WorldWideScience

Sample records for blood viscosity

  1. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico

    OpenAIRE

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Pan, Wenxiao; Caswell, Bruce; Gompper, Gerhard; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-01-01

    The viscosity of blood has long been used as an indicator in the understanding and treatment of disease, and the advent of modern viscometers allows its measurement with ever-improving clinical convenience. However, these advances have not been matched by theoretical developments that can yield a quantitative understanding of blood’s microrheology and its possible connection to relevant biomolecules (e.g., fibrinogen). Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics and two different red blood cell m...

  2. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Pan, Wenxiao; Caswell, Bruce; Gompper, Gerhard; Karniadakis, George E

    2011-07-19

    The viscosity of blood has long been used as an indicator in the understanding and treatment of disease, and the advent of modern viscometers allows its measurement with ever-improving clinical convenience. However, these advances have not been matched by theoretical developments that can yield a quantitative understanding of blood's microrheology and its possible connection to relevant biomolecules (e.g., fibrinogen). Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics and two different red blood cell models, we accurately predict the dependence of blood viscosity on shear rate and hematocrit. We explicitly represent cell-cell interactions and identify the types and sizes of reversible rouleaux structures that yield a tremendous increase of blood viscosity at low shear rates. We also present the first quantitative estimates of the magnitude of adhesive forces between red cells. In addition, our simulations support the hypothesis, previously deduced from experiments, of yield stress as an indicator of cell aggregation. This non-Newtonian behavior is analyzed and related to the suspension's microstructure, deformation, and dynamics of single red blood cells. The most complex cell dynamics occurs in the intermediate shear rate regime, where individual cells experience severe deformation and transient folded conformations. The generality of these cell models together with single-cell measurements points to the future prediction of blood-viscosity anomalies and the corresponding microstructures associated with various diseases (e.g., malaria, AIDS, and diabetes mellitus). The models can easily be adapted to tune the properties of a much wider class of complex fluids including capsule and vesicle suspensions. PMID:21730178

  3. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A. [Inst. of Complex Systems and Inst. for Advanced Simulation, Julich (Germany); Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Pan, Wenxiao [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Caswell, Bruce [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Gompper, Gerhard [Inst. of Complex Systems and Inst. for Advanced Simulation, Julich (Germany); Karniadakis, George E. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2011-07-05

    Cellular suspensions such as blood are a part of living organisms and their rheological and flow characteristics determine and affect majority of vital functions. The rheological and flow properties of cell suspensions are determined by collective dynamics of cells, their structure or arrangement, cell properties and interactions. We study these relations for blood in silico using a mesoscopic particle-based method and two different models (multi-scale/low-dimensional) of red blood cells. The models yield accurate quantitative predictions of the dependence of blood viscosity on shear rate and hematocrit. We explicitly model cell aggregation interactions and demonstrate the formation of reversible rouleaux structures resulting in a tremendous increase of blood viscosity at low shear rates and yield stress, in agreement with experiments. The non-Newtonian behavior of such cell suspensions (e.g., shear thinning, yield stress) is analyzed and related to the suspension’s microstructure, deformation and dynamics of single cells. We provide the flrst quantitative estimates of normal stress differences and magnitude of aggregation forces in blood. Finally, the flexibility of the cell models allows them to be employed for quantitative analysis of a much wider class of complex fluids including cell, capsule, and vesicle suspensions.

  4. Blood viscosity during coagulation at different shear rates

    OpenAIRE

    Ranucci, Marco; Laddomada, Tommaso; Ranucci, Matteo; Baryshnikova, Ekaterina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract During the coagulation process, blood changes from a liquid to a solid gel phase. These changes are reflected by changes in blood viscosity; however, blood viscosity at different shear rates (SR) has not been previously explored during the coagulation process. In this study, we investigated the viscosity changes of whole blood in 10 subjects with a normal coagulation profile, using a cone‐on‐plate viscosimeter. For each subject, three consecutive measurements were performed, at a SR ...

  5. Effect of plasma exchange on blood viscosity and cerebral blood flow.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, M M; Marshall, J

    1982-01-01

    The effects of plasma exchange using a low viscosity plasma substitute on blood viscosity and cerebral blood flow were investigated in eight subjects with normal cerebral vasculature. Plasma exchange resulted in significant reductions in plasma viscosity, whole blood viscosity, globulin and fibrinogen concentration without affecting packed cell volume. The reduction in whole blood viscosity was more pronounced at low shear rates suggesting an additional effect on red cell aggregation. Despite...

  6. Effect of rouleaux size of erythrocyte on blood viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the rouleaux size dependence of viscosity in concentrated red blood cell suspension is derived analytically, by using reversible kinetic equation of coagulation, to reveal the effect of erythrocyte aggregation on the blood viscosity. In the limit of dilute concentration and low shear rate, the result does not reduce to Casson's equation. In the end we argue Murata's result on the shear rate dependence of viscosity. (author). 8 refs, 5 figs

  7. Cytokine modulation of human blood viscosity from vivax malaria patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Edson Fredulin; Cantarini, Déborah Giovanna; Siqueira, Renan; Ribeiro, Elton Brito; Braga, Érika Martins; Honório-França, Adenilda Cristina; França, Eduardo Luzía

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a major infectious disease in several countries and is caused by protozoa of the genus Plasmodium. In vivax malaria patients, inflammatory processes occur, as well as changes in cytokines and blood flow. The present study analyzed the cytokine modulation of blood viscosity from patients infected with Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax). Blood samples were collected from 42 non-infected individuals (control group) and 37 individuals infected with P. vivax. The IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNFα, TGF-β and IL-17 cytokine concentrations in the serum were assessed, and the blood rheological properties were determined. The analysis of blood viscosity for shear rates revealed that the blood viscosity of the infected patients was significantly greater than that of the non-infected individuals. The viscosity of the blood was greater in the infected individuals than in the non-infected subjects. The serum from individuals with P. vivax infections exhibited higher IFN-γ and IL-17 concentrations and lower TGF-β levels. Incubation of the blood from infected individuals with IL-17 or IL-17 associated with IFN-γ reduced the viscosity to rates equivalent to the blood from non-infected individuals. Independently of cytokine modulation, no correlation was found between the parasitemia and blood viscosity of the infected patients. These data suggest that the alterations of blood viscosity are relevant as an auxiliary tool for the clinical diagnosis of disease. In malaria, erythrocytes are more sensitive to osmotic shock, and the reduction of viscosity by IL-17 may be related to a possible immunomodulator agent during infection. PMID:26948901

  8. Whole blood viscosity extrapolation formula: Note on appropriateness of units

    OpenAIRE

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose; Ross Stuart Richards

    2011-01-01

    Background : A series has recently been done on whole blood viscosity. The first on the series proposed extrapolation chart with conventional reference range. Since the publication, two concerns have been received in personal communications. The first expressed concern over the use of serum proteins values in ′g/L′ instead of ′g/dL′ that was contained in the referenced material. The second enquired on suitability of the formula for determination of blood viscosity at low shear rate. Aim : Thi...

  9. Whole blood viscosity extrapolation formula: Note on appropriateness of units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : A series has recently been done on whole blood viscosity. The first on the series proposed extrapolation chart with conventional reference range. Since the publication, two concerns have been received in personal communications. The first expressed concern over the use of serum proteins values in ′g/L′ instead of ′g/dL′ that was contained in the referenced material. The second enquired on suitability of the formula for determination of blood viscosity at low shear rate. Aim : This work sets out to compare different units-converted-modifications of the extrapolation with a view to develop a statement of comparison and suitability of units. Materials and Methods : The values of haematocrit and serum proteins were used in different unit-conversions on the mathematical formula to derive four modifications, which were compared. Five clinical cases that were specifically tested for whole blood viscosity, and had results for haematocrit and serum proteins were evaluated. The appropriateness of modifications for determination of viscosity at low shear rate was reviewed. Results : Except as modified and used in the series, determination of whole blood viscosity at low shear rate using other unit conversions on the formula yields negative values for all five cases. Conclusion : Given that it is unexpected for blood viscosity level to be zero let alone less, it is logical that negative values are invalid. A formula that gives the least invalid results may be most appropriate. Therefore, extrapolation modification used in the series is most appropriate.

  10. Whole blood viscosity issues VI: Association with blood salicylate level and gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : This series on whole blood viscosity issues has been trying to elucidate the sensitivity, specificity and usefulness of the laboratory parameter in clinical practice. The postulation has been that since antiplatelet is used in the management of stasis, of which blood viscosity is an index, the latter would be useful laboratory indication and/or contraindication. Aim : The aim of this study was to observe whether blood level of acetylsalicylic acid differs with the level of whole blood viscosity. Patients and Methods : Out of the ten years database, 538 cases that were concomitantly tested for haematocrit, total proteins and blood level of salicylate were selected for this study. A separate nine cases of positive faecal occult blood tests were audited for blood viscosity and reviewed. Results : A statistically significant difference is observed with lower blood viscosity being associated with higher salicylate level in comparison of the former between the highest vs. lowest quartiles (p < 0.002. This observation demonstrates the effect of aspirin in lowering blood stasis. Reviewing the positive faecal occult blood cases indicate that gastrointestinal bleeding is characterized by relative hypoviscosity and that hyperviscosity is not present during bleeding complications. Conclusion : The findings affirm that whole blood viscosity is a valid clinical laboratory parameter for evidence-based contraindication, indication and monitoring of antiplatelet medication. It calls for better appreciation and clinical utility of whole blood viscosity, which (in the absence of viscometer can now be extrapolated from haematocrit and total proteins.

  11. [Blood viscosity and blood factors in non-embolic cerebral infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, C S; Chia, L G

    1990-11-01

    We compared blood viscosity at a high and a low shear rate, hematocrit, as well as levels of fibrinogen, cholesterol, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol between 42 patients with nonembolic cerebral infarction and 39 normal subjects. Blood viscosity, levels of fibrinogen, cholesterol and triglyceride were significantly higher, and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels were significantly lower, in patients than in normal persons. Blood viscosity had a positive correlation with hematocrit and fibrinogen, and a negative correlation with high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, but no correlation with cholesterol and triglyceride. PMID:1982124

  12. On-line dynamic measurement of blood viscosity, hematocrit and change of blood volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To develop an on-line system for the measurement of blood viscosity and hematocrit. The dynamic changes of the macrovascular blood volumes,microvascular blood volumes and the total blood volume were observed by means of calculating from the testing result. Methods: Applying traditional viscosity measurement principle and specific wavelength optic density measurement method, an on-line system for the measurement of blood viscosity and hematocrit was developed, and the A/D multifunctionai board and the testing circuit were designed by ourselves. The system was validated by experiments both in vitro and in vivo. Therapeutic effects of hypertonic saline dextran solution (HSD) and Lactatic Ringer's solution at the early stage after burn-blast combined injury were compared by this method. Results: The results showed that the system has attained the goal of the design. The changes of the blood viscosity and hematocrit could be detected effectively and continuously. The changes of macrovascular, microvascular and total blood volume could be calculated approximately. Conclusions: The system and the method can continuously on-line test the blood viscosity and hematocrit, and reveal the change and distribution of blood volumes more accurately and dearly in the therapy process by estimating changes of the macrovascular, microvascular and total blood volumes, respectively. It has confirmed that HSD treatment could increase blood pressure and attenuate tissue edema by significantly increasing total blood volume,improving macrocirculatory and microcirculatory blood volumes. This study suggested that it could be desirable to develop an experiment technique based on the method mentioned above.

  13. The clinical significance of whole blood viscosity in (cardio)vascular medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Pop, G.A.M.; Duncker, D. J.; Gardien, M.; Vranckx, P.; Versluis, S.; Hasan, D.; Slager, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    Whole blood is a non-Newtonian fluid, which means that its viscosity depends on shear rate. At low shear, blood cells aggregate, which induces a sharp increase in viscosity, whereas at higher shear blood cells disaggregate, deform and align in the direction of flow. Other important determinants of blood viscosity are the haematocrit, the presence of macro-molecules in the medium, temperature and, especially at high shear, the deformability of red blood cells. At the sites of severe atheroscle...

  14. Blood pressure and blood viscosity are not correlated in normal healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salazar Vázquez BY

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Beatriz Y Salazar Vázquez1,21Departamento de Medicina Experimental, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Hospital General de México, México D.F., México; 2Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: The relationship between blood viscosity, hematocrit (Hct, and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP was studied in a healthy population of 91 men and 66 women with an average age of 30.6 ± 8.0 years, from the city of Victoria de Durango (1800 m elevation. In women and men, Hct values were 42.4% ± 2.9% and 47.2% ± 2.3%, blood viscosities were 4.5 ± 0.7 and 6.1 ± 1.0 cP, and MAP was 83.0 ± 6.8 and 88.0 ± 6.1 mmHg, respectively. The correlation between blood viscosity and Hct was linear and positive (r2 = 0.48 and identical to that of previous studies reported in the literature when men and women are taken as a single group. Separating the data by gender yielded positive, linear correlations (r2 = 0.18 and 0.10, respectively with identical slopes, however blood viscosity for men was 1.2 cP greater than in women (P = 0.02. MAP and blood viscosity (and Hct were not statistically associated when men and women were analyzed separately and were weakly positively correlated (r2 = 0.08, P < 0.02 when treated as a group. The present results suggest that studies that show a positive correlation between MAP and blood viscosity (and Hct do not differentiate data according to gender, or involve populations that do not compensate for increased blood viscosity and potentially increased shear stress.Keywords: blood pressure, blood viscosity, hematocrit, gender, endothelial dysfunction

  15. Apparent viscosity of human blood in a high static magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haik, Yousef E-mail: haik@eng.fsu.edu; Pai, Vinay; Chen Chingjen

    2001-07-01

    This study investigates the apparent additive viscosity due to magnetic effects on the human blood. Experimental results show that blood flow rate under gravity decreases by 30% when subjected to a high magnetic field of 10 T. The decrease in the flow rate is due to an increase in the apparent viscosity of the blood due to the magnetic field. A correlation describing the viscosity of blood under these conditions is introduced which depends on the Langevin function and parameters.

  16. Application of the Carreau viscosity model to the oscillatory flow in blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabakova, Sonia; Kutev, Nikolay; Radev, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    When studying the oscillatory flow in different types of blood vessels it is very important to know what type of the blood viscosity model has to be used. In general the blood viscosity is defined as a shear-thinning liquid, for which there exist different shear-dependent models, for example the Carreau model, which represents the viscosity as a non-linear function of the shear-rate. In some cases, however, the blood viscosity could be regarded as constant, i.e., the blood is treated as Newtonian fluid. The aim of the present work is to show theoretically and numerically some approximate limits of the Newtonian model application, when the blood vessel is assumed as a 2D straight tube. The obtained results are in agreement with other authors' numerical results based on similar blood viscosity models.

  17. Measurement of human blood viscosity by an electromagnetic spinning sphere viscometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Koji; Abumiya, Takeo; Sakai, Keiji; Hirano, Miki; Osanai, Toshiya; Shichinohe, Hideo; Nakayama, Naoki; Kazumata, Ken; Aida, Toshimitsu; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2016-08-01

    We herein applied an electromagnetic spinning sphere (EMS) viscometer to the measurement of human blood viscosity for the first time. We collected blood samples from 100 healthy outpatient volunteers in order to analyse viscosity dependence on blood cell parameters and on the shear rate with a simple approximation formula [ηi (γ)\\, = Ai γ(- pi) + η0]. Viscosity dependence on blood cell parameters was relatively high at a high shear rate, but became lower as the shear rate decreased. The approximation formula with appropriate parameters of Ai and pi nearly faithfully reproduced actual blood rheological behaviour with a standard deviation of 1.5%. The distributions of Ai and pi values were broad, suggesting that the pattern of viscosity dependence on the shear rate varied with individual differences. The results obtained using the EMS viscometer suggest that blood viscosity values are individual-specific and actual individual measurements are important for understanding rheological conditions. PMID:27167739

  18. Effects of a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage on blood viscosity after dehydration in healthy adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Cui-qing; CHEN Yan-bo; CHEN Zhi-min; ZHANG Lan-tao

    2010-01-01

    Background The consumption of carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages (CEs) has been known to be more effective than plain water for recovery from dehydration. This phenomenon suggests that the ingestion of CEs after dehydration is better than water for maintaining body fluid and plasma volume, and for the recovery from hemoconcentration and high blood viscosity as well. High blood viscosity causes infarction and other cardiovascular events. In this study, CE was compared with water and tea for the ability to reduce increased blood viscosity after dehydration.Methods A crossover random control study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of three beverages for rehydration and decreasing of blood viscosity. Following exercise-induced dehydration of 2.2% of body weight in a permanent warm environment, 10 male subjects rested in a thermoneutral environment for 3 hours (rehydration period,REP). The subjects ingested test beverages equal to their body weight loss during the first 20 minutes in REP. Blood and urine samples were obtained throughout the experiments to assess the rehydration effect.rate was significantly greater for CE ((77.0+3.9)%) than water ((61.2±3.4)%) and tea ((60.5±3.7)%) for 3 hours of rest in REP.Conclusions The recovery from high blood viscosity induced by dehydration was higher with CE consumption than with water or tea. These results suggest that CE is useful for normalizing increased blood viscosity due to exercise-induced dehydration.

  19. Evaluation of oxidative stress and whole blood viscosity for clinical laboratory testing of smoking toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel U. Nwose

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are no clearly established clinical biochemical markers for cigarette smoking despite the knowledge that cigarette smoking is a risk factor for various diseases, especially cardiovascular complications of respiratory pathologies. However, there are reports of significant increases in blood viscosity and oxidative stress among smokers. The main objective of the study was to ascertain the association of toxicity from cigarette smoking on whole blood viscosity in our data. Methods: This study analysed the archived clinical data of 20 cigarette smokers and 20 apparently healthy individuals. Results: The data show that on average, oxidative stress levels are relatively the same between groups, while whole blood viscosity is statistically significantly lower in non-smokers compared to smokers. Conclusions: This report suggests that oxidative stress induced whole blood hyper-viscosity could be a valid biomarker for laboratory testing of smoking toxicity among cigarette smokers. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2332-2336

  20. Blood Viscosity and Hematocrit as Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Tamariz, Leonardo J; Young, J. Hunter; Pankow, James S; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Schmidt, Maria Ines; Astor, Brad; Frederick L. Brancati

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence support the notion that elevated blood viscosity may predispose to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus by limiting delivery of glucose, insulin, and oxygen to metabolically active tissues. To test this hypothesis, the authors analyzed longitudinal data on 12,881 initially nondiabetic adults, aged 45–64 years, who were participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (1987–1998). Whole blood viscosity was estimated by using a validated ...

  1. Sensorless Viscosity Measurement in a Magnetically-Levitated Rotary Blood Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijikata, Wataru; Rao, Jun; Abe, Shodai; Takatani, Setsuo; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2015-07-01

    Controlling the flow rate in an implantable rotary blood pump based on the physiological demand made by the body is important. Even though various methods to estimate the flow rate without using a flow meter have been proposed, no adequate method for measuring the blood viscosity, which is necessary for an accurate estimate of the flow rate, without using additional sensors or mechanisms in a noninvasive way, has yet been realized. We have developed a sensorless method for measuring viscosity in magnetically levitated rotary blood pumps, which requires no additional sensors or mechanisms. By applying vibrational excitation to the impeller using a magnetic bearing, we measured the viscosity of the working fluid by measuring the phase difference between the current in the magnetic bearing and the displacement of the impeller. The measured viscosity showed a high correlation (R(2)  > 0.992) with respect to a reference viscosity. The mean absolute deviation of the measured viscosity was 0.12 mPa·s for several working fluids with viscosities ranging from 1.18 to 5.12 mPa·s. The proposed sensorless measurement method has the possibility of being utilized for estimating flow rate. PMID:25920684

  2. Endothelial Dysfunction and Blood Viscosity Inpatients with Unstable Angina in Different Periods of a Solar Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshina, S. S.; Tokaeva, L. K.; Dolgova, E. M.; Afanas'yeva, T. N.; Strelnikova, O. A.

    The origin of hemorheologic and endothelial defects in patients with unstable angina (comparing with healthy persons) is determined by a solar activity period: the blood viscosity increases in a period of high solar activity in the vessels of small, medium and macro diameters, a local decompensate dysfunction of small vessels endothelium had been fixed (microcirculation area). In the period of a low solar activity there is an increase of a blood viscosity in vessels of all diameters, generalized subcompensated endothelial dysfunction is developed (on the background of the III phase blood clotting activating). In the period of a high solar activity a higher blood viscosity had been fixed, comparing with the period of a low solar activity.

  3. Mathematical Modelling of Blood Flow through a Tapered Overlapping Stenosed Artery with Variable Viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Shit, G. C.; Roy, M.; Sinha, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of blood flow through a tapered and overlapping stenosed artery under the action of an externally applied magnetic field. The fluid (blood) medium is assumed to be porous in nature. The variable viscosity of blood depending on hematocrit (percentage volume of erythrocytes) is taken into account in order to improve resemblance to the real situation. The governing equation for laminar, incompressible and Newtonian fluid subject to the boundary conditions ...

  4. Mathematical modelling of blood flow through a tapered overlapping stenosed artery with variable viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Shit, G. C.; Roy, M.; Sinha, A

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of blood flow through a tapered and overlapping stenosed artery under the action of an externally applied magnetic field. The fluid (blood) medium is assumed to be porous in nature. The variable viscosity of blood depending on hematocrit (percentage volume of erythrocytes) is taken into account in order to improve resemblance to the real situation. The governing equation for laminar, incompressible and Newtonian fluid subject to the boundary conditions ...

  5. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shit, G.C., E-mail: gopal_iitkgp@yahoo.co.in; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-15

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank–Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance. - Highlights: • We have investigated the pulsatile MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in arteries. • The influence of periodic body acceleration has been taken into account. • The temperature dependent viscosity of blood is considered. • The variable viscosity has an increasing effect on blood flow and heat transfer. • The overall temperature distribution enhances in the presence of magnetic field.

  6. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank–Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance. - Highlights: • We have investigated the pulsatile MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in arteries. • The influence of periodic body acceleration has been taken into account. • The temperature dependent viscosity of blood is considered. • The variable viscosity has an increasing effect on blood flow and heat transfer. • The overall temperature distribution enhances in the presence of magnetic field

  7. Whole blood viscosity assessment issues IV: Prevalence in acute phase inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyperviscosity syndrome has been suggested as not simply an acute reaction. Yet, erythrocyte sedimentation rate is associated with whole blood viscosity and it is an indirect acute phase inflammation marker. Aims: This work investigates the prevalence of hyperviscosity in acute phase inflammation. Materials and Methods: Archived clinical pathology data for the period of 1999 to 2008 were utilized. 40,632-cases tested for C-reactive protein and/or erythrocyte sedimentation rate from five alternate years, which were concomitantly tested for haematocrit and total proteins, were extracted. The prevalence of abnormal viscosity associated with positive results of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were evaluated. Results: Hyperviscosity is infrequently associated with positive C-reactive protein (2.9% and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (2.7% sub-populations, and are not statistically different from their respective negative sub-populations. Normoviscosity is significantly more prevalent in the positive sub-populations (p < 0.01. Further analyses indicate that prevalence of acute phase inflammation is statistically significantly less in hyperviscosity compared to normoviscosity sub-population (p < 0.00001. Actual blood viscosity level increases with level of inflammation though. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that although blood viscosity level may increase with inflammation, hyperviscosity is not frequent in, or sensitive to acute phase inflammation. It portends that whole blood viscosity is not unspecific as acute phase inflammation markers. It calls for clinicians to consider utilizing whole blood viscosity in disease conditions where stasis is implicated, in which it is specific and valuable. It would also benefit to establish whether hyperviscosity is a chronic phase inflammation marker.

  8. Fluid friction and wall viscosity of the 1D blood flow model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Matsukawa, Mami; Ghigo, Arthur; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Fullana, Jose-Maria

    2015-01-01

    We study the behavior of the pulse waves of water into a flexible tube for application to blood flow simulations. In pulse waves both fluid friction and wall viscosity are damping factors, and difficult to evaluate separately. In this paper, the coefficients of fluid friction and wall viscosity are estimated by fitting a nonlinear 1D flow model to experimental data. In the experimental setup, a distensible tube is connected to a piston pump at one end and closed at another end. The pressure and wall displacements are measured simultaneously. A good agreement between model predictions and experiments was achieved. For amplitude decrease, the effect of wall viscosity on the pulse wave has been shown as important as that of fluid viscosity.

  9. Fluid friction and wall viscosity of the 1D blood flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Nishi, Shohei; Matsukawa, Mami; Ghigo, Arthur; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Fullana, Jose-Maria

    2016-02-29

    We study the behavior of the pulse waves of water into a flexible tube for application to blood flow simulations. In pulse waves both fluid friction and wall viscosity are damping factors, and difficult to evaluate separately. In this paper, the coefficients of fluid friction and wall viscosity are estimated by fitting a nonlinear 1D flow model to experimental data. In the experimental setup, a distensible tube is connected to a piston pump at one end and closed at another end. The pressure and wall displacements are measured simultaneously. A good agreement between model predictions and experiments was achieved. For amplitude decrease, the effect of wall viscosity on the pulse wave has been shown as important as that of fluid viscosity. PMID:26862041

  10. Reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, plasma viscosity, and whole blood viscosity by the application of pulsed corona discharges and filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin M.; Fridman, Alexander; Cho, Daniel J.; Cho, Young I.

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of applying pulsed corona discharges to blood plasma to reduce the viscosity of blood plasma and whole blood. Blood plasma was separated from blood cells, treated with corona discharges, and filtered before it was re-mixed with blood cells. Plasma viscosity (PV), whole blood viscosity (WBV), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-c concentration were measured before and after the corona treatment and filtration. Both PV and WBV increased in the case of the corona treatment only, whereas both of them decreased in the case of the corona treatment plus filtration. In particular, the LDL-c decreased in the case of the corona treatment plus filtration by 31.5% from the baseline value. The effect of the corona treatment on the reduction of the WBV was significant at low shear rates, but not at high shear rates, suggesting that the precipitation of the molecules in blood plasma by the corona treatment and subsequent removal may suppress the aggregation of erythrocytes and improve rheological properties of blood.

  11. The Contribution of Red Blood Cell Dynamics to Intrinsic Viscosity and Functional ATP Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Alison; Abkarian, Manouk; Wan, Jiandi; Stone, Howard

    2010-11-01

    In shear flow, red blood cells (RBCs) exhibit a variety of behaviors such as rouleaux formation, tumbling, swinging, and tank-treading. The physiological consequences of these dynamic behaviors are not understood. In vivo, ATP is known to signal vasodilation; however, to our knowledge, no one has deciphered the relevance of RBC microrheology to the functional release of ATP. Previously, we correlated RBC deformation and ATP release in microfluidic constrictions (Wan et al., 2008). In this work, a cone-plate rheometer is used to shear a low hematocrit solution of RBCs at varying viscosity ratios (λ) between the inner cytoplasmic hemoglobin and the outer medium, to determine the intrinsic viscosity of the suspension. Further, using a luciferin-luciferase enzymatic reaction, we report the relative ATP release at varying shear rates. Results indicate that for λ = 1.6, 3.8 and 11.1, ATP release is constant up to 500 s-1, which suggests that the tumbling-tanktreading transition does not alter ATP release in pure shear. For lower viscosity ratios, λ = 1.6 and 3.8, at 500 s-1 a change in slope occurs in the intrinsic viscosity data and is marked by an increase in ATP release. Based on microfluidic observations, this simultaneous change in viscosity and ATP release occurs within the tank-treading regime.

  12. Insoluble Fiber in Young Barley Leaf Suppresses the Increment of Postprandial Blood Glucose Level by Increasing the Digesta Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Takano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. is a well-known cereal plant. Young barley leaf is consumed as a popular green-colored drink, which is named “Aojiru” in Japan. We examined the effects of barley leaf powder (BLP and insoluble fibers derived from BLP on postprandial blood glucose in rats and healthy Japanese volunteers. BLP and insoluble fibers derived from BLP suppressed the increment of postprandial blood glucose levels in rats (, and increased the viscosity of their digesta. The insoluble fibers present in BLP might play a role in controlling blood glucose level by increasing digesta viscosity. In human, BLP suppressed the increment of postprandial blood glucose level only in those which exhibited higher blood glucose levels after meals (. BLP might suppress the increment of postprandial blood glucose level by increasing digesta viscosity in both of rats and humans who require blood glucose monitoring.

  13. Mathematical modelling of blood flow through a tapered overlapping stenosed artery with variable viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Shit, G C; Sinha, A

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of blood flow through a tapered and overlapping stenosed artery under the action of an externally applied magnetic field. The fluid (blood) medium is assumed to be porous in nature. The variable viscosity of blood depending on hematocrit (percentage volume of erythrocytes) is taken into account in order to improve resemblance to the real situation. The governing equation for laminar, incompressible and Newtonian fluid subject to the boundary conditions is solved by using a well known Frobenius method. The analytical expressions for velocity component, volumetric flow rate, wall shear stress and pressure gradient are obtained. The numerical values are extracted from these analytical expressions and are presented graphically. It is observed that the influence of hematocrit, magnetic field and the shape of artery have important impact on the velocity profile, pressure gradient and wall shear stress. Moreover, the effect of primary stenosis on the secondary one has been sig...

  14. Mathematical Modelling of Blood Flow through a Tapered Overlapping Stenosed Artery with Variable Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Shit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical study of blood flow through a tapered and overlapping stenosed artery under the action of an externally applied magnetic field. The fluid (blood medium is assumed to be porous in nature. The variable viscosity of blood depending on hematocrit (percentage volume of erythrocytes is taken into account in order to improve resemblance to the real situation. The governing equation for laminar, incompressible and Newtonian fluid subject to the boundary conditions is solved by using a well known Frobenius method. The analytical expressions for velocity component, volumetric flow rate, wall shear stress and pressure gradient are obtained. The numerical values are extracted from these analytical expressions and are presented graphically. It is observed that the influence of hematocrit, magnetic field and the shape of artery have important impact on the velocity profile, pressure gradient and wall shear stress. Moreover, the effect of primary stenosis on the secondary one has been significantly observed.

  15. Studying red blood cell agglutination by measuring membrane viscosity with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Heloise P.; Fontes, Adriana; de Thomaz, André A.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Barjas-Castro, Maria L.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2007-09-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) viscoelastic membrane contains proteins and glycoproteins embedded in a fluid lipid bilayer that are responsible for cell agglutination. Manipulating RBCs rouleaux with a double optical tweezers, we observed that the cells slide easily one over the others but are strongly connected by their edges. An explanation for this behavior could be the fact that when the cells slide one over the others, proteins are dragged through the membrane. It confers to the movement a viscous characteristic that is dependent of the velocity between the RBCs and justifies why is so easy to slide them apart. Therefore, in a first step of this work, by measuring the force as a function of the relative velocity between two cells, we confirmed this assumption and used this viscous characteristic of the RBC rouleaux to determine the apparent membrane viscosity of the cell. As this behavior is related to the proteins interactions, we can use the apparent membrane viscosity to obtain a better understanding about cell agglutination. Methods related to cell agglutination induced by antigen-antibody interactions are the basis of most of tests used in transfusion centers. Then, in a second step of this work, we measured the apparent membrane viscosity using antibodies. We observed that this methodology is sensitive to different kinds of bindings between RBCs. Better comprehension of the forces and bindings between RBCs could improve the sensibility and specificity of the hemagglutination reactions and also guides the development of new potentiator substances.

  16. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shit, G. C.; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-01

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank-Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance.

  17. About a mechanism of the influence of shear stress for viscosity of the blood in vessels of small diameter

    OpenAIRE

    Катюхин, Лев Николаевич

    2014-01-01

    It is proposed a physiological and experimentally confirmed explanation of Fåhraeus-Lindqvist-effect in capillaries using the profile analyses of osmotic deformability of red blood cells. It was shown the dose-dependent change of the erythrocytes deformability in the stage of isotropic spheres after forming artificial water pores (nystatin) and occlusion (PbCl2) of available pores. The Sigma-effect reducing of hematocrit and viscosity in a shear flow of blood through the vessels of a small di...

  18. The effect of hemodialysis ultrafiltration on changes in whole blood viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazian, Shayan; Rios-Rojas, Liliana; Drakakis, James; Dikkala, Sudharani; Dutka, Paula; Duey, Marc; Cho, Daniel J; Fishbane, Steven

    2012-07-01

    Increased whole blood viscosity (WBV) can be injurious to the vascular endothelium and increase the risk of atherothrombotic events. This study examined the effect of hemodialysis ultrafiltration (UF) on WBV, with a focus on high vs. low-volume UF patients. In stable hemodialysis patients, blood was drawn for hematocrit (Hct) and WBV at the start, midpoint, and at the end of dialysis. For analysis, patients were divided into high UF (≥2700 mL) or low UF (<2700 mL) groups. A total of 59 patients completed the study. Mean Hct increased during dialysis in both groups. The intradialytic increase in Hct was significantly greater in the high vs. the low UF group (3.2% vs. 1.28%, P = 0.01), with a significantly higher end-dialysis Hct in the high UF group (40.5% vs. 38%, P = 0.02). At the end of dialysis, both high shear rate WBV (P < 0.01) and low shear rate WBV (P < 0.01) were significantly higher in the high UF compared with the low UF group. There was an approximately two-fold greater increase in high shear rate (P < 0.01) and low shear rate (P = 0.01) WBV during dialysis in high vs. low UF groups. The increase in high shear rate WBV during dialysis was significantly correlated with an increase in Hct (R(2) = 0.63, P < 0.01). We found that hemodialysis UF causes a surge in WBV. The surge was of greater magnitude in high than in low UF patients. PMID:22360439

  19. Gender features of rheological properties of blood (plasma viscosity, aggregation and deformation of erythrocytes in patients with chronic generalized periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazantsev A.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal is to study gender features of rheological properties of blood in patients with chronic generalized periodontitis (CGP from mild to moderate severity. Material and Methods. 80 patients (43.8% male with CGP aged 42±5 years have been studied. 41 patients (43.9% male experienced mild severity of CGP, and 39 patients (43.6% male experienced moderate severity. 40 healthy adults (50% male, aged 31±7 years, have been included into the study. Plasma viscosity on shear rate values 300 sec1 to 5 sec1, and rheological features of erythrocytes (aggregation and deformation have been evaluated. Results. In healthy women and women with mild severity of CGP, plasma viscosity was lower than in the similar group of men. The rheological features of erythrocytes have not gender differences among healthy adults and patients with mild CGP. Increased severity of CGP has been associated with increased plasma viscosity and rheological features of erythrocytes, particularly in men. Conclusion. Plasma viscosity differs in men and women (childbearing age (healthy subjects and patients with CGP. In women, severity of pathological changes of plasma viscosity and rheological features of erythrocytes have been determined to be lower than in men.

  20. Effect of Pyramidal Training on Plasma Lipid Profile and Fibrinogen, and Blood Viscosity of Untrained Young Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbass Ghanbari-Niaki

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the effects of progressive exercise (pyramidal short-term program on plasma fibrinogen, lipid profile and blood viscosity in untrained young men. Changes and imbalances in homeostasis lead to cause of heart attacks. There is conflicting information about the effect of exercise on these factors. 19 young healthy untrained men were randomly assigned to the exercise group (n = 10 and controls (n = 9 groups. Exercise training group with increasing severity of heart maximum 25 to 100 percent began to run the practice (pyramid in 42-minute sessions, 3 times a week, for 4 weeks. There was no significant difference between the parameters of body composition, control, and training groups. Levels of total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein density and viscosity of the blood significantly decreased in the training group compared with the control group (p value, respectively is 0.001, 0.001 and 0.035. The changes in the concentration of fibrinogen, high-density lipoprotein and triglycerides in both groups are not significant in both groups (p value, respectively is 0.645, 0.993 and 0.421. The present results show that it is possible that progressive training (pyramidal short-term program changed the levels of cardiovascular risk factors by reducing blood viscosity.

  1. Effect of salvianolate combined with meglumine adenosine cyclphosphate on blood viscosity, inflammatory factors and NT-proBNP in angina pectoris patients after PCI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Peng; Li Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of salvianolate combined with meglumine adenosine cyclphosphate on blood viscosity, inflammatory factors and NT-proBNP in angina pectoris patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).Methods:A total of 130 angina pectoris patients who received PCI treatment in our hospital from May 2012 to October 2015 were selected for study, patients' medical records were retrospectively analyzed, they were divided into the experimental group and the control group based on the different medication schemes after PCI, experimental group received routine treatment combined with salvianolate and meglumine adenosine cyclphosphate treatment after operation, and control group received conventional medical treatment after operation. The changes of perioperative blood viscosity, inflammatory factor and NT-proBNP content were compared between two groups.Results:After PCI, the blood viscosity indexes as well as inflammatory factor and NT-proBNP levels of experimental group were significantly lower than those before PCI (P0.05), inflammatory factor and NT-proBNP levels were significantly lower than those before PCI (P<0.05); 7 days after PCI, the high-shear whole blood viscosity, low-shear whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity and aggregation index as well as TNF-α, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, LP-PLA2, NT-proBNP, D-dimer and PTEN levels of experimental group were significantly lower than those of control group (P<0.05).Conclusions: Salvianolate combined with meglumine adenosine cyclphosphate can reduce the blood viscosity of patients with angina pectoris after PCI, and can also reduce inflammation and improve heart pump function.

  2. Mathematical model describing erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Implications for blood viscosity changes in traumatic shock and crush syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchuk Nikolai A

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR is a simple and inexpensive laboratory test, which is widespread in clinical practice, for assessing the inflammatory or acute response. This work addresses the theoretical and experimental investigation of sedimentation a single and multiple particles in homogeneous and heterogeneous (multiphase medium, as it relates to their internal structure (aggregation of solid or deformed particles. Methods The equation system has been solved numerically. To choose finite analogs of derivatives we used the schemes of directional differences. Results (1 Our model takes into account the influence of the vessel wall on group aggregation of particles in tubes as well as the effects of rotation of particles, the constraint coefficient, and viscosity of a mixture as a function of the volume fraction. (2 This model can describe ESR as a function of the velocity of adhesion of erythrocytes; (3 Determination of the ESR is best conducted at certain time intervals, i.e. in a series of periods not exceeding 5 minutes each; (4 Differential diagnosis of various diseases by means of ESR should be performed using the aforementioned timed measurement of ESR; (5 An increase in blood viscosity during trauma results from an increase in rouleaux formation and the time-course method of ESR will be useful in patients with trauma, in particular, with traumatic shock and crush syndrome. Conclusion The mathematical model created in this study used the most fundamental differential equations that have ever been derived to estimate ESR. It may further our understanding of its complex mechanism.

  3. Development of a Comprehensive Model of the Apparent Viscosity of Blood for Simulations of the Microcirculation in Rat Spinotrapezius Muscle Fascia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Porterfield, Colin; Engebrecht, Cheryn; Metzger, Ian

    2007-11-01

    A more comprehensive model for the apparent viscosity of blood is proposed and applied to simulations of the microcirculation in rat spinotrapezius muscle fascia. At the microcirculatory level, the apparent viscosity of blood depends on the local vessel diameter, hematocrit, and shear rate. Starting with the apparent viscosity model proposed by Pries, Secomb, Gaehtgens, and Gross (Circulation Research, 67, 826-834, 1990), describing the effect of vessel diameter and hematocrit on the apparent viscosity, and using experimental data presented by Lipowsky, Usami, and Chien (Microvascular Research, 19, 297-319, 1980), describing the shear rate dependence of apparent viscosity, a more comprehensive model is developed. This model is applied to simulations of the microcirculation in rat spinotrapezius muscle fascia. The simulations use realistic vessel topology for the microvasculature, reconstructed from microscope images of tissue samples, and consider passive and active vessel properties. The numerical method is based on a Hagen-Poiseuille balance in the microvessels and a sparse matrix solver is used to obtain the solution. It was found, for example, that the distribution of vessel length follows a log-normal law. The distribution of hematocrit, however, was found to be approximately normal.

  4. Increases in platelet and red cell counts, blood viscosity, and arterial pressure during mild surface cooling: factors in mortality from coronary and cerebral thrombosis in winter.

    OpenAIRE

    Keatinge, W R; Coleshaw, S R; Cotter, F.; Mattock, M; Murphy, M; Chelliah, R

    1984-01-01

    Six hours of mild surface cooling in moving air at 24 degrees C with little fall in core temperature (0.4 degree C) increased the packed cell volume by 7% and increased the platelet count and usually the mean platelet volume to produce a 15% increase in the fraction of plasma volume occupied by platelets. Little of these increases occurred in the first hour. Whole blood viscosity increased by 21%; plasma viscosity usually increased, and arterial pressure rose on average from 126/69 to 138/87 ...

  5. Effects of oxygenation and the stress hormones adrenaline and cortisol on the viscosity of blood from the trout oncorhynchus mykiss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bodil; Weber, Roy

    1995-01-01

    Although the concentrations of the stress hormones adrenaline and cortisol in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) blood increase upon hypoxic exposure, the combined effects of these hormones and O2 lack upon fish blood rheology have not been investigated. Deoxygenated blood taken by caudal puncture...

  6. Effects of Erythrocyte Deformability and Aggregation on the Cell Free Layer and Apparent Viscosity of Microscopic Blood Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Junfeng; Johnson, Paul C.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2009-01-01

    Concentrated erythrocyte (i.e., red blood cell) suspensions flowing in microchannels have been simulated with an immersed-boundary lattice Boltzmann algorithm, to examine the cell layer development process and the effects of cell deformability and aggregation on hemodynamic and hemorheological behaviors. The cells are modeled as two-dimensional deformable biconcave capsules and experimentally measured cell properties have been utilized. The aggregation among cells is modeled by a Morse potent...

  7. Plasma Viscosity : A Risk Factor In Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puniyani R. R

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrheological study on hypertension was done at Indian Institute of Technology Hospital, Bombay. Male population in the age groups of 35 to 60 years was screened for hypertension from February 1986 to February 1987. Out of 340 subjects examined, 44 hypertensive cases were found, who were investigated for blood viscosity profile and were compared with 45 controls. The parameters studied were plasma viscosity, whole blood viscosity, red cell aggregation, red cell deformability and haematocrit W.H.O. criteria of hypertension (HT was strictly adhered to (B.P. above 160/95 mm of Hg. When compared to control group, plasma viscosity and whole blood viscosity were elevated in freshly detected and uncontrolled hypertensives. Red cell aggregation and deformability were significantly altered in chronic hypertensives than in normal, but haematocrit was not affected in any group.

  8. 小型猪减压性骨坏死病理及血液流变学改变%Changes of histopathology and blood viscosity in mini pigs with dysbaric osteonecrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慈; 方以群; 孟淼; 付国举; 王杰; 朱祥祺; 蒋功达

    2010-01-01

    Objective To develop the dysharie osteonecrosis (DON) model in mini pigs induced by rapid decompression, following repeated hyperbaric exposures and observe changes in blood rheology in DON. Methods Twelve male mini pigs were exposed to compressed air of 0.45 MPa for 6 hours twice to three times a week and were then brought to the surface with linear decompression at a rate of 0.35 MPa/min. Blood viscosity was measured with cone-plate type viscosimeter, platelet count was made under the light microscope. Emission of computed tomography (ECT) and pathologic examination were performed for the evaluation of accumulated rate of 99Tc in the femur, following 3 months of repeated compression and decompression. Results ECT showed an increased accumulation of isotope in the femur, when a comparison was made between the experimental animals and the control. Osteopatholngy revealed changes of osteonecrosis in the femur. Platelet count decreased progressively with frequencies of pressure exposures, and meanwhile blood viscosity also increased progressively at a low shear rate. Conclusions Dysharie osteronecrosis was usually accompanied with bone ischemia. Platelet consumption and increased blood viscosity induced by decompression bubbles could be attributed to decreased blood flow in the bone, resulting in osteonecrosis.%目的 通过反复加减压建立小型猪减压性骨坏死模型并观察其血液流变学改变.方法 12头小型香猪,每周2~3次暴露于0.45 MPa加压舱内,每次6 h,1 min匀速减至常压.用锥板式黏度计测定全血黏度,光镜下血小板计数,反复加减压3个月后进行股骨同位素发射计算机扫描(ECT)及组织病理学检查.结果 ECT检查发现,动物股骨头同位素聚集增加,骨病理检查发现股骨发生缺血性坏死改变,血小板计数随加压次数增多而进行性降低,低剪切率下全血黏度则进行性升高.结论 减压性气泡引起的血小板消耗、血黏度增高是骨缺血坏死的原因之一.

  9. Hall Viscosity II: Extracting Viscosity from Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Moshe; Bradlyn, Barry; Read, Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    When time reversal symmetry is broken, the viscosity tensor of a fluid can have non-dissipative components, similarly to the non-dissipative off-diagonal Hall conductivity. This ``Hall viscosity'' was recently shown to be half the particle density times the orbital angular momentum per particle. Its observation can thus help elucidate the nature of the more exotic quantum Hall states and related systems (e.g., p+ip superconductors). However, no concrete measurement scheme has hitherto been proposed. Motivated by this question we use linear response theory to derive a general relation between the viscosity tensor and the wave-vector dependent conductivity tensor for a Galilean-invariant quantum fluid. This relation enables one to extract the Hall viscosity, as well as other viscosity coefficients (shear and bulk) when relevant, from electromagnetic response measurements. We also discuss the connection between this result and a similar one recently derived by C. Hoyos and D. T. Son [arXiv:1109.2651].

