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Sample records for blood vaccines biological

  1. A cell-based systems biology assessment of human blood to monitor immune responses after influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoek, Kristen L; Samir, Parimal; Howard, Leigh M; Niu, Xinnan; Prasad, Nripesh; Galassie, Allison; Liu, Qi; Allos, Tara M; Floyd, Kyle A; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Levy, Shawn E; Joyce, Sebastian; Edwards, Kathryn M; Link, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Systems biology is an approach to comprehensively study complex interactions within a biological system. Most published systems vaccinology studies have utilized whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to monitor the immune response after vaccination. Because human blood is comprised of multiple hematopoietic cell types, the potential for masking responses of under-represented cell populations is increased when analyzing whole blood or PBMC. To investigate the contribution of individual cell types to the immune response after vaccination, we established a rapid and efficient method to purify human T and B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), monocytes, and neutrophils from fresh venous blood. Purified cells were fractionated and processed in a single day. RNA-Seq and quantitative shotgun proteomics were performed to determine expression profiles for each cell type prior to and after inactivated seasonal influenza vaccination. Our results show that transcriptomic and proteomic profiles generated from purified immune cells differ significantly from PBMC. Differential expression analysis for each immune cell type also shows unique transcriptomic and proteomic expression profiles as well as changing biological networks at early time points after vaccination. This cell type-specific information provides a more comprehensive approach to monitor vaccine responses.

  2. A Cell-Based Systems Biology Assessment of Human Blood to Monitor Immune Responses after Influenza Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoek, Kristen L.; Samir, Parimal; Howard, Leigh M.; Niu, Xinnan; Prasad, Nripesh; Galassie, Allison; Liu, Qi; Allos, Tara M.; Floyd, Kyle A.; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Levy, Shawn E.; Joyce, Sebastian; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Link, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Systems biology is an approach to comprehensively study complex interactions within a biological system. Most published systems vaccinology studies have utilized whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to monitor the immune response after vaccination. Because human blood is comprised of multiple hematopoietic cell types, the potential for masking responses of under-represented cell populations is increased when analyzing whole blood or PBMC. To investigate the contribution of individual cell types to the immune response after vaccination, we established a rapid and efficient method to purify human T and B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), monocytes, and neutrophils from fresh venous blood. Purified cells were fractionated and processed in a single day. RNA-Seq and quantitative shotgun proteomics were performed to determine expression profiles for each cell type prior to and after inactivated seasonal influenza vaccination. Our results show that transcriptomic and proteomic profiles generated from purified immune cells differ significantly from PBMC. Differential expression analysis for each immune cell type also shows unique transcriptomic and proteomic expression profiles as well as changing biological networks at early time points after vaccination. This cell type-specific information provides a more comprehensive approach to monitor vaccine responses. PMID:25706537

  3. Biology of Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... switch to the Professional version Home Blood Disorders Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Resources In This ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Components of Blood ...

  4. Whole organism blood stage vaccines against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisic, Danielle I; Good, Michael F

    2015-12-22

    Despite a century of research focused on the development and implementation of effective control strategies, infection with the malaria parasite continues to result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. An effective malaria vaccine is considered by many to be the definitive solution. Yet, after decades of research, we are still without a vaccine that is capable of inducing robust, long lasting protection in naturally exposed individuals. Extensive sub-unit vaccine development focused on the blood stage of the malaria parasite has thus far yielded disappointing results. There is now a renewed focus on whole parasite vaccine strategies, particularly as they may overcome some of the inherent weaknesses deemed to be associated with the sub-unit approach. This review discusses the whole parasite vaccine strategy focusing on the blood stage of the malaria parasite, with an emphasis on recent advances and challenges in the development of killed and live attenuated vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Systems biology of vaccination in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraisingham, Sai S; Rouphael, Nadine; Cavanagh, Mary M; Nakaya, Helder I; Goronzy, Jorg J; Pulendran, Bali

    2013-01-01

    Aging population demographics, combined with suboptimal vaccine responses in the elderly, make the improvement of vaccination strategies in the elderly a developing public health issue. The immune system changes with age, with innate and adaptive cell components becoming increasingly dysfunctional. As such, vaccine responses in the elderly are impaired in ways that differ depending on the type of vaccine (e.g., live attenuated, polysaccharide, conjugate, or subunit) and the mediators of protection (e.g., antibody and/or T cell). The rapidly progressing field of systems biology has been shown to be useful in predicting immunogenicity and offering insights into potential mechanisms of protection in young adults. Future application of systems biology to vaccination in the elderly may help to identify gene signatures that predict suboptimal responses and help to identify more accurate correlates of protection. Moreover, the identification of specific defects may be used to target novel vaccination strategies that improve efficacy in elderly populations.

  6. Conjugate Meningococcal Vaccines Development: GSK Biologicals Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline M. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningococcal diseases are serious threats to global health, and new vaccines specifically tailored to meet the age-related needs of various geographical areas are required. This paper focuses on the meningococcal conjugate vaccines developed by GSK Biologicals. Two combined conjugate vaccines were developed to help protect infants and young children in countries where the incidence of meningococcal serogroup C or serogroup C and Y disease is important: Hib-MenC-TT vaccine, which offers protection against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C diseases, is approved in several countries; and Hib-MenCY-TT vaccine, which adds N. meningitidis serogroup Y antigen, is currently in the final stages of development. Additionally, a tetravalent conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT designed to help protect against four meningococcal serogroups is presently being evaluated for global use in all age groups. All of these vaccines were shown to be highly immunogenic and to have clinically acceptable safety profiles.

  7. Conjugate Meningococcal Vaccines Development: GSK Biologicals Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline M.; Mesaros, Narcisa; Van Der Wielen, Marie; Baine, Yaela

    2011-01-01

    Meningococcal diseases are serious threats to global health, and new vaccines specifically tailored to meet the age-related needs of various geographical areas are required. This paper focuses on the meningococcal conjugate vaccines developed by GSK Biologicals. Two combined conjugate vaccines were developed to help protect infants and young children in countries where the incidence of meningococcal serogroup C or serogroup C and Y disease is important: Hib-MenC-TT vaccine, which offers protection against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C diseases, is approved in several countries; and Hib-MenCY-TT vaccine, which adds N. meningitidis serogroup Y antigen, is currently in the final stages of development. Additionally, a tetravalent conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) designed to help protect against four meningococcal serogroups is presently being evaluated for global use in all age groups. All of these vaccines were shown to be highly immunogenic and to have clinically acceptable safety profiles. PMID:21991444

  8. Vaccines against biologic agents: uses and developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ales, Noel C; Katial, Rohit K

    2004-03-01

    Although the Geneva protocol that prohibits the use of chemical and biologic weapons was ratified in 1925, many countries failed to accept this protocol: others stipulated retaliation, and some, like the United States, did not ratify the protocol for decades. This delay allowed the continued development of chemical and biologic agents. Members of the health care community are responsible for determining the best way to protect society from the potentially devastating effects of these biologic agents. Ideally,these diseases would be prevented from ever developing into systemic illnesses. In the past, vaccination has been a successful means of eradicating disease. Vaccines remain a hopeful therapy for the future, but time is short,and there are many obstacles.Information regarding bioterrorism agents and their treatments comes mainly from dated data or from in vitro or animal studies that may not apply to human treatment and disease. Additionally, the current threat of bioterrorism does not allow enough time for accurate, well-designed,controlled studies in humans before the release of investigational vaccines. Furthermore, some human studies would not be safe or ethical. Finally,many members of society suffer from illnesses that would put them at high risk to receive prophylactic vaccination. It is therefore naive to believe that vaccines would be the ultimate protection from these agents. In addition to vaccine development, there must be concurrent investigations into disease management and treatment. Even in instances in which vaccination is known to be an effective means of disease protection. biologic agents may be presented in a manner that renders vaccines ineffective. Virulent strains of organisms may be used, more than one organism may be used in tandem to increase virulence, and strains may be selected for antibiotic and vaccine resistance. Genetically engineered strains may use virulence factors other than those targeted in vaccines, and high

  9. Gene expression profiles are different in venous and capillary blood: Implications for vaccine studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, D F; O'Connor, D; Blohmke, C J; Sadarangani, M; Pollard, A J

    2016-10-17

    Detailed analysis of the immunological pathways leading to robust vaccine responses has become possible with the application of systems biology, including transcriptomic analysis. Venous blood is usually obtained for such studies but others have obtained capillary blood (e.g. finger-prick). Capillary samples are practically advantageous, especially in children. The aim of this study was to compare gene expression profiles in venous and capillary blood before, 12h and 24h after vaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide or trivalent inactivated seasonal influenza vaccines. Gene expression at baseline was markedly different between venous and capillary samples, with 4940 genes differentially expressed, and followed a different pattern of changes after vaccination. At baseline, multiple pathways were upregulated in venous compared to capillary blood, including transforming growth factor-beta receptor signalling and toll-like receptor cascades. After vaccination with the influenza vaccine, there was enrichment for T and NK cell related signatures in capillary blood, and monocyte signatures in venous blood. By contrast, after vaccination with the pneumococcal vaccination, there was enrichment of dendritic cells, monocytes and interferon related signatures in capillary blood, whilst at 24h there was enrichment for T and NK cell related signatures in venous blood. These data show differences between venous and capillary gene expression both at baseline, and post vaccination, which may impact on the conclusions regarding immunological mechanisms drawn from studies using these different sampling methodologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hepatitis B vaccination awareness and biological risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, A; Borella Venturini, M; Paruzzolo, P; Maso, S

    2002-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus is a possible risk in persons exposed to biological risk at work. Vaccination is the only prevention against infection. A population of 1,408 employees of the University of Padua was investigated to define the immunological status for HBV and degree of awareness to hepatitis B vaccination. The subjects were subdivided according to sex, age ( 40 years old), level of education (college graduates or lower), and the extent of biological risk (no risk, low or high risk). Clinical history questionnaires were used and measurement of hepatitis B markers was carried out. The results showed that only 30.5% of the subjects had been vaccinated; among these, 90.2% showed a measurable level of anti-HBs antibodies, 8.2% showed anti-HBs antibodies lower than 10 IU/L, and 1.6% showed positive markers of previous infection. However, among non-vaccinated subjects 13.4% were positive for previous infection; in all subjects, prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection was 9.8%. The awareness to hepatitis B vaccination was altogether very low (30.5%), but females (44.2%), subjects less than 40 years of age (43.5%), college graduates (34.1%), and high risk exposed personnel (57.7%) were more likely to comply compared to male subjects (odds ratio 2.53), subjects more than 40 years of age (odds ratio 3.57), non-college graduates (odds ratio 1.65), or low risk exposed (odds ratio 13.42). The variables considered appeared to influence awareness to vaccination. Owing to low awareness, an information campaign was started and 90% of the invited subjects were immunized.

  11. Progress and prospects for blood-stage malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Kazutoyo

    2016-06-01

    There have been significant decreases in malaria mortality and morbidity in the last 10-15 years, and the most advanced pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine, RTS,S, received a positive opinion from European regulators in July 2015. However, no blood-stage vaccine has reached a phase III trial. The first part of this review summarizes the pros and cons of various assays and models that have been and will be used to predict the efficacy of blood-stage vaccines. In the second part, blood-stage vaccine candidates that showed some efficacy in human clinical trials or controlled human malaria infection models are discussed. Then, candidates under clinical investigation are described in the third part, and other novel candidates and strategies are reviewed in the last part.

  12. Blood-stage malaria vaccines: post-genome strategies for the identification of novel vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntege, Edward H; Takashima, Eizo; Morita, Masayuki; Nagaoka, Hikaru; Ishino, Tomoko; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2017-08-01

    An efficacious malaria vaccine is necessary to advance the current control measures towards malaria elimination. To-date, only RTS,S/AS01, a leading pre-erythrocytic stage vaccine completed phase 3 trials, but with an efficacy of 28-36% in children, and 18-26% in infants, that waned over time. Blood-stage malaria vaccines protect against disease, and are considered effective targets for the logical design of next generation vaccines to improve the RTS,S field efficacy. Therefore, novel blood-stage vaccine candidate discovery efforts are critical, albeit with several challenges including, high polymorphisms in vaccine antigens, poor understanding of targets of naturally protective immunity, and difficulties in the expression of high AT-rich plasmodial proteins. Areas covered: PubMed ( www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed ) was searched to review the progress and future prospects of malaria vaccine research and development. We focused on post-genome vaccine candidate discovery, malaria vaccine development, sequence diversity, pre-clinical and clinical trials. Expert commentary: Post-genome high-throughput technologies using wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis technology and immuno-profiling with sera from malaria patients with clearly defined outcomes are highlighted to overcome current challenges of malaria vaccine candidate discovery.

  13. Flying vaccinator; a transgenic mosquito delivers a Leishmania vaccine via blood feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, D S; Nagumo, H; Yoshida, S

    2010-06-01

    'Flying vaccinator' is the concept of using genetically engineered hematophagous insects to deliver vaccines. Here we show the generation of a transgenic anopheline mosquito that expresses the Leishmania vaccine candidate, SP15, fused to monomeric red fluorescent protein (mDsRed) in its salivary glands. Importantly, mice bitten repeatedly by the transgenic mosquitoes raised anti-SP15 antibodies, indicating delivery of SP15 via blood feeding with its immunogenicity intact. Thus, this technology makes possible the generation of transgenic mosquitoes that match the original concept of a 'flying vaccinator'. However, medical safety issues and concerns about informed consent mitigate the use of the 'flying vaccinator' as a method to deliver vaccines. We propose that this expression system could be applied to elucidate saliva-malaria sporozoite interactions.

  14. Exploring the Limitations of Peripheral Blood Transcriptional Biomarkers in Predicting Influenza Vaccine Responsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Marchetti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Systems biology has been recently applied to vaccinology to better understand immunological responses to the influenza vaccine. Particular attention has been paid to the identification of early signatures capable of predicting vaccine immunogenicity. Building from previous studies, we employed a recently established algorithm for signature-based clustering of expression profiles, SCUDO, to provide new insights into why blood-derived transcriptome biomarkers often fail to predict the seroresponse to the influenza virus vaccination. Specifically, preexisting immunity against one or more vaccine antigens, which was found to negatively affect the seroresponse, was identified as a confounding factor able to decouple early transcriptome from later antibody responses, resulting in the degradation of a biomarker predictive power. Finally, the broadly accepted definition of seroresponse to influenza virus vaccine, represented by the maximum response across the vaccine-targeted strains, was compared to a composite measure integrating the responses against all strains. This analysis revealed that composite measures provide a more accurate assessment of the seroresponse to multicomponent influenza vaccines.

  15. Systems Biology and the Development of Vaccines and Drugs for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. J. T. Ekanem

    2004-11-16

    Nov 16, 2004 ... Systems Biology and the Development of Vaccines and Drugs for Malaria Treatments. Ezekiel F. ... Microarray technology enables simultaneous gene expression analysis of thousands of genes, enabling a snapshot of an organisms' ... and DNA-derived samples to DNA chips allows the monitoring of gene ...

  16. Biology and Mechanics of Blood Flows Part I: Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Thiriet, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Biology and Mechanics of Blood Flows presents the basic knowledge and state-of-the-art techniques necessary to carry out investigations of the cardiovascular system using modeling and simulation. Part I of this two-volume sequence, Biology, addresses the nanoscopic and microscopic scales. The nanoscale corresponds to the scale of biochemical reaction cascades involved in cell adaptation to mechanical stresses among other stimuli. The microscale is the scale of stress-induced tissue remodeling associated with acute or chronic loadings. The cardiovascular system, like any physiological system, has a complicated three-dimensional structure and composition. Its time dependent behavior is regulated, and this complex system has many components. In this authoritative work, the author provides a survey of relevant cell components and processes, with detailed coverage of the electrical and mechanical behaviors of vascular cells, tissues, and organs. Because the behaviors of vascular cells and tissues are tightly coupl...

  17. 78 FR 20663 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function..., Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. FDA intends to...

  18. 78 FR 60884 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function... Immunoregulation, Division of Viral Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics...

  19. 76 FR 44016 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function... Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research...

  20. 77 FR 3780 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function... Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. The...

  1. 42 CFR 410.63 - Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors... Other Health Services § 410.63 Hepatitis B vaccine and blood clotting factors: Conditions... under § 410.10, subject to the specified conditions: (a) Hepatitis B vaccine: Conditions. Effective...

  2. 77 FR 42319 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... consideration of the appropriateness of cell lines derived from human tumors for vaccine manufacture. FDA...

  3. 75 FR 2876 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... virus vaccine for the 2010 - 2011 influenza season. FDA intends to make background material available to...

  4. 75 FR 47605 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function... Laboratory of Vector Borne Virus Diseases, Division of Viral Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review...

  5. 76 FR 55397 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function... Laboratory of Method Development, Division of Viral Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center...

  6. 76 FR 13646 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function... Polysaccharides, Division of Bacterial, Parasitic, and Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review...

  7. 75 FR 59729 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function... vaccines for a post-exposure prophylaxis indication using the animal rule. On November 17, 2010, the...

  8. 75 FR 17929 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... vaccine manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline and indicated for the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in...

  9. 76 FR 52668 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice AGENCY: Food and Drug... notice of meeting of the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. This meeting was... INFORMATION: In the Federal Register of July 22, 2011, FDA announced that a meeting of the Vaccines and...

  10. 76 FR 3639 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... the influenza virus vaccine for the 2011-2012 influenza season. The committee will also hear an update...

  11. 78 FR 5465 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... virus vaccine for the 2013- 2014 influenza season. FDA intends to make background material available to...

  12. 77 FR 63839 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide...) Virus Monovalent Vaccine manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. On November 15, 2012, the committee will meet...

  13. Yellow fever vaccination centers: concurrent vaccinations and updates on mosquito biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Subhash C; Agarwal, Nirmala

    2012-09-01

    Mandatory visits to immunization centers that offer pre-travel Yellow fever vaccine to prospective travelers would be useful for briefing the basics of the biology of the mosquito responsible for Yellow fever spread. Pre- travel knowledge on the day-time rather the nocturnal biting habit of the mosquitoes of Aedes species would prevent from bites of the mosquitoes responsible for the spread of viruses causing Yellow fever, dengue or Chikungunya infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative Pathogenesis and Systems Biology for Biodefense Virus Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin C. Bowick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing vaccines to biothreat agents presents a number of challenges for discovery, preclinical development, and licensure. The need for high containment to work with live agents limits the amount and types of research that can be done using complete pathogens, and small markets reduce potential returns for industry. However, a number of tools, from comparative pathogenesis of viral strains at the molecular level to novel computational approaches, are being used to understand the basis of viral attenuation and characterize protective immune responses. As the amount of basic molecular knowledge grows, we will be able to take advantage of these tools not only to rationally attenuate virus strains for candidate vaccines, but also to assess immunogenicity and safety in silico. This review discusses how a basic understanding of pathogenesis, allied with systems biology and machine learning methods, can impact biodefense vaccinology.

  15. Blunting the knife: development of vaccines targeting digestive proteases of blood-feeding helminth parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Mark S; Ranjit, Najju; Loukas, Alex

    2010-08-01

    Proteases are pivotal to parasitism, mediating biological processes crucial to worm survival including larval migration through tissue, immune evasion/modulation and nutrient acquisition by the adult parasite. In haematophagous parasites, many of these proteolytic enzymes are secreted from the intestine (nematodes) or gastrodermis (trematodes) where they act to degrade host haemoglobin and serum proteins as part of the feeding process. These proteases are exposed to components of the immune system of the host when the worms ingest blood, and therefore present targets for the development of anti-helminth vaccines. The protective effects of current vaccine antigens against nematodes that infect humans (hookworm) and livestock (barber's pole worm) are based on haemoglobin-degrading intestinal proteases and act largely as a result of the neutralisation of these proteases by antibodies that are ingested with the blood-meal. In this review, we survey the current status of helminth proteases that show promise as vaccines and describe their vital contribution to a parasitic existence.

  16. Live Vaccine Strain Francisella tularensis is Detectable at the Inoculation Site but Not in Blood after Vaccination Against Tularemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hepburn, Matthew J; Purcell, Bret K; Lawler, James V; Coyne, Susan R; Petitt, Patricia L; Sellers, Karen D; Norwood, David A; Ulrich, Melanie P

    2006-01-01

    ...) for the detection of F. tularensis in human clinical samples. Methods. Blood and skin swab samples were prospectively collected from volunteers who received the LVS tularemia vaccine at baseline (negative controls...

  17. Travel and biologic therapy: travel-related infection risk, vaccine response and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Victoria; Johnson, Douglas; Torresi, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    Biologic therapy has revolutionized the management of refractory chronic autoimmune and auto-inflammatory disease, as well as several malignancies, providing rapid symptomatic relief and/or disease remission. Patients receiving biologic therapies have an improved quality of life, facilitating travel to exotic destinations and potentially placing them at risk of a range of infections. For each biologic agent, we review associated travel-related infection risk and expected travel vaccine response and effectiveness. A PUBMED search [vaccination OR vaccine] AND/OR ['specific vaccine'] AND/OR [immunology OR immune response OR response] AND [biologic OR biological OR biologic agent] was performed. A review of the literature was performed in order to develop recommendations on vaccination for patients in receipt of biologic therapy travelling to high-risk travel destinations. There is a paucity of literature in this area, however, it is apparent that travel-related infection risk is increased in patients on biologic therapy and when illness occurs they are at a higher risk of complication and hospitalization. Patients in receipt of biologic agents are deemed as having a high level of immunosuppression-live vaccines, including the yellow fever vaccine, are contraindicated. Inactivated vaccines are considered safe; however, vaccine response can be attenuated by the patient's biologic therapy, thereby resulting in reduced vaccine effectiveness and protection. Best practice requires a collaborative approach between the patient's primary healthcare physician, relevant specialist and travel medicine expert, who should all be familiar with the immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory effects resulting from the biologic therapies. Timing of vaccines should be carefully planned, and if possible, vaccination provided well before established immunosuppression.

  18. Molecular Basis of Allele-Specific Efficacy of a Blood-Stage Malaria Vaccine: Vaccine Development Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, Amed; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Thera, Mahamadou A.; Coulibaly, Drissa; Niangaly, Amadou; Saye, Renion; Tolo, Youssouf; Dutta, Sheetij; Heppner, D. Gray; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter L.; Vekemans, Johan; Cohen, Joe; Blackwelder, William C.; Dube, Tina; Laurens, Matthew B.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Plowe, Christopher V.

    2013-01-01

    The disappointing efficacy of blood-stage malaria vaccines may be explained in part by allele-specific immune responses that are directed against polymorphic epitopes on blood-stage antigens. FMP2.1/AS02A, a blood-stage candidate vaccine based on apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) from the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum, had allele-specific efficacy against clinical malaria in a phase II trial in Malian children. We assessed the cross-protective efficacy of the malaria vaccine and inferred which polymorphic amino acid positions in AMA1 were the targets of protective allele-specific immune responses. FMP2.1/AS02A had the highest efficacy against AMA1 alleles that were identical to the 3D7 vaccine-type allele at 8 highly polymorphic amino acid positions in the cluster 1 loop (c1L) but differed from 3D7 elsewhere in the molecule. Comparison of the incidence of vaccine-type alleles before and after vaccination in the malaria vaccine and control groups and examination of the patterns of allele change at polymorphic positions in consecutive malaria episodes suggest that the highly polymorphic amino acid position 197 in c1L was the most critical determinant of allele-specific efficacy. These results indicate that a multivalent AMA1 vaccine with broad efficacy could include only a limited set of key alleles of this extremely polymorphic antigen. PMID:23204168

  19. Approaches to monitoring biological outcomes for HPV vaccination: challenges of early adopter countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Charlene A; Saraiya, Mona; Hariri, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we describe plans to monitor the impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine on biologic outcomes in selected international areas (Australia, Canada, Mexico, the Nordic countries, Scotland, and the United States) that have adopted this vaccine. This summary of monitoring plans...... provides a background for discussing the challenges of vaccine monitoring in settings where resources and capacity may vary. A variety of approaches that depend on existing infrastructure and resources are planned or underway for monitoring HPV vaccine impact. Monitoring HPV vaccine impact on biologic...

  20. Systems biology applied to vaccine and immunotherapy development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immunotherapies, including vaccines, represent a potent tool to prevent or contain disease with high morbidity or mortality such as infections and cancer. However, despite their widespread use, we still have a limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying the induction of protective immune responses. Immunity is made of a multifaceted set of integrated responses involving a dynamic interaction of thousands of molecules; among those is a growing appreciation for the role the innate immunity (i.e. pathogen recognition receptors - PRRs plays in determining the nature and duration (immune memory of adaptive T and B cell immunity. The complex network of interactions between immune manipulation of the host (immunotherapy on one side and innate and adaptive responses on the other might be fully understood only employing the global level of investigation provided by systems biology. In this framework, the advancement of high-throughput technologies, together with the extensive identification of new genes, proteins and other biomolecules in the "omics" era, facilitate large-scale biological measurements. Moreover, recent development of new computational tools enables the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of the interactions between all of the components of immunity over time. Here, we review recent progress in using systems biology to study and evaluate immunotherapy and vaccine strategies for infectious and neoplastic diseases. Multi-parametric data provide novel and often unsuspected mechanistic insights while enabling the identification of common immune signatures relevant to human investigation such as the prediction of immune responsiveness that could lead to the improvement of the design of future immunotherapy trials. Thus, the paradigm switch from "empirical" to "knowledge-based" conduct of medicine and immunotherapy in particular, leading to patient-tailored treatment.

  1. Use of Biologic Therapy by Pregnant Women With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Does Not Affect Infant Response to Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Dawn B; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Martin, Christopher; Cohen, Russell D; Kane, Sunanda V; Mahadevan, Uma

    2018-01-01

    In women with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), exposure to immunomodulator or biologic therapy has not been associated with adverse events during pregnancy or outcomes of newborns. We investigated whether exposure of patients to these agents during pregnancy affects serologic responses to vaccines in newborns. We collected data from the Pregnancy in IBD and Neonatal Outcomes registry, which records outcomes of pregnant women with diagnosis of IBD receiving care at multiple centers in the United States, from 2007 through 2016. Serum samples collected from infants at least 7 months old were analyzed for titers of antibodies to Haemophilus influenzae B (HiB) or tetanus toxin; mothers completed a survey of vaccine practices and outcomes from July 2013 through October 2016. Umbilical cord blood samples from 33 infants were assayed for concentration of biologic agents. Vaccination response was compared between infants born to mothers exposed to biologic therapy (infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, golimumab, natalizumab, vedolizumab, or ustekinumab-either as a single agent or in combination with an immunomodulator, at any time between conception and delivery) and infants born to unexposed mothers. A total of 179 women completed the vaccine survey (26 biologic unexposed, 153 exposed to a biologic agent). We found no significant difference in proportions of infants with protective antibody titers against HiB born to exposed mothers (n = 42, 71%) vs unexposed mothers (n = 8, 50%) (P = .41). We also found no difference in the proportion of infants with protective antibody titers to tetanus toxoid born to exposed mothers (80%) vs unexposed mothers (75%) (P = .66). The median concentration of infliximab in cord blood did not differ significantly between infants with vs without protective antibody titers to HiB (P = .30) or tetanus toxoid (P = .93). Mild reactions were observed in 7/40 infants who received rotavirus vaccine and whose mothers had been exposed to

  2. Biological and phylogenetic characterization of a genotype VII Newcastle disease virus from Venezuela: Efficacy of vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we describe the characterization a virulent genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from Venezuela and evaluate the efficacy of heterologous genotype commercial vaccination under field and controlled rearing conditions. Biological pathotyping and molecular analysis were applied. Results sh...

  3. A Field Trial to Assess a Blood-Stage Malaria Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thera, Mahamadou A.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Coulibaly, Drissa; Laurens, Matthew B.; Ouattara, Amed; Kone, Abdoulaye K.; Guindo, Ando B.; Traore, Karim; Traore, Idrissa; Kouriba, Bourema; Diallo, Dapa A.; Diarra, Issa; Daou, Modibo; Dolo, Amagana; Tolo, Youssouf; Sissoko, Mahamadou S.; Niangaly, Amadou; Sissoko, Mady; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Lyke, Kirsten E.; Wu, Yukun; Blackwelder, William C.; Godeaux, Olivier; Vekemans, Johan; Dubois, Marie-Claude; Ballou, W. Ripley; Cohen, Joe; Thompson, Darby; Dube, Tina; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter L.; House, Brent; Lanar, David E.; Dutta, Sheetij; Heppner, D. Gray; Plowe, Christopher V.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Blood-stage malaria vaccines are intended to prevent clinical disease. The malaria vaccine FMP2.1/AS02A, a recombinant protein based on apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) from the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum, has previously been shown to have immunogenicity and acceptable safety in Malian adults and children. METHODS In a double-blind, randomized trial, we immunized 400 Malian children with either the malaria vaccine or a control (rabies) vaccine and followed them for 6 months. The primary end point was clinical malaria, defined as fever and at least 2500 parasites per cubic millimeter of blood. A secondary end point was clinical malaria caused by parasites with the AMA1 DNA sequence found in the vaccine strain. RESULTS The cumulative incidence of the primary end point was 48.4% in the malaria-vaccine group and 54.4% in the control group; efficacy against the primary end point was 17.4% (hazard ratio for the primary end point, 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.63 to 1.09; P = 0.18). Efficacy against the first and subsequent episodes of clinical malaria, as defined on the basis of various parasite-density thresholds, was approximately 20%. Efficacy against clinical malaria caused by parasites with AMA1 corresponding to that of the vaccine strain was 64.3% (hazard ratio, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.86; P = 0.03). Local reactions and fever after vaccination were more frequent with the malaria vaccine. CONCLUSIONS On the basis of the primary end point, the malaria vaccine did not provide significant protection against clinical malaria, but on the basis of secondary results, it may have strain-specific efficacy. If this finding is confirmed, AMA1 might be useful in a multicomponent malaria vaccine. PMID:21916638

  4. In vitro marker gene expression analyses in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: A tool to assess safety of influenza vaccines in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Eita; Momose, Haruka; Hiradate, Yuki; Ishii, Ken J; Mizukami, Takuo; Hamaguchi, Isao

    2018-12-01

    Vaccines are inoculated in healthy individuals from children to the elderly, and thus high levels of safety and consistency of vaccine quality in each lot must meet the required specifications by using preclinical and lot release testing. Because vaccines are inoculated into humans, recapitulation of biological reactions in humans should be considered for test methods. We have developed a new method to evaluate the safety of influenza vaccines using biomarker gene expression in mouse and rat models. Some biomarker genes are already known to be expressed in human lymphocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells; therefore, we considered some of these genes might be common biomarkers for human and mice to evaluate influenza vaccine safety. In this study, we used human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a primary assessment tool to confirm the usefulness of potential marker genes in humans. Analysis of marker gene expression in PBMC revealed biomarker gene expressions were dose-relatedly increased in toxic reference influenza vaccine (RE)-stimulated PBMC. Although some marker genes showed increased expression in hemagglutinin split vaccine-stimulated PBMC, their expression levels were lower than that of RE in PBMC from two different donors. Many marker gene expressions correlated with chemokine production. Marker genes such as IRF7 were associated with other Type 1 interferon (IFN)-associated signals and were highly expressed in the CD304 + plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) population. These results suggest PBMC and their marker genes may be useful for vaccine safety evaluation in humans.

  5. A semi-synthetic whole parasite vaccine designed to protect against blood stage malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddam, Ashwini Kumar; Reiman, Jennifer M; Zaman, Mehfuz; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan; Good, Michael F

    2016-10-15

    Although attenuated malaria parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs) are promising vaccine candidates, their application in humans may be restricted for ethical and regulatory reasons. Therefore, we developed an organic microparticle-based delivery platform as a whole parasite malaria-antigen carrier to mimic pRBCs. Killed blood stage parasites were encapsulated within liposomes that are targeted to antigen presenting cells (APCs). Mannosylated lipid core peptides (MLCPs) were used as targeting ligands for the liposome-encapsulated parasite antigens. MLCP-liposomes, but not unmannosylated liposomes, were taken-up efficiently by APCs which then significantly upregulated expression of MHC-ll and costimulatory molecules, CD80 and CD86. Two such vaccines using rodent model systems were constructed - one with Plasmodium chabaudi and the other with P. yoelii. MLCP-liposome vaccines were able to control the parasite burden and extended the survival of mice. Thus, we have demonstrated an alternative delivery system to attenuated pRBCs with similar vaccine efficacy and added clinical advantages. Such liposomes are promising candidates for a human malaria vaccine. Attenuated whole parasite-based vaccines, by incorporating all parasite antigens, are very promising candidates, but issues relating to production, storage and safety concerns are significantly slowing their development. We therefore developed a semi-synthetic whole parasite malaria vaccine that is easily manufactured and stored. Two such prototype vaccines (a P. chabaudi and a P. yoelii vaccine) have been constructed. They are non-infectious, highly immunogenic and give good protection profiles. This semi-synthetic delivery platform is an exciting strategy to accelerate the development of a licensed malaria vaccine. Moreover, this strategy can be potentially applied to a wide range of pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ontology-supported research on vaccine efficacy, safety and integrative biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongqun

    2014-07-01

    While vaccine efficacy and safety research has dramatically progressed with the methods of in silico prediction and data mining, many challenges still exist. A formal ontology is a human- and computer-interpretable set of terms and relations that represent entities in a specific domain and how these terms relate to each other. Several community-based ontologies (including Vaccine Ontology, Ontology of Adverse Events and Ontology of Vaccine Adverse Events) have been developed to support vaccine and adverse event representation, classification, data integration, literature mining of host-vaccine interaction networks, and analysis of vaccine adverse events. The author further proposes minimal vaccine information standards and their ontology representations, ontology-based linked open vaccine data and meta-analysis, an integrative One Network ('OneNet') Theory of Life, and ontology-based approaches to study and apply the OneNet theory. In the Big Data era, these proposed strategies provide a novel framework for advanced data integration and analysis of fundamental biological networks including vaccine immune mechanisms.

  7. Phase 1 study of a combination AMA1 blood stage malaria vaccine in Malian children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alassane Dicko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA1 is one of the leading blood stage malaria vaccine candidates. AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel consists of an equal mixture of recombinant AMA1 from FVO and 3D7 clones of P. falciparum, adsorbed onto Alhydrogel. A Phase 1 study in semi-immune adults in Mali showed that the vaccine was safe and immunogenic, with higher antibody responses in those who received the 80 microg dose. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and immunogenicity of this vaccine in young children in a malaria endemic area.This was a Phase 1 dose escalating study in 36 healthy children aged 2-3 years started in March 2006 in Donéguébougou, Mali. Eighteen children in the first cohort were randomized 2 ratio 1 to receive either 20 microg AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel or Haemophilus influenzae type b Hiberix vaccine. Two weeks later 18 children in the second cohort were randomized 2 ratio 1 to receive either 80 microg AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel or Haemophilus influenzae type b Hiberix vaccine. Vaccinations were administered on Days 0 and 28 and participants were examined on Days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 14 after vaccination and then about every two months. Results to Day 154 are reported in this manuscript.Of 36 volunteers enrolled, 33 received both vaccinations. There were 9 adverse events related to the vaccination in subjects who received AMA1-C1 vaccine and 7 in those who received Hiberix. All were mild to moderate. No vaccine-related serious or grade 3 adverse events were observed. There was no increase in adverse events with increasing dose of vaccine or number of immunizations. In subjects who received the test vaccine, antibodies to AMA1 increased on Day 14 and peaked at Day 42, with changes from baseline significantly different from subjects who received control vaccine.AMA-C1 vaccine is well tolerated and immunogenic in children in this endemic area although the antibody response was short lived.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00341250.

  8. EDQM biological reference preparation for rabies vaccine (inactivated) for veterinary use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daas, A; Bruckner, L; Milne, C

    2015-01-01

    Rabies is a deadly zoonotic disease. Control of rabies in animals by vaccination is an important strategy to protect humans from infection and control the spread of the disease. Requirements for the quality control of rabies vaccines (inactivated) for veterinary use include an in vivo quantitative potency determination as outlined in the Ph. Eur. monograph 0451. Performance of this assay requires a reference preparation calibrated in International Units (IU). A European Pharmacopeia (Ph. Eur.) Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) for rabies vaccines (inactivated) for veterinary use, calibrated in IU, has been established for this purpose. Due to the dwindling stocks of the current batch (batch 4) of Ph. Eur. BRP for rabies vaccines (inactivated) for veterinary use, a collaborative study was run as part of the EDQM Biological Standardisation Programme to establish BRP batch 5. Ten laboratories, including Official Medicines Control Laboratories and manufacturers, participated. The candidate BRP5 was assayed against the 6(th) International Standard for rabies vaccine using the in vivo vaccination-challenge assay (monograph 0451) to assign a potency value. The candidate was also compared to BRP batch 4 to establish continuity. Taking into account the results from the comparisons a potency of 10 IU/vial was assigned and in March 2015 the Ph. Eur. Commission adopted the material as Ph. Eur. BRP for rabies vaccines (inactivated) for veterinary use batch 5. In addition to the in vivo assay 3 laboratories tested the candidate material using their in-house in vitro assays for information.

  9. Enhancing the role of veterinary vaccines reducing zoonotic diseases of humans: Linking systems biology with vaccine development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Leslie G.; Khare, Sangeeta; Lawhon, Sara D.; Rossetti, Carlos A.; Lewin, Harris A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Turse, Joshua E.; Wylie, Dennis C.; Bai, Yu; Drake, Kenneth L.

    2011-09-22

    The aim of research on infectious diseases is their prevention, and brucellosis and salmonellosis as such are classic examples of worldwide zoonoses for application of a systems biology approach for enhanced rational vaccine development. When used optimally, vaccines prevent disease manifestations, reduce transmission of disease, decrease the need for pharmaceutical intervention, and improve the health and welfare of animals, as well as indirectly protecting against zoonotic diseases of people. Advances in the last decade or so using comprehensive systems biology approaches linking genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, and biotechnology with immunology, pathogenesis and vaccine formulation and delivery are expected to enable enhanced approaches to vaccine development. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the role of computational systems biology analysis of host:pathogen interactions (the interactome) as a tool for enhanced rational design of vaccines. Systems biology is bringing a new, more robust approach to veterinary vaccine design based upon a deeper understanding of the host pathogen interactions and its impact on the host's molecular network of the immune system. A computational systems biology method was utilized to create interactome models of the host responses to Brucella melitensis (BMEL), Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (STM), and a Salmonella mutant (isogenic *sipA, sopABDE2) and linked to the basis for rational development of vaccines for brucellosis and salmonellosis as reviewed by Adams et al. and Ficht et al. [1,2]. A bovine ligated ileal loop biological model was established to capture the host gene expression response at multiple time points post infection. New methods based on Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) machine learning were employed to conduct a comparative pathogenicity analysis of 219 signaling and metabolic pathways and 1620 gene ontology (GO) categories that defined the host

  10. Avipoxviruses: infection biology and their use as vaccine vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tryland Morten

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Avipoxviruses (APVs belong to the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of the Poxviridae family. APVs are distributed worldwide and cause disease in domestic, pet and wild birds of many species. APVs are transmitted by aerosols and biting insects, particularly mosquitoes and arthropods and are usually named after the bird species from which they were originally isolated. The virus species Fowlpox virus (FWPV causes disease in poultry and associated mortality is usually low, but in flocks under stress (other diseases, high production mortality can reach up to 50%. APVs are also major players in viral vaccine vector development for diseases in human and veterinary medicine. Abortive infection in mammalian cells (no production of progeny viruses and their ability to accommodate multiple gene inserts are some of the characteristics that make APVs promising vaccine vectors. Although abortive infection in mammalian cells conceivably represents a major vaccine bio-safety advantage, molecular mechanisms restricting APVs to certain hosts are not yet fully understood. This review summarizes the current knowledge relating to APVs, including classification, morphogenesis, host-virus interactions, diagnostics and disease, and also highlights the use of APVs as recombinant vaccine vectors.

  11. A whole parasite vaccine to control the blood stages of Plasmodium: the case for lateral thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Michael F

    2011-08-01

    Now, 27 years following the cloning of malaria antigens with the promise of the rapid development of a malaria vaccine, we face significant obstacles that are belatedly being addressed. Poor immunogenicity of subunit vaccine antigens and significant antigenic diversity of target epitopes represent major hurdles for which there are no clear strategies for a way forward within the current paradigm. Thus, a different paradigm - a vaccine that uses the whole organism - is now being examined. Although most advances in this approach relate to a vaccine for the pre-erythrocytic stages (sporozoites, liver stages), this opinion paper will outline the possibilities of developing a whole parasite vaccine for the blood stage and address some of the challenges for this strategy, which are entirely different to the challenges for a subunit vaccine. It is the view of the author that both vaccine paradigms should be pursued, but that success will come more quickly using the paranormal approach of exposing individuals to ultra-low doses of whole attenuated or killed parasites. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. The evolutionary consequences of blood-stage vaccination on the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria C Barclay

    Full Text Available Malaria vaccine developers are concerned that antigenic escape will erode vaccine efficacy. Evolutionary theorists have raised the possibility that some types of vaccine could also create conditions favoring the evolution of more virulent pathogens. Such evolution would put unvaccinated people at greater risk of severe disease. Here we test the impact of vaccination with a single highly purified antigen on the malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi evolving in laboratory mice. The antigen we used, AMA-1, is a component of several candidate malaria vaccines currently in various stages of trials in humans. We first found that a more virulent clone was less readily controlled by AMA-1-induced immunity than its less virulent progenitor. Replicated parasites were then serially passaged through control or AMA-1 vaccinated mice and evaluated after 10 and 21 rounds of selection. We found no evidence of evolution at the ama-1 locus. Instead, virulence evolved; AMA-1-selected parasites induced greater anemia in naïve mice than both control and ancestral parasites. Our data suggest that recombinant blood stage malaria vaccines can drive the evolution of more virulent malaria parasites.

  13. Salivary gland thrombostasin isoforms differentially regulate blood uptake of horn flies fed on control- and thrombostasin-vaccinated cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupp, Mary S; Cupp, Eddie W; Navarre, Christine; Zhang, Dunhua; Yue, Xin; Todd, Latora; Panangala, Victor

    2010-07-01

    Thrombostasin (TS) is an anticlotting protein found in saliva of Haematobia irritans (horn flies). The polymorphic nature of the ts gene was first associated with success of horn flies blood feeding on a laboratory host, New Zealand White rabbits. In this study, we report results of similar studies testing blood uptake of horn flies feeding on a natural host, cattle. These studies confirmed the association of ts genotype with blood uptake of horn flies and showed that it was host species specific. In contrast to rabbits, blood uptake volumes of homozygous ts10 horn flies were lower than those of other ts genotypes when fed on control (ovalbumin-vaccinated) cattle. Cattle vaccinated with recombinant protein isoforms, rTS9 or rTB8, resisted horn fly feeding by yielding lower blood volumes compared with flies feeding on control cattle. The specific impact of vaccination, however, varied by ts genotype of flies. Cattle vaccinated with isoform rTS9 resisted flies of ts2, ts9, and tb8 genotype. Vaccination with isoform rTB8 produced resistance to ts8, ts9, and tb8 genotype flies. Horn flies of genotype ts10 were not affected by vaccination with either TS isoform and fed as well on rTS9- and rTB8-vaccinated as on control-vaccinated cattle. These experimental results confirm the efficacy of vaccines targeting horn fly salivary proteins and provide new insight into the dynamics of horn fly-cattle interactions in nature.

  14. Antiradiation Vaccine: Technology Development Of Prophylaxis, Prevention And Treatment Of Biological Consequences And Complications After Neutron Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava; Jones, Jeffrey

    Introduction: Neutrons irradiation produce a unique biological effectiveness compare to different types of radiation because their ability to create a denser trail of ionized atoms in biological living tissues[Straume 1982; Latif et al.2010; Katz 1978; Bogatyrev 1982]. The efficacy of an Anti-Radiation Vaccine for the prophylaxis, prevention and therapy of acute radiation pathology was studied in a neutron exposure facility. The biological effects of fast neutrons include damage of central nervous system and cardiovascular system with development of Acute Cerebrovascular and Cardiovascular forms of acute radiation pathology. After irradiation by high doses of fast neutron, formation of neurotoxins, hematotoxins,cytotoxins forming from cell's or tissue structures. High doses of Neutron Irradiation generate general and specific toxicity, inflammation reactions. Current Acute Medical Management and Methods of Radiation Protection are not effective against moderate and high doses of neutron irradiation. Our experiments demonstrate that Antiradiation Vaccine is the most effective radioprotectant against high doses of neutron-radiation. Radiation Toxins(biological substances with radio-mimetic properties) isolated from central lymph of gamma-irradiated animals could be working substance with specific antigenic properties for vaccination against neutron irradiation. Methods: Antiradiation Vaccine preparation standard - mixture of a toxoid form of Radiation Toxins - include Cerebrovascular RT Neurotoxin, Cardiovascular RT Neurotoxin, Gastrointestinal RT Neurotoxin, Hematopoietic RT Hematotoxin. Radiation Toxins were isolated from the central lymph of gamma-irradiated animals with different forms of Acute Radiation Syndromes - Cerebrovascular, Cardiovascular, Gastrointestinal, Hematopoietic forms. Devices for Y-radiation were "Panorama","Puma". Neutron exposure was accomplished at the Department of Research Institute of Nuclear Physics, Dubna, Russia. The neutrons

  15. Structural and Computational Biology in the Design of Immunogenic Vaccine Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassi Liljeroos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is historically one of the most important medical interventions for the prevention of infectious disease. Previously, vaccines were typically made of rather crude mixtures of inactivated or attenuated causative agents. However, over the last 10–20 years, several important technological and computational advances have enabled major progress in the discovery and design of potently immunogenic recombinant protein vaccine antigens. Here we discuss three key breakthrough approaches that have potentiated structural and computational vaccine design. Firstly, genomic sciences gave birth to the field of reverse vaccinology, which has enabled the rapid computational identification of potential vaccine antigens. Secondly, major advances in structural biology, experimental epitope mapping, and computational epitope prediction have yielded molecular insights into the immunogenic determinants defining protective antigens, enabling their rational optimization. Thirdly, and most recently, computational approaches have been used to convert this wealth of structural and immunological information into the design of improved vaccine antigens. This review aims to illustrate the growing power of combining sequencing, structural and computational approaches, and we discuss how this may drive the design of novel immunogens suitable for future vaccines urgently needed to increase the global prevention of infectious disease.

  16. Application of solid-phase radioimmunoassay in determining antibodies to Aujeszky's disease virus in blood serum of vaccinated pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodak, L.; Smid, B.; Valicek, L.

    1983-01-01

    In the blood sera of pigs vaccinated with inactivated vaccines manufactured by three different manufacturers the RIA method was used to determine the specific antibodies to the virus of Aujeszky's disease. In certain groups of vaccinated pigs the results of the RIA examination are unfavourably affected by the bond of antibodies to the cellular antigenous determinants. This proves that following vaccination antibodies are formed not only against the viral antigen but also against the antigens of cells on which the vaccination virus is propagated. These shortcomings are eliminated by the use of suitable cellular cultures for the preparation of viral and control antigens. Antigens are applicable for RIA and for ELISA examinations of blood sera of infected and vaccinated pigs. The advantages are described of the RIA and ELISA methods as compared with the virus neutralization test. (author)

  17. Anaemia in a phase 2 study of a blood stage falciparum malaria vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guindo Aldiouma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Phase 1-2b study of the blood stage malaria vaccine AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel was conducted in 336 children in Donéguébougou and Bancoumana, Mali. In the Phase 2 portion of the study (n = 300, no impact on parasite density or clinical malaria was seen; however, children who received the study vaccine had a higher frequency of anaemia (defined as haemoglobin Methods To further investigate the possible impact of vaccination on anaemia, additional analyses were conducted including patients from the Phase 1 portion of the study and controlling for baseline haemoglobin, haemoglobin types S or C, alpha-thalassaemia, G6PD deficiency, and age. A multiplicative intensity model was used, which generalizes Cox regression to allow for multiple events. Frailty effects for each subject were used to account for correlation of multiple anaemia events within the same subject. Intensity rates were calculated with reference to calendar time instead of time after randomization in order to account for staggered enrollment and seasonal effects of malaria incidence. Associations of anaemia with anti-AMA1 antibody were further explored using a similar analysis. Results A strong effect of vaccine on the incidence of anaemia (risk ratio [AMA1-C1 to comparator (Hiberix]= 2.01, 95% confidence interval [1.26,3.20] was demonstrated even after adjusting for baseline haemoglobin, haemoglobinopathies, and age, and using more sophisticated statistical models. Anti-AMA1 antibody levels were not associated with this effect. Conclusions While these additional analyses show a robust effect of vaccination on anaemia, this is an intensive exploration of secondary results and should, therefore, be interpreted with caution. Possible mechanisms of the apparent adverse effect on haemoglobin of vaccination with AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel and implications for blood stage vaccine development are discussed. The potential impact on malaria-associated anaemia should be closely

  18. [Oral polio vaccine in infants does not interfere in detection of enterovirus in blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Marcela; Sandoval, Carmen; Valenzuela, Patricia; Montecinos, Luisa; Martínez, Constanza; Godoy, Paula; Abarca, Katia

    2013-12-01

    There is not known if a viraemia post-oral polio vaccine (OPV) is detectable by modern molecular techniques. Such viraemia could affect the performance of the real time-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for non polio enterovirus (EV) detection, technique of growing clinical use for the study of febrile infants. To determine viraemia post-first dose of OPV in healthy infants, by molecular techniques. 50 infants less than three months without previous VPO were randomized in 5 groups: a control group with pre-vaccination blood sample (BS), group 1 BS at day 2, group 2 BS at day 4, group 3, BS at day 6 and group 4, BS at day 8 post-vaccination. Conventional and specific PCR for poliovirus and real time PCR for non polio EV were performed in BS and in OPV samples. No genetic material of poliovirus was detected in any infant, while in 9 of them (18%) non polio EV was identified. Real time PCR for EV did not amplify poliovirus from OPV samples. Results suggest that no post VPO viraemia detectable by molecular methods exists. Considering that real time PCR for EV does not allow to identify polio virus, no false positives of the test are expected as a result of a recent VPO vaccination. We documented presence of non polio EV in blood of healthy asymptomatic infants.

  19. Systems Biology and the Development of Vaccines and Drugs for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transcriptome at an unprecedented resolution. The close correlation between gene transcription and function, allow the inference of biological processes from the assessed transcriptome profile. Among the sophisticated analytical problems in microarray technology at the front and back ends respectively, are the selection of ...

  20. Canine Distemper Viral Inclusions in Blood Cells of Four Vaccinated Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, Bruce G.; Adams, Pamela S.; Cornell, William D.; Elkins, A. Darrel

    1985-01-01

    Four cases of canine distemper were detected by the presence of numerous cytoplasmic inclusions in various circulating blood cells. Fluorescent antibody techniques and electron microscopy confirmed the identity of the viral inclusions. The cases occurred in the same geographic area and within a short time span. All four dogs had been vaccinated against canine distemper, but stress or other factors may have compromised their immune status. The possibility of an unusually virulent virus strain ...

