained a diagnosis of exclusion. Site, characteristics and reversibility of MRI changes, and association with characteristics of seizures were determined. Results MRI showed unilateral (13/26) and bilateral abnormalities, with high (24/26) and low (2/26) T2-signal, leptomeningeal contrast-enhancement (2/26), restricted diffusion (9/19). Location of abnormality was cortical/subcortical, basal ganglia, white matter, corpus callosum, cerebellum. Hippocampus was involved in 10/26 patients. Reversibility of MRI changes was complete in 15, and with residual gliosis or focal atrophy in 11 patients. Reversibility was noted between 15 and 150 days (average, 62 days). Partial simple and complex seizures were associated with hippocampal involvement (p = 0.015), status epilepticus with incomplete reversibility of MRI abnormalities (p = 0.041). Conclusions Seizure or epileptic status can induce transient, variably reversible MRI brain abnormalities. Partial seizures are frequently associated with hippocampal involvement and status epilepticus with incompletely reversible lesions. These seizure-induced MRI abnormalities pose a broad differential diagnosis; increased awareness may reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention

  13. Seizure-induced brain lesions: A wide spectrum of variably reversible MRI abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianfoni, A., E-mail: acianfoni@hotmail.com [Neuroradiology, Neurocenter of Italian Switzerland–Ospedale regionale Lugano, Via Tesserete 46, Lugano, 6900, CH (Switzerland); Caulo, M., E-mail: caulo@unich.it [Department of Neuroscience and Imaging, University of Chieti, Via dei Vestini 33, 6610 Chieti. Italy (Italy); Cerase, A., E-mail: alfonsocerase@gmail.com [Unit of Neuroimaging and Neurointervention NINT, Department of Neurological and Sensorineural Sciences, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Policlinico “Santa Maria alle Scotte”, V.le Bracci 16, Siena (Italy); Della Marca, G., E-mail: dellamarca@rm.unicatt.it [Neurology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Falcone, C., E-mail: carlo_falc@libero.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Di Lella, G.M., E-mail: gdilella@rm.unicatt.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Gaudino, S., E-mail: sgaudino@sirm.org [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Edwards, J., E-mail: edwardjc@musc.edu [Neuroscience Dept., Medical University of South Carolina, 96J Lucas st, 29425, Charleston, SC (United States); Colosimo, C., E-mail: colosimo@rm.unicatt.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Introduction MRI abnormalities in the postictal period might represent the effect of the seizure activity, rather than its structural cause. Material and Methods Retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging charts of 26 patients diagnosed with seizure-related MR-signal changes. All patients underwent brain-MRI (1.5-Tesla, standard pre- and post-contrast brain imaging, including DWI-ADC in 19/26) within 7 days from a seizure and at least one follow-up MRI, showing partial or complete reversibility of the MR-signal changes. Extensive clinical work-up and follow-up, ranging from 3 months to 5 years, ruled out infection or other possible causes of brain damage. Seizure-induced brain-MRI abnormalities remained a diagnosis of exclusion. Site, characteristics and reversibility of MRI changes, and association with characteristics of seizures were determined. Results MRI showed unilateral (13/26) and bilateral abnormalities, with high (24/26) and low (2/26) T2-signal, leptomeningeal contrast-enhancement (2/26), restricted diffusion (9/19). Location of abnormality was cortical/subcortical, basal ganglia, white matter, corpus callosum, cerebellum. Hippocampus was involved in 10/26 patients. Reversibility of MRI changes was complete in 15, and with residual gliosis or focal atrophy in 11 patients. Reversibility was noted between 15 and 150 days (average, 62 days). Partial simple and complex seizures were associated with hippocampal involvement (p = 0.015), status epilepticus with incomplete reversibility of MRI abnormalities (p = 0.041). Conclusions Seizure or epileptic status can induce transient, variably reversible MRI brain abnormalities. Partial seizures are frequently associated with hippocampal involvement and status epilepticus with incompletely reversible lesions. These seizure-induced MRI abnormalities pose a broad differential diagnosis; increased awareness may reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention.

  14. Reversible Age-Related Phenotypes Induced during Larval Quiescence in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Antoine E.; Langhans, Kelley; Huynh, Walter; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    Summary Cells can enter quiescent states in which cell cycling and growth are suspended. We find that during a long developmental arrest (quiescence) induced by starvation, newly-hatched C. elegans acquire features associated with impaired proteostasis and aging: mitochondrial fission, ROS production, protein aggregation, decreased proteotoxic-stress resistance, and at the organismal level, decline of mobility and high mortality. All signs of aging but one, the presence of protein aggregates, were reversed upon return to development induced by feeding. The endoplasmic reticulum receptor IRE-1 is completely required for recovery, and the downstream transcription factor XBP-1, as well as a protein kinase, KGB-1, are partially required. Interestingly, kgb-1(−) mutants that do recover fail to reverse aging-like mitochondrial phenotypes and have a short adult lifespan. Our study describes the first pathway that reverses phenotypes of aging at the exit of prolonged quiescence. PMID:27304510

  15. Hypoinsulinemia regulates amphetamine-induced reverse transport of dopamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M Williams

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The behavioral effects of psychomotor stimulants such as amphetamine (AMPH arise from their ability to elicit increases in extracellular dopamine (DA. These AMPH-induced increases are achieved by DA transporter (DAT-mediated transmitter efflux. Recently, we have shown that AMPH self-administration is reduced in rats that have been depleted of insulin with the diabetogenic agent streptozotocin (STZ. In vitro studies suggest that hypoinsulinemia may regulate the actions of AMPH by inhibiting the insulin downstream effectors phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K and protein kinase B (PKB, or Akt, which we have previously shown are able to fine-tune DAT cell-surface expression. Here, we demonstrate that striatal Akt function, as well as DAT cell-surface expression, are significantly reduced by STZ. In addition, our data show that the release of DA, determined by high-speed chronoamperometry (HSCA in the striatum, in response to AMPH, is severely impaired in these insulin-deficient rats. Importantly, selective inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 within the striatum results in a profound reduction in the subsequent potential for AMPH to evoke DA efflux. Consistent with our biochemical and in vivo electrochemical data, findings from functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments reveal that the ability of AMPH to elicit positive blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes in the striatum is significantly blunted in STZ-treated rats. Finally, local infusion of insulin into the striatum of STZ-treated animals significantly recovers the ability of AMPH to stimulate DA release as measured by high-speed chronoamperometry. The present studies establish that PI3K signaling regulates the neurochemical actions of AMPH-like psychomotor stimulants. These data suggest that insulin signaling pathways may represent a novel mechanism for regulating DA transmission, one which may be targeted for the treatment of AMPH abuse and potentially other dopaminergic disorders.

  16. Morphology and physiology of the olfactory system of blood-feeding insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidobaldi, F; May-Concha, I J; Guerenstein, P G

    2014-01-01

    Several blood-feeding (hematophagous) insects are vectors of a number of diseases including dengue, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis which persistently affect public health throughout Latin America. The vectors of those diseases include mosquitoes, triatomine bugs and sandflies. As vector control is an efficient way to prevent these illnesses it is important to understand the sensory biology of those harmful insects. We study the physiology of the olfactory system of those insects and apply that knowledge on the development of methods to manipulate their behavior. Here we review some of the latest information on insect olfaction with emphasis on hematophagous insects. The insect olfactory sensory neurons are housed inside hair-like organs called sensilla which are mainly distributed on the antenna and mouthparts. The identity of many of the odor compounds that those neurons detect are already known in hematophagous insects. They include several constituents of host (vertebrate) odor, sex, aggregation and alarm pheromones, and compounds related to egg-deposition behavior. Recent work has contributed significant knowledge on how odor information is processed in the insect first odor-processing center in the brain, the antennal lobe. The quality, quantity, and temporal features of the odor stimuli are encoded by the neural networks of the antennal lobe. Information regarding odor mixtures is also encoded. While natural mixtures evoke strong responses, synthetic mixtures that deviate from their natural counterparts in terms of key constituents or proportions of those constituents evoke weaker responses. The processing of olfactory information is largely unexplored in hematophagous insects. However, many aspects of their olfactory behavior are known. As in other insects, responses to relevant single odor compounds are weak while natural mixtures evoke strong responses. Future challenges include studying how information about odor mixtures is processed in their brain

  17. Dynamics of digestive proteolytic system during blood feeding of the hard tick Ixodes ricinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sojka Daniel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ticks are vectors of a wide variety of pathogens causing severe diseases in humans and domestic animals. Intestinal digestion of the host blood is an essential process of tick physiology and also a limiting factor for pathogen transmission since the tick gut represents the primary site for pathogen infection and proliferation. Using the model tick Ixodes ricinus, the European Lyme disease vector, we have previously demonstrated by genetic and biochemical analyses that host blood is degraded in the tick gut by a network of acidic peptidases of the aspartic and cysteine classes. Results This study reveals the digestive machinery of the I. ricinus during the course of blood-feeding on the host. The dynamic profiling of concentrations, activities and mRNA expressions of the major digestive enzymes demonstrates that the de novo synthesis of peptidases triggers the dramatic increase of the hemoglobinolytic activity along the feeding period. Overall hemoglobinolysis, as well as the activity of digestive peptidases are negligible at the early stage of feeding, but increase dramatically towards the end of the slow feeding period, reaching maxima in fully fed ticks. This finding contradicts the established opinion that blood digestion is reduced at the end of engorgement. Furthermore, we show that the digestive proteolysis is localized intracellularly throughout the whole duration of feeding. Conclusions Results suggest that the egressing proteolytic system in the early stage of feeding and digestion is a potential target for efficient impairment, most likely by blocking its components via antibodies present in the host blood. Therefore, digestive enzymes are promising candidates for development of novel 'anti-tick' vaccines capable of tick control and even transmission of tick-borne pathogens.

  18. Effects of Preexposure to DEET on the Downstream Blood-Feeding Behaviors of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiharto, Victor A; Grieco, John P; Murphy, Jittawadee R; Olsen, Cara H; Colacicco-Mayhugh, Michelle G; Stewart, V Ann; Achee, Nicole L; Turell, Michael J

    2016-06-10

    Mosquito behavior is heavily influenced by the chemical molecules in the environment. This knowledge can be used to modify insect behaviors; particularly to reduce vector-host contact as a powerful method for disease prevention. N,N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) is the most widely used insect repellent in the market and an excellent example of a chemical that has been used to modify insect behavior for disease prevention. However, genetic insensitivity and habituation in Aedes aegypti (L.) mosquitoes after preexposure to DEET have been reported. In this study, we investigated the effect of preexposure to DEET on the downstream blood-feeding behavior of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes and the duration of the effect. We exposed mosquitoes to four different DEET concentrations: 0.10, 0.12, 0.14, and 0.16% for 10 min then allowed the mosquitoes to blood-feed on an artificial blood-feeding system either immediately or after being held for 1, 3, 6, or 24 h following DEET exposure. We found that preexposing Ae. aegypti mosquitoes to 0.14 or 0.16% DEET lowered their blood engorgement level, but did not alter their landing and probing behavior when compared to the control test populations. The reduction in complete blood-feeding was observed at all time periods tested, but was only statistically significant at 3 and 6 h after the preexposure process. Because reduction in blood meal has been associated with increased refeeding, future studies analyzing the effect of this behavior using arbovirus-infected mosquitoes are needed to address the concern of potentially increased vectorial capacity. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Identification of salivary gland proteins depleted after blood feeding in the malaria vector Anopheles campestris-like mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriwatapron Sor-suwan

    Full Text Available Malaria sporozoites must invade the salivary glands of mosquitoes for maturation before transmission to vertebrate hosts. The duration of the sporogonic cycle within the mosquitoes ranges from 10 to 21 days depending on the parasite species and temperature. During blood feeding salivary gland proteins are injected into the vertebrate host, along with malaria sporozoites in the case of an infected mosquito. To identify salivary gland proteins depleted after blood feeding of female Anopheles campestris-like, a potential malaria vector of Plasmodium vivax in Thailand, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques were used. Results showed that 19 major proteins were significantly depleted in three to four day-old mosquitoes fed on a first blood meal. For the mosquitoes fed the second blood meal on day 14 after the first blood meal, 14 major proteins were significantly decreased in amount. The significantly depleted proteins in both groups included apyrase, 5'-nucleotidase/apyrase, D7, D7-related 1, short form D7r1, gSG6, anti-platelet protein, serine/threonine-protein kinase rio3, putative sil1, cyclophilin A, hypothetical protein Phum_PHUM512530, AGAP007618-PA, and two non-significant hit proteins. To our knowledge, this study presents for the first time the salivary gland proteins that are involved in the second blood feeding on the day corresponding to the transmission period of the sporozoites to new mammalian hosts. This information serves as a basis for future work concerning the possible role of these proteins in the parasite transmission and the physiological processes that occur during the blood feeding.

  20. Identification of salivary gland proteins depleted after blood feeding in the malaria vector Anopheles campestris-like mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sor-suwan, Sriwatapron; Jariyapan, Narissara; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Paemanee, Atchara; Phumee, Atchara; Phattanawiboon, Benjarat; Intakhan, Nuchpicha; Chanmol, Wetpisit; Bates, Paul A; Saeung, Atiporn; Choochote, Wej

    2014-01-01

    Malaria sporozoites must invade the salivary glands of mosquitoes for maturation before transmission to vertebrate hosts. The duration of the sporogonic cycle within the mosquitoes ranges from 10 to 21 days depending on the parasite species and temperature. During blood feeding salivary gland proteins are injected into the vertebrate host, along with malaria sporozoites in the case of an infected mosquito. To identify salivary gland proteins depleted after blood feeding of female Anopheles campestris-like, a potential malaria vector of Plasmodium vivax in Thailand, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques were used. Results showed that 19 major proteins were significantly depleted in three to four day-old mosquitoes fed on a first blood meal. For the mosquitoes fed the second blood meal on day 14 after the first blood meal, 14 major proteins were significantly decreased in amount. The significantly depleted proteins in both groups included apyrase, 5'-nucleotidase/apyrase, D7, D7-related 1, short form D7r1, gSG6, anti-platelet protein, serine/threonine-protein kinase rio3, putative sil1, cyclophilin A, hypothetical protein Phum_PHUM512530, AGAP007618-PA, and two non-significant hit proteins. To our knowledge, this study presents for the first time the salivary gland proteins that are involved in the second blood feeding on the day corresponding to the transmission period of the sporozoites to new mammalian hosts. This information serves as a basis for future work concerning the possible role of these proteins in the parasite transmission and the physiological processes that occur during the blood feeding.

  1. The Effects of Pre-Exposure to DEET on the Downstream Blood-Feeding Behaviors of Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    1 Sugiharto et al.: Aedes aegypti blood- Michael J. Turell 1 feeding after DEET pre-exposure Virology Division, USAMRIID 2 1425 Porter...Pre-exposure to DEET on the Downstream Blood-Feeding Behaviors of 9 Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes1 10 11 Victor A. Sugiharto,2 John P. Grieco,2,3...insect behavior for disease prevention. However, genetic insensitivity and 31 habituation in Aedes aegypti (L.) mosquitoes after pre-exposure to DEET

  2. Natural blood feeding and temperature shift modulate the global transcriptional profile of Rickettsia rickettsii infecting its tick vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda B M Galletti

    Full Text Available Rickettsia rickettsii is an obligate intracellular tick-borne bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF, the most lethal spotted fever rickettsiosis. When an infected starving tick begins blood feeding from a vertebrate host, R. rickettsii is exposed to a temperature elevation and to components in the blood meal. These two environmental stimuli have been previously associated with the reactivation of rickettsial virulence in ticks, but the factors responsible for this phenotype conversion have not been completely elucidated. Using customized oligonucleotide microarrays and high-throughput microfluidic qRT-PCR, we analyzed the effects of a 10°C temperature elevation and of a blood meal on the transcriptional profile of R. rickettsii infecting the tick Amblyomma aureolatum. This is the first study of the transcriptome of a bacterium in the genus Rickettsia infecting a natural tick vector. Although both stimuli significantly increased bacterial load, blood feeding had a greater effect, modulating five-fold more genes than the temperature upshift. Certain components of the Type IV Secretion System (T4SS were up-regulated by blood feeding. This suggests that this important bacterial transport system may be utilized to secrete effectors during the tick vector's blood meal. Blood feeding also up-regulated the expression of antioxidant enzymes, which might correspond to an attempt by R. rickettsii to protect itself against the deleterious effects of free radicals produced by fed ticks. The modulated genes identified in this study, including those encoding hypothetical proteins, require further functional analysis and may have potential as future targets for vaccine development.

  3. Intrinsic torque reversals induced by magnetic shear effects on the turbulence spectrum in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z. X.; Tynan, G. [Center for Energy Research and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization and Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Diamond, P. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization and Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Gao, C.; Rice, J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Intrinsic torque, which can be generated by turbulent stresses, can induce toroidal rotation in a tokamak plasma at rest without direct momentum injection. Reversals in intrinsic torque have been inferred from the observation of toroidal velocity changes in recent lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments. This work focuses on understanding the cause of LHCD-induced intrinsic torque reversal using gyrokinetic simulations and theoretical analyses. A new mechanism for the intrinsic torque reversal linked to magnetic shear (s{sup ^}) effects on the turbulence spectrum is identified. This reversal is a consequence of the ballooning structure at weak s{sup ^}. Based on realistic profiles from the Alcator C-Mod LHCD experiments, simulations demonstrate that the intrinsic torque reverses for weak s{sup ^} discharges and that the value of s{sup ^}{sub crit} is consistent with the experimental results s{sup ^}{sub crit}{sup exp}≈0.2∼0.3 [Rice et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 125003 (2013)]. The consideration of this intrinsic torque feature in our work is important for the understanding of rotation profile generation at weak s{sup ^} and its consequent impact on macro-instability stabilization and micro-turbulence reduction, which is crucial for ITER. It is also relevant to internal transport barrier formation at negative or weakly positive s{sup ^}.

  4. Olanzapine Reverses MK-801-Induced Cognitive Deficits and Region-Specific Alterations of NMDA Receptor Subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Li, Jitao; Guo, Chunmei; Wang, Hongli; Sun, Yaxin; Wang, Han; Su, Yun-Ai; Li, Keqing; Si, Tianmei

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction constitutes an essential component in schizophrenia for its early presence in the pathophysiology of the disease and close relatedness to life quality of patients. To develop effective treatment of cognitive deficits, it is important to understand their neurobiological causes and to identify potential therapeutic targets. In this study, adopting repeated MK-801 treatment as an animal model of schizophrenia, we investigated whether antipsychotic drugs, olanzapine and haloperidol, can reverse MK-801-induced cognitive deficits and how the reversal processes recruited proteins involved in glutamate neurotransmission in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus. We found that low-dose chronic MK-801 treatment impaired object-in-context recognition memory and reversal learning in the Morris water maze, leaving reference memory relatively unaffected, and that these cognitive deficits can be partially reversed by olanzapine, not haloperidol, treatment. At the molecular level, chronic MK-801 treatment resulted in the reduction of multiple N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits in rat mPFC and olanzapine, not haloperidol, treatment restored the levels of GluN1 and phosphorylated GluN2B in this region. Taken together, MK-801-induced cognitive deficits may be associated with region-specific changes in NMDA receptor subunits and the reversal of specific NMDA receptor subunits may underlie the cognition-enhancing effects of olanzapine. PMID:29375333

  5. Photoreactivation reverses ultraviolet radition induced premutagenic lesions leading to frameshift mutations in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuo

    1985-01-01

    The effect of photoreactivation of the ultraviolet radiation induced reversion of a trpE9777 frameshift mutation was studied in a uvr A6 derivative of Escherichia coli K12. Two different photoreactivation treatments were used, one providing a single flash of photoreactivating light and another providing 10 min of light from fluorescent lamps. The reversion frequency of the trpE9777 frameshift mutation was strongly reduced when subsueqently exposed to visible light. The dose modification factor (the ratio of equally effective doses), for cells challenged with single-flash photoreactivation, for survival and induction of reversion to Trp + was 3.6 and 3.4, respectively. UV induction of RecA protein synthesis was not reversed by a single flash of photoreactivation. The dose modification factor for 10 min of fluorescent lamp photoreactivation for survival and for induction of reversion to Trp + was 6.5 and 6.3, respectively. The dose modification factor for 10 min of photoreactivation for induction of RecA protein was 1.7-2.5. Photoreactivation decreased the reversion of trpE9777 and increased survival to the same extent. We concluded that cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers are the premutagenic lesions of UV mutagenesis of the trpE9777 allele in a uvr A6 background. (orig.)

  6. Salivary Gland Proteome during Adult Development and after Blood Feeding of Female Anopheles dissidens Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phattanawiboon, Benjarat; Jariyapan, Narissara; Mano, Chonlada; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Paemanee, Atchara; Sor-Suwan, Sriwatapron; Sriwichai, Patchara; Saeung, Atiporn; Bates, Paul A

    Understanding changes in mosquito salivary proteins during the time that sporozoite maturation occurs and after blood feeding may give information regarding the roles of salivary proteins during the malarial transmission. Anopheles dissidens (formerly Anopheles barbirostris species A1) is a potential vector of Plasmodium vivax in Thailand. In this study, analyses of the proteomic profiles of female An. dissidens salivary glands during adult development and after blood feeding were carried out using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results showed at least 17 major salivary gland proteins present from day one to day 21 post emergence at 8 different time points sampled. Although there was variation observed, the patterns of protein expression could be placed into one of four groups. Fifteen protein spots showed significant depletion after blood feeding with the percentages of the amount of depletion ranging from 8.5% to 68.11%. The overall results identified various proteins, including a putative mucin-like protein, an anti-platelet protein, a long form D7 salivary protein, a putative gVAG protein precursor, a D7-related 3.2 protein, gSG7 salivary proteins, and a gSG6 protein. These results allow better understanding of the changes of the salivary proteins during the adult mosquito development. They also provide candidate proteins to investigate any possible link or not between sporozoite maturation, or survival of skin stage sporozoites, and salivary proteins.

  7. Mouth reversal extinguishes mismatch negativity induced by the McGurk illusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskelund, Kasper; Andersen, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    The sight of articulatory mouth movements (visual speech) influences auditory speech perception. This is demonstrated by the McGurk illusion in which incongruent visual speech alters the auditory phonetic percept. In behavioral studies, reversal of the vertical mouth direction has been reported...... by visual speech with either upright (unaltered) or vertically reversed mouth area. In a preliminary analysis, we found a Mismatch Negativity component induced by the McGurk illusion for 6 of 17 participants at electrode Cz when the mouth area was upright. In comparison, these participants produced...

  8. Inhibition of protein kinase A and GIRK channel reverses fentanyl-induced respiratory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaonan; Yong, Zheng; Su, Ruibin

    2018-06-11

    Opioid-induced respiratory depression is a major obstacle to improving the clinical management of moderate to severe chronic pain. Opioids inhibit neuronal activity via various pathways, including calcium channels, adenylyl cyclase, and potassium channels. Currently, the underlying molecular pathway of opioid-induced respiratory depression is only partially understood. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of opioid-induced respiratory depression in vivo by examining the effects of different pharmacological agents on fentanyl-induced respiratory depression. Respiratory parameters were detected using whole body plethysmography in conscious rats. We show that pre-treatment with the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H89 reversed the fentanyl-related effects on respiratory rate, inspiratory time, and expiratory time. Pre-treatment with the G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel blocker Tertiapin-Q dose-dependently reversed the fentanyl-related effects on respiratory rate and inspiratory time. A phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) analogs did not affect fentanyl-induced respiratory depression. These findings suggest that PKA and GIRK may be involved in fentanyl-induced respiratory depression and could represent useful therapeutic targets for the treatment of fentanyl-induced ventilatory depression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of spin-polarized current on pulse field-induced precessional magnetization reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-fu Zhang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate effects of a small DC spin-polarized current on the pulse field-induced precessional magnetization reversal in a thin elliptic magnetic element by micromagnetic simulations. We find that the spin-polarized current not only broadens the time window of the pulse duration, in which a successful precessional reversal is achievable, but also significantly suppresses the magnetization ringing after the reversal. The pulse time window as well as the decay rate of the ringing increase with increasing the current density. When a spin-polarized current with 5 MA/cm2 is applied, the time window increases from 80 ps to 112 ps, and the relaxation time of the ringing decreases from 1.1 ns to 0.32 ns. Our results provide useful information to achieve magnetic nanodevices based on precessional switching.

  10. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-12-21

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices.

  11. X-ray irradiation induced reversible resistance change in Pt/TiO2/Pt cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seo Hyoung; Kim, Jungho; Phatak, Charudatta; D'Aquila, Kenneth; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Jiyoon; Song, Seul Ji; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Eastman, Jeffrey A; Freeland, John W; Hong, Seungbum

    2014-02-25

    The interaction between X-rays and matter is an intriguing topic for both fundamental science and possible applications. In particular, synchrotron-based brilliant X-ray beams have been used as a powerful diagnostic tool to unveil nanoscale phenomena in functional materials. However, it has not been widely investigated how functional materials respond to the brilliant X-rays. Here, we report the X-ray-induced reversible resistance change in 40-nm-thick TiO2 films sandwiched by Pt top and bottom electrodes, and propose the physical mechanism behind the emergent phenomenon. Our findings indicate that there exists a photovoltaic-like effect, which modulates the resistance reversibly by a few orders of magnitude, depending on the intensity of impinging X-rays. We found that this effect, combined with the X-ray irradiation induced phase transition confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, triggers a nonvolatile reversible resistance change. Understanding X-ray-controlled reversible resistance changes can provide possibilities to control initial resistance states of functional materials, which could be useful for future information and energy storage devices.

  12. TNF α is involved in neuropathic pain induced by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuexing; Ouyang, Handong; Liu, Shue; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J.; Hao, Shuanglin

    2011-01-01

    In patients with HIV/AIDS, neuropathic pain is a common neurological complication. Infection with the HIV itself may lead to neuropathic pain, and painful symptoms are enhanced when patients are treated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI). The mechanisms by which NRTIs contribute to the development of neuropathic pain are not known. In the current studies, we tested the role of TNFα in antiretroviral drug-induced neuropathic pain. We administered 2′,3′-dideoxycytidine (ddC, one of the NRTIs) systemically to induce mechanical allodynia. We found that ddC induced overexpression of both mRNA and proteins of GFAP and TNFα in the spinal dorsal horn. TNFα was colocalized with GFAP in the spinal dorsal horn and with NeuN in the DRG. Knockdown of TNFα with siRNA blocked the mechanical allodynia induced by ddC. Intrathecal administration of glial inhibitor or recombinant TNF soluble receptor, reversed mechanical allodynia induced by ddC. These results suggest that TNFα is involved in NRTI-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:21741472

  13. Antivenom reversal of biochemical alterations induced by black scorpion Heterometrus fastigiousus Couzijn venom in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MK Chaubey

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, Heterometrus fastigiousus venom (HFV was employed as antigen to produce species-specific scorpion antivenom (SAV in albino mice (NIH strain. To determine SAV efficacy, it was pre-incubated with 10 LD50 of HFV and then injected subcutaneously into mice. Subsequently, mortality was observed after 24 hours. Minimum effective dose (MED was 12.5 LD50 of HFV/mL of SAV. SAV effectiveness to reverse HFV-induced biochemical alterations in mice was analyzed by challenge method. Simultaneously, mice received subcutaneously 40% of 24-hour-LD50 of HFV and intravenously SAV. After four hours, changes in serum glucose, free amino acids, uric acids, pyruvic acid, cholesterol, total protein, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, lactic dehydrogenase and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase enzyme level were determined. Treatment with species-specific SAV resulted in the reversal of HFV-induced biochemical alterations.

  14. Sugammadex 4.0 mg kg-1 reversal of deep rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Buwei; Wang, Xiangrui; Hansen, Søren Helbo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Maintenance of deep Neuro Muscular Blockade (NMB) until the end of surgery may be beneficial in some surgical procedures. The selective relaxant binding agent sugammadex rapidly reverses deep levels of rocuronium-induced NMB. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy...... and safety of sugammadex 4.0 mg kg-1 for reversal of deep rocuronium-induced NMB in Chinese and Caucasian patients. Methods: This was an open-label, multicenter, prospective Phase III efficacy study in adult American Society of Anesthesiologists Class 1-3 patients scheduled for surgery under general...... anesthesia and requiring deep NMB. All patients received intravenous propofol and opioids for induction and maintenance of anesthesia, and a single intubation dose of rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg, with maintenance doses of 0.1-0.2 mg/kg as required. Sugammadex 4.0 mg/kg was administered after the last dose...

  15. Negative Pressure Pulmonary Edema after Reversing Rocuronium-Induced Neuromuscular Blockade by Sugammadex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzo Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE is a rare complication that accompanies general anesthesia, especially after extubation. We experienced a case of negative pressure pulmonary edema after tracheal extubation following reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex. In this case, the contribution of residual muscular block on the upper airway muscle as well as large inspiratory forces created by the respiratory muscle which has a low response to muscle relaxants, is suspected as the cause.

  16. Nicotine Prevents and Reverses Paclitaxel-Induced Mechanical Allodynia in a Mouse Model of CIPN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyte, S Lauren; Toma, Wisam; Bagdas, Deniz; Meade, Julie A; Schurman, Lesley D; Lichtman, Aron H; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Del Fabbro, Egidio; Fang, Xianjun; Bigbee, John W; Damaj, M Imad; Gewirtz, David A

    2018-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), a consequence of peripheral nerve fiber dysfunction or degeneration, continues to be a dose-limiting and debilitating side effect during and/or after cancer chemotherapy. Paclitaxel, a taxane commonly used to treat breast, lung, and ovarian cancers, causes CIPN in 59-78% of cancer patients. Novel interventions are needed due to the current lack of effective CIPN treatments. Our studies were designed to investigate whether nicotine can prevent and/or reverse paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy in a mouse model of CIPN, while ensuring that nicotine will not stimulate lung tumor cell proliferation or interfere with the antitumor properties of paclitaxel. Male C57BL/6J mice received paclitaxel every other day for a total of four injections (8 mg/kg, i.p.). Acute (0.3-0.9 mg/kg, i.p.) and chronic (24 mg/kg per day, s.c.) administration of nicotine respectively reversed and prevented paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia. Blockade of the antinociceptive effect of nicotine with mecamylamine and methyllycaconitine suggests that the reversal of paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia is primarily mediated by the α 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtype. Chronic nicotine treatment also prevented paclitaxel-induced intraepidermal nerve fiber loss. Notably, nicotine neither promoted proliferation of A549 and H460 non-small cell lung cancer cells nor interfered with paclitaxel-induced antitumor effects, including apoptosis. Most importantly, chronic nicotine administration did not enhance Lewis lung carcinoma tumor growth in C57BL/6J mice. These data suggest that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated pathways may be promising drug targets for the prevention and treatment of CIPN. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Reversal of haloperidol induced motor deficits in rats exposed to repeated immobilization stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shireen, Erum; Pervez, Sidra; Masroor, Maria; Ali, Wafa Binte; Rais, Qudsia; Khalil, Samira; Tariq, Anum; Haleem, Darakshan Jabeen

    2014-09-01

    Stress is defined as a non specific response of body to any physiological and psychological demand. Preclinical studies have shown that an uncontrollable stress condition produces neurochemical and behavioral deficits. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that a decrease in the responsiveness of somatodendritic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-1A receptors following adaptation to stress could attenuate haloperidol induced acute parkinsonian like effect. Results showed that single exposure (2h) to immobilization stress markedly decreased food intake, growth rate and locomotor activity but these stress-induced behavioral deficits were not observed following repeated (2h/day for 5 days) exposure of immobilization stress suggesting behavioral tolerance occurs to similar stress. An important finding of present study is a reversal of haloperidol-induced motor deficits in animals exposed to repeated immobilization stress than respective control animals. It is suggested that stress induced possible desensitization of somatodendritic 5-HT-1A as well as 5-HT-2C receptors could release dopamine system from the inhibitory influence of serotonin. On the other hand, an increase in the effectiveness of postsynaptic 5-HT-1A receptors elicits a direct stimulatory influence on the activity of dopaminergic neuron and is possibly involved in the reversal of haloperidol-induced parkinsonian like symptoms in repeatedly immobilized rats.

  18. Dexamethasone Does Not Inhibit Sugammadex Reversal After Rocuronium-Induced Neuromuscular Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, Pasquale; Laiola, Anna; Palumbo, Chiara; Spinelli, Gianmario; Servillo, Giuseppe; Di Minno, Raffaele Maria; Cafiero, Tullio; Di Iorio, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Sugammadex is a relatively new molecule that reverses neuromuscular block induced by rocuronium. The particular structure of sugammadex traps the cyclopentanoperhydrophenanthrene ring of rocuronium in its hydrophobic cavity. Dexamethasone shares the same steroidal structure with rocuronium. Studies in vitro have demonstrated that dexamethasone interacts with sugammadex, reducing its efficacy. In this study, we investigated the clinical relevance of this interaction and its influence on neuromuscular reversal. In this retrospective case-control study, we analyzed data from 45 patients divided into 3 groups: dexamethasone after induction group (15 patients) treated with 8 mg dexamethasone as an antiemetic drug shortly after induction of anesthesia; dexamethasone before reversal group (15 patients) treated with dexamethasone just before sugammadex injection; and control group (15 patients) treated with 8 mg ondansetron. All groups received 0.6 mg/kg rocuronium at induction, 0.15 mg/kg rocuronium at train-of-four ratio (TOF) 2 for neuromuscular relaxation, and 2 mg/kg sugammadex for reversal at the end of the procedure at TOF2. Neuromuscular relaxation was monitored with a TOF-Watch® system. The control group had a recovery time of 154 ± 54 seconds (mean ± SD), the dexamethasone after induction group 134 ± 55 seconds, and the dexamethasone before reversal group 131 ± 68 seconds. The differences among groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.5141). Our results show that the use of dexamethasone as an antiemetic drug for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting does not interfere with reversal of neuromuscular blockade with sugammadex in patients undergoing elective surgery with general anesthesia in contrast to in vitro studies that support this hypothesis.

  19. Reversal of rocuronium-induced (1.2 mg/kg) profound neuromuscular block by sugammadex: a multicenter, dose-finding and safety study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, H.D. de; Driessen, J.J.; Marcus, M.A.; Kerkkamp, H.E.M.; Heeringa, M.; Klimek, M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade can be accomplished by chemical encapsulation of rocuronium by sugammadex, a modified gamma-cyclodextrin derivative. This study investigated the efficacy and safety of sugammadex in reversing rocuronium-induced profound neuromuscular

  20. Exercise reverses metabolic syndrome in high-fat diet-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touati, Sabeur; Meziri, Fayçal; Devaux, Sylvie; Berthelot, Alain; Touyz, Rhian M; Laurant, Pascal

    2011-03-01

    Chronic consumption of a high-fat diet induces obesity. We investigated whether exercise would reverse the cardiometabolic disorders associated with obesity without it being necessary to change from a high- to normal-fat diet. Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a high-fat (HFD) or control diet (CD) for 12 wk. HFD rats were then divided into four groups: sedentary HFD (HFD-S), exercise trained (motor treadmill for 12 wk) HFD (HFD-Ex), modified diet (HFD to CD; HF/CD-S), and exercise trained with modified diet (HF/CD-Ex). Cardiovascular risk parameters associated with metabolic syndrome were measured, and contents of aortic Akt, phospho-Akt at Ser (473), total endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and phospho-eNOS at Ser (1177) were determined by Western blotting. Chronic consumption of HFD induced a metabolic syndrome. Exercise and dietary modifications reduced adiposity, improved glucose and insulin levels and plasma lipid profile, and exerted an antihypertensive effect. Exercise was more effective than dietary modification in improving plasma levels of thiobarbituric acid-reacting substance and in correcting the endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine and insulin. Furthermore, independent of the diet used, exercise increased Akt and eNOS phosphorylation. Metabolic syndrome induced by HFD is reversed by exercise and diet modification. It is demonstrated that exercise training induces these beneficial effects without the requirement for dietary modification, and these beneficial effects may be mediated by shear stress-induced Akt/eNOS pathway activation. Thus, exercise may be an effective strategy to reverse almost all the atherosclerotic risk factors linked to obesity, particularly in the vasculature.

  1. Reversal of sodium pump inhibitor induced vascular smooth muscle contraction with digibind. Stoichiometry and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krep, H H; Graves, S W; Price, D A; Lazarus, M; Ensign, A; Soszynski, P A; Hollenberg, N K

    1996-01-01

    The possibility that a circulating sodium pump inhibitor contributes to the pathogenesis of volume-dependent hypertension via an action on vascular smooth muscle (VSM) is supported by multiple lines of investigation, but remains controversial. We had two goals in this study. The first was to compare the pattern of contractile response of rabbit aorta induced by two candidates, ouabain and a labile sodium pump inhibitor that we have identified in the peritoneal dialysate of volume-expanded hypertensive patients with chronic renal failure. Our second goal was to examine the ability of Digibind, a Fab fragment of antisera directed against digoxin, to reverse VSM contraction induced by both agents. Ouabain induced a concentration-dependent contraction, which was delayed in onset, was gradual, and reached a stable plateau after many hours. The labile sodium pump inhibitor induced a qualitatively similar series of responses. Digibind rapidly reversed the contractile responses to both sodium pump inhibitors, with a rate of relaxation that matched that induced by physical removal of the pump inhibitor from the bath. For ouabain, the Digibind:ouabain stoichiometry was highly predictable. When Digibind was present in a molar concentration equivalent to that of ouabain, or less, it had no effect. When the Digibind concentration was twice that of ouabain, complete relaxation occurred. Although the concentration:VSM response relationship for ouabain was steep, the concentration:effect interaction with Digibind was even more steep. The molar concentration of Digibind required to reverse the effects of the labile endogenous inhibitor from peritoneal dialysate was consistently lower than that for ouabain, which is compatible with either greater potency of the labile factor in VSM or greater affinity for Digibind. These findings are compatible with a role for one or more endogenous sodium pump inhibitors as the determinant of vascular smooth muscle tone in the volume

  2. Meeting the challenges of on-host and off-host water balance in blood-feeding arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Joshua B; Denlinger, David L

    2010-10-01

    In this review, we describe water balance requirements of blood-feeding arthropods, particularly contrasting dehydration tolerance during the unfed, off-host state and the challenges of excess water that accompany receipt of the bloodmeal. Most basic water balance characteristics during the off-host stage are applicable to other terrestrial arthropods, as well. A well-coordinated suite of responses enable arthropods to conserve water resources, enhance their desiccation tolerance, and increase their water supplies by employing a diverse array of molecular, structural and behavioral responses. Water loss rates during the off-host phase are particularly useful for generating a scheme to classify vectors according to their habitat requirements for water, thus providing a convenient tool with potential predictive power for defining suitable current and future vector habitats. Blood-feeding elicits an entirely different set of challenges as the vector responds to overhydration by quickly increasing its rate of cuticular water loss and elevating the rate of diuresis to void excess water and condense the bloodmeal. Immature stages that feed on blood normally have a net increase in water content at the end of a blood-feeding cycle, but in adults the water content reverts to the pre-feeding level when the cycle is completed. Common themes are evident in diverse arthropods that feed on blood, particularly the physiological mechanisms used to respond to the sudden influx of water as well as the mechanisms used to counter water shortfalls that are encountered during the non-feeding, off-host state. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Susceptibility of adult female Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae is modified following blood feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuels Richard I

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mosquito Aedes aegypti, vector of dengue fever, is a target for control by entomopathogenic fungi. Recent studies by our group have shown the susceptibility of adult A. aegypti to fungal infection by Metarhizium anisopliae. This fungus is currently being tested under field conditions. However, it is unknown whether blood-fed A. aegypti females are equally susceptible to infection by entomopathogenic fungi as sucrose fed females. Insect populations will be composed of females in a range of nutritional states. The fungus should be equally efficient at reducing survival of insects that rest on fungus impregnated surfaces following a blood meal as those coming into contact with fungi before host feeding. This could be an important factor when considering the behavior of A. aegypti females that can blood feed on multiple hosts over a short time period. Methods Female A. aegypti of the Rockefeller strain and a wild strain were infected with two isolates of the entomopathogenic fungus M. anisopliae (LPP 133 and ESALQ 818 using an indirect contact bioassay at different times following blood feeding. Survival rates were monitored on a daily basis and one-way analysis of variance combined with Duncan's post-hoc test or Log-rank survival curve analysis were used for statistical comparisons of susceptibility to infection. Results Blood feeding rapidly reduced susceptibility to infection, determined by the difference in survival rates and survival curves, when females were exposed to either of the two M. anisopliae isolates. Following a time lag which probably coincided with digestion of the blood meal (96-120 h post-feeding, host susceptibility to infection returned to pre-blood fed (sucrose fed levels. Conclusions Reduced susceptibility of A. aegypti to fungi following a blood meal is of concern. Furthermore, engorged females seeking out intra-domicile resting places post-blood feeding, would be predicted to rest for prolonged

  4. Susceptibility of adult female Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae is modified following blood feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Adriano R; Carolino, Aline T; Silva, Carlos P; Samuels, Richard I

    2011-05-26

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti, vector of dengue fever, is a target for control by entomopathogenic fungi. Recent studies by our group have shown the susceptibility of adult A. aegypti to fungal infection by Metarhizium anisopliae. This fungus is currently being tested under field conditions. However, it is unknown whether blood-fed A. aegypti females are equally susceptible to infection by entomopathogenic fungi as sucrose fed females. Insect populations will be composed of females in a range of nutritional states. The fungus should be equally efficient at reducing survival of insects that rest on fungus impregnated surfaces following a blood meal as those coming into contact with fungi before host feeding. This could be an important factor when considering the behavior of A. aegypti females that can blood feed on multiple hosts over a short time period. Female A. aegypti of the Rockefeller strain and a wild strain were infected with two isolates of the entomopathogenic fungus M. anisopliae (LPP 133 and ESALQ 818) using an indirect contact bioassay at different times following blood feeding. Survival rates were monitored on a daily basis and one-way analysis of variance combined with Duncan's post-hoc test or Log-rank survival curve analysis were used for statistical comparisons of susceptibility to infection. Blood feeding rapidly reduced susceptibility to infection, determined by the difference in survival rates and survival curves, when females were exposed to either of the two M. anisopliae isolates. Following a time lag which probably coincided with digestion of the blood meal (96-120 h post-feeding), host susceptibility to infection returned to pre-blood fed (sucrose fed) levels. Reduced susceptibility of A. aegypti to fungi following a blood meal is of concern. Furthermore, engorged females seeking out intra-domicile resting places post-blood feeding, would be predicted to rest for prolonged periods on fungus impregnated black cloths, thus optimizing infection

  5. Inactivation of Ca2+-induced ciliary reversal by high-salt extraction in the cilia of Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutomi, Osamu; Seki, Makoto; Nakamura, Shogo; Kamachi, Hiroyuki; Noguchi, Munenori

    2013-10-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) induces ciliary reversal and backward swimming in Paramecium. However, it is not known how the Ca(2+) signal controls the motor machinery to induce ciliary reversal. We found that demembranated cilia on the ciliated cortical sheets from Paramecium caudatum lost the ability to undergo ciliary reversal after brief extraction with a solution containing 0.5 M KCl. KNO(3), which is similar to KCl with respect to chaotropic effect; it had the same effect as that of KCl on ciliary response. Cyclic AMP antagonizes Ca(2+)-induced ciliary reversal. Limited trypsin digestion prevents endogenous A-kinase and cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of an outer arm dynein light chain and induces ciliary reversal. However, the trypsin digestion prior to the high-salt extraction did not affect the inhibition of Ca(2+)-induced ciliary reversal caused by the high-salt extraction. Furthermore, during the course of the high-salt extraction, some axonemal proteins were extracted from ciliary axonemes, suggesting that they may be responsible for Ca(2+)-induced ciliary reversal.

  6. Efficacy of the chelating agent CaEDTA in reversing lead-induced changes in behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory-Slechta, D A; Weiss, B

    1989-01-01

    The chelating agent CaEDTA has been reported to reverse the deficits in intellectual function and performance associated with Pb (lead) exposure in children. However, such studies have not included rigorous controls for the intervention procedures per se. The experiments reported here examined reversibility of performance changes in a rat model based on behavior sensitive to low-level Pb exposure. Rats were exposed to 50 ppm sodium or Pb acetate in drinking water from weaning. Performance maintained under a Fixed-Interval schedule of food reinforcement began at 55 days of age. Following the onset of the characteristic increase in short interresponse times (IRTs) associated with low-level Pb exposure after 35 experimental sessions, Pb treatment was terminated. Animals within both the control and Pb groups were then matched on the basis of performance indices and injected daily for 5 days with either saline, 75 mg/kg or 150 mg/kg CaEDTA. Subsequent changes in F1 performance were monitored for 35-60 sessions. No consistent effects of CaEDTA were detected in control animals. CaEDTA treatment failed to reverse the behavioral effects in Pb-exposed animals. If anything, it tended to further increase the proportion of short IRTs. These data suggest that better controlled clinical studies are warranted to evaluate the efficacy of CaEDTA in reversing Pb-induced behavioral effects before its application for these purposes becomes widespread.

  7. Reversal of CRF- and stress-induced anorexia by an ayurvedic formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Kulkarni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Trikatu churna is one of the commonly used Ayurvedic formulations in the traditional system of medicine in India for the treatment of agnimandya, i.e. anorexia. Trikatu contains equal amounts of finely powdered rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae and fruits of Piper longum L. and Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae. The chief objective of the study was to determine the antianorectic effects of three drugs individually and to compare these effects with the effect of Trikatu. The activity of the drugs was studied after anorexia was induced in rats by (1 physical stress arising from immobilization for 60 min; (2 intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 μg/kg body weight; and (3 intraperitoneal administration of fluoxetine (8 mg/kg body weight. Similar doses of the extracts were tested on freely feeding rats and on rats that had been deprived of food for 20 h. Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF, 0.3 μg/rat can induce anxiogenic-like behavior and reduced food intake. This model was also studied, and the results were compared. The components of Trikatu churna failed to individually reverse the inhibition of feeding. In contrast, Trikatu churna pretreatment reversed stress-, fluoxetine- and CRF-induced anorexia. The study provides strong evidence of the synergistic action of Ayurvedic formulas and also proves the ability of Trikatu churna to reduce stress and CRF-induced anorexia.

  8. Reversal of CRF- and stress-induced anorexia by an ayurvedic formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Kulkarni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Trikatu churna is one of the commonly used Ayurvedic formulations in the traditional system of medicine in India for the treatment of agnimandya, i.e. anorexia. Trikatu contains equal amounts of finely powdered rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae and fruits of Piper longum L. and Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae. The chief objective of the study was to determine the antianorectic effects of three drugs individually and to compare these effects with the effect of Trikatu. The activity of the drugs was studied after anorexia was induced in rats by (1 physical stress arising from immobilization for 60 min; (2 intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 μg/kg body weight; and (3 intraperitoneal administration of fluoxetine (8 mg/kg body weight. Similar doses of the extracts were tested on freely feeding rats and on rats that had been deprived of food for 20 h. Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF, 0.3 μg/rat can induce anxiogenic-like behavior and reduced food intake. This model was also studied, and the results were compared. The components of Trikatu churna failed to individually reverse the inhibition of feeding. In contrast, Trikatu churna pretreatment reversed stress-, fluoxetine- and CRF-induced anorexia. The study provides strong evidence of the synergistic action of Ayurvedic formulas and also proves the ability of Trikatu churna to reduce stress and CRF-induced anorexia.

  9. Cladribine and Fludarabine Nucleotides Induce Distinct Hexamers Defining a Common Mode of Reversible RNR Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisitpitthaya, Somsinee; Zhao, Yi; Long, Marcus J C; Li, Minxing; Fletcher, Elaine A; Blessing, William A; Weiss, Robert S; Aye, Yimon

    2016-07-15

    The enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a major target of anticancer drugs. Until recently, suicide inactivation in which synthetic substrate analogs (nucleoside diphosphates) irreversibly inactivate the RNR-α2β2 heterodimeric complex was the only clinically proven inhibition pathway. For instance, this mechanism is deployed by the multifactorial anticancer agent gemcitabine diphosphate. Recently reversible targeting of RNR-α-alone coupled with ligand-induced RNR-α-persistent hexamerization has emerged to be of clinical significance. To date, clofarabine nucleotides are the only known example of this mechanism. Herein, chemoenzymatic syntheses of the active forms of two other drugs, phosphorylated cladribine (ClA) and fludarabine (FlU), allow us to establish that reversible inhibition is common to numerous drugs in clinical use. Enzyme inhibition and fluorescence anisotropy assays show that the di- and triphosphates of the two nucleosides function as reversible (i.e., nonmechanism-based) inhibitors of RNR and interact with the catalytic (C site) and the allosteric activity (A site) sites of RNR-α, respectively. Gel filtration, protease digestion, and FRET assays demonstrate that inhibition is coupled with formation of conformationally diverse hexamers. Studies in 293T cells capable of selectively inducing either wild-type or oligomerization-defective mutant RNR-α overexpression delineate the central role of RNR-α oligomerization in drug activity, and highlight a potential resistance mechanism to these drugs. These data set the stage for new interventions targeting RNR oligomeric regulation.

  10. Resolving the conflict of mating versus blood feeding: exploring role of quick-to-court gene in the mosquito Anopheles culicifacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanwee Das De

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes are the deadliest animal in the world. Mosquitoes transmit several vector borne disease (VBDs such as malaria, dengue, chikungunya, zika fever, yellow fever and responsible for a loss of millions of lives annually. Though, suppression of mosquito population by means of chemical insecticides plays a crucial role in controlling vector population. However, fast emergence of insecticide resistance limits the efforts and demanding to design alternative molecular tools to fight against these VBDs. One of the potential strategies may include interfering complex feeding and/or mating behavioural properties. Compared to female mosquito male mosquito have an indirect effect in disease transmission and thus least studied. Males induce several post-mating behavioural changes in females, including the induction of host seeking and blood feeding behavior. Although, a successful mating events are guided by non-genetic circadian rhythm, but how genetic factors manages the sequential events of swarm formation, suitable mate finding and aerial coupling remains poorly investigated. While understanding the complex feeding behaviour of adult An. culicifacies female mosquito, we identified and analyzed a unique transcript (383 bp from the olfactory system of the blood-fed mosquito, encoding the ‘quick to court’ (QTC protein. It is a homolog of Drosophila coiled-coil QTC (Q9VMU5 protein and shown to play an important role in driving the male courtship behaviour. A comprehensive in silico analysis predicted a 1536 bp long transcript encoding 511 AA long protein in the mosquito genome. Age dependent and sex specific transcriptional profiling revealed that both male female mosquitoes attain the specific age of adulteration on 5-7 days. Circadian clock dependent Ac-qtc profiling indicated that late evening natural dysregulation of Ac-qtc by unknown mechanism may promote the successful insemination event during active copulation. Together, our findings

  11. The effects of blood feeding and exogenous supply of tryptophan on the quantities of xanthurenic acid in the salivary glands of Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okech, Bernard; Arai, Meiji; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki

    2006-03-24

    Xanthurenic acid (XA), produced as a byproduct during the biosynthesis of insect eye pigment (ommochromes), is a strong inducer of Plasmodium gametogenesis at very low concentrations. In previous studies, it was shown that XA is present in Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquito salivary glands and that during blood feeding the mosquitoes ingested their own saliva into the midgut. Considering these two facts together, it is therefore likely that XA is discharged with saliva during blood feeding and is swallowed into the midgut where it exerts its effect on Plasmodium gametocytes. However, the quantities of XA in the salivary glands and midgut are unknown. In this study, we used high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection to detect and quantify XA in the salivary glands and midgut. Based on the results of this study, we found 0.28+/-0.05 ng of XA in the salivary glands of the mosquitoes, accounting for 10% of the total XA content in the mosquito whole body. The amounts of XA in the salivary glands reduced to 0.13+/-0.06 ng after mosquitoes ingested a blood meal. Approximately 0.05+/-0.01 ng of XA was detected in the midgut of nonblood fed An. stephensi mosquitoes. By adding synthetic tryptophan as a source of XA into larval rearing water (2 mM) or in sugar meals (10 mM), we evaluated whether XA levels in the mosquito (salivary glands, midgut, and whole body) were boosted and the subsequent effect on infectivity of Plasmodium berghei in the treated mosquito groups. A female specific increase in XA content was observed in the whole body and in the midgut of mosquito groups where tryptophan was added either in the larval water or sugar meals. However, XA in the salivary glands was not affected by tryptophan addition to larval water, and surprisingly it reduced when tryptophan was added to sugar meals. The P. berghei oocyst loads in the mosquito midguts were lower in mosquitoes fed tryptophan treated sugar meals than in mosquitoes

  12. Local Peltier-effect-induced reversible metal–insulator transition in VO2 nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takami, Hidefumi; Kanki, Teruo; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    We report anomalous resistance leaps and drops in VO 2 nanowires with operating current density and direction, showing reversible and nonvolatile switching. This event is associated with the metal–insulator phase transition (MIT) of local nanodomains with coexistence states of metallic and insulating phases induced by thermoelectric cooling and heating effects. Because the interface of metal and insulator domains has much different Peltier coefficient, it is possible that a significant Peltier effect would be a source of the local MIT. This operation can be realized by one-dimensional domain configuration in VO 2 nanowires because one straight current path through the electronic domain-interface enables theoretical control of thermoelectric effects. This result will open a new method of reversible control of electronic states in correlated electron materials.

  13. Local Peltier-effect-induced reversible metal–insulator transition in VO{sub 2} nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takami, Hidefumi; Kanki, Teruo, E-mail: kanki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: h-tanaka@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, Hidekazu, E-mail: kanki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: h-tanaka@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We report anomalous resistance leaps and drops in VO{sub 2} nanowires with operating current density and direction, showing reversible and nonvolatile switching. This event is associated with the metal–insulator phase transition (MIT) of local nanodomains with coexistence states of metallic and insulating phases induced by thermoelectric cooling and heating effects. Because the interface of metal and insulator domains has much different Peltier coefficient, it is possible that a significant Peltier effect would be a source of the local MIT. This operation can be realized by one-dimensional domain configuration in VO{sub 2} nanowires because one straight current path through the electronic domain-interface enables theoretical control of thermoelectric effects. This result will open a new method of reversible control of electronic states in correlated electron materials.

  14. Restoration of hippocampal growth hormone reverses stress-induced hippocampal impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin M. Vander Weele

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Though growth hormone (GH is synthesized by hippocampal neurons, where its expression is influenced by stress exposure, its function is poorly characterized. Here, we show that a regimen of chronic stress that impairs hippocampal function in rats also leads to a profound decrease in hippocampal GH levels. Restoration of hippocampal GH in the dorsal hippocampus via viral-mediated gene transfer completely reversed stress-related impairment of two hippocampus-dependent behavioral tasks, auditory trace fear conditioning and contextual fear conditioning, without affecting hippocampal function in unstressed control rats. GH overexpression reversed stress-induced decrements in both fear acquisition and long-term fear memory. These results suggest that loss of hippocampal GH contributes to hippocampal dysfunction following prolonged stress and demonstrate that restoring hippocampal GH levels following stress can promote stress resilience.

  15. [Comparison of neostigmine induced reversal of rocuronium in different age children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinzhu; Cheng, Zhaoyu

    2016-03-15

    To compare the effectiveness of neostigmine induced reversal of rocuronium in neonates, infants, young children and children. One hundred and sixty ASA I or II pediatric patients undergoings elective surgical procedures under total intravenous anesthesia were enrolled during July 2014 to April 2015 in Tianjin Children's Hospital. The patients were divided into four groups according to ages: neonate group, infant group, young children group and children group.Then control subgroup and neostigmine reversal subgroup including twenty patients were randomly selected from every different age groups by the method of random number table. After induction of anesthesia, 0.6 mg/kg rocuronium was administered, and 0.2 mg/kg maintenance doses given as required during period of operation. Neuromuscular block was monitored using acceleromyographic train of four (TOF). When T1/control returned to 15%, 0.03 mg/kg neostigmine and 0.01 mg/kg atropine were given to patients of reversal subgroups, and saline 0.1 ml/kg was given to patients of control subgroups. The recovery time of T25, T75, TR0.7, recovery index, blood pressure, heart rate and adverse reactions were observed and recorded. In control subgroups, the recovery time of T75 for neonates, infants, young children and children were (27.10±8.72), (16.70±6.35), (13.05±1.96), (14.40±3.08) min, respectively (F=25.052, P0.05). But the recovery time of T75, TR0.7 and recovery index in neonate group were longer than other age groups (all Procuronium are comparable in infant, young children and children. There are obviously reversal effects in all of age groups when neostigmine is given to antagonize rocuronium. Either spontaneous recovery time or reversal recovery time of neostigmine to rocuronium is longer for neonates than other age's children.

  16. Reversal of profound vecuronium-induced neuromuscular block under sevoflurane anesthesia: sugammadex versus neostigmine.

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    Lemmens Hendrikus JM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors cannot rapidly reverse profound neuromuscular block. Sugammadex, a selective relaxant binding agent, reverses the effects of rocuronium and vecuronium by encapsulation. This study assessed the efficacy of sugammadex compared with neostigmine in reversal of profound vecuronium-induced neuromuscular block under sevoflurane anesthesia. Methods Patients aged ≥18 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1-4, scheduled to undergo surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled in this phase III, multicenter, randomized, safety-assessor blinded study. Sevoflurane anesthetized patients received vecuronium 0.1 mg/kg for intubation, with maintenance doses of 0.015 mg/kg as required. Patients were randomized to receive sugammadex 4 mg/kg or neostigmine 70 μg/kg with glycopyrrolate 14 μg/kg at 1-2 post-tetanic counts. The primary efficacy variable was time from start of study drug administration to recovery of the train-of-four ratio to 0.9. Safety assessments included physical examination, laboratory data, vital signs, and adverse events. Results Eighty three patients were included in the intent-to-treat population (sugammadex, n = 47; neostigmine, n = 36. Geometric mean time to recovery of the train-of-four ratio to 0.9 was 15-fold faster with sugammadex (4.5 minutes compared with neostigmine (66.2 minutes; p Conclusions Recovery from profound vecuronium-induced block is significantly faster with sugammadex, compared with neostigmine. Neostigmine did not rapidly reverse profound neuromuscular block (Trial registration number: NCT00473694.

  17. The effect of photoperiod on life history and blood-feeding activity in Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, K S; Schelble, S; Jerz, K; Keenan, M

    2015-06-01

    Several studies have examined how climatic variables such as temperature and precipitation may affect life history traits in mosquitoes that are important to disease transmission. Despite its importance as a seasonal cue in nature, studies investigating the influence of photoperiod on such traits are relatively few. This study aims to investigate how photoperiod alters life history traits, survival, and blood-feeding activity in Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus). We performed three experiments that tested the effects of day length on female survival, development time, adult size, fecundity, adult life span, and propensity to blood feed in Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti. Each experiment had three photoperiod treatments: 1) short-day (10L:14D), 2) control (12L:12D), and 3) long-day (14L:10D). Aedes albopictus adult females were consistently larger in size when reared in short-day conditions. Aedes aegypti adult females from short-day treatments lived longer and were more likely to take a blood meal compared to other treatments. We discuss how species-specific responses may reflect alternative strategies evolved to increase survival during unfavorable conditions. We review the potential impacts of these responses on seasonal transmission patterns, such as potentially increasing vectorial capacity of Ae. aegypti during periods of shorter day lengths. © 2015 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  18. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Reverses Ammonium Metavanadate-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Rats

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    Mounira Tlili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of atmospheric vanadium is constantly increasing due to fossil fuel combustion. This environmental pollution favours vanadium exposure in particular to its vanadate form, causing occupational bronchial asthma and bronchitis. Based on the well admitted bronchodilator properties of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, we investigated the ability of this neuropeptide to reverse the vanadate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in rats. Exposure to ammonium metavanadate aerosols (5 mg/m3/h for 15 minutes induced 4 hours later an array of pathophysiological events, including increase of bronchial resistance and histological alterations, activation of proinflammatory alveolar macrophages, and increased oxidative stress status. Powerfully, PACAP inhalation (0.1 mM for 10 minutes alleviated many of these deleterious effects as demonstrated by a decrease of bronchial resistance and histological restoration. PACAP reduced the level of expression of mRNA encoding inflammatory chemokines (MIP-1α, MIP-2, and KC and cytokines (IL-1α and TNF-α in alveolar macrophages and improved the antioxidant status. PACAP reverses the vanadate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness not only through its bronchodilator activity but also by counteracting the proinflammatory and prooxidative effects of the metal. Then, the development of stable analogs of PACAP could represent a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of inflammatory respiratory disorders.