  10. Viscosity of water fog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fog stream velocity profiles were analysed inside narrow and wide flat channels. To calculate the shear viscosity coefficient, we used the Navier–Stokes equation. It was revealed that fog is a non-Newtonian liquid: its viscosity grows when the shear speed drops, and it can exceed the viscosity of clean air hundreds of times when the speed gradient is less than 0.01 sec−1. The high viscosity can be explained by the electrostatic interaction of the charged water drops. (paper)

  11. Computer Simulations of Pulsatile Human Blood Flow Through 3D-Models of the Human Aortic Arch, Vessels of Simple Geometry and a Bifurcated Artery: Investigation of Blood Viscosity and Turbulent Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Sultanov, Renat A

    2008-01-01

    We report computational results of blood flow through a model of the human aortic arch and a vessel of actual diameter and length. On the top of the aortic arch the branching of the %%three arteries are included: the subclavian and jugular. A realistic pulsatile flow is used in all simulations. Calculations for bifurcation type vessels are also carried out and presented. Different mathematical methods for numerical solution of the fluid dynamics equations have been considered. The non-Newtonian behaviour of the human blood is investigated together with turbulence effects. A detailed time-dependent mathematical convergence test has been carried out. The results of computer simulations of the blood flow in vessels of three different geometries are presented: for pressure, strain rate and velocity component distributions we found significant disagreements between our results obtained with realistic non-Newtonian treatment of human blood and the widely used method in the literature: a simple Newtonian approximati...

  12. Viscosity measuring using microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Patrick Ian

    2001-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the viscosity of a fluid uses a micromachined cantilever mounted on a moveable base. As the base is rastered while in contact with the fluid, the deflection of the cantilever is measured and the viscosity determined by comparison with standards.

  13. Viscosity and Solvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses theories underlying the phenomena of solution viscosities, involving the Jones and Dole equation, B-coefficient determination, and flickering cluster model. Indicates that viscosity measurements provide a basis for the study of the structural effects of ions in aqueous solutions and are applicable in teaching high school chemistry. (CC)

  14. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Verberg, R; Cohen, E G D

    1997-01-01

    Simple expressions are given for the Newtonian viscosity \\eta_N(\\phi) as well as the viscoelastic behavior of the viscosity \\eta(\\phi,\\omega) of neutral monodisperse hard sphere colloidal suspensions as a function of volume fraction \\phi and frequency \\omega over the entire fluid range, i.e., for volume fractions 0 < \\phi < 0.55. These expressions are based on an approximate theory which considers the viscosity as composed as the sum of two relevant physical processes: \\eta (\\phi,\\omega) = \\eta_{\\infty}(\\phi) + \\eta_{cd}(\\phi,\\omega), where \\eta_{\\infty}(\\phi) = \\eta_0 \\chi(\\phi) is the infinite frequency (or very short time) viscosity, with \\eta_0 the solvent viscosity, \\chi(\\phi) the equilibrium hard sphere radial distribution function at contact, and \\eta_{cd}(\\phi,\\omega) the contribution due to the diffusion of the colloidal particles out of cages formed by their neighbors, on the P\\'{e}clet time scale \\tau_P, the dominant physical process in concentrated colloidal suspensions. The Newtonian viscos...

  15. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, E.G.D. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States); Schepper, I.M. de [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  16. Viscosity model of high-viscosity dispersing system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏先福; 王娜; 黄蓓青; 孙承博

    2008-01-01

    High-viscosity dispersing system is formed by dispersing the solid particles in the high-viscosity continuous medium.It is very easy to form the three-dimensional network structure for solid particles in the system and the rheology behavior becomes complicated.The apparent viscosity of this dispersing system always has the connection with the volume ratio and the shear rate.In order to discuss the rheology behavior and put up the viscosity model,the suspension of silicon dioxide and silicon oil were prepared.Through testing the viscosity,the solid concentration and the shear rate,the effects of the ratio and the shear rate on viscosity was analyzed,the model of the high-viscosity dispersing system was designed and the model with the printing ink were validated.The experiment results show that the model is applicable to the high-viscosity dispersing systems.

  17. Viscosidade do Sangue como Parâmetro de Diagnóstico da Síndrome Ascítica em Linhagens de Frangos de Corte com Diferentes Suscetibilidade Blood Viscosity as Diagnostic Parameter for Ascites in Broiler Chickens Strains of Different Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SF Fontes

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar o desenvolvimento de ascites em duas linhagens diferentes de frangos de corte, Hubbard e Pescoço-pelado, através da variação da viscosidade do sangue. As aves foram criadas até 45 dias de idade em duas temperaturas ambiente diferentes (termoneutra e fria e com dieta de ração à base de milho e farelo de soja, peletizada e de alta energia. Aos 28 e 45 dias de idade, amostras de 8 mL de sangue foram obtidas para determinação da viscosidade aparente em um viscosímetro de cilindros concêntricos da marca Brookfield, modelo LVDII+ e para determinação do hematócrito. Aos 28 dias de idade foram verificadas algumas ocorrências de ascite nas aves da linhagem Hubbard criadas à temperatura ambiente fria, e aos 45 dias de idade, todos os frangos de corte dessa linhagem criados no ambiente frio apresentaram ascite. A linhagem Pescoço-pelado foi resistente ao desenvolvimento de ascite em todas as idades e temperaturas ambiente. A análise dos resultados da viscosidade aparente do sangue indicaram que aves com valores similares ou maiores que 4 cP (centipoise apresentaram ascite. Podemos concluir que na linhagem comercial o valor de 4 cP para a viscosidade aparente parece identificar o desenvolvimento de ascite.The objective of this work was to investigate the development of ascites in broilers from Hubbard and Naked-neck strains based on the change in blood viscosity. The broilers were reared up to 45 days of age at different environmental temperatures (thermoneutral or cold and fed pelleted diets with high energy content. At 28 and 45 days, blood samples were obtained to measure the apparent blood viscosity, using a viscosimeter of concentric cylinders, and hematocrit. The results showed that at 28 days of age, some occurrence of ascites was verified in Hubbard birds living in the cold environment, but at 45 days of age all the birds reared at cold temperature had developed ascites. The Naked

  18. Critical exponent for viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    The critical exponent y characterizing the divergence of the viscosity for carbon dioxide and xenon has been measured. The values of y for both fluids fall within the range y = 0.041 + or - 0.001 and are consistent with the range y = 0.042 + or - 0.002 spanned by earlier data for four binary liquid mixtures. This agreement is the strongest evidence that pure fluids and binary liquids are in the same dynamic universality class; however, the results for y are inconsistent with the recent theoretical value of 0.032.

  19. Viscosity of Quantum Hall Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Avron, J. E.; Seiler, R.; Zograf, P. G.

    1995-01-01

    The viscosity of quantum fluids with an energy gap at zero temperature is non-dissipative and is related to the adiabatic curvature on the space of flat background metrics (which plays the role of the parameter space). For a quantum Hall fluid on two dimensional tori this viscosity is computed. In this case the average viscosity is quantized and is proportional to the total magnetic flux through the torus.

  20. Shear viscosity of nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports my recent study[1] on the shear viscosity of neutron-rich nuclear matter from a relaxation time approach. An isospin- and momentum-dependent interaction is used in the study. Dependence of density, temperature, and isospin asymmetry of nuclear matter on its shear viscosity have been discussed. Similar to the symmetry energy, the symmetry shear viscosity is defined and its density and temperature dependence are studied. (authors)

  1. High-Frequency Shear Viscosity of Low-Viscosity Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatze, U.; Behrends, R.

    2014-11-01

    A thickness shear quartz resonator technique is described to measure the shear viscosity of low-viscosity liquids in the frequency range from 6 MHz to 130 MHz. Examples of shear-viscosity spectra in that frequency range are presented to show that various molecular processes are accompanied by shear-viscosity relaxation. Among these processes are conformational variations of alkyl chains, with relaxation times of about 0.3 ns for -pentadecane and -hexadecane at 25 C. These variations can be well represented in terms of a torsional oscillator model. Also featured briefly are shear-viscosity relaxations associated with fluctuations of hydrogen-bonded clusters in alcohols, for which values between 0.3 ns (-hexanol) and 1.5 ns (-dodecanol) have been found at 25 C. In addition, the special suitability of high-frequency shear-viscosity spectroscopy to the study of critically demixing mixtures is demonstrated by some illustrative examples. Due to slowing, critical fluctuations do not contribute to the shear viscosity at sufficiently high frequencies of measurements so that the non-critical background viscosity of critical systems can be directly determined from high-frequency shear-viscosity spectroscopy. Relaxations in appear also in the shear-viscosity spectra with, for example, 2 ns for the critical triethylamine-water binary mixture at temperatures between 10 C and 18 C. Such relaxations noticeably influence the relaxation rate of order parameter fluctuations. They may be also the reason for the need of a special mesoscopic viscosity when mutual diffusion coefficients of critical polymer solutions are discussed in terms of mode-coupling theory.

  2. Pressure Effect on Extensional Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Kjær, Erik Michael

    1999-01-01

    The primary object of these experiments was to investigate the influence of hydrostatic pressure on entrance flow. The effect of pressure on shear and extensional viscosity was evaluated using an axis symmetric capillary and a slit die where the hydrostatic pressure was raised with valves. The...... experiments show a significant increase in extensional viscosity with increasing pressure....

  3. Hall Viscosity and Electromagnetic Response

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyos, Carlos; Son, Dam Thanh

    2011-01-01

    We show that, for Galilean invariant quantum Hall states, the Hall viscosity appears in the electromagnetic response at finite wave numbers q. In particular, the leading q dependence of the Hall conductivity at small q receives a contribution from the Hall viscosity. The coefficient of the q^2 term in the Hall conductivity is universal in the limit of strong magnetic field.

  4. The viscosity of dimethyl ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Jakobsen, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    NOx traps are installed. The most significant problem encountered when engines are fuelled with DME is that the injection equipment breaks down prematurely due to extensive wear. This tribology issue can be explained by the very low lubricity and viscosity of DME. Recently, laboratory methods have...... appeared capable of measuring these properties of DME. The development of this is rendered difficult because DME has to be pressurised to remain in the liquid state and it dissolves most of the commercially available elastomers. This paper deals fundamentally with the measurement of the viscosity of DME...... and extends the discussion to the difficulty of viscosity establishing of very thin fluids. The main issue here is that it is not easy to calibrate the viscometers in the very low viscosity range corresponding to about one-fifth of that of water. The result is that the low viscosity is measured at...

  5. Inflation from bulk viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Kazuharu

    2015-01-01

    We explore the perfect fluid description of the inflationary universe. In particular, we investigate a fluid model with the bulk-viscosity term. We find that the three observables of inflationary cosmology: the spectral index of the curvature perturbations, the tensor-to-scalar ratio of the density perturbations, and the running of the spectral index, can be consistent with the recent Planck results. We also reconstruct the explicit equation of state (EoS) of the viscous fluid from the spectral index of the curvature perturbations compatible with the Planck analysis. In the reconstructed models of the viscous fluid, the tensor-to-scalar ratio of the density perturbations can satisfy the constraints obtained from the Planck satellite. The running of the spectral index can explain the Planck data. In addition, it is demonstrated that in the reconstructed models of the viscous fluid, the graceful exit from inflation can be realized. Furthermore, we show that the singular inflation can occur in the viscous fluid ...

  6. Viscosity coefficient with pairing interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the study of dynamic process (for example, deep-inelastic scattering of heavy ion, nuclear fission), viscosity, which describes the coupling between the intrinsic degrees of freedom and the collective one, is a basic quantity. In this paper, under BCS approximation, we derive a microscopic expression of viscosity coefficient with pairing interaction by means of a linear response theory. Taking the fission process of 236U as an example, we discuss the effect of pairing interaction on the viscosity coefficient. The results show that pairing interaction must be taken into account at lower temperature and can be neglected at a high-temperature region

  7. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  8. Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut Mike Fincke places droplets of honey onto the strings for the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) investigation onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The FMVM experiment measures the time it takes for two individual highly viscous fluid droplets to coalesce or merge into one droplet. Different fluids and droplet size combinations were tested in the series of experiments. By using the microgravity environment, researchers can measure the viscosity or 'thickness' of fluids without the influence of containers and gravity using this new technique. Understanding viscosity could help scientists understand industrially important materials such as paints, emulsions, polymer melts and even foams used to produce pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic products.

  9. Fission hindrance and nuclear viscosity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indranil Mazumdar

    2015-08-01

    We discuss the role of nuclear viscosity in hindering the fission of heavy nuclei as observed in the experimental measurements of GDR -ray spectra from the fissioning nuclei. We review a set of experiments carried out and reported by us previously [see Dioszegi et al, Phys. Rev. C 61, 024613 (2000); Shaw et al, Phys. Rev. C 61, 044612 (2000)] and argue that the nuclear viscosity parameter has no apparent dependence on temperature. However, it may depend upon the deformation of the nucleus.

  10. Viscosity kernel of molecular fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puscasu, Ruslan; Todd, Billy; Daivis, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    The wave-vector dependent shear viscosities for butane and freely jointed chains have been determined. The transverse momentum density and stress autocorrelation functions have been determined by equilibrium molecular dynamics in both atomic and molecular hydrodynamic formalisms. The density......, temperature, and chain length dependencies of the reciprocal and real-space viscosity kernels are presented. We find that the density has a major effect on the shape of the kernel. The temperature range and chain lengths considered here have by contrast less impact on the overall normalized shape. Functional...... forms that fit the wave-vector-dependent kernel data over a large density and wave-vector range have also been tested. Finally, a structural normalization of the kernels in physical space is considered. Overall, the real-space viscosity kernel has a width of roughly 3–6 atomic diameters, which means...

  11. THE RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF BLOOD IN THE MOST ACUTE STAGE OF ISCHEMIC STROKE AND THEIR RELATION TO THE SEVERITY OF NEUROLOGICAL IMPAIRMENT

    OpenAIRE

    M. N. Azhermacheva; D. M. Plotnikov; O. I. Aliev; V. M. Alifirova; M. B. Plotnikov; K. I. Burkova

    2016-01-01

    The study evaluated the rheological parameters of blood: blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, hematocrit, red blood cell aggregation and deformability. The severity of the patients was assessed by clinical scales:Glasgowcoma scale, the scale NIHSS, Barthel index. The study found that in the acute phase of ischemic stroke increased blood viscosity by increasing red blood cell aggregation and reduced erythrocyte deformability. The increase in the viscosity of the blood in acute ischemic stroke is...

  12. Bulk Viscosity of Interacting Hadrons

    OpenAIRE

    Wiranata, A.; M. Prakash

    2009-01-01

    We show that first approximations to the bulk viscosity $\\eta_v$ are expressible in terms of factors that depend on the sound speed $v_s$, the enthalpy, and the interaction (elastic and inelastic) cross section. The explicit dependence of $\\eta_v$ on the factor $(\\frac 13 - v_s^2)$ is demonstrated in the Chapman-Enskog approximation as well as the variational and relaxation time approaches. The interesting feature of bulk viscosity is that the dominant contributions at a given temperature ari...

  13. Bulk Viscosity of Interacting Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Wiranata, A

    2009-01-01

    We show that first approximations to the bulk viscosity $\\eta_v$ are expressible in terms of factors that depend on the sound speed $v_s$, the enthalpy, and the interaction (elastic and inelastic) cross section. The explicit dependence of $\\eta_v$ on the factor $(\\frac 13 - v_s^2)$ is demonstrated in the Chapman-Enskog approximation as well as the variational and relaxation time approaches. The interesting feature of bulk viscosity is that the dominant contributions at a given temperature arise from particles which are neither extremely nonrelativistic nor extremely relativistic. Numerical results for a model binary mixture are reported.

  14. Eddy viscosity and diffusivity modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard Smagorinsky subgrid scale model for large eddy simulation can be derived from turbulent eddy viscosity models by assuming that the unresolved scales exhibit a Kolmogorov energy spectrum. The present work provides a general framework for developing eddy viscosity and corresponding subgrid models for flow problems in which Kolmogorov scaling cannot be assumed because additional physical mechanisms strongly modify the turbulence dynamics. Examples of such mechanisms include externally imposed time scales, compressibility, and intermittency. The general formalism is also applied to the turbulent thermal diffusivity. In special cases, this approach yields models that agree with those existing in the literature

  15. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  16. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  17. The Viscosity of Meson Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Dobado, A; Dobado, Antonio; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2003-01-01

    We report a calculation of the shear viscosity in a relativistic multicomponent meson gas as a function of temperature and chemical potentials. We approximately solve the Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport equation of kinetic theory, appropriate for a boson gas, with relativistic kinematics. Since at low temperatures the gas can be taken as mostly composed of pions, with a fraction of kaons and etas, we explore the region where binary elastic collisions with at least one pion are the dominant scattering processes. Our input meson scattering phase shifts are fits to the experimental data obtained from chiral perturbation theory and the Inverse Amplitude Method. Our results take the correct non-relativistic limit (viscosity proportional to the square root of the temperature), show a viscosity of order the cubed of the pion mass up to temperatures somewhat below that mass, and then a large increase due to kaons and etas. Our approximation may break down at even higher temperatures, where the viscosity follows a tempera...

  18. Bulk viscosity and deflationary universes

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, J A S; Waga, I

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the conditions that make possible the description of entropy generation in the new inflationary model by means of a nearequilibrium process. We show that there are situations in which the bulk viscosity cannot describe particle production during the coherent field oscillations phase.

  19. Viscosity of black liquor project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrall, G.A.

    1998-06-01

    The discussion of magnetic resonance in this report is confined to nuclides with a spin quantum number of 1/2. Included is a basic discussion of magnetic resonance; magnetic resonance relaxation and viscosity; and rhometers and viscometers. Many other effects are ignored for the sake of clarity.

  20. Viscosity measurement using microcantilever sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fedorchenko, Alexander I.; Koroleva, Anastasia; Pavelka, Miroslav; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Wang, W.; Ch.

    Danvers: I E E E Computer Society, 2014 - (Bilof, R.), s. 315-319 ISBN 978-1-4799-6666-0. ISSN 1063-6900. [ISOT 2014 : International Symposium on Optomechatronic Technologies. Seattle, Washington (US), 05.11.2014-07.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12042 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : forced vibration of microcantilever * viscosity sensor * bend loss of optical fiber Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  1. Dynamical viscosity of nucleating bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Alamoudi, S M; Boyanovsky, D; Aragão de Carvalho, C; Fraga, E S; Jorás, S E; Takakura, F I

    1999-01-01

    We study the viscosity corrections to the growth rate of nucleating bubbles in a first order phase transition in scalar field theory. We obtain the non-equilibrium equation of motion of the coordinate that describes small departures from the critical bubble and extract the growth rate consistently in weak coupling and in the thin wall limit. Viscosity effects arise from the interaction of this coordinate with the stable quantum and thermal fluctuations around a critical bubble. In the case of 1+1 dimensions we provide an estimate for the growth rate that depends on the details of the free energy functional. In 3+1 dimensions we recognize robust features that are a direct consequence of the thin wall approximation and give the leading viscosity corrections.These are long-wavelength hydrodynamic fluctuations that describe surface waves, quasi-Goldstone modes which are related to ripples on interfaces in phase ordered Ising-like systems. We discuss the applicability of our results to describe the growth rate of ...

  2. Viscosity Index Improvers and Thickeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, R. L.; Kinker, B. G.

    The viscosity index of an oil or an oil formulation is an important physical parameter. Viscosity index improvers, VIIs, are comprised of five main classes of polymers: polymethylmethacrylates (PMAs), olefin copolymers (OCPs), hydrogenated poly(styrene-co-butadiene or isoprene) (HSD/SIP/HRIs), esterified polystyrene-co-maleic anhydride (SPEs) and a combination of PMA/OCP systems. The chemistry, manufacture, dispersancy and utility of each class are described. The comparative functions, properties, thickening ability, dispersancy and degradation of VIIs are discussed. Permanent and temporary shear thinning of VII-thickened formulations are described and compared. The end-use performance and choice of VI improvers is discussed in terms of low- and high-temperature viscosities, journal bearing oil film thickness, fuel economy, oil consumption, high-temperature pumping efficiency and deposit control. Discussion of future developments concludes that VI improvers will evolve to meet new challenges of increased thermal-oxidative degradation from increased engine operating temperatures, different base stocks of either synthetic base oils or vegetable oil-based, together with alcohol- or vegetable oil-based fuels. VI improvers must also evolve to deal with higher levels of fuel dilution and new types of sludge and also enhanced low-temperature requirements.

  3. Effect of viscosity on learned satiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, M.; Hogenkamp, P.S.; Gosses, A.M.; Stafleu, A.; Graaf, C.de

    2009-01-01

    A higher viscosity of a food leads to a longer orosensory stimulation. This may facilitate the learned association between sensory signals and metabolic consequences. In the current study we investigated the effect of viscosity on learned satiation. In two intervention groups a low viscosity (LV) yo

  4. Extension of Radiative Viscosity to Superfluid Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PI Chun-Mei; YANG Shu-Hua; ZHENG Xiao-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The radiative viscosity of superfluid npe matter is studied and it is found that to the lowest order of δμ/T,the ratio of radiative viscosity to bulk viscosity is the same as that of its normal matter.As one of the most important transport coefficients,the bulk viscosities of simple npe matter,of hyperon matter and even of quark matter,both in normal and superfluid states,have been extensively studied,[1-18] for more detail see Ref.[19].%The radiative viscosity of superfluid npe matter is studied and it is found that to the lowest order of δμ/T, the ratio of radiative viscosity to bulk viscosity is the same as that of its normal matter.

  5. Effective Viscosity of Microswimmer Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaï, Salima; Jibuti, Levan; Peyla, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of a quantitative and macroscopic parameter to estimate the global motility of a large population of swimming biological cells is a challenge. Experiments on the rheology of active suspensions have been performed. Effective viscosity of sheared suspensions of live unicellular motile microalgae (Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii) is far greater than for suspensions containing the same volume fraction of dead cells. In addition, suspensions show shear thinning behavior. We relate these macroscopic measurements to the orientation of individual swimming cells under flow and discuss our results in the light of several existing models.

  6. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana

    2013-10-15

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. Viscosity and dispersion state of magnetic suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the viscosity behavior of a magnetic suspension in which magnetic particles are dispersed in a mixture of polyacrylic liquids. The size of magnetite particles is nearly 300 nm and the volume fraction of the magnetic particles is in the range of 0.003-0.03. The particle concentration dependence of the suspension viscosity yields the intrinsic viscosity [η], which varies from 25.6 at 5 s-1 to 5.1 at 400 s-1. The yield stress and the infinite shear viscosity of the suspension increase non-linearly as the particle concentration φ increases. We examine the effect of process conditions such as milling time and amount of dispersant on the viscosity behavior of the suspension. As milling time elapses, yield stress and low shear viscosity decrease and then reach constant values while the infinite shear viscosity remains constant. When oleic acid is added as a dispersant, the yield stress and low shear viscosity of the suspension show minimum values as the amount of oleic acid increases. These results agree with experimental results of sedimentation tests, which enable us to estimate the aggregate size of magnetic suspension. The yield stress and the low shear viscosity of the magnetic suspension are found to be useful in evaluating the dispersion state of the magnetic suspension. - Highlights: → Viscosity behavior of magnetic suspensions in which nanomagnetic particles are discrete in polyacrylic liquid. → Particle concentration and shear dependence of suspension viscosity examined. → Low shear properties found to be sensitive to formation of particle aggregates. → Viscosity behavior due to particle aggregation agrees with dispersion stability measured by sedimentation experiment. → Viscosity actions of magnetic delay found to be quite correct and useful in evaluating discrete state of magnetic particles.

  8. Non-Newtonian models for molecular viscosity and wall shear stress in a 3D reconstructed human left coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulis, Johannes V; Giannoglou, George D; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S; Seralidou, Kypriani V; Parcharidis, George E; Louridas, George E

    2008-01-01

    The capabilities and limitations of various molecular viscosity models, in the left coronary arterial tree, were analyzed via: molecular viscosity, local and global non-Newtonian importance factors, wall shear stress (WSS) and wall shear stress gradient (WSSG). The vessel geometry was acquired using geometrically correct 3D intravascular ultrasound (3D IVUS). Seven non-Newtonian molecular viscosity models, plus the Newtonian one, were compared. The WSS distribution yielded a consistent LCA pattern for nearly all non-Newtonian models. High molecular viscosity, low WSS and low WSSG values occurred at the outer walls of the major bifurcation in proximal LCA regions. The Newtonian blood flow was found to be a good approximation at mid- and high-strain rates. The non-Newtonian Power Law, Generalized Power Law, Carreau and Casson and Modified Cross blood viscosity models gave comparable molecular viscosity, WSS and WSSG values. The Power Law and Walburn-Schneck models over-estimated the non-Newtonian global importance factor I(G) and under-estimated the area averaged WSS and WSSG values. The non-Newtonian Power Law and the Generalized Power Law blood viscosity models were found to approximate the molecular viscosity and WSS calculations in a more satisfactory way. PMID:17412633

  9. FACTORS ON VISCOSITY STABILITY OF MOLD FLUXES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.Y.Zhu; C.J.Liu; M.F.Jiang; Z.D.Yang

    2004-01-01

    Viscosity stability indexes of mold flux at high temperature and low temperature have been introduced,and the effects of flux compositions on viscosity stability indexes have been studied.Two mold fluxes have been developed by analyzing the effects of flux viscosity stability on the process and the condition of continuous casting slab of medium carbon steel.The results show that the fluxes are suitable for the process.

  10. Uniaxial Elongational viscosity of bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for three bidisperse polystyrene (PS) melts, consisting of blends of monodisperse PS with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole or 103 kg/mole and 390 kg/mole. The bidisperse melts have a maximum in the steady elongational...... viscosity, of up to a factor of 7 times the Trouton limit of 3 times the zero-shear viscosity....

  11. Hall viscosity from effective field theory

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolis, Alberto; Son, Dam Thanh

    2011-01-01

    For two-dimensional non-dissipative fluids with broken parity, we show via effective field theory methods that the infrared dynamics generically exhibit Hall viscosity--a conservative form of viscosity compatible with two-dimensional isotropy. The equality between the Hall viscosity coefficient and the ground state's intrinsic angular momentum density follows straightforwardly from their descending from the same Lagrangian term of the low-energy effective action. We show that for such fluids ...

  12. Viscosity in Modified Gravity 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iver Brevik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A bulk viscosity is introduced in the formalism of modified gravity. It is shownthat, based on a natural scaling law for the viscosity, a simple solution can be found forquantities such as the Hubble parameter and the energy density. These solutions mayincorporate a viscosity-induced Big Rip singularity. By introducing a phase transition inthe cosmic fluid, the future singularity can nevertheless in principle be avoided. 

  13. VISCOSITY MODELING OF CONVENTIONAL KRAFT COOKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONGBOYAN; GOPALA.KRISHNAGOPALAN

    2004-01-01

    Static and dynamic models were studied for bothsoftwood and hardwood viscosity loss during Kraftpulping process. G-factor and initial EA charge in thestyle of Hatton equation can predicate final pulpviscosity. Dynamic models generated by effectivealkaline (EA) and temperature profile informationcan be used to predicate pulp viscosity at any timeduring pulping process. Viscosity online real-timeprediction is made possible by this model through anonline NIR sensor, which has been well calibrated tomeasure black liquor EA and temperature.

  14. The effects of viscosity on circumplanetary disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Fu Bu; Hsien Shang; Feng Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The effects of viscosity on the circumplanetary disks residing in the vicinity of protoplanets are investigated through two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations with the shearing sheet model.We find that viscosity can considerably affect properties of the circumplanetary disk when the mass of the protoplanet Mp (<) 33 M(⊙),where M(⊙) is the Earth's mass.However,effects of viscosity on the circumplanetary disk are negligibly small when the mass of the protoplanet Mp(>) 33 M(⊙).We find that when Mp(<) 33 M(⊙),viscosity can markedly disrupt the spiral structure of the gas around the planet and smoothly distribute the gas,which weakens the torques exerted on the protoplanet.Thus,viscosity can slow the migration speed of a protoplanet.After including viscosity,the size of the circumplanetary disk can be decreased by a factor of (>) 20%.Viscosity helps to transport gas into the circumplanetary disk from the differentially rotating circumstellar disk.The mass of the circumplanetary disk can be increased by a factor of 50% after viscosity is taken into account when Mp(<) 33 M(⊙).Effects of viscosity on the formation of planets and satellites are briefly discussed.

  15. VISCOSITY MODELING OF CONVENTIONAL KRAFT COOKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONGBO YAN; GOPAL A. KRISHNAGOPALAN

    2004-01-01

    Static and dynamic models were studied for both softwood and hardwood viscosity loss during Kraft pulping process. G-factor and initial EA charge in the style of Hatton equation can predicate final pulp viscosity. Dynamic models generated by effective alkaline (EA) and temperature profile information can be used to predicate pulp viscosity at any time during pulping process. Viscosity online real-time prediction is made possible by this model through an online NIR sensor, which has been well calibrated to measure black liquor EA and temperature.

  16. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated v...

  17. Shear Viscosity from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Mages, Simon W; Fodor, Zoltán; Schäfer, Andreas; Szabó, Kálmán

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the transport properties of the the quark-gluon plasma is becoming increasingly important to describe current measurements at heavy ion collisions. This work reports on recent efforts to determine the shear viscosity h in the deconfined phase from lattice QCD. The main focus is on the integration of the Wilson flow in the analysis to get a better handle on the infrared behaviour of the spectral function which is relevant for transport. It is carried out at finite Wilson flow time, which eliminates the dependence on the lattice spacing. Eventually, a new continuum limit has to be carried out which sends the new regulator introduced by finite flow time to zero. Also the non-perturbative renormalization strategy applied for the energy momentum tensor is discussed. At the end some quenched results for temperatures up to 4 : 5 T c are presented

  18. Holographic viscosity of fundamental matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, David; Myers, Robert C; Thomson, Rowan M

    2007-03-01

    A holographic dual of a finite-temperature SU(Nc) gauge theory with a small number of flavors Nfblack hole background. By considering the backreaction of the branes, we demonstrate that, to leading order in Nf/Nc, the viscosity to entropy ratio in these theories saturates the conjectured universal bound eta/s> or =1/4pi. Given the known results for the entropy density, the contribution of the fundamental matter eta fund is therefore enhanced at strong 't Hooft coupling lambda; for example, eta fund approximately lambda NcNfT3 in four dimensions. Other transport coefficients are analogously enhanced. These results hold with or without a baryon number chemical potential. PMID:17358523

  19. Viscosity of deeply supercooled water and its coupling to molecular diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaoui, Amine; Issenmann, Bruno; Caupin, Frédéric

    2015-09-29

    The viscosity of a liquid measures its resistance to flow, with consequences for hydraulic machinery, locomotion of microorganisms, and flow of blood in vessels and sap in trees. Viscosity increases dramatically upon cooling, until dynamical arrest when a glassy state is reached. Water is a notoriously poor glassformer, and the supercooled liquid crystallizes easily, making the measurement of its viscosity a challenging task. Here we report viscosity of water supercooled close to the limit of homogeneous crystallization. Our values contradict earlier data. A single power law reproduces the 50-fold variation of viscosity up to the boiling point. Our results allow us to test the Stokes-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein-Debye relations that link viscosity, a macroscopic property, to the molecular translational and rotational diffusion, respectively. In molecular glassformers or liquid metals, the violation of the Stokes-Einstein relation signals the onset of spatially heterogeneous dynamics and collective motions. Although the viscosity of water strongly decouples from translational motion, a scaling with rotational motion remains, similar to canonical glassformers. PMID:26378128

  20. The influence of oxidative damage on viscosity of seminal fluid in infertile men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Birsen; Onaran, Ilhan; Kiziler, Ali Riza; Alici, Bulent; Akyolcu, Mehmet Can

    2008-01-01

    Increased oxidative damage has been suggested to play an important role in the viscosity changes of blood. However, changes in levels of oxidative damage products in semen and their relationship to seminal fluid viscosity are unknown. The aim of our study was to investigate whether oxidative damage was associated with seminal plasma viscosity in infertile subjects. The levels of malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyls were measured in sperm and seminal plasma from 102 individuals, including 60 infertile patients. Seminal fluid viscosity and semen viscosity were studied by use of capillary viscometer and glass pipettes, respectively. Significantly higher levels of oxidative stress and damage markers were found in subfertile subjects compared with the control subjects. The seminal fluid viscosities of patients were found to be significantly higher, although all of the control and patient subjects had normal viscoelasticity when semen samples were assessed according to World Health Organization guidelines. From Pearson correlation analysis, there were significant positive correlations between seminal fluid viscosity and seminal malondialdehyde and carbonyl levels in infertile males (r = .676, P < .01; r = .276, P < .05, respectively). Our results suggest that increased oxidative damage might be a factor for hyperviscosity of seminal plasma in infertile males. PMID:17673435

  1. Viscosity evolution of anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pevere, A.; Guibaud, G.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.; Baudu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the apparent viscosity at steady shear rate of sieved anaerobic granular sludge (20¿315 ¿m diameter) sampled from different full-scale anaerobic reactors was recorded using rotation tests. The ¿limit viscosity¿ of sieved anaerobic granular sludge was determined from the apparent vis

  2. Surface dilatational viscosity of Langmuir monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Juan; Vogel, Michael; Hirsa, Amir

    2003-11-01

    With increased interest in microfluidic systems, interfacial phenomena is receiving more attention. As the length scales of fluid problems decrease, the surface to volume ratio increases and the coupling between interfacial flow and bulk flow becomes increasingly dominated by effects due to intrinsic surface viscosities (shear and dilatational), in comparison to elastic effects (due to surface tension gradients). The surface shear viscosity is well-characterized, as cm-scale laboratory experiments are able to isolate its effects from other interfacial processes (e.g., in the deep-channel viscometer). The same is not true for the dilatational viscosity, because it acts in the direction of surface tension gradients. Their relative strength scale with the capillary number, and for cm-scale laboratory flows, surface tension effects tend to dominate. In microfluidic scale flows, the scaling favors viscosity. We have devised an experimental apparatus which is capable of isolating and enhancing the effects of dilatational viscosity at the cm scales by driving the interface harmonically in time, while keeping the interface flat. In this talk, we shall present both the theory for how this works as well as experimental measurements of surface velocity from which we deduce the dilatational viscosity of several monolayers on the air-water interface over a substantial range of surface concentrations. Anomalous behavior over some range of concentration, which superficially indicates negative viscosity, maybe explained in terms of compositional effects due to large spatial and temporal variations in concentration and corresponding viscosity.

  3. The Friction Theory for Viscosity Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2001-01-01

    In this work the one-parameter friction theory (f-theory) general models have been extended to the viscosity prediction and modeling of characterized oils. It is demonstrated that these simple models, which take advantage of the repulsive and attractive pressure terms of cubic equations of state...... such as the SRK, PR and PRSV, can provide accurate viscosity prediction and modeling of characterized oils. In the case of light reservoir oils, whose properties are close to those of normal alkanes, the one-parameter f-theory general models can predict the viscosity of these fluids with good accuracy....... Yet, in the case when experimental information is available a more accurate modeling can be obtained by means of a simple tuning procedure. A tuned f-theory general model can deliver highly accurate viscosity modeling above the saturation pressure and good prediction of the liquid-phase viscosity at...

  4. Determination of viscosity-average molecular weight of chitosan using intrinsic viscosity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of molecular weight by intrinsic viscosity measurement is a simple method for characterization of chitosan. To study the effect of radiation on molecular weight, chitosan was first irradiated using electron beam at different doses prior to measurement. Different concentrations of chitosan were prepared and measurement was done at room temperature. The flow time data was used to calculate the intrinsic viscosity by extrapolating the reduced viscosity to zero concentration. The value of intrinsic viscosity was then recalculated into the viscosity-average molecular weight using Mark-Houwink equation. (Author)

  5. Extracting shear viscosity of the Quark Gluon Plasma in the presence of bulk viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-01-01

    One of the most remarkable features of the Quark Gluon Plasma is its nearly perfect fluidity behavior indicated by the small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio obtained from fitting relativistic viscous hydrodynamics flow harmonics to experimental data. In recent years, bulk viscosity has also been considered in the context of event-by-event relativistic hydrodynamics and it has been found to have a non-trivial interplay with shear viscosity. In this paper some of the issues are discussed that require further work when extracting the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio in the presence of a non-zero bulk viscosity.

  6. Green's functions at zero viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkin-type propagator representations are written for solutions to Navier-Stokes and related equations, for arbitrary dimension D and arbitrary source geometry. In the limit of very small viscosity, velocity/vorticity solutions are given in terms of Cauchy position coordinates q of a particle advected by the velocity flow v, using a set of coupled equations for q and v. For localized point vortices in two dimensions, the vectors q become the time-dependent position coordinates of interacting vortices, and our equations reduce to those of the familiar, coupled vortex problem. The formalism is, however, able to discuss three-dimensional vortex motion, discrete or continuous, including the effects of vortex stretching. The mathematical structure of vortex stretching in a D-dimensional fluid without boundaries is conveniently described in terms of an SU(D) representation of these equations. Several simple examples are given in two dimensions, to anchor the method in the context of previously known, exact solutions. In three dimensions, vortex stretching effects are approximated using a previous strong coupling technique of particle physics, enabling one to build a crude model of the intermittent growth of enstrophy, which may signal the onset of turbulence. For isotropic turbulence, the possibility of a singularity in the inviscid enstrophy at a finite time is related to the behavior of a single function characterizing the intermittency

  7. Green's functions at zero viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkin-type propagator representations are written for solutions to Navier--Stokes and related equations, for arbitrary dimension D and arbitrary source geometry. In the limit of very small viscosity, velocity/vorticity solutions are given in terms of Cauchy position coordinates q of a particle advected by the velocity flow v, using a set of coupled equations for q and v. For localized point vortices in two dimensions, the vectors q become the time-dependent position coordinates of interacting vortices, and our equations reduce to those of the familiar, coupled vortex problem. The formalism is, however, able to discuss three-dimensional vortex motion, discrete or continuous, including the effects of vortex stretching. The mathematical structure of vortex stretching in a D-dimensional fluid without boundaries is conveniently described in terms of an SU(D) representation of these equations. Several simple examples are given in two dimensions, to anchor the method in the context of previously known, exact solutions. In three dimensions, vortex stretching effects are approximated using a previous ''strong coupling'' technique of particle physics, enabling one to build a crude model of the intermittent growth of enstrophy, which may signal the onset of turbulence. For isotropic turbulence, the possibility of a singularity in the inviscid enstrophy at a finite time is related to the behavior of a single function characterizing the intermittency

  8. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  9. Intrinsic viscosity of a suspension of cubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mallavajula, Rajesh K.

    2013-11-06

    We report on the viscosity of a dilute suspension of cube-shaped particles. Irrespective of the particle size, size distribution, and surface chemistry, we find empirically that cubes manifest an intrinsic viscosity [η]=3.1±0.2, which is substantially higher than the well-known value for spheres, [η]=2.5. The orientation-dependent intrinsic viscosity of cubic particles is determined theoretically using a finite-element solution of the Stokes equations. For isotropically oriented cubes, these calculations show [η]=3.1, in excellent agreement with our experimental observations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  10. Bulk Viscosity in Holographic Lifshitz Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyos, Carlos; Oz, Yaron

    2013-01-01

    We compute the bulk viscosity in holographic models dual to theories with Lifshitz scaling and/or hyperscaling violation, using a generalization of the bulk viscosity formula derived in arXiv:1103.1657 from the null focusing equation. We find that only a class of models with massive vector fields are truly Lifshitz scale invariant, and have a vanishing bulk viscosity. For other holographic models with scalars and/or massless vector fields we find a universal formula in terms of the dynamical exponent and the hyperscaling violation exponent.

  11. Bulk viscosity in holographic Lifshitz hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Hoyos; Bom Soo Kim; Yaron Oz

    2014-01-01

    We compute the bulk viscosity in holographic models dual to theories with Lifshitz scaling and/or hyperscaling violation, using a generalization of the bulk viscosity formula derived in arXiv:1103.1657 from the null focusing equation. We find that only a class of models with massive vector fields are truly Lifshitz scale invariant, and have a vanishing bulk viscosity. For other holographic models with scalars and/or massless vector fields we find a universal formula in terms of the dynamical ...

  12. Bulk viscosity in holographic Lifshitz hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compute the bulk viscosity in holographic models dual to theories with Lifshitz scaling and/or hyperscaling violation, using a generalization of the bulk viscosity formula derived in arXiv:1103.1657 from the null focusing equation. We find that only a class of models with massive vector fields are truly Lifshitz scale invariant, and have a vanishing bulk viscosity. For other holographic models with scalars and/or massless vector fields we find a universal formula in terms of the dynamical exponent and the hyperscaling violation exponent

  13. Bulk viscosity of hot and dense hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bulk viscosity of hot and dense hadrons has been estimated within the framework of hadronic resonance gas model. We observe that the bulk viscosity to entropy ratio increases faster with temperature for higher μB. The magnitude of ζ is more at high μB. This results will have crucial importance for fire-ball produced at low energy nuclear collisions (FAIR, NICA). We note that the bulk to shear viscosity ratio remains above the bound set by AdS/CFT

  14. Viscosity studies of water based magnetite nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, K.; Hemalatha, J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetite nanofluids of various concentrations have been synthesized through co-precipitation method. The structural and topographical studies made with the X-Ray Diffractometer and Atomic Force Microscope are presented in this paper. The density and viscosity studies for the ferrofluids of various concentrations have been made at room temperature. The experimental viscosities are compared with theoretical values obtained from Einstein, Batchelor and Wang models. An attempt to modify the Rosensweig model is made and the modified Rosensweig equation is reported. In addition, new empirical correlation is also proposed for predicting viscosity of ferrofluid at various concentrations.

  15. Shear viscosity of liquid mixtures: Mass dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expressions for zeroth, second, and fourth sum rules of transverse stress autocorrelation function of two component fluid have been derived. These sum rules and Mori's memory function formalism have been used to study shear viscosity of Ar-Kr and isotopic mixtures. It has been found that theoretical result is in good agreement with the computer simulation result for the Ar-Kr mixture. The mass dependence of shear viscosity for different mole fraction shows that deviation from ideal linear model comes even from mass difference in two species of fluid mixture. At higher mass ratio shear viscosity of mixture is not explained by any of the emperical model. (author)

  16. The extension of radiative viscosity to superfluid matter

    OpenAIRE

    Pi, Chun-Mei; Yang, Shu-Hua; Zheng, Xiao-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The radiative viscosity of superfluid $npe$ matter is studied, and it is found that to the lowest order of $\\delta \\mu/T$ the ratio of radiative viscosity to bulk viscosity is the same as that of the normal matter.

  17. Blood Clots

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Index A-Z Blood Clots Blood clots are semi-solid masses of blood that can be stationary (thrombosis) ... treated? What are blood clots? Blood clots are semi-solid masses of blood. Normally, blood flows freely through ...

  18. Hydrophilicity and the viscosity of interfacial water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, Matthew P; Houston, J E; Zhu, X-Y

    2007-05-01

    We measure the viscosity of nanometer-thick water films at the interface with an amorphous silica surface. We obtain viscosity values from three different measurements: friction force in a water meniscus formed between an oxide-terminated W tip and the silica surface under ambient conditions; similar measurements for these interfaces under water; and the repulsive "drainage" force as the two surfaces approach at various speeds in water. In all three cases, we obtain effective viscosities that are approximately 10(6) times greater than that of bulk water for nanometer-scale interfacial separations. This enhanced viscosity is not observed when we degrade the hydrophilicity of the surface by terminating it with -H or -CH3. In view of recent results from other interfaces, we conclude that the criterion for the formation of a viscous interphase is the degree of hydrophilicity of the interfacial pair. PMID:17408290

  19. Viscosity and confinement in magnetized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    An alternative to the Braginskii decomposition is proposed, one rooted in treating the viscosity as a scalar quantity in a coordinate-free representation. With appropriate application to the rate-of-shear tensor, one may solve the neoclassical force density equations for its undetermined velocity dependence, as well as the radial and poloidal profiles mentioned in [R. W. Johnson, Phys. Plasmas, under review], using an improved poloidal expansion. The pseudoplastic behavior of magnetized plasma is again obtained, and the high viscosity solution is determined to be physical. A clear relationship between confinement mode and viscosity is observed, indicating a physical origin for transport barriers, pedestals, and other phenomena. The gyroviscous contribution is found to be an effect on the order of one one-thousandth of one percent of the dominant collisional viscosity.

  20. Shear viscosity in magnetized neutron star crust

    CERN Document Server

    Ofengeim, D D

    2015-01-01

    The electron shear viscosity due to Coulomb scattering of degenerate electrons by atomic nuclei throughout a magnetized neutron star crust is calculated. The theory is based on the shear viscosity coefficient calculated neglecting magnetic fields but taking into account gaseous, liquid and solid states of atomic nuclei, multiphonon scattering processes, and finite sizes of the nuclei albeit neglecting the effects of electron band structure. The effects of strong magnetic fields are included in the relaxation time approximation with the effective electron relaxation time taken from the field-free theory. The viscosity in a magnetized matter is described by five shear viscosity coefficients. They are calculated and their dependence on the magnetic field and other parameters of dense matter is analyzed. Possible applications and open problems are outlined.