  1. RTS,S vaccination is associated with serologic evidence of decreased exposure to Plasmodium falciparum liver- and blood-stage parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Joe J; Aponte, John J; Skinner, Jeff; Nakajima, Rie; Molina, Douglas M; Liang, Li; Sacarlal, Jahit; Alonso, Pedro L; Crompton, Peter D; Felgner, Philip L; Dobaño, Carlota

    2015-03-01

    The leading malaria vaccine candidate, RTS,S, targets the sporozoite and liver stages of the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle, yet it provides partial protection against disease associated with the subsequent blood stage of infection. Antibodies against the vaccine target, the circumsporozoite protein, have not shown sufficient correlation with risk of clinical malaria to serve as a surrogate for protection. The mechanism by which a vaccine that targets the asymptomatic sporozoite and liver stages protects against disease caused by blood-stage parasites remains unclear. We hypothesized that vaccination with RTS,S protects from blood-stage disease by reducing the number of parasites emerging from the liver, leading to prolonged exposure to subclinical levels of blood-stage parasites that go undetected and untreated, which in turn boosts pre-existing antibody-mediated blood-stage immunity. To test this hypothesis, we compared antibody responses to 824 P. falciparum antigens by protein array in Mozambican children 6 months after receiving a full course of RTS,S (n = 291) versus comparator vaccine (n = 297) in a Phase IIb trial. Moreover, we used a nested case-control design to compare antibody responses of children who did or did not experience febrile malaria. Unexpectedly, we found that the breadth and magnitude of the antibody response to both liver and asexual blood-stage antigens was significantly lower in RTS,S vaccinees, with the exception of only four antigens, including the RTS,S circumsporozoite antigen. Contrary to our initial hypothesis, these findings suggest that RTS,S confers protection against clinical malaria by blocking sporozoite invasion of hepatocytes, thereby reducing exposure to the blood-stage parasites that cause disease. We also found that antibody profiles 6 months after vaccination did not distinguish protected and susceptible children during the subsequent 12-month follow-up period but were strongly associated with exposure. Together

  2. Evaluation of blood monocyte and lymphocyte population in broiler chicken after vaccination and experimental challenge with Newcastle disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taebipour, Mohammad Jafar; Dadras, Habibollah; Nazifi, Saeed; Afsar, Mina; Ansari-Lari, Maryam

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, after vaccination and challenge with Newcastle disease virus, changes in the population of blood monocytes and lymphocytes of broiler chickens were evaluated using flow cytometry. 300 apparently healthy 1-day-old Cobb broiler chicks were divided randomly into four experimental groups (n=75). At 20days of age the chicks in group 1 and 2 were vaccinated with live B1 ND vaccine. Those in group 2 were additionally injected with a killed vaccine simultaneously and group 3 chicks received only the adjuvant of the killed vaccine. The birds in groups 1, 2 and 3 were challenged with a velogenic ND virus and those in group 4 were treated as control. Sampling was done on days 1,2,3,7 after vaccination and also on 1, 2, 3,7,14, 21 post challenge days. In this study percentage of B cell population was increased after vaccination and challenge in vaccinated birds, but CD3+ cells were decreased after vaccination and challenge, which showed B cells have more expansion than T cells. The CD4+ cell percentage in vaccinated birds was always lower than control birds. However, the percentage of CD8+ cells in vaccinated birds was increased. Results indicate increased CMI with the live NDV vaccination. In this study CD4/CD8 ratio in control birds was about 1.5 at 30days of age and it was slightly lower in vaccinated and challenged birds. The percentage of monocytes in vaccinated birds was significantly higher than control birds from 3days post vaccination to the end of the experiment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pre-vaccination nasopharyngeal pneumococcal carriage in a Nigerian population: epidemiology and population biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifedayo M O Adetifa

    Full Text Available Introduction of pneumococcal vaccines in Nigeria is a priority as part of the Accelerated Vaccine Introduction Initiative (AVI of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI. However, country data on the burden of pneumococcal disease (IPD is limited and coverage by available conjugate vaccines is unknown. This study was carried out to describe the pre vaccination epidemiology and population biology of pneumococcal carriage in Nigeria.This was a cross sectional survey. Nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS were obtained from a population sample in 14 contiguous peri-urban Nigerian communities. Data on demographic characteristics and risk factor for carriage were obtained from all study participants. Pneumococci isolated from NPS were characterised by serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility and Multi Locus Sequencing Typing (MLST.The prevalence of pneumococcal carriage was 52.5%. Carriage was higher in children compared to adults (67.4% vs. 26%, highest (≈90% in infants aged <9 months and reduced significantly with increasing age (P<0.001. Serotypes 19F (18.6% and 6A (14.4% were most predominant. Potential vaccine coverage was 43.8%, 45.0% and 62% for PCV-7, PCV-10 and PCV-13 respectively. There were 16 novel alleles, 72 different sequence types (STs from the isolates and 3 Sequence Types (280, 310 and 5543 were associated with isolates of more than one serotype indicative of serotype switching. Antimicrobial resistance was high for cotrimoxazole (93% and tetracycline (84%, a third of isolates had intermediate resistance to penicillin. Young age was the only risk factor significantly associated with carriage.Pneumococcal carriage and serotype diversity is highly prevalent in Nigeria especially in infants. Based on the coverage of serotypes in this study, PCV-13 is the obvious choice to reduce disease burden and prevalence of drug resistant pneumococci. However, its use will require careful monitoring. Our findings provide sound baseline data

  4. A controllable bacterial lysis system to enhance biological safety of live attenuated Vibrio anguillarum vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Teng; Guan, Lingyu; Shang, Pengfei; Wang, Qiyao; Xiao, Jingfan; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial strains used as backbone for the generation of vaccine prototypes should exhibit an adequate and stable safety profile. Given the fact that live attenuated vaccines often contain some potential risks in virulence recovery and spread infections, new approaches are greatly needed to improve their biological safety. Here, a critically iron-regulated promoter PviuA was screened from Vibrio anguillarum, which was demonstrated to respond to iron-limitation signal both in vitro and in vivo. By using PviuA as a regulatory switch to control the expression of phage P22 lysis cassette 13-19-15, a novel in vivo inducible bacterial lysis system was established in V. anguillarum. This system was proved to be activated by iron-limitation signals and then effectively lyse V. anguillarum both in vitro and in vivo. Further, this controllable bacterial lysis system, after being transformed into a live attenuated V. anguillarum vaccine strain MVAV6203, was confirmed to significantly improve biological safety of the live attenuated vaccine without impairing its immune protection efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Utilizing population variation, vaccination, and systems biology to study human immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The move toward precision medicine has highlighted the importance of understanding biological variability within and across individuals in the human population. In particular, given the prevalent involvement of the immune system in diverse pathologies, an important question is how much and what information about the state of the immune system is required to enable accurate prediction of future health and response to medical interventions. Towards addressing this question, recent studies using vaccination as a model perturbation and systems-biology approaches are beginning to provide a glimpse of how natural population variation together with multiplexed, high-throughput measurement and computational analysis can be used to uncover predictors of immune response quality in humans. Here I discuss recent developments in this emerging field, with emphasis on baseline correlates of vaccination responses, sources of immune-state variability, as well as relevant features of study design, data generation, and computational analysis. PMID:26187853

  6. Current Status and Development of Vaccines and Other Biologics for Human Rabies Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, Charles E; Nagarajan, Thirumeni; Ertl, Hildegund

    2016-06-01

    Rabies is a neglected viral zoonosis with the highest case fatality of any infectious disease. Pasteur's historical accomplishments during the late 19(th) century began the process of human vaccine development, continuing to evolve into the 21(st) century. Over the past 35 years, great improvements occurred in the production of potent tissue culture vaccines and the gradual removal from the market of unsafe nerve tissue products. Timely and appropriate administration of modern biologics virtually assures survivorship, even after severe exposures. Nevertheless, in the developing world, if not provided for free nationally, the cost of a single course of human prophylaxis exceeds the average monthly wage of the common worker. Beyond traditional approaches, recombinant, sub-unit and other novel methods are underway to improve the availability of safe, effective and more affordable rabies biologics.

  7. Utilizing population variation, vaccination, and systems biology to study human immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, John S

    2015-08-01

    The move toward precision medicine has highlighted the importance of understanding biological variability within and across individuals in the human population. In particular, given the prevalent involvement of the immune system in diverse pathologies, an important question is how much and what information about the state of the immune system is required to enable accurate prediction of future health and response to medical interventions. Towards addressing this question, recent studies using vaccination as a model perturbation and systems-biology approaches are beginning to provide a glimpse of how natural population variation together with multiplexed, high-throughput measurement and computational analysis can be used to uncover predictors of immune response quality in humans. Here I discuss recent developments in this emerging field, with emphasis on baseline correlates of vaccination responses, sources of immune-state variability, as well as relevant features of study design, data generation, and computational analysis. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Need for new technologies for detection of adventitious agents in vaccines and other biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Laurent; Gisonni-Lex, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    From an industrial perspective, the conventional in vitro and in vivo assays used for detection of viral contaminants have shown their limitations, as illustrated by the unfortunate detection of porcine circovirus contamination in a licensed rotavirus vaccine. This contamination event illustrates the gaps within the existing adventitious agent strategy and the potential use of new broader molecular detection methods. This paper serves to summarize current testing approaches and challenges, along with opportunities for the use of these new technologies. Testing of biological products is required to ensure the safety of patients. Recently, a licensed vaccine was found to be contaminated with a virus. This contamination did not cause a safety concern to the patients; however, it highlights the need for using new testing methods to control our biological products. This paper introduces the benefits of these new tests and outlines the challenges with the current tests. © PDA, Inc. 2014.

  9. A nurse-led intervention improved blood-borne virus testing and vaccination in Victorian prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Rebecca J; White, Bethany; Kinner, Stuart A; Stoové, Mark; Guy, Rebecca; Hellard, Margaret E

    2016-12-01

    Testing is the first step in treatment and care for blood-borne viruses (BBVs) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). As new treatments for viral hepatitis emerge, it is important to document effective models for BBV/STI testing. A nurse-led intervention was implemented across three prisons in Victoria to improve BBV/STI testing. We evaluated the impact of the intervention on BBV/STI testing rates and hepatitis B (HBV) vaccination for reception prisoners. BBV/STI testing and HBV vaccination data were collected from the medical files of 100 consecutive reception prisoners at three prisons (n=300) prior to and after the intervention was implemented. BBV testing increased significantly from 21% of prisoners to 62% post-intervention. Testing for some STIs increased significantly, but remained low: 5% to 17% for chlamydia and 1% to 5% for gonorrhoea. HBV vaccination increased significantly from 2% to 19%. The nurse-led intervention resulted in substantially increased testing and vaccination, demonstrating the benefits of a concerted effort to improve BBV and STI management in correctional settings. The availability of new treatments for hepatitis C has precipitated expansion of treatment in prisons. Improving the testing rate of prisoners, the first step in the treatment cascade, will maximise the benefits. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  10. Vaccination and blood sampling acceptability during Ramadan fasting month: A cross-sectional study in Conakry, Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer-Smadja, Nathan; Ouedraogo, Ramatou; D'Ortenzio, Eric; Cissé, Papa Ndiaga; Zeggani, Zahra; Beavogui, Abdoul Habib; Faye, Sylvain Landry; Le Marcis, Frédéric; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Nguyen, Vinh-Kim

    2017-05-02

    There are few data on the acceptability of vaccination or blood sampling during Ramadan fasting month in Muslim countries. This could impact vaccination campaigns, clinical trials or healthcare during Ramadan. Using a semi-structured questionnaire, we conducted a cross-sectional study on 201 practising Muslims and 10 religious leaders in Conakry, Guinea in the wake of the recent epidemic Ebola epidemic. Acceptability of vaccination and blood sampling during Ramadan were investigated as well as reasons for refusal. Vaccination was judged acceptable during Ramadan by 46% (93/201, 95% CI 0.40-0.53) of practising Muslims versus 80% (8/10, 95% CI 0.49-0.94) of religious leaders (p=0.11). Blood sampling was judged acceptable during Ramadan by 54% (108/201, 95% CI 0.47-0.60) of practising Muslims versus 80% (8/10, 95% CI 0.49-0.94) of religious leaders (p=0.19). The percentage of participants that judged both blood sampling and vaccination acceptable during Ramadan was 40% (81/201, 95% CI 0.34-0.47) for practising Muslims versus 80% (8/10, 95% CI 0.49-0.94) for religious leaders (p=0.048). The most common reasons for refusal of vaccination or blood sampling were that nothing should enter or leave the body during Ramadan (43%), that adverse events could lead to breaking the fast (32%), that blood should not be seen during Ramadan (9%) and that the Quran explicitly forbids it (9%). Although most Muslims leaders and scientists consider that injections including immunization and blood sampling should be authorized during Ramadan, many Muslims in our study judged vaccination or blood sampling unacceptable when fasting. Widely available recommendations on healthcare during Ramadan would be useful to inform Muslims. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Corrections for inhomogeneities in biological tissue caused by blood vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talsma, A; Chance, B; Graaff, R

    In tissue optics, the assumption that blood is homogeneously distributed in tissue can give rise to miscalculations because blood is found only in blood vessels. In our paper randomly oriented blood vessels are treated as particles for which we obtained apparent absorption and scattering

  12. Human immune responses to vaccines in the first year of life: biological, socio-economic and ethical issues - a viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, M O C; Idoko, O T; Ogundare, E O; Afolabi, M O

    2013-05-17

    Human newborns are vulnerable to infectious diseases that account for majority of the morbidity and mortality, particularly in first year of life. Vaccines have become the most effective public health intervention strategy to curtail the prevalence of these infectious diseases. Although vaccines against a number of diseases exist, there are no vaccines against many other diseases that commonly affect children. The adequate assessment of immune responses to vaccines is an important step in the development of vaccines. However, a number of biological and "non-medical" socio-economic and ethical factors could influence either the administration and/or evaluation of vaccines in infants. Recognition and understanding of these determinants are crucial in planning interventions and for logical interpretations of results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The use of systems biology and immunological big data to guide vaccine development

    OpenAIRE

    Blohmke, Christoph J.; O?Connor, Daniel; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Editorial summary High-throughput technologies applied to the analysis of vaccine responses are likely to reveal the mechanisms responsible for vaccine-induced protection, aid understanding of vaccine safety and help accelerate vaccine development and clinical trials.

  14. Biological characterization of bovine herpesvirus 1 recombinants possessing the vaccine glycoprotein E negative phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muylkens, Benoît; Meurens, François; Schynts, Frédéric; de Fays, Katalin; Pourchet, Aldo; Thiry, Julien; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Antoine, Nadine; Thiry, Etienne

    2006-03-31

    Intramolecular recombination is a frequent event during the replication cycle of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1). Recombinant viruses frequently arise and survive in cattle after concomitant nasal infections with two BoHV-1 mutants. The consequences of this process, related to herpesvirus evolution, have to be assessed in the context of large use of live marker vaccines based on glycoprotein E (gE) gene deletion. In natural conditions, double nasal infections by vaccine and wild-type strains are likely to occur. This situation might generate virulent recombinant viruses inducing a serological response indistinguishable from the vaccine one. This question was addressed by generating in vitro BoHV-1 recombinants deleted in the gE gene from seven wild-type BoHV-1 strains and one mutant strain deleted in the genes encoding gC and gE. In vitro growth properties were assessed by virus production, one step growth kinetics and plaque size assay. Heterogeneity in the biological properties was shown among the investigated recombinant viruses. The results demonstrated that some recombinants, in spite of their gE minus phenotype, have biological characteristics close to wild-type BoHV-1.

  15. ABO blood type correlates with survival on prostate cancer vaccine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthana, Saddam M; Gulley, James L; Hodge, James W; Schlom, Jeffrey; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C

    2015-10-13

    Immunotherapies for cancer are transforming patient care, but clinical responses vary considerably from patient to patient. Simple, inexpensive strategies to target treatment to likely responders could substantially improve efficacy while simultaneously reducing health care costs, but identification of reliable biomarkers has proven challenging. Previously, we found that pre-treatment serum IgM to blood group A (BG-A) correlated with survival for patients treated with PROSTVAC-VF, a therapeutic cancer vaccine in phase III clinical trials for the treatment of prostate cancer. These results suggested that ABO blood type might influence efficacy. Unfortunately, blood types were not available in the clinical records for all but 8 patients and insufficient amounts of sera were left for standard blood typing methods. To test the hypothesis, therefore, we developed a new glycan microarray-based method for determining ABO blood type. The method requires only 4 μL of serum, provides 97% accuracy, and allows simultaneous profiling of many other serum anti-glycan antibodies. After validation with 220 healthy subjects of known blood type, the method was then applied to 74 PROSTVAC-VF patients and 37 control patients from a phase II trial. In this retrospective study, we found that type B and O PROSTVAC-VF patients demonstrated markedly improved clinical outcomes relative to A and AB patients, including longer median survival, longer median survival relative to Halabi predicted survival, and improved overall survival via Kaplan-Meier survival analysis (p = 0.006). Consequently, blood type may provide an inexpensive screen to pre-select patients likely to benefit from PROSTVAC-VF therapy.

  16. Strain-specific Plasmodium falciparum growth inhibition among Malian children immunized with a blood-stage malaria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurens, Matthew B; Kouriba, Bourema; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke; Angov, Evelina; Coulibaly, Drissa; Diarra, Issa; Daou, Modibo; Niangaly, Amadou; Blackwelder, William C; Wu, Yukun; Cohen, Joe; Ballou, W Ripley; Vekemans, Johan; Lanar, David E; Dutta, Sheetij; Diggs, Carter; Soisson, Lorraine; Heppner, D Gray; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Plowe, Christopher V; Thera, Mahamadou A

    2017-01-01

    The blood-stage malaria vaccine FMP2.1/AS02A, comprised of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and the adjuvant system AS02A, had strain-specific efficacy against clinical malaria caused by P. falciparum with the vaccine strain 3D7 AMA1 sequence. To evaluate a potential correlate of protection, we measured the ability of participant sera to inhibit growth of 3D7 and FVO strains in vitro using high-throughput growth inhibition assay (GIA) testing. Sera from 400 children randomized to receive either malaria vaccine or a control rabies vaccine were assessed at baseline and over two annual malaria transmission seasons after immunization. Baseline GIA against vaccine strain 3D7 and FVO strain was similar in both groups, but more children in the malaria vaccine group than in the control group had 3D7 and FVO GIA activity ≥15% 30 days after the last vaccination (day 90) (49% vs. 16%, pvaccine group was 7.4 times the mean increase in the control group (pvaccination (day 364) and did not correlate with efficacy in the extended efficacy time period to day 730. In Cox proportional hazards regression models with time-varying covariates, there was a slight suggestion of an association between 3D7 GIA activity and increased risk of clinical malaria between day 90 and day 240. We conclude that vaccination with this AMA1-based malaria vaccine increased inhibition of parasite growth, but this increase was not associated with allele-specific efficacy in the first malaria season. These results provide a framework for testing functional immune correlates of protection against clinical malaria in field trials, and will help to guide similar analyses for next-generation malaria vaccines. Clinical trials registry: This clinical trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov, registry number NCT00460525.

  17. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not work well for all pets. Your veterinarian will determine a vaccination schedule most appropriate for ... programs, but in some instances may help your veterinarian determine if your pet has a reasonable expectation ...

  18. Analyses of Brucella pathogenesis, host immunity, and vaccine targets using systems biology and bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqun eHe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Brucella is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium that causes zoonotic brucellosis in humans and various animals. Out of ten classified Brucella species, B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, and B. canis are pathogenic to humans. In the past decade, the mechanisms of Brucella pathogenesis and host immunity have been extensively investigated using the cutting edge systems biology and bioinformatics approaches. This article provides a comprehensive review of the applications of Omics (including genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics and bioinformatics technologies for the analysis of Brucella pathogenesis, host immune responses, and vaccine targets. Based on more than 30 sequenced Brucella genomes, comparative genomics is able to identify gene variations among Brucella strains that help to explain host specificity and virulence differences among Brucella species. Diverse transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression studies have been conducted to analyze gene expression profiles of wild type Brucella strains and mutants under different laboratory conditions. High throughput Omics analyses of host responses to infections with virulent or attenuated Brucella strains have been focused on responses by mouse and cattle macrophages, bovine trophoblastic cells, mouse and boar splenocytes, and ram buffy coat. Differential serum responses in humans and rams to Brucella infections have been analyzed using high throughput serum antibody screening technology. The Vaxign reverse vaccinology has been used to predict many Brucella vaccine targets. More than 180 Brucella virulence factors and their gene interaction networks have been identified using advanced literature mining methods. The recent development of community-based Vaccine Ontology and Brucellosis Ontology provides an efficient way for Brucella data integration, exchange, and computer-assisted automated reasoning.

  19. Analyses of Brucella Pathogenesis, Host Immunity, and Vaccine Targets using Systems Biology and Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongqun

    2011-01-01

    Brucella is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium that causes zoonotic brucellosis in humans and various animals. Out of 10 classified Brucella species, B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, and B. canis are pathogenic to humans. In the past decade, the mechanisms of Brucella pathogenesis and host immunity have been extensively investigated using the cutting edge systems biology and bioinformatics approaches. This article provides a comprehensive review of the applications of Omics (including genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics) and bioinformatics technologies for the analysis of Brucella pathogenesis, host immune responses, and vaccine targets. Based on more than 30 sequenced Brucella genomes, comparative genomics is able to identify gene variations among Brucella strains that help to explain host specificity and virulence differences among Brucella species. Diverse transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression studies have been conducted to analyze gene expression profiles of wild type Brucella strains and mutants under different laboratory conditions. High throughput Omics analyses of host responses to infections with virulent or attenuated Brucella strains have been focused on responses by mouse and cattle macrophages, bovine trophoblastic cells, mouse and boar splenocytes, and ram buffy coat. Differential serum responses in humans and rams to Brucella infections have been analyzed using high throughput serum antibody screening technology. The Vaxign reverse vaccinology has been used to predict many Brucella vaccine targets. More than 180 Brucella virulence factors and their gene interaction networks have been identified using advanced literature mining methods. The recent development of community-based Vaccine Ontology and Brucellosis Ontology provides an efficient way for Brucella data integration, exchange, and computer-assisted automated reasoning. PMID:22919594

  20. Strain-specific Plasmodium falciparum growth inhibition among Malian children immunized with a blood-stage malaria vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Laurens

    Full Text Available The blood-stage malaria vaccine FMP2.1/AS02A, comprised of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1 and the adjuvant system AS02A, had strain-specific efficacy against clinical malaria caused by P. falciparum with the vaccine strain 3D7 AMA1 sequence. To evaluate a potential correlate of protection, we measured the ability of participant sera to inhibit growth of 3D7 and FVO strains in vitro using high-throughput growth inhibition assay (GIA testing. Sera from 400 children randomized to receive either malaria vaccine or a control rabies vaccine were assessed at baseline and over two annual malaria transmission seasons after immunization. Baseline GIA against vaccine strain 3D7 and FVO strain was similar in both groups, but more children in the malaria vaccine group than in the control group had 3D7 and FVO GIA activity ≥15% 30 days after the last vaccination (day 90 (49% vs. 16%, p<0.0001; and 71.8% vs. 60.4%, p = 0.02. From baseline to day 90, 3D7 GIA in the vaccine group was 7.4 times the mean increase in the control group (p<0.0001. In AMA1 vaccinees, 3D7 GIA activity subsequently returned to baseline one year after vaccination (day 364 and did not correlate with efficacy in the extended efficacy time period to day 730. In Cox proportional hazards regression models with time-varying covariates, there was a slight suggestion of an association between 3D7 GIA activity and increased risk of clinical malaria between day 90 and day 240. We conclude that vaccination with this AMA1-based malaria vaccine increased inhibition of parasite growth, but this increase was not associated with allele-specific efficacy in the first malaria season. These results provide a framework for testing functional immune correlates of protection against clinical malaria in field trials, and will help to guide similar analyses for next-generation malaria vaccines. Clinical trials registry: This clinical trial was registered on clinicaltrials

  1. Cell biological characterization of the malaria vaccine candidate trophozoite exported protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Kulangara

    Full Text Available In a genome-wide screen for alpha-helical coiled coil motifs aiming at structurally defined vaccine candidates we identified PFF0165c. This protein is exported in the trophozoite stage and was named accordingly Trophozoite exported protein 1 (Tex1. In an extensive preclinical evaluation of its coiled coil peptides Tex1 was identified as promising novel malaria vaccine candidate providing the rational for a comprehensive cell biological characterization of Tex1. Antibodies generated against an intrinsically unstructured N-terminal region of Tex1 and against a coiled coil domain were used to investigate cytological localization, solubility and expression profile. Co-localization experiments revealed that Tex1 is exported across the parasitophorous vacuole membrane and located to Maurer's clefts. Change in location is accompanied by a change in solubility: from a soluble state within the parasite to a membrane-associated state after export to Maurer's clefts. No classical export motifs such as PEXEL, signal sequence/anchor or transmembrane domain was identified for Tex1.

  2. Application of solid-phase radioimmunoassay in determining antibodies to Aujeszky's disease virus in blood serum of vaccinated pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodak, L.; Smid, B.; Valicek, L. (Vyzkumny Ustav Veterinarniho Lekarstvi, Brno-Medlanky (Czechoslovakia))

    1983-11-01

    In the blood sera of pigs vaccinated with inactivated vaccines manufactured by three different manufacturers the RIA method was used to determine the specific antibodies to the virus of Aujeszky's disease. In certain groups of vaccinated pigs the results of the RIA examination are unfavourably affected by the bond of antibodies to the cellular antigenous determinants. This proves that following vaccination antibodies are formed not only against the viral antigen but also against the antigens of cells on which the vaccination virus is propagated. These shortcomings are eliminated by the use of suitable cellular cultures for the preparation of viral and control antigens. Antigens are applicable for RIA and for ELISA examinations of blood sera of infected and vaccinated pigs. The advantages are described of the RIA and ELISA methods as compared with the virus neutralization test.

  3. Simultaneous determination of trace levels of ethylmercury and methylmercury in biological samples and vaccines using sodium tetra(n-propyl)borate as derivatizing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibicar, Darija; Logar, Martina; Horvat, Nusa; Horvat, Milena [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department of Environmental Sciences, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Marn-Pernat, Andreja; Ponikvar, Rafael [University Medical Centre, Department of Nephrology, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2007-05-15

    Because of increasing awareness of the potential neurotoxicity of even low levels of organomercury compounds, analytical techniques are required for determination of low concentrations of ethylmercury (EtHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples. An accurate and sensitive method has been developed for simultaneous determination of methylmercury and ethylmercury in vaccines and biological samples. MeHg and EtHg were isolated by acid leaching (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-KBr-CuSO{sub 4}), extraction of MeHg and EtHg bromides into an organic solvent (CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}), then back-extraction into Milli-Q water. MeHg and EtHg bromides were derivatized with sodium tetrapropylborate (NaBPr{sub 4}), collected at room temperature on Tenax, separated by isothermal gas chromatography (GC), pyrolysed, and detected by cold-vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV AFS). The repeatability of results from the method was approximately 5-10% for EtHg and 5-15% for MeHg. Detection limits achieved were 0.01 ng g{sup -1} for EtHg and MeHg in blood, saliva, and vaccines and 5 ng g{sup -1} for EtHg and MeHg in hair. The method presented has been shown to be suitable for determination of background levels of these contaminants in biological samples and can be used in studies related to the health effects of mercury and its species in man. This work illustrates the possibility of using hair and blood as potential biomarkers of exposure to thiomersal. (orig.)

  4. IFN-γ and TNF-α producing CD4+ T-cells in the blood after Mycoplasma hyosynoviae challenge of vaccinated pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Hansen, Mette Sif; Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøll

    In a vaccine trial against Mycoplasma hyosynoviae infection, pigs were vaccinated with formalin fixed whole-cell-antigen formulated with adjuvant DDA/TDB (SSI). Placebo pigs received adjuvant with saline. Vaccinations were performed at five and eight weeks of age, followed by an intranasal M....... hyosynoviae challenge inoculation three weeks later. Vaccination induced both antibodies and a cell-mediated immune response (CMI) in vaccinated pigs compared to placebo pigs as shown by M. hyosynoviae antigen (Ag) specific IFN-γ response in an IL-18 potentiated whole-blood IFN-γ stimulation assay (mean IFN......-γ level 1936 pg/ml vs. 82 pg/ml (p=0.0001)). A central memory T cell phenotype with polyfunctional capacity to produce all three cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 has recently been linked to development of vaccine induced protection in several infections. In a subset of seven vaccinated pigs and four...

  5. Molecular biology of the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers: similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Efficient processing of information by the central nervous system (CNS represents an important evolutionary advantage. Thus, homeostatic mechanisms have developed that provide appropriate circumstances for neuronal signaling, including a highly controlled and stable microenvironment. To provide such a milieu for neurons, extracellular fluids of the CNS are separated from the changeable environment of blood at three major interfaces: at the brain capillaries by the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which is localized at the level of the endothelial cells and separates brain interstitial fluid (ISF from blood; at the epithelial layer of four choroid plexuses, the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier (BCSFB, which separates CSF from the CP ISF, and at the arachnoid barrier. The two barriers that represent the largest interface between blood and brain extracellular fluids, the BBB and the BCSFB, prevent the free paracellular diffusion of polar molecules by complex morphological features, including tight junctions (TJs that interconnect the endothelial and epithelial cells, respectively. The first part of this review focuses on the molecular biology of TJs and adherens junctions in the brain capillary endothelial cells and in the CP epithelial cells. However, normal function of the CNS depends on a constant supply of essential molecules, like glucose and amino acids from the blood, exchange of electrolytes between brain extracellular fluids and blood, as well as on efficient removal of metabolic waste products and excess neurotransmitters from the brain ISF. Therefore, a number of specific transport proteins are expressed in brain capillary endothelial cells and CP epithelial cells that provide transport of nutrients and ions into the CNS and removal of waste products and ions from the CSF. The second part of this review concentrates on the molecular biology of various solute carrier (SLC transport proteins at those two barriers and underlines

  6. The impact of Rotavirus mass vaccination on hospitalization rates, nosocomial Rotavirus gastroenteritis and secondary blood stream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlamy, Manuela; Kofler, Sabine; Orth, Dorothea; Würzner, Reinhard; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Streng, Andrea; Prelog, Martina

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of universal mass vaccination (UMV) against rotavirus (RV) on the hospitalization rates, nosocomial RV infections and RV-gastroenteritis (GE)-associated secondary blood stream infections (BSI). The retrospective evaluation (2002-2009) by chart analysis included all clinically diagnosed and microbiologically confirmed RV-GE cases in a large tertiary care hospital in Austria. The pre-vaccination period (2002-2005) was compared with the recommended and early funded (2006-2007) and the funded (2008-2009) vaccination periods. Primary outcomes were RV-GE-associated hospitalizations, secondary outcomes nosocomial RV disease, secondary BSI and direct hospitalization costs for children and their accompanying persons. In 1,532 children with RV-GE, a significant reduction by 73.9% of hospitalized RV-GE cases per year could be observed between the pre-vaccination and the funded vaccination period, which was most pronounced in the age groups 0-11 months (by 87.8%), 6-10 years (by 84.2%) and 11-18 years (88.9%). In the funded vaccination period, a reduction by 71.9% of nosocomial RV-GE cases per year was found compared to the pre-vaccination period. Fatalities due to nosocomial RV-GE were only observed in the pre-vaccination period (3 cases). Direct costs of hospitalized, community-acquired RV-GE cases per year were reduced by 72.7% in the funded vaccination period. The reduction of direct costs for patients (by 86.9%) and accompanying persons (86.2%) was most pronounced in the age group 0-11 months. UMV may have contributed to the significant decrease of RV-GE-associated hospitalizations, to a reduction in nosocomial RV infections and RV-associated morbidity due to secondary BSI and reduced direct hospitalization costs. The reduction in nosocomial cases is an important aspect considering severe disease courses in hospitalized patients with co-morbidities and death due to nosocomial RV-GE.

  7. Impact of the RTS,S malaria vaccine candidate on naturally acquired antibody responses to multiple asexual blood stage antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J Campo

    Full Text Available Partial protective efficacy lasting up to 43 months after vaccination with the RTS,S malaria vaccine has been reported in one cohort (C1 of a Phase IIb trial in Mozambique, but waning efficacy was observed in a smaller contemporaneous cohort (C2. We hypothesized that low dose exposure to asexual stage parasites resulting from partial pre-erythrocytic protection afforded by RTS,S may contribute to long-term vaccine efficacy to clinical disease, which was not observed in C2 due to intense active detection of infection and treatment.Serum collected 6 months post-vaccination was screened for antibodies to asexual blood stage antigens AMA-1, MSP-1(42, EBA-175, DBL-α and variant surface antigens of the R29 laboratory strain (VSA(R29. Effect of IgG on the prospective hazard of clinical malaria was estimated. No difference was observed in antibody levels between RTS,S and control vaccine when all children aged 1-4 years at enrollment in both C1 and C2 were analyzed together, and no effects were observed between cohort and vaccine group. RTS,S-vaccinated children <2 years of age at enrollment had lower levels of IgG for AMA-1 and MSP-1(42 (p<0.01, all antigens, while no differences were observed in children ≥2 years. Lower risk of clinical malaria was associated with high IgG to EBA-175 and VSA(R29 in C2 only (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 0.76, 95% CI 0.66-0.88; HR: 0.75, 95% CI 0.62-0.92, respectively.Vaccination with RTS,S modestly reduces anti-AMA-1 and anti-MSP-1 antibodies in very young children. However, for antigens associated with lower risk of clinical malaria, there were no vaccine group or cohort-specific effects, and age did not influence antibody levels between treatment groups for these antigens. The antigens tested do not explain the difference in protective efficacy in C1 and C2. Other less-characterized antigens or VSA may be important to protection.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00197041.

  8. Analysis of peripheral blood immune cells after prophylactic immunization with HPV-16/18 ASO4-adjuvanted vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Hus

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV is a causal factor for more than 99% of cervical cancers. Recently, prophylactic vaccines have been developed to prevent infections with cancer-associated HPV types (HPV16 and HPV18. The aim of this study was to analyze the changes in the immune system that occur within four weeks of the first dose of HPV-16/18 ASO4-adjuvanted vaccine. Assessment of the percentages of selected cell populations in peripheral blood of 20 healthy volunteers vaccinated with Cervarix was performed using flow cytometry. The analysis revealed an increase in the proportion of activated B and CD4+ T helper cells and an absence of significant differences in cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes, indicating activation of the humoral response after vaccination, without a significant effect on cellular response. There were no significant changes in the NK cell population, and there was a reduction of the percentage of NKT-like cells, which may result from expiry of the primary response at the time of analysis. The presented results are preliminary, and in the context of the increasing use of the anti-HPV vaccine, it would be worth continuing the study in larger groups of patients and at earlier and later time points in combination with the measurement of specific anti-HPV16 and -HPV18 antibody levels. Such an assessment could therefore contribute not only to better understanding of the exact mechanism of action of the vaccine, but also to defining the immunological parameters that determine its effectiveness.

  9. Comparison of blood and brain mercury levels in infant monkeys exposed to methylmercury or vaccines containing thimerosal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbacher, Thomas M; Shen, Danny D; Liberato, Noelle; Grant, Kimberly S; Cernichiari, Elsa; Clarkson, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    Thimerosal is a preservative that has been used in manufacturing vaccines since the 1930s. Reports have indicated that infants can receive ethylmercury (in the form of thimerosal) at or above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidelines for methylmercury exposure, depending on the exact vaccinations, schedule, and size of the infant. In this study we compared the systemic disposition and brain distribution of total and inorganic mercury in infant monkeys after thimerosal exposure with those exposed to MeHg. Monkeys were exposed to MeHg (via oral gavage) or vaccines containing thimerosal (via intramuscular injection) at birth and 1, 2, and 3 weeks of age. Total blood Hg levels were determined 2, 4, and 7 days after each exposure. Total and inorganic brain Hg levels were assessed 2, 4, 7, or 28 days after the last exposure. The initial and terminal half-life of Hg in blood after thimerosal exposure was 2.1 and 8.6 days, respectively, which are significantly shorter than the elimination half-life of Hg after MeHg exposure at 21.5 days. Brain concentrations of total Hg were significantly lower by approximately 3-fold for the thimerosal-exposed monkeys when compared with the MeHg infants, whereas the average brain-to-blood concentration ratio was slightly higher for the thimerosal-exposed monkeys (3.5 +/- 0.5 vs. 2.5 +/- 0.3). A higher percentage of the total Hg in the brain was in the form of inorganic Hg for the thimerosal-exposed monkeys (34% vs. 7%). The results indicate that MeHg is not a suitable reference for risk assessment from exposure to thimerosal-derived Hg. Knowledge of the toxicokinetics and developmental toxicity of thimerosal is needed to afford a meaningful assessment of the developmental effects of thimerosal-containing vaccines.

  10. Quantitation of antibody-secreting cells in the blood after vaccination with Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Heilmann, C; Andersen, V

    1990-01-01

    The human B-lymphocyte response to protein-conjugated polysaccharide antigens has not previously been studied at the cellular level. In order to do so, we developed and evaluated haemolytic plaque-forming cell assays detecting Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) capsular polysaccharide...... capsular polysaccharides from Hib and pneumococci. The predominance of IgA AbSC in response to both conjugate and pure polysaccharide vaccines is probably due to reactivation of the same clones of IgA-committed memory B cells originally primed at the mucosa by natural exposure to the polysaccharide...

  11. Blood stage malaria vaccine eliciting high antigen-specific antibody concentrations confers no protection to young children in Western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhards R Ogutu

    Full Text Available The antigen, falciparum malaria protein 1 (FMP1, represents the 42-kDa C-terminal fragment of merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1 of the 3D7 clone of P. falciparum. Formulated with AS02 (a proprietary Adjuvant System, it constitutes the FMP1/AS02 candidate malaria vaccine. We evaluated this vaccine's safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy in African children.A randomised, double-blind, Phase IIb, comparator-controlled trial.The trial was conducted in 13 field stations of one mile radii within Kombewa Division, Nyanza Province, Western Kenya, an area of holoendemic transmission of P. falciparum. We enrolled 400 children aged 12-47 months in general good health.Children were randomised in a 1ratio1 fashion to receive either FMP1/AS02 (50 microg or Rabipur(R rabies vaccine. Vaccinations were administered on a 0, 1, and 2 month schedule. The primary study endpoint was time to first clinical episode of P. falciparum malaria (temperature >/=37.5 degrees C with asexual parasitaemia of >/=50,000 parasites/microL of blood occurring between 14 days and six months after a third dose. Case detection was both active and passive. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated for eight months after first immunisations; vaccine efficacy (VE was measured over a six-month period following third vaccinations.374 of 400 children received all three doses and completed six months of follow-up. FMP1/AS02 had a good safety profile and was well-tolerated but more reactogenic than the comparator. Geometric mean anti-MSP-1(42 antibody concentrations increased from1.3 microg/mL to 27.3 microg/mL in the FMP1/AS02 recipients, but were unchanged in controls. 97 children in the FMP1/AS02 group and 98 controls had a primary endpoint episode. Overall VE was 5.1% (95% CI: -26% to +28%; p-value = 0.7.FMP1/AS02 is not a promising candidate for further development as a monovalent malaria vaccine. Future MSP-1(42 vaccine development should focus on other formulations and antigen constructs

  12. European Pharmacopoeia biological reference preparation for poliomyelitis vaccine (inactivated): collaborative study for the establishment of batch No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Daas, A; Milne, C

    2016-01-01

    Inactivated poliomyelitis vaccines are an important part of the World Health Organization (WHO) control strategy to eradicate poliomyelitis. Requirements for the quality control of poliomyelitis vaccines (inactivated) include the use of an in vitro D antigen quantification assay for potency determination on the final lot as outlined in the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) monograph 0214. Performance of this assay requires a reference preparation calibrated in International Units (IU). A Ph. Eur. biological reference preparation (BRP) for poliomyelitis vaccine (inactivated) calibrated in IU has been established for this purpose. Due to the dwindling stocks of batch 2 of the BRP a collaborative study was run as part of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM) Biological Standardisation Programme to establish BRP batch 3 (BRP3). Twelve laboratories including Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) and manufacturers participated. The candidate BRP3 (cBRP3) was from the same source and had the same characteristics as BRP batch 2 (BRP2). During the study the candidate was calibrated against the 3 rd International Standard for inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine using in-house D antigen ELISA assays in line with the Ph. Eur. monograph 0214. The candidate was also compared to BRP2 to evaluate the continuity. Based on the results of the study, values of 320 DU/mL, 78 DU/mL and 288 DU/mL (D antigen units/mL) (IU) for poliovirus type 1, 2 and 3 respectively were assigned to the candidate. In June 2016, the Ph. Eur. Commission adopted the material as Ph. Eur. BRP for poliomyelitis vaccine (inactivated) batch 3.

  13. 76 FR 79203 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Veterinary Biological Products for Swine Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    .... Sustained outbreaks of highly pathogenic influenza in animals increase the risk of reassortment and adaption... efficient and versatile than the conventional inactivated whole-virus vaccines; (b) Can be precisely...) Because they do not contain other viral proteins, a diagnostic test will enable vaccinated animals to be...

  14. Distribution of kappa and lambda light chain isotypes among human blood immunoglobulin-secreting cells after vaccination with pneumococcal polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilmann, C; Barington, T

    1989-01-01

    The light chain isotype of immunoglobulin-secreting blood cells was investigated by means of monolayer plaque-forming cell assays allowing direct immunofluorescence staining for cytoplasmic kappa and lambda light chains in centre cells. The study revealed that cultured, polyclonally activated...... pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), IgM-, IgG- and IgA-secreting cells expressed the kappa light chain isotype in approximately 65% of the cells. IgM- and IgG-secreting cells induced by vaccination with pneumococcal polysaccharides had a similar percentage of kappa light chain......-containing cells. In contrast, IgA-secreting cells induced by vaccination with pneumococcal polysaccharides showed a different (bimodal) distribution as regards expression of kappa light chain. The majority (56%) of the investigated individuals expressed kappa light chain in approximately 50% of the cells...

  15. Vaccine Adverse Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... in the primary immunization series in infants Report Adverse Event Report a Vaccine Adverse Event Contact FDA ( ...

  16. An Oral DNA Vaccine Encoding Endoglin Eradicates Breast Tumors by Blocking Their Blood Supply

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reisfeld, Ralph A

    2005-01-01

    .... These cells overexpress a glycoprotein called endoglin which stimulates such vessels. We successfully constructed and evaluated an oral endoglin-based DNA vaccine and demonstrated its capability to induce a robust CD8...

  17. Blocking Blood Supply to Breast Carcinoma with a DNA Vaccine Encoding VEGF Receptor-2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiang, Rong

    2003-01-01

    Proof of concept was established for the hypothesis driving this project indicating that effective suppression of tumor angiogenesis can be achieved with a DNA vaccine encoding murine VEGF receptor-2 (FLK-l...

  18. Blocking Blood Supply to Breast Carcinoma with a DNA Vaccine Encoding VEGF Receptor-2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiang, Rong

    2004-01-01

    .... In our second fiscal year, we demonstrated proof of concept indicating that effective suppression of tumor angiogenesis can be achieved with a DNA vaccine encoding either muring VEGF receptor-2 (Flk-1...

  19. An Oral DNA Vaccine Encoding Endoglin Eradicates Breast Tumors by Blocking Their Blood Supply

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reisfeld, Ralph A

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to meet the urgent need for the development of novel and effective treatments for metastatic breast cancer, we developed and evaluated a novel, oral DNA vaccine targeting endoglin (CD105...

  20. Response of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF ) in blood and spleen mice that vaccinated with P.berghei radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darlina; Tur R; Teja K

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor is a glycoprotein derived from helper T lymphocytes that play an important role in the body's response against malaria infection. However, TNF-α has double play that is on appropriate levels will provide protection and healing, while at excessive levels which may be a response to hyperparasitemia. Thus investigated the expression of TNF alpha secreted blood lymphocytes and spleen cells the mice that's infected with 1 x 10 7 P.berghei infectious or inactivated by radiation. Levels of TNF alpha serum and spleen cell culture medium was monitored on days 2, 7, 14 post infection. Monitoring of parasite growth every two days for 60 days. Determination of TNF alpha levels were measure using ELISA. The results showed parasitaemia mice infected with 175 Gy irradiated parasites have pre patent period of 16 days longer than the control (non-irradiated parasites) with low parasitaemia. TNF alpha concentration that secreted spleen cells of mice vaccinated higher than control mice. Concentration of TNF alpha that secreted blood lymphocyte of mice vaccinated lower than control mice. It was concluded that the secretion of TNF alpha by blood lymphocytes caused more pathogenic factors of the parasite, while the secretion of TNF alpha in spleen due to an immune response against the parasite. (author)

  1. Delivery of Biologics Across the Blood-Brain Barrier with Molecular Trojan Horse Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardridge, William M

    2017-12-01

    Biologics are potential new therapeutics for many diseases of the central nervous system. Biologics include recombinant lysosomal enzymes, neurotrophins, decoy receptors, and therapeutic antibodies. These are large molecule drugs that do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). All classes of biologics have been tested, without success, in clinical trials of brain disease over the last 25 years. In none of these past clinical trials was the biologic re-engineered to enable transport across the BBB. If the biologic does not cross the BBB, the drug cannot reach the target site in brain, and success in a clinical trial is not expected. Biologics can be re-engineered for BBB transport with the use of molecular Trojan horse technology. A BBB molecular Trojan horse is a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against an endogenous BBB receptor transporter, such as the insulin receptor or transferrin receptor. The receptor-specific MAb penetrates the brain via transport on the endogenous BBB receptor. The MAb acts as a molecular Trojan horse to deliver across the BBB the biologic pharmaceutical that is genetically fused to the MAb. The lead Trojan horse is a MAb against the human insulin receptor (HIR), and HIRMAb-derived fusion proteins have entered clinical trials for the treatment of brain disease.

  2. Blood borne infections in sport: risks of transmission, methods of prevention, and recommendations for hepatitis B vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, R; Wallace, W A

    2004-12-01

    Athletes are at risk of blood borne infections through bleeding injuries or injection of drugs with contaminated syringes. Prevention should focus on reducing non-sport associated risky behaviour, as well as dealing appropriately with bleeding injuries. The risk of transmission of hepatitis B virus is particularly high in athletes in contact and collision sports, those who live in or travel to endemic regions, injecting drug abusers, and those who practice first aid when there is no healthcare practitioner available. It is recommended that such athletes, and also adolescent athletes, should be vaccinated against the virus as a routine.

  3. Structural diversity and biological importance of ABO, H, Lewis and secretor histo-blood group carbohydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos de Mattos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT ABO, H, secretor and Lewis histo-blood system genes control the expression of part of the carbohydrate repertoire present in areas of the body occupied by microorganisms. These carbohydrates, besides having great structural diversity, act as potential receptors for pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms influencing susceptibility and resistance to infection and illness. Despite the knowledge of some structural variability of these carbohydrate antigens and their polymorphic levels of expression in tissue and exocrine secretions, little is known about their biological importance and potential applications in medicine. This review highlights the structural diversity, the biological importance and potential applications of ABO, H, Lewis and secretor histo-blood carbohydrates.

  4. Antiviral Biologic Produced in DNA Vaccine/Goose Platform Protects Hamsters Against Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome When Administered Post-exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Haese

    Full Text Available Andes virus (ANDV and ANDV-like viruses are responsible for most hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS cases in South America. Recent studies in Chile indicate that passive transfer of convalescent human plasma shows promise as a possible treatment for HPS. Unfortunately, availability of convalescent plasma from survivors of this lethal disease is very limited. We are interested in exploring the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce antiviral biologics, including polyclonal neutralizing antibodies for use in humans. Geese produce IgY and an alternatively spliced form, IgYΔFc, that can be purified at high concentrations from egg yolks. IgY lacks the properties of mammalian Fc that make antibodies produced in horses, sheep, and rabbits reactogenic in humans. Geese were vaccinated with an ANDV DNA vaccine encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins. All geese developed high-titer neutralizing antibodies after the second vaccination, and maintained high-levels of neutralizing antibodies as measured by a pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA for over 1 year. A booster vaccination resulted in extraordinarily high levels of neutralizing antibodies (i.e., PsVNA80 titers >100,000. Analysis of IgY and IgYΔFc by epitope mapping show these antibodies to be highly reactive to specific amino acid sequences of ANDV envelope glycoproteins. We examined the protective efficacy of the goose-derived antibody in the hamster model of lethal HPS. α-ANDV immune sera, or IgY/IgYΔFc purified from eggs, were passively transferred to hamsters subcutaneously starting 5 days after an IM challenge with ANDV (25 LD50. Both immune sera, and egg-derived purified IgY/IgYΔFc, protected 8 of 8 and 7 of 8 hamsters, respectively. In contrast, all hamsters receiving IgY/IgYΔFc purified from normal geese (n=8, or no-treatment (n=8, developed lethal HPS. These findings demonstrate that the DNA vaccine/goose platform can be used to produce a candidate antiviral

  5. Defining and measuring blood donor altruism: a theoretical approach from biology, economics and psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R; Ferguson, E

    2014-02-01

    While blood donation is traditionally described as a behaviour motivated by pure altruism, the assessment of altruism in the blood donation literature has not been theoretically informed. Drawing on theories of altruism from psychology, economics and evolutionary biology, it is argued that a theoretically derived psychometric assessment of altruism is needed. Such a measure is developed in this study that can be used to help inform both our understanding of the altruistic motives of blood donors and recruitment intervention strategies. A cross-sectional survey (N = 414), with a 1-month behavioural follow-up (time 2, N = 77), was designed to assess theoretically derived constructs from psychological, economic and evolutionary biological theories of altruism. Theory of planned behaviour (TPB) variables and co-operation were also assessed at time 1 and a measure of behavioural co-operation at time 2. Five theoretical dimensions (impure altruism, kinship, self-regarding motives, reluctant altruism and egalitarian warm glow) of altruism were identified through factor analyses. These five altruistic motives differentiated blood donors from non-donors (donors scored higher on impure altruism and reluctant altruism), showed incremental validity over TPB constructs to predict donor intention and predicted future co-operative behaviour. These findings show that altruism in the context of blood donation is multifaceted and complex and, does not reflect pure altruism. This has implication for recruitment campaigns that focus solely on pure altruism. © 2013 The Authors. Vox Sanguinis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. on behalf of International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of Onderstepoort Biological Products’ Rift Valley fever Clone 13 vaccine in sheep and goats under field conditions in Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modou M. Lo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This blinded field safety study was conducted in Senegal to assess safety and immunogenicity of administration of the registered dose of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV Clone 13 vaccine (Onderstepoort Biological Products to sheep and goats of West African breeds under natural conditions. A total of 267 small ruminants (220 sheep, 47 goats were included; half received RVFV Clone 13 vaccine at the recommended dose and half received the diluent (as placebo only. The study was performed on three commercial farms in the northern and eastern region of Senegal in accordance with veterinary good clinical practices. The animals were observed daily for 3 days after vaccination, and then weekly for 1 year. In both sheep and goats vaccinated against RVFV seroconversion rates above 70% were recorded. No seroconversion related to RVFV was observed in placebo-treated animals. No statistically significant differences were determined between placebo and vaccinated groups for mean rectal temperatures for the first 3 days after administration (p > 0.05. No abnormal clinical signs related to treatment were noted, and only one slight injection site reaction was observed in one vaccinated animal for 2 days after vaccination. Out of 176 births assessed over 1 year (93 from the vaccinated group, 83 from the placebo group, 9 were abnormal in the placebo group and 3 in the vaccinated group (p > 0.05. The frequency of adverse events was similar in the placebo and vaccinated groups. RVFV Clone 13 vaccine administered according to the manufacturer’s instructions was safe and well tolerated in West African breeds of sheep and goats, including animals of approximately 6 months of age and pregnant females, under field conditions in Senegal. Antibody levels persisted up to 1 year after vaccination.