  19. Acute food deprivation reverses morphine-induced locomotion deficits in M5 muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidl, Stephan; Lee, Esther; Wasserman, David; Yeomans, John S

    2013-09-01

    Lesions of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT), one of two sources of cholinergic input to the ventral tegmental area (VTA), block conditioned place preference (CPP) for morphine in drug-naïve rats. M5 muscarinic cholinergic receptors, expressed by midbrain dopamine neurons, are critical for the ability of morphine to increase nucleus accumbens dopamine levels and locomotion, and for morphine CPP. This suggests that M5-mediated PPT cholinergic inputs to VTA dopamine neurons critically contribute to morphine-induced dopamine activation, reward and locomotion. In the current study we tested whether food deprivation, which reduces PPT contribution to morphine CPP in rats, could also reduce M5 contributions to morphine-induced locomotion in mice. Acute 18-h food deprivation reversed the phenotypic differences usually seen between non-deprived wild-type and M5 knockout mice. That is, food deprivation increased morphine-induced locomotion in M5 knockout mice but reduced morphine-induced locomotion in wild-type mice. Food deprivation increased saline-induced locomotion equally in wild-type and M5 knockout mice. Based on these findings, we suggest that food deprivation reduces the contribution of M5-mediated PPT cholinergic inputs to the VTA in morphine-induced locomotion and increases the contribution of a PPT-independent pathway. The contributions of cholinergic, dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons to the effects of acute food deprivation are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) on radiation-induced heteroallelic reversion in diploid yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.R.; Mahajan, J.M.; Krishnan, D.

    1976-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide has cryoprotective and radioprotective properties. It is also an efficient scavenger of radicals produced by radiolysis of water. Gamma-induced reversion of diploid yeast in the presence of this chemical during irradiation have been studied. The dose-modifying factor was in the same range as for survival. When the yeast was irradiated in the frozen state, the observed protection by DMSO disappeared. The results are discussed in terms of direct and indirect actions of radiations and the radical-scavenging ability of this chemical

  1. Age-Dependent Cellular and Behavioral Deficits Induced by Molecularly Targeted Drugs Are Reversible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafidi, Joseph; Ritter, Jonathan; Talbot, Brooke M; Edwards, Jorge; Chew, Li-Jin; Gallo, Vittorio

    2018-04-15

    Newly developed targeted anticancer drugs inhibit signaling pathways commonly altered in adult and pediatric cancers. However, as these pathways are also essential for normal brain development, concerns have emerged of neurologic sequelae resulting specifically from their application in pediatric cancers. The neural substrates and age dependency of these drug-induced effects in vivo are unknown, and their long-term behavioral consequences have not been characterized. This study defines the age-dependent cellular and behavioral effects of these drugs on normally developing brains and determines their reversibility with post-drug intervention. Mice at different postnatal ages received short courses of molecularly targeted drugs in regimens analagous to clinical treatment. Analysis of rapidly developing brain structures important for sensorimotor and cognitive function showed that, while adult administration was without effect, earlier neonatal administration of targeted therapies attenuated white matter oligodendroglia and hippocampal neuronal development more profoundly than later administration, leading to long-lasting behavioral deficits. This functional impairment was reversed by rehabilitation with physical and cognitive enrichment. Our findings demonstrate age-dependent, reversible effects of these drugs on brain development, which are important considerations as treatment options expand for pediatric cancers. Significance: Targeted therapeutics elicit age-dependent long-term consequences on the developing brain that can be ameliorated with environmental enrichment. Cancer Res; 78(8); 2081-95. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Reversal or protection by light of the ethidium bromide induced petite mutation in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hixon, S.C.; Burnham, A.D.; Irons, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    An intermediate in the ethidium bromide (EB) induced petite mutation pathway may be destabilized by daylight light to cause a reversion to the normal grande phenotype. Starved cells preincubated in the dark for up to 6 h with 100μg/ml EB could be reverted to grandes after one hour of light exposure, whereas similarly treated cells maintained in the dark expresse the petite mutation in more than 80 percent of the population. In addition, the production of petite mutants by EB in buffer could be prevented if cell suspensions were exposed to light immediately upon the addition of EB. Photoreversal of the EB-derived petite mutation in growing cells as less efficient presumably because the availability of an energy source caused a continuation of mutation events beyond the light revertible step to a non-reversible fixation of the mutation. Cells treated with EB in growth and reversal of the mutation. This may be due to the cold inhibition of an enzyme which comes into play beyond the light sensitive step in the mutation pathway. (orig.) [de

  3. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain JB-1 reverses restraint stress-induced gut dysmotility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C; Wu, R Y; Wong, A; Stanisz, A M; Yan, R; Min, K K; Pasyk, M; McVey Neufeld, K-A; Karamat, M I; Foster, J A; Bienenstock, J; Forsythe, P; Kunze, W A

    2017-01-01

    Environmental stress affects the gut with dysmotility being a common consequence. Although a variety of microbes or molecules may prevent the dysmotility, none reverse the dysmotility. We have used a 1 hour restraint stress mouse model to test for treatment effects of the neuroactive microbe, L. rhamnosus JB-1 ™ . Motility of fluid-filled ex vivo gut segments in a perfusion organ bath was recorded by video and migrating motor complexes measured using spatiotemporal maps of diameter changes. Stress reduced jejunal and increased colonic propagating contractile cluster velocities and frequencies, while increasing contraction amplitudes for both. Luminal application of 10E8 cfu/mL JB-1 restored motor complex variables to unstressed levels within minutes of application. L. salivarius or Na.acetate had no treatment effects, while Na.butyrate partially reversed stress effects on colonic frequency and amplitude. Na.propionate reversed the stress effects for jejunum and colon except on jejunal amplitude. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, a potential for certain beneficial microbes as treatment of stress-induced intestinal dysmotility and that the mechanism for restoration of function occurs within the intestine via a rapid drug-like action on the enteric nervous system. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Speman®, A Proprietary Ayurvedic Formulation, Reverses Cyclophosphamide-Induced Oligospermia In Rats.

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    Mohd. Azeemuddin Mukram

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This investigation was aimed to evaluate the effect of Speman®, a well known ayurvedic proprietary preparation, in an experimental model of cyclophosphamide-(CP induced oligospermia in rats.Materials and Methods: Thirty male rats were randomized in to five, equally-sized groups. Rats in group 1 served as a normal control; group 2 served as an untreated positive control; groups 3, 4, 5 received  Speman® granules  at doses of 300, 600, and 900mg/kg body weight p.o. respectively, once daily for 13 days. On day four, one hour after the respective treatment, oligospermia was induced by administering a single dose of CP (100mg/kg body weight p.o.  to all the groups except group1. At the end of the study period the rats were euthanised and accessory reproductive organs were weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. The semen samples were subject to enumeration of sperms.  Weight of the reproductive organs, histopathological examination of the tissues, and sperm count were the parameters studied to understand the effect of Speman® on rats with CP-induced oligospermia.Results: Changes that occurred due to the administration of CP at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight were dose dependently reversed with Speman® at a dose of 300, 600, and 900 mg/kg body weight. There was a statistically significant increase in sperm count and the weight of the seminal vesicle, epididymis, and prostate.Conclusion: Findings of this investigation indicate that Speman® dose dependently reversed the CP-induced derangement of various parameters pertaining to the reproductive system.  This could explain the total beneficial actions of Speman® reported in several other clinical trials.

  5. Free radical scavenging reverses fructose-induced salt-sensitive hypertension

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    Zenner ZP

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Zachary P Zenner, Kevin L Gordish, William H Beierwaltes Department of Internal Medicine, Hypertension and Vascular Research Division, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: We have previously reported that a moderate dietary supplementation of 20% fructose but not glucose leads to a salt-sensitive hypertension related to increased proximal sodium–hydrogen exchanger activity and increased renal sodium retention. We also found that while high salt increased renal nitric oxide formation, this was retarded in the presence of fructose intake. We hypothesized that at least part of the pathway leading to fructose-induced salt-sensitive hypertension could be due to fructose-induced formation of reactive oxygen species and inappropriate stimulation of renin secretion, all of which would contribute to an increase in blood pressure. We found that both 20% fructose intake and a high-salt diet stimulated 8-isoprostane excretion. The superoxide dismutase (SOD mimetic tempol significantly reduced this elevated excretion. Next, we placed rats on a high-salt diet (4% for 1 week in combination with normal rat chow or 20% fructose with or without chronic tempol administration. A fructose plus high-salt diet induced a rapid increase (15 mmHg in systolic blood pressure and reversed high salt suppression of plasma renin activity. Tempol treatment reversed the pressor response and restored high salt suppression of renin. We conclude that fructose-induced salt-sensitive hypertension is driven by increased renal reactive oxygen species formation associated with salt retention and an enhanced renin–angiotensin system. Keywords: reactive oxygen species, tempol, sodium, renin, oxidative stress

  6. Quetiapine reverse paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain in mice: Role of Alpha2- adrenergic receptors

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    Alireza Abed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common adverse effect of cancer chemo -therapy. This neuropathy has a profound impact on quality of life and patient’s survival. Preventing and treating paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is a major concern. First- and second-generation antipsychotics have shown analgesic effects both in humans and animals. Quetiapine is a novel atypical antipsychotic with low propensity to induce extrapyramidal or hyperprolactinemia side effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of quetiapine on the development and expression of neuropathic pain induced by paclitaxel in mice and the role of α2-adrenoceptors on its antinociception. Materials and Methods: Paclitaxel (2 mg/kg IP was injected for five consecutive days which resulted in thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical and cold allodynia. Results: Early administration of quetiapine from the 1st day until the 5th day (5, 10, and 15 mg/kg PO did not affect thermal, mechanical, and cold stimuli and could not prevent the development of neuropathic pain. In contrast, when quetiapine (10 and 15 mg/kg PO administration was started on the 6th day after the first paclitaxel injections, once the model had been established, and given daily until the 10th day, heat hyperalgesia and mechanical and cold allodynia were significantly attenuated. Also, the effect of quetiapine on heat hyperalgesia was reversed by pretreatment with yohimbine, as an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist. Conclusion: These results indicate that quetiapine, when administered after nerve injury can reverse the expression of neuropathic pain. Also, we conclude that α2-adrenoceptors participate in the antinociceptive effects of quetiapine.

  7. Measurement of the efficacy of 2% lipid in reversing bupivacaine- induced asystole in isolated rat hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The reversal efficacy of 2% lipid emulsion in cardiac asystole induced by different concentrations of bupivacaine is poorly defined and needs to be determined. Methods Forty-two male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into seven groups: B40, B60, B80, B100, B120, B140 and B160, n = 6. The Langendorff isolated heart perfusion model was used, which consisted of a balanced perfusion with Krebs-Henseleit solution for 25 minutes and a continuous infusion of 100 μmol/L bupivacaine until asystole had been induced for 3 minutes. The hearts in the seven groups were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing a 2% lipid emulsion, and 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 140 or 160 μmol/L bupivacaine, respectively. Cardiac recovery was defined as a spontaneous and regular rhythm with a rate-pressure product > 10% of the baseline value for more than 1 minute. Our primary outcome was the rate-pressure product 25 minutes after cardiac recovery. Other cardiac function parameters were also recorded. Results All groups demonstrated cardiac recovery. During the recovery phase, heart rate, rate-pressure product, the maximum left ventricular pressure rise and decline in heart rate in the B120-B160 groups was significantly lower than those in the B40-B80 groups (P bupivacaine and the reversal effects of a 2% lipid emulsion showed a typical transoid S-shaped curve, R2 = 0.9983, IC50 value was 102.5 μmol/L (95% CI: 92.44 - 113.6). Conclusions There is a concentration-response relationship between the concentrations of bupivacaine and the reversal effects of 2% lipid emulsion. PMID:25089118

  8. Cadmium induces apoptosis in anterior pituitary cells that can be reversed by treatment with antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poliandri, Ariel H.B.; Cabilla, Jimena P.; Velardez, Miguel O.; Bodo, Cristian C.A.; Duvilanski, Beatriz H.

    2003-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd 2+ ) is an ubiquitous toxic metal that is involved in a variety of pathological conditions. Several reports indicate that Cd 2+ alters normal pituitary hormone secretion; however, little is known about the mechanisms that induce this misregulation. This paper reports the effect of Cd 2+ on anterior pituitary cell viability and its relation to prolactin secretion. Cd 2+ concentrations above 10 μM were found to be cytotoxic for pituitary cells. Morphological studies as well as DNA ladder fragmentation and caspase activation showed that Cd 2+ -treated cells undergo apoptosis. Even though several hours were needed to detect Cd 2+ -induced cytotoxicity, the effect of the metal became irreversible very quickly, requiring only 3 h of treatment. Prolactin release (measured at 48 h) was inhibited when the cells were exposed to Cd 2+ for 1 h, before any change in cell viability was observed. The antioxidants N-acetyl-cysteine and Trolox (a hydrosoluble derivative of vitamin E), but not ascorbic acid, reversed both Cd 2+ -mediated cytotoxicity and the inhibition of prolactin release, supporting the involvement of oxidative stress in the mechanism of Cd 2+ action. In summary, the present work demonstrates that Cd 2+ is cytotoxic for anterior pituitary cells, that this effect is due to an induction of apoptosis, and that it can be reversed by antioxidants

  9. Reversible photo-induced trap formation in mixed-halide hybrid perovskites for photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, Eric T; Slotcavage, Daniel J; Dohner, Emma R; Bowring, Andrea R; Karunadasa, Hemamala I; McGehee, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    We report on reversible, light-induced transformations in (CH 3 NH 3 )Pb(Br x I 1- x ) 3 . Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these perovskites develop a new, red-shifted peak at 1.68 eV that grows in intensity under constant, 1-sun illumination in less than a minute. This is accompanied by an increase in sub-bandgap absorption at ∼1.7 eV, indicating the formation of luminescent trap states. Light soaking causes a splitting of X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks, suggesting segregation into two crystalline phases. Surprisingly, these photo-induced changes are fully reversible; the XRD patterns and the PL and absorption spectra revert to their initial states after the materials are left for a few minutes in the dark. We speculate that photoexcitation may cause halide segregation into iodide-rich minority and bromide-enriched majority domains, the former acting as a recombination center trap. This instability may limit achievable voltages from some mixed-halide perovskite solar cells and could have implications for the photostability of halide perovskites used in optoelectronics.

  10. Injection-induced gluteus muscle contractures: diagnosis with the "reverse Ober test" and surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, William F; White, Klane K; Song, Kit M; Mosca, Vincent S

    2015-03-01

    Adoption rates are increasing in the United States and other developed countries. A large proportion of adopted children have been found to have unsuspected medical diagnoses, including orthopedic problems. One condition, termed injection-induced gluteus maximus contracture, has been previously described in several case series and can be difficult to diagnose if unfamiliar with this condition. By reviewing the etiology and pathoanatomy of this problem, as well as the typical examination findings, including the near-pathognomonic-positive "reverse Ober test," treating providers will be better prepared to recognize and properly treat this condition. This is a retrospective review of 4 patients treated at our institution for injection-induced gluteus maximus contracture. Patient history, physical examination findings, and treatment outcomes were recorded. All had undergone surgical treatment through a longitudinal incision along the posterior margin of the iliotibial band, with division of thickened, contracted gluteus tissue down to the ischial tuberosity. All 4 of the patients were adopted from orphanages in developing countries. Chief complaints of the patients varied, but physical examination findings were very consistent. Three of the 4 patients had undergone rotational osteotomies for presumed femoral retroversion before their diagnosis and treatment for injection-induced gluteus maximus contracture. All patients had concave, atrophic buttock contours and numerous punctate buttock scars. All walked with an out-toed gait and had marked apparent femoral retroversion. Each patient was found to have full hip adduction when the hip was extended but a hip abduction contracture when the hip was flexed. This finding of increasing abduction as an extended/adducted hip is flexed to 90 degrees is described as a positive "reverse Ober test." After surgical treatment, all hips could adduct to neutral from full extension to full flexion. Although common in some countries

  11. Seasonality, Blood Feeding Behavior, and Transmission of Plasmodium Falciparum by Anopheles Arabiensis after an Extended Drought In Southern Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuma, Philip E.; Mharakurwa, Sungano; Norris, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Transmission of Plasmodium falciparum is hyperendemic in southern Zambia. However, no data on the entomologic aspects of malaria transmission have been published from Zambia in more than 25 years. We evaluated seasonal malaria transmission by Anopheles arabiensis and An. funestus s.s. and characterized the blood feeding behavior of An. arabiensis in two village areas. Transmission during the 2004–2005 rainy season was nearly zero because of widespread drought. During 2005–2006, the estimated entomologic inoculation rate values were 1.6 and 18.3 infective bites per person per transmission season in each of the two village areas, respectively. Finally, with a human blood index of 0.923, An. arabiensis was substantially more anthropophilic in our study area than comparable samples of indoor-resting An. arabiensis throughout Africa and was the primary vector responsible for transmission of P. falciparum. PMID:17297034

  12. Effects of in vivo exposure to DEET on blood feeding behavior and fecundity in Anopheles quadrimaculatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Rui-De; Ali, Arshad; Barnard, Donald R

    2007-07-01

    This study determined the effects of contact with DEET on guinea pig skin on mortality, probing time, blood feeding rate, engorgement time, and fecundity responses in female Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say. Exposure, in this manner, to 10% DEET (in ethanol) for 5 min, resulted in 98% mortality in mosquitoes after 24h. The median probing time (PT(50)) required by females, when exposed to 0.1%, 1.0%, and 10% DEET, was significantly (Pblood feeding rates in populations of females exposed to 1.0% DEET for feeding on the control guinea pigs (105.9s). The mean number of mature oöcytes per female (fecundity) in treatment (1.0% DEET) and control mosquitoes was not significantly different. The responses to DEET observed in this study suggest that repeated exposure of female A. quadrimaculatus populations to this repellent, in laboratory bioassays, could result in confounding of toxicant and repellent effects and inaccurate estimates of DEET repellency.

  13. Simulated Seasonal Photoperiods and Fluctuating Temperatures Have Limited Effects on Blood Feeding and Life History in Aedes triseriatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westby, K M; Juliano, S A

    2015-09-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors change seasonally and impact life history in temperate-zone ectotherms. Temperature and photoperiod are factors that change in predictable ways. Most studies testing for effects of temperature on vectors use constant temperatures and ignore potential correlated effects of photoperiod. In two experiments, we tested for effects of larval rearing environments creating ecologically relevant temperatures and photoperiods simulating early and late season conditions (June and August), or constant temperatures (cool and warm) with the June or August photoperiods, respectively. We determined effects on survivorship, development, size, and a composite performance index in a temperate-zone population of Aedes triseriatus (Say). We followed cohorts of resulting females, all held under the same environmental conditions, to assess carry-over effects of rearing conditions for larvae on longevity, blood feeding, and egg production. Larval survivorship was affected by treatment in one experiment. Development time was greater in the June and cool treatments, but the constant and fluctuating temperatures did not differ. Significantly larger mosquitoes were produced in fluctuating versus constant temperature treatments. There were no significant treatment effects on the composite performance index. Adult female longevity was lower after rearing at constant versus fluctuating temperature, but there was no difference between June and August, nor did size affect longevity. There was no effect of treatments on blood feeding and a limited effect on egg production. We conclude that seasonal temperatures and photoperiods during development have limited effects on this population of A. triseriatus and find little evidence of strong effects of fluctuating versus constant temperatures. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Lactobacillus salivarius reverse diabetes-induced intestinal defense impairment in mice through non-defensin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Pei-Hsuan; Wu, Ying-Ying; Chen, Pei-Hsuan; Fung, Chang-Phone; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Chen, Lee-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Altered intestinal microbiota and subsequent endotoxemia play pathogenic roles in diabetes. We aimed to study the mechanisms of intestinal defense impairment in type 1 diabetes and the effects of Lactobacillus salivarius as well as fructooligosaccharides (FOS) supplementation on diabetes-induced bacterial translocation. Alterations in the enteric microbiome, expression of mucosal antibacterial proteins and bacteria-killing activity of the intestinal mucosa in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice and Ins2(Akita) mice were investigated. The effects of dead L. salivarius (2×10(8)CFU/ml) and FOS (250 mg per day) supplementation for 1 week on endotoxin levels and Klebsiella pneumoniae translocation were also examined. Finally, germ-free mice were cohoused with wild-type or Ins2(Akita) mice for 2 weeks to examine the contribution of microbiota on the antibacterial protein expression. STZ-induced diabetic mice developed intestinal defense impairment as demonstrated by decreased mucosal bacteria-killing activity; reduction of non-defensin family proteins, such as Reg3β, Reg3γ, CRP-ductin and RELMβ, but not the defensin family proteins; and increased bacterial translocation. Intestinal bacteria overgrowth, enteric dysbiosis and increased intestinal bacterial translocation, particularly pathogenic K. pneumoniae in STZ-induced diabetic mice and Ins2(Akita) mice, were noted. Treating diabetic mice with dead L. salivarius or FOS reversed enteric dysbiosis, restored mucosal antibacterial protein and lessened endotoxin levels as well as K. pneumoniae translocation. Moreover, germ-free mice cohoused with wild-type mice demonstrated more intestinal Reg3β and RELMβ expression than those cohoused with Ins2(Akita) mice. These results indicate that hyperglycemia induces enteric dysbiosis, reduction of non-defensin proteins as well as bacteria-killing activity of the intestinal mucosa and intestinal defense impairment. Reversal of enteric dysbiosis with dead L. salivarius or

  15. Selective Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Reversed Zinc Chloride-Induced Spatial Memory Impairment via Increasing Cholinergic Marker Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Azami, Kian; Belaran, Maryam; Soodi, Maliheh; Abdi, Khosrou; Fanoudi, Sahar; Sanati, Mehdi; Mottaghi Dastjerdi, Negar; Soltany Rezaee-Rad, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Zinc, an essential micronutrient and biochemical element of the human body, plays structural, catalytic, and regulatory roles in numerous physiological functions. In the current study, the effects of a pretraining oral administration of zinc chloride (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) for 14 consecutive days and post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W as a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor (10, 50, and 100 μM/side), alone and in combination, on the spatial memory retention in Morris water maze (MWM) were investigated. Animals were trained for 4 days and tested 48 h after completion of training. Also, the molecular effects of these compounds on the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), as a cholinergic marker in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and medial septal area (MSA), were evaluated. Behavioral and molecular findings of this study showed that a 2-week oral administration of zinc chloride (50 mg/kg) impaired spatial memory retention in MWM and decreased ChAT expression. Immunohistochemical analysis of post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W revealed a significant increase in ChAT immunoreactivity. Furthermore, post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W into the CA1 region of the hippocampus reversed zinc chloride-induced spatial memory impairment in MWM and significantly increased ChAT expression in comparison with zinc chloride-treated animals. Taken together, these results emphasize the role of selective iNOS inhibitors in reversing zinc chloride-induced spatial memory deficits via modulation of cholinergic marker expression.

  16. 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonism reverses and prevents fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukoff Rizzo, Stacey J; Pulicicchio, Claudine; Malberg, Jessica E; Andree, Terrance H; Stack, Gary P; Hughes, Zoë A; Schechter, Lee E; Rosenzweig-Lipson, Sharon

    2009-09-01

    Sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressant treatment continues to be a major compliance issue for antidepressant therapies. 5-HT(1A) antagonists have been suggested as beneficial adjunctive treatment in respect of antidepressant efficacy; however, the effects of 5-HT(1A) antagonism on antidepressant-induced side-effects has not been fully examined. The present study was conducted to evaluate the ability of acute or chronic treatment with 5-HT(1A) antagonists to alter chronic fluoxetine-induced impairments in sexual function. Chronic 14-d treatment with fluoxetine resulted in a marked reduction in the number of non-contact penile erections in sexually experienced male rats, relative to vehicle-treated controls. Acute administration of the 5-HT(1A) antagonist WAY-101405 resulted in a complete reversal of chronic fluoxetine-induced deficits on non-contact penile erections at doses that did not significantly alter baselines. Chronic co-administration of the 5-HT(1A) antagonists WAY-100635 or WAY-101405 with fluoxetine prevented fluoxetine-induced deficits in non-contact penile erections in sexually experienced male rats. Moreover, withdrawal of WAY-100635 from co-treatment with chonic fluoxetine, resulted in a time-dependent reinstatement of chronic fluoxetine-induced deficits in non-contact penile erections. Additionally, chronic administration of SSA-426, a molecule with dual activity as both a SSRI and 5-HT(1A) antagonist, did not produce deficits in non-contact penile erections at doses demonstrated to have antidepressant-like activity in the olfactory bulbectomy model. Taken together, these data suggest that 5-HT(1A) antagonist treatment may have utility for the management of SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction.

  17. Sugammadex for reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade in pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Young Ju; Lim, Byung Gun; Lee, Dong Kyu; Kim, Heezoo; Kong, Myoung Hoon; Lee, Il Ok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Previous studies have shown that sugammadex, a modified γ-cyclodextrin, is a well-tolerated agent for the reversal of neuromuscular blockade (NMB) induced by a steroidal neuromuscular blocking drug in adult patients. However, its use has not been reviewed in pediatric patients. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of sugammadex in the reversal of rocuronium-induced NMB during surgery under general anesthesia in pediatric patients. Methods: A literature search was performed using the Pubmed, EMBASE: Drugs and pharmacology, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.3. Data collected from different trials were pooled; the weighted mean difference or the pooled risk ratio and the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were used for analysis, and heterogeneity (I2) assessment was performed. Results: Six randomized controlled trials comparing 253 pediatric patients (age range, 2–18 years) were included in the final analysis. The mean time taken to reach a train-of-four ratio of ≥0.9 was significantly shorter in the sugammadex groups (2 and 4 mg/kg) than in the control group (neostigmine or placebo), although the heterogeneity was high. The weighted mean differences of the 2 and 4 mg/kg sugammadex groups were −7.15 (95% CI: −10.77 to −3.54; I2 = 96%; P = 0.0001) and −17.32 (95% CI: −29.31 to −5.32; I2 = 98%; P = 0.005), respectively. The extubation time in the sugammadex group was shorter than that in the control group; the weighted mean difference of the sugammadex group was −6.00 (95% CI: −11.46 to −0.53; I2 = 99%; P = 0.03). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of the incidence of postanesthetic adverse events; the pooled risk ratio was 0.67 (95% CI: 0.27–1.71; I2 = 59%; P = 0.41). Conclusion: We suggest that sugammadex is fast and

  18. Reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block by the selective relaxant binding agent sugammadex: a dose-finding and safety study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorgenfrei, Iben F; Norrild, Kathrine; Larsen, Per Bo

    2006-01-01

    Sugammadex (Org 25969) forms a complex with steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents, thereby reversing neuromuscular block. This study investigated the dose-response relation, safety, and pharmacokinetics of sugammadex to reverse rocuronium-induced block.......Sugammadex (Org 25969) forms a complex with steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents, thereby reversing neuromuscular block. This study investigated the dose-response relation, safety, and pharmacokinetics of sugammadex to reverse rocuronium-induced block....

  19. Reversion of pH-induced physiological drug resistance: a novel function of copolymeric nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutian Li

    Full Text Available AIMS: The extracellular pH of cancer cells is lower than the intracellular pH. Weakly basic anticancer drugs will be protonated extracellularly and display a decreased intracellular concentration. In this study, we show that copolymeric nanoparticles (NPs are able to overcome this "pH-induced physiological drug resistance" (PIPDR by delivering drugs to the cancer cells via endocytosis rather than passive diffussion. MATERIALS AND METHODS: As a model nanoparticle, Tetradrine (Tet, Pka 7.80 was incorporated into mPEG-PCL. The effectiveness of free Tet and Tet-NPs were compared at different extracellular pHs (pH values 6.8 and 7.4, respectively by MTT assay, morphological observation and apoptotic analysis in vitro and on a murine model by tumor volume measurement, PET-CT scanning and side effect evaluation in vivo. RESULTS: The cytotoxicity of free Tet decreased prominently (P<0.05 when the extracellular pH decreased from 7.4 to 6.8. Meanwhile, the cytotoxicity of Tet-NPs was not significantly influenced by reduced pH. In vivo experiment also revealed that Tet-NPs reversed PIPDR more effectively than other existing methods and with much less side effects. CONCLUSION: The reversion of PIPDR is a new discovered mechanism of copolymeric NPs. This study emphasized the importance of cancer microenvironmental factors in anticancer drug resistance and revealed the superiority of nanoscale drug carrier from a different aspect.

  20. Curcumin reverses the depressive-like behavior and insulin resistance induced by chronic mild stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ji-Duo; Wei, Yu; Li, Yu-Jie; Qiao, Jing-Yi; Li, Yu-Cheng

    2017-08-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that patients with depression have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance has been identified as the key mechanism linking depression and diabetes. The present study established a rat model of depression complicated by insulin resistance using a 12-week exposure to chronic mild stress (CMS) and investigated the therapeutic effects of curcumin. Sucrose intake tests were used to evaluate depressive-like behaviors, and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests (IPITT) were performed to evaluate insulin sensitivity. Serum parameters were detected using commercial kits. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to examine mRNA expression. CMS rats exhibited reduced sucrose consumption, increased serum glucose, insulin, triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA), glucagon, leptin, and corticosterone levels, as well as impaired insulin sensitivity. Curcumin upregulated the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and protein kinase B (Akt) in the liver, enhanced insulin sensitivity, and reversed the metabolic abnormalities and depressive-like behaviors mentioned above. Moreover, curcumin increased the hepatic glycogen content by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β and prevented gluconeogenesis by inhibiting phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase). These results suggest that curcumin not only exerted antidepressant-like effects, but also reversed the insulin resistance and metabolic abnormalities induced by CMS. These data may provide evidence to support the potential use of curcumin against depression and/or metabolic disorders.

  1. Reversible Heat-Induced Inactivation of Chimeric β-Glucuronidase in Transgenic Plants1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoguera, Concepción; Rojas, Anabel; Jordano, Juan

    2002-01-01

    We compared the expression patterns in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) of two chimeric genes: a translational fusion to β-glucuronidase (GUS) and a transcriptional fusion, both with the same promoter and 5′-flanking sequences of Ha hsp17.7 G4, a small heat shock protein (sHSP) gene from sunflower (Helianthus annuus). We found that immediately after heat shock, the induced expression from the two fusions in seedlings was similar, considering chimeric mRNA or GUS protein accumulation. Surprisingly, we discovered that the chimeric GUS protein encoded by the translational fusion was mostly inactive in such conditions. We also found that this inactivation was fully reversible. Thus, after returning to control temperature, the GUS activity was fully recovered without substantial changes in GUS protein accumulation. In contrast, we did not find differences in the in vitro heat inactivation of the respective GUS proteins. Insolubilization of the chimeric GUS protein correlated with its inactivation, as indicated by immunoprecipitation analyses. The inclusion in another chimeric gene of the 21 amino-terminal amino acids from a different sHSP lead to a comparable reversible inactivation. That effect not only illustrates unexpected post-translational problems, but may also point to sequences involved in interactions specific to sHSPs and in vivo heat stress conditions. PMID:12011363

  2. Coupled Reversible and Irreversible Bistable Switches Underlying TGFβ-induced Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Hang; Xing, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and cancer metastasis. Whereas several feedback loops have been shown to regulate EMT, it remains elusive how they coordinately modulate EMT response to TGF-β treatment. We construct a mathematical model for the core regulatory network controlling TGF-β-induced EMT. Through deterministic analyses and stochastic simulations, we show that EMT is a sequential two-step program in which an epithelial cell first is converted to partial EMT then to the mesenchymal state, depending on the strength and duration of TGF-β stimulation. Mechanistically the system is governed by coupled reversible and irreversible bistable switches. The SNAIL1/miR-34 double-negative feedback loop is responsible for the reversible switch and regulates the initiation of EMT, whereas the ZEB/miR-200 feedback loop is accountable for the irreversible switch and controls the establishment of the mesenchymal state. Furthermore, an autocrine TGF-β/miR-200 feedback loop makes the second switch irreversible, modulating the maintenance of EMT. Such coupled bistable switches are robust to parameter variation and molecular noise. We provide a mechanistic explanation on multiple experimental observations. The model makes several explicit predictions on hysteretic dynamic behaviors, system response to pulsed stimulation, and various perturbations, which can be straightforwardly tested. PMID:23972859

  3. Surviving bacterial sibling rivalry: inducible and reversible phenotypic switching in Paenibacillus dendritiformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'er, Avraham; Florin, E-L; Fisher, Carolyn R; Swinney, Harry L; Payne, Shelley M

    2011-01-01

    Natural habitats vary in available nutrients and room for bacteria to grow, but successful colonization can lead to overcrowding and stress. Here we show that competing sibling colonies of Paenibacillus dendritiformis bacteria survive overcrowding by switching between two distinct vegetative phenotypes, motile rods and immotile cocci. Growing colonies of the rod-shaped bacteria produce a toxic protein, Slf, which kills cells of encroaching sibling colonies. However, sublethal concentrations of Slf induce some of the rods to switch to Slf-resistant cocci, which have distinct metabolic and resistance profiles, including resistance to cell wall antibiotics. Unlike dormant spores of P. dendritiformis, the cocci replicate. If cocci encounter conditions that favor rods, they secrete a signaling molecule that induces a switch to rods. Thus, in contrast to persister cells, P. dendritiformis bacteria adapt to changing environmental conditions by inducible and reversible phenotypic switching. In favorable environments, species may face space and nutrient limits due to overcrowding. Bacteria provide an excellent model for analyzing principles underlying overcrowding and regulation of density in nature, since their population dynamics can be easily and accurately assessed under controlled conditions. We describe a newly discovered mechanism for survival of a bacterial population during overcrowding. When competing with sibling colonies, Paenibacillus dendritiformis produces a lethal protein (Slf) that kills cells at the interface of encroaching colonies. Slf also induces a small proportion of the cells to switch from motile, rod-shaped cells to nonmotile, Slf-resistant, vegetative cocci. When crowding is reduced and nutrients are no longer limiting, the bacteria produce a signal that induces cocci to switch back to motile rods, allowing the population to spread. Genes encoding components of this phenotypic switching pathway are widespread among bacterial species, suggesting

  4. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Progranulin-Deficient Frontotemporal Dementia Uncover Specific Reversible Neuronal Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Almeida

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic mechanisms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD remain poorly understood. Here we generated multiple induced pluripotent stem cell lines from a control subject, a patient with sporadic FTD, and an FTD patient with a novel heterozygous GRN mutation (progranulin [PGRN] S116X. In neurons and microglia differentiated from PGRN S116X induced pluripotent stem cells, the levels of intracellular and secreted PGRN were reduced, establishing patient-specific cellular models of PGRN haploinsufficiency. Through a systematic screen of inducers of cellular stress, we found that PGRN S116X neurons, but not sporadic FTD neurons, exhibited increased sensitivity to staurosporine and other kinase inhibitors. Moreover, the serine/threonine kinase S6K2, a component of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, was specifically downregulated in PGRN S116X neurons. Both increased sensitivity to kinase inhibitors and reduced S6K2 were rescued by PGRN expression. Our findings identify cell-autonomous, reversible defects in patient neurons with PGRN deficiency, and provide a compelling model for studying PGRN-dependent pathogenic mechanisms and testing potential therapies.

  5. Hall magnetohydrodynamics simulations of end-shorting induced rotation in field-reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macnab, A. I. D.; Milroy, R. D.; Kim, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2007-01-01

    End-shorting of the open field lines that surround a field-reversed configuration (FRC) is believed to contribute to its observed rotation. In this study, nonlinear extended magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations were performed that detail the end-shorting process and the resulting spin-up of the FRC. The tangential component of the electric field E T is set to zero at the axial boundaries in an extended MHD model that includes the Hall and ∇P e terms. This shorting of the electric field leads to the generation of toroidal fields on the open field lines, which apply a torque leading to a rotation of the ions on the open field lines. The FRC then gains angular momentum through a viscous transfer from the open field line region. In addition, it is shown that spin-up is still induced when insulating boundaries are assumed

  6. Strategies for reversing the effects of metabolic disorders induced as a consequence of developmental programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H Vickers

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and the metabolic syndrome have reached epidemic proportions worldwide with far-reaching health care and economic implications. The rapid increase in the prevalence of these disorders suggests that environmental and behavioural influences, rather than genetic causes, are fuelling the epidemic. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis has highlighted the link between the periconceptual, fetal and early infant phases of life and the subsequent development of metabolic disorders in later life. In particular, the impact of poor maternal nutrition on susceptibility to later life metabolic disease in offspring is now well documented. Several studies have now shown, at least in experimental animal models, that some components of the metabolic syndrome, induced as a consequence of developmental programming, are potentially reversible by nutritional or targeted therapeutic interventions during windows of developmental plasticity. This review will focus on critical windows of development and possible therapeutic avenues that may reduce metabolic and obesogenic risk following an adverse early life environment.

  7. HDAC inhibition induces HIV-1 protein and enables immune-based clearance following latency reversal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Guoxin; Swanson, Michael; Talla, Aarthi

    2017-01-01

    Promising therapeutic approaches for eradicating HIV include transcriptional activation of provirus from latently infected cells using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) and immune-mediated clearance to purge reservoirs. Accurate detection of cells capable of producing viral antigens and virions......, and the measurement of clearance of infected cells, is essential to assessing therapeutic efficacy. Here, we apply enhanced methodology extending the sensitivity limits for the rapid detection of subfemtomolar HIV gag p24 capsid protein in CD4+ T cells from ART-suppressed HIV+ individuals, and we show viral protein...... induction following treatment with LRAs. Importantly, we demonstrate that clinical administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis; vorinostat and panobinostat) induced HIV gag p24, and ex vivo stimulation produced sufficient viral antigen to elicit immune-mediated cell killing using anti-gp120/CD3...

  8. Sulforaphane reverses glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in osteoblastic cells through regulation of the Nrf2 pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin H

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hao Lin,1,* Bo Wei,1,* Guangsheng Li,1 Jinchang Zheng,1 Jiecong Sun,1 Jiaqi Chu,2 Rong Zeng,1 Yanru Niu21Department of Spinal Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang, People’s Republic of China; 2Laboratory Institute of Minimally Invasive Orthopedic Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Apoptosis of osteoblasts triggered by high-dose glucocorticoids (GCs has been identified as a major cause of osteoporosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms accounting for this action remain elusive, which has impeded the prevention and cure of this side effect. Sulforaphane (SFP is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate that has huge health benefits for humans. In this study, by using osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells as a model, we demonstrate the protective effects of SFP against dexamethasone (Dex-induced apoptosis and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. The results show that SFP could effectively inhibit the Dex-induced growth inhibition and release of lactate dehydrogenase in MC3T3-E1 cells. Treatment with Dex induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in MC3T3-E1 cells, as evidenced by an increase in the Sub-G1 phase, chromatin condensation, and deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, which were significantly suppressed by coincubation with SFP. Mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway contributed importantly to Dex-induced apoptosis, as revealed by the activation of caspase-3/-9 and subsequent cleavage of poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase, which was also effectively blocked by SFP. Moreover, treatments of Dex strongly induced overproduction of reactive oxygen species and inhibited the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and the downstream effectors HO1 and NQO1. However, cotreatment with SFP effectively reversed this action of Dex. Furthermore, silencing of Nrf2 by

  9. D-cycloserine in prelimbic cortex reverses scopolamine-induced deficits in olfactory memory in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Portero-Tresserra

    Full Text Available A significant interaction between N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA and muscarinic receptors has been suggested in the modulation of learning and memory processes. The present study further investigates this issue and explores whether d-cycloserine (DCS, a partial agonist at the glycine binding site of the NMDA receptors that has been regarded as a cognitive enhancer, would reverse scopolamine (SCOP-induced amnesia in two olfactory learning tasks when administered into the prelimbic cortex (PLC. Thus, in experiment 1, DCS (10 µg/site was infused prior to acquisition of odor discrimination (ODT and social transmission of food preference (STFP, which have been previously characterized as paradigms sensitive to PLC muscarinic blockade. Immediately after learning such tasks, SCOP was injected (20 µg/site and the effects of both drugs (alone and combined were tested in 24-h retention tests. To assess whether DCS effects may depend on the difficulty of the task, in the STFP the rats expressed their food preference either in a standard two-choice test (experiment 1 or a more challenging three-choice test (experiment 2. The results showed that bilateral intra-PLC infusions of SCOP markedly disrupted the ODT and STFP memory tests. Additionally, infusions of DCS alone into the PLC enhanced ODT but not STFP retention. However, the DCS treatment reversed SCOP-induced memory deficits in both tasks, and this effect seemed more apparent in ODT and 3-choice STFP. Such results support the interaction between the glutamatergic and the cholinergic systems in the PLC in such a way that positive modulation of the NMDA receptor/channel, through activation of the glycine binding site, may compensate dysfunction of muscarinic neurotransmission involved in stimulus-reward and relational learning tasks.

  10. D-cycloserine in prelimbic cortex reverses scopolamine-induced deficits in olfactory memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portero-Tresserra, Marta; Cristóbal-Narváez, Paula; Martí-Nicolovius, Margarita; Guillazo-Blanch, Gemma; Vale-Martínez, Anna

    2013-01-01

    A significant interaction between N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and muscarinic receptors has been suggested in the modulation of learning and memory processes. The present study further investigates this issue and explores whether d-cycloserine (DCS), a partial agonist at the glycine binding site of the NMDA receptors that has been regarded as a cognitive enhancer, would reverse scopolamine (SCOP)-induced amnesia in two olfactory learning tasks when administered into the prelimbic cortex (PLC). Thus, in experiment 1, DCS (10 µg/site) was infused prior to acquisition of odor discrimination (ODT) and social transmission of food preference (STFP), which have been previously characterized as paradigms sensitive to PLC muscarinic blockade. Immediately after learning such tasks, SCOP was injected (20 µg/site) and the effects of both drugs (alone and combined) were tested in 24-h retention tests. To assess whether DCS effects may depend on the difficulty of the task, in the STFP the rats expressed their food preference either in a standard two-choice test (experiment 1) or a more challenging three-choice test (experiment 2). The results showed that bilateral intra-PLC infusions of SCOP markedly disrupted the ODT and STFP memory tests. Additionally, infusions of DCS alone into the PLC enhanced ODT but not STFP retention. However, the DCS treatment reversed SCOP-induced memory deficits in both tasks, and this effect seemed more apparent in ODT and 3-choice STFP. Such results support the interaction between the glutamatergic and the cholinergic systems in the PLC in such a way that positive modulation of the NMDA receptor/channel, through activation of the glycine binding site, may compensate dysfunction of muscarinic neurotransmission involved in stimulus-reward and relational learning tasks.

  11. Selective activation of M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors reverses MK-801-induced behavioral impairments and enhances associative learning in rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubser, Michael; Bridges, Thomas M; Dencker, Ditte

    2014-01-01

    PAMs, enabling a more extensive characterization of M4 actions in rodent models. We used VU0467154 to test the hypothesis that selective potentiation of M4 receptor signaling could ameliorate the behavioral, cognitive, and neurochemical impairments induced by the noncompetitive NMDAR antagonist MK-801....... VU0467154 produced a robust dose-dependent reversal of MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion and deficits in preclinical models of associative learning and memory functions, including the touchscreen pairwise visual discrimination task in wild-type mice, but failed to reverse these stimulant...

  12. Bacterial lipoprotein-induced tolerance is reversed by overexpression of IRAK-1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Li, Chong Hui

    2012-03-01

    Tolerance to bacterial cell wall components including bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) represents an essential regulatory mechanism during bacterial infection. Reduced Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK-1) expression is a characteristic of the downregulated TLR signaling pathway observed in BLP-tolerised cells. In this study, we attempted to clarify whether TLR2 and\\/or IRAK-1 are the key molecules responsible for BLP-induced tolerance. Transfection of HEK293 cells and THP-1 cells with the plasmid encoding TLR2 affected neither BLP tolerisation-induced NF-κB deactivation nor BLP tolerisation-attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production, indicating that BLP tolerance develops despite overexpression of TLR2 in these cells. In contrast, overexpression of IRAK-1 reversed BLP-induced tolerance, as transfection of IRAK-1 expressing vector resulted in a dose-dependent NF-κB activation and TNF-α release in BLP-tolerised cells. Furthermore, BLP-tolerised cells exhibited markedly repressed NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and impaired binding of p65 to several pro-inflammatory cytokine gene promoters including TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Overexpression of IRAK-1 restored the nuclear transactivation of p65 at both TNF-α and IL-6 promoters. These results indicate a crucial role for IRAK-1 in BLP-induced tolerance, and suggest IRAK-1 as a potential target for manipulation of the TLR-mediated inflammatory response during microbial sepsis.

  13. Reversible and irreversible vascular bioeffects induced by ultrasound and microbubbles in chorioallantoic membrane model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarapacki, Christine; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Tabuchi, Arata; Karshafian, Raffi

    2017-03-01

    Background: The application of ultrasound and microbubbles at therapeutic conditions has been shown to improve delivery of molecules, cause vasoconstriction, modulate blood flow and induce a vascular shut down in in vivo cancerous tissues. The underlying mechanism has been associated with the interaction of ultrasonically-induced microbubble oscillation and cavitation with the blood vessel wall. In this study, the effect of ultrasound and microbubbles on blood flow and vascular architecture was studied using a fertilized chicken egg CAM (chorioallantoic membrane) model. Methods: CAM at day 12 of incubation (Hamburger-Hamilton stage 38-40) were exposed to ultrasound at varying acoustic pressures (160, 240 and 320 kPa peak negative pressure) in the presence of Definity microbubbles and 70 kDa FITC dextran fluorescent molecules. A volume of 50 µL Definity microbubbles were injected into a large anterior vein of the CAM prior to ultrasound exposure. The ultrasound treatment sequence consisted of 5 s exposure at 500 kHz frequency, 8 cycles and 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency with 5 s off for a total exposure of 2 minutes. Fluorescent videos and images of the CAM vasculature were acquired using intravital microscopy prior, during and following the ultrasound exposure. Perfusion was quantified by measuring the length of capillaries in a region of interest using Adobe Illustrator. Results and Discussion: The vascular bioeffects induced by USMB increased with acoustic peak negative pressure. At 160 kPa, no visible differences were observed compared to the control. At 240 kPa, a transient decrease in perfusion with subsequent recovery within 15 minutes was observed, whereas at 320 kPa, the fluorescent images showed an irreversible vascular damage. The study indicates that a potential mechanism for the transient decrease in perfusion may be related to blood coagulation. The results suggest that ultrasound and microbubbles can induce reversible and irreversible vascular

  14. Progressive myopia or hyperopia can be induced in chicks and reversed by manipulation of the chromaticity of ambient light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulds, Wallace S; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Luu, Chi D

    2013-12-09

    To determine whether progressive ametropia can be induced in chicks and reversed by manipulation of the chromaticity of ambient light. One-day-old chicks were raised in red light (90% red, 10% yellow-green) or in blue light (85% blue, 15% green) with a 12 hour on/off cycle for 14 to 42 days. Refraction was determined by streak retinoscopy, and by automated infrared photoretinoscopy and ocular biometry by A-scan ultrasonography. Red light induced progressive myopia (mean refraction ± SD at 28 days, -2.83 ± 0.25 diopters [D]). Progressive hyperopia was induced by blue light (mean refraction at 28 days, +4.55 ± 0.21 D). The difference in refraction between the groups was highly significant at P light (-2.21 ± 0.21 D) was reversed to hyperopia (+2.50 ± 0.29 D) by subsequent 21 days of blue light. Hyperopia induced by 21 days of blue light (+4.21 ± 0.19 D) was reversed to myopia (-1.23 ± 0.12 D) by 21 days of red light. Rearing chicks in red light caused progressive myopia, while rearing in blue light caused progressive hyperopia. Light-induced myopia or hyperopia in chicks can be reversed to hyperopia or myopia, respectively, by an alteration in the chromaticity of ambient light. Manipulation of chromaticity may be applicable to the management of human childhood myopia.

  15. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Progranulin-Deficient Frontotemporal Dementia Uncover Specific Reversible Neuronal Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Sandra; Zhang, Zhijun; Coppola, Giovanni; Mao, Wenjie; Futai, Kensuke; Karydas, Anna; Geschwind, Michael D.; Tartaglia, M. Carmela; Gao, Fuying; Gianni, Davide; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Miller, Bruce L.; Farese, Robert V.; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The pathogenic mechanisms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) remain poorly understood. Here we generated multiple induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from a control subject, a patient with sporadic FTD, and an FTD patient with a novel GRN mutation (PGRN S116X). In neurons and microglia differentiated from PGRN S116X iPSCs, the levels of intracellular and secreted progranulin were reduced, establishing patient-specific cellular models of progranulin haploinsufficiency. Through a systematic screen of inducers of cellular stress, we found that PGRN S116X neurons, but not sporadic FTD neurons, exhibited increased sensitivity to staurosporine and other kinase inhibitors. Moreover, the serine/threonine kinase S6K2, a component of the PI3K and MAPK pathways, was specifically downregulated in PGRN S116X neurons. Both increased sensitivity to kinase inhibitors and reduced S6K2 were rescued by progranulin expression. Our findings identify cell-autonomous, reversible defects in patient neurons with progranulin deficiency and provide a new model for studying progranulin-dependent pathogenic mechanisms and testing potential therapies. PMID:23063362

  16. Expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase in radiation-induced chronic human skin ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Po; Li Zhijun; Lu Yali; Zhong Mei; Gu Qingyang; Wang Dewen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of the catalytic subunit of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TRT) and the possible relationship between the TRT and cancer transformation or poor healing in radiation-induced chronic ulcer of human skin. Methods: Rabbit antibody against human TRT and SP immunohistochemical method were used to detect TRT expression in 24 cases of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embed human skin chronic ulcer tissues induced by radiation, 5 cases of normal skin, 2 of burned skin, and 8 of carcinoma. Results: The positive rate for TRT was 58.3%(14/24) in chronic radiation ulcers, of which the strongly positive rate was 41.7%(10/24) and the weakly positive 16.7%(4/24), 0% in normal (0/5) and burned skin (0/2), and 100% in carcinoma (8/8). The strongly positive expression of TRT was observed almost always in the cytoplasm and nucleus of squamous epithelial cells of proliferative epidermis but the negative and partly weakly positive expression in the smooth muscles, endothelia of small blood vessels and capillaries, and fibroblasts. Chronic inflammtory cells, plasmacytes and lymphocytes also showed weakly positive for TRT. Conclusion: TRT expression could be involved in the malignant transformation of chronic radiation ulcer into squamous carcinoma, and in the poor healing caused by sclerosis of small blood vessels and lack of granulation tissue consisting of capillaries and fibroblasts

  17. Liver fibrosis in mice induced by carbon tetrachloride and its reversion by luteolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domitrovic, Robert; Jakovac, Hrvoje; Tomac, Jelena; Sain, Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is effusive wound healing process in which excessive connective tissue builds up in the liver. Because specific treatments to stop progressive fibrosis of the liver are not available, we have investigated the effects of luteolin on carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 )-induced hepatic fibrosis. Male Balb/C mice were treated with CCl 4 (0.4 ml/kg) intraperitoneally (i.p.), twice a week for 6 weeks. Luteolin was administered i.p. once daily for next 2 weeks, in doses of 10, 25, and 50 mg/kg of body weight. The CCl 4 control group has been observed for spontaneous reversion of fibrosis. CCl 4 -intoxication increased serum aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase levels and disturbed hepatic antioxidative status. Most of these parameters were spontaneously normalized in the CCl 4 control group, although the progression of liver fibrosis was observed histologically. Luteolin treatment has increased hepatic matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels and metallothionein (MT) I/II expression, eliminated fibrinous deposits and restored architecture of the liver in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitantly, the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and α-smooth muscle actin indicated deactivation of hepatic stellate cells. Our results suggest the therapeutic effects of luteolin on CCl 4 -induced liver fibrosis by promoting extracellular matrix degradation in the fibrotic liver tissue and the strong enhancement of hepatic regenerative capability, with MTs as a critical mediator of liver regeneration.

  18. Reversal of reflex pulmonary vasoconstriction induced by main pulmonary arterial distension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juratsch, C E; Grover, R F; Rose, C E; Reeves, J T; Walby, W F; Laks, M M

    1985-04-01

    Distension of the main pulmonary artery (MPA) induces pulmonary hypertension, most probably by neurogenic reflex pulmonary vasoconstriction, although constriction of the pulmonary vessels has not actually been demonstrated. In previous studies in dogs with increased pulmonary vascular resistance produced by airway hypoxia, exogenous arachidonic acid has led to the production of pulmonary vasodilator prostaglandins. Hence, in the present study, we investigated the effect of arachidonic acid in seven intact anesthetized dogs after pulmonary vascular resistance was increased by MPA distention. After steady-state pulmonary hypertension was established, arachidonic acid (1.0 mg/min) was infused into the right ventricle for 16 min; 15-20 min later a 16-mg bolus of arachidonic acid was injected. MPA distension was maintained throughout the study. Although the infusion of arachidonic acid significantly lowered the elevated pulmonary vascular resistance induced by MPA distension, the pulmonary vascular resistance returned to control levels only after the bolus injection of arachidonic acid. Notably, the bolus injection caused a biphasic response which first increased the pulmonary vascular resistance transiently before lowering it to control levels. In dogs with resting levels of pulmonary vascular resistance, administration of arachidonic acid in the same manner did not alter the pulmonary vascular resistance. It is concluded that MPA distension does indeed cause reflex pulmonary vasoconstriction which can be reversed by vasodilator metabolites of arachidonic acid. Even though this reflex may help maintain high pulmonary vascular resistance in the fetus, its function in the adult is obscure.

  19. Frequent blood feeding enables insecticide-treated nets to reduce transmission by mosquitoes that bite predominately outdoors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Tanya L; Beebe, Nigel W; Bugoro, Hugo; Apairamo, Allan; Chow, Weng K; Cooper, Robert D; Collins, Frank H; Lobo, Neil F; Burkot, Thomas R

    2016-03-10

    The effectiveness of vector control on malaria transmission by long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) depends on the vectors entering houses to blood feed and rest when people are inside houses. In the Solomon Islands, significant reductions in malaria have been achieved in the past 20 years with insecticide-treated bed nets, IRS, improved diagnosis and treatment with artemisinin combination therapies; despite the preference of the primary vector, Anopheles farauti, to feed outdoors and early in the evening and thereby avoid potential exposure to insecticides. Rational development of tools to complement LLINs and IRS by attacking vectors outdoor requires detailed knowledge of the biology and behaviours of the target species. Malaria transmission in Central Province, Solomon Islands was estimated by measuring the components comprising the entomological inoculation rate (EIR) as well as the vectorial capacity of An. farauti. In addition, the daily and seasonal biting behaviour of An. farauti, was examined and the duration of the feeding cycle was estimated with a mark-release-recapture experiment. Anopheles farauti was highly exophagic with 72% captured by human landing catches (HLC) outside of houses. Three-quarters (76%) of blood feeding on humans was estimated to occur before 21.00 h. When the hourly location of humans was considered, the proportion of exposure to mosquito bites on humans occurring indoors (πi) was only 0.130 ± 0.129. Peak densities of host seeking An. farauti occurred between October and January. The annual EIR was estimated to be 2.5 for 2012 and 33.2 for 2013. The length of the feeding cycle was 2.1 days. The short duration of the feeding cycle by this species offers an explanation for the substantial control of malaria that has been achieved in the Solomon Islands by LLINs and IRS. Anopheles farauti is primarily exophagic and early biting, with 13% of mosquitoes entering houses to feed late at night during

  20. Gabapentin reverses central pain sensitization following a collagenase-induced intrathalamic hemorrhage in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castel A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aude Castel, Pascal VachonFaculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Veterinary Biomedicine, University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, CanadaPurpose: The treatment of central neuropathic pain remains amongst the biggest challenges for pain specialists. The main objective of this study was to assess gabapentin (GBP, amitriptyline (AMI, and carbamazepine (CARBA for the treatment of a rodent central neuropathic pain model.Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were trained on the rotarod, Hargreaves, Von Frey and acetone behavioral tests, and baseline values were obtained prior to surgery. A stereotaxic injection of either a collagenase solution or saline was made in the right ventral posterolateral thalamic nucleus. The rats were tested on days 2, 4, 8, and 11 postsurgery. They were retested at regular intervals from day 15 to day 25 postsurgery, after oral administration of either the vehicle (n=7 and n=8 rats with intracerebral injections of collagenase and saline, respectively or the different drugs (GBP [60 mg/kg], AMI [10 mg/kg], CARBA [100 mg/kg]; n=8 rats/drug.Results: A significant decrease in the mechanical thresholds and no change in heat threshold were observed in both hind limbs in the collagenase group, as we had previously shown elsewhere. Reversal of the mechanical hypersensitivity was achieved only with GBP (P<0.05. AMI and CARBA, at the dosages used, failed to show any effect on mechanical thresholds. Transient cold allodynia was observed in some collagenase-injected rats but failed to be statistically significant.Conclusion: Intrathalamic hemorrhaging in the ventrolateral thalamic nucleus induced a bilateral mechanical allodynia, which was reversed by GBP but not AMI or CARBA.Keywords: central pain, thalamus, amitriptyline, carbamazepine

  1. Reversibility of ecstasy-induced reduction in serotonin transporter availability in polydrug ecstasy users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchert, Ralph; Wilke, Florian; Nebeling, Bruno; Clausen, Malte; Thomasius, Rainer; Petersen, Kay; Obrocki, Jost; Wartberg, Lutz; Zapletalova, Pavlina

    2006-01-01

    Animal data suggest that the synthetic drug ecstasy may damage brain serotonin neurons. Previously we reported protracted reductions in the availability of the serotonin transporter (SERT), an index of integrity of the axon terminals of brain serotonergic neurons, in SERT-rich brain regions in current human ecstasy users. Comparison of current ecstasy users and former ecstasy users yielded some evidence that this reduction might be reversible. However, participant selection effects could not be ruled out. Therefore, follow-up examinations were performed in these subjects to test the following a priori hypothesis in a prospective longitudinal design that eliminates participant selection effects to a large extent: availability of the SERT increases towards normal levels when ecstasy use is stopped, and remains unchanged or is further decreased if use is continued. Two follow-up positron emission tomography measurements using the SERT ligand [ 11 C](+)McN5652 were completed by 15 current and nine former ecstasy users. All subjects used illicit drugs other than ecstasy, too. The time interval between repeated measurements was about 1 year. The time course of the availability of the SERT was analysed in the following SERT-rich regions: mesencephalon, putamen, caudate and thalamus. Current ecstasy users showed a consistent increase in the availability of the SERT in the mesencephalon during the study (Friedman test: p=0.010), which most likely was caused by a decrease in the intensity of ecstasy consumption (Spearman correlation coefficient -0.725, p=0.002). Former ecstasy users showed a consistent increase in SERT availability in the thalamus (Friedman test: p=0.006). Ecstasy-induced protracted alterations in the availability of the SERT might be reversible. (orig.)

  2. Reversibility of ecstasy-induced reduction in serotonin transporter availability in polydrug ecstasy users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchert, Ralph; Wilke, Florian; Nebeling, Bruno; Clausen, Malte [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); Thomasius, Rainer; Petersen, Kay; Obrocki, Jost; Wartberg, Lutz; Zapletalova, Pavlina [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Departments of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    Animal data suggest that the synthetic drug ecstasy may damage brain serotonin neurons. Previously we reported protracted reductions in the availability of the serotonin transporter (SERT), an index of integrity of the axon terminals of brain serotonergic neurons, in SERT-rich brain regions in current human ecstasy users. Comparison of current ecstasy users and former ecstasy users yielded some evidence that this reduction might be reversible. However, participant selection effects could not be ruled out. Therefore, follow-up examinations were performed in these subjects to test the following a priori hypothesis in a prospective longitudinal design that eliminates participant selection effects to a large extent: availability of the SERT increases towards normal levels when ecstasy use is stopped, and remains unchanged or is further decreased if use is continued. Two follow-up positron emission tomography measurements using the SERT ligand [{sup 11}C](+)McN5652 were completed by 15 current and nine former ecstasy users. All subjects used illicit drugs other than ecstasy, too. The time interval between repeated measurements was about 1 year. The time course of the availability of the SERT was analysed in the following SERT-rich regions: mesencephalon, putamen, caudate and thalamus. Current ecstasy users showed a consistent increase in the availability of the SERT in the mesencephalon during the study (Friedman test: p=0.010), which most likely was caused by a decrease in the intensity of ecstasy consumption (Spearman correlation coefficient -0.725, p=0.002). Former ecstasy users showed a consistent increase in SERT availability in the thalamus (Friedman test: p=0.006). Ecstasy-induced protracted alterations in the availability of the SERT might be reversible. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of neostigmine induced reversal of vecuronium in normal weight, overweight and obese female patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Bhimasen Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Obese patients are more vulnerable to residual neuromuscular block (NMB and its associated complications in the post-operative period. This study was carried out to compare neostigmine induced reversal of vecuronium in normal weight, overweight and obese female patients, objectively using neuromuscular (NM monitoring. Methods: Twenty female patients each belonging to normal weight, overweight and obese, based on body mass index, requiring general anaesthesia were recruited for this prospective cross sectional study. NMB was induced with vecuronium (0.1 mg/kg dose based on patient′s real body weight (RBW and monitored using acceleromyographic train of four (TOF. All patients received neostigmine 40 μg/kg and glycopyrrolate 10 μg/kg at 25% of spontaneous recovery of first twitch height (T1 of TOF (DUR 25% and were allowed to recover to TOF ratio of 0.9. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance test. Results: Recovery of TOF ratio to 0.5 was comparable in all three groups. Recovery of TOF ratio to 0.7 was delayed in obese (9.82 ± 3.21 min compared with normal weight group (7.50 ± 2.52 min. Recovery of TOF to 0.9 was significantly delayed in both overweight (12.18 ± 4.29 min and obese patients (13.78 ± 4.30 min. DUR 25% was significantly longer in overweight (mean, standard deviation [range]; 30.10 [19-40 min] and obese (28.8 [12-45 min] compared with normal weight patients (22.75 [16-30 min]. Conclusion: In overweight and obese patients, when vecuronium induction dose is based on RBW, neostigmine induced recovery of NMB is delayed in late phases (TOF 0.7-0.9, which may result in vulnerability for associated complications of incomplete recovery. Ensuring safe recovery thus requires objective NM monitoring.