  1. Extensional viscosity of microfibrillated cellulose suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Tobias; Rigdahl, Mikael; Stading, Mats; Levenstam Bragd, Emma

    2014-02-15

    The extensional properties of micro fibrillated cellulose (MFC)-suspensions at different fibril concentrations and with different amounts of added sodium chloride were evaluated. The MFC-suspensions were obtained by diluting a stock solution consisting of 0.95 wt.% cellulose with either deionized water or sodium chloride solution, giving a series of different concentrations and sodium chloride contents. The extensional viscosities of the suspensions were measured utilizing contraction flow geometry. Here the specimens were forced through a hyperbolic nozzle and the required pressure drop over the nozzle was measured. The extensional viscosity exhibited an extensional-thinning behaviour over the extensional strain rates used. Furthermore the extensional viscosity decreased with decreasing concentration of the suspensions, in similarities with the shear properties of the specimens. For the suspensions containing sodium chloride, the extensional viscosity appeared to increase when the concentration of sodium chloride was increased. But excessive amounts of added sodium chloride promoted an agglomeration of the suspensions. PMID:24507298

  2. Lift force due to odd (Hall) viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Kogan, E

    2016-01-01

    We study the problem of flow past an infinite cylinder at right angle to its axis at low Reynolds number when the fluid is characterised by broken time-reversal invariance, and hence by odd viscosity in addition to the normal even one. We solve the Oseen approximation to Navier-Stokes equation and calculate the lift force which appears due to the odd viscosity.

  3. Viscosity effect in Landau's hydrodynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bose-Einstein distribution is used to investigate Landau's hydrodynamical model with viscosity. In case the viscosity dependence on the temperature is T3, the correction to the multiplicity behaves like I/E and is found to be negligible for the pp data. A discussion is presented on a possibility of reconciling E1/2 and logE dependence of the multiplicity law. (orig.)

  4. Viscosity of Liquid Perfluoroalkanes and Perfluoroalkylalkane Surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Morgado, Pedro; Laginhas, Carlos M. C.; Lewis, J. Ben; McCabe, Clare; Martins, Luís F. G.; Filipe, Eduardo J. M.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a systematic study of the thermophysical properties of two important classes of fluorinated organic compounds (perfluoroalkanes and perfluoroalkylalkanes), viscosity measurements of four n-perfluoroalkanes and five perfluoroalkylalkanes have been carried out at atmospheric pressure and over a wide range of temperatures (278–353 K). From the experimental results the contribution to the viscosity from the CF2 and CF3 groups as a function of temperature have been estimated. Similarly,...

  5. A Simple BODIPY-Based Viscosity Probe for Imaging of Cellular Viscosity in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Gao, Nengyue; Xu, Qing-Hua; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we developed a simple boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based probe, BTV, for cellular mitochondria viscosity imaging by coupling a simple BODIPY rotor with a mitochondria-targeting unit. The BTV exhibited a significant fluorescence intensity enhancement of more than 100-fold as the solvent viscosity increased. Also, the probe showed a direct linear relationship between the fluorescence lifetime and the media viscosity, which makes it possible to trace the change of the medium viscosity. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that BTV could achieve practical applicability in the monitoring of mitochondrial viscosity changes in live cells through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). PMID:27589762

  6. STUDY OF THE VISCOSITY OF PROTEIN SOLUTIONS THROUGH THE RAPID VISCOSITY ANALYZER (RVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura P. Alves

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine viscosity curves prepared from whey protein concentrates (WPCs by the rapid viscosity analyzer (RVA and determine the optimal heat treatment time in order to obtain the maximum viscosity solutions at this stage. The WPCs produced from whey samples initially subjected to thermal treatment and microfiltration presented composition compatible with the international standards, with a significant difference (p<0.05 for fat concentration. Viscographic profiles indicated that WPCs produced from microfiltered whey had higher viscosities than those subjected to heat treatment. In addition, 10 min was determined to be the optimal length of time for heat treatment in order to maximise WPCs viscosity. These results indicate that WPC production can be designed for different food applications. Finally, a rapid viscosity analyzer was demonstrated to be an appropriate tool to study the application of whey proteins in food systems.

  7. High-Temperature Viscosity Of Commercial Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R; See, Clem A; Lam, Oanh P; Minister, Kevin B

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity was measured for six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Viscosity data were obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900°C and 1550°C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa∙s to 750 Pa∙s. Arrhenius coefficients were calculated for individual glasses and linear models were applied to relate them to the mass fractions of 11 major components (SiO2, CaO, Na2O, Al2O3, B2O3, BaO, SrO, K2O, MgO, PbO, and ZrO2) and 12 minor components (Fe2O3, ZnO, Li2O, TiO2, CeO2, F, Sb2O3, Cr2O3, As2O3, MnO2, SO3, and Co3O4). The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100°C to 1550°C and viscosity range from 10 to 400 Pas.

  8. On the similarity of variable viscosity flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voivenel, L.; Danaila, L.; Varea, E.; Renou, B.; Cazalens, M.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent mixing is ubiquitous in both nature and industrial applications. Most of them concern different fluids, therefore with variable physical properties (density and/or viscosity). The focus here is on variable viscosity flows and mixing, involving density-matched fluids. The issue is whether or not these flows may be self-similar, or self-preserving. The importance of this question stands on the predictability of these flows; self-similar dynamical systems are easier tractable from an analytical viewpoint. More specifically, self-similar analysis is applied to the scale-by-scale energy transport equations, which represent the transport of energy at each scale and each point of the flow. Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are developed for inhomogeneous and anisotropic flows, in which the viscosity varies as a result of heterogeneous mixture or temperature variations. Additional terms are highlighted, accounting for the viscosity gradients, or fluctuations. These terms are present at both small and large scales, thus rectifying the common belief that viscosity is a small-scale quantity. Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are then adapted for the particular case of a round jet evolving in a more viscous host fluid. It is further shown that the condition of self-preservation is not necessarily satisfied in variable-viscosity jets. Indeed, the jet momentum conservation, as well as the constancy of the Reynolds number in the central region of the jet, cannot be satisfied simultaneously. This points to the necessity of considering less stringent conditions (with respect to classical, single-fluid jets) when analytically tackling these flows and reinforces the idea that viscosity variations must be accounted for when modelling these flows.

  9. Viscosity of Xenon Examined in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Why does water flow faster than honey? The short answer, that honey has a greater viscosity, merely rephrases the question. The fundamental answer is that viscosity originates in the interactions between a fluid s molecules. These interactions are so complicated that, except for low-density gases, the viscosity of a fluid cannot be accurately predicted. Progress in understanding viscosity has been made by studying moderately dense gases and, more recently, fluids near the critical point. Modern theories predict a universal behavior for all pure fluids near the liquid-vapor critical point, and they relate the increase in viscosity to spontaneous fluctuations in density near this point. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX) experiment tested these theories with unprecedented precision when it flew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-85) in August 1997. Near the critical point, xenon is a billion times more compressible than water, yet it has about the same density. Because the fluid is so "soft," it collapses under its own weight when exposed to the force of Earth s gravity - much like a very soft spring. Because the CVX experiment is conducted in microgravity, it achieves a very uniform fluid density even very close to the critical point. At the heart of the CVX experiment is a novel viscometer built around a small nickel screen. An oscillating electric field forces the screen to oscillate between pairs of electrodes. Viscosity, which dampens the oscillations, can be calculated by measuring the screen motion and the force applied to the screen. So that the fluid s delicate state near the critical point will not be disrupted, the screen oscillations are set to be both slow and small.

  10. Viscosity of confined inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junfang; Todd, B D; Travis, Karl P

    2004-12-01

    We use the nonlocal linear hydrodynamic constitutive model, proposed by Evans and Morriss [Statistical Mechanics of Nonequilibrium Liquids (Academic, London, 1990)], for computing an effective spatially dependent shear viscosity of inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids. The model is applied to a simple atomic fluid undergoing planar Poiseuille flow in a confined channel of several atomic diameters width. We compare the spatially dependent viscosity with a local generalization of Newton's law of viscosity and the Navier-Stokes viscosity, both of which are known to suffer extreme inaccuracies for highly inhomogeneous systems. The nonlocal constitutive model calculates effective position dependent viscosities that are free from the notorious singularities experienced by applying the commonly used local constitutive model. It is simple, general, and has widespread applicability in nanofluidics where experimental measurement of position dependent transport coefficients is currently inaccessible. In principle the method can be used to predict approximate flow profiles of any arbitrary inhomogeneous system. We demonstrate this by predicting the flow profile for a simple fluid undergoing planar Couette flow in a confined channel of several atomic diameters width. PMID:15549963

  11. High temperature viscosity measurement system and viscosity of a common dielectric liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncer, Enis

    2013-01-01

    A device to measure viscosity of dielectric oils was developed. The device is an inset to an autoclave system where the temperature and the pressure could be controlled. The device is capable of measuring viscosities up to 400C and 5000psi, which are the limits of our autoclave at the moment.

  12. Viscosity correlations for Gulf of Mexico crude oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrosky, G.E. Jr.; Farshad, F.F. [Univ. of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, LA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In 1984, Sutton and Farshad evaluated the accuracy of several published viscosity correlations for application in the Gulf of Mexico. A total of 31 different crude oil systems from the Louisiana and Texas gulf coast were used in their analysis. The errors encountered were rather high for dead and saturated oil viscosity. New empirical viscosity correlations for estimating dead oil, saturated oil and undersaturated oil viscosities have been developed as a function of commonly available field data. Results show that these viscosities can be predicted with average absolute errors ranging from 2.91% for undersaturated oil viscosity to 14.47% for saturated oil viscosity.

  13. Red blood cell aggregation, aggregate strength and oxygen transport potential of blood are abnormal in both homozygous sickle cell anemia and sickle-hemoglobin C disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tripette, Julien; Alexy, Tamas; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Mougenel, Daniele; Beltan, Eric; Chalabi, Tawfik; Chout, Roger; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Hue, Olivier; Meiselman, Herbert J.; Connes, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that red cell aggregation and the ratio of hematocrit to blood viscosity, an index of the oxygen transport potential of blood, might considerably modulate blood flow dynamics in the microcirculation. The findings of this study indicate that patients with sickle cell disease and those with sickle cell hemoglobin C disease have low ratios of hematocrit to blood viscosity as compared to normal controls. This may play a role in tissue hypoxia and clinical status of these ...

  14. How Polymers Behave as Viscosity Index Improvers in Lubricating Oils

    OpenAIRE

    Michael J. Covitch; Kieran J. Trickett

    2015-01-01

    One of the requirements of engine lubricating oil is that it must have a low enough viscosity at low temperatures to assist in cold starting and a high enough viscosity at high temperatures to maintain its load-bearing characteristics. Viscosity Index (VI) is one approach used widely in the lubricating field to assess the variation of viscosity with temperature. The VI of both mineral and synthetic base oils can be improved by the addition of polymeric viscosity modifiers (VMs). VI improvemen...

  15. The Friction Theory for Viscosity Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2001-01-01

    In this work the one-parameter friction theory (f-theory) general models have been extended to the viscosity prediction and modeling of characterized oils. It is demonstrated that these simple models, which take advantage of the repulsive and attractive pressure terms of cubic equations of state...... such as the SRK, PR and PRSV, can provide accurate viscosity prediction and modeling of characterized oils. In the case of light reservoir oils, whose properties are close to those of normal alkanes, the one-parameter f-theory general models can predict the viscosity of these fluids with good accuracy. Yet...... below the saturation pressure. In addition, a tuned f-theory general model delivers accurate modeling of different kinds of light and heavy oils. Thus, the simplicity and stability of the f-theory general models make them a powerful tool for applications such as reservoir simulations, between others. (C...

  16. Hall viscosity from effective field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolis, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    For two-dimensional non-dissipative fluids with broken parity, we show via effective field theory methods that the infrared dynamics generically exhibit Hall viscosity--a conservative form of viscosity compatible with two-dimensional isotropy. The equality between the Hall viscosity coefficient and the ground state's intrinsic angular momentum density follows straightforwardly from their descending from the same Lagrangian term of the low-energy effective action. We show that for such fluids sound waves are not purely longitudinal, but acquire an elliptical polarization, with transverse-to-longitudinal aspect ratio proportional to frequency. Our analysis is fully relativistic, thus providing a natural description of (2+1) dimensional relativistic fluids with broken parity.

  17. Viscosity jump in Earth's mid-mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Maxwell L; Lekić, Vedran; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2015-12-11

    The viscosity structure of Earth's deep mantle affects the thermal evolution of Earth, the ascent of mantle plumes, settling of subducted oceanic lithosphere, and the mixing of compositional heterogeneities in the mantle. Based on a reanalysis of the long-wavelength nonhydrostatic geoid, we infer viscous layering of the mantle using a method that allows us to avoid a priori assumptions about its variation with depth. We detect an increase in viscosity at 800- to 1200-kilometers depth, far greater than the depth of the mineral phase transformations that define the mantle transition zone. The viscosity increase is coincident in depth with regions where seismic tomography has imaged slab stagnation, plume deflection, and changes in large-scale structure and offers a simple explanation of these phenomena. PMID:26659053

  18. Viscosity of a dusty plasma liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of our experimental study of the flow of a dusty plasma liquid produced by macroparticles in an argon plasma. The dependences of shear viscosity for such a liquid on the magnitude of the external force inducing the dusty plasma liquid flow and on the plasma-generating gas pressure are analyzed. We have established that the viscosity of a dusty plasma medium decreases with increasing shear stress in it, while the viscosity of such a liquid increases with buffer gas pressure. The flow of a dusty plasma liquid under the action of an external force has been found to resemble the plastic deformation of a Bingham body. We suggest that the formation of crystal-like dusty plasma clusters in a 'liquid' phase can be responsible for the non-Newtonian behavior of the dusty plasma liquid flow

  19. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, Heng [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Kennedy, Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-09

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  20. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  1. Apparatus and method for measuring viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jr., Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the viscosity of a fluid. This apparatus and method is particularly useful for the measurement of the viscosity of a liquid in a harsh environment characterized by high temperature and the presence of corrosive or deleterious gases and vapors which adversely affect conventional ball or roller bearings. The apparatus and method of the present invention employ one or more flexural or torsional bearings to suspend a bob capable of limited angular motion within a rotatable sleeve suspended from a stationary frame.

  2. Entropy viscosity method for nonlinear conservation laws

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2011-05-01

    A new class of high-order numerical methods for approximating nonlinear conservation laws is described (entropy viscosity method). The novelty is that a nonlinear viscosity based on the local size of an entropy production is added to the numerical discretization at hand. This new approach does not use any flux or slope limiters, applies to equations or systems supplemented with one or more entropy inequalities and does not depend on the mesh type and polynomial approximation. Various benchmark problems are solved with finite elements, spectral elements and Fourier series to illustrate the capability of the proposed method. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  3. Rare Gas Viscosities: A Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Arthur M.

    2002-02-01

    The viscosities, h, of the rare gases and SF6 are determined in a physical chemistry laboratory experiment using the evacuation method, which is based on Poiseuille's equation. Students become aware that h does not vary monotonically with row number (or atomic mass) and confirm this behavior on the basis of the kinetic theory expression for h. They find that the collision diameters of the gases, s, which are obtained from h values, increase monotonically with molar mass, as expected. Students can show that values of s obtained from gas viscosities agree reasonably well with ab initio calculations of atomic (molecular) diameters using Gaussian 98W.

  4. Thermal relics in cosmology with bulk viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we discuss some consequences of cosmological models in which the primordial cosmic matter is described by a relativistic imperfect fluid. The latter takes into account the dissipative effects (bulk viscosity) arising from different cooling rates of the fluid components in the expanding Universe. We discuss, in particular, the effects of the bulk viscosity on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on the thermal relic abundance of particles, looking at recent results of PAMELA experiment. The latter has determined an anomalous excess of positron events, which cannot be explained by conventional cosmology and particle physics. (orig.)

  5. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides

  6. Shear viscosity of a hadronic gas mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Itakura, Kazunori; Morimatsu, Osamu; Otomo, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    We discuss in detail the shear viscosity coefficient eta and the viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s of a hadronic gas comprised of pions and nucleons. In particular, we study the effects of baryon chemical potential on eta and eta/s. We solve the relativistic quantum Boltzmann equations with binary collisions (pi pi, pi N, and NN) for a state slightly deviated from thermal equilibrium at temperature T and baryon chemical potential mu. The use of phenomenological amplitudes in the collis...

  7. Thermal relics in cosmology with bulk viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iorio, A. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Lambiase, G. [Universita di Salerno, Dipartimento di Fisica E.R. Caianiello, Fisciano (Italy); INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Fisciano (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we discuss some consequences of cosmological models in which the primordial cosmic matter is described by a relativistic imperfect fluid. The latter takes into account the dissipative effects (bulk viscosity) arising from different cooling rates of the fluid components in the expanding Universe. We discuss, in particular, the effects of the bulk viscosity on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on the thermal relic abundance of particles, looking at recent results of PAMELA experiment. The latter has determined an anomalous excess of positron events, which cannot be explained by conventional cosmology and particle physics. (orig.)

  8. SOME ASPECTS OF THE REACTIVITY OF PULP INTENDED FOR HIGH-VISCOSITY VISCOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Ostberg,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The motivation for this study was to reduce the consumption of C2S when preparing high-viscosity viscose by pre-treating two softwood pulps with enzymes prior to the viscose stages. Reactivity was evaluated in two ways, Fock´s test of the pulp and the gamma number of the viscose solution prior to regeneration. Whilst the reactivity of a pulp that had been subjected to enzyme pretreatment increased according to Fock´s test, it did not increase according to the gamma number. This unexpected difference between the two reactivity tests was investigated. It was concluded that Fock´s test measures the extent to which C2S reacts with a pulp sample during a standardized test, whereas the gamma number measures the resulting degree of xanthate substitution on the cellulose backbone. The gamma number was judged to be the more relevant of the two tests, since it reflects the dissolution ability of a pulp in the viscose preparation. A higher gamma number also means that the coagulation time in the spinning process is prolonged; this is beneficial, as it can be used to increase the tenacity of the viscose fibres. Measuring the reactivity according to Fock´s test, on the contrary, provides more dubious results, as the test has no undisputed correlation to the viscose preparation process.

  9. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  10. Viscose and Terylene Market Witnesses Positive Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua xiaowei; Guoyun

    2010-01-01

    @@ Viscose and terylene staple fiber market is very hot as prices rise this year. The main reason for the positive market activity is that cotton prices hay increased rapidly. But, there is a worry that the appreciation of the yuan, to gether with the rate hike will squeeze profit margins of the industry.

  11. Commensurability Effects in Viscosity of Nanoconfined Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neek-Amal, Mehdi; Peeters, Francois M; Grigorieva, Irina V; Geim, Andre K

    2016-03-22

    The rate of water flow through hydrophobic nanocapillaries is greatly enhanced as compared to that expected from macroscopic hydrodynamics. This phenomenon is usually described in terms of a relatively large slip length, which is in turn defined by such microscopic properties as the friction between water and capillary surfaces and the viscosity of water. We show that the viscosity of water and, therefore, its flow rate are profoundly affected by the layered structure of confined water if the capillary size becomes less than 2 nm. To this end, we study the structure and dynamics of water confined between two parallel graphene layers using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the shear viscosity is not only greatly enhanced for subnanometer capillaries, but also exhibits large oscillations that originate from commensurability between the capillary size and the size of water molecules. Such oscillating behavior of viscosity and, consequently, the slip length should be taken into account in designing and studying graphene-based and similar membranes for desalination and filtration. PMID:26882095

  12. Shear Viscosity of Turbulent Chiral Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Das, Amita; Kaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the difference between the chemical potentials of left-handed and right-handed particles in a parity violating (chiral) plasma can lead to an instability. We show that the chiral instability may drive turbulent transport. Further we estimate the anomalous viscosity of chiral plasma arising from the enhanced collisionality due to turbulence.

  13. On the measurement of magnetic viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serletis, C. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Efthimiadis, K.G., E-mail: kge@auth.gr [Department of Physics, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2012-08-15

    This work is an investigation of the experimental method used for measuring the magnetic viscosity in a hard ferromagnetic material, i.e. the recording of the magnetization under constant applied field and temperature, after the material has been magnetically saturated. It investigates how the experimental results are affected by the initial conditions of the method (saturation field, field change rate and field oscillation prior to its stabilization), and by minor variations of field and temperature during the recording. Based on the arising conclusions and the use of a more complex fitting function of measurements, the accuracy and repeatability of experimental results is improved. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic viscosity is affected by initial measurement conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Minor field deviations prior to its stabilization cause large changes in viscosity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Viscosity is strongly dependent on the field change rate from saturation to the measurement field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small changes in field and temperature during the experiment can lead to false measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Errors in measurements can be eliminated through the use of a proper fitting function.

  14. Pressure viscosity coefficient of vegetable oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) pressure viscosity coefficient (PVC) of ten vegetable oils from commodity and new crops, and two petroleum-based oils, polyalphaolefin (PAO) and hexadecane, were investigated. PVC was measured using three different methods: the So and Klaus (S-K) procedure from oil visco...

  15. Weak Dynamic Programming Principle for Viscosity Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchard, Bruno; Touzi, Nizar

    2011-01-01

    We prove a weak version of the dynamic programming principle for standard stochastic control problems and mixed control-stopping problems, which avoids the technical difficulties related to the measurable selection argument. In the Markov case, our result is tailor-maid for the derivation of the dynamic programming equation in the sense of viscosity solutions.

  16. Sensor for Viscosity and Shear Strength Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. The work for this project will be performed in three phases. The first phase, carried out in FY96, involved (1) an evaluation of acoustic and other methods for viscosity measurement; (2) measurement of the parameters of slurries over the range of percent solids found in tanks and transport systems; (3) a comparison of physical properties (e.g., viscosity and density) to percent solids found composition; and (4) the design of a prototype sensor. The second phase (FY97) will involve the fabrication of a prototype hybrid sensor to measure the viscosity and mechanical properties of slurries in remote, high-radiation environments. Two different viscometer designs are being investigated in this study: a magnetostrictive pulse wave guide viscometer; an oscillating cylinder viscometer. In FY97, the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), which has printed circuit, thick film, thin film, and co-fired ceramic fabrication capability, will fabricate five probes for demonstration after technology selection and evaluation

  17. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-01

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a "heat flux viscosity," is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  18. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application

  19. Viscosity in a Lepton-Photon Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Husdal, Lars

    2016-01-01

    We look at viscosity production in a universe consisting purely of leptons and photons. This is quite close to what the Universe actually look like when the temperature was between $10^{10}$ K and $10^{12}$ K ($1$ -- $100$ MeV). By taking the strong force and the hadronic particles out of the equation, we can examine how the viscous forces behave with all the 12 leptons present. By this we study how shear- and (more interestingly) bulk viscosity is affected during periods with particle annihilation. We use the theory given by Hoogeveen et. al. from 1986, replicate their 9-particle results and expanded it to include the muon and tau particles as well. This will impact the bulk viscosity immensely for high temperatures. We will show that during the beginning of the lepton era, when the temperature is around 100 MeV, the bulk viscosity will be roughly 100 million times larger with muons included in the model compared to a model without.

  20. Sensor for Viscosity and Shear Strength Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, J.; Moore, J.E. Jr.; Ebadian, M.A.; Jones, W.K.

    1998-10-20

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. The work for this project will be performed in three phases. The first phase, carried out in FY96, involved (1) an evaluation of acoustic and other methods for viscosity measurement; (2) measurement of the parameters of slurries over the range of percent solids found in tanks and transport systems; (3) a comparison of physical properties (e.g., viscosity and density) to percent solids found composition; and (4) the design of a prototype sensor. The second phase (FY97) will involve the fabrication of a prototype hybrid sensor to measure the viscosity and mechanical properties of slurries in remote, high-radiation environments. Two different viscometer designs are being investigated in this study: a magnetostrictive pulse wave guide viscometer; an oscillating cylinder viscometer. In FY97, the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), which has printed circuit, thick film, thin film, and co-fired ceramic fabrication capability, will fabricate five probes for demonstration after technology selection and evaluation.

  1. The high-frequency viscosity of dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kruif, C. G.; Woutersen, A. T. J. M.; Mellema, J.

    1992-09-01

    Several theories for the high-frequency viscosity of hard sphere dispersions are discussed and compared with experimental results. The theories based on a virial expansion are known to be valid for low volume fractions only. We show that the most satisfactory description is given by Beenakker's multipole expansion theory.

  2. Viscosity of endodontic irrigants: Influence of temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Poggio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to assess the influence of temperature on the viscosity of different endodontic irrigants. Materials and Methods: The measurements of viscosity of 3% hydrogen peroxide, 0.9% sodium chloride, aqueous solution of 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX and 0.2% cetrimide, 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA at different temperatures (22°C, 30°C, 40°C, 50°C and 60°C were obtained using Mohr balance and Ostwald viscometer. The Shapiro-Wilk test and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used for the statistical analysis. (α = 0.05. Results: No significant differences were recorded at each temperature among 3% hydrogen peroxide, 0.9% sodium chloride and aqueous solution of 0.2% CHX and 0.2% cetrimide. 5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA showed the higher values. Viscosity statistically decreased with increasing temperature. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, 5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA are significantly viscous at room temperature and their viscosity reduces with elevating temperature.

  3. From Stopping to Viscosity in Nuclear Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Danielewicz, P.; Barker, B.; Shi, L.

    2009-01-01

    Data on stopping in intermediate-energy central heavy-ion collisions are analyzed following transport theory based on the Boltzmann equation. In consequence, values of nuclear shear viscosity are inferred. The inferred values are significantly larger than obtained for free nucleon dispersion relations and free nucleon-nucleon cross sections.

  4. Pressure dependence of polysulphone melt viscosity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, T.; Polášková, M.; Filip, Petr; Sáha, P.

    Cape Town : Southern African Society of Rheology, 2006, S2. [SASOR 2006: Southern African Conference on Rheology /1./. Cape Town (ZA), 24.08.2006-27.08.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2060202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : polymer melt * pressure dependent viscosity Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  5. Electro fluid dynamic viscosity rheometer oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.В. Древецький

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available  The block diagram is given and the principle of work of the dynamic viscosity of oil products viscosimeter on the basis of symmetric hydraulic bridge with by electrofluid converters and microprocessor system of an equilibration is described. The condition of the hydraulic bridge balance is received and results of computer modelling of the viscosimeter are presented.

  6. Viscosity of endodontic irrigants: Influence of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Ceci, Matteo; Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Dagna, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the influence of temperature on the viscosity of different endodontic irrigants. Materials and Methods: The measurements of viscosity of 3% hydrogen peroxide, 0.9% sodium chloride, aqueous solution of 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and 0.2% cetrimide, 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) at different temperatures (22°C, 30°C, 40°C, 50°C and 60°C) were obtained using Mohr balance and Ostwald viscometer. The Shapiro-Wilk test and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used for the statistical analysis. (α = 0.05). Results: No significant differences were recorded at each temperature among 3% hydrogen peroxide, 0.9% sodium chloride and aqueous solution of 0.2% CHX and 0.2% cetrimide. 5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA showed the higher values. Viscosity statistically decreased with increasing temperature. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, 5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA are significantly viscous at room temperature and their viscosity reduces with elevating temperature. PMID:26604955

  7. Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new representation of the viscosity for the fluid phase of ethane includes a zero-density correlation and a contribution for the critical enhancement, initially both developed separately, but based on experimental data. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρc and of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = Tc/T (ρc—critical density and Tc—critical temperature). The final formulation contains 14 coefficients obtained using a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the selected primary data sets is reviewed, in particular with respect to the assessment used in earlier viscosity correlations. The new viscosity surface correlation makes use of the reference equation of state for the thermodynamic properties of ethane by Bücker and Wagner [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 35, 205 (2006)] and is valid in the fluid region from the melting line to temperatures of 675 K and pressures of 100 MPa. The viscosity in the limit of zero density is described with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 290 < T/K < 625, increasing to 1.0% at temperatures down to 212 K. The uncertainty of the correlated values is 1.5% in the range 290 < T/K < 430 at pressures up to 30 MPa on the basis of recent measurements judged to be very reliable as well as 4.0% and 6.0% in further regions. The uncertainty in the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2) increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0% considering the available reliable data. Tables of the viscosity calculated from the correlation are listed in an appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor–liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region

  8. Conditions of viscosity measurement for detecting irradiated peppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viscosity of gelatinized suspensions of black and white peppers decreased depending upon dose. The viscosity was influenced by gelatinization and viscosity measurement conditions. The difference between unirradiated pepper and an irradiated one was larger at a higher pH and temperature for gelatinization. A viscosity parameter normalized with the starch content of pepper sample and the viscosity of a 5% suspension of corn starch could get rid of the influence of the conditions for viscosity measurement such as type of viscometer, shear rate and temperature. (author)

  9. Numerical studies of thermal convection with temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity at extreme viscosity contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleque, Tania S.; Fowler, A. C.; Howell, P. D.; Vynnycky, M.

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by convection of planetary mantles, we consider a mathematical model for Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a basally heated layer of a fluid whose viscosity depends strongly on temperature and pressure, defined in an Arrhenius form. The model is solved numerically for extremely large viscosity variations across a unit aspect ratio cell, and steady solutions for temperature, isotherms, and streamlines are obtained. To improve the efficiency of numerical computation, we introduce a modified viscosity law with a low temperature cutoff. We demonstrate that this simplification results in markedly improved numerical convergence without compromising accuracy. Continued numerical experiments suggest that narrow cells are preferred at extreme viscosity contrasts, and this conclusion is supported by a linear stability analysis.

  10. Viscose kink and drift-kink modes in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intristic kink modes in a tokamak are theoretically investigated taking account of longitudinal viscosity of ions and electrons and drift effect. It is marked that dispersion equation of investigated modes coinsides in form with that for ballooning modes. It is shown that five types of intrinsic kink instability may be distinguished in disregard of viscosity and drift effects. Effect of stabilizing quasiideal viscose kink and viscose resistive kink modes by finite Larmuir ion radius is investigated. A branch of viscose reclosure mode which instability is due to electron viscosity is pointed out. A series of other viscose and drift-kink tokamak modes is considered. Both general disperse equations of the above-mentioned kink instability varieties, taking account of viscose and drift ones, and disperse equations of separate branches are presented

  11. Plasma Viscosity with Mass Transport in Spherical ICF Implosion Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Vold, Erik L; Ortega, Mario I; Moll, Ryan; Fenn, Daniel; Molvig, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrange hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduc...

  12. Magnetic effect in viscosity of magnetorheological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, H. A.; Gonzalez, E.; Restrepo, J.; Parra, C. A.; Ortiz, C.

    2016-02-01

    In this work the study of viscosity is presented for a magnetorheological fluid made from iron oxides micrometre, under an external magnetic field. The material was characterized by magnetic loops in a vibrating sample magnetometer and its crystal structure by X-ray diffraction. The results show that saturation magnetization and coercive field have dependence with the powder size. The material has different crystal structure which lattice parameters were determined by Rietveld refinement. The viscosity of the magnetorheological fluid was measured by a viscometer with rotational symmetry with and without external field. This result evidence a dependency on the size, percentage iron oxide and the applied magnetic field, it is due to the hydrodynamic volume of iron oxide interacts with the external magnetic field, increasing the flow resistance.

  13. Intrinsic viscosity of model starburst dendrimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrodynamic radii (Rη) calculated from intrinsic viscosities of poly(amido amide) (PAMAM) starburst dendrimers increasing generation number. This would seem to support a structure with strongly stretched tiers, which is relatively hollow near the core, and with most end groups near the surface. However, a computer simulation due to Lescanec and Muthukumar supports a more folded structure with higher density near the core and with end groups dispersed throughout the molecule. Here we calculate the hydrodynamic radii of the Lescanec-Muthukumar model using intrinsic viscosity formulas developed by Zimm and Fixman. The Lescanec-Muthukumar starbursts with relatively stiff spacers have hydrodynamic radii in good agreement with the experimental PAMAM radii, in spite of their folded structure. The hydrodynamic radius is sensitive both to the molecular size and to the density. As the number of generations increases, the molecules become more dense and the hydrodynamic radius increases more rapidly than the radius of gyration. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Viscosity: From air to hot nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nguyen Dinh Dang

    2014-11-01

    After a brief review of the history of viscosity from classical to quantal fluids, a discussion of how the shear viscosity of a finite hot nucleus is calculated directly from the width and energy of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) of the nucleus is given in this paper. The ratio / with s being the entropy volume density, is extracted from the experimental systematic of GDR in copper, tin and lead isotopes at finite temperature . These empirical results are compared with the results predicted by several independent models, as well as with almost model-independent estimations. Based on these results, it is concluded that the ratio / in medium and heavy nuclei decreases with increasing to reach (1.3−4)$×\\hbar/(4 k_B)$ at = 5 MeV, which is almost the same as that obtained for quark-gluon plasma at > 170 MeV.

  15. Low temperature viscosity in elongated ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, T.; Pérez-Madrid, A.; Rubí, J. M.

    1997-12-01

    We have studied the relaxation and transport properties of a ferrofluid in an elongational flow. These properties are influenced by the bistable nature of the potential energy. Bistability comes from the irrotational character of the flow together with the symmetry of the dipoles. Additionally, the presence of a constant magnetic field destroys the symmetry of the potential energy magnetizing the system. We have shown that at a moderate temperature, compared to the height of the energy barrier, the viscosity decreases with respect to the value it would have if the potential were stable. This phenomenon is known as the "negative viscosity" effect. Thermal motion induces jumps of the magnetic moment between the two stable states of the system leading to the aforementioned lowered dissipation effect.

  16. Elongational viscosity of narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders; Almdal, Kristoffer; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz;

    2003-01-01

    Transient and steady elongational viscosity has been measured for two narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene melts of molar masses 200 000 and 390 000 by means of a filament stretching rheometer. Total Hencky strains of about five have been obtained. The transient elongational viscosity rises...... above the linear viscoelastic prediction at intermediate strains, indicating strain hardening. The steady elongational viscosities are monotone decreasing functions of elongation rate. At elongation rates larger than the inverse reptation time, the steady elongational viscosity scales linearly with...

  17. An acoustic transmission sensor for the longitudinal viscosity of fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Antlinger, Hannes; Clara, Stefan; Beigelbeck, Roman; Cerimovic, Samir; Keplinger, Franz; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Physical fluid parameters like viscosity, mass density and sound velocity can be determined utilizing ultrasonic sensors. We introduce the concept of a recently devised transmission based sensor utilizing pressure waves to determine the longitudinal viscosity, bulk viscosity, and second coefficient of viscosity of a sample fluid in a test chamber. A model is presented which allows determining these parameters from measurement values by means of a fit. The setup is particularly suited for liqu...

  18. A Viscosity Adaptive Lattice Boltzmann Method

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis describes the development and validation of a viscosity adaption method for the numerical simulation of non-Newtonian fluids on the basis of the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), as well as the development and verification of the related software bundle SAM-Lattice. By now, Lattice Boltzmann Methods are established as an alternative approach to classical computational fluid dynamics methods. The LBM has been shown to be an accurate and efficient tool for the numerical...

  19. Viscoelastic-electromagnetism and Hall viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Hidaka, Yoshimasa; Hirono, Yuji(Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan); Kimura, Taro; MINAMI, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a kind of electromagnetism, which we call viscoelastic-electromagnetism, to investigate viscoelastic transport phenomena. It is shown that Cartan's formalism of general relativity is essential for viscoelastic theory, and then the corresponding electric and magnetic fields are regarded as a velocity gradient and a Burgers vector density, respectively. As an application of this formalism, the Streda formula for the Hall viscosity is obtained.

  20. Singularities in droplet pinching without viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, J

    1997-01-01

    A model for the pinching of an inviscid liquid column, originally developed by Lee, is considered. We find that Lee's model has a singularity in the curvature at a finite thread radius, and therefore does not describe breakup. However, the observed steepening of the profile corresponds to experiments with fluids at low viscosity. The singularity has similarity form, which we compute analytically. The result agrees well with numerical simulations of Lee's model.

  1. Liquid mixture viscosities correlation with rational models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević-Stevanović Anđela B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper twenty two selected rational correlation models for liquid mixture viscosities of organic compounds were tested on 219 binary sets of experimental data taken from literature. The binary sets contained 3675 experimental data points for 70 different compounds. The Dimitrov-Kamenski X, Dimitrov-Kamenski XII, and Dimitrov-Kamenski XIII models demonstrated the best correlative characteristics for binary mixtures with overall absolute average deviation less then 2%. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172063

  2. Diffusion, Viscosity, and Thermodynamics in Liquid Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bosse, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    This thesis aims at an overall improvement of the diffusion coefficient predictions. For this reason the theoretical determination of diffusion, viscosity, and thermodynamics in liquid systems is discussed. Furthermore, the experimental determination of diffusion coefficients is also part of this work. All investigations presented are carried out for organic binary liquid mixtures. Diffusion coefficient data of 9 highly nonideal binary mixtures are reported over the whole concentration range ...

  3. Elasticity, viscosity, and deformation of orbital fat

    OpenAIRE

    Schoemaker, Ivo; Hoefnagel, Pepijn; Mastenbroek, Tom; Kolff, Cornelis; Schutte, Sander; van der Helm, Frans; Picken, Stephen; Gerritsen, Anton; Wielopolski, Piotr; Spekreijse, Henk; Simonsz, Huib

    2006-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE. For development of a finite element analysis model of orbital mechanics, it was necessary to determine the material properties of orbital fat and its degree of deformation in eye rotation. METHODS. Elasticity and viscosity of orbital fat of eight orbits of four calves and two orbits of one rhesus monkey were measured with a parallel-plate rheometer. The degree of deformation of orbital fat was studied in two human subjects by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) through the o...

  4. Magnetic viscosity studies in hard magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic viscosity behavior has been studied in several hard magnets with different magnetization reversal mechanisms including barium ferrite powders, Cu-Mn-Al, ferrite magnets, Nd-Fe-B, and SmCo5, Sm2(Co,Fe,Cu,Zr)17. The measurements were made with a vibrating sample magnetometer for times up to 60 s and a SQUID magnetometer for longer times in the range of 60--2300 s. For most of the samples the magnetization was found to vary logarithmically with time. The field and temperature dependence of the magnetic viscosity coefficient S was studied. Here, S was found to vary with the applied field and it usually peaked around the coercive field Hc. The measured values of Smax at 10 K range from 0.004 to 1.853 emu/g for Cu-Mn-Al and Sm2(Co,Fe,Cu,Zr)17, respectively. The magnetic viscosity coefficient was used together with the magnetic susceptibility to determine the activation volume

  5. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  6. Shear viscosity of a hadronic gas mixture

    CERN Document Server

    Itakura, Kazunori; Otomo, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    We discuss in detail the shear viscosity coefficient eta and the viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s of a hadronic gas comprised of pions and nucleons. In particular, we study the effects of baryon chemical potential on eta and eta/s. We solve the relativistic quantum Boltzmann equations with binary collisions (pi pi, pi N, and NN) for a state slightly deviated from thermal equilibrium at temperature T and baryon chemical potential mu. The use of phenomenological amplitudes in the collision terms, which are constructed to reproduce experimental data, greatly helps to extend the validity region in the T-mu plane. The total viscosity coefficient eta(T,mu)=eta^pi + eta^N increases as a function of T and mu, indirectly reflecting energy dependences of binary cross sections. The increase in mu direction is due to enhancement of the nucleon contribution eta^N while the pion contribution eta^pi diminishes with increasing mu. On the other hand, due to rapid growth of entropy density, the ratio eta/s becomes a de...

  7. ON THE EDDY VISCOSITY MODEL OF PERIODIC TURBULENT SHEAR FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新军; 罗纪生; 周恒

    2003-01-01

    Physical argument shows that eddy viscosity is essentially different from molecular viscosity. By direct numerical simulation, it was shown that for periodic turbulent flows, there is phase difference between Reynolds stress and rate of strain. This finding posed great challenge to turbulence modeling, because most turbulence modeling, which use the idea of eddy viscosity, do not take this effect into account.

  8. Viscosity solution of linear regulator quadratic for degenerate diffusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studied a linear regulator quadratic control problem for degenerate Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB equation. We showed the existence of viscosity properties and established a unique viscosity solution of the degenerate HJB equation associated with this problem by the technique of viscosity solutions.

  9. Blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart contracts, which ... as it relaxes, which is called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure ...

  10. Blood transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000431.htm Blood transfusions To use the sharing features on this ... several sources of blood which are described below. Blood From the Public (Volunteer Blood Donation) The most ...

  11. Blood Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Group Links Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Basics Blood is a specialized body fluid. It ... about 9 pints. Jump To: The Components of Blood and Their Importance Many people have undergone blood ...

  12. Blood Thinners

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have some kinds of heart or blood vessel disease, or if you have poor blood flow to your brain, your doctor may recommend that you take a blood thinner. Blood thinners reduce the risk of heart ...

  13. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  14. Effects of Contrast Media on Blood Rheology: Comparison in Humans, Pigs, and Sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare whole blood viscosity and erythrocyte aggregation in humans, pigs, and sheep, before and after adding water-soluble iodinated contrast medium (CM). Methods: Two CMs were studied: iopromide (nonionic) and ioxaglate (ionic). The blood-CM viscosity was measured with a Couette viscometer. Erythrocyte aggregation was measured with an erythroaggregometer. Results: The blood-CM viscosity was increased up to +20% (relative to pure blood) with a CM concentration of 0%-10%. At CM concentrations from 10% to 50%, the viscosity decreased. The disaggregation shear stress was increased (relative to pure blood) at low CM concentration (0%-10%). When the CM concentration increased from 10% to 20%, the disaggregation shear stress was decreased, except with the pig blood-ioxaglate mixture. Conclusion: At low CM concentration the blood viscosity was increased in pig, sheep, and humans and the disaggregation shear stress was increased in pig and humans. The aggregation of sheep blood was too low to be detected by the erythroaggregometer. This rise can be explained by the formation of poorly deformable echinocytes. At higher CM concentration, the viscosity and the disaggregation shear stress decreased in relation to the blood dilution. We conclude that pig blood and sheep blood can both be used to study the effect of CM injection on blood viscosity. Nevertheless, the rheologic behavior of pig blood in terms of erythrocyte aggregation is closer to that of human blood than is sheep blood when mixed with CM. Pigs could thus be more suitable than sheep for in vivo studies of CM miscibility with blood during selective cannulation procedures

  15. Effects of flow geometry on blood viscoelasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, George B; Henderson, Nancy M

    2006-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of blood are dominated by microstructures formed by red cells. The microstructures are of several types such as irregular aggregates, rouleaux, and layers of aligned cells. The dynamic deformability of the red cells, aggregation tendency, cell concentration, size of confining vessel and rate of flow are determining factors in the microstructure. Viscoelastic properties, viscosity and elasticity, relate to energy loss and storage in flowing blood while relaxation time and Weissenberg number play a role in assessing the importance of the elasticity relative to the viscosity. These effects are shown herein for flow in a large straight cylindrical tube, a small tube, and a porous medium. These cases approximate the geometries of the arterial system: large vessels, small vessels and vessels with many branches and bifurcations. In each case the viscosity, elasticity, relaxation time and Weissenberg number for normal human blood as well as blood with enhanced cell aggregation tendency and diminished cell deformability are given. In the smaller spaces of the microtubes and porous media, the diminished viscosity shows the possible influence of the Fåhraeus-Lindqvist effect and at high shear rates, the viscoelasticity of blood shows dilatancy. This is true for normal, aggregation enhanced and hardened cells. PMID:17148856

  16. Non-Newtonian viscosity wedge in film formation of EHL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUOF.; WONGP.L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the action of viscosity wedge in the oil film formation ofEHL at opposite sliding and zero entrainment. Using solvers developed for Newtonian and Eyringfluids, the film formation behavior originating from viscosity wedge is investigated. The numericalsimulation displays that lubricant film formation induced by viscosity wedge is different from that bythe well-known geometrical wedge with entrainment in classic EHL. The numerical analyses showthat at high opposite sliding speed the viscosity wedge acts as a leading role in film formation, thenon-Newtonian effects can have a pronounced influence on action of the viscosity wedge.

  17. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF VISCOSITY OF Al-Si ALLOY MELTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.R. Geng; R. Wang; Z.X. Yang; J.H. Chen; C.J. Sun; Y. Wang

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between the viscosity and temperature of Al-Si alloy melts was investigated.The viscosity of three different types of Al-Si alloy melts was measured. It was showed that the relationship between the viscosity and temperature of hypoeutectic Al-5% Si and eutectic Al12.5%Si alloy melts is approximately exponential except for some special zones, but that of the hypereutectic melt is different. The paper discussed the correlation of the viscosity and atomic density, which is thought that the viscosity corresponds to the atomic density to some extent.

  18. The Role of Viscosity in TATB Hot Spot Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, L E; Zepeda-Ruis, L; Howard, W M; Najjar, F; Reaugh, J E

    2011-08-02

    The role of dissipative effects, such as viscosity, in the ignition of high explosive pores is investigated using a coupled chemical, thermal, and hydrodynamic model. Chemical reactions are tracked with the Cheetah thermochemical code coupled to the ALE3D hydrodynamic code. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine the viscosity of liquid TATB. We also analyze shock wave experiments to obtain an estimate for the shock viscosity of TATB. Using the lower bound liquid-like viscosities, we find that the pore collapse is hydrodynamic in nature. Using the upper bound viscosity from shock wave experiments, we find that the pore collapse is closest to the viscous limit.