  7. Cell-Based Systems Biology Analysis of Human AS03-Adjuvanted H5N1 Avian Influenza Vaccine Responses: A Phase I Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Leigh M; Hoek, Kristen L; Goll, Johannes B; Samir, Parimal; Galassie, Allison; Allos, Tara M; Niu, Xinnan; Gordy, Laura E; Creech, C Buddy; Prasad, Nripesh; Jensen, Travis L; Hill, Heather; Levy, Shawn E; Joyce, Sebastian; Link, Andrew J; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2017-01-01

    Vaccine development for influenza A/H5N1 is an important public health priority, but H5N1 vaccines are less immunogenic than seasonal influenza vaccines. Adjuvant System 03 (AS03) markedly enhances immune responses to H5N1 vaccine antigens, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. We compared the safety (primary endpoint), immunogenicity (secondary), gene expression (tertiary) and cytokine responses (exploratory) between AS03-adjuvanted and unadjuvanted inactivated split-virus H5N1 influenza vaccines. In a double-blinded clinical trial, we randomized twenty adults aged 18-49 to receive two doses of either AS03-adjuvanted (n = 10) or unadjuvanted (n = 10) H5N1 vaccine 28 days apart. We used a systems biology approach to characterize and correlate changes in serum cytokines, antibody titers, and gene expression levels in six immune cell types at 1, 3, 7, and 28 days after the first vaccination. Both vaccines were well-tolerated. Nine of 10 subjects in the adjuvanted group and 0/10 in the unadjuvanted group exhibited seroprotection (hemagglutination inhibition antibody titer > 1:40) at day 56. Within 24 hours of AS03-adjuvanted vaccination, increased serum levels of IL-6 and IP-10 were noted. Interferon signaling and antigen processing and presentation-related gene responses were induced in dendritic cells, monocytes, and neutrophils. Upregulation of MHC class II antigen presentation-related genes was seen in neutrophils. Three days after AS03-adjuvanted vaccine, upregulation of genes involved in cell cycle and division was detected in NK cells and correlated with serum levels of IP-10. Early upregulation of interferon signaling-related genes was also found to predict seroprotection 56 days after first vaccination. Using this cell-based systems approach, novel mechanisms of action for AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccination were observed. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01573312.

  8. Blocking Blood Supply to Breast Carcinoma With a DNA Vaccine Encoding VEGF Receptor-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    vaccination: an update. Methods Mol Med 2003;87:377–90. 14. Ambrosini G, Adida C, Altieri DC. A novel anti- apoptosis gene, survivin, expressed in cancer...endothelial cells. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1999;264:781–8. 26. O’Connor DS, Schechner JS, Adida C, et al. Control of apoptosis during angiogenesis by...minigene DNA vaccine protects mice from tumors of different origins by inducing a T cell-mediated suppression of tumor angiogenesis. From the Department of

  9. [Induction of biological protection in pigs against infection with Aujeszky disease virus by vaccination with large doses of live or inactivated vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuffa, A

    1986-02-01

    Pigs were inoculated against the Aujeszky's disease twice in a four-week interval. The dose of the live vaccine was 10(6) TKID50 and the titres of neutralizing antibodies were 1 : 16 to 1 : 128 in blood serum. Two weeks later the pigs were exposed to contact infection. Primary multiplication of the virus was observed on the mucous membranes of the nose and oropharynx and the virus was detected on the nasal mucous membrane within one to five days, the maximum infection titre values being 10(1.3) TKID50, and on the oropharyngeal mucous membrane within seven days, the maximum titres being up to 10(3.5) TKID50. In another group the pigs were inoculated with the same dose of attenuated virus or re-vaccinated with a dose of 10(8.5) TKID50, with neutralizing antibody titres of 1 : 256 to 1 : 1024 in blood serum. No viruses were detected on the nasal mucous membrane after contact infection and only trace amounts of the virus were found in the oropharynx within one to five days. Six piglets were inoculated in the same way but the infection was intranasal. The infective virus was detected on the nasal mucous membrane of only one piglet; however, trace amounts of the virus were found in the oropharynx of all the six piglets within three to nine days after infection. The nasal mucous membrane and oropharynx of the noninoculated control piglets exposed to intranasal infection were infectious until death and those of the contact-infected piglets remained so until the 14th day. At the intranasal infection of the piglets infected twice with a live or inactivated vaccine and slaughtered the 1st to 14th day after intranasal infection, the virus was replicated only in the place of primary multiplication without penetrating into the CNS and the internal organs. The intranasal infection of susceptible control piglets resulted in the dissemination of the infection via the neurogenic and lymphohaematogenic routes.

  10. Poor validity of self-reported HBV vaccination among young heroin users in Spain supports the policy "don't ask, draw a blood sample, vaccinate and try to schedule another visit".

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Luis; Toro, Carlos; Brugal, M Teresa; Vallejo, Fernando; Soriano, Vicente; Barrio, Gregorio; Ballesta, Rosario; Bravo, María J

    2007-01-01

    To assess the validity of self-reported hepatitis B virus vaccination status in young heroin users. Cross-sectional study among 949 street-recruited young injection heroin users (IHUs) and non-injection heroin users (NIHUs) in Madrid, Barcelona and Seville. Face-to-face interviews and dried blood spot tested for anti-HBc and anti-HBs. The validity of self-reported vaccination status was assessed comparing with the serological status. The percentage of agreement with the kappa (kappa) statistic and the positive predictive value were calculated. The percentage of agreement between self-reported and serologic vaccination status was 51.9% overall, with little difference by city (53.1% in Barcelona, 49.0% in Madrid and 51.5% in Seville) or between IHUs (51.3%) and NIHUs (53.0%). All the kappa scores were lower than 0.1. The positive predictive value of self-reports was less than 25% in all categories analysed, except in the city of Barcelona (37%). Among those who indicated that they had been vaccinated, 31% were actually susceptible. In areas with a high prevalence of infection and rising coverage of vaccination the policy "don't ask, take a blood sample, give a dose of vaccine and try to schedule another visit" should be recommended in clinical practice.

  11. Gene expression profiling in whole blood identifies distinct biological pathways associated with obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorman Shelby A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions and represents a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. Methods To explore the relationship between increased body mass and gene expression in blood, we conducted whole-genome expression profiling of whole blood from seventeen obese and seventeen well matched lean subjects. Gene expression data was analyzed at the individual gene and pathway level and a preliminary assessment of the predictive value of blood gene expression profiles in obesity was carried out. Results Principal components analysis of whole-blood gene expression data from obese and lean subjects led to efficient separation of the two cohorts. Pathway analysis by gene-set enrichment demonstrated increased transcript levels for genes belonging to the "ribosome", "apoptosis" and "oxidative phosphorylation" pathways in the obese cohort, consistent with an altered metabolic state including increased protein synthesis, enhanced cell death from proinflammatory or lipotoxic stimuli, and increased energy demands. A subset of pathway-specific genes acted as efficient predictors of obese or lean class membership when used in Naive Bayes or logistic regression based classifiers. Conclusion This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the whole blood transcriptome in obesity and demonstrates that the investigation of gene expression profiles from whole blood can inform and illustrate the biological processes related to regulation of body mass. Additionally, the ability of pathway-related gene expression to predict class membership suggests the feasibility of a similar approach for identifying clinically useful blood-based predictors of weight loss success following dietary or surgical interventions.

  12. Changes in peripheral blood level of regulatory T cells in patients with malignant melanoma during treatment with dendritic cell vaccination and low-dose IL-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjoern, J; Brimnes, M K; Andersen, M H

    2011-01-01

    In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-α and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high) , was prospecti......In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-α and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high...

  13. Antiradiation UV Vaccine: UV Radiation, Biological effects, lesions and medical management - immune-therapy and immune-protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    rabbits, 11-12 months old, live weight 3.5-3.7 (n=11), Balb mice, 2-3 months old, live weight 20-22 g (n=33), Wistar rats, 3-4 months old, live weight 180-220 g(n=33). The studies were approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee for ethical animal research equivalent, at each institution. Seven rabbits, ten mice, eleven Wistar rats were vaccinated with a UV antiradiation vaccine. A second group of animals was used as biological control which received vaccine but no UV Radiation and a third group of animals was used as control without any interventions. Before and after UV Radiation, Vaccination with the UV antiradiation vaccine were provided 17 days prior to UV exposure. The animals were irradiated by a DRT-1 UV generator lamp. The dose of irradiation for laboratory, experimental animals was 10-12 * Standard Erythema Dose (SED) at L=283,7 Laboratory animals were placed in to the box with ventilation. Results: Ultraviolet irradiation of the skin was performed with high doses and causes an inflammation or erythema in all experimental animals. However the grade of skin damage and inflammation was significantly different between animals protected by vaccination and non-protected, non-vaccinated animals. Animals UV-irradiated, but who did not receive the antiradiation vaccine suffered from extensive UV skin burns of second or third degree (grade 2-3). However, animals protected with the UV antiradiation vaccine demonstrated much mild forms of skin cellular injury - mainly erythema, first degree skin burns and a few small patches with second degree skin burns (grade 1-2). Discussion: The severity of skin damage depended on area of exposed skin, time and dose of UV irradiation. Skin injury could be divided into 4 major grades: 1. Faint erythema with dry desquamation. 2. Moderate to severe erythema. 3. Severe erythema with blistering, moist desquamation. 4. Toxic epidermal necrolysis. Mild doses of UV radiation and ionizing radiation can induce cell death by apoptosis and

  14. Studies of biological properties of Uncaria tomentosa extracts on human blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bors, Milena; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Pilarski, Radosław; Sicińska, Paulina; Gulewicz, Krzysztof; Bukowska, Bożena

    2012-08-01

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC is a lignified climbing plant from South and Central America, which (under the name of "vilcacora" or "cat's claw") has become highly popular in many countries due to its proven immunostimmulatory and anti-inflammatory activities and also with respect to its anticancer and antioxidative effects. There are insufficient data on the mechanism of U. tomentosa action on normal blood mononuclear cells. The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of ethanol and aqueous extracts from bark and leaves of Uncaria tomentosa on the structure and function of human mononuclear cells and to find out whether the kind of extractant used modulates biological activity of the extracts studied. Plant material consisted of four different extracts: (1) ethanol extract from leaves, (2) aqueous extract from leaves, (3) ethanol extract from bark and (4) aqueous extract from bark. The effect of these extracts on protein damage as well as on free-radical formation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analyzed. Moreover, changes in viability, size, and granularity as well as apoptotic alterations in human blood mononuclear cells exposed to U. tomentosa extracts were investigated. The oxidative changes were observed in mononuclear blood cells exposed to both ethanol and aqueous extracts obtained from bark and leaves. Moreover, in the cells studied the extracts from U. tomentosa induced apoptosis and a decrease in viability of mononuclear blood cells, with the exception of aqueous extract from leaves. Additionally, no statistically significant changes in the cell size were observed both for aqueous extracts from leaves and bark. Changes in the blood mononuclear cell granularity were observed at 250 μg/mL for all extracts examined. The strongest changes were observed for the ethanol extract of the bark, which increased cell granularity at 50 μg/mL and changed cell size at 100 μg/mL. The conducted research showed differences in biological activity

  15. Micrometastatic cancer cells in lymph nodes, bone marrow, and blood: Clinical significance and biologic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Stanley P L; Tseng, William W

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis may be regarded as a progressive process from its inception in the primary tumor microenvironment to distant sites by way of the lymphovascular system. Although this type of tumor dissemination often occurs in an orderly fashion via the sentinel lymph node (SLN), acting as a possible gateway to the regional lymph nodes, bone marrow, and peripheral blood and ultimately to distant metastatic sites, this is not a general rule as tumor cells may enter the blood and spread to distant sites, bypassing the SLN. Methods of detecting micrometastatic cancer cells in the SLN, bone marrow, and peripheral blood of patients have been established. Patients with cancer cells in their SLN, bone marrow, or peripheral blood have worse clinical outcomes than patients with no evidence of spread to these compartments. The presence of these cells also has important biologic implications for disease progression and the clinician's understanding of the process of cancer metastasis. Further characterization of these micrometastatic cancer cells at each stage and site of metastasis is needed to design novel selective therapies for a more "personalized" treatment. © 2014 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  16. Synthesis and biological screening by novel hybrid fluorocarbon hydrocarbon compounds for use as artificial blood substitutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moacanin, J.; Scherer, K.; Toronto, A.; Lawson, D.; Terranova, T.; Yavrouian, A.; Astle, L.; Harvey, S.; Kaaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    A series of hybrid fluorochemicals of general structure R(1)R(2)R(3)CR(4) was prepared where the R(i)'s (i=1,2,3) is a saturated fluoroalkyl group of formula C sub N F sub 2n+1, and R(4) is an alkyl group C sub n H sub 2n+1 or a related moiety containing amino, ether, or ester functions but no CF bonds. Compounds of this class containing approximately eight to twenty carbons total have physical properties suitable for use as the oxygen carrying phase of fluorochemical emulsion artificial blood. The chemical synthesis, and physical and biological testing of pure single isomers of the proposed artificial blood candidate compounds are included. Significant results are given.

  17. Isolation, Specification, Molecular Biology Assessment and Vaccine Development of Clostridium in Iran: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Pilehchian Langroudi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Context: The genus Clostridium, which consists of spore-forming anaerobes, can cause different diseases in domestic animals and human and some of them are serious and fatal. According to the increasing economic value of the meat and milk-producing animals, the importance of a certain number of such diseases in Iran is unquestionable. Evidence Acquisition: In Iran, and probably in other Near East countries, much attention was formerly paid to control more serious contagious diseases, such as rinderpest, anthrax, etc. resulting in the negligence of diseases such as enterotoxaemia. The epizootiological position has now changed whereby some of the contagious diseases are eradicated or are being methodically controlled.Now it is time to care about the other problems such as clostridial diseases, which threaten the health of the sheep and cattle. It is impossible to eradicate these infectious microorganisms, since they are normally found in the soil and the intestinal contents of apparently healthy animals. Therefore, it is necessary to resort to vaccination which in some cases has given encouraging results. To avoid the losses from such infections it is necessary to have the best possible vaccination information, methodically and regularity of the susceptible animals. Conclusions: This review refers to the veterinary aspects of the anaerobic clostridial diseases and vaccine development concerning the works carried out in Iran and especially at the Razi Serum and Vaccine Research Institute in the last eight decades.

  18. Induction of antigen-specific antibody response in human pheripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro by a dog kidney cell vaccine against rabies virus (DKCV).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); H.G. Loggen; R.H.J. Bakker (Roland); J.A.A.M. van Asten (Jack); J.G. Kreeftenberg; P. van der Marel; G. van Steenis (Bert)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractIn the present report an in vitro method for obtaining a secondary human antibody response to a dog kidney cell vaccine against rabies virus (DKCV) is described. Cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal rabies-immune and nonimmune donors were stimulated in vitro by

  19. New Biological Insights in the Immunomodulatory Effects of Mucosal Polybacterial Vaccines in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera-Alhambra, Marta; Palomares, Oscar; Perez de Diego, Rebeca; Diaz-Lezcano, Ignacio; Sanchez-Ramon, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    A main focus in healthcare is the active search for alternative strategies to antibiotics, both for prophylactic and therapeutical interventions, due to the accelerated and widespread increase in antibiotic resistance. This problem is more marked for patients with recurrent infections, in which the risk for antibiotic resistance and adverse effects is higher and can be life-threatening. Although antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment for infectious diseases, prophylactic vaccines via the mucosal route in defined populations of patients with recurrent infections has gained use in recent years. Concomitantly, relevant advances in the formulation and administration of these vaccines driven by an increased knowledge of mucosal immunity have expanded their use, although still in its infancy. These drugs target both the innate and adaptive immune systems, at the actual point of entry of most pathogens. A fascinating new application of the concepts of trained immunity may open novel studies in their potential uses, given the paradoxically simultaneous pro-tolerogenic and boosting effector effects on diverse immune cells for different antigens. Here we delineate an updated review on the immunomodulatory mechanisms of mucosal polybacterial vaccines. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Extracellular membrane vesicles in blood products-biology and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilija Krstova Krajnc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular membrane vesicles are fragments shed from plasma membranes off all cell types that are undergoing apoptosis or are being subjected to various types of stimulation or stress.  Even in the process of programmed cell death (apoptosis, cell fall apart of varying size vesicles. They expose phosphatidylserine (PS on the outer leaflet of their membrane, and bear surface membrane antigens reflecting their cellular origin. Extracellular membrane vesicles have been isolated from many types of biological fluids, including serum, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, saliva, tears and conditioned culture medium. Flow cytometry is one of the many different methodological approaches that have been used to analyze EMVs. The method attempts to characterize the EMVs cellular origin, size, population, number, and structure. EMVs are present and accumulate in blood products (erythrocytes, platelets as well as in fresh frozen plasma during storage. The aim of this review is to highlight the importance of extracellular vesicles as a cell-to-cell communication system and the role in the pathogenesis of different diseases. Special emphasis will be given to the implication of extracellular membrane vesicles in blood products and their clinical relevance. Although our understanding of the role of  EMVs in disease is far from comprehensive, they display promise as biomarkers for different diseases in the future and also as a marker of quality and safety in the quality control of blood products.

  1. Biological characteristics of human menstrual blood-derived endometrial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanli; Niu, Rongcheng; Yang, Fen; Yan, Yan; Liang, Shengying; Sun, Yuliang; Shen, Ping; Lin, Juntang

    2018-03-01

    Successful isolation of human endometrial stem cells from menstrual blood, namely menstrual blood-derived endometrial stem cells (MenSCs), has provided enticing alternative seed cells for stem cell-based therapy. MenSCs are enriched in the self-regenerative tissue, endometrium, which shed along the periodic menstrual blood and thus their acquisition involves no physical invasiveness. However, the impact of the storage duration of menstrual blood prior to stem cell isolation, the age of the donor, the number of passages on the self-renewing of MenSCs, the paracrine production of biological factors in MenSCs and expression of adhesion molecules on MenSCs remain elusive. In this study, we confirmed that MenSCs reside in shedding endometrium, and documented that up to 3 days of storage at 4°C has little impact on MenSCs, while the age of the donor and the number of passages are negatively associated with proliferation capacity of MenSCs. Moreover, we found that MenSCs were actually immune-privileged and projected no risk of tumour formation. Also, we documented a lung- and liver-dominated, spleen- and kidney-involved organic distribution profile of MenSC 3 days after intravenous transfer into mice. At last, we suggested that MenSCs may have potentially therapeutic effects on diseases through paracrine effect and immunomodulation. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  2. Whither vaccines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Charlene M C; Pinto, Marta V; Sadarangani, Manish; Plotkin, Stanley A

    2017-06-01

    Currently used vaccines have had major effects on eliminating common infections, largely by duplicating the immune responses induced by natural infections. Now vaccinology faces more complex problems, such as waning antibody, immunosenescence, evasion of immunity by the pathogen, deviation of immunity by the microbiome, induction of inhibitory responses, and complexity of the antigens required for protection. Fortunately, vaccine development is now incorporating knowledge from immunology, structural biology, systems biology and synthetic chemistry to meet these challenges. In addition, international organisations are developing new funding and licensing pathways for vaccines aimed at pathogens with epidemic potential that emerge from tropical areas. © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular and Cellular Dynamics in the Skin, the Lymph Nodes, and the Blood of the Immune Response to Intradermal Injection of Modified Vaccinia Ankara Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Rosenbaum

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available New vaccine design approaches would be greatly facilitated by a better understanding of the early systemic changes, and those that occur at the site of injection, responsible for the installation of a durable and oriented protective response. We performed a detailed characterization of very early infection and host response events following the intradermal administration of the modified vaccinia virus Ankara as a live attenuated vaccine model in non-human primates. Integrated analysis of the data obtained from in vivo imaging, histology, flow cytometry, multiplex cytokine, and transcriptomic analysis using tools derived from systems biology, such as co-expression networks, showed a strong early local and systemic inflammatory response that peaked at 24 h, which was then progressively replaced by an adaptive response during the installation of the host response to the vaccine. Granulocytes, macrophages, and monocytoid cells were massively recruited during the local innate response in association with local productions of GM-CSF, IL-1β, MIP1α, MIP1β, and TNFα. We also observed a rapid and transient granulocyte recruitment and the release of IL-6 and IL-1RA, followed by a persistent phase involving inflammatory monocytes. This systemic inflammation was confirmed by molecular signatures, such as upregulations of IL-6 and TNF pathways and acute phase response signaling. Such comprehensive approaches improve our understanding of the spatiotemporal orchestration of vaccine-elicited immune response, in a live-attenuated vaccine model, and thus contribute to rational vaccine development.

  4. Physicochemical and biological characterization of 1E10 Anti-Idiotype vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Yoan J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 1E10 monoclonal antibody is a murine anti-idiotypic antibody that mimics N-glycolyl-GM3 gangliosides. This antibody has been tested as an anti-idiotypic cancer vaccine, adjuvated in Al(OH3, in several clinical trials for melanoma, breast, and lung cancer. During early clinical development this mAb was obtained in vivo from mice ascites fluid. Currently, the production process of 1E10 is being transferred from the in vivo to a bioreactor-based method. Results Here, we present a comprehensive molecular and immunological characterization of 1E10 produced by the two different production processes in order to determine the impact of the manufacturing process in vaccine performance. We observed differences in glycosylation pattern, charge heterogeneity and structural stability between in vivo-produced 1E10 and bioreactor-obtained 1E10. Interestingly, these modifications had no significant impact on the immune responses elicited in two different animal models. Conclusions Changes in 1E10 primary structure like glycosylation; asparagine deamidation and oxidation affected 1E10 structural stability but did not affect the immune response elicited in mice and chickens when compared to 1E10 produced in mice.

  5. Optical force on diseased blood cells: Towards the optical sorting of biological matter

    KAUST Repository

    Gongora, J. S. Totero

    2015-05-01

    By employing a series of massively parallel ab-initio simulations, we study how optical forces act on biological matter subject to morphological disease. As a representative case study, we here consider the case of Plasmodium falciparum on red blood cells (RBC) illuminated by a monochromatic plane wave. Realistic parameters for the geometry and the refractive index are then taken from published experiments. In our theoretical campaign, we study the dependence of the optical force on the disease stage for different incident wavelengths. We show that optical forces change significantly with the disease, with amplitude variation in the hundreds of pN range. Our results open up new avenues for the design of new optical systems for the treatment of human disease. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Biology and Mechanics of Blood Flows Part II: Mechanics and Medical Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Thiriet, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Biology and Mechanics of Blood Flows presents the basic knowledge and state-of-the-art techniques necessary to carry out investigations of the cardiovascular system using modeling and simulation. Part II of this two-volume sequence, Mechanics and Medical Aspects, refers to the extraction of input data at the macroscopic scale for modeling the cardiovascular system, and complements Part I, which focuses on nanoscopic and microscopic components and processes. This volume contains chapters on anatomy, physiology, continuum mechanics, as well as pathological changes in the vasculature walls including the heart and their treatments. Methods of numerical simulations are given and illustrated in particular by application to wall diseases. This authoritative book will appeal to any biologist, chemist, physicist, or applied mathematician interested in the functioning of the cardiovascular system.

  7. Extracorporeal blood oxygenation and ozonation: clinical and biological implications of ozone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, N; Gaggiotti, E; Galli, F

    2005-01-01

    Some lines of evidence have suggested that the challenge to antioxidants and biomolecules provoked by pro-oxidants such as ozone may be used to generate a controlled stress response of possible therapeutic relevance in some immune dysfunctions and chronic, degenerative conditions. Immune and endothelial cells have been proposed to be elective targets of the positive molecular effects of ozone and its derived species formed during blood ozonation. On the bases of these underlying principles and against often prejudicial scepticism and concerns about its toxicity, ozone has been used in autohemotherapy (AHT) for four decades with encouraging results. However, clinical application and validation of AHT have been so far largely insufficient. Latterly, a new and more effective therapeutic approach to ozone therapy has been established, namely extracorporeal blood oxygenation and ozonation (EBOO). This technique, first tested in vitro and then in vivo in sheep and humans (more than 1200 treatments performed in 82 patients), is performed with a high-efficiency apparatus that makes it possible to treat with a mixture of oxygen-ozone (0.5-1 microg/ml oxygen) in 1 h of extracorporeal circulation up to 4800 ml of heparinized blood without technical or clinical problems, whereas only 250 ml of blood can be treated with ozone by AHT. The EBOO technique can be easily adapted for use in hemodialysis also. The standard therapeutic cycle lasts for 7 weeks in which 14 treatment sessions of 1 h are performed. After a session of EBOO, the interaction of ozone with blood components results in 4-5-fold increased levels of thiobarbituric acid reactants and a proportional decrease in plasma protein thiols without any appreciable erythrocyte haemolysis. On the basis of preliminary in vitro evidence, these simple laboratory parameters may represent a useful complement in the routine monitoring of biological compliance to the treatment. The clinical experience gained so far confirms the

  8. No biological evidence of XMRV in blood or prostatic fluid from prostate cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Mendoza

    Full Text Available XMRV (xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus was initially discovered in association with prostate cancer and later with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Its association with CFS is now largely discredited, and current results support a laboratory origin for XMRV with no reproducible evidence for infection of humans. However, some results indicating the presence of XMRV in prostate cancer are difficult to attribute to sample contamination. Here we have sought biological evidence that might confirm the presence of XMRV in prostate cancer samples previously having tested positive.We have tested for infectious XMRV and neutralizing antibodies against XMRV in blood plasma from 29 subjects with prostate cancer, and for infectious XMRV in prostate secretions from another five prostate cancer subjects. Nine of these subjects had previously tested positive for XMRV by PCR or by virus assay. We did not detect XMRV or related retroviruses in any sample, and the neutralizing activities of the plasma samples were all very low, a result inconsistent with XMRV infection of the plasma donors.We find no evidence for XMRV infection of any human subject tested, either by assay for infectious virus or for neutralizing antibodies. Our results are consistent with the majority of published studies on XMRV, which find that XMRV is not present in humans. The observed low to undetectable XMRV neutralization by human plasma indicates a lack of innate restriction of XMRV replication by soluble factors in human blood.

  9. Biological characterization of clones derived from the edmonston strain of measles virus in comparison with schwarz and CAM-70 vaccine strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Beatriz Junqueira Borges

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Four virus clones were derived from the Edmonston strain of measles virus by repeated plaque purification. These clones were compared with the vaccine strains Schwarz and CAM-70 in terms of biological activities including plaque formation, hemagglutination, hemolysis and replication in Vero cells and chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF. Two clones of intermediate plaque yielded mixed plaque populations on subcultivation whereas the other two, showing small and large plaque sizes, showed stable plaque phenotypes. The vaccine strains showed consistent homogeneous plaque populations. All the Edmonston clones showed agglutination of monkey erythrocytes in isotonic solution while both vaccine strains hemagglutinated only in the presence of high salt concentrations. Variation in the hemolytic activity was observed among the four clones but no hemolytic activity was detected for the vaccine virus strains. Vaccine strains replicated efficiently both in Vero cells and CEF. All four clones showed efficient replication in Vero cells but different replication profiles in CEF. Two of them replicated efficiently, one was of intermediate efficiency and the other showed no replication in CEF. Two of the clones showed characteristics similar to vaccine strains. One in terms of size and homogeneity of plaques, the other for a low hemolytic activity and both for the efficiency of propagation in CEF.

  10. Blood-Brain Barrier Penetrating Biologic TNF-α Inhibitor for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Rudy; Knox, Jillian; Chang, Jae; Derbedrossian, Aram; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Cribbs, David; Boado, Ruben J; Pardridge, William M; Sumbria, Rachita K

    2017-07-03

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) driven processes are involved at multiple stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathophysiology and disease progression. Biologic TNF-α inhibitors (TNFIs) are the most potent class of TNFIs but cannot be developed for AD since these macromolecules do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A BBB-penetrating TNFI was engineered by the fusion of the extracellular domain of the type II human TNF receptor (TNFR) to a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the mouse transferrin receptor (TfR), designated as the cTfRMAb-TNFR fusion protein. The cTfRMAb domain functions as a molecular Trojan horse, binding to the mouse TfR and ferrying the biologic TNFI across the BBB via receptor-mediated transcytosis. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of this BBB-penetrating biologic TNFI in a mouse model of AD. Six-month-old APPswe, PSEN 1dE9 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice were treated with saline (n = 13), the cTfRMAb-TNFR fusion protein (n = 12), or etanercept (non-BBB-penetrating biologic TNFI; n = 11) 3 days per week intraperitoneally. After 12 weeks of treatment, recognition memory was assessed using the novel object recognition task, mice were sacrificed, and brains were assessed for amyloid beta (Aβ) load, neuroinflammation, BBB damage, and cerebral microhemorrhages. The cTfRMAb-TNFR fusion protein caused a significant reduction in brain Aβ burden (both Aβ peptide and plaque), neuroinflammatory marker ICAM-1, and a BBB disruption marker, parenchymal IgG, and improved recognition memory in the APP/PS1 mice. Fusion protein treatment resulted in low antidrug-antibody formation with no signs of either immune reaction or cerebral microhemorrhage development with chronic 12-week treatment. Chronic treatment with the cTfRMAb-TNFR fusion protein, a BBB-penetrating biologic TNFI, offers therapeutic benefits by targeting Aβ pathology, neuroinflammation, and BBB-disruption, overall improving recognition memory in a transgenic mouse model

  11. Biological therapeutics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenstein, Ben; Brook, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    This introductory textbook covers all the main categories of biological medicines, including vaccines, hormonal preparations, drugs for rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases, drugs...

  12. New candidate vaccines against blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria: prime-boost immunization regimens incorporating human and simian adenoviral vectors and poxviral vectors expressing an optimized antigen based on merozoite surface protein 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodman, Anna L.; Epp, C.; Moss, D.; Holder, A. A.; Wilson, J. M.; Gao, G. P.; Long, C. A.; Remarque, E. J.; Thomas, A. W.; Ammendola, V.; Colloca, S.; Dicks, M. D. J.; Biswas, S.; Seibel, D.; van Duivenvoorde, L. M.; Gilbert, S. C.; Hill, A. V. S.; Draper, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Although merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) is a leading candidate vaccine antigen for blood-stage malaria, its efficacy in clinical trials has been limited in part by antigenic polymorphism and potentially by the inability of protein-in-adjuvant vaccines to induce strong cellular immunity. Here we

  13. Mechanism of action for anti-radiation vaccine in reducing the biological impact of high-dose gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after high-dose gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naïve animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. Initial analysis of the biochemical characteristics indicated that the SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which they mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  14. Mechanism of Action for Anti-Radiation Vaccine in Reducing the Biological Impact of High-Dose Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then collected and circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naive animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. We partially analyzed the biochemical characteristics of the SRDs. The SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which the mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  15. Mechanism of Action for Anti-radiation Vaccine in Reducing the Biological Impact of High-dose Gamma Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then collected and circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naive animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. Initial analysis of the biochemical characteristics indicated that the SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which the mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  16. Effects of dietary Centella asiatica (L.) Urban on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood composition in piglets vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneewan, Chamroon; Mekbungwan, Apichai; Charerntantanakul, Wasin; Yamauchi, Kohsho; Yamauchi, Koh-en

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the effects of Centella asiatica (L.) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility and blood composition in piglets, 32 nursery pigs were fed 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0% dietary C. asiatica (L.) from 15 to 90 kg BW. At 30 kg BW, nutrient digestibility was measured and at 35 kg BW piglets were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Hematological parameters were checked at 40 and 80 kg BW. Compared with the control, growth performance was not affected. The ether extract, ash and calcium digestibility were lower at 0.5%, and dry matter, crude protein, crude fat, phosphorus and energy digestibility were lower at 1.0% (Phyopneumoniae did not differ except that at 40 kg the cholesterol of 0.5% was lower (Phyopneumoniae-specific antibodies tended to be higher with increasing levels of C. asiatica (L.) (Pmycoplasma immunity to M. hyopneumoniae might suggest that C. asiatica (L.) has no function to elevate body weight but has the potential to enhance innate immunity. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. Serum Albumin Domain Structures in Human Blood Serum by Mass Spectrometry and Computational Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsom, Adam; Schneider, Michael; Fischer, Lutz; Brock, Oliver; Rappsilber, Juri

    2016-03-01

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry has proven useful for studying protein-protein interactions and protein structure, however the low density of cross-link data has so far precluded its use in determining structures de novo. Cross-linking density has been typically limited by the chemical selectivity of the standard cross-linking reagents that are commonly used for protein cross-linking. We have implemented the use of a heterobifunctional cross-linking reagent, sulfosuccinimidyl 4,4'-azipentanoate (sulfo-SDA), combining a traditional sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide (sulfo-NHS) ester and a UV photoactivatable diazirine group. This diazirine yields a highly reactive and promiscuous carbene species, the net result being a greatly increased number of cross-links compared with homobifunctional, NHS-based cross-linkers. We present a novel methodology that combines the use of this high density photo-cross-linking data with conformational space search to investigate the structure of human serum albumin domains, from purified samples, and in its native environment, human blood serum. Our approach is able to determine human serum albumin domain structures with good accuracy: root-mean-square deviation to crystal structure are 2.8/5.6/2.9 Å (purified samples) and 4.5/5.9/4.8Å (serum samples) for domains A/B/C for the first selected structure; 2.5/4.9/2.9 Å (purified samples) and 3.5/5.2/3.8 Å (serum samples) for the best out of top five selected structures. Our proof-of-concept study on human serum albumin demonstrates initial potential of our approach for determining the structures of more proteins in the complex biological contexts in which they function and which they may require for correct folding. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001692. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Biological consequences from interaction of nanosized titanium(iv) oxides with defined human blood components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Aaron

    The utility of engineered nanomaterials is growing, particularly the titanium(iv) oxide (titanium dioxide, TiO2) nanoparticles. TiO 2 is very useful for brightening paints, and coloring foods. Nano-sized TiO2 is also useful for sunscreens, cosmetics, and can be utilized as a photocatalyst. However, the nanometer size of the TiO2 nanoparticle is a characteristic that may contribute oxidative stress to red blood cells (RBCs) in humans. This study utilized screening methods to evaluate different forms of TiO2 nanoparticles which differ by primary particle size, specific surface area, crystalline phase, and surface polarity. RBCs are rich in the intracellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH). HPLC analysis revealed that some TiO2 nanoparticles caused oxidation of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Vitamin E is a major membrane-bound antioxidant. Vitamin E levels were then determined by HPLC in the RBC membrane after exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles. The HPLC results showed that each nanoparticle oxidized RBC glutathione and membrane vitamin E at different rates. When hemoglobin was mixed with each TiO2 nanoparticle, hemoglobin was adsorbed at varying rates to the surface of the nanoparticles. Similarly, the aminothiol homocysteine was also adsorbed at different rates by the TiO2 nanoparticles. Using light microscopy, some TiO2 nanoparticles caused the formation of RBC aggregates which significantly changed the RBC morphology. The aggregation data was quantified using a hemacytometer. The TiO2 nanoparticles also caused hemolysis of RBCs. Hemolysis is considered to be a toxic endpoint for RBCs. Changes in the nucleated lymphocyte gene expression of certain oxidative stress genes were also observed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The data indicates that RBCs can ultimately be hemolyzed by biological oxidative damage resulting from a combination of oxidative mechanisms. Additionally, the TiO2 nanoparticles demonstrated the ability to adsorb biomolecules to

  19. The Emergence of Blood and Blood Vessels in the Embryo and Its Relevance to Postnatal Biology and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Tiffany M.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    Blood and blood vessels develop in parallel within mammalian systems, and this temporal and spatial association has led to the confirmation of an endothelial origin of hematopoiesis. The extraembryonic yolk sac and aorto-gonado-mesonephros (AGM) region both contain a specialized population of endothelial cells ("hemogenic endothelium") that function to produce hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, which then differentiate to provide the full complement of blood cells within the developing embryo and furthermore in the adult system. Therefore, this population has great therapeutic potential in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. This chapter reviews the development of the vascular and hematopoietic systems, characterization and function of the hemogenic endothelium within embryonic and embryonic stem cell (ES cell) models, and speculate on the presence of such a population within the adult system. In order to harness this endothelial subtype for clinical application, we must understand both the normal functions of these cells and the potential for misregulation in disease states.

  20. Safety and preliminary evidence of biologic efficacy of a mammaglobin-a DNA vaccine in patients with stable metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Tucker, Natalia; Herndon, John; Li, Lijin; Sturmoski, Mark; Ellis, Matthew; Ma, Cynthia; Naughton, Michael; Lockhart, A Craig; Gao, Feng; Fleming, Timothy; Goedegebuure, Peter; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Gillanders, William E

    2014-12-01

    Mammaglobin-A (MAM-A) is overexpressed in 40% to 80% of primary breast cancers. We initiated a phase I clinical trial of a MAM-A DNA vaccine to evaluate its safety and biologic efficacy. Patients with breast cancer with stable metastatic disease were eligible for enrollment. Safety was monitored with clinical and laboratory assessments. The CD8 T-cell response was measured by ELISPOT, flow cytometry, and cytotoxicity assays. Progression-free survival (PFS) was described using the Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator. Fourteen subjects have been treated with the MAM-A DNA vaccine and no significant adverse events have been observed. Eight of 14 subjects were HLA-A2(+), and the CD8 T-cell response to vaccination was studied in detail. Flow cytometry demonstrated a significant increase in the frequency of MAM-A-specific CD8 T cells after vaccination (0.9% ± 0.5% vs. 3.8% ± 1.2%; P cells (41 ± 32 vs. 215 ± 67 spm; P cell responses, and preliminary evidence suggests improved PFS. Additional studies are required to define the potential of the MAM-A DNA vaccine for breast cancer prevention and/or therapy. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Phase 1 trial of AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel plus CPG 7909: an asexual blood-stage vaccine for Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory E D Mullen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1, a polymorphic merozoite surface protein, is a leading blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate. This is the first reported use in humans of an investigational vaccine, AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel, with the novel adjuvant CPG 7909.A phase 1 trial was conducted at the University of Rochester with 75 malaria-naive volunteers to assess the safety and immunogenicity of the AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel+CPG 7909 malaria vaccine. Participants were sequentially enrolled and randomized within dose escalating cohorts to receive three vaccinations on days 0, 28 and 56 of either 20 microg of AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel+564 microg CPG 7909 (n = 15, 80 microg of AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel (n = 30, or 80 microg of AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel+564 microg CPG 7909 (n = 30.Local and systemic adverse events were significantly more likely to be of higher severity with the addition of CPG 7909. Anti-AMA1 immunoglobulin G (IgG were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and the immune sera of volunteers that received 20 microg or 80 microg of AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel+CPG 7909 had up to 14 fold significant increases in anti-AMA1 antibody concentration compared to 80 microg of AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel alone. The addition of CPG 7909 to the AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel vaccine in humans also elicited AMA1 specific immune IgG that significantly and dramatically increased the in vitro growth inhibition of homologous parasites to levels as high as 96% inhibition.The safety profile of the AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel+CPG 7909 malaria vaccine is acceptable, given the significant increase in immunogenicity observed. Further clinical development is ongoing.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00344539.

  2. Evaluation of some selected vaccines and other biological products irradiated by gamma rays, electron beams and X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, J.C. E-mail: may@cber.fda.gov; Rey, L.; Lee, C.-J

    2002-03-01

    Molecular sizing potency results are presented for irradiated samples of one lot of Haemophilus b conjugate vaccine, pneumococcal polysaccharide type 6B and typhoid vi polysaccharide vaccine. The samples were irradiated (25 kGy) by gamma rays, electron beams and X-rays. IgG and IgM antibody response in mice test results (ELISA) are given for the Hib conjugate vaccine irradiated at 0 deg. C or frozen in liquid nitrogen.

  3. [The biological reaction of inflammation, methylglyoxal of blood plasma, functional and structural alterations in elastic type arteries at the early stage of hypertension disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V N; Dmitriev, V A; Oshchepkov, E V; Balakhonova, T V; Tripoten', M I; Shiriaeva, Iu K

    2012-08-01

    The article deals with studying of the relationship between biologic reaction of inflammation with glycosylation reaction and content of methylglyoxal in blood serum. The positive correlation between pulse wave velocity and content of methylglyoxal, C-reactive protein in intercellular medium and malleolar brachial index value was established. This data matches the experimental results concerning involvement of biological reaction of inflammation into structural changes of elastic type arteries under hypertension disease, formation of arteries' rigidity and increase of pulse wave velocity. The arterial blood pressure is a biological reaction of hydrodynamic pressure which is used in vivo by several biological functions: biological function of homeostasis, function of endoecology, biological function of adaptation and function of locomotion. The biological reaction of hydrodynamic (hydraulic) pressure is a mode of compensation of derangement of several biological functions which results in the very high rate of hypertension disease in population. As a matter of fact, hypertension disease is a syndrome of lingering pathological compensation by higher arterial blood pressure of the biological functions derangements occurring in the distal section at the level of paracrine cenoses of cells. The arterial blood pressure is a kind of in vivo integral indicator of deranged metabolism. The essential hypertension disease pathogenically is a result of the derangement of three biological functions: biological function of homeostasis, biological function of trophology - nutrition (biological reaction of external feeding - exotrophia) and biological function of endoecology. In case of "littering" of intercellular medium in vivo with nonspecific endogenic flogogens a phylogenetically earlier activation of biological reactions of excretion, inflammation and hydrodynamic arterial blood pressure occur. In case of derangement of biological function of homeostasis, decreasing of

  4. Phase 1 study in malaria naïve adults of BSAM2/Alhydrogel®+CPG 7909, a blood stage vaccine against P. falciparum malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth D Ellis

    Full Text Available A Phase 1 dose escalating study was conducted in malaria naïve adults to assess the safety, reactogenicity, and immunogenicity of the blood stage malaria vaccine BSAM2/Alhydrogel®+ CPG 7909. BSAM2 is a combination of the FVO and 3D7 alleles of recombinant AMA1 and MSP1(42, with equal amounts by weight of each of the four proteins mixed, bound to Alhydrogel®, and administered with the adjuvant CPG 7909. Thirty (30 volunteers were enrolled in two dose groups, with 15 volunteers receiving up to three doses of 40 µg total protein at Days 0, 56, and 180, and 15 volunteers receiving up to three doses of 160 µg protein on the same schedule. Most related adverse events were mild or moderate, but 4 volunteers experienced severe systemic reactions and two were withdrawn from vaccinations due to adverse events. Geometric mean antibody levels after two vaccinations with the high dose formulation were 136 µg/ml for AMA1 and 78 µg/ml for MSP1(42. Antibody responses were not significantly different in the high dose versus low dose groups and did not further increase after third vaccination. In vitro growth inhibition was demonstrated and was closely correlated with anti-AMA1 antibody responses. A Phase 1b trial in malaria-exposed adults is being conducted.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00889616.

  5. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte binding protein homologue 5-interacting protein, PfRipr, as a highly conserved blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntege, Edward H; Arisue, Nobuko; Ito, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Tomoyuki; Palacpac, Nirianne M Q; Egwang, Thomas G; Horii, Toshihiro; Takashima, Eizo; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2016-11-04

    Genetic variability in Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites hampers current malaria vaccine development efforts. Here, we hypothesize that to address the impact of genetic variability on vaccine efficacy in clinical trials, conserved antigen targets should be selected to achieve robust host immunity across multiple falciparum strains. Therefore, suitable vaccine antigens should be assessed for levels of polymorphism and genetic diversity. Using a total of one hundred and two clinical isolates from a region of high malaria transmission in Uganda, we analyzed extent of polymorphism and genetic diversity in four recently reported novel blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate proteins: Rh5 interacting protein (PfRipr), GPI anchored micronemal antigen (PfGAMA), rhoptry-associated leucine zipper-like protein 1 (PfRALP1) and Duffy binding-like merozoite surface protein 1 (PfMSPDBL1). In addition, utilizing the wheat germ cell-free system, we expressed recombinant proteins for the four candidates based on P. falciparum laboratory strain 3D7 sequences, immunized rabbits to obtain specific antibodies (Abs) and performed functional growth inhibition assay (GIA). The GIA activity of the raised Abs was demonstrated using both homologous 3D7 and heterologous FVO strains in vitro. Both pfripr and pfralp1 are less polymorphic but the latter is comparatively more diverse, with varied number of regions having insertions and deletions, asparagine and 6-mer repeats in the coding sequences. Pfgama and pfmspdbl1 are polymorphic and genetically diverse among the isolates with antibodies against the 3D7-based recombinant PfGAMA and PfMSPDBL1 inhibiting merozoite invasion only in the 3D7 but not FVO strain. Moreover, although Abs against the 3D7-based recombinant PfRipr and PfRALP1 proteins potently inhibited merozoite invasion of both 3D7 and FVO, the GIA activity of anti-PfRipr was much higher than that of anti-PfRALP1. Thus, PfRipr is regarded as a promising blood-stage vaccine

  6. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination elicits IgG anti-AB blood group antibodies in healthy individuals and patients with Type I diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendelin Wolfram

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypothesis: Blood group antibodies are natural antibodies that develop early in life in response to cross-reactive environmental antigens in the absence of antigen encounter. Even later in life structural similarities in saccharide composition between environmental antigens such as bacterial polysaccharides and blood group A/B antigens could lead to changes in serum levels, IgM/IgG isotype and affinity maturation of blood group anti-A/B antibodies. We adressed the question whether immunization with pneumococcal polysaccharide (PnP vaccine (PPV Pneumovax®23 could have such an effect in patients with with type I diabetes mellitus (DM I, an autoimmune disease where an aberrant immune response to microbial antigens likely plays a role.Methods: Anti-PnP IgM and IgG responses were determined by ELISA and the Diamed-ID Micro Typing System was used to screen anti-A/B antibody titer before and after Pneumovax®23 immunization in 28 healthy individuals and 16 patients with DM I. In addition, surface plasmon resonance (SPR technology using the Biacore® device and a synthetic blood group A/B trisaccharide as the antigen was applied to investigate IgM and IgG anti-A/B antibodies and to measure antibody binding dynamics. Results: All healthy individuals and DM I patients responded with anti-PnP IgM and IgG antibody production four to six weeks after Pneumovax®23 (Pn23 immunization, while no increase in blood group anti-A/B antibody titer was observed when measured by the Diamed-ID Micro Typing System. Interestingly, isotype-specific testing by SPR-technology revealed an increase in blood group anti-A/B IgG, but not IgM, following Pn23 immunization in both patients and controls. No change in binding characteristics of blood group anti-A/B antibodies could be detected following Pn23 vaccination, supporting the assumption of an increase in IgG antibody titer with no or very little affinity maturation.Conclusion: The study provides evidence for epitope sharing

  7. Changes in cytokine and biomarker blood levels in patients with colorectal cancer during dendritic cell-based vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan; Claesson, Mogens; Nielsen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    of responding patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine and biomarker responses in patients with colorectal cancer treated with a cancer vaccine based on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate. Material and methods. Plasma and serum samples were collected prior......Introduction. Immunotherapy based on dendritic cell vaccination has exciting perspectives for treatment of cancer. In order to clarify immunological mechanisms during vaccination it is essential with intensive monitoring of the responses. This may lead to optimization of treatment and prediction...... to vaccination and continuously during treatment. GM-CSF, IL-2, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-8, IL-1b, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12, MIP-1b, IP-10 and Eotaxin were analyzed in a multiplex assay with a Luminex 100 instrument. CEA and TIMP-1 were analysed on ELISA platforms. Results. Patients achieving stable...

  8. Establishment of the 2nd Korean national biological reference standard for blood coagulation factor VIII:C concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Naery; Seo, Ji Suk; Kim, Jae Ok; Ban, Sang Ja

    2017-05-01

    Since the 1st Korean national biological reference standard for factor (F)VIII concentrate, established in 2001, has shown declining potency, we conducted this study to replace this standard with a 2nd Korean national biological reference standard for blood coagulation FVIII concentrate. The candidate materials for the 2nd standard were prepared in 8000 vials with 10 IU/ml of target potency, according to the approved manufacturing process of blood coagulation Factor VIII:C Monoclonal Antibody-purified, Freeze-dried Human Blood Coagulation Factor VIII:C. Potency was evaluated by one-stage clotting and chromogenic methods and the stability was confirmed to meet the specifications during a period of 73 months. Since the potencies obtained by the two methods differed significantly (P < 0.015), the values were determined separately according to the geometric means (8.9 and 7.4 IU/vial, respectively). The geometric coefficients of interlaboratory variability were 3.4% and 7.6% by the one-stage clotting and chromogenic assays, respectively. Copyright © 2017 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tuberculosis contact investigation with a new, specific blood test in a low-incidence population containing a high proportion of BCG-vaccinated persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meywald-Walter K

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BCG-vaccination can confound tuberculin skin test (TST reactions in the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection. Methods We compared the TST with a Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific whole blood interferon-gamma assay (QuantiFERON®-TB-Gold In Tube; QFT-G during ongoing investigations among close contacts of sputum smear positive source cases in Hamburg, Germany. Results During a 6-month period, 309 contacts (mean age 28.5 ± 10.5 years from a total of 15 source cases underwent both TST and QFT-G testing. Of those, 157 (50.8% had received BCG vaccination and 84 (27.2% had migrated to Germany from a total of 25 different high prevalence countries (i.e. >20 cases/100,000. For the TST, the positive response rate was 44.3% (137/309, whilst only 31 (10% showed a positive QFT-G result. The overall agreement between the TST and the QFT-G was low (κ = 0.2, with 95% CI 0.14.-0.23, and positive TST reactions were closely associated with prior BCG vaccination (OR 24.7; 95% CI 11.7–52.5. In contrast, there was good agreement between TST and QFT-G in non-vaccinated persons (κ = 0.58, with 95% CI 0.4–0.68, increasing to 0.68 (95% CI 0.46–0.81, if a 10-mm cut off for the TST was used instead of the standard 5 mm recommended in Germany. Conclusion The QFT-G assay was unaffected by BCG vaccination status, unlike the TST. In close contacts who were BCG-vaccinated, the QFT-G assay appeared to be a more specific indicator of latent tuberculosis infection than the TST, and similarly sensitive in unvaccinated contacts. In BCG-vaccinated close contacts, measurement of IFN-gamma responses of lymphocytes stimulated with M. tuberculosis-specific antigen should be recommended as a basis for the decision on whether to perform subsequent chest X-ray examinations or to start treatment for latent tuberculosis infection.

  10. Malaria vaccines and human immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Carole A; Zavala, Fidel

    2016-08-01

    Despite reductions in malaria episodes and deaths over the past decade, there is still significant need for more effective tools to combat this serious global disease. The positive results with the Phase III trial of RTS,S directed to the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum have established that a vaccine against malaria can provide partial protection to children in endemic areas, but its limited efficacy and relatively short window of protection mandate that new generations of more efficacious vaccines must be sought. Evidence shows that anti-parasite immune responses can control infection against other stages as well, but translating these experimental findings into vaccines for blood stages has been disappointing and clinical efforts to test a transmission blocking vaccine are just beginning. Difficulties include the biological complexity of the organism with a large array of stage-specific genes many of which in the erythrocytic stages are antigenically diverse. In addition, it appears necessary to elicit high and long-lasting antibody titers, address the redundant pathways of merozoite invasion, and still seek surrogate markers of protective immunity. Most vaccine studies have focused on a single or a few antigens with an apparent functional role, but this is likely to be too restrictive, and broad, multi-antigen, multi-stage vaccines need further investigation. Finally, novel tools and biological insights involving parasite sexual stages and the mosquito vector will provide new avenues for reducing or blocking malaria transmission. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Comparative studies on the biology and filarial susceptibility of selected blood-feeding and autogenous Aedes togoi sub-colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuluck Junkum

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood-feeding and autogenous sub-colonies were selected from a laboratory, stock colony of Aedes togoi, which was originally collected from Koh Nom Sao, Chanthaburi province, Southeast Thailand. Comparative biology and filarial susceptibility between the two sub-colonies (blood-feeding: F11, F13; autogeny: F38, F40 were investigated to evaluate their viability and vectorial capacity. The results of comparison on biology revealed intraspecific differences, i.e., the average egg deposition/gravid female (F11/F38; F13/F40, embryonation rate (F13/F40, hatchability rate (F11/F38; F13/F40, egg width (F11/F38, wing length of females (F13/F40, and wing length and width of males (F11/F38 in the blood-feeding sub-colony were significantly greater than that in the autogenous sub-colony; and egg length (F11/F38 and width (F13/F40, and mean longevity of adult females (F11/F38 and males (F13/F40 in the blood-feeding sub-colony were significantly less than that in the autogenous sub-colony. The results of comparison on filarial susceptibility demonstrated that both sub-colonies yielded similar susceptibilities to Brugia malayi [blood-feeding/autogeny = 56.7% (F11/53.3%(F38, 60%(F13/83.3%(F40] and Dirofilaria immitis [blood-feeding/autogeny = 85.7%(F11/75%(F38, 45%(F13/29.4%(F40], suggesting autogenous Ae. togoi sub-colony was an efficient laboratory vector in study of filariasis.