  4. Reverse electron flow-induced ROS production is attenuated by activation of mitochondrial Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, André; Aldakkak, Mohammed; Stowe, David F.; Rhodes, Samhita S.; Riess, Matthias L.; Varadarajan, Srinivasan G.; Camara, Amadou K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent on substrate conditions, O(2) concentration, redox state, and activity of the mitochondrial complexes. It is well known that the FADH(2)-linked substrate succinate induces reverse electron flow to complex I of the electron transport chain

  5. Effects of a neem extract on blood feeding, oviposition and oocyte ultrastructure in Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucantoni, L; Giusti, F; Cristofaro, M; Pasqualini, L; Esposito, F; Lupetti, P; Habluetzel, A

    2006-12-01

    Secondary metabolites of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica A. Juss., Meliaceae) exhibit a wide range of biological activities in insects. However, few studies have addressed the effects of neem extracts or compounds in arthropods of medical importance. In this study, a laboratory strain of Anopheles stephensi was used to assess the effects of a commercial formulation (Neem Azal) (NA)), containing azadirachtin A at 34%, on blood feeding, oviposition and oocyte ultrastructure. Oral administration of Neem Azal) to A. stephensi females through artificial blood meals did impair blood intake and oviposition in a concentration dependent manner. Similar results were obtained on females, which had consumed Neem Azal) in sucrose solution before taking a blood meal of plain blood. Neem treated females displayed a delay in oocyte development in both the phase of vitellogenesis and the phase of choriogenesis. The ultrastructural studies on ovaries from Neem Azal) treated females revealed distinct structural modifications indicative of: (i) a complete block of oogenesis, (ii) impairment of vitellogenesis and vitelline envelope formation, (iii) a severe degeneration of follicle cells. In agreement with results obtained in other insects, this study indicates that Neem Azal) impairs hormone control of oogenesis and exerts a cytotoxic effect on both follicular cells and oocytes of the Asian malaria vector A. stephensi.

  6. AMPK Activation Prevents and Reverses Drug-Induced Mitochondrial and Hepatocyte Injury by Promoting Mitochondrial Fusion and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Woo Sophie Kang

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial damage is the major factor underlying drug-induced liver disease but whether conditions that thwart mitochondrial injury can prevent or reverse drug-induced liver damage is unclear. A key molecule regulating mitochondria quality control is AMP activated kinase (AMPK. When activated, AMPK causes mitochondria to elongate/fuse and proliferate, with mitochondria now producing more ATP and less reactive oxygen species. Autophagy is also triggered, a process capable of removing damaged/defective mitochondria. To explore whether AMPK activation could potentially prevent or reverse the effects of drug-induced mitochondrial and hepatocellular damage, we added an AMPK activator to collagen sandwich cultures of rat and human hepatocytes exposed to the hepatotoxic drugs, acetaminophen or diclofenac. In the absence of AMPK activation, the drugs caused hepatocytes to lose polarized morphology and have significantly decreased ATP levels and viability. At the subcellular level, mitochondria underwent fragmentation and had decreased membrane potential due to decreased expression of the mitochondrial fusion proteins Mfn1, 2 and/or Opa1. Adding AICAR, a specific AMPK activator, at the time of drug exposure prevented and reversed these effects. The mitochondria became highly fused and ATP production increased, and hepatocytes maintained polarized morphology. In exploring the mechanism responsible for this preventive and reversal effect, we found that AMPK activation prevented drug-mediated decreases in Mfn1, 2 and Opa1. AMPK activation also stimulated autophagy/mitophagy, most significantly in acetaminophen-treated cells. These results suggest that activation of AMPK prevents/reverses drug-induced mitochondrial and hepatocellular damage through regulation of mitochondrial fusion and autophagy, making it a potentially valuable approach for treatment of drug-induced liver injury.

  7. AMPK Activation Prevents and Reverses Drug-Induced Mitochondrial and Hepatocyte Injury by Promoting Mitochondrial Fusion and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniane, Caitlin; Farrell, Geoffrey; Arias, Irwin M.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Fu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial damage is the major factor underlying drug-induced liver disease but whether conditions that thwart mitochondrial injury can prevent or reverse drug-induced liver damage is unclear. A key molecule regulating mitochondria quality control is AMP activated kinase (AMPK). When activated, AMPK causes mitochondria to elongate/fuse and proliferate, with mitochondria now producing more ATP and less reactive oxygen species. Autophagy is also triggered, a process capable of removing damaged/defective mitochondria. To explore whether AMPK activation could potentially prevent or reverse the effects of drug-induced mitochondrial and hepatocellular damage, we added an AMPK activator to collagen sandwich cultures of rat and human hepatocytes exposed to the hepatotoxic drugs, acetaminophen or diclofenac. In the absence of AMPK activation, the drugs caused hepatocytes to lose polarized morphology and have significantly decreased ATP levels and viability. At the subcellular level, mitochondria underwent fragmentation and had decreased membrane potential due to decreased expression of the mitochondrial fusion proteins Mfn1, 2 and/or Opa1. Adding AICAR, a specific AMPK activator, at the time of drug exposure prevented and reversed these effects. The mitochondria became highly fused and ATP production increased, and hepatocytes maintained polarized morphology. In exploring the mechanism responsible for this preventive and reversal effect, we found that AMPK activation prevented drug-mediated decreases in Mfn1, 2 and Opa1. AMPK activation also stimulated autophagy/mitophagy, most significantly in acetaminophen-treated cells. These results suggest that activation of AMPK prevents/reverses drug-induced mitochondrial and hepatocellular damage through regulation of mitochondrial fusion and autophagy, making it a potentially valuable approach for treatment of drug-induced liver injury. PMID:27792760

  8. Pressure-induced reversal between thermal contraction and expansion in ferroelectric PbTiO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinlong; Zhang, Jianzhong; Xu, Hongwu; Vogel, Sven C; Jin, Changqing; Frantti, Johannes; Zhao, Yusheng

    2014-01-15

    Materials with zero/near zero thermal expansion coefficients are technologically important for applications in thermal management and engineering. To date, this class of materials can only be produced by chemical routes, either by changing chemical compositions or by composting materials with positive and negative thermal expansion. Here, we report for the first time a physical route to achieve near zero thermal expansion through application of pressure. In the stability field of tetragonal PbTiO3 we observed pressure-induced reversals between thermal contraction and expansion between ambient pressure and 0.9 GPa. This hybrid behavior leads to a mathematically infinite number of crossover points in the pressure-volume-temperature space and near-zero thermal expansion coefficients comparable to or even smaller than those attained by chemical routes. The observed pressures for this unusual phenomenon are within a small range of 0.1-0.9 GPa, potentially feasible for designing stress-engineered materials, such as thin films and nano-crystals, for thermal management applications.

  9. Sugammadex reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block in a patient with ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, E.; Jung, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old adolescent with ataxia-telangiectasia was scheduled to have laparoscopic colectomy for a resection of colon cancer. He had symptoms and signs of dyspnea, generalized dystonia, dysmetria, ataxia, and telangiectasia on the orbit. General anesthesia was performed, and rocuronium 30 mg was administered for muscle relaxation. Deep neuromuscular block (post-tetanic count: 0-8) was maintained for 95 minutes without additional rocuronium. On completion of surgery, sugammadex 80 mg was injected and train-of-four ratio was 0.93 at 210 seconds after administration. The tracheal tube was removed 5 min after the end of surgery. He recovered full spontaneous respiration and voluntary movements within 1 minute after extubation. After the surgery, he transferred to the intensive care unit and discharged 14 days after the surgery without any concrete problem. The reversal of rocuronium induced neuromuscular block by sugammadex was fast, complete, and recovered to the initial preoperative level of neuromuscular function in this patient. (author)

  10. Teucrium polium reversed the MCD diet-induced liver injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Rahim; Yazdanparast, Razieh; Aghazadeh, Safiyeh; Ghaffari, Seyed H

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the ability of Teucrium polium ethyl acetate fraction, with high antioxidant activity, in the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in rats and its possible effect on factors involved in pathogenesis of the disease. To induce NASH, a methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet was given to N-Mary rats for 8 weeks. After NASH development, MCD-fed rats were divided into 2 groups: NASH group that received MCD diet and NASH + T group which was fed MCD diet plus ethyl acetate fraction of T. polium orally for 3 weeks. Histopathological evaluations revealed that treatment with the extract has abated the severity of NASH among the MCD-fed rats. In addition, the fraction reduced the elevated levels of hepatic tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) gene expression and also the elevated level of malondialdehyde (MDA). In addition, the extract increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and enhanced the level of hepatic glutathione (GSH). Moreover, the fraction treatments lowered caspase-3 level and the phosphorylated form of C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and augmented the phosphorylated level of extracellular regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2). These results indicate that the ethyl acetate fraction of T. poium effectively reversed NASH, mainly due to its strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

  11. Localization of Reversion-Induced LIM Protein (RIL) in the Rat Central Nervous System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Yuko; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Morishima, Tetsuro; Sasano, Hiroshi; Asai, Kiyofumi; Sobue, Kazuya; Takata, Kuniaki

    2009-01-01

    Reversion-induced LIM protein (RIL) is a member of the ALP (actinin-associated LIM protein) subfamily of the PDZ/LIM protein family. RIL serves as an adaptor protein and seems to regulate cytoskeletons. Immunoblotting suggested that RIL is concentrated in the astrocytes in the central nervous system. We then examined the expression and localization of RIL in the rat central nervous system and compared it with that of water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4). RIL was concentrated in the cells of ependyma lining the ventricles in the brain and the central canal in the spinal cord. In most parts of the central nervous system, RIL was expressed in the astrocytes that expressed AQP4. Double-labeling studies showed that RIL was concentrated in the cytoplasm of astrocytes where glial fibrillary acidic protein was enriched as well as in the AQP4-enriched regions such as the endfeet or glia limitans. RIL was also present in some neurons such as Purkinje cells in the cerebellum and some neurons in the brain stem. Differential expression of RIL suggests that it may be involved in the regulation of the central nervous system

  12. Inositol induces mesenchymal-epithelial reversion in breast cancer cells through cytoskeleton rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinicola, Simona; Fabrizi, Gianmarco; Masiello, Maria Grazia; Proietti, Sara; Palombo, Alessandro; Minini, Mirko; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Alwasel, Saleh H; Ricci, Giulia; Catizone, Angela; Cucina, Alessandra; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2016-07-01

    Inositol displays multi-targeted effects on many biochemical pathways involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). As Akt activation is inhibited by inositol, we investigated if such effect could hamper EMT in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. In cancer cells treated with pharmacological doses of inositol E-cadherin was increased, β-catenin was redistributed behind cell membrane, and metalloproteinase-9 was significantly reduced, while motility and invading capacity were severely inhibited. Those changes were associated with a significant down-regulation of PI3K/Akt activity, leading to a decrease in downstream signaling effectors: NF-kB, COX-2, and SNAI1. Inositol-mediated inhibition of PS1 leads to lowered Notch 1 release, thus contributing in decreasing SNAI1 levels. Overall, these data indicated that inositol inhibits the principal molecular pathway supporting EMT. Similar results were obtained in ZR-75, a highly metastatic breast cancer line. These findings are coupled with significant changes on cytoskeleton. Inositol slowed-down vimentin expression in cells placed behind the wound-healing edge and stabilized cortical F-actin. Moreover, lamellipodia and filopodia, two specific membrane extensions enabling cell migration and invasiveness, were no longer detectable after inositol addiction. Additionally, fascin and cofilin, two mandatory required components for F-actin assembling within cell protrusions, were highly reduced. These data suggest that inositol may induce an EMT reversion in breast cancer cells, suppressing motility and invasiveness through cytoskeleton modifications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reversal of haloperidol-induced tardive vacuous chewing movements and supersensitive somatodendritic serotonergic response by imipramine in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samad, N.; Haleem, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    The study was designed to test the hypothesis that a decrease in the responsiveness of somatodendritic 5-HT-1A receptors by co- administration of imipramine could reverse the induction of VCMs and supersensitivity at 5-HT-IA receptors by haloperidol. Rats treated with haloperidol 0.2mg/rat/day for 2 weeks induced VCMs with twitching of facial musculature that increased in a time dependent manner as the treatment continued to 5 weeks. Co administration of imipramine (5mg/kg/m1) attenuated haloperidol-induced VCMs after 2 weeks and completely reversed it after 5 weeks. The intensity of 8-hydroxy -2-di(n-propyleamino)tetraline (8-OH-DPAT)-induced locomotion and forepaw treading were greater in saline+haloperidol injected but not in imipramine+haloperidol injected animals. 8-OH-DPAT induced decreases of 5-HT metabolism were greater in saline+haloperidol injected animals but not in imipramine+haloperidol injected animals. The mechanism involved in reversal/attenuation of haloperidol-induced tardive dyskinesia by imipramine is discussed. (author)

  14. Spin-orbit torque induced magnetic vortex polarity reversal utilizing spin-Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Cai, Li; Liu, Baojun; Yang, Xiaokuo; Cui, Huanqing; Wang, Sen; Wei, Bo

    2018-05-01

    We propose an effective magnetic vortex polarity reversal scheme that makes use of spin-orbit torque introduced by spin-Hall effect in heavy-metal/ferromagnet multilayers structure, which can result in subnanosecond polarity reversal without endangering the structural stability. Micromagnetic simulations are performed to investigate the spin-Hall effect driven dynamics evolution of magnetic vortex. The mechanism of magnetic vortex polarity reversal is uncovered by a quantitative analysis of exchange energy density, magnetostatic energy density, and their total energy density. The simulation results indicate that the magnetic vortex polarity is reversed through the nucleation-annihilation process of topological vortex-antivortex pair. This scheme is an attractive option for ultra-fast magnetic vortex polarity reversal, which can be used as the guidelines for the choice of polarity reversal scheme in vortex-based random access memory.

  15. Electric-Field-Induced Magnetization Reversal in a Ferromagnet-Multiferroic Heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, J. T.; Trassin, M.; Ashraf, K.; Gajek, M.; He, Q.; Yang, S. Y.; Nikonov, D. E.; Chu, Y.-H.; Salahuddin, S.; Ramesh, R.

    2011-11-01

    A reversal of magnetization requiring only the application of an electric field can lead to low-power spintronic devices by eliminating conventional magnetic switching methods. Here we show a nonvolatile, room temperature magnetization reversal determined by an electric field in a ferromagnet-multiferroic system. The effect is reversible and mediated by an interfacial magnetic coupling dictated by the multiferroic. Such electric-field control of a magnetoelectric device demonstrates an avenue for next-generation, low-energy consumption spintronics.

  16. Reversal of rocuronium-induced (1.2 mg kg-1) profound neuromuscular block by accidental high dose of sugammadex (40 mg kg-1).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molina, A.L.; Boer, H.D. de; Klimek, M.; Heeringa, M.; Klein, J.

    2007-01-01

    Sugammadex is the first selective relaxant binding agent and reverses rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block. A case is reported in which a patient accidentally received a high dose of sugammadex (40 mg kg-1) to reverse a rocuronium-induced (1.2 mg kg-1) profound neuromuscular block. A fast and

  17. Strain-assisted current-induced magnetization reversal in magnetic tunnel junctions: A micromagnetic study with phase-field microelasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H. B.; Hu, J. M.; Yang, T. N.; Chen, L. Q.; Ma, X. Q.

    2014-01-01

    Effect of substrate misfit strain on current-induced in-plane magnetization reversal in CoFeB-MgO based magnetic tunnel junctions is investigated by combining micromagnetic simulations with phase-field microelasticity theory. It is found that the critical current density for in-plane magnetization reversal decreases dramatically with an increasing substrate strain, since the effective elastic field can drag the magnetization to one of the four in-plane diagonal directions. A potential strain-assisted multilevel bit spin transfer magnetization switching device using substrate misfit strain is also proposed.

  18. The influence of dengue virus serotype-2 infection on Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae motivation and avidity to blood feed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Maciel-de-Freitas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue virus (DENV is transmitted by Aedes aegypti, a species that lives in close association with human dwellings. The behavior of DENV-infected mosquitoes needs further investigation, especially regarding the potential influence of DENV on mosquito biting motivation and avidity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We orally challenged 4-5 day-old Ae. aegypti females with a low passage DENV serotype -2 (DENV-2 to test whether the virus influences motivation to feed (the likelihood that a mosquito obtains a blood-meal and the size of its blood meal and avidity (the likelihood to re-feed after an interrupted first blood-meal. To assay motivation, we offered mosquitoes an anesthetized mouse for 2, 3, 4 or 5 minutes 7 or 14 days after the initial blood meals and measured the time they started feeding. 60.5% of the unexposed mosquitoes fed on the mouse, but only 40.5% of the positive ones did. Exposed but negative mosquitoes behaved similarly to unexposed ones (55.0% feeding. Thus DENV-2 infection decreased the mosquitoes' motivation to feed. To assay avidity, we offered the same mosquitoes a mouse two hours after the first round of feeding, and we measured the time at which they started probing. The exposed (positive or negative mosquitoes were more likely to re-feed than the unexposed ones and, in particular, the size of the previous blood-meal that kept mosquitoes from re-feeding was larger in the exposed than in the unexposed mosquitoes. Thus, DENV-2 infection increased mosquito avidity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: DENV-2 significantly decreased the mosquitoes' motivation to feed, but increased their avidity (even after taking account the amount of blood previously imbibed. As these are important components of transmission, we expect that the changes of the blood-feeding behaviour impact the vectorial capacity Ae. aegypti for dengue.

  19. The influence of dengue virus serotype-2 infection on Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) motivation and avidity to blood feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel-de-Freitas, Rafael; Sylvestre, Gabriel; Gandini, Mariana; Koella, Jacob C

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is transmitted by Aedes aegypti, a species that lives in close association with human dwellings. The behavior of DENV-infected mosquitoes needs further investigation, especially regarding the potential influence of DENV on mosquito biting motivation and avidity. We orally challenged 4-5 day-old Ae. aegypti females with a low passage DENV serotype -2 (DENV-2) to test whether the virus influences motivation to feed (the likelihood that a mosquito obtains a blood-meal and the size of its blood meal) and avidity (the likelihood to re-feed after an interrupted first blood-meal). To assay motivation, we offered mosquitoes an anesthetized mouse for 2, 3, 4 or 5 minutes 7 or 14 days after the initial blood meals and measured the time they started feeding. 60.5% of the unexposed mosquitoes fed on the mouse, but only 40.5% of the positive ones did. Exposed but negative mosquitoes behaved similarly to unexposed ones (55.0% feeding). Thus DENV-2 infection decreased the mosquitoes' motivation to feed. To assay avidity, we offered the same mosquitoes a mouse two hours after the first round of feeding, and we measured the time at which they started probing. The exposed (positive or negative) mosquitoes were more likely to re-feed than the unexposed ones and, in particular, the size of the previous blood-meal that kept mosquitoes from re-feeding was larger in the exposed than in the unexposed mosquitoes. Thus, DENV-2 infection increased mosquito avidity. DENV-2 significantly decreased the mosquitoes' motivation to feed, but increased their avidity (even after taking account the amount of blood previously imbibed). As these are important components of transmission, we expect that the changes of the blood-feeding behaviour impact the vectorial capacity Ae. aegypti for dengue.

  20. Effect of Si on the reversibility of stress-induced martensite in Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanford, N. [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3217 (Australia); Dunne, D.P., E-mail: druce_dunne@uow.edu.au [Faculty of Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2010-12-15

    Fe-Mn-Si is a well-characterized ternary shape memory alloy. Research on this alloy has consistently shown that the addition of 5-6 wt.% Si is desirable to enhance the reversibility of stress-induced martensite vis-a-vis shape memory. This paper examines the effect of Si on the morphology and the crystallography of the martensite in the Fe-Mn-Si system. It is concluded that the addition of Si increases the c/a ratio of the martensite, reduces the transformation volume change and decreases the atomic spacing difference between the parallel close-packed directions in the austenite-martensite interface (habit) plane. It is proposed that, in addition to austenite strengthening, Si enhances reversibility by reducing the volume change and the interfacial atomic mismatch between the martensite and the austenite. Although shape memory is improved, transformation reversibility remains limited by the necessary misfit dislocations that accommodate the atomic spacing differences in the interface.

  1. Effect of Si on the reversibility of stress-induced martensite in Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, N.; Dunne, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    Fe-Mn-Si is a well-characterized ternary shape memory alloy. Research on this alloy has consistently shown that the addition of 5-6 wt.% Si is desirable to enhance the reversibility of stress-induced martensite vis-a-vis shape memory. This paper examines the effect of Si on the morphology and the crystallography of the martensite in the Fe-Mn-Si system. It is concluded that the addition of Si increases the c/a ratio of the martensite, reduces the transformation volume change and decreases the atomic spacing difference between the parallel close-packed directions in the austenite-martensite interface (habit) plane. It is proposed that, in addition to austenite strengthening, Si enhances reversibility by reducing the volume change and the interfacial atomic mismatch between the martensite and the austenite. Although shape memory is improved, transformation reversibility remains limited by the necessary misfit dislocations that accommodate the atomic spacing differences in the interface.

  2. Efficacy of Blood Sources and Artificial Blood Feeding Methods in Rearing of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) for Sterile Insect Technique and Incompatible Insect Technique Approaches in Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Nayana Gunathilaka; Tharaka Ranathunge; Lahiru Udayanga; Wimaladharma Abeyewickreme

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Selection of the artificial membrane feeding technique and blood meal source has been recognized as key considerations in mass rearing of vectors. Methodology Artificial membrane feeding techniques, namely, glass plate, metal plate, and Hemotek membrane feeding method, and three blood sources (human, cattle, and chicken) were evaluated based on feeding rates, fecundity, and hatching rates of Aedes aegypti. Significance in the variations among blood feeding was investigated by one...

  3. Is the expression of autogeny by Culex molestus Forskal (Diptera: Culicidae) influenced by larval nutrition or by adult mating, sugar feeding, or blood feeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Nur Faeza A; Webb, Cameron E; Russell, Richard C

    2012-06-01

    Culex molestus Forskal is suspected to have been introduced into southern Australia during the 1940s. Investigations to determine factors influencing the expression of autogeny, the response of this mosquito to potential blood meals, and the subsequent influence on oviposition were undertaken. Immature mosquitoes raised at five feeding regimes had mortality rates, development rates, wing length, and autogenous egg raft size measured. All surviving female mosquitoes laid autogenous eggs but there was a significant difference between the mean number of eggs per raft. For mosquitoes raised at each of the feeding regimes, there was a significant linear relationship between the number of eggs per autogenous egg raft and wing length. Newly emerged mosquitoes were offered a blood meal (i.e., rodent) daily but no blood feeding occurred until the autogenous egg raft was laid. There was no statistical difference in the rate of autogenous oviposition or post-oviposition blood feeding between control or treatment groups. The results of this study indicate that Cx. molestus is perfectly adapted to subterranean habitats in close association with human habitation, but their preference to delay blood feeding until up to day 8 following emergence may reduce their relative importance as a vector of arboviruses. © 2012 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  4. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q fi ) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes

  5. Potent and reversible lentiviral vector restriction in murine induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geis, Franziska K; Galla, Melanie; Hoffmann, Dirk; Kuehle, Johannes; Zychlinski, Daniela; Maetzig, Tobias; Schott, Juliane W; Schwarzer, Adrian; Goffinet, Christine; Goff, Stephen P; Schambach, Axel

    2017-05-31

    Retroviral vectors are derived from wild-type retroviruses, can be used to study retrovirus-host interactions and are effective tools in gene and cell therapy. However, numerous cell types are resistant or less permissive to retrovirus infection due to the presence of active defense mechanisms, or the absence of important cellular host co-factors. In contrast to multipotent stem cells, pluripotent stem cells (PSC) have potential to differentiate into all three germ layers. Much remains to be elucidated in the field of anti-viral immunity in stem cells, especially in PSC. In this study, we report that transduction with HIV-1-based, lentiviral vectors (LV) is impaired in murine PSC. Analyses of early retroviral events in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) revealed that the restriction is independent of envelope choice and does not affect reverse transcription, but perturbs nuclear entry and proviral integration. Proteasomal inhibition by MG132 could not circumvent the restriction. However, prevention of cyclophilin A (CypA) binding to the HIV-1 capsid via use of either a CypA inhibitor (cyclosporine A) or CypA-independent capsid mutants improved transduction. In addition, application of higher vector doses also increased transduction. Our data revealed a CypA mediated restriction in iPSC, which was acquired during reprogramming, associated with pluripotency and relieved upon subsequent differentiation. We showed that murine PSC and iPSC are less susceptible to LV. The block observed in iPSC was CypA-dependent and resulted in reduced nuclear entry of viral DNA and proviral integration. Our study helps to improve transduction of murine pluripotent cells with HIV-1-based vectors and contributes to our understanding of retrovirus-host interactions in PSC.

  6. Studies of Current Induced Magnetization reversal and generation of GHz radiation in magnetic nanopillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhajdarwish, Mustafa Yousef

    This thesis describes studies of two phenomena: Current-Induced Magnetization Switching (CIMS), and Current-Induced Generation of GHz Radiation. The CIMS part contains results of measurements of current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) magnetoresistance (MR) and CIMS behavior on Ferromagnetic/Nonmetal/Ferromagnetic (F1/N/F2) nanopillars. Judicious combinations of F1 and F2 metals with different bulk scattering asymmetries, and with F1/N and N/F2 interfaces having different interfacial scattering asymmetries, are shown to be able to controllably, and independently, 'invert' both the CPP-MR and the CIMS. In 'normal' CPP-MR, R(AP) > R(P), where R(AP) and R(P) are the nanopillar resistances for the anti-parallel (AP) and parallel (P) orientations of the Fi and F2 magnetic moments. In 'inverse' CPP-MR, R(P) > R(AP). In 'normal' CIMS, positive current switches the nanopillar from the P to the AP state. In 'inverse' CIMS, positive current switches the nanopillar from AP to P. All four possible combinations of CPP-MR and CIMS---(a) 'normal'-'normal', (b) 'normal'- 'inverse', 'inverse'-'normal', and (d) 'inverse'-'inverse' are shown and explained. These results rule out the self-Oersted field as the switching source, since the direction of that field is independent of the bulk or interfacial scattering asymmetries. Successful use of impurities to reverse the bulk scattering asymmetry shows the importance of scattering off of impurities within the bulk F1 and F2 metals---i.e. that the transport must be treated as 'diffusive' rather than 'ballistic'. The GHz studies consist of five parts: (1) designing a sample geometry that allows reliable measurements; (2) making nanopillar samples with this geometry; (3) constructing a system for measuring frequencies up to 12 GHz and measuring current-driven GHz radiation data with it; (4) showing 'scaling' behavior of GHz data with the critical fields and currents for nominally identical (but actually slightly different) samples, and

  7. Ultraviolet-induced reversion of cyc1 alleles in radiation-sensitive strains of yeast. III. rev 3 mutant strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, C.W.; Crhistensen, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    The role of rev3 gene function in uv-induced mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been examined by determining the reversion of 12 well-defined cyc1 mutations in diploid strains homozygous for the rev3-1 or rev3-3 allale. The 12 cyc1 alleles include one ochre, one amber, four initiation, two proline missense, and four frameshift mutations. We find that the rev3 mutations reduce the frequency of UV-induced reversion of all of the cyc1 alleles, though different classes of alleles respond to a different extent. These results imply that the rev3 gene function is required for the production of a wide variety of mutational events, though probably not all, and show that each of the three rev loci have different mutational phenotypes. Such diverse phenotypes are not predicted by the unitary model for bacterial mutagenes, suggesting that this is at best an incomplete description of eukaryotic mutagenesis

  8. UV-induced reversion of his4 frameshift mutations in rad6, rev1, and rev3 mutants of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, C W; O'Brien, T; Bond, J

    1984-01-01

    The UV-induced reversion of two his4 frameshift alleles was much reduced in rad6 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an observation that is consistent with the hypothesis that RAD6 function is required for the induction of all types of genetic alteration in misrepair mutagenesis. The reversion of these his4 alleles, together with two others of the same type, was also reduced in rev1 and rev3 mutant strains; in these, however, the extent of the reduction varied considerably with test allele used, in a manner analogous to the results in these strains for base repair substitution test alleles. The general features of UV-induced frameshift and substitution mutagenesis therefore appear quite similar, indicating that they may depend on related processes. If this conclusion is correct, greater attention must be given to integrating models which account for the production of nucleotide additions and deletions into those concerning misrepair mutagenesis.

  9. INCREASES IN ANXIETY-LIKE BEHAVIOR INDUCED BY ACUTE STRESS ARE REVERSED BY ETHANOL IN ADOLESCENT BUT NOT ADULT RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Spear, Linda P.

    2011-01-01

    Repeated exposure to stressors has been found to increase anxiety-like behavior in laboratory rodents, with the social anxiety induced by repeated restraint being extremely sensitive to anxiolytic effects of ethanol in both adolescent and adult rats. No studies, however, have compared social anxiogenic effects of acute stress or the capacity of ethanol to reverse this anxiety in adolescent and adult animals. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate whether adolescent [postnata...

  10. Reversal of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)-Induced Hepatic Encephalopathy Using a Strictured Self-Expanding Covered Stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, Mitchell W.; Soltes, George D.; Lin, Peter H.; Bush, Ruth L.; Lumsden, Alan B.

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a known complication following percutaneous transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement. We describe herein a simple and effective strategy of TIPS revision by creating an intraluminal stricture within a self-expanding covered stent, which is deployed in the portosystemic shunt to reduce the TIPS blood flow. This technique was successful in reversing a TIPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in our patient

  11. Temperature induced reversible polymorphic phase transformations in a bis-hydrazone compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayant, Vikrant; Das, Dinabandhu

    2018-03-01

    Two reversible polymorphic phase transformation of 2,3-butanedione, 2,3- bis[4,4‧-bis(diethylamino)benzophenone hydrazone] (DEBH) have been identified in DSC experiment. Topotactic phase transformation of three polymorphs has been observed in variable temperature Single Crystal X-ray Diffraction experiment. The reversible phase transformation of bulk material has been confirmed by Powder X-ray diffraction study.

  12. Estimation of neutral-beam-induced field reversal in MFTF by an approximate scaling law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Scaling rules are derived for field-reversed plasmas whose dimensions are common multiples of the ion gyroradius in the vacuum field. These rules are then applied to the tandem MFTF configuration, and it is shown that field reversal appears to be possible for neutral beam currents of the order of 150 amperes, provided that the electron temperature is at least 500 eV

  13. Efficacy of larvicidal activity of green synthesized titanium dioxide nanoparticles using Mangifera indica extract against blood-feeding parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana; Chung, Ill-Min; Anbarasan, Karunanithi; Karthikeyan, Viswanathan

    2015-02-01

    , simple, and eco-friendly approach has been suggested to control blood-feeding parasites.

  14. Can mesenchymal stem cells reverse chronic stress-induced impairment of lung healing following traumatic injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Amy V; Bible, Letitia E; Livingston, David H; Mohr, Alicia M; Sifri, Ziad C

    2015-04-01

    One week following unilateral lung contusion (LC), rat lungs demonstrate full histologic recovery. When animals undergo LC plus the addition of chronic restraint stress (CS), wound healing is significantly delayed. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are pluripotent cells capable of immunomodulation, which have been the focus of much research in wound healing and tissue regeneration. We hypothesize that the addition of MSCs will improve wound healing in the setting of CS. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6-7 per group) were subjected to LC/CS with or without the injection of MSCs. MSCs were given as a single intravenous dose of 5 × 10 cells in 1 mL Iscove's Modified Dulbecco's Medium at the time of LC. Rats were subjected to 2 hours of restraint stress on Days 1 to 6 following LC. Seven days following injury, rats were sacrificed, and the lungs were examined for histologic evidence of wound healing using a well-established histologic lung injury score (LIS) to grade injury. LIS examines inflammatory cells/high-power field (HPF) averaged over 30 fields, interstitial edema, pulmonary edema, and alveolar integrity, with scores ranging from 0 (normal) to 11 (highly damaged). Peripheral blood was analyzed by flow cytometry for the presence of T-regulatory (C4CD25FoxP3) cells. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance followed by Tukey's multiple comparison test, expressed as mean (SD). As previously shown, 7 days following isolated LC, LIS has returned to 0.83 (0.41), with a subscore of zero for inflammatory cells/HPF. The addition of CS results in an LIS of 4.4 (2.2), with a subscore of 1.9 (0.7) for inflammatory cells/HPF. Addition of MSC to LC/CS decreased LIS to 1.7 (0.8), with a subscore of zero for inflammatory cells/HPF. Furthermore, treatment of animals undergoing LC/CS with MSCs increased the %T-regulatory cells by 70% in animals undergoing LC/CS alone (12.9% [2.4]% vs. 6.2% [1.3%]). Stress-induced impairment of wound healing is reversed by the addition of MSCs given

  15. Whole brain radiation-induced impairments in learning and memory are time-sensitive and reversible by systemic hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junie P Warrington

    Full Text Available Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT is commonly used for treatment of primary and metastatic brain tumors; however, cognitive impairment occurs in 40-50% of brain tumor survivors. The etiology of the cognitive impairment following WBRT remains elusive. We recently reported that radiation-induced cerebrovascular rarefaction within hippocampal subregions could be completely reversed by systemic hypoxia. However, the effects of this intervention on learning and memory have not been reported. In this study, we assessed the time-course for WBRT-induced impairments in contextual and spatial learning and the capacity of systemic hypoxia to reverse WBRT-induced deficits in spatial memory. A clinical fractionated series of 4.5Gy WBRT was administered to mice twice weekly for 4 weeks, and after various periods of recovery, behavioral analyses were performed. To study the effects of systemic hypoxia, mice were subjected to 11% (hypoxia or 21% oxygen (normoxia for 28 days, initiated 1 month after the completion of WBRT. Our results indicate that WBRT induces a transient deficit in contextual learning, disruption of working memory, and progressive impairment of spatial learning. Additionally, systemic hypoxia completely reversed WBRT-induced impairments in learning and these behavioral effects as well as increased vessel density persisted for at least 2 months following hypoxia treatment. Our results provide critical support for the hypothesis that cerebrovascular rarefaction is a key component of cognitive impairment post-WBRT and indicate that processes of learning and memory, once thought to be permanently impaired after WBRT, can be restored.

  16. Reversal with sugammadex for rocuronium-induced deep neuromuscular block after pretreatment of magnesium sulfate in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woon Seok; Kim, Kyo Sang; Song, Shin Mi

    2017-04-01

    Magnesium sulfate (MgSO 4 ) has been used in the treatment of pre-eclampsia, hypertension and arrhythmia. Magnesium enhances the neuromuscular block of rocuronium. This study has been conducted to evaluate the reversal efficacy of sugammadex from deep rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block (NMB) during consistent pretreatment of MgSO 4 in rabbits. Twenty-eight rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups, a control group or study groups (50% MgSO 4 150-200 mg/kg and 25 mg/kg/h IV), and received rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg. When post-tetanic count 1-2 appeared, sugammadex 2, 4, and 8 mg/kg was administered in the 2-mg group, control and 4-mg group, and 8-mg group, respectively. The recovery course after reversal of sugammadex administration was evaluated in each group. The mean serum concentration of magnesium was maintained at more than 2 mmol/L in the study groups, and the total dose of MgSO 4 was more than 590 mg. The reversal effect of sugammadex on rocuronium-induced NMB in pretreated MgSO 4 was not different from that in the group without MgSO 4 . The recovery time to train-of-four ratio 0.9 after sugammadex administration in the 2-mg group was longer than in the other groups (P rocuronium-induced NMB during large pretreatment of MgSO 4 was not affected. However, we should consider that the reversal effect of sugammadex varied depending on the dose.

  17. Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields can impair spermatogenesis recovery after reversible testicular damage induced by heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Bruno Mendes; Ferreira Filho, Moisés Bonifacio Alves; Jimenez, George Chaves; de Morais, Rosana Nogueira; Peixoto, Christina Alves; Nogueira, Romildo de Albuquerque; da Silva Junior, Valdemiro Amaro

    2014-06-01

    Male infertility is often related to reproductive age couples experiencing fertility-related issues. Men may have fertility problems associated with reversible testicular damage. Considering that men have been increasingly exposed to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields generated by the production, distribution and use of electricity, this study analyzed whether 60 Hz and 1 mT magnetic field exposure may impair spermatogenesis recovery after reversible testicular damage induced by heat shock using rats as an experimental model. Adult male rats were subjected to a single testicular heat shock (HS, 43 °C for 12 min) and then exposed to the magnetic field for 15, 30 and 60 d after HS. Magnetic field exposure during the spermatogenesis recovery induced changes in testis components volume, cell ultrastructure and histomorphometrical parameters. Control animals had a reestablished and active spermatogenesis at 60 d after heat shock, while animals exposed to magnetic field still showed extensive testicular degeneration. Magnetic field exposure did not change the plasma testosterone. In conclusion, extremely low-frequency magnetic field may be harmful to fertility recovery in males affected by reversible testicular damage.

  18. A randomized, dose-response study of sugammadex given for the reversal of deep rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade under sevoflurane anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaldestin, Philippe; Kuizenga, Karel; Saldien, Vera

    2010-01-01

    Sugammadex is the first of a new class of selective muscle relaxant binding drugs developed for the rapid and complete reversal of neuromuscular blockade induced by rocuronium and vecuronium. Many studies have demonstrated a dose-response relationship with sugammadex for reversal of neuromuscular...

  19. A Randomized, Dose-Response Study of Sugammadex Given for the Reversal of Deep Rocuronium- or Vecuronium-Induced Neuromuscular Blockade Under Sevoflurane Anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duvaldestin, Philippe; Kuizenga, Karel; Saldien, Vera; Claudius, Casper; Servin, Frederique; Klein, Jan; Debaene, Bertrand; Heeringa, Marten

    BACKGROUND: Sugammadex is the first of a new class of selective muscle relaxant binding drugs developed for the rapid and complete reversal of neuromuscular blockade induced by rocuronium and vecuronium. Many studies have demonstrated a close-response relationship with sugammadex for reversal of

  20. Acute agmatine administration, similar to ketamine, reverses depressive-like behavior induced by chronic unpredictable stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neis, Vivian B; Bettio, Luis E B; Moretti, Morgana; Rosa, Priscila B; Ribeiro, Camille M; Freitas, Andiara E; Gonçalves, Filipe M; Leal, Rodrigo B; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    Agmatine is an endogenous neuromodulator that has been shown to have antidepressant-like properties. We have previously demonstrated that it can induce a rapid increase in BDNF levels after acute administration, suggesting that agmatine may be a fast-acting antidepressant. To investigate this hypothesis, the present study evaluated the effects of a single administration of agmatine in mice subjected to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), a model of depression responsive only to chronic treatment with conventional antidepressants. The ability of agmatine to reverse CUS-induced behavioral and biochemical alterations was evaluated and compared with those elicited by the fast-acting antidepressant (ketamine) and the conventional antidepressant (fluoxetine). After exposed to CUS for 14days, mice received a single oral dose of agmatine (0.1mg/kg), ketamine (1mg/kg) or fluoxetine (10mg/kg), and were submitted to behavioral evaluation after 24h. The exposure to CUS caused an increased immobility time in the tail suspension test (TST) but did not change anhedonic-related parameters in the splash test. Our findings provided evidence that, similarly to ketamine, agmatine is able to reverse CUS-induced depressive-like behavior in the TST. Western blot analyses of prefrontal cortex (PFC) demonstrated that mice exposed to CUS and/or treated with agmatine, fluoxetine or ketamine did not present alterations in the immunocontent of synaptic proteins [i.e. GluA1, postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) and synapsin]. Altogether, our findings indicate that a single administration of agmatine is able to reverse behavioral alterations induced by CUS in the TST, suggesting that this compound may have fast-acting antidepressant-like properties. However, there was no alteration in the levels of synaptic proteins in the PFC, a result that need to be further investigated in other time points. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of domain structure induced coupling on magnetization reversal of Co/Pt/Co film with perpendicular anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matczak, Michał [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Schäfer, Rudolf [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, PO 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Dresden University of Technology, Institute for Materials Science, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Urbaniak, Maciej; Kuświk, Piotr; Szymański, Bogdan; Schmidt, Marek; Aleksiejew, Jacek [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Stobiecki, Feliks, E-mail: Feliks.Stobiecki@ifmpan.poznan.pl [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2017-01-15

    A magnetic multilayer of substrate/Pt-15 nm/Co-0.8 nm/Pt-wedge 0–7 nm/Co-0.6 nm/Pt-2 nm structure is characterized by a perpendicular anisotropy of the Co layers and by graded interlayer coupling between them. Using magnetooptical Kerr microscopy we observed a distinct influence of magnetic domains in one Co layer on the nucleation field and positions of nucleation sites of reversed domains in the second Co layer. For sufficiently strong interlayer coupling a replication of magnetic domains from the magnetically harder layer to the magnetically softer layer is observed. - Highlights: • Co/Pt-wedge/Co layered film is characterized by a gradient of interlayer coupling. • Magnetic field controls propagation of straight domain wall. • Replication of magnetic domains in multilayers with strong ferromagnetic coupling. • Coupling induced by domains influences magnetization reversal of spin valves.

  2. On the relation between quasi-static and dynamic stress induced reversible structural relaxation of amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, P.; Stucky, T.; Boewe, M.; Neuhaeuser, H.

    1993-01-01

    Quasi-static stress relaxation and dynamic internal friction measurements of stress induced reversible structural relaxation were performed on the amorphous alloy Fe 40 Ni 40 B 20 . The kinetics can be well described by a stretched exponential Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts quasi-static relaxation. The thermally activated part of the internal friction shows an Arrhenius temperature behaviour for a fixed vibration frequency and an inverse power frequency behaviour for a fixed temperature. The activation energies calculated from the Arrhenius equation and from the frequency shift method are significantly different. In order to explain this discrepancy the relation between the quasi-static and the dynamic descriptions of the reversible relaxation is reexamined. In particular it is shown that these two activation energies are connected by the Kohlrausch exponent of the quasi-static relaxation. (orig.)

  3. Nanostructured graphite-induced destabilization of LiBH4 for reversible hydrogen storage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wang, K

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available been conducted to gain insight into the promoting effect of nano-G on the reversible dehydrogenation of the LiBH(sub4). Our study found that nano-G exerts its promoting effect via interaction with LiBH(sub4) and as grinding aid....

  4. Hydrazine-induced thermo-reversible optical shifts in silver-gelatin bionanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimé, Carole; Rietveld, Ivo B.; Coradin, Thibaud

    2011-03-01

    Bionanocomposites formed by in situ growth of silver nanoparticles within gelatin gels exhibit large (up to 100 nm) thermo-reversible optical shifts resulting from the enhancement of gel matrix scattering by the interaction of the biopolymer with the hydrazine reducing agent.

  5. Anti-HBV treatment induces novel reverse transcriptase mutations with reflective effect on HBV S antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cento, Valeria; van Hemert, Formijn; Neumann-Fraune, Maria; Mirabelli, Carmen; Di Maio, Velia-Chiara; Salpini, Romina; Bertoli, Ada; Micheli, Valeria; Gubertini, Guido; Romano, Sara; Visca, Michela; de Sanctis, Giuseppe-Maria; Berkhout, Ben; Marino, Nicoletta; Mazzotta, Francesco; Cappiello, Giuseppina; Spanò, Alberto; Sarrecchia, Cesare; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Andreoni, Massimo; Angelico, Mario; Verheyen, Jens; Perno, Carlo Federico; Svicher, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    The identification of novel reverse-transcriptase (RT) drug-resistance mutations is critical in predicting the probability of success to anti-HBV treatment. Furthermore, due to HBV-RT/HBsAg gene-overlap, they can have an impact on HBsAg-detection and quantification. 356 full-length HBV-RT sequences

  6. Crack Cocaine-Induced Cardiac Conduction Abnormalities Are Reversed by Sodium Bicarbonate Infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a dramatic case of a 19-year-old man with crack cocaine overdose with important clinical complications as cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation and epileptics status. During this intoxication, electrocardiographic abnormalities similar to those found in tricyclic antidepressant poisoning were observed, and they were reversed by intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion.

  7. Effects of insemination and blood-feeding on locomotor activity of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) females under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Camara, Tamara Nunes; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Bruno, Rafaela Vieira; Peixoto, Alexandre Afranio

    2014-07-02

    Dengue is an arbovirus disease transmitted by two Aedes mosquitoes: Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus. Virgin females of these two species generally show a bimodal and diurnal pattern of activity, with early morning and late afternoon peaks. Although some studies on the flight activity of virgin, inseminated and blood-fed Ae. aegypti females have been carried out under laboratory conditions, little is known about the effects of such physiological states on the locomotor activity of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti females. The aim of this study was to analyze, under laboratory conditions, the effects of insemination and blood-feeding on the locomotor activity of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti females under LD 12:12, at 25°C. Both Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti females were obtained from established laboratory colonies. Control groups were represented by virgin/unfed Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti females. Experiments were conducted under laboratory conditions, using an activity monitor that registers individual activity every thirty minutes. Virgin/unfed Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti females showed a diurnal and bimodal pattern of locomotor activity, with peaks at early morning and late afternoon. Insemination and blood-feeding significantly decreased the locomotor activity of Ae. aegypti females, but inseminated/blood-fed Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus females showed a similar significant decrease on the locomotor activity compared to virgin/unfed females. This study is the first demonstration of the effects of insemination and blood-feeding on the locomotor activity of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti females under artificial conditions. Data suggest that Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti females respond in different ways to physiological status changes and such divergence between these two dengue vectors, associated with several ecological differences, could be related to the greater dengue vectorial capacity of Ae. aegypti in Americas in comparison to Ae. albopictus.

  8. Blood Feeding Status, Gonotrophic Cycle and Survivorship of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) Caught in Churches from Merida, Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baak-Baak, C M; Ulloa-Garcia, A; Cigarroa-Toledo, N; Tzuc Dzul, J C; Machain-Williams, C; Torres-Chable, O M; Navarro, J C; Garcia-Rejon, J E

    2017-12-01

    Blood-feeding status, gonotrophic cycle, and survival rates of Aedes (Stegmyia) aegypti (L.) was investigated in catholic churches from Merida, Yucatan. Female Ae. aegypti were caught using backpack aspirator during 25 consecutive days in rainy (2015) and dry season (2016). Blood-feeding status was determined by external examination of the abdomen and classified as unfed, fed, and gravid. Daily changes in the parous-nulliparous ratio were recorded, and the gonotrophic cycle length was estimated by a time series analysis. Also, was observed the vitellogenesis to monitoring egg maturity. In total, 408 females Ae. aegypti were caught, and there was a significant difference in the number of females collected per season (Z = -6.729, P ≤ 0.05). A great number was caught in the rainy season (n = 329). In the dry season, 79 females were caught, which the fed females were twice greatest than the unfed. The length of gonotrophic cycle was estimated on the base of a high correlation coefficient value appearing every 4 days in rainy at 26.7 ± 1.22°C, and 3 days in dry season at 29.8 ± 1.47°C. The daily survival rate of the Ae. aegypti population was higher in both seasons, 0.94 and 0.93 for the rainy and dry season, respectively. The minimum time estimated for developing mature eggs after blood feeding was similar in both seasons (3.5 days in rainy versus 3.25 days in dry). The measurement of the vectorial capacity of Ae. aegypti in catholic churches could help to understand the dynamics of transmission of arboviruses in sites with high human aggregation.

  9. Host-seeking and blood-feeding behavior of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) exposed to vapors of geraniol, citral, citronellal, eugenol, or anisaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Huiling; Wei, Jianrong; Dai, Jianqing; Du, Jiawei

    2008-05-01

    The changes of the host-seeking and blood-feeding behavior of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae) surviving in a space containing vapors of the spatial repellents geraniol, eugenol, citral, anisaldehyde, or citronellal were evaluated using an arm-in-cage test and a bioassay of bloodmeals on a shaved mouse. The mosquitoes surviving concentrations of geraniol, citral, eugenol, or anisaldehyde at 0.013, 0.025, 0.050, 0.100, and 0.250 microg/cm3 for 24 and 48 h all showed different degrees of reduction in host-seeking ability. After 48 h of exposure to 0.250 microg/cm3 geraniol, almost 100% of the mosquitoes lost their host-seeking ability. The next most potent spatial repellent, anisaldehyde, stopped host seeking by > 85.5%. Citronellal did not result in a significant reduction in the host-seeking ability at any concentration level after either 24 or 48 h of treatment. We also found that reduction of host-seeking ability recovered after various times. The longest recovery time (144 h) was observed for geraniol after 24 h at 0.250 microg/cm3. In the study, geraniol, eugenol, and citral all significantly affected the activation and orientation stages of the blood-feeding behavior. However, only anisaldehyde significantly interrupted the normal blood-feeding of mosquitoes in all stages of behavior. These initial laboratory results clearly showed that anisaldehyde and geraniol could be promising spatial repellents against Ae. albopictus that they could play a major role in new repellent technology.

  10. Effect of the Topical Repellent para-Menthane-3,8-diol on Blood Feeding Behavior and Fecundity of the Dengue Virus Vector Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jugyeong Lee

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is an acute disease caused by the dengue virus and transmitted primarily by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. The current strategy for dengue prevention is vector control including the use of topical repellents to reduce mosquito biting. Although N,N-diethyl-m-methylbenzamide (DEET is the most common active ingredient in topical repellent products, para-menthane-3,8-diol (PMD is also used commercially. Studies have indicated PMD reduced biting by 90–95% for up to 6–8 h, similar to the efficacy of DEET, depending on the testing environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the behavioral effects of PMD on Ae. aegypti blood feeding and fecundity to explore the potential impact of PMD on downstream mosquito life-history traits. Two experiments were performed. In both experiments, cohorts of female Ae. aegypti (Belize strain were exposed to 20% PMD or ethanol for 10 min in a closed system and introduced to an artificial membrane feeding system. Following a 30min feed time, mosquitoes of Experiment 1 were killed and weighed as a proxy measure of blood meal, whereas mosquitoes of Experiment 2 were monitored for oviposition, a measure of fecundity. Results showed a statistically significant reduction (p < 0.001 in the percentage of Ae. aegypti that blood-fed when exposed to PMD (38% compared to those non-exposed (49%. No significant difference in fecundity between test populations was indicated. These findings suggest that exposure of Ae. aegypti to 20% PMD may influence the probability of subsequent blood feeding but of those mosquitoes that do blood feed, egg-lay density is not affected. Further studies are warranted to investigate the full range of effects of PMD exposure on other Ae. aegypti life-history traits such as mating, to continue characterizing the potential effects of PMD to impact overall vector population dynamics.

  11. Dose-dependency and reversibility of radiation-induced injury in cardiac explant-derived cells of mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lan; Yan, Chen; Urata, Yoshishige; Hasan, Al Shaimaa; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Zhang, Shouhua; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the dose-dependency and reversibility of radiation-induced injury in cardiac explant-derived cells (CDCs), a mixed cell population grown from heart tissues. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0, 10, 50 and 250 mGy γ-rays for 7 days and atrial tissues were collected for experiments 24 hours after last exposure. The number of CDCs was significantly decreased by daily exposure to over 250 mGy. Interestingly, daily exposure to over 50 mGy significantly decreased the c-kit expression and telomerase activity, increased 53BP1 foci in the nuclei of CDCs. However, CD90 expression and growth factors production in CDCs were not significantly changed even after daily exposure to 250 mGy. We further evaluated the reversibility of radiation-induced injury in CDCs at 1 week and 3 weeks after a single exposure to 3 Gy γ-rays. The number and growth factors production of CDCs were soon recovered at 1 week. However, the increased expression of CD90 were retained at 1 week, but recovered at 3 weeks. Moreover, the decreased expression of c-kit, impaired telomerase activity, and increased 53BP1 foci were poorly recovered even at 3 weeks. These data may help us to find the most sensitive and reliable bio-parameter(s) for evaluating radiation-induced injury in CDCs. PMID:28098222

  12. Selective Activation of M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reverses MK-801-Induced Behavioral Impairments and Enhances Associative Learning in Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) represent a novel approach for the treatment of psychotic symptoms associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently reported that the selective M4 PAM VU0152100 produced an antipsychotic drug-like profile in rodents after amphetamine challenge. Previous studies suggest that enhanced cholinergic activity may also improve cognitive function and reverse deficits observed with reduced signaling through the N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of the glutamate receptor (NMDAR) in the central nervous system. Prior to this study, the M1 mAChR subtype was viewed as the primary candidate for these actions relative to the other mAChR subtypes. Here we describe the discovery of a novel M4 PAM, VU0467154, with enhanced in vitro potency and improved pharmacokinetic properties relative to other M4 PAMs, enabling a more extensive characterization of M4 actions in rodent models. We used VU0467154 to test the hypothesis that selective potentiation of M4 receptor signaling could ameliorate the behavioral, cognitive, and neurochemical impairments induced by the noncompetitive NMDAR antagonist MK-801. VU0467154 produced a robust dose-dependent reversal of MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion and deficits in preclinical models of associative learning and memory functions, including the touchscreen pairwise visual discrimination task in wild-type mice, but failed to reverse these stimulant-induced deficits in M4 KO mice. VU0467154 also enhanced the acquisition of both contextual and cue-mediated fear conditioning when administered alone in wild-type mice. These novel findings suggest that M4 PAMs may provide a strategy for addressing the more complex affective and cognitive disruptions associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25137629

  13. Memory-induced sign reversals of the spatial cross-correlation for particles in viscoelastic shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauga, Ako; Laas, Katrin; Mankin, Romi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cross-correlation (CC) of coordinates of particles in viscoelastic shear flows is discussed. • Expressions for CC functions subjected to both internal and external noises are presented. • Impact of internal and external noises on CC functions are compared. • Memory-induced reentrant sign reversals of the spatial cross-moment are established. - Abstract: The behavior of shear-induced cross-correlation functions between particle fluctuations along orthogonal directions in the shear plane for harmonically trapped Brownian particles in a viscoelastic shear flow is studied. A generalized Langevin equation with a power-law-type memory kernel is used to model the complex structure of the viscoelastic media. Interaction with fluctuations of environmental parameters is modeled by a multiplicative white Gaussian noise, by an internal fractional Gaussian noise, and by an additive external white noise. It is shown that the presence of a memory has a profound effect on the behavior of the cross-correlation functions. Particularly, memory-induced reentrant sign reversals of the spatial cross-moment between orthogonal random displacements of a particle are established, i.e., an increase of the memory exponent can cause the sign reversal from positive to negative, but by a further increase of the memory exponent a reentrant transition from negative to positive values appears. Similarities and differences between the behavior of the models with additive internal and external noises are considered. It is shown that additive external and internal noises cause qualitatively different dependencies of the cross-correlation functions on the time lag. The occurrence of energetic instability due to the influence of multiplicative noise is also discussed.

  14. Vinclozolin exposure in utero induces postpubertal prostatitis and reduces sperm production via a reversible hormone-regulated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowin, Prue A; Gold, Elspeth; Aleksova, Jasna; O'Bryan, Moira K; Foster, Paul M D; Scott, Hamish S; Risbridger, Gail P

    2010-02-01

    Vinclozolin is an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) that binds with high affinity to the androgen receptor (AR) and blocks the action of gonadal hormones on male reproductive organs. An alternative mechanism of action of Vinclozolin involves transgenerational effects on the male reproductive tract. We previously reported in utero Vinclozolin exposure-induced prostatitis (prostate inflammation) in postpubertal rats concurrent with down-regulation of AR and increased nuclear factor-kappaB activation. We postulated the male reproductive abnormalities induced by in utero Vinclozolin exposure could be reversed by testosterone supplementation, in contrast to the permanent modifications involving DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) described by others. To test this hypothesis, we administered high-dose testosterone at puberty to Vinclozolin-treated rats and determined the effect on anogenital distance (AGD); testicular germ cell apoptosis, concentration of elongated spermatids, and the onset of prostatitis. Concurrently we examined Dnmt1, -3A, -3B, and -3L mRNA expression. Consistent with previous reports, in utero exposure to Vinclozolin significantly reduced AGD, increased testicular germ cell apoptosis 3-fold, reduced elongated spermatid number by 40%, and induced postpubertal prostatitis in 100% of exposed males. Administration of high-dose testosterone (25 mg/kg) at puberty normalized AGD, reduced germ cell apoptosis, and restored elongated spermatid number. Testosterone restored AR and nuclear factor-kappaB expression in the prostate and abolished Vinclozolin-induced prostatitis. Altered Dnmt expression was evident with in utero Vinclozolin exposure and was not normalized after testosterone treatment. These data demonstrate in utero Vinclozolin-induced male reproductive tract abnormalities are AR mediated and reversible and involve a mechanism independent of Dnmt expression.

  15. Redox-induced reversible luminescence switching of cerium-doped upconversion nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yanan [College of Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Xiao, Qingbo, E-mail: qbxiao2011@sinano.ac.cn [International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Jian [College of Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Xi, Yonglan [Laboratory for Agricultural Wastes Treatment and Recycling Institute of Agricultural Resources and Environment, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Science, Nanjing 210014 (China); Li, Fujin [International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Feng, Yamin [College of Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China); Shi, Liyi [College of Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Lin, Hongzhen, E-mail: hzlin2010@sinano.ac.cn [International Laboratory for Adaptive Bio-nanotechnology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Smart upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) that can be reversibly switched between two or more luminescent states by certain external stimuli have attracted considerable attention due to their great potential in biological applications. Here we report for the first time a type of redox-switchable UCNPs by codoping NaGdF{sub 4}:Yb/Er nanorods with the redox-active Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+} ion pairs. A reversible switching of their UC luminescence intensity was observed upon the variation of the surrounding redox environments. We show solid proof that the luminescence switching is caused by the tailoring of the NaGdF{sub 4} host crystal structure in response to changing redox state of the codoped cerium ions. A proof-of-concept example is further demonstrated by using these UCNPs for probing the dynamical variation of redox environments in biological tissues. - Highlights: • Synthesis of upconversion nanoparticles doped with Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+} ions. • The precise and reversible modification of crystal structure by redox reactions. • Tuning the upconversion luminescence by tailoring the crystal structure.

  16. Superhydrophobic TiO2-polymer nanocomposite surface with UV-induced reversible wettability and self-cleaning properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian Feng; Liu, Yang; Lin, Fang-Ju; Mondal, Bikash; Lyons, Alan M

    2013-09-25

    Multifunctional superhydrophobic nanocomposite surfaces based on photocatalytic materials, such as fluorosilane modified TiO2, have generated significant research interest. However, there are two challenges to forming such multifunctional surfaces with stable superhydrophobic properties: the photocatalytic oxidation of the hydrophobic functional groups, which leads to the permanent loss of superhydrophobicity, as well as the photoinduced reversible hydrolysis of the catalytic particle surface. Herein, we report a simple and inexpensive template lamination method to fabricate multifunctional TiO2-high-density polyethylene (HDPE) nanocomposite surfaces exhibiting superhydrophobicity, UV-induced reversible wettability, and self-cleaning properties. The laminated surface possesses a hierarchical roughness spanning the micro- to nanoscale range. This was achieved by using a wire mesh template to emboss the HDPE surface creating an array of polymeric posts while partially embedding untreated TiO2 nanoparticles selectively into the top surface of these features. The surface exhibits excellent superhydrophobic properties immediately after lamination without any chemical surface modification to the TiO2 nanoparticles. Exposure to UV light causes the surface to become hydrophilic. This change in wettability can be reversed by heating the surface to restore superhydrophobicity. The effect of TiO2 nanoparticle surface coverage and chemical composition on the mechanism and magnitude of wettability changes was studied by EDX and XPS. In addition, the ability of the surface to shed impacting water droplets as well as the ability of such droplets to clean away particulate contaminants was demonstrated.