  19. Electron treatment of wood pulp for the viscose process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron processing is currently being evaluated by several viscose producers for integration into their process. The viscose industry converts dissolving wood pulp into products such as staple fibre, filament, cord, film, packaging, and non-edible sausage casings. These materials are used in the clothing, drapery, hygiene, automobile, food, and packaging industries. Viscose producers are facing increasingly high production costs and stringent environmental regulations that have forced some plants to close. Electron treatment of wood pulp can significantly reduce the amounts of chemicals used for producing viscose and the production of hazardous pollutants. Acsion Industries has worked with companies worldwide to demonstrate the benefits of using electron treated pulp for producing viscose (rayon). This paper describes the viscose process, the benefits of using electron treatment in the viscose process, and Acsion's efforts in developing this technology. (author)

  20. Foaminess and viscosity effects in heavy oil flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshmakhy, Ahmed; Maini, Brij [University of Calgary (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of conventional oil reservoirs and the increasing energy demand, the exploitation of unconventional hydrocarbon resources is increasing. However, the rheology of heavy oil is still not well understood; foamy oil viscosity is believed to be lower than oil viscosity, which is counter-intuitive since continuous phase viscosity is supposed to be lower than that of dispersion. The aim of this paper is to provide a better understanding of foamy oil viscosity. Experiments were conducted using a slim tube filled with sand and oil viscosity was measured for different flow rates, foaminess and gas volume fractions. Results showed that the foaming agent has a low impact on the apparent viscosity of foamy oil and that the apparent viscosity of foamy oils was significantly higher than that of the oil. This paper provided a better understanding of the rheology of foamy oils.

  1. Effective density and viscosity of a suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents results of a series of experiments on the settling velocity of spheres in two-component solid--liquid suspensions. Both sedimenting and fluidized suspensions are considered. Particular emphasis has been given to the effective values of the density and viscosity of the mixture which allow us to describe slow settling of a test sphere using the Francis modification of the Stokes formula for the settling of a single sphere in a Newtonian fluid with wall effects. Our experimental results show that values of the effective density and viscosity are close to the average density of the mixture and to the viscosity of the mixture predicted by a correlation suggested by Thomas when the test particles are of the same size as the suspended particles, or larger, but not too much smaller. The signature of the failure of the concept of effective fluid properties is traced to an increase of the variance of the experimental results and is not associated merely with a different than average value of the density; in particular, none of our results are well described by the use of the fluid density in the expression for the buoyant force. We also studied the settling of spheres in fluidized suspensions at high Reynolds numbers. The Barnea and Mizrahi model for the expansion of uniformly fluidized beds was modified in two different ways to describe the settling of particles in the fluidized suspensions. It is not possible to describe the modified drag laws with an effective Newtonian theory if for no other reason than the effective densities which enter into buoyancy are not in principle those which control inertia. The modified drag law is in agreement with experiments in sedimentation columns. Coarse agreement between the predicted and measured drag is found in the fluidized suspension even when the test and the fluidized particles are the same size

  2. From Suitable Weak Solutions to Entropy Viscosity

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2010-12-16

    This paper focuses on the notion of suitable weak solutions for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and discusses the relevance of this notion to Computational Fluid Dynamics. The purpose of the paper is twofold (i) to recall basic mathematical properties of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and to show how they might relate to LES (ii) to introduce an entropy viscosity technique based on the notion of suitable weak solution and to illustrate numerically this concept. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  3. On the measurement of magnetic viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletis, C.; Efthimiadis, K. G.

    2012-08-01

    This work is an investigation of the experimental method used for measuring the magnetic viscosity in a hard ferromagnetic material, i.e. the recording of the magnetization under constant applied field and temperature, after the material has been magnetically saturated. It investigates how the experimental results are affected by the initial conditions of the method (saturation field, field change rate and field oscillation prior to its stabilization), and by minor variations of field and temperature during the recording. Based on the arising conclusions and the use of a more complex fitting function of measurements, the accuracy and repeatability of experimental results is improved.

  4. Efficiency model of pumping low viscosity fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the current research situation of pump efficiency, especially in pumping low viscosity fluids. Then we propose a simple and widely used efficiency model for the pump which just depends on the suction, discharge and leakage resistance coefficient. An experimental test rig is setup. After evaluating the efficiency of the pump in different conditions, it is found that the performance is quite different when pumping different medium. A phenomenon has been observed which results of the appearance of the BEP (best efficiency point), and our efficiency model can explain these testing phenomena very well

  5. Correlation of the liquid mixture viscosities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević-Stevanović Anđela B.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper forty two selected correlation models for liquid mixture viscosities of organic compounds were tested on 219 binary and 41 ternary sets of experimental data taken from literature. The binary sets contained 3675 experimental data points for 70 different compounds. The ternary sets contained 2879 experimental data points for 29 different compounds. The Heric I, Heric-Brewer II, and Krishnan-Laddha models demonstrated the best correlative characteristics for binary mixtures (overall absolute average deviation < 2%. The Heric I, Heric-Brewer II, Krishnan-Laddha and Heric II models demonstrated the best correlative characteristics for ternary mixtures (overall absolute average deviation < 3%.

  6. Blood Thixotropy in Patients with Sickle Cell Anaemia: Role of Haematocrit and Red Blood Cell Rheological Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Waltz, Xavier; Romana, Marc; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Lemonne, Nathalie; Billaud, Marie; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Connes, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We compared the blood thixotropic/shear-thinning properties and the red blood cells’ (RBC) rheological properties between a group of patients with sickle cell anaemia (SS) and healthy individuals (AA). Blood thixotropy was determined by measuring blood viscosity with a capillary viscometer using a “loop” protocol: the shear rate started at 1 s−1 and increased progressively to 922 s−1 and then re-decreased to the initial shear rate. Measurements were performed at native haematocrit for the two...

  7. Solvent viscosity dependence for enzymatic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sitnitsky, A E

    2008-01-01

    A mechanism for relationship of solvent viscosity with reaction rate constant at enzyme action is suggested. It is based on fluctuations of electric field in enzyme active site produced by thermally equilibrium rocking (cranckshaft motion) of the rigid plane (in which the dipole moment $\\approx 3.6 D$ lies) of a favourably located and oriented peptide group (or may be a few of them). Thus the rocking of the plane leads to fluctuations of the electric field of the dipole moment. These fluctuations can interact with the reaction coordinate because the latter in its turn has transition dipole moment due to separation of charges at movement of the reacting system along it. The rocking of the plane of the peptide group is sensitive to the microviscosity of its environment in protein interior and the latter is a function of the solvent viscosity. Thus we obtain an additional factor of interrelationship for these characteristics with the reaction rate constant. We argue that due to the properties of the cranckshaft ...

  8. Multiresolution schemes for conservation laws with viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents multiresolution schemes for the efficient numerical solution of one-dimensional conservation laws with viscosity. The method, originally developed by A, Harten (Commun. Pure Appl. Math., to appear) for hyperbolic conservation laws, computes the cell average multiresolution representation of the solution which provides much information about the solution's regularity. As a consequence, the possibly expensive ENO (essentially nonoscillatory) reconstruction as well as numerous flux computations are performed only near discontinuities, and thereby the numerical solution procedure becomes considerably more efficient. The multiresolution scheme is also expected to open-quotes followclose quotes possibly unsteady irregularities from one time step to the next. When viscosity is added, predicting the location of the irregularity becomes a problem of estimating the change in shock thickness. To this end, we derive shock width estimates for our 1D prototype equations, which, when combined with the stability restriction of the numerical scheme, provide a reliable mechanism for enlarging the original multiresolution stencil. The numerical experiments for scalar conservation laws indicate the feasibility of multiresolution schemes for the viscous case as well

  9. The intrinsic viscosity of linear DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsortos, Achilleas; Papadakis, George; Gizeli, Electra

    2011-12-01

    We measured the intrinsic viscosity of very small synthetic DNA molecules, of 20-395 base pairs, and incorporated them in a nearly complete picture for the whole span of molecular weights reported in the literature to date. A major transition is observed at M approximately 2 × 10(6) . It is found that in the range of approximately 7 × 10(3) ≤ M ≤ 2 × 10(6) , the intrinsic viscosity scales as [η] approximately M(1.05) , suggesting that short DNA chains are not as rigid as generally thought. The corresponding scaling for the range of 2 × 10(6) ≤ M ≤ 8 × 10(10) is [η] approximately M(0.69) . A comparison of our results with existing equations, for much narrower data distributions, is made, and the agreement is very satisfactory considering the huge range of data analyzed here. Experimental concerns such as the effect of ionic strength, polydispersity, temperature, and shear rate are discussed in detail. Some issues concerning the Huggins coefficient, polymer chain stiffness, and the relationship between the Mark-Houwink constants K, α are also presented; it is found that log K = 1.156 - 6.19α. PMID:21638275

  10. Viscosity, entropy and the viscosity to entropy density ratio; how perfect is a nucleonic fluid?

    CERN Document Server

    Mekjian, Aram Z

    2010-01-01

    The viscosity of hadronic matter is studied using a classical evaluation of the scattering angle and a quantum mechanical discussion based on phase shifts from a potential. Semi classical limits of the quantum theory are presented. A hard sphere and an attractive square well potential step are each considered as well as the combined effects of both. The lowest classical value of the viscosity for an attractive potential is shown to be a hard sphere limit. The high wave number-short wavelength limits of the quantum result have scaling laws associated with it for both the viscosity and entropy. These scaling laws are similar to the Fraunhoher diffraction increase for the hard sphere geometric cross section. Specific examples for nuclear collisions are given. The importance of the nuclear tensor force and hard core is mentioned. The viscosity (eta), entropy density (s) and eta/s ratio are calculated for a gas of dilute neutrons in the unitary limit of large scattering length. Away from the unitary limit, the rat...

  11. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Blood Types KidsHealth > For Teens > Blood Types Print A A ... or straight hair instead of curly. ...Make Eight Blood Types The different markers that can be found in ...

  12. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... confidence to respond in emergency situations with the skills that can help to save a life. Learn more » Red Cross Information Donating Blood Learn About Blood Hosting a Blood Drive For Hospitals Engage with Us About Us Media ...

  13. Immunoelectrophoresis - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    IEP - serum; Immunoglobulin electrophoresis - blood; Gamma globulin electrophoresis; Serum immunoglobulin electrophoresis ... A blood sample is needed. For information on how this is done, see: Venipuncture

  14. EFFECT OF ADSORPTION ON THE VISCOSITY OF DILUTE POLYMER SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-shi Cheng; Yu-fang Shao; Ming-zhu Liu; Rong-qing Lu

    1999-01-01

    Careful measurements of the dilute solution viscosities of polyethylene glycol and polyvinyl alcohol in water were carried out. The reduced viscosities of both polymer solutions plot upward curves at extremely dilute concentration levels similar to the phenomena observed for many polymer solutions in the early 1950's. Upon observation of the changes of the flow times of pure water in and the wall surface wettability of the viscometer after measuring solution viscosity, a view was formed that the observed viscosity abnormality at extremely dilute concentration regions is solely due to the effect of adsorption of polymer chains onto the wall surface of viscometer. A theory of adsorption effect based on the Langmuir isotherms was proposed and a mathematical analysis for data treatment was performed. The theory could adequately describe the existing viscosity data. It seems necessary to correct the viscosity result of dilute polymer solutions measured by glass capillary viscometer by taking into account the effect of adsorption in all cases.

  15. Modeling the viscosity of silicate melts containing manganese oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Wan-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed model for the viscosity of silicate melts is applied to describe and predict the viscosities of oxide melts containing manganese oxide. The model requires three pairs of adjustable parameters that describe the viscosities in three systems: pure MnO, MnO-SiO2 and MnO-Al2O3-SiO2. The viscosity of other ternary and multicomponent silicate melts containing MnO is then predicted by the model without any additional adjustable model parameters. Experimental viscosity data are reviewed for melts formed by MnO with SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, PbO, Na2O and K2O. The deviation of the available experimental data from the viscosities predicted by the model is shown to be within experimental error limits.

  16. The Effects of Temperature Related Viscosity on Cosmological Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jiaxin

    2014-01-01

    Bulk viscosity has been intrinsically existing in the observational cosmos evolution with various effects for different cosmological evolution stages endowed with complicated cosmic media. Normally in the idealized "standard cosmology" the physical viscosity effect is often negligent in some extent by assumptions, except for galaxies formation and evolution or the like astro-physics phenomena. Actually we have not fully understood the physical origin and effects of cosmic viscosity, including its practical functions for the universe evolution in reality. In this present article we extend the concept of temperature related viscosity from classical statistical physics to observational cosmology, especially we examine the cosmological effects with possibility of the existence for two kinds of viscosity forms, which are described by the Chapman's relation and Sutherland's formula respectively. With that the unified dark fluid model and also a modification of standard model with viscosity which is named as $\\Lambd...

  17. GodunovSPH with shear viscosity : implementation and tests

    CERN Document Server

    Cha, Seung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The acceleration and energy dissipation terms due to the shear viscosity have been implemented and tested in GodunovSPH. The double summation method has been employed to avoid the well known numerical noise of the second derivative in particle based codes. The plane Couette flow with various initial and boundary conditions have been used as tests, and the numerical and analytical results show a good agreement. Not only the viscosity--only calculation, but the full hydrodynamics simulations have been performed, and they show expected results as well. The very low kinematic viscosity simulations show a turbulent pattern when the Reynolds number exceeds $\\sim$$10^2$. The critical value of the Reynolds number at the transition point of the laminar and turbulent flows coincides with the previous works approximately. A smoothed dynamic viscosity has been suggested to describe the individual kinematic viscosity of particles. The infinitely extended Couette flow which has two layers of different viscosities has been ...

  18. Does seminal fluid viscosity influence sperm chromatin integrity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalkrishnan, K; Padwal, V; Balaiah, D

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to investigate whether viscosity alters sperm chromatin integrity. Semen samples were obtained from 269 men attending the infertility clinic. The viscosity was measured quantitatively by needle and syringe method and the viscosity ratio was calculated against distilled water. The chromatin integrity was evaluated by in vitro decondensation test using 1% SDS and 6 mM EDTA. According to the viscosity ratios the samples were divided into 2 groups: I, normal (ratio 9, n = 30) viscosity. Chromatin integrity was significantly lower in the group with higher viscosity. Significant decrease in sperm count and motility were seen in group II as compared to group I. Thus, hyperviscosity of seminal fluid alters the sperm chromatin integrity. PMID:11028927

  19. Isomorphic Viscosity Equation of State for Binary Fluid Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnejad, Hassan; Cheshmpak, Hashem; Jamali, Asma

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of the simple binary mixtures in the vicinity of critical line has a universal character and can be mapped from pure components using the isomorphism hypothesis. Consequently, based upon the principle of isomorphism, critical phenomena and similarity between P-ρ-T and T-η-(viscosity)-P relationships, the viscosity model has been developed adopting two cubic, Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) and Peng-Robinson (PR), equations of state (EsoS) for predicting the viscosity of the binary mixtures. This procedure has been applied to the methane-butane mixture and predicted its viscosity data. Reasonable agreement with the experimental data has been observed. In conclusion, we have shown that the isomorphism principle in conjunction with the mapped viscosity EoS suggests a reliable model for calculating the viscosity of mixture of hydrocarbons over a wide pressure range up to 35 MPa within the stated experimental errors. PMID:26680701

  20. Bulk and shear viscosities of hot and dense hadron gas

    CERN Document Server

    Kadam, Guru Prakash

    2014-01-01

    We estimate bulk and shear viscosity at finite temperature and baryon densities of hadronic matter within hadron resonance gas model. For bulk viscosity we use low energy theorems of QCD for the energy momentum tensor correlators. For shear viscosity coefficient, we estimate the same using molecular kinetic theory to relate the shear viscosity coefficient to average momentum of the hadrons in the hot and dense hadron gas. The bulk viscosity to entropy ratio increases with chemical potential and is related to the reduction of velocity of sound at nonzero chemical potential. The shear viscosity to entropy ratio on the other hand, shows a nontrivial behavior with the ratio decreasing with chemical potential for small temperatures but increasing with chemical potential at high temperatures and is related to decrease of entropy density with chemical potential at high temperature due to finite volume of the hadrons.

  1. Non-invasive fluid density and viscosity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2012-05-01

    The noninvasively measurement of the density and viscosity of static or flowing fluids in a section of pipe such that the pipe performs as the sensing apparatus, is described. Measurement of a suitable structural vibration resonance frequency of the pipe and the width of this resonance permits the density and viscosity to be determined, respectively. The viscosity may also be measured by monitoring the decay in time of a vibration resonance in the pipe.

  2. Viscosity, thermal diffusivity and Prandtl number of nanoparticle suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Buxuan; ZHOU Leping; PENG Xiaofeng

    2004-01-01

    Using our reported experimental data of effective thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity and viscosity for CuO nanoparticle suspensions, the corresponding thermal diffusivity and Prandtl number are calculated. With the hard sphere model and considering effects of particle clustering and surface adsorption, the increase of viscosity for nanoparticle suspension observed is explained. It is shown that the effective thermal conductivity will be strongly affected by the formation and correlated spatial distribution of nanoparticle clusters when compared to viscosity in hosting liquid.

  3. Extracting the bulk viscosity of the quark–gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the implications of a nonzero bulk viscosity coefficient on the azimuthal momentum anisotropy of ultracentral relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. We find that, with IP-Glasma initial conditions, a finite bulk viscosity coefficient leads to a better description of the flow harmonics in ultracentral collisions. We then extract optimal values of bulk and shear viscosity coefficients that provide the best agreement with flow harmonic coefficients data in this centrality class

  4. Viscosity Prediction of Hydrocarbon Mixtures Based on the Friction Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Cisneros, Sergio; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2001-01-01

    The application and capability of the friction theory (f-theory) for viscosity predictions of hydrocarbon fluids is further illustrated by predicting the viscosity of binary and ternary liquid mixtures composed of n-alkanes ranging from n-pentane to n-decane for wide ranges of temperature and from...... low to high pressures. In the f-theory viscosity predictions the SRK and the PRSV EOS have respectively been used. Further, a comparison with the widely used LBC viscosity model shows that better results are obtained with the f-theory models. The obtained AAD% is within or close to the experimental...

  5. Heat Transfer Analysis for Peristaltic Mechanism in Variable Viscosity Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Hayat; F.M.Abbasi; Awatif A.Hendi

    2011-01-01

    An analysis is carried out for a peristaltic flow of a third-order fluid with heat transfer and variable viscosity when no-slip condition does not hold. Perturbation solution is discussed and a comparative study between the cases of constant and variable viscosities is presented and analyzed.%@@ An analysis is carried out for a peristaltic flow of a third-order fluid with heat transfer and variable viscosity when no-slip condition does not hold.Perturbation solution is discussed and a comparative stuity between the cases of constant and variable viscosities is presented and analyzed.

  6. Rotational and spin viscosities of water: Application to nanofluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard; Bruus, Henrik; Todd, B.D.;

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the rotational viscosity and the two spin viscosities for liquid water using equilibrium molecular dynamics. Water is modeled via the flexible SPC/Fw model where the Coulomb interactions are calculated via the Wolf method which enables the long simulation times required....... We find that the rotational viscosity is independent of the temperature in the range from 284 to 319 K. The two spin viscosities, on the other hand, decrease with increasing temperature and are found to be two orders of magnitude larger than that estimated by Bonthuis et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103...

  7. On Eling-Oz formula for the holographic bulk viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Buchel, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Recently Eling and Oz [1] proposed a simple formula for the bulk viscosity of holographic plasma. They argued that the formula is valid in the high temperature (near-conformal) regime, but is expected to break down at low temperatures. We point out that the formula is in perfect agreement with the previous computations of the bulk viscosity of the cascading plasma [2,3], as well as with the previous computations of the bulk viscosity of N=2^* plasma [4,5]. In the latter case it correctly reproduces the critical behaviour of the bulk viscosity in the vicinity of the critical point with the vanishing speed of sound.

  8. Determination of viscosity in recirculating fluidized bed using radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of radioactive tracer for measuring viscosity is proposed. The methodology relates the terminal velocity of a radioactive sphere in interior of fluid with the viscosity, which can be a fluidized bed or total flow of solids. The arrangement is composed by two γ detectors placed externally and along the bed. Both detectors are coupled by amplifier to electronic clock. The drop time of sphere between two detectors is measured. The bed viscosity two detectors is measured. The bed viscosity is calculated from mathematical correlations of terminal velocity of the sphere. (M.C.K.)

  9. Observation of parallel viscosity in the CHS Heliotron/Torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damping of the toroidal velocity owing to parallel viscosity is observed in the plasma with a tangential neutral beam injection in the CHS Heliotron/Torsatron device. Toroidal velocity profile is dominated by the perpendicular viscosity when magnetic field modulation is weak near axis. However, the parallel viscosity is found to be dominant when the modulation is strong enough and to increase in proportion to the square of the modulation of magnetic field. The absolute values of the viscosity agree with the neoclassical prediction within a factor of three. (author)

  10. Experimental Viscosity Measurements for Copper Oxide Nanoparticle Suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊明; 李泽梁; 王补宣

    2002-01-01

    The viscosity of water with copper oxide nanoparticle suspensions was measured using capillary viscometers. The mass fractions of copper oxide nanoparticles in the experiment, w, varied between 0.02 and 0.10, and the temperature range was 30℃ to 80℃. The experimental results show that the temperature was the major factor affecting the viscosity of the nanoparticle suspensions, while the effect of the mass fraction on the viscosity was not so obvious as that of the temperature for the mass fractions chosen in the experiment. The effect of the capillary tube size on the viscosity was also found to be relatively important at higher mass fractions.

  11. Applicability of viscosity measurement to the detection of irradiated peppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starch is degraded by ionising radiation, resulting in a decrease in viscosity. The viscosities of black and white peppers which contain large amounts of starch are reduced by irradiation so, therefore, viscosity measurement has been proposed as a method to detect the irradiation treatment of these food products. Although detection of irradiated spices by thermoluminescence measurement has been established, it is useful to establish the viscosity measuring technique for detecting irradiated peppers, as this method is carried out widely in the laboratories of food controlling authorities and food processing companies. (author)

  12. Non-Newtonian viscosity in magnetized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    The particle and momentum balance equations can be solved on concentric circular flux surfaces to determine the effective viscous drag present in a magnetized tokamak plasma in the low aspect ratio limit. An analysis is developed utilizing the first-order Fourier expansion of the poloidal variation of quantities on the flux surface akin to that by Stacey and Sigmar [Phys. Fluids, 28, 9 (1985)]. Expressions to determine the poloidal variations of density, poloidal velocity, toroidal velocity, radial electric field, poloidal electric field, and other radial profiles are presented in a multi-species setting. Using as input experimental data for the flux surface averaged profiles of density, temperature, toroidal current, toroidal momentum injection, and the poloidal and toroidal rotations of at least one species of ion, one may solve the equations numerically for the remaining profiles. The resultant effective viscosities are compared to those predicted by Stacey and Sigmar and Shaing, et al., [Nuclear Fusion, 2...

  13. Holographic bulk viscosity: GPR vs EO

    CERN Document Server

    Buchel, Alex; Kiritsis, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Recently Eling and Oz (EO) proposed a formula for the holographic bulk viscosity, in arXiv:1103.1657, derived from the null horizon focusing equation. This formula seems different from that obtained earlier by Gubser, Pufu and Rocha (GPR) in arXiv:0806.0407 calculated from the IR limit of the two-point function of the trace of the stress tensor. The two were shown to agree only for some simple scaling cases. We point out that the two formulae agree in two non-trivial holographic theories describing RG flows. The first is the strongly coupled N=2* gauge theory plasma. The second is the semi-phenomenological model of Improved Holographic QCD.

  14. Transition to turbulence through decline of viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Volokh, K Y

    2008-01-01

    Experiments (Mullin and Kreswell, 2005) show that transition to turbulence can start at Reynolds numbers lower than it is predicted by the linear stability analysis - the subcritical transition to turbulence. To explain these observations qualitatively we suggest that the onset of subcritical instability is related to decline of viscosity of the fluid: friction between fluid layers fails with the increase of the velocity gradient. To describe the declinie of friction theoretically we relax the the assumption of the stability of the fluid material and introduce a constant of fluid strength. Particularly, we enhance the Navier-Stokes model with a failure description by introducing the fluid strength in the constitutive equation for the viscous stress. The clasical model is obtained from the enhanced one when strength goes to infinity. We use the modified Navier-Stokes model to analyze the Couette flow between two parallel plates and find that the lateral perturbations can destabilize the flow and the critical R...

  15. Universe Models with Negative Bulk Viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Brevik, Iver

    2013-01-01

    The concept of negative temperatures has occasionally been used in connection with quantum systems. A recent example of this sort is reported in the paper of S. Braun et al. [Science 339,52 (2013)], where an attractively interacting ensemble of ultracold atoms is investigated experimentally and found to correspond to a negative-temperature system since the entropy decreases with increasing energy at the high end of the energy spectrum. As the authors suggest, it would be of interest to investigate whether a suitable generalization of standard cosmological theory could be helpful, in order to elucidate the observed accelerated expansion of the universe usually explained in terms of a positive tensile stress (negative pressure). In the present note we take up this basic idea and investigate a generalization of the standard viscous cosmological theory, not by admitting negative temperatures but instead by letting the bulk viscosity take negative values. Evidently, such an approach breaks standard thermodynamics,...

  16. Hydrodynamics of spacetime and vacuum viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eling, Christopher

    2008-11-01

    It has recently been shown that the Einstein equation can be derived by demanding a non-equilibrium entropy balance law dS = δQ/T+diS hold for all local acceleration horizons through each point in spacetime. The entropy change dS is proportional to the change in horizon area while δQ and T are the energy flux across the horizon and Unruh temperature seen by an accelerating observer just inside the horizon. The internal entropy production term diS is proportional to the squared shear of the horizon and the ratio of the proportionality constant to the area entropy density is hbar/4π. Here we will show that this derivation can be reformulated in the language of hydrodynamics. We postulate that the vacuum thermal state in the Rindler wedge of spacetime obeys the holographic principle. Hydrodynamic perturbations of this state exist and are manifested in the dynamics of a stretched horizon fluid at the horizon boundary. Using the equations of hydrodynamics we derive the entropy balance law and show the Einstein equation is a consequence of vacuum hydrodynamics. This result implies that hbar/4π is the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the local vacuum thermal state. The value hbar/4π has attracted much attention as the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio for all gauge theories with an Einstein gravity dual. It has also been conjectured as the universal lower bound on the ratio. We argue that our picture of the vacuum thermal state is consistent with the physics of the gauge/gravity dualities and then consider possible applications to open questions.

  17. Sensor for viscosity and shear strength measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dillion, J.; Moore, J.; Jones, K.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. Two different viscometer techniques are being investigated in this study, based on: magnetostrictive pulse generated acoustic waves; and an oscillating cylinder. Prototype sensors have been built and tested which are based on both techniques. A base capability instrumentation system has been designed, constructed, and tested which incorporates both of these sensors. It requires manual data acquisition and off-line calculation. A broad range of viscous media has been tested using this system. Extensive test results appear in this report. The concept for each technique has been validated by these test results. This base capability system will need to be refined further before it is appropriate for field tests. The mass of the oscillating system structure will need to be reduced. A robust acoustic probe assembly will need to be developed. In addition, in March 1997 it was made known for the first time that the requirement was for a deliverable automated viscosity instrumentation system. Since then such a system has been designed, and the hardware has been constructed so that the automated concept can be proved. The rest of the hardware, which interfaced to a computer, has also been constructed and tested as far as possible. However, for both techniques the computer software for automated data acquisition, calculation, and logging had not been completed before funding and time ran out.

  18. The peak in anomalous magnetic viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anomalous magnetic viscosity, where the magnetization as a function of time exhibits non-monotonic behaviour, being seen to increase, reach a peak, and then decrease, is observed on recoil lines in bulk amorphous ferromagnets, for certain magnetic prehistories. A simple geometrical approach based on the motion of the state line on the Preisach plane gives a theoretical framework for interpreting non-monotonic behaviour and explains the origin of the peak. This approach gives an expression for the time taken to reach the peak as a function of the applied (or holding) field. The theory is applied to experimental data for bulk amorphous ferromagnet alloys of composition Nd60−xFe30Al10Dyx, x = 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4, and it gives a reasonable description of the observed behaviour. The role played by other key magnetic parameters, such as the intrinsic coercivity and fluctuation field, is also discussed. When the non-monotonic behaviour of the magnetization of a number of alloys is viewed in the context of the model, features of universal behaviour emerge, that are independent of alloy composition. - Highlights: • Development of a simple geometrical model based on the Preisach model which gives a complete explanation of the peak in the magnetic viscosity. • Geometrical approach is extended by considering equations that govern the motion of the state line. • The model is used to deduce the relationship between the holding field and the time it takes to reach the peak. • The model is tested with experimental results for a range of Nd–Fe–Al–Dy bulk amorphous ferromagnets. • There is good agreement between the model and the experimental data

  19. Cosmic String Universes Embedded with Viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koijam Manihar Singh; Kangujam Priyokumar Singh

    2011-01-01

    We study string cosmological models with attached particles in LRS BI type space time.The dynamical and physical properties of such universes are studied,and the possibility that during the evolution of the universe the strings disappear,leaving only the particles,is also discussed.It is found that bulk viscosity plays a large role in the evolution of the universe.In these models we find critical instances of when there was a “Bounce”.The studied models are found to be of an inflationary type,and since a desirable feature of a meaningful string cosmological model is the presence of an inflationary epoch in the very early stages of evolution,our models can be thought of as realistic universes.The origin of the universe and the early stages of formation are still interesting areas of research.The concept of string theory was developed to describe the events of the early stages of the evolution of the universe.The universe can be described as a collection of extended (non point) objects.Thus,“string dust” cosmology will provide us with a model to investigate the properties related to this fact.%We study string cosmological models with attached particles in LRS BI type space time. The dynamical and physical properties of such universes are studied, and the possibility that during the evolution of the universe the strings disappear, leaving only the particles, is also discussed. It is found that bulk viscosity plays a large role in the evolution of the universe. In these models we find critical instances of when there was a "Bounce". The studied models are found to be of an inflationary type, and since a desirable feature of a meaningful string cosmological model is the presence of an inflationary epoch in the very early stages of evolution, our models can be thought of as realistic universes.

  20. Hydrodynamics of spacetime and vacuum viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has recently been shown that the Einstein equation can be derived by demanding a non-equilibrium entropy balance law dS = δQ/T+diS hold for all local acceleration horizons through each point in spacetime. The entropy change dS is proportional to the change in horizon area while δQ and T are the energy flux across the horizon and Unruh temperature seen by an accelerating observer just inside the horizon. The internal entropy production term diS is proportional to the squared shear of the horizon and the ratio of the proportionality constant to the area entropy density is h-bar /4π. Here we will show that this derivation can be reformulated in the language of hydrodynamics. We postulate that the vacuum thermal state in the Rindler wedge of spacetime obeys the holographic principle. Hydrodynamic perturbations of this state exist and are manifested in the dynamics of a stretched horizon fluid at the horizon boundary. Using the equations of hydrodynamics we derive the entropy balance law and show the Einstein equation is a consequence of vacuum hydrodynamics. This result implies that h-bar /4π is the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the local vacuum thermal state. The value h-bar /4π has attracted much attention as the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio for all gauge theories with an Einstein gravity dual. It has also been conjectured as the universal lower bound on the ratio. We argue that our picture of the vacuum thermal state is consistent with the physics of the gauge/gravity dualities and then consider possible applications to open questions.

  1. Effects of Blood-cooling and Stasis-removing Formula on Hemorheology in Rats with Acute Blood Stasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyi Ning

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of blood-cooling and stasis-removing formula on hemorheology in rats with acute blood stasis induced by mutifactor stimuli. Methods: The selected SD rats orally took blood-cooling and stasis-removing granule for six days, then the model of acute blood stasis was prepared on the fifth day by injection of epinephrine combined with ice-water bath. The variations of blood-cooling and stasis-removing granule on hemorheology were detected. Results: The high-dose group of blood-cooling and stasis-removing formula can decrease plasma viscosity in rats with acute blood stasis, and obviously reduce the blood viscosity under the condition of shear rates (200s-1, 30s-1, 5s-1, 1s-1 (P < 0.01, P < 0.05. The middle-dose group can decrease the blood viscosity under the condition of shear rate (30s-1 (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Blood-cooling and stasis-removing formula can improve abnormal hemorheology in rats with acute blood stasis.

  2. Viscosity of iodinated contrast agents during renal excretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Modern iodinated non-ionic contrast agents (CAs) can be classified based on their molecular structure into monomeric and dimeric CAs and have at comparable iodine concentrations a different viscosity and osmolality. During their renal excretion, CAs are concentrated in the renal tubuli which might enhance the viscosity difference between monomeric and dimeric CAs. The viscosity of a CA might have an underestimated importance for renal safety, as suggested by recent publications. In this study, we investigated the viscosities of CAs at the concentrations expected to be present in renal tubules. This concentration process was simulated in vitro using dialysis. Furthermore, we investigated urine viscosity and urine flow in rodents after administration of several non-ionic monomeric and dimeric CAs. Materials and methods: To estimate the viscosity of the CAs in vivo, we performed an in vitro dialysis of monomeric and dimeric CAs at various physiological osmolalities of the renal tubulus (290, 400, 500, 700 and 1000 mOsm/kg H2O). Following the dialysis, the iodine concentrations and the viscosities of the CAs were determined. Furthermore, to investigate the concentration process in vivo, we measured the urine viscosity and the urine flow in Han Wister rats after the administration of Iopromide, Iohexol, Ioversol, Iomeprol, Iodixanol, and Iosimenol at comparable iodine concentrations. As a control, saline was injected at the same volume. Results: In vitro dialysis of the dimeric CA increased the iodine concentration and strongly increased the viscosity at all tested osmolalities. In contrast, for the monomeric agents an increase in concentration and viscosity was observed only at 700 as well 1000 mOsm/kg H2O but to a lesser extent. In summary, dialysis strongly enhanced the viscosity differences between the non-ionic monomeric and dimeric CAs. The administration of dimeric CAs leads to a strong increase in urine viscosity; this was not observed for the

  3. Rheology and tribology of lubricants with polymeric viscosity modifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babak, LotfizadehDehkordi

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) theory has been used to model the lubrication state of antifriction machine elements, where initial viscosity and pressure viscosity coefficients are essential parameters in film thickness modeling. Since the pressures of lubricants in the contact zone can be very high, it is important to know the rheological properties of lubricants in these pressure and temperature regimes. The characteristics of viscosity behavior as a function of pressure are also essential for a universal definition of the pressure viscosity coefficient in order to estimate film thickness in an EHL regime. In this study, viscosities and pressure-viscosity coefficients of ten commercial engine and gear oils and seventeen laboratory-produced oil/polymer viscosity modifiers (VM) additives are measured up to 1.3 GPa at 40, 75 and 100 °C. For the first time, a sharp increase in the viscosity and piezoviscous factor is observed in both mineral-based and synthetic-based oils with different VMs. Analysis of the experimental results indicates that sharp increase in viscosity observed in these experiments are believed to arise from physical changes in the VMs, that is liquid-solid phase transition. Evidence is offered that polymer properties such as molecular weight, concentration and structure influence the onset of the phase transitions. A modified Yasutomi model, which normally describes the pressure dependence of the viscosity of lubricants very well, fails to predict the viscosity of the specimens above the onset of sharp increase in viscosity. A design of experiment (DOE) analysis using Design-Expert software indicates that pressure and temperature are the most critical parameters in the viscosity variation. Tribological tests demonstrate that wear in the contact, zone occurs at temperatures and stresses that coincides with the VM phase transitions in both commercial and laboratory synthesized oil/VMs. Tribological results also indicate that the onset of the

  4. Viscosity of iodinated contrast agents during renal excretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Jost@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Lengsfeld, Philipp, E-mail: Philipp.Lengsfeld@bayer.com [Global Medical Affairs Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Lenhard, Diana C., E-mail: Diana.Lenhard@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Pietsch, Hubertus, E-mail: Hubertus.Pietsch@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Huetter, Joachim, E-mail: Joachim.Huetter@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Sieber, Martin A., E-mail: Martin.Sieber@bayer.com [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: Modern iodinated non-ionic contrast agents (CAs) can be classified based on their molecular structure into monomeric and dimeric CAs and have at comparable iodine concentrations a different viscosity and osmolality. During their renal excretion, CAs are concentrated in the renal tubuli which might enhance the viscosity difference between monomeric and dimeric CAs. The viscosity of a CA might have an underestimated importance for renal safety, as suggested by recent publications. In this study, we investigated the viscosities of CAs at the concentrations expected to be present in renal tubules. This concentration process was simulated in vitro using dialysis. Furthermore, we investigated urine viscosity and urine flow in rodents after administration of several non-ionic monomeric and dimeric CAs. Materials and methods: To estimate the viscosity of the CAs in vivo, we performed an in vitro dialysis of monomeric and dimeric CAs at various physiological osmolalities of the renal tubulus (290, 400, 500, 700 and 1000 mOsm/kg H{sub 2}O). Following the dialysis, the iodine concentrations and the viscosities of the CAs were determined. Furthermore, to investigate the concentration process in vivo, we measured the urine viscosity and the urine flow in Han Wister rats after the administration of Iopromide, Iohexol, Ioversol, Iomeprol, Iodixanol, and Iosimenol at comparable iodine concentrations. As a control, saline was injected at the same volume. Results: In vitro dialysis of the dimeric CA increased the iodine concentration and strongly increased the viscosity at all tested osmolalities. In contrast, for the monomeric agents an increase in concentration and viscosity was observed only at 700 as well 1000 mOsm/kg H{sub 2}O but to a lesser extent. In summary, dialysis strongly enhanced the viscosity differences between the non-ionic monomeric and dimeric CAs. The administration of dimeric CAs leads to a strong increase in urine viscosity; this was not observed for

  5. Viscosity measurements of epoxy resin filled with ferrite powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stabik

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The goal of this work was to determine influence of fillers on viscosity, especially of six mixtures that contain different amount of ferrite powder. It was made in order to find out an effect of introduced ferrite powder on epoxy resin processing conditions and parameters. Additionally viscosity of pure epoxy resin was determined for reference purposes. The influence of temperature on composites viscosity was also examined.Design/methodology/approach: Viscosity of mixtures based on epoxy resin that contain ferrite powders and pure epoxy resin using Hoeppler viscometer was measured. Procedures of viscosity measurements were performed for three temperatures and for three filler contents.Findings: Higher temperature of measurement resulted in lower values of viscosity while higher quantity of ferrite powder increased viscosity of mixtures. There was no difference between results of viscosity that were obtained for barium ferrite and strontium ferrite.Research limitations/implications: The main problem of this work was limitations of research method. Mixtures before measurement had to be put to the vacuum venting in order to remove air bubbles that were introduced through mixing. Also an amount of powder introduced into the matrix was limited because for higher contents it was not possible to pour mixtures into glass pipe of measurement device.Practical implications: Applied method allowed to determine the influence of temperature, kind and quantity of filler on viscosity. Viscosity is the main factor defining processing parameters in many processing technologies.Originality/value: Results of viscosity for searched composites are not known up till now. Achieved results are planned in order to use them in future works of authors on polymeric magnetic composites.

  6. On the Correlation Between Free Volume and Viscosity of Polysulphone Melt Viscosity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, T.; Polášková, M.; Pivokonský, Radek; Filip, Petr; Sáha, P.

    Copenhagen : Hexagon Holding ApS, 2007, s. 1-8. ISBN 87-89753-56-9. [PPS07 EA: Europe/Africa Regional Meeting 2007. Gothenburg (SE), 28.08.2007-30.08.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB208100702 Grant ostatní: GA MPO(CZ) 2A-1TP1/126 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Free volume * viscosity Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  7. Effect of Xiaoke Granule(消渴冲剂)on Blood Sugar and Blood Rheological Property in Experimental Diabetic Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季晓梅; 刘根尚; 齐昉; 郑虎占; 佘靖; 龚慕辛; 孙军; 章红英

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the pharmacological effect of Xiaoke Granule (XKG, 消渴冲剂) on blood sugar and blood rheological property in the diabetic animals.Methods: Alloxan induced diabetic mice or rats were grouped randomly. The effects of XKG on blood sugar, appetite, capacity of drinking, glucose tolerance, blood lipid and blood rheological property were observed and compared among groups.Results:XKG showed a trend in reducing the appetite and capacity of drinking, increasing the body weight, and significantly inhibiting the increase of blood sugar coused by ectogenic glucose in mice, and could improve the blood lipid and blood rheological property in rats.Conclusion:XKG is effective in reducing serum total cholesterol, lowering the blood viscosity, improving the blood rheological property of alloxan induced diabetic animals. Therefore, it might effective in treating and preventing the occurrence of diabetes mellitus and the complications of blood stasis.

  8. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  9. Elongational viscosity of monodisperse and bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole;

    2006-01-01

    The start-up and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for two monodisperse polystyrene melts with molecular weights of 52 and 103 kg/mole, and for three bidisperse polystyrene melts. The monodisperse melts show a maximum in the steady elongational viscosity vs. the elongational...

  10. Bianchi-Type Ⅱ String Cosmological Models with Bulk Viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xing-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    The locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi-type Ⅱ string cosmological models with bulk viscosity are obtained, where an equation of state, p = kλ, and a relation between metric potentials, R = ASn, are adopted. The physical features of the models are also discussed. In special cases the model reduces to the string models without viscosity that was previously given in the literatures.

  11. On-line measurement of food viscosity during flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mason, Sarah Louise; Friis, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Sarah L. Mason and Alan Friis discuss some of the principles and equipment used to monitor food viscosity in real time.......Sarah L. Mason and Alan Friis discuss some of the principles and equipment used to monitor food viscosity in real time....

  12. Nonlinear Eddy Viscosity Models applied to Wind Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laan, van der, Paul Maarten; Sørensen, Niels N.; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan;

    2013-01-01

    The linear k−ε eddy viscosity model and modified versions of two existing nonlinear eddy viscosity models are applied to single wind turbine wake simulations using a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes code. Results are compared with field wake measurements. The nonlinear models give better results...

  13. Homeostasis of plasma membrane viscosity in fluctuating temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinière, Alexandre; Shvedunova, Maria; Thomson, Adrian J W; Evans, Nicola H; Penfield, Steven; Runions, John; McWatters, Harriet G

    2011-10-01

    Temperature has a direct effect at the cellular level on an organism. For instance, in the case of biomembranes, cooling causes lipids to lose entropy and pack closely together. Reducing temperature should, in the absence of other factors, increase the viscosity of a lipid membrane. We have investigated the effect of temperature variation on plasma membrane (PM) viscosity. We used dispersion tracking of photoactivated green fluorescent protein (GFP) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in wild-type and desaturase mutant Arabidopsis thaliana plants along with membrane lipid saturation analysis to monitor the effect of temperature and membrane lipid composition on PM viscosity. Plasma membrane viscosity in A. thaliana is negatively correlated with ambient temperature only under constant-temperature conditions. In the more natural environment of temperature cycles, plants actively manage PM viscosity to counteract the direct effects of temperature. Plasma membrane viscosity is regulated by altering the proportion of desaturated fatty acids. In cold conditions, cell membranes accumulate desaturated fatty acids, which decreases membrane viscosity and vice versa. Moreover, we show that control of fatty acid desaturase 2 (FAD2)-dependent lipid desaturation is essential for this homeostasis of membrane viscosity. Finally, a lack of FAD2 function results in aberrant temperature responses. PMID:21762166

  14. A Riemann problem with small viscosity and dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayyunnapara Thomas Joseph

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we prove existence of global solutions to a hyperbolic system in elastodynamics, with small viscosity and dispersion terms and derive estimates uniform in the viscosity-dispersion parameters. By passing to the limit, we prove the existence of solution the Riemann problem for the hyperbolic system with arbitrary Riemann data.

  15. Sound damping in ferrofluids: Magnetically enhanced compressional viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Hanns Walter; Jiang, Yimin; Liu, Mario

    2002-01-01

    The damping of sound waves in magnetized ferrofluids is investigated and shown to be considerably higher than in the non-magnetized case. This fact may be interpreted as a field-enhanced, effective compressional viscosity -- in analogy to the ubiquitous field-enhanced shear viscosity that is known to be the reason for many unusual behavior of ferrofluids under shear.

  16. Collaborative study of viscosity measurement of black and white peppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viscosity measurement has been reported to be a promising method for detecting irradiated peppers. Based on the results of previous studies, a protocol for determining the parameter values for detecting irradiated peppers by viscosity measurement was prepared and a collaborative study conducted to examine the usefulness of the viscometric method. (author)

  17. Post glacial rebounds measure the viscosity of the lithosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Garai, J

    2003-01-01

    The observed higher uplift rates before the end of deglaciation requires the existence of a low viscosity channel or layer. The uplifts observed after the end of deglaciation does not show any contribution from this low viscosity channel and a homogeneous viscosity model fits very well to the observed uplift. Most of the researchers therefore prefer the homogeneous model and suggest that the higher uplift rate before the end of deglaciation is the result of elastic contamination. It has been shown that the elastic deformation of the lithosphere is far too small to be responsible for the observed extra uplift; therefore, the homogeneous viscosity model should be discredited. The homogeneous viscosity of the postglacial period and the high uplift rate of the late glacial period can be explained with a model which has an upper layer determining the homogeneous viscosity and the layer below it which has a low viscosity. The contribution to the uplift of this low viscosity layer is indistinguishable from an instan...

  18. Poiseuille flow to measure the viscosity of particle model fluids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Backer; C.P. Lowe; H.C.J. Hoefsloot; P.D. Iedema

    2005-01-01

    The most important property of a fluid is its viscosity, it determines the flow properties. If one simulates a fluid using a particle model, calculating the viscosity accurately is difficult because it is a collective property. In this article we describe a new method that has a better signal to noi

  19. Critical exponent for the viscosity of four binary liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    The viscosity of the following binary mixtures was measured near their consolute points: (1) methanol + cyclohexane, (2) isobutyric acid + water, (3) nitroethane + 3-methylpentane, and (4) 2-butoxyethanol + water. It is shown that the multiplicative hypothesis is valid for these mixtures. It is also found that the concentration closest to critical has the largest viscosity enhancement.