  12. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... production of red blood cells, including: Iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and ... inflammatory bowel disease are especially likely to have iron deficiency anemia. Anemia due to chronic disease. People with chronic ...

  13. A Plasmodium vivax Plasmid DNA- and Adenovirus-Vectored Malaria Vaccine Encoding Blood-Stage Antigens AMA1 and MSP142in a Prime/Boost Heterologous Immunization Regimen Partially Protects Aotus Monkeys against Blood-Stage Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaldia, Nicanor; Stockelman, Michael G; Otero, William; Cockrill, Jennifer A; Ganeshan, Harini; Abot, Esteban N; Zhang, Jianfeng; Limbach, Keith; Charoenvit, Yupin; Doolan, Denise L; Tang, De-Chu C; Richie, Thomas L

    2017-04-01

    Malaria is caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium , which are transmitted to humans by the bites of Anopheles mosquitoes. After the elimination of Plasmodium falciparum , it is predicted that Plasmodium vivax will remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality outside Africa, stressing the importance of developing a vaccine against P. vivax malaria. In this study, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of two P. vivax antigens, apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and the 42-kDa C-terminal fragment of merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1 42 ) in a plasmid recombinant DNA prime/adenoviral (Ad) vector boost regimen in Aotus monkeys. Groups of 4 to 5 monkeys were immunized with plasmid DNA alone, Ad alone, prime/boost regimens with each antigen, prime/boost regimens with both antigens, and empty vector controls and then subjected to blood-stage challenge. The heterologous immunization regimen with the antigen pair was more protective than either antigen alone or both antigens delivered with a single vaccine platform, on the basis of their ability to induce the longest prepatent period and the longest time to the peak level of parasitemia, the lowest peak and mean levels of parasitemia, the smallest area under the parasitemia curve, and the highest self-cure rate. Overall, prechallenge MSP1 42 antibody titers strongly correlated with a decreased parasite burden. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of immunized animals developed anemia. In conclusion, the P. vivax plasmid DNA/Ad serotype 5 vaccine encoding blood-stage parasite antigens AMA1 and MSP1 42 in a heterologous prime/boost immunization regimen provided significant protection against blood-stage challenge in Aotus monkeys, indicating the suitability of these antigens and this regimen for further development. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal ...

  15. Effect of the pre-erythrocytic candidate malaria vaccine RTS,S/AS01E on blood stage immunity in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejon, Philip; Cook, Jackie; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke

    2011-01-01

    -linked immunosorbent assay, antibodies to 4 Plasmodium falciparum merozoite antigens (AMA-1, MSP-1(42), EBA-175, and MSP-3) and by growth inhibitory activity (GIA) using 2 parasite clones (FV0 and 3D7) at 4 times on 860 children who were randomized to receive with RTS,S/AS01(E) or a control vaccine. Results. Antibody...... concentrations to AMA-1, EBA-175, and MSP-1(42) decreased with age during the first year of life, then increased to 32 months of age. Anti-MSP-3 antibody concentrations gradually increased, and GIA gradually decreased up to 32 months. Vaccination with RTS,S/AS01(E) resulted in modest reductions in AMA-1, EBA-175......, MSP-1(42), and MSP-3 antibody concentrations and no significant change in GIA. Increasing anti-merozoite antibody concentrations and GIA were prospectively associated with increased risk of clinical malaria. Conclusions. Vaccination with RTS,S/AS01E reduces exposure to blood-stage parasites and, thus...

  16. Blood Interferon Signatures Putatively Link Lack of Protection Conferred by the RTS,S Recombinant Malaria Vaccine to an Antigen-specific IgE Response [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darawan Rinchai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Progress has been made in recent years with the development of vaccines that could pave the way towards protection of hundreds of millions of exposed individuals. Here we used a modular repertoire approach to re-analyze a publically available microarray blood transcriptome dataset monitoring the response to malaria vaccination. We report the seminal identification of interferon signatures in the blood of subjects on days 1, 3 and 14 following administration of the third dose of the RTS,S recombinant malaria vaccine. These signatures at day 1 correlate with protection, and at days 3 and 14 to susceptibility to subsequent challenge of study subjects with live parasites. In addition we putatively link the decreased abundance of interferon-inducible transcripts observed at days 3 and 14 post-vaccination with the elicitation of an antigen-specific IgE response in a subset of vaccine recipients that failed to be protected by the RTS,S vaccine. Furthermore, profiling of antigen-specific levels of IgE in a Mozambican cohort of malaria-exposed children vaccinated with RTS,S identified an association between elevated baseline IgE levels and subsequent development of naturally acquired malaria infection during follow up. Taken together these findings warrant further investigation of the role of antigen-specific IgE in conferring susceptibility to malaria infection.

  17. Effects of single and combined Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccinations on blood electrolytes and acid-base balance in commercial egg-laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanrewaju, H A; Collier, S D; Branton, S L

    2011-02-01

    A previous study from our laboratory on F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum-inoculated layers showed a significant increase in arterial partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)), which is generally associated with an oxygen-dependent improvement in tissue oxygenation. The aim of this study was to determine whether a killed (bacterin) and live TS-11-strain M. gallisepticum (TS-11-MG) vaccine treatment combination could further enhance the arterial pO(2) levels in layer chickens. The experiment was conducted in 2 trials and arranged in a completely randomized experimental design with 4 treatments. The treatments consisted of a control M. gallisepticum, bacterin, TS-11-MG, and bacterin + TS-11-MG combined, with all treatments receiving the R low strain of MG at 30 wk of age (WOA). In each of the 2 trials, 160 one-day-old MG-free pullets were raised to 10 WOA and were transported to a poultry disease isolation facility. Sixteen isolation units were divided into 4 treatment groups, and each of the 4 treatment groups had 4 replication units, with 10 birds/unit (40 birds/treatment). Venous blood samples were collected at the termination of the study at 56 WOA. The TS-11-MG-vaccinated chickens had a higher (P ≤ 0.05) blood pO(2) and a lower (P ≤ 0.05) partial pressure of CO(2) when compared with the control and combined MG-vaccinated groups. However, no significant blood pO(2) differences were observed between the bacterin and TS-11-MG treatment groups. Hematocrit and blood concentrations of hemoglobin were not statistically different among treatments, but were numerically higher in the TS-11-MG treatment group. There was a significant (P ≤ 0.05) treatment effect on blood concentrations of Na(+), Ca(2+), and anion, but no significant effect on glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, or osmolality. These data suggest that the inoculation of layers with TS-11-MG was more effective in elevating pO(2) than was inoculation with TS-11-MG + bacterin combined.

  18. Changes in cytokine and biomarker blood levels in patients with colorectal cancer during dendritic cell-based vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Nielsen, Hans J

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. Immunotherapy based on dendritic cell vaccination has exciting perspectives for treatment of cancer. In order to clarify immunological mechanisms during vaccination it is essential with intensive monitoring of the responses. This may lead to optimization of treatment and prediction...... of responding patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine and biomarker responses in patients with colorectal cancer treated with a cancer vaccine based on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate. Material and methods. Plasma and serum samples were collected prior...... disease showed increasing levels of plasma GM-CSF, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-2, and IL-5. Patients with progressive disease showed significant increase in CEA and TIMP-1 levels, while patients with stable disease showed relatively unaltered levels. Conclusion. The increased levels of key pro...

  19. Analysis behaviour of free radicals produced by ionizing radiations in human blood by EPR for biological dosimetry in patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, O. O.; Almanza, A.; Plazas, M. M. C.

    2006-01-01

    In this work is analyzed the biological dosimetry of the free radicals produced by ionizing radiations in human blood obtained by EPR and the biological behaviour of samples In-Vitro, with Rh: O+, in tubes with EDTA (Acid Etilen Diamino Tetracetic) the samples was extracted of the main investigator, these samples were radiated with gammas of ''60Co of a Theratron 780 between plates of PMMA to a depth of Z m ax of 0.5 cm and between doses 1 to 25 Gy. In these results the behaviors of signal the free radicals presented a increasing a their intensity depending on applied dose, of equal way are results of the biologic dosimetry displayed in sanguineous populations like. White Globules, Red. Platelets etc, to being compared with Resonance Paramagnetic Electronic (EPR). The results show changes in sanguineous populations in high doses (D>10 Gy) in the case of lymphocytes, granulocitos, macusanita, plaquetas, hemoglobina, haematocrit with change similarly in medium and low doses (D>10Gy) in linfocites, platelets, granulocytes, monocytes and the haematocrit. A sanguineous sample without radiating analyzes by EPR giving the presence of signals with values of g=2.13 2,41 in blood. For the first certain value of g authors have associated it to free radicals like: globin (Fe(IV)=0) or Cu''+ incorporated to the ceruloplasmin molecule. (Author)

  20. Construction and biological characterization of artificial recombinants between a wild type flavivirus (Kunjin) and a live chimeric flavivirus vaccine (ChimeriVax-JE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugachev, Konstantin V; Schwaiger, Julia; Brown, Nathan; Zhang, Zhen-xi; Catalan, John; Mitchell, Frederick S; Ocran, Simeon W; Rumyantsev, Alexander A; Khromykh, Alexander A; Monath, Thomas P; Guirakhoo, Farshad

    2007-09-17

    Although the theoretical concern of genetic recombination has been raised related to the use of live attenuated flavivirus vaccines [Seligman, Gould, Lancet 2004;363:2073-5], it has little foundation [e.g., Monath TP, Kanesa-Thasan N, Guirakhoo F, Pugachev K, Almond J, Lang J, et al. Vaccine 2005;23:2956-8]. To investigate biological effects of recombination between a chimeric yellow fever (YF) 17D/Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine virus (ChimeriVax-JE) and a wild-type flavivirus Kunjin (KUN-cDNA), the prM-E envelope protein genes were swapped between the two viruses, resulting in new YF 17D/KUN(prM-E) and KUN/JE(prM-E) chimeras. The prM-E genes are easily exchangeable between flavivirues, and thus the exchange was expected to yield the most replication-competent chimeras, while other rationally designed recombinants would be more likely to be crippled or non-viable. The new chimeras proved highly attenuated in comparison with the KUN-cDNA parent, as judged by plaque size and growth kinetics in cell culture, low viremia in hamsters, and reduced neurovirulence/neuroinvasiveness in mice. These data provide strong experimental evidence that the potential of recombinants, should they ever emerge, to cause disease or spread (compete in nature with wild-type flaviviruses) would be indeed extremely low.

  1. Laser facilitates vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of novel vaccine deliveries and vaccine adjuvants is of great importance to address the dilemma that the vaccine field faces: to improve vaccine efficacy without compromising safety. Harnessing the specific effects of laser on biological systems, a number of novel concepts have been proposed and proved in recent years to facilitate vaccination in a safer and more efficient way. The key advantage of using laser technology in vaccine delivery and adjuvantation is that all processes are initiated by physical effects with no foreign chemicals administered into the body. Here, we review the recent advances in using laser technology to facilitate vaccine delivery and augment vaccine efficacy as well as the underlying mechanisms.

  2. Technical Stability and Biological Variability in MicroRNAs from Dried Blood Spots: A Lung Cancer Therapy-Monitoring Showcase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Mustafa; Laufer, Thomas; Backes, Christina; Schrörs, Hannah; Fehlmann, Tobias; Ludwig, Nicole; Kohlhaas, Jochen; Meese, Eckart; Wehler, Thomas; Bals, Robert; Keller, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Different work flows have been proposed to use miRNAs as blood-borne biomarkers. In particular, the method used for collecting blood from patients can considerably influence the diagnostic results. We explored whether dried blood spots (DBSs) facilitate stable miRNA measurements and compared its technical stability with biological variability. First, we tested the stability of DBS samples by generating from 1 person 18 whole-genome-wide miRNA profiles of DBS samples that were exposed to different temperature and humidity conditions. Second, we investigated technical reproducibility by performing 7 replicates of DBS again from 1 person. Third, we investigated DBS samples from 53 patients with lung cancer undergoing different therapies. Across these 3 stages, 108 genome-wide miRNA profiles from DBS were generated and evaluated biostatistically. In the stability analysis, we observed that temperature and humidity had an overall limited influence on the miRNomes (average correlation between the different conditions of 0.993). Usage of a silica gel slightly diminished DBS' technical reproducibility. The 7 technical replicates had an average correlation of 0.996. The correlation with whole-blood PAXGene miRNomes of the same individual was remarkable (correlation of 0.88). Finally, evaluation of the samples from the 53 patients with lung cancer exposed to different therapies showed that the biological variations exceeded the technical variability significantly ( P technical variations significantly. DBS-based miRNA profiles will potentially further the translational character of miRNA biomarker studies. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  3. Copper-mediated controlled radical polymerization under biological conditions: SET-LRP in blood serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Zaidong; Wilson, Paul; Haddleton, David M

    2013-07-28

    The polymerization of hydrophilic monomers is reported utilizing Cu(0)-mediated living radical polymerization, SET-LRP. Highly active Cu(0) is formed in situ as a result of rapid disproportionation of [Cu(I)(Me6-Tren)Br] in serum. Disproportionation and homogenous controlled radical polymerization (PDI 1.09-1.25) are performed for the first time in blood (sheep) serum.

  4. Vector Biology: Tyrosine Degradation Protects Blood Feeders from Death via La Grande Bouffe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopáček, Petr; Perner, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 16 (2016), R763-R765 ISSN 0960-9822 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tick boophilus-microplus * heme detoxification * pathway * insect Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.851, year: 2016

  5. Reproductive biology of blood cockle Anadara granosa (Bivalvia: Arcidae) in the northern region of the Strait of Malacca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Munawar; Yasin, Zulfigar; Hwai, Tan Shau

    2017-03-01

    A study on the reproductive cycle of the blood cockle Anadara granosa (Bivalvia: Arcidae) was conducted at three different areas in the northern region of the Strait of Malacca. A total of 1,920 samples of adult A. granosa (38-71 mm length) were collected from June 2009 until September 2010. Qualitative techniques (gonadal microscopic fresh smear test and histology analysis) as well as quantitative techniques (analysis of condition index and gonadal index) were used to predict monthly gonadal development stages of A. granosa. The gonadal index of A. granosa from Banda Aceh (Indonesia) ( r = 0.469, P > 0.05) and Pulau Pinang (Malaysia) ( r = 0.123, P > 0.05) did not show any correlation to their condition index, whereas the gonadal index of A. granosa from Lhokseumawe (Indonesia) ( r = 0.609, P granosa reproduction was affected by interaction between internal physiological factors and indigenous environmental factors. In all sampling areas, phytoplankton density played a key role in the reproductive cycle in A. granosa. Information on the reproductive biology of this species is essential for species management and to improve the sustainability practices of the fisheries industry. These findings will provide basic information on the biology of the blood cockle A. granosa for stock management in the region.

  6. Development of vaccines for Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ivo; Shakri, Ahmad Rushdi; Chitnis, Chetan E

    2015-12-22

    Plasmodium vivax continues to cause significant morbidity outside Africa with more than 50% of malaria cases in many parts of South and South-east Asia, Pacific islands, Central and South America being attributed to P. vivax infections. The unique biology of P. vivax, including its ability to form latent hypnozoites that emerge months to years later to cause blood stage infections, early appearance of gametocytes before clinical symptoms are apparent and a shorter development cycle in the vector makes elimination of P. vivax using standard control tools difficult. The availability of an effective vaccine that provides protection and prevents transmission would be a valuable tool in efforts to eliminate P. vivax. Here, we review the latest developments related to P. vivax malaria vaccines and discuss the challenges as well as directions toward the goal of developing highly efficacious vaccines against P. vivax malaria. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Blood Stage Plasmodium falciparum Exhibits Biological Responses to Direct Current Electric Fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena M Coronado

    Full Text Available The development of resistance to insecticides by the vector of malaria and the increasingly faster appearance of resistance to antimalarial drugs by the parasite can dangerously hamper efforts to control and eradicate the disease. Alternative ways to treat this disease are urgently needed. Here we evaluate the in vitro effect of direct current (DC capacitive coupling electrical stimulation on the biology and viability of Plasmodium falciparum. We designed a system that exposes infected erythrocytes to different capacitively coupled electric fields in order to evaluate their effect on P. falciparum. The effect on growth of the parasite, replication of DNA, mitochondrial membrane potential and level of reactive oxygen species after exposure to electric fields demonstrate that the parasite is biologically able to respond to stimuli from DC electric fields involving calcium signaling pathways.

  8. Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I am particularly happy that the Academy is bringing out this document by Professor M S. Valiathan on Ayurvedic Biology. It is an effort to place before the scientific community, especially that of India, the unique scientific opportunities that arise out of viewing Ayurveda from the perspective of contemporary science, its tools ...

  9. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose- effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Achkar, W.

    2002-01-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, blood from eight healthy people were studied. Samples were irradiated in tubes with 0.15-2.5 gray of gamma ray.Irradiated and control samples were incubated for cell cultures. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics+ rings and total numbers of breaks were drawn. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  10. Parasite Carbohydrate Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaurigue, Jonnel A; Seeberger, Peter H

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination is an efficient means of combating infectious disease burden globally. However, routine vaccines for the world's major human parasitic diseases do not yet exist. Vaccines based on carbohydrate antigens are a viable option for parasite vaccine development, given the proven success of carbohydrate vaccines to combat bacterial infections. We will review the key components of carbohydrate vaccines that have remained largely consistent since their inception, and the success of bacterial carbohydrate vaccines. We will then explore the latest developments for both traditional and non-traditional carbohydrate vaccine approaches for three of the world's major protozoan parasitic diseases-malaria, toxoplasmosis, and leishmaniasis. The traditional prophylactic carbohydrate vaccine strategy is being explored for malaria. However, given that parasite disease biology is complex and often arises from host immune responses to parasite antigens, carbohydrate vaccines against deleterious immune responses in host-parasite interactions are also being explored. In particular, the highly abundant glycosylphosphatidylinositol molecules specific for Plasmodium, Toxoplasma , and Leishmania spp. are considered exploitable antigens for this non-traditional vaccine approach. Discussion will revolve around the application of these protozoan carbohydrate antigens for vaccines currently in preclinical development.

  11. Method for Separation of Blood Vessels on the Three-Color Images of Biological Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisenko, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    A new technology was developed to improve the visibility of blood vessels on images of tissues of hollow human organs(the alimentary tract and respiratory system) based on the relation between the color components of the image, the scattering properties of the tissue, and its hemoglobin content. A statistical operator was presented to convert the three-color image of the tissue into a parametric map objectively characterizing the concentration of hemoglobin in the tissue regardless of the illumination and shooting conditions. An algorithm for obtaining conversion parameters for image systems with known spectral characteristics was presented. An image of a multilayer multiple-scattering medium modeling bronchial tissue was synthesized and was used to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed conversion system. It was shown that the conversion made it possible to increase the contrast of the blood vessels by almost two orders of magnitude, to significantly improve the clarity of the display of their borders, and to eliminate almost completely the influence of background and nonuniform illumination of the medium in comparison with the original image.

  12. Antiradiation vaccine: Technology and development of prophylaxis, prevention and treatment of biological consequences from Heavy Ion irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav

    Introduction: An anti-radiation vaccine could be an important part of a countermeasures reg-imen for effective radioprotection, immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy of the acute radi-ation syndromes (ARS) after gamma-irradiation, neutron irradiation or heavy ion irradiation. Reliable protection of non-neoplastic regions of patients with different forms of cancer which undergo to heavy ion therapy ( e.g. Hadron-therapy) can significantly extend the efficiency of the therapeutic course. The protection of cosmonauts astronauts from the heavy ion ra-diation component of space radiation with specific immunoprophylaxis by the anti-radiation vaccine may be an important part of medical management for long term space missions. Meth-ods and experiments: 1. The Antiradiation Vaccine preparation -standard (mixture of toxoid form of Radiation Toxins -SRD-group) which include Cerebrovascular RT Neurotoxin, Car-diovascular RT Neurotoxin, Gastrointestinal RT Neurotoxin, Hematopoietic RT Hematotoxin. Radiation Toxins Specific Radiation Determinant Group were isolated from a central lymph of gamma-irradiated animals with Cerebrovascular, Cardiovascular, Gastrointestiinal, Hematopoi-etic forms of ARS. Devices for γ-radiation are "Panorama", "Puma". 2. Heavy ion exposure was accomplished at Department of Scientific Research Institute of Nuclear Physics, Dubna, Russia. The heavy ions irradiation was generated in heavy ion (Fe56) accelerator -UTI. Heavy Ion linear transfer energy -2000-2600 KeV mkm, 600 MeV U. Absorbed Dose -3820 Rad. 3. Experimental Design: Rabbits from all groups were irradiated by heavy ion accelerator. Group A -control -10 rabbits; Group B -placebo -5 rabbits; Group C -radioprotectant Cystamine (50 mg kg)-5 rabbits, 15 minutes before irradiation -5 rabbits; Group D -radioprotectant Gammafos (Amifostine -400mg kg ), -5 rabbits; Group E -Antiradiation Vaccine: subcuta-neus administration or IM -2 ml of active substance, 14 days before irradiation -5 rabbits. 4

  13. The influence of biological and environmental factors on metallothionein concentration in the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Katarzyna; Bizoń, Anna; Zalewska, Marta; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2015-01-01

    The concentration of metallothionein (MT), a low-molecular-weight protein, is regulated by many factors, primarily metals (zinc, cadmium, copper), cytokines, glucocorticoides and free radicals. These factors are determined by such aspects of human biology as gender, pregnancy and age, as well as by environmental factors including the use of oral contraceptives and cigarette smoking, all which may affect MT levels in the body. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of these biological and environmental factors on MT concentrations in erythrocyte lysate and in plasma. MT concentrations were determined by a two-step direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Evaluation of exposure to cigarette smoking was performed by checking cotinine levels in the plasma of subjects. The studies showed higher MT concentrations in both the erythrocyte lysate and plasma of women when compared to men. Furthermore, pregnancy causes an increase of MT concentration in plasma, while oral contraceptives cause an elevated concentration of MT in erythrocyte lysate. Age impacts plasma MT concentrations in men, whereas it does not affect concentrations of MT in erythrocyte lysate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. The proctolin gene and biological effects of proctolin in the blood-feeding bug, Rhodnius prolixus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian eOrchard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We have reinvestigated the possible presence or absence of the pentapeptide proctolin in Rhodnius prolixus and report here the cloning of the proctolin cDNA. The transcript is highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS with some low expression associated with peripheral tissues. The proctolin prepropeptide encodes a single copy of proctolin along with a proctolin-precursor-associated peptide. We have biochemically identified proctolin in CNS extracts and shown its distribution using proctolin-like immunoreactivity. Immunostained processes are found on the salivary glands, female and male reproductive organs, and heart and associated alary muscles. Proctolin-like immunoreactive bipolar neurons are found on the lateral margins of the common oviduct and bursa. Proctolin is biologically active on R. prolixus tissues, stimulating increases in contraction of anterior midgut and hindgut muscles, and increasing heartbeat frequency. Contrary to the previous suggestion that proctolin is absent from R. prolixus, proctolin is indeed present and biologically active in this medically-important bug.

  15. How to: Measuring blood cytokines in biological psychiatry using commercially available multiplex immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzeaux, Raoul; Lefebvre, Marie-Noëlle; Lazzari, Anne; Le Carpentier, Tifenn; Consoloni, Julia-Lou; Zendjidjian, Xavier; Abbar, Mocrane; Courtet, Philippe; Naudin, Jean; Boucraut, José; Gressens, Pierre; Glaichenhaus, Nicolas; Ibrahim, El Chérif

    2017-01-01

    Cytokines produced by both immune and non-immune cells are likely to play roles in the development and/or progression of psychiatric disorders. Indeed, many investigators have compared the blood cytokine levels in psychiatric patients with those of healthy controls or monitored their levels in patients during disease progression to identify biomarkers. Nevertheless, very few studies have confirmed that such cytokines remain stable in healthy individuals through periods of weeks and months. This is an important issue to consider before using blood cytokine levels as biomarkers of disease traits, disease state, or treatment response. Although multiplex assay technology represents an advance in identifying biomarkers because it allows simultaneous examination of large panels of analytes from a small volume of sample, it is necessary to verify whether these assays yield enough sensitivity and reproducibility when applied to the blood from neuropsychiatric patients. Therefore, we compared two multiplex immunoassays, the bead-based Luminex ® (Bio-Rad) and the electro-chemiluminescence-based V-plex ® (MesoScaleDiscovery), for the detection and quantification of 31 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors in both the sera and plasma of patients with major depressive episodes (MDE) and age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects during a 30-week period. Although both platforms exhibited low coefficients of variability (CV) between the duplicates in the calibration curves, the linearity was better in general for the V-PLEX ® platform. However, neither platform was able to detect the absolute values for all of the tested analytes. Among the 16 analytes that were detected by both assays, the intra-assay reproducibility was in general better with the V-PLEX ® platform. Although it is not a general rule that the results from sera and plasma will be correlated, consistent results were more frequent with the V-PLEX ® platform. Furthermore, the V-PLEX ® results were more

  16. Heterogeneity of O blood group in India: Peeping through the window of molecular biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harita Gogri

    2018-01-01

    Results And Discussion: Overall, ten different genotypes were identified. Three rare alleles, namely, O05, O11, and O26 were seen in the mixed group category. These results suggest that there is an internal heterogeneity in the mixed group while Dhodias and Parsis, the groups which were screened earlier, seem to be more homogenous groups. An important piece of information emerges out from this study, that is, O01O02 genotype is expressing some selective force in population groups screened in India as well as many other groups worldwide. Conclusion: In the future, molecular genotyping of the ABO blood group system among different ethnic and tribal Indian groups would help in generating data to fill up the gaps in the molecular ABO map of the world.

  17. Impact of AT2-receptor stimulation on vascular biology, kidney function, and blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danyel, L.A.; Schmerler, P.; Paulis, L.

    2013-01-01

    angiotensin II) and with relevance for blood pressure (BP) regulation or hypertensive end-organ damage. These data will include studies on vasodilation/vasoconstriction in isolated resistance arteries ex vivo, studies on kidney function, studies on vascular remodeling, and studies that measured the net effect...... of AT2R stimulation on BP in vivo. Current data indicate that although AT2R stimulation causes vasodilation ex vivo and promotes natriuresis, it does not alter BP levels in vivo acutely - at least as long as there is no additional low-dose blockade of AT1R. However, AT2R stimulation alone is able......, but that this new future drug class may be beneficial in combination with established antihypertensives for the treatment of hypertension with improved protection from end-organ damage....

  18. Heterogeneity of O blood group in India: Peeping through the window of molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogri, Harita; Ray, Sabita; Agrawal, Snehal; Aruna, S; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Gorakshakar, Ajit

    2018-01-01

    Molecular genotyping of ABO blood group system has identified more than 60 "O" group alleles based on the single-nucleotide polymorphisms present in the ABO gene. Heterogeneity of O group alleles has been observed in various countries from South America, Europe, Middle East, and Asia. India is a vast country with more than 1300 million population which is divided into various ethnic and tribal groups. However, very little is known about the heterogeneity of O alleles in Indians. A total of 116 O group individuals from the mixed population of Mumbai, India, were enrolled in the present study. DNA was extracted using the standard phenol-chloroform method. The exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism and/or DNA sequencing. The genotyping results were compared with our earlier findings. Overall, ten different genotypes were identified. Three rare alleles, namely, O05, O11, and O26 were seen in the mixed group category. These results suggest that there is an internal heterogeneity in the mixed group while Dhodias and Parsis, the groups which were screened earlier, seem to be more homogenous groups. An important piece of information emerges out from this study, that is, O01O02 genotype is expressing some selective force in population groups screened in India as well as many other groups worldwide. In the future, molecular genotyping of the ABO blood group system among different ethnic and tribal Indian groups would help in generating data to fill up the gaps in the molecular ABO map of the world.

  19. Baseline peripheral blood leukocytosis: Biological marker predicts outcome in oropharyngeal cancer, regardless of HPV-status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouw, Zeno A R; Paul de Boer, Jan; Navran, Arash; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim

    2018-03-01

    To study the prognostic value of abnormalities in baseline complete blood count in patients with oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) treated with (chemo) radiation. The prognostic value of baseline complete blood count on outcome in 234 patients with OPC treated between 2010 and 2015 was examined in multivariate analysis together with other conventional prognostic variables including HPV-status, tumor stage, tumor and nodal size. The 3-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional control (LRC), and distant control (DC) of the whole group were 74%, 64%, 79%, and 88%, respectively. Leukocytosis and HPV-status were the only significant prognosticators for OS and DFS at the multivariate analysis. Patients without leukocytosis had a significantly better DC compared to those with leukocytosis (92% and 70%, respectively, p HPV-negative OPC had significantly worse LRC compared to HPV-positive patients (67% and 90%, respectively, p HPV-positive group with leukocytosis compared to those without leukocytosis were 69% and 95%, respectively (p HPV-negative patients were 41% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.010). This is the first study to date reporting the independent impact of leukocytosis and HPV-status on outcome of patients with OPC. The poor outcome of patients with leukocytosis is mainly caused by the worse DC. The significant impact of leukocytosis on outcome was even more pronounced in HPV-positive patients. These biomarkers could help identifying patients with poor prognosis at baseline requiring intensification of local and/or systemic treatment while treatment de-intensification might be offered to the low-risk group. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium in biological samples (scalp hair, serum, blood, and urine) of Pakistani referents and arthritis patients of different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Kazi, Naveed; Shah, Abdul Qadir; Khan, Sumaira; Kolachi, Nida Fatima; Wadhwa, Sham Kumar; Shah, Faheem

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease resulting in joint inflammation (particularly joints of hands, wrists, feet, knees, ankles, and shoulder) that is manifested by swelling and functional impairment. This study was designed to compare the levels of calcium (Ca), magnesium (mg), potassium (K), and sodium (Na) in four biological samples (scalp hair, serum, blood, and urine) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as compared to referent subjects of both genders who do have not arthritis problems. All patients and referents were divided in two age groups, (46-60) and (61-75) years. A microwave assisted wet acid digestion procedure was used for acid digestion of biological samples. The digests of all biological samples were analysed for Ca, Mg, K, and Na by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The proposed method was validated by using conventional wet digestion of the same sub samples and certified reference samples of hair, serum, blood, and urine. The results indicated significantly lower levels of Ca, Mg, and K in the biological samples (blood, serum, and scalp hair) of male and female rheumatoid arthritis patients when compared to referents of both genders, whereas the levels of Na were found to be high in blood and urine samples of patients as compared to nonrheumatic referents. These data represent a guide for clinicians and other professionals who will be investigating the deficiency of essential micronutrients in biological samples (scalp hair, serum, and blood) of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  1. Phase 1b randomized trial and follow-up study in Uganda of the blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate BK-SE36.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirianne Marie Q Palacpac

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Up to now a malaria vaccine remains elusive. The Plasmodium falciparum serine repeat antigen-5 formulated with aluminum hydroxyl gel (BK-SE36 is a blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate that has undergone phase 1a trial in malaria-naive Japanese adults. We have now assessed the safety and immunogenicity of BK-SE36 in a malaria endemic area in Northern Uganda. METHODS: We performed a two-stage, randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled phase 1b trial (Current Controlled trials ISRCTN71619711. A computer-generated sequence randomized healthy subjects for 2 subcutaneous injections at 21-day intervals in Stage1 (21-40 year-olds to 1-mL BK-SE36 (BKSE1.0 (n = 36 or saline (n = 20 and in Stage2 (6-20 year-olds to BKSE1.0 (n = 33, 0.5-mL BK-SE36 (BKSE0.5 (n = 33, or saline (n = 18. Subjects and laboratory personnel were blinded. Safety and antibody responses 21-days post-second vaccination (Day42 were assessed. Post-trial, to compare the risk of malaria episodes 130-365 days post-second vaccination, Stage2 subjects were age-matched to 50 control individuals. RESULTS: Nearly all subjects who received BK-SE36 had induration (Stage1, n = 33, 92%; Stage2, n = 63, 96% as a local adverse event. No serious adverse event related to BK-SE36 was reported. Pre-existing anti-SE36 antibody titers negatively correlated with vaccination-induced antibody response. At Day42, change in antibody titers was significant for seronegative adults (1.95-fold higher than baseline [95% CI, 1.56-2.43], p = 0.004 and 6-10 year-olds (5.71-fold [95% CI, 2.38-13.72], p = 0.002 vaccinated with BKSE1.0. Immunogenicity response to BKSE0.5 was low and not significant (1.55-fold [95% CI, 1.24-1.94], p = 0.75. In the ancillary analysis, cumulative incidence of first malaria episodes with ≥5000 parasites/µL was 7 cases/33 subjects in BKSE1.0 and 10 cases/33 subjects in BKSE0.5 vs. 29 cases/66 subjects in the control group. Risk ratio

  2. Immunological changes in canine peripheral blood leukocytes triggered by immunization with first or second generation vaccines against canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; de Andrade, Renata Aline; Sathler-Avelar, Renato; Magalhães, Camila Paula; Carvalho, Andréa Teixeira; Andrade, Mariléia Chaves; Campolina, Sabrina Sidney; Mello, Maria Norma; Vianna, Leonardo Rocha; Mayrink, Wilson; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Rocha, Luciana Morais; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2011-05-15

    In this study, we summarized the major phenotypic/functional aspects of circulating leukocytes following canine immunization with Leishvaccine and Leishmune®. Our findings showed that Leishvaccine triggered early changes in the innate immunity (neutrophils and eosinophils) with late alterations on monocytes. Conversely, Leishmune(®) induced early phenotypic changes in both, neutrophils and monocytes. Moreover, Leishvaccine triggered mixed activation-related phenotypic changes on T-cells (CD4+ and CD8+ and B-lymphocytes, whereas Leishmune(®) promoted a selective response, mainly associated with CD8+ T-cell activation. Mixed cytokine profile (IFN-γ/IL-4) was observed in Leishvaccine immunized dogs whereas a selective pro-inflammatory pattern (IFN-γ/NO) was induced by Leishmune® vaccination. The distinct immunological profile triggered by Leishvaccine and Leishmune® may be a direct consequence of the distinct biochemical composition of these immunobiological, i.e. complex versus purified Leishmania antigen along with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) versus saponin adjuvant. Both immunobiologicals are able to activate phagocytes and CD8+ T-cells and therefore could be considered as a putative vaccines against canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural aspects of graphitic carbon modified SBA-15 mesoporous silica and biological interactions with red blood cells and plasma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Diego S T; Damasceno, João Paulo V; Franqui, Lidiane S; Bettini, Jefferson; Mazali, Italo O; Strauss, Mathias

    2017-09-01

    Functional mesoporous materials have been worldwide studied for different applications. Mesoporous silicas are highlighted due to the synthetic possibilities for the preparation of such materials with different particle sizes and morphologies, and controlled pores sizes and structures. Moreover, the silica superficial silanol groups are explored in several chemical modifications, leading to functional materials with tuned functionalities and properties. In this work, an organo-functionalization and pyrolysis synthetic procedure is used to obtain graphitic carbon modified mesoporous SBA-15 silica. The carbon content was tuned during the functionalization step, and the graphitic nanodomains were formed in the pores surface and particles outer surface. Textural and small angle X-ray diffraction analysis accessed the presence of the carbon nanostructures inside the SBA-15 mesopores. Advanced microanalysis using electron energy loss spectroscopy coupled to a transmission electron microscope had confirmed the carbon distribution along the silica pores, which gives higher hydrophobicity and changed the interaction of the mesoporous material with biological systems. Finally, the influence of the surface modification with graphitic carbon species over the interaction with human red blood cells (hemolysis) and human blood plasma (protein corona formation) was elucidated for the very first time for this kind of functional materials. It was observed that the graphitic carbon species considerably reduced the hemolytic effect of the silica particles, and was responsible for modulating the loading and composition of the hard corona plasma proteins. This work deepness the fundamental knowledge on the interaction between such nanomaterials and biological systems, one step further the use of these modified silicas in biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The effects of social status on biological aging as measured by white-blood-cell telomere length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkas, L F; Aviv, A; Valdes, A M; Hunkin, J L; Gardner, J P; Surdulescu, G L; Kimura, M; Spector, T D

    2006-10-01

    Low socio-economic status (SES) is associated with a shortened life expectancy, but its effect on aging is unknown. The rate of white-blood-cell (WBC) telomere attrition may be a biological indicator of human aging. We tested the hypothesis that SES is associated with telomere attrition independent of known risk factors influencing the aging process. We studied 1552 female twins. A venous blood sample was taken from each twin and isolated WBCs used for extraction of DNA. Terminal restriction fragment length (TRFL) was measured. Questionnaire data were collected on occupation, education, income, smoking, exercise, height and weight. Standard multiple linear regression and multivariate analyses of variance tested for associations between SES and TRFL, adjusting for covariates. A discordant twin analysis was conducted on a subset to verify findings. WBC telomere length was highly variable but significantly shorter in lower SES groups. The mean difference in TRFL between nonmanual and manual SES groups was 163.2 base pairs (bp) of which 22.9 bp (approximately 14%) was accounted for by body mass index, smoking and exercise. Comparison of TRFL in the 17 most discordant SES twin pairs confirmed this difference. Low SES, in addition to the harmful effects of smoking, obesity and lack of exercise, appears to have an impact on telomere length.

  5. Unmanipulated peripheral blood stem cell autograft in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical findings and biological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, G; Proia, A; Mauro, F; Amaranto, P; Capria, S; Cimino, G; Cordone, I; de Fabritiis, P; Rapanotti, C; Reato, G; Vignetti, M; Foa, R; Mandelli, F

    2000-09-01

    To investigate the feasibility of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantion in patients with high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in remission after fludarabine therapy, the clinical impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring and the immunologic reconstitution after transplantation. Twenty CLL patients, in clinical complete remission (CR) after fludarabine, were offered an unmanipulated PBSC transplant and were longitudinally monitored for MRD and immunologic reconstitution. Due to unsatisfactory PBSC collection, 4 patients received bone marrow cells. All patients engrafted. Two patients died, one due to infection and one because of another neoplasia. Thirteen patients are at present in clinical CR after a median follow-up of 17 months and 18 patients are alive with a survival probability of 0.87 (+/-0.04) at 52 months after transplant. Fifteen patients had a molecular remission. Three of them showed a molecular relapse 16-28 months after autograft, followed by a clinical relapse 10-16 months later. Three of the four patients who remained persistently rearranged could be revaluated over time and showed an immunologic relapse 11-26 months after transplant; two of these had a clinical relapse 12 and 7 months later. A marked and persistent impairment of both the B- and T-immunologic compartments was recorded in the horizontal follow-up. Unmanipulated PBSC autograft is a feasible procedure that produces prolonged molecular remissions in high-risk CLL patients. Persistence or reappearance of a molecular signal after engraftment is predictive of subsequent immunologic and clinical CLL recurrence. The long -lasting impairment of the host immune repertoire after fludarabine followed by autograft has to be taken into account in the patients' management.

  6. Effects of biological age on the associations of blood pressure with cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality in old age: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yajun; Fratiglioni, Laura; Wang, Rui; Santoni, Giola; Welmer, Anna-Karin; Qiu, Chengxuan

    2016-10-01

    Whether chronological or biological age may play a role in the association between blood pressure and cause-specific mortality in old age is unclear. We seek to investigate the associations of blood pressure with all-cause, cardiovascular, and non-cardiovascular mortality among older people and to explore whether chronological age and biological age may modify the associations. This cohort study included 3014 participants (age≥60years, 64.0% women) from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen, Stockholm. In 2001-2004, data were collected through interviews, clinical examinations, and inpatient register. Survival status and causes of deaths till 2011 for all participants were ascertained from Swedish death register. Data were analyzed with Cox proportional hazard models for all-cause mortality, and Fine-Gray competing risks models for cause-specific mortality. During 23,788 person-years of follow-up (median per person, 8.4years), 933 (31.0%) participants died. Systolic blood pressure<130mmHg (vs. 130-139mmHg) was significantly associated with decreased all-cause mortality (hazard ratio=0.59, 95% confidence interval=0.40-0.87) and non-cardiovascular mortality (0.59, 0.36-0.98) in biologically young people (persons with neither cognitive impairment nor mobility limitation), but with increased all-cause mortality (1.63, 1.22-2.16) and non-cardiovascular mortality (2.18, 1.27-3.75) in biologically old people (persons with either cognitive impairment or mobility limitation). The hazard ratio of cardiovascular mortality was increased with increasing levels of systolic blood pressure (ptrend=0.009) and diastolic blood pressure (ptrend=0.008) in biologically young people. Biological age plays a pivotal role in the associations of blood pressure with cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality in old age. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Vaccine Administration Modality on Immunogenicity and Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, Wei; Wang, Shixia

    2016-01-01

    Summary The many factors impacting the efficacy of a vaccine can be broadly divided into three categories: (1) features of the vaccine itself, including immunogen design, vaccine type, formulation, adjuvant, and dosing; (2) individual variations among vaccine recipients; and (3) vaccine administration-related parameters. While much literature exists related to vaccines, and recently systems biology has started to dissect the impact of individual subject variation on vaccine efficacy, few studies have focused on the role of vaccine administration-related parameters on vaccine efficacy. Parenteral and mucosal vaccinations are traditional approaches for licensed vaccines; novel vaccine delivery approaches, including needless injection and adjuvant formulations, are being developed to further improve vaccine safety and efficacy. This review provides a brief summary of vaccine administration-related factors, including vaccination approach, delivery route, and method of administration, to gain a better understanding of their potential impact on the safety and immunogenicity of candidate vaccines. PMID:26313239

  8. Changes in some pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines produced by bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells following foot and mouth disease vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Delirezh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-17 is exclusively produced by CD4 helper T-cells upon activation. It most often acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine, which stimulates the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF. In this study, we studied the in-vitro IL-17 response to specific antigens and a variety of mitogens and compared the IL-17 response to IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-γ responses. We used a foot and mouth disease (FMD vaccine as specific antigens and mitogens (phytohemagglutinin [PHA], pokeweed mitogen [PWM], and concanavalin A [Con A] to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of vaccinated calves. Cell culture supernatant was harvested and analyzed for cytokines, using commercially available bovine ELISA kits. The mitogens induced a significant increase in IL-17 production. IL-17 was produced at high levels in response to the T cell-stimulated mitogens, PHA, and Con A, and at low levels in response to PWM mitogens. In contrast, level of the produced IL-17 cytokines in response to the FMDV antigens was lower as compared to those produced by mitogens. The FMDV antigens and mitogens significantly increased IL-17 production. There was not a correlation between IL-17 production and type-1 cytokine, IFN-γ, and IL-2, while there was a correlation between type-2 cytokine, IL-4, and IL-5 at either cytokine level produced by PBMCs stimulated by FMDV antigens. Moreover, there was an interaction between IL-17 and IL-6, that is, as IL-6 cytokine level elevated or diminished, IL-17 cytokine level increased or decreased, as well.

  9. Prevalence of Pertussis Antibodies in Maternal Blood, Cord Serum, and Infants From Mothers With and Those Without Tdap Booster Vaccination During Pregnancy in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallo, Aurelia A; Neyro, Silvina E; Manonelles, Gabriela V; Lara, Claudia; Hozbor, Daniela; Zintgraff, Jonathan; Mazzeo, Silvina; Davison, Héctor E; González, Susana; Zapulla, Estella; Canle, Oscar; Huespe, Miguel; Galas, Marcelo; López, Eduardo L

    2018-02-19

    Morbidity and mortality rates for pertussis in infants are high because disease often occurs before the onset of routine immunization or in those who do not complete a primary immunization series. Pertussis immunization is recommended during pregnancy to achieve antibody levels sufficient to protect young infants. To our knowledge, no previous reports of maternal pertussis immunization results in Latin America exist in the literature. This study compared pertussis antibody levels in newborns from mothers who received or did not receive a tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis vaccination (TdapV) during pregnancy. Each mother's level of immunoglobulin G antibodies against pertussis toxin (IgG-PT) was measured with a validated, specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Paired mother and cord serum samples were compared in 105 mothers with and 99 mothers without a TdapV. At birth, the mothers with and those without a TdapV had serum IgG-PT geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) of 35.1 and 9.8 ELISA units (EU)/mL, respectively (P Vaccination timing did not affect the IgG-PT GMC at birth. Placental antibody transference efficiencies (measured as the ratio of the cord blood GMC to the maternal GMC) were 1.46 and 1.18 for mothers with and those without a TdapV, respectively. The IgG-PT GMCs were 17.7 EU/mL in 36 infants in their first month of life and 11.6 EU/mL in 32 infants in their second month of life. Women who received a TdapV during pregnancy had significantly a higher serum/cord IgG-PT concentration at birth than mothers who did not receive a TdapV. Timing of the immunization was not correlated with antibody concentrations. Infants born to immunized mothers had significantly higher antibody levels during their first 2 months of life.

  10. Vaccines and Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Bianchini, Sonia; Dellepiane, Rosa Maria; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The distinctive immune system characteristics of children with Kawasaki disease (KD) could suggest that they respond in a particular way to all antigenic stimulations, including those due to vaccines. Moreover, treatment of KD is mainly based on immunomodulatory therapy. These factors suggest that vaccines and KD may interact in several ways. These interactions could be of clinical relevance because KD is a disease of younger children who receive most of the vaccines recommended for infectious disease prevention. This paper shows that available evidence does not support an association between KD development and vaccine administration. Moreover, it highlights that administration of routine vaccines is mandatory even in children with KD and all efforts must be made to ensure the highest degree of protection against vaccine-preventable diseases for these patients. However, studies are needed to clarify currently unsolved issues, especially issues related to immunologic interference induced by intravenous immunoglobulin and biological drugs.

  11. Cancer vaccines: from research to clinical practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bot, Adrian; Obrocea, Mihail; Marincola, Francesco M

    2011-01-01

    ..., for both solid and blood borne cancers. Cancer Vaccines: Challenges and Opportunities in Translation is the first text in the field to bring immunotherapy treatments from the laboratory trial to the bedside for the practicing oncologist. Cancer Vaccines...

  12. β-Hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and glucose concentrations in the blood of dairy calves as influenced by age, vaccination stress, weaning, and starter intake including evaluation of BHB and glucose markers of starter intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Mena, F X; Hu, W; Dennis, T S; Hill, T M; Schlotterbeck, R L

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this research was to determine how blood β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and glucose are affected by age, time of day, stress, weaning, forced intake restriction, and voluntary starter intake in calves between 1 and 9 wk of age, and to evaluate if either is an acceptable proxy for starter intake. Holstein calves were fed a 27% crude protein, 17% fat milk replacer at 660 g of dry matter daily along with free-choice starter and water. Calves were weaned on d 42. Jugular blood was sampled at 0800, 1200, and 1600 h, and within 5 min of sampling BHB, and glucose concentrations were estimated using test strips (Nova Max Plus meter, Nova Biomedical Corporation, Waltham, MA). Age effects and time of day were estimated by sampling blood weekly (d 6, 13, 20, 27, 34, 41, and 48). To determine vaccination stress, a Pasteurella vaccine was administered after blood sampling at 0800 h on d 36. Effect of voluntary starter intake was tested by selecting calves for low and high intakes (d 35 to 39) and sampling on d 40, 41, 43, and 44. Starter intake restriction was tested by restricting intake in half of the calves and sampling on d 60 and 61. Data were analyzed with repeated measurements in a mixed model procedure with either within-calf effect (day or week) or within-calf effects (hour, and day or week) included in the model. Time of day did not affect blood BHB and glucose in the first 6 wk. Blood BHB was greater in wk 7 versus wk 1 to 6. Blood glucose was greater in the first 5 wk compared with wk 6 and 7. Blood BHB increased and glucose decreased with increasing starter intake. Blood BHB declined due to vaccination, but glucose was unaffected. Starter intake restriction reduced BHB for 3 d and glucose for 2 d after restriction. Both were affected by time of day. Around weaning (d 40 to 44), BHB and glucose increased with increasing starter intake. In this research, neither blood BHB nor glucose was a good proxy for starter intake. Blood BHB was positively and glucose

  13. Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations; Immunizations; Immunize; Vaccine shots; Prevention - vaccine ... component) of the vaccine. VACCINE SCHEDULE The recommended vaccination (immunization) schedule is updated every 12 months by ...

  14. Pertussis vaccination during pregnancy in Belgium: Results of a prospective controlled cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maertens, Kirsten; Caboré, Raïssa Nadège; Huygen, Kris; Hens, Niel; Van Damme, Pierre; Leuridan, Elke

    2016-01-02

    Vaccination during pregnancy has been recommended in some countries as a means to protect young infants from severe infection. Nevertheless, many aspects are still unknown and possible blunting of the infant's immune responses by maternal antibodies, is one of the concerns with maternal vaccination. We report the first prospective controlled cohort study in women and infants on the effects of using Boostrix(®), a combined tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis vaccine, during pregnancy. The primary aim was to measure the influence of this booster dose on the titer and duration of the presence of maternal antibodies in the infants and assess possible interference with infant immune responses. In a controlled cohort study, 57 pregnant women were vaccinated with Tdap vaccine (Tetanus Diphtheria acellular Pertussis, Boostrix, GSK Biologicals), at a mean gestational age of 28.6 weeks. A control group of pregnant women (N=42) received no vaccine. Antibody geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) against tetanus (TT), diphtheria (DT), pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA) and pertactin (Prn) were measured with commercial ELISA tests in samples taken preceding maternal vaccination and one month afterwards, at delivery and from the cord blood, and in infants before and 1 month after the primary series of 3 pertussis containing hexavalent vaccines. Infants born to vaccinated women had significantly higher GMC at birth and during the first 2 months of life for all vaccine antigens compared to the offspring of unvaccinated women, thereby closing the susceptibility gap for pertussis in infants. However, blunting was noticed for infant diphtheria and pertussis toxin vaccine responses (pvaccinated women after the primary vaccination schedule (weeks 8,12 and 16). Since pertussis vaccination has been recommended during pregnancy already, the results of this study support that recommendation and provide additional scientific evidence to document possible

  15. Vaccine hesitancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Eve; Laberge, Caroline; Guay, Maryse; Bramadat, Paul; Roy, Réal; Bettinger, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the most successful public health measures, vaccination is perceived as unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of individuals. Lack of confidence in vaccines is now considered a threat to the success of vaccination programs. Vaccine hesitancy is believed to be responsible for decreasing vaccine coverage and an increasing risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy. First, we will characterize vaccine hesitancy and suggest the possible causes of the apparent increase in vaccine hesitancy in the developed world. Then we will look at determinants of individual decision-making about vaccination. PMID:23584253

  16. [Mercury in vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessel, Luc

    2003-01-01

    Thiomersal, also called thimerosal, is an ethyl mercury derivative used as a preservative to prevent bacterial contamination of multidose vaccine vials after they have been opened. Exposure to low doses of thiomersal has essentially been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Nevertheless there is no evidence that allergy to thiomersal could be induced by thiomersal-containing vaccines. Allergy to thiomersal is usually of delayed-hypersensitivity type, but its detection through cutaneous tests is not very reliable. Hypersensitivity to thiomersal is not considered as a contraindication to the use of thiomersal-containing vaccines. In 1999 in the USA, thiomersal was present in approximately 30 different childhood vaccines, whereas there were only 2 in France. Although there were no evidence of neurological toxicity in infants related to the use of thiomersal-containing vaccines, the FDA considered that the cumulative dose of mercury received by young infants following vaccination was high enough (although lower than the FDA threshold for methyl mercury) to request vaccine manufacturers to remove thiomersal from vaccine formulations. Since 2002, all childhood vaccines used in Europe and the USA are thiomersal-free or contain only minute amounts of thiomersal. Recently published studies have shown that the mercury levels in the blood, faeces and urine of children who had received thiomersal-containing vaccines were much lower than those accepted by the American Environmental Protection Agency. It has also been demonstrated that the elimination of mercury in children was much faster than what was expected on the basis of studies conducted with methyl mercury originating from food. Recently, the hypothesis that mercury contained in vaccines could be the cause of autism and other neurological developmental disorders created a new debate in the medical community and the general public. To date, none of the epidemiological studies conducted in Europe and elsewhere

  17. Effect of vaccination route and composition of DNA vaccine on the induction of protective immunity against pseudorabies infection in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, van E.M.A.; Haagmans, B.L.; Visser, de Y.E.; Bruin, de M.G.M.; Boersma, W.; Bianchi, A.T.J.