  17. How do Nutritional Stress and La Crosse Virus Infection Interact? Tests for Effects on Willingness to Blood Feed and Fecundity in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westby, Katie M; Muturi, Ephantus J; Juliano, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that vector-borne pathogens should have low virulence for their vector because of selection against pathogens that harm the vector sufficiently to reduce transmission. Environmental factors such as nutritional stress can alter vector-pathogen associations by making the vectors more susceptible to pathogens (condition-dependent competence) and vulnerable to the harm caused by pathogen replication (condition-dependent virulence). We tested the hypotheses of condition-dependent competence and condition-dependent virulence by examining the interactive effects of short-term sugar deprivation and exposure to La Crosse virus (LACV) in female Aedes albopictus (Skuse). We predicted that infection status interacts with sugar deprivation to alter willingness to blood feed and fecundity in the second gonotrophic cycle (condition-dependent virulence). Sugar deprivation had no effect on body infection or disseminated infection rates. Infection status, sugar treatment, and their interaction had no effect on fecundity. Mosquitoes that had intermittent access to sugar were significantly more willing to take a second bloodmeal compared with those that had continuous access to sugar. Infection status and the interaction with sugar treatment had no effect on blood-feeding behavior. Thus, we found no evidence of short-term sugar deprivation leading to condition-dependent competence for, or condition-dependent virulence of, LACV in Ae. albopictus. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Efficacy of Blood Sources and Artificial Blood Feeding Methods in Rearing of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) for Sterile Insect Technique and Incompatible Insect Technique Approaches in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunathilaka, Nayana; Ranathunge, Tharaka; Udayanga, Lahiru; Abeyewickreme, Wimaladharma

    2017-01-01

    Selection of the artificial membrane feeding technique and blood meal source has been recognized as key considerations in mass rearing of vectors. Artificial membrane feeding techniques, namely, glass plate, metal plate, and Hemotek membrane feeding method, and three blood sources (human, cattle, and chicken) were evaluated based on feeding rates, fecundity, and hatching rates of Aedes aegypti . Significance in the variations among blood feeding was investigated by one-way ANOVA, cluster analysis of variance (ANOSIM), and principal coordinates (PCO) analysis. Feeding rates of Ae. aegypti significantly differed among the membrane feeding techniques as suggested by one-way ANOVA ( p feeding technique. Blood feeding rate of Ae. aegypti was higher with human blood followed by cattle and chicken blood, respectively. However, no significant difference was observed from the mosquitoes fed with cattle and human blood, in terms of fecundity, oviposition rate, and fertility as suggested by one-way ANOVA ( p > 0.05). Metal plate method could be recommended as the most effective membrane feeding technique for mass rearing of Ae. aegypti , due to its high feeding rate and cost effectiveness. Cattle blood could be recommended for mass rearing Ae. aegypti .

  19. The Influence of Insecticide Resistance, Age, Sex, and Blood Feeding Frequency on Thermal Tolerance of Wild and Laboratory Phenotypes of Anopheles funestus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, C L; Oliver, S V; Hunt, R H; Coetzee, M

    2016-03-01

    Resistance to insecticides is a global phenomenon and is increasing at an unprecedented rate. How resistant and susceptible strains of malaria vectors might differ in terms of life history and basic biology is often overlooked, despite the potential importance of such information in light of changing climates. Here, we investigated the upper thermal limits (ULT50) of wild and laboratory strains of Anopheles funestus Giles mosquitoes, including resistance status, sex, age, and blood feeding status as potential factors influencing ULT50. No significant differences in ULT50 were observed between strains displaying different resistance patterns, nor was there a significant difference between wild and laboratory strains. In some instances, strains showed a senescence response, displaying decreased ULT50 with an increase in age, and differences between males and females (females displaying higher ULT50 than males). Blood feeding did not seem to influence ULT50 in any way. For An. funestus, it seems evident that there is no cost to resistance despite what is displayed in other anopheline species. This could have significant impacts for vector control, with resistant populations of An. funestus performing just as well, if not better, than susceptible strains, especially under changing environmental conditions such as those expected to occur with climate change.

  20. Host species diversity and post-blood feeding carbohydrate availability enhance survival of females and fecundity in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Rui-De; Ali, Arshad; Barnard, Donald R

    2008-06-01

    Aedes albopictus mosquito is an opportunistic blood feeder and has a broad host range. The feeding behavior and habits of this mosquito are liable to increase the transmission potential of arboviruses. The survival and fecundity in A. albopictus fed on different hosts and post-blood meal provision of sugar were investigated in a laboratory-reared colony. Adult survival of caged female A. albopictus that were fed on blood of two different hosts (double meal) was higher than the females fed only on one host (single meal) (mean survival: 70.2+/-9.6 vs. 55.5+/-5.5%, respectively) when held in the laboratory for 72 h after blood feeding. Mean survival of females provided 10% sucrose solution (in water) after a single or double blood meal was higher (90.5+/-6.4% and 89.3+/-6.5%, respectively) than in the respective groups receiving water only following blood feeding (double meal: 49.0+/-9.6%; single meal: 45.3+/-10.9%). Females receiving a double meal were more fecund on average (89.0+/-6.6 eggs) than females provided a single meal (82.3+/-8.2 eggs).

  1. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Mans, Ben J. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Agricultural Research Council, Onderstepoort 0110 (South Africa); Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F., E-mail: jandersen@niaid.nih.gov [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity.

  2. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W.; Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity

  3. Age structure, blood-feeding behavior, and Leishmania chagasi infection in Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae) at an endemic focus of visceral leishmaniasis in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, C; Morrison, A C; Torres, M; Pardo, R; Wilson, M L; Tesh, R B

    1995-09-01

    Ecological studies on the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz & Neiva) were conducted during 1990-1992 in a small rural community in Colombia where American visceral leishmaniasis (AVL) is endemic. Subsamples of sand flies collected weekly from pigpens, the interior of houses, and natural outdoor resting sites were dissected to determine physiological age and Leishmania chagasi Cunha & Chagas infection rates. Eleven female L. longipalpis had flagellates in their gut, 2 of which were successfully cultured and identified as Leishmania chagasi. The reproductive status, stage of ovarian development, and trophic history of female sand flies varied among sites, habitats, and time of collection. The percentage of parous females ranged from about one-third to two-thirds overall and varied seasonally. Of most relevance to AVL transmission was the finding that 8% of L. longipalpis females were multiparous. In addition, our data suggest that L. longipalpis rest inside houses after blood-feeding outdoors, and that this species can blood-feed more than once during a single gonotrophic cycle.

  4. RECOMBINANT HUMAN INTERLEUKIN-6 INDUCES A RAPID AND REVERSIBLE ANEMIA IN CANCER-PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NIEKEN, J; MULDER, NH; VELLENGA, E; LIMBURG, PC; PIERS, DA; DEVRIES, EGE

    1995-01-01

    Initial studies have shown that recombinant human interleukin-6 (rhIL-6) induces anemia. Until now, the pathophysiologic mechanism of this induced anemia has been unknown. To unravel the underlying mechanism, we examined 15 cancer patients receiving rhIL-6 as an antitumor immunotherapy in a phase II

  5. Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Cardiovascular Remodeling Is Reversed by Normoxia in a Mouse Model of Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Grattoni, Anabel L; Alvarez-Buvé, Roger; Torres, Marta; Farré, Ramon; Montserrat, Josep M; Dalmases, Mireia; Almendros, Isaac; Barbé, Ferran; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) is the principal injurious factor involved in the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with OSA. The gold standard for treatment is CPAP, which eliminates IH and appears to reduce cardiovascular risk. There is no experimental evidence on the reversibility of cardiovascular remodeling after IH withdrawal. The objective of the present study is to assess the reversibility of early cardiovascular structural remodeling induced by IH after resumption of normoxic breathing in a novel recovery animal model mimicking OSA treatment. We investigated cardiovascular remodeling in C57BL/6 mice exposed to IH for 6 weeks vs the normoxia group and its spontaneous recovery after 6 subsequent weeks under normoxia. Aortic expansive remodeling was induced by IH, with intima-media thickening and without lumen perimeter changes. Elastic fiber network disorganization, fragmentation, and estrangement between the end points of disrupted fibers were increased by IH. Extracellular matrix turnover was altered, as visualized by collagen and mucoid interlaminar accumulation. Furthermore, left ventricular perivascular fibrosis was increased by IH, whereas cardiomyocytes size was unaffected. These cardiovascular remodeling events induced by IH were normalized after recovery in normoxia, mimicking CPAP treatment. The early structural cardiovascular remodeling induced by IH was normalized after IH removal, revealing a novel recovery model for studying the effects of OSA treatment. Our findings suggest the clinical relevance of early detection and effective treatment of OSA in patients to prevent the natural course of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Increases in anxiety-like behavior induced by acute stress are reversed by ethanol in adolescent but not adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Spear, Linda P

    2012-01-01

    Repeated exposure to stressors has been found to increase anxiety-like behavior in laboratory rodents, with the social anxiety induced by repeated restraint being extremely sensitive to anxiolytic effects of ethanol in both adolescent and adult rats. No studies, however, have compared social anxiogenic effects of acute stress or the capacity of ethanol to reverse this anxiety in adolescent and adult animals. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate whether adolescent [postnatal day (P35)] Sprague-Dawley rats differ from their adult counterparts (P70) in the impact of acute restraint stress on social anxiety and in their sensitivity to the social anxiolytic effects of ethanol. Animals were restrained for 90 min, followed by examination of stress- and ethanol-induced (0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 g/kg) alterations in social behavior using a modified social interaction test in a familiar environment. Acute restraint stress increased anxiety, as indexed by reduced levels of social investigation at both ages, and decreased social preference among adolescents. These increases in anxiety were dramatically reversed among adolescents by acute ethanol. No anxiolytic-like effects of ethanol emerged following restraint stress in adults. The social suppression seen in response to higher doses of ethanol was reversed by restraint stress in animals of both ages. To the extent that these data are applicable to humans, the results of the present study provide some experimental evidence that stressful life events may increase the attractiveness of alcohol as an anxiolytic agent for adolescents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reprogramming human A375 amelanotic melanoma cells by catalase overexpression: Reversion or promotion of malignancy by inducing melanogenesis or metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracalente, Candelaria; Salguero, Noelia; Notcovich, Cintia; Müller, Carolina B.; da Motta, Leonardo L.; Klamt, Fabio; Ibañez, Irene L.; Durán, Hebe

    2016-01-01

    Advanced melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer. It is highly metastatic and dysfunctional in melanogenesis; two processes that are induced by H2O2. This work presents a melanoma cell model with low levels of H2O2 induced by catalase overexpression to study differentiation/dedifferentiation processes. Three clones (A7, C10 and G10) of human A375 amelanotic melanoma cells with quite distinct phenotypes were obtained. These clones faced H2O2 scavenging by two main strategies. One developed by clone G10 where ROS increased. This resulted in G10 migration and metastasis associated with the increased of cofilin-1 and CAP1. The other strategy was observed in clone A7 and C10, where ROS levels were maintained reversing malignant features. Particularly, C10 was not tumorigenic, while A7 reversed the amelanotic phenotype by increasing melanin content and melanocytic differentiation markers. These clones allowed the study of potential differentiation and migration markers and its association with ROS levels in vitro and in vivo, providing a new melanoma model with different degree of malignancy. PMID:27206672

  8. Reversible pressure-induced crystal-amorphous structural transformation in ice Ih

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Niall J.; Tse, John S.

    2014-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of depressurised high-density amorphous ice (HDA) at 80 K and at negative pressures has been performed. Over several attempts, HDA recrystallised to a form close to hexagonal ice Ih, albeit with some defects. The results support the hypothesis that compression of ice-Ih to HDA is a reversible first-order phase transition, with a large hysteresis. Therefore, it would appear that LDA is not truly amorphous. The elastic energy estimated from the area of the hysteresis loop is ca. 4.5 kJ/mol, in some way consistent with experimentally-determined accumulated successive heats of transformations from recovered HDA → ice Ih.

  9. Verapamil reverses PTH- or CRF-induced abnormal fatty acid oxidation in muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, A.F.; Smogorzewski, M.; Massry, S.G.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with impaired long chain fatty acids (LCFA) oxidation by skeletal muscle mitochondria. This is due to reduced activity of carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT). These derangements were attributed to the secondary hyperparathyroidism of CRF, since prior parathyroidectomy in CRF rats reversed these abnormalities and PTH administration to normal rats reproduced them. It was proposed that these effects of PTH are mediated by its ionophoric property leading to increased entry of calcium into skeletal muscle. A calcium channel blocker may, therefore, correct these derangements. The present study examined the effects of verapamil on LCFA oxidation, CPT activity by skeletal muscle mitochondria, and 45 Ca uptake by skeletal muscle obtained from CRF rats and normal animals treated with PTH with and without verapamil. Both four days of PTH administration and 21 days of CRF produced significant (P less than 0.01) reduction in LCFA oxidation and CPT activity of skeletal muscle mitochondria, and significant (P less than 0.01) increment in 45 Ca uptake by skeletal muscle. Simultaneous treatment with verapamil corrected all these derangements. Administration of verapamil alone to normal rats did not cause a significant change in any of these parameters. The data are consistent with the proposition that the alterations in LCFA in CRF or after PTH treatment are related to the ionophoric action of the hormone and could be reversed by a calcium channel blocker

  10. Steam-cooking rapidly destroys and reverses onion-induced antiplatelet activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Emilie A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foods in the diet that can aid in the prevention of diseases are of major interest. Onions are key ingredients in many cuisines around the world and moreover, onion demand has trended higher over the past three decades. An important pharmacological aspect of onion is the ability to inhibit platelet aggregation. Raw onions inhibit platelet aggregation; however, when onions are boiled or heated, antiplatelet activity may be abolished. Methods Onion quarters were steamed for 0, 1, 3, 6, 10, and 15 min. The in vitro antiplatelet activity of a yellow hybrid storage onion was examined at these times on the blood of 12 human subjects using in vitro whole blood aggregometry. Results Contrary to findings reported for boiling, antiplatelet activity was destroyed between 3 and 6 min of steaming, and at 10 min of steaming, cooked onions stimulated platelet activity. Extracts from cooked onion had the potential to reverse the inhibitory effect on blood platelets by 25%. Responses were consistent across all donors. Total polyphenolic concentration and soluble solids were not affected by steaming time. Conclusions The potential value of cooked onion preparations may result in destruction or reversal of antiplatelet activity, without affecting the polyphenolic concentration.

  11. Elucidation of mechanism of Si-jun-zi decoction-induced reversal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Spleen deficiency syndrome was induced in a rat model with reserpine. Liquid ... high-throughput quantification ability for ... HPLC grade acetonitrile was purchased from ..... study on the antitumor effect of flavonoid derivative 3d in.

  12. Subacute ethanol consumption reverses p-xylene-induced decreases in axonal transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, S.; Lyerly, D.L.; Pope, C.N.

    1992-01-01

    Organic solvants, as a class, have been implicated as neurotoxic agents in humans and laboratory animals. The study was designed to assess the interaction between subacute ingestion of moderate levels of ethanol and the p-xylene-induced decreases in protein and glycoprotein synthesis and axonal transport in the rat optic system. The results indicated that animals maintained on 10% ethanol as a drinking liquid show less p-xylene-induced neurotoxicity than animals receiving no ethanol supplement.

  13. Reversible-Deactivation Radical Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate Induced by Photochemical Reduction of Various Copper Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Mosnáček

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Photochemically mediated reversible-deactivation radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate was successfully performed using 50–400 ppm of various copper compounds such as CuSO4·5H2O, copper acetate, copper triflate and copper acetylacetonate as catalysts. The copper catalysts were reduced in situ by irradiation at wavelengths of 366–546 nm, without using any additional reducing agent. Bromopropionitrile was used as an initiator. The effects of various solvents and the concentration and structure of ligands were investigated. Well-defined polymers were obtained when at least 100 or 200 ppm of any catalyst complexed with excess tris(2-pyridylmethylamine as a ligand was used in dimethyl sulfoxide as a solvent.

  14. A Case of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Induced by Cisplatin/Pemetrexed Chemotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Ishihara

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the case of a 60-year-old woman who was diagnosed with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma with asymptomatic brain metastases and commenced chemotherapy with cisplatin/pemetrexed (CDDP/Pem. She experienced tonic-clonic convulsions on day 9 of the first cycle, which were accompanied by increased blood pressure (173/69 mm Hg and headache. Therefore, brain MRI was performed to check for stroke or progression of brain metastatic foci. T2-weighted, FLAIR, and ADC map images showed high-intensity areas in the subcortical region of the bilateral parieto-occipital lobes, leading to a diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES. The symptoms improved after treatment with antihypertensive and antiepileptic drugs. Clinicians should keep it in mind that central nervous system symptoms during anticancer therapy containing Pem may indicate possible PRES.

  15. Organic honey supplementation reverses pesticide-induced genotoxicity by modulating DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleva, Renata; Manzella, Nicola; Gaetani, Simona; Ciarapica, Veronica; Bracci, Massimo; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Pasini, Federica; Monaco, Federica; Amati, Monica; Borghi, Battista; Tomasetti, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Glyphosate (GLY) and organophosphorus insecticides such as chlorpyrifos (CPF) may cause DNA damage and cancer in exposed individuals through mitochondrial dysfunction. Polyphenols ubiquitously present in fruits and vegetables, have been viewed as antioxidant molecules, but also influence mitochondrial homeostasis. Here, honey containing polyphenol compounds was evaluated for its potential protective effect on pesticide-induced genotoxicity. Honey extracts from four floral organic sources were evaluated for their polyphenol content, antioxidant activity, and potential protective effects on pesticide-related mitochondrial destabilization, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species formation, and DNA damage response in human bronchial epithelial and neuronal cells. The protective effect of honey was, then evaluated in a residential population chronically exposed to pesticides. The four honey types showed a different polyphenol profile associated with a different antioxidant power. The pesticide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction parallels ROS formation from mitochondria (mtROS) and consequent DNA damage. Honey extracts efficiently inhibited pesticide-induced mtROS formation, and reduced DNA damage by upregulation of DNA repair through NFR2. Honey supplementation enhanced DNA repair activity in a residential population chronically exposed to pesticides, which resulted in a marked reduction of pesticide-induced DNA lesions. These results provide new insight regarding the effect of honey containing polyphenols on pesticide-induced DNA damage response. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Sialotranscriptomics of Rhipicephalus zambeziensis reveals intricate expression profiles of secretory proteins and suggests tight temporal transcriptional regulation during blood-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Minique Hilda; de Klerk, Daniel; Pienaar, Ronel; Rees, D Jasper G; Mans, Ben J

    2017-08-10

    Ticks secrete a diverse mixture of secretory proteins into the host to evade its immune response and facilitate blood-feeding, making secretory proteins attractive targets for the production of recombinant anti-tick vaccines. The largely neglected tick species, Rhipicephalus zambeziensis, is an efficient vector of Theileria parva in southern Africa but its available sequence information is limited. Next generation sequencing has advanced sequence availability for ticks in recent years and has assisted the characterisation of secretory proteins. This study focused on the de novo assembly and annotation of the salivary gland transcriptome of R. zambeziensis and the temporal expression of secretory protein transcripts in female and male ticks, before the onset of feeding and during early and late feeding. The sialotranscriptome of R. zambeziensis yielded 23,631 transcripts from which 13,584 non-redundant proteins were predicted. Eighty-six percent of these contained a predicted start and stop codon and were estimated to be putatively full-length proteins. A fifth (2569) of the predicted proteins were annotated as putative secretory proteins and explained 52% of the expression in the transcriptome. Expression analyses revealed that 2832 transcripts were differentially expressed among feeding time points and 1209 between the tick sexes. The expression analyses further indicated that 57% of the annotated secretory protein transcripts were differentially expressed. Dynamic expression profiles of secretory protein transcripts were observed during feeding of female ticks. Whereby a number of transcripts were upregulated during early feeding, presumably for feeding site establishment and then during late feeding, 52% of these were downregulated, indicating that transcripts were required at specific feeding stages. This suggested that secretory proteins are under stringent transcriptional regulation that fine-tunes their expression in salivary glands during feeding. No open

  17. Sugammadex for reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade in pediatric patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Young Ju; Lim, Byung Gun; Lee, Dong Kyu; Kim, Heezoo; Kong, Myoung Hoon; Lee, Il Ok

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that sugammadex, a modified γ-cyclodextrin, is a well-tolerated agent for the reversal of neuromuscular blockade (NMB) induced by a steroidal neuromuscular blocking drug in adult patients. However, its use has not been reviewed in pediatric patients. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of sugammadex in the reversal of rocuronium-induced NMB during surgery under general anesthesia in pediatric patients. A literature search was performed using the Pubmed, EMBASE: Drugs and pharmacology, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.3. Data collected from different trials were pooled; the weighted mean difference or the pooled risk ratio and the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were used for analysis, and heterogeneity (I) assessment was performed. Six randomized controlled trials comparing 253 pediatric patients (age range, 2-18 years) were included in the final analysis. The mean time taken to reach a train-of-four ratio of ≥0.9 was significantly shorter in the sugammadex groups (2 and 4 mg/kg) than in the control group (neostigmine or placebo), although the heterogeneity was high. The weighted mean differences of the 2 and 4 mg/kg sugammadex groups were -7.15 (95% CI: -10.77 to -3.54; I = 96%; P = 0.0001) and -17.32 (95% CI: -29.31 to -5.32; I = 98%; P = 0.005), respectively. The extubation time in the sugammadex group was shorter than that in the control group; the weighted mean difference of the sugammadex group was -6.00 (95% CI: -11.46 to -0.53; I = 99%; P = 0.03). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of the incidence of postanesthetic adverse events; the pooled risk ratio was 0.67 (95% CI: 0.27-1.71; I = 59%; P = 0.41). We suggest that sugammadex is fast and effective in reversing rocuronium-induced NMB in pediatric patients. Although there

  18. Carnosine reverses the aging-induced down regulation of brain regional serotonergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Soumyabrata; Ghosh, Tushar K; Poddar, Mrinal K

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the role of carnosine, an endogenous dipeptide biomolecule, on brain regional (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla) serotonergic system during aging. Results showed an aging-induced brain region specific significant (a) increase in Trp (except cerebral cortex) and their 5-HIAA steady state level with an increase in their 5-HIAA accumulation and declination, (b) decrease in their both 5-HT steady state level and 5-HT accumulation (except cerebral cortex). A significant decrease in brain regional 5-HT/Trp ratio (except cerebral cortex) and increase in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio were also observed during aging. Carnosine at lower dosages (0.5-1.0μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) didn't produce any significant response in any of the brain regions, but higher dosages (2.0-2.5μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) showed a significant response on those aging-induced brain regional serotonergic parameters. The treatment with carnosine (2.0μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days), attenuated these brain regional aging-induced serotonergic parameters and restored towards their basal levels that observed in 4 months young control rats. These results suggest that carnosine attenuates and restores the aging-induced brain regional down regulation of serotonergic system towards that observed in young rats' brain regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reversible acid-induced inactivation of the membrane fusion protein of Semliki Forest virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarts, BL; Smit, JM; Aneke, OJC; McInerney, GM; Liljestrom, P; Bittman, R; Wilschut, J

    Previously, it has been shown that the exposure of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) to a mildly acidic environment induces a rapid and complete loss of the ability of the virus to bind and fuse to target membranes added subsequently. In the present study, incubation of SFV at low pH followed by a specific

  20. Reversal by methylene blue of tetanic fade induced in cats by nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. Ambiel

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous data from our laboratory have indicated that nitric oxide (NO acting at the presynaptic level increases the amplitude of muscular contraction (AMC of the phrenic-diaphragm preparations isolated from indirectly stimulated rats, but, by acting at the postsynaptic level, it reduces the AMC when the preparations are directly stimulated. In the present study we investigated the effects induced by NO when tetanic frequencies of stimulation were applied to in vivo preparations (sciatic nerve-anterior tibial muscle of the cat. Intra-arterial injection of NO (0.75-1.5 mg/kg induced a dose-dependent increase in the Wedensky inhibition produced by high frequencies of stimulation applied to the motor nerve. Intra-arterial administration of 7.2 µg/kg methylene blue did not produce any change in AMC at low frequencies of nerve stimulation (0.2 Hz, but antagonized the NO-induced Wedensky inhibition. The experimental data suggest that NO-induced Wedensky inhibition may be mediated by the guanylate cyclase-cGMP pathway

  1. Go-6976 Reverses Hyperglycemia-Induced Insulin Resistance Independently of cPKC Inhibition in Adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Katherine A.; Hegyi, Krisztina; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Buse, Maria G.; Sethi, Jaswinder K.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia induces insulin resistance by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. One model of hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance involves chronic preincubation of adipocytes in the presence of high glucose and low insulin concentrations. We have previously shown that the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a partial role in the development of insulin resistance in this model. Here, we demonstrate that treatment with Go-6976, a widely used “specific” inhibitor of cPKCs, alleviates hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance. However, the effects of mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin and Go-6976 were not additive and only rapamycin restored impaired insulin-stimulated AKT activation. Although, PKCα, (but not –β) was abundantly expressed in these adipocytes, our studies indicate cPKCs do not play a major role in causing insulin-resistance in this model. There was no evidence of changes in the expression or phosphorylation of PKCα, and PKCα knock-down did not prevent the reduction of insulin-stimulated glucose transport. This was also consistent with lack of IRS-1 phosphorylation on Ser-24 in hyperglycemia-induced insulin-resistant adipocytes. Treatment with Go-6976 did inhibit a component of the mTORC1 pathway, as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein. Raptor knock-down enhanced the effect of insulin on glucose transport in insulin resistant adipocytes. Go-6976 had the same effect in control cells, but was ineffective in cells with Raptor knock-down. Taken together these findings suggest that Go-6976 exerts its effect in alleviating hyperglycemia-induced insulin-resistance independently of cPKC inhibition and may target components of the mTORC1 signaling pathway. PMID:25330241

  2. Fast light-induced reversible wettability of a zinc oxide nanorod array coated with a thin gold layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuefan; Du, Hejun; Kong, Junhua; Tran, Van-Thai; Koh, Jia Kai; Zhao, Chenyang; He, Chaobin

    2017-11-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has gained much attention recently due to its excellent physical and chemical properties, and has been extensively studied in energy harvesting applications such as photovoltaic and piezoelectric devices. In recent years, its reversible wettability has also attracted increasing interest. The wettability of ZnO nanostructures with various morphologies has been studied. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is still a lack of investigations on further modifications on ZnO to provide more benefits than pristine ZnO. Comprehensive studies on the reversible wettability are still needed. In this study, a ZnO nanorod array was prepared via a hydrothermal process and subsequently coated with thin gold layers with varied thickness. The morphologies and structures, optical properties and wettability were investigated. It is revealed that the ZnO-Au system possesses recoverable wettability upon switching between visible-ultraviolet light and a dark environment, which is verified by the contact angle change. The introduction of the thin gold layer to the ZnO nanorod array effectively increases the recovery rate of the wettability. The improvements are attributed to the hierarchical structures, which are formed by depositing thin gold layers onto the ZnO nanorod array, the visible light sensitivity due to the plasmonic effect of the deposited gold, as well as the fast charge-induced surface status change upon light illumination or dark storage. The improvement is beneficial to applications in environmental purification, energy harvesting, micro-lenses, and smart devices.

  3. Martensite phase reversion-induced nano/ ultrafine grained AISI 304L stainless steel with magnificent mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shirdel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels are extensively used in various applications requiring good corrosion resistance and formability. In the current study, the formation of nano/ ultrafine grained austenitic microstructure in a microalloyed AISI 304L stainless steel was investigated by the advanced thermomechanical process of reversion of strain-induced martensite. For this purpose, samples were subjected to heavy cold rolling to produce a nearly complete martensitic structure. Subsequently, a wide range of annealing temperatures (600 to 800°C and times (1 to 240 min were employed to assess the reversion behavior and to find the best annealing condition for the production of the nano/ultrafine grained austenitic microstructure. Microstructural characterizations have been performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and magnetic measurement, whereas the mechanical properties were assessed by tensile and hardness tests. After thermomechanical treatment, a very fine austenitic structure was obtained, which was composed of nano sized grains of ~ 85 nm in an ultrafine grained matrix with an average grain size of 480 nm. This microstructure exhibited superior mechanical properties: high tensile strength of about 1280 MPa with a desirable elongation of about 41%, which can pave the way for the application of these sheets in the automotive industry.

  4. L-cysteine reversibly inhibits glucose-induced biphasic insulin secretion and ATP production by inactivating PKM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsu, Daiki; Horiuchi, Yuta; Kano, Fumi; Noguchi, Yoshiyuki; Sugawara, Taichi; Takamoto, Iseki; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Murata, Masayuki

    2015-03-10

    Increase in the concentration of plasma L-cysteine is closely associated with defective insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, which results in type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this study, we investigated the effects of prolonged L-cysteine treatment on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) cells and from mouse pancreatic islets, and found that the treatment reversibly inhibited glucose-induced ATP production and resulting GSIS without affecting proinsulin and insulin synthesis. Comprehensive metabolic analyses using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed that prolonged L-cysteine treatment decreased the levels of pyruvate and its downstream metabolites. In addition, methyl pyruvate, a membrane-permeable form of pyruvate, rescued L-cysteine-induced inhibition of GSIS. Based on these results, we found that both in vitro and in MIN6 cells, L-cysteine specifically inhibited the activity of pyruvate kinase muscle isoform 2 (PKM2), an isoform of pyruvate kinases that catalyze the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. L-cysteine also induced PKM2 subunit dissociation (tetramers to dimers/monomers) in cells, which resulted in impaired glucose-induced ATP production for GSIS. DASA-10 (NCGC00181061, a substituted N,N'-diarylsulfonamide), a specific activator for PKM2, restored the tetramer formation and the activity of PKM2, glucose-induced ATP production, and biphasic insulin secretion in L-cysteine-treated cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that impaired insulin secretion due to exposure to L-cysteine resulted from its direct binding and inactivation of PKM2 and suggest that PKM2 is a potential therapeutic target for T2D.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced resistance to doxorubicin is reversed by paeonol treatment in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Fan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress is generally activated in solid tumors and results in tumor cell anti-apoptosis and drug resistance. Paeonol (Pae, 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone, is a natural product extracted from the root of Paeonia Suffruticosa Andrew. Although Pae displays anti-neoplastic activity and increases the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs in various cell lines and in animal models, studies related to the effect of Pae on ER stress-induced resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the effect of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response during resistance of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to doxorubicin. Treatment with the ER stress-inducer tunicamycin (TM before the addition of doxorubicin reduced the rate of apoptosis induced by doxorubicin. Interestingly, co-pretreatment with tunicamycin and Pae significantly increased apoptosis induced by doxorubicin. Furthermore, induction of ER stress resulted in increasing expression of COX-2 concomitant with inactivation of Akt and up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153 in HepG2 cells. These cellular changes in gene expression and Akt activation may be an important resistance mechanism against doxorubicin in hepatocellular carcinoma cells undergoing ER stress. However, co-pretreatment with tunicamycin and Pae decreased the expression of COX-2 and levels of activation of Akt as well as increasing the levels of CHOP in HCC cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that Pae reverses ER stress-induced resistance to doxorubicin in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by targeting COX-2 mediated inactivation of PI3K/AKT/CHOP.

  6. Ciguatoxin-induced catecholamine secretion in bovine chromaffin cells: mechanism of action and reversible inhibition by brevenal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Huu, Truong D; Mattei, César; Wen, Peter J; Bourdelais, Andrea J; Lewis, Richard J; Benoit, Evelyne; Baden, Daniel G; Molgó, Jordi; Meunier, Frédéric A

    2010-10-01

    Ciguatoxin (P-CTX-1B) from the dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus, belongs to the family of polyether neurotoxins responsible for the neurological poisoning disorder ciguatera. Although it is the most widespread marine-borne disease affecting humans, there is no current FDA-approved treatment available except for symptomatic therapies. In this paper, we report that P-CTX-1B promotes catecholamine secretion from bovine chromaffin cells, an effect that is insensitive to concomitant activation of capacitative Ca(2+) entry. Moreover, we confirm that brevenal, a polyether from the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, blocks P-CTX-1B-induced catecholamine secretion. This effect is partially reversible. Our results therefore raise the prospect of finding functional antagonists for P-CTX-1B that could be useful for the treatment of ciguatera. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Energetic rationale for an unexpected and abrupt reversal of guanidinium chloride-induced unfolding of peptide deformylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Alexander K; Manokaran, Sumathra; Eiler, Daniel; Kooren, Joel; Mallik, Sanku; Srivastava, D K

    2008-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the removal of formyl group from the N-terminal methionine residues of nascent proteins in prokaryotes, and this enzyme is a high priority target for antibiotic design. In pursuit of delineating the structural-functional features of Escherichia coli PDF (EcPDF), we investigated the mechanistic pathway for the guanidinium chloride (GdmCl)-induced unfolding of the enzyme by monitoring the secondary structural changes via CD spectroscopy. The experimental data revealed that EcPDF is a highly stable enzyme, and it undergoes slow denaturation in the presence of varying concentrations of GdmCl. The most interesting aspect of these studies has been the abrupt reversal of the unfolding pathway at low to moderate concentrations of the denaturant, but not at high concentration. An energetic rationale for such an unprecedented feature in protein chemistry is offered.

  8. Bevacizumab-Induced Reversible Thrombocytopenia in a Patient with Adenocarcinoma of Colon: Rare Adverse Effect of Bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeevan Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of bevacizumab- (BEV- induced thrombocytopenia in a 59-year-old man with adenocarcinoma of colon. After colectomy, the patient was treated with twelve cycles of FOLFOX-4 (folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin regimen. On relapse, he was treated with FOLFIRI (folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, and irinotecan regimen along with BEV 10 mg/kg for 6 cycles. After that, BEV was continued for maintenance as a single agent at an interval of three weeks. After the13th cycle of BEV, the patient developed melena with epistaxis and thrombocytopenia, from which he recovered on withdrawal of BEV. On rechallenge with half the initial dose, there was once again a reversible drop in platelet count. The proposed mechanism of thrombocytopenia may be immune-mediated peripheral destruction of platelets.

  9. [27- Hydroxycholesterol reverses estradiol induced inhibition of platelet aggregation in postmenopausal women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Gladys; Sierralta, Walter; Valladares, Luis

    2016-11-01

    The decline of estrogen levels increases cardiovascular risk in women. Platelets express estrogen receptors and 17β-estradiol- (E2) can produce a protective effect on thrombus formation. The hydroxylation of cholesterol generates several sterols and 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC) predominates in circulation. To evaluate the effect of 27HC as an endogenous antagonist of the anti-aggregating properties of E2 in platelets of postmenopausal women. Platelet function of postmenopausal women was evaluated ex-vivo. Platelets pre-incubated with 27HC in the presence or absence of E2, were stimulated with collagen. Aggregation was evaluated using turbidimetry using a Chrono-log aggregometer. Collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation was significantly inhibited by E2. The inhibitory effect of E2 on collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation was significantly reversed in the presence of 27HC. The suppressive effect of E2 on platelet aggregation is inhibited by 27HC, which could contribute to increase cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women.

  10. Electrochemically-induced reversible transition from the tunneled to layered polymorphs of manganese dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boeun; Yoon, Chong Seung; Lee, Hae Ri; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Cho, Byung Won; Oh, Si Hyoung

    2014-08-01

    Zn-ion batteries are emerging energy storage systems eligible for large-scale applications, such as electric vehicles. These batteries consist of totally environmentally-benign electrode materials and potentially manufactured very economically. Although Zn/α-MnO2 systems produce high energy densities of 225 Wh kg-1, larger than those of conventional Mg-ion batteries, they show significant capacity fading during long-term cycling and suffer from poor performance at high current rates. To solve these problems, the concrete reaction mechanism between α-MnO2 and zinc ions that occur on the cathode must be elucidated. Here, we report the intercalation mechanism of zinc ions into α-MnO2 during discharge, which involves a reversible phase transition of MnO2 from tunneled to layered polymorphs by electrochemical reactions. This transition is initiated by the dissolution of manganese from α-MnO2 during discharge process to form layered Zn-birnessite. The original tunneled structure is recovered by the incorporation of manganese ions back into the layers of Zn-birnessite during charge process.

  11. Magnetized Reverse Shock: Density-fluctuation-induced Field Distortion, Polarization Degree Reduction, and Application to GRBs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Wei; Zhang Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Li Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Stone, James M., E-mail: deng@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: hli@lanl.gov, E-mail: jstone@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    The early optical afterglow emission of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) shows a high linear polarization degree (PD) of tens of percent, suggesting an ordered magnetic field in the emission region. The light curves are consistent with being of a reverse shock (RS) origin. However, the magnetization parameter, σ , of the outflow is unknown. If σ is too small, an ordered field in the RS may be quickly randomized due to turbulence driven by various perturbations so that the PD may not be as high as observed. Here we use the “Athena++” relativistic MHD code to simulate a relativistic jet with an ordered magnetic field propagating into a clumpy ambient medium, with a focus on how density fluctuations may distort the ordered magnetic field and reduce PD in the RS emission for different σ values. For a given density fluctuation, we discover a clear power-law relationship between the relative PD reduction and the σ value of the outflow. Such a relation may be applied to estimate σ of the GRB outflows using the polarization data of early afterglows.

  12. Pressure-induced Polarization Reversal in Z-type Hexaferrite Single Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Byung-Gu; Chun, Sae Hwan; Kim, Kee Hoon

    2012-02-01

    Multiferroic materials with a gigantic magnetoelectric (ME) coupling at room temperature have been searched for applications to novel devices. Recently, large direct and converse ME effects were realized at room temperature in the so-called Z-type hexaferrite (Ba,Sr)3Co2Fe24O41 single crystals [1,2]. To obtain a new control parameter for realizing a sensitive ME tuning, we studied ME properties of the crystals under uniaxial pressure. Upon applying a tiny uniaxial pressure of about 0.6 GPa, magnetic field-driven electric polarization reversal and anomaly in a M-H loop start to appear at 10 K and gradually disappear at higher temperature above 130 K. By comparing those results with longitudinal magnetostriction at ambient pressure, we propose the pressure-dependent variations of transverse conical spin configuration as well as its domain structure under small magnetic field bias, and point out the possibility of having two different physical origins of the ME coupling in this system. [1] Y. Kitagawa et al., Nat. Mater. 9, 797 (2010) [2] S. H. Chun et al., submitted.

  13. Reversible antibiotic tolerance induced in Staphylococcus aureus by concurrent drug exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Krause; Friberg, Cathrine; McCreary, Mark

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to beta-lactam antibiotics has led to increasing use of the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin as a life-saving treatment for major S. aureus infections. Coinfection by an unrelated bacterial species may necessitate concurrent treatment with a second...... antibiotic that targets the coinfecting pathogen. While investigating factors that affect bacterial antibiotic sensitivity, we discovered that susceptibility of S. aureus to vancomycin is reduced by concurrent exposure to colistin, a cationic peptide antimicrobial employed to treat infections by Gram......-negative pathogens. We show that colistin-induced vancomycin tolerance persists only as long as the inducer is present and is accompanied by gene expression changes similar to those resulting from mutations that produce stably inherited reduction of vancomycin sensitivity (vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus [VISA...

  14. Efficacy of Blood Sources and Artificial Blood Feeding Methods in Rearing of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae for Sterile Insect Technique and Incompatible Insect Technique Approaches in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayana Gunathilaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Selection of the artificial membrane feeding technique and blood meal source has been recognized as key considerations in mass rearing of vectors. Methodology. Artificial membrane feeding techniques, namely, glass plate, metal plate, and Hemotek membrane feeding method, and three blood sources (human, cattle, and chicken were evaluated based on feeding rates, fecundity, and hatching rates of Aedes aegypti. Significance in the variations among blood feeding was investigated by one-way ANOVA, cluster analysis of variance (ANOSIM, and principal coordinates (PCO analysis. Results. Feeding rates of Ae. aegypti significantly differed among the membrane feeding techniques as suggested by one-way ANOVA (p0.05. Conclusions. Metal plate method could be recommended as the most effective membrane feeding technique for mass rearing of Ae. aegypti, due to its high feeding rate and cost effectiveness. Cattle blood could be recommended for mass rearing Ae. aegypti.

  15. Reversible Lansoprazole-Induced Interstitial Lung Disease Showing Improvement after Drug Cessation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Kyu Won; Woo, Ok Hee; Yong, Hwan Seok; Shin, Bong Kyung; Shim, Jae Jeong; Kang, Eun Young

    2008-01-01

    Lansoprazole is an acid proton-pump inhibitor that is similar to omeprazole. It is used to treat duodenal or gastric ulcers, H. pylori infection, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Common adverse effects of lansoprazole are diarrhea, abdominal pain, skin rash and/or itching. Information from U.S. National Library of Medicine warns that this drug can on rare occasion cause cough or cold-like symptoms. The pathophysiological mechanisms of lansoprazole-related pulmonary symptoms are not yet understood. In particular, there are no known reports regarding lansoprazole-induced interstitial lung diseases. We report here a case of interstitial lung disease (ILD) induced by oral administration of lansoprazole, which showed a pattern of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) as detected from a video-assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy. We believe that this is the first report of a case of pathologically proven lansoprazole-induced ILD for which a surgical lung biopsy was performed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of DI-ILD caused by lansoprazole. The diagnosis was made by considering the radiological, histopathological and clinical findings, including the close temporal relationship between lansoprazole exposure and symptom severity. Other possible causes were excluded due to a lack of a temporal relationship between the symptoms and work history or prednisolone therapy, and no other history of specific allergen exposure. When there is diffuse interstitial lung disease with an unknown etiology, it is important to remember that drugs can be the cause of pulmonary symptoms and it is crucial to take a careful patient history. If there is a recent history of taking lansoprazole in a patient with clinical and radiological findings of diffuse interstitial lung disease, we recommend stopping the medication to see if there is clinical and radiological improvement. That way, one can avoid using invasive procedures to

  16. Chlorfenapyr-induced toxic leukoencephalopathy with radiologic reversibility: A case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Byung Hyun; Kim, Seul Kee; Yoon, Woong; Heo, Tae Wook; Lee, Yun Young [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Heonung Keun [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Chlorfenapyr is a widely used, moderately hazardous pesticide. Previous reports have indicated that chlorfenapyr intoxication can be fatal in humans. We reported the first non-fatal case of chlorfenapyr-induced toxic leukoencephalopathy in a 44-year-old female with resolution of extensive and abnormal signal intensities in white matter tracts throughout the brain, brain stem, and spinal cord on serial magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Reversion of methacholine induced bronchoconstriction with inhaled diazepam in patients with asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Miric, Mirjana; Ristic, Sinisa; Joksimovic, Bojan N; Medenica, Snezana; Racic, Maja; Ristic, Slavica; Joksimovic, Vedrana R; Skipina, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benzodiazepines have a direct bronchodilatory effect. Methacholine is a non-selective muscarinic receptor agonist causing bronchoconstriction. Aim: To examine the effects of inhaled benzodiazepines, modulating bronchoconstriction induced by methacholine in patients with asthma. Patients and Methods: Twelve patients with well controlled asthma were studied. On the first day, after determining the initial values of pulmonary function, a dose response curve was carried out with progr...

  18. Novel and Reversible Mechanisms of Smoking-Induced Insulin Resistance in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Bryan C.; Perreault, Leigh; Hunerdosse, Devon; Kerege, Anna; Playdon, Mary; Samek, Ali M.; Eckel, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is the most common cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in the United States, in part because it is an independent risk factor for the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, mechanisms responsible for smoking-induced insulin resistance are unclear. In this study, we found smokers were less insulin sensitive compared with controls, which increased after either 1 or 2 weeks of smoking cessation. Improvements in insulin sensitivity after smoking cessation...

  19. Reversible Lansoprazole-Induced Interstitial Lung Disease Showing Improvement after Drug Cessation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Kyu Won; Woo, Ok Hee; Yong, Hwan Seok; Shin, Bong Kyung; Shim, Jae Jeong; Kang, Eun Young [College of Medicine, Korea University, Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Lansoprazole is an acid proton-pump inhibitor that is similar to omeprazole. It is used to treat duodenal or gastric ulcers, H. pylori infection, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Common adverse effects of lansoprazole are diarrhea, abdominal pain, skin rash and/or itching. Information from U.S. National Library of Medicine warns that this drug can on rare occasion cause cough or cold-like symptoms. The pathophysiological mechanisms of lansoprazole-related pulmonary symptoms are not yet understood. In particular, there are no known reports regarding lansoprazole-induced interstitial lung diseases. We report here a case of interstitial lung disease (ILD) induced by oral administration of lansoprazole, which showed a pattern of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) as detected from a video-assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy. We believe that this is the first report of a case of pathologically proven lansoprazole-induced ILD for which a surgical lung biopsy was performed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of DI-ILD caused by lansoprazole. The diagnosis was made by considering the radiological, histopathological and clinical findings, including the close temporal relationship between lansoprazole exposure and symptom severity. Other possible causes were excluded due to a lack of a temporal relationship between the symptoms and work history or prednisolone therapy, and no other history of specific allergen exposure. When there is diffuse interstitial lung disease with an unknown etiology, it is important to remember that drugs can be the cause of pulmonary symptoms and it is crucial to take a careful patient history. If there is a recent history of taking lansoprazole in a patient with clinical and radiological findings of diffuse interstitial lung disease, we recommend stopping the medication to see if there is clinical and radiological improvement. That way, one can avoid using invasive procedures to

  20. Opiate-induced suppression of rat hypoglossal motoneuron activity and its reversal by ampakine therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R Lorier

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglossal (XII motoneurons innervate tongue muscles and are vital for maintaining upper-airway patency during inspiration. Depression of XII nerve activity by opioid analgesics is a significant clinical problem, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Currently there are no suitable pharmacological approaches to counter opiate-induced suppression of XII nerve activity while maintaining analgesia. Ampakines accentuate alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA receptor responses. The AMPA family of glutamate receptors mediate excitatory transmission to XII motoneurons. Therefore the objectives were to determine whether the depressant actions of mu-opioid receptor activation on inspiratory activity includes a direct inhibitory action at the inspiratory premotoneuron to XII motoneuron synapse, and to identify underlying mechanism(s. We then examined whether ampakines counteract opioid-induced depression of XII motoneuron activity.A medullary slice preparation from neonatal rat that produces inspiratory-related output in vitro was used. Measurements of inspiratory burst amplitude and frequency were made from XII nerve roots. Whole-cell patch recordings from XII motoneurons were used to measure membrane currents and synaptic events. Application of the mu-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO, to the XII nucleus depressed the output of inspiratory XII motoneurons via presynaptic inhibition of excitatory glutamatergic transmission. Ampakines (CX614 and CX717 alleviated DAMGO-induced depression of XII MN activity through postsynaptic actions on XII motoneurons.The inspiratory-depressant actions of opioid analgesics include presynaptic inhibition of XII motoneuron output. Ampakines counteract mu-opioid receptor-mediated depression of XII motoneuron inspiratory activity. These results suggest that ampakines may be beneficial in countering opiate-induced suppression of XII motoneuron activity and resultant impairment of airway patency.

  1. Platycodon grandiflorum (PG) reverses angiotensin II-induced apoptosis by repressing IGF-IIR expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-Chuan; Lin, Chih-Hsueh; Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Shen, Chia-Yao; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Padma, V Vijaya; Lin, Yu-Chen; Huang, Chih-Yang; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2017-06-09

    Platycodon grandiflorum (PG) is a Chinese medical plant used for decades as a traditional prescription to eliminate phlegm, relieve cough, reduce inflammation and lower blood pressure. PG also has a significant effect on the cardiovascular systems. The aqueous extract of Platycodon grandiflorum (JACQ.) A. DC. root was screened for inhibiting Ang II-induced IGF-IIR activation and apoptosis pathway in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. The effects were also studied in spontaneously hypertensive rats (five groups, n=5) using low and high doses of PG for 50 days. The Ang II-induced IGF-IIR activation was analyzed by luciferase reporter, RT-PCR, western blot and surface IGF-IIR expression assay. Furthermore, the major active constituent of PG was carried out by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Our results indicate that a crude extract of PG significantly suppresses the Ang II-induced IGF-IIR signaling pathway to prevent cardiomyocyte apoptosis. PG extract inhibits Ang II-mediated JNK activation and SIRT1 degradation to reduce IGF-IIR activity. Moreover, PG maintains SIRT1 stability to enhance HSF1-mediated IGF-IIR suppression, which prevents cardiomyocyte apoptosis. In animal models, the administration of PG markedly reduced this apoptotic pathway in the heart of SHRs. Taken together, PG may be considered as an effective treatment for cardiac diseases in hypertensive patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Reversible DNA condensation induced by a tetranuclear nickel(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xindian; Wang, Xiaoyong; He, Yafeng; Yu, Zhen; Lin, Miaoxin; Zhang, Changli; Wang, Jing; Song, Yajie; Zhang, Yangmiao; Liu, Zhipeng; Li, Yizhi; Guo, Zijian

    2010-12-17

    DNA condensing agents play a critical role in gene therapy. A tetranuclear nickel(II) complex, [Ni(II)(4)(L-2H)(H(2)O)(6)(CH(3)CH(2)OH)(2)]·6NO(3) (L=3,3',5,5'-tetrakis{[(2-hydroxyethyl)(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]methyl}biphenyl-4,4'-diol), has been synthesized as a nonviral vector to induce DNA condensation. X-ray crystallographic data indicate that the complex crystallizes in the monoclinic system with space group P2(1)/n, a=10.291(9), b=24.15(2), c=13.896(11) Å, and β=98.175(13)°. The DNA condensation induced by the complex has been investigated by means of UV/Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, gel electrophoresis assay, and zeta potential analysis. The complex interacts strongly with DNA through electrostatic attraction and induces its condensation into globular nanoparticles at low concentration. The release of DNA from its compact state has been achieved using the chelator ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for the first time. Other essential properties, such as DNA cleavage inactivity and biocompatibility, have also been examined in vitro. In general, the complex satisfies the requirements of a gene vector in all of these respects.

  3. Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation through activating the NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Wen-Zhu [Anesthesia and Operation Center, Hainan Branch of Chinese PLA General Hospital, Hainan 572013 (China); Anesthesia and Operation Center, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Miao, Yu-Liang [Department of Anesthesiology, PLA No. 306 Hospital, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Wen-Zhi [Department of Anesthesiology, Beijing Military General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing 100700 (China); Wu, Wei, E-mail: wwzwgk@163.com [Department of Head and Neck Surgery of Otolaryngology, PLA No. 306 Hospital, Beijing 100101 (China); Li, Bao-Wei [Department of Head and Neck Surgery of Otolaryngology, PLA No. 306 Hospital, Beijing 100101 (China); An, Li-Na [Department of Anesthesiology, Armed Police General Hospital, Beijing 100039 (China); Fang, Wei-Wu [Department of Anesthesiology, PLA No. 306 Hospital, Beijing 100101 (China); Mi, Wei-Dong, E-mail: elite2005gg@163.com [Anesthesia and Operation Center, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • Leptin promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells isolated from embryonic mouse hippocampus. • Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation. • The effects of leptin are partially mediated by upregulating NR2B subunits. - Abstract: Corticosterone inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). The removal of corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation has been reported to contribute to neural regeneration. Leptin has been shown to regulate brain development, improve angiogenesis, and promote neural regeneration; however, its effects on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation remain unclear. Here we reported that leptin significantly promoted the proliferation of hippocampal NSCs in a concentration-dependent pattern. Also, leptin efficiently reversed the inhibition of NSCs proliferation induced by corticosterone. Interestingly, pre-treatment with non-specific NMDA antagonist MK-801, specific NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NR2B, significantly blocked the effect of leptin on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. Furthermore, corticosterone significantly reduced the protein expression of NR2B, whereas pre-treatment with leptin greatly reversed the attenuation of NR2B expression caused by corticosterone in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Our findings demonstrate that leptin reverses the corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. This process is, at least partially mediated by increased expression of NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors.

  4. Sex specific molecular responses of quick-to-court protein in Indian malarial vector Anopheles culicifacies: conflict of mating versus blood feeding behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanwee Das De

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular basis of mosquito behavioural complexity plays a central role in designing novel molecular tools to fight against their vector-borne diseases. Although the olfactory system plays an important role in guiding and managing many behavioural responses including feeding and mating, but the sex-specific regulation of olfactory responses remain poorly investigated. From our ongoing transcriptomic data annotation of olfactory tissue of blood fed adult female An. culicifacies mosquitoes; we have identified a 383 bp long unique transcript encoding a Drosophila homolog of the quick-to-court protein. Previously this was shown to regulate courtship behaviour in adult male Drosophila. A comprehensive in silico analysis of the quick-to-court (qtc gene of An. culicifacies (Ac-qtc predicts a 1536 bp single copy gene encoding 511 amino acid protein, having a high degree of conservation with other insect homologs. The age-dependent increased expression of putative Ac-qtc correlated with the maturation of the olfactory system, necessary to meet the sex-specific conflicting demand of mating (mate finding versus host-seeking behavioural responses. Sixteen to eighteen hours of starvation did not alter Ac-qtc expression in both sexes, however, blood feeding significantly modulated its response in the adult female mosquitoes, confirming that it may not be involved in sugar feeding associated behavioural regulation. Finally, a dual behavioural and molecular assay indicated that natural dysregulation of Ac-qtc in the late evening might promote the mating events for successful insemination. We hypothesize that Ac-qtc may play a unique role to regulate the sex-specific conflicting demand of mosquito courtship behaviour versus blood feeding behaviour in the adult female mosquitoes. Further elucidation of this molecular mechanism may provide further information to evaluate Ac-qtc as a key molecular target for mosquito-borne disease management.

  5. Sugammadex efficacy for reversal of rocuronium- and vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade: A pooled analysis of 26 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, William Joseph; Woo, Tiffany; Assaid, Christopher A; Lupinacci, Robert J; Lemmens, Hendrikus J; Blobner, Manfred; Khuenl-Brady, Karin S

    2017-09-01

    To summarize and compare efficacy of sugammadex with neostigmine or placebo for reversal of rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade (NMB), and to demonstrate consistency of sugammadex results across various patient populations. Pooled analysis on data from 26 multicenter, randomized, Phase II and III studies. Operating room. 1855 adults undergoing surgery under general anesthesia and receiving rocuronium or vecuronium for NMB. Sugammadex (2.0mg/kg at second twitch reappearance [T 2 ; moderate NMB], 4.0mg/kg at 1-2 post-tetanic counts [PTC; deep NMB] or 16.0mg/kg at 3min after rocuronium 1.2mg/kg), neostigmine or placebo. Time to recovery of the train-of-four (TOF) ratio to 0.9. Geometric mean (95% CI) times to recovery to TOF ratio of 0.9 were 1.9 (1.8-2.0) min following sugammadex 2.0mg/kg and 10.6 (9.8-11.6) min following neostigmine administration at T 2 after rocuronium, and 2.9 (2.5-3.4) min and 17.4 (13.4-22.6) min, respectively, after vecuronium. Recovery times were 2.2 (2.1-2.3) min following sugammadex 4.0mg/kg and 19.0 (14.8-24.6) min following neostigmine administered at a target of 1-2 PTC after rocuronium, and 3.8 (3.0-5.0) min and 67.6 (56.3-81.2) min after vecuronium. Sugammadex administered 3min after rocuronium 1.2mg/kg resulted in rapid recovery (1.7 [1.5-2.0] min). Modest increases in mean recovery time were associated with vecuronium use (+1.6min [78%; (61%-98%)] versus rocuronium), mild-to-moderate renal impairment (+0.4min [20%; (9%-32%)] versus normal renal function) and geographic location (+1.0min [38%; (25%-52%)] in subjects in USA/Canada versus Europe/Japan). Sugammadex administered at recommended doses provides rapid and predictable reversal of rocuronium and vecuronium-induced moderate and deep NMB, and effective reversal 3min after rocuronium 1.2mg/kg. Robust recovery was seen across various patient factors, providing further confirmation of labeled dose recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  6. Three- versus four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate for the reversal of warfarin-induced bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Tara; Taylor, Scott; Abraham, Prasad; Mcmillian, Wesley; Harris, Serena; Curtis, James; Elder, Tai

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 3-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (3F-PCC) compared to 4-factor PCC (4F-PCC) in warfarin-associated bleeding. Methods: This multicenter, retrospective, cohort study analyzed data from patients admitted between May 2011 and October 2014 who received PCC for warfarin-associated bleeding. The primary outcome was the rate of international normalized ratio (INR) normalization, defined as an INR ≤1.3, after administration of 3F-PCC compared to 4F-PCC. Other variables of interest included the incidence of additional reversal agents, new thromboembolic events, and mortality. Results: A total of 134 patients were included in the analysis. The average dose of PCC administered was 24.6 ± 9.3 units/kg versus 36.3 ± 12.8 units/kg in the 3F-PCC and 4F-PCC groups, respectively, P < 0.001. Baseline INR in the 3F-PCC and 4F-PCC groups was 3.61 ± 2.3 and 6.87 ± 2.3, respectively P < 0.001. 4F-PCC had a higher rate of INR normalization at first INR check post-PCC administration compared to 3F-PCC (84.2% vs. 51.9%, P = 0.0001). Thromboembolic events, intensive care unit and hospital length of stay, and mortality were similar among both groups. Conclusion: The use of 4F-PCC leads to a more significant reduction in INR compared to 3F-PCC though no difference in mortality or length of stay was observed. Thromboembolism rates were similar among both groups. PMID:29619338

  7. Reversal of sibutramine-induced anorexia with a selective 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Suzanne; Cooper, Alison J; Barnes, Nicholas M

    2011-04-01

    The monoamine reuptake inhibitor sibutramine reduces food intake but the receptor subtypes mediating the effects of sibutramine on feeding remain to be clearly identified. The involvement of the 5-HT(2C) receptor subtype in the satiety-enhancing effects of sibutramine was investigated by examining the effects of co-administration of sibutramine with the selective 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 242084 Microstructural analyses of licking for a glucose solution by non-deprived, male rats were performed over a range of doses of sibutramine to identify a selective satiety-enhancing dose (experiment 1). Similar analyses were performed after administration of a vehicle control, two doses of SB 242084 alone or two doses of SB 242084 in combination with sibutramine (experiment 2). Sibutramine at doses of 1-3 mg/kg selectively reduced glucose consumption via a reduction in the number of bouts of licking. Non-selective effects to increase latency to lick were only observed at the higher dose of 6 mg/kg. Co-administration of sibutramine (3 mg/kg) with SB 242084 (1 or 3 mg/kg) reversed the effect of sibutramine on bout number whereas either dose of SB 242084 alone had no significant effect. We confirm behaviourally selective effects of sibutramine on feeding and provide further support for the satiety-enhancing effects of sibutramine. Our data also provide evidence for the involvement of the 5-HT(2C) receptor in the satiety-enhancing effects of sibutramine although additional targets may have an impact, and further investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the efficacy of sibutramine as an anorectic is warranted.

  8. Martensite shear phase reversion-induced nanograined/ultrafine-grained Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy: The effect of interstitial alloying elements and degree of austenite stability on phase reversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Madison Hall Room 217, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70504-1430 (United States); Zhang, Z.; Venkatasurya, P.K.C. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Madison Hall Room 217, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70504-1430 (United States); Somani, M.C.; Karjalainen, L.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, Oulu 90014 (Finland)

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of a novel process involving phase-reversion annealing process. {yields} Austensite stability strongly influences development of nanograined structure. {yields} Interstitial elements influence microstructural evolution during annealing. - Abstract: We describe here an electron microscopy study of microstructural evolution associated with martensitic shear phase reversion-induced nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) structure in an experimental Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy with very low interstitial content. The primary objective is to understand and obtain fundamental insights on the influence of degree of austenite stability (Fe-16Cr-10Ni, 301LN, and 301 have different austenite stability index) and interstitial elements (carbon and nitrogen) in terms of phase reversion process, microstructural evolution during reversion annealing, and temperature-time annealing sequence. A relative comparison of Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy with 301LN and 301 austenitic stainless steels indicated that phase reversion in Fe-16Cr-10Ni occurred by shear mechanism, which is similar to that observed for 301, but is different from the diffusional mechanism in 301LN steel. While the phase reversion in the experimental Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy and 301 austenitic stainless steel occurred by shear mechanism, there were fundamental differences between these two alloys. The reversed strain-free austenite grains in Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy were characterized by nearly same crystallographic orientation, where as in 301 steel there was evidence of break-up of martensite laths during reversion annealing resulting in several regions of misoriented austenite grains in 301 steel. Furthermore, a higher phase reversion annealing temperature range (800-900 deg. C) was required to obtain a fully NG/UFG structure of grain size 200-600 nm. The difference in the phase reversion and the temperature-time sequence in the three stages is explained in terms of Gibbs free energy change that

  9. Piroxicam Reverses Endotoxin-Induced Hypotension in Rats: Contribution of Vasoactive Eicosanoids and Nitric Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buharalioglu, C. Kemal; Korkmaz, Belma; Cuez, Tuba; Sahan-Firat, Seyhan; Sari, Ayşe Nihal; Malik, Kafait U.; Tunctan, Bahar

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) is responsible for endotoxin-induced vascular hyporeactivity and hypotension resulting in multiple organ failure. Endotoxic shock is also characterized by decreased expression of constitutive cyclooxygenase (COX-1), cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A and endothelial NOS (eNOS). Our previous studies demonstrated that dual inhibition of iNOS and COX with a selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, or a non-selective COX inhibitor, indomethacin, restores blood pressure presumably due to increased production of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) derived from arachidonic acid (AA) by CYP4A in endotoxaemic rats. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of piroxicam, a preferential COX-1 inhibitor, on the endotoxin-induced changes in blood pressure, expression of COX-1, inducible COX (COX-2), CYP4A1, eNOS, iNOS and heat shock protein 90 (hsp90), and production of PGI2, PGE2, 20-HETE and NO. Injection of endotoxin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) to male Wistar rats caused a fall in blood pressure and an increase in heart rate associated with elevated renal 6-keto-PGF1α and PGE2 levels as well as an increase in COX-2 protein expression. Endotoxin also caused an elevation in systemic and renal nitrite levels associated with increased renal iNOS protein expression. In contrast, systemic and renal 20-HETE levels and renal expression of eNOS, COX-1 and CYP4A1 were decreased in endotoxaemic rats. The effects of endotoxin, except for renal COX-1 and eNOS protein expression, were prevented by piroxicam (10 mg/kg, i.p.), given 1 hr after injection of endotoxin. Endotoxin did not change renal hsp90 protein expression. These data suggest that a decrease in the expression and activity of COX-2 and iNOS associated with an increase in CYP4A1 expression and 20-HETE synthesis contributes to the effect of piroxicam to prevent the hypotension during rat endotoxaemia. PMID:21463481

  10. Stress induced right ventricular dysfunction: An indication of reversible right ventricular ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, S.R.; Walton, S.; Emanuel, R.W.; Swanton, R.H.; Campos Costa, D.; Laming, P.J.; Ell, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Stress induced changes in left ventricular ejection fraction are widely used in the detection and assessment of coronary artery disease. This study demonstrates that right ventricular dysfunction may also occur, and assesses its significance in terms of coronary artery anatomy. This study involved 14 normal subjects and 26 with coronary artery disease investigated by equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography, at rest and during maximal dynamic exercise. Mean normal resting right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) was 0.40 (SD 0.118), and all normal subjects increased RVEF with stress (mean ΔRVEF+0.13 SD 0.099). Mean ΔRVEF in the subjects with coronary artery disease was significantly lower at 0.00 (SD 0.080), but there was overlap between the two groups. The largest falls in RVEF were seen if the right coronary artery was occluded without retrograde filling. In this subgroup with the most severely compromised right ventricular perfusion (nine subjects), RVEF always fell with stress, and mean ΔRVEF was -0.08 (SD 0.050). There was no significant correlation between ΔLVEF and ΔRVEF, implying that the right ventricular dysfunction was due to right ventricular ischaemia, rather than secondary to left ventricular dysfunction. Stress induced right ventricular ischaemia can therefore be detected readily by radionuclide ventriculography. (orig.)