  20. Turbulent viscosity variability in self-propelled body wake model

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovin, K; Golbraikh, E; Soloviev, A

    2011-01-01

    We study the influence of turbulent viscosity variability on the properties of self-propelled body wake model. In addition to the already known integrals of motion obtained with constant turbulent viscosity, we obtain new ones. The presence of new integrals of motion leads, in particular, to changes in the behavior of the width and profile of the wake leading to its conservation.

  1. Artificial blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Suman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. Various manufacturers have products in clinical trials; however, no truly safe and effective artificial blood product is currently marketed. It is anticipated that when an artificial blood product is available, it will have annual sales of over $7.6 billion in the United States alone.

  2. Viscosity Prediction of Natural Gas Using the Friction Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Cisneros, Sergio; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2002-01-01

    Based on the concepts of the friction theory (f-theory) for viscosity modeling, a procedure is introduced for predicting the viscosity of hydrocarbon mixtures rich in one component, which is the case for natural gases. In this procedure, the mixture friction coefficients are estimated with mixing...... rules based on the values of the pure component friction coefficients. Since natural gases contain mainly methane, two f-theory models are combined, where the friction coefficients of methane are estimated by a seven-constant f-theory model directly fitted to methane viscosities, and the friction...... coefficients of the other components are estimated by the one-parameter general f-theory model. The viscosity predictions are performed with the SRK, the PR, and the PRSV equations of state, respectively. For recently measured viscosities of natural gases, the resultant AAD (0.5 to 0.8%) is in excellent...

  3. Compressibilities and viscosities of reference, vegetable, and synthetic gear lubricants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regueira Muñiz, Teresa; Lugo, Luis; Fernández, Josefa

    2014-01-01

    knowledge of their thermophysical properties such as their viscosity or density, among others. Regarding this issue, in this work, we have carried out density measurements between 278.15 and 398.15 K and pressures up to 120 MPa and calculated the isothermal compressibility and isobaric thermal expansivity.......06%. Dowson and Higginson and Zhu and Wen equations of state do not predict well the isothermal compressibilities, with AAD % being around 45% for both equations. Moreover, the viscosities were measured in the temperature range from 278.15 to 373.15 K at atmospheric pressure for these oils, and the viscosity...... index was also determined. New formulated oils present the highest viscosity indexes and the lowest viscosity data at low temperatures; therefore, they become the most suitable for machinery cold start. © 2014 American Chemical Society....

  4. Influence of chromium, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen on iron viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic viscosity of 70 beforehand melted iron samples with additions of chromium (up to 2%) and carbon (up to 1%) has been investigated. Different conditions of melting brought about differences in oxygen and nitrogen contents. Viscosity of most samples has been determined in the 1550-1650 deg C temperature range. It is stated that small additions to pure iron of each of the investigated elements (O, Cr, C, N) decrease its viscosity. Combined effect of these additions on viscosity is inadditive. Simultaneous introduction of oxygen and carbon may result in increase of melt viscosity. The same fact is observed at combined introduction of chromium and nitrogen. Simultaneous introduction of other impurities-chromium with oxygen or carbon, nitrogen with oxygen causes amplification of their individual effect. Reasons for the observed regularities result from changes in energies of interparticle interactions in the melt and therefore rebuilding of structure of its short-range order

  5. Solvent isotope effect on viscosity of polystyrene-benzene solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration and temperature dependencies of viscosity and density of solutions of nearly monodisperse samples (Mw/Mn w) ranging from 4x103 to 4x105 between 293-313 K. Isotope H/D substitution in benzene causes visible changes in viscosity and density of solutions, however, its influence on intrinsic viscosities and Huggins constants, derived from the concentration dependences of viscosity, is negligible. No isotope effects on the exponents in the power low relationship have been detected. The viscosities of the solutions have been also correlated with the densities. The apparent close-packed volumes are practically constant for all solutions and seem to be determined by the properties of the solvent. The deuterium substitution visibly affects the close-packed volumes - they decrease by approximately 13%, both in pure solvent and in solutions. (author)

  6. Differential Geometrically Consistent Artificial Viscosity in Comoving Curvilinear Coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Höller, Harald; Dorfi, Ernst; Benger, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Context. High-resolution numerical methods have been developed for nonlinear, discontinuous problems as they appear in simulations of astrophysical objects. One of the strategies applied is the concept of artificial viscosity. Aims. Grid-based numerical simulations ideally utilize problem-oriented grids in order to minimize the necessary number of cells at a given (desired) spatial resolution. We want to propose a modified tensor of artificial viscosity which is employable for generally comoving, curvilinear grids. Methods. We study a differential geometrically consistent artificial viscosity analytically and visualize a comparison of our result to previous implementations by applying it to a simple self-similar velocity field. We give a general introduction to artificial viscosity first and motivate its application in numerical analysis. Then we present how a tensor of artificial viscosity has to be designed when going beyond common static Eulerian or Lagrangian comoving rectangular grids. Results. We find t...

  7. Quantitative characterization of the viscosity of a microemulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Huang, John S.

    1987-01-01

    The viscosity of the three-component microemulsion water/decane/AOT has been measured as a function of temperature and droplet volume fraction. At temperatures well below the phase-separation temperature the viscosity is described by treating the droplets as hard spheres suspended in decane. Upon approaching the two-phase region from low temperature, there is a large (as much as a factor of four) smooth increase of the viscosity which may be related to the percolation-like transition observed in the electrical conductivity. This increase in viscosity is not completely consistent with either a naive electroviscous model or a simple clustering model. The divergence of the viscosity near the critical point (39 C) is superimposed upon the smooth increase. The magnitude and temperature dependence of the critical divergence are similar to that seen near the critical points of binary liquid mixtures.

  8. Shear viscosity relaxation of a critical binary liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrends, Ralph; Kaatze, Udo

    2003-07-01

    Two series of diffusion coefficients D are reported for the triethylamine-water binary critical mixture. One has been obtained from quasielastic light scattering measurements, the other one has been derived from broadband ultrasonic spectra, yielding the relaxation rate of order parameter fluctuations, and shear viscosity data. Using high frequency shear impedance spectrometry in the range 20-130 MHz, relaxations in the background part of the viscosity, resulting in viscoelastic mixture properties, have been found. Both series of D data agree either if a half-attenuation frequency distinctly smaller than the theoretical value Omega(1/2)=2.1 is used in the Bhattacharjee-Ferrell scaling function or if the viscosity extrapolated from the shear impedance measurements to low frequencies is applied to the Kawasaki-Ferrell relation. This extrapolated viscosity is smaller than the static shear viscosity measured with capillary viscosimeters. PMID:12935130

  9. Turbulent thermal boundary layers with temperature-dependent viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Turbulent thermal boundary layers with temperature-dependent viscosity are simulated. • Effect of temperature-dependent viscosity on the statistics of the scalar field. • An identity for the Stanton number is derived and analyzed. • Effect of temperature-dependent viscosity on the statistics of scalar transfer rate. • Modification of turbulent flow field leads to an enhanced scalar transfer rate. - Abstract: Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over isothermally heated walls were performed, and the influence of the wall-heating on the thermal boundary layers was investigated. The DNS adopt an empirical relation for the temperature-dependent viscosity of water. The Prandtl number therefore changes with temperature, while the Péclet number is constant. Two wall temperatures (Tw = 70 °C and 99 °C) were considered relative to T∞ = 30 °C, and a reference simulation of TBL with constant viscosity was also performed for comparison. In the variable viscosity flow, the mean and variance of the scalar, when normalized by the friction temperature deficit, decrease relative to the constant viscosity flow. A relation for the mean scalar which takes into account the variable viscosity is proposed. Appropriate scalings for the scalar fluctuations and the scalar flux are also introduced, and are shown to be applicable for both variable and constant viscosity flows. Due to the modification of the near-wall turbulence, the Stanton number and the Reynolds analogy factor are augmented by 10% and 44%, respectively, in the variable viscosity flow. An identity for the Stanton number is derived and shows that the mean wall-normal velocity and wall-normal scalar flux cause the increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Finally, the augmented near-wall velocity fluctuations lead to an increase of the wall-normal scalar flux, which contributes favorably to the enhanced heat transfer at the wall

  10. Fluid Viscosity Affects the Fragmentation and Inertial Cavitation Threshold of Lipid-Encapsulated Microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfield, Brandon; Black, John J; Qin, Bin; Pacella, John; Chen, Xucai; Villanueva, Flordeliza S

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound and microbubble optimization studies for therapeutic applications are often conducted in water/saline, with a fluid viscosity of 1 cP. In an in vivo context, microbubbles are situated in blood, a more viscous fluid (∼4 cP). In this study, ultrahigh-speed microscopy and passive cavitation approaches were employed to investigate the effect of fluid viscosity on microbubble behavior at 1 MHz subject to high pressures (0.25-2 MPa). The propensity for individual microbubble (n = 220) fragmentation was found to significantly decrease in 4-cP fluid compared with 1-cP fluid, despite achieving similar maximum radial excursions. Microbubble populations diluted in 4-cP fluid exhibited decreased wideband emissions (up to 10.2 times), and increasingly distinct harmonic emission peaks (e.g., ultraharmonic) with increasing pressure, compared with those in 1-cP fluid. These results suggest that in vitro studies should consider an evaluation using physiologic viscosity perfusate before transitioning to in vivo evaluations. PMID:26674676

  11. A biodynamic microsystem for fluids viscosity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research was to model, design and fabricate a biodynamic analysis microsystem required for determination of various molecular transport properties of the biological fluids. In order to achieve this, a lab-on-a-chip device was fabricated. The microfluidic system developed satisfies the objectives for the study of microcirculation and characterization of cell rheological properties, functions and behaviour. The measurement principle of the viscosity of biological fluids is based on the detection of the rotation of a polysilicon gear-wheels system. The gear-wheels have external diameters of 250 μm, 200 μm, 160 μm and 3 μm thickness. The micromachining process combines the undercut and refill technique with pin-joint bearing permitting the fabrication of bushings that were used to elevate the rotor away from the silicon surface. The testing of the microfluidic dynamic system was performed using electromagnetic micropumps and magnetic controllers. Each device was fabricated by silicon micromachining technology and tested to obtain the specific characteristics

  12. Effects of Metal Ions on Viscosity of Aqueous Sodium Carboxylmethylcellulose Solution and Development of Dropping Ball Method on Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Set, Seng; Ford, David; Kita, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    This research revealed that metal ions with different charges could significantly affect the viscosity of aqueous sodium carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC) solution. On the basis of an Ostwald viscometer, an improvised apparatus using a dropping ball for examining the viscosity of liquids/solutions has been developed. The results indicate that the…

  13. CFD simulation of blood flow inside the corkscrew collaterals of the Buerger’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Sharifi

    2016-03-01

    Results: The local velocity patterns, pressure and kinematic viscosity distributions in different segments of the corkscrew collateral artery was demonstrated and discussed for the first time for this kind of artery. The effects of non-Newtonian consideration for the blood viscosity behavior were investigated in different segments of the artery. Moreover, the variations of the blood flow patterns along the artery were investigated in details for each segment. Conclusion: It was found that the flow patterns were affected by the complex geometry of this artery in such a way that it could lead to the presence of sites that were prone to the accumulation of the flowing particles in blood like nicotine. Furthermore, due to the existence of many successive bends in this artery, the variations of kinematic viscosity along this artery were significant, therefore the non-Newtonian behavior of the blood viscosity must be considered.

  14. Blood smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... osmotic fragility ) Deficiency of an enzyme called lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase Abnormalities of hemoglobin , the protein in ... sickle and Pappenheimer Red blood cells, target cells Formed elements of blood References Bain BJ. The peripheral ...

  15. Microscopic theory of intrinsic shear and bulk viscosities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microscopic theory of intrinsic shear and bulk viscosities of solutions is given for a model of particles that interact with hard-sphere cores and weak long-range attraction. The approximation considered (the velocity chaos assumption of the Enskog theory) can be expected to yield quantitatively useful values for viscosities of the model solute-solvent system when the solute particles are not much larger than the solvent particles. Under solute-solvent mixing conditions of constant pressure and temperature, it is found that the intrinsic viscosities of a hard-sphere solute in a hard-sphere solvent can be positive or negative, depending upon size and mass ratios; for solute and solvent particles whose mass ratio equals their volume ratio, the intrinsic shear and bulk viscosities are always positive for solute particles larger than solvent particles: in the opposite case, the intrinsic shear viscosity is always negative while the intrinsic bulk viscosity is for the most part negative, becoming positive again when the solute particle is sufficiently small. For solute particles smaller than solvent particles, this result is sensitive to change in mass ratio. The addition of solvent-solvent attraction is found to lower the intrinsic viscosities substantially; the addition of solute-solvent attraction raises it. Detailed quantitative analysis of these effects is given

  16. GodunovSPH with shear viscosity: implementation and tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seung-Hoon; Wood, Matt A.

    2016-05-01

    The acceleration and energy dissipation terms due to the shear viscosity have been implemented and tested in GodunovSPH. The double summation method has been employed to avoid the well-known numerical noise of the second derivative in particle based codes. The plane Couette flow with various initial and boundary conditions have been used as tests, and the numerical and analytical results show a good agreement. Not only the viscosity-only calculation, but the full hydrodynamics simulations have been performed, and they show expected results as well. The very low kinematic viscosity simulations show a turbulent pattern when the Reynolds number exceeds ˜102. The critical value of the Reynolds number at the transition point of the laminar and turbulent flows coincides with the previous works approximately. A smoothed dynamic viscosity has been suggested to describe the individual kinematic viscosity of particles. The infinitely extended Couette flow which has two layers of different viscosities has been simulated to check the smoothed dynamic viscosity, and the result agrees well with the analytic solution. In order to compare the standard smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and GodunovSPH, the two layers test has been performed again with a density contrast. GodunovSPH shows less dispersion than the standard SPH, but there is no significant difference in the results. The results of the viscous ring evolution has also been presented as well, and the numerical results agrees with the analytic solution.

  17. Elongational viscosity of multiarm (Pom-Pom) polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Almdal, Kristoffer;

    2006-01-01

    -Pom was estimated to have 2.5 arms on average, while the estimate is 3.3 for the asymmetric star. The molar mass of each arm is about 27 kg/mol. The melts were characterized in the linear viscoelastic regime and in non-linear elongational rheometry. The transient elongational viscosity for the Pom...... corresponds well with an estimate of the maximum stretchability of the backbone. Time-strain separability was not observed for the 'Asymmetric star' molecule at the elongation rates investigated. The transient elongational viscosity for the 'Pom-Pom' molecule went through a reproducible maximum in the...... viscosity at the highest elongational rate....

  18. Viscosity of Liquid Fayalite up to 9 GPa

    OpenAIRE

    Spice, Holly; Sanloup, Chrystèle; Cochain, Benjamin; de Grouchy, Charlotte; Kono, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    International audience The viscosity of liquid fayalite (Fe 2 SiO 4) was determined up to 9.2 GPa and 1850 • C using in situ falling sphere viscometry and X-ray radiography imaging. The viscosity of liquid fayalite was found to decrease with pressure, reducing by a factor of 2.5 between ambient pressure and 9.2 GPa. The results are in contrast with previous studies on depolymerised silicate melts which found viscosity to increase with pressure. In accordance with recent in situ structural ...

  19. Low Viscosity Highly Concentrated Injectable Nonaqueous Suspensions of Lysozyme Microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Maria A.; Engstrom, Joshua D.; Ludher, Baltej S.; Johnston, Keith P.

    2010-01-01

    Subcutaneous injection of concentrated protein and peptide solutions, in the range of 100–400 mg/mL, is often not possible with a 25- to 27-gauge needle, as the viscosity can be well above 50 cP. Apparent viscosities below this limit are reported for suspensions of milled lysozyme microparticles up to nearly 400 mg/mL in benzyl benzoate or benzyl benzoate mixtures with safflower oils through a syringe with a 25- to 27-gauge needle at room temperature. These apparent viscosities were confirmed...

  20. Theoretical evaluation of bulk viscosity: Expression for relaxation time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein Mohammad Zaheri, Ali; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K.

    2007-10-01

    A theoretical calculation of bulk viscosity has been carried out by deriving an expression for the relaxation time which appears in the formula for bulk viscosity derived by Okumura and Yonezawa. The expression involved a pair distribution function and interaction potential. Numerical results have been obtained over a wide range of densities and temperatures for Lennard-Jones fluids. It is found that our results provide a good description of bulk viscosity as has been judged by comparing the results with nonequilibrium molecular dynamics results. In addition, our results demonstrate the importance of the multiparticle correlation function.

  1. Shear viscosities of photons in strongly coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di-Lun; Müller, Berndt

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the shear viscosity of thermalized photons in the quark gluon plasma (QGP) at weak coupling and N = 4 super Yang-Mills plasma (SYMP) at both strong and weak couplings. We find that the shear viscosity due to the photon-parton scattering up to the leading order of electromagnetic coupling is suppressed when the coupling of the QGP/SYMP is increased, which stems from the blue-shift of the thermal-photon spectrum at strong coupling. In addition, the shear viscosity rapidly increases near the deconfinement transition in a phenomenological model analogous to the QGP.

  2. Viscosity of Liquid Crystal Mixtures in the Presence of Electroconvection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Tomoyuki; Satou, Yuki; Goto, Yoshitomo; Hidaka, Yoshiki; Orihara, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    We have experimentally investigated the viscosity of nematic liquid crystal mixtures of p-methoxybenzylidene-p'-n-butylaniline (MBBA) and p-ethoxybenzylidene-p'-cyanoaniline (EBCA) in the presence of electroconvection under an ac electric field with 60 Hz. Although the viscosity of the mixtures with negative dielectric anisotropy shows a characteristic decrease in the high-voltage regime, that with positive dielectric anisotropy shows a monotonic increase as the applied voltage is increased. The experimental results suggest that the decrease in viscosity observed only for the mixtures with negative dielectric anisotropy is attributed to the negative contribution of electric stress caused by the anisotropic director distribution of the turbulent state.

  3. Numerical solutions of Williamson fluid with pressure dependent viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffat Zehra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we have examined the flow of Williamson fluid in an inclined channel with pressure dependent viscosity. The governing equations of motion for Williamson fluid model under the effects of pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porosity are modeled and then solved numerically by the shooting method with Runge Kutta Fehlberg for two types of geometries i.e., (i Poiseuille flow and (ii Couette flow. Four different cases for pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porosity are assumed and the physical features of pertinent parameters are discussed through graphs.

  4. Astronaut Mike Fincke Conducts Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut Mike Fincke places droplets of honey onto the strings for the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) investigation onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The FMVM experiment measures the time it takes for two individual highly viscous fluid droplets to coalesce or merge into one droplet. Different fluids and droplet size combinations were tested in the series of experiments. By using the microgravity environment, researchers can measure the viscosity or 'thickness' of fluids without the influence of containers and gravity using this new technique. Understanding viscosity could help scientists understand industrially important materials such as paints, emulsions, polymer melts and even foams used to produce pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic products.

  5. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  6. Measurement of viscosity as a means to identify irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of viscosity is a simple method to identify previous irradiation of some kinds of spices and foods, at least in combination with other methods. A possible change of the soaking capacity was examined up to a storage period of 18 months after irradiation of black pepper, white pepper, cinnamon, ginger and onion powder with a radiation dose of 10 kGy each. After irradiation, either increased or decreased viscosity values were measured; the results showed, also after the 18-months-storage period, considerable differences of the viscosity behaviour in non-irradiated and irradiated samples. The time of storage had no effect to the individual viscosity values, so that this method could also be applied to the examined spices after a longer storage period. (orig.) With 51 figs., 25 tabs

  7. Density and viscosity modeling and characterization of heavy oils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Creek, J

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity and density are key properties for the evaluation, simulation, and development of petroleum reservoirs. Previously, the friction theory (f-theory) was shown to be capable of delivering simple and accurate viscosity models for petroleum reservoir fluids with molecular weights up to similar...... to 200 g/mol and viscosities up to similar to 10 mPa s, under usual reservoir conditions. As a basis, the f-theory approach requires a compositional characterization procedure that is used in conjunction with a van der Waals type of equation of state (EOS). This is achieved using simple cubic EOSs......, which are widely used within the oil industry. Further work also established the basis for extending the approach to heavy oils. Thus, in this work, the extended f-theory approach is further discussed with the study and modeling of a wider set of representative heavy reservoir fluids with viscosities up...

  8. Viscosity of aluminum under shock-loading conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Xiao-Juan; Liu Fu-Sheng; Zhang Ming-Jian; Sun Yan-Yun

    2011-01-01

    A reliable data treatment method is critical for viscosity measurements using the disturbance amplitude damping method of shock waves. In this paper the finite difference method is used to obtain the numerical solutions for the disturbance amplitude damping behaviour of the sinusoidal shock front in a flyer-impact experiment. The disturbance amplitude damping curves are used to depict the numerical solutions of viscous flow. By fitting the experimental data to the numerical solutions of different viscosities, we find that the effective shear viscosity coefficients of shocked aluminum at pressures of 42, 78 and 101 GPa are (1500±100) Pa. s, (2800±100) Pa. s and (3500±100) Pa. s respectively. It is clear that the shear viscosity of aluminum increases with an increase in shock pressure, so aluminum does not melt below a shock pressure of 101 GPa. This conclusion is consistent with the sound velocity measurement.

  9. Birkhoff's theorem and viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wei

    2009-01-01

    We obtain a partial generalization of Birkhoff's theorem of invariant curve to higher dimesional case in the context of viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations,or weak KAM theory.This is a new approach after Herman's proof.

  10. Crystallization and viscosity of heavy metal fluoride glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shear viscosity data for a glassforming ZrF/sub 4/-BaF/sub 3/-AlF/sub 3/ composition covering the range from the highly fluid melt down to the glass transition (10/sup -1/ to 10/sup 13/ P) have been collected from five sources. The viscosity temperature dependence is highly non-Arrhenius and cannot be described by three parameter expressions such as the Fulcher equation. The four parameter Cohen-Grest equation, however, does give a good fit to the data, possibly allowing interpolation in the range of intermediate viscosity important for fiber drawing where data is currently lacking. The viscosity data are compared with crystallization temperatures obtained by DSC during heating and cooling at 10K/min

  11. What do we know about the viscosity of QCD matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Steffen A. [Department of Physics Duke University Durham, NC 27708-0305 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    This article provides an overview over the current state of knowledge regarding the viscosity of QCD matter and on its extraction via ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider.

  12. Determination of the viscosity by spherical drop using nuclear tecniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurements of the drop limit velocity of a Sphere in a fluid using a radiotracer method are analyzed. The dynamic process involved was observed, identifying the density and viscosity of the fluid. (E.G.)

  13. Mechanism of sulfide effect on viscosity of HPAM polymer solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康万利; 周阳; 王志伟; 孟令伟; 刘述忍; 白宝君

    2008-01-01

    The effect of sulfide on HPAM solution viscosity was studied using BROOKFIELD DV-II viscometer,and the interaction mechanism was discussed.The HPAM solution viscosity was investigated through fully reducing sulfide by the addition of hydrogen peroxide oxidation,and the mechanism of increasing polymer viscosity was investigated.The experimental results also show that there is a critical concentration of 15 mg/L.Below it,the loss rate of HPAM solution viscosity increases more rapidly,but becomes slowly above the critical concentration.A theoretical guidance for oilfields to prepare polymer solution using sewage-water by eliminating sulfide,and it is also importance to prepare polymer solution using sewage-water and save fresh water.

  14. Experimental Study of Additives on Viscosity biodiesel at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajar, Berkah; Sukarno

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to find out the viscosity of additive and biodiesel fuel mixture in the temperature range from 283 K to 318 K. Solutions to reduce the viscosity of biodiesel is to add the biodiesel with some additive. The viscosity was measured using a Brookfield Rheometer DV-II. The additives were the generic additive (Diethyl Ether/DDE) and the commercial additive Viscoplex 10-330 CFI. Each biodiesel blends had a concentration of the mixture: 0.0; 0.25; 0.5; 0.75; 1.0; and 1.25% vol. Temperature of biodiesel was controlled from 40°C to 0°C. The viscosity of biodiesel and additive mixture at a constant temperature can be approximated by a polynomial equation and at a constant concentration by exponential equation. The optimum mixture is at 0.75% for diethyl ether and 0.5% for viscoplex.

  15. Expanded fluid based viscosity correlation : diluted heavy oil case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarranton, H.; Satyro, M.A.; Schoeggl, F. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The viscosity of pure hydrocarbons has been correlated using a simple function involving fluid density, low pressure gas viscosity and pressure. The correlation was developed based on measured densities from the NIST database. The correlation has been refit to use densities predicted from the Advanced Peng-Robinson equation of state. The usefulness of the correlation was shown for pure hydrocarbons such as n-alkanes, branched alkanes, alkenes, cyclics and aromatics as well as binary mixtures of pure hydrocarbons. This presentation included a case study on the viscosity of heavy oil diluted with solvent. The newly proposed, simple and quick method for calculating liquid and vapour viscosities was found to be suitable for incorporation into process and reservoir simulators. tabs., figs.

  16. Measurements of fluid viscosity using a miniature ball drop device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jay X.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes measurement of fluid viscosity using a small ball drop device. It requires as little as 100 μl of fluid. Each measurement can be performed in seconds. The experiment is designed to yield reliable viscosity values by operating at properly chosen tilt angles and with calibration using well-characterized Newtonian fluids such as mixtures of glycerol and water. It also yields dynamical viscosity of non-Newtonian fluids at moderate shear rates. The device is easy to assemble and it allows for the measurement of viscosity even when the fluid samples are too small to measure using most commercial viscometers or rheometers. Therefore, the technique is particularly useful in characterizing biological fluids such as solutions of proteins, DNA, and polymers frequently used in biomaterial applications.

  17. Viscosity and density tables of sodium chloride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fair, J.A.; Ozbek, H. (comps.)

    1977-04-01

    A file is presented containing tabulated data extracted from the scientific literature on the density and viscosity of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. Also included is a bibliography of the properties of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. (MHR)

  18. Influence of viscosity and the adiabatic index on planetary migration

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsch, B; Kley, W

    2013-01-01

    The strength and direction of migration of low mass embedded planets depends on the disk's thermodynamic state, where the internal dissipation is balanced by radiative transport, and the migration can be directed outwards, a process which extends the lifetime of growing embryos. Very important parameters determining the structure of disks, and hence the direction of migration, are the viscosity and the adiabatic index. In this paper we investigate the influence of different viscosity prescriptions (alpha-type and constant) and adiabatic indices on disk structures and how this affects the migration rate of planets embedded in such disks. We perform 3D numerical simulations of accretion disks with embedded planets. We use the explicit/implicit hydrodynamical code NIRVANA that includes full tensor viscosity and radiation transport in the flux-limited diffusion approximation, as well as a proper equation of state for molecular hydrogen. The migration of embedded 20Earthmass planets is studied. Low-viscosity disks...

  19. Viscoelastic properties of whole blood. Influence of fast sedimenting red blood cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneditz, D; Rainer, F; Kenner, T

    1987-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is known to be of deciding influence on erythrocyte sedimentation-rate (ESR) and on whole blood viscoelastic properties. The rheological behaviour of blood collected from a control-group with normal ESR is compared to the viscoelastic behaviour of blood collected from two groups with high to very high ESR, whose individuals are suffering from chronical polyarthritis and Morbus Bechterew, respectively. The rheological properties are evaluated by means of an oscillating-flow capillary-rheometer where the viscous (eta') and elastic (eta") component of the complex viscosity (eta) is measured at a constant frequency of 2 Hz. Correcting for the varying hematocrit of the different blood samples according to an exponential equation, the viscoelastic data are found to be elevated in the groups with high ESR. For the viscous properties this is only due to the increase of the plasma viscosity. A correction for the plasma viscosity, however, shows that the viscous properties at low shear- rates (2s-1) are significantly reduced, whereas elastic properties in a range of medium shear-rates (10s-1 to 50s-1) are significantly increased (P less than 0.001, t-test of Student). This result is discussed to be due to the high packing density of the RBC in fast sedimenting aggregates. High packing density reduces the effective volume of the RBC but increases the stiffness of the aggregates. PMID:3651579

  20. Studies of electrorheological properties of blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, N; Riha, P

    2006-01-01

    The electrorheological (ER) properties of blood indicate changes in the blood rheological behaviour due to imposition of electric field. The present work identifies and quantifies ER properties of blood at different shear rates and at different local structure of the flow field. A concurrent measurement system, based on a Contraves Low Shear 30 rotational rheometer was used in this study. It includes a pair of cylindrically shaped platinum electrodes, embedded into the wall of a resin replica of the Couette type flow chamber of the rheometer, constructed for conductivity measurement, and associated software (Data acquisition system). The relationship between the whole blood and plasma conductivity (the main active component of blood impedance) was studied in parallel with the changes in the rheological behaviour under steady and transient flow conditions. The time variation of blood conductivity at different flow regimes and the dependences of the apparent whole blood and plasma viscosity were investigated in the presence and absence of an electric field of 2 kHz. The results show that blood conductivity is strongly dependent on the blood factors considered and that any application using blood conductivity measurement should take into account the effect of flow, shear rates and hematocrit. The results also show that valuable information on the mechanical properties of blood can be obtained, in particular concerning the structuring and kinetics of "rouleaux formation". PMID:16899902

  1. Effect of Fluid Dynamic Viscosity on the Strength of Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, K.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    The mechanical strength of high porosity and weakly cemented chalk is affected by the fluid in the pores. In this study, the effect of the dynamic viscosity of non-polar fluids has been measured on outcrop chalk from Sigerslev Quarry, Stevns, Denmark. The outcome is that the measured strength of...... the chalk decreases with increasing dynamic viscosity. The proposed qualitative explanation is that pressure difference supports and enhances the generation of microscopic shear and tensile failures....

  2. Viscosity prediction of refrigerants under subcritical/supercritical conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Hong-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Viscosity is an important thermophysical property of fluids. Viscosities of refrigerants were predicted based on friction theory combined with the Lemmon and Span short reference equation of state. This model is valid for the temperature up to 397 K and pressure up to 40 MPa, which cover both the subcritical and supercritical regions. Experimental data were further used to validate the model. Under all test conditions, the accuracy is better than 6%, which is acceptable in most practical applications.

  3. Comment on "Accelerating cosmological expansion from shear and bulk viscosity"

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In a recent Letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 091301 (2105)] the cause of the acceleration of the present Universe has been identified with the shear viscosity of an imperfect relativistic fluid even in the absence of any bulk viscous contribution. The gist of this comment is that the shear viscosity, if anything, can only lead to an accelerated expansion over sufficiently small scales well inside the Hubble radius.

  4. GodunovSPH with shear viscosity : implementation and tests

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Seung-Hoon; Wood, Matt A.

    2016-01-01

    The acceleration and energy dissipation terms due to the shear viscosity have been implemented and tested in GodunovSPH. The double summation method has been employed to avoid the well known numerical noise of the second derivative in particle based codes. The plane Couette flow with various initial and boundary conditions have been used as tests, and the numerical and analytical results show a good agreement. Not only the viscosity--only calculation, but the full hydrodynamics simulations ha...

  5. Measuring Solution Viscosity and its Effect on Enzyme Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Uribe Salvador; Sampedro José G.

    2003-01-01

    In proteins, some processes require conformational changes involving structural domain diffusion. Among these processes are protein folding, unfolding and enzyme catalysis. During catalysis some enzymes undergo large conformational changes as they progress through the catalytic cycle. According to Kramers theory, solvent viscosity results in friction against proteins in solution, and this should result in decreased motion, inhibiting catalysis in motile enzymes. Solution viscosity was increas...

  6. Intrinsic ambiguity in second order viscosity parameters in relativistic hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Nakayama, Yu

    2012-01-01

    We show that relativistic hydrodynamics in Minkowski space-time has intrinsic ambiguity in second order viscosity parameters in the Landau-Lifshitz frame. This stems from the possibility of improvements of energy-momentum tensor. There exist at least two viscosity parameters which can be removed by using this ambiguity in scale invariant hydrodynamics in (1+3) dimension, and seemingly non-conformal hydrodynamic theories can be hiddenly conformal invariant.

  7. Characterizing Vibrating Cantilevers for Liquid Viscosity and Density Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Bernhard Jakoby; Franz Keplinger; Erwin K. Reichel; Christian Riesch

    2008-01-01

    Miniaturized liquid sensors are essential devices in online process or condition monitoring. In case of viscosity and density sensing, microacoustic sensors such as quartz crystal resonators or SAW devices have proved particularly useful. However, these devices basically measure a thin-film viscosity, which is often not comparable to the macroscopic parameters probed by conventional viscometers. Miniaturized cantilever-based devices are interesting alternatives for such applications, but here...

  8. A simple model for the anomalous intrinsic viscosity of dendrimers

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yuyuan; Shi, Tongfei; An, Lijia; Jin, Liping; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2010-01-01

    The intrinsic viscosity of dendrimers in solution shows several anomalous behaviors that have hitherto not been explained within the existing theoretical frameworks of either Zimm or Rouse. Here we propose a simple two-zone model based on the radial segmental density profile of the dendrimers and combine a non-draining core with a free-draining outer region description, to arrive at a simple formula that captures most of the main features in the intrinsic viscosity data obtained in experiments.

  9. Viscosity calculation of polydisperse branching polymers near gel point

    OpenAIRE

    Sievers, D.

    1980-01-01

    The viscosity of randomly branched polymers has been calculated based on an interpolation formula by Marrinan and Hermans, which contains dependent on certain constants both the so called excluded-volume-effect and the free-draining limit. Closer inspection of the constants used shows that the first choice is better direct near the gel point and yields a logarithmic divergence of the viscosity or a finite limit depending on the gelation theory used. The theoretical calculated values for the i...

  10. Effect of viscosity on seismic response of waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the effect of viscosity on the dynamic response of a liquid storage tank subjected to base excitations is presented. The tank is a typical high level waste storage tank which has a diameter of 50 ft. and liquid height of 20.4 ft. The liquid density is taken to be 93.6 lb/ft3. The tank is assumed to be rigid. Both harmonic and earthquake excitations are used in the study. The finite element method is employed to attack the problem. The response functions examined include the sloshing wave height and the impulsive and convective components of the hydrodynamic pressure. A small tank, about 1/15 the size of the typical waste storage tank, is also used in the study to understand the effect of viscosity on the response of liquid storage tanks and to investigate the dependency of the viscosity effect on the size of the tank. The results of this study show that the effect of viscosity depends strongly on the size of the liquid-tank system. For the typical waste storage tank considered, the effect of viscosity on the sloshing wave height and the impulsive and convective pressures is very small and can be neglected. For the viscosity effect to become noticeable in the response of the typical waste storage tank, the liquid viscosity must be greater than 10,000 cP. This value is far greater than the estimated viscosity value of the high level wastes, which may range from 60 to 200 cP

  11. Bulk Viscosity and Particle Creation in the Inflationary Cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Eshaghi, Mehdi; Riazi, Nematollah; Kiasatpour, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    We study particle creation in the presence of bulk viscosity of cosmic fluid in the early universe within the framework of open thermodynamical systems. Since the first-order theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is non-causal and unstable, we try to solve the bulk viscosity equation of the cosmic fluid with particle creation through the full causal theory. By adopting an appropriate function for particle creation rate of "Creation of Cold Dark Matter" model, we obtain analytical solutions...

  12. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric plasma mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric two-component plasma (TCP). They compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. for the case of viscosity they propose a new predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion they point out some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann equation based models

  13. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Bastea, Sorin

    2006-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixture (BIM). We compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. For the case of viscosity we propose a new predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion we discuss some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann equation based models.

  14. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Bastea, S

    2005-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixture (BIM). We compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. For the case of viscosity we propose a new predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion we discuss some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann equation based models.

  15. VARIATION IN MEAT COMPOSITION VISCOSITY DURING THE MIXING PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    DANIELA IANIłCHI; CRISTIANA DIACONESCU; LAURA URDES; CARMEN NICOLAE; I.G. MALOS

    2013-01-01

    Animal raw material processing is directly influenced by the physical and chemical characteristics of the materials which also influence their water holding capacity. The various combinations and status of the raw materials used in the food industry determine specific behaviours that may influence the processing equipment performance and construction. The study on meat composition viscosity depending upon the added components, temperature and mixing time length, has shown that viscosity is in...

  16. INFLUENCE OF STARCH ADDING ON THE BEEF COMPOSITIONS VISCOSITY

    OpenAIRE

    DANIELA IANIŢCHI; LUCICA NISTOR; LAURA URDEŞ; CAMELIA HODOŞAN; CRISTIANA DIACONESCU

    2013-01-01

    Animal raw material processing is directly influenced by the physical and chemical characteristics of their. The various combinations and status of the raw materials used in the food industry determine specific behaviours that may influence the processing equipment performance and construction. The study on meat composition viscosity depending upon the added components, temperature and mixing time length, has shown that viscosity is increasing with lower mixing temperature , higher mixing tim...

  17. Dark matter perturbations and viscosity: a causal approach

    OpenAIRE

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; John, Anslyn; Pénin, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of dissipative effects in cosmic fluids modifies their clustering properties and could have observable effects on the formation of large scale structures. We analyse the evolution of density perturbations of cold dark matter endowed with causal bulk viscosity. The perturbative analysis is carried out in the Newtonian approximation and the bulk viscosity is described by the causal Israel-Stewart (IS) theory. In contrast to the non-causal Eckart theory, we obtain a third order evo...

  18. Convergence of a residual based artificial viscosity finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Nazarov, Murtazo

    2013-02-01

    We present a residual based artificial viscosity finite element method to solve conservation laws. The Galerkin approximation is stabilized by only residual based artificial viscosity, without any least-squares, SUPG, or streamline diffusion terms. We prove convergence of the method, applied to a scalar conservation law in two space dimensions, toward an unique entropy solution for implicit time stepping schemes. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of viscosity and the adiabatic index on planetary migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsch, B.; Boley, A.; Kley, W.

    2013-02-01

    Context. The strength and direction of migration of low mass embedded planets depends on the disk's thermodynamic state. It has been shown that in active disks, where the internal dissipation is balanced by radiative transport, migration can be directed outwards, a process which extends the lifetime of growing embryos. Very important parameters determining the structure of disks, and hence the direction of migration, are the viscosity and the adiabatic index. Aims: In this paper we investigate the influence of different viscosity prescriptions (α-type and constant) and adiabatic indices on disk structures. We then determine how this affects the migration rate of planets embedded in such disks. Methods: We perform three-dimensional numerical simulations of accretion disks with embedded planets. We use the explicit/implicit hydrodynamical code NIRVANA that includes full tensor viscosity and radiation transport in the flux-limited diffusion approximation, as well as a proper equation of state for molecular hydrogen. The migration of embedded 20 MEarth planets is studied. Results: Low-viscosity disks have cooler temperatures and the migration rates of embedded planets tend toward the isothermal limit. Hence, in these disks, planets migrate inwards even in the fully radiative case. The effect of outward migration can only be sustained if the viscosity in the disk is large. Overall, the differences between the treatments for the equation of state seem to play a more important role in disks with higher viscosity. A change in the adiabatic index and in the viscosity changes the zero-torque radius that separates inward from outward migration. Conclusions: For larger viscosities, temperatures in the disk become higher and the zero-torque radius moves to larger radii, allowing outward migration of a 20-MEarth planet to persist over an extended radial range. In combination with large disk masses, this may allow for an extended period of the outward migration of growing

  20. A note on the mixture viscosity using the Shannak definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A note on the mixture viscosity using the Shannak definition is presented. • The Shannak definition gives μ(2ph) > μf at low x. • Attention must be taken when using the Shannak definition at low x. - Abstract: In this study, a note on the mixture viscosity using the Shannak definition is presented [Shannak, B. A., 2008. Frictional pressure drop of gas liquid two-phase flow in pipes. Nucl. Eng. Des. 238, 3277–3284]. From his definition of the two-phase Reynolds number (Re(2ph)), an expression of the two-phase viscosity (μ(2ph)) is obtained. This expression of the two-phase viscosity (μ(2ph)) satisfies the following important limiting conditions: i. at x = 0, μ(2ph) = μf, and at x = 1, μ(2ph) = μg. This definition of the two-phase viscosity (μ(2ph)) can be used to compute the two-phase frictional pressure gradient using the homogeneous modeling approach in circular pipes, minichannels and microchannels. By plotting μ(2ph)/μf versus x for air–water system at atmospheric conditions using the Shannak definition as well as the other most commonly used formulas of the two-phase viscosity (μ(2ph)) in gas–liquid two-phase flows such as McAdams et al. (1942), Cicchitti et al. (1960), and Awad and Muzychka (2008) (Definition 1, Definition 2, Definition 3, and Definition 4), it is clear that the Shannak definition of the two-phase viscosity gives μ(2ph) > μf at low x. This is impossible because we must have μg (2ph) f for 0 < x < 1. Therefore, attention must be taken when using the Shannak definition of the two-phase viscosity at low x

  1. Effect of Solvation Film on the Viscosity of Colloidal Dispersions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Chang-Sheng; GU Qing-Bao; SONG Shao-Xian

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity is one of the most important properties of colloids in mixing, transportation, stabilization, energy consumption, and so on. According to Einstein's viscosity equation, the viscosity of a colloidal dispersion increases with the increase of particle concentration. And the equation can be applicable to all micro-particle dispersions, because the effect of solvation films coated on particles can be neglectable in that case. But with the decrease of particle size to nano-scale, the formation of solvation films on nano-particles can greatly affect the viscosity of a dispersion, and Einstein's equation may not be applicable to this case. In this work, one kind of micro-size silica particle and two kinds of nano-size silica particles were used to investigate the effect of solvation films on dispersion viscosity, dispersed in water and ethyl alcohol solvents, respectively. The results of theoretical calculation and experimental investigation show that the increase of viscosity is contributed from solvation films by more than 95 percent for nano-particle dispersions, while less than 10 percent for micro-particle dispersions.

  2. Viscosity of In and In-Sb alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The dynamic viscosity of pure In, In-1%Sb (mass fraction, so as the follows) alloy, In-55%Sb hypoeutectic alloyand In-69.5%Sb eutectic alloy was measured by using a torsional oscillation viscometer at different temperatures above liq-uidus. The experimental results show that the viscosity of these melts decreases with increasing temperature. The anomalouschange of viscosity occurs at about 430 and 470℃ in pure In melt. The variation of viscosity with temperature well meetsexponential correlation and no anomalous change occurs in measured temperature range in the In-1%Sb alloy melt. A tran-sition occurs at about 800℃ in both of In-55%Sb and In-69.5%Sb alloy melts. The sudden change of viscosity suggests thestructure change of melts. DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) curves of In-1%Sb alloy during heating and cooling weremeasured, and the results show that no structural variation in In-1%Sb alloy melt was testified further. In addition, the vis-cosity of In melt decreases with the addition of 1%Sb.

  3. Viscosity of liquid fayalite up to 9 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spice, Holly; Sanloup, Chrystèle; Cochain, Benjamin; de Grouchy, Charlotte; Kono, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The viscosity of liquid fayalite (Fe2SiO4) was determined up to 9.2 GPa and 1850 °C using in situ falling sphere viscometry and X-ray radiography imaging. The viscosity of liquid fayalite was found to decrease both along the melting curve and an isotherm, therefore temperature is thought to have little effect on liquid fayalite viscosity at high pressure. The results are in contrast with previous studies on depolymerised silicate melts which found viscosity to increase with pressure. In accordance with recent in situ structural measurements on liquid fayalite, the viscosity decrease is likely a result of the increase in Fe-O coordination with pressure. The results show that liquid silicate viscosities need to be considered on an individual basis and can be strongly dependent on the melt structure and composition. This has important implications for models of planetary differentiation. In particular, terrestrial bodies with high Fe contents and reducing mantle conditions are likely to have had very mobile melts at depth.

  4. Contraints on cosmological viscosity from GW150914 observation

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, Gaurav; Prasanna, A R

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that gravitational waves propagate through ideal fluids without experiencing any dispersion or dissipation. However, if the medium has a non-zero shear viscosity $\\eta$ , gravitational waves will be dissipated at a rate proportional to $G \\eta$. We test dark matter and dark energy models with non-zero shear viscosity by calculating the dissipation of GW150914 which propagates over a distance of 410 Mpc through the dissipative fluid and testing the data with the theoretical prediction. We put an upper bound on the shear viscosity of the cosmological fluid as $\\eta < 1.9 \\times 10^{9} {\\rm Pa \\,\\, sec}$ which is close to the critical viscosity of fluids at which the viscous pressure becomes significant for the dynamics of the universe. The upper bound on $\\eta$ is lower than the estimated shear viscosity of self-interacting dark matter in galaxy cluster Abel 3827. Future observations of gravitational waves at LIGO have the potential of detecting the viscosity of dark matter and dark energy.