    1998-01-01

    Vaccination with naked DNA may be an alternative to conventional vaccines because it combines the efficacy of attenuated vaccines with the biological safety of inactivated vaccines. We recently showed that the vaccination with naked DNA coding for the immunorelevant glycoprotein D (gD) of

  18. Moving towards improved vaccines for Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yawen; Zhou, Huaiyu

    2018-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasitic protozoan that infects almost all warm-blooded animals and humans, resulting in threats to public health and economic losses. Despite continuous research efforts, there are still very few effective strategies against toxoplasmosis. In the past few years, numerous vaccination experiments have been performed to control T. gondii infection. Areas covered: In this review, the authors summarize the development of T. gondii vaccines with proper adjuvants, ranging from live or live-attenuated vaccines to protein vaccines, DNA vaccines, epitope vaccines and novel vaccines. They also highlight the challenges involved in the development of T. gondii vaccines, including specific impediments and shortcomings. Expert opinion: Moving towards the development of effective vaccines against T. gondii is not only a tedious mission but also a difficult challenge. Future studies should consider new approaches and strategies for vaccine development, particularly novel vaccines and genetic adjuvants, as well as optimizing immunization protocols and evaluation criteria.

  19. Genome-wide association analysis identifies novel blood pressure loci and offers biological insights into cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warren, Helen R.; Evangelou, Evangelos; Cabrera, Claudia P.; Gao, He; Ren, Meixia; Mifsud, Borbala; Ntalla, Ioanna; Surendran, Praveen; Liu, Chunyu; Cook, James P.; Kraja, Aldi T.; Drenos, Fotios; Loh, Marie; Verweij, Niek; Marten, Jonathan; Karaman, Ibrahim; Lepe, Marcelo P. Segura; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Knight, Joanne; Snieder, Harold; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang; Tai, E. Shyong; Said, M. Abdullah; Porteous, David; Alver, Maris; Poulter, Neil; Farrall, Martin; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Magi, Reedik; Stanton, Alice; Connell, John; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Metspalu, Andres; Shields, Denis C.; Thom, Simon; Brown, Morris; Sever, Peter; Esko, Tonu; Hayward, Caroline; van der Harst, Pim; Saleheen, Danish; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Chambers, John C.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Levy, Daniel; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Keavney, Bernard; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Samani, Nilesh J.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Tobin, Martin D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ehret, Georg B.; Wain, Louise V.; Barnes, Michael R.; Tzoulaki, Joanna; Caulfield, Mark J.; Elliott, Paul; Vaez, Ahmad; Jansen, Rick; Joehanes, Roby; van der Most, Peter J.; Erzurumluoglu, A. Mesut; O'Reilly, Paul; Rose, Lynda M.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Arking, Dan E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Guo, Xiuqing; Kutalik, Zoltan; Trompet, Stella; Shrine, Nick; Teumer, Alexander; Ried, Janina S.; Bis, Joshua C.; Smith, Albert V.; Amin, Najaf; Nolte, Ilja M.; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Mahajan, Anubha; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Hofer, Edith; Joshi, Peter K.; Kristiansson, Kati; Traglia, Michela; Havulinna, Aki S.; Goel, Anuj; Nalls, Mike A.; Sober, Siim; Vuckovic, Dragana; Luan, Jian'an; del Greco, Fabiola M.; Ayers, Kristin L.; Marrugat, Jaume; Ruggiero, Daniela; Lopez, Lorna M.; Niiranen, Teemu; Enroth, Stefan; Jackson, Anne U.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Zhang, Weihua; Gandin, Ilaria; Harris, Sarah E.; Zemonik, Tatijana; Lu, Yingchang; Shah, Nabi; de Borst, Martin H.; Mangino, Massimo; Prins, Bram P.; Campbell, Archie; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Chauhan, Ganesh; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Abecasis, Goncalo; Abedi, Maryam; Barbieri, Caterina M.; Batini, Chiara; Blake, Tineka; Boehnke, Michael; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Braund, Peter S.; Brumat, Marco; Campbell, Harry; Cocca, Massimiliano; Collins, Francis; Cordell, Heather J.; Damman, Jeffrey J.; Davies, Gail; de Geus, Eco J.; de Mutsert, Renee; Deelen, Joris; Demirkale, Yusuf; Doney, Alex S. F.; Dorr, Marcus; Ferreira, Teresa; Franberg, Mattias; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Gieger, Christian; Giulianini, Franco; Gow, Alan J.; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hofman, Albert; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Andrew D.; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kahonen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Langenberg, Claudia; Larson, Marty; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehne, Benjamin; Liewald, David C. M.; Lin, Li; Lind, Lars; Mach, Francois; Mamasoula, Chrysovalanto; Menni, Cristina; Milaneschi, Yuri; Morgan, Anna; Morris, Andrew D.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Munson, Peter J.; Nandakumar, Priyanka; Nguyen, Quang Tri; Nutile, Teresa; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Oostra, Ben A.; Org, Elin; Palotie, Aarno; Pare, Guillaume; Pattie, Alison; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rice, Kenneth; Ridker, Paul M.; Riese, Harriette; Ripatti, Samuli; Robino, Antonietta; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; Saba, Yasaman; Saint Pierre, Aude; Sala, Cinzia F.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Scott, Rodney; Seelen, Marc A.; Siscovick, David; Sorice, Rossella; Stott, David J.; Sundstrom, Johan; Swertz, Morris; Taylor, Kent D.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Volker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wild, Sarah; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wright, Alan F.; Yao, Jie; Theriault, Sebastien; Conen, David; John, Attia; Debette, Stephanie; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Spector, Tim D.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Polasek, Ozren; Starr, John M.; Girotto, Giorgia; Lindgren, Cecila M.; Vitart, Veronique; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Knekt, Paul; Deary, Ian J.; Ciullo, Marina; Elosua, Roberto; Keavney, Bernard D.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Scott, Robert A.; Gasparini, Paolo; Laan, Maris; Liu, Yongmei; Watkins, Hugh; Hartman, Catharina A.; Salomaa, Veikko; Toniolo, Daniela; Perola, Markus; Wilson, James F.; Schmidt, Helena; Zhao, Jing Hua; Lehtimaki, Terho; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Psaty, Bruce M.; Peters, Annette; Rettig, Rainer; James, Alan; Jukema, J. Wouter; Strachan, David P.; Palmas, Walter; Ingelsson, Erik; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Franco, Oscar H.; Bochud, Murielle; Morris, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure is the leading heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease worldwide. We report genetic association of blood pressure (systolic, diastolic, pulse pressure) among UK Biobank participants of European ancestry with independent replication in other cohorts, and robust

  20. Genome-wide association analysis identifies novel blood pressure loci and offers biological insights into cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warren, Helen R.; Evangelou, Evangelos; Cabrera, Claudia P.; Gao, He; Ren, Meixia; Mifsud, Borbala; Ntalla, Ioanna; Surendran, Praveen; Liu, Chunyu; Cook, James P.; Kraja, Aldi T.; Drenos, Fotios; Loh, Marie; Verweij, Niek; Marten, Jonathan; Karaman, Ibrahim; Lepe, Marcelo P. Segura; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Knight, Joanne; Snieder, Harold; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang; Tai, E. Shyong; Said, M. Abdullah; Porteous, David; Alver, Maris; Poulter, Neil; Farrall, Martin; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Magi, Reedik; Stanton, Alice; Connell, John; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Metspalu, Andres; Shields, Denis C.; Thom, Simon; Brown, Morris; Sever, Peter; Esko, Tonu; Hayward, Caroline; van der Harst, Pim; Saleheen, Danish; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Chambers, John C.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Levy, Daniel; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Keavney, Bernard; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Samani, Nilesh J.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Tobin, Martin D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ehret, Georg B.; Wain, Louise V.; Barnes, Michael R.; Tzoulaki, Joanna; Caulfield, Mark J.; Elliott, Paul; Wain, Louise V.; Vaez, Ahmad; Jansen, Rick; Joehanes, Roby; van der Most, Peter J.; Erzurumluoglu, A. Mesut; O'Reilly, Paul; Cabrera, Claudia P.; Warren, Helen R.; Rose, Lynda M.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Esko, Tonu; Arking, Dan E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Guo, Xiuqing; Kutalik, Zoltan; Trompet, Stella; Shrine, Nick; Teumer, Alexander; Ried, Janina S.; Bis, Joshua C.; Smith, Albert V.; Amin, Najaf; Nolte, Ilja M.; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Mahajan, Anubha; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Hofer, Edith; Joshi, Peter K.; Kristiansson, Kati; Traglia, Michela; Havulinna, Aki S.; Goel, Anuj; Nalls, Mike A.; Sober, Siim; Vuckovic, Dragana; Luan, Jian'an; Del Greco M, Fabiola; Ayers, Kristin L.; Marrugat, Jaume; Ruggiero, Daniela; Lopez, Lorna M.; Niiranen, Teemu; Enroth, Stefan; Jackson, Anne U.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Zhang, Weihua; Marten, Jonathan; Gandin, Ilaria; Harris, Sarah E.; Zemonik, Tatijana; Lu, Yingchang; Evangelou, Evangelos; Shah, Nabi; de Borst, Martin H.; Mangino, Massimo; Prins, Bram P.; Campbell, Archie; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Chauhan, Ganesh; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Abecasis, Goncalo; Abedi, Maryam; Barbieri, Caterina M.; Barnes, Michael R.; Batini, Chiara; Blake, Tineka; Boehnke, Michael; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Braund, Peter S.; Brown, Morris; Brumat, Marco; Campbell, Harry; Chambers, John C.; Cocca, Massimiliano; Collins, Francis; Connell, John; Cordell, Heather J.; Damman, Jeffrey J.; Davies, Gail; de Geus, Eco J.; de Mutsert, Renee; Deelen, Joris; Demirkale, Yusuf; Doney, Alex S. F.; Dorr, Marcus; Farrall, Martin; Ferreira, Teresa; Franberg, Mattias; Gao, He; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Gieger, Christian; Giulianini, Franco; Gow, Alan J.; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hofman, Albert; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Andrew D.; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kahonen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Langenberg, Claudia; Larson, Marty; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehne, Benjamin; Liewald, David C. M.; Lin, Li; Lind, Lars; Mach, Francois; Mamasoula, Chrysovalanto; Menni, Cristina; Mifsud, Borbala; Milaneschi, Yuri; Morgan, Anna; Morris, Andrew D.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Munson, Peter J.; Nandakumar, Priyanka; Quang Tri Nguyen,; Nutile, Teresa; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Oostra, Ben A.; Org, Elin; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palotie, Aarno; Pare, Guillaume; Pattie, Alison; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Poulter, Neil; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ren, Meixia; Rice, Kenneth; Ridker, Paul M.; Riese, Harriette; Ripatti, Samuli; Robino, Antonietta; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; Saba, Yasaman; Saint Pierre, Aude; Sala, Cinzia F.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Scott, Rodney; Seelen, Marc A.; Shields, Denis C.; Siscovick, David; Sorice, Rossella; Stanton, Alice; Stott, David J.; Sundstrom, Johan; Swertz, Morris; Taylor, Kent D.; Thom, Simon; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Volker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wild, Sarah; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wright, Alan F.; Yao, Jie; Theriault, Sebastien; Conen, David; John, Attia; Sever, Peter; Debette, Stephanie; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Spector, Tim D.; van der Harst, Pim; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Polasek, Ozren; Starr, John M.; Girotto, Giorgia; Hayward, Caroline; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Lindgren, Cecila M.; Vitart, Veronique; Samani, Nilesh J.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Knekt, Paul; Deary, Ian J.; Ciullo, Marina; Elosua, Roberto; Keavney, Bernard D.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Scott, Robert A.; Gasparini, Paolo; Laan, Maris; Liu, YongMei; Watkins, Hugh; Hartman, Catharina A.; Salomaa, Veikko; Toniolo, Daniela; Perola, Markus; Wilson, James F.; Schmidt, Helena; Zhao, Jing Hua; Lehtimaki, Terho; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Psaty, Bruce M.; Peters, Annette; Rettig, Rainer; James, Alan; Jukema, J. Wouter; Strachan, David P.; Palmas, Walter; Metspalu, Andres; Ingelsson, Erik; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Franco, Oscar H.; Bochud, Murielle; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Munroe, Patricia B.; Elliott, Paul; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Knight, Joanne; Morris, Andrew P.; Levy, Daniel; Tobin, Martin D.; Snieder, Harold; Caulfield, Mark J.; Ehret, Georg B.

    Elevated blood pressure is the leading heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease worldwide. We report genetic association of blood pressure (systolic, diastolic, pulse pressure) among UK Biobank participants of European ancestry with independent replication in other cohorts, and robust

  1. Vaccines to combat smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevins, Rick A; Wilkinson, Jamie L; Sanderson, Sam D

    2008-04-01

    Current US FDA-approved biological therapies for treating smoking target central nervous system processes. Although these therapies have had some success, relapse within a year is still high. Clearly additional strategies are needed to aid individuals in maintaining abstinence. We briefly discuss promising research using vaccines to combat smoking and then identify some potentially important directions for future research. Immunization with a nicotine vaccine generates drug-specific antibodies that sequester some of the nicotine in the peripheral circulation preventing it from entering the brain, thus decreasing its addictive effects. Albeit promising, much more research is necessary to identify more efficacious vaccine designs and formulations, as well as optimal immunization regimens. A further understanding of the factors contributing to the substantial individual differences in immunogenicity to these vaccines and how to best use vaccines in combination with other treatment strategies will increase the success of intervention efforts.

  2. Acceptability of study procedures (self-collected introital swabs, blood draws and stool sample collection) by students 10-16 years for an HPV vaccine effectiveness study: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakalembe, Miriam; Mutyaba, Twaha; Mirembe, Florence

    2016-03-16

    A cohort study was planned to evaluate vaccine immunogenicity and effect of malaria and helminth co-infections on the bivalent Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. The study would involve self collected introital swabs, blood draws and stool sample collection. We therefore conducted a pilot study to assess the acceptability of these procedures among the students and their parents. A cross-sectional study among forty four students from two purposively selected primary schools of Western Uganda. Exit interviews and two focus group discussions (FGD) (for parents) were conducted. Acceptability was measured by willingness to undergo the procedures again, recommending the procedures to others as well as proportion of introital swabs positive for β globulin. FGD determined acceptability of the parents and explored opinions and perceptions that would influence their decisions. HPV-16/18 and β globulin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) were analysed using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) kit. All the students (100%) in the study were willing to provide a self- collected introital swab and a stool sample as well as recommending their friends while (86.3%) were willing for blood draws. There were 40/44 (90.1%) self collected introital swabs that had positive result for human β globulin though none of them was positive for HPV-16/18. In the FGD, it emerged that parents concerns were on the blood draws and introital swab collection which were addressed. The study procedures were highly acceptable among this study population of students and their parents. Follow-up to assess HPV vaccine effectiveness and factors that may influence the vaccine in this age group is feasible.

  3. The Biological Function of Antibodies Induced by the RTS,S/AS01 Malaria Vaccine Candidate is Determined by Their Fine Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-31

    malaria vaccine candidate is determined by their fine specificity Sidhartha Chaudhury1, Christian F. Ockenhouse2, Jason A. Regules3, Sheetij Dutta4...Anders Wallqvist1, Erik Jongert5, Norman C. Waters4, Franck Lemiale2 and Elke Bergmann‑Leitner4* Abstract Background: Recent vaccine studies have shown... vaccine candidate, RTS,S, have shown that circumsporozoite protein (CSP)‑specific antibodies and CD4+ T cell responses are associated with protection

  4. Towards functional antibody-based vaccines to prevent pre-erythrocytic malaria infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Brandon; Kappe, Stefan H I; Sather, D Noah

    2017-05-01

    An effective malaria vaccine would be considered a milestone of modern medicine, yet has so far eluded research and development efforts. This can be attributed to the extreme complexity of the malaria parasites, presenting with a multi-stage life cycle, high genome complexity and the parasite's sophisticated immune evasion measures, particularly antigenic variation during pathogenic blood stage infection. However, the pre-erythrocytic (PE) early infection forms of the parasite exhibit relatively invariant proteomes, and are attractive vaccine targets as they offer multiple points of immune system attack. Areas covered: We cover the current state of and roadblocks to the development of an effective, antibody-based PE vaccine, including current vaccine candidates, limited biological knowledge, genetic heterogeneity, parasite complexity, and suboptimal preclinical models as well as the power of early stage clinical models. Expert commentary: PE vaccines will need to elicit broad and durable immunity to prevent infection. This could be achievable if recent innovations in studying the parasites' infection biology, rational vaccine selection and design as well as adjuvant formulation are combined in a synergistic and multipronged approach. Improved preclinical assays as well as the iterative testing of vaccine candidates in controlled human malaria infection trials will further accelerate this effort.

  5. Green revolution vaccines, edible vaccines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    Diabetes. Key words: Edible vaccines, oral vaccines, antigen expression, food vaccines. INTRODUCTION. Vaccination involves the stimulation of the immune system to prepare it for the event of an invasion from a particular pathogen for which the immune system has been primed (Arntzen, 1997). The release of vaccine is.

  6. HBV-DNA as marker of hepatitis B virus infection in autochtho- nous and foreign population of the Molecular Biology Laboratory of the Immuno-Haematology and Blood Transfusion Unit, AO “S. Maria”, Terni, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cappuccini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Italy has recently become land of immigration of people coming from geographical areas with high or medium endemia of Hepatitis B Virus. HBV-DNA shows the presence of that virus in blood. Materials and Methods. The aim of this study is to value the prevalence of HBV-DNA in patients coming to the Molecular Biology Laboratory of the Immuno-Haematology and Blood Transfusion Unit, AO “S. Maria”, Terni in 2012 focusing the areas of origin. HBV-DNA was analysed in 505 samples of plasma belonging to 328 individuals. The evaluation was related to sex and places of origin. Results. Among the 328 individuals analysed, 149 were positive to HBV-DNA: 88 were Italian and 61 were foreigners. Male positivity to virus was higher than female. Nationality of origin were found for all the subjects except 2. Positive samples belong mostly to individuals from central Europe: 11 to Albania, 28 to Romania, 1 to Ukraine, 4 to Moldova, 1 to Bulgaria. 5 positive individuals were from Asia: 2 from Philippines and 3 from China. One positive man was French and 9 positive individuals were from Africa (Maghreb and Central Sub-Saharan Africa. Last positive individual was of unknown nationality.Conclusions. The HBV prevalence among immigrants changes according to the geographical area of origin and it is higher in many other countries than Italy. Prevention and vaccination together with monitoring of HBV-DNA is strictly necessary for all the population autochthonous and not in this particular historical moment.

  7. Leptospirosis vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leptospirosis is a serious infection disease caused by pathogenic strains of the Leptospira spirochetes, which affects not only humans but also animals. It has long been expected to find an effective vaccine to prevent leptospirosis through immunization of high risk humans or animals. Although some leptospirosis vaccines have been obtained, the vaccination is relatively unsuccessful in clinical application despite decades of research and millions of dollars spent. In this review, the recent advancements of recombinant outer membrane protein (OMP vaccines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS vaccines, inactivated vaccines, attenuated vaccines and DNA vaccines against leptospirosis are reviewed. A comparison of these vaccines may lead to development of new potential methods to combat leptospirosis and facilitate the leptospirosis vaccine research. Moreover, a vaccine ontology database was built for the scientists working on the leptospirosis vaccines as a starting tool.

  8. Polio Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IBS) Home Family Health Infants and Toddlers Polio Vaccine Polio Vaccine Share Print What is polio? Poliomyelitis (polio) is ... each year. Fortunately, the use of the polio vaccine has made the disease very rare in most ...

  9. Measles Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Measles Vaccination Pronounced (MEE-zills) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... also be up to date on their MMR vaccination. The MMR vaccine is very safe and effective. ...

  10. Molecular and biological characterization of the 5 human-bovine rotavirus (WC3)-based reassortant strains of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq (registered)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Joelsson, Daniel B.; Warakomski, Donald J.; Zhou, Tingyi; Mathis, Pamela K.; Maanen, Marc-Henri van; Ranheim, Todd S.; Ciarlet, Max

    2010-01-01

    RotaTeq (registered) is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine that contains five human-bovine reassortant strains (designated G1, G2, G3, G4, and P1) on the backbone of the naturally attenuated tissue culture-adapted parental bovine rotavirus (BRV) strain WC3. The viral genomes of each of the reassortant strains were completely sequenced and compared pairwise and phylogenetically among each other and to human rotavirus (HRV) and BRV reference strains. Reassortants G1, G2, G3, and G4 contained the VP7 gene from their corresponding HRV parent strains, while reassortants G1 and G2 also contained the VP3 gene (genotype M1) from the HRV parent strain. The P1 reassortant contained the VP4 gene from the HRV parent strain and all the other gene segments from the BRV WC3 strain. The human VP7s had a high level of overall amino acid identity (G1: 95-99%, G2: 94-99% G3: 96-100%, G4: 93-99%) when compared to those of representative rotavirus strains of their corresponding G serotypes. The VP4 of the P1 reassortant had a high identity (92-97%) with those of serotype P1A[8] HRV reference strains, while the BRV VP7 showed identities ranging from 91% to 94% to those of serotype G6 HRV strains. Sequence analyses of the BRV or HRV genes confirmed that the fundamental structure of the proteins in the vaccine was similar to those of the HRV and BRV references strains. Sequences analyses showed that RotaTeq (registered) exhibited a high degree of genetic stability as no mutations were identified in the material of each reassortant, which undergoes two rounds of replication cycles in cell culture during the manufacturing process, when compared to the final material used to fill the dosing tubes. The infectivity of each of the reassortant strains of RotaTeq (registered) , like HRV strains, did not require the presence of sialic acid residues on the cell surface. The molecular and biologic characterization of RotaTeq (registered) adds to the significant body of clinical data supporting the

  11. Vaccine-Mediated Mechanisms Controlling Replication of Francisella tularensis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using a Co-culture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell Eneslätt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immunity (CMI is normally required for efficient protection against intracellular infections, however, identification of correlates is challenging and they are generally lacking. Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent, facultative intracellular bacterium and CMI is critically required for protection against the pathogen, but how this is effectuated in humans is poorly understood. To understand the protective mechanisms, we established an in vitro co-culture assay to identify how control of infection of F. tularensis is accomplished by human cells and hypothesized that the model will mimic in vivo immune mechanisms. Non-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were expanded with antigen and added to cultures with adherent PBMC infected with the human vaccine strain, LVS, or the highly virulent SCHU S4 strain. Intracellular numbers of F. tularensis was followed for 72 h and secreted and intracellular cytokines were analyzed. Addition of PBMC expanded from naïve individuals, i.e., those with no record of immunization to F. tularensis, generally resulted in little or no control of intracellular bacterial growth, whereas addition of PBMC from a majority of F. tularensis-immune individuals executed static and sometimes cidal effects on intracellular bacteria. Regardless of infecting strain, statistical differences between the two groups were significant, P < 0.05. Secretion of 11 cytokines was analyzed after 72 h of infection and significant differences with regard to secretion of IFN-γ, TNF, and MIP-1β was observed between immune and naïve individuals for LVS-infected cultures. Also, in LVS-infected cultures, CD4 T cells from vaccinees, but not CD8 T cells, showed significantly higher expression of IFN-γ, MIP-1β, TNF, and CD107a than cells from naïve individuals. The co-culture system appears to identify correlates of immunity that are relevant for the understanding of mechanisms of the protective host immunity to

  12. 'He is now like a brother, I can even give him some blood'--relational ethics and material exchanges in a malaria vaccine 'trial community' in The Gambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P Wenzel; Kelly, Ann; Imoukhuede, Babatunde; Pool, Robert

    2008-09-01

    This paper explores social relations within the 'trial community' (staff and volunteers) of a Malaria Vaccine Trial (MVT), implemented by the Medical Research Council (MRC) in The Gambia between 2001 and 2004. It situates ethical concerns with medical research within the everyday life of scientific fieldwork. Based upon discussions with volunteers and staff, we explore processes of mediation between scientific project and study population, and between formal ethics, local ethical debates and everyday practice. We observe that material contact and substantial transactions, notably of blood and medicine, are central to the construction of the MVT. These transactions are guided by a concrete and relational form of ethics, which contrasts with the abstract and vertical formal ethical principles underwriting the scientific study protocol. The success of the MVT owed much to these kinship-like ethics. One possible conclusion from these observations is that research ethics should be understood, not just as a quasi-legal frame but also as an open, searching movement, much in the same way that kinship is not merely a juridical institution and a prescriptive frame of rules, but a network made through relational work. However, this conclusion raises new problems: by contrasting formal, abstract principles to intimate, immediate relations, and economic justice to personal morality, we accept that the order of medical research is moved further out of the public and political, and into the domains of either quasi-legal claims or of private morality. Irrespective of the undeniable importance of clear-cut rules and of good face-to-face relations, a third essential foundation of medical research ethics is the democratically constituted public sphere, including equitable health services, and transparent institutions to facilitate open debate and regulate particular interests. Ultimately, the ethics of global science can rely neither on principles nor trust but requires citizenship

  13. The effect of Ligula intestinalis on blood sex steroid hormones, gonadal tissue and some other biological parameters changes of Chalcalburnus mossulensis in Vahdat dam of Kordestan-Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Khanghah, Ali Parsa

    2010-01-01

    Chalcalburnus mossulensis from the cyprinidae family is one of the indigenous fish in Gheshlag Lake of Kordestan-Iran. Ligula intestinalis is one of the infective parasites of this fish. In this study, the effect of this parasite on some biological aspects of this fish like weight, length, PI, CF, GSR, blood sex steroid hormones and gonadal tissue, was investigated. During one year, by seasonal sampling, 144 fish sample from mentioned species were collected using trap net. By considering the ...

  14. Current topics in red cell biology: report on the Red Cell Special Interest Group meeting held at NHS Blood and Transplant Bristol on 30 October 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, T; Bruce, L J; Ridgwell, K

    2016-08-01

    The Red Cell Special Interest Group (SIG) meeting, hosted by the British Blood Transfusion Society, provides an annual forum for the presentation of UK- and European-based red cell research. The 2015 meeting was held on Friday 30 October at the National Health Service Blood & Transplant (NHSBT) facility in Filton, Bristol and provided an exciting and varied programme on the themes of erythropoiesis, malaria biology and pathophysiology and red cells properties in stress and disease. Ten speakers presented on these topics over the course of one day. The meeting was well attended by over 90 delegates. Posters were presented during the lunch break, and abstracts from the posters are published at the end of this issue. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  15. A vaccine prepared from the 22 nm particles of surface hepatitis B antigen (HBsAg)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karelin, V.P.; Babaeva, E.E.; Gubenko, E.F.; Kaulen, D.K.; Zhdanov, V.M.

    1980-01-01

    A method for obtaining a subunit inactivated vaccine preparation from the 22-nm particles of HBsAg is proposed. For inactivation of the residual infectious hepatitis B virus (HBV) the preparations were successively treated with 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and nucleases. In addition, thermal denaturation and ultraviolet irradiation of HBV DNA were used. As a control the biologic activity of a reference virus (SV40) was tested after the same treatment. The effectiveness of DNA inactivation was monitored by adding 3H-thymidine labeled reference virus to the vaccine preparations. The purified and inactivated HBsAg was adsorbed on Al2O3. Antigenicity was calculated on the basis of the determination of antibody in guinea pigs immunized with various doses of the vaccine, and the release of 125 I- HBsAg from blood and kidneys in immunized and control mice was analyzed. Possible methods of inactivation and control of HBV vaccine is discussed

  16. Vaccination elicits a prominent acute phase response in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Susanne A; Petersen, Henrik H; Ersbøll, Annette K; Falk-Rønne, Jørgen; Jacobsen, Stine

    2012-02-01

    European and American guidelines for vaccination against tetanus and influenza in horses recommend annual and annual/semi-annual vaccinations, respectively, against the two pathogens. Too-frequent vaccination may, however, have adverse effects, among other things because an inflammatory response is elicited with subsequent alterations in homeostasis. The objective of the study was to compare the acute phase response (APR) in 10 horses following administration of two different types of vaccines, namely, an inactivated Immune Stimulating COMplex (ISCOM) vaccine and a live recombinant vector vaccine. Blood was sampled before and after vaccination to measure levels of serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen, white blood cell counts (WBC) and iron. Vaccination induced a prominent APR with increased WBC, elevated blood levels of SAA and fibrinogen, and decreased serum iron concentrations. The ISCOM vaccine caused significantly (Phorse owners about convalescence after vaccination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 75 FR 9905 - Guidance for Industry: Characterization and Qualification of Cell Substrates and Other Biological...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... Viral Vaccines for Infectious Disease Indications; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... and Other Biological Materials Used in the Production of Viral Vaccines for Infectious Disease... vaccines for the characterization and qualification of cell substrates, viral seeds, and other biological...

  18. Implementation workshop of WHO guidelines on evaluation of malaria vaccines: Current regulatory concepts and issues related to vaccine quality, Pretoria, South Africa 07 Nov 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mei Mei; Baca-Estrada, Maria; Conrad, Christoph; Karikari-Boateng, Eric; Kang, Hye-Na

    2015-08-26

    The current World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on the quality, safety and efficacy of recombinant malaria vaccines targeting the pre-erythrocytic and blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum were adopted by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization in 2012 to provide guidance on the quality, nonclinical and clinical aspects of recombinant malaria vaccines. A WHO workshop was organised to facilitate implementation into African (national/regional) regulatory practices, of the regulatory evaluation principles outlined in the guidelines regarding quality aspects. The workshop was used also to share knowledge and experience on regulatory topics of chemistry, manufacturing and control with a focus on vaccines through presentations and an interactive discussion using a case study approach. The basic principles and concepts of vaccine quality including consistency of production, quality control and manufacturing process were presented and discussed in the meeting. By reviewing and practicing a case study, better understanding on the relationship between consistency of production and batch release tests of an adjuvanted pre-erythrocytic recombinant malaria vaccine was reached. The case study exercise was considered very useful to understand regulatory evaluation principles of vaccines and a suggestion was made to WHO to provide such practices also through its Global Learning Opportunities for Vaccine Quality programme. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. DNA Vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA vaccine, immune response, antibodies, infectious diseases. GENERAL I ARTICLE. DNA Vaccines. P N Rangarajan. History of Vaccine Development. The year 1996 marked the 200th anniversary of the first vaccine developed against smallpox by Edward Jenner. In the now- famous 1796 experiment, Jenner scratched ...

  20. Vaccination, seizures and 'vaccine damage'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Natasha J; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2007-04-01

    Concerns about the safety of vaccination have plagued the community, with reduction in vaccine uptake resulting in increased risk of epidemics. Vaccination has been implicated in the cause of febrile seizures, 'vaccine encephalopathy' and autistic spectrum disorders. Evaluation of alleged associations is complicated by evolution in the vaccination field. This review focuses on the risk of seizures following vaccination and the alleged associations of vaccination with vaccine encephalopathy and also with autism spectrum disorders. Over the last decade the introduction of new vaccines such as the acellular pertussis vaccine has produced a reduction in seizures following vaccination, the outcome of which was benign even with older vaccines. New evidence emerged in 2006 showing that cases of alleged 'vaccine encephalopathy' are due to mutations within a sodium channel gene. The weight of epidemiological evidence does not support a relationship between vaccination and childhood epileptic encephalopathies or autism spectrum disorders. Vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society in such a way that produces change in attitudes to vaccination and subsequent increase in vaccine coverage.

  1. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emerging Immunotherapies Registration Schedule & Program Meeting on Lymphoma Biology Registration Schedule & Program Abstracts 60th ASH Annual Meeting & ... Malignancies Consultative Hematology Course ASH Meeting on Lymphoma Biology ASH Workshop on Genome Editing Publications Blood Blood ...

  2. Two problems in multiphase biological flows: Blood flow and particulate transport in microvascular network, and pseudopod-driven motility of amoeboid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-11-01

    In this talk, two problems in multiphase biological flows will be discussed. The first is the direct numerical simulation of whole blood and drug particulates in microvascular networks. Blood in microcirculation behaves as a dense suspension of heterogeneous cells. The erythrocytes are extremely deformable, while inactivated platelets and leukocytes are nearly rigid. A significant progress has been made in recent years in modeling blood as a dense cellular suspension. However, many of these studies considered the blood flow in simple geometry, e.g., straight tubes of uniform cross-section. In contrast, the architecture of a microvascular network is very complex with bifurcating, merging and winding vessels, posing a further challenge to numerical modeling. We have developed an immersed-boundary-based method that can consider blood cell flow in physiologically realistic and complex microvascular network. In addition to addressing many physiological issues related to network hemodynamics, this tool can be used to optimize the transport properties of drug particulates for effective organ-specific delivery. Our second problem is pseudopod-driven motility as often observed in metastatic cancer cells and other amoeboid cells. We have developed a multiscale hydrodynamic model to simulate such motility. We study the effect of cell stiffness on motility as the former has been considered as a biomarker for metastatic potential. Funded by the National Science Foundation.

  3. DNA VACCINES

    OpenAIRE

    Aksu, Burak

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, protection against infectious diseases has relied on the use of attenuated or killed vaccines. However, many such vaccines are inadequate for reason of efficacy, safety, and cost effectiveness. Live-attenuated vaccines may be immunosuppressive, cause disease if not attenuated sufficiently, or provide limited immunity if too much attenuated. A major concern regarding the use of live vaccines is the possibility of outgrowth of more virulent organisms. Killed vaccines are often un...

  4. Hepatitis Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Sina Ogholikhan; Kathleen B. Schwarz

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B ...

  5. Brain-to-Blood Transporters for Endogenous Substrates and Xenobiotics at the Blood-Brain Barrier: An Overview of Biology and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In the past decade, research into P-glycoprotein involving the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has seen a shift in the concept of the BBB as a structural barrier to that of a functional barrier for xenobiotics and changed simultaneously the strategy for the discovery and development of drugs acting in the CNS. As far as making advances in neurotherapeutics are concerned, the brain-to-blood transport function at the BBB will be one of the most important issues. Knowing the limitations of the in vivo and in vitro methods for BBB efflux research, it is essential to adopt a multidisciplinary approach in investigating the true physiological role of the BBB. Among several methods, the Brain Efflux Index method and the use of conditionally immortalized brain capillary endothelial cell lines, established from transgenic rats harboring temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T-antigen gene, are likely to be very useful tools for the BBB efflux transport research. According to our recent findings using these methods, several transporters in the brain capillary endothelial cells appear to play an important role in reducing the brain level of hydrophilic endogenous substrates produced either in the brain or peripheral organs, e.g., neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, metabolites of neurotransmitters, and uremic toxins. It has been reported also that large hydrophilic molecules, such as IgG, apo-transferrin, and amyloid-β peptide, are susceptible to brain-to-blood efflux transport. In the light of the latest findings, we have formed the hypothesis that the BBB acts as a CNS detoxifying system for both endogenous substrates and xenobiotics in the brain. A fuller understanding of the physiological role of BBB efflux transporters will provide rational insights to assist in the development of safer neurotherapeutics. PMID:15717058

  6. Comparisons of the humoral and cellular immunity induced by live A16R attenuated spore and AVA-like anthrax vaccine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jin; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Lu, Xun; Zhang, Hao; Wei, Lin; Gao, Jun; Hu, Bin; Hu, Wen-Wei; Hu, Dun-Zhong; Jia, Na; Feng, Xin

    2017-03-01

    The live attenuated anthrax vaccine and anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA) are two main types of anthrax vaccines currently used in human. However, the immunoprotective mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we compared humoral and cellular immunity induced by live A16R spore vaccine and A16R strain derived AVA-like vaccine in mice peripheral blood, spleen and bone marrow. Both A16R spores and AVA-like vaccines induced a sustained IgG antibody response with IgG1/IgG2b subtype dominance. However, A16R spores vaccine induced higher titer of IgG2a compared with AVA-like vaccine, indicating a stronger Th1 response to A16R spores. Using antigen-specific ELISpot assay, we observed a significant response of ASCs (antibody secreting cells) and IL4-CSCs (cytokine secreting cells) in mice. Specially, there was a positive correlation between the frequencies of antigen specific ASCs and IL4-CSCs in bone marrow derived cells, either by A16R spore or AVA-like vaccine vaccination. Moreover, we also found A16R spore vaccine, not AVA-like vaccine, could induce sustained frequency of IFN-γ-CSCs in bone marrow derived cells. Collectively, both the vaccines induced a mixed Th1/Th2 response with Th2 dominance in mice and A16R spore vaccine might provide a more comprehensive protection because of humoral and cellular immunity induced in bone marrow. Copyright © 2017 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of triploidy and vaccination on neutrophils and B-cells in the peripheral blood and head kidney of 0+ and 1+ Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) post-smolts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Thomas W K; Rønneseth, Anita; Haugland, Gyri T; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Mayer, Ian; Wergeland, Heidrun I

    2012-07-01

    Sterile triploid fish are being used in aquaculture to prevent early unwanted sexual maturation and the genetic interaction between wild and cultured fish; however, triploid fish are typically considered to be more susceptible to disease than diploid counterparts. Proportions of leucocytes from the head kidney and peripheral blood were identified using monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry in triploid and diploid, vaccinated and unvaccinated, out-of-season (0+) and 1+ Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) three weeks post seawater transfer. Triploid 1+ fish were significantly (PAtlantic salmon post-smolts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel MUC1 glycopeptide conjugate vaccine candidate comprising a 4’-deoxy-4’-fluoro-Thomsen–Friedenreich epitope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of selective anticancer vaccines that provide enhanced protection against tumor recurrence and metastasis has been the subject of intense research in the scientific community. The tumor-associated glycoprotein MUC1 represents a well-established target for cancer immunotherapy and has been used for the construction of various synthetic vaccine candidates. However, many of these vaccine prototypes suffer from an inherent low immunogenicity and are susceptible to rapid in vivo degradation. To overcome these drawbacks, novel fluorinated MUC1 glycopeptide-BSA/TTox conjugate vaccines have been prepared. Immunization of mice with the 4’F-TF-MUC1-TTox conjugate resulted in strong immune responses overriding the natural tolerance against MUC1 and producing selective IgG antibodies that are cross-reactive with native MUC1 epitopes on MCF-7 human cancer cells.

  9. 2011 lAAF World Championships in Daegu: blood tests for all athletes in the framework of the Athlete Biological Passport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Neil; Dollé, Gabriel; Garnier, Pierre-Yves; Saugy, Martial

    2012-07-01

    The 2011 International Association of Athletics Federation (IAAF) World Championships took place in Daegu, Korea. For the first time, all athletes were blood tested prior to the competition in order to give a clear signal to the world athletic community of the wish to enter into the era of the Athlete Biological Passport and fight against doping in their sport. The hematological parameters were measured on site. Thus, a mobile-accredited laboratory for blood testing was created in Daegu. Two serum tubes were collected for clinical chemistry and hormonal analyses in order to build the bases of the endocrine and the androgen (steroid) modules of the Athlete Biological Passport in blood. This paper describes some of the main challenges the project faced with regard to the large number of athletes, competing in different disciplines, and the logistic problems that had to be solved for smart implementation of one of the most complex operations organized in the last decade in the fight against doping.

  10. Vaccines, viruses, and voodoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, Andrea T; Keen, Carl L; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Silva, Joseph; Gershwin, M Eric

    2002-01-01

    Vaccinations are invaluable in protection from a wide variety of diseases that can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Although a rare complication of vaccination, autoimmune disorders represent one of these morbidities. Recently, widespread public concern has arisen from case reports suggesting that--similar to what has been observed after natural viral infections--there might be an association between specific immunizations and autoimmune diseases. Herein we address the biological plausibility of such a connection, focusing particularly on the examples of hepatitis B, rubella, and measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccinations, and the autoimmune diseases they are potentially associated with. Our review of the available data suggests that, for the general population, the risk: benefit ratio is overwhelmingly in favor of vaccinations. However, the possibility cannot be ruled out that, in genetically susceptible individuals, vaccination can result in the unmasking of an autoimmune disease triggered by the immunization. We also critically examine the existing data suggesting a link between immunization against MMR and autism, and briefly discuss the controversial evidence pointing to a possible relationship between mercury exposure from vaccines and autistic disorders. There is a continued urgent need for rigorously designed and executed studies addressing these potential associations, although the use of vaccinations remains a critical public health tool for protection against infectious disease.

  11. THE SIZE AND SURFACE COATING OF NANOSILVER DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTS BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY IN BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER (RBEC4) CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linking the physical properties of nanoparticles with differences in their biological activity is critical for understanding their potential toxicity and mode of action. The influence of aggregate size, surface coating, and surface charge on nanosilver's (nanoAg) movement through...

  12. [Development of new vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Romo, Fernando; Picazo, Juan J

    2015-10-01

    Recent and important advances in the fields of immunology, genomics, functional genomics, immunogenetics, immunogenomics, bioinformatics, microbiology, genetic engineering, systems biology, synthetic biochemistry, proteomics, metabolomics and nanotechnology, among others, have led to new approaches in the development of vaccines. The better identification of ideal epitopes, the strengthening of the immune response due to new adjuvants, and the search of new routes of vaccine administration, are good examples of advances that are already a reality and that will favour the development of more vaccines, their use in indicated population groups, or its production at a lower cost. There are currently more than 130 vaccines are under development against the more wished (malaria or HIV), difficult to get (CMV or RSV), severe re-emerging (Dengue or Ebola), increasing importance (Chagas disease or Leishmania), and nosocomial emerging (Clostridium difficile or Staphylococcus aureus) infectious diseases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  13. Biomarkers of safety and immune protection for genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania vaccines against visceral leishmaniasis-Discovery and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas eGannavaram

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite intense efforts there is no safe and efficacious vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis, which is fatal and endemic in many tropical countries. A major shortcoming in the vaccine development against blood borne parasitic agents such as Leishmania is the inadequate predictive power of the early immune responses mounted in the host against the experimental vaccines. Often immune correlates derived from in-bred animal models do not yield immune markers of protection that can be readily extrapolated to humans. The limited efficacy of vaccines based on DNA, sub-unit, heat killed parasites has led to the realization that acquisition of durable immunity against the protozoan parasites requires a controlled infection with a live attenuated organism. Recent success of irradiated malaria parasites as a vaccine candidate further strengthens this approach to vaccination. We developed several gene deletion mutants in L. donovani as potential live attenuated vaccines and reported extensively on the immunogenicity of LdCentrin1 deleted mutant in mice, hamsters and dogs. Additional limited studies using genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccine candidates have been reported. However, for the live attenuated parasite vaccines, the primary barrier against widespread use remains the absence of clear biomarkers associated with protection and safety. Recent studies in evaluation of vaccines e.g., influenza and yellow fever vaccines, using systems biology tools demonstrated the power of such strategies in understanding the immunological mechanisms that underpin a protective phenotype. Applying similar tools in isolated human tissues such as PBMCs from healthy individuals infected with live attenuated parasites such as LdCen1-/- in vitro followed by human microarray hybridization experiments will enable us to understand how early vaccine-induced gene expression profiles and the associated immune responses are coordinately regulated

  14. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800 s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Blood-based biomarkers of selenium and thyroid status indicate possible adverse biological effects of mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls in Southern Beaufort Sea polar bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Katrina K; Schenk, Patricia; Beyerlein, Susan; Boyd, Daryle; Ylitalo, Gina M; O'Hara, Todd M

    2011-11-01

    We examined biomarkers of selenium status (whole blood Se; serum Se; glutathione peroxidase activity) and thyroid status (concentrations and ratios of thyroxine, T4; tri-iodothyronine, T3; albumin) in polar bears to assess variations among cohorts, and relationships to circulating concentrations of contaminants. Concentrations of total mercury (Hg) in whole blood were similar among cohorts (prime aged males and females, older animals, ages≥16 years, and young animals, ages 1-5 years; 48.44±35. 81; p=0.253). Concentrations of sum of seven polychlorinated biphenyls (∑PCB7) in whole blood were greater in females (with and without cubs, 26.44±25.82 ng/g ww) and young (26.81±10.67 ng/g ww) compared to males (8.88±5.76 ng/g ww, p0.08). Thyroid hormones were greater in females (solitary females and females with cubs) compared to males (ppolar bears (ppolar bears were more susceptible to changes in blood-based biomarkers of selenium and thyroid status than males. Further classifications of the physiologic states of polar bears and repeated measures of individuals over time are needed to accurately assess the biological impact of combined toxicant exposures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Blood Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amount of blood given. Although rare, a hemolytic transfusion reaction can occur when transfused red cells are damaged ... center staff needs to be aware of this reaction and take precautions if you undergo subsequent transfusions. Viral infection transmission . Since blood is a biological ...

  17. The immunological effects of oral polio vaccine provided with BCG vaccine at birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov; Karkov, Hanne Sophie; Lund, Najaaraq

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vaccines may have non-specific effects. An observational study from Guinea-Bissau suggested that oral polio vaccine at birth (OPV0) provided with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine was associated with down-regulation of the immune response to BCG vaccine 6 weeks later. Based...... BCG alone at birth, and subsequently randomised to have a blood sample taken at 2, 4 or 6 weeks post-randomisation. Excreted levels of cytokines (IL-2, IL-5, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ) were measured from whole blood in vitro stimulations with a panel of recall vaccine antigens (BCG, PPD, OPV), mitogen...

  18. DENGUE VACCINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thisyakorn, Usa; Thisyakorn, Chule

    2015-01-01

    The uniqueness of the dengue viruses (DENVs) and the spectrum of disease resulting from infection have made dengue vaccine development difficult. Several vaccine candidates are currently being evaluated in clinical studies. The candidate currently at the most advanced clinical development stage, a live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on the chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV), has progressed to Phase 3 efficacy studies. Several other live-attenuated vaccines, as well as subunit, DNA, and purified inactivated vaccine candidates are at earlier stages of clinical development. Additional technological approaches, such as virus-vectored and Virus-Like Particles (VLP)-based vaccines are under evaluation in preclinical studies.

  19. Physical exercise, fitness and dietary pattern and their relationship with circadian blood pressure pattern, augmentation index and endothelial dysfunction biological markers: EVIDENT study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Eguskiñe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthy lifestyles may help to delay arterial aging. The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship of physical activity and dietary pattern to the circadian pattern of blood pressure, central and peripheral blood pressure, pulse wave velocity, carotid intima-media thickness and biological markers of endothelial dysfunction in active and sedentary individuals without arteriosclerotic disease. Methods/Design Design: A cross-sectional multicenter study with six research groups. Subjects: From subjects of the PEPAF project cohort, in which 1,163 who were sedentary became active, 1,942 were sedentary and 2,346 were active. By stratified random sampling, 1,500 subjects will be included, 250 in each group. Primary measurements: We will evaluate height, weight, abdominal circumference, clinical and ambulatory blood pressure with the Radial Pulse Wave Acquisition Device (BPro, central blood pressure and augmentation index with Pulse Wave Application Software (A-Pulse and SphymgoCor System Px (Pulse Wave Analysis, pulse wave velocity (PWV with SphymgoCor System Px (Pulse Wave Velocity, nutritional pattern with a food intake frequency questionnaire, physical activity with the 7-day PAR questionnaire and accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X, physical fitness with the cycle ergometer (PWC-170, carotid intima-media thickness by ultrasound (Micromax, and endothelial dysfunction biological markers (endoglin and osteoprotegerin. Discussion Determining that sustained physical activity and the change from sedentary to active as well as a healthy diet improve circadian pattern, arterial elasticity and carotid intima-media thickness may help to propose lifestyle intervention programs. These interventions could improve the cardiovascular risk profile in some parameters not routinely assessed with traditional risk scales. From the results of this study, interventional approaches could be obtained to delay vascular aging that combine physical

  20. Governing biological material at the intersection of care and research: the use of dried blood spots for biobanking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, C.M.W.; van El, C.G.; Faulkner, A.; Cornel, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    A series of governance issues currently surrounds the multiple uses and multiple users of dried blood spots (DBS) for research purposes. Internationally there is a discussion on storing DBS resulting from newborn screening for public health and using them as the basis for large biobanklike

  1. Virtual Reconstruction and Three-Dimensional Printing of Blood Cells as a Tool in Cell Biology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Ingrid; Monteiro, Douglas; Girard-Dias, Wendell; Dos Santos, Thaisa Oliveira; Rosa Belmonte, Simone Letícia; Pinto de Oliveira, Jairo; Mauad, Helder; da Silva Pacheco, Marcos; Lenz, Dominik; Stefanon Bittencourt, Athelson; Valentim Nogueira, Breno; Lopes Dos Santos, Jorge Roberto; Miranda, Kildare; Guimarães, Marco Cesar Cunegundes

    2016-01-01

    The cell biology discipline constitutes a highly dynamic field whose concepts take a long time to be incorporated into the educational system, especially in developing countries. Amongst the main obstacles to the introduction of new cell biology concepts to students is their general lack of identification with most teaching methods. The introduction of elaborated figures, movies and animations to textbooks has given a tremendous contribution to the learning process and the search for novel teaching methods has been a central goal in cell biology education. Some specialized tools, however, are usually only available in advanced research centers or in institutions that are traditionally involved with the development of novel teaching/learning processes, and are far from becoming reality in the majority of life sciences schools. When combined with the known declining interest in science among young people, a critical scenario may result. This is especially important in the field of electron microscopy and associated techniques, methods that have greatly contributed to the current knowledge on the structure and function of different cell biology models but are rarely made accessible to most students. In this work, we propose a strategy to increase the engagement of students into the world of cell and structural biology by combining 3D electron microscopy techniques and 3D prototyping technology (3D printing) to generate 3D physical models that accurately and realistically reproduce a close-to-the native structure of the cell and serve as a tool for students and teachers outside the main centers. We introduce three strategies for 3D imaging, modeling and prototyping of cells and propose the establishment of a virtual platform where different digital models can be deposited by EM groups and subsequently downloaded and printed in different schools, universities, research centers and museums, thereby modernizing teaching of cell biology and increasing the accessibility to

  2. Genetically modified tumour vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 3, Suppl. 1 (2005), S7 ISSN 1214-021X. [Cells VI - Biological Days /18./. 24.10.2005-26.10.2005, České Budějovice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : tumour vaccines * HPV16 Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  3. A phase 1 trial of MSP2-C1, a blood-stage malaria vaccine containing 2 isoforms of MSP2 formulated with Montanide® ISA 720.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S McCarthy

    Full Text Available In a previous Phase 1/2b malaria vaccine trial testing the 3D7 isoform of the malaria vaccine candidate Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2, parasite densities in children were reduced by 62%. However, breakthrough parasitemias were disproportionately of the alternate dimorphic form of MSP2, the FC27 genotype. We therefore undertook a dose-escalating, double-blinded, placebo-controlled Phase 1 trial in healthy, malaria-naïve adults of MSP2-C1, a vaccine containing recombinant forms of the two families of msp2 alleles, 3D7 and FC27 (EcMSP2-3D7 and EcMSP2-FC27, formulated in equal amounts with Montanide® ISA 720 as a water-in-oil emulsion.The trial was designed to include three dose cohorts (10, 40, and 80 µg, each with twelve subjects receiving the vaccine and three control subjects receiving Montanide® ISA 720 adjuvant emulsion alone, in a schedule of three doses at 12-week intervals. Due to unexpected local reactogenicity and concern regarding vaccine stability, the trial was terminated after the second immunisation of the cohort receiving the 40 µg dose; no subjects received the 80 µg dose. Immunization induced significant IgG responses to both isoforms of MSP2 in the 10 µg and 40 µg dose cohorts, with antibody levels by ELISA higher in the 40 µg cohort. Vaccine-induced antibodies recognised native protein by Western blots of parasite protein extracts and by immunofluorescence microscopy. Although the induced anti-MSP2 antibodies did not directly inhibit parasite growth in vitro, IgG from the majority of individuals tested caused significant antibody-dependent cellular inhibition (ADCI of parasite growth.As the majority of subjects vaccinated with MSP2-C1 developed an antibody responses to both forms of MSP2, and that these antibodies mediated ADCI provide further support for MSP2 as a malaria vaccine candidate. However, in view of the reactogenicity of this formulation, further clinical development of MSP2-C1 will require formulation

  4. Extended automated separation techniques in destructive neutron activation analysis; application to various biological materials, including human tissues and blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjioe, P.S.; Goeij, J.J.M. de; Houtman, J.P.W.