  11. Vitamin C-induced hyperoxaluria causing reversible tubulointerstitial nephritis and chronic renal failure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathi Shradha

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vitamin C is a precursor of oxalate and promoter of its absorption, potentially causing hyperoxaluria. Malabsorption causes Calcium (Ca chelation with fatty acids, producing enteric hyperoxaluria. Case A 73-year-old man with both risk factors was hospitalized with serum creatinine of 8.4 mg/dL (versus 1.2 mg/dL four months earlier (normal 0.6–1.3 mg/dL. Given his oxalate-rich diet, chronic diarrhea, and daily 680 mg vitamin C and furosemide, we postulated Ca oxalate-induced nephropathy, a diagnosis confirmed by documenting hyperoxaluria, and finding of diffuse intraluminal crystals and extensive interstitial fibrosis on biopsy. He was hemodialysed 6 times to remove excess oxalate. Two weeks off vitamin C, his creatinine spontaneously fell to 3.1 mg/dL. Three months later, on low oxalate diet and 100 mg vitamin B6, urine oxalate to creatinine ratio decreased from 0.084 to 0.02 (normal Conclusion 1 High-dose vitamin C can induce hyperoxaluric nephropathy and progressive renal failure, especially if aggravated by diarrhea, oxalate-rich diet, metabolic acidosis, and dehydration. 2 The diagnosis should be suspected in unexplained renal insufficiency when associated with these risk factors. 3 Since prompt treatment could avert end-stage renal disease, we recommend monitoring urinary oxalate in patients on high-dose vitamin C and renal biopsy if necessary.

  12. Minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation: comparison of 3 Q-switched lasers to reverse its effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisar MS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mahrukh S Nisar,1 Karthik Iyer,1 Robert T Brodell,2 Jenifer R Lloyd,3 Thuzar M Shin,3 Asad Ahmad4 1Northeast Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, OH, USA; 2Division of Dermatology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA; 3Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 4Northside Medical Center, Youngstown, OH, USA Abstract: Minocycline is a tetracycline derivative antibiotic commonly prescribed for acne, rosacea, and other inflammatory skin disorders. Minocycline turns black when oxidized, leading to discoloration of the skin, nails, bulbar conjunctiva, oral mucosa, teeth, bones, and thyroid gland. Hyperpigmentation has been reported after long-term minocycline therapy with at least 100 mg/day. Three types of minocycline-induced cutaneous hyperpigmentation can result. Type I is the most common, and is associated with blue-black discoloration in areas of previous inflammation and scarring. Type II most commonly affects the legs and is characterized by blue-gray pigmentation of previously normal skin. Type III is the least common and is characterized by diffuse muddy-brown discoloration predominantly on sun exposed skin. Minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation may be cosmetically disfiguring and prompt identification is essential. Without treatment, symptoms may take several months, to years to resolve, after discontinuation of the drug. However, the pigmentation may never completely disappear. In fact, there have been few reports of complete resolution associated with any therapeutic intervention. We report a case of a patient on long-term minocycline therapy utilized as an anti-inflammatory agent to control symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, which led to minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation of the face. To remove the blue-gray cutaneous deposits, 3 Q-switched lasers (Neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG 1064 nm, Alexandrite 755 nm, and Ruby 694 nm were used in test areas. The Alexandrite 755 nm

  13. Phosphatidylcholine Reverses Ethanol-Induced Increase in Transepithelial Endotoxin Permeability and Abolishes Transepithelial Leukocyte Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitzscherling, Katja; Volynets, Valentina; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse increases both intestinal bacterial overgrowth and intestinal permeability to macromolecules. Intestinal permeability of endotoxin, a component of the outer cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, plays a crucial role in the development of alcohol-induced liver disease (ALD......). As impaired bile flow leads to endotoxemia and the bile component phosphatidylcholine (PC) is therapeutically active in ALD, we tested the hypothesis that conjugated primary bile salts (CPBS) and PC inhibit ethanol-enhanced transepithelial permeability of endotoxin and the subsequent transepithelial...... activation of human leukocytes. For this purpose, we used a model in which intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2) were basolaterally cocultivated with mononuclear leukocytes. Cells were challenged apically with endotoxin from Escherichia coli K12 and were incubated with or without the addition of CPBS (1.5 m...

  14. Phosphatidylcholine reverses ethanol-induced increase in transepithelial endotoxin permeability and abolishes transepithelial leukocyte activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitscherling, K.; Volynets, V.; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic alcohol abuse increases both intestinal bacterial overgrowth and intestinal permeability to macromolecules. Intestinal permeability of endotoxin, a component of the outer cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, plays a crucial role in the development of alcohol-induced liver...... disease (ALD). As impaired bile flow leads to endotoxemia and the bile component phosphatidylcholine (PC) is therapeutically active in ALD, we tested the hypothesis that conjugated primary bile salts (CPBS) and PC inhibit ethanol-enhanced transepithelial permeability of endotoxin and the subsequent...... transepithelial activation of human leukocytes. METHODS: For this purpose, we used a model in which intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2) were basolaterally cocultivated with mononuclear leukocytes. Cells were challenged apically with endotoxin from Escherichia coli K12 and were incubated with or without...

  15. Dietary Reversal Ameliorates Short- and Long-Term Memory Deficits Induced by High-fat Diet Early in Life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catrina Sims-Robinson

    Full Text Available A high-fat diet (HFD, one of the major factors contributing to metabolic syndrome, which is associated with an increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases, leads to insulin resistance and cognitive impairment. It is not known whether these alterations are improved with dietary intervention. To investigate the long-term impact of a HFD on hippocampal insulin signaling and memory, C57BL6 mice were placed into one of three groups based on the diet: a standard diet (control, a HFD, or a HFD for 16 weeks and then the standard diet for 8 weeks (HF16. HFD-induced impairments in glucose tolerance and hippocampal insulin signaling occurred concurrently with deficits in both short- and long-term memory. Furthermore, these conditions were improved with dietary intervention; however, the HFD-induced decrease in insulin receptor expression in the hippocampus was not altered with dietary intervention. Our results demonstrate that memory deficits due to the consumption of a HFD at an early age are reversible.

  16. Controlling laser-induced magnetization reversal dynamics in a rare-earth iron garnet across the magnetization compensation point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Marwan; Molho, Pierre; Barbara, Bernard; Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2018-04-01

    In this work we explore the ultrafast magnetization dynamics induced by femtosecond laser pulses in a doped film of gadolinium iron garnet over a broad temperature range including the magnetization compensation point TM. By exciting the phonon-assisted 6S→4G and 6S→4P electronic d -d transitions simultaneously by one- and two-photon absorption processes, we find out that the transfer of heat energy from the lattice to the spin has, at a temperature slightly below TM, a large influence on the magnetization dynamics. In particular, we show that the speed and the amplitude of the magnetization dynamics can be strongly increased when increasing either the external magnetic field or the laser energy density. The obtained results are explained by a magnetization reversal process across TM. Furthermore, we find that the dynamics has unusual characteristics which can be understood by considering the weak spin-phonon coupling in magnetic garnets. These results open new perspectives for controlling the magnetic state of magnetic dielectrics using an ultrashort optically induced heat pulse.

  17. 3-Bromopyruvate reverses hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension through inhibiting glycolysis: In vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangzheng; Wang, Heng; Lai, Jiadan; Cai, Shujing; Yuan, Linbo

    2018-05-04

    Pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation is vital to pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) pathogenesis, and inhibiting PASMC metabolism could serve as a new possible therapy to reverse the process. 3-Bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) is an effective glycolysis inhibitor with its effect in PAH remains unclear. Our study aims to assess the therapeutic effect of 3-BrPA in PAH rats and investigate the possible mechanism of 3-BrPA in PASMC proliferation and apoptosis. 27 healthy SD rats were grouped and treated with hypoxia/normoxia and administration of 3-BrPA/physiological saline. Mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) and cardiac output (CO) were measured and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) was calculated. Right ventricular hypertrophy index (RVHI) was calculated to evaluate the right ventricular hypertrophy degree. The percentage of medial wall area (WA%) and medial wall thickness (WT%) were measured by image analysis. PASMCs groups received hypoxia/normoxia treatments and 3-BrPA/physiological saline. PASMC proliferation and migration were respectively detected by CCK-8 and cell wound scratch assay. Hexokinase II (HK-2) expression and lactate level were respectively measured by Western Blotting and lactate test kit to detect glycolysis. mPAP, PVR, PVHI, WA% and WT% in rats increased after the hypoxia treatment, but were lower compared to rats received 3-BrPA in hypoxia environment. HK-2 expression, lactate concentration, OD value and scratch areas in PASMCs increased after the hypoxia treatment, but were decreased after the administration of 3-BrPA. 3-BrPA can inhibit PASMC proliferation and migration by inhibiting glycolysis, and is effective in reversing the vascular remodeling in hypoxia-induced PAH rats. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Nitric oxide-related species-induced protein oxidation: reversible, irreversible, and protective effects on enzyme function of papain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väänänen, Antti J; Kankuri, Esko; Rauhala, Pekka

    2005-04-15

    Protein oxidation, irreversible modification, and inactivation may play key roles in various neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, we studied the effects of the potentially in vivo occurring nitric oxide-related species on two different markers of protein oxidation: protein carbonyl generation on bovine serum albumine (BSA) and loss of activity of a cysteine-dependent protease, papain, in vitro by using Angeli's salt, papanonoate, SIN-1, and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) as donors of nitroxyl, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite, and nitrosonium ions, respectively. Angeli's salt, SIN-1, and papanonoate (0-1000 microM) all generated a concentration-dependent increase in carbonyl formation on BSA (107, 60, and 45%, respectively). GSNO did not affect carbonyl formation. Papain was inhibited by Angeli's salt, SIN-1, papanonoate, and GSNO with IC50 values of 0.62, 2.3, 54, and 80 microM, respectively. Angeli's salt (3.16 microM)-induced papain inactivation was only partially reversible, while the effects of GSNO (316 microM) and papanonoate (316 microM) were reversible upon addition of excess DTT. The Angeli's salt-mediated DTT-irreversible inhibition of papain was prevented by GSNO or papanonoate pretreatment, hypothetically through mixed disulfide formation or S-nitrosylation of the catalytically critical thiol group of papain. These results, for the first time, compare the generation of carbonyls in proteins by Angeli's salt, papanonoate, and SIN-1. Furthermore, these results suggest that S-nitrosothiols may have a novel function in protecting critical thiols from irreversible oxidative damage.

  19. THYROID HORMONE REVERSES AGING-INDUCED MYOCARDIAL FATTY ACID OXIDATION DEFECTS AND IMPROVES THE RESPONSE TO ACUTELY INCREASED AFTERLOAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledee, Dolena; Portman, Michael A.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron

    2013-06-07

    Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased reliance on flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) to maintain function. We hypothesize that the metabolic changes in aged hearts make them less tolerant to acutely increased work and that thyroid hormone reverses these defects. Methods: Studies were performed on young (Young, 4-6 months) and aged (Old, 22-24 months) C57/BL6 mice at standard (50 mmHg) and high afterload (80 mmHg). Another aged group received thyroid hormone for 3 weeks (Old-TH, high afterload only). Function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle (CAC) using perfusate with 13C labeled lactate, pyruvate, glucose and unlabeled palmitate and insulin. Results: Cardiac function was similar between Young and Old mice at standard afterload. Palmitate Fc was reduced but no individual carbohydrate contributions differed. CAC and individual substrate fluxes decreased in aged. At high afterload, -dP/dT was decreased in Old versus Young. Similar to low afterload, palmitate Fc was decreased in Old. Thyroid hormone reversed aging-induced changes in palmitate Fc and flux while significantly improving cardiac function. Conclusion: The aged heart shows diminished ability to increase cardiac work due to substrate limitations, primarily impaired fatty acid oxidation. The heart accommodates slightly by increasing efficiency through oxidation of carbohydrate substrates. Thyroid hormone supplementation in aged mice significantly improves cardiac function potentially through restoration of fatty acid oxidation.

  20. Tetramethylpyrazine reverses intracerebroventricular streptozotocin-induced memory deficits by inhibiting GSK-3β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fen; Li, Xu; Li, Wei; Wei, Ke; Yao, Yong; Zhang, Qianlin; Liang, Xinliang; Zhang, Jiewen

    2017-08-01

    Brain dysfunction, especially cognitive impairment, is one of the main complications in Alzheimer's disease (AD), which threatens the health of 46.8 million people worldwide. At present, the pathogenesis of cognitive dysfunction is only partially understood, and effective therapies for memory loss in AD remain elusive. Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) is one of the major bioactive compounds purified from Chuanxiong, a Chinese herb used for the treatment of neurovascular and cardiovascular diseases. The neuroprotective properties of TMP are evident in some neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. However, whether TMP plays a neuroprotective role in AD is still unknown. Here, we report that 2-week treatment with TMP rescued both short-term and long-term fear memory impairment induced by intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin in a well-known AD rat model. Administration of TMP also restored spatial learning and memory retention abilities in streptozotocin-injected rats. Furthermore, TMP inhibited the activity of GSK-3β, an important kinase that mediates hippocampal synaptic and memory disorders in diabetes mellitus. Finally, we found that TMP treatment restored the function of cholinergic neurons. Our data suggest that dietary uptake of TMP can provide protection against memory loss in AD, and the inhibition of GSK-3β may play an important role in this protective effect. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Light-induced, dark-reversible colour shifts in petals of Phlox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjön, G.S.; Braune, W.; Bjön, L.O.

    1985-01-01

    Flowers of some Phlox (Phlox x paniculata L.) varieties undergo daily colour shifts, being blue in the early morning, turning red during the day, and returning to blue in the evening. The colour shift, which occurs only in the upper (adaxial) petal surfaces, is due to the daily changes in ambient light. In the laboratory, colour shifts could be induced by 2.5 h of ultraviolet, visible or far-red light and recorded by reflectance spectrophotometry. There are indications that irradiations with different kinds of light cause qualitatively different colour shifts, and that thus more than one photoreceptor pigment and more than one primary light reaction may be involved. The presence of phytochrome was demonstrated in petals of white Phlox flowers by in vivo transmission spectrophotometry. It is therefore possible that colour shifts in coloured Phlox flowers are mediated by phytochrome. Possibly the movement of ions (e.g. hydrogen ions) into or out of the vacuole (where the visible pigments are located) is affected by light absorption in a pigment in the tonoplast

  2. Reversal of statin-induced memory dysfunction by co-enzyme Q10: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okeahialam BN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Basil N Okeahialam Cardiology Sub-Unit 1, Department of Medicine, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria Abstract: Statins are useful in the armamentarium of the clinician dealing with dyslipidemia, which increases cardiovascular morbi-mortality in hypertensive and diabetic patients among others. Dyslipidemia commonly exists as a comorbidity factor in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Use of statins is however associated with side effects which at times are so disabling as to interfere with activities of daily living. There are various ways of dealing with this, including use of more water-soluble varieties, intermittent dosing, or use of statin alternatives. Of late, use of co-enzyme Q10 has become acceptable for the muscle side effects. Only one report of any benefit on the rarely reported memory side effect was encountered by the author in the search of English medical literature. This is a report of a documented case of a Nigerian woman with history of statin intolerance in this case, memory dysfunction despite persisting dyslipidemia comorbidity. Her memory dysfunction side effect which interfered with activities of daily living and background muscle pain cleared when coenzyme Q10 was administered alongside low dose statin. Her lipid profile normalized and has remained normal. It is being recommended for use when statin side effects (muscle- and memory-related impair quality of life and leave patient at dyslipidemia-induced cardiovascular morbi-mortality. Keywords: statin, memory dysfunction, co-enzyme Q10, improvement

  3. Inhibition and reversal of nickel-induced transformation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qunwei; Salnikow, Konstantin; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, L.C.; Su, W.C.; Costa, Max

    2003-01-01

    The carcinogenic process initiated by nongenotoxic carcinogens involves modulation of gene expression. Nickel compounds have low mutagenic activity, but are highly carcinogenic. In vitro both mouse and human cells can be efficiently transformed by soluble and insoluble nickel compounds to anchorage-independent growth. Because previous studies have shown that carcinogenic nickel compounds silence genes by inhibiting histone acetylation and enhancing DNA methylation, we investigated the effect of enhancing histone acetylation on cell transformation. The exposure of nickel-transformed cells to the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) resulted in the appearance of significant number of revertants measured by their inability to grow in soft agar. Using the Affymetrix GeneChip we found that the level of expression of a significant number of genes was changed (suppressed or upregulated) in nickel-transformed clones but returned to a normal level in revertants obtained following TSA treatment. Moreover, we found that treatment of cells with TSA inhibited the ability of nickel to transform mouse PW cells to anchorage-independent growth. Treatment with TSA also inhibited the ability of nickel to transform human HOS cells, although to a lesser extent. In contrast, treatment with TSA was not able to revert established cancer cell lines as readily as the nickel-transformed cells. These data indicated that modulation of gene expression is important for nickel-induced transformation

  4. Reversal of Trimethyltin-Induced Learning and Memory Deficits by 3,5-Dicaffeoylquinic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yong Kang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The antiamnesic effect of 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (3,5-diCQA as the main phenolic compound in Artemisia argyi H. extract on cognitive dysfunction induced by trimethyltin (TMT (7.1 μg/kg of body weight; intraperitoneal injection was investigated in order to assess its ameliorating function in mice. In several behavioral tests, namely, the Y-maze, passive avoidance, and Morris water maze (MWM test, 3,5-diCQA significantly ameliorated learning and memory deficits. After the behavioral tests, brain tissues from the mice were analyzed to characterize the basis of the neuroprotective effect. Acetylcholine (ACh levels increased, whereas the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE decreased upon administration of 3,5-diCQA. In addition, 3,5-diCQA effectively protected against an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA content, an increase in the oxidized glutathione (GSH ratio, and a decline of total superoxide dismutase (SOD level. 3,5-diCQA may prevent neuronal apoptosis through the protection of mitochondrial activities and the repression of apoptotic signaling molecules such as p-Akt, BAX, and p-tau (Ser 404.

  5. Regression of fibrosis and reversal of cirrhosis in rats by galectin inhibitors in thioacetamide-induced liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter G Traber

    Full Text Available Galectin-3 protein is critical to the development of liver fibrosis because galectin-3 null mice have attenuated fibrosis after liver injury. Therefore, we examined the ability of novel complex carbohydrate galectin inhibitors to treat toxin-induced fibrosis and cirrhosis. Fibrosis was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injections with thioacetamide (TAA and groups were treated with vehicle, GR-MD-02 (galactoarabino-rhamnogalaturonan or GM-CT-01 (galactomannan. In initial experiments, 4 weeks of treatment with GR-MD-02 following completion of 8 weeks of TAA significantly reduced collagen content by almost 50% based on Sirius red staining. Rats were then exposed to more intense and longer TAA treatment, which included either GR-MD-02 or GM-CT-01 during weeks 8 through 11. TAA rats treated with vehicle developed extensive fibrosis and pathological stage 6 Ishak fibrosis, or cirrhosis. Treatment with either GR-MD-02 (90 mg/kg ip or GM-CT-01 (180 mg/kg ip given once weekly during weeks 8-11 led to marked reduction in fibrosis with reduction in portal and septal galectin-3 positive macrophages and reduction in portal pressure. Vehicle-treated animals had cirrhosis whereas in the treated animals the fibrosis stage was significantly reduced, with evidence of resolved or resolving cirrhosis and reduced portal inflammation and ballooning. In this model of toxin-induced liver fibrosis, treatment with two galectin protein inhibitors with different chemical compositions significantly reduced fibrosis, reversed cirrhosis, reduced galectin-3 expressing portal and septal macrophages, and reduced portal pressure. These findings suggest a potential role of these drugs in human liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

  6. Telomerase activity-independent function of telomerase reverse transcriptase is involved in acrylamide-induced neuron damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P; Pan, H; Wang, J; Liu, X; Hu, X

    2014-07-01

    Polyacrylamide is used widely in industry, and its decomposition product, acrylamide (ACR), readily finds its way into commonly consumed cosmetics and baked and fried foods. ACR exerts potent neurotoxic effects in human and animal models. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase, traditionally has been considered to play an important role in maintaining telomere length. Emerging evidence has shown, however, that TERT plays an important role in neuroprotection by inhibiting apoptosis and excitotoxicity, and by promoting angiogenesis, neuronal survival and neurogenesis, which are closely related to the telomere-independent functions of TERT. We investigated whether and how the TERT pathway is involved in ACR induced neurotoxicity in rat cortical neurons. We found that ACR 1) significantly reduced the viability of cortical neurons as measured by MTT assay, 2) induced neuron apoptosis as revealed by FITC-conjugated Annexin V/PI double staining and flow cytometry (FACS) analysis, 3) elevated expression of cleaved caspase-3, and 4) decreased bcl-2 expression of cortical neurons. ACR also increased intracellular ROS levels in cortical neurons, increased MDA levels and reduced GSH, SOD and GSH-Px levels in mitochondria in a dose-dependent manner. We found that TERT expression in mitochondria was increased by ACR at concentrations of 2.5 and 5.0 mM, but TERT expression was decreased by 10 mM ACR. Telomerase activity, however, was undetectable in rat cortical neurons. Our results suggest that the TERT pathway is involved in ACR induced apoptosis of cortical neurons. TERT also may exert its neuroprotective role in a telomerase activity-independent way, especially in mitochondria.

  7. Tofacitinib restores the inhibition of reverse cholesterol transport induced by inflammation: understanding the lipid paradox associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Baos, S; Barrasa, J I; Gratal, P; Larrañaga-Vera, A; Prieto-Potin, I; Herrero-Beaumont, G; Largo, R

    2017-09-01

    Patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have increased cardiovascular mortality, paradoxically associated with reduced circulating lipid levels. The JAK inhibitor tofacitinib ameliorates systemic and joint inflammation in RA with a concomitant increase in serum lipids. We analysed the effect of tofacitinib on the lipid profile of hyperlipidaemic rabbits with chronic arthritis (CA) and on the changes in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) during chronic inflammation. CA was induced in previously immunized rabbits, fed a high-fat diet, by administering four intra-articular injections of ovalbumin. A group of rabbits received tofacitinib (10 mg·kg -1 ·day -1 ) for 2 weeks. Systemic and synovial inflammation and lipid content were evaluated. For in vitro studies, THP-1-derived macrophages were exposed to high lipid concentrations and then stimulated with IFNγ in the presence or absence of tofacitinib in order to study mediators of RCT. Tofacitinib decreased systemic and synovial inflammation and increased circulating lipid levels. Although it did not modify synovial macrophage density, it reduced the lipid content within synovial macrophages. In foam macrophages in culture, IFNγ further stimulated intracellular lipid accumulation, while the JAK/STAT inhibition provoked by tofacitinib induced lipid release by increasing the levels of cellular liver X receptor α and ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCA1) synthesis. Active inflammation could be associated with lipid accumulation within macrophages of CA rabbits. JAK inhibition induced lipid release through RCT activation, providing a plausible explanation for the effect of tofacitinib on the lipid profile of RA patients. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Involvement of reversible binding to alpha 2u-globulin in 1,4-dichlorobenzene-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, M; Strasser, J; Lock, E A; Turner, M J; Swenberg, J A

    1989-06-01

    Similarly to unleaded gasoline, 1,4-dichlorobenzene (1,4-DCB) administered for 2 years caused a dose-related increase in the incidence of renal tumors in male but not in female rats or in either sex of mice. Unleaded gasoline and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP), a component of unleaded gasoline, increased protein droplet formation and cell proliferation in male but not in female rat kidneys. These protein droplets contained, alpha 2u-globulin, a male rat-specific low-molecular-weight protein and 2,4,4-trimethyl-2-pentanol, a metabolite of TMP that was reversibly bound to this protein. Studies were undertaken to determine if 1,4-DCB produced similar effects; 1,2-DCB was used for comparison since it did not produce renal carcinogenesis in male rats. Gel filtration chromatography of a 116,000g supernatant prepared from kidneys of 1,4-[14C]DCB-treated rats showed that radiolabel coeluted with alpha 2u-globulin as one sharp peak as opposed to a multipeak pattern observed for 1,2-[14C]DCB; the maximal quantity of radiolabel for 1,4-DCB was twice that for 1,2-DCB. Equilibrium dialysis of kidney cytosol in the presence or absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate demonstrated that the radiolabel was reversibly bound to alpha 2u-globulin; the amount for 1,4-[14C]DCB-treated rats was almost twice as much as that for 1,2-[14C]DCB-treated rats. 1,2-DCB was also shown to be covalently bound to renal alpha 2u-globulin, and covalently bound to liver and plasma high-molecular-weight proteins. 1,4-DCB and, to a minor extent, 2,5-dichlorophenol, the major metabolite of 1,4-DCB, were reversibly bound to renal alpha 2u-globulin from 1,4-DCB-treated rats. 1,4-DCB increased protein droplet formation in male but not in female rat kidneys, whereas equimolar doses of 1,2-DCB showed no effect in either sex. Renal cell proliferation, measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation into renal DNA, was increased after 1,4-DCB but not after 1,2-DCB treatment. Nephrotoxicity and biochemical alterations induced by

  9. Growth hormone reverses excitotoxic damage induced by kainic acid in the green iguana neuroretina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-Mendoza, José; Mora, Janeth; Carranza, Martha; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    It is known that growth hormone (GH) is expressed in extrapituitary tissues, including the nervous system and ocular tissues, where it is involved in autocrine/paracrine actions related to cell survival and anti-apoptosis in several vertebrates. Little is known, however, in reptiles, so we analyzed the expression and distribution of GH in the eye of green iguana and its potential neuroprotective role in retinas that were damaged by the intraocular administration of kainic acid (KA). It was found, by Western blotting, that GH-immunoreactivity (GH-IR) was expressed as two isoforms (15 and 26kDa, under reducing conditions) in cornea, vitreous, retina, crystalline, iris and sclera, in varying proportions. Also, two bands for the growth hormone receptor (GHR)-IR were observed (70 and 44kDa, respectively) in the same tissues. By immunofluorescence, GH-IR was found in neurons present in several layers of the neuroretina (inner nuclear [INL], outer nuclear [ONL] and ganglion cell [GCL] layers) as determined by its co-existence with NeuN, but not in glial cells. In addition, GH and GHR co-expression was found in the same cells, suggesting paracrine/autocrine interactions. KA administration induced retinal excitotoxic damage, as determined by a significant reduction of the cell density and an increase in the appearance of apoptotic cells in the INL and GCL. In response to KA injury, both endogenous GH and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) expression were increased by 70±1.8% and 33.3±16%, respectively. The addition of exogenous GH significantly prevented the retinal damage produced by the loss of cytoarchitecture and cell density in the GCL (from 4.9±0.79 in the control, to 1.45±0.2 with KA, to 6.35±0.49cell/mm(2) with KA+GH) and in the INL (19.12±1.6, 10.05±1.9, 21.0±0.8cell/mm(2), respectively) generated by the long-term effect of 1mM KA intraocular administration. The co-incubation with a specific anti-GH antibody, however, blocked the protective effect of GH

  10. Chemogenetic activation of the lateral hypothalamus reverses early life stress-induced deficits in motivational drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Erin J; Mitchell, Caitlin S; Adams, Cameron D; Yeoh, Jiann Wei; Hodgson, Deborah M; Graham, Brett A; Dayas, Christopher V

    2017-10-01

    Altered motivated behaviour is a cardinal feature of several neuropsychiatric conditions including mood disorders. One well-characterized antecedent to the development of mood disorders is exposure to early life stress (ELS). A key brain substrate controlling motivated behaviour is the lateral hypothalamus (LH). Here, we examined the effect of ELS on LH activation and the motivation to self-administer sucrose. We tested whether chemogenetic activation of LH circuits could modify sucrose responding in ELS rats and examined the impact on LH cell populations. Male rat pups were maternally separated for 0 or 3 h on postnatal days 2-14. During adolescence, rats received bilateral injections of hM3D(Gq), the excitatory designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drugs, into LH. In adulthood, rats were trained to self-administer sucrose and tested under a progressive ratio schedule to determine their motivation for reward following injection with either vehicle or 5 mg/kg clozapine-N-oxide. Brains were processed for Fos-protein immunohistochemistry. ELS significantly suppressed lever responding for sucrose, indicating a long-lasting impact of ELS on motivation circuits. hM3D(Gq) activation of LH increased responding, normalizing deficits in ELS rats, and increased Fos-positive orexin and MCH cell numbers within LH. Our findings indicate that despite being susceptible to environmental stressors, LH circuits retain the capacity to overcome ELS-induced deficits in motivated behaviour. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Brain antioxidant effect of mirtazapine and reversal of sedation by its combination with alpha-lipoic acid in a model of depression induced by corticosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tatiana de Queiroz; de Sousa, Caren Nádia Soares; Vasconcelos, Germana Silva; de Sousa, Luciene Costa; de Oliveira, Anneheydi Araújo; Patrocínio, Cláudio Felipe Vasconcelos; Medeiros, Ingridy da Silva; Honório Júnior, José Eduardo Ribeiro; Maes, Michael; Macedo, Danielle; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2017-09-01

    Depression is accompanied by activated neuro-oxidative and neuro-nitrosative pathways, while targeting these pathways has clinical efficacy in depression. This study aimed to investigate the effects of mirtazapine (MIRT) alone and combined with alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) against corticosterone (CORT) induced behavioral and oxidative alterations. Male mice received vehicle or CORT 20mg/kg during 14 days. From the 15th to 21st days they were divided in groups administered: vehicle, MIRT 3mg/kg or the combinations MIRT+ALA100 or MIRT+ALA200. On the 21st day of treatment, the animals were subjected to behavioral tests. Twenty-four hours after the last drug administration hippocampus (HC) and striatum (ST) were dissected for the determination reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LP) and nitrite levels. CORT induced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors as observed by increased immobility time in the tail suspension test and decreased sucrose consumption. MIRT or MIRT+ALA are effective in reversing anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors induced by CORT. CORT and MIRT alone prolonged sleeping time and this effect was reversed by MIRT+ALA. CORT significantly increased LP, which was reversed by MIRT or MIRT+ALA. Nitrite levels were increased in CORT-treated animals and reversed by MIRT+ALA200 (HC), MIRT or MIRT+ALA (ST). A relative small sample size and lack of a washout period between drug administration and behavioral testing. MIRT or MIRT+ALA reverse CORT-induced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors probably via their central antioxidant effects. Augmentation of MIRT with ALA may reverse sedation, an important side effect of MIRT. Randomized controlled studies are needed to examine the clinical efficacy of this combination in human depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Reversal of dexamethasone induced insulin resistance in 3T3L1 adipocytes by 3β-taraxerol of Mangifera indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, K N; Shilpa, K; Jyothi Kumari, P; Lakshmi, B S

    2013-02-15

    The present study investigates the efficacy of Mangifera indica ethyl acetate extract (MIEE) and its bioactive compound, 3β-taraxerol in the reversal of dexamethasone (DEX) induced insulin resistance in 3T3L1 adipocytes. MIEE and 3β-taraxerol were evaluated for their ability to restore impaired glucose uptake and, expression of molecular markers in the insulin signaling pathway induced by DEX in 3T3L1 adipocytes using 2-deoxy-D-[1-(3)H] glucose uptake assay and ELISA. An insulin resistant model has been developed using a glucocorticoid, DEX on 3T3L1 adipocytes. Insulin resistant condition was observed at 24h of DEX induction wherein a maximum degree of resistance of about 50% was measured based on inhibition of glucose uptake, which was confirmed using cytotoxicity analysis. The developed model of insulin resistance was studied in comparison to positive control rosiglitazone. DEX induced inhibition of glucose uptake and the expression of insulin signaling markers GLUT4 and PI3K were found to be restored by 3β-taraxerol and MIEE, thus delineating its mechanism of action in the reversal of insulin resistance. 3β-Taraxerol effectively restored DEX induced desensitization via restoration of PI3K and GLUT4 expression. To conclude, since 3β-taraxerol exhibits significant effect in reversing insulin resistance it can be further investigated as an insulin resistance reversal agent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitrogen remobilisation facilitates adventitious root formation on reversible dark-induced carbohydrate depletion in Petunia hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerche, Siegfried; Haensch, Klaus-Thomas; Druege, Uwe; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-10-10

    Adventitious root (AR) formation in axillary shoot tip cuttings is a crucial physiological process for ornamental propagation that is utilised in global production chains for young plants. In this process, the nitrogen and carbohydrate metabolisms of a cutting are regulated by its total nitrogen content (N t ), dark exposure during transport and irradiance levels at distinct production sites and phases through a specific plasticity to readjust metabolite pools. Here, we examined how elevated N t contents with a combined dark exposure of cuttings influence their internal N-pools including free amino acids and considered early anatomic events of AR formation as well as further root development in Petunia hybrida cuttings. Enhanced N t contents of unrooted cuttings resulted in elevated total free amino acid levels and in particular glutamate (glu) and glutamine (gln) in leaf and basal stem. N-allocation to mobile N-pools increased whereas the allocation to insoluble protein-N declined. A dark exposure of cuttings conserved initial N t and nitrate-N, while it reduced insoluble protein-N and increased soluble protein, amino- and amide-N. The increase of amino acids mainly comprised asparagine (asn), aspartate (asp) and arginine (arg) in the leaves, with distinct tissue specific responses to an elevated N supply. Dark exposure induced an early transient rise of asp followed by a temporary increase of glu. A strong positive N effect of high N t contents of cuttings on AR formation after 384 h was observed. Root meristematic cells developed at 72 h with a negligible difference for two N t levels. After 168 h, an enhanced N t accelerated AR formation and gave rise to first obvious fully developed roots while only meristems were formed with a low N t . However, dark exposure for 168 h promoted AR formation particularly in cuttings with a low N t to such an extent so that the benefit of the enhanced N t was almost compensated. Combined dark exposure and low N t of

  14. Implementation of all-optical reversible logic gate based on holographic laser induced grating using azo-dye doped polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsati, Rana; Valipour Ebrahimi, Sara; Navi, Keivan; Mohajerani, Ezeddin; Jashnsaz, Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Increasing demand for power reduction in computer systems has led to new trends in computations and computer design including reversible computing. Its main aim is to eliminate power dissipation in logical elements but can have some other advantages such as data security and error prevention. Because of interesting properties of reversible computing, implementing computing devices with reversible manner is the only way to make the reversible computing a reality. In recent years, reversible logic has turned out to be a promising computing paradigm having application in CMOS, nanotechnology, quantum computing and optical computing. In this paper, we propose and realize a novel implementation of Toffoli gate in all-optical domain. We have explained its principle of operations and described an actual experimental implementation. The all-optical reversible gate presented in this paper will be useful in different applications such as arithmetic and logical operations in the domain of reversible logic-based computing.

  15. Recovery from prolonged deep rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade: A randomized comparison of sugammadex reversal with spontaneous recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahe-Meyer, N; Berger, C; Wittmann, M; Solomon, C; Abels, E A M; Rietbergen, H; Reuter, D A

    2015-07-01

    Deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) may not always be maintained to the end of surgery and the depth of block may be allowed to gradually diminish over time, particularly if reversal of NMB is not routinely performed. The current study aimed to assess recovery from deep rocuronium-induced NMB with sugammadex compared with placebo, provide data regarding the extent of residual blockade after deep rocuronium-induced NMB (placebo group), and to determine whether complete and reliable recovery could be provided by sugammadex (sugammadex group). This was a randomized, placebo-controlled, safety-assessor-blinded study in adult patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists Class I to III. Patients with clinically relevant kidney or liver insufficiency were excluded. Anesthesia was administered as routinely practiced at each study site. Rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg was administered for intubation, with maintenance doses of 0.1-0.2 mg/kg as needed. After the last rocuronium dose, at deep NMB (target depth 1-2 post-tetanic counts), patients received a single dose of sugammadex 4.0 mg/kg or placebo as randomized. The primary endpoint was time from sugammadex or placebo administration to recovery of the train-of-four (TOF) ratio to 0.9. Safety was assessed through monitoring of adverse events, vital signs and physical examination. Patients were also assessed for evidence of residual or recurrence of NMB. With this design, the study will provide data regarding the extent of residual blockade under these conditions (placebo group), and determine whether complete and reliable recovery could be provided by sugammadex (sugammadex group). Recovery to a TOF ratio of ≥ 0.9 with sugammadex was significantly faster (~ 40 times) than spontaneous recovery: geometric mean (95 % confidence interval) times were 2.2 (1.9-2.5) and 89.8 (80.1-100.7) min, respectively (p sugammadex, with median time to recovery > 1.5 h in the placebo group and one patient taking 4.8 h to achieve a

  16. Comparison of the efficacy of two anticonvulsants, phenytoin and valproate to improve PCP and d-amphetamine induced deficits in a reversal learning task in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagi F Idris

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in our laboratory have shown that PCP (phencyclidine and d-amphetamine induce a cognitive deficit in rats, in a paradigm of potential relevance for the pathology of schizophrenia. Atypical, but not classical antipsychotics and the anticonvulsant, lamotrigine have been shown to prevent a selective reversal learning deficit induced by PCP. In contrast, only haloperidol reversed the d-amphetamine-induced deficit. The present study aimed to explore the ability of two anticonvulsants with differing mechanism of action, valproate and phenytoin to attenuate the cognitive deficits induced by PCP and d-amphetamine in the reversal learning paradigm. PCP at 1.5mg/kg and d-amphetamine at 0.5mg/kg both produced a selective and significant reduction in performance of the reversal phase with no effect on the initial phase of the task in female-hooded Lister rats. Valproate (25-200mg/kg and phenytoin (25-50mg/kg had no effect on performance when administered alone. Valproate (100-200mg/kg, whose principle action is thought to be the enhancement of GABA transmission, was unable to prevent the cognitive deficit induced by either PCP or d-amphetamine. Conversely, phenytoin (50mg/kg, a use-dependent sodium channel inhibitor, significantly prevented the deficit induced by PCP, but not d-amphetamine. These results add to our earlier work with lamotrigine, and suggest that sodium channel blockade may be a mechanism by which some anticonvulsant drugs can prevent the PCP-induced deficit. These data have implications for the use of anticonvulsant drugs in the treatment of cognitive or psychotic disorders.

  17. Evaluation of a simple polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-based membrane for blood-feeding of malaria and dengue fever vectors in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, Doreen J; Batista, Elis P A; Opiyo, Mercy A; Melo, Elizangela F; Sumaye, Robert D; Ngowo, Halfan S; Eiras, Alvaro E; Okumu, Fredros O

    2018-04-11

    Controlled blood-feeding is essential for maintaining laboratory colonies of disease-transmitting mosquitoes and investigating pathogen transmission. We evaluated a low-cost artificial feeding (AF) method, as an alternative to direct human feeding (DHF), commonly used in mosquito laboratories. We applied thinly-stretched pieces of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes cut from locally available seal tape (i.e. plumbers tape, commonly used for sealing pipe threads in gasworks or waterworks). Approximately 4 ml of bovine blood was placed on the bottom surfaces of inverted Styrofoam cups and then the PTFE membranes were thinly stretched over the surfaces. The cups were filled with boiled water to keep the blood warm (~37 °C), and held over netting cages containing 3-4 day-old inseminated adults of female Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae (s.s.) or Anopheles arabiensis. Blood-feeding success, fecundity and survival of mosquitoes maintained by this system were compared against DHF. Aedes aegypti achieved 100% feeding success on both AF and DHF, and also similar fecundity rates (13.1 ± 1.7 and 12.8 ± 1.0 eggs/mosquito respectively; P > 0.05). An. arabiensis had slightly lower feeding success on AF (85.83 ± 16.28%) than DHF (98.83 ± 2.29%) though these were not statistically different (P > 0.05), and also comparable fecundity between AF (8.82 ± 7.02) and DHF (8.02 ± 5.81). Similarly, for An. gambiae (s.s.), we observed a marginal difference in feeding success between AF (86.00 ± 10.86%) and DHF (98.92 ± 2.65%), but similar fecundity by either method. Compared to DHF, mosquitoes fed using AF survived a similar number of days [Hazard Ratios (HR) for Ae. aegypti = 0.99 (0.75-1.34), P > 0.05; An. arabiensis = 0.96 (0.75-1.22), P > 0.05; and An. gambiae (s.s.) = 1.03 (0.79-1.35), P > 0.05]. Mosquitoes fed via this simple AF method had similar feeding success, fecundity and longevity. The method could potentially be used for laboratory colonization of mosquitoes

  18. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana reduces instantaneous blood feeding in wild multi-insecticide-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes in Benin, West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Annabel FV

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquito-borne diseases are still a major health risk in many developing countries, and the emergence of multi-insecticide-resistant mosquitoes is threatening the future of vector control. Therefore, new tools that can manage resistant mosquitoes are required. Laboratory studies show that entomopathogenic fungi can kill insecticide-resistant malaria vectors but this needs to be verified in the field. Methods The present study investigated whether these fungi will be effective at infecting, killing and/or modifying the behaviour of wild multi-insecticide-resistant West African mosquitoes. The entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana were separately applied to white polyester window netting and used in combination with either a permethrin-treated or untreated bednet in an experimental hut trial. Untreated nets were used because we wanted to test the effect of fungus alone and in combination with an insecticide to examine any potential additive or synergistic effects. Results In total, 1125 female mosquitoes were collected during the hut trial, mainly Culex quinquefasciatus Say. Unfortunately, not enough wild Anopheles gambiae Giles were collected to allow the effect the fungi may have on this malaria vector to be analysed. None of the treatment combinations caused significantly increased mortality of Cx. quinquefasciatus when compared to the control hut. The only significant behaviour modification found was a reduction in blood feeding by Cx. quinquefasciatus, caused by the permethrin and B. bassiana treatments, although no additive effect was seen in the B. bassiana and permethrin combination treatment. Beauveria bassiana did not repel blood foraging mosquitoes either in the laboratory or field. Conclusions This is the first time that an entomopathogenic fungus has been shown to reduce blood feeding of wild mosquitoes. This behaviour modification indicates that B. bassiana could potentially be a new

  19. Blood-feeding patterns of native mosquitoes and insights into their potential role as pathogen vectors in the Thames estuary region of the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugman, V A; Hernández-Triana, L M; England, M E; Medlock, J M; Mertens, P P C; Logan, J G; Wilson, A J; Fooks, A R; Johnson, N; Carpenter, S

    2017-03-27

    The range of vertebrate hosts on which species of mosquito blood-feed is an important parameter for identifying potential vectors and in assessing the risk of incursion and establishment of vector-borne pathogens. In the United Kingdom, studies of mosquito host range have collected relatively few specimens and used techniques that could only broadly identify host species. This study conducted intensive collection and analysis of mosquitoes from a grazing marsh environment in southeast England. This site provides extensive wetland habitat for resident and migratory birds and has abundant human nuisance biting mosquitoes. The aim was to identify the blood-feeding patterns of mosquito species present at the site which could contribute to the transmission of pathogens. Twice-weekly collections of mosquitoes were made from Elmley Nature Reserve, Kent, between June and October 2014. Mosquitoes were collected using resting boxes, by aspiration from man-made structures and using a Mosquito Magnet Pro baited with 1-octen-3-ol. Blood-fed specimens were classified according to the degree of blood meal digestion using the Sella scale and vertebrate origin determined using sequencing of a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit I gene. Mosquitoes that were morphologically cryptic were identified to species level using multiplex PCR and sequencing methods. A total of 20,666 mosquitoes of 11 species were collected, and 2,159 (10.4%) were blood-fed (Sella scale II-VI); of these 1,341 blood-fed specimens were selected for blood meal analysis. Vertebrate origin was successfully identified in 964 specimens (72%). Collections of blood-fed individuals were dominated by Anopheles maculipennis complex (73.5%), Culiseta annulata (21.2%) and Culex pipiens form pipiens (10.4%). Nineteen vertebrate hosts comprising five mammals and 14 birds were identified as hosts for mosquitoes, including two migratory bird species. Feeding on birds by Culex modestus and Anopheles

  20. Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Oxidative Stress in Lung Epithelial Cells Depends on Pneumococcal Autolysis and Is Reversible by Resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahlten, Janine; Kim, Ye-Ji; Doehn, Jan-Moritz; Pribyl, Thomas; Hocke, Andreas C; García, Pedro; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Suttorp, Norbert; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Hübner, Ralf-Harto

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. During pneumococcal pneumonia, the human airway epithelium is exposed to large amounts of H2O2 as a product of host and pathogen oxidative metabolism. Airway cells are known to be highly vulnerable to oxidant damage, but the pathophysiology of oxidative stress induced by S. pneumoniae and the role of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant systems of the host are not well characterized. For gluthation/gluthathion disulfide analysis BEAS-2B cells, primary broncho-epithelial cells (pBEC), explanted human lung tissue and mouse lungs were infected with different S. pneumoniae strains (D39, A66, R6x, H2O2/pneumolysin/LytA- deficient mutants of R6x). Cell death was proven by LDH assay and cell viability by IL-8 ELISA. The translocation of Nrf2 and the expression of catalase were shown via Western blot. The binding of Nrf2 at the catalase promoter was analyzed by ChIP. We observed a significant induction of oxidative stress induced by S. pneumoniae in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. Upon stimulation, the oxidant-responsive transcription factor Nrf2 was activated, and catalase was upregulated via Nrf2. The pneumococci-induced oxidative stress was independent of S. pneumoniae-derived H2O2 and pneumolysin but depended on the pneumococcal autolysin LytA. The Nrf2 inducer resveratrol, as opposed to catalase, reversed oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. These observations indicate a H2O2-independent induction of oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells via the release of bacterial factors of S. pneumoniae. Resveratrol might be an option for prevention of acute lung injury and inflammatory responses observed in pneumococcal pneumonia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Trifluoperazine-Induced Suicidal Erythrocyte Death and S-Nitrosylation Inhibition, Reversed by the Nitric Oxide Donor Sodium Nitroprusside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Ghashghaeinia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The high potency antipsychotic drug trifluoperazine (10-[3-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl-propyl]-2-(trifluoromethyl-(10H-phenothiazine dihydrochloride; TFP may either counteract or promote suicidal cell death or apoptosis. Similar to apoptosis, erythrocytes may enter eryptosis, characterized by phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface and cell shrinkage. Eryptosis can be stimulated by an increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i and inhibited by nitric oxide (NO. We explored whether TFP treatment of erythrocytes induces phosphatidylserine exposure, cell shrinkage, and calcium influx, whether it impairs S-nitrosylation and whether these effects are inhibited by NO. Methods: Phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and protein nitrosylation from fluorescence switch of the Bodipy-TMR/Sypro Ruby signal. Results: Exposure of human erythrocytes to TFP significantly enhanced the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells, raised [Ca2+]i, and decreased S-nitrosylation. The effect of TFP on annexin-V-binding was not affected by removal of extracellular Ca2+ alone, but was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment with sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an effect significantly augmented by additional removal of extracellular Ca2+. A 3 hours treatment with 0.1 µM Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin triggered annexin-V-binding and cell shrinkage, effects fully reversed by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Conclusions: TFP induces eryptosis and decreases protein S-nitrosylation, effects blunted by nitroprusside. The effect of nitroprusside is attenuated in the presence of extracellular Ca2+.

  2. Baclofen reverses the reduction in prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response induced by dizocilpine, but not by apomorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolato, Marco; Frau, Roberto; Aru, Gian Nicola; Orrù, Marco; Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2004-01-01

    Since baclofen, the prototypical GABA(B) receptor agonist, is known to reduce the activity of dopaminergic mesolimbic neurons, a putative antipsychotic property of this compound has been suggested, but the evidence for this is still controversial. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effects of baclofen on the prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response (ASR), a behavioral paradigm considered to be one of the most powerful tools for the evaluation of sensorimotor gating and for the screening of antipsychotics. We tested the effects of baclofen (1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg IP) in rats, per se and in co-treatment with some of the substances known to induce a robust reduction of PPI, such as apomorphine (0.25 mg/kg SC) and dizocilpine (0.1 mg/kg SC). Finally, in order to ascertain whether the effects of baclofen could be ascribed to its activity on GABA(B) receptors, we analyzed whether its action could be prevented by pretreatment with SCH 50911, a selective GABA(B) receptor antagonist (20 mg/kg IP). All the experiments were carried out using standard procedures for the assessment of PPI of the ASR. Baclofen per se produced no significant change in PPI parameters. Moreover, while no effect on apomorphine-mediated alterations in PPI parameters was observed, baclofen proved able to reverse dizocilpine-induced PPI disruption, and this effect was significantly prevented by SCH 50911. On the other hand, this last compound exhibited no effects per se at the same dose. These results indicate that GABA(B) receptors are implicated in the neurobiological circuitry accounting for glutamatergic action in sensorimotor gating, and therefore can be proposed as putative new targets in the pharmacological therapy of psychotic disorders. Further studies should be addressed to evaluate more closely the clinical efficacy of baclofen in this respect.

  3. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass reverses the effects of diet-induced obesity to inhibit the responsiveness of central vagal motoneurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Kirsteen N; Fortna, Samuel R; Hajnal, Andras

    2013-05-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) has been shown to alter the biophysical properties and pharmacological responsiveness of vagal afferent neurones and fibres, although the effects of DIO on central vagal neurones or vagal efferent functions have never been investigated. The aims of this study were to investigate whether high-fat diet-induced DIO also affects the properties of vagal efferent motoneurones, and to investigate whether these effects were reversed following weight loss induced by Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from rat dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurones in thin brainstem slices. The DMV neurones from rats exposed to high-fat diet for 12-14 weeks were less excitable, with a decreased membrane input resistance and decreased ability to fire action potentials in response to direct current pulse injection. The DMV neurones were also less responsive to superfusion with the satiety neuropeptides cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide 1. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass reversed all of these DIO-induced effects. Diet-induced obesity also affected the morphological properties of DMV neurones, increasing their size and dendritic arborization; RYGB did not reverse these morphological alterations. Remarkably, independent of diet, RYGB also reversed age-related changes of membrane properties and occurrence of charybdotoxin-sensitive (BK) calcium-dependent potassium current. These results demonstrate that DIO also affects the properties of central autonomic neurones by decreasing the membrane excitability and pharmacological responsiveness of central vagal motoneurones and that these changes were reversed following RYGB. In contrast, DIO-induced changes in morphological properties of DMV neurones were not reversed following gastric bypass surgery, suggesting that they may be due to diet, rather than obesity. These findings represent the first direct evidence for the plausible effect of RYGB to improve vagal

  4. Time-reversal breaking and spin transport induced by magnetic impurities in a 2D topological insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derakhshan, V; Ketabi, S A; Moghaddam, A G

    2016-01-01

    We employed the formalism of bond currents, expressed in terms of non-equilibrium Green’s function to obtain the local currents and transport features of zigzag silicene ribbon in the presence of magnetic impurity. When only intrinsic and Rashba spin–orbit interactions are present, silicene behaves as a two-dimensional topological insulator with gapless edge states. But in the presence of finite intrinsic spin–orbit interaction, the edge states start to penetrate into the bulk of the sample by increasing Rashba interaction strength. The exchange interaction induced by local impurities breaks the time-reversal symmetry of the gapless edge states and influences the topological properties strongly. Subsequently, the singularity of partial Berry curvature disappears and the silicene nanoribbon becomes a trivial insulator. On the other hand, when the concentration of the magnetic impurities is low, the edge currents are not affected significantly. In this case, when the exchange field lies in the x – y plane, the spin mixing around magnetic impurity is more profound rather than the case in which the exchange field is directed along the z -axis. Nevertheless, when the exchange field of magnetic impurities is placed in the x – y plane, a spin-polarized conductance is observed. The resulting conductance polarization can be tuned by the concentration of the impurities and even completely polarized spin transport is achievable. (paper)

  5. LHCSR1 induces a fast and reversible pH-dependent fluorescence quenching in LHCII in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinc, Emine; Tian, Lijin; Roy, Laura M; Roth, Robyn; Goodenough, Ursula; Croce, Roberta

    2016-07-05

    To avoid photodamage, photosynthetic organisms are able to thermally dissipate the energy absorbed in excess in a process known as nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). Although NPQ has been studied extensively, the major players and the mechanism of quenching remain debated. This is a result of the difficulty in extracting molecular information from in vivo experiments and the absence of a validation system for in vitro experiments. Here, we have created a minimal cell of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that is able to undergo NPQ. We show that LHCII, the main light harvesting complex of algae, cannot switch to a quenched conformation in response to pH changes by itself. Instead, a small amount of the protein LHCSR1 (light-harvesting complex stress related 1) is able to induce a large, fast, and reversible pH-dependent quenching in an LHCII-containing membrane. These results strongly suggest that LHCSR1 acts as pH sensor and that it modulates the excited state lifetimes of a large array of LHCII, also explaining the NPQ observed in the LHCSR3-less mutant. The possible quenching mechanisms are discussed.

  6. Synaptic Impairment in Layer 1 of the Prefrontal Cortex Induced by Repeated Stress During Adolescence is Reversed in Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrón-Oyarzo, Ignacio; Dagnino-Subiabre, Alexies; Muñoz Carvajal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress is a risk factor for the development of psychiatric disorders, some of which involve dysfunction of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). There is a higher prevalence of these chronic stress-related psychiatric disorders during adolescence, when the PFC has not yet fully matured. In the present work we studied the effect of repeated stress during adolescence on synaptic function in the PFC in adolescence and adulthood. To this end, adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to seven consecutive days of restraint stress. Afterward, both synaptic transmission and short- and long-term synaptic plasticity were evaluated in layer 1 of medial-PFC (mPFC) slices from adolescent and adult rats. We found that repeated stress significantly reduced the amplitude of evoked field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP) in the mPFC. Isolation of excitatory transmission reveled that lower-amplitude fEPSPs were associated with a reduction in α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor-mediated transmission. We also found that repeated stress significantly decreased long-term depression (LTD). Interestingly, AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated transmission and LTD were recovered in adult animals that experienced a three-week stress-free recovery period. The data indicates that the changes in synaptic transmission and plasticity in the mPFC induced by repeated stress during adolescence are reversed in adulthood after a stress-free period. PMID:26617490

  7. A trypsin inhibitor from rambutan seeds with antitumor, anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, and nitric oxide-inducing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-04-01

    Nephelium lappaceum L., commonly known as "rambutan," is a typical tropical tree and is well known for its juicy and sweet fruit which has an exotic flavor. Chemical studies on rambutan have led to the identification of various components such as monoterpene lactones and volatile compounds. Here, a 22.5-kDa trypsin inhibitor (N . lappaceum trypsin inhibitor (NLTI)) was isolated from fresh rambutan seeds using liquid chromatographical techniques. NLTI reduced the proteolytic activities of both trypsin and α-chymotrypsin. Dithiothreitol reduced the trypsin inhibitory activity of NLTI at a concentration of 1 mM, indicating that an intact disulfide bond is essential to the activity. NLTI inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 0.73 μM. In addition, NLTI manifested a time- and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on growth in many tumor cells. NLTI is one of the few trypsin inhibitors with nitric oxide-inducing activity and may find application in tumor therapy.

  8. Synaptic impairment in layer 1 of the prefrontal cortex induced by repeated stress during adolescence is reversed in adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio eNegron-Oyarzo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress is a risk factor for the development of psychiatric disorders, some of which involve dysfunction of the prefrontal cortex (PFC. There is a higher prevalence of these chronic stress-related psychiatric disorders during adolescence, when the PFC has not yet fully matured. In the present work we studied the effect of repeated stress during adolescence on synaptic function in the PFC in adolescence and adulthood. To this end, adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to seven consecutive days of restraint stress. Afterward, both synaptic transmission and short- and long-term synaptic plasticity were evaluated in layer 1 of medial-PFC (mPFC slices from adolescent and adult rats. We found that repeated stress significantly reduced the amplitude of evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP in the mPFC. Isolation of excitatory transmission reveled that lower-amplitude fEPSPs were associated with a reduction in AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated transmission. We also found that repeated stress significantly decreased long-term depression (LTD. Interestingly, AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated transmission and LTD were recovered in adult animals that experienced a three-week stress-free recovery period. The data indicates that the changes in synaptic transmission and plasticity in the mPFC induced by repeated stress during adolescence are reversed in adulthood after a stress-free period.

  9. Contribution of direct actions of the oxime HI-6 in reversing soman-induced muscle weakness in the rat diaphragm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alder, M.; Maxwell, D.M.; Filbert, M.G.; Deshpande, S.S.

    1994-12-31

    The actions of the bispyridinium oxime HI-6 ((4-AMINOCARBONYL) PYRIDINO-methoxymethyl- 2-(HYDROXYIMINO)METHYL- pyridinium dichloride) were investigated in vitro on rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations. Isometric twitch and tetanic tensions were elicited at 37 deg C with supramaximal nerve stimulation at frequencies of 20 and 50 Hz. To approximate normal respiration patterns, trials consisting of 30 successive 0.55 5 trains were alternated with 1.25 5 rest periods. Under control conditions, the above stimulation pattern generated tensions that were well maintained at both frequencies. In contrast, a marked depression of muscle tension was observed in diaphragms removed from rats administered 339 ug/kg soman (3 LD50) and tested in vitro. Addition of HI-6, 4 h after soman exposure, led to a nearly complete recovery of muscle tension at 20 Hz. At 50 Hz, muscle tensions still declined especially when trains were elicited at 1.25 and 3 5 intervals. The recovery by HI-6 observed in this study appears to be mediated by mechanisms unrelated to acetylcholinesterase reactivation since no increase of enzymatic activity was detected and the effect was reversed by a brief washout in oxime-free physiological solution. The results suggest that the direct action of HI-6 may play a role in restoring soman-induced diaphragmatic failure but this effect would be significant primarily under low use conditions.