  5. Effects of viscosity variations in temporal mixing layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present investigation is to assess the effects of viscosity variations in low-speed temporally-evolving turbulent mixing layer. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are performed for several viscosity ratios, Rv = vhigh/vlow, varying between 1 and 9, whereas the upper and lower streams are of equal density. The space-time evolution of Variable-Viscosity Flow (VVF) is compared with the Constant-Viscosity Flow (CVF), for which Rv = 1. The initial Reynolds number, based on the initial momentum thickness, δθ,0, is Reδθ,0 = 160 for the considered cases. The study focuses on the first stages of the temporal evolution of the mixing-layer. It is shown that in VVF (with respect to CVF): (i) the birth of turbulent fluctuations is accelerated; (ii) large-scale quantities, i.e. mean longitudinal velocity and momentum thickness, are affected by the viscosity variations, thus dispelling the myth that viscosity is a 'small-scale quantity that does not affect the large scales'; (iii) the velocity fluctuations are enhanced for VVF. In particular, the turbulent kinetic energy peaks earlier and is three times larger for VVF than CVF at the earliest stage of the mixing, and (iv) the transport equation for the turbulent kinetic energy is derived and favourably compared with simulations data.

  6. Bulk viscosity from the Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The insufficiency of ideal fluid dynamics to reproduce certain expected results threw light on the necessity of dissipative effects. The viscosity coefficients give an estimate of the hydrodynamical evolution of fluid dissipative processes. Not only do they provide information about the deviation of the system from ideal hydrodynamics, they also give us a picture of the fluid dynamics and critical phenomena. In this work we concentrate on the effects of bulk viscosity. Bulk viscosity bears essential significance like in the context of violation of scale invariance. Now, the smallness of sound velocity being directly related to the former, it becomes obvious that bulk viscosity will show a peak-like nature in the critical region. Bulk viscosity manifests itself by an addition of the diagonal term πδij to the stress tensor Tij in the local rest frame. In this work we take resort to the Kubo formalism which relates viscosity coefficients to the correlation functions of the energy-momentum (E-M) tensor

  7. Bulk and shear viscosities of hot and dense hadron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We estimate the bulk and the shear viscosity at finite temperature and baryon densities of hadronic matter within a hadron resonance gas model which includes a Hagedorn spectrum. The parameters of the Hagedorn spectrum are adjusted to fit recent lattice QCD simulations at finite chemical potential. For the estimation of the bulk viscosity we use low energy theorems of QCD for the energy momentum tensor correlators. For the shear viscosity coefficient, we estimate the same using molecular kinetic theory to relate the shear viscosity coefficient to average momentum of the hadrons in the hot and dense hadron gas. The bulk viscosity to entropy ratio increases with chemical potential and is related to the reduction of velocity of sound at nonzero chemical potential. The shear viscosity to entropy ratio on the other hand, shows a nontrivial behavior with the ratio decreasing with chemical potential for small temperatures but increasing with chemical potential at high temperatures and is related to decrease of entropy density with chemical potential at high temperature due to finite volume of the hadrons

  8. Effect of viscosity on harmonic signals from magnetic fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explored the effect of viscosity on harmonic signals from a magnetic fluid. Using a numerical simulation that accounts for both the Brownian and Néel processes, we clarified how the magnetization mechanism is affected by viscosity. When the excitation field varies much slower than the Brownian relaxation time, magnetization can be described by the Langevin function. On the other hand, for the case when the excitation field varies much faster than the Brownian relaxation time, but much slower than the Néel relaxation time, the easy axes of the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) turn to some extent toward the direction of the excitation field in an equilibrium state. This alignment of the easy axes of MNPs caused by the AC field becomes more significant with the increase of the AC field strength. Consequently, the magnetization is different from the Langevin function even though Néel relaxation time is faster than time period of the external frequency. It is necessary to consider these results when we use harmonic signals from a magnetic fluid in a high-viscosity medium. - Highlights: • We explore the effect of viscosity on harmonic signals from a magnetic fluid. • We clarify how the magnetization mechanism is affected by the viscosity of the fluid. • The magnetization in a high-viscosity medium is different from a Langevin function. • We empirically express the alignment of easy axes of the MNPs caused by an AC field

  9. Correlations for thermal conductivity and viscosity of water based nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermo-physical properties of nanofluids such as thermal conductivity, viscosity, density and specific heat of nanofluids are required for the analysis of convection heat transfer coefficients. The density and specific heat of nanofluids can be estimated with the mixture relations in literature. Information regarding the properties at different volume concentration and temperature is required for the estimation of heat transfer coefficient. The two most fundamental properties which are, experimentally, determined, are viscosity and thermal conductivity. Investigators have been determining the properties of nanofluids at different temperatures and base liquids. The present work is an attempt to analyze the available data to develop a non-linear regression equation for the estimation of thermal conductivity and viscosity of water based nanofluids. In the present study, nanofluids are considered as a homogenous medium and the parameters influencing the thermo physical properties identified. Equations are developed for the analysis of thermo-physical properties of nanofluids as a function of parameters viz., material, concentration, temperature and particle size useful for designer. The opposing nature of thermal conductivity rise and viscosity decrease with temperature; dependence of nanofluid thermal conductivity on material properties alters the range of applicability of nanofluids for heat transfer applications. The thermal conductivity and viscosity of Al2O3, ZnO and TiO2 dispersed in water are measured to validate the proposed equations. The result shows that the equations are able to predict the thermal conductivity and viscosity of different types of nanofluids of different particle diameters closely.

  10. ESTIMATION OF VISCOSITY ENGINE OILS USING ROTATIONAL RHEOMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. RYNIEWICZ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The operating criteria, the assurance of energy-efficiency and environmental protection impose very diversified rheological requirements on the parameters of work of car engine oils. The aim of the work was the estimation of rheological parameters of selected car engine oils at controlled shear stress in a wide range of temperatures, using a rotational rheometer. Investigated mineral engine oils, semi-synthetic and synthetic ones that belong to different viscosity classes. The characteristics of viscosity in relation to temperature in the testing node were determined. The results of tests at sub-zero and low temperatures indicate significant differentiation of rheological properties of engine oils. It can be claimed that in the exploited friction nodes, especially in the conditions of fluid and mixed friction, the smallest viscosity is characteristic to the fully synthetic oils from the tested group 5W and the semi-synthetic oil Orlen Gas Semisynthetic 10W-40. Semi-synthetic oil Platinum Rally Sport 10W-60 stands out as its viscosity values at sub-zero and low temperatures are greater than the ones of mineral oils from the tested group 15W-40. At high temperatures one can distinguish the oil called Elf Sporti SRI 15W-40 whose viscosity very slightly decreases. The conducted oil tests confirmed their catalog parameters and affiliation to viscosity classes.

  11. Blood / Money

    OpenAIRE

    Strong, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Marilyn Strathern has argued that "nature" in Euro-American culture has appeared as constraint; it has figured the givens of existence on which human artifice is seen to construct "society" or "culture."(5) Among those givens is the notion that human beings are naturally individuals. And blood, too, images individuality: "The very thought of blood, individual blood, touches the deepest feelings in man about life and death" ([RIchard Titmuss] 16.) Transfusion medicine, then, draws on a series ...

  12. Mathematical Model of Blood Flow in Small Blood Vessel in the Presence of Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Bali

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for blood flow in the small blood vessel in the presence of magnetic field is presented in this paper. We have modeled the two phase model for the blood flow consists of a central core of suspended erythrocytes and cell-free layer surrounding the core. The system of differential equations has been solved analytically. We have obtained the result for velocity, flow rate and effective viscosity in presence of peripheral layer and magnetic field .All the result has been obtained and discussed through graphs.

  13. Development of Viscosity Model for Petroleum Industry Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motahhari, Hamed reza

    Heavy oil and bitumen are challenging to produce and process due to their very high viscosity, but their viscosity can be reduced either by heating or dilution with a solvent. Given the key role of viscosity, an accurate viscosity model suitable for use with reservoir and process simulators is essential. While there are several viscosity models for natural gases and conventional oils, a compositional model applicable to heavy petroleum and diluents is lacking. The objective of this thesis is to develop a general compositional viscosity model that is applicable to natural gas mixtures, conventional crudes oils, heavy petroleum fluids, and their mixtures with solvents and other crudes. The recently developed Expanded Fluid (EF) viscosity correlation was selected as a suitable compositional viscosity model for petroleum applications. The correlation relates the viscosity of the fluid to its density over a broad range of pressures and temperatures. The other inputs are pressure and the dilute gas viscosity. Each fluid is characterized for the correlation by a set of fluid-specific parameters which are tuned to fit data. First, the applicability of the EF correlation was extended to asymmetric mixtures and liquid mixtures containing dissolved gas components. A new set of mass-fraction based mixing rules was developed to calculate the fluid-specific parameters for mixtures. The EF correlation with the new set of mixing rules predicted the viscosity of over 100 mixtures of hydrocarbon compounds and carbon dioxide with overall average absolute relative deviations (AARD) of less than 10% either with measured densities or densities estimated by Advanced Peng-Robinson equation of state (APR EoS). To improve the viscosity predictions with APR EoS-estimated densities, general correlations were developed for non-zero viscosity binary interaction parameters. The EF correlation was extended to non-hydrocarbon compounds typically encountered in natural gas industry. It was

  14. Viscosities and viscosity deviations of binary mixtures of biodiesel + petrodiesel (or n-hexadecane) at different temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    F. M. R. Mesquita; F. X. Feitosa; F. R. do Carmo; R. S. de Santiago-Aguiar; de Sant'ana, H. B.

    2012-01-01

    Viscosities of four binaries mixtures [soybean biodiesel + diesel oil (or n-hexadecane) and coconut biodiesel + diesel oil (or n-hexadecane)] have been determined at T = (293.15, 313.15, 333.15, 353.15, 373.15) K and atmospheric pressure over the entire composition range. Experimental data were fitted to the Andrade equation and the adjustable parameters and the standard deviations between experimental and calculated values were estimated. From the experimental data, the viscosity dev...

  15. Understanding Blood Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lab and Imaging Tests Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts SHARE: Print Glossary Blood cell counts give ... your blood that's occupied by red cells. Normal Blood Counts Normal blood counts fall within a range ...

  16. Viscosity Relaxation in Molten HgZnTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, James K.

    2002-01-01

    Because of its narrow electronic band-gap, HgZnTe solid solutions have been proposed as effective detectors for infrared radiation. To produce the best single crystals of these materials for this application, knowledge of the phase diagram that governs the freezing of the liquid is essential. Besides the phase diagram, however, some information concerning the thermophysical properties of the melt, such as viscosity, density, specific heat, and enthalpy of mixing, can also be useful. Of these thermophysical properties, the viscosity is perhaps of the most interest scientifically. Measurements using the oscillating cup method have shown that the isothermal melt requires tens of hours of equilibration time before a steady value of the viscosity can be achieved. Over this equilibration time, which depends upon temperature, the viscosity can increase by as much as a factor of two before reaching a steady state. We suggest that this relaxation phenomenon may be due to a slight polymerization of Te atoms in the melt. To account for the time dependence of the viscosity in the HgZnTe melt, we propose that the liquid acts as a solvent that favors the formation of Te atom chains. We suggest that as the melt is cooled from a high temperature to the temperature for measurement of the viscosity, a free radical polymerization of Te atoms begins. To estimate this average molecular weight, we use a simple free radical polymerization mechanism, including a depolymerization step, to calculate the time dependence to the concentration of each Te polymer molecular weight fraction. From these molecular weight fractions, we compute the weight average molecular weight of the distribution. Using the semi-empirical relation between average molecular weight and viscosity, we obtain a formula for the time dependence of the viscosity of the melt. Upon examining this formula, we find that the viscosity achieves a steady value when a balance is achieved between the rate of formation of the chains

  17. Electromechanical Model of Blood Flow in Vessels

    OpenAIRE

    Ivo Cap; Barbora Czippelova

    2008-01-01

    The present paper deals with some theoretical derivations connected with very efficient method of solution of hydrodynamic problems of blood flow in human cardiovascular system. The electromechanical analogy of liquid flow in a tube and electromagnetic wave propagating along an electric transmission line is discussed. We have derived a detailed circuit-like model of an elementary section of the elastic tube with viscose Newtonian liquid. The analogy harmonic current electrical cir...

  18. Electromechanical Model of Blood Flow in Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Cap

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with some theoretical derivations connected with very efficient method of solution of hydrodynamic problems of blood flow in human cardiovascular system. The electromechanical analogy of liquid flow in a tube and electromagnetic wave propagating along an electric transmission line is discussed. We have derived a detailed circuit-like model of an elementary section of the elastic tube with viscose Newtonian liquid. The analogy harmonic current electrical circuit has been designed

  19. Rheological properties of blood after whole body gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of rheological properties of blood has special interest; since it is a circulating fluid exposed to shear rates during its life time. This work aims to investigate the influence of whole body gamma irradiation on the rheological properties of rat's blood. The applied shear rate was from 12 to 375 s-1. Low shear viscosity (up to 100 s-1) depends mainly on the erythrocytes aggregation while the high shear viscosity depends on the erythrocytes deformability. Materials and Methods: Adult male rats were exposed to 1, 2.5, 3.5, 5, 7 and 9 Gy single doses. The consistency index, apparent viscosity, yield stress and aggregation index were increased after exposure to gamma radiation. The dielectric properties of the erythrocytes, in the low frequency range (60 Hz to 40 k Hz), were measured in order to investigate the changes in the membrane surface charge. Results: The results obtained indicate that the viscosity, consistency index and yield stress increased after the exposure to the lowest dose taken; 1 Gy, and continued to increase as the exposure dose increased up to dose 7 Gy and then decrease after exposure to 9 Gy. The relative permittivity and relaxation time showed significant decrease after exposure to the lowest dose and continue to decrease as the dose increased. Conclusion: The obtained results can be attributed to the decrease of membrane surface charge after exposure to gamma radiation. The decrease in the membrane surface charge is known to decrease the repulsion between the cells and increase blood viscosity.

  20. Blood donation

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    A blood donation is organised by the Cantonal Hospital of Geneva On Thursday 19 March 2009 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. CERN RESTAURANT 2 Number of donations during the last blood donations :135 donors in July 2008 122 donors in November 2008 Let’s do better in 2009 !!! Give 30 minutes of your time to save lives...

  1. BLOOD DONATION

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    A blood donation, organized by EFS (Etablissement Français du Sang) of Annemasse will take place On Wednesday 12 November 2008, from 8:30 to 16:00, at CERN Restaurant 2 If possible, please, bring your blood group Card.

  2. Tainted blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, Ida; Sheikh, Zainab Afshan; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    study of the historical rise and current workings of safety practices in the Danish blood system. Here, we identify a strong focus on contamination in order to avoid 'tainted blood', at the expense of working with risks that could be avoided through enhanced blood monitoring practices. Of further...... significance to this focus are the social dynamics found at the heart of safety practices aimed at avoiding contamination. We argue that such dynamics need more attention, in order to achieve good health outcomes in transfusion medicine. Thus, we conclude that, to ensure continuously safe blood systems, we...... need to move beyond the bifurcation of the social and medical aspects of blood supply as two separate issues and approach social dynamics as key medical safety questions....

  3. Comparative toxicokinetics of low-viscosity mineral oil in Fischer 344 rats, Sprague-Dawley rats, and humans--implications for an Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boogaard, Peter J; Goyak, Katy O; Biles, Robert W; van Stee, Leo L P; Miller, Matthew S; Miller, Mary Jo

    2012-06-01

    Oral repeated-dose studies with low-viscosity mineral oils showed distinct species and strain differences, which are hypothesized to be due to differences in bioavailability, with Fischer 344 rats being more susceptible than Sprague-Dawley rats or dogs. Sensitive analytical methodology was developed for accurate measurement of low levels of mineral hydrocarbons and applied in single-dose toxicokinetics studies in rats and humans. Fischer 344 rats showed a 4-fold higher AUC(0-∞) and consistently higher blood and liver concentrations were found than Sprague-Dawley rats. Hepatic mineral hydrocarbon concentration tracked the blood concentration in both strains, indicating that blood concentrations can serve as functional surrogate measure for hepatic concentrations. In human volunteers receiving 1mg/kg body weight of low-viscosity white oil, all blood concentrations of mineral hydrocarbons were below the detection limit. Comparison with threshold blood concentrations associated with NOAELs in both rat strains, indicate that the margin-of-exposure is at least 37-fold. Using an internal dose metric rather than applied dose reduces the uncertainty around the temporary ADI considerably since it intrinsically accounts for intra- and inter-species differences. The current data support replacement of the temporary ADI of 0.01 mg/kg/day by a (permanent) ADI of at least 1.0mg/kg/day for low- and medium-viscosity mineral oils. PMID:22425899

  4. Shear viscosity of shocked metals at mega-bar pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-Sheng

    2013-06-01

    Viscosity of metals at high pressures and temperatures has been one of the most concerned problems in weapon physics and geophysics, e.g., the shear viscosity coefficients of substances in earth's mantle and earth's core at mega-bar pressures are needed for understanding the core mantle convection in deep earth. But the experimental data is very scarce because the conventional measurement methods can hardly be applied to such compression conditions [1]. In this talk, the principle of small-disturbance perturbation method [2] is re-investigated based on both the analytic solution and the numerical solution of the two-dimentional shock flow of sinusoidal distubance on front. In numerical solution, the real viscosity, which governs the flow behind the shock front and the perturbation damping feature, and the artificial viscosity, whick controls the numerical oscillation, separately treated. The relation between the viscosity of flow and the damping features of perturbation amplitude is quantitatively established for the loading situations of Sakharov's [3] and a flyer-impact situation with a finite disturbance. The later is the theoretical basis to develop a new experimental method, called the flyer-impact small-disturbance method [4]. In the flyer-impact small-disturbance method, the two-stage light-gas gun is used to launch a metal flyer. When the flyer directly impacts on the wedge-shaped sample with a sinusoidal surface, a two-dimensional shock flow of sinusoidal distubance on its front is generated. The amplitude of disturbance and its dependance with propagation distance is measured by use of an electric pin-array probe or a fibre-array probe. Correspondingly, the solution of the flow is given by numerically solving the hydrodynamic equations by the finite difference technique to find out the quantative correlations among the amplitude decay, the initial distribution of flow, the amplitude of initial disturbance, the shear viscosity of the flow, and the material

  5. Noninvasive blood pressure measurement in large vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulse pressure in the aorta was evaluated by the measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV) and blood flow velocity (BFV). PWV reflects the elasticity of the vessel and was determined by a time-of-flight method. BFV was measured by analyzing the change of magnetization decay due to flow in multiecho experiments. If one neglects pulse wave reflections at vascular branch points and flow resistance due to blood viscosity, pulse pressure is proportional to PWV and BFV. Noninvasive MR imaging measurements were obtained in 12 patients, all of whom underwent correlative arterial catheterization. Values varied between 35 and 100 mm Hg. The results demonstrated a high correlation between the two methods

  6. The effect of gasses on the viscosity of dimethyl ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Jakobsen, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    media, but their effect on DME viscosity is unknown. Argon (Ar), nitrogen (NA carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen (H-2) and propane (C3H8) have been investigated at pressure levels of 12-15 bar. A Cannon-Manning semi-micro capillary glass viscometer, size 25, enclosed in a cylindrical pressure container, of...... glass, submerged completely in a constant temperature bath, has been used. A distinct reduction of efflux times was found only for the gas, CO2. The reduction in efflux time was about 9%. The kinematic viscosity of pure DME was determined to be: 0.188 +/- 0.001 cSt, 25 degrees C. A previously reported...... viscosity of pure DME has been corrected for the surface tension effect. Viscosity determination was initially based on a direct comparison of efflux times of DME with that of distilled water. The calculation gave a revised viscosity of 0.186 +/- 0.002 cSt, 25 degrees C, consistent with the above...

  7. Viscosity changes in hyaluronic acid: Irradiation and rheological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daar, Eman [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: e.daar@surrey.ac.uk; King, L.; Nisbet, A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Thorpe, R.B. [Fluids and Systems Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a significant component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), particular interest being shown herein in synovial fluid. The present study aims to investigate the degrading effects of X-ray radiation on HA at radiotherapy doses. Measurements of viscosity and shear stresses on HA solutions have been made at different shear rates using various types of viscometer for different concentrations in the range 0.01-1% w/v of HA. The HA has been subjected to doses of 6 MV photon radiation ranging from 0 to 20 Gy, the major emphasis being on doses below 5 Gy. It is found that there is a dose-dependent relationship between viscosity and shear rate, viscosity reducing with radiation dose, this being related to polymer scissions via the action of radiation-induced free radicals. The dependency appears to become weaker at higher concentrations, possibly due to the contribution to viscosity from polymer entanglement becoming dominant over that from mean molecular weight. Present results, for HA solutions in the concentration range 0.01% to 1% w/v, show reduced viscosity with dose over the range 0-4 Gy, the latter covering the dose regime of interest in fractionated radiotherapy. The work also shows agreement with previous Raman microspectrometry findings by others, the possible bond alterations being defined by comparison with available published data.

  8. Viscosity changes in hyaluronic acid: Irradiation and rheological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a significant component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), particular interest being shown herein in synovial fluid. The present study aims to investigate the degrading effects of X-ray radiation on HA at radiotherapy doses. Measurements of viscosity and shear stresses on HA solutions have been made at different shear rates using various types of viscometer for different concentrations in the range 0.01-1% w/v of HA. The HA has been subjected to doses of 6 MV photon radiation ranging from 0 to 20 Gy, the major emphasis being on doses below 5 Gy. It is found that there is a dose-dependent relationship between viscosity and shear rate, viscosity reducing with radiation dose, this being related to polymer scissions via the action of radiation-induced free radicals. The dependency appears to become weaker at higher concentrations, possibly due to the contribution to viscosity from polymer entanglement becoming dominant over that from mean molecular weight. Present results, for HA solutions in the concentration range 0.01% to 1% w/v, show reduced viscosity with dose over the range 0-4 Gy, the latter covering the dose regime of interest in fractionated radiotherapy. The work also shows agreement with previous Raman microspectrometry findings by others, the possible bond alterations being defined by comparison with available published data.

  9. Investigation of viscosity of whole hydrolyze sweetened condensed milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kalinina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Рaper is aimed at developing of low-lactose (hydrolyzed sweetened condensed milk products technology for lactose intolerant people and for the whole population. Materials and methods: Rheological characteristics were determined on a Reotest device by the 2 nd method of viscometry Results and discussion. Reasonability of ß-galactosidase use for milk lactose hydrolyze during the production of canned products with sugar was proved in the previous works. This technology gives possibility to increase the quality of condensed canned foods, to reduce sugar concentration till 50 %, to increase dietary properties. Due to the reducing of saccharose mass part till 22 and 31 % the products had a liquid consistency that’s why was a necessity to increase the viscosity properties of condensed products. One of method to increase the product viscosity is inoculation of stabilization systems. Reasonability of the usage of stabilization system Bivicioc 1L was proved. The researches of viscosity determination in whole hydrolyzed sweetened condensed milk were shown in the work. Relations of viscosity of whole hydrolyzed condensed milk to the deformation rate were presented. Conclusions Viscosity indices of experimental samples in the fresh produced products and during storage are determined and justified.

  10. Dark goo: bulk viscosity as an alternative to dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a simple (microscopic) model in which bulk viscosity plays a role in explaining the present acceleration of the universe. The effect of bulk viscosity on the Friedmann equations is to turn the pressure into an 'effective' pressure containing the bulk viscosity. For a sufficiently large bulk viscosity, the effective pressure becomes negative and could mimic a dark energy equation of state. Our microscopic model includes self-interacting spin-zero particles (for which the bulk viscosity is known) that are added to the usual energy content of the universe. We study both background equations and linear perturbations in this model. We show that a dark energy behavior is obtained for reasonable values of the two parameters of the model (i.e. the mass and coupling of the spin-zero particles) and that linear perturbations are well-behaved. There is no apparent fine tuning involved. We also discuss the conditions under which hydrodynamics holds, in particular that the spin-zero particles must be in local equilibrium today for viscous effects to be important

  11. Viscosity and crystallization mechanism of cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Kitheri, E-mail: joskit@igcar.gov.in [Chemistry Group, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kutty, K.V. Govindan [Chemistry Group, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Goswami, M.C. [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831 007 (India); Rao, P.R. Vasudeva [Chemistry Group, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Melt viscosity of cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses is measured and reported for the first time. • Viscosity – temperature followed Arrhenius model. • Activation energy of viscous flow is strongly correlated to glass transition temperature of the glasses. • Process of crystallization of cesium loaded glass by approximation-free kinetic method to understand the mechanism. • Cesium loaded IPG and IPG shows bulk crystallization mechanism. - Abstract: This paper describes the melt viscosity behaviour and the crystallization mechanism of a series of iron phosphate glasses. High temperature viscosity measurements were carried out on pristine iron phosphate glass and a series of cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses in order to understand the effect of addition of Cs{sub 2}O on viscosity of iron phosphate glasses. Activation energy of viscous flow was estimated from the experimental data by applying Arrhenius model of viscosity–temperature relationship. Activation energy of viscous flow is observed to be strongly correlated to glass transition temperature of these glasses. Fragility of iron phosphate and cesium loaded iron phosphate glass systems were also evaluated in region of high temperature. Crystallization of these glasses was studied using thermal analysis techniques. Temperature integral approximation free method was utilized to evaluate the kinetic parameters such as activation energy of crystallization (E{sub c}) and Avrami exponent (n). The value of Avrami exponent ‘n’ obtained showed that the glasses under present study crystallize via bulk crystallization mechanism, i.e., nucleation and three dimensional growth.

  12. Dynamics of rising bubble inside a viscosity-stratified medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Manoj; Premlata, A. R.; Sahu, Kirti

    2015-11-01

    The rising bubble dynamics in an unconfined quiescent viscosity-stratified medium has been numerically investigated. This is frequently encountered in industrial as well as natural phenomena. In spite of the large number of studies carried out on bubbles and drops, very few studies have examined the influence of viscosity stratification on bubble rise dynamics. To the best of our knowledge, none of them have isolated the effects of viscosity-stratification alone, even though it is known to influence the dynamics extensively, which is the main objective of the present study. By conducting time-dependent simulations, we present a library of bubble shapes in the Gallilei and the Eötvös numbers plane. Our results demonstrate some counter-intuitive phenomena for certain range of parameters due to the presence of viscosity stratification in the surrounding fluid. We found that in a linearly increasing viscosity medium, for certain values of parameters, bubble undergoes large deformation by forming an elongated skirt, while the skirt tends to physically separate the wake region from the rest of the surrounding fluid. This peculiar dynamics is attributed to the migration of less viscous fluid that is carried in the wake of the bubble as it rises, and thereby creating an increase.

  13. Viscosity and crystallization mechanism of cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Melt viscosity of cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses is measured and reported for the first time. • Viscosity – temperature followed Arrhenius model. • Activation energy of viscous flow is strongly correlated to glass transition temperature of the glasses. • Process of crystallization of cesium loaded glass by approximation-free kinetic method to understand the mechanism. • Cesium loaded IPG and IPG shows bulk crystallization mechanism. - Abstract: This paper describes the melt viscosity behaviour and the crystallization mechanism of a series of iron phosphate glasses. High temperature viscosity measurements were carried out on pristine iron phosphate glass and a series of cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses in order to understand the effect of addition of Cs2O on viscosity of iron phosphate glasses. Activation energy of viscous flow was estimated from the experimental data by applying Arrhenius model of viscosity–temperature relationship. Activation energy of viscous flow is observed to be strongly correlated to glass transition temperature of these glasses. Fragility of iron phosphate and cesium loaded iron phosphate glass systems were also evaluated in region of high temperature. Crystallization of these glasses was studied using thermal analysis techniques. Temperature integral approximation free method was utilized to evaluate the kinetic parameters such as activation energy of crystallization (Ec) and Avrami exponent (n). The value of Avrami exponent ‘n’ obtained showed that the glasses under present study crystallize via bulk crystallization mechanism, i.e., nucleation and three dimensional growth

  14. Low viscosity automatic transmission fluids with enhanced friction durability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenji Yatsunami; Samuel H. Tersigni; TANG Hong- zhi; Lee D. Saathoff; Christopher S. Cleveland; Mark Jones

    2009-01-01

    This study focused on the development of a new low viscosity automatic transmission fluid (ATF) with enhanced friction durability to meet the needs of new step type automatic transmissions. Recent high fuel prices encourage increased efficiency in the driveline, including the transmission. Reduction in fluid viscosity and wider use of slip control in torque con-verter clutches are two ways to practically improve fuel efficiency. Increased torque and more shifting is seen with a variety of new transmission hardware platforms, such as wet starting clutches, dual clutches and seven - or eight - speed ATs.This suggests the need for enhanced levels of friction durability from the ATF. The new challenge from this hardware for the ATF formulator lies in the need to simultaneously meet the wear, friction durability and torque capacity requirements at low viscosity in a cost- effective manner. This report introduced a new low viscosity fluid that represents a different commercial ATF formulation style. The new chemistry employs a low viscosity for increased fuel economy, while easily doubling the friction durability of current conven-tional ATFs and offering higher torque and better EP.

  15. Viscosity and thermal conductivity of stable graphite suspensions near percolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lei; Wang, Jianjian; Marconnet, Amy M; Barbati, Alexander C; McKinley, Gareth H; Liu, Wei; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-14

    Nanofluids have received much attention in part due to the range of properties possible with different combinations of nanoparticles and base fluids. In this work, we measure the viscosity of suspensions of graphite particles in ethylene glycol as a function of the volume fraction, shear rate, and temperature below and above the percolation threshold. We also measure and contrast the trends observed in the viscosity with increasing volume fraction to the thermal conductivity behavior of the same suspensions: above the percolation threshold, the slope that describes the rate of thermal conductivity enhancement with concentration reduces compared to below the percolation threshold, whereas that of the viscosity enhancement increases. While the thermal conductivity enhancement is independent of temperature, the viscosity changes show a strong dependence on temperature and exhibit different trends with respect to the temperature at different shear rates above the percolation threshold. Interpretation of the experimental observations is provided within the framework of Stokesian dynamics simulations of the suspension microstructure and suggests that although diffusive contributions are not important for the observed thermal conductivity enhancement, they are important for understanding the variations in the viscosity with changes of temperature and shear rate above the percolation threshold. The experimental results can be collapsed to a single master curve through calculation of a single dimensionless parameter (a Péclet number based on the rotary diffusivity of the graphite particles). PMID:25469709

  16. On the viscosity stratification in temporal mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaila, Luminita; Taguelmimt, Noureddine; Hadjadj, Abdellah; Turbulence Team

    2015-11-01

    We assess the effects of viscosity variations in low-speed temporally-evolving turbulent mixing layer. The two streams are density-matched, but the slow fluid is Rv times more viscous than the rapid stream. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are performed for several viscosity ratios, Rv varying between 1 and 9. The space-time evolution of Variable-Viscosity Flow (VVF) is compared with that of the Constant-Viscosity Flow (CVF). The velocity fluctuations occur earlier and are more enhanced for VVF. In particular, the kinetic energy peaks earlier and is up to three times larger for VVF than for CVF at the earliest stages of the flow. Over the first stages of the flow, the temporal growth rate of the fluctuations kinetic energy is exponential, in full agreement with linear stability theory. The transport equation for the fluctuations kinetic energy is favourably compared with simulations data. The enhanced kinetic energy for VVF is mainly due to an increased production at the interface between the two fluids, in tight correlation with enlarged values of mean velocity gradient at the inflection point of the mean velocity profile. The transport equations of the one-and two-point kinetic energy show that self-preservation cannot be complete in variable-viscosity flows. ANR is acknowledged for financial support.

  17. A new look at blood shear-thinning

    CERN Document Server

    Lanotte, Luca; Mendez, Simon; Fedosov, Dmitry A; Fromental, Jean-Marc; Clavería, Viviana; Nicoud, Franck; Gompper, Gerhard; Abkarian, Manouk

    2016-01-01

    Blood viscosity decreases with shear stress, a property essential for an efficient perfusion of the vascular tree. Shear-thinning is intimately related to the dynamics and mutual interactions of red blood cells (RBCs), the major constituents of blood. Our work explores RBCs dynamics under physiologically relevant conditions of flow strength, outer fluid viscosity and volume fraction. Our results contradict the current paradigm stating that RBCs should align and elongate in the flow direction thanks to their membrane circulation around their center of mass, reducing flow-lines disturbances. On the contrary, we observe both experimentally and with simulations, rich morphological transitions that relate to global blood rheology. For increasing shear stresses, RBCs successively tumble, roll, deform into rolling stomatocytes and finally adopt highly deformed and polylobed shapes even for semi-dilute volume fractions analogous to microcirculatory values. Our study suggests that any pathological change in plasma com...

  18. Effect of viscosity on appetite and gastro-intestinal hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zijlstra, Nicolien; Mars, Monica; de Wijk, René A;

    2009-01-01

    In previous studies we showed that higher viscosity resulted in lower ad libitum intake and that eating rate is an important factor. In this study we aimed to explore the effect of viscosity on the gastro-intestinal hormones ghrelin, CCK-8 and GLP-1. Thirty-two subjects (22+/-2 y, BMI 21.9+/-2.2 kg...... than the liquid. There was a significant product effect for fullness (p 0.03), desire to eat (p 0.04), appetite something sweet (p 0.002) and prospective consumption (p 0.0009). We observed no clear effect of viscosity on gastro-intestinal hormones. Only for desacyl ghrelin there was a significant...

  19. Measurement of Viscosity of Hydrocarbon Liquids Using a Microviscometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandekar, Abhijit; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    The viscosity of normal alkanes, their mixtures, and true boiling point (TBP) fractions (C (sub 6) -C (sub 19)) of four North Sea petroleum reservoir fluids have been measured by use of an automatic rolling ball mixroviscometer at 20°C. The equipment is specially suited for samples of limited...... amount as only 120 to 2500 micro l. is required depending on the viscosity range. The densities of the fluids were also determined. The accuracy of these measurements is ascertained and compared with literature data on n-alkane mixtures. The data reported for reservoir fluids includes molecular weights...... as well as density. Finally, generalized viscosity correlations for the C (sub 6) to C (sub 19) fractions are discussed....

  20. Magnetic Instability in Accretion Disks with Anomalous Viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ai-Ping; LI Xiao-Qing

    2004-01-01

    @@ Using the new model of anomalous viscosity, we investigate the magnetic instability in the accretion disks and give the dispersion formula. On the basis of the dispersion relation obtained, it is numerically shown that the instability condition of viscous accretion disk is well consistent with that of the ideal accretion disk, namely there would be magneto-rotational instability in the presence of a vertical weak magnetic field. For a given distance R from the centre of the disk, the growth rate in the anomalous case deviates from the ideal case more greatly when the vertical magnetic field is smaller. The large viscosity limits to the instability. In the two cases, the distributions of growth rate with wave number k approach each other when the magnetic field increases. It greatly represses the effect of viscosity.

  1. MODELING A SOLID BOUNDARY AS A FLUID OF INFINITE VISCOSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new approach to model viscosity in the conservation of momentum equations is presented and discussed. Coefficient of viscosity is modeled in such a way that it reaches asymptotically to infinity at the solid boundary but still yields a finite value for the shear stress at the solid wall. Basic objective of this research is to show that certain combinations of higher order normal velocity gradients become zero at the solid boundary.Modified solutions for the Couette flow and Poiseuille flow between two parallel plates are obtained by modeling the coefficient of viscosity in a novel way. Also,viscous drag computed by our model is expected to yield higher values than the values predicted by the existing models, which matches closely to the experimental data.

  2. Boosting magnetic reconnection by viscosity and thermal conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoshima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Takahiro; Imada, Shinsuke

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinear evolution of magnetic reconnection is investigated by means of magnetohydrodynamic simulations including uniform resistivity, uniform viscosity, and anisotropic thermal conduction. When viscosity exceeds resistivity (the magnetic Prandtl number P r m > 1 ), the viscous dissipation dominates outflow dynamics and leads to the decrease in the plasma density inside a current sheet. The low-density current sheet supports the excitation of the vortex. The thickness of the vortex is broader than that of the current for P r m > 1 . The broader vortex flow more efficiently carries the upstream magnetic flux toward the reconnection region, and consequently, boosts the reconnection. The reconnection rate increases with viscosity provided that thermal conduction is fast enough to take away the thermal energy increased by the viscous dissipation (the fluid Prandtl number Pr < 1). The result suggests the need to control the Prandtl numbers for the reconnection against the conventional resistive model.

  3. Boosting Magnetic Reconnection by Viscosity and Thermal Conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Minoshima, Takashi; Imada, Shinsuke

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear evolution of magnetic reconnection is investigated by means of magnetohydrodynamic simulations including uniform resistivity, uniform viscosity, and anisotropic thermal conduction. When viscosity exceeds resistivity (the magnetic Prandtl number Prm > 1), the viscous dissipation dominates outflow dynamics and leads to the decrease in the plasma density inside a current sheet. The low-density current sheet supports the excitation of the vortex. The thickness of the vortex is broader than that of the current for Prm > 1. The broader vortex flow more efficiently carries the upstream magnetic flux toward the reconnection region, and consequently boosts the reconnection. The reconnection rate increases with viscosity provided that thermal conduction is fast enough to take away the thermal energy increased by the viscous dissipation (the fluid Prandtl number Pr < 1). The result suggests the need to control the Prandtl numbers for the reconnection against the conventional resistive model.

  4. Fluctuations in horizon-fluid lead to negative bulk viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Swastik; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2016-03-01

    Einstein equations projected on to a black-hole horizon give rise to Navier-Stokes equations. Horizon-fluids typically possess unusual features like negative bulk viscosity, and it is not clear whether a statistical-mechanical description exists for such fluids. In this work, we provide an explicit derivation of the Bulk viscosity of the horizon-fluid based on the theory of fluctuations à la Kubo. The main advantage of our approach is that our analysis remains for the most part independent of the details of the underlying microscopic theory and hence the conclusions reached here are model independent. We show that the coefficient of bulk viscosity for the horizon-fluid matches exactly with the value found from the equations of motion for the horizon-fluid.

  5. Pipeline flow of heavy oil with temperature-dependent viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maza Quinones, Danmer; Carvalho, Marcio da Silveira [Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], E-mail: msc@puc-rio.br

    2010-07-01

    The heavy oil produced offshore needs to be transported through pipelines between different facilities. The pipelines are usually laid down on the seabed and are submitted to low temperatures. Although heavy oils usually present Newtonian behavior, its viscosity is a strong function of temperature. Therefore, the prediction of pressure drops along the pipelines should include the solution of the energy equation and the dependence of viscosity to temperature. In this work, an asymptotic model is developed to study this problem. The flow is considered laminar and the viscosity varies exponentially with temperature. The model includes one-dimensional equations for the temperature and pressure distribution along the pipeline at a prescribed flow rate. The solution of the coupled differential equation is obtained by second-order finite difference. Results show a nonlinear behavior as a result of coupled interaction between the velocity, temperature, and temperature dependent material properties. (author)

  6. Geometry-dependent viscosity reduction in sheared active fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Słomka, Jonasz

    2016-01-01

    We investigate flow pattern formation and viscosity reduction mechanisms in active fluids by studying a generalized Navier-Stokes model that captures the experimentally observed bulk vortex dynamics in microbial suspensions. We present exact analytical solutions including stress-free vortex lattices and introduce a computational framework that allows the efficient treatment of previously intractable higher-order shear boundary conditions. Large-scale parameter scans identify the conditions for spontaneous flow symmetry breaking, geometry-dependent viscosity reduction and negative-viscosity states amenable to energy harvesting in confined suspensions. The theory uses only generic assumptions about the symmetries and long-wavelength structure of active stress tensors, suggesting that inviscid phases may be achievable in a broad class of non-equilibrium fluids by tuning confinement geometry and pattern scale selection.

  7. Fluctuations in horizon-fluid lead to negative bulk viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Swastik

    2015-01-01

    Einstein equations projected on to a black hole horizon gives rise to Navier-Stokes equations. Horizon-fluids typically possess unusual features like negative bulk viscosity and it is not clear whether a statistical mechanical description exists for such fluids. In this work, we provide an explicit derivation of the Bulk viscosity of the horizon-fluid based on the theory of fluctuations a la Kubo. The main advantage of our approach is that our analysis remains for the most part independent of the details of the underlying microscopic theory and hence the conclusions reached here are model independent. We show that the coefficient of bulk viscosity for the horizon-fluid matches exactly with the value found from the equations of motion for the horizon-fluid.

  8. Diffusivities and Viscosities of Poly(ethylene oxide) Oligomers †

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Bingbing

    2010-10-14

    Diffusivities and viscosities of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) oligomer melts with 1 to 12 repeat units have been obtained from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations using the TraPPE-UA force field. The simulations generated diffusion coefficients with high accuracy for all of the molar masses studied, but the statistical uncertainties in the viscosity calculations were significantly larger for longer chains. There is good agreement of the calculated viscosities and densities with available experimental data, and thus, the simulations can be used to bridge gaps in the data and for extrapolations with respect to chain length, temperature, and pressure. We explored the convergence characteristics of the Green-Kubo formulas for different chain lengths and propose minimal production times required for convergence of the transport properties. The chain-length dependence of the transport properties suggests that neither Rouse nor reptation models are applicable in the short-chain regime investigated. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  9. In situ viscosity measurements of albite melt under high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Funakoshi, K I; Terasaki, H

    2002-01-01

    The viscosities of albite (NaAlSi sub 3 O sub 8) melt under high pressures have been measured using an x-ray radiography falling sphere method with synchrotron radiation. This method has enabled us to determine the precise sinking velocity directly. Recent experiments of albite melt showed the presence of a viscosity minimum around 5 GPa (Poe et al 1997 Science 276 1245, Mori et al 2000 Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 175 87). We present the results for albite melt up to 5.2 GPa at 1600 and 1700 deg. C. The viscosity minimum is clearly observed to be around 4.5 GPa, and it might be explained not by the change of the compression mechanism in albite melt but by change of the phase itself.

  10. Viscosity Measurement via Drop Coalescence: A Space Station Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antar, Basil; Ethridge, Edwin C.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of using low gravity experimental data together with CFD simulations for measuring the viscosity of highly viscous liquids was recently validated on onboard the International Space Station (ISS). A series of microgravity tests were conducted for this purpose on the ISS in July, 2004 and in May of 2005. In these experiments two liquid drops were brought manually together until they touched and were allowed to coalesce under the action of the capillary force alone. The coalescence process was recorded photographically from which the contact radius speed of the merging drops was measured. The liquid viscosity was determined by fitting the measured data with accurate numerical simulation of the coalescence process. Several liquids were tested and for each liquid several drop diameters were employed. Experimental and numerical results will be presented in which the viscosity of several highly viscous liquids were determined using this technique.

  11. Ferrohydrodynamic evaluation of rotational viscosity and relaxation in certain ferrofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajesh

    2012-07-01

    A significant effect of aggregation dynamics for aqueous ferrofluid (AF) and kerosene based ferrofluid (KF) using magnetic field dependent capillary viscosity and magneto-optical relaxation measurements is studied. For better comparison parameters of AF and KF are kept similar. Ferrohydrodynamic equations of chain forming ferrofluids, dilute ferrofluids, and Brownian dynamic simulations are compared. It is observed that the rotational viscosity of AF is larger than that of KF due to field induced aggregates in it and strong dipolar interactions. It is also observed that at Ωτ ~ 0.04 both AF and KF viscosity becomes almost similar, suggesting similar behavior at that shear rate. The magneto-optical relaxation in AF exhibits nonexponential behavior when relaxed from higher magnetic field and follows irreversible thermodynamics, whereas for KF the relaxation is exponential and follows the effective field method. This discrepancy is explained based on aggregation dynamics of magnetic particles. Results are well described by the corresponding theoretical models. PMID:23005542

  12. Viscosity mixing rules for binary systems containing one ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Mohammed; Altamash, Tausif; Salavera, Daniel; Coronas, Alberto; Rebelo, Luis P N; Canongia Lopes, Jose N

    2013-06-24

    In this work the applicability of four of the most commonly used viscosity mixing rules to [ionic liquid (IL)+molecular solvent (MS)] systems is assessed. More than one hundred (IL+MS) binary mixtures were selected from the literature to test the viscosity mixing rules proposed by 1) Hind (Hi), 2) Grunberg and Nissan (G-N), 3) Herric (He) and 4) Katti and Chaudhri (K-C). The analyses were performed by estimating the average (absolute or relative) deviations, AADs and ARDs, between the available experimental data and the predicted ideal mixture viscosity values obtained by means of each rule. The interaction terms corresponding to the adjustable parameters inherent to each rule were also calculated and their trends discussed. PMID:23650138

  13. Viscosity and thermal conductivity of moderately dense gas mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeham, W. A.; Kestin, J.; Mason, E. A.; Sandler, S. I.

    1972-01-01

    Derivation of a simple, semitheoretical expression for the initial density dependence of the viscosity and thermal conductivity of gaseous mixtures in terms of the appropriate properties of the pure components and of their interaction quantities. The derivation is based on Enskog's theory of dense gases and yields an equation in which the composition dependence of the linear factor in the density expansion is explicit. The interaction quantities are directly related to those of the mixture extrapolated to zero density and to a universal function valid for all gases. The reliability of the formulation is assessed with respect to the viscosity of several binary mixtures. It is found that the calculated viscosities of binary mixtures agree with the experimental data with a precision which is comparable to that of the most precise measurements.

  14. Bulk Viscosity and Particle Creation in the Inflationary Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Eshaghi, Mehdi; Kiasatpour, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    We study particle creation in the presence of bulk viscosity of cosmic fluid in the early universe within the framework of open thermodynamical systems. Since the first-order theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is non-causal and unstable, we try to solve the bulk viscosity equation of the cosmic fluid with particle creation through the full causal theory. By adopting an appropriate function for particle creation rate of "Creation of Cold Dark Matter" model, we obtain analytical solutions which do not suffer from the initial singularity and are in agreement with equivalent solutions of Lambda-CDM model. We constrain the free parameter of particle creation in our model based on recent Planck data. It is also found that the inflationary solution is driven by bulk viscosity with or without particle creation.