    1976-09-01

    Neutron activation analysis may be performed as a multi-element and low-level technique for many important trace elements in biological materials, provided that post-irradiation chemical separations are applied. This paper describes a chemical separation consisting of automated procedures for destruction, distillation, and anion-chromatography. The system developed enables the determination of 14 trace elements in biological materials, viz. antimony, arsenic, bromine, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, gold, iron, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc. The aspects of sample preparation, neutron irradiation, gamma-spectrum evaluation, and blank-value contribution are also discussed

  5. Vaccines against malaria-still a long way to go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuschewski, Kai

    2017-08-01

    Several species of Plasmodium cause a broad spectrum of human disease that range from nausea and fever to severe anemia, cerebral malaria, and multiorgan failure. In malaria-endemic countries, continuous exposure to Plasmodium sporozoite inoculations and subsequent blood infections elicit only partial and short-lived immunity, which gradually develops over many years of parasite exposure and multiple clinical episodes. The ambitious goal of malaria vaccinology over the past 70 years has been to develop an immunization strategy that mounts protection superior to naturally acquired immunity. Herein, three principal concepts in evidence-based malaria vaccine development are compared. Feasible leads are typically stand-alone subunit vaccine approaches that block Plasmodium parasite life cycle progression or parasite/host interactions, and they constitute the majority of candidates in preclinical research and early clinical testing. Integrated approaches incorporate malaria antigen(s) into licensed or emerging pediatric vaccine formulations. This strategy can complement the malaria control portfolio even if the antimalarial component is only partially effective and has led to the development of the only candidate vaccine to date, namely RTS,S-AS01. Experimental whole parasite vaccine approaches have been repeatedly shown to elicit sterile and lasting protection against identical parasite strains, but mass production, proof of broad protection against different parasite strains, and routes of vaccine delivery remain significant translational road blocks. Global access to an effective and affordable malaria vaccine will critically depend on innovative translational research that builds on a better molecular understanding of Plasmodium biology and host immunity. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Resuscitating the Critical in the Biological Grotesque: Blood, Guts, Biomachismo in Science/Education and Human Guinea Pig Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Matthew; Broda, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    This article draws on Bakhtin and other cultural studies theorists to understand the role of the grotesque as a libratory moment in biology education. Four examples of texts and moments are analyzed: Sylvia Branzei's "Grossology" series of children's books about the grotesque, observations of a pig heart dissection, a standard high school…

  7. Anthrax Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... anthrax vaccine causes long-term health problems.Independent civilian committees have not found anthrax vaccination to be ... doctor, or get the person to a doctor right away. Tell your doctor what happened, the date ...

  8. Vaccine Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vaccine Safety Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) New website and ...

  9. Vaccine Finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... list . Showing availability for 6,604 locations. Influenza Vaccine Recommended for everyone greater than or equal to ... which one may be right for you! Flu Vaccines Protects again influenza, commonly called flu, a respiratory ...

  10. WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization. Sixty-fifth report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of a WHO Expert Committee commissioned to coordinate activities leading to the adoption of international recommendations for the production and control of vaccines and other biological substances, and the establishment of international biological reference materials. Following a brief introduction, the report summarizes a number of general issues brought to the attention of the Committee. The next part of the report, of particular relevance to manufacturers and national regulatory authorities, outlines the discussions held on the development and adoption of new and revised WHO Recommendations, Guidelines and guidance documents. Following these discussions, a WHO guidance document on the Scientific principles for regulatory risk evaluation on finding an adventitious agent in a marketed vaccine was adopted along with WHO Guidelines on procedures and data requirements for changes to approved vaccines and revised WHO Recommendations to assure the quality, safety and efficacy of poliomyelitis vaccines (inactivated). Subsequent sections of the report provide information on the current status and proposed development of international reference materials in the areas of antibiotics; biotherapeutics other than blood products; blood products and related substances; in vitro diagnostic device reagents; and vaccines and related substances. A series of annexes are then presented which include an updated list of all WHO Recommendations, Guidelines and other documents on biological substances used in medicine (Annex 1) followed by the above three WHO documents adopted on the advice of the Committee (Annexes 2-4). All additions and discontinuations made during the 2014 meeting to the list of International Standards, Reference Reagents and Reference Panels for biological substances maintained by WHO are summarized in Annex 5. The updated full catalogue of WHO International Reference Preparations is available at: http://www.who.int/bloodproducts/catalogue/en/.

  11. ROTAVIRUS VACCINES

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, G

    2006-01-01

    Rotavirus, the most common cause of severe diarrhea and a leading cause of mortality in children, has been a priority target for vaccine development for the past several years. The first rotavirus vaccine licensed in the United States was withdrawn because of an association of the vaccine with intussusception. However, the need for a vaccine is greatest in the developing world, because the benefits of preventing deaths due to rotavirus disease are substantially greater than the risk of intuss...

  12. ART-ML - a novel XML format for the biological procedures modeling and the representation of blood flow simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvounis, E C; Tsakanikas, V D; Fotiou, E; Fotiadis, D I

    2010-01-01

    The paper proposes a novel Extensible Markup Language (XML) based format called ART-ML that aims at supporting the interoperability and the reuse of models of blood flow, mass transport and plaque formation, exported by ARTool. ARTool is a platform for the automatic processing of various image modalities of coronary and carotid arteries. The images and their content are fused to develop morphological models of the arteries in easy to handle 3D representations. The platform incorporates efficient algorithms which are able to perform blood flow simulation. In addition atherosclerotic plaque development is estimated taking into account morphological, flow and genetic factors. ART-ML provides a XML format that enables the representation and management of embedded models within the ARTool platform and the storage and interchange of well-defined information. This approach influences in the model creation, model exchange, model reuse and result evaluation.

  13. Effects of dexamethasone treatment and respiratory vaccination on rectal temperature, complete blood count, and functional capacities of neutrophils in beef steers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to examine the effects of dexamethasone (DEX) treatment on various aspects of immunity following administration of a multivalent respiratory vaccine, using a model intended to mimic acute versus chronic stress. Angus × Hereford steers (n = 32; 209 ± 8 kg) were str...

  14. Report of a consultation on the optimization of clinical challenge trials for evaluation of candidate blood stage malaria vaccines, 18-19 March 2009, Bethesda, MD, USA.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moorthy, V.S.; Diggs, C.; Ferro, S.; Good, M.F.; Herrera, S.; Hill, A.V.; Imoukhuede, E.B.; Kumar, S.; Loucq, C.; Marsh, K.; Ockenhouse, C.F.; Richie, T.L.; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Development and optimization of first generation malaria vaccine candidates has been facilitated by the existence of a well-established Plasmodium falciparum clinical challenge model in which infectious sporozoites are administered to human subjects via mosquito bite. While ideal for testing

  15. Biobanking human endometrial tissue and blood specimens: standard operating procedure and importance to reproductive biology research and diagnostic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Elizabeth; Vo, Kim Chi; McIntire, Ramsey A; Aghajanova, Lusine; Zelenko, Zara; Irwin, Juan C; Giudice, Linda C

    2011-05-01

    To develop a standard operating procedure (SOP) for collection, transport, storage of human endometrial tissue and blood samples, subject and specimen annotation, and establishing sample priorities. The SOP synthesizes sound scientific procedures, the literature on ischemia research, sample collection and gene expression profiling, good laboratory practices, and the authors' experience of workflow and sample quality. The National Institutes of Health, University of California, San Francisco, Human Endometrial Tissue and DNA Bank. Women undergoing endometrial biopsy or hysterectomy for nonmalignant indications. Collecting, processing, storing, distributing endometrial tissue and blood samples under approved institutional review board protocols and written informed consent from participating subjects. Standard operating procedure. The SOP addresses rigorous and consistent subject annotation, specimen processing and characterization, strict regulatory compliance, and a reference for researchers to track collection and storage times that may influence their research. The comprehensive and systematic approach to the procurement of human blood and endometrial tissue in this SOP ensures the high quality, reliability, and scientific usefulness of biospecimens made available to investigators by the National Institutes of Health, University of California, San Francisco, Human Endometrial Tissue and DNA Bank. The detail and perspective in this SOP also provides a blueprint for implementation of similar collection programs at other institutions. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Phenotype and functions of memory Tfh cells in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Bentebibel, Salah-Eddine; Ueno, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    Our understanding of the origin and functions of human blood CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells found in human blood has changed dramatically in the past years. These cells are currently considered to represent a circulating memory compartment of T follicular helper (Tfh) lineage cells. Recent studies have shown that blood memory Tfh cells are composed of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Here, we review the current understanding of human blood memory Tfh cells and the subsets within this compartment. We present a strategy to define these subsets based on cell surface profiles. Finally, we discuss how increased understanding of the biology of blood memory Tfh cells may contribute insight into the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and the mode of action of vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Resuscitating the critical in the biological grotesque: blood, guts, biomachismo in science/education and human guinea pig discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Matthew; Broda, Matthew

    2009-12-01

    This article draws on Bakhtin and other cultural studies theorists to understand the role of the grotesque as a libratory moment in biology education. Four examples of texts and moments are analyzed: Sylvia Branzei's Grossology series of children's books about the grotesque, observations of a pig heart dissection, a standard high school textbook, and zines by and for human subjects. Findings confirm a powerful social leveling effect within the biological grotesque, but limits are also identified. Specifically, the grotesque itself can become a form of social capital in itself, and thus the material for establishing new hierarchies. The paper also examines the ways that teachers and texts try to limit the leveling effects of the grotesque.

  18. Biological Reference Interval for Hematological Profile of Umbilical Cord Blood: A Study Conducted at A Tertiary Care Centre in South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Reddy S. Sudheer; Priyathersini, N.; Rajendran, Rithika; Rajendran, Rashmika; Ramadoss, Umalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Umbilical cord blood (UCB) a source of hematopoietic stem cells, is also an acceptable sample to assess neonatal sepsis. Though reports are available for stem cell counts very minimal literature is available regarding hematologic parameters, which may vary on ethnicity. Aim To establish biological reference interval for hematological parameters of umbilical cord blood to guide neonatologists, hematopoietic stem cell transplant specialists and future analysis. Materials and Methods Prospective longitudinal study was done from January 2014 to April 2014 after ethics committee approval. UCB from 120 full term new borns of normal birth weight born out of uneventful pregnancy to mothers aged between 21 to 45 years with hemoglobin above 10g/dL were processed in Beckman Coulter LH780 analyzer for complete blood count and counter checked by peripheral smear. Results tabulated in Microsoft excel are analyzed using IBM SPSS statistics 16 software. Results Male to female ratio is 1:1.05. There is no difference in the values between males and females. When compared with few studies available, though many values are comparable a few values are not comparable. Conclusion This study can be a useful guide to neonatologists, hematopoietic stem cells transplant hematologists and future analysis. PMID:26557584

  19. Contraceptive Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Supotnitsky

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Researches to develop vaccines with contraceptive effect are being carried out since the 1920s. Since 1972, the contraceptive vaccines are one of the priority programs of the World Health Organization (WHO Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Rockefeller Foundation participates in implementing the program. Openly declared objective of creating such vaccines — the regulation of the population in the Third World countries. There are currently three main directions of contraceptive vaccine design: 1 vaccines targeted at blocking the production of gametes; 2 impairing their function; 3 violating the fertilization process. Contraceptive vaccines for more than 10 years are widely used to reduce fertility and castration of wild and domestic animals. In the commercial realization there are veterinary vaccines Equity®, Improvac®, GonaCon®, Repro-BLOC (based on gonadotropin-releasing hormone; SpayVac™ and IVT-PZP® (based on zona pellucida antigens. Clinical studies have shown effective contraceptive action (in women of vaccines, in which human chorionic gonadotropin is used as an antigen. At the same time, there are found the side effects of such vaccines: for vaccines containing gonadotropin-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone as antigenic components — castration, impotence; for vaccines containing follicle stimulating hormone — oligospermia; zona pellucida antigens — irreversible oophoritis. This paper discusses approaches to detection of sterilizing components in vaccines intended for mass prevention of infectious diseases, not reported by manufacturers, and the consequences of their use. Hidden use of contraceptive vaccines, which already took place, can be detected: 1 by the presence of antibodies to their antigenic components (in unvaccinated by contraceptive vaccines people such antibodies do not exist, except infertility cases; 2 by change in the hormonal levels of the

  20. Biology of three species of the Meccus phyllosomus complex (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae fed on blood of hens and rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alejandro Martínez-Ibarra

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Aspects related to hatching, life time, number of blood meals to molt, mortality, feeding time and postfeed defecation delay for each instar of Meccus phyllosomus, M. mazzottii, and M. bassolsae, life-cycle were evaluated and compared in two cohorts of each of those three species, fed on hens or rabbits. No significant (p > 0.05 differences were recorded among cohorts fed on hens respect to cohorts fed on rabbits in M. phyllosomus and M. mazzottii and the average time of hatching was 21.5 days for cohorts fed on hens and 22.5 for cohorts fed on rabbits. Average egg-to-adult development times were no significant (p > 0.05 different between both cohorts of M. phyllosomus and M. mazzotti, independent of the blood meal source. The average span in days for each instar fed on hens was not significantly different to the average span for each instar fed on rabbits, when comparisons were made by species. The number of blood meals at each nymphal instar varied from 1 to 6 in both cohorts of each species. The mortality rates were higher on older nymphs, in both cohorts of M. phyllosomus and M. bassolsae, whereas they were higher on first instar nymphs on M. mazzottii. Mean feeding time was no significant (p > 0.05 different in triatomines fed on hens or fed on rabbits, when each species were compared separately. A similar number of nymphs of each cohort, completed the cycle. Defecation delay was no significant (p > 0.05 different when cohorts fed on hens and fed on rabbits were compared by species. Most of the studied parameters showed no significant (p > 0.05 differences among those cohorts fed on hens and for fed on rabbits, which could mean a high degree of association of those species with birds as much as mammals, under wild conditions, increasing their capacity to colonize human dwellings.

  1. Vaccines directed against microorganisms or their products present during biofilm lifestyle: can we make a translation as a broad biological model to tuberculosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Alberto eFlores-Valdez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains as a global public health problem. In recent years, experimental evidence suggesting the relevance of in vitro pellicle (a type of biofilm formed at the air-liquid interface production as a phenotype mimicking aspects found by M. tuberculosis-complex bacteria during in vivo infection has started to accumulate. There are still opportunities for better diagnostic tools, therapeutic molecules as well as new vaccine candidates to assist in TB control programs worldwide and particularly in less developed nations. Regarding vaccines, despite the availability of a live, attenuated strain (M. bovis BCG since almost a century ago, its variable efficacy and lack of protection against pulmonary and latent disease has prompted basic and applied research leading to preclinical and clinical evaluation of up to 15 new candidates. In this work, I present examples of vaccines based on whole cells grown as biofilms, or specific proteins expressed under such condition, and the effect they have shown in relevant animal models or directly in the natural host. I also discuss why it might be worthwhile to explore these approaches, for constructing and developing new vaccine candidates for testing their efficacy against TB.

  2. Walnut consumption in a weight reduction intervention: effects on body weight, biological measures, blood pressure and satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Cheryl L; Flatt, Shirley W; Barkai, Hava-Shoshana; Pakiz, Bilge; Heath, Dennis D

    2017-12-04

    Dietary strategies that help patients adhere to a weight reduction diet may increase the likelihood of weight loss maintenance and improved long-term health outcomes. Regular nut consumption has been associated with better weight management and less adiposity. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of a walnut-enriched reduced-energy diet to a standard reduced-energy-density diet on weight, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and satiety. Overweight and obese men and women (n = 100) were randomly assigned to a standard reduced-energy-density diet or a walnut-enriched (15% of energy) reduced-energy diet in the context of a behavioral weight loss intervention. Measurements were obtained at baseline and 3- and 6-month clinic visits. Participants rated hunger, fullness and anticipated prospective consumption at 3 time points during the intervention. Body measurements, blood pressure, physical activity, lipids, tocopherols and fatty acids were analyzed using repeated measures mixed models. Both study groups reduced body weight, body mass index and waist circumference (time effect p weight was -9.4 (0.9)% vs. -8.9 (0.7)% (mean [SE]), for the standard vs. walnut-enriched diet groups, respectively. Systolic blood pressure decreased in both groups at 3 months, but only the walnut-enriched diet group maintained a lower systolic blood pressure at 6 months. The walnut-enriched diet group, but not the standard reduced-energy-density diet group, reduced total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) at 6 months, from 203 to 194 mg/dL and 121 to 112 mg/dL, respectively (p weight loss that is comparable to a standard reduced-energy-density diet in the context of a behavioral weight loss intervention. Although weight loss in response to both dietary strategies was associated with improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors, the walnut-enriched diet promoted more favorable effects on LDL-C and systolic blood pressure. The trial

  3. FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Infirmary (ground-floor, bldg. 57), with their vaccine, without a prior appointment. The vaccine can be reimbursed directly by Uniqa providing you attach the receipt and the prescription that you will receive from the Medical Service the day of your injection at the infirmary. Ideally, the vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2007 (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00). CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor. Medical Service

  4. Unresolved clinical aspects and safety hazards of blood derived- EV/MV in stored blood components: From personal memory lanes to newer perspectives on the roles of EV/MV in various biological phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghatchian, Jerard; Amiral, Jean

    2016-08-01

    Blood cells generate heterogeneous populations of vesicles that are delivered, as small-specialized packages of highly active cell fragments in blood circulation, having almost similar functional activities, as the mother cells. These so called extracellular vesicles are the essential part of an energy-dependent natural apoptotic process; hence their beneficial and harmful biological functions cannot be ignored. Evidence is accumulating, that cellular derived vesicles, originate from all viable cells including: megakaryocytes, platelets, red blood cells, white blood cells and endothelial cells, the highest in proportions from platelets. Shedding can also be triggered by pathological activation of inflammatory processes and activation of coagulation or complement pathways, or even by shear stress in the circulation. Structurally, so called MV/EV appear to be, sometimes inside-out and sometimes outside-in cell fragments having a bilayered phospholipid structure exposing coagulant-active phosphatidylserine, expressing various membrane receptors, and they serve as cell-to-cell shuttles for bioactive molecules such as lipids, growth factors, microRNAs, and mitochondria. Ex vivo processing of blood into its components, embodying centrifugation, processing by various apheresis procedures, leukoreduction, pathogen reduction, and finally storage in different media and different types of blood bags, also have major impacts on the generation and retention of MV content. These artificially generated small, but highly liable packages, together with the original pool of MVs collected from the donor, do exhibit differing biological activities, and are not inert elements and should be considered as a parameter of blood safety in haemovigilance programmes. Harmonization and consensus in sampling protocols, sample handling, processing, and assessment methods, in particular converting to full automation, are needed to achieve consensual interpretations. This review focuses on some of

  5. The Possible Roles of Biological Bone Constructed with Peripheral Blood Derived EPCs and BMSCs in Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the possible potential of partially deproteinized biologic bone (PDPBB seeded with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in osteogenesis and angiogenesis. BMSCs and EPCs were isolated, identified, and cocultured in vitro, followed by seeding on the PDPBB. Expression of osteogenesis and vascularization markers was quantified by immunofluorescence (IF staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC, and quantitive real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Scanning electron microscope (SEM was also employed to further evaluate the morphologic alterations of cocultured cells in the biologic bone. Results demonstrated that the coculture system combined with BMSCs and EPCs had significant advantages of (i upregulating the mRNA expression of VEGF, Osteonectin, Osteopontin, and Collagen Type I and (ii increasing ALP and OC staining compared to the BMSCs or EPCs only group. Moreover, IHC staining for CD105, CD34, and ZO-1 increased significantly in the implanted PDPBB seeded with coculture system, compared to that of BMSCs or EPCs only, respectively. Summarily, the present data provided evidence that PDPBB seeded with cocultured system possessed favorable cytocompatibility, provided suitable circumstances for different cell growth, and had the potential to provide reconstruction for cases with bone defection by promoting osteogenesis and angiogenesis.

  6. Early indicators of exposure to biological threat agents using host gene profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peel Sheila

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective prophylaxis and treatment for infections caused by biological threat agents (BTA rely upon early diagnosis and rapid initiation of therapy. Most methods for identifying pathogens in body fluids and tissues require that the pathogen proliferate to detectable and dangerous levels, thereby delaying diagnosis and treatment, especially during the prelatent stages when symptoms for most BTA are indistinguishable flu-like signs. Methods To detect exposures to the various pathogens more rapidly, especially during these early stages, we evaluated a suite of host responses to biological threat agents using global gene expression profiling on complementary DNA arrays. Results We found that certain gene expression patterns were unique to each pathogen and that other gene changes occurred in response to multiple agents, perhaps relating to the eventual course of illness. Nonhuman primates were exposed to some pathogens and the in vitro and in vivo findings were compared. We found major gene expression changes at the earliest times tested post exposure to aerosolized B. anthracis spores and 30 min post exposure to a bacterial toxin. Conclusion Host gene expression patterns have the potential to serve as diagnostic markers or predict the course of impending illness and may lead to new stage-appropriate therapeutic strategies to ameliorate the devastating effects of exposure to biothreat agents.

  7. An Integrated Workflow To Assess Technical and Biological Variability of Cell Population Frequencies in Human Peripheral Blood by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burel, Julie G; Qian, Yu; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia; Weiskopf, Daniela; Zapardiel-Gonzalo, Jose; Taplitz, Randy; Gilman, Robert H; Saito, Mayuko; de Silva, Aruna D; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Scheuermann, Richard H; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2017-02-15

    In the context of large-scale human system immunology studies, controlling for technical and biological variability is crucial to ensure that experimental data support research conclusions. In this study, we report on a universal workflow to evaluate both technical and biological variation in multiparameter flow cytometry, applied to the development of a 10-color panel to identify all major cell populations and T cell subsets in cryopreserved PBMC. Replicate runs from a control donation and comparison of different gating strategies assessed the technical variability associated with each cell population and permitted the calculation of a quality control score. Applying our panel to a large collection of PBMC samples, we found that most cell populations showed low intraindividual variability over time. In contrast, certain subpopulations such as CD56 T cells and Temra CD4 T cells were associated with high interindividual variability. Age but not gender had a significant effect on the frequency of several populations, with a drastic decrease in naive T cells observed in older donors. Ethnicity also influenced a significant proportion of immune cell population frequencies, emphasizing the need to account for these covariates in immune profiling studies. We also exemplify the usefulness of our workflow by identifying a novel cell-subset signature of latent tuberculosis infection. Thus, our study provides a universal workflow to establish and evaluate any flow cytometry panel in systems immunology studies. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. An assessment in rodents of the pathological and immunopathological consequence of multiple vaccinations and challenge with radiation-attenuated malaria parasites (blood forms and sporozoites)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonpucknavig, S.

    1982-06-01

    Multiple vaccination with irradiated merozoites of Plasmodium berghei resulted in high levels of circulating antibody but a low degree of protection to challenge with normal merozoites. On the other hand, the multiple vaccinations and the challenge resulted in severe immunopathological reactions shortly after the immunization or challenge. These reactions were seen in the liver, kidneys and spleen and included the accumulation of mononuclear cells, severe coagulative necrosis of liver cells and proliferative changes in the splenic white pulp and in the glomeruli. The pathological reactions were more severe than in non-immunized animals but the parasitemia was lower and less malarial antigen was detected in Kupfer Cells of the liver, the sinusoidal cells of the spleen and the reticuloendothelial cells in the interstitial tissue of the kidney. Vaccination with irradiated sporozoites of P. berghei resulted in good protection to challenge with normal sporozoites even before circulating anti-sporozoite antibody could be detected. Only mild pathological changes were associated with up to 4 immunizations followed by challenge and these were largely limited to the liver, and were reversible. Sporozoite antigens were detected in the spleen and immune complexes in the glomeruli for 2-4 weeks following challenge but not later. Immunized mice however often developed some lobular pneumonia of the lung but the severity of this did not increase with challenge

  9. The impact of environmental and biological factors on paraoxonase 1 and γ-glutamyltranspeptydase activities in the blood of smelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizoń, Anna; Kepinska, Marta; Snacki, Krzysztof; Milnerowicz, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of paraoxonase and γ-glutamyltranspeptydase activities can induce development of the atherosclerotic process. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of occupational exposure to heavy metals, tobacco smoke and alcohol consumption on the activities of paraoxonase and γ-glutamyltranspeptydase as well as glutathione concentration. We have observed reduced paraoxonase activity and higher γ-glutamyltranspeptydase activity in serum of smelters when compared to control groups. In the blood of smoking smelters was demonstrated a negative correlation between paraoxonase activity and BMI value as well as between paraoxonase activity and tobacco smoke and consumption of 40% alcohol. Also, negative correlation was found for the activity of paraoxonase and glutathione concentration as well as γ-glutamyltranspeptydase activity. Higher γ-glutamyltranspeptydase activity and lower paraoxonase activity in the serum of smelters exposed to heavy metals and tobacco smoke can cause disorders in functioning of the body.

  10. Influence of the blood meal source on the biology of Meccus picturatus Usinger 1939 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Ibarra José Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspects related to hatching, time-lapse between presenting the blood meal and beginning of feeding, feeding time, postfeed defecation delay,life time, mortality and fecundity for each stage of Meccus picturatus, life-cycle were evaluated and compared in two cohorts of M. picturatus fed on hens or rabbits. The hatching rate observed for each of the two studied groups of eggs was 78.1% (n = 2298 on the group fed on hens and 82.1% (n = 2704 on that fed on rabbits, and the average time of hatching was 20 days. Mean time-lapse for beginning feeding was under 3 min in nymphal stages and postfeed defecation delay was under 10 min in all stages, in both cohorts. Mean feeding time was significantly (P 0.05 differences were recorded among the average times from NI to adult in the cohort fed on hens (196.8 ± 15.8 days and the average time in the cohort fed on rabbits (189.5 ± 22.9. The average span in days for each stage fed on hens was not significantly different to the average span for each stage fed on rabbits. The number of blood meals at each nymphal stage varied from 1 to 6 in both cohorts. The mortality rates were higher on fifth nymphal stage, in both cohorts. No significant (P > 0.05 differences were recorded on mortality rates on most nymphal stages of both cohorts. The average number of eggs laid per female from the cohort fed on hens in a 9-month period was 791.1, whereas the average number of eggs in the cohort fed on rabbits was 928.3.

  11. Hepatitis Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  12. Extracting Biological Meaning From Global Proteomic Data on Circulating-Blood Platelets: Effects of Diabetes and Storage Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, John H.; Suleiman, Atef; Daly, Don S.; Springer, David L.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P.

    2008-11-25

    Transfusion of platelets into patients suffering from trauma and a variety of disease is a common medical practice that involves millions of units per year. Partial activation of platelets can result in the release of bioactive proteins and lipid mediators that increase the risk of adverse post-transfusion effects. Type-2 diabetes and storage are two factors known to cause partial activation of platelets. A global proteomic study was undertaken to investigate these effects. In this paper we discuss the methods used to interpret these data in terms of biological processes affected by diabetes and storage. The main emphasis is on the processing of proteomic data for gene ontology enrichment analysis by techniques originally designed for microarray data.

  13. Azimuthally invariant Mueller-matrix mapping of optically anisotropic layers of biological networks of blood plasma in the diagnosis of liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, A. G.; Dubolazov, A. V.; Ushenko, V. A.; Ushenko, Yu. A.; Sakhnovskiy, M. Y.; Pavlyukovich, O.; Pavlyukovich, N.; Novakovskaya, O.; Gorsky, M. P.

    2016-09-01

    The model of Mueller-matrix description of mechanisms of optical anisotropy that typical for polycrystalline layers of the histological sections of biological tissues and fluids - optical activity, birefringence, as well as linear and circular dichroism - is suggested. Within the statistical analysis distributions quantities of linear and circular birefringence and dichroism the objective criteria of differentiation of myocardium histological sections (determining the cause of death); films of blood plasma (liver pathology); peritoneal fluid (endometriosis of tissues of women reproductive sphere); urine (kidney disease) were determined. From the point of view of probative medicine the operational characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) of the method of Mueller-matrix reconstruction of optical anisotropy parameters were found.

  14. Towards clinical development of a Pfs48/45-based transmission blocking malaria vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theisen, Michael; Jore, Matthijs M; Sauerwein, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Malaria is a devastating vector-borne disease caused by the Plasmodium parasite, resulting in almost 0.5 million casualties per year. The parasite has a complex life-cycle that includes asexual replication in human red blood cells, causing symptomatic malaria, and sexual stages which...... are essential for the transmission to the mosquito vector. A vaccine targeting the sexual stages of the parasite and thus blocking transmission will be instrumental for the eradication of malaria. One of the leading transmission blocking vaccine candidates is the sexual stage antigen Pfs48/45. Areas covered......: PubMed was searched to review the progress and future prospects for clinical development of a Pfs48/45-based subunit vaccine. We will focus on biological function, naturally acquired immunity, functional activity of specific antibodies, sequence diversity, production of recombinant protein...

  15. Vaccine supply, demand, and policy: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzumdar, Jagannath M; Cline, Richard R

    2009-01-01

    To provide an overview of supply and demand issues in the vaccine industry and the policy options that have been implemented to resolve these issues. Medline, Policy File, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts were searched to locate academic journal articles. Other sources reviewed included texts on the topics of vaccine history and policy, government agency reports, and reports from independent think tanks. Keywords included vaccines, immunizations, supply, demand, and policy. Search criteria were limited to English language and human studies. Articles pertaining to vaccine demand, supply, and public policy were selected and reviewed for inclusion. By the authors. Vaccines are biologic medications, therefore making their development and production more difficult and costly compared with "small-molecule" drugs. Research and development costs for vaccines can exceed $800 million, and development may require 10 years or more. Strict manufacturing regulations and facility upgrades add to these costs. Policy options to increase and stabilize the supply of vaccines include those aimed at increasing supply, such as government subsidies for basic vaccine research, liability protection for manufacturers, and fast-track approval for new vaccines. Options to increase vaccine demand include advance purchase commitments, government stockpiles, and government financing for select populations. High development costs and multiple barriers to entry have led to a decline in the number of vaccine manufacturers. Although a number of vaccine policies have met with mixed success in increasing the supply of and demand for vaccines, a variety of concerns remain, including developing vaccines for complex pathogens and increasing immunization rates with available vaccines. New policy innovations such as advance market commitments and Medicare Part D vaccine coverage have been implemented and may aid in resolving some of the problems in the vaccine industry.

  16. Biological and Epidemiological Features of Antibiotic-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Pre- and Post-Conjugate Vaccine Eras: a United States Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Lindsay; McGee, Lesley; Tomczyk, Sara

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptococcus pneumoniae inflicts a huge disease burden as the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and meningitis. Soon after mainstream antibiotic usage, multiresistant pneumococcal clones emerged and disseminated worldwide. Resistant clones are generated through adaptation to antibiotic pressures imposed while naturally residing within the human upper respiratory tract. Here, a huge array of related commensal streptococcal strains transfers core genomic and accessory resistance determinants to the highly transformable pneumococcus. β-Lactam resistance is the hallmark of pneumococcal adaptability, requiring multiple independent recombination events that are traceable to nonpneumococcal origins and stably perpetuated in multiresistant clonal complexes. Pneumococcal strains with elevated MICs of β-lactams are most often resistant to additional antibiotics. Basic underlying mechanisms of most pneumococcal resistances have been identified, although new insights that increase our understanding are continually provided. Although all pneumococcal infections can be successfully treated with antibiotics, the available choices are limited for some strains. Invasive pneumococcal disease data compiled during 1998 to 2013 through the population-based Active Bacterial Core surveillance program (U.S. population base of 30,600,000) demonstrate that targeting prevalent capsular serotypes with conjugate vaccines (7-valent and 13-valent vaccines implemented in 2000 and 2010, respectively) is extremely effective in reducing resistant infections. Nonetheless, resistant non-vaccine-serotype clones continue to emerge and expand. PMID:27076637

  17. Effects of dietary selenium and vitamin E on immune response and biological blood parameters of broilers reared under thermoneutral or heat stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibian, Mahmood; Ghazi, Shahab; Moeini, Mohammad Mehdi; Abdolmohammadi, Alireza

    2014-07-01

    A study was conducted using 360 broiler chickens to evaluate the effects of dietary vitamin E (0, 125 and 250 mg/kg), selenium (Se, 0, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg), or their different combinations on immune response and blood biological parameters of broilers raised under either thermoneutral (TN, 23.9 °C constant) or heat stress (HS, 23.9 to 37 °C cycling) conditions. Humoral immunity was assessed by intravenous injection of 7 % sheep red blood cell (SRBC) followed by evaluation of serum for antibody titers in primary and secondary responses. Heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio also determined as an indicator of stress. Furthermore, at the end of the experiment, birds were bled for determination of some biological parameters. There was a significant reduction in body weight and feed intake, but the feed conversion ratio increased when the birds were exposed to HS ( P vitamin E and Se ( P > 0.05), whereas feed conversion was improved significantly by 125 mg/kg vitamin E ( P vitamin E resulted in improvement of primary and secondary antibody responses both in TN and HS broilers ( P Vitamin E and Se had interactive effects on anti-SRBC titers; however, no consistent differences were found between dietary levels during the study. The H/L ratio decreased by feeding vitamin E at both levels either under HS or TN conditions ( P < 0.05). The serum concentrations of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol were increased but serum HDL-cholesterol decreased in HS broilers ( P < 0.05).

  18. Flu Vaccination

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical service

  19. FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical Service

  20. Flu vaccination

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Medical Service

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor.CERN Medical Service

  1. Flu Vaccination

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical Service

  2. Leptospirosis vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Jin Li; Wang Zhijun; Węgrzyn Alicja

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Leptospirosis is a serious infection disease caused by pathogenic strains of the Leptospira spirochetes, which affects not only humans but also animals. It has long been expected to find an effective vaccine to prevent leptospirosis through immunization of high risk humans or animals. Although some leptospirosis vaccines have been obtained, the vaccination is relatively unsuccessful in clinical application despite decades of research and millions of dollars spent. In this review, the...

  3. Combination Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Skibinski, David AG; Baudner, Barbara C; Singh, Manmohan; O’Hagan, Derek T

    2011-01-01

    The combination of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccines into a single product has been central to the protection of the pediatric population over the past 50 years. The addition of inactivated polio, Haemophilus influenzae, and hepatitis B vaccines into the combination has facilitated the introduction of these vaccines into recommended immunization schedules by reducing the number of injections required and has therefore increased immunization compliance. However, the development of th...

  4. Tumor vaccines:

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Mojca; Ihan, Alojz

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regirrcents. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tccmor aaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which imrrtune tol...

  5. The amphiphilic nature of saponins and their effects on artificial and biological membranes and potential consequences for red blood and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorent, Joseph H; Quetin-Leclercq, Joëlle; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2014-11-28

    Saponins, amphiphiles of natural origin with numerous biological activities, are widely used in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry. Some saponins exhibit relatively selective cytotoxic effects on cancer cells but the tendency of saponins to induce hemolysis limits their anticancer potential. This review focused on the effects of saponin activity on membranes and consequent implications for red blood and cancer cells. This activity seems to be strongly related to the amphiphilic character of saponins that gives them the ability to self-aggregate and interact with membrane components such as cholesterol and phospholipids. Membrane interactions of saponins with artificial membrane models, red blood and cancer cells are reviewed with respect to their molecular structures. The review considered the mechanisms of these membrane interactions and their consequences including the modulation of membrane dynamics, interaction with membrane rafts, and membrane lysis. We summarized current knowledge concerning the mechanisms involved in the interactions of saponins with membrane lipids and examined the structure activity relationship of saponins regarding hemolysis and cancer cell death. A critical analysis of these findings speculates on their potential to further develop new anticancer compounds.

  6. The march toward malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephen L; Vekemans, Johan; Richie, Thomas L; Duffy, Patrick E

    2015-11-27

    In 2013 there were an estimated 584,000 deaths and 198 million clinical illnesses due to malaria, the majority in sub-Saharan Africa. Vaccines would be the ideal addition to the existing armamentarium of anti-malaria tools. However, malaria is caused by parasites, and parasites are much more complex in terms of their biology than the viruses and bacteria for which we have vaccines, passing through multiple stages of development in the human host, each stage expressing hundreds of unique antigens. This complexity makes it more difficult to develop a vaccine for parasites than for viruses and bacteria, since an immune response targeting one stage may not offer protection against a later stage, because different antigens are the targets of protective immunity at different stages. Furthermore, depending on the life cycle stage and whether the parasite is extra- or intra-cellular, antibody and/or cellular immune responses provide protection. It is thus not surprising that there is no vaccine on the market for prevention of malaria, or any human parasitic infection. In fact, no vaccine for any disease with this breadth of targets and immune responses exists. In this limited review, we focus on four approaches to malaria vaccines, (1) a recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccine aimed at Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) pre-erythrocytic stages of the parasite cycle (RTS,S/AS01), (2) whole sporozoite vaccines aimed at Pf pre-erythrocytic stages (PfSPZ Vaccine and PfSPZ-CVac), (3) prime boost vaccines that include recombinant DNA, viruses and bacteria, and protein with adjuvant aimed primarily at Pf pre-erythrocytic, but also asexual erythrocytic stages, and (4) recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccines aimed at Pf and Plasmodium vivax sexual erythrocytic and mosquito stages. We recognize that we are not covering all approaches to malaria vaccine development, or most of the critically important work on development of vaccines against P. vivax, the second most important cause of

  7. Beta-glucan feeding effect on biochemical and immune responses in vaccinated and non-vaccinated piglets against proliferative enteropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Soročinová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the results of active non-specific immuno-modulation in form of feeding food additive based on beta-glucan to pregnant sows and consecutive specific immuno-modulation by vaccination of their sucklings. Experimental sows were fed feedstuff with preparation on basis of beta-glucan at a 5% concentration from day 14 before parturition until the weaning of piglets; control sows were fed standard feedstuff only. Sucklings were vaccinated with a single dose of 2 ml of oral vaccine Enterisol® Ileitis one week before weaning. Collection of biological material was done 3 × in sows and 5 × in sucklings. Post-vaccination examination of blood serum for antibodies against L. intracellularis in sucklings in experimental and control groups was negative, probably due to insufficiently long period of rejection of antibiotics-medicated feedstuff and by chlorinated water. With the exception of immunological profile, no essential changes were recorded in the dynamics of other indices of examined profiles in groups of sows in relation to immune-modulation. In groups of sucklings from sows fed beta-glucan supplemented feedstuff significant changes were determined for various indices compared with sucklings from sows fed standard foodstuff. This is the first similar study in pig herds in Slovakia.

  8. Book review: Safety of Biologics Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robak T

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tadeusz Robak Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz and Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, PolandSafety of Biologics Therapy: Monoclonal Antibodies, Cytokines, Fusion Proteins, Hormones, Enzymes, Coagulation Proteins, Vaccines, Botulinum Toxins (Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing; 2016 by Brian A Baldo from the Molecular Immunology Unit, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Royal North Shore Hospital of Sydney, and the Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Australia, is a book that belongs on the shelf of everyone in the field of biologic therapies research and clinical practice. In writing this book, the author’s intention was to produce an up-to-date text book on approved biologic therapies, as far as that is possible in this time of rapidly evolving developments in biotherapeutic research and the introduction of new and novel agents for clinical use.The monograph comprises 610 pages in 13 chapters, each including a summary and further reading suggestions. All chapters include a discussion of basic and clinical material. Well-designed, comprehensive tables and color figures are present throughout the book. The book itself examines the biologic products that have regulatory approval in the USA and/or European Union and that show every indication of remaining important therapies. It covers in great detail all the latest work on peptide hormones and enzymes, monoclonal antibodies, fusion proteins, and cytokine therapies. Beyond that, it also presents the latest information on blood coagulation proteins, vaccines, botulinum neurotoxins, and biosimilars. 

  9. Development of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Recombinant Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioro, Silvana Beutinger; Simionatto, Simone; Dellagostin, Odir

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiological agent of swine enzootic pneumonia (EP), a disease that affects swine production worldwide. Vaccination is the most cost-effective strategy for the control and prevention of the disease. Research using genome-based approach has the potential to elucidate the biology and pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae and contribute to the development of more effective vaccines. Here, we describe the protocol for developing M. hyopneumoniae recombinant vaccines using reverse vaccinology approaches.

  10. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an immediate impact on your practice Summit on Emerging Immunotherapies Registration Schedule & Program Meeting on Lymphoma Biology ... blood clots are treated with an anticoagulant, a medicine that prevents the blood from clotting. Certain anticoagulants ...

  11. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Section Action Alerts Advocacy Toolkit Policy News Sickle Cell Disease Initiative Policy Statements Congressional Fellowship Testimony and ... Malignancies Consultative Hematology Course ASH Meeting on Lymphoma Biology ASH Workshop on Genome Editing Publications Blood Blood ...

  12. Human Immune Responses to Experimental Vaccinia Vaccines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ennis, Francis

    1996-01-01

    .... During the two years of this contract we have: (1) obtained, separated and cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 92 vaccinees in a clinical study to compare the standard and an experimental small pox vaccine, (2...

  13. TUMOUR VACCINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Ernst; Kircheis, Ralf; Crommelin, D.; Van Slooten, Maaike; Storm, Gert

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to a tumour vaccine with a tumour antigen base. In addition to a source of tumour antigens, the vaccine contains a release system for the delayed release of the active agent IFN- gamma , the active dose of IFN- gamma being 50 ng to 5 mu g. The IFN- gamma is released over a

  14. HPV vaccine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    campaign of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of grade 4 girls in South African (SA) public schools, ... This use is of concern in view of the billions of US dollars GSK had to pay for bribery in the USA, and is ... argument used to entice parents to have their daughters vaccinated is to prevent 3 000 women from dying of ...

  15. Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Safety and Pregnant Women Febrile Seizures Following Vaccination Flu Vaccine and People with Egg Allergies Guillain- ... Flu Vaccines Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Intradermal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination Fluzone High-Dose Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Cell-Based ...

  16. Combination vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David AG Skibinski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccines into a single product has been central to the protection of the pediatric population over the past 50 years. The addition of inactivated polio, Haemophilus influenzae, and hepatitis B vaccines into the combination has facilitated the introduction of these vaccines into recommended immunization schedules by reducing the number of injections required and has therefore increased immunization compliance. However, the development of these combinations encountered numerous challenges, including the reduced response to Haemophilus influenzae vaccine when given in combination; the need to consolidate the differences in the immunization schedule (hepatitis B; and the need to improve the safety profile of the diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis combination. Here, we review these challenges and also discuss future prospects for combination vaccines.

  17. Hib antibody responses in infants following diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis, and conjugated Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) combination vaccines with decreasing amounts of tetanus toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Henry H; Seyferth, Elisabeth R

    2017-12-04

    While combination vaccines have contributed to improved vaccine uptake rates in children, studies have documented varied immunogenicity to specific vaccine components. We studied whether varying the amount of tetanus toxoid (TT) in a DTaP and Hib combination vaccine would result in immunogenicity comparable with separate, concurrent administration. We evaluated the immunogenicity of Massachusetts Biologic Laboratories (MBL) diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (mDTaP) vaccine combined with tetanus-conjugated MBL Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (mHib) in a single injection (DTaPH). We compared four DTaPH vaccines containing varying concentrations of TT. We also evaluated the immune response to the DTaP vaccine manufactured by Connaught Laboratories (now known as Sanofi Pasteur) given with mHib and with Wyeth Hib-CRM 197 (HbOC) as separate injections. Vaccines were administered to 240 healthy infants at 2, 4, and 6 months of age, and blood specimens for antibody determination were obtained before each immunization and one month after the third immunization. We found no significant differences in immune response to the vaccines between the four DTaPH groups. Hib antibody responses were similar in the mHib and the HbOC groups but significantly lower in the DTaPH groups, as measured by Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell neutralization titers and filamentous hemagglutinin antigen (FHA) geometric mean concentrations (GMC) of anti-Hib antibodies. There were no significant differences between the groups in pertussis or tetanus toxoid antibody levels. Reducing tetanus toxoid amounts did not produce comparable immunogenicity for Hib. The nature of the interaction between immune responses to DTaPH components should be explored further to enable the development of better Hib-containing combination vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Guidelines for vaccination of immunocompromised individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedermann, Ursula; Sitte, Harald H; Burgmann, Heinz; Eser, Alexander; Falb, Petra; Holzmann, Heidemarie; Kitchen, Maria; Köller, Marcus; Kollaritsch, Herwig; Kundi, Michael; Lassmann, Hans; Mutz, Ingomar; Pickl, Winfried F; Riedl, Elisabeth; Sibilia, Maria; Thalhammer, Florian; Tucek, Barbara; Zenz, Werner; Zwiauer, Karl

    2016-08-01

    Immunosuppression of various origins is associated with an increased risk of infection; therefore the prevention of infectious diseases by vaccination is especially important in immunocompromised patients. However, the response to vaccinations is often reduced in these risk groups and the application of live vaccines is contraindicated during immunosuppression.In the following expert statement, recommendations for vaccination were created on the basis of current evidence and theoretical/immunological considerations. A first, general part elaborates on efficacy and safety of vaccinations during immunosuppression, modes of action of immunosuppressive medications and recommended time intervals between immunosuppressive treatments and vaccinations. A core piece of this part is a graduation of immunosuppression into three stages, i. e. no relevant immunosuppression, mild to moderate and severe immunosuppression and the assignment of various medications (including biologicals) to one of those stages; this is followed by an overview of possible and necessary vaccinations in each of those stages.The second part gives detailed vaccination guidelines for common diseases and therapies associated with immunosuppression. Primary immune deficiencies, chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, solid and hematological tumors, hematopoetic stem cell transplantation, transplantation of solid organs, aspenia, rheumatological-, gastroenterologic-, dermatologic-, neurologic diseases, biologicals during pregnancy and HIV infection are dealt with.These vaccination guidelines, compiled for the first time in Austria, aim to be of practical help for physicians to facilitate and improve vaccination coverage in immunocompromised patients and their household members and contact persons.

  19. Correlates of protection for enteric vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Jan; Parashar, Umesh D; Plotkin, Stanley; Louis, Jacques; Ng, Su-Peing; Desauziers, Eric; Picot, Valentina; Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra

    2017-06-08

    An immunological Correlate of Protection (CoP) is an immune response that is statistically interrelated with protection. Identification of CoPs for enteric vaccines would help design studies to improve vaccine performance of licensed vaccines in low income settings, and would facilitate the testing of future vaccines in development that might be more affordable. CoPs are lacking today for most existing and investigational enteric vaccines. In order to share the latest information on CoPs for enteric vaccines and to discuss novel approaches to correlate mucosal immune responses in humans with protection, the Foundation Mérieux organized an international conference of experts where potential CoPs for vaccines were examined using case-studies for both bacterial and viral enteric pathogens. Experts on the panel concluded that to date, all established enteric vaccine CoPs, such as those for hepatitis A, Vi typhoid and poliovirus vaccines, are based on serological immune responses even though these may poorly reflect the relevant gut immune responses or predict protective efficacy. Known CoPs for cholera, norovirus and rotavirus could be considered as acceptable for comparisons of similarly composed vaccines while more work is still needed to establish CoPs for the remaining enteric pathogens and their candidate vaccines. Novel approaches to correlate human mucosal immune responses with protection include the investigation of gut-originating antibody-secreting cells (ASCs), B memory cells and follicular helper T cells from samples of peripheral blood during their recirculation. Copyright © 2017.

  20. Sistema de grupo sangüíneo Duffy: biologia e prática transfusional Duffy blood group system: biology and transfusion practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Jens

    2005-06-01

    locus was mapped on chromosome 1q22-q23. The Fyª and Fy b antigens are encoded by FYA and FYB alleles, and are responsible for the Fy(a+b-, Fy(a-b+ and Fy(a+b+ phenotypes. They are carried by a 336 amino acid glycoprotein called DARC (Duffy Antigen/Receptor for Chemokines which has high affinity to chemokines, also being Plasmodium vivax receptors. The polymorphisms related to its alleles have led to the development of a PCR genotyping technique, which is useful for the safety of blood transfusion, and determining fetus-maternal incompatibilities. In the last decade, much research has been done to determine the biological role of blood group antigens. In this paper we reviewed the Duffy Blood Group System, especially in respect to transfusional practice and biological functions.

  1. Biomarkers of safety and immune protection for genetically modified live attenuated leishmania vaccines against visceral leishmaniasis - discovery and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Dey, Ranadhir; Avishek, Kumar; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2014-01-01

    Despite intense efforts there is no safe and efficacious vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis, which is fatal and endemic in many tropical countries. A major shortcoming in the vaccine development against blood-borne parasitic agents such as Leishmania is the inadequate predictive power of the early immune responses mounted in the host against the experimental vaccines. Often immune correlates derived from in-bred animal models do not yield immune markers of protection that can be readily extrapolated to humans. The limited efficacy of vaccines based on DNA, subunit, heat killed parasites has led to the realization that acquisition of durable immunity against the protozoan parasites requires a controlled infection with a live attenuated organism. Recent success of irradiated malaria parasites as a vaccine candidate further strengthens this approach to vaccination. We developed several gene deletion mutants in Leishmania donovani as potential live attenuated vaccines and reported extensively on the immunogenicity of LdCentrin1 deleted mutant in mice, hamsters, and dogs. Additional limited studies using genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccine candidates have been reported. However, for the live attenuated parasite vaccines, the primary barrier against widespread use remains the absence of clear biomarkers associated with protection and safety. Recent studies in evaluation of vaccines, e.g., influenza and yellow fever vaccines, using systems biology tools demonstrated the power of such strategies in understanding the immunological mechanisms that underpin a protective phenotype. Applying similar tools in isolated human tissues such as PBMCs from healthy individuals infected with live attenuated parasites such as LdCen(-/-) in vitro followed by human microarray hybridization experiments will enable us to understand how early vaccine-induced gene expression profiles and the associated immune responses are coordinately regulated in normal

  2. Biomarkers of Safety and Immune Protection for Genetically Modified Live Attenuated Leishmania Vaccines Against Visceral Leishmaniasis – Discovery and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Dey, Ranadhir; Avishek, Kumar; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite intense efforts there is no safe and efficacious vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis, which is fatal and endemic in many tropical countries. A major shortcoming in the vaccine development against blood-borne parasitic agents such as Leishmania is the inadequate predictive power of the early immune responses mounted in the host against the experimental vaccines. Often immune correlates derived from in-bred animal models do not yield immune markers of protection that can be readily extrapolated to humans. The limited efficacy of vaccines based on DNA, subunit, heat killed parasites has led to the realization that acquisition of durable immunity against the protozoan parasites requires a controlled infection with a live attenuated organism. Recent success of irradiated malaria parasites as a vaccine candidate further strengthens this approach to vaccination. We developed several gene deletion mutants in Leishmania donovani as potential live attenuated vaccines and reported extensively on the immunogenicity of LdCentrin1 deleted mutant in mice, hamsters, and dogs. Additional limited studies using genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccine candidates have been reported. However, for the live attenuated parasite vaccines, the primary barrier against widespread use remains the absence of clear biomarkers associated with protection and safety. Recent studies in evaluation of vaccines, e.g., influenza and yellow fever vaccines, using systems biology tools demonstrated the power of such strategies in understanding the immunological mechanisms that underpin a protective phenotype. Applying similar tools in isolated human tissues such as PBMCs from healthy individuals infected with live attenuated parasites such as LdCen−/− in vitro followed by human microarray hybridization experiments will enable us to understand how early vaccine-induced gene expression profiles and the associated immune responses are coordinately regulated in normal

  3. Use of the Immunegenetical Methods for Biological Risks Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozdnyakova, L.; Stopchanskaya, A.; Parkhomenko, N.; Pilipenko, N.; Kostyuchenko, L.; Djurtubaeva, G.; Slavina, N.; Pozdnyakov, S.