  10. Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through the formation and reversion of deformation-induced martensite: Mechanisms, microstructures, mechanical properties, and TRIP effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirdel, M., E-mail: mshirdel1989@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzadeh, H., E-mail: hmirzadeh@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parsa, M.H., E-mail: mhparsa@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for High Performance Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A comprehensive study was carried out on the strain-induced martensitic transformation, its reversion to austenite, the resultant grain refinement, and the enhancement of strength and strain-hardening ability through the transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect in a commercial austenitic 304L stainless steel with emphasis on the mechanisms and the microstructural evolution. A straightforward magnetic measurement device, which is based on the measurement of the saturation magnetization, for evaluating the amount of strain-induced martensite after cold rolling and reversion annealing in metastable austenitic stainless steels was used, which its results were in good consistency with those of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. A new parameter called the effective reduction in thickness was introduced, which corresponds to the reasonable upper bound on the obtainable martensite fraction based on the saturation in the martensitic transformation. By means of thermodynamics calculations, the reversion mechanisms were estimated and subsequently validated by experimental results. The signs of thermal martensitic transformation at cooling stage after reversion at 850 °C were found, which was attributed to the rise in the martensite start temperature due to the carbide precipitation. After the reversion treatment, the average grain sizes were around 500 nm and the nanometric grains of the size of ~ 65 nm were also detected. The intense grain refinement led to the enhanced mechanical properties and observation of the change in the work-hardening capacity and TRIP effect behavior. A practical map as a guidance for grain refining and characterizing the stability against grain growth was proposed, which shows the limitation of the reversion mechanism for refinement of grain size. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through martensite treatment • A parameter descriptive of a reasonable upper bound on

  11. Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through the formation and reversion of deformation-induced martensite: Mechanisms, microstructures, mechanical properties, and TRIP effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirdel, M.; Mirzadeh, H.; Parsa, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study was carried out on the strain-induced martensitic transformation, its reversion to austenite, the resultant grain refinement, and the enhancement of strength and strain-hardening ability through the transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect in a commercial austenitic 304L stainless steel with emphasis on the mechanisms and the microstructural evolution. A straightforward magnetic measurement device, which is based on the measurement of the saturation magnetization, for evaluating the amount of strain-induced martensite after cold rolling and reversion annealing in metastable austenitic stainless steels was used, which its results were in good consistency with those of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. A new parameter called the effective reduction in thickness was introduced, which corresponds to the reasonable upper bound on the obtainable martensite fraction based on the saturation in the martensitic transformation. By means of thermodynamics calculations, the reversion mechanisms were estimated and subsequently validated by experimental results. The signs of thermal martensitic transformation at cooling stage after reversion at 850 °C were found, which was attributed to the rise in the martensite start temperature due to the carbide precipitation. After the reversion treatment, the average grain sizes were around 500 nm and the nanometric grains of the size of ~ 65 nm were also detected. The intense grain refinement led to the enhanced mechanical properties and observation of the change in the work-hardening capacity and TRIP effect behavior. A practical map as a guidance for grain refining and characterizing the stability against grain growth was proposed, which shows the limitation of the reversion mechanism for refinement of grain size. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through martensite treatment • A parameter descriptive of a reasonable upper bound on

  12. Efficacy of anti-inflammatory, antibiotic and pleiotropic agents in reversing nitrogen mustard-induced injury in ex vivo cultured rabbit cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Dinesh G; Kant, Rama; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2018-09-01

    Vesicating agent, Sulfur mustard (SM), causes devastating eye injury; however, there are no effective antidotes available. Using nitrogen mustard (NM), a bi-functional analog of SM, we have earlier reported that NM-induced corneal injury in ex vivo rabbit cornea organ culture model parallels corneal injury reported with SM. Using this model, we have demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of dexamethasone (DEX), doxycycline (DOX) and silibinin (SB) in reversing NM (2h exposure)-induced corneal injuries when added immediately after washing NM. In the present study, we further examined the efficacy of similar/higher doses of these agents when added immediately, 2, or 4h after washing NM following its 2h exposure. All three treatment agents caused a reversal in established NM-induced injury biomarkers when added immediately or 2h after washing NM following its 2h exposure; however, when treatments were carried out 4h after washing NM, there was no significant effect. Together, our results further show the beneficial effect of these agents in reversing NM-induced corneal injury and indicate the time window for effective treatment. This could be useful towards future development of targeted therapeutics against vesicant-induced ocular injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The distribution and function of serotonin in the large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus. a comparative study with the blood-feeding bug, Rhodnius prolixus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miggiani, L; Orchard, I; TeBrugge, V

    1999-11-01

    The blood-feeding hemipteran, Rhodnius prolixus, ingests a large blood meal at the end of each larval stage. To accommodate and process this meal, its cuticle undergoes plasticisation, and its gut and Malpighian tubules respectively absorb and secrete a large volume of water and salts for rapid diuresis. Serotonin has been found to be integral to the feeding process in this animal, along with a diuretic peptide(s). The large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, tends to feed in a more continuous and abstemious manner, and therefore may have different physiological requirements than the blood feeder. Unlike R. prolixus, O. fasciatus is lacking serotonin-like immunoreactive dorsal unpaired median neurons in the mesothoracic ganglionic mass, and lacks serotonin-like immunoreactive neurohaemal areas and processes on the abdominal nerves, integument, salivary glands, and anterior junction of the foregut and crop. The salivary glands and crop do, however, respond to serotonin with increased levels of cAMP, while the integument and Malpighian tubules do not. In addition, O. fasciatus Malpighian tubules respond to both O. fasciatus and R. prolixus partially purified CNS extracts, which are likely to contain any native diuretic peptides. Thus, while serotonin and diuretic peptides may be involved in tubule control in R. prolixus, the latter may be of greater importance in O. fasciatus.

  14. Glytube: a conical tube and parafilm M-based method as a simplified device to artificially blood-feed the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Costa-da-Silva

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti, the main vector of dengue virus, requires a blood meal to produce eggs. Although live animals are still the main blood source for laboratory colonies, many artificial feeders are available. These feeders are also the best method for experimental oral infection of Ae. aegypti with Dengue viruses. However, most of them are expensive or laborious to construct. Based on principle of Rutledge-type feeder, a conventional conical tube, glycerol and Parafilm-M were used to develop a simple in-house feeder device. The blood feeding efficiency of this apparatus was compared to a live blood source, mice, and no significant differences (p = 0.1189 were observed between artificial-fed (51.3% of engorgement and mice-fed groups (40.6%. Thus, an easy to assemble and cost-effective artificial feeder, designated "Glytube" was developed in this report. This simple and efficient feeding device can be built with common laboratory materials for research on Ae. aegypti.

  15. The effects of forced-egg retention on the blood-feeding behavior and reproductive potential of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian J; Fonseca, Dina M

    2014-07-01

    High rates of West Nile virus (WNV) transmission to humans are associated with exceptionally hot and dry summers. This is paradoxical since the eggs of Culex vectors of WNV depend on the persistence of containers with water, which decline during droughts. We examined the effects of forced-egg retention on the reproductive success of female Culex pipiens as well as behavioral responses, such as likelihood of secondary blood meals. As controls we examined the effects of female age and delayed mating. We found that early mating is essential to achieve reproductive success and, consistent with an "all-or-none" ovipositing strategy, C. pipiens females are able to retain considerable reproductive potential while searching for oviposition sites. Specifically, although forced-egg retention resulted in significant decreases in fitness, the decline was moderate for 5 weeks and most can be accounted for by increases in female age. Consequently, no females took blood more than once per gonotrophic cycle, which eliminates the possibility that heightened vectorial capacity due to multiple blood-feedings increases WNV transmission during periods of drought. Instead, our findings suggest that during droughts populations of C. pipiens have time to locate the remaining water holes, which are associated with human populations and WNV-competent bird species. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Blood feeding patterns of Nyssomyia intermedia and Nyssomyia neivai (Diptera, Psychodidae in a cutaneous leishmaniasis endemic area of the Ribeira Valley, State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Marassa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The aim of this study was to identify the blood feeding sources of Nyssomyia intermedia (Ny. intermedia and Nyssomyia neivai (Ny. neivai, which are Leishmania vectors and the predominant sandfly species in the Ribeira Valley, State of São Paulo, Brazil, an endemic area for cutaneous leishmaniasis. Methods Specimens were captured monthly between February 2001 and December 2003 on a smallholding and a small farm situated in the Serra district in the Iporanga municipality. The blood meals of 988 engorged females were tested using the avidin-biotin immunoenzymatic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Seven blood meal sources were investigated: human, dog, chicken, bovine, pig, horse and rat. Results The results showed that among the females that fed on one or more blood sources, the respective percentages for Ny. intermedia and Ny. neivai, respectively, were as follows: human (23% and 36.8%, pig (47.4% and 26.4%, chicken (25.7% and 36.8% and dog (3.9% and 0%, and the differences in the blood sources between the two species were statistically significant (p = 0.043. Conclusions Both species had predominant reactivity for one or two blood sources, and few showed reactivity indicating three or four sources. Many different combinations were observed among the females that showed reactivity for more than one source, which indicated their opportunistic habits and eclecticism regarding anthropic environmental conditions.

  17. In situ atomic force microscopy studies of reversible light-induced switching of surface roughness and adhesion in azobenzene-containing PMMA films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, Y.; Pakula, C.; Zaporojtchenko, V.; Strunskus, T.; Faupel, F.; Herges, R.; Zargarani, D.; Magnussen, O.M.

    2011-01-01

    Thin films in the range 40-80 nm of a blend of PMMA with an azobenzene derivative have been studied directly during UV and blue light irradiation by atomic force microscopy (AFM), revealing highly reversible changes in the surface roughness and the film adhesion. UV light induces an ∼80% increase in surface roughness, whereas illumination by blue light completely reverses these changes. Based on the observed surface topography and transition kinetics a reversible mass flow mechanisms is suggested, where the polarity changes upon switching trigger a wetting-dewetting transition in a surface segregation layer of the chromophore. Similar AFM measurements of the pull-off force indicate a decrease upon UV and an increase after blue light illumination with a complex kinetic behavior: a rapid initial change, attributed to the change in the cis isomer fraction of the azobenzene derivative, and a more gradual change, indicative of slow structural reorganization.

  18. Exogenous hydrogen peroxide reversibly inhibits root gravitropism and induces horizontal curvature of primary root during grass pea germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinglong; Su, Miao; Wang, Liyan; Jiao, Chengjin; Sun, Zhengxi; Cheng, Wei; Li, Fengmin; Wang, Chongying

    2012-04-01

    During germination in distilled water (dH(2)O) on a horizontally positioned Petri dish, emerging primary roots of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) grew perpendicular to the bottom of the Petri dish, due to gravitropism. However, when germinated in exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the primary roots grew parallel to the bottom of the Petri dish and asymmetrically, forming a horizontal curvature. Time-course experiments showed that the effect was strongest when H(2)O(2) was applied prior to the emergence of the primary root. H(2)O(2) failed to induce root curvature when applied post-germination. Dosage studies revealed that the frequency of primary root curvature was significantly enhanced with increased H(2)O(2) concentrations. This curvature could be directly counteracted by dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a scavenger of H(2)O(2), but not by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and pyridine, inhibitors of H(2)O(2) production. Exogenous H(2)O(2) treatment caused both an increase in the activities of H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzymes [including ascorbate peroxidase (APX: EC 1.11.1.11), catalase (CAT: EC 1.11.1.6) and peroxidase (POD: EC 1.11.1.7)] and a reduction in endogenous H(2)O(2) levels and root vitality. Although grass pea seeds absorbed exogenous H(2)O(2) during seed germination, DAB staining of paraffin sections revealed that exogenous H(2)O(2) only entered the root epidermis and not inner tissues. These data indicated that exogenously applied H(2)O(2) could lead to a reversible loss of the root gravitropic response and a horizontal curvature in primary roots during radicle emergence of the seedling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Reverse-phase phosphoproteome analysis of signaling pathways induced by Rift valley fever virus in human small airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taissia G Popova

    Full Text Available Rift valley fever virus (RVFV infection is an emerging zoonotic disease endemic in many countries of sub-Saharan Africa and in Egypt. In this study we show that human small airway epithelial cells are highly susceptible to RVFV virulent strain ZH-501 and the attenuated strain MP-12. We used the reverse-phase protein arrays technology to identify phosphoprotein signaling pathways modulated during infection of cultured airway epithelium. ZH-501 infection induced activation of MAP kinases (p38, JNK and ERK and downstream transcriptional factors [STAT1 (Y701, ATF2 (T69/71, MSK1 (S360 and CREB (S133]. NF-κB phosphorylation was also increased. Activation of p53 (S15, S46 correlated with the increased levels of cleaved effector caspase-3, -6 and -7, indicating activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. RVFV infection downregulated phosphorylation of a major anti-apoptotic regulator of survival pathways, AKT (S473, along with phosphorylation of FOX 01/03 (T24/31 which controls cell cycle arrest downstream from AKT. Consistent with this, the level of apoptosis inhibitor XIAP was decreased. However, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway marker, caspase-9, demonstrated only a marginal activation accompanied by an increased level of the inhibitor of apoptosome formation, HSP27. Concentration of the autophagy marker, LC3B, which often accompanies the pro-survival signaling, was decreased. Cumulatively, our analysis of RVFV infection in lung epithelium indicated a viral strategy directed toward the control of cell apoptosis through a number of transcriptional factors. Analyses of MP-12 titers in challenged cells in the presence of MAPK inhibitors indicated that activation of p38 represents a protective cell response while ERK activation controls viral replication.

  20. Osteoporotic cytokines and bone metabolism on rats with induced hyperthyroidism; changes as a result of reversal to euthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Gönül; Karter, Yesari; Aydin, Seval; Uzun, Hafize

    2003-12-31

    Hyperthyroidism is characterized by increased bone turnover and resorptive activity. Raised levels of serum osteoporotic cytokines, such as interleukin (IL) -1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha have been demonstrated previously in hyperthyroidism. These elevations are controversial and it is difficult to differentiate the contribution of thyroid hormones to the elevation of cytokines from that of the autoimmune inflammation in Graves' disease (GD) and follicular cell damage in thyroiditis. Therefore, we investigated the effect of thyroid hormones on serum IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha levels and bone metabolism on L-thyroxine induced hyperthyroid rats and changes in cytokine levels and bone metabolism on the same rats after reversal to euthyroidism. Rats were treated with L-thyroxine for 5 weeks (0.4 mg/ 100 g food). Plasma T3, T4, TSH and serum IL-1beta, IL-6, TNFalpha, Calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P), parathyroid hormone (PTH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP) levels were measured and differential leucocyte counts were made initially, at the 5th week of the experiment (hyperthyroid state) and 5 weeks after quitting the administration of L-thyroxine (euthyroid state). Significant rises in serum IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNFalpha were noted in hyperthyroidism (P hyperthyroid state while there was no correlation in euthyroid states. Ca and P levels did not differ significantly while PTH levels declined significantly in the hyperthyroid state (P hyperthyroidism (P hyperthyroid state (P metabolism in hyperthyroidism might be mediated by cytokines and the increased bone turnover in hyperthyroidism failed to decrease despite euthyroidism.

  1. Reverse Algols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K. C.

    1989-01-01

    Reverse Algols, binary systems with a semidetached configuration in which the more massive component is in contact with the critical equipotential surface, are examined. Observational evidence for reverse Algols is presented and the parameters of seven reverse Algols are listed. The evolution of Algols and reverse Algols is discussed. It is suggested that, because reverse Algols represent the premass-reversal semidetached phase of close binary evolution, the evolutionary time scale between regular and reverse Algols is the ratio of the number of confirmed systems of these two Algol types.

  2. Structural study of the AOT reverse micellar system. Influence of attractive interactions induced by the solubilisation of native and modified proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassin, Guillaume

    1994-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the influence of intra-micellar attractions on the thermodynamic behaviour of reverse micellar systems, as well as of the effects induced by the solubilisation of natives or modified proteins. The author proposes a model to explain the decrease of attractions between droplets when the volume fraction occupied by reverse micelles increases. This model which highlights the importance of depletion forces between reverse micelles, allows the building up of a theoretical relationship between the bonding parameter and the volume fraction of reverse micelles. In order to understand the appearance of an attractive term related to the solubilisation of native cytochrome-c in these systems, this protein has been chemically modified. The author highlights the role of the charge born by a micellar probe on the thermodynamic behaviour of micro-emulsions. Then, the author applies the model of dimerizing adhesive spheres to reverse micellar systems containing native cytochrome-c. He shows that theoretical predictions of this model are in agreement with obtained experimental results [fr

  3. Inhibitory effect of Piper betel leaf extracts on copper-mediated LDL oxidation and oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation via inducing reverse cholesterol transport in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gwo-Chin; Wu, Pei-Fang; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Lu, Hsiu-Chin; Chou, Fen-Pi

    2013-12-15

    Piper betel leaf (PBL) has the biological capabilities of detoxification and can work as an anti-inflammatory agent and an anti-oxidant. In this study, we evaluated the anti-oxidative activity of the extract of Piper betel leaves (PBLs) on the basis of Cu(2+)-mediated oxidation, and its ability to prevent foam cell formation in a model for oxidised low density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced lipid accumulation in macrophages. Our data demonstrated that PBLs were able to inhibit LDL oxidation in vitro and are able to reduce the lipid accumulation in macrophages. We showed the underlying mechanisms to be the following: PBLs up-regulated the protein levels of the class A and class B scavenger receptors, the membrane lipid transporter ABCA1, and its upstream regulator Liver X receptor (LXR) in the macrophages exposed to oxLDL. The results suggested that PBLs activated the reverse cholesterol transport mechanism to enhance the metabolism of the oxLDL that could prevent both lipid accumulation and foam cell formation and further minimise the possible damage of vessels caused by the oxLDL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Glucocorticoid-induced reversal of interleukin-1β-stimulated inflammatory gene expression in human oviductal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Backman

    Full Text Available Studies indicate that high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC, the most common epithelial ovarian carcinoma histotype, originates from the fallopian tube epithelium (FTE. Risk factors for this cancer include reproductive parameters associated with lifetime ovulatory events. Ovulation is an acute inflammatory process during which the FTE is exposed to follicular fluid containing both pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules, such as interleukin-1 (IL1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF, and cortisol. Repeated exposure to inflammatory cytokines may contribute to transforming events in the FTE, with glucocorticoids exerting a protective effect. The global response of FTE cells to inflammatory cytokines or glucocorticoids has not been investigated. To examine the response of FTE cells and the ability of glucocorticoids to oppose this response, an immortalized human FTE cell line, OE-E6/E7, was treated with IL1β, dexamethasone (DEX, IL1β and DEX, or vehicle and genome-wide gene expression profiling was performed. IL1β altered the expression of 47 genes of which 17 were reversed by DEX. DEX treatment alone altered the expression of 590 genes, whereas combined DEX and IL1β treatment altered the expression of 784 genes. Network and pathway enrichment analysis indicated that many genes altered by DEX are involved in cytokine, chemokine, and cell cycle signaling, including NFκΒ target genes and interacting proteins. Quantitative real time RT-PCR studies validated the gene array data for IL8, IL23A, PI3 and TACC2 in OE-E6/E7 cells. Consistent with the array data, Western blot analysis showed increased levels of PTGS2 protein induced by IL1β that was blocked by DEX. A parallel experiment using primary cultured human FTE cells indicated similar effects on PTGS2, IL8, IL23A, PI3 and TACC2 transcripts. These findings support the hypothesis that pro-inflammatory signaling is induced in FTE cells by inflammatory mediators and raises the possibility that

  5. TNF-α protein synthesis inhibitor restores neuronal function and reverses cognitive deficits induced by chronic neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belarbi Karim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neuroinflammation is a hallmark of several neurological disorders associated with cognitive loss. Activated microglia and secreted factors such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α are key mediators of neuroinflammation and may contribute to neuronal dysfunction. Our study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of a novel analog of thalidomide, 3,6'-dithiothalidomide (DT, an agent with anti-TNF-α activity, in a model of chronic neuroinflammation. Methods Lipopolysaccharide or artificial cerebrospinal fluid was infused into the fourth ventricle of three-month-old rats for 28 days. Starting on day 29, animals received daily intraperitoneal injections of DT (56 mg/kg/day or vehicle for 14 days. Thereafter, cognitive function was assessed by novel object recognition, novel place recognition and Morris water maze, and animals were euthanized 25 min following water maze probe test evaluation. Results Chronic LPS-infusion was characterized by increased gene expression of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β in the hippocampus. Treatment with DT normalized TNF-α levels back to control levels but not IL-1β. Treatment with DT attenuated the expression of TLR2, TLR4, IRAK1 and Hmgb1, all genes involved in the TLR-mediated signaling pathway associated with classical microglia activation. However DT did not impact the numbers of MHC Class II immunoreactive cells. Chronic neuroinflammation impaired novel place recognition, spatial learning and memory function; but it did not impact novel object recognition. Importantly, treatment with DT restored cognitive function in LPS-infused animals and normalized the fraction of hippocampal neurons expressing the plasticity-related immediate-early gene Arc. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that the TNF-α synthesis inhibitor DT can significantly reverse hippocampus-dependent cognitive deficits induced by chronic neuroinflammation. These results suggest that TNF-α is a

  6. Reverse Logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Kulikova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was focused on the analysis of the concept of reverse logistics and actual reverse processes which are implemented in mining industry and finding solutions for the optimization of reverse logistics in this sphere. The objective of this paper was the assessment of the development of reverse logistics in mining industry on the example of potash production. The theoretical part was based on reverse logistics and mining waste related literature and provided foundations for further...

  7. Reversible magnetic-field-induced martensitic transformation over a wide temperature window in Ni42-xCoxCu8Mn37Ga13 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Hui; Wang, Jingmin; Jiang, Chengbao; Xu, Huibin

    2018-05-01

    Ni42-xCoxCu8Mn37Ga13 (0 ≤ x ≤ 14) alloys are reported to exhibit a magnetostructural transition from weakly-magnetic martensite to ferromagnetic austenite over a rather wide temperature window ranging from 200 K to 380 K. Simultaneously a large magnetization change Δσ of up to 105 Am2 kg-1 is obtained at the martensitic transformation. A reversible magnetic-field-induced martensitic transformation is realized, resulting in a large magnetocaloric effect related to the high magnetic entropy change with a broad working temperature span. This work shows how it is possible to effectively tailor the magnetostructural transition in Ni-Mn-Ga alloys so as to achieve a reversible magnetic-field-induced martensitic transformation and associated functionalities.

  8. Cerebral palsy in adult patients: constraint-induced movement therapy is effective to reverse the nonuse of the affected upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cecília P. Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To determine if the original protocol of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT, is adequate to reverse the nonuse of the affected upper limb (AUL in patients with Cerebral Palsy (CP in adulthood. Method The study included 10 patients diagnosed with CP hemiparesis had attended the adult protocol CIMT, from January/August 2009/2014. Results Average age 24.6 (SD 9.44; MAL average pretreatment How Often (HO = 0.72 and How Well (HW = 0.68 and post-treatment HO = 3.77 and HW = 3.60 (p ≤ 0.001 and pretreatment WMFT average = 21.03 and post-treatment average = 18.91 (p = 0.350. Conclusion The constraint-induced movement therapy is effective to reverse the nonuse learn of the AUL in adult patients with CP.

  9. Hesperetin-5,7,3'-O-triacetate suppresses airway hyperresponsiveness in ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged mice without reversing xylazine/ketamine-induced anesthesia in normal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, You-Lan; Chen, Chi-Li; Chen, Chi-Ming; Ko, Wun-Chang

    2017-05-30

    We recently reported that hesperetin-5,7,3'-O-triacetate (HTA) dually inhibited phosphodiesterase (PDE)3/4 with a therapeutic ratio of 20.8. The application and development of PDE4 inhibitors for treating asthma or COPD are limited by their side effects, such as nausea, vomiting and gastric hypersecretion. PDE4 inhibitors were reported to reverse xylazine/ketamine-induced anesthesia in rats and triggered vomiting in ferrets. Thus the reversing effect of HTA on xylazine/ketamine-induced anesthesia in mice was studied to assess emetic effect of HTA. The aim of this study was to prove the therapeutic effect of HTA without vomiting effect at an effective dose for treating COPD. Ten female BALB/c mice in each group were sensitized by ovalbumin (OVA) on days 0 and 14. On day 21, these mice were emphasized the sensitization by Freund's complete adjuvant. Mice were challenged by 1% OVA nebulization on days 28, 29, and 30. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was assessed on day 32 in each group, using the FlexiVent system to determine airway resistance (R L ) and lung dynamic compliance (C dyn ) in anesthetized ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and challenged mice. Each group was orally administered HTA (10 ~ 100 μmol/kg), roflumilast (1 and 5 mg/kg) or vehicles (controls) 2 h before and 6 and 24 h after OVA provocation. For comparison, sham-treated mice were challenged with saline instead of 1% OVA. The ability to reverse xylazine/ketamine-induced anesthesia by HTA or roflumilast for 3 h was determined in normal mice. We used roflumilast, a selective PDE4 inhibitor and bronchodilator for severe COPD approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, as a reference drug. In the results, HTA (100 μmol/kg, p.o.) or roflumilast (5 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly suppressed all R L values of MCh at 0.78 ~ 25 mg/mL and enhanced C dyn values of MCh at 3.125 ~ 25 mg/mL compared to OVA-sensitized and -challenged control mice. Orally administered 1, 3 or 10 mg/kg roflumilast

  10. Effects of Fatty Acid and Geraniol Repellent-Oil Mixtures Applied to Cattle on Blood Feeding and Reproductive Parameters in Field Populations of Haematobia irritans (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullens, Bradley A; Soto, Diane; Gerry, Alec C; Fowler, Fallon E; Diniz, Alesha N

    2018-02-28

    California pastured cattle were treated with 250 ml of a 15% mixture of fatty acids (C8-C9-C10) or 125 ml of 2% geraniol in a mineral oil carrier to assess impacts on horn flies, Haematobia irritans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae) over two summers. Horn flies were netted from cattle every 3-4 d for 2 wk before treatment, 2 wk during treatment (four treatments, with flies collected before each treatment), and 2 wk after treatments ceased. Blood meal weights were estimated by hemoglobin assay of excised abdomens. Other females were dissected to determine the number of active ovarioles and the stage of primary follicle development. Depending on year and herd, pretreatment males contained an average of 0.6-1.0 mg of blood, while females contained 1.7-2.7 mg. Pretreatment egg development (least developed oocytes were stage 1 and fully developed eggs were stage 5) averaged 3.7-4.3, and number of active ovarioles averaged 18.1 to 19.6/female. During treatment periods, significant reductions in blood weight were noted for females, but usually not for males, and females also often exhibited reduced mean oocyte stage and number of active ovarioles. Peaks in proportions of young nulliparous females (oocyte stages 1 or 2) were seen during some repellent application periods. This suggested older females had been killed or driven off from the local population by the treatments, and flies on cattle included more young flies that likely were recent arrivals. The repellent-oil mixture thus impacted blood feeding, reproductive fitness, and probably age structure in the field.

  11. Reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block by sugammadex is independent of renal perfusion in anesthetized cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staals, L.M.; Boer, H.D. de; Egmond, J. van; Hope, F.; Pol, F.M. van de; Bom, A.H.; Driessen, J.J.; Booij, L.H.D.J.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Sugammadex is a selective relaxant binding agent designed to encapsulate the aminosteroidal neuromuscular blocking agent rocuronium, thereby reversing its effect. Both sugammadex and the sugammadex-rocuronium complex are eliminated by the kidneys. This study investigated the effect of

  12. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r 2   =  0.77); (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r 2   =  0.82); (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  <  0.05, safe opening compared to cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r 2   =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response

  13. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r2  =  0.77) (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r2  =  0.82) (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r2  =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response therefore showed great promise in predicting the

  14. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-12-07

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r(2)  =  0.77); (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r(2)  =  0.82); (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r(2)  =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response therefore showed great promise in predicting the BBB opening duration, enabling thus control of opening according to the drug

  15. Biochemical adaptations of mammalian hibernation: exploring squirrels as a perspective model for naturally induced reversible insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C-W.; Biggar, K.K.; Storey, K.B. [Carleton University, Department of Biology, Institute of Biochemistry, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2013-01-28

    An important disease among human metabolic disorders is type 2 diabetes mellitus. This disorder involves multiple physiological defects that result from high blood glucose content and eventually lead to the onset of insulin resistance. The combination of insulin resistance, increased glucose production, and decreased insulin secretion creates a diabetic metabolic environment that leads to a lifetime of management. Appropriate models are critical for the success of research. As such, a unique model providing insight into the mechanisms of reversible insulin resistance is mammalian hibernation. Hibernators, such as ground squirrels and bats, are excellent examples of animals exhibiting reversible insulin resistance, for which a rapid increase in body weight is required prior to entry into dormancy. Hibernator studies have shown differential regulation of specific molecular pathways involved in reversible resistance to insulin. The present review focuses on this growing area of research and the molecular mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis, and explores the roles of the Akt signaling pathway during hibernation. Here, we propose a link between hibernation, a well-documented response to periods of environmental stress, and reversible insulin resistance, potentially facilitated by key alterations in the Akt signaling network, PPAR-γ/PGC-1α regulation, and non-coding RNA expression. Coincidentally, many of the same pathways are frequently found to be dysregulated during insulin resistance in human type 2 diabetes. Hence, the molecular networks that may regulate reversible insulin resistance in hibernating mammals represent a novel approach by providing insight into medical treatment of insulin resistance in humans.

  16. Biochemical adaptations of mammalian hibernation: exploring squirrels as a perspective model for naturally induced reversible insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C-W.; Biggar, K.K.; Storey, K.B.

    2013-01-01

    An important disease among human metabolic disorders is type 2 diabetes mellitus. This disorder involves multiple physiological defects that result from high blood glucose content and eventually lead to the onset of insulin resistance. The combination of insulin resistance, increased glucose production, and decreased insulin secretion creates a diabetic metabolic environment that leads to a lifetime of management. Appropriate models are critical for the success of research. As such, a unique model providing insight into the mechanisms of reversible insulin resistance is mammalian hibernation. Hibernators, such as ground squirrels and bats, are excellent examples of animals exhibiting reversible insulin resistance, for which a rapid increase in body weight is required prior to entry into dormancy. Hibernator studies have shown differential regulation of specific molecular pathways involved in reversible resistance to insulin. The present review focuses on this growing area of research and the molecular mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis, and explores the roles of the Akt signaling pathway during hibernation. Here, we propose a link between hibernation, a well-documented response to periods of environmental stress, and reversible insulin resistance, potentially facilitated by key alterations in the Akt signaling network, PPAR-γ/PGC-1α regulation, and non-coding RNA expression. Coincidentally, many of the same pathways are frequently found to be dysregulated during insulin resistance in human type 2 diabetes. Hence, the molecular networks that may regulate reversible insulin resistance in hibernating mammals represent a novel approach by providing insight into medical treatment of insulin resistance in humans

  17. Reverse Osmosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    many applications, one of which is desalination of seawater. The inaugural Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded in 1901 to van 't Hoff for his seminal work in this area. The present article explains the principle of osmosis and reverse osmosis. Osmosis and Reverse Osmosis. As the name suggests, reverse osmosis is the ...

  18. A temporary decrease in twitch response during reversal of rocuronium-induced muscle relaxation with a small dose of sugammadex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld, Douglas J.; Kuizenga, Karel; Proost, Johannes H.; Wierda, J. Mark K. H.

    BACKGROUND: We present a case in which a temporary decrease in train-of-four (TOF) response was observed after reversal of muscle relaxation with a small dose (0.5 mg/kg) of sugammadex administered 42 min after 0.9 mg/kg of rocuronium. At the end of the operation, the TOF ratio was > 0.9, and the

  19. Targeting miR-423-5p Reverses Exercise Training-Induced HCN4 Channel Remodeling and Sinus Bradycardia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Souza, Alicia; Pearman, Charles M.; Wang, Yanwen

    2017-01-01

    -generation sequencing and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed remodeling of miRs in the sinus node of swim-trained mice. Computational predictions highlighted a prominent role for miR-423-5p. Interaction between miR-423-5p and HCN4 was confirmed by a dose-dependent reduction...

  20. Early postmenopausal phase is associated with reduced prostacyclin-induced vasodilation that is reversed by exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Egelund, Jon; Mandrup Jensen, Camilla Maria

    2016-01-01

    The postmenopausal phase is associated with an accelerated rate of rise in the prevalence of vascular dysfunction and hypertension; however, the mechanisms underlying these adverse vascular changes and whether exercise training can reverse the decline in vascular function remains unclear. We...... increased (Pphase is associated with a marked reduction in vascular function. Despite of a reduced sensitivity...

  1. Amarogentin Induces Apoptosis of Liver Cancer Cells via Upregulation of p53 and Downregulation of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Runqin; Zhang, Yinglin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Amarogentin has been reported to have a preventive effect on liver cancer via inducing cancer cell apoptosis. We attempted to elucidate the roles of p53-associated apoptosis pathways in the chemopreventive mechanism of amarogentin. The findings of this study will facilitate the development of a novel supplementary strategy for the treatment of liver cancer. Materials and Methods: The purity of amarogentin was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The inhibitory ratios of the liver cell lines were determined using a Cell Counting Kit-8 following treatment with a gradient concentration of amarogentin. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry using annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide kits. The gene and protein expression of p53-associated molecules, such as Akt, human telomerase reverse transcriptase, RelA, and p38, was detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining in liver cancer cells and mouse tumor tissues after treatment with amarogentin. Results: The inhibitory effect of amarogentin on cell proliferation was more obvious in liver cancer cells, and amarogentin was more likely to induce the apoptosis of liver cancer cells than that of normal liver cells. The gene and protein expression levels of Akt, RelA, and human telomerase reverse transcriptase were markedly higher in the control group than in the preventive group and treatment groups. Only the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase was downregulated, accompanied by the upregulation of p53. Conclusion: The results of our study suggest that amarogentin promotes apoptosis of liver cancer cells by the upregulation of p53 and downregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase and prevents the malignant transformation of these cells. PMID:27402632

  2. Reversal of Vecuronium-induced Neuromuscular Blockade with Low-dose Sugammadex at Train-of-four Count of Four: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asztalos, László; Szabó-Maák, Zoltán; Gajdos, András; Nemes, Réka; Pongrácz, Adrienn; Lengyel, Szabolcs; Fülesdi, Béla; Tassonyi, Edömér

    2017-09-01

    Rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block that spontaneously recovered to a train-of-four count of four can be reversed with sugammadex 0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg. We investigated whether these doses of sugammadex can also reverse vecuronium at a similar level of block. Sixty-five patients were randomly assigned, and 64 were analyzed in this controlled, superiority study. Participants received general anesthesia with propofol, sevoflurane, fentanyl, and vecuronium. Measurement of neuromuscular function was performed with acceleromyography (TOF-Watch-SX, Organon Teknika B.V., The Netherlands ). Once the block recovered spontaneously to four twitches in response to train-of-four stimulation, patients were randomly assigned to receive sugammadex 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 mg/kg; neostigmine 0.05 mg/kg; or placebo. Time from study drug injection to normalized train-of-four ratio 0.9 and the incidence of incomplete reversal within 30 min were the primary outcome variables. Secondary outcome was the incidence of reparalysis (normalized train-of-four ratio less than 0.9). Sugammadex, in doses of 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg, reversed a threshold train-of-four count of four to normalized train-of-four ratio of 0.9 or higher in all patients in 4.4 ± 2.3 min (mean ± SD) and 2.6 ± 1.6 min, respectively. Sugammadex 0.5 mg/kg reversed the block in 6.8 ± 4.1 min in 70% of patients (P 0.05 vs. sugammadex 0.5 mg/kg). The overall frequency of reparalysis was 18.7%, but this incidence varied from group to group. Sugammadex 1.0 mg/kg, unlike 0.5 mg/kg, properly reversed a threshold train-of-four count of four vecuronium-induced block but did not prevent reparalysis.

  3. Hypothyroidism-induced Reversible Encephalopathy as a Cause of Aggravation of Parkinsonism and Myoclonus in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehm, Gwanhee; Kim, Han-Joon; Jeon, Beomseok

    2017-01-01

    Myoclonus and encephalopathy are unusual in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We describe the case of a 59-year-old male with PD who developed myoclonus and encephalopathy. Underlying hypothyroidism was revealed after admission and treated with levothyroxine. Myoclonus and encephalopathy were completely resolved following thyroid hormone replacement. Hypothyroidism can cause reversible myoclonus and encephalopathy along with unusual aggravation of parkinsonism symptoms in patients with PD.

  4. Reverse Transcriptase-Containing Particles Induced in Rous Sarcoma Virus-Transformed Rat Cells by Arginine Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Moshe; Weinberg, Eynat; Haspel, Osnat; Becker, Yechiel

    1972-01-01

    Incubation of rat cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) in an arginine-deficient medium resulted in accumulation of particles in the culture medium. Such particles did not appear when the transformed rat cells were incubated in a complete medium nor in the medium of primary rat cells which were incubated either in arginine-deficient or complete media. The particles which were released from the arginine-deprived transformed rat cells resemble C-type particles in their properties. These particles band in sucrose gradients at a density of 1.16 g/ml and contain 35S ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules and a reverse transcriptase activity. Analysis of the cytoplasm of transformed and primary rat cells, deprived and undeprived of arginine, revealed the presence of reverse transcriptase-containing particles which banded in sucrose gradients at a density of 1.14 g/ml. These particles differed from the particles released into the medium by the arginine-deprived RSV-transformed rat cells. The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules synthesized in vitro by the reverse transcriptase present in the particles isolated from the medium of arginine-deprived cells hybridized to RSV RNA, whereas the DNA synthesized by the cell-bound enzyme had no homology to RSV RNA. PMID:4116137

  5. Sexual dimorphic expression of DMRT1 and Sox9a during gonadal differentiation and hormone-induced sex reversal in the teleost fish Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tohru; Kajiura-Kobayashi, Hiroko; Guan, Guijun; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2008-01-01

    We examined the expression profiles of tDMRT1 and Sox9a during gonadal sex differentiation and hormone-induced sex reversal. tDMRT1 was detected in the gonial germ-cell-surrounding cells in XY fry specifically before the appearance of any signs of morphological sex differentiation, that is, sex differences in germ cell number and histogenesis, such as differentiation into intratesticular efferent duct or ovarian cavity. The signals became localized in the Sertoli and epithelial cells comprising the efferent duct during gonadal differentiation. After the induction of XY sex reversal with estrogen, tDMRT1 decreased and then disappeared completely. In contrast, tDMRT1 was expressed in the germ-cell-surrounding cells in XX sex reversal with androgen. On the other hand, Sox9a did not show sexual dimorphism before the appearance of sex differences in histogenesis and was not expressed in the efferent duct in the testis. These results suggest that tDMRT1 is a superior testicular differentiation marker in tilapia.

  6. p53-dependent manner of persistent activation of the radiation-induced reversion in the pink-eyed unstable mouse embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, K.; Yonezawa, M.; Niwa, O.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We previously reported that radiation has an ability to induce genomic instability which causes delayed and untargeted mutation. These mutations aren't accounted for by the usual relationship between DNA damages and repair. However, the mechanisms of a long-term memory of DNA damage and the persistence of up-regulated recombination activity have yet to be elucidated. The mouse pink-eyed unstable (pun) mutation is due to an intragenic duplication of the pink-eyed dilution locus and frequently reverts black to the wild type in germ cells as well as somatic cells. The frequency of reversion was estimated by counting cluster of pigment cells in retinal pigment epithelium. Twice increase of the reversion was observed in F1 mice born to 6Gy irradiated male at spermatozoa stage, but not at other spermatogenesis stages( -tid, -cyte, -gonia ). Trans-genarational effect in F2 mice also didn't observe. Therefore, this phenomenon only occurs under the restricted germ cell stage. Additionally, the reversion frequency of p53 deficient F1 mouse born to irradiated sperm was less than irradiated wild mouse. 5aza-dc chemical agent, which is DNA methylation emzyme inhibitor, also suppressed pun allele recombination in mouse embryo. These data indicate that p53 contributes delayed and untargeted mutation, perhaps, by regulation of DNA metylation status

  7. Efficacy and safety of sugammadex in the reversal of deep neuromuscular blockade induced by rocuronium in patients with end-stage renal disease: A comparative prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Camila M; Tardelli, Maria A; Tedesco, Helio; Garcia, Natalia N; Caparros, Mario P; Alvarez-Gomez, Jose A; de Oliveira Junior, Itamar S

    2015-10-01

    Renal failure affects the pharmacology of nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers making recovery of neuromuscular function unpredictable. Sugammadex antagonises rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade by encapsulating rocuronium, creating a stable complex molecule that is mainly excreted by the kidneys. Previous studies suggest that sugammadex is effective in reversing moderate neuromuscular block in the presence of renal failure, but no data are available regarding reversal of profound neuromuscular block in patients with renal failure. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of sugammadex in reversing profound neuromuscular block induced by rocuronium in patients with end-stage renal disease and those with normal renal function. A prospective clinical trial. Two university hospitals, from 1 October 2011 to 31 January 2012. Forty patients undergoing kidney transplant: 20 with renal failure [creatinine clearance (ClCr) 90 ml min). Neuromuscular monitoring was performed by acceleromyography and train-of-four (TOF) stimulation. Profound neuromuscular block (posttetanic count, one to three responses) was maintained during surgery. Sugammadex 4 mg kg was administered on completion of skin closure. Recovery of the TOF ratio to 0.9 was recorded. Monitoring of neuromuscular function continued in the postanesthesia care unit for a further 2 h. The efficacy of sugammadex was evaluated by the time taken for the TOF ratio to recover to 0.9. The safety of sugammadex was assessed by monitoring for recurrence of neuromuscular block every 15 min for 2 h. Secondary variables were time to recovery of TOF ratio to 0.7 and 0.8. After sugammadex administration, the mean time for recovery of the TOF ratio to 0.9 was prolonged in the renal failure group (5.6 ± 3.6 min) compared with the control group (2.7 ± 1.3 min, P = 0.003). No adverse events or evidence of recurrence of neuromuscular block were observed. In patients with

  8. Distinct neuronal activation patterns are associated with PCP-induced social withdrawal and its reversal by the endocannabinoid-enhancing drug URB597.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matricon, Julien; Seillier, Alexandre; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    The fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, URB597, an endocannabinoid enhancing drug, reverses social withdrawal in the sub-chronic PCP rat model of schizophrenia, but reduces social interaction (SI) in controls. To identify the anatomical substrates associated with PCP-induced social withdrawal and the contrasting effects of URB597 on SI in PCP- versus saline-treated rats, we analyzed SI-induced c-Fos expression in 28 brain areas relevant to schizophrenia and/or social behavior following vehicle or URB597 administration. In saline-treated rats, SI was accompanied by changes in c-Fos expression in the infralimbic and orbitofrontal cortices, dorsomedial caudate putamen, ventrolateral nucleus of the septum, dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) and central amygdala. Except for the dlPAG, these changes were not observed in PCP-treated rats or in saline-treated rats receiving URB597. In the dorsomedial part of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dmBNST), SI-induced c-Fos expression was observed only in PCP-treated rats. Interestingly, URB597 in PCP-treated rats restored a similar c-Fos expression pattern as observed in saline-treated rats: activation of the orbitofrontal cortex, inhibition of the central amygdala and suppression of activation of the dmBNST. These data suggest that orbitofrontal cortex, central amygdala and dmBNST play a critical role in the reversal of PCP-induced social withdrawal by URB597. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Rescue of cAMP response element-binding protein signaling reversed spatial memory retention impairments induced by subanesthetic dose of propofol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Shao-Bo; Zhang, Qing-Qing; Liu, Meng; He, Xing-Ying; Zou, Zui; Sun, Hai-Jing; You, Zhen-Dong; Shi, Xue-Yin

    2013-07-01

    The intravenous anesthetic propofol caused episodic memory impairments in human. We hypothesized propofol caused episodic-like spatial memory retention but not acquisition impairments in rats and rescuing cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling using selective type IV phosphodiesterase (PDEIV) inhibitor rolipram reversed these effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups: control; propofol (25 mg/kg, intraperitoneal); rolipram; and rolipram + propofol (pretreatment of rolipram 25 min before propofol, 0.3 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Sedation and motor coordination were evaluated 5, 15, and 25 min after propofol injection. Invisible Morris water maze (MWM) acquisition and probe test (memory retention) were performed 5 min and 24 h after propofol injection. Visible MWM training was simultaneously performed to resist nonspatial effects. Hippocampal CREB signaling was detected 5 min, 50 min, and 24 h after propofol administration. Rolipram did not change propofol-induced anesthetic/sedative states or impair motor skills. No difference was found on the latency to the platform during the visible MWM. Propofol impaired spatial memory retention but not acquisition. Rolipram reversed propofol-induced spatial memory impairments and suppression on cAMP levels, CaMKIIα and CREB phosphorylation, brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and Arc protein expression. Propofol caused spatial memory retention impairments but not acquisition inability possibly by inhibiting CREB signaling. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Sodium Butyrate, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Reverses Behavioral and Mitochondrial Alterations in Animal Models of Depression Induced by Early- or Late-life Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valvassori, Samira S; Resende, Wilson R; Budni, Josiane; Dal-Pont, Gustavo C; Bavaresco, Daniela V; Réus, Gislaine Z; Carvalho, André F; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Furlanetto, Camila B; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of sodium butyrate on depressive-like behavior and mitochondrial alteration parameters in animal models of depression induced by maternal deprivation or chronic mild stress in Wistar rats. maternal deprivation was established by separating pups from their mothers for 3 h daily from postnatal day 1 to day 10. Chronic mild stress was established by water deprivation, food deprivation, restraint stress, isolation and flashing lights. Sodium butyrate or saline was administered twice a day for 7 days before the behavioral tests. Depressive behavior was evaluated using the forced swim test. The activity of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes (succinate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase) and of mitochondrial chain complexes (I, II, II-III and IV) was measured in the striatum of rats. From these analyses it can be observed that sodium butyrate reversed the depressive-like behavior observed in both animal models of depression. Additionally, maternal deprivation and chronic mild stress inhibited mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and increased the activity of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. Sodium butyrate treatment reversed -maternal deprivation and chronic mild stress- induced dysfunction in the striatum of rats. In conclusion, sodium butyrate showed antidepressant effects in maternal deprivation and chronic mild stress-treated rats, and this effect can be attributed to its action on the neurochemical pathways related to depression.

  11. Formoxanthone C, isolated from Cratoxylum formosum ssp. pruniflorum, reverses anticancer drug resistance by inducing both apoptosis and autophagy in human A549 lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewpiboon, Chutima; Boonnak, Nawong; Kaowinn, Sirichat; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2018-02-15

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) cancer toward cancer chemotherapy is one of the obstacles in cancer therapy. Therefore, it is of interested to use formoxanthone C (1,3,5,6-tetraoxygenated xanthone; XanX), a natural compound, which showed cytotoxicity against MDR human A549 lung cancer (A549RT-eto). The treatment with XanX induced not only apoptosis- in A549RT-eto cells, but also autophagy-cell death. Inhibition of apoptosis did not block XanX-induced autophagy in A549RT-eto cells. Furthermore, suppression of autophagy by beclin-1 small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) did not interrupt XanX-induced apoptosis, indicating that XanX can separately induce apoptosis and autophagy. Of interest, XanX treatment reduced levels of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) protein overexpressed in A549RT-etocells. The co-treatment with XanX and HDAC4 siRNA accelerated both autophagy and apoptosis more than that by XanX treatment alone, suggesting survival of HDAC4 in A549RT-eto cells. XanX reverses etoposide resistance in A549RT-eto cells by induction of both autophagy and apoptosis, and confers cytotoxicity through down-regulation of HDAC4. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Putrescine treatment reverses α-tocopherol-induced desynchronization of polyamine and retinoid metabolism during rat liver regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Sánchez-Sevilla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pre-treatment with α-tocopherol inhibits progression of rat liver proliferation induced by partial hepatectomy (PH, by decreasing and/or desynchronizing cyclin D1 expression and activation into the nucleus, activation and nuclear translocation of STAT-1 and -3 proteins and altering retinoid metabolism. Interactions between retinoic acid and polyamines have been reported in the PH-induced rat liver regeneration. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of low dosage of α-tocopherol on PH-induced changes in polyamine metabolism. Methods This study evaluated the participation of polyamine synthesis and metabolism during α-tocopherol-induced inhibition of rat liver regeneration. In PH-rats (Wistar treated with α-tocopherol and putrescine, parameters indicative of cell proliferation, lipid peroxidation, ornithine decarboxylase expression (ODC, and polyamine levels, were determined. Results Pre-treatment with α-tocopherol to PH-animals exerted an antioxidant effect, shifting earlier the increased ODC activity and expression, temporally affecting polyamine synthesis and ornithine metabolism. Whereas administration of putrescine induced minor changes in PH-rats, the concomitant treatment actually counteracted most of adverse actions exerted by α-tocopherol on the remnant liver, restituting its proliferative potential, without changing its antioxidant effect. Putrescine administration to these rats was also associated with lower ODC expression and activity in the proliferating liver, but the temporally shifting in the amount of liver polyamines induced by α-tocopherol, was also “synchronized” by the putrescine administration. The latter is supported by the fact that a close relationship was observed between fluctuations of polyamines and retinoids. Conclusions Putrescine counteracted most adverse actions exerted by α-tocopherol on rat liver regeneration, restoring liver proliferative potential and restituting the decreased

  13. Weight loss after bariatric surgery reverses insulin-induced increases in brain glucose metabolism of the morbidly obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuulari, Jetro J; Karlsson, Henry K; Hirvonen, Jussi; Hannukainen, Jarna C; Bucci, Marco; Helmiö, Mika; Ovaska, Jari; Soinio, Minna; Salminen, Paulina; Savisto, Nina; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2013-08-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with altered brain glucose metabolism. Here, we studied brain glucose metabolism in 22 morbidly obese patients before and 6 months after bariatric surgery. Seven healthy subjects served as control subjects. Brain glucose metabolism was measured twice per imaging session: with and without insulin stimulation (hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp) using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose scanning. We found that during fasting, brain glucose metabolism was not different between groups. However, the hyperinsulinemic clamp increased brain glucose metabolism in a widespread manner in the obese but not control subjects, and brain glucose metabolism was significantly higher during clamp in obese than in control subjects. After follow-up, 6 months postoperatively, the increase in glucose metabolism was no longer observed, and this attenuation was coupled with improved peripheral insulin sensitivity after weight loss. We conclude that obesity is associated with increased insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism in the brain and that this abnormality can be reversed by bariatric surgery.

  14. Reversible air-induced optical and electrical modulation of methylammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr3) single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huotian; Liu, Yiting; Lu, Haizhou; Deng, Wan; Yang, Kang; Deng, Zunyi; Zhang, Xingmin; Yuan, Sijian; Wang, Jiao; Niu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Xiaolei; Jin, Qingyuan; Feng, Hongjian; Zhan, Yiqiang; Zheng, Lirong

    2017-09-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) variations of organic-inorganic hybrid lead halide perovskites in different atmospheres are well documented, while the fundamental mechanism still lacks comprehensive understandings. This study reports the reversible optical and electrical properties of methylammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr3 or CH3NH3PbBr3) single crystals caused by air infiltration. With the change in the surrounding atmosphere from air to vacuum, the PL intensity of perovskite single crystals decreases, while the conductivity increases. By means of first-principles computational studies, the shallow trap states are considered as key elements in PL and conductivity changes. These results have important implications for the characterization and application of organic-inorganic hybrid lead halide perovskites in vacuum.

  15. Reversible and irreversible temperature-induced changes in exchange-biased planar Hall effect bridge (PHEB) magnetic field sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, G.; Lundtoft, N.C.; Østerberg, F.W.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the changes of planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors upon exposure to temperatures between 25° C and 90°C. From analyses of the sensor response vs. magnetic fields we extract the exchange bias field Hex, the uniaxial anisotropy field HK and the anisotropic...... magnetoresistance (AMR) of the exchange biased thin film at a given temperature and by comparing measurements carried out at elevated temperatures T with measurements carried out at 25° C after exposure to T, we can separate the reversible from the irreversible changes of the sensor. The results are not only...... relevant for sensor applications but also demonstrate the method as a useful tool for characterizing exchange-biased thin films....

  16. Parity-even and time-reversal-odd neutron optical potential in spinning matter induced by gravitational torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.N., E-mail: ivanov@kph.tuwien.ac.at [Atominstitut, Technische Universität Wien, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Wien (Austria); Snow, W.M., E-mail: wsnow@indiana.edu [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    Recent theoretical work has shown that spin 1/2 particles moving through unpolarized matter which sources torsion fields experience a new type of parity-even and time-reversal-odd optical potential if the matter is spinning in the lab frame. This new type of optical potential can be sought experimentally using the helicity dependence of the total cross sections for longitudinally polarized neutrons moving through a rotating cylindrical target. In combination with recent experimental constraints on short-range P-odd, T-even torsion interactions derived from polarized neutron spin rotation in matter one can derive separate constraints on the time components of scalar and pseudoscalar torsion fields in matter. We estimate the sensitivity achievable in such an experiment and briefly outline some of the potential sources of systematic error to be considered in any future experimental search for this effect.

  17. Parity-even and time-reversal-odd neutron optical potential in spinning matter induced by gravitational torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Ivanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent theoretical work has shown that spin 1/2 particles moving through unpolarized matter which sources torsion fields experience a new type of parity-even and time-reversal-odd optical potential if the matter is spinning in the lab frame. This new type of optical potential can be sought experimentally using the helicity dependence of the total cross sections for longitudinally polarized neutrons moving through a rotating cylindrical target. In combination with recent experimental constraints on short-range P-odd, T-even torsion interactions derived from polarized neutron spin rotation in matter one can derive separate constraints on the time components of scalar and pseudoscalar torsion fields in matter. We estimate the sensitivity achievable in such an experiment and briefly outline some of the potential sources of systematic error to be considered in any future experimental search for this effect.

  18. First molecular identification of the vertebrate hosts of Culicoides imicola in Europe and a review of its blood-feeding patterns worldwide: implications for the transmission of bluetongue disease and African horse sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-DE LA Puente, J; Navarro, J; Ferraguti, M; Soriguer, R; Figuerola, J

    2017-12-01

    Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of pathogens that affect wildlife, livestock and, occasionally, humans. Culicoides imicola (Kieffer, 1913) is considered to be the main vector of the pathogens that cause bluetongue disease (BT) and African horse sickness (AHS) in southern Europe. The study of blood-feeding patterns in Culicoides is an essential step towards understanding the epidemiology of these pathogens. Molecular tools that increase the accuracy and sensitivity of traditional methods have been developed to identify the hosts of potential insect vectors. However, to the present group's knowledge, molecular studies that identify the hosts of C. imicola in Europe are lacking. The present study genetically characterizes the barcoding region of C. imicola trapped on farms in southern Spain and identifies its vertebrate hosts in the area. The report also reviews available information on the blood-feeding patterns of C. imicola worldwide. Culicoides imicola from Spain feed on blood of six mammals that include species known to be hosts of the BT and AHS viruses. This study provides evidence of the importance of livestock as sources of bloodmeals for C. imicola and the relevance of this species in the transmission of BT and AHS viruses in Europe. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  19. Reversal of diet-induced obesity increases insulin transport into cerebrospinal fluid and restores sensitivity to the anorexic action of central insulin in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Denovan P; Mul, Joram D; Liu, Min; Reedy, Brianne M; D'Alessio, David A; Seeley, Randy J; Woods, Stephen C

    2013-03-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) reduces the ability of centrally administered insulin to reduce feeding behavior and also reduces the transport of insulin from the periphery to the central nervous system (CNS). The current study was designed to determine whether reversal of high-fat DIO restores the anorexic efficacy of central insulin and whether this is accompanied by restoration of the compromised insulin transport. Adult male Long-Evans rats were initially maintained on either a low-fat chow diet (LFD) or a high-fat diet (HFD). After 22 weeks, half of the animals on the HFD were changed to the LFD, whereas the other half continued on the HFD for an additional 8 weeks, such that there were 3 groups: 1) a LFD control group (Con; n = 18), 2) a HFD-fed, DIO group (n = 17), and 3) a HFD to LFD, DIO-reversal group (DIO-rev; n = 18). The DIO reversal resulted in a significant reduction of body weight and epididymal fat weight relative to the DIO group. Acute central insulin administration (8 mU) reduced food intake and caused weight loss in Con and DIO-rev but not DIO rats. Fasting cerebrospinal fluid insulin was higher in DIO than Con animals. However, after a peripheral bolus injection of insulin, cerebrospinal fluid insulin increased in Con and DIO-rev rats but not in the DIO group. These data provide support for previous reports that DIO inhibits both the central effects of insulin and insulin's transport to the CNS. Importantly, DIO-rev restored sensitivity to the effects of central insulin on food intake and insulin transport into the CNS.

  20. Facilitating influence of stress on the consolidation of fear memory induced by a weak training: reversal by midazolam pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Noelia Martina; Martijena, Irene Delia; Molina, Víctor Alejandro

    2011-11-20

    It is well known that an emotionally arousing experience usually results in a robust and persistent memory trace. The present study explored the potential mechanisms involved in the influence of stress on the consolidation of a contextual fear memory in animals subjected to a weak fear training protocol, and whether pretreatment with intra-basolateral amygdala or systemic administration of midazolam (MDZ) prevents the potential stress-induced influence on fear memory formation. A previous restraint session facilitated fear retention, this effect was not due to a sensitized effect of restraint on the footshock experience. MDZ, both systemically or intra-basolateral amygdala infusion prior to the restraint, attenuated the stress-induced promoting influence on fear memory formation. In addition, stress exposure activated the ERK1/2 pathway in basolateral amygdala (BLA) after the weak training procedure but not after the immediate footshock protocol. Similar to our behavioral findings, MDZ attenuated stress-induced elevation of phospho-ERK2 (p-ERK2) in BLA following the acquisition session. Given that the activation of ERK1/2 pathway is essential for associative learning, we propose that stress-induced facilitation of p-ERK2 in BLA is an important mechanism for the promoting influence of stress on the consolidation of contextual fear memory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) as a reverse genetic tool to study development of symbiotic root nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Gabriela Didina Constantin; Grønlund, Mette; Stougaard, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) can provide a shortcut to plants with altered expression of specific genes. Here, we report that VIGS of the Nodule inception gene (Nin) can alter the nodulation phenotype and Nin gene expression in Pisum sativum. PsNin was chosen as target because of the disti...

  2. Chronic ethanol intake induces partial microglial activation that is not reversed by long-term ethanol withdrawal in the rat hippocampal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Catarina; Meireles, Manuela; Silva, Susana M

    2017-05-01

    Neuroinflammation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several disorders. Activation of microglia leads to the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and microglial-mediated neuroinflammation has been proposed as one of the alcohol-induced neuropathological mechanisms. The present study aimed to examine the effect of chronic ethanol exposure and long-term withdrawal on microglial activation and neuroinflammation in the hippocampal formation. Male rats were submitted to 6 months of ethanol treatment followed by a 2-month withdrawal period. Stereological methods were applied to estimate the total number of microglia and activated microglia detected by CD11b immunohistochemistry in the hippocampal formation. The expression levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, COX-2 and IL-15 were measured by qRT-PCR. Alcohol consumption was associated with an increase in the total number of activated microglia but morphological assessment indicated that microglia did not exhibit a full activation phenotype. These data were supported by functional evidence since chronic alcohol consumption produced no changes in the expression of TNF-α or COX-2. The levels of IL-15 a cytokine whose expression is increased upon activation of both astrocytes and microglia, was induced by chronic alcohol treatment. Importantly, the partial activation of microglia induced by ethanol was not reversed by long-term withdrawal. This study suggests that chronic alcohol exposure induces a microglial phenotype consistent with partial activation without significant increase in classical cytokine markers of neuroinflammation in the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, long-term cessation of alcohol intake is not sufficient to alter the microglial partial activation phenotype induced by ethanol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Toxin ζ Reversible Induces Dormancy and Reduces the UDP-N-Acetylglucosamine Pool as One of the Protective Responses to Cope with Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Tabone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Toxins of the ζ/PezT family, found in the genome of major human pathogens, phosphorylate the peptidoglycan precursor uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UNAG leading to unreactive UNAG-3P. Transient over-expression of a PezT variant impairs cell wall biosynthesis and triggers autolysis in Escherichia coli. Conversely, physiological levels of ζ reversibly induce dormancy produce a sub-fraction of membrane-compromised cells, and a minor subpopulation of Bacillus subtilis cells become tolerant of toxin action. We report here that purified ζ is a strong UNAG-dependent ATPase, being GTP a lower competitor. In vitro, ζ toxin phosphorylates a fraction of UNAG. In vivo, ζ-mediated inactivation of UNAG by phosphorylation does not deplete the active UNAG pool, because expression of the toxin enhances the efficacy of genuine cell wall inhibitors (fosfomycin, vancomycin or ampicillin. Transient ζ expression together with fosfomycin treatment halt cell proliferation, but ε2 antitoxin expression facilitates the exit of ζ-induced dormancy, suggesting that there is sufficient UNAG for growth. We propose that ζ induces diverse cellular responses to cope with stress, being the reduction of the UNAG pool one among them. If the action of ζ is not inhibited, e.g., by de novo ε2 antitoxin synthesis, the toxin markedly enhances the efficacy of antimicrobial treatment without massive autolysis in Firmicutes.

  4. Fluoxetine reverses the behavioral despair induced by neurogenic stress in mice: role of N-methyl-d-aspartate and opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arvin; Dehpour, AhmadReza

    2016-06-01

    Opioid and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors mediate different effects of fluoxetine. We investigated whether opioid and NMDA receptors are involved in the protective effect of fluoxetine against the behavioral despair induced by acute physical stress in male mice. We used the forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), and open-field test (OFT) for behavioral evaluation. We used fluoxetine, naltrexone (opioid receptor antagonist), MK-801 (NMDA receptor antagonist), morphine (opioid receptor agonist), and NMDA (NMDA receptor agonist). Acute foot-shock stress (FSS) significantly induced behavioral despair (depressive-like) and anxiety-like behaviors in tests. Fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) reversed the depressant-like effect of FSS, but it did not alter the locomotion and anxiety-like behavior in animals. Acute administration of subeffective doses of naltrexone (0.3 mg/kg) or MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg) potentiated the antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine, while subeffective doses of morphine (1 mg/kg) and NMDA (75 mg/kg) abolished this effect of fluoxetine. Also, co-administration of subeffective doses of naltrexone (0.05 mg/kg) and MK-801 (0.003 mg/kg) with fluoxetine (1 mg/kg) induced a significant decrease in the immobility time in FST and TST. Our results showed that opioid and NMDA receptors (alone or in combination) are involved in the antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine against physical stress.