  15. Synthesis and Aqueous Solution Viscosity of Hydrophobically Modified Xanthan Gum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Xiao-lin; WU Wen-hui; YU Pei-zhi; WANG Jian-quan

    2007-01-01

    Two xanthan gum derivatives hydrophobically modified by 4 or 8 tetradecyl chains per 100 xanthan gum structure units were synthesized. The derivatives were studied by scanning electron microscope and pyrene fluorescence spectrometry. And the aqueous solution apparent viscosity of the derivatives was investigated. The results indicate that the network of the derivatives with more hydrophobic groups is closer and tighter. With increasing of alkyl chain substitution degree, the hydrophobically associating interactions enhance in aqueous solution. Aqueous solution apparent viscosity of the derivatives increases with increasing of polymer concentration and alkyl substitution degree, and decreases with the increase of temperature. In the brine solution, the strong viscosity enhancement phenomenon appears. The interaction between the derivatives and surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate is strong.

  16. Donating Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... And be sure to drink plenty of water, milk, or other liquids. Before donating, you'll need to answer some questions about your medical history, and have your temperature, pulse, blood pressure, and ...

  17. Blood smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of RBCs due to body destroying them ( immune hemolytic anemia ) Low number of RBCs due to some red ... of Heinz bodies may indicate: Alpha thalassemia Congenital hemolytic anemia Disorder in which red blood cells break down ...

  18. Amylase - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amylase is an enzyme that helps digest carbohydrates. It is made in the pancreas and the glands ... saliva. When the pancreas is diseased or inflamed, amylase releases into the blood. A test can be ...

  19. Moving blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelis, K

    1997-01-01

    Our internationally acclaimed journalist Sanguinia has returned safely from her historic assignment. Travelling from Homeric Greece to British Romanticism, she was witness to blood drinking, letting, bathing, and transfusion. In this report, she explores connections between the symbolic and the sadistic; the mythic and the medical--all in an effort to appreciate the layered meanings our culture has given to the movement of blood between our bodies. PMID:9407636

  20. VISCOSITY ANALYSIS OF EMPTY FRUIT BUNCH (EFB BIO-OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.S. Nazirah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Empty fruit bunches (EFB are one of the solid wastes produced by the palm oil industry, which is increasing rapidly. The aim of this paper is to analyse the viscosity of empty fruit bunch (EFB bio-oil that can be extracted from all solid waste EFB as a sample, and a few processes were executed. The samples underwent two processes, which were pre-treatment and pyrolysis. The pre-treatment involved three processes, namely, cutting, shredding and sieving, which were necessary in order to prepare EFB into a particle size suitable for the reactor. After that, the samples were fed into the feedback reactor as feedstock for the pyrolysis process to produce bio-oil. Once the bio-oil was produced, its viscosity was tested using the Brookfield Viscometer in two conditions: before and after the chemical reaction. The bio-oil was treated by adding 10 ml and 20 ml of acetone respectively through the chemical reaction. The viscosity test was carried out at different temperatures, which were 25°C, 30°C, 35°C, 40°C, 45°C and 50°C respectively. The observed viscosity of the EFB bio-oil varied and was higher as the temperature decreased. In addition, the viscosity of the EFB bio-oil was higher when it reacted chemically with the acetone added. Therefore, the results showed that the chemical reaction with acetone has the potential to increase the viscosity of EFB bio-oil.

  1. Effective viscosity of non-gravitactic Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii microswimmer suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussler, Matthias; Rafaï, Salima; Peyla, Philippe; Wagner, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Active microswimmers are known to affect the macroscopic viscosity of suspensions in a more complex manner than passive particles. For puller-like microswimmers an increase in the viscosity has been observed. It has been suggested that the persistence of the orientation of the microswimmers hinders the rotation that is normally caused by the vorticity. It was previously shown that some sorts of algae are bottom-heavy swimmers, i.e., their centre of mass is not located in the centre of the body. In this way, the algae affect the vorticity of the flow when they are perpendicularly oriented to the axis of gravity. This orientation of gravity to vorticity is given in a rheometer that is equipped with a cone-plate geometry. Here we present measurements of the viscosity both in a cone-plate and a Taylor-Couette cell. The two set-ups yielded the same increase in viscosity although the axis of gravitation in the Taylor-Couette cell is parallel to the direction of vorticity. In a complementary experiment we tested the orientation of the direction of swimming through microscopic observation of single Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and could not identify a preferred orientation, i.e., our specific strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are not bottom-heavy swimmers. We thus conclude that bottom heaviness is not a prerequisite for the increase of viscosity and that the effect of gravity on the rheology of our strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is negligible. This finding reopens the question of whether the origin of persistence in the orientation of cells is actually responsible for the increased viscosity of the suspension.

  2. Bulk viscosity coefficients due to phonons in superfluid neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manuel, Cristina; Tolos, Laura [Institut de Ciències del Espai (IEEC/CSIC), Facultat de Ciències, Campus Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Torre C5, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Tarrús, Jaume, E-mail: cmanuel@ieec.uab.es, E-mail: tarrus@ecm.ub.edu, E-mail: tolos@ice.csic.es [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Matèria, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    We calculate the three bulk viscosity coefficients as arising from the collisions among phonons in superfluid neutron stars. We use effective field theory techniques to extract the allowed phonon collisional processes, written as a function of the equation of state of the system. The solution of the dynamical evolution of the phonon number density allows us to calculate the bulk viscosity coefficients as function of the phonon collisional rate and the phonon dispersion law, which depends on the neutron pairing gap. Our method of computation is rather general, and could be used for different superfluid systems, provided they share the same underlying symmetries. We find that the behavior with temperature of the bulk viscosity coefficients is dominated by the contributions coming from the collinear regime of the 2↔3 phonon processes. For typical star radial pulsation frequencies of ω ∼ 10{sup 4}s{sup −1}, we obtain that the bulk viscosity coefficients at densities n∼>4n{sub 0} are within 10% from its static value for T∼<10{sup 9} K and for the case of strong neutron superfluidity in the core with a maximum value of the {sup 3}P{sub 2} gap above 1 MeV, while, otherwise, the static solution is not a valid approximation to the bulk viscosity coefficients. Compared to previous results from Urca and modified Urca reactions, we conclude that at T ∼ 10{sup 9}K phonon collisions give the leading contribution to the bulk viscosities in the core of the neutron stars, except for n ∼ 2n{sub 0} when the opening of the Urca processes takes place.

  3. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding Disorders Blood Cancers Blood Clots Blood Clotting and Pregnancy Clots and ... Increased maternal age Other medical illness (e.g., cancer, infection) back to top How are Blood Clots ...

  4. Biology of Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mail Facebook TwitterTitle Google+ LinkedIn Home Blood Disorders Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Medical Dictionary Also ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Components of Blood ...

  5. Blood (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Print A A A ... about the mysterious, life-sustaining fluid called blood. Blood Basics Two types of blood vessels carry blood ...

  6. Blood Facts and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Blood > Blood Facts and Statistics Printable Version Blood Facts and Statistics Facts about blood needs Facts ... about American Red Cross Blood Services Facts about blood needs Every two seconds someone in the U.S. ...

  7. Catecholamine blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norepinephrine -- blood; Epinephrine -- blood; Adrenalin -- blood; Dopamine -- blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... the test. This is especially true if both blood and urine catecholamines are to be measured. You ...

  8. Time Dependent and Steady Uni-axial Elongational Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens K.; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Here we present measurements of transient and steady uni-axial elongational viscosity, using the Filament Stretching Rheometer1 or FSR1 (see Fig. 1) of the following melts: Four narrow MMD polystyrene (PS) samples with weight-average molar mass Mw in the range of 50k to 390k. Three different bi......-disperse samples, mixed from the narrow MMD PS. Two low-density polyethylene (LDPE) melts (Lupolen 1840D and 3020D). A steady-state viscosity was kept for 1-2.5 Hencky strain units in all measurements....

  9. RECENT PROGRESS IN NONLINEAR EDDY-VISCOSITY TURBULENCE MODELING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符松; 郭阳; 钱炜祺; 王辰

    2003-01-01

    This article presents recent progresses in turbulence modeling in the Unit for Turbulence Simulation in the Department of Engineering Mechanics at Tsinghua University. The main contents include: compact Non-Linear Eddy-Viscosity Model (NLEVM) based on the second-moment closure, near-wall low-Re non-linear eddy-viscosity model and curvature sensitive turbulence model.The models have been validated in a wide range of complex flow test cases and the calculated results show that the present models exhibited overall good performance.

  10. Mathematical Viscosity Models for Ternary Metallic and Silicate Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yuan-kun; MENG Xian-min; GUO Han-jie

    2004-01-01

    The mathematical viscosity models for metallic melts were discussed. The experimental data of Ag-Au-Cu systems were used to verify the models based on Chou's general geometric thermodynamic model and the calculated results are consistent with the reported experimental data. A new model predicting the viscosity of multi-component silicate melts was established. The CaO-MnO-SiO2, CaO-FeO-SiO2 and FeO-MnO-SiO2 silicate slag systems were used to verify the model.

  11. Bianchi Type Ⅲ String Cosmological Model with Bulk Viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xing-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    The Bianchi type Ⅲ cosmological model for a cloud string with bulk viscosity are presented. To obtaina determinate model, an equation of state p = κλ and a relation between metric potentials B = Cn are assumed. Thephysical and geometric aspects of the model are also discussed. The model describes a shearing non-rotating continuouslyexpanding universe with a big-bang start, and the relation between the coefficient of bulk viscosity and the energy densityis ζ∝1 p1/2.

  12. Viscosity-Induced Crossing of the Phantom Barrier

    CERN Document Server

    Brevik, Iver

    2015-01-01

    We show explicitly, by using astrophysical data plus reasonable assumptions for the bulk viscosity in the cosmic fluid, how the magnitude of this viscosity may be high enough to drive the fluid from its position in the quintessence region at present time $t=0$ across the barrier $w=-1$ into the phantom region in the late universe. The phantom barrier is accordingly not a sharp mathematical divide, but rather a fuzzy concept. We also calculate the limiting forms of various thermodynamical quantities, including the rate of entropy production, for a dark energy fluid near the future Big Rip singularity.

  13. Poloidal and parallel plasma viscosities in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The poloidal and parallel plasma viscosities in tokamak geometry in Hamada coordinates are calculated from the drift kinetic equation, including a large mass flow velocity without imposing the usual constraint that VpB/(vtiBp) be small. Here, Vp is the poloidal plasma flow velocity, vti is the ion thermal speed, B is the magnetic field strength, and Bp is the poloidal magnetic field strength. With this extended validity, the poloidal and parallel viscosities are useful in modeling the radial electric field in the edge region of a tokamak in the enhanced confinement regime

  14. Changing shapes and implied viscosities of suspended submicron particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    2015-03-01

    area. Numerical modeling was used to estimate the particle viscosity associated with this flow. Based on particle diameter and RH exposure time, the viscosity dropped from 10(8.7±2.0 to 10(7.0±2.0 Pa s (2σ for an increase in RH from < 5 to 58% at 293 K, corresponding to a solid to semisolid transition for the organic material. These results imply that the equilibration of the chemical composition of the particle phase with the gas phase can shift from hours at mid-range RH to weeks for low RH.

  15. An overview of Viscosity Solutions of Path-Dependent PDEs

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Zhenjie; Touzi, Nizar; Zhang, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the recently developed notion of viscosity solutions of path-dependent partial di erential equations. We start by a quick review of the Crandall- Ishii notion of viscosity solutions, so as to motivate the relevance of our de nition in the path-dependent case. We focus on the wellposedness theory of such equations. In partic- ular, we provide a simple presentation of the current existence and uniqueness arguments in the semilinear case. We also review the sta...

  16. Quantifying the Efficiency Advantages of High Viscosity Index Hydraulic Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian D. Neveu; Michael D. Zink; Alex Tsay

    2006-01-01

    By providing higher in- use viscosity at elevated operating temperatures, hydraulic fluids with high viscosity index improve the efficiency of the hydraulic system. For mobile hydraulic equipment this efficiency can be quantified as an increase in fuel economy. This paper reviews the research that demonstrates these efficiency advantages in gear, vane and piston pumps and presents a method for predicting the overall fuel economy for a fleet of hydraulic equipment in opquipment operator to easily improve the performance of the system and reduce fuel consumption.

  17. Non-equilibrium Spacetime Thermodynamics, Entanglement viscosity and KSS bound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chirco, G; Eling, C; Liberati, S, E-mail: chirco@sissa.it, E-mail: eling@sissa.it, E-mail: liberati@sissa.it [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy) and INFN Sezione di Trieste (Italy)

    2011-09-22

    We propose a dual lower dimensional description of the vacuum state associated to a strongly coupled CFT living on Rindler wedge slice close to the horizon hypersurface. From this field theory, with a linear response approach, we show the possibility to derive an entanglement horizon viscosity via a holographic Kubo formula in terms of a two-point function of the stress tensor of matter fields in the bulk. The entanglement viscosity over entropy density ratio come out to satisfy the universal Kovtun-Son-Starinets (KSS) value 1/4{pi} in four dimensions, suggesting the universal ratio may be a fundamental property of quantum entanglement.

  18. Effect of magnetic field-dependent viscosity on revolving ferrofluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of magnetic field-dependent viscosity on the revolving axi-symmetric steady flow of ferrofluid in a disc is investigated by solving the boundary layer equations using Neuringer-Rosenweig model. Besides numerically calculating the velocity components and pressure for different values of magnetic field-dependent viscosity with variation in dimensionless parameter α (Karman's parameter), we also have calculated the thickness of the boundary layer and the total volume flowing outward the z-axis. Here, the solutions of non-linear differential equations are obtained in the form of asymptotic series.

  19. Effect of magnetic field-dependent viscosity on revolving ferrofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram, Paras, E-mail: parasram_nit@yahoo.co.i [Department of Mathematics, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra (India); Bhandari, Anupam, E-mail: pankaj.anupam6@gmail.co [Department of Mathematics, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra (India); Sharma, Kushal [Department of Mathematics, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra (India)

    2010-11-15

    The effect of magnetic field-dependent viscosity on the revolving axi-symmetric steady flow of ferrofluid in a disc is investigated by solving the boundary layer equations using Neuringer-Rosenweig model. Besides numerically calculating the velocity components and pressure for different values of magnetic field-dependent viscosity with variation in dimensionless parameter {alpha} (Karman's parameter), we also have calculated the thickness of the boundary layer and the total volume flowing outward the z-axis. Here, the solutions of non-linear differential equations are obtained in the form of asymptotic series.

  20. Shear viscosity from a large-Nc NJL model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the shear viscosity to entropy ratio within the vicinity of the chiral phase transition/crossover using the NJL model in a large-Nc expansion. As heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC in combination with hydrodynamic simulations suggest, this ratio is close to the AdS/CFT benchmark. This indicates a strongly correlated state of matter produced in such collisions. We study in detail the non-perturbative structure of the NJL model and the question if resummation techniques are required. In the large-Nc expansion next-to-leading-order contributions to the shear viscosity are derived.

  1. Effect of viscosity on seismic response of waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic response of liquid-storage tanks subjected to harmonic excitations and earthquake ground motions has been studied. A rigid tank of negligible mass, rigidly supported at the base having a diameter of 50 ft. and fluid height of 20.4 ft. was used in the computer analysis. The liquid is assumed to have a density of 1.5 g/ml. Viscosity values, μ = 60, 200, 100, and 10,000 cP, were used in the numerical analyses to study the effects of viscosity on sloshing wave height, impulsive and convective pressure on the tank wall, base shear and base moments. Harmonic excitations as well as earthquake ground motions were used as input motions. The harmonic excitations used in the analyses covers a wide range of frequencies, including both the resonant and non-resonant frequencies. Two earthquake motions were used. One matches the Newmark-Hall median response spectrum and is anchored at 0.24 g for a rock site with a damping of 2% and a time duration of 10 s. The other is the 1978 Tabas earthquake which had a peak ZPA of 0.81 g and a time duration of 29 s. A small tank, about 1/15 the size of the typical waste storage tank, was used in the harmonic excitation study to investigate the effect of viscosity on the response of liquid-storage tanks and how the viscosity effect is affected by the size of the storage tank. The results of this study show that for the typical waste storage tank subjected to earthquake motions, the effect of viscosity on sloshing wave height and impulsive and convective pressures is very small and can be neglected. For viscosity effect to become noticeable in the response of the typical waste storage tank, the waste viscosity must be greater than 10,000 cP. This value is far greater than the estimated viscosity value of the high level wastes, which may range from 60 to 200 cP for some tanks

  2. Viscosity of a binary mixture: Approach to the hydrodynamic limit

    OpenAIRE

    McPhie, M. G.; Daivis, P. J.; Snook, I.K.

    2006-01-01

    We have used equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to study the solute self-diffusion coefficient and the shear rate dependence of the solution viscosity in solutions of model nanocolloidal particles that range in mass ratio from mu=1 up to mu=50 and size ratio from s=1 up to s=4.03 at various concentrations. The zero shear rate viscosities and the initial rates of shear thinning were determined from data in the shear rate region in which the suspension is strongly she...

  3. Effect of viscosity on seismic response of waste storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yu; Uras, R.A.; Chang, Yao-Wen.

    1992-06-01

    The dynamic response of liquid-storage tanks subjected to harmonic excitations and earthquake ground motions has been studied. A rigid tank of negligible mass, rigidly supported at the base having a diameter of 50 ft. and fluid height of 20.4 ft. was used in the computer analysis. The liquid is assumed to have a density of 1.5 g/ml. Viscosity values, {mu} = 60, 200, 100, and 10,000 cP, were used in the numerical analyses to study the effects of viscosity on sloshing wave height, impulsive and convective pressure on the tank wall, base shear and base moments. Harmonic excitations as well as earthquake ground motions were used as input motions. The harmonic excitations used in the analyses covers a wide range of frequencies, including both the resonant and non-resonant frequencies. Two earthquake motions were used. One matches the Newmark-Hall median response spectrum and is anchored at 0.24 g for a rock site with a damping of 2% and a time duration of 10 s. The other is the 1978 Tabas earthquake which had a peak ZPA of 0.81 g and a time duration of 29 s. A small tank, about 1/15 the size of the typical waste storage tank, was used in the harmonic excitation study to investigate the effect of viscosity on the response of liquid-storage tanks and how the viscosity effect is affected by the size of the storage tank. The results of this study show that for the typical waste storage tank subjected to earthquake motions, the effect of viscosity on sloshing wave height and impulsive and convective pressures is very small and can be neglected. For viscosity effect to become noticeable in the response of the typical waste storage tank, the waste viscosity must be greater than 10,000 cP. This value is far greater than the estimated viscosity value of the high level wastes, which may range from 60 to 200 cP for some tanks.

  4. NVP melt/magma viscosity: insight on Mercury lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Stefano; Morgavi, Daniele; Namur, Olivier; Vetere, Francesco; Perugini, Diego; Mancinelli, Paolo; Pauselli, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    After more than four years of orbiting Mercury, NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft came to an end in late April 2015. MESSENGER has provided many new and surprising results. This session will again highlight the latest results on Mercury based on MESSENGER observations or updated modelling. The session will further address instrument calibration and science performance both retrospective on MESSENGER and on the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission. Papers covering additional themes related to Mercury are also welcomed. Please be aware that this session will be held as a PICO session. This will allow an intensive exchange of expertise and experience between the individual instruments and mission. NVP melt/magma viscosity: insight on Mercury lava flows S. Rossi1, D. Morgavi1, O. Namur2, D. Perugini1, F.Vetere1, P. Mancinelli1 and C. Pauselli1 1 Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, piazza Università 1, 06123 Perugia, Italy 2 Uni Hannover Institut für Mineralogie, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Callinstraβe 3, 30167 Hannover, Germany In this contribution we report new measurements of viscosity of synthetic komatitic melts, used the behaviour of silicate melts erupted at the surface of Mercury. Composition of Mercurian surface magmas was calculated using the most recent maps produced from MESSENGER XRS data (Weider et al., 2015). We focused on the northern hemisphere (Northern Volcanic Province, NVP, the largest lava flow on Mercury and possibly in the Solar System) for which the spatial resolution of MESSENGER measurements is high and individual maps of Mg/Si, Ca/Si, Al/Si and S/Si were combined. The experimental starting material contains high Na2O content (≈7 wt.%) that strongly influences viscosity. High temperature viscosity measurements were carried out at 1 atm using a concentric cylinder apparatus equipped with an Anton Paar RheolabQC viscometer head at the Department of Physics and Geology (PVRG_lab) at the University of Perugia (Perugia, Italy

  5. Viscosity-Induced Crossing of the Phantom Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iver Brevik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We show explicitly, by using astrophysical data plus reasonable assumptions for the bulk viscosity in the cosmic fluid, how the magnitude of this viscosity may be high enough to drive the fluid from its position in the quintessence region at present time t = 0 across the barrier w = −1 into the phantom region in the late universe. The phantom barrier is accordingly not a sharp mathematical divide, but rather a fuzzy concept. We also calculate the limiting forms of various thermodynamical quantities, including the rate of entropy production, for a dark energy fluid near the future Big Rip singularity.

  6. VARIATION IN MEAT COMPOSITION VISCOSITY DURING THE MIXING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA IANIłCHI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Animal raw material processing is directly influenced by the physical and chemical characteristics of the materials which also influence their water holding capacity. The various combinations and status of the raw materials used in the food industry determine specific behaviours that may influence the processing equipment performance and construction. The study on meat composition viscosity depending upon the added components, temperature and mixing time length, has shown that viscosity is increasing with lower added water percentage, lower mixing temperature and higher mixing time length.

  7. Lipid Bilayer Domain Fluctuations as a Probe of Membrane Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camley, Brian A.; Esposito, Cinzia; Baumgart, Tobias; Brown, Frank L.H.

    2010-01-01

    We argue that membrane viscosity, ηm, plays a prominent role in the thermal fluctuation dynamics of micron-scale lipid domains. A theoretical expression is presented for the timescales of domain shape relaxation, which reduces to the well-known ηm = 0 result of Stone and McConnell in the limit of large domain sizes. Experimental measurements of domain dynamics on the surface of ternary phospholipid and cholesterol vesicles confirm the theoretical results and suggest domain flicker spectroscopy as a convenient means to simultaneously measure both the line tension, σ, and the membrane viscosity, ηm, governing the behavior of individual lipid domains. PMID:20858410

  8. Viscosity of high crystal content melts: dependence on solid fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, A

    2005-01-01

    The rheological properties of suspensions containing high solid fractions are investigated. Attention is focused on viscosity of silicate and magmatic melt systems. A general empirical equation which describes the relative viscosity of suspensions as a function of suspended solid fraction is proposed. In the limit of very dilute solid concentrations it reduces to the Einstein equation. The proposed relationship is satisfactorily applied to reproduce available experimental data relative to silicate melts. Moreover, the extrapolation of the model to very high concentrations is compared with experimental observations on partially-melted granite.

  9. Viscosities and viscosity deviations of binary mixtures of biodiesel + petrodiesel (or n-hexadecane at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. R. Mesquita

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Viscosities of four binaries mixtures [soybean biodiesel + diesel oil (or n-hexadecane and coconut biodiesel + diesel oil (or n-hexadecane] have been determined at T = (293.15, 313.15, 333.15, 353.15, 373.15 K and atmospheric pressure over the entire composition range. Experimental data were fitted to the Andrade equation and the adjustable parameters and the standard deviations between experimental and calculated values were estimated. From the experimental data, the viscosity deviations, , were calculated by using the Redlich - Kister polynomial equation. The comparison between experimental data determined in this work and four predictive methods used for the estimation of viscosities of biodiesel fuels (based on their fatty acid composition is discussed.

  10. Rheology of Blood by NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Song-I.; Marseille, Oliver; Gehlen, Christa; Blümich, Bernhard

    2001-09-01

    Pipe flow of blood in tubes of 1 and 7 mm inner diameter, respectively, was investigated employing two-dimensional NMR velocity imaging and PFG propagator measurements at different Reynolds numbers between 10 and 3500. The results are compared to flow of a water/glycerol mixture of matching viscosity under identical conditions. The transition from laminar to turbulent flow is observed by both a flattening of the velocity profile and a change of the propagator shape. For blood flow this transition is found to be shifted toward higher Reynolds numbers as compared to the transition of the water/glycerol mixture. This observation is in agreement with predictions from hydraulic measurements and is a consequence of the non-Newtonian flow characteristics of blood as a suspension of erythrocytes and plasma. Likewise, a deviation from the laminar flow condition is observed for blood at low Reynolds numbers between 10 and 100. This phenomenon is unknown for Newtonian liquids and is explained by the onset of a geometrical arrangement of the erythrocytes, the so-called rouleaux effect.

  11. Numerical simulation of the blood flow behavior in the circle of Willis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razavi Seyyed Esmail

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper represents the numerical simulation of blood flow in the circle of Willis (CoW. Circle of Willis is responsible for the oxygenated blood distribution into the cerebral mass. To investigate the blood behavior, two Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscosity models were considered and the results were compared under steady state conditions. Methods: Methodologically, the arterial geometry was obtained using 3D magnetic resonance angiography (MRA data. The blood flow through the cerebral vasculature was considered to be steady and laminar, and the Galerkin’s finite element method was applied to solve the systems of non-linear Navier-Stokes equations. Results: Flow patterns including flow rates and shear rates were obtained through the simulation. The minimal magnitude of shear rates was much greater than 100 s-1 through the larger arteries; thus, the non-Newtonian blood viscosity tended to approach the constant limit of infinite shear viscosity through the CoW. So, in larger arteries the non-Newtonian nature of blood was less dominant and it would be treated as a Newtonian fluid. The only exception was the anterior communicating artery (ACoA in which the blood flow showed different behavior for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian cases. Conclusion: By comparing the results it was concluded that the Newtonian viscosity assumption of blood flow through the healthy, complete circle of Willis under the normal and steady conditions would be acceptably accurate.

  12. Heat Transfer in Hydromagnetic Fluid Flow: Study of Temperature Dependence of Fluid Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Shit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow of a viscoelastic fluid through a channel with stretching walls in the presence of a magnetic field has been investigated. The viscosity of the fluid is assumed to vary with temperature. Convective heat transfer is considered along with viscous dissipation and Ohmic dissipation. The equations that govern the motion of the fluid and heat transfer are coupled and non-linear. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformation. The transformed equations subject to the boundary conditions are solved by developing a suitable finite difference scheme. Numerical estimates of the flow and heat transfer variables are obtained by considering blood as the working fluid. The computational values are found to be in good agreement with those of previous studies.

  13. A Clinical Study on Treatment of Senile Psoriasis by Replenishing Qi to Activate Blood--A Report of 40 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪普; 谭奇纹; 刘华昌

    2004-01-01

    40 cases of senile psoriasis were treated by the therapeutic principle of replenishing qi to activate blood,and the changes of T lymphocyte subgroups and indexes of haemorheology were observed. The results showed that CD4 was significantly increased, CDs significantly decreased, and the CD4/CD8 ratio significantly raised; and that the specific viscosity of whole blood at high shearing rate, and at low shearing rate, the specific viscosity of plasma, packed cell volume, and fibrinogen all significantly decreased after treatment. It is therefore concluded that the therapeutic method of replenishing qi to activate blood can exert an effect of improving immunologic function and blood circulation.

  14. Measuring Viscosity with a Levitating Magnet: Application to Complex Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, C.; Bouquet, F.; Remond, J.; Deloche, B.

    2009-01-01

    As an experimental project proposed to students in fourth year of university, a viscometer was developed, consisting of a small magnet levitating in a viscous fluid. The viscous force acting on the magnet is directly measured: viscosities in the range 10-10[superscript 6] mPa s are obtained. This experiment is used as an introduction to complex…

  15. Phase and viscosity behaviour of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Garcia, J.; Fernandez, J.;

    2005-01-01

    , mainly as a function of the molecular asymmetry. This also has a profound effect in the mixture transport properties. Thus, in this work the general aspects of phase and viscosity behaviour linked to the type of asymmetry found in refrigerant-lubricant mixtures are discussed in the context of phase...

  16. Electrical conductivity and viscosity of borosilicate glasses and melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrt, Doris; Keding, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    by impedance measurements in a wide temperature range (250 to 1450°C). The activation energies were calculated by Arrhenius plots in various temperature regions: below the glass transition temperature, Tg, above the melting point, Tl, and between Tg and Tl. Viscosity measurements were carried out...

  17. Viscosity solutions of fully nonlinear functional parabolic PDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wei-an

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available By the technique of coupled solutions, the notion of viscosity solutions is extended to fully nonlinear retarded parabolic equations. Such equations involve many models arising from optimal control theory, economy and finance, biology, and so forth. The comparison principle is shown. Then the existence and uniqueness are established by the fixed point theory.

  18. Elongational viscosity of monodisperse and bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    2005-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for two monodisperse polystyrene melts with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole (PS52K) and 103 kg/mole (PS103K), and for three bidisperse polystyrene melts. The bidisperse melts consist of PS103K or PS52K and a monodisperse...... (closed loop proportional regulator) using the laser in such a way that the stretch rate at the neck is kept constant. The rheometer has been described in more detail in (A. Bach, H.K. Rasmussen and O. Hassager, Journal of Rheology, 47 (2003) 429). PS390K show a decrease in the steady viscosity as a power......-law function of the elongational rate (A. Bach, K. Almdal, H.K. Rasmussen and O. Hassager, Macromolecules 36 (2003) 5174). PS52K and PS103K show that the steady viscosity has a maximum that is respectively 100% and 50% above 3 times the zero-shear-rate viscosity. The bidisperse melts show a significant...

  19. Upper mantle viscosity and lithospheric thickness under Iceland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnhoorn, A.; Wal, W. van der; Drury, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Deglaciation during the Holocene on Iceland caused uplift due to glacial isostatic adjustment. Relatively low estimates for the upper mantle viscosity and lithospheric thickness result in rapid uplift responses to the deglaciation cycles on Iceland. The relatively high temperatures of the upper mant

  20. Viscosity changes in hyaluronic acid: irradiation and rheological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a significant component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and synovial fluid. Measurements of viscosity and shear stresses at different shear rates are made with rotational viscometers on HA solutions of different concentrations (0.01% - 1% wbv) subjected to doses of 6 MV photon radiation ranging from 0 - 15 Gy. It is found that there is a dose-dependent relationship between viscosity and shear rate, viscosity reducing with radiation dose, this being related to polymer scissions via the action of radiation-induced free radicals. The dependency appears to become weaker at higher concentrations, possibly due to the contribution to viscosity from polymer entanglement becoming dominant over that from mean molecular weight. HA rheology is also found to be adequately described by a power law equation over the shear rate range 0 - 1000 s-1, where the consistency factor K2 = 3.497 ± 0.151 Pa.sn and n = 0.524 ± 0.015

  1. The universal viscosity to entropy density ratio from entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Chirco, Goffredo; Liberati, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    We present evidence that the universal Kovtun-Son-Starinets shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of 1/4\\pi can be associated with a Rindler causal horizon in flat spacetime. Since there is no known holographic (gauge/gravity) duality for this spacetime, a natural microscopic explanation for this viscosity is in the peculiar properties of quantum entanglement. In particular, it is well-known that the Minkowski vacuum state is a thermal state and carries an area entanglement entropy density in the Rindler spacetime. Based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we expect a similar notion of viscosity arising from vacuum fluctuations. Therefore, we propose a holographic Kubo formula in terms of a two-point function of the stress tensor of matter fields in the bulk. We calculate this viscosity assuming a minimally coupled scalar field theory and find that the ratio with respect to the entanglement entropy density is exactly 1/4\\pi in four dimensions. The issues that arise in extending this result to non-minim...

  2. Steady-shear viscosity of stirred yogurts with varying ropiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marle, van M.E.; Ende, van den D.; Kruif, de C.G.; Mellema, J.

    1999-01-01

    Stirred yogurt was viewed as a concentrated dispersion of aggregates consisting of protein particles. The steady-shear behavior of three types of stirred yogurt with varying ropiness was investigated experimentally. To describe the shear-dependent viscosity, a microrheological model was used which w

  3. Increased cytoplasm viscosity hampers aggregate polar segregation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Samuel M D; Neeli-Venkata, Ramakanth; Goncalves, Nadia S M; Santinha, João A; Martins, Leonardo; Tran, Huy; Mäkelä, Jarno; Gupta, Abhishekh; Barandas, Marilia; Häkkinen, Antti; Lloyd-Price, Jason; Fonseca, José M; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2016-02-01

    In Escherichia coli, under optimal conditions, protein aggregates associated with cellular aging are excluded from midcell by the nucleoid. We study the functionality of this process under sub-optimal temperatures from population and time lapse images of individual cells and aggregates and nucleoids within. We show that, as temperature decreases, aggregates become homogeneously distributed and uncorrelated with nucleoid size and location. We present evidence that this is due to increased cytoplasm viscosity, which weakens the anisotropy in aggregate displacements at the nucleoid borders that is responsible for their preference for polar localisation. Next, we show that in plasmolysed cells, which have increased cytoplasm viscosity, aggregates are also not preferentially located at the poles. Finally, we show that the inability of cells with increased viscosity to exclude aggregates from midcell results in enhanced aggregate concentration in between the nucleoids in cells close to dividing. This weakens the asymmetries in aggregate numbers between sister cells of subsequent generations required for rejuvenating cell lineages. We conclude that the process of exclusion of protein aggregates from midcell is not immune to stress conditions affecting the cytoplasm viscosity. The findings contribute to our understanding of E. coli's internal organisation and functioning, and its fragility to stressful conditions. PMID:26507787

  4. Magnetic microrheometer for in situ characterization of coating viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jin-Oh; Henry, Robert M; Jacobs, Ryan M; Francis, Lorraine F

    2010-09-01

    A magnetic microrheometer has been designed to characterize the local viscosity of liquid-applied coatings in situ during solidification. The apparatus includes NdFeB magnets mounted on computer-controlled micropositioners for the manipulation of ∼1 μm diameter superparamagnetic particles in the coating. Magnetic field gradients at 20-70 T/m are generated by changing magnet size and the gap distance between the magnets. A specimen stage located between two magnets is outfitted with a heater and channels to control process conditions (temperature and air flow), and a digital optical microscope lens above the stage is used to monitor the probe particle position. Validation studies with glycerol and polyimide precursor solution showed that microrheometry results match traditional bulk rheometry within an error of 5%. The viscosities of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) solution and polyimide precursor solution coatings were measured at different shear rates (0.01-5 s(-1)) by adjusting the magnetic field gradient. The effect of proximity to the substrate on the particle motion was characterized and compared with theoretical predictions. The magnetic microrheometer was used to characterize the time-viscosity profile of PVA coatings during drying at several temperatures. The viscosity range measured by the apparatus was 0.1-20 Pa s during drying of coatings at temperatures between room temperature and 80 °C. PMID:20886990

  5. Almost Periodic Viscosity Solutions of Nonlinear Parabolic Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shilin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We generalize the comparison result 2007 on Hamilton-Jacobi equations to nonlinear parabolic equations, then by using Perron's method to study the existence and uniqueness of time almost periodic viscosity solutions of nonlinear parabolic equations under usual hypotheses.

  6. Morphological investigations of viscose fibers by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Viscose fibers are used in textiles, hygiene products, and medical applications. The fibers are spun from a viscose solution of cellulose. Their cross-section is shaped by spinning the viscose solution through a spinneret, thus forming the fibers. The water absorption is an important property in the applications mentioned. Here, two samples of viscose fibers were investigated, which showed different behavior under water absorption. The samples were produced under similar conditions and therefore morphological investigations were of interest. In this study, the morphology of samples with high and low water absorption were compared. The surface was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in tapping mode. A comprehensive roughness analysis, including height-height correlation function (HHCF), showed no significant differences in the roughness parameters. On the surface of all samples, trenches could be observed and further investigation of these trenches was conducted. Depth and length distribution were similar, but the angle distribution, as well as trench density were different. From this result we conclude that the trench alignment and density are the main differences in morphology between the two ber types, which might explain their different water absorption. (author)

  7. Relook on fitting of viscosity with undercooling of glassy liquids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Chattopadhyay; S Sangal; K Mondal

    2014-02-01

    The present approach is on the modification of viscosity fitting of undercooled liquid as a function of undercooling. The method consists of finding analytical solution of three arbitrary constants of the Vogel–Fulcher–Tamman (VFT) equation by choosing three viscosity data at three critical temperatures for an undercooled liquid. Three critical temperatures are liquidus temperature (l), crystallization onset temperature (x) and glass transition temperature (g). The experimental viscosity data at or very near to these three critical temperatures (depending on the availability in literature) have been utilized to achieve the analytical solution. The analytical solution of VFT equation is further examined by selecting the experimental data points away from the critical temperatures in order to check their (l, x and g) significance towards the solution. Total absolute error (TAE) and total squared error (TSE) values obtained from the present method with respect to the experimental viscosity data in the temperature range between l and g are very much comparable and in most of the cases lower than that of existing `best-fit' cited in the literature for a number of glassy alloys. Moreover, this method interestingly enables us to find the fragility parameters for a number of glassy alloys and convincingly explain their true glass forming abilities (GFA).

  8. Iterative Method for Intrinsic Viscosity Measurements on Perpendicular Recording Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Phan Le; Lodder, Cock

    2002-01-01

    We introduce a new method that allows one to directly measure the intrinsic viscosity (S/sub i/) for perpendicular media using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The measurement is carried out in a number of iterations. In each iteration, the behavior of applied field (H/sub a/) with time is gradually

  9. Effective viscosity of non-gravitactic Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii microswimmer suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Mussler, Matthias; Peyla, Philippe; Wagner, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Active microswimmers are known to affect the macroscopic viscosity of suspensions in a more complex manner than passive particles. For puller-like microswimmers an increase in the viscosity has been observed. It has been suggested that the persistence of the orientation of the microswimmers hinders the rotation that is normally caused by the vorticity. It was previously shown that some sorts of algaes are bottom-heavy swimmers, i.e. their centre of mass is not located in the centre of the body. In this way, the algae affects the vorticity of the flow when it is perpendicular oriented to the axis of gravity. This orientation of gravity to vorticity is given in a rheometer that is equipped with a cone-plate geometry. Here we present measurements of the viscosity both in a cone-plate and a Taylor-Couette cell. The two set-ups yielded the same increase in viscosity although the axis of gravitation in the Taylor-Couette cell is parallel to the direction of vorticity. In a complementary experiment we tested the ori...

  10. Considerations of viscosity in the preliminaries to mammalian fertilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Ronald H F; Coy, P; Gadea, J; Rath, D

    2011-03-01

    Migration of spermatozoa in the female genital tract will be strongly influenced by the viscosity of the fluids encountered, yet little systematic analysis has been given to such a consideration. This essay reviews the series of milieux confronting a fertilising sperm during its progression to the oviduct ampulla. Two groups are discussed, first those in which ejaculation is into the vagina, second those in which semen enters the uterus during a protracted mating. Viscous glycoprotein secretions that accumulate in the oviduct isthmus of both groups before ovulation are highlighted, as is the environment generated in the ampulla by the post-ovulatory suspension of oocyte(s), cumulus cells and spermatozoa; follicular and peritoneal fluids may also be present. The viscosity of all female tract fluids responds to cyclical variations in temperature, and these exist within the oviduct near the time of ovulation. Gradations in viscosity influence the pattern and strength of sperm flagellar activity and the rate of forward movement. Measurements of sperm motility are currently made in a physiological medium of constant viscosity and temperature, thereby overlooking changes in the female genital tract. A more sophisticated approach might reveal an adequate fertilising potential in a proportion of putatively poor semen samples. PMID:21234667

  11. High sperm chromatin stability in semen with high viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, G F; Sánchez, A

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of high semen viscosity on sperm chromatin stability. Semen samples obtained from men with normal and high viscosity were studied. Sperm chromatin stability was tested by exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) only and SDS together with a zinc-chelating agent, disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetate (SDS+EDTA). After SDS incubation, stable sperm was 61.36 +/- 3.0 and 54.71 +/- 3.42% for normal and high semen viscosity, respectively (P:NS), and after SDS+EDTA, it was further reduced to 12.48 +/- 0.99% in semen samples with normal consistency and in a less magnitude in semen samples with high viscosity (25.6 +/- 5.2). Comparing values obtained in SDS+EDTA, a high sperm stability was observed in samples with hyperviscosity (p hyperviscosity is associated with a high sperm chromatin stability in situations when a zinc-chelating agent is present. PMID:8122934

  12. Effective viscosity in quantum turbulence: a steady-state approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babuin, Simone; Varga, E.; Skrbek, L.; Lévêque, E.; Roche, P.-E.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 2 (2014), "24006-1"-"24006-6". ISSN 0295-5075 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : quantum turbulence * effective viscosity * superfluid hydrodynamics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.095, year: 2014

  13. Viscosity measurement of alkali chlorides with capillary viscometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viscosities of molten alkali chlorides have been measured by means of newly designed capillary viscometer made of fused quartz as shown in Fig. 1 and combined with a special transparent electric furnace which can be inverted. The viscometer was of a suspended level type and designed so as to minimize the error associated with the measurement, e.g., the effect of surface tension. Reynolds number of the capillary was less than 100. The sample was introduced into the viscometer through the quartz filter and then sealed under vacuum. Cell constants of the viscometer were determined by using distilled water as a calibration liquid. Efflux times were measured by direct visual observation using a digital stopwatch, and showed excellent reproducibility. The viscometer in the present investigation proved to be very precise and the errors accompanied were considered to be less than 0.7%. Viscosities obtained are collected in Table 1 and Figs. 3-1 -- 3-5 together with the previous data. Whereas the viscosity did not necessarily show any regularity, the activation energy for viscous flow increased with increasing cation size in the series of molten alkali chlorides. On the basis of a hard sphere model, the sizes of the flow units were considered to be nearly equal to those of cation-anion pairs. The viscosity of each molten alkali chloride at melting temperature increased with an increasing ratio of the flow unit volume to the hole volume. (author)

  14. Bubble Coalescence: Effect of Bubble Approach Velocity and Liquid Viscosity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Orvalho, Sandra; Růžička, Marek; Olivieri, G.; Marzocchella, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 134, SEP 29 (2015), s. 205-216. ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubble coalescence * bubble approach velocity * liquid viscosity Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.337, year: 2014

  15. Temperature Dependence of Viscosities of Common Carrier Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Trent S.; Nahir, Tal M.

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidence for the dependence of viscosities of the real gases on temperature is described, suggesting that this dependence is greater than that predicted by the kinetic theory of gases. The experimental results were obtained using common modern instrumentation and could be reproduced by students in analytical or…

  16. Density, viscosity, and saturated vapor pressure of ethyl trifluoroacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Density of ethyl trifluoroacetate was measured and its thermal expansion coefficient was determined. • Viscosity of ethyl trifluoroacetate was measured and fitted to the Andrade equation. • Saturated vapor pressure of ethyl trifluoroacetate was reported. • The Clausius–Clapeyron equation was used to calculate the molar evaporation enthalpy of ethyl trifluoroacetate. - Abstract: The properties of ethyl trifluoroacetate (CF3COOCH2CH3) were measured as a function of temperature: density (278.08 to 322.50) K, viscosity (293.45 to 334.32) K, saturated vapor pressure (293.35 to 335.65) K. The density data were fitted to a quadratic polynomial equation, and the viscosity data were regressed to the Andrade equation. The correlation coefficient (R2) of equations for density and viscosity are 0.9997 and 0.9999, respectively. The correlation between saturated vapor pressures and temperatures was achieved with a maximum absolute relative deviation of 0.142%. In addition, the molar evaporation enthalpy in the range of T = (293.35 to 335.65) K was estimated by the Clausius–Clapeyron equation

  17. Viscosity and Electrical Conductivity of Concentrated Solutions of Soluble Coffee

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobolík, Václav; Žitný, R.; Tovčigrečko, Valentin; Delgado, M.; Allaf, K.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2002), s. 93-98. ISSN 0260-8774 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921; CEZ:MSM 212200008 Keywords : coffee extract * soluble coffee * viscosity Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.085, year: 2002

  18. Glass viscosity calculation based on a global statistical modeling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A global statistical glass viscosity model was developed for predicting the complete viscosity curve, based on more than 2200 composition-property data of silicate glasses from the scientific literature, including soda-lime-silica container and float glasses, TV panel glasses, borosilicate fiber wool and E type glasses, low expansion borosilicate glasses, glasses for nuclear waste vitrification, lead crystal glasses, binary alkali silicates, and various further compositions from over half a century. It is shown that within a measurement series from a specific laboratory the reported viscosity values are often over-estimated at higher temperatures due to alkali and boron oxide evaporation during the measurement and glass preparation, including data by Lakatos et al. (1972) and the recently published High temperature glass melt property database for process modeling by Seward et al. (2005). Similarly, in the glass transition range many experimental data of borosilicate glasses are reported too high due to phase separation effects. The developed global model corrects those errors. The model standard error was 9-17 C, with R2 = 0.985-0.989. The prediction 95% confidence interval for glass in mass production largely depends on the glass composition of interest, the composition uncertainty, and the viscosity level. New insights in the mixed-alkali effect are provided

  19. Glass viscosity calculation based on a global statistical modelling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluegel, Alex

    2007-02-01

    A global statistical glass viscosity model was developed for predicting the complete viscosity curve, based on more than 2200 composition-property data of silicate glasses from the scientific literature, including soda-lime-silica container and float glasses, TV panel glasses, borosilicate fiber wool and E type glasses, low expansion borosilicate glasses, glasses for nuclear waste vitrification, lead crystal glasses, binary alkali silicates, and various further compositions from over half a century. It is shown that within a measurement series from a specific laboratory the reported viscosity values are often over-estimated at higher temperatures due to alkali and boron oxide evaporation during the measurement and glass preparation, including data by Lakatos et al. (1972) and the recently published High temperature glass melt property database for process modeling by Seward et al. (2005). Similarly, in the glass transition range many experimental data of borosilicate glasses are reported too high due to phase separation effects. The developed global model corrects those errors. The model standard error was 9-17°C, with R^2 = 0.985-0.989. The prediction 95% confidence interval for glass in mass production largely depends on the glass composition of interest, the composition uncertainty, and the viscosity level. New insights in the mixed-alkali effect are provided.