    2007-01-01

    For the present biological risk evaluation and forecast, information on gene-phenotypic characteristics of circulating regional EDAs, their connatural sources and conditions for epidemic distribution is necessary. We lead a relative gene-phenotypic comparison of vaccine and wild F.tularensis strains isolated from carriers, vectors, environment and patients in the different natural foci. Phenotyping investigations were done on 'in vitro' model with use of the human peripheral blood immune competent cells (ICC) of non-vaccinated and vaccinated with LVS volunteers. Variations of virulence manifestations of F.tularensis strains, isolated from different sources (ticks, waters, patients) are revealed. Principal differences in interactions of ICC with strains of various virulence degree, presence of ICC structural-functional changes in cytokines secretion dynamics at the presence of the wild and vaccine strains are shown. Morphological proofs for toxic materials production by pathogen during reproductive development term, damaging membranes structure, nucleus and cytoplasm are received. Certain interrelations between isolates phenotypic characteristics, source of isolation and types of natural foci is revealed. VNTR-analysis has showed genotypical heterogeneity and specific peculiarities in VNTR locuses combination of F. tularensis strains from different sources. Biological sense of VNTR-locuses combinations variations and their influence upon virulence signs expression are discussed. The complex approach, including agent's gene-phenotypic characteristics, ecological and geographical features of the natural foci, level of the human recruitment into the epidemic process will promote development of measures for counteraction in case of agents and their modified variants deliberate use. (author)

  4. Casting off vaccine supply charity -- the pace quickens. CVI goal: quality vaccines for all children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Several proposals are offered for production of high-quality vaccines within developing countries. The World Health Organization's Vaccine Supply and Quality (VSQ) team from the Global Program for Vaccines and Immunization (GPV) visited 10 countries (Bangladesh, Brazil, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Iran, Mexico, Pakistan, Philippines, and South Africa) out of 14 priority countries (China, Russia, Thailand, and Vietnam were not visited) producing vaccines and found only two with a quality control system that was acceptable. Vaccine-producing countries are urged to consider the full costs of production that include necessary infrastructure, an independent national control authority and laboratory, manufacturers with managerial autonomy, and manufacturers with good management, a qualified staff, and adequate technology. UNICEF has urged both private and public sectors to combine forces in bringing down the price of new vaccines for distribution to a very large market. Some imaginative proposals were made by some manufacturers for vaccine production and supply for a range of less traditional vaccines. The Director of the Massachusetts Public Health Biologic Laboratories proposed the formation of a consortium of vaccine manufacturers who would support public health priorities for market-affordable, simple vaccines against the major childhood diseases. The aim would be international validation of high-quality local vaccine production in developing countries, ease of research collaboration, improvement in information exchange between countries, and structured assistance. Lack of political commitment has been blamed for poor quality local production. A small cooperative effort among some Latin American countries, the Pan American Association's Regional Vaccine System for Latin America (SIREVA), is backed by the Children's Vaccine Initiative. SIREVA is a consortium of manufacturers in Brazil, Chile, and Mexico that plans joint development of some vaccines. Donor assistance is

  5. 17DD yellow fever vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Reinaldo M.; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S.; Farias, Roberto Henrique G.; Camacho, Luiz Antonio B.; Freire, Marcos S.; Galler, Ricardo; Yamamura, Anna Maya Yoshida; Almeida, Luiz Fernando C.; Lima, Sheila Maria B.; Nogueira, Rita Maria R.; Sá, Gloria Regina S.; Hokama, Darcy A.; de Carvalho, Ricardo; Freire, Ricardo Aguiar V.; Filho, Edson Pereira; Leal, Maria da Luz Fernandes; Homma, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To verify if the Bio-Manguinhos 17DD yellow fever vaccine (17DD-YFV) used in lower doses is as immunogenic and safe as the current formulation. Results: Doses from 27,476 IU to 587 IU induced similar seroconversion rates and neutralizing antibodies geometric mean titers (GMTs). Immunity of those who seroconverted to YF was maintained for 10 mo. Reactogenicity was low for all groups. Methods: Young and healthy adult males (n = 900) were recruited and randomized into 6 groups, to receive de-escalating doses of 17DD-YFV, from 27,476 IU to 31 IU. Blood samples were collected before vaccination (for neutralization tests to yellow fever, serology for dengue and clinical chemistry), 3 to 7 d after vaccination (for viremia and clinical chemistry) and 30 d after vaccination (for new yellow fever serology and clinical chemistry). Adverse events diaries were filled out by volunteers during 10 d after vaccination. Volunteers were retested for yellow fever and dengue antibodies 10 mo later. Seropositivity for dengue was found in 87.6% of volunteers before vaccination, but this had no significant influence on conclusions. Conclusion: In young healthy adults Bio-Manguinhos/Fiocruz yellow fever vaccine can be used in much lower doses than usual. International Register ISRCTN 38082350. PMID:23364472

  6. Tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.; Ihan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regiments. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tumor vaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which immune tolerance exists. That is why the population of tumor-specific lymphocytes is represented by a small number of low-affinity T-lymphocytes that induce weak antitumor immune response. Simultaneously, tumors evolve many mechanisms to actively evade immune system, what makes them poorly immunogenic or even tolerogenic. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies are directed toward breaking immune tolerance to tumor antigens, enhancing immunogenicity of tumor vaccines and overcoming mechanisms of tumor escape. There are several approaches, unfortunately, all of them still far away from an ideal tumor vaccine that would reject a tumor. Difficulties in the activation of antitumor immune response by tumor vaccines have led to the development of alternative immunotherapeutic strategies that directly focus on effector mechanisms of immune system (adoptive tumor- specific T-lymphocyte transfer and tumor specific monoclonal antibodies). (author)

  7. Varicella-zoster-virus vaccination in immunosuppressed children with rheumatic diseases using a pre-vaccination check list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Fabian; Hinze, Claas H; Andel, Susanne; Mertens, Thomas; Haas, Johannes-Peter

    2018-03-02

    The goal of this study was to apply the varicella zoster virus (VZV) vaccine to patients with pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD) at risk for severe chickenpox, without interrupting their current immunosuppression, including biological agents, using an immunological-based pre-vaccination checklist to assure safety. A pre-vaccination checklist was implemented to ensure adequate immune competence prior to immunization. This prospective study included seronegative patients (VZV-IgG ≤200 mIU/ml) and patients who had previously received only a single dose of VZV vaccine. All vaccinees demonstrated clinically inactive PRD. Patients were categorized according to their actual treatment in low-intensity IS (LIIS) and high-intensity IS (HIIS) including biological therapy. The pre-vaccination checklist defined thresholds for the following basic laboratory tests: white blood cell count ≥3000/mm 3 , lymphocytes ≥1200/mm 3 , serum IgG ≥500 mg/dl, IgM ≥20 mg/dl, tetanus toxoid antibody ≥0.1 IU/ml. In case of HIIS additional specifications included a CD4+ lymphocyte count ≥200/mm 3 and a positive T-cell function (via analyzable positive control of a standard tuberculosis interferon-gamma-release-assay (TB-IGRA) indicating mitogen-induced T cell proliferation). Patients who met the criteria of the pre-vaccination checklist received the first and/or second VZV vaccination. Immunologic response and side effects were monitored. Twenty-three patients were recruited of whom nine had already received one VZV immunization before initiating IS. All patients met the pre-vaccination checklist criteria despite ongoing IS. There was no overall difference in VZV-IgG levels when comparing the LIIS (n=9) and HIIS (n=14) groups. In total, 21 patients (91%) showed a positive vaccination response, after the first immunization the median VZV-IgG across all patients was 224 (59-1219) mIU/ml (median (range)), after booster immunization it increased to 882 (30-4685) mIU/ml. Two patients in

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood biomarkers for neurodegenerative dementias: An update of the Consensus of the Task Force on Biological Markers in Psychiatry of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewczuk, Piotr; Riederer, Peter; O'Bryant, Sid E; Verbeek, Marcel M; Dubois, Bruno; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Jellinger, Kurt A; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Ramirez, Alfredo; Parnetti, Lucilla; Jack, Clifford R; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Hampel, Harald; Lleó, Alberto; Jessen, Frank; Glodzik, Lidia; de Leon, Mony J; Fagan, Anne M; Molinuevo, José Luis; Jansen, Willemijn J; Winblad, Bengt; Shaw, Leslie M; Andreasson, Ulf; Otto, Markus; Mollenhauer, Brit; Wiltfang, Jens; Turner, Martin R; Zerr, Inga; Handels, Ron; Thompson, Alexander G; Johansson, Gunilla; Ermann, Natalia; Trojanowski, John Q; Karaca, Ilker; Wagner, Holger; Oeckl, Patrick; van Waalwijk van Doorn, Linda; Bjerke, Maria; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Kuiperij, H Bea; Farotti, Lucia; Li, Yi; Gordon, Brian A; Epelbaum, Stéphane; Vos, Stephanie J B; Klijn, Catharina J M; Van Nostrand, William E; Minguillon, Carolina; Schmitz, Matthias; Gallo, Carla; Lopez Mato, Andrea; Thibaut, Florence; Lista, Simone; Alcolea, Daniel; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Kornhuber, Johannes

    2017-10-27

    In the 12 years since the publication of the first Consensus Paper of the WFSBP on biomarkers of neurodegenerative dementias, enormous advancement has taken place in the field, and the Task Force takes now the opportunity to extend and update the original paper. New concepts of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the conceptual interactions between AD and dementia due to AD were developed, resulting in two sets for diagnostic/research criteria. Procedures for pre-analytical sample handling, biobanking, analyses and post-analytical interpretation of the results were intensively studied and optimised. A global quality control project was introduced to evaluate and monitor the inter-centre variability in measurements with the goal of harmonisation of results. Contexts of use and how to approach candidate biomarkers in biological specimens other than cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), e.g. blood, were precisely defined. Important development was achieved in neuroimaging techniques, including studies comparing amyloid-β positron emission tomography results to fluid-based modalities. Similarly, development in research laboratory technologies, such as ultra-sensitive methods, raises our hopes to further improve analytical and diagnostic accuracy of classic and novel candidate biomarkers. Synergistically, advancement in clinical trials of anti-dementia therapies energises and motivates the efforts to find and optimise the most reliable early diagnostic modalities. Finally, the first studies were published addressing the potential of cost-effectiveness of the biomarkers-based diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. On the bifurcation of blood vessels--Wilhelm Roux's doctoral thesis (Jena 1878)--a seminal work for biophysical modelling in developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, H; Sandau, K; Christ, B

    1997-02-01

    Wilhelm Roux's doctoral thesis described the relationship between the angle and diameter of bifurcating blood vessels. We have re-read this work in the light of biophysics and developmental biology and found two remarkable aspects hidden among a multitude of observations, rules and exceptions to these rules. First, the author identified the major determinants involved in vascular development; genetics, cybernetics, and mechanics; moreover, he knew that he could not deal with the genetic and regulatory aspects, and could hardly treat the mechanical part adequately. Second, he was deeply convinced that the laws of physics determine the design of organisms, and that a necessity for optimality was inherent in development. We combined the analysis of diameter relationships with the requirement for optimality in a stochastic biophysical model, and concluded that a constant wall-stress condition could define a minimum wall-tissue optimum during arterial development. Hence, almost 120 years after Wilhelm Roux's pioneering work, our model indicates one possible way in which physical laws have determined the evolution of regulatory and structural properties in vessel wall development.

  10. Optimal vaccination scenarios against vector-borne diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Enøe, Claes; Bødker, Rene

    Using a process oriented semi-agent based model we simulated the spread of Bluetongue virus in Denmark. We evaluated the efficiency and minimum vaccination cover for eight different preventive vaccination strategies in Denmark. The simulation model replicates both passive and active flight...... of Culicoides between hosts on pasture and stables in Denmark. Seasonal abundance of midges and temperature dependence on biological processes were included in the model. The eight vaccination scenarios comprised of: All holdings vaccinated to a given percentage, random holdings selected for vaccination, two...... scenarios based on the size of holdings, mosaic vaccination of nearest neighbor farms, vaccination of hosts on pasture, regional vaccination, and trench vaccination from the border to Germany. These eight scenarios were investigated under normal grazing conditions and under a forced housing scenario...

  11. The immunosuppressive impact of PRRS virus on the immune response following anti - erysipelas vaccination in swine from various farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Chiurciu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available PRRS virus, the etiologic agent of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome by immunosuppressive action can significantly affect the immune response after vaccination. It was intended the following of the immunological reaction induced by the Erysipelothrix rhusopathiae vaccination from pigs from intensive system and from households. The biological material studied was provided from clinically healthy pigs of different ages. The animals were from four different locations. Serological examinations were performed by blood sampling [gathered from the confluence of jugular vein] before and after the vaccination. The investigations were performed by ELISA method. In the industrial breeding system, seroprevalence of anti PRRS presented high levels, in contrast to the low level of postvaccinal E. rhusopathiae antibodies. In households the incidence of PRRS virus was low and the seroconversion after the vaccination was raised. The morphopathological and bacteriological examinations performed from the lesions in various organs [lungs, lymph nodes, liver, spleen and intestine] has revealed the presence of germ association, pathogenic or potentially pathogenic. The results point the link between the existence of PRRS virus in the swine populations and post-vaccinal response, its presence interfering significantly with the vaccination protocols efficacy.

  12. Influenza vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerhus, Sven Frederick

    2015-01-01

    The Cochrane Library was systematically searched for meta-analyses regarding influenza vaccination of various populations, both healthy and sick. An effect in reducing the number of cases of influenza, influenza-like illness or complications to influenza was found in some studies, but, generally......, the quality of the studies was low, and several studies lacked hard clinical endpoints. Data on adverse effects were scarce. More randomised controlled trials investigating the effects of influenza vaccination are warranted....

  13. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  14. Flu Vaccine Safety Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Flu Vaccine Safety Information Questions & Answers Language: English (US) Español ... of flu vaccines monitored? Egg Allergy Are flu vaccines safe? Flu vaccines have good safety record. Hundreds ...

  15. Thimerosal in Flu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Thimerosal in Flu Vaccine Questions & Answers Language: English (US) Español Recommend on ... or fungi from contaminating the vaccine. Do flu vaccines contain thimerosal? Flu vaccines in multi-dose vials ...

  16. Vaccinations during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... community Home > Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Vaccinations and pregnancy Vaccinations and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... date before you get pregnant. What is a vaccination? A vaccination is a shot that contains a ...

  17. DNA Vaccines Against Anthrax

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Galloway, Darrell R; Baillie, Les

    2004-01-01

    DNA vaccination is vaccination at its simplest. Due to renewed interest in vaccination against anthrax and other biothreat agents, a genetic immunisation approach offers attractive possibilities for rapid, responsive vaccine development...

  18. Comparative resistance towards infection with Y. ruckeri in vaccinated and non-vaccinated rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raida, Martin Kristian

    2010-01-01

    is to investigate differences in the immune responses as well as infection levels between non-vaccinated control fish and fish immersion vaccinated with formalin-killed, GFP-tagged Y. ruckeri (1x109 CFU/ml, 10 minutes, serotype O1, biotype 2,). 7 months post vaccination of the vaccinated group, both groups were......  Comparative resistance towards infection with Y. ruckeri in vaccinated and non-vaccinated rainbow trout Kasper Rømer Villumsen & Martin Kristian Raida Laboratory of Aquatic Pathobiology, Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Section of Biomedicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, University...... of Copenhagen. As the causative bacterial agent for enteric red mouth disease, Yersinia ruckeri presents a valuable target for development of efficient vaccines. Since valuable lessons can be learned from the investigation of host-pathogen interactions during infection, the focus of the present study...

  19. Antipneumococcal vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Vincenzo Zuccotti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP is a gram-positive bacterium with more than 90 known serotypes causing around 11% of all deaths worldwide in children aged 1-59 months. A new era in prevention of SP-related diseases started in at the beginning of 2000s when a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 was recommended as the vaccine of choice in pediatric age. PCV7 dramatically reduced invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD among children with indirect effects noted among other age groups as well. However, thanks to a strict surveillance network, an increase in non-vaccine serotypes (NVTs causing IPD was noted worldwide and in late 2000s a new second generation vaccine (13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine-PCV13 with an expanded serotype coverage was licensed. Due to the lack of solid effectiveness data, up to know it is difficult to predict how the composition of NVTs will change after the large-scale introduction of PCV13 or whether the characteristics of the serotypes will change. Long-term surveillance of both IPD, pneumonia, acute otitis media and carriage will be crucial to ascertain whether these second generation vaccines are having the desired effect of reducing the incidence of diseases in the long term. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  20. Comparative evaluation of antibody response in rabbits vaccinated with toxoid, alum precipitated and alum precipitated oil adjuvant enterotoxaemia vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Rai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the newly formulated enterotoxaemia vaccine having oil and alum adjuvants, with presently available toxoid and alum precipitated vaccines. Materials and Methods: Three types of enterotoxaemia vaccines, namely toxoid (TV, alum precipitated (APV and alum precipitated oil adjuvant vaccine (AOV were prepared using a highly toxigenic strain of Clostridium perfringens type D procured from Division of Biological Standardization, IVRI, Izatnagar. Humoral immunity generated in rabbits with these vaccines was then quantified using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and mice neutralization test (MNT. Results: Out of three enterotoxaemia vaccines tested, alum precipitated oil adjuvant vaccine produced higher and persistent antibody titre for more than 45 days without any booster dose and did not produce any untoward reactions at the injection site. Alum precipitated vaccine elicited better and persistent immune response than toxoid vaccine though it was less than alum precipitated oil adjuvant vaccine. In MNT, alum precipitated and alum precipitated oil adjuvant vaccines showed protection at 45th day of post vaccination while toxoid vaccine showed only up to 28th day. Conclusion: Results of the study unfolded the synergistic role of adjuvants in the induction of better and persistent immune response and also indicated the superiority of alum precipitated oil adjuvant vaccine over the currently available toxoid and alum precipitated enterotoxaemia vaccines. [Vet World 2013; 6(4.000: 200-204

  1. Vaccination against bacterial kidney disease: Chapter 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Diane G.; Wiens, Gregory D.; Hammell, K. Larry; Rhodes, Linda D.; Edited by Gudding, Roar; Lillehaug, Atle; Evensen, Øystein

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has been recognized as a serious disease in salmonid fishes since the 1930s. This chapter discusses the occurrence and significance, etiology, and pathogenesis of BKD. It then describes the different vaccination procedures and the effects and side-effects of vaccination. Despite years of research, however, only a single vaccine has been licensed for prevention of BKD, and has demonstrated variable efficacy. Therefore, in addition to a presentation of the current status of BKD vaccination, a discussion of potential future directions for BKD vaccine development is included in the chapter. This discussion is focused on the unique characteristics of R. salmoninarum and its biology, as well as aspects of the salmonid immune system that might be explored specifically to develop more effective vaccines for BKD prevention.

  2. Hepatitis B vaccination: Efficiency of pretesting by RIA-methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, T.I.; Schmid, B.

    1984-01-01

    Vaccination of individuals who possess antibodies against HBs virus from a previous infection is not necessary. Health-care personnel represents a large population of potential vaccine recipients. The risk of developing hepatitis B among these workers is proportional to the degree of their exposure to both blood and blood products as well as to patients with hepatitis B. The decision to screen before vaccination depends on the costs of screening, the costs of vaccination, and the likelihood of vaccination candidates having had hepatitis B. We have demonstrated the cost effective use of screening using RIA-methods in a group of health workers for anti-HBs. If care is taken in the organization of the vaccination program, prevaccination screening of vaccine candidates can save considerable amounts of money. (orig.) [de

  3. Characterization of germline antibody libraries from human umbilical cord blood and selection of monoclonal antibodies to viral envelope glycoproteins: Implications for mechanisms of immune evasion and design of vaccine immunogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weizao; Streaker, Emily D; Russ, Daniel E; Feng, Yang; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-01-27

    We have previously observed that all known HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are highly divergent from germline antibodies in contrast to bnAbs against Hendra virus, Nipah virus and SARS coronavirus (SARS CoV). We have hypothesized that because the germline antibodies are so different from the mature HIV-1-specific bnAbs they may not bind the epitopes of the mature antibodies and provided the first evidence to support this hypothesis by using individual putative germline-like predecessor antibodies. To further validate the hypothesis and understand initial immune responses to different viruses, two phage-displayed human cord blood-derived IgM libraries were constructed which contained mostly germline antibodies or antibodies with very low level of somatic hypermutations. They were panned against different HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs), SARS CoV protein receptor-binding domain (RBD), and soluble Hendra virus G protein (sG). Despite a high sequence and combinatorial diversity observed in the cord blood-derived IgM antibody repertoire, no enrichment for binders of Envs was observed in contrast to considerable specific enrichments produced with panning against RBD and sG; one of the selected monoclonal antibodies (against the RBD) was of high (nM) affinity with only few somatic mutations. These results further support and expand our initial hypothesis for fundamental differences in immune responses leading to elicitation of bnAbs against HIV-1 compared to SARS CoV and Hendra virus. HIV-1 uses a strategy to minimize or eliminate strong binding of germline antibodies to its Env; in contrast, SARS CoV and Hendra virus, and perhaps other viruses causing acute infections, can bind germline antibody or minimally somatically mutated antibodies with relatively high affinity which could be one of the reasons for the success of sG and RBD as vaccine immunogens. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Amylase and blood cell-count hematological radiation-injury biomarkers in a rhesus monkey radiation model-use of multiparameter and integrated biological dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, W.F. [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)], E-mail: blakely@afrri.usuhs.mil; Ossetrova, N.I.; Manglapus, G.L.; Salter, C.A.; Levine, I.H.; Jackson, W.E.; Grace, M.B.; Prasanna, P.G.S.; Sandgren, D.J.; Ledney, G.D. [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Effective medical management of suspected radiation exposure incidents requires the recording of dynamic medical data (clinical signs and symptoms), biological assessments of radiation exposure, and physical dosimetry in order to provide diagnostic information to the treating physician and dose assessment for personnel radiation protection records. The need to rapidly assess radiation dose in mass-casualty and population-monitoring scenarios prompted an evaluation of suitable biomarkers that can provide early diagnostic information after exposure. We investigated the utility of serum amylase and hematological blood-cell count biomarkers to provide early assessment of severe radiation exposures in a non-human primate model (i.e., rhesus macaques; n=8) exposed to whole-body radiation of {sup 60}Co-gamma rays (6.5 Gy, 40cGymin{sup -1}). Serum amylase activity was significantly elevated (12.3{+-}3.27- and 2.6{+-}0.058-fold of day zero samples) at 1 and 2-days, respectively, after radiation. Lymphocyte cell counts decreased ({<=}15% of day zero samples) 1 and 2 days after radiation exposure. Neutrophil cell counts increased at day one by 1.9({+-}0.38)-fold compared with levels before irradiation. The ratios of neutrophil to lymphocyte cell counts increased by 13({+-}2.66)- and 4.23({+-}0.95)-fold at 1 and 2 days, respectively, after irradiation. These results demonstrate that increases in serum amylase activity along with decreases of lymphocyte counts, increases in neutrophil cell counts, and increases in the ratio of neutrophil to lymphocyte counts 1 day after irradiation can provide enhanced early triage discrimination of individuals with severe radiation exposure and injury. Use of the biodosimetry assessment tool (BAT) application is encouraged to permit dynamic recording of medical data in the management of a suspected radiological casualty.

  5. Influence of management and biological factors on parasitic invasions in the wild – Spread of the blood-sucking nematode Ashworthius sidemi in European bison (Bison bonasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kołodziej-Sobocińska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The full course of new parasite introductions in wild animals is difficult to accurately trace. We documented and analysed the invasive blood-sucking nematode Ashworthius sidemi (Trichostrongylidae introduction and spread in European bison (Bison bonasus from the initial phase of its progression. In the Polish part of the Białowieża Primeval Forest (BPF the parasite was first found in 2000. From 2002 to 2015, 165 culled bison were investigated. The prevalence and intensity of A. sidemi Schulz, 1933 infection increased over the following years, reaching 100% of investigated bison four years after introduction and a maximal median intensity of 8200 nematodes per animal in the winter of 2008/2009. Afterwards, a significant decline of median infection intensity was observed to the minimum value of 410 nematodes per animal. Between 2011 and 2014 prevalence varied from 89 to 100%. Among the factors analysed, the number of years since introduction, herd size, age and sex proved to significantly influence infection intensity. A higher infection intensity was recorded in sub-adults compared to juveniles and adults. Males had significantly lower infection intensity than females, but this was the case for adults only. The highest infection intensities were recorded in the biggest bison herds, where the winter supplementary feeding of bison is intense. Moreover, the longer the parasite was present in the host population, the more important herd size became as a factor. Our study indicates that it is not solely biological factors that determine the spread of a newly detected parasite in wildlife, but that management practices can also have a strong influence. This is especially important in endangered species under intensive human care as the management practices may pose a threat to the species.

  6. Molecular Signatures of a TLR4 Agonist-Adjuvanted HIV-1 Vaccine Candidate in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Anderson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Systems biology approaches have recently provided new insights into the mechanisms of action of human vaccines and adjuvants. Here, we investigated early transcriptional signatures induced in whole blood of healthy subjects following vaccination with a recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein subunit CN54gp140 adjuvanted with the TLR4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant-aqueous formulation (GLA-AF and correlated signatures to CN54gp140-specific serum antibody responses. Fourteen healthy volunteers aged 18–45 years were immunized intramuscularly three times at 1-month intervals and whole blood samples were collected at baseline, 6 h, and 1, 3, and 7 days post first immunization. Subtle changes in the transcriptomic profiles were observed following immunization, ranging from over 300 differentially expressed genes (DEGs at day 1 to nearly 100 DEGs at day 7 following immunization. Functional pathway analysis revealed blood transcription modules (BTMs related to general cell cycle activation, and innate immune cell activation at early time points, as well as BTMs related to T cells and B cell activation at the later time points post-immunization. Diverse CN54gp140-specific serum antibody responses of the subjects enabled their categorization into high or low responders, at early (<1 month and late (up to 6 months time points post vaccination. BTM analyses revealed repression of modules enriched in NK cells, and the mitochondrial electron chain, in individuals with high or sustained antigen-specific antibody responses. However, low responders showed an enhancement of BTMs associated with enrichment in myeloid cells and monocytes as well as integrin cell surface interactions. Flow cytometry analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from the subjects revealed an enhanced frequency of CD56dim NK cells in the majority of vaccines 14 days after vaccination as compared with the baseline. These results emphasize the utility of a

  7. MALVAC 2012 scientific forum: accelerating development of second-generation malaria vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) convened a malaria vaccines committee (MALVAC) scientific forum from 20 to 21 February 2012 in Geneva, Switzerland, to review the global malaria vaccine portfolio, to gain consensus on approaches to accelerate second-generation malaria vaccine development, and to discuss the need to update the vision and strategic goal of the Malaria Vaccine Technology Roadmap. This article summarizes the forum, which included reviews of leading Plasmodium falciparum vaccine candidates for pre-erythrocytic vaccines, blood-stage vaccines, and transmission-blocking vaccines. Other major topics included vaccine candidates against Plasmodium vivax, clinical trial site capacity development in Africa, trial design considerations for a second-generation malaria vaccine, adjuvant selection, and regulatory oversight functions including vaccine licensure. PMID:23140365

  8. Periodontal Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Happy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an infectious disease caused by predominantly gram-negative, anaerobic bacteria like P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans T. denticola and T. forsythus etc.. Various immunization approaches both as active and passive immunization, against periodontal pathogens have been explored either using the whole microorganism or their specific virulence factors. Non-human primate and other study models have demonstrated raised production of specific antibody titers against various antigens without any recognizable systemic side-effects. But, the current status of our understanding in the field of vaccines against periodontal disease is incomplete. Ongoing research & collaborative efforts can result in development of functional periodontal vaccine for human use in future.

  9. Measles vaccination using a microneedle patch☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, Chris; Collins, Marcus L.; Ayers, Jessica; Rota, Paul A.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Measles vaccination programs would benefit from delivery methods that decrease cost, simplify logistics, and increase safety. Conventional subcutaneous injection is limited by the need for skilled healthcare professionals to reconstitute and administer injections, and by the need for safe needle handling and disposal to reduce the risk of disease transmission through needle re-use and needlestick injury. Microneedles are micron-scale, solid needles coated with a dry formulation of vaccine that dissolves in the skin within minutes after patch application. By avoiding the use of hypodermic needles, vaccination using a microneedle patch could be carried out by minimally trained personnel with reduced risk of blood-borne disease transmission. The goal of this study was to evaluate measles vaccination using a microneedle patch to address some of the limitations of subcutaneous injection. Viability of vaccine virus dried onto a microneedle patch was stabilized by incorporation of the sugar, trehalose, and loss of viral titer was less than 1 log10(TCID50) after storage for at least 30 days at room temperature. Microneedle patches were then used to immunize cotton rats with the Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine strain. Vaccination using microneedles at doses equaling the standard human dose or one-fifth the human dose generated neutralizing antibody levels equivalent to those of a subcutaneous immunization at the same dose. These results show that measles vaccine can be stabilized on microneedles and that vaccine efficiently reconstitutes in vivo to generate a neutralizing antibody response equivalent to that generated by subcutaneous injection. PMID:23044406

  10. Diversity and Vaccine Controversy

    OpenAIRE

    Frempong, Erica

    2010-01-01

    My area of research dealt with many different aspects of the vaccine movement, the main three were: anti-vaccine sentiments over the Internet, global instances of anti-vaccination efforts, and differences in social class and race in vaccine utilization. I have come to realize that there are two distinct issues arising in the organization that encompasses vaccines. The distinctions are the anti-vaccine movement - the spread of anti-vaccine sentiments over the Internet, and global instances ...

  11. [Towards a new vaccine economy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirot, P; Martin, J F

    1994-01-01

    When Jonas Salk announced in the mid-50s the availability of a new vaccine against poliomyelitis, the world had the impression that it was now controlling infectious diseases. In fact, the success of this vaccine has been considerable and although some innovations lead to the launch of vaccines against flu, measles, rubella or mumps, the world vaccine market remained remarkably stable till the mid-80s. However, since 1984 (launch of the hepatitis B vaccine) there have been very substantial changes and further change is expected in the next ten years in the world market. Today, big companies are making a concentrated supply: Pasteur Mérieux with its subsidiary Connaught, SmithKline Beecham who acquired the Belgian company RIT, and Merck & Co. who is joining its forces with Pasteur Mérieux. Medium sized and small companies remain and reflect the situation of the past, but must work hard to secure their long term existence eventhough the world demand is going to double before the year 2000. Very substantial technological innovations explain to a large extent the development of the supply: progress in molecular biology, and particularly genetic engineering, lead to recombinant vaccines of which hepatitis B is the best example with worldwide sales in the range of $600 million a year. Similarly, conjugation technologies have allowed the development of new vaccines against meningitis, particularly Haemophilus influenzae type b. More recently, an efficacious vaccine against hepatitis A has been launched and many new products will be marketed in the next years against herpes, Lyme disease, and agents of other meningitis, etc.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Rabies vaccination for international travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautret, Philippe; Parola, Philippe

    2012-01-05

    Rabies prevention in travelers is a controversial issue. According to experts, the decision to vaccinate results from an individual risk assessment based on the duration of stay, the likelihood of engagement in at-risk activities, the age of the traveler, the rabies endemicity and access to appropriate medical care in the country of destination. However, no detailed information is available regarding the last two determinants in many regions. Twenty-two cases of rabies were reported in tourists, expatriates and migrant travelers over the last decade, including three cases following short-term travel of no more than two weeks. Studies on rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) in travelers show that overall, 0.4% (range 0.01-2.3%) of travelers have experienced an at-risk bite per month of stay in a rabies-endemic country, while 31% of expatriates and 12% of tourists were vaccinated against rabies before traveling. The main reason cited by travelers for not being vaccinated is the cost of the vaccine. The majority of patients who sustained a high risk injury was not vaccinated against rabies before traveling and were not properly treated abroad. From available studies, the following risk factors for injuries sustained from potentially rabid animals may be identified: traveling to South-East Asia, India or North Africa, young age, and traveling for tourism. The duration of travel does not appear to be a risk factor. It should be noted that "at-risk activities" have not been addressed in these studies. Detailed rabies distribution maps and information on the availability of rabies biologics are urgently needed in order to identify those travelers who need pre-travel vaccination. Meanwhile, cost-minimization of rabies pre-exposure vaccination may be achieved in several ways, notably by using the intra-dermal method of vaccination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Green revolution vaccines, edible vaccines | Tripurani | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edible vaccines are sub-unit vaccines where the selected genes are introduced into the plants and the transgenic plant is then induced to manufacture the encoded protein. Edible vaccines are mucosal-targeted vaccines where stimulation of both systematic and mucosal immune network takes place. Foods under study ...

  14. Vaccination in inflammatory bowel disease patients: attitudes, knowledge, and uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Gurtej; Rumman, Amir; Thanabalan, Reka; Croitoru, Kenneth; Silverberg, Mark S; Hillary Steinhart, A; Nguyen, Geoffrey C

    2015-06-01

    Immunomodulators and biological agents, used to treat inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], are associated with an increased risk of infection, including vaccine-preventable infections. We assessed patient attitudes towards vaccination, knowledge of vaccine recommendations, and uptake of recommended vaccines. Patients attending IBD clinics completed a self-administered, structured, paper-based questionnaire. We collected demographic data, medical and immunisation history, self-reported patient uptake, knowledge, and perceptions of childhood and adult vaccinations. The prevalence of treatment with biologicals, steroids, thiopurines, and methotrexate among the 300 respondents were 37.3%, 16.0%, 16.0%, and 5.7%, respectively. Self-reported vaccine completion was reported by 45.3% of patients. Vaccination uptake rates were 61.3% for influenza, 10.3% for pneumococcus, 61.0% for hepatitis B, 52.0% for hepatitis A, 26.0% for varicella, 20.7% for meningococcus, 5.3% for herpes zoster, and 11.0% for herpes papilloma virus [females only]. Significant predictors of vaccine completion were annual vaccination review by family physician (odds ratio [OR] = 1.82) or gastroenterologist [OR = 1.72], current steroid use [OR = 1.28], and current or prior treatment with biologicals [OR = 1.42]. The majority of patients reported that the primary responsibility to ensure vaccine completion lies with the patient [41.7%] and the family physician [32.3%]. Uncertainty about indications, fears of side effects, and concerns regarding vaccine safety were the most commonly reported reasons for non-uptake [22.0%, 20.7%, and 5.3%, respectively]. Uptake of recommended vaccines among IBD patients is suboptimal. Annual vaccination reviews by both family physician and gastroenterologist may improve vaccine uptake. Interventions targeted at improving vaccination uptake in IBD patients are needed. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All

  15. Biological rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halberg, F.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is given of basic features of biological rhythms. The classification of periodic behavior of physical and psychological characteristics as circadian, circannual, diurnal, and ultradian is discussed, and the notion of relativistic time as it applies in biology is examined. Special attention is given to circadian rhythms which are dependent on the adrenocortical cycle. The need for adequate understanding of circadian variations in the basic physiological indicators of an individual (heart rate, body temperature, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, etc.) to ensure the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic measures is stressed.

  16. DNA Vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The year 1996 marked the 200th anniversary of the first vaccine developed against smallpox by Edward Jenner. In the now- famous 1796 experiment, Jenner scratched the arm of eight- year-old James Phipps, infecting the boy with cowpox pus taken from a milkmaid carrying the virus. Two months later, he scratched James ...

  17. Valuing vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E; Cafiero-Fonseca, Elizabeth T; O'Brien, Jennifer Carroll

    2014-08-26

    Vaccination has led to remarkable health gains over the last century. However, large coverage gaps remain, which will require significant financial resources and political will to address. In recent years, a compelling line of inquiry has established the economic benefits of health, at both the individual and aggregate levels. Most existing economic evaluations of particular health interventions fail to account for this new research, leading to potentially sizable undervaluation of those interventions. In line with this new research, we set forth a framework for conceptualizing the full benefits of vaccination, including avoided medical care costs, outcome-related productivity gains, behavior-related productivity gains, community health externalities, community economic externalities, and the value of risk reduction and pure health gains. We also review literature highlighting the magnitude of these sources of benefit for different vaccinations. Finally, we outline the steps that need to be taken to implement a broad-approach economic evaluation and discuss the implications of this work for research, policy, and resource allocation for vaccine development and delivery.

  18. Rotavirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rotavirus disease was a common and serious health problem for children in the United States. Almost all children in the U.S. had at least one rotavirus infection before their 5th birthday.Every year before the vaccine was available: more ...

  19. Vexing Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    Schools play a key role in ensuring that children are being immunized against diseases, but conflicting research is making enforcement difficult. This article discusses a growing trend of vaccine avoidance and the endless supply of conflicting information and research about immunization safety. Despite the controversy, many people appear to accept…

  20. Valuing vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E.; Cafiero-Fonseca, Elizabeth T.; O’Brien, Jennifer Carroll

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination has led to remarkable health gains over the last century. However, large coverage gaps remain, which will require significant financial resources and political will to address. In recent years, a compelling line of inquiry has established the economic benefits of health, at both the individual and aggregate levels. Most existing economic evaluations of particular health interventions fail to account for this new research, leading to potentially sizable undervaluation of those interventions. In line with this new research, we set forth a framework for conceptualizing the full benefits of vaccination, including avoided medical care costs, outcome-related productivity gains, behavior-related productivity gains, community health externalities, community economic externalities, and the value of risk reduction and pure health gains. We also review literature highlighting the magnitude of these sources of benefit for different vaccinations. Finally, we outline the steps that need to be taken to implement a broad-approach economic evaluation and discuss the implications of this work for research, policy, and resource allocation for vaccine development and delivery. PMID:25136129

  1. Pertussis vaccination during pregnancy in Vietnam: Results of a randomized controlled trial Pertussis vaccination during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Ha Thi Thu; Leuridan, Elke; Maertens, Kirsten; Nguyen, Trung Dac; Hens, Niel; Vu, Ngoc Ha; Caboré, Raissa Nadège; Duong, Hong Thi; Huygen, Kris; Van Damme, Pierre; Dang, Anh Duc

    2016-01-02

    A pertussis vaccination during pregnancy has recently been adopted in several countries to indirectly protect young infants. This study assessed the effect of adding a pertussis component to the tetanus vaccination, in the pregnancy immunization program in Vietnam. A randomized controlled trial was performed. Pregnant women received either a Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria acellular pertussis) vaccine or a tetanus only vaccine between 19 and 35 weeks' gestational age. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) against tetanus (TT), diphtheria (DT), pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous hemaglutinin (FHA) and pertactin (Prn) were measured using commercial ELISA tests, at baseline, 1 month after maternal vaccination, at delivery, and in infants from cord blood and before and after the primary series (EPI: month 2-3-4) of a pertussis containing vaccine. Significantly higher geometric mean concentrations (GMC) were observed for all 3 measured pertussis antigens in the offspring of the Tdap group, up to 2 months of age. One month after completion of the primary infant vaccination schedule, anti-Prn GMC, but not anti-PT and anti-FHA GMCs, was significantly (p=0.006) higher in the control group. Maternal antibodies induced by vaccination during pregnancy close the susceptibility gap for pertussis in young infants. Limited interference with the infant vaccine responses was observed. Whether this interference effect disappears with the administration of a fourth vaccine dose is further studied. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Understanding modern-day vaccines: what you need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Volker; Denizer, Gülhan; Friedland, Leonard R; Krishnan, Jyothsna; Shapiro, Marla

    2018-03-01

    Vaccines are considered to be one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. Depending on the biology of the infection, the disease to be prevented, and the targeted population, a vaccine may require the induction of different adaptive immune mechanisms to be effective. Understanding the basic concepts of different vaccines is therefore crucial to understand their mode of action, benefits, risks, and their potential real-life impact on protection. This review aims to provide healthcare professionals with background information about the main vaccine designs and concepts of protection in a simplified way to improve their knowledge and understanding, and increase their confidence in the science of vaccination ( Supplementary Material ). KEY MESSAGE Different vaccine designs, each with different advantages and limitations, can be applied for protection against a particular disease. Vaccines may contain live-attenuated pathogens, inactivated pathogens, or only parts of pathogens and may also contain adjuvants to stimulate the immune responses. This review explains the mode of action, benefits, risks and real-life impact of vaccines by highlighting key vaccine concepts. An improved knowledge and understanding of the main vaccine designs and concepts of protection will help support the appropriate use and expectations of vaccines, increase confidence in the science of vaccination, and help reduce vaccine hesitancy.

  3. High white blood cell count at diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: biological background and prognostic impact. Results from the NOPHO ALL-92 and ALL-2000 studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaitkeviciene, G; Forestier, E; Hellebostad, M

    2011-01-01

    Prognostic impact of peripheral blood white blood cell count (WBC) at the diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) was evaluated in a population-based consecutive series of 2666 children aged 1–15 treated for ALL between 1992 and 2008 in the five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland...

  4. VACCINATION IN RHEUMATOLOGY: CURRENT ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Belov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases still remain a serious social and medical problem. The importance of comorbid infections in rheumatology has increased substantially in recent years, particularly due to the clinical introduction of biologicals. The investigation and active use of different vaccines are one of the ways to solve the above problem. This review considers the issues concerning the use of vaccines against influenza, infections caused by pneumococci, herpesviruses, human papillomavirus, and hepatitis B virus in rheumatology patients. It discusses the safety and immunogenicity of vaccination associated with the prevention of airway infections as the most common cause of a poor outcome in rheumatic diseases. The main areas of future investigations in the problem under consideration are defined.

  5. Leishmaniasis: vaccine candidates and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhawana; Sundar, Shyam

    2012-06-06

    Leishmania is a protozoan parasite and a causative agent of the various clinical forms of leishmaniasis. High cost, resistance and toxic side effects of traditional drugs entail identification and development of therapeutic alternatives. The sound understanding of parasite biology is key for identifying novel drug targets, that can induce the cell mediated immunity (mainly CD4+ and CD8+ IFN-gamma mediated responses) polarized towards a Th1 response. These aspects are important in designing a new vaccine along with the consideration of the candidates with respect to their ability to raise memory response in order to improve the vaccine performance. This review is an effort to identify molecules according to their homology with the host and their ability to be used as potent vaccine candidates. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Protein Crystallography in Vaccine Research and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malito, Enrico; Carfi, Andrea; Bottomley, Matthew J

    2015-06-09

    The use of protein X-ray crystallography for structure-based design of small-molecule drugs is well-documented and includes several notable success stories. However, it is less well-known that structural biology has emerged as a major tool for the design of novel vaccine antigens. Here, we review the important contributions that protein crystallography has made so far to vaccine research and development. We discuss several examples of the crystallographic characterization of vaccine antigen structures, alone or in complexes with ligands or receptors. We cover the critical role of high-resolution epitope mapping by reviewing structures of complexes between antigens and their cognate neutralizing, or protective, antibody fragments. Most importantly, we provide recent examples where structural insights obtained via protein crystallography have been used to design novel optimized vaccine antigens. This review aims to illustrate the value of protein crystallography in the emerging discipline of structural vaccinology and its impact on the rational design of vaccines.

  7. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drive Home Types of Blood Donations Blood Types Blood Types Not all blood is alike. There are eight ... African descent. Learn More About Blood and Diversity Blood Types and Transfusion There are very specific ways in ...

  8. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  9. Vaccines and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaccination. Because it is very unlikely that a live vaccine will cause disease, being in the same household with a healthy child who has received a live vaccine is also not likely to increase the ...

  10. Vaccination in Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar

    vaccines have reduced the need for usage of antibiotics with more than 99 % since the 1980s. Fish can be vaccinated by three different administration routes: injection, immersion and oral vaccination. Injection vaccination (intraperitoneal injection of vaccine) is the most time consuming and labor...... intensive method, which however, provides the best protection of the fish. Immersion vaccination is used for immunization of a high number of small fish is cost-efficient and fast (30 sec immersion into vaccine). Oral vaccination (vaccine in feed) is the least efficient. As in higher vertebrates fish...... respond to vaccination by increasing the specific antibody titer and by activating the cellular responses. My talk will cover vaccination methods in fish, immune responses and some adverse effect of oil-adjuvanted vaccines in fish with reference to our work in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss....

  11. Vaccines and Thimerosal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Thimerosal in Vaccines Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Thimerosal is ... harm. Thimerosal prevents the growth of bacteria in vaccines. Thimerosal is added to vials of vaccine that ...

  12. Vaccines Stop Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  13. Childhood Vaccine Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Childhood Vaccine Schedule Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents ... please turn Javascript on. When to Vaccinate What Vaccine Why Birth (or any age if not previously ...

  14. Vaccines Stop Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Diseases and Vaccinations Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table ... if we take away the protection given by vaccination, more and more people will be infected and ...

  15. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Whooping Cough (Pertussis) Vaccination Pronounced (per-TUS-iss) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... and adults receive Tdap. CDC recommends whooping cough vaccination for all babies and children, preteens and teens, ...

  16. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... system activity , and blood vessel structure and function. Biology and High Blood Pressure Researchers continue to study ... and Your Heart U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Maintaining ...

  17. The immunogenicity and safety of a reduced PRP-content DTPw-HBV/Hib vaccine when administered according to the accelerated EPI schedule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collard Alix

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combination vaccines improve coverage, compliance and effectively introduce new antigens to mass vaccination programmes. This was a phase III, observer-blind, randomized study of GSK Biologicals diphtheria-tetanus-whole cell pertussis vaccine combined with hepatitis B and Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines, containing a reduced amount of polyribosyl-ribitol-phosphate (PRP and a DTPw component manufactured at a different site (DTPw-HBV/Hib2.5 [Kft]. The primary aim of this study was to demonstrate that DTPw-HBV/Hib2.5 [Kft] was not inferior to the licensed DTPw-HBV/Hib (Tritanrix(tm-HepB/Hiberix(tm vaccine or the DTPw-HBV/Hib2.5 vaccine, also containing a reduced amount of PRP, with respect to the immune response to the PRP antigen, when administered to healthy infants, according to the Expanded Programme for Immunization (EPI schedule at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age. Methods 299 healthy infants were randomised to receive either DTPw-HBV/Hib2.5 [Kft] DTPw-HBV/Hib2.5 or DTPw-HBV/Hib according to the 6-10-14 week EPI schedule. Blood samples were analysed prior to the first dose of study vaccine and one month after the third vaccine dose for the analysis of immune responses. Solicited local and general symptoms such as pain, redness and swelling at the injection site and drowsiness and fever, unsolicited symptoms (defined as any additional adverse event and serious adverse events (SAEs were recorded up to 20 weeks of age. Results One month after the third vaccine dose, 100% of subjects receiving DTPw-HBV/Hib2.5 [Kft] or DTPw-HBV/Hib and 98.8% of subjects receiving DTPw-HBV/Hib2.5 vaccine had seroprotective levels of anti-PRP antibodies (defined as anti-PRP antibody concentration ≥0.15 μg/ml. Seroprotective antibody concentrations were attained in over 98.9% of subjects for diphtheria, tetanus and hepatitis B. The vaccine response rate to pertussis antigen was at least 97.8% in each group. Overall, the DTPw-HBV/Hib2.5 [Kft

  18. Relationship Between Tetanus Antitoxin Titration Level and Vaccination History

    OpenAIRE

    Işıkgöz Taşbakan, Meltem; Durusoy, Raika; Tosun, Selma

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to determine tetanus antitoxin levels and to evaluate their relationship with history of vaccination among patients applying to the outpatient clinics of a University hospital. Methods: A questionnaire including socio-demographic characteristics and tetanus vaccination status was applied and blood samples taken from 218 subjects between 1 and 30 June 2015. Participants were classified into five groups according to their vaccination timing. Results: The mean age of...

  19. Vaccine refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColloster, Patrick J; Martin-de-Nicolas, Andres

    2014-01-01

    This commentary reviews recent changes in Centers for Disease Control (CDC) vaccine storage guidelines that were developed in response to an investigative report by the Office of the Inspector General. The use of temperature data loggers with probes residing in glycol vials is advised along with storing vaccines in pharmaceutical refrigerators. These refrigerators provide good thermal distribution but can warm to 8 °C in less than one hour after the power is discontinued. Consequently, electric grid instability influences appropriate refrigerator selection and the need for power back-up. System Average Interruption Duration Index (SAIDI) values quantify this instability and can be used to formulate region-specific guidelines. A novel aftermarket refrigerator regulator with a battery back-up power supply and microprocessor control system is also described. PMID:24442209

  20. Towards clinical development of a Pfs48/45-based transmission blocking malaria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, Michael; Jore, Matthijs M; Sauerwein, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Malaria is a devastating vector-borne disease caused by the Plasmodium parasite, resulting in almost 0.5 million casualties per year. The parasite has a complex life-cycle that includes asexual replication in human red blood cells, causing symptomatic malaria, and sexual stages which are essential for the transmission to the mosquito vector. A vaccine targeting the sexual stages of the parasite and thus blocking transmission will be instrumental for the eradication of malaria. One of the leading transmission blocking vaccine candidates is the sexual stage antigen Pfs48/45. Areas covered: PubMed was searched to review the progress and future prospects for clinical development of a Pfs48/45-based subunit vaccine. We will focus on biological function, naturally acquired immunity, functional activity of specific antibodies, sequence diversity, production of recombinant protein and preclinical studies. Expert commentary: Pfs48/45 is one of the lead-candidates for a transmission blocking vaccine and should be further explored in clinical trials.

  1. Engineered human vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, J.S. (Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Div. of Immunology and Neurobiology)

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  2. Effective Vaccination Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    effective” vaccine can stop the virus spread by causing herd immunity and the disease will die out. Vaccines that have this capability are in the vaccine ...Effective Vaccination Policies L. Shawa, W. Spears∗,b, L. Billingsc, P. Maximd aDepartment of Computer Science, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY...this study is to develop tools that determine the optimal distribution of a vaccine supply in the model. Using plausible benchmark vaccine allocation

  3. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2014-01-01

    Measles vaccination: Targeted and non-targeted benefits CDC reports: 2-dose regimen of chickenpox vaccine is a success Positive preliminary results from the CAPiTA study Seasonal flu vaccine associate with reduced stroke risk HPV vaccine shown to halve cervical abnormalities Global prize for mobile mast vaccine storage project Developmental pathway of potent HIV-neutralizing antibodies Burkholderia vaccine: US Dep of Defense collaborates with Bavarian Nordic

  4. Schistosomiasis vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Afzal A.; Siddiqui, Bilal A.; Ganley-Leal, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major neglected tropical disease of public health importance to a billion people. An estimated 200 million people are currently infected; an additional 779 million individuals are at risk to acquire the infection in 74 countries. Despite many years of implementation of mass anti-parasitic drug therapy programs and other control measures, this disease has not been contained and continues to spread to new geographic areas.  The discovery of a protective vaccine still remain...