  5. Reorganization of motor cortex and impairment of motor performance induced by hindlimb unloading are partially reversed by cortical IGF-1 administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysoet, Julien; Canu, Marie-Hélène; Gillet, Christophe; Fourneau, Julie; Garnier, Cyril; Bastide, Bruno; Dupont, Erwan

    2017-01-15

    Immobilization, bed rest, or sedentary lifestyle, are known to induce a profound impairment in sensorimotor performance. These alterations are due to a combination of peripheral and central factors. Previous data conducted on a rat model of disuse (hindlimb unloading, HU) have shown a profound reorganization of motor cortex and an impairment of motor performance. Recently, our interest was turned towards the role of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in cerebral plasticity since this growth factor is considered as the mediator of beneficial effects of exercise on the central nervous system, and its cortical level is decreased after a 14-day period of HU. In the present study, we attempted to determine whether a chronic subdural administration of IGF-1 in HU rats could prevent deleterious effects of HU on the motor cortex and on motor activity. We demonstrated that HU induces a shrinkage of hindlimb cortical representation and an increase in current threshold to elicit a movement. Administration of IGF-1 in HU rats partially reversed these changes. The functional evaluation revealed that IGF-1 prevents the decrease in spontaneous activity found in HU rats and the changes in hip kinematics during overground locomotion, but had no effect of challenged locomotion (ladder rung walking test). Taken together, these data clearly indicate the implication of IGF-1 in cortical plastic mechanisms and in behavioral alteration induced by a decreased in sensorimotor activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Engineering and Scaling the Spontaneous Magnetization Reversal of Faraday Induced Magnetic Relaxation in Nano-Sized Amorphous Ni Coated on Crystalline Au.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Hsien; Lee, Chi-Hung; Kuo, Chen-Chen

    2016-05-28

    We report on the generation of large inverse remanent magnetizations in nano-sized core/shell structure of Au/Ni by turning off the applied magnetic field. The remanent magnetization is very sensitive to the field reduction rate as well as to the thermal and field processes before the switching off of the magnetic field. Spontaneous reversal in direction and increase in magnitude of the remanent magnetization in subsequent relaxations over time were found. All of the various types of temporal relaxation curves of the remanent magnetizations are successfully scaled by a stretched exponential decay profile, characterized by two pairs of relaxation times and dynamic exponents. The relaxation time is used to describe the reduction rate, while the dynamic exponent describes the dynamical slowing down of the relaxation through time evolution. The key to these effects is to have the induced eddy current running beneath the amorphous Ni shells through Faraday induction.

  7. Engineering and Scaling the Spontaneous Magnetization Reversal of Faraday Induced Magnetic Relaxation in Nano-Sized Amorphous Ni Coated on Crystalline Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Hsien; Lee, Chi-Hung; Kuo, Chen-Chen

    2016-01-01

    We report on the generation of large inverse remanent magnetizations in nano-sized core/shell structure of Au/Ni by turning off the applied magnetic field. The remanent magnetization is very sensitive to the field reduction rate as well as to the thermal and field processes before the switching off of the magnetic field. Spontaneous reversal in direction and increase in magnitude of the remanent magnetization in subsequent relaxations over time were found. All of the various types of temporal relaxation curves of the remanent magnetizations are successfully scaled by a stretched exponential decay profile, characterized by two pairs of relaxation times and dynamic exponents. The relaxation time is used to describe the reduction rate, while the dynamic exponent describes the dynamical slowing down of the relaxation through time evolution. The key to these effects is to have the induced eddy current running beneath the amorphous Ni shells through Faraday induction. PMID:28773549

  8. Mutant tamm-horsfall glycoprotein accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum induces apoptosis reversed by colchicine and sodium 4-phenylbutyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung Won; Ryu, Ok Hee; Choi, Sun Jin; Song, In Sun; Bleyer, Anthony J; Hart, Thomas C

    2005-10-01

    As a consequence of uromodulin gene mutations, individuals develop precocious hyperuricemia, gout, and progressive renal failure. In vitro studies suggest that pathologic accumulation of uromodulin/Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein (THP) occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but the pathophysiology of renal damage is unclear. It was hypothesized that programmed cell death triggered by accumulation of misfolded THP in the ER causes progressive renal disease. Stably transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells and immortalized thick ascending limb of Henle's loop cells with wild-type and mutated uromodulin cDNA were evaluated to test this hypothesis. Immunocytochemistry, ELISA, and deglycosylation studies indicated that accumulation of mutant THP occurred in the ER. FACS analyses showed a significant increase in early apoptosis signal in human embryonic kidney 293 and thick ascending limb of Henle's loop cells that were transfected with mutant uromodulin constructs. Colchicine and sodium 4-phenylbutyrate treatment increased secretion of THP from the ER to the cell membrane and into the culture media and significantly improved cell viability. These findings indicate that intracellular accumulation of THP facilitates apoptosis and that this may provide the pathologic mechanism responsible for the progressive renal damage associated with uromodulin gene mutations. Colchicine and sodium 4-phenylbutyrate reverse these processes and could potentially be beneficial in ameliorating the progressive renal damage in uromodulin-associated kidney diseases.

  9. Reversible Changes in Resistance of Perovskite Nickelate NdNiO3 Thin Films Induced by Fluorine Substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Tomoya; Chikamatsu, Akira; Katayama, Tsukasa; Hirose, Yasushi; Harayama, Isao; Sekiba, Daiichiro; Ikenaga, Eiji; Minohara, Makoto; Kumigashira, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2017-03-29

    Perovskite nickel oxides are of fundamental as well as technological interest because they show large resistance modulation associated with phase transition as a function of the temperature and chemical composition. Here, the effects of fluorine doping in perovskite nickelate NdNiO 3 epitaxial thin films are investigated through a low-temperature reaction with polyvinylidene fluoride as the fluorine source. The fluorine content in the fluorinated NdNiO 3-x F x films is controlled with precision by varying the reaction time. The fully fluorinated film (x ≈ 1) is highly insulating and has a bandgap of 2.1 eV, in contrast to NdNiO 3 , which exhibits metallic transport properties. Hard X-ray photoelectron and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopies reveal the suppression of the density of states at the Fermi level as well as the reduction of nickel ions (valence state changes from +3 to +2) after fluorination, suggesting that the strong Coulombic repulsion in the Ni 3d orbitals associated with the fluorine substitution drives the metal-to-insulator transition. In addition, the resistivity of the fluorinated films recovers to the original value for NdNiO 3 after annealing in an oxygen atmosphere. By application of the reversible fluorination process to transition-metal oxides, the search for resistance-switching materials could be accelerated.

  10. Reversal of olanzapine-induced weight gain in a patient with schizophrenia by switching to asenapine: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okazaki K

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Kosuke Okazaki, Kazuhiko Yamamuro, Toshifumi Kishimoto Department of Psychiatry, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Japan Aims: Antipsychotics are effective for treating schizophrenia, but atypical antipsychotics can cause several adverse side effects including weight gain, hyperprolactinemia, and extrapyramidal symptoms. Moreover, weight gain increases the risk of metabolic diseases.Methods: We treated a case of olanzapine-induced weight gain in a 41-year-old man with schizophrenia by switching his medication from olanzapine to asenapine.Results: The weight gain improved after switching the medication, from 80.3 to 75.0 kg, a weight loss of 6.6%, and there was no significant worsening of psychological symptoms or other adverse effects.Conclusions: Asenapine might be effective for treating patients with schizophrenia who experience olanzapine-induced weight gain. Keywords: olanzapine, weight gain, schizophrenia, asenapine

  11. Sensitivity to Rocuronium-Induced Neuromuscular Block and Reversibility with Sugammadex in a Patient with Myotonic Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Kashiwai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with myotonic dystrophy who showed prolonged rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade, although with a fast recovery with sugammadex. During general anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil, the times to spontaneous recovery of the first twitch (T1 of train of four to 10% of control values after an intubating dose of rocuronium 1 mg/kg and an additional dose of 0.2 mg/kg were 112 min and 62 min, respectively. Despite the high sensitivity to rocuronium, sugammadex 2 mg/kg administered at a T1 of 10% safely and effectively antagonized rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block in 90 s.

  12. Nanosized zinc oxide particles do not promote DHPN-induced lung carcinogenesis but cause reversible epithelial hyperplasia of terminal bronchioles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiegou; Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Alexander, David B; Fukamachi, Katsumi; Numano, Takamasa; Suzui, Masumi; Shimizu, Hideo; Omori, Toyonori; Kanno, Jun; Hirose, Akihiko; Tsuda, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is known to induce lung toxicity, including terminal bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia, which gives rise to concerns that nanosized ZnO (nZnO) might lead to lung carcinogenesis. We studied the tumor promoting activity of nZnO by an initiation-promotion protocol using human c-Ha-ras proto-oncogene transgenic rats (Hras128 rats). The rats were given 0.2 % N-nitrosobis(2-hydroxypropyl)amine (DHPN) in the drinking water for 2 weeks and then treated with 0.5 ml of 250 or 500 μg/ml nZnO suspension by intra-pulmonary spraying once every 2 weeks for a total of 7 times. Treatment with nZnO particles did not promote DHPN-induced lung carcinogenesis. However, nZnO dose-dependently caused epithelial hyperplasia of terminal bronchioles (EHTB) and fibrosis-associated interstitial pneumonitis (FAIP) that were independent of DHPN treatment. Tracing the fate of EHTB lesions in wild-type rats indicated that the hyperplastic lesions almost completely disappeared within 12 weeks after the last nZnO treatment. Since nZnO particles were not found in the lung and ZnCl2 solution induced similar lung lesions and gene expression profiles, the observed lesions were most likely caused by dissolved Zn(2+). In summary, nZnO did not promote carcinogenesis in the lung and induced EHTB and FAIP lesions that regressed rapidly, probably due to clearance of surplus Zn(2+) from the lung.

  13. Reversal of olanzapine-induced weight gain in a patient with schizophrenia by switching to asenapine: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Okazaki, Kosuke; Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2017-01-01

    Kosuke Okazaki, Kazuhiko Yamamuro, Toshifumi Kishimoto Department of Psychiatry, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Japan Aims: Antipsychotics are effective for treating schizophrenia, but atypical antipsychotics can cause several adverse side effects including weight gain, hyperprolactinemia, and extrapyramidal symptoms. Moreover, weight gain increases the risk of metabolic diseases.Methods: We treated a case of olanzapine-induced weight gain in a 41-year-old man with s...

  14. Vinclozolin Exposure in Utero Induces Postpubertal Prostatitis and Reduces Sperm Production via a Reversible Hormone-Regulated Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Cowin, Prue A.; Gold, Elspeth; Aleksova, Jasna; O'Bryan, Moira K.; Foster, Paul M. D.; Scott, Hamish S.; Risbridger, Gail P.

    2010-01-01

    Vinclozolin is an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) that binds with high affinity to the androgen receptor (AR) and blocks the action of gonadal hormones on male reproductive organs. An alternative mechanism of action of Vinclozolin involves transgenerational effects on the male reproductive tract. We previously reported in utero Vinclozolin exposure-induced prostatitis (prostate inflammation) in postpubertal rats concurrent with down-regulation of AR and increased nuclear factor-κB activat...

  15. Rapid reversal of heart failure in a patient with pheochromocytoma and catecholamine-induced myocarditis/cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.; Sankaran, R.; Al-Addad, A.

    2002-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is rare and usually presents as paroxysal or sustained hypertension, nonetheless, it can also cause severe acute pulmonary edema in normotensive individuals. We present a case with pheochromocytoma and severe left ventricular failure caused by catecholamine induced myocarditis/cardiomyopathy. Severe left ventricular failure resolved rapidly and left ventricular systolic function became normal within two weeks of medical treatment. Later, patient underwent elective and uneventful surgical removal of pheochromocytoma. (author)

  16. Indole-3-carbinol, but not its major digestive product 3,3'-diindolylmethane, induces reversible hepatocyte hypertrophy and cytochromes P450

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowell, James A.; Page, John G.; Levine, Barry S.; Tomlinson, Michael J.; Hebert, Charles D.

    2006-01-01

    Indole-3-carbinol (I-3-C) and 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) have been shown to reduce the incidence and multiplicity of cancers in laboratory animal models. Based on the observation that I-3-C induced hepatocyte hypertrophy when administered orally for 13 weeks to rats, a treatment and recovery study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that the induction of hepatocyte hypertrophy and cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity by I-3-C are adaptive, reversible responses. Additionally, we directly compared the effects of I-3-C to those of its principle metabolite DIM. Rats were treated orally for 28 days with 2 doses of I-3-C (5 and 50 mg I-3-C/kg body weight/day) and DIM (7.5 and 75 mg DIM/kg body weight/day) and then one-half of the animals were not treated for an additional 28 days. Organ weights, histopathology, and the CYP enzyme activities of 1A1/2, 2B1/2, 2C9, 2D6, 2E1, 3A4, and 19 A were measured both after treatment and after recovery. Oral administration of 50 mg I-3-C/kg body weight/day to rats for 28 days significantly increased liver weights and CYP enzyme activities. The effects in males were more pronounced and persistent after recovery than the effects in females. The increased organ weights returned to control values after treatment. Conversely, DIM did not alter liver weights and had no effect on CYP activities after the 28-day treatment. Some changes in CYP activities were measured after the DIM recovery period but the magnitudes of the changes were considered biologically insignificant. The results show that I-3-C, but not DIM, induces reversible adaptive responses in the liver

  17. Normoxic Recovery Mimicking Treatment of Sleep Apnea Does Not Reverse Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Bacterial Dysbiosis and Low-Grade Endotoxemia in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Indias, Isabel; Torres, Marta; Sanchez-Alcoholado, Lidia; Cardona, Fernando; Almendros, Isaac; Gozal, David; Montserrat, Josep M; Queipo-Ortuño, Maria I; Farré, Ramon

    2016-10-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) mimicking obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) significantly modifies gut microbiota in mice. However, whether these IH-induced gut microbiome changes are reversible after restoring normal oxygenation (the equivalent of effective OSA therapy) is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate gut microbiota composition and circulating endotoxemia after a post-IH normoxic period in a mouse model of OSA. Ten mice were subjected to IH (40 sec 21% O2-20 sec 5% O2) for 6 h/day for 6 w and 10 mice breathing normoxic air (NM) were used as controls. After exposures, both groups were subjected to 6 w in normoxia. Microbiome composition of fecal samples was determined by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) pyrosequencing. Bioinformatic analysis was performed by Quantitative Insights into Microbial Ecology. Plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels were measured by endotoxin assay. After normoxic recovery, the Chao and Shannon indices of each group suggested similar bacterial richness and diversity. 16S rRNA pyrosequencing analysis showed that IH-exposed mice had a significant decrease in the abundance of Bacteroidetes and a significant increase of Firmicutes and Deferribacteres compared to the NM group. After normoxic recovery, circulating LPS concentrations were higher in the IH group (P < 0.009). Moreover, the IH group showed a negative and significant correlation between the abundance of Lactobacillus and Ruminococcus and significant positive correlations between the abundance of Mucispirillum and Desulfovibrio and plasma LPS levels, respectively. Even after prolonged normoxic recovery after IH exposures, gut microbiota and circulating endotoxemia remain negatively altered, suggesting that potential benefits of OSA treatment for reversing OSA-induced changes in gut microbiota may either require a longer period or alternative interventions. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  18. Melatonin Reverses Fas, E2F-1 and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mediated Apoptosis and Dysregulation of Autophagy Induced by the Herbicide Atrazine in Murine Splenocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Sharma

    Full Text Available Exposure to the herbicide Atrazine (ATR can cause immunotoxicity, apart from other adverse consequences for animal and human health. We aimed at elucidating the apoptotic mechanisms involved in immunotoxicity of ATR and their attenuation by Melatonin (MEL. Young Swiss mice were divided into control, ATR and MEL+ATR groups based on daily (x14 intraperitoneal administration of the vehicle (normal saline, ATR (100 mg/kg body weight and MEL (20 mg/kg body weight with ATR. Isolated splenocytes were processed for detection of apoptosis by Annexin V-FITC and TUNEL assays, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress by immunostaining. Key proteins involved in apoptosis, ER stress and autophagy were quantified by immunoblotting. ATR treatment resulted in Fas-mediated activation of caspases 8 and 3 and inactivation of PARP1 which were inhibited significantly by co-treatment with MEL. MEL also attenuated the ATR-induced, p53 independent mitochondrial apoptosis through upregulation of E2F-1 and PUMA and suppression of their downstream target Bax. An excessive ER stress triggered by ATR through overexpression of ATF-6α, spliced XBP-1, CREB-2 and GADD153 signals was reversed by MEL. MEL also reversed the ATR-induced impairment of autophagy which was indicated by a decline in BECN-1, along with significant enhancement in LC3B-II and p62 expressions. Induction of mitochondrial apoptosis, ER stress and autophagy dysregulation provide a new insight into the mechanism of ATR immunotoxicity. The cytoprotective role of MEL, on the other hand, was defined by attenuation of ER stress, Fas-mediated and p53 independent mitochondria-mediated apoptosis as well as autophagy signals.

  19. Sex Reversal in Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Andrew T; Smith, Craig A

    2016-01-01

    Sexual differentiation in birds is controlled genetically as in mammals, although the sex chromosomes are different. Males have a ZZ sex chromosome constitution, while females are ZW. Gene(s) on the sex chromosomes must initiate gonadal sex differentiation during embryonic life, inducing paired testes in ZZ individuals and unilateral ovaries in ZW individuals. The traditional view of avian sexual differentiation aligns with that expounded for other vertebrates; upon sexual differentiation, the gonads secrete sex steroid hormones that masculinise or feminise the rest of the body. However, recent studies on naturally occurring or experimentally induced avian sex reversal suggest a significant role for direct genetic factors, in addition to sex hormones, in regulating sexual differentiation of the soma in birds. This review will provide an overview of sex determination in birds and both naturally and experimentally induced sex reversal, with emphasis on the key role of oestrogen. We then consider how recent studies on sex reversal and gynandromorphic birds (half male:half female) are shaping our understanding of sexual differentiation in avians and in vertebrates more broadly. Current evidence shows that sexual differentiation in birds is a mix of direct genetic and hormonal mechanisms. Perturbation of either of these components may lead to sex reversal. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Radiation-induced progressive decreasing in the expression of reverse transcriptase gene of hEST2 and telomerase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Hanneng; Chen Wenying; Xiong Sidong

    2000-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex that adds heximeric repeats called telomeres to the growing ends of chromosomal DNA. Telomerase activity is present in a vast majority of tumors but is repressed in most normal tissues. Human telomerase catalytic subunit gene (hEST2) reverse transcriptase (RT) segment was cloned by PCR according to the sequence published in GeneBank. PCR was used to investigate the expression of the hEST2 RT segment in diverse tumors as well as in various normal tissues. Results indicated that hEST2 RT segment was detectable in tumor cells lines but not in normal cells and tissues. In order to identify the relationship between telomerase and the biological effect of radiation injury, HeLa cells, KB cells and A431 cells were employed to measure the change in telomerase activity after 60 Co-ray irradiation at RNA level and protein level. Quantitative PCR determined that expression of hEST2 RT segment that encodes seven motifs of the human telomeras decreased with increasing dosage of radiation. In addition, a PCR-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol was used to assay telomerase activity after exposure to radiation. The results strongly support the experiments we had made: Telomerase activity decreases with increasing dosage of radiation. We conclude that detection of the hEST2 RT segment by Northern blotting is a new method for detecting telomerase activity. Furthermore, radiation can cause a dose-dependent decrease in telomerase activity. The effect of radiation on telomerase is one possible reason for the death of cancer cells after irradiation. (author)

  1. Nitrated Fatty Acids Reverse Cigarette Smoke-Induced Alveolar Macrophage Activation and Inhibit Protease Activity via Electrophilic S-Alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Aravind T; Lakshmi, Sowmya P; Muchumarri, Ramamohan R; Reddy, Raju C

    2016-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids (NFAs), endogenous products of nonenzymatic reactions of NO-derived reactive nitrogen species with unsaturated fatty acids, exhibit substantial anti-inflammatory activities. They are both reversible electrophiles and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists, but the physiological implications of their electrophilic activity are poorly understood. We tested their effects on inflammatory and emphysema-related biomarkers in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of smoke-exposed mice. NFA (10-nitro-oleic acid or 12-nitrolinoleic acid) treatment downregulated expression and activity of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB while upregulating those of PPARγ. It also downregulated production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and of the protease cathepsin S (Cat S), a key mediator of emphysematous septal destruction. Cat S downregulation was accompanied by decreased AM elastolytic activity, a major mechanism of septal destruction. NFAs downregulated both Cat S expression and activity in AMs of wild-type mice, but only inhibited its activity in AMs of PPARγ knockout mice, pointing to a PPARγ-independent mechanism of enzyme inhibition. We hypothesized that this mechanism was electrophilic S-alkylation of target Cat S cysteines, and found that NFAs bind directly to Cat S following treatment of intact AMs and, as suggested by in silico modeling and calculation of relevant parameters, elicit S-alkylation of Cys25 when incubated with purified Cat S. These results demonstrate that NFAs' electrophilic activity, in addition to their role as PPARγ agonists, underlies their protective effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and support their therapeutic potential in this disease.

  2. Reversible alterations in cultured pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayer morphology and albumin permeability induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, M.; Ryan, U.S.; Davenport, W.C.; Chaney, E.L.; Strickland, D.L.; Kwock, L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of ionizing irradiation (0, 600, 1500, or 3000 rads) on the permeability of pulmonary endothelial monolayers to albumin were studied. Pulmonary endothelial cells were grown to confluence on gelatin-coated polycarbonate filters, placed in serum-free medium, and exposed to a 60 Co source. The monolayers were placed in modified flux chambers 24 hours after irradiation; 125 I-albumin was added to the upper well, and both the upper and lower wells were serially sampled over 4 hours. The amount of albumin transferred from the upper well/hour over the period of steady-state clearance (90-240 min after addition of 125 I-albumin) was 2.8 +/- 0.2% in control monolayers and was increased in monolayers exposed to 1500 or 3000 rads (increase of 63 +/- 10% and 61 +/- 10%, respectively, P less than 0.01). No increase was found in monolayers exposed to 600 rads. The increases in endothelial albumin transfer rates were associated with morphologic evidence of monolayer disruption and endothelial injury which paralleled the changes in albumin permeability. Dose-dependent alterations in endothelial actin filament organization were also found. Incubation of the monolayers exposed to 3000 rads with medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum for 24 hours resulted in normalization of albumin permeability, improvement in morphologic appearance of the monolayers, and reorganization of the actin filament structure. These studies demonstrate that ionizing radiation is an active principle in the reversible disorganization of cultured pulmonary endothelial cell monolayers without the need of other cell types or serum components

  3. Activating mitochondrial function and haemoglobin expression with EH-201, an inducer of erythropoietin in neuronal cells, reverses memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Lin-Yea; Hsu, Pei-Lun; Chen, Li-Wen; Tseng, Wang-Zou; Hsu, Kai-Tin; Wu, Chia-Ling; Wu, Rong-Tsun

    2015-10-01

    Memory impairment can be progressive in neurodegenerative diseases, and physiological ageing or brain injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are critical components of these issues. An early clinical study has demonstrated cognitive improvement during erythropoietin treatment in patients with chronic renal failure. As erythropoietin cannot freely cross the blood-brain barrier, we tested EH-201 (2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-d-glucoside, also known as TSG), a low MW inducer of erythropoietin, for its therapeutic effects on memory impairment in models of neurodegenerative diseases, physiological ageing or brain injury. The effects of EH-201 were investigated in astrocytes and PC12 neuronal-like cells. In vivo, we used sleep-deprived (SD) mice as a stress model, amyloid-β (Aβ)-injected mice as a physiological ageing model and kainic acid (KA)-injected mice as a brain damage model to assess the therapeutic effects of EH-201. EH-201 induced expression of erythropoietin, PPAR-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and haemoglobin in astrocytes and PC12 neuronal-like cells. In vivo, EH-201 treatment restored memory impairment, as assessed by the passive avoidance test, in SD, Aβ and KA mouse models. In the hippocampus of mice given EH-201 in their diet, levels of erythropoietin, PGC-1α and haemoglobin were increased The induction of endogenous erythropoietin in neuronal cells by inducers such as EH-201 might be a therapeutic strategy for memory impairment in neurodegenerative disease, physiological ageing or traumatic brain injury. © 2015 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Oxidative stress-induced cognitive impairment in obesity can be reversed by vitamin D administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiluian, Ghazaleh; Abbasalizad Farhangi, Mahdieh; Nameni, Ghazaleh; Shahabi, Parviz; Megari-Abbasi, Mehran

    2017-07-06

    There is evidence that obesity leads to cognitive impairments via several markers of oxidative stress including glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the hippocampus. Increased inflammatory markers in the brain have obesity triggering effects. In the current study we aimed to investigate the effects of vitamin D on cognitive function, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α concentration and markers of oxidative stress in the hippocampus of high-fat diet-induced obese rats. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: control diet (CD) and high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 weeks; then each group subdivided into two groups including: CD, CD + vitamin D, HFD and HFD + vitamin D. Vitamin D was administered at 500 IU/kg dosage for 5 weeks. Four weeks after supplementation, Morris water maze test was performed. NF-κB and TNF-α concentration in the hippocampus were determined using ELISA kits. Moreover, oxidative stress markers in the hippocampus including GPx, SOD, MDA and CAT concentrations were measured by spectrophotometry methods. HFD significantly increased TNF-α (P = 0.04) and NF-κB (P = 0.01) concentrations in the hippocampus compared with CD. Vitamin D treatment led to a significant reduction in hippocampus NF-κB concentrations in HFD + vitamin D group (P = 0.001); however, vitamin D had no effect on TNF-α concentrations. Moreover, HFD significantly induced oxidative stress by reducing GPx, SOD and increasing MDA concentrations in the hippocampus. Vitamin D supplementation in HFD group also significantly increased GPx, SOD and reduced MDA concentrations. Vitamin D improved hippocampus oxidative stress and inflammatory markers in HFD-induced obese rats and improved cognitive performance. Further studies are needed to better clarify the underlying mechanisms.

  5. Comparative study between atropine and hyoscine-N-butylbromide for reversal of detomidine induced bradycardia in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, E L M; Teixeira Neto, F J; Sá, P A; Pignaton, W; Garofalo, N A

    2011-05-01

    Bradycardia may be implicated as a cause of cardiovascular instability during anaesthesia. Hyoscine would induce positive chronotropism of shorter duration than atropine, without adversely impairing intestinal motility in detomidine sedated horses. Ten minutes after detomidine (0.02 mg/kg bwt, i.v.), physiological saline (control), atropine (0.02 mg/kg bwt) or hyoscine (0.2 mg/kg bwt) were randomly administered i.v. to 6 horses, allowing one week intervals between treatments. Investigators blinded to the treatments monitored cardiopulmonary data and intestinal auscultation for 90 min and 24 h after detomidine, respectively. Gastrointestinal transit was assessed for 96 h via chromium detection in dry faeces. Detomidine significantly decreased heart rate (HR) and cardiac index (CI) from baseline for 30 and 60 min, respectively (control). Mean ± s.d. HR increased significantly 5 min after atropine (79 ± 5 beats/min) and hyoscine (75 ± 8 beats/min). After this time, HR was significantly higher after atropine in comparison to other treatments, while hyoscine resulted in intermediate values (lower than atropine but higher than controls). Hyoscine and atropine resulted in significantly higher CI than controls for 5 and 20 min, respectively; but this effect coincided with significant hypertension (mean arterial pressures >180 mmHg). Auscultation scores decreased from baseline in all treatments. Time to return to auscultation scores ≥12 (medians) did not differ between hyoscine (4 h) and controls (4 h) but atropine resulted in significantly longer time (10 h). Atropine induced colic in one horse. Gastrointestinal transit times did not differ between treatments. Hyoscine is a shorter acting positive chronotropic agent than atropine, but does not potentiate the impairment in intestinal motility induced by detomidine. Because of severe hypertension, routine use of anticholinergics combined with detomidine is not recommended. Hyoscine may represent an alternative to

  6. Reversal of alcohol induced testicular hyperlipidemia by supplementation of ascorbic acid and its comparison with abstention in male guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnakartha, Harikrishnan; Appu, Abhilash Puthuvelvippel; Madambath, Indira

    2014-02-01

    Chronic ethanol exposure causes hyperlipidemia. The present study was designed to investigate the impact of ascorbic acid supplementation on ethanol induced hyperlipidemia in testis and to compare it with that of abstinence from taking alcohol. Thirty-six male guinea pigs were divided into two groups and were maintained for 90 days as follows (1) control (C) (2) ethanol treated group (E) (4 g/kg body wt/day). Ethanol was administered for 90 days and on 90th day, alanine amino transaminase (ALT), aspartate amino transaminase (AST) and γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) in serum was assayed. The animals in the ethanol group were further divided into an ascorbic acid supplemented group (25 mg/100 g body wt/day) (E+AA) and an ethanol abstention group (EAG) and those in the control group were divided into a control group and a control+ascorbic acid group (C+AA). There was significant increase in levels of testicular cholesterol, free fatty acid, phospholipids and triglycerides in the ethanol group. There was also a significant increase in the activity of HMG CoA reductase and decrease in activity of testicular glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and malic enzyme in ethanol-ingested animals that further led to decreased levels of serum testosterone. Alcohol administration also enhanced the activity of testicular alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Ascorbic acid supplementation and abstention altered all these parameters induced by chronic alcohol administration. Histological studies were also in line with the above results. Ascorbic acid was able to reinstate the cholesterol homeostasis in testis which could have further restored the testicular steroidogenesis. The present study demonstrated that ascorbic acid is effective in reducing the hyperlipidemia induced by chronic alcohol administration and produced a better recovery than abstention.

  7. In vivo growth-restricted and reversible malignancy induced by Human Herpesvirus-8/ KSHV: a cell and animal model of virally induced Kaposi's sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Agata D'Agostino; Cavallin, Lucas E.; Vincent, Loïc; Chiozzini, Chiara; Eroles, Pilar; Duran, Elda M.; Asgari, Zahra; Hooper, Andrea T.; La Perle, Krista M. D.; Hilsher, Chelsey; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Dittmer, Dirk P.; Rafii, Shahin; Mesri, Enrique A.

    2007-01-01

    Transfection of a Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) herpesvirus (KSHV) Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (KSHVBac36) into mouse bone marrow endothelial lineage cells generates a cell (mECK36) that forms KS-like tumors in mice. mECK36 expressed most KSHV genes and were angiogenic, but didn't form colonies in soft agar. In nude mice, mECK36 formed KSHV-harboring vascularized spindle-cell sarcomas that were LANA+/podoplanin+, overexpressed VEGF and Angiopoietin ligands and receptors, and displayed KSHV and host transcriptomes reminiscent of KS. mECK36 that lost the KSHV episome reverted to non-tumorigenicity. siRNA suppression of KSHV vGPCR, an angiogenic gene up-regulated in mECK36 tumors, inhibited angiogenicity and tumorigenicity. These results show that KSHV malignancy is in vivo growth-restricted and reversible, defining mECK36 as a biologically sensitive animal model of KSHV-dependent KS. PMID:17349582

  8. DHT selectively reverses Smad3-mediated/TGF-beta-induced responses through transcriptional down-regulation of Smad3 in prostate epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyung; Wang, Hui; Krebs, Tracy L; Wang, Bingcheng; Kelley, Thomas J; Danielpour, David

    2010-10-01

    Androgens suppress TGF-β responses in the prostate through mechanisms that are not fully explored. We have recently reported that 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) suppresses the ability of TGF-β to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of prostatic epithelial cells and provided evidence that such suppression was fueled by transcriptional down-regulation of TGF-β receptor II (ΤβRII). We now show that androgen receptor (AR) activated by DHT suppresses the TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of Sma- and Mad-related protein (Smad)3 in LNCaP cells overexpressing TβRII under the control of a cytomegalovirus promoter, which is not regulated by DHT, suggesting that transcriptional repression of TβRII alone does not fully account for the impact of DHT on TGF-β responses. Instead, we demonstrate that such suppression occurs through loss of total Smad3, resulting from transcriptional suppression of Smad3. We provide evidence that DHT down-regulates the promoter activity of Smad3 in various prostate cancer cell lines, including NRP-154+AR, DU145+AR, LNCaP, and VCaP, at least partly through androgen-dependent inactivation of Sp1. Moreover, we show that overexpression of Smad3 reverses the ability of DHT to protect against TGF-β-induced apoptosis in NRP-154+AR, supporting our model that loss of Smad3 by DHT is involved in the protection against TGF-β-induced apoptosis. Together, these findings suggest that deregulated/enhanced expression and activation of AR in prostate carcinomas may intercept the tumor suppressor function of TGF-β through transcriptional suppression of Smad3, thereby providing new mechanistic insight into the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  9. Rutin reverses radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage and inflammation through the modulation of p38/Nf-Kb and Keap1/Nrf2 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manna, Krishnendu; Khan, Amitava; Biswas, Sushobhan; Das, Ujjal; Sengupta, Aaveri; Dey, Sanjit; Chakraborty, Anindita

    2016-01-01

    Rutin (RU), widely known plant polyphenol, possesses wide range of biological activities. In this study, we evaluated the effect of RU on radiation (IR)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in murine liver and explored the potential mechanisms underlying this effect. Swiss albino mice were subjected to oral pretreatment of RU (75 mg/kg body weight) for three consecutive days before irradiation (6 Gy). Plethora of biochemical indices were carried out to determine the hepato protective effect of RU. Molecular mechanism of action was also assessed through employing the immunoblot, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence techniques. Hepatoprotective effects of RU were associated with the upregulation of antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD, catalase and GSH) and down regulation of serum toxicity markers (ALT, AST and LDH). Results also demonstrated that RU significantly down regulated the levels of hepatic inflammatory markers like TNF-α, IL-6 and expressions of p38-MAPK, NF-κB, iNOS and COX-2. Histopathological changes further confirmed the biochemical and immunohistochemical results showing that IR caused significant structural damage to liver which were reversed by pretreatment of RU. RU also significantly suppressed the IR-induced activation of Keap1 and modulated the phosphorylation of PI3K/AKT. Further, pretreatment with RU augmented the expression of Nrf2 thereby enhancing the activity of downstream phase-2 detoxifying hepatic enzymes (HO-1, NQO-1, GST and Mn-SOD) which altered the IR-induced oxidative imbalance. The present results is evidence based mechanism that RU remained a promising radioprotector in attenuating IR-induced oxidative stress, inflammation and hepatotoxicity through the modulation of Nrf2/HO-1 and p38 /NF-κB signaling pathway. (author)

  10. Growth factors and medium hyperglycemia induce Sox9+ ductal cell differentiation into β cells in mice with reversal of diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingfeng; Lin, Qing; Qi, Tong; Wang, Tiankun; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Riggs, Arthur D.; Zeng, Defu

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that long-term administration of a low dose of gastrin and epidermal growth factor (GE) augments β-cell neogenesis in late-stage diabetic autoimmune mice after eliminating insulitis by induction of mixed chimerism. However, the source of β-cell neogenesis is still unknown. SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 9+ (Sox9+) ductal cells in the adult pancreas are clonogenic and can give rise to insulin-producing β cells in an in vitro culture. Whether Sox9+ ductal cells in the adult pancreas can give rise to β cells in vivo remains controversial. Here, using lineage-tracing with genetic labeling of Insulin- or Sox9-expressing cells, we show that hyperglycemia (>300 mg/dL) is required for inducing Sox9+ ductal cell differentiation into insulin-producing β cells, and medium hyperglycemia (300–450 mg/dL) in combination with long-term administration of low-dose GE synergistically augments differentiation and is associated with normalization of blood glucose in nonautoimmune diabetic C57BL/6 mice. Short-term administration of high-dose GE cannot augment differentiation, although it can augment preexisting β-cell replication. These results indicate that medium hyperglycemia combined with long-term administration of low-dose GE represents one way to induce Sox9+ ductal cell differentiation into β cells in adult mice. PMID:26733677

  11. Proline-induced changes in acetylcholinesterase activity and gene expression in zebrafish brain: reversal by antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savio, L E B; Vuaden, F C; Kist, L W; Pereira, T C; Rosemberg, D B; Bogo, M R; Bonan, C D; Wyse, A T S

    2013-10-10

    Hyperprolinemia is an inherited disorder of proline metabolism and hyperprolinemic patients can present neurological manifestations, such as seizures, cognitive dysfunctions, and schizoaffective disorders. However, the mechanisms related to these symptoms are still unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the in vivo and in vitro effects of proline on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and gene expression in the zebrafish brain. For the in vivo studies, animals were exposed at two proline concentrations (1.5 and 3.0mM) during 1h or 7 days (short- or long-term treatments, respectively). For the in vitro assays, different proline concentrations (ranging from 3.0 to 1000 μM) were tested. Long-term proline exposures significantly increased AChE activity for both treated groups when compared to the control (34% and 39%). Moreover, the proline-induced increase on AChE activity was completely reverted by acute administration of antipsychotic drugs (haloperidol and sulpiride), as well as the changes induced in ache expression. When assessed in vitro, proline did not promote significant changes in AChE activity. Altogether, these data indicate that the enzyme responsible for the control of acetylcholine levels might be altered after proline exposure in the adult zebrafish. These findings contribute for better understanding of the pathophysiology of hyperprolinemia and might reinforce the use of the zebrafish as a complementary vertebrate model for studying inborn errors of amino acid metabolism. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nature of mutants induced by ionizing radiation in cultured hamster cells. II. Antigenic response and reverse mutation of HPRT-deficient mutants induced by. gamma. -rays or ethyl methanesulphonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R; Stretch, A; Thacker, J

    1986-04-01

    A large series of independent mutants deficient in HPRT enzyme activity, isolated from V79-4 hamster cells, were assessed for properties which reflect the nature of the genetic changes induced. A total of 88 mutants were screened, 43 isolated from ..gamma..-ray-treated cultures and 45 induced by ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS). Firstly, each mutant was assayed for the presence of protein with the antigenic response of HPRT. In a competitive inhibition assay, 31% of EMS-induced mutants were CRM-positive compared to 7% of the ..gamma..-ray series. Secondly, each mutant was tested for ability to revert to HPRT proficiency. All except 2 of the EMS-induced mutants reverted with ethyl nitrosourea ENU, and many reverted spontaneously, under the given conditions. However reversion was not detected in about 80% of ..gamma..-ray-induced mutants, suggesting that the types of forward mutation caused by ionizing radiation differ qualitatively from those caused by EMS. (Auth.). 30 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs.

  13. Depolarization-induced release of [(3)H]D-aspartate from GABAergic neurons caused by reversal of glutamate transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Pickering, D S; Schousboe, A

    2000-01-01

    if glutamate in addition to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) could be released from these cultures. The neurons were preloaded with [(3)H]D-aspartate and subsequently its release was followed during depolarization induced by a high potassium concentration or the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4......-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonists, AMPA and kainate. Depolarization of the neurons with 55 mM potassium increased the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate by more than 10-fold. When the non-specific calcium-channel blockers cobalt or lanthanum were included in the stimulation buffer with potassium......, the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate was decreased by about 40%. These results indicated that some of the released [(3)H]D-aspartate might originate from a vesicular pool. When AMPA was applied to the neurons, the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate was increased 2-fold and could not be prevented or decreased...

  14. MK-801-induced deficits in social recognition in rats: reversal by aripiprazole, but not olanzapine, risperidone, or cannabidiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiana, Serena; Watanabe, Akihito; Yamasaki, Yuki; Amada, Naoki; Kikuchi, Tetsuro; Stott, Colin; Riedel, Gernot

    2015-12-01

    Deficiencies in social activities are hallmarks of numerous brain disorders. With respect to schizophrenia, social withdrawal belongs to the category of negative symptoms and is associated with deficits in the cognitive domain. Here, we used the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) for induction of social withdrawal in rats and assessed the efficacy of several atypical antipsychotics with different pharmacological profiles as putative treatment. In addition, we reasoned that the marijuana constituent cannabidiol (CBD) may provide benefit or could be proposed as an adjunct treatment in combination with antipsychotics. Hooded Lister rats were tested in the three-chamber version for social interaction, with an initial novelty phase, followed after 3 min by a short-term recognition memory phase. No drug treatment affected sociability. However, distinct effects on social recognition were revealed. MK-801 reduced social recognition memory at all doses (>0.03 mg/kg). Predosing with aripiprazole dose-dependently (2 or 10 mg/kg) prevented the memory decline, but doses of 0.1 mg/kg risperidone or 1 mg/kg olanzapine did not. Intriguingly, CBD impaired social recognition memory (12 and 30 mg/kg) but did not rescue the MK-801-induced deficits. When CBD was combined with protective doses of aripiprazole (CBD-aripiprazole at 12 :  or 5 : 2 mg/kg) the benefit of the antipsychotic was lost. At the same time, activity-related changes in behaviour were excluded as underlying reasons for these pharmacological effects. Collectively, the combined activity of aripiprazole on dopamine D2 and serotonin 5HT1A receptors appears to provide a significant advantage over risperidone and olanzapine with respect to the rescue of cognitive deficits reminiscent of schizophrenia. The differential pharmacological properties of CBD, which are seemingly beneficial in human patients, did not back-translate and rescue the MK-801-induced social memory deficit.

  15. Multi-Vitamin B Supplementation Reverses Hypoxia-Induced Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Improves Memory Function in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lixia; Chen, Yuan; Wang, Weiguang; Xiao, Zhonghai; Hong, Yan

    2016-08-04

    Hypobaric hypoxia (HH) leads to reduced oxygen delivery to brain. It could trigger cognitive dysfunction and increase the risk of dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was undertaken in order to examine whether B vitamins (B6, B12, folate, and choline) could exert protective effects on hypoxia-induced memory deficit and AD related molecular events in mice. Adult male Kunming mice were assigned to five groups: normoxic control, hypoxic model (HH), hypoxia+vitamin B6/B12/folate (HB), hypoxia+choline (HC), hypoxia+vitamin B6/B12/folate+choline (HBC). Mice in the hypoxia, HB, HC, and HBC groups were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia for 8 h/day for 28 days in a decompression chamber mimicking 5500 meters of high altitude. Spatial and passive memories were assessed by radial arm and step-through passive test, respectively. Levels of tau and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β phosphorylation were detected by western blot. Homocysteine (Hcy) concentrations were determined using enzymatic cycling assay. Mice in the HH group exhibited significant spatial working and passive memory impairment, increased tau phosphorylation at Thr181, Ser262, Ser202/Thr205, and Ser396 in the cortex and hippocampus, and elevated Hcy levels compared with controls. Concomitantly, the levels of Ser9-phosphorylated GSK-3β were significantly decreased in brain after hypoxic treatment. Supplementations of vitamin B6/B12/folate+choline could significantly ameliorate the hypoxia-induced memory deficits, observably decreased Hcy concentrations in serum, and markedly attenuated tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple AD-related sites through upregulating inhibitory Ser9-phosphorylated GSK-3β. Our finding give further insight into combined neuroprotective effects of vitamin B6, B12, folate, and choline on brain against hypoxia.

  16. Reversal effect of intra-central amygdala microinjection of L-arginine on place aversion induced by naloxone in morphine conditioned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Sara; Karami, Manizheh; Sahraei, Hedayat; Rahimpour, Mahnaz

    2011-01-01

    Role of nitric oxide (NO) on expression of morphine conditioning using a solely classic task has been proposed previously. In this work, the involvement of NO on the expression of opioid-induced conditioning in the task paired with an injection of naloxone was investigated. Conditioning was established in adult male Wistar rats (weighing 200-250 g) using an unbiased procedure. Naloxone (0.05-0.4 mg/kg, i.p.), a selective antagonist of mu-opioid receptor, was administered once prior to morphine response testing. NO agents were administered directly into the central amygdala (CeA) prior to naloxone injection pre-testing. Morphine (2.5-10 mg/kg, s.c.) produced a significant dose-dependent place preference in experimental animals. When naloxone (0.05-0.4 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected before testing of morphine (5 mg/kg, s.c.) response, the antagonist induced a significant aversion. This response was reversed due to injection of L-arginine (0.3-3 microg/rat), intra-CeA prior to naloxone administration. However, pre-injection of L-NAME (intra-CeA), an inhibitor of NO production, blocked this effect. The finding may reflect that NO in the nucleus participates in morphine plus naloxone interaction.

  17. Inducible and reversible suppression of Npm1 gene expression using stably integrated small interfering RNA vector in mouse embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Beibei; Lu Rui; Wang Weicheng; Jin Ying

    2006-01-01

    The tetracycline (Tc)-inducible small interference RNA (siRNA) is a powerful tool for studying gene function in mammalian cells. However, the system is infrequently utilized in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here, we present First application of the Tc-inducible, stably integrated plasmid-based siRNA system in mouse ES cells to down-regulate expression of Npm1, an essential gene for embryonic development. The physiological role of Npm1 in ES cells has not been defined. Our data show that the knock-down of Npm1 expression by this siRNA system was not only highly efficient, but also Tc- dose- and induction time-dependent. Particularly, the down-regulation of Npm1 expression was reversible. Importantly, suppression of Npm1 expression in ES cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation. Taken together, this system allows for studying gene function in a highly controlled manner, otherwise difficult to achieve in ES cells. Moreover, our results demonstrate that Npm1 is essential for ES cell proliferation

  18. Dietary phenolic acids reverse insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia, inflammation and oxidative stress in high-fructose diet-induced metabolic syndrome rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibitoye, Oluwayemisi B; Ajiboye, Taofeek O

    2017-12-20

    This study investigated the influence of caffeic, ferulic, gallic and protocatechuic acids on high-fructose diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats. Oral administration of the phenolic acids significantly reversed high-fructose diet-mediated increase in body mass index and blood glucose. Furthermore, phenolic acids restored high-fructose diet-mediated alterations in metabolic hormones (insulin, leptin and adiponectin). Similarly, elevated tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and -8 were significantly lowered. Administration of phenolic acids restored High-fructose diet-mediated increase in the levels of lipid parameters and indices of atherosclerosis, cardiac and cardiovascular diseases. High-fructose diet-mediated decrease in activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase) and increase in oxidative stress biomarkers (reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation products, protein oxidation and fragmented DNA) were significantly restored by the phenolic acids. The result of this study shows protective influence of caffeic acid, ferulic acid, gallic acid and protocatechuic acid in high-fructose diet-induced metabolic syndrome.

  19. (p-ClPhSe)2 stimulates carbohydrate metabolism and reverses the metabolic alterations induced by high fructose load in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quines, Caroline B; Rosa, Suzan G; Chagas, Pietro M; Velasquez, Daniela; Prado, Vinicius C; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2017-09-01

    The modern life leads to excess consumption of food rich in fructose; however, the long-term changes in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism could lead to metabolic dysfunction in humans. The present study evaluated the in vitro insulin-mimetic action of p-chloro-diphenyl diselenide (p-ClPhSe) 2 . The second aim of this study was to investigate if (p-ClPhSe) 2 reverses metabolic dysfunction induced by fructose load in Wistar rats. The insulin-mimetic action of (p-ClPhSe) 2  at concentrations of 50 and 100 μM was determined in slices of rat skeletal muscle. (p-ClPhSe) 2  at a concentration of 50 μM stimulated the glucose uptake by 40% in skeletal muscle. A dose-response curve revealed that (p-ClPhSe) 2  at a dose of 25 mg/kg reduced (∼20%) glycemia in rats treated with fructose (5 g/kg, i.g.). The administration of fructose impaired the liver homeostasis and (p-ClPhSe) 2 (25 mg/kg) protected against the increase (∼25%) in the G-6-Pase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities and reduced the triglyceride content (∼25%) in the liver. (p-ClPhSe) 2 regulated the liver homeostasis by stimulating hexokinase activity (∼27%), regulating the TCA cycle activity (increased the ATP and citrate synthase activity (∼15%)) and increasing the glycogen levels (∼67%). In conclusion, (p-ClPhSe) 2 stimulated carbohydrate metabolism and reversed metabolic dysfunction in rats fed with fructose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of exogenous ATM gene on mRNA expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase in AT cells induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Fangjun; Cao Jianping; Luo Jialin; Zhu Wei; Liu Fenju; Feng Shuang; Song Jianyuan; Li Chong

    2005-01-01

    The study is to observe effects of exogenous ATM gene on mRNA expression of hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) in fibroblast cells (AT5BIVA cells) from skin of Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) patients and to study the regulation of ATM to hTERT. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), mRNA expression of hTERT in AT, PEBS7-AT, ATM + -AT and GM cells irradiated with 0 and 3 Gy of 60 Co γ-rays were examined respectively. The difference of the mRNA expression of hTERT among AT, PEBS7-AT, ATM + -AT and GM cells were analyzed. Difference of the mRNA expression of hTERT between 0 Gy and 3 Gy groups was analyzed, too. The results showed that the mRNA expression of hTERT in GM cells was negative, but positive mRNA expression of hTERT in AT cells. The mRNA expression of hTERT in ATM + -AT cells decreased significantly (p 60 Co γ-rays, the mRNA expression of hTERT in GM cells was positive, and that in AT, PEBS7-AT, ATM + -AT cells was increased (p + -AT cells was lower than that in AT and PEBS7-AT cells respectively (p<0.05). It is postulated that exogenous ATM is able to downregulate the mRNA expression of hTERT in AT cells, ionizing radiation can induce the mRNA expression of hTERT in cells and telomerase anticipates the repair of damaged DNA. (authors)

  1. Tesofensine induces appetite suppression and weight loss with reversal of low forebrain dopamine levels in the diet-induced obese rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik H; Jensen, Majbrit M; Overgaard, Agnete

    2013-01-01

    is not clarified. Tesofensine effectively induces appetite suppression in the diet-induced obese (DIO) rat partially being ascribed to an indirect stimulation of central dopamine receptor function subsequent to blocked dopamine transporter activity. This is interesting, as obese patients have reduced central......Tesofensine is a triple monoamine reuptake inhibitor which inhibits noradrenaline, 5-HT and dopamine reuptake. Tesofensine is currently in clinical development for the treatment of obesity, however, the pharmacological basis for its strong and sustained effects in obesity management...... as compared to age-matched chow-fed rats. DIO rats also exhibited a marked reduction in baseline extracellular dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC), as compared to chow-fed rats using microdialysis. While acute administration of tesofensine (2.0mg/kg) normalized accumbal...

  2. Reverse plasticity: TGF-β and IL-6 induce Th1-to-Th17-cell transdifferentiation in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geginat, Jens; Paroni, Moira; Kastirr, Ilko; Larghi, Paola; Pagani, Massimiliano; Abrignani, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    Th17 cells are a heterogeneous population of pro-inflammatory T cells that have been shown to mediate immune responses against intestinal bacteria. Th17 cells are highly plastic and can transdifferentiate to Th1/17 cells or unconventional Th1 cells, which are highly pathogenic in animal models of immune-mediated diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases. A recent European Journal of Immunology article by Liu et al. (Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45:1010-1018) showed, surprisingly, that Th1 cells have a similar plasticity, and could transdifferentiate to Th17 cells. Thus, IFN-γ-producing Th1 effector cells specific for an intestinal microbial antigen were shown to acquire IL-17-producing capacities in the gut in a mouse model of colitis, and in response to TGF-β and IL-6 in vitro. TGF-β induced Runx1, and together with IL-6 was shown to render the ROR-γt and IL-17 promoters in Th1 cells accessible for Runx1 binding. In this commentary, we discuss how this unexpected plasticity of Th1 cells challenges our view on the generation of Th1/17 cells with the capacity to co-produce IL-17 and IFN-γ, and consider possible implications of this Th1-to-Th17-cell conversion for therapies of inflammatory bowel diseases and protective immune responses against intracellular pathogens. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Reversal of endothelial dysfunction in aorta of streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced type-2 diabetic rats by S-Allylcysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmanaidu, Parim; Uddandrao, V V Sathibabu; Sasikumar, Vadivukkarasi; Naik, Ramavat Ravindar; Pothani, Suresh; Begum, Mustapha Sabana; Rajeshkumar, M Prasanna; Varatharaju, Chandrasekar; Meriga, Balaji; Rameshreddy, P; Kalaivani, A; Saravanan, Ganapathy

    2017-08-01

    Dietary measures and plant-based therapies as prescribed by native systems of medicine have gained attraction among diabetics with claims of efficacy. The present study investigated the effects of S-Allylcysteine (SAC) on body weight gain, glucose, insulin, insulin resistance, and nitric oxide synthase in plasma and argininosuccinate synthase (AS) and argininosuccinate lyase (ASL), lipid peroxides and antioxidant enzymes in aorta of control and streptozotocin-nicotinamide (STZ-NA)-induced diabetic rats. Changes in body weight, glucose, insulin, insulin resistance, and antioxidant profiles of aorta and mRNA expressions of nitric oxide synthase, AS, and ASL were observed in experimental rats. SAC (150 mg/kg b.w) showed its therapeutic effects similar to gliclazide in decreasing glucose, insulin resistance, lipid peroxidation, and increasing body weight; insulin, antioxidant enzymes, and mRNA levels of nitric oxide synthase, argininosuccinate synthase, and argininosuccinate lyase genes in STZ-NA rats. Histopathologic studies also revealed the protective nature of SAC on aorta. In conclusion, garlic and its constituents mediate the anti-diabetic potential through mitigating hyperglycemic status, changing insulin resistance by alleviating endothelial dysregulation in both plasma and tissues.

  4. Gene correction of HAX1 reversed Kostmann disease phenotype in patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittermann, Erik; Lachmann, Nico; MacLean, Glenn; Emmrich, Stephan; Ackermann, Mania; Göhring, Gudrun; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Welte, Karl; Schambach, Axel; Heckl, Dirk; Orkin, Stuart H; Cantz, Tobias; Klusmann, Jan-Henning

    2017-06-13

    Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN, Kostmann disease) is a heritable disorder characterized by a granulocytic maturation arrest. Biallelic mutations in HCLS1 associated protein X-1 ( HAX1 ) are frequently detected in affected individuals, including those of the original pedigree described by Kostmann in 1956. To date, no faithful animal model has been established to study SCN mediated by HAX1 deficiency. Here we demonstrate defective neutrophilic differentiation and compensatory monocyte overproduction from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) carrying the homozygous HAX1 W44X nonsense mutation. Targeted correction of the HAX1 mutation using the CRISPR-Cas9 system and homologous recombination rescued neutrophil differentiation and reestablished an HAX1 and HCLS1 -centered transcription network in immature myeloid progenitors, which is involved in the regulation of apoptosis, apoptotic mitochondrial changes, and myeloid differentiation. These findings made in isogenic iPSC-derived myeloid cells highlight the complex transcriptional changes underlying Kostmann disease. Thus, we show that patient-derived HAX1 W44X -iPSCs recapitulate the Kostmann disease phenotype in vitro and confirm HAX1 mutations as the disease-causing monogenic lesion. Finally, our study paves the way for nonvirus-based gene therapy approaches in SCN.

  5. Deficiency of cardiac Acyl-CoA synthetase-1 induces diastolic dysfunction, but pathologic hypertrophy is reversed by rapamycin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, David S; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Pascual, Florencia

    2014-01-01

    In mice with temporally-induced cardiac-specific deficiency of acyl-CoA synthetase-1 (Acsl1(H-/-)), the heart is unable to oxidize long-chain fatty acids and relies primarily on glucose for energy. These metabolic changes result in the development of both a spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy...... and B-type natriuretic peptide. mTOR activation of the related Acsl3 gene, usually associated with pathologic hypertrophy, was also attenuated in the Acsl1(H-/-) hearts, indicating that alternative pathways of fatty acid activation did not compensate for the loss of Acsl1. Compared to controls, Acsl1(H......-/-) hearts exhibited an 8-fold higher uptake of 2-deoxy[1-(14)C]glucose and a 35% lower uptake of the fatty acid analog 2-bromo[1-(14)C]palmitate. These data indicate that Acsl1-deficiency causes diastolic dysfunction and that mTOR activation is linked to the development of cardiac hypertrophy in Acsl1(H...

  6. Antioxidative Diet Supplementation Reverses High-Fat Diet-Induced Increases of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Vargas-Robles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a worldwide epidemic that is characterized not only by excessive fat deposition but also by systemic microinflammation, high oxidative stress, and increased cardiovascular risk factors. While diets enriched in natural antioxidants showed beneficial effects on oxidative stress, blood pressure, and serum lipid composition, diet supplementation with synthetic antioxidants showed contradictive results. Thus, we tested in C57Bl/6 mice whether a daily dosage of an antioxidative mixture consisting of vitamin C, vitamin E, L-arginine, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid (corabion would affect cardiovascular risk factors associated with obesity. Obese mice showed increased serum triglyceride and glucose levels and hypertension after eight weeks of being fed a high-fat diet (HFD. Importantly, corabion ameliorated all of these symptoms significantly. Oxidative stress and early signs of systemic microinflammation already developed after two weeks of high-fat diet and were significantly reduced by daily doses of corabion. Of note, the beneficial effects of corabion could not be observed when applying its single antioxidative components suggesting that a combination of various nutrients is required to counteract HFD-induced cardiovascular risk factors. Thus, daily consumption of corabion may be beneficial for the management of obesity-related cardiovascular complications.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide-induced inhibition of transcription of tlr4 in vitro is reversed by dexamethasone and correlates with presence of conserved NFκB binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, Camila P., E-mail: mila_bonin@yahoo.com.br [Department of Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Baccarin, Raquel Y.A., E-mail: baccarin@usp.br [Department of Clinics, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Nostell, Katarina, E-mail: katarina.nostell@slu.se [Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7054, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Nahum, Laila A., E-mail: laila@nahum.com.br [Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Belo Horizonte 30190-002 (Brazil); Faculdade Infórium de Tecnologia, Belo Horizonte 30130-180 (Brazil); Fossum, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.fossum@bvf.slu.se [Department of Biomedicine and Veterinary Public Health, Section for Immunology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, BMC, Box 588, SE 751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Camargo, Maristela M. de, E-mail: mmcamar@usp.br [Department of Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Chimpanzees, horses and humans have regions of similarity on TLR4 and MD2 promoters. ► Rodents have few regions of similarity on TLR4 promoter when compared to primates. ► Conserved NFkB binding sites were found in the promoters of TLR4 and MD2. ► LPS-induced inhibition of TLR4 transcription is reversed by dexamethasone. ► LPS-induced transcription of MD2 is inhibited by dexamethasone. -- Abstract: Engagement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a master trigger of the deleterious effects of septic shock. Horses and humans are considered the most sensitive species to septic shock, but the mechanisms explaining these phenomena remain elusive. Analysis of tlr4 promoters revealed high similarity among LPS-sensitive species (human, chimpanzee, and horse) and low similarity with LPS-resistant species (mouse and rat). Four conserved nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) binding sites were found in the tlr4 promoter and two in the md2 promoter sequences that are likely to be targets for dexamethasone regulation. In vitro treatment of equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (eqPBMC) with LPS decreased transcripts of tlr4 and increased transcription of md2 (myeloid differentiation factor 2) and cd14 (cluster of differentiation 14). Treatment with dexamethasone rescued transcription of tlr4 after LPS inhibition. LPS-induced transcription of md2 was inhibited in the presence of dexamethasone. Dexamethasone alone did not affect transcription of tlr4 and md2.