  20. Bitumen and heavy oil rheological properties: reconciliation with viscosity measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bazyleva, A.B.; Hasan, M.D.A.; Fulem, Michal; Becerra, M.; Shaw, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 3 (2010), s. 1389-1397. ISSN 0021-9568 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Athabasca bitumen * Maya crude oil * rheological properties * viscosity measurements Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.089, year: 2010

  1. On the empirical modelling of nonmonotonous shear viscosity functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    David, Jiří; Filip, Petr

    Florianopolis: Polymer processing society, 2004, s. 549-550. [PPS 2004 Américas Regional Meeting. Florianapolis (BR), 07.11.2004-10.11.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2060202; GA AV ČR KSK2076106 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2060917 Keywords : modelling * nonmonotonous shear * viscosity functions Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  2. Phenomenological modelling of non-monotonous shear viscosity functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    David, Jiří; Filip, Petr

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 2 (2004), s. 82-88. ISSN 1430-6395 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2060202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2060917 Keywords : viscosity * phenomenological modelling * non-monotonous behaviour Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  3. Measurement of viscosity of gaseous mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. J.; Mall, G. H.; Chegini, H.

    1986-01-01

    Coefficients of viscosity of various types of gas mixtures, including simulated natural-gas samples, have been measured at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a modified capillary tube method. Pressure drops across the straight capillary tube section of a thermal mass flowmeter were measured for small, well-defined, volume flow rates for the test gases and for standard air. In this configuration, the flowmeter provides the volumetric flow rates as well as a well-characterized capillary section for differential pressure measurements across it. The coefficients of viscosity of the test gases were calculated using the reported value of 185.6 micro P for the viscosity of air. The coefficients of viscosity for the test mixtures were also calculated using Wilke's approximation of the Chapman-Enskog (C-E) theory. The experimental and calculated values for binary mixtures are in agreement within the reported accuracy of Wilke's approximation of the C-E theory. However, the agreement for multicomponent mixtures is less satisfactory, possible because of the limitations of Wilkes's approximation of the classical dilute-gas state model.

  4. Viscosity of aqueous and cyanate ester suspensions containing alumina nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, Katherine [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The viscosities of both aqueous and cyanate ester monomer (BECy) based suspensions of alumina nanoparticle were studied. The applications for these suspensions are different: aqueous suspensions of alumina nanoparticles are used in the production of technical ceramics made by slip casting or tape casting, and the BECy based suspensions are being developed for use in an injection-type composite repair resin. In the case of aqueous suspensions, it is advantageous to achieve a high solids content with low viscosity in order to produce a high quality product. The addition of a dispersant is useful so that higher solids content suspensions can be used with lower viscosities. For BECy suspensions, the addition of nanoparticles to the BECy resin is expected to enhance the mechanical properties of the cured composite. The addition of saccharides to aqueous suspensions leads to viscosity reduction. Through DSC measurements it was found that the saccharide molecules formed a solution with water and this resulted in lowering the melting temperature of the free water according to classic freezing point depression. Saccharides also lowered the melting temperature of the bound water, but this followed a different rule. The shear thinning and melting behaviors of the suspensions were used to develop a model based on fractal-type agglomeration. It is believed that the structure of the particle flocs in these suspensions changes with the addition of saccharides which leads to the resultant viscosity decrease. The viscosity of the BECy suspensions increased with solids content, and the viscosity increase was greater than predicted by the classical Einstein equation for dilute suspensions. Instead, the Mooney equation fits the viscosity behavior well from 0-20 vol% solids. The viscosity reduction achieved at high particle loadings by the addition of benzoic acid was also investigated by NMR. It appears that the benzoic acid interacts with the surface of the alumina particle which may

  5. Pressure dependent viscosity of Surlyn/montmorillonite nanocomposite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, T.; Lengálová, A.; Zatloukal, M.; Filip, Petr; Sáha, P.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 7 (2004), s. 299-303. ISSN 1465-8011 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2060202 Keywords : pressure coefficient * shear and elongational viscosity * nanocomposites Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.412, year: 2004

  6. Polymer melt viscosity and free volume interconnection: Comparison study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, T.; Filip, Petr; Sáha, P.

    Pretoria : Polymer Processing Society, 2006, B4. [Europe/Africa Meeting of Polymer Processing Society PPS. Pretoria (ZA), 09.10.2006-13.10.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2060202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : polymer melt * pressure-temperature dependent viscosity * PVT behaviour Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  7. On the measurement of elongational viscosity of polyethylene materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švrčinová, Petra; Kharlamov, Alexander; Filip, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 1 (2009), s. 49-57. ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/08/1307 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Elongational viscosity * SER Universal * Testing Platform * LDPE Escorene Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  8. Intermolecular potential parameters and combining rules determined from viscosity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastien, Lucas A.J.; Price, Phillip N.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2010-05-07

    The Law of Corresponding States has been demonstrated for a number of pure substances and binary mixtures, and provides evidence that the transport properties viscosity and diffusion can be determined from a molecular shape function, often taken to be a Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential, that requires two scaling parameters: a well depth {var_epsilon}{sub ij} and a collision diameter {sigma}{sub ij}, both of which depend on the interacting species i and j. We obtain estimates for {var_epsilon}{sub ij} and {sigma}{sub ij} of interacting species by finding the values that provide the best fit to viscosity data for binary mixtures, and compare these to calculated parameters using several 'combining rules' that have been suggested for determining parameter values for binary collisions from parameter values that describe collisions of like molecules. Different combining rules give different values for {sigma}{sub ij} and {var_epsilon}{sub ij} and for some mixtures the differences between these values and the best-fit parameter values are rather large. There is a curve in ({var_epsilon}{sub ij}, {sigma}{sub ij}) space such that parameter values on the curve generate a calculated viscosity in good agreement with measurements for a pure gas or a binary mixture. The various combining rules produce couples of parameters {var_epsilon}{sub ij}, {sigma}{sub ij} that lie close to the curve and therefore generate predicted mixture viscosities in satisfactory agreement with experiment. Although the combining rules were found to underpredict the viscosity in most of the cases, Kong's rule was found to work better than the others, but none of the combining rules consistently yields parameter values near the best-fit values, suggesting that improved rules could be developed.

  9. Individual lipid encapsulated microbubble radial oscillations: Effects of fluid viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfield, Brandon; Chen, Xucai; Qin, Bin; Villanueva, Flordeliza S

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-stimulated microbubble dynamics have been shown to be dependent on intrinsic bubble properties, including size and shell characteristics. The effect of the surrounding environment on microbubble response, however, has been less investigated. In particular, microbubble optimization studies are generally conducted in water/saline, characterized by a 1 cP viscosity, for application in the vasculature (i.e., 4 cP). In this study, ultra-high speed microscopy was employed to investigate fluid viscosity effects on phospholipid encapsulated microbubble oscillations at 1 MHz, using a single, eight-cycle pulse at peak negative pressures of 100 and 250 kPa. Microbubble oscillations were shown to be affected by fluid viscosity in a size- and pressure-dependent manner. In general, the oscillation amplitudes exhibited by microbubbles between 3 and 6 μm in 1 cP fluid were larger than in 4 cP fluid, reaching a maximum of 1.7-fold at 100 kPa for microbubbles 3.8 μm in diameter and 1.35-fold at 250 kPa for microbubbles 4.8 μm in diameter. Simulation results were in broad agreement at 250 kPa, however generally underestimated the effect of fluid viscosity at 100 kPa. This is the first experimental demonstration documenting the effects of surrounding fluid viscosity on microbubble oscillations, resulting in behavior not entirely predicted by current microbubble models. PMID:26827018

  10. A tensor artificial viscosity using a finite element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolev, Tz. V.; Rieben, R. N.

    2009-12-01

    We derive a tensor artificial viscosity suitable for use in a 2D or 3D unstructured arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics code. This work is similar in nature to that of Campbell and Shashkov [1]; however, our approach is based on a finite element discretization that is fundamentally different from the mimetic finite difference framework. The finite element point of view leads to novel insights as well as improved numerical results. We begin with a generalized tensor version of the Von Neumann-Richtmyer artificial viscosity, then convert it to a variational formulation and apply a Galerkin discretization process using high order Gaussian quadrature to obtain a generalized nodal force term and corresponding zonal heating (or shock entropy) term. This technique is modular and is therefore suitable for coupling to a traditional staggered grid discretization of the momentum and energy conservation laws; however, we motivate the use of such finite element approaches for discretizing each term in the Euler equations. We review the key properties that any artificial viscosity must possess and use these to formulate specific constraints on the total artificial viscosity force term as well as the artificial viscosity coefficient. We also show, that under certain simplifying assumptions, the two-dimensional scheme from [1] can be viewed as an under-integrated version of our finite element method. This equivalence holds on general distorted quadrilateral grids. Finally, we present computational results on some standard shock hydro test problems, as well as some more challenging problems, indicating the advantages of the new approach with respect to symmetry preservation for shock wave propagation over general grids.

  11. A comparison of viscosity-concentration relationships for emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Jeffrey W; Pauli, Adam T; Garboczi, Edward J; Martys, Nicos S

    2009-02-01

    Differential effective medium theory (D-EMT) has been used by a number of investigators to derive expressions for the shear viscosity of a colloidal suspension or an emulsion as a function of the volume fraction of the dispersed phase. Pal and Rhodes [R. Pal, E. Rhodes, J. Rheol. 33 (7) (1989) 1021-1045] used D-EMT to derive a viscosity-concentration expression for non-Newtonian emulsions, in which variations among different oil-water emulsions were accommodated by fitting the value of an empirical solvation factor by matching the volume fraction at which the ratio of each emulsion was experimentally observed to have a viscosity 100 times greater than that of the pure solvent. When the particles in suspension have occluded volume due to solvation or flocculation, we show that the application of D-EMT to the problem becomes more ambiguous than these investigators have indicated. In addition, the resulting equations either do not account for the limiting behavior near the critical concentration, that is, the concentration at which the viscosity diverges, or they incorporate this critical behavior in an ad hoc way. We suggest an alternative viscosity-concentration equation for emulsions, based on work by Bicerano and coworkers [J. Bicerano, J.F. Douglas, D.A. Brune, J. Macromol. Sci., Rev. Macromol. Chem. Phys. C 39 (4) (1999) 561-642]. This alternative equation has the advantages that (1) its parameters are more closely related to physical properties of the suspension and (2) it recovers the correct limiting behavior both in the dilute limit and near the critical concentration for rigid particles. In addition, the equation can account for the deformability of flexible particles in the semidilute regime. The proposed equation is compared to the equation proposed by Pal and Rhodes. PMID:18995865

  12. Fluid Dynamic Evidence for Extremely Low Viscosity Coseismic Fault Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Meneghini, F.; Rowe, C. D.; Moore, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    We combine geological observations of fault rock textures with fluid mechanics to constrain the mechanics of a fault zone during a subduction earthquake. We analyze buoyant intrusive features in a fault rock that formed at 12- 14 km depth in a large-scale thrust fault embedded in a paleo-accretionary prism in Kodiak Island, AK. The fault rock can been interpreted as either a pseudotachylyte or fluidized ultracataclasite. The intrusive structures provide new, direct evidence on the coseismic rheology of the fault. The asymmetric buoyant intrusions are most readily understood as Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with an unusually short wavelengths relative to the thickness of the layer. The geometry requires a moderately high Reynolds number flow (Re~1-10) in order to produce the observed wavelength to thickness ratio. The resulting rise velocity under these conditions is ~40 cm/s. Since the shear strain in the layer is over order 1 and the deformation is continuous, the rise velocity must be comparable to the horizontal shear velocity during emplacement. Thus, the geometry alone requires that the fault rocks were intruded coseismically. Furthermore, the Reynolds number constraint combined with the computed rise velocity provides a maximum bound on the viscosity of the fluid during emplacement. The coseismic fault fluid at this locality must have had a viscosity of \\ll 10 Pa-s. This viscosity constraint is compatible with the viscosity of the silicate melt of the observed composition at 1300-1400°, which is consistent with the temperature constraints imposed by the absence of plagioclase survivor grains. In summary, both the fluid dynamical and geological evidence points to an extraordinarily low viscosity fluid in the fault zone during rupture and hence extremely low local stress in the fault during an earthquake.

  13. Universality of the high-temperature viscosity limit of silicate liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Qiuju; Mauro, John C.; Ellison, Adam J.;

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the high-temperature limit of liquid viscosity by analyzing measured viscosity curves for 946 silicate liquids and 31 other liquids including metallic, molecular, and ionic systems. Our results show no systematic dependence of the high-temperature viscosity limit on chemical...... composition for the studied liquids. Based on theMauro-Yue-Ellison-Gupta-Allan (MYEGA) model of liquid viscosity, the high-temperature viscosity limit of silicate liquids is 10−2.93 Pa·s. Having established this value, there are only two independent parameters governing the viscosity-temperature relation...

  14. Dual Role of Viscosity During Start-Up of a Maxwell Fluid in a Pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任玲; 朱克勤

    2004-01-01

    Based on the exact solution of start-up flow of Maxwell fluids in a long circular straight pipe, the effect of viscosity on the time of flow establishment is analysed. It is found that the viscosity of Maxwell fluids plays a dual role.A key parameter is the dimensionless relaxation time λ-. For 0 <λ-< 0.0432, the viscosity mainly plays the same role as in Newtonian fluids, and the time of flow establishment decreases with the increasing viscosity; for λ- > 0.0432, the viscosity mainly plays a role of strengthening the oscillation, and the time of flow establishment increases with the incremental viscosity.

  15. Blood Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to infections including those we develop from our vaccinations (such as poliovirus antibodies, which are made by ... the Transfusion Medicine Unit, Blood Bank, and Stem Cell Storage Facility University of Rochester Medical ... and health educators who are available by phone Monday through Friday, 9 am to 9 pm ( ...

  16. The Hydrodynamic Radii of Macromolecules and Their Effect on Red Blood Cell Aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, J. K.; Wenby, R. B.; Meiselman, H.J.; Fisher, T.C.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of nonionic polymers on human red blood cell (RBC) aggregation were investigated. The hydrodynamic radius (Rh) of individual samples of dextran, polyvinylpyrrolidone, and polyoxyethylene over a range of molecular weights (1500–2,000,000) were calculated from their intrinsic viscosities using the Einstein viscosity relation and directly measured by quasi-elastic light scattering, and the effect of each polymer sample on RBC aggregation was studied by nephelometry and low-shear visc...

  17. Filtration parameters influencing circulating tumor cell enrichment from whole blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A W Coumans

    Full Text Available Filtration can achieve circulating tumor cell (CTC enrichment from blood. Key parameters such as flow-rate, applied pressure, and fixation, vary largely between assays and their influence is not well understood. Here, we used a filtration system, to monitor these parameters and determine their relationships. Whole blood, or its components, with and without spiked tumor cells were filtered through track-etched filters. We characterize cells passing through filter pores by their apparent viscosity; the viscosity of a fluid that would pass with the same flow. We measured a ratio of 5·10(4∶10(2∶1 for the apparent viscosities of 15 µm diameter MDA-231 cells, 10 µm white cells and 90 fl red cells passing through a 5 µm pore. Fixation increases the pressure needed to pass cells through 8 µm pores 25-fold and halves the recovery of spiked tumor cells. Filtration should be performed on unfixed samples at a pressure of ∼10 mbar for a 1 cm(2 track-etched filter with 5 µm pores. At this pressure MDA-231 cells move through the filter in 1 hour. If fixation is needed for sample preservation, a gentle fixative should be selected. The difference in apparent viscosity between CTC and blood cells is key in optimizing recovery of CTC.

  18. The GRD Model for Silicate Melt Viscosity: Volcanological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, K.; Giordano, D.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    We recently published a model for predicting the non-Arrhenian Newtonian viscosity of silicate melts as a function of temperature (T) and melt composition (X), including the volatile constituents H2O and F (Giordano et al. 2008). The non-Arrhenian T-dependence is accounted for by the VFT equation [log η = A + B/(T(K) -C)] and the model is calibrated on > 1750 measurements of melt viscosity. All compositional dependence is accommodated by 17 model coefficients embedded in the parameters B and C. The optimization assumes a common, high-T limit (A) for silicate melt viscosity and returns a value for this limit of - 4.55 (± 0.2) (e.g., log η ~ 10-4.6 Pa s) making for a total of 18 model coefficients. The effects of pressure on the silicate melt viscosity are not accounted for in this model, however, the model has the following attributes: a) it covers over fifteen log units of viscosity [10-1 to 1014 Pa s], b) it spans most of the compositional range found in naturally-occurring volcanic rocks, c) it is computationally continuous across the entire compositional and temperature spectrum of the database, and d) it is capable of accommodating both strong (near-Arrhenian T-dependence) and fragile (non-Arrhenian T-dependence) behaviour of silicate melts. Lastly, the model for melt viscosity can be used to predict other transport properties including glass transition temperatures (Tg) and melt fragility (m). Volcanic regimes feature constantly changing T-X melt conditions and, in many instances, these small changes generate strong non- linear variations in melt viscosity. The GRD model allows for accurate, continuous prediction of melt properties as a function of temperature and melt composition and, thus, is ideal for modelling transport properties in dynamic natural systems. Below we demonstrate the utility of this model with three volcanological applications: (A) We track variations in viscosity along liquid lines of descent predicted by MELTS (Ghiorso et al. 1995) and

  19. A model for the viscosity of dilute smectite gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A simple yet accurate model describing the viscosity of dilute suspensions of sodium montmorillonite in low ionic strength waters is presented. Taking the clay particle and the surrounding clouds of ions as whole as an uncharged but soft particle, the Huggins' equation is extended in the model to account for both the primary and the secondary electro-viscous effects, by use of the notion of an effective volume fraction. In the model, however, we do not represent the clay particle as a sphere surrounded by immobile water layer with thickness of a Debye length, as did by Adachi et al. (1998) who used the co-volume fraction to approximate the effective volume fraction. We visualize the effective geometry of the particle and the associated ionic atmosphere as an ellipsoid. This representation is more practical and more plausible, because in the limit of large ionic strength, the electrolyte ions have been screened to a significant extent so that the charged particle behaves just like an uncharged one. As a result, the application of the Simha's equation of intrinsic viscosity for ellipsoidal particle following with random Brownian motion enables us to obtain an analytical expression for the primary electro-viscous effect. More importantly, the available models for hard plate-like particles can be used to aid in the quantification of the secondary electro-viscous effect. The development of the model is based firmly on precise measurements of the viscosity of sufficiently dilute suspensions of sodium montmorillonite in low concentration NaCl solutions (at room temperature) using Ostwald capillary viscometers. The obtained data clearly demonstrate the primary and the secondary electro-viscous effects. That is, with an decrease of ionic strength, the intrinsic viscosity which is the intercept of the extrapolation of the plot at zero volume fraction will increase, and the slope of the linear part which appears in

  20. Blood Culture (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... BMP) Blood Test: Complete Blood Count Basic Blood Chemistry Tests Getting a Blood Test (Video) Blood Test: ...

  1. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor prescribes it, medicine. What Is Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is the force of blood flow inside ... Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you won't ...

  2. Blood Pressure Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Blood Pressure Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents ... About High Blood Pressure / Treatment: Types of Blood Pressure Medications / Blood Pressure Quiz Fall 2011 Issue: Volume 6 Number ...

  3. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... right away. continue How Do Doctors Measure Blood Pressure? Blood pressure readings are fast and painless. Blood pressure ... same age, height, and gender have lower blood pressure. Blood pressure between 90% and 95% of the normal ...

  4. Blood pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... or your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The ...

  5. Blood Transfusions (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Blood Transfusions KidsHealth > For Teens > Blood Transfusions Print A ... United States get blood transfusions. A Bit About Blood As blood moves throughout the body, it carries ...

  6. Blood Count Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your blood contains red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Blood count tests measure the number and types of cells in your blood. This helps doctors check on your overall health. ...

  7. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Awards Membership ASH Foundation Global Programs Newsroom facebook twitter youtube linkedin Research In This Section Agenda ... View all publications For Patients Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding Disorders Blood Cancers Blood Clots Blood ...

  8. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For Patients Blood Disorders Blood Clots Blood Clotting & Pregnancy If you are pregnant, or you have just ... The risk of developing a blood clot during pregnancy is increased by the following: Previous blood clots ...

  9. Advances of Studies on Mechanisms of Drugs for Activating Blood Circulation and Removing Blood Stasis in Treatment of Primary Liver Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Primary liver cancer is mainly characterized by the mass in hypochondriac region, stabbing pain at a fixative region, tenderness, dim complexion,vascular spider, vein exposure, livid tongue,ecchymosis, taut and uneven pulse and other symptoms of blood stasis. Experimental studies have found that the patient with liver cancer is often accompanied with disturbance of microcirculation,increase of blood viscosity and high blood agglutinative state. Therefore, activating blood circulation to remove blood stasis is clinically an important therapy for primary liver cancer. A great number of studies on the mechanisms have been carried out in China and other countries. The follow is a review about the mechanisms.

  10. Flows and diffusions driven by neoclassical viscosities in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previously formulated full neoclassical transport matrix for general non-symmetric toroidal plasmas, full neoclassical characteristics of magnetic configurations are described by the three mono-energetic viscosity coefficients M*(parallel viscosity against flows), N*(driving force for bootstrap currents), and L*(radial diffusion). Here we discuss on analytical expressions for these mono-energetic coefficients. Although this previous formulation has been applied to some recently designed devices to date, these applications were based on a direct numerical calculation of the linearized drift kinetic equation (LDKE). For the calculations requiring many iterative processes such as configuration optimization studies and the equilibrium calculations including the ''self-consistent bootstrap currents'', however, the analytical expressions are indispensable. To derive the expressions, the radial drift term in the LDKE is divided into two parts corresponding to the effects of local and global structures of the magnetic field. The advantages provided by this method separating the contributions of two types of trapped orbits (banana-trapped and ripple-trapped) are as follows; (1) Effects of non-bounce-averaged particle motions can be approximated by connecting results of only three types of conventional asymptotic expansions of the divided equations, i.e., banana-, plateau-, and Pfirsch-Schlueter- regime expansions, (2) N* obtained by adding the results of divided equations precisely predicts the directions of bootstrap currents and Ware pinch depending on the collisionality, (3) L* predicts ν regime of the diffusion due to the non-bounce-averaged particle motions, and so on. A simple analytical expression is derived for the ripple-trapped/untrapped boundary layer effect to the parallel viscosity force (N*) in the 1/ν regime. An existing expression of the boundary layer solution is applied to obtain the moments of the LDKE with the pitch-angle- scattering collision

  11. LES of non-Newtonian physiological blood flow in a model of arterial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, M M; Paul, M C

    2012-10-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is performed to study the physiological pulsatile transition-to-turbulent non-Newtonian blood flow through a 3D model of arterial stenosis by using five different blood viscosity models: (i) Power-law, (ii) Carreau, (iii) Quemada, (iv) Cross and (v) modified-Casson. The computational domain has been chosen is a simple channel with a biological type stenosis formed eccentrically on the top wall. The physiological pulsation is generated at the inlet of the model using the first four harmonic series of the physiological pressure pulse (Loudon and Tordesillas [1]). The effects of the various viscosity models are investigated in terms of the global maximum shear rate, post-stenotic re-circulation zone, mean shear stress, mean pressure, and turbulent kinetic energy. We find that the non-Newtonian viscosity models enlarge the length of the post-stenotic re-circulation region by moving the reattachment point of the shear layer separating from the upper wall further downstream. But the turbulent kinetic energy at the immediate post-lip of the stenosis drops due to the effects of the non-Newtonian viscosity. The importance of using LES in modelling the non-Newtonian physiological pulsatile blood flow is also assessed for the different viscosity models in terms of the results of the dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) stress Smagorinsky model constant, C(s), and the corresponding SGS normalised viscosity. PMID:22153320

  12. The effect of pulsed IR-light on the rheological parameters of blood in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocka-Bogusz, Honorata; Marcinkowska-Gapińska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    In this study we attempted to assess the effect of light of 855 nm wavelength (IR-light) on the rheological parameters of blood in vitro. As an anticoagulant, heparin was used. The source of IR-light was an applicator connected to the special generator--Viofor JPS®. The blood samples were irradiated for 30 min. During the irradiation the energy density was growing at twelve-second intervals starting from 1.06 J/cm2 to 8.46 J/cm2, then the energy density dropped to the initial value; the process was repeated cyclically. The study of blood viscosity was carried out with a Contraves LS40 oscillatory-rotational rheometer, with a decreasing shearing rate from 100 to 0.01 s⁻¹ over 5 min (flow curve) and applying constant frequency oscillations f=0.5 Hz with decreasing shear amplitude ˙γ0 (viscoelasticity measurements). The analysis of the results of rotational measurements was based on the assessment of hematocrit, plasma viscosity, whole blood viscosity at four selected shear rates and on the basis of the numerical values of parameters from Quemada's rheological model: k0 (indicating red cell aggregability), k∞ (indicating red cell rigidity) and ˙γc (the value of the shear rate for which the rouleaux formation begins). In oscillatory experiments we estimated viscous and elastic components of the complex blood viscosity in the same groups of patients. We observed a decrease of the viscous component of complex viscosity (η') at ˙γ0=0.2 s⁻¹, while other rheological parameters, k0, k∞, and relative blood viscosity at selected shear rates showed only a weak tendency towards smaller values after irradiation. The IR-light effect on the rheological properties of blood in vitro turned out to be rather neutral in the studied group of patients. PMID:24898338

  13. Hartmann flow with Braginsky viscosity: a test problem for intercluster plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2008-01-01

    We consider a Hartmann layer, stationary flow of a viscose and resistive fluid between two plates with superimposed transverse magnetic field, in the limit of gyrotropic plasma, when viscosity across the field is strongly suppressed. For zero cross-field viscosity, the problem is not well posed, since viscosity then vanishes on the boundaries and in the middle of the layer, where there is no longitudinal field. An additional arbitrarily small isotropic viscosity allows one to find magnetic field and velocity profiles which are independent of this viscosity floor and different from flows with isotropic viscosity. Velocity sharply rises in a thin boundary layer, which thickness depends both on the Hartmann number and on the Lundquist number of the flow. The implication of the work is that, in simulating ICM dynamics it is imperative to use numerical schemes which take into account anisotropic viscosity. Although magnetic fields are dynamically subdominant in the ICM they do determine its the dissipative propert...

  14. On the viscosity of magnetic fluid with low and moderate solid fraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiqiang Ren; Yanping Han; Ruoyu Hong; Jianmin Ding; Hongzhong Li

    2008-01-01

    The design of a pressurized capillary rheometer operating at prescribed temperature is described to measure the viscosity of magnetic fluids (MFs) containing Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The equipment constant of the rheometer was obtained using liquids with predetermined viscosities. Experimentally measured viscosities were used to evaluate different equations for suspension viscosities. Deviation of measured suspension viscosities from the Einstein equation was found to be basically due to the influence of spatial distribution and aggregation of Fe3O4 MNPs. By taking account of the coating layer on MNPs and the aggregation of MNPs in MFs, a modified Einstein equation was proposed to fit the experimental data. Moreover, the influence of external magnetic field on viscosity was also taken into account. Viscosities thus predicted are in good agreement with experimental data. Temperature effect on suspension viscosity was shown experimentally to be due to the shear-thinning behavior of the MFs.

  15. Viscosity of egg white from hens of different strains fed with commercial and natural additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Papa Spada

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Yolk color and egg white (albumen cleanliness and viscosity are important parameters by which consumers judge the quality of eggs. This study aimed to investigate changes in albumen viscosity during storage of eggs for up to 36 days from two different commercial laying hen strains (Carijo Barbada and Isa Brown fed a diet containing annatto (1.5 and 2.0% or a synthetic additive without synthetic colorants (control. Analyses of humidity, albumen height, pH, viscosity, foam formation, and stability were carried out on eggs. Carijo Barbada strain had smaller albumen, lower humidity and higher egg white viscosity than Isa Brown strain; however, with storage, viscosity lowered significantly on both strains. Initially, the addition of 2.0% of annatto or a synthetic additive increased viscosity in both strains, but with storage only the control maintained longer viscosity. Lower viscosity did not change foam density and stability.

  16. Utilizing the non-bridge oxygen model to predict the glass viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viscosity is the most important process property of waste glass. Viscosity measurement is difficult and costs much. Non-bridging Oxygen (NBO) model which relates glass composition to viscosity had been developed for high level waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This research utilized this NBO model to predict the viscosity of KEPRI's 55 glasses. It was found that there was a linear relationship between the measured viscosity and the predicted viscosity. The NBO model could be used to predict glass viscosity in glass formulation development. However the precision of predicted viscosity is out of satisfaction because the composition ranges are very different between the SRS and KEPRI glasses. The modification of NBO calculation, which included modification of alkaline earth elements and TiO2, could not strikingly improve the precision of predicted values

  17. The Shear Viscosity in an Anisotropic Unitary Fermi Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, Rickmoy; Trivedi, Sandip P

    2016-01-01

    We consider a system consisting of a strongly interacting, ultracold unitary Fermi gas under harmonic confinement. Our analysis suggests the possibility of experimentally studying, in this system, an anisotropic shear viscosity tensor driven by the anisotropy in the trapping potential. In particular, we suggest that this experimental setup could mimic some features of anisotropic geometries that have recently been studied for strongly coupled field theories which have a gravitational dual. Results using the AdS/CFT correspondence in these theories show that in systems with a background linear potential, certain viscosity components can be made much smaller than the entropy density, parametrically violating the KSS bound. This intuition, along with results from a Boltzmann analysis that we perform, suggests that a violation of the KSS bound can perhaps occur in the unitary Fermi gas system when it is subjected to a suitable anisotropic trapping potential. We give a concrete proposal for an experimental setup w...

  18. Dark matter perturbations and viscosity: a causal approach

    CERN Document Server

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; Pénin, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of dissipative effects in cosmic fluids modifies their clustering properties and could have observable effects on the formation of large scale structures. We analyse the evolution of density perturbations of cold dark matter endowed with causal bulk viscosity. The perturbative analysis is carried out in the Newtonian approximation and the bulk viscosity is described by the causal Israel-Stewart (IS) theory. In contrast to the non-causal Eckart theory, we obtain a third order evolution equation for the density contrast that depends on three free parameters. For certain parameter values, the density contrast and growth factor in IS mimic their behaviour in $\\Lambda$CDM when $z \\geq 1$. Interestingly, and contrary to intuition, certain sets of parameters lead to an increase of the clustering.

  19. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Aguilar Sandoval

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD of thermal fluctuations together with Sader’s model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0.03 mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL.

  20. Entropy production, viscosity bounds and bumpy black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnoll, Sean A; Santos, Jorge E

    2016-01-01

    The ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, $\\eta/s$, is computed in various holographic geometries that break translation invariance (but are isotropic). The shear viscosity does not have a hydrodynamic interpretation in such backgrounds, but does quantify the rate of entropy production due to a strain. Fluctuations of the metric components $\\delta g_{xy}$ are massive about these backgrounds, leading to $\\eta/s < 1/(4\\pi)$ at all finite temperatures (even in Einstein gravity). As the temperature is taken to zero, different behaviors are possible. If translation symmetry breaking is irrelevant in the far IR, then $\\eta/s$ tends to a constant at $T=0$. This constant can be parametrically small. If the translation symmetry is broken in the far IR (which nonetheless develops emergent scale invariance), then $\\eta/s \\sim T^{2 \

  1. Black Brane Viscosity and the Gregory-Laflamme Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Camps, Joan; Haddad, Nidal

    2010-01-01

    We study long wavelength perturbations of neutral black p-branes in asymptotically flat space and show that, as anticipated in the blackfold approach, solutions of the relativistic hydrodynamic equations for an effective p+1-dimensional fluid yield solutions to the vacuum Einstein equations in a derivative expansion. Going beyond the perfect fluid approximation, we compute the effective shear and bulk viscosities of the black brane. The values we obtain saturate generic bounds. Sound waves in the effective fluid are unstable, and have been previously related to the Gregory-Laflamme instability of black p-branes. By including the damping effect of the viscosity in the unstable sound waves, we obtain a remarkably good and simple approximation to the dispersion relation of the Gregory-Laflamme modes, whose accuracy increases with the number of transverse dimensions. We propose an exact limiting form as the number of dimensions tends to infinity.

  2. A model for the viscosity of dilute smectite gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple yet accurate model describing the viscosity of dilute suspensions of sodium montmorillonite in dilute homo-ionic solutions is presented. Taking the clay particle and the surrounding clouds of ions as a whole as an uncharged but soft, coin-like particle, the Huggins' equation for a suspension of uncharged particles is extended in the model to account for not only the primary and the secondary electro-viscous effects, but also the multi-particle interaction. The agreements between the predicted and measured results are excellent. The Huggins' coefficient obtained compares favorably with available data, while the intrinsic viscosity reduces to the Simha's equation in the large limit of ionic strength, suggesting that the model is robust. (authors)

  3. Relationship between the thermal conductivity and shear viscosity of nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yulong; Chen, Haisheng; Musina, Zenfira; Jin, Yi; Zhang, Tianfu; Witharana, Sanjeeva; Yang, Wei

    2010-05-01

    Nanofluids are dilute liquid suspensions of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles and liquid media, in such fluids, mix and interact at the nanoscale. Interactions between nanoparticles in nanofluids can lead to structuring of the particles. This paper discusses how the nanoparticle structuring affects the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids and how the two transport properties are related through the nanoparticle structuring. It is shown that the experimentally measured thermal conductivity enhancement and the viscosity increase due to the presence of nanoparticles can be interpreted by the aggregation of nanoparticles. It is also shown that modification of the conventional form of the effective medium theory by taking into account nanoparticle structuring information from the rheological analyses gives good agreement with experimentally measured thermal conductivity.

  4. Preparation of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of proteins are too large to be comprehensively examined by solution NMR methods, primarily because they tumble too slowly in solution. One potential approach to making the NMR relaxation properties of large proteins amenable to modern solution NMR techniques is to encapsulate them in a reverse micelle which is dissolved in a low viscosity fluid. Unfortunately, promising low viscosity fluids such as the short chain alkanes, supercritical carbon dioxide, and various halocarbon refrigerants all require the application of significant pressure to be kept liquefied at room temperature. Here we describe the design and use of a simple cost effective NMR tube suitable for the preparation of solutions of proteins encapsulated in reverse micelles dissolved in such fluids

  5. Area evolution, bulk viscosity and entropy principles for dynamical horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Gourgoulhon, E; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Jaramillo, Jose Luis

    2006-01-01

    We derive from Einstein equation an evolution law for the area of a trapping or dynamical horizon. The solutions to this differential equation show a causal behavior. Moreover, in a viscous fluid analogy, the equation can be interpreted as an energy balance law, yielding to a positive bulk viscosity. These two features contrast with the event horizon case, where the non-causal evolution of the area and the negative bulk viscosity require teleological boundary conditions. This reflects the local character of trapping horizons as opposed to event horizons. Interpreting the area as the entropy, we propose to use an area/entropy evolution principle to select a unique dynamical horizon and time slicing in the Cauchy evolution of an initial marginally trapped surface.

  6. Gas distribution effects on waste properties: Viscosities of bubbly slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The retention and episodic release of flammable gases are critical safety concerns for double-shell tanks that contain waste slurries. The rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. Accordingly, the objectives of this study are to develop models for the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of a particulate slurry, develop an experimental method (capillary rheometer), collect data on the viscosity of a bubbly slurry, and develop a theoretical basis for interpreting the experimental data from the capillary rheometer

  7. Fission Dynamics: The Quest of a Temperature Dependent Nuclear Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vardaci

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a journey within some open questions about the current use of a temperature dependent nuclear viscosity in models of nuclear fission and proposes an alternative experimental approach by using systems of intermediate fissility. This study is particularly relevant because: i systems of intermediate fissility offer a suitable frame-work since the intervals between the compound nucleus and scission point temperatures with increasing excitation energy are much smaller than in the case of heavier systems, ii the dependence of viscosity on the temperature may change with the fissility of the composite system; iii the opportunity to measure also observables in the evaporation residues channel translates into a larger set of effective constraints for the models.

  8. Holographic Shear Viscosity in Hyperscaling Violating Theories without Translational Invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, Yi; Zhou, Zhenhua

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, $\\eta/s$, in hyperscaling violating geometry with lattice structure. We show that the scaling relation with hyperscaling violation gives a strong constraint to the mass of graviton and usually leads to a power law of temperature, $\\eta/s\\sim T^\\kappa$. Remarkably, we find the exponent $\\kappa$ can be greater than two such that the new bound for viscosity raised in arXiv:1601.02757 is violated. Our above observation is testified by constructing specific solutions with UV completion in various holographic models. Finally, we compare the boundedness of $\\kappa$ with the behavior of entanglement entropy and conjecture a relation between them.

  9. Low Viscosity Imides Based on Asymmetric Oxydiphthalic Anhydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Criss, Jim M., Jr.; Mintz, Eric A.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Nguyen, Baochau N.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2008-01-01

    A series of low-melt viscosity imide resins were prepared from asymmetric oxydiphthalic dianhydride (a-ODPA) and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride as the endcap, along with 3,4' - oxydianiline (3,4' -ODA), 3,4' -methylenedianiline (3,4' -MDA), 3,3' -methylenedianiline (3,3' - MDA) and 3,3'-diaminobenzophenone (3,3'-DABP), using a solvent-free melt process. These imide oligomers displays low-melt viscosities (2-15 poise) at 260-280 C, which made them amenable to low-cost resin transfer molding (RTM) process. The a-ODPA based RTM resins exhibits glass transition temperatures (Tg's) in the range of 265-330 C after postcure at 343 C. The mechanical properties of these polyimide/carbon fiber composites fabricated by RTM will be discussed.

  10. Electron viscosity, current vortices and negative nonlocal resistance in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitov, Leonid; Falkovich, Gregory

    2016-07-01

    Quantum-critical strongly correlated electron systems are predicted to feature universal collision-dominated transport resembling that of viscous fluids. However, investigation of these phenomena has been hampered by the lack of known macroscopic signatures of electron viscosity. Here we identify vorticity as such a signature and link it with a readily verifiable striking macroscopic d.c. transport behaviour. Produced by the viscous flow, vorticity can drive electric current against an applied field, resulting in a negative nonlocal voltage. We argue that the latter may play the same role for the viscous regime as zero electrical resistance does for superconductivity. Besides offering a diagnostic that distinguishes viscous transport from ohmic currents, the sign-changing electrical response affords a robust tool for directly measuring the viscosity-to-resistivity ratio. A strongly interacting electron-hole plasma in high-mobility graphene affords a unique link between quantum-critical electron transport and the wealth of fluid mechanics phenomena.

  11. Sedimentation instabilities: impact of the fluid compressibility and viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebling, Michael J; Flekkøy, Eirik G; Måløy, Knut Jørgen; Toussaint, Renaud

    2010-11-01

    The effect of an interstitial fluid on the mixing of sedimenting grains is studied numerically in a closed rectangular Hele-Shaw cell. We investigate the impact of the fluid compressibility and fluid viscosity on the dynamics and structures of the granular Rayleigh-Taylor instability. First we discuss the effect of the fluid compressibility on the initial fluid pressure evolution and on the dynamics of the particles. Here, the emerging patterns do not seem highly affected by the compressibility change studied. To characterize the patterns and motion the combined length of the particle trajectories in relation to the movement of the center of mass is analyzed, and the separation of particle pairs is measured as a function of the fluid viscosity. PMID:21230468

  12. Dark matter perturbations and viscosity: A causal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; John, Anslyn; Pénin, Aurélie

    2016-08-01

    The inclusion of dissipative effects in cosmic fluids modifies their clustering properties and could have observable effects on the formation of large-scale structures. We analyze the evolution of density perturbations of cold dark matter endowed with causal bulk viscosity. The perturbative analysis is carried out in the Newtonian approximation and the bulk viscosity is described by the causal Israel-Stewart (IS) theory. In contrast to the noncausal Eckart theory, we obtain a third-order evolution equation for the density contrast that depends on three free parameters. For certain parameter values, the density contrast and growth factor in IS mimic their behavior in Λ CDM when z ≥1 . Interestingly, and contrary to intuition, certain sets of parameters lead to an increase of the clustering.

  13. Magnetic viscosity and texture in NdFeB magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dependence of the magnetic viscosity on texture can be used to study a model recently proposed by Givord and co-workers to describe the angular dependence of the coercive field in NdFeB magnets. We have measured the magnetic viscosity parameter S/sub v/ for samples of Magnequench (MQ) II and III as a function of magnetic field H and temperature T above room temperature. Near room temperature, S/sub v/ for MQ II is smaller than for MQ III, while for temperatures above ∼70 0C, the opposite behavior is observed. This temperature dependence is discussed and compared with that observed in sintered NdFeB and NdDyFeB magnets

  14. Prediction on the viscosity of multi-component melts with a new geometric model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A geometric model for calculating the viscosity of multi-component melt from related binary physicochemistry properties was derived based on Chou's thermodynamic geometric model. The model derived was employed to predict the viscosity of Au-Ag-Cu alloys. The results show that the calculated viscosity for Au-Ag-Cu alloys meet the experimental data very well. In addition, the viscosity of Bi-Sn-In systems was also predicted with this model.

  15. The Flow of a Variable Viscosity Fluid down an Inclined Plane with a Free Surface

    OpenAIRE

    M. S. Tshehla

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a temperature dependent variable viscosity fluid flow down an inclined plane with a free surface is investigated. The fluid film is thin, so that lubrication approximation may be applied. Convective heating effects are included, and the fluid viscosity decreases exponentially with temperature. In general, the flow equations resulting from the variable viscosity model must be solved numerically. However, when the viscosity variation is small, then an asymptotic approximation is p...

  16. Viscosity and Softening Behavior of Alkali Zinc Sulfophosphate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da, Ning; Krolikowski, Sebastian; Nielsen, Karsten Hansgaard;

    2010-01-01

    We report on the softening properties and viscosity of glasses from the system ZnO-Na2O-SO3-P2O5 for low-temperature sealing applications. Up to a ratio of network-forming ions PO(4)3-:SO(4)2- of about 2:1, a gradual substitution of P2O5 by SO3 results in decreasing glass transition and softening...

  17. Observational constraints on viscosity in AGN accretion discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optical/UV/soft X-ray big bump can be modelled as thermal emission from an accretion disc. The observed UV variability in AGN spectra may be caused by accretion-disc instabilities, and can be used to constrain the viscosity. The comparison of thermal time-scales with the observed time-scales of variability in 10 Seyfert galaxies and 16 QSOs indicates values for the parameter α of the order of 0.01 for most cases. (author)

  18. Variable viscosity condition in the modeling of a slider bearing

    OpenAIRE

    Uprety, Kedar Nath; Mancas, Stefan C.

    2014-01-01

    To reduce tear and wear of machinery lubrication is essential. Lubricants form a layer between two surfaces preventing direct contact and reduce friction between moving parts and hence reduce wear. In this short letter the lubrication of two slider bearings with parallel and nonparallel is studied. First, we show that bearings with parallel plates cannot support any load. For bearings with nonparallel plates we are interested on how constant and temperature dependent viscosity affects the pro...

  19. Gamma radiation effects on the viscosity of green banana flour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banana (Musa sp) is a tropical fruits with great acceptability among consumers and produced in Brazil in a large scale. Bananas are not being as exploited as they could be in prepared food, and research could stimulate greater interest from industry. The viscosity characteristics and a product consistency can determine its acceptance by the consumer. Particularly the starch obtained from green banana had been studied from the nutritional point of view since the concept of Resistant Starch was introduced. Powder RS with high content of amylose was included in an approved food list with alleged functional properties in Brazilian legislation. Ionizing radiation can be used as a public health intervention measure for the control of food-borne diseases. Radiation is also a very convenient tool for polymer materials modification through degradation, grafting and crosslinking. In this work the influence of ionizing radiation on the rheological behavior of green banana pulp was investigated. Samples of green banana pulp flour were irradiated in a 60Co Gammacell 220 (AECL) with doses of 0 kGy,1 kGy, 3 kGy, 5 kGy and 10 kGy in glass recipients. After irradiation 3% and 5% aqueous dilution were prepared and viscosity measurements performed in a Brooksfield, model DVIII viscometer using spindle SC4-18 and SC4-31. There was a reduction of the initial viscosity of the samples as a consequence of radiation processing, being the reduction inversely proportional to the flour concentration. The polysaccharide content of the banana starch seems to be degraded by radiation in solid state as shown by the reduction of viscosity as a function of radiation dose. (author)

  20. viscosity and density stratification in vertical Poiseuille flow

    OpenAIRE

    Renardy, Y

    1987-01-01

    The linear stability of plane three_layer vertical Poiseuille flow is considered. The layers are composed of two immiscible fluids, one next to the walls and one centrally located. The fluids have different viscosities and densities and surface tension effects are included. Intuitively, an analogy with the concentric Hagen-Poiseuille flow is expected and the similarities and differences are investigated. The ability of heuristic reasoning to predict which arrangements are more likely to be ob...