  8. Selective and membrane-permeable small molecule inhibitors of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase reverse high fat diet-induced obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakantan, Harshini; Vance, Virginia; Wetzel, Michael D; Wang, Hua-Yu Leo; McHardy, Stanton F; Finnerty, Celeste C; Hommel, Jonathan D; Watowich, Stanley J

    2018-01-01

    reverse diet-induced obesity and validate NNMT as a viable target to treat obesity and related metabolic conditions. Increased flux of key cellular energy regulators, including NAD + and SAM, may potentially define the therapeutic mechanism-of-action of NNMT inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An insert-based enzymatic cell culture system to rapidly and reversibly induce hypoxia: investigations of hypoxia-induced cell damage, protein expression and phosphorylation in neuronal IMR-32 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2013-11-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury and tissue hypoxia are of high clinical relevance because they are associated with various pathophysiological conditions such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms causing cell damage are still not fully understood, which is at least partially due to the lack of cell culture systems for the induction of rapid and transient hypoxic conditions. The aim of the study was to establish a model that is suitable for the investigation of cellular and molecular effects associated with transient and long-term hypoxia and to gain insights into hypoxia-mediated mechanisms employing a neuronal culture system. A semipermeable membrane insert system in combination with the hypoxia-inducing enzymes glucose oxidase and catalase was employed to rapidly and reversibly generate hypoxic conditions in the culture medium. Hydrogen peroxide assays, glucose measurements and western blotting were performed to validate the system and to evaluate the effects of the generated hypoxia on neuronal IMR-32 cells. Using the insert-based two-enzyme model, hypoxic conditions were rapidly induced in the culture medium. Glucose concentrations gradually decreased, whereas levels of hydrogen peroxide were not altered. Moreover, a rapid and reversible (onoff generation of hypoxia could be performed by the addition and subsequent removal of the enzyme-containing inserts. Employing neuronal IMR-32 cells, we showed that 3 hours of hypoxia led to morphological signs of cellular damage and significantly increased levels of lactate dehydrogenase (a biochemical marker of cell damage. Hypoxic conditions also increased the amounts of cellular procaspase-3 and catalase as well as phosphorylation of the pro-survival kinase Akt, but not Erk1/2 or STAT5. In summary, we present a novel framework for investigating hypoxia-mediated mechanisms at the cellular level. We claim that the model, the first of its kind, enables researchers to rapidly and

  10. Reversal of cycloheximide-induced memory disruption by AIT-082 (Neotrofin) is modulated by, but not dependent on, adrenal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rongzi; Nguyen, Quang; Gonzaga, James; Johnson, Mai; Ritzmann, Ronald F; Taylor, Eve M

    2003-04-01

    AIT-082 (Neotrofin), a hypoxanthine derivative, has been shown to improve memory in both animals and humans. In animals, adrenal hormones modulate the efficacy of many memory-enhancing compounds, including piracetam and tacrine (Cognex). To investigate the role of adrenal hormones in the memory-enhancing action of AIT-082. Plasma levels of adrenal hormones (corticosterone and aldosterone) in mice were significantly reduced by surgical or chemical (aminoglutethimide) adrenalectomy or significantly elevated by oral administration of corticosterone. The effects of these hormone level manipulations on the memory-enhancing activity of AIT-082 and piracetam were evaluated using a cycloheximide-induced amnesia/passive avoidance model. As previously reported by others, the memory enhancing action of piracetam was abolished by adrenalectomy. In contrast, the memory enhancement by 60 mg/kg AIT-082 (IP) was unaffected. However, a sub-threshold dose of AIT-082 (0.1 mg/kg, IP) that did not improve memory in control animals did improve memory in adrenalectomized animals. These data suggested that, similar to piracetam and tacrine, the memory enhancing action of AIT-082 might be inhibited by high levels of adrenal hormones. As expected, corticosterone (30 and 100 mg/kg) inhibited the action of piracetam, however no dose up to 100 mg/kg corticosterone inhibited the activity of AIT-082. These data suggest that while AIT-082 function is not dependent on adrenal hormones, it is modulated by them. That memory enhancement by AIT-082 was not inhibited by high plasma corticosterone levels may have positive implications for its clinical utility, given that many Alzheimer's disease patients have elevated plasma cortisol levels.

  11. Reversal of drug-induced gingival overgrowth by UV-mediated apoptosis of gingival fibroblasts - an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchhart, Casey; Joy, Anita

    2018-05-01

    Gingival overgrowth (GO) is an undesirable result of certain drugs like Cyclosporine A (CsA). Histopathology of GO shows hyperplasia of gingival epithelium, expansion of connective tissue with increased collagen, or a combination. Factors such as age, gender, oral hygiene, duration, and dosage also influence onset and severity of GO. One of the mechanisms behind uncontrolled cell proliferation in drug-induced GO is inhibition of apoptotic pathways, with a consequent effect on normal cell turnover. Our objective was to determine if UV photo-treatment would activate apoptosis in the gingival fibroblast component. Human gingival fibroblast cells (HGF-1) were exposed to 200ng/ml or 400ng/ml CsA and maintained for 3, 6, and 9 days, followed by UV radiation for 2, 5, or 10min (N=6). Naïve (no CsA or UV), negative (UV, no CsA), and positive controls (CsA, no UV) were designated. Prior to UV treatment, growth media was replaced with 1M PBS to prevent absorption of UV radiation by serum proteins, and cells were incubated in growth media for 24h post-UV before processing for TUNEL assay, cell proliferation assays, or immunofluorescence. Data showed a temporal increase in proliferation of HGF-1 cells under the influence of CsA. The 200ng/ml dose was more effective in causing over-proliferation. UV treatment for 10min resulted in significant reduction in cell numbers, as evidenced by counts and proliferation assays. Our study is a first step to further evaluate UV-mediated apoptosis as a mechanism to control certain forms of GO. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Reversible Low-Light Induced Photoswitching of Crowned Spiropyran-DO3A Complexed with Gadolinium(III Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Knoesen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Photoswitchable spiropyran has been conjugated to the crowned ring system DO3A, which improves its solubility in dipolar and polar media and stabilizes the merocyanine isomer. Adding the lanthanide ion gadolinium(III to the macrocyclic ring system leads to a photoresponsive magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent that displays an increased spin-lattice relaxation time (T1 upon visible light stimulation. In this work, the photoresponse of this photochromic molecule to weak light illumination using blue and green light emitting diodes was investigated, simulating the emission spectra from bioluminescent enzymes. Photon emission rate of the light emitting diodes was changed, from 1.75 × 1016 photons·s−1 to 2.37 × 1012 photons·s−1. We observed a consistent visible light-induced isomerization of the merocyanine to the spiropyran form with photon fluxes as low as 2.37 × 1012 photons·s−1 resulting in a relaxivity change of the compound. This demonstrates the potential for use of the described imaging probes in low light level applications such as sensing bioluminescence enzyme activity. The isomerization behavior of gadolinium(III-ion complexed and non-complexed spiropyran-DO3A was analyzed in water and ethanol solution in response to low light illumination and compared to the emitted photon emission rate from over-expressed Gaussia princeps luciferase.

  13. Rapid reversal of human intestinal ischemia-reperfusion induced damage by shedding of injured enterocytes and reepithelialisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joep P M Derikx

    . At the same time, M30 immunoreactivity was absent in intact epithelial lining. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first human study to clarify intestinal IR induced cell damage and repair and its direct consequences. It reveals a unique, endogenous clearing mechanism for injured enterocytes: rapid detachment of damaged apoptotic enterocytes into the lumen. This process is followed by repair of the epithelial continuity within an hour, resulting in a normal epithelial lining.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist rosiglitazone reverses the adverse effects of diet-induced obesity on oocyte quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minge, Cadence E; Bennett, Brenton D; Norman, Robert J; Robker, Rebecca L

    2008-05-01

    Obesity and its physiological consequences are increasingly prevalent among women of reproductive age and are associated with infertility. To investigate, female mice were fed a high-fat diet until the onset of insulin resistance, followed by assessments of ovarian gene expression, ovulation, fertilization, and oocyte developmental competence. We report defects to ovarian function associated with diet-induced obesity (DIO) that result in poor oocyte quality, subsequently reduced blastocyst survival rates, and abnormal embryonic cellular differentiation. To identify critical cellular mediators of ovarian responses to obesity induced insulin resistance, DIO females were treated for 4 d before mating with an insulin-sensitizing pharmaceutical: glucose and lipid-lowering AMP kinase activator, 5-aminoimidazole 4-carboxamide-riboside, 30 mg/kg.d; sodium salicylate, IkappaK inhibitor that reverses insulin resistance, 50 mg/kg.d; or peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma agonist rosiglitazone, 10 mg/kg.d. 5-aminoimidazole 4-carboxamide-riboside or sodium salicylate treatment did not have significant effects on the reproductive parameters examined. However, embryonic development to the blastocyst stage was significantly improved when DIO mice were treated with rosiglitazone, effectively repairing development rates. Rosiglitazone also normalized DIO-associated abnormal blastomere allocation to the inner cell mass. Such improvements to oocyte quality were coupled with weight loss, improved glucose metabolism, and changes in ovarian mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-regulated genes, Cd36, Scarb1, and Fabp4 cholesterol transporters. These studies demonstrate that peri-conception treatment with select insulin-sensitizing pharmaceuticals can directly influence ovarian functions and ultimately exert positive effects on oocyte developmental competence. Improved blastocyst quality in obese females treated with rosiglitazone before mating

  15. A high-fat high-sugar diet-induced impairment in place-recognition memory is reversible and training-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dominic M D; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2017-03-01

    A high-fat high-sugar (HFHS) diet is associated with cognitive deficits in people and produces spatial learning and memory deficits in rodents. Notable, such diets rapidly impair place-, but not object-recognition memory in rats within one week of exposure. Three experiments examined whether this impairment was reversed by removal of the diet, or prevented by pre-diet training. Experiment 1 showed that rats switched from HFHS to chow recovered from the place-recognition impairment that they displayed while on HFHS. Experiment 2 showed that control rats ("Untrained") who were exposed to an empty testing arena while on chow, were impaired in place-recognition when switched to HFHS and tested for the first time. However, rats tested ("Trained") on the place and object task while on chow, were protected from the diet-induce deficit and maintained good place-recognition when switched to HFHS. Experiment 3 examined the conditions of this protection effect by training rats in a square arena while on chow, and testing them in a rectangular arena while on HFHS. We have previously demonstrated that chow rats, but not HFHS rats, show geometry-based reorientation on a rectangular arena place-recognition task (Tran & Westbrook, 2015). Experiment 3 assessed whether rats switched to the HFHS diet after training on the place and object tasks in a square area, would show geometry-based reorientation in a rectangular arena. The protective benefit of training was replicated in the square arena, but both Untrained and Trained HFHS failed to show geometry-based reorientation in the rectangular arena. These findings are discussed in relation to the specificity of the training effect, the role of the hippocampus in diet-induced deficits, and their implications for dietary effects on cognition in people. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. ''Positive'' and ''negative'' electric-pulse-induced reversible resistance switching effect in Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Chen, L.D.; Li, X.M.; Shang, D.S.; Wu, Z.H.

    2007-01-01

    ''Negative'' electric-pulse-induced reversible resistance (EPIR) switching phenomenon was found in In/PCMO/Pt sandwich, in which the high resistance can be written with positive voltage pulses, and the low resistance can be reset using negative voltage pulses (the positive voltage direction is defined as going from the top electrode to the bottom electrode). This is just the opposite from the ''positive'' EPIR effect in Ag/PCMO/Pt sandwich, in which the high resistance can be written only with negative voltage pulses, and the low resistance can be reset using positive voltage pulses. The I-V hysteresis curves of In/PCMO/Pt and Ag/PCMO/Pt sandwiches also show opposite directions, i.e., counterclockwise and clockwise under a negative voltage region for indium and Ag electrode systems, respectively. C-V characteristics show that the barrier does not exist in Ag/PCMO/Pt sandwich, while In/PCMO/Pt sandwich exhibits an obvious Schottky-like barrier. We suggest that in the negative EPIR behavior in In/PCMO/Pt structure, the resistance states are mainly controlled changing the Schottky-like barrier at the interface with the weak effect of carrier trapping process, while the positive EPIR behavior in Ag/PCMO/Pt sandwich mainly depends on the carrier trapping process at the interface. (orig.)

  17. Survival or revival: long-term preservation induces a reversible viable but non-culturable state in methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Hoefman

    Full Text Available Knowledge on long-term preservation of micro-organisms is limited and research in the field is scarce despite its importance for microbial biodiversity and biotechnological innovation. Preservation of fastidious organisms such as methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB has proven difficult. Most MOB do not survive lyophilization and only some can be cryopreserved successfully for short periods. A large-scale study was designed for a diverse set of MOB applying fifteen cryopreservation or lyophilization conditions. After three, six and twelve months of preservation, the viability (via live-dead flow cytometry and culturability (via most-probable number analysis and plating of the cells were assessed. All strains could be cryopreserved without a significant loss in culturability using 1% trehalose in 10-fold diluted TSB (TT as preservation medium and 5% DMSO as cryoprotectant. Several other cryopreservation and lyophilization conditions, all of which involved the use of TT medium, also allowed successful preservation but showed a considerable loss in culturability. We demonstrate here that most of these non-culturables survived preservation according to viability assessment indicating that preservation induces a viable but non-culturable (VBNC state in a significant fraction of cells. Since this state is reversible, these findings have major implications shifting the emphasis from survival to revival of cells in a preservation protocol. We showed that MOB cells could be significantly resuscitated from the VBNC state using the TT preservation medium.

  18. Reversed Effects of Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation following Motor Training That Vary as a Function of Training-Induced Changes in Corticospinal Excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tino Stöckel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS has the potential to enhance corticospinal excitability (CSE and subsequent motor learning. However, the effects of iTBS following motor learning are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of iTBS on CSE and performance following motor learning. Therefore twenty-four healthy participants practiced a ballistic motor task for a total of 150 movements. iTBS was subsequently applied to the trained motor cortex (STIM group or the vertex (SHAM group. Performance and CSE were assessed before motor learning and before and after iTBS. Training significantly increased performance and CSE in both groups. In STIM group participants, subsequent iTBS significantly reduced motor performance with smaller reductions in CSE. CSE changes as a result of motor learning were negatively correlated with both the CSE changes and performance changes as a result of iTBS. No significant effects of iTBS were found for SHAM group participants. We conclude that iTBS has the potential to degrade prior motor learning as a function of training-induced CSE changes. That means the expected LTP-like effects of iTBS are reversed following motor learning.

  19. Reversed Effects of Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation following Motor Training That Vary as a Function of Training-Induced Changes in Corticospinal Excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, Tino; Summers, Jeffery J; Hinder, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) has the potential to enhance corticospinal excitability (CSE) and subsequent motor learning. However, the effects of iTBS following motor learning are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of iTBS on CSE and performance following motor learning. Therefore twenty-four healthy participants practiced a ballistic motor task for a total of 150 movements. iTBS was subsequently applied to the trained motor cortex (STIM group) or the vertex (SHAM group). Performance and CSE were assessed before motor learning and before and after iTBS. Training significantly increased performance and CSE in both groups. In STIM group participants, subsequent iTBS significantly reduced motor performance with smaller reductions in CSE. CSE changes as a result of motor learning were negatively correlated with both the CSE changes and performance changes as a result of iTBS. No significant effects of iTBS were found for SHAM group participants. We conclude that iTBS has the potential to degrade prior motor learning as a function of training-induced CSE changes. That means the expected LTP-like effects of iTBS are reversed following motor learning.

  20. In silico-designed novel non-peptidic ABAD LD hot spot mimetics reverse Aβ-induced mitochondrial impairments in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Ambily Nath Indu; Kim, TaeHun; Jung, Seo Yun; Lim, Sang Min; Pae, Ae Nim

    2017-12-01

    Present work aimed to introduce non-peptidic ABAD loop D (L D ) hot spot mimetics as ABAD-Aβ inhibitors. A full-length atomistic model of ABAD-Aβ complex was built as a scaffold to launch the lead design and its topology later verified by cross-checking the computational mutagenesis results with that of in vitro data. Thereafter, the interactions of prime Aβ-binding L D residues-Tyr101, Thr108, and Thr110-were translated into specific pharmacophore features and this hypothesis subsequently used as a virtual screen query. ELISA-based screening of 20 hits identified two promising lead candidates, VC15 and VC19 with an IC 50 of 4.4 ± 0.3 and 9.6 ± 0.1 μm, respectively. They productively reversed Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions such as mitochondrial membrane potential loss (JC-1 assay), toxicity (MTT assay), and ATP reduction (ATP assay) in addition to increased cell viabilities. This is the first reporting of L D hot spot-centric in silico scheme to discover novel compounds with promising ABAD-Aβ inhibitory potential. These chemotypes are proposed for further structural optimization to derive novel Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapeutics. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Sliding-induced non-uniform pre-tension governs robust and reversible adhesion: a revisit of adhesion mechanisms of geckos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Q H; Chen, B; Gao, H J; Zhang, Y W

    2012-02-07

    Several mechanisms have been proposed in the literature to explain the robust attachment and rapid, controllable detachment of geckos' feet on vertical walls or ceilings, yet, it is still debatable, which one is ultimately responsible for geckos' extraordinary capabilities for robust and reversible adhesion. In this paper, we re-examine some of the key movements of geckos' spatula pads and seta hairs during attachment and detachment, and propose a sequence of simple mechanical steps that would lead to the extraordinary properties of geckos observed in experiments. The central subject under study here is a linear distribution of pre-tension along the spatula pad induced by its sliding motion with respect to a surface. The resulting pre-tension, together with a control of setae's pulling force and angle, not only allows for robust and strong attachment, but also enables rapid and controllable detachment. We perform computational modelling and simulations to validate the following key steps of geckos' adhesion: (i) creation of a linear distribution of pre-tension in spatula through sliding, (ii) operation of an instability envelope controlled by setae's pulling force and angle, (iii) triggering of an adhesion instability leading to partial decohesion along the interface, and (iv) complete detachment of spatula through post-instability peeling. The present work not only reveals novel insights into the adhesion mechanism of geckos, but also develops a powerful numerical simulation approach as well as additional guidelines for bioinspired materials and devices.

  2. Chemical Activation of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Reversibly Reduces Tendon Stem Cell Proliferation, Inhibits Their Differentiation, and Maintains Cell Undifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Alessandra; Creo, Pasquale; Piccoli, Marco; Bergante, Sonia; Conforti, Erika; Banfi, Giuseppe; Randelli, Pietro; Anastasia, Luigi

    2018-01-01

    Adult stem cell-based therapeutic approaches for tissue regeneration have been proposed for several years. However, adult stem cells are usually limited in number and difficult to be expanded in vitro, and they usually tend to quickly lose their potency with passages, as they differentiate and become senescent. Culturing stem cells under reduced oxygen tensions (below 21%) has been proposed as a tool to increase cell proliferation, but many studies reported opposite effects. In particular, cell response to hypoxia seems to be very stem cell type specific. Nonetheless, it is clear that a major role in this process is played by the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF), the master regulator of cell response to oxygen deprivation, which affects cell metabolism and differentiation. Herein, we report that a chemical activation of HIF in human tendon stem cells reduces their proliferation and inhibits their differentiation in a reversible and dose-dependent manner. These results support the notion that hypoxia, by activating HIF, plays a crucial role in preserving stem cells in an undifferentiated state in the "hypoxic niches" present in the tissue in which they reside before migrating in more oxygenated areas to heal a damaged tissue.

  3. Chemical Activation of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Reversibly Reduces Tendon Stem Cell Proliferation, Inhibits Their Differentiation, and Maintains Cell Undifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Menon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult stem cell-based therapeutic approaches for tissue regeneration have been proposed for several years. However, adult stem cells are usually limited in number and difficult to be expanded in vitro, and they usually tend to quickly lose their potency with passages, as they differentiate and become senescent. Culturing stem cells under reduced oxygen tensions (below 21% has been proposed as a tool to increase cell proliferation, but many studies reported opposite effects. In particular, cell response to hypoxia seems to be very stem cell type specific. Nonetheless, it is clear that a major role in this process is played by the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF, the master regulator of cell response to oxygen deprivation, which affects cell metabolism and differentiation. Herein, we report that a chemical activation of HIF in human tendon stem cells reduces their proliferation and inhibits their differentiation in a reversible and dose-dependent manner. These results support the notion that hypoxia, by activating HIF, plays a crucial role in preserving stem cells in an undifferentiated state in the “hypoxic niches” present in the tissue in which they reside before migrating in more oxygenated areas to heal a damaged tissue.

  4. Silencing of reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs stimulates hyperplastic phenotypes through activation of epidermal growth factor receptor and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Mie Lee

    Full Text Available Reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK, a tumor suppressor is down-regulated by the oncogenic signals and hypoxia, but the biological function of RECK in early tumorigenic hyperplastic phenotypes is largely unknown. Knockdown of RECK by small interfering RNA (siRECK or hypoxia significantly promoted cell proliferation in various normal epithelial cells. Hypoxia as well as knockdown of RECK by siRNA increased the cell cycle progression, the levels of cyclin D1 and c-Myc, and the phosphorylation of Rb protein (p-pRb, but decreased the expression of p21(cip1, p27(kip1, and p16(ink4A. HIF-2α was upregulated by knockdown of RECK, indicating HIF-2α is a downstream target of RECK. As knockdown of RECK induced the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and treatment of an EGFR kinase inhibitor, gefitinib, suppressed HIF-2α expression induced by the silencing of RECK, we can suggest that the RECK silenicng-EGFR-HIF-2α axis might be a key molecular mechanism to induce hyperplastic phenotype of epithelial cells. It was also found that shRNA of RECK induced larger and more numerous colonies than control cells in an anchorage-independent colony formation assay. Using a xenograft assay, epithelial cells with stably transfected with shRNA of RECK formed a solid mass earlier and larger than those with control cells in nude mice. In conclusion, the suppression of RECK may promote the development of early tumorigenic hyperplastic characteristics in hypoxic stress.

  5. GluN2C/GluN2D subunit-selective NMDA receptor potentiator CIQ reverses MK-801-induced impairment in prepulse inhibition and working memory in Y-maze test in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryavanshi, P S; Ugale, R R; Yilmazer-Hanke, D; Stairs, D J; Dravid, S M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Despite ample evidence supporting the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction hypothesis of schizophrenia, progress in the development of effective therapeutics based on this hypothesis has been limited. Facilitation of NMDA receptor function by co-agonists (d-serine or glycine) only partially alleviates the symptoms in schizophrenia; other means to facilitate NMDA receptors are required. NMDA receptor sub-types differ in their subunit composition, with varied GluN2 subunits (GluN2A-GluN2D) imparting different physiological, biochemical and pharmacological properties. CIQ is a positive allosteric modulator that is selective for GluN2C/GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors (Mullasseril et al.). Experimental Approach The effect of systemic administration of CIQ was tested on impairment in prepulse inhibition (PPI), hyperlocomotion and stereotypy induced by i.p. administration of MK-801 and methamphetamine. The effect of CIQ was also tested on MK-801-induced impairment in working memory in Y-maze spontaneous alternation test. Key Results We found that systemic administration of CIQ (20 mg·kg−1, i.p.) in mice reversed MK-801 (0.15 mg·kg−1, i.p.)-induced, but not methamphetamine (3 mg·kg−1, i.p.)-induced, deficit in PPI. MK-801 increased the startle amplitude to pulse alone, which was not reversed by CIQ. In contrast, methamphetamine reduced the startle amplitude to pulse alone, which was reversed by CIQ. CIQ also partially attenuated MK-801- and methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion and stereotyped behaviours. Additionally, CIQ reversed the MK-801-induced working memory deficit in spontaneous alternation in a Y-maze. Conclusion and Implications Together, these results suggest that facilitation of GluN2C/GluN2D-containing receptors may serve as an important therapeutic strategy for treating positive and cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia. PMID:24236947

  6. Effects of magnesium chloride on rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade and sugammadex reversal in an isolated rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparation: An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Tae-Yun; You, Hwang-Ju; Cho, Choon-Kyu; Choi, Hey Ran; Kim, Yong Beom; Shin, Yong Sup; Yang, Hong Seuk

    2018-03-01

    Magnesium potentiates the effects of nondepolarising muscle relaxants. However, few studies have used magnesium chloride (MgCl2). Sugammadex reverses neuromuscular block by steroidal nondepolarising muscle relaxants. To assess the effects of MgCl2 on rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade and its reversal by sugammadex. In-vitro experimental study. Animal laboratory, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea, from 20 March 2016 to 3 April 2016. Forty male Sprague Dawley rats. Left phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragms from 40 Sprague Dawley rats were allocated randomly to four groups (1, 2, 3 and 4 mmol l MgCl2 group, n = 10 each). Rocuronium was administered cumulatively until the first twitch of train-of-four (TOF) disappeared completely. Then, equimolar sugammadex was administered. The effective concentration (EC) of rocuronium was obtained in each group. After administering sugammadex, recovery of the first twitch height and the TOF ratio were measured for 30 min. EC50, EC90 and EC95 significantly decreased as the concentration of MgCl2 increased (all P ≤ 0.001), except the comparison between the 3 and 4 mmol l MgCl2 groups. After administration of sugammadex, the maximal TOF ratio (%) was lower in the 4 mmol l MgCl2 group than the 1 mmol l MgCl2 group [median 91.7 interquartile range (83.4 to 95.8) vs. 98.3 interquartile range (92.2 to 103.4), P = 0.049]. The mean time (s) from sugammadex injection to achieving maximal first twitch was significantly prolonged in the 4 mmol l MgCl2 group vs. the 1 mmol l MgCl2 and 2 mmol l MgCl2 groups [1483.9 (± 237.0) vs. 1039.0 (± 351.8) and 926.0 (± 278.1), P = 0.022 and 0.002, respectively]. Increases in MgCl2 concentration reduce the ECs of rocuronium. In addition, administering sugammadex equimolar to the administered rocuronium shows limited efficacy as MgCl2 concentration is increased. The in-vitro study was not registered in a database.

  7. Reversible Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tryggestad, Kjell

    2004-01-01

    The study aims is to describe how the inclusion and exclusion of materials and calculative devices construct the boundaries and distinctions between statistical facts and artifacts in economics. My methodological approach is inspired by John Graunt's (1667) Political arithmetic and more recent work...... within constructivism and the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS). The result of this approach is here termed reversible statistics, reconstructing the findings of a statistical study within economics in three different ways. It is argued that all three accounts are quite normal, albeit...... in different ways. The presence and absence of diverse materials, both natural and political, is what distinguishes them from each other. Arguments are presented for a more symmetric relation between the scientific statistical text and the reader. I will argue that a more symmetric relation can be achieved...

  8. Extract of Bauhinia vahlii Shows Antihyperglycemic Activity, Reverses Oxidative Stress, and Protects against Liver Damage in Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbanna, Ahmed H.; Nooh, Mohammed M.; Mahrous, Engy A.; Khaleel, Amal E.; Elalfy, Taha S.

    2017-01-01

    strong α-glucosidase inhibition while the nonpolar fraction (n-hexane extract) failed to show any activity in both assays. DEE was further investigated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model where oral administration of DEE at 2 doses (150 and 300 mg/kg) for 4 weeks resulted in significant reduction in fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin and reversal of oxidative stress signs as indicated by measurement of hepatic reduced glutathione, nitric oxide, and malondialdehyde levels. In addition, histopathological examination and measurement of serum aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase levels showed that DEE protected the liver from signs of pathogenesis observed in diabetic untreated rats. Phytochemical analysis of DEE showed high flavonoid content with quercitrin as the major constituent (62.9 ± 0.18 mg/mg). Abbreviations used: ALT: Alanine transaminase, AST: Aspartate transaminase, DEE: Defatted ethanol extract, DPPH: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, FBG: Fasting blood glucose, GAE: Gallic acid equivalent, GSH: Reduced glutathione, Hb1Ac: Glycated hemoglobin, HE: Hexane extract MDA: Malondialdehyde, QE: Quercetin equivalent, STZ: Streptozotocin, TAC: Total antioxidant capacity. PMID:29142421

  9. How decision reversibility affects motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullens, Lottie; van Harreveld, Frenk; Förster, Jens; Higgins, Tory E

    2014-04-01

    The present research examined how decision reversibility can affect motivation. On the basis of extant findings, it was suggested that 1 way it could affect motivation would be to strengthen different regulatory foci, with reversible decision making, compared to irreversible decision making, strengthening prevention-related motivation relatively more than promotion-related motivation. If so, then decision reversibility should have effects associated with the relative differences between prevention and promotion motivation. In 5 studies, we manipulated the reversibility of a decision and used different indicators of regulatory focus motivation to test these predictions. Specifically, Study 1 tested for differences in participants' preference for approach versus avoidance strategies toward a desired end state. In Study 2, we used speed and accuracy performance as indicators of participants' regulatory motivation, and in Study 3, we measured global versus local reaction time performance. In Study 4, we approached the research question in a different way, making use of the value-from-fit hypothesis (Higgins, 2000, 2002). We tested whether a fit between chronic regulatory focus and focus induced by the reversibility of the decision increased participants' subjective positive feelings about the decision outcome. Finally, in Study 5, we tested whether regulatory motivation, induced by decision reversibility, also influenced participants' preference in specific product features. The results generally support our hypothesis showing that, compared to irreversible decisions, reversible decisions strengthen a prevention focus more than a promotion focus. Implications for research on decision making are discussed.

  10. Sorption-induced reversible oxidation of Fe(2) at the smectite/water interface under strictly anoxic conditions. A Moessbauer spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehin, A.; Charlet, L. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique (LGIT), Universite de Grenoble, 38 - Grenoble (France); Gehin, A. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs, ANDRA, 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France); Greneche, J.M. [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Etat Condense, UMR-CNRS 6087, 72 - Le Mans (France); Brendle, J. [Universite de Haute Alsace, Lab. des Materiaux Mineraux (LMM), 68 - Mulhouse (France); Rancourt, D.G. [Ottawa Univ., Dept. of Physics, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    not been polymerized, but is present as cations. This result shows that sorption at the clay-water interface occurs in a two steps mechanism: sorption of individual Fe(II) cations, followed by an oxidation of some of them. As a first hypothesis, water could be the oxidizing agent. However in this case, the reversibility of the phenomenon cannot be explained. Thus we proposed, as a second hypothesis, that as pH is increased, protons H{sup +} is removed from the clay surface and, more and more of highly reactive sites acquire steric properties that stabilize Fe(III) relative to Fe(II). This differential affinity induces in turn an Fe-to-clay particle electron transfer. The change in surface site local environment is shown by observed large pH induced change in the sorbed Fe(II) quadrupole splitting distributions. (authors)

  11. Agmatine Reverses Sub-chronic Stress induced Nod-like Receptor Protein 3 (NLRP3) Activation and Cytokine Response in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ceren; Albayrak, Ozgur; Akdeniz, Tuğba F; Akbulut, Zeynep; Yanikkaya Demirel, Gulderen; Aricioglu, Feyza

    2016-10-01

    The activation of Nod-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) has lately been implicated in stress and depression as an initiator mechanism required for the production of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Agmatine, an endogenous polyamine widely distributed in mammalian brain, is a novel neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, with antistress, anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects. In this study, we examined the effect of exogenously administered agmatine on NLRP3 inflammasome pathway/cytokine responses in rats exposed to restraint stress for 7 days. The rats were divided into three groups: stress, stress+agmatine (40 mg/kg; i.p.) and control groups. Agmatine significantly down-regulated the gene expressions of all stress-induced NLRP3 inflammasome components (NLRP3, NF-κB, PYCARD, caspase-1, IL-1β and IL-18) in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine levels not only in both brain regions, but also in serum. Stress-reduced levels of IL-4 and IL-10, two major anti-inflammatory cytokines, were restored back to normal by agmatine treatment in the PFC. The findings of the present study suggest that stress-activated NLRP3 inflammasome and cytokine responses are reversed by an acute administration of agmatine. Whether antidepressant-like effect of agmatine can somehow, at least partially, be mediated by the inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome cascade and relevant inflammatory responses requires further studies in animal models of depression. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  12. Acute reversible inactivation of the bed nucleus of stria terminalis induces antidepressant-like effect in the rat forced swimming test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST) is a limbic forebrain structure involved in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation and stress adaptation. Inappropriate adaptation to stress is thought to compromise the organism's coping mechanisms, which have been implicated in the neurobiology of depression. However, the studies aimed at investigating BNST involvement in depression pathophysiology have yielded contradictory results. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of temporary acute inactivation of synaptic transmission in the BNST by local microinjection of cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in rats subjected to the forced swimming test (FST). Methods Rats implanted with cannulae aimed at the BNST were submitted to 15 min of forced swimming (pretest). Twenty-four hours later immobility time was registered in a new 5 min forced swimming session (test). Independent groups of rats received bilateral microinjections of CoCl2 (1 mM/100 nL) before or immediately after pretest or before the test session. Additional groups received the same treatment and were submitted to the open field test to control for unspecific effects on locomotor behavior. Results CoCl2 injection into the BNST before either the pretest or test sessions reduced immobility in the FST, suggesting an antidepressant-like effect. No significant effect of CoCl2 was observed when it was injected into the BNST immediately after pretest. In addition, no effect of BNST inactivation was observed in the open field test. Conclusion These results suggest that acute reversible inactivation of synaptic transmission in the BNST facilitates adaptation to stress and induces antidepressant-like effects. PMID:20515458

  13. Acute reversible inactivation of the bed nucleus of stria terminalis induces antidepressant-like effect in the rat forced swimming test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joca Sâmia RL

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST is a limbic forebrain structure involved in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation and stress adaptation. Inappropriate adaptation to stress is thought to compromise the organism's coping mechanisms, which have been implicated in the neurobiology of depression. However, the studies aimed at investigating BNST involvement in depression pathophysiology have yielded contradictory results. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of temporary acute inactivation of synaptic transmission in the BNST by local microinjection of cobalt chloride (CoCl2 in rats subjected to the forced swimming test (FST. Methods Rats implanted with cannulae aimed at the BNST were submitted to 15 min of forced swimming (pretest. Twenty-four hours later immobility time was registered in a new 5 min forced swimming session (test. Independent groups of rats received bilateral microinjections of CoCl2 (1 mM/100 nL before or immediately after pretest or before the test session. Additional groups received the same treatment and were submitted to the open field test to control for unspecific effects on locomotor behavior. Results CoCl2 injection into the BNST before either the pretest or test sessions reduced immobility in the FST, suggesting an antidepressant-like effect. No significant effect of CoCl2 was observed when it was injected into the BNST immediately after pretest. In addition, no effect of BNST inactivation was observed in the open field test. Conclusion These results suggest that acute reversible inactivation of synaptic transmission in the BNST facilitates adaptation to stress and induces antidepressant-like effects.

  14. Risk factors and the choice of long-acting reversible contraception following medical abortion: effect on subsequent induced abortion and unwanted pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korjamo, Riina; Heikinheimo, Oskari; Mentula, Maarit

    2018-04-01

    To analyse the post-abortion effect of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) plans and initiation on the risk of subsequent unwanted pregnancy and abortion. retrospective cohort study of 666 women who underwent medical abortion between January-May 2013 at Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. Altogether 159 (23.8%) women planning post-abortion use of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) participated in a randomized study and had an opportunity to receive the LNG-IUS free-of-charge from the hospital. The other 507 (76.2%) women planned and obtained their contraception according to clinical routine. Demographics, planned contraception, and LARC initiation at the time of the index abortion were collected. Data on subsequent abortions were retrieved from the Finnish Abortion Register and electronic patient files until the end of 2014. During the 21 months ([median], IQR 20-22) follow-up, 54(8.1%) women requested subsequent abortions. When adjusted for age, previous pregnancies, deliveries, induced abortions and gestational-age, planning LARC for post-abortion contraception failed to prevent subsequent abortion (33 abortions/360 women, 9.2%) compared to other contraceptive plans (21/306, 6.9%) (HR 1.22, 95% CI 0.68-2.17). However, verified LARC initiation decreased the abortion rate (4 abortions/177 women, 2.3%) compared to women with uncertain LARC initiation status (50/489, 10.2%) (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.06-0.48). When adjusted for LARC initiation status, age abortion (27 abortions/283 women, 9.5%) compared to women ≥25 years (27/383, 7.0%, HR1.95, 95% CI 1.04-3.67). Initiation of LARC as part of abortion service at the time of medical abortion is an important means to prevent subsequent abortion, especially among young women.

  15. Targeted reversion of induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with human cleidocranial dysplasia improves bone regeneration in a rat calvarial bone defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akiko; Ooki, Akio; Nakamura, Takashi; Onodera, Shoko; Hayashi, Kamichika; Hasegawa, Daigo; Okudaira, Takahito; Watanabe, Katsuhito; Kato, Hiroshi; Onda, Takeshi; Watanabe, Akira; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Nishimura, Ken; Ohtaka, Manami; Nakanishi, Mahito; Sakamoto, Teruo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Sueishi, Kenji; Azuma, Toshifumi

    2018-01-22

    Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) haploinsufficiency causes cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) which is characterized by supernumerary teeth, short stature, clavicular dysplasia, and osteoporosis. At present, as a therapeutic strategy for osteoporosis, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation therapy is performed in addition to drug therapy. However, MSC-based therapy for osteoporosis in CCD patients is difficult due to a reduction in the ability of MSCs to differentiate into osteoblasts resulting from impaired RUNX2 function. Here, we investigated whether induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) properly differentiate into osteoblasts after repairing the RUNX2 mutation in iPSCs derived from CCD patients to establish normal iPSCs, and whether engraftment of osteoblasts derived from properly reverted iPSCs results in better regeneration in immunodeficient rat calvarial bone defect models. Two cases of CCD patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (CCD-iPSCs) were generated using retroviral vectors (OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC) or a Sendai virus SeVdp vector (KOSM302L). Reverted iPSCs were established using programmable nucleases, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas-derived RNA-guided endonucleases, to correct mutations in CCD-iPSCs. The mRNA expressions of osteoblast-specific markers were analyzed using quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. iPSCs-derived osteoblasts were transplanted into rat calvarial bone defects, and bone regeneration was evaluated using microcomputed tomography analysis and histological analysis. Mutation analysis showed that both contained nonsense mutations: one at the very beginning of exon 1 and the other at the initial position of the nuclear matrix-targeting signal. The osteoblasts derived from CCD-iPSCs (CCD-OBs) expressed low levels of several osteoblast differentiation markers, and transplantation of these osteoblasts into calvarial bone defects created in rats with

  16. Hypoxia induces telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT gene expression in non-tumor fish tissues in vivo: the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mok Helen OL

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current understanding on the relationships between hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT gene expression are largely based on in vitro studies in human cancer cells. Although several reports demonstrated HIF-1- mediated upregulation of the human TERT gene under hypoxia, conflicting findings have also been reported. Thus far, it remains uncertain whether these findings can be directly extrapolated to non-tumor tissues in other whole animal systems in vivo. While fish often encounter environmental hypoxia, the in vivo regulation of TERT by hypoxia in non-neoplastic tissues of fish remains virtually unknown. Results The adult marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma was employed as a model fish in this study. We have cloned and characterized a 3261-bp full-length TERT cDNA, omTERT, which encodes a protein of 1086 amino acids. It contains all of the functional motifs that are conserved in other vertebrate TERTs. Motif E is the most highly conserved showing 90.9–100% overall identity among the fish TERTs and 63.6% overall identity among vertebrates. Analysis of the 5'-flanking sequence of the omTERT gene identified two HRE (hypoxia-responsive element; nt. – 283 and – 892 cores. Overexpression of the HIF-1α induced omTERT promoter activity as demonstrated using transient transfection assays. The omTERT gene is ubiquitously expressed in fish under normoxia, albeit at varying levels, where highest expression was observed in gonads and the lowest in liver. In vivo expression of omTERT was significantly upregulated in testis and liver in response to hypoxia (at 96 h and 48 h, respectively, where concomitant induction of the omHIF-1α and erythropoietin (omEpo genes was also observed. In situ hybridization analysis showed that hypoxic induction of omTERT mRNA was clearly evident in hepatocytes in the caudal region of liver and in spermatogonia-containing cysts in testis. Conclusion This

  17. A diet high in fat and sugar reverses anxiety-like behaviour induced by limited nesting in male rats: Impacts on hippocampal markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniam, Jayanthi; Antoniadis, Christopher P; Le, Vivian; Morris, Margaret J

    2016-06-01

    Stress exposure during early development is known to produce long-term mental health deficits. Stress promotes poor lifestyle choices such as poor diet. Early life adversity and diets high in fat and sugar (HFHS) are known to affect anxiety and memory. However additive effects of HFHS and stress during early development are less explored. Here, we examined whether early life stress (ELS) simulated by limited nesting (LN) induces anxiety-like behaviour and cognitive deficits that are modulated by HFHS diet. We examined key hippocampal markers involved in anxiety and cognition, testing the hypothesis that post-weaning HFHS following ELS would ameliorate anxiety-like behaviour but worsen memory and associated hippocampal changes. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to LN, postnatal days 2-9, and at weaning, male siblings were given unlimited access to chow or HFHS resulting in (Con-Chow, Con-HFHS, LN-Chow, LN-HFHS, n=11-15/group). Anxiety-like behaviour was assessed by Elevated Plus Maze (EPM) at 10 weeks and spatial and object recognition tested at 11 weeks of age. Rats were culled at 13 weeks. Hippocampal mRNA expression was measured using TaqMan(®) Array Micro Fluidic cards (Life Technologies). As expected HFHS diet increased body weight; LN and control rats had similar weights at 13 weeks, energy intake was also similar across groups. LN-Chow rats showed increased anxiety-like behaviour relative to control rats, but this was reversed by HFHS diet. Spatial and object recognition memory were unaltered by LN exposure or consumption of HFHS diet. Hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein was not affected by LN exposure in chow rats, but was increased by 45% in HFHS rats relative to controls. Hippocampal genes involved in plasticity and mood regulation, GSKα and GSKβ were affected, with reductions in GSKβ under both diet conditions, and reduced GSKα only in LN-HFHS versus Con-HFHS. Interestingly, HFHS diet and LN exposure independently reduced expression of

  18. Hyperosmotic stimulus induces reversible angiogenesis within the hypothalamic magnocellular nuclei of the adult rat: a potential role for neuronal vascular endothelial growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Anne

    2005-03-01

    inhibited within the hypothalamic magnocellular nuclei of hyperosmotically stimulated rats. Conclusion This study shows that the functional stimulation of hypothalamic magnocellular neurons of adult rats induces reversible angiogenesis via the local secretion of neuronal VEGF. Since many diseases are driven by unregulated angiogenesis, the hypothalamic magnocellular nuclei should provide an interesting model to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of angiogenesis processes within the adult CNS.

  19. Positive modulation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors reverses subcronic PCP-induced deficits in the novel object recognition task in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Damgaard; Larsen, Dorrit Bjerg; Hansen, Suzanne Lisbet

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are a major clinical unmet need in schizophrenia. The psychotomimetic drug phencyclicline (PCP) is widely applied in rodents to mimic symptoms of schizophrenia, including cognitive deficits. Precious studies have shown that sub-chronic PCP induces an enduring episodic memory......-cbronic PCP treatment induced a significant decrease in the discrimination index (DI) and both ampakines CX546 and CX516 were able to reverse this diruption of object memory in rats in the novel object recognition task. These data suggest that positive AMPAR modulation may represent a mechanism for treatment...

  20. Thermomchromic Reaction-Induced Reversible Upconversion Emission Modulation for Switching Devices and Tunable Upconversion Emission Based on Defect Engineering of WO3:Yb3+,Er3+ Phosphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jiufeng; Yang, Zhengwen; Huang, Anjun; Zhang, Hailu; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo

    2018-05-02

    Reversible luminescence modulation of upconversion phosphors has the potential applications as photoswitches and optical memory and data storage devices. Previously, the photochromic reaction was extensively used for the realization of reversible luminescence modulation. It is very necessary to develop other approaches such as thermomchromic reaction to obtain the reversible upconversion luminescence modulation. In this work, the WO 3 :Yb 3+ ,Er 3+ phosphors with various colors were prepared at various temperatures, exhibiting tunable upconversion luminescence attributed to the formation of oxygen vacancies in the host. Upon heat treatment in the reducing atmosphere or air, the WO 3 :Yb 3+ ,Er 3+ phosphors show a reversible thermomchromic property. The reversible upconversion luminescence modulation of WO 3 :Yb 3+ ,Er 3+ phosphors was observed based on thermomchromic reaction. Additionally, the upconversion luminescence modulation is maintained after several cycles, indicating its excellent stability. The WO 3 :Yb 3+ ,Er 3+ phosphors with reversible upconversion luminescence and excellent reproducibility have potential applications as the photoswitches and optical memory and data storage devices.

  1. The mesolimbic system participates in the naltrexone-induced reversal of sexual exhaustion: opposite effects of intra-VTA naltrexone administration on copulation of sexually experienced and sexually exhausted male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garduño-Gutiérrez, René; León-Olea, Martha; Rodríguez-Manzo, Gabriela

    2013-11-01

    Male rats allowed to copulate until reaching sexual exhaustion exhibit a long-lasting sexual behavior inhibition (around 72 h) that can be reversed by systemic opioid receptor antagonist administration. Copulation activates the mesolimbic dopaminergic system (MLS) and promotes endogenous opioid release. In addition, endogenous opioids, acting at the ventral tegmental area (VTA), modulate the activity of the MLS. We hypothesized that endogenous opioids participate in the sexual exhaustion phenomenon by interacting with VTA opioid receptors and consequently, its reversal by opioid antagonists could be exerted at those receptors. In this study we determined the effects of intra-VTA infusion of different doses of the non-specific opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.1-1.0 μg/rat) on the already established sexual behavior inhibition of sexually exhausted male rats. To elucidate the possible involvement of VTA δ-opioid receptors in the naltrexone-mediated reversal of sexual exhaustion, the effects of different doses of the selective δ-opioid receptor antagonist, naltrindole (0.03-1.0 μg/rat) were also tested. Results showed that intra-VTA injection of 0.3 μg naltrexone reversed the sexual inhibition of sexually exhausted rats, evidenced by an increased percentage of animals capable of showing two successive ejaculations. Intra-VTA infused naltrindole did not reverse sexual exhaustion at any dose. It is concluded that the MLS is involved in the reversal of sexual exhaustion induced by systemic naltrexone, and that μ-, but not δ-opioid receptors participate in this effect. Intra-VTA naltrexone infusion to sexually experienced male rats had an inhibitory effect on sexual activity. The opposite effects of intra-VTA naltrexone on male rat sexual behavior expression of sexually experienced and sexually exhausted rats is discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. MicroRNA-15b regulates reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK) expression in human uterine leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yichun; Guo, Lankai; Zukerberg, Lawrence; Rueda, Bo R; Styer, Aaron K

    2016-08-17

    Human uterine leiomyoma (fibroids; LYO) are the most common benign neoplasms in reproductive-aged women. Dysregulated extracellular matrix and irregular LYO reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK) expression are thought to be mediated by aberrant microRNA (miR) expression. The relationship of miR-15b and RECK expression in LYO has not been studied. The expression levels of miR-15b and RECK were determined by quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry in cultures derived from commercial primary leiomyoma (cpLYO) and myometrial (cpMYO) cell lines and leiomyoma (pLYO) and myometrium (pMYO) tissue from surgical samples respectively. The relationship between miR-15b and RECK expression in cpLYO and pLYO (compared to their respective myometrial controls) was evaluated following transfection of cell cultures with either miR-15b mimic or inhibitor. Elevated levels of miR-15b were observed in cpLYO (2.82-fold; p = 0.04) and pLYO cell (1.30-fold; p = 0.0001) cultures respectively compared to corresponding MYO cell controls. Following transfection with miR-15b mimic, cpLYO cells (0.62-fold; p < 0.0001) and pLYO cells (0.68-fold; p < 0.0001) demonstrated reduced RECK protein expression. Following transfection with miR-15b inhibitor, cpLYO cells (1.20-fold; p < 0.0001) and pLYO cells (1.31-fold; p = 0.0007) demonstrated elevated RECK protein expression. RECK protein expression was reduced in pLYO tissues (0.73-fold; p < 0.0001) and pLYO (0.47-fold; p = 0.047) cells when compared to the corresponding MYO tissue controls. Our findings suggest that miR-15b negatively regulates RECK expression in LYO, and increased miR-15b and decreased RECK expression may contribute to the pathobiology of LYO. The functional significance of miR-15b and RECK expression warrants further investigation as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of human LYO.

  3. Lithium, phenserine, memantine and pioglitazone reverse memory deficit and restore phospho-GSK3β decreased in hippocampus in intracerebroventricular streptozotocin induced memory deficit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Lopez, Teresa; Liy-Salmeron, Gustavo; Hong, Enrique; Meneses, Alfredo

    2011-12-02

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) streptozotocin (STZ) treated rat has been described as a suitable model for sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Central application of STZ has demonstrated behavioral and neurochemical features that resembled those found in human AD. Chronic treatments with antioxidants, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, or improving glucose utilization drugs have reported a beneficial effect in ICV STZ-treated rats. In the present study the post-training administration of a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3) inhibitor, lithium; antidementia drugs: phenserine and memantine, and insulin sensitizer, pioglitazone on memory function of ICV STZ-rats was assessed. In these same animals the phosphorylated GSK3β (p-GSK3β) and total GSK3β levels were determined, and importantly GSK3β regulates the tau phosphorylation responsible for neurofibrillary tangle formation in AD. Wistar rats received ICV STZ application (3mg/kg twice) and 2 weeks later short- (STM) and long-term memories (LTM) were assessed in an autoshaping learning task. Animals were sacrificed immediately following the last autoshaping session, their brains removed and dissected. The enzymes were measured in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) by western blot. ICV STZ-treated rats showed a memory deficit and significantly decreased p-GSK3β levels, while total GSK3β did not change, in both the hippocampus and PFC. Memory impairment was reversed by lithium (100mg/kg), phenserine (1mg/kg), memantine (5mg/kg) and pioglitazone (30 mg/kg). The p-GSK3β levels were restored by lithium, phenserine and pioglitazone in the hippocampus, and restored by lithium in the PFC. Memantine produced no changes in p-GSK3β levels in neither the hippocampus nor PFC. Total GSK3β levels did not change with either drug. Altogether these results show the beneficial effects of drugs with different mechanisms of actions on memory impairment induced by ICV STZ, and restored p-GSK3β levels, a kinase key of

  4. Cardiac resynchronization induces major structural and functional reverse remodeling in patients with New York Heart Association class I/II heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    St John Sutton, Martin; Ghio, Stefano; Plappert, Ted

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves LV structure, function, and clinical outcomes in New York Heart Association class III/IV heart failure with prolonged QRS. It is not known whether patients with New York Heart Association class I/II systolic heart failure exhibit left...... ventricular (LV) reverse remodeling with CRT or whether reverse remodeling is modified by the cause of heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: Six hundred ten patients with New York Heart Association class I/II heart failure, QRS duration > or =120 ms, LV end-diastolic dimension > or =55 mm, and LV ejection...... reduction in LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volume indexes and a 3-fold greater increase in LV ejection fraction in patients with nonischemic causes of heart failure. CONCLUSIONS: CRT in patients with New York Heart Association I/II resulted in major structural and functional reverse remodeling at 1 year...

  5. Microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence combined with one-step duplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for the rapid detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 in throat swab specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ruan; Chengjun, Sun; Heng, Chen; Chen, Zhou; Yuanqian, Li; Yongxin, Li

    2015-07-01

    Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 are the main pathogens causing hand-foot-mouth disease. In this paper, microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence combined with one-step duplex reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction has been developed for the detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 in throat swab specimens. The specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplicons labeled with SYBR Orange were separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis and detected by laser induced fluorescence detector within 7 min. The intraday and interday relative standard deviation of migration time for DNA Marker was in the range of 1.36-2.94 and 2.78-3.96%, respectively. The detection limits were as low as 2.06 × 10(3) copies/mL for Enterovirus 71 and 5 × 10(3) copies/mL for Coxsackievirus A16. No cross-reactivity was observed with rotavirus, astrovirus, norovirus, and adenovirus, which showed good specificity of the method. This assay was validated using 100 throat swab specimens that were detected by real-time reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction in parallel and the two methods produced the same results. This study provided a rapid, sensitive and specific method for the detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16, which make a contribution to significant time and cost saving for the identification and treatment of patients. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. The mitochondrial genomes of Nuttalliella namaqua (Ixodoidea: Nuttalliellidae and Argas africolumbae (Ixodoidae: Argasidae: estimation of divergence dates for the major tick lineages and reconstruction of ancestral blood-feeding characters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben J Mans

    Full Text Available Ixodida are composed of hard (Ixodidae, soft (Argasidae and the monotypic Nuttalliellidae (Nuttalliella namaqua tick families. Nuclear 18S rRNA analysis suggested that N. namaqua was the closest extant relative to the last common ancestral tick lineage. The mitochondrial genomes of N. namaqua and Argas africolumbae were determined using next generation sequencing and de novo assembly to investigate this further. The latter was included since previous estimates on the divergence times of argasids lacked data for this major genus. Mitochondrial gene order for both was identical to that of the Argasidae and Prostriata. Bayesian analysis of the COI, Cytb, ND1, ND2 and ND4 genes confirmed the monophyly of ticks, the basal position of N. namaqua to the other tick families and the accepted systematic relationships of the other tick genera. Molecular clock estimates were derived for the divergence of the major tick lineages and supported previous estimates on the origins of ticks in the Carboniferous. N. namaqua larvae fed successfully on lizards and mice in a prolonged manner similar to many argasids and all ixodids. Excess blood meal-derived water was secreted via the salivary glands, similar to ixodids. We propose that this prolonged larval feeding style eventually gave rise to the long feeding periods that typify the single larval, nymphal and adult stages of ixodid ticks and the associated secretion of water via the salivary glands. Ancestral reconstruction of characters involved in blood-feeding indicates that most of the characteristics unique to either hard or soft tick families were present in the ancestral tick lineage.

  7. Kinetic Line Voronoi Operations and Their Reversibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mioc, Darka; Anton, François; Gold, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    In Geographic Information Systems the reversibility of map update operations has not been explored yet. In this paper we are using the Voronoi based Quad-edge data structure to define reversible map update operations. The reversibility of the map operations has been formalised at the lowest level...... mechanisms and dynamic map visualisations. In order to use the reversibility within the kinetic Voronoi diagram of points and open oriented line segments, we need to assure that reversing the map commands will produce exactly the changes in the map equivalent to the previous map states. To prove...... that reversing the map update operations produces the exact reverse changes, we show an isomorphism between the set of complex operations on the kinetic Voronoi diagram of points and open oriented line segments and the sets of numbers of new / deleted Voronoi regions induced by these operations, and its...

  8. Peripheral a-helical CRF (9-41) does not reverse stress-induced mast cell dependent visceral hypersensitivity in maternally separated rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wijngaard, R. M.; Stanisor, O. I.; van Diest, S. A.; Welting, O.; Wouters, M. M.; de Jonge, W. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute stress-induced hypersensitivity to colorectal distention was shown to depend on corticotropin releasing factor (CRF)-induced mast cell degranulation. At present it remains unclear whether CRF also induces chronic poststress activation of these cells. Accordingly, the objective of

  9. In vitro transfection of the hepatitis B virus PreS2 gene into the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 induces upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hua; Luan Fang; Ju Ying; Shen Hongyu; Gao Lifen; Wang Xiaoyan; Liu Suxia; Zhang Lining; Sun Wensheng; Ma Chunhong

    2007-01-01

    The preS2 domain is the minimal functional unit of transcription activators that is encoded by the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface (S) gene. It is present in more than one-third of the HBV-integrates in HBV induced hepatocarcinoma (HCC). To further understand the functional role of PreS2 in hepatocytes, a PreS2 expression plasmid, pcS2, was constructed and stably transfected into HepG2 cells. We conducted growth curve and colony-forming assays to study the impact of PreS2 expression on cell proliferation. Cells transfected with PreS2 proliferated more rapidly and formed colonies in soft agar. PreS2 expressing cells also induced upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and telomerase activation by RT-PCR and the modified TRAP assay. Blocking expression of hTERT with antisense oligonuleotide reversed the growth rate in cells stably transfected with PreS2. Our data suggest that PreS2 may increase the malignant transformation of human HCC cell line HepG2 by upregulating hTERT and inducing telomerase activation

  10. In vitro transfection of the hepatitis B virus PreS2 gene into the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 induces upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Liu [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Fang, Luan [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Ying, Ju [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Hongyu, Shen [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Lifen, Gao [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Xiaoyan, Wang [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Suxia, Liu [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Lining, Zhang [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Wensheng, Sun [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Chunhong, Ma [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology, Ministry of Education (China)]. E-mail: machunhong@sdu.edu.cn

    2007-04-06

    The preS2 domain is the minimal functional unit of transcription activators that is encoded by the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface (S) gene. It is present in more than one-third of the HBV-integrates in HBV induced hepatocarcinoma (HCC). To further understand the functional role of PreS2 in hepatocytes, a PreS2 expression plasmid, pcS2, was constructed and stably transfected into HepG2 cells. We conducted growth curve and colony-forming assays to study the impact of PreS2 expression on cell proliferation. Cells transfected with PreS2 proliferated more rapidly and formed colonies in soft agar. PreS2 expressing cells also induced upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and telomerase activation by RT-PCR and the modified TRAP assay. Blocking expression of hTERT with antisense oligonuleotide reversed the growth rate in cells stably transfected with PreS2. Our data suggest that PreS2 may increase the malignant transformation of human HCC cell line HepG2 by upregulating hTERT and inducing telomerase activation.

  11. Managing Reverse Logistics or Reversing Logistics Management?

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Marisa

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the past, supply chains were busy fine-tuning the logistics from raw material to the end customer. Today an increasing flow of products is going back in the chain. Thus, companies have to manage reverse logistics as well.This thesis contributes to a better understanding of reverse logistics. The thesis brings insights on reverse logistics decision-making and it lays down theoretical principles for reverse logistics as a research field.In particular it puts together a framework ...

  12. Influence of grain structure on the deformation mechanism in martensitic shear reversion-induced Fe-16Cr-10Ni model austenitic alloy with low interstitial content: Coarse-grained versus nano-grained/ultrafine-grained structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challa, V.S.A. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Department of Metallurgical, Materials Engineering, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra2@utep.edu [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Department of Metallurgical, Materials Engineering, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Somani, M.C. [Center for Advanced Steels Research, The University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Wang, Z.D. [State Key Laboratory for Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, 3-11 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2016-04-20

    Nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) materials characterized by high strength-high ductility combination are excellent vehicles to obtain an unambiguous understanding of deformation mechanisms vis-à-vis their coarse-grained counterparts. In this context, the innovative concept of phase reversion-induced NG/UFG structure enabled achieving high strength besides comparable ductility, for instance, in metastable austenitic stainless steels. In the phase reversion process, severe deformation of austenite at room temperature (typically ~60–80%) transforms face-centered cubic austenite (γ) to body centered cubic martensite (α′). Upon annealing, martensite reverts to austenite leading to extensive grain refinement. The objective of the present study to fundamentally understand the deformation mechanisms in NG/UFG structure in relation to that of the coarse-grained (CG) structure was accomplished by combining depth-sensing nanoscale experiments on an Fe-16Cr-10Ni model austenitic alloy conducted at different strain rates, followed by the study of structural evolution in the deformed zone using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the high strength NG/UFG steel (YS~585 MPa), stacking faults and nanotwins contributed to the enhanced ductility (El~35%), while in the case of low strength (YS~260 MPa) coarse-grained (CG) counterpart, ductility was also high (El~40%), but chiefly due to strain-induced martensite, which points to a clear case of grain size effect (and the corresponding level of strength). The distinct change in the deformation mechanism from stacking faults and twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) in the NG structure to transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) in the CG structure is elucidated in terms of austenite stability-strain energy relationship. The insights on the relationship between grain structure (and strength) and deformation mechanisms are envisaged to be important in providing a new direction for the futuristic design of high strength

  13. Sex Reversal in Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians have been widely used to study developmental biology due to the fact that embryo development takes place independently of the maternal organism and that observations and experimental approaches are easy. Some amphibians like Xenopus became model organisms in this field. In the first part of this article, the differentiation of the gonads in amphibians and the mechanisms governing this process are reviewed. In the second part, the state of the art about sex reversal, which can be induced by steroid hormones in general and by temperature in some species, is presented. Also information about pollutants found in the environment that could interfere with the development of the amphibian reproductive apparatus or with their reproductive physiology is given. Such compounds could play a part in the amphibian decline, since in the wild, many amphibians are endangered species. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Effect of Quorum Sensing by Staphylococcus epidermidis on the Attraction Response of Female Adult Yellow Fever Mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti aegypti (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Culicidae), to a Blood-Feeding Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyang; Crippen, Tawni L; Coates, Craig J; Wood, Thomas K; Tomberlin, Jeffery K

    2015-01-01

    host-associated microbes to determine suitability for blood feeding. We believe these data suggest that manipulating quorum sensing by bacteria could serve as a novel approach for reducing mosquito attraction to hosts, or possibly enhancing the trapping of adults at favored oviposition sites.

  15. Effect of Quorum Sensing by Staphylococcus epidermidis on the Attraction Response of Female Adult Yellow Fever Mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti aegypti (Linnaeus (Diptera: Culicidae, to a Blood-Feeding Source.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyang Zhang

    occurring between host-associated microbes to determine suitability for blood feeding. We believe these data suggest that manipulating quorum sensing by bacteria could serve as a novel approach for reducing mosquito attraction to hosts, or possibly enhancing the trapping of adults at favored oviposition sites.

  16. Parkinson’s disease managing reversible neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Cole, Ted; McDougall, Beth; Westaway, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the Parkinson’s disease (PD) symptom course has been classified as an irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease. This paper documents 29 PD and treatment-induced systemic depletion etiologies which cause and/or exacerbate the seven novel primary relative nutritional deficiencies associated with PD. These reversible relative nutritional deficiencies (RNDs) may facilitate and accelerate irreversible progressive neurodegeneration, while other reversible RNDs may induce previously undocumented reversible pseudo-neurodegeneration that is hiding in plain sight since the symptoms are identical to the symptoms being experienced by the PD patient. Documented herein is a novel nutritional approach for reversible processes management which may slow or halt irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease and correct reversible RNDs whose symptoms are identical to the patient’s PD symptoms. PMID:27103805

  17. Icariin reverses corticosterone-induced depression-like behavior, decrease in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and metabolic network disturbances revealed by NMR-based metabonomics in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Meng-Juan; Han, Bin; Wang, Shu-mei; Liang, Sheng-wang; Zou, Zhong-jie

    2016-05-10

    Previously published reports have revealed the antidepressant-like effects of icariin in a chronic mild stress model of depression and in a social defeat stress model in mice. However, the therapeutic effect of icariin in an animal model of glucocorticoid-in