  5. Assaying the Potency of Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D. Minor

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The potency of vaccines must be determined to ensure that the appropriate dose is given. The manufacture and assessment of influenza vaccines are complicated by the continuously changing nature of the pathogen, which makes efficacy estimates difficult but also confounds attempts to produce a well-validated, consistent potency assay. Single radial diffusion has been used for decades and provides a relatively simple way to measure the amount of biologically active materials present in the vaccine. It requires reagents, which are updated on a regular, frequently yearly, basis and alternative methods continue to be sought.

  6. Immunology Update: New Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, S Paul

    2016-11-01

    A new 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is effective against more cancer-causing HPV types than previous vaccines. HPV vaccine series started with previous vaccines can be completed with the 9-valent vaccine. Two new influenza vaccines are available for adults 65 years and older: a high-dose vaccine and an enhanced adjuvant vaccine. These elicit stronger antibody responses than standard-dose vaccines. Current guidelines specify no preference for the new versus standard-dose vaccines. Two new group B meningococcal vaccines are intended for use during outbreaks and for patients with asplenia, complement deficiencies, frequent occupational meningococcus exposure, or for patients who desire protection from type B meningococcus. These are not substitutes for the quadrivalent vaccine already in use. For pneumococcus, new recommendations state that 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) should be administered to patients 65 years and older, followed at least 1 year later by the polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23). For patients ages 19 to 64 years with immunocompromise and not previously vaccinated against pneumococcus, administration of these two vaccines should be separated by at least 8 weeks. Rotavirus vaccine is standard for infants at age 2 months. Also, there is a new cholera vaccine approved for use in the United States. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  7. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engerix-B® ... as a combination product containing Haemophilus influenzae type b, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis, Hepatitis B, Polio Vaccine)

  8. Taking aim at novel vaccines market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Sita

    2009-10-01

    The World Vaccine Congress Washington 2009 was held in Chantilly, VA USA April 2O -23rd. The Vaccine congress attracted over 400 participants from across the world, including leading vaccine manufacturers, biotechs, governmental agencies, NGOs, research and academic institutes, venture capital and legal firms, contract service and equipment manufacturers. The speakers covered a wide range of topics, including the role of government and regulatory agencies, funding availability, research and development, manufacturing, packaging and post vaccine evaluations. Past vaccine development efforts have historically focused on infectious diseases. With advancements in the field of immunology, molecular biology and vaccinology, the vaccine field has begun moving in new directions. "Taking aim at novel vaccines market" session chaired by Dr. Una Ryan, Chief Executive Officer of Waltham Technologies, was focused on traditional approaches to novel targets (nosocomial infections), novel approaches to traditional targets (flu and rabies), novel approaches to novel targets (Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and smoking) and vaccines for developing markets (TB, malaria, rabies). The importance of collaborations among academic institutions, industries, and philanthropic foundations for developing markets was also emphasized.

  9. Long-term Immunogenicity of Hepatitis B Vaccination in children | El ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Their data are included. Group `A` included 53 males and 47 females, around 6 years old, all children were vaccinated 5 years ago. Group `B` included 27 males and 73 females, around 11 years old. All children vaccinated 10years ago. HBsAb titre was tested in their blood, booster dose of the vaccine was given to children ...

  10. The dog that did not bark: malaria vaccines without antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heppner, D.G.; Schwenk, R.J.; Arnot, D.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Luty, A.J.F.

    2007-01-01

    To date, the only pre-blood stage vaccine to confer protection against malaria in field trials elicits both antigen-specific antibody and T-cell responses. Recent clinical trials of new heterologous prime-boost malaria vaccine regimens using DNA, fowlpox or MVA, have chiefly elicited T-cell

  11. Field Evaluation of Immunogenicity of Five Commercial Vaccines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to evaluate immunogenicity of five commonly used vaccines for prevention of Newcastle disease (ND) in Ibadan, the capital city of Oyo State Nigeria. Two hundred and twenty (220) blood samples were collected from apparently healthy vaccinated chickenin 8 poultry farms in suburbs of the city.

  12. Analysis behaviour of free radicals produced by ionizing radiations in human blood by EPR for biological dosimetry in patients; Analisis del comportamiento de los radicales libre en la radiolisis de la sangre por EPR para dosimetria biologia en pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, O. O.; Almanza, A.; Plazas, M. M. C.

    2006-07-01

    In this work is analyzed the biological dosimetry of the free radicals produced by ionizing radiations in human blood obtained by EPR and the biological behaviour of samples In-Vitro, with Rh: O+, in tubes with EDTA (Acid Etilen Diamino Tetracetic) the samples was extracted of the main investigator, these samples were radiated with gammas of ''60Co of a Theratron 780 between plates of PMMA to a depth of Z{sub m}ax of 0.5 cm and between doses 1 to 25 Gy. In these results the behaviors of signal the free radicals presented a increasing a their intensity depending on applied dose, of equal way are results of the biologic dosimetry displayed in sanguineous populations like. White Globules, Red. Platelets etc, to being compared with Resonance Paramagnetic Electronic (EPR). The results show changes in sanguineous populations in high doses (D>10 Gy) in the case of lymphocytes, granulocitos, macusanita, plaquetas, hemoglobina, haematocrit with change similarly in medium and low doses (D>10Gy) in linfocites, platelets, granulocytes, monocytes and the haematocrit. A sanguineous sample without radiating analyzes by EPR giving the presence of signals with values of g=2.13 2,41 in blood. For the first certain value of g authors have associated it to free radicals like: globin (Fe(IV)=0) or Cu''+ incorporated to the ceruloplasmin molecule. (Author)

  13. Testing for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability (Biologics) HIV Home Test Kits Testing for HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  14. Malaria vaccine clinical trials: what’s on the horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Alberto; Joyner, Chester

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress towards a malaria vaccine, specifically for Plasmodium falciparum, has been made in the past few years with the completion of numerous clinical trials. Each trial has utilized a unique combination of antigens, delivery platforms, and adjuvants, and the data that has been obtained provides critical information that has poises the research community for the development of next generation malaria vaccines. Despite the progress towards a P. falciparum vaccine, P. vivax vaccine research requires more momentum and additional investigations to identify novel vaccine candidates. In this review, recently completed and ongoing malaria vaccine clinical trials as well as vaccine candidates that are in the development pipeline are reviewed. Perspectives for future research using post-genomic mining, nonhuman primate models, and systems biology are also discussed. PMID:26172291

  15. Adversomics: a new paradigm for vaccine safety and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Jennifer A; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Poland, Gregory A

    2015-07-01

    Despite the enormous population benefits of routine vaccination, vaccine adverse events (AEs) and reactions, whether real or perceived, have posed one of the greatest barriers to vaccine acceptance--and thus to infectious disease prevention--worldwide. A truly integrated clinical, translational, and basic science approach is required to understand the mechanisms behind vaccine AEs, predict them, and then apply this knowledge to new vaccine design approaches that decrease, or avoid, these events. The term 'adversomics' was first introduced in 2009 and refers to the study of vaccine adverse reactions using immunogenomics and systems biology approaches. In this review, we present the current state of adversomics research, review known associations and mechanisms of vaccine AEs/reactions, and outline a plan for the further development of this emerging research field.

  16. Adversomics: a new paradigm for vaccine safety and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Jennifer A.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite the enormous population benefits of routine vaccination, vaccine adverse events and reactions, whether real or perceived, have posed one of the greatest barriers to vaccine acceptance—and thus to infectious disease prevention—worldwide. A truly integrated clinical, translational, and basic science approach is required to understand the mechanisms behind vaccine adverse events, predict them, and then apply this knowledge to new vaccine design approaches that decrease, or avoid, these events. The term “adversomics” was first introduced in 2009 and refers to the study of vaccine adverse reactions using immunogenomics and systems biology approaches. In this review, we present the current state of adversomics research, review known associations and mechanisms of vaccine adverse events/reactions, and outline a plan for the further development of this emerging research field. PMID:25937189

  17. [Vaccination in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwetkat, A; Pletz, M W

    2013-10-01

    The aging immune system, so-called immunosenescence, is well documented as the cause of increased infection rates and severe, often complicated course of infections in the elderly with increased morbidity and mortality rates. Furthermore, it can lead to decreased efficacy of vaccination. The administration of more immunogenic vaccines can be beneficial in the elderly. Implementing vaccination recommendations for the elderly by STIKO can reduce burden of infectious diseases by prevention of infection or reduction of severity of infection. The following vaccinations are recommended by STIKO for all persons aged 60 and above: annual influenza vaccination (additionally all nursing home residents independently of age), once only pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination, completion of tetanus and diphtheria (Td) vaccination as well as regular revaccination. All adults should be vaccinated against pertussis with Tdap vaccine once. Meanwhile, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is allowed for administration in adults but is not recommended by STIKO yet. A lifelong course of vaccination may help to attenuate the effect of immunosenescence.

  18. Macromolecular systems for vaccine delivery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mužíková, Gabriela; Laga, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, Suppl. 2 (2016), S203-S216 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : vaccine delivery * cellular and humoral immunity * polymer immunostimulants Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/65%20Suppl%202/65_S203.pdf

  19. Nine μg intradermal influenza vaccine and 15 μg intramuscular influenza vaccine induce similar cellular and humoral immune responses in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nougarede, Nolwenn; Bisceglia, Hélène; Rozières, Aurore; Goujon, Catherine; Boudet, Florence; Laurent, Philippe; Vanbervliet, Beatrice; Rodet, Karen; Hennino, Ana; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Intanza® 9 μg (Sanofi Pasteur), a trivalent split-virion vaccine administered by intradermal (ID) injection, was approved in Europe in 2009 for the prevention of seasonal influenza in adults 18 to 59 years. Here, we examined the immune responses induced in adults by the ID 9 μg vaccine and the standard trivalent intramuscular (IM) vaccine (Vaxigrip® 15 μg, Sanofi Pasteur). This trial was a randomized, controlled, single-center, open-label study in healthy adults 18 to 40 years of age during the 2007/8 influenza season. Subjects received a single vaccination with the ID 9 μg (n=38) or IM 15 μg (n=42) vaccine. Serum, saliva, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected up to 180 days post-vaccination. Geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition titers, seroprotection rates, seroconversion rates, and pre-vaccination-to-post-vaccination ratios of geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition titers did not differ between the two vaccines. Compared with pre-vaccination, the vaccines induced similar increases in vaccine-specific circulating B cells at day 7 but did not induce significant increases in vaccine-specific memory B cells at day 180. Cell-mediated immunity to all three vaccine strains, measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, was high at baseline and not increased by either vaccine. Neither vaccine induced a mucosal immune response. These results show that the humoral and cellular immune responses to the ID 9 μg vaccine are similar to those to the standard IM 15 μg vaccine.

  20. Emergency postexposure vaccination with vesicular stomatitis virus-vectored Ebola vaccine after needlestick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lilin; Davey, Richard; Beck, Allison; Xu, Yongxian; Suffredini, Anthony F; Palmore, Tara; Kabbani, Sarah; Rogers, Susan; Kobinger, Gary; Alimonti, Judie; Link, Charles J; Rubinson, Lewis; Ströher, Ute; Wolcott, Mark; Dorman, William; Uyeki, Timothy M; Feldmann, Heinz; Lane, H Clifford; Mulligan, Mark J

    needlestick. In this patient, postexposure vaccination with VSVΔG-ZEBOV induced a self-limited febrile syndrome that was associated with transient detection of the recombinant vesicular stomatitis vaccine virus in blood. Strong innate and Ebola-specific adaptive immune responses were detected after vaccination. The clinical syndrome and laboratory evidence were consistent with vaccination response, and no evidence of Ebola virus infection was detected.

  1. Dried influenza vaccines : Over the counter vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saluja, Vinay; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.

    2010-01-01

    Since last year influenza pandemic has struck again after 40 years, this is the right moment to discuss the different available formulation options for influenza vaccine. Looking back to the last 4 decades, most vaccines are still formulated as liquid solution. These vaccines have shown a poor

  2. Proceedings of the Food and Drug Administration's public workshop on new red blood cell product regulatory science 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vostal, Jaroslav G; Buehler, Paul W; Gelderman, Monique P; Alayash, Abdu I; Doctor, Alan; Zimring, James C; Glynn, Simone A; Hess, John R; Klein, Harvey; Acker, Jason P; Spinella, Philip C; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Palsson, Bernhard; Raife, Thomas J; Busch, Michael P; McMahon, Timothy J; Intaglietta, Marcos; Swartz, Harold M; Dubick, Michael A; Cardin, Sylvain; Patel, Rakesh P; Natanson, Charles; Weisel, John W; Muszynski, Jennifer A; Norris, Philip J; Ness, Paul M

    2018-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) held a workshop on red blood cell (RBC) product regulatory science on October 6 and 7, 2016, at the Natcher Conference Center on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Campus in Bethesda, Maryland. The workshop was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH; the Department of Defense; the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Department of Health and Human Services; and the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. The workshop reviewed the status and scientific basis of the current regulatory framework and the available scientific tools to expand it to evaluate innovative and future RBC transfusion products. A full record of the proceedings is available on the FDA website (http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/NewsEvents/WorkshopsMeetingsConferences/ucm507890.htm). The contents of the summary are the authors' opinions and do not represent agency policy. © 2017 AABB.

  3. Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood, as discussed in the following paragraphs. Red Blood Cells Red blood cells carry oxygen from ... leaks out, and its levels in your blood rise. For example, blood levels of troponin rise when ...

  4. [The time course of changes in cell immunological parameters during administration of live dry plague vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacheva, N V; Darmov, I V; Borisevich, I V; Kriuchkov, A V; Pechenkin, D V

    2009-08-01

    The study of the time course of changes in cell immunological parameters by a magnetic separation technique in human beings during the administration of plague vaccine in relation to the immunological load revealed the higher blood levels of all T lymphocyte subpopulations on day 14 after vaccination. These changes are most typical of a primary vaccinated cohort. The increased frequency of plague vaccine administration and multiple immunizations with live plague, anthrax, and tularemia vaccines produce the time-course of changes in T lymphocyte populations (subpopulations) in response to the regular administration of plague vaccine. A high immunological load in man also promotes a significant reduction in the level of B lymphocytes.

  5. Cross-stage immunity for malaria vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahrendorf, Wiebke; Scholzen, Anja; Sauerwein, Robert W; Langhorne, Jean

    2015-12-22

    A vaccine against malaria is urgently needed for control and eventual eradication. Different approaches are pursued to induce either sterile immunity directed against pre-erythrocytic parasites or to mimic naturally acquired immunity by controlling blood-stage parasite densities and disease severity. Pre-erythrocytic and blood-stage malaria vaccines are often seen as opposing tactics, but it is likely that they have to be combined into a multi-stage malaria vaccine to be optimally safe and effective. Since many antigenic targets are shared between liver- and blood-stage parasites, malaria vaccines have the potential to elicit cross-stage protection with immune mechanisms against both stages complementing and enhancing each other. Here we discuss evidence from pre-erythrocytic and blood-stage subunit and whole parasite vaccination approaches that show that protection against malaria is not necessarily stage-specific. Parasites arresting at late liver-stages especially, can induce powerful blood-stage immunity, and similarly exposure to blood-stage parasites can afford pre-erythrocytic immunity. The incorporation of a blood-stage component into a multi-stage malaria vaccine would hence not only combat breakthrough infections in the blood should the pre-erythrocytic component fail to induce sterile protection, but would also actively enhance the pre-erythrocytic potency of this vaccine. We therefore advocate that future studies should concentrate on the identification of cross-stage protective malaria antigens, which can empower multi-stage malaria vaccine development. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Vaccination in food allergic patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    allergy: • Vaccines produced in embryonated eggs, such as yellow fever vaccine, influenza vaccine and rabies vaccine. Yellow fever vaccine is most likely to contain significant amounts of egg protein. • Vaccines produced in chick fibroblast cell cultures, such as measles and measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccines, do not.

  7. Influenza virus vaccine live intranasal--MedImmune vaccines: CAIV-T, influenza vaccine live intranasal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    (now Wyeth Vaccines) had begun a phase II bridging study with a refrigerator-stable liquid formulation of FluMist in the Southern Hemisphere. The randomised single-blind trial is being conducted together with Aviron (now MedImmune Vaccines) and is intended to demonstrate clinical equivalence between frozen and liquid FluMist. At the time of the announcement, more than 500 children aged 1-3 years had been enrolled to receive either frozen or liquid FluMist. The final study population is approximately 1300. If clinical equivalence of the two forms of FluMist is demonstrated in this study, MedImmune Vaccines will be able to use data from trials of frozen FluMist in licence applications for international markets. Aviron submitted a Biologics Licence Application (BLA) to the US FDA in July 1998. The FDA rejected this application on the grounds of a lack of data on manufacturing, validation and stability. In June 1999, Aviron announced that it had completed a bridging study on FluMist designed to provide some of the manufacturing data required by the US FDA on FluMist prepared at one of two manufacturing sites. Preliminary analysis indicated that the results had met the company's objectives. The primary endpoint of the study was to demonstrate that the batch of FluMist blended and filled at Packaging Coordinators, Inc. in Philadelphia had similar immunogenicity for all three 1997-98 influenza strains as the vaccine used in earlier clinical trials, which was manufactured by Medeva Pharma (now Evans Vaccines, a subsidiary of PowderJect Pharmaceuticals) in England. The secondary endpoint was to show that these lots of FluMist had similar safety and tolerability profiles. Aviron then submitted a BLA in October 2000. However, in late July 2001, an FDA advisory committee declined to recommend approval of the vaccine, citing concerns with safety. Aviron subsequently received a Complete Response Letter from the FDA requesting additional clinical and manufacturing data. Aviron stated

  8. In vitro characterization of pertussis vaccines : Functional analysis as part of the Consistency Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoonakker, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    The current paradigm in vaccine lot release testing is that each final lot of vaccine produced is unique, due to the considerable inherent variation in the preceding biological production process. Consequently, each individual vaccine lot needs to be tested for safety and potency, frequently

  9. Recombinant viral-vectored vaccines for the control of avian influenza in poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccination is a commonly used tool for the control of both low pathogenic and highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. Traditionally inactivated adjuvanted vaccines made from a low pathogenic field strain has been used for vaccination, but advances in molecular biology has allowed a number of di...

  10. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be tested...

  11. Malaria Vaccine Development: The Need for Novel Approach-es: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima MAHMOUDI

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although rigorous efforts have substantially decreased the malaria burden through decades, it still threatens the lives of millions of children. Development of an effective vaccine can provide important approach in malaria control strategies. Unfortunately, development of an effective vaccine for falciparum malaria has been hindered by the extreme complexity of malaria parasite biology, complex and diverse parasite genomes, and immune evasion by the parasites as well as the intricate nature of the parasites infection cycle. The aim of this review was to discuss the different approaches to malaria vaccine development until now.Methods: Scientific databases, including MEDLINE (via PubMed and SCOPUS were searched up to 30 Jan 2017 and the articles regarding malaria vaccine development were taken into examination.Results: Several strategies for malaria vaccine development including pre-erythrocytic vaccines, antibody-based subunit vaccines, vectored vaccines, whole sporozoite vaccines, genetically Attenuated parasites and sporozoite subunit vaccine, erythrocytic vaccines, sexual stage vaccine, transmission-blocking vaccine as well as synthetic peptides and conjugate vaccine has been introduced. However, the success has been limited thus far.Conclusion: Although development of malaria vaccine over the past 70 year has been continued, the discovery, development, and licensing of a malaria vaccine formulation, which meets safety, affordability, accessibility, applicability, and efficacy has not yet been achieved.

  12. Development of a novel vaccine for contagious caprine ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project will use cutting-edge synthetic biology tools to construct a vaccine for CCPP that will grow efficiently, express protective Mccp antigens, and be used either as a live or inactivated vaccine. This 24-month project is a collaboration between the University of Bern in Switzerland, the Institut national de la recherche ...

  13. Seasonal and biological variation of blood concentrations of total cholesterol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, hemoglobin A(1c), IgA, prolactin, and free testosterone in healthy women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, A H; Hansen, Åse Marie; Skovgaard, L T

    2000-01-01

    Concentrations of physiological response variables fluctuate over time. The present study describes within-day and seasonal fluctuations for total cholesterol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)), IgA, prolactin, and free testosterone in blood, and estimates within...

  14. [Childhood vaccines and autism--much ado about nothing?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solt, Ido; Bornstein, Jacob

    2010-04-01

    The increased diagnoses of autism and developmental disorders in recent decades, together with the childhood vaccination program, has led to the hypothesis that vaccination in general, and the measles, mumps, and rubella virus live vaccine, and vaccines that contain mercury, in particular, cause autism. It has been hypothesized that intestinal infection caused by live virus vaccines change the permeability of the intestinal wall, and subsequently, the passage of peptides through the intestinal wall to the blood, and from there to the brain. It has been suggested that the accumulation of these peptides in the central nervous system causes autism. Studies that investigated this theory did not find an association between vaccine administration and between digestive system symptoms and autism. According to a second hypothesis, an organomercury compound (Thimerosal), used as a preservative in vaccines that do not include live viruses, is a cause of autism. Like the former, this hypothesis has been well researched, and refuted. Some studies have in fact found an increase in autism diagnosis among children who were vaccinated after Thimerosal was removed from the vaccine preparation. Recent studies have refuted the theory that the consecutive administration of vaccines weakens the young immune system in children, and leads to an autoimmune process that causes autism. The etiology of autism is still unknown, with research continuing from different directions. The extensive research conducted so far indicates that childhood vaccination is not a cause of the sharp increase in autism diagnoses in recent decades.

  15. Funções biológicas dos antígenos eritrocitários Biological functions of blood group antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia L. Bonifácio

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Os antígenos de grupos sanguíneos eritrocitários são estruturas macromoleculares localizadas na superfície extracelular da membrana eritrocitária. Com o desenvolvimento de estudos moleculares, mais de 250 antígenos são conhecidos e estão organizados em 29 sistemas de grupos sanguíneos reconhecidos pela Sociedade Internacional de Transfusão Sanguínea (ISBT. Estudos têm revelado que os antígenos de grupo sanguíneo estão expressos na membrana eritrocitária com ampla diversidade estrutural, incluindo epítopos de carboidratos em glicoproteínas e/ou glicolipídios e em proteínas inseridas na membrana via um domínio, via domínios de multipassagem ou ligados a glicosilfosfatidinositol. Além das diversidades estruturais, muitas funções importantes têm sido associadas aos antígenos eritrocitários recentemente identificadas, podendo ser esquematicamente divididas em: estruturais, transportadores, receptores e moléculas de adesão, enzimas, proteínas controladoras do complemento e outras. Esta revisão tem como foco as funções potenciais das moléculas que expressam os antígenos eritrocitários.Erythrocyte blood group antigens are macromolecules structures located on the extracellular surface of the red blood cell membrane. The development of molecular studies allowed the recognition of more than 250 antigens by the International Society for Blood Transfusion (ISBT. These studies have also shown that blood group antigens are carried on red blood cell membrane of wide structural diversity, including carbohydrate epitopes on glycoproteins and/or glycolipids and on proteins inserted within the membrane via single or multi-pass transmembrane domains, or via glycosylphosphatidylinositol linkages. In addition, to their structural diversity, many important functions associated with blood group antigens have been recently identified and can be didactically divided into: structural proteins, transporters, receptors and adhesion

  16. VACCINATION SAFETY: MODERN DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.К. Tatochenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination aided disease control over infection pathology among the children led to elimination of smallpox and poliomyelitis, drastic decrease of the tuberculous meningitis recurrences, tetanus, measles and other infection diseases and their complications. At the same time, Russia is still afraid to apply certain vaccines. The reasons for that are mainly subjective. This is the unjustified caution related to the fear that it may cause severe vaccine associated complications. The data in view of the lecture indicates the safety of the vaccinal prevention procedures and measures for the prevention of their complications.Key words: vaccinal prevention, vaccination complications, vaccination safety, children.

  17. Mexico introduces pentavalent vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Combination vaccines have been introduced in Mexico. The national immunization program has incorporated the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccines in 1998, and the pentavalent vaccine in 1999. The two categories of antigen composition in combination vaccines are: 1) multiple different antigenic types of a single pathogen, such as the 23 valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, and 2) antigens from different pathogens causing different diseases, such as the DPT and MMR vaccines. Pentavalent vaccines are included in the second category. The vaccine protects against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, and other diseases produced by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). Combined diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, and Haemophilus influenza type b (DTP-HB/Hib) vaccine has been distributed to 87% of Mexican children under 1 year of age. Over 800,000 doses of pentavalent vaccine have been administered.

  18. Comparison of anamnestic responses to rabies vaccination in dogs and cats with current and out-of-date vaccination status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael C; Davis, Rolan D; Kang, Qing; Vahl, Christopher I; Wallace, Ryan M; Hanlon, Cathleen A; Mosier, Derek A

    2015-01-15

    To compare anamnestic antibody responses of dogs and cats with current versus out-of-date vaccination status. Cross-sectional study. 74 dogs and 33 cats. Serum samples were obtained from dogs and cats that had been exposed to rabies and brought to a veterinarian for proactive serologic monitoring or that had been brought to a veterinarian for booster rabies vaccination. Blood samples were collected on the day of initial evaluation (day 0) and then again 5 to 15 days later. On day 0, a rabies vaccine was administered according to label recommendations. Paired serum samples were analyzed for antirabies antibodies by means of a rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test. All animals had an antirabies antibody titer ≥ 0.5 IU/mL 5 to 15 days after booster vaccination. Dogs with an out-of-date vaccination status had a higher median increase in titer, higher median fold increase in titer, and higher median titer following booster vaccination, compared with dogs with current vaccination status. Most (26/33) cats, regardless of rabies vaccination status, had a titer ≥ 12 IU/mL 5 to 15 days after booster vaccination. Results indicated that dogs with out-of-date vaccination status were not inferior in their antibody response following booster rabies vaccination, compared with dogs with current vaccination status. Findings supported immediate booster vaccination followed by observation for 45 days of dogs and cats with an out-of-date vaccination status that are exposed to rabies, as is the current practice for dogs and cats with current vaccination status.

  19. Vaccines today, vaccines tomorrow: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucq, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines are considered as one of the major contributions of the 20th century and one of the most cost effective public health interventions. The International Vaccine Institute has as a mission to discover, develop and deliver new and improved vaccines against infectious diseases that affects developing nations. If Louis Pasteur is known across the globe, vaccinologists like Maurice Hilleman, Jonas Salk and Charles Mérieux are known among experts only despite their contribution to global health. Thanks to a vaccine, smallpox has been eradicated, polio has nearly disappeared, Haemophilus influenzae B, measles and more recently meningitis A are controlled in many countries. While a malaria vaccine is undergoing phase 3, International Vaccine Institute, in collaboration with an Indian manufacturer has brought an oral inactivated cholera vaccine to pre-qualification. The field of vaccinology has undergone major changes thanks to philanthropists such as Bill and Melinda Gates, initiatives like the Decade of Vaccines and public private partnerships. Current researches on vaccines have more challenging targets like the dengue viruses, malaria, human immunodeficiency virus, the respiratory syncytial virus and nosocomial diseases. Exciting research is taking place on new adjuvants, nanoparticles, virus like particles and new route of administration. An overcrowded infant immunization program, anti-vaccine groups, immunizing a growing number of elderlies and delivering vaccines to difficult places are among challenges faced by vaccinologists and global health experts.

  20. Systemic and local immune response in pigs intradermally and intramuscularly injected with inactivated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, P; Saleri, R; Cavalli, V; De Angelis, E; Ferrari, L; Benetti, M; Ferrarini, G; Merialdi, G; Borghetti, P

    2014-01-31

    The systemic and respiratory local immune response induced by the intradermal administration of a commercial inactivated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae whole-cell vaccine (Porcilis(®) MHYO ID ONCE - MSD AH) in comparison with two commercial vaccines administered via the intramuscular route and a negative control (adjuvant only) was investigated. Forty conventional M. hyopneumoniae-free pigs were randomly assigned to four groups (ten animals each): Group A=intradermal administration of the test vaccine by using the needle-less IDAL(®) vaccinator at a dose of 0.2 ml; Group B=intramuscular administration of a commercially available vaccine (vaccine B); Group C=intramuscular administration of the adjuvant only (2 ml of X-solve adjuvant); Group D=intramuscular administration of a commercially available vaccine (vaccine D). Pigs were vaccinated at 28 days of age. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples were collected at vaccination (blood only), 4 and 8 weeks post-vaccination. Serum and BAL fluid were tested for the presence of antibodies by ELISA test. Peripheral blood monomorphonuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated to quantify the number of IFN-γ secreting cells by ELISpot. Moreover, cytokine gene expression from the BAL fluid was performed. Total antibodies against M. hyopneumoniae and specific IgG were detected in serum of intradermally and intramuscularly (vaccine B only) vaccinated pigs at 4 and 8 weeks post-vaccination. M. hyopneumoniae specific IgA were detected in BAL fluid from vaccinated animals (Groups A and B) but not from controls and animals vaccinated with the bacterin D (padministration of an adjuvanted bacterin induces both systemic and mucosal immune responses. Moreover, the intramuscularly administered commercial vaccines each had a different ability to stimulate the immune response both systemically and locally. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Extended Safety, Immunogenicity and Efficacy of a Blood-Stage Malaria Vaccine in Malian Children: 24-Month Follow-Up of a Randomized, Double-Blinded Phase 2 Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurens, Matthew B.; Thera, Mahamadou A.; Coulibaly, Drissa; Ouattara, Amed; Kone, Abdoulaye K.; Guindo, Ando B.; Traore, Karim; Traore, Idrissa; Kouriba, Bourema; Diallo, Dapa A.; Diarra, Issa; Daou, Modibo; Dolo, Amagana; Tolo, Youssouf; Sissoko, Mahamadou S.; Niangaly, Amadou; Sissoko, Mady; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Lyke, Kirsten E.; Wu, Yukun; Blackwelder, William C.; Godeaux, Olivier; Vekemans, Johan; Dubois, Marie-Claude; Ballou, W. Ripley; Cohen, Joe; Dube, Tina; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter L.; House, Brent; Bennett, Jason W.; Lanar, David E.; Dutta, Sheetij; Heppner, D. Gray; Plowe, Christopher V.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.

    2013-01-01

    Background The FMP2.1/AS02A candidate malaria vaccine was tested in a Phase 2 study in Mali. Based on results from the first eight months of follow-up, the vaccine appeared well-tolerated and immunogenic. It had no significant efficacy based on the primary endpoint, clinical malaria, but marginal efficacy against clinical malaria in secondary analyses, and high allele-specific efficacy. Extended follow-up was conducted to evaluate extended safety, immunogenicity and efficacy. Methods A randomized, double-blinded trial of safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of the candidate Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) vaccine FMP2.1/AS02A was conducted in Bandiagara, Mali. Children aged 1–6 years were randomized in a 1∶1 ratio to receive FMP2.1/AS02A or control rabies vaccine on days 0, 30 and 60. Using active and passive surveillance, clinical malaria and adverse events as well as antibodies against P. falciparum AMA1 were monitored for 24 months after the first vaccination, spanning two malaria seasons. Findings 400 children were enrolled. Serious adverse events occurred in nine participants in the FMP2.1/AS02A group and three in the control group; none was considered related to study vaccination. After two years, anti-AMA1 immune responses remained significantly higher in the FMP2.1/AS02A group than in the control group. For the entire 24-month follow-up period, vaccine efficacy was 7.6% (p = 0.51) against first clinical malaria episodes and 9.9% (p = 0.19) against all malaria episodes. For the final 16-month follow-up period, vaccine efficacy was 0.9% (p = 0.98) against all malaria episodes. Allele-specific efficacy seen in the first malaria season did not extend into the second season of follow-up. Interpretation Allele-specific vaccine efficacy was not sustained in the second malaria season, despite continued high levels of anti-AMA1 antibodies. This study presents an opportunity to evaluate correlates of partial protection against

  2. Extended safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of a blood-stage malaria vaccine in malian children: 24-month follow-up of a randomized, double-blinded phase 2 trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Laurens

    Full Text Available The FMP2.1/AS02A candidate malaria vaccine was tested in a Phase 2 study in Mali. Based on results from the first eight months of follow-up, the vaccine appeared well-tolerated and immunogenic. It had no significant efficacy based on the primary endpoint, clinical malaria, but marginal efficacy against clinical malaria in secondary analyses, and high allele-specific efficacy. Extended follow-up was conducted to evaluate extended safety, immunogenicity and efficacy.A randomized, double-blinded trial of safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of the candidate Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1 vaccine FMP2.1/AS02A was conducted in Bandiagara, Mali. Children aged 1-6 years were randomized in a 1∶1 ratio to receive FMP2.1/AS02A or control rabies vaccine on days 0, 30 and 60. Using active and passive surveillance, clinical malaria and adverse events as well as antibodies against P. falciparum AMA1 were monitored for 24 months after the first vaccination, spanning two malaria seasons.400 children were enrolled. Serious adverse events occurred in nine participants in the FMP2.1/AS02A group and three in the control group; none was considered related to study vaccination. After two years, anti-AMA1 immune responses remained significantly higher in the FMP2.1/AS02A group than in the control group. For the entire 24-month follow-up period, vaccine efficacy was 7.6% (p = 0.51 against first clinical malaria episodes and 9.9% (p = 0.19 against all malaria episodes. For the final 16-month follow-up period, vaccine efficacy was 0.9% (p = 0.98 against all malaria episodes. Allele-specific efficacy seen in the first malaria season did not extend into the second season of follow-up.Allele-specific vaccine efficacy was not sustained in the second malaria season, despite continued high levels of anti-AMA1 antibodies. This study presents an opportunity to evaluate correlates of partial protection against clinical malaria that waned during

  3. Dengue 4 Vaccine Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    and monkeys. b) Preparation of a production seed from uncloned Dengue 4 (H241) PDK-35 vaccine isolated from viremic serum of a volunteer vaccinee , and... synthetic peptide vaccines , work on development of live attenuated virus vaccines continues. Experimental attenuated live virus vaccines -I- for protection...CopU~1C FftE 0~AD( ) DENGUE 4 VACCINE DEVELOPMENT Lf 0, to ANNUAL AND FINAL REPORT0 by 0Nyven J. Marchette, Ph.D. September 1, 1987 (For the period 1

  4. Oral vaccination of fish

    OpenAIRE

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen breakdown in the harsh gastric environment, but also to the high tolerogenic gut environment and to inadequate vaccine design. In this review we discuss current approaches used to develop oral vaccines fo...

  5. Notes from the field: rotavirus vaccine administration errors--United States, 2006-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, Beth F; Miller, Elaine R; Shimabukuro, Tom

    2014-01-31

    Two live rotavirus oral vaccines, RotaTeq (RV5) (Merck & Co., Inc.) and Rotarix (RV1) (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals), are approved for prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis and recommended at ages 2, 4 (RV5/RV1), and 6 (RV5) months by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Because most childhood vaccines are injectable, vaccination providers might have less experience administering oral vaccines. To assess that hypothesis, CDC searched for reports to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) of rotavirus vaccine administration errors involving injection and eye splashes in the United States during the period January 1, 2006-August 1, 2013. A total of 66 reports were found.

  6. Recombinant vaccines and the development of new vaccine strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, I.P.; Leite, L.C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines were initially developed on an empirical basis, relying mostly on attenuation or inactivation of pathogens. Advances in immunology, molecular biology, biochemistry, genomics, and proteomics have added new perspectives to the vaccinology field. The use of recombinant proteins allows the targeting of immune responses focused against few protective antigens. There are a variety of expression systems with different advantages, allowing the production of large quantities of proteins depending on the required characteristics. Live recombinant bacteria or viral vectors effectively stimulate the immune system as in natural infections and have intrinsic adjuvant properties. DNA vaccines, which consist of non-replicating plasmids, can induce strong long-term cellular immune responses. Prime-boost strategies combine different antigen delivery systems to broaden the immune response. In general, all of these strategies have shown advantages and disadvantages, and their use will depend on the knowledge of the mechanisms of infection of the target pathogen and of the immune response required for protection. In this review, we discuss some of the major breakthroughs that have been achieved using recombinant vaccine technologies, as well as new approaches and strategies for vaccine development, including potential shortcomings and risks

  7. Recombinant vaccines and the development of new vaccine strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.P. Nascimento

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines were initially developed on an empirical basis, relying mostly on attenuation or inactivation of pathogens. Advances in immunology, molecular biology, biochemistry, genomics, and proteomics have added new perspectives to the vaccinology field. The use of recombinant proteins allows the targeting of immune responses focused against few protective antigens. There are a variety of expression systems with different advantages, allowing the production of large quantities of proteins depending on the required characteristics. Live recombinant bacteria or viral vectors effectively stimulate the immune system as in natural infections and have intrinsic adjuvant properties. DNA vaccines, which consist of non-replicating plasmids, can induce strong long-term cellular immune responses. Prime-boost strategies combine different antigen delivery systems to broaden the immune response. In general, all of these strategies have shown advantages and disadvantages, and their use will depend on the knowledge of the mechanisms of infection of the target pathogen and of the immune response required for protection. In this review, we discuss some of the major breakthroughs that have been achieved using recombinant vaccine technologies, as well as new approaches and strategies for vaccine development, including potential shortcomings and risks.

  8. Recombinant vaccines and the development of new vaccine strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, I.P.; Leite, L.C.C. [Centro de Biotecnologia, Instituto Butantan, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-07

    Vaccines were initially developed on an empirical basis, relying mostly on attenuation or inactivation of pathogens. Advances in immunology, molecular biology, biochemistry, genomics, and proteomics have added new perspectives to the vaccinology field. The use of recombinant proteins allows the targeting of immune responses focused against few protective antigens. There are a variety of expression systems with different advantages, allowing the production of large quantities of proteins depending on the required characteristics. Live recombinant bacteria or viral vectors effectively stimulate the immune system as in natural infections and have intrinsic adjuvant properties. DNA vaccines, which consist of non-replicating plasmids, can induce strong long-term cellular immune responses. Prime-boost strategies combine different antigen delivery systems to broaden the immune response. In general, all of these strategies have shown advantages and disadvantages, and their use will depend on the knowledge of the mechanisms of infection of the target pathogen and of the immune response required for protection. In this review, we discuss some of the major breakthroughs that have been achieved using recombinant vaccine technologies, as well as new approaches and strategies for vaccine development, including potential shortcomings and risks.

  9. Irradiated vaccines against bovine babesiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weilgama, D.J.; Weerasinghe, H.M.C.; Perera, P.S.G.; Perera, J.M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on non-splenectomized Bos taurus calves to determine the immunogenicity of blood vaccines containing either Babesia bigemina or Babesia bovis parasites irradiated in a 60 Co source. Groups of calves between 6 and 10 months of age, found to be free of previous babesial infections by serodiagnosis, were inoculated with B. bigemina ('G' isolate) irradiated at rates ranging from 350 to 500 Gy. These vaccines caused low to moderate reactions on primary inoculation which subsided without treatment. Parasites irradiated at 350 Gy produced a strong immunity against virulent homologous challenge. Vaccinated calves also withstood virulent heterologous B. bigemina ('H' isolate) and B. bovis ('A' isolate) challenges made 85 and 129 days later. It also became evident that the use of babesicides to control reactions should be avoided since early treatment of 'reactor' animals caused breakdown of immunity among vaccinates. B. bovis ('A' isolate) parasites irradiated at dose rates of either 300 Gy or 350 Gy caused mild to moderate reactions in immunized calves, with the reactions in the 300 Gy group being slightly more severe. On challenge with homologous parasites, animals that had previously been inoculated with organisms irradiated at 300 Gy showed better protection than those that had received parasites irradiated at 350 Gy. (author). 28 refs, 5 tabs

  10. IMMUNE RESPONSES OF GOATS (SHAMI BREED TO VACCINATION WITH A FULL, REDUCED AND CONJUNCTIVAL DOSE OF BRUCEVAC (BRUCELLA MELITENSIS REV.1 VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. ALDOMY, M. ALKHAWALDEH1 AND I. B. YOUNIS

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Three groups of Shami goats were randomly vaccinated with Brucevac (Rev. 1 vaccine. Group 1 was vaccinated subcutaneously with a full dose (1.54 x 109 organisms. Group 2 was vaccinated conjunctively with one eye drop (5.2 x 108 organisms, while Group 3 was injected subcutaneously with a reduced dose (7.1 x 105 organisms of vaccine. Blood samples were collected before vaccination, two, four, eight, 15 and 24 weeks post vaccination. All samples were tested through CFT, ELISA, SAT and Rose Bengal plate test. All serological tests used detected a higher percentage of vaccinated female kids with a full dose than they did in other groups vaccinated with a reduced dose or with a conjunctival dose of Rev.1 vaccine. The overall results suggested that 100% of animals vaccinated with a conjunctival dose became positive to CFT at two, four, eight and 15 weeks post vaccination, and then the percentage of seropositive animals declined and became 20% at 24 weeks post inoculation. The conjunctival route of vaccination significantly reduced the intensity and duration of the post vaccination serological response, which makes the use of this vaccine compatible with brucellosis programmes, even when these are based on a test-and–slaughter policy. The overall results showed that Shami goats responded to Rev.1 vaccine in the expected way. The majority of animals were seropositive to the CFT by two weeks after vaccination with higher numbers of seropositive animals in the kids group vaccinated with a full dose of Rev.1 vaccine.

  11. New generation of dendritic cell vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Kristen J; Caminschi, Irina

    2013-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal role in the induction and regulation of immune responses, including the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses. These are essential for the eradication of cancers and pathogens including HIV and malaria, for which there are currently no effective vaccines. New developments in our understanding of DC biology have identified the key DC subset responsible for CTL induction, which is now an attractive candidate to target for vaccination. These DC are characterized by expression of novel markers Clec9A and XCR1, and a specialized capacity to cross-present antigen (Ag) from tumors and pathogens that do not directly infect DC. New generation DC vaccines that specifically target the cross-presenting DC in vivo have already demonstrated potential in preclinical animal models but the challenge remains to translate these findings into clinically efficacous vaccines in man. This has been greatly facilitated by the recent identification of the equivalent Clec9A(+) XCR1(+) cross-presenting DC in human lymphoid tissues and peripheral tissues that are key sites for vaccination administration. These findings combined with further studies on DC subset biology have important implications for the design of new CTL-mediated vaccines.

  12. Association of IDDM and attenuated response of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase to yellow fever vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnevie-Nielsen, V; Larsen, M L; Frifelt, J J

    1989-01-01

    Basal and yellow fever vaccination-induced 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (2',5'A) activity was determined in blood mononuclear cells (peripheral blood lymphocytes [PBLs]) from insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and matched control subjects. The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine...

  13. Vaccines against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Adrian V S

    2011-10-12

    There is no licenced vaccine against any human parasitic disease and Plasmodium falciparum malaria, a major cause of infectious mortality, presents a great challenge to vaccine developers. This has led to the assessment of a wide variety of approaches to malaria vaccine design and development, assisted by the availability of a safe challenge model for small-scale efficacy testing of vaccine candidates. Malaria vaccine development has been at the forefront of assessing many new vaccine technologies including novel adjuvants, vectored prime-boost regimes and the concept of community vaccination to block malaria transmission. Most current vaccine candidates target a single stage of the parasite's life cycle and vaccines against the early pre-erythrocytic stages have shown most success. A protein in adjuvant vaccine, working through antibodies against sporozoites, and viral vector vaccines targeting the intracellular liver-stage parasite with cellular immunity show partial efficacy in humans, and the anti-sporozoite vaccine is currently in phase III trials. However, a more effective malaria vaccine suitable for widespread cost-effective deployment is likely to require a multi-component vaccine targeting more than one life cycle stage. The most attractive near-term approach to develop such a product is to combine existing partially effective pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidates.

  14. Monitoring of Antibodies Titre Against Canine Distemper Virus in Ferrets Vaccinated with a Live Modified Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pavlačík

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A group of five ferrets vaccinated against the canine distemper virus (CDV was evaluated as to the onset of anti-CDV antibody production and the serum levels of the animals were monitored for one year. The ferrets were immunized with a live attenuated vaccine. The vaccination pattern was as follows: primary vaccination at the age of 6 weeks, fi rst revaccination at 30 days after primary vaccination, and second revaccination after another 30 days. Blood samples were taken prior to primary vaccination and then at 30-day intervals (sampling 1 to 12. The whole experimental cycle covered the period of one year from primary vaccination (till the age of 1 year and 6 weeks. Serum samples were analysed for anti-CDV virus-neutralisation antibodies using a virus-neutralisation test using the Onderstepoort CDV strain. All ferrets had zero virus-neutralisation antibody titres before primary vaccination. Two ferrets produced virus-neutralisation antibodies as a response to first revaccination. A stable antibody level (titre 256 was maintained between months 4 and 11 after primary vaccination and a sudden increase in antibody titre (titres 512 and 1024 - 2048 occurred in both animals in months 11 and 12. The reason for the abrupt rise in antibody titres in the two animals remains unclear. No anti-CDV seroconversion was observed in the three remaining animals. Regarding the results obtained in this study we do not consider commonly recommended vaccination with a live attenuated anti-CDV vaccine as an effective method of antibodies induction against distemper in young ferrets.

  15. Seasonal and biological variation of blood concentrations of total cholesterol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, hemoglobin A(1c), IgA, prolactin, and free testosterone in healthy women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, A H; Hansen, Åse Marie; Skovgaard, L T

    2000-01-01

    Concentrations of physiological response variables fluctuate over time. The present study describes within-day and seasonal fluctuations for total cholesterol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)), IgA, prolactin, and free testosterone in blood, and estimates within......- (CV(i)) and between-subject (CV(g)) CVs for healthy women. In addition, the index of individuality, prediction intervals, and power calculations were derived....

  16. Ontology-based Brucella vaccine literature indexing and systematic analysis of gene-vaccine association network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Junguk; Xiang, Zuoshuang; Feldman, Eva L; He, Yongqun

    2011-08-26

    Vaccine literature indexing is poorly performed in PubMed due to limited hierarchy of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) annotation in the vaccine field. Vaccine Ontology (VO) is a community-based biomedical ontology that represents various vaccines and their relations. SciMiner is an in-house literature mining system that supports literature indexing and gene name tagging. We hypothesize that application of VO in SciMiner will aid vaccine literature indexing and mining of vaccine-gene interaction networks. As a test case, we have examined vaccines for Brucella, the causative agent of brucellosis in humans and animals. The VO-based SciMiner (VO-SciMiner) was developed to incorporate a total of 67 Brucella vaccine terms. A set of rules for term expansion of VO terms were learned from training data, consisting of 90 biomedical articles related to Brucella vaccine terms. VO-SciMiner demonstrated high recall (91%) and precision (99%) from testing a separate set of 100 manually selected biomedical articles. VO-SciMiner indexing exhibited superior performance in retrieving Brucella vaccine-related papers over that obtained with MeSH-based PubMed literature search. For example, a VO-SciMiner search of "live attenuated Brucella vaccine" returned 922 hits as of April 20, 2011, while a PubMed search of the same query resulted in only 74 hits. Using the abstracts of 14,947 Brucella-related papers, VO-SciMiner identified 140 Brucella genes associated with Brucella vaccines. These genes included known protective antigens, virulence factors, and genes closely related to Brucella vaccines. These VO-interacting Brucella genes were significantly over-represented in biological functional categories, including metabolite transport and metabolism, replication and repair, cell wall biogenesis, intracellular trafficking and secretion, posttranslational modification, and chaperones. Furthermore, a comprehensive interaction network of Brucella vaccines and genes were identified. The asserted

  17. Ontology-based Brucella vaccine literature indexing and systematic analysis of gene-vaccine association network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Vaccine literature indexing is poorly performed in PubMed due to limited hierarchy of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) annotation in the vaccine field. Vaccine Ontology (VO) is a community-based biomedical ontology that represents various vaccines and their relations. SciMiner is an in-house literature mining system that supports literature indexing and gene name tagging. We hypothesize that application of VO in SciMiner will aid vaccine literature indexing and mining of vaccine-gene interaction networks. As a test case, we have examined vaccines for Brucella, the causative agent of brucellosis in humans and animals. Results The VO-based SciMiner (VO-SciMiner) was developed to incorporate a total of 67 Brucella vaccine terms. A set of rules for term expansion of VO terms were learned from training data, consisting of 90 biomedical articles related to Brucella vaccine terms. VO-SciMiner demonstrated high recall (91%) and precision (99%) from testing a separate set of 100 manually selected biomedical articles. VO-SciMiner indexing exhibited superior performance in retrieving Brucella vaccine-related papers over that obtained with MeSH-based PubMed literature search. For example, a VO-SciMiner search of "live attenuated Brucella vaccine" returned 922 hits as of April 20, 2011, while a PubMed search of the same query resulted in only 74 hits. Using the abstracts of 14,947 Brucella-related papers, VO-SciMiner identified 140 Brucella genes associated with Brucella vaccines. These genes included known protective antigens, virulence factors, and genes closely related to Brucella vaccines. These VO-interacting Brucella genes were significantly over-represented in biological functional categories, including metabolite transport and metabolism, replication and repair, cell wall biogenesis, intracellular trafficking and secretion, posttranslational modification, and chaperones. Furthermore, a comprehensive interaction network of Brucella vaccines and genes were

  18. Clinical, serological and echocardiographic examination of healthy field dogs before and after vaccination with a commercial tetravalent leptospirosis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiri, Andrea M; Rodriguez-Campos, Sabrina; Matos, José M; Glaus, Tony M; Riond, Barbara; Reusch, Claudia E; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Willi, Barbara

    2017-05-25

    Leptospirosis is a re-emerging bacterial zoonosis caused by spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Severe disease has been reported in dogs in Europe despite vaccination with bivalent Leptospira vaccines. Recently, a tetravalent canine Leptospira vaccine (Nobivac® L4) was licenced in Europe. The goal of this study was to investigate clinical signs, microscopic agglutination test (MAT) titres, haematology, blood biochemistry, cardiac (c) Troponin I levels and echocardiography before and after vaccination with this tetravalent vaccine. Forty-eight healthy dogs were prospectively enrolled and vaccinated twice, 3-4 weeks apart (T0 and T1). Before vaccination (T0) and 16-31 days after the second vaccination (T2), MAT (n = 48), haematology (n = 48), blood biochemistry (n = 36) and cTroponin I measurements (n = 29) were performed, and MAT was repeated 347-413 days after the second vaccination (T3, n = 44). Echocardiography was performed before the first and second vaccination (T0 and T1, n = 24). Mild and transient clinical signs within 5 days following the first and second vaccination occurred in 23% and 10% of the dogs, respectively. Before the first vaccination (T0), all dogs showed negative MAT titres for the tested serovars except for Canicola (50% with titres 100-400). At T2, positive MAT titres to the serovars Canicola (100%), Australis (89%), Grippotyphosa (86%), Bratislava (60%), Autumnalis (58%), Copenhageni (42%), Pomona (12%), Pyrogenes (8%) and Icterohaemorrhagiae (2%) were found. Median to high titres (≥ 400) were most common to the serovar Canicola (92%) and less common to the serovars Australis (41%), Grippotyphosa (21%), Bratislava (12%), Autumnalis (4%), Pyrogenes (4%) and Pomona (2%). At T3, positive MAT titres (titre range: 100-400) were found in 2-18% of the dogs to serovars of the vaccine serogroups and in 2-18% of the dogs to the non-vaccine serovars Pomona, Autumnalis, Pyrogenes and Ballum. Haematology, blood biochemistry, c

  19. Vaccinomics, the new road to tick vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, José; Merino, Octavio

    2013-12-05

    Ticks are a threat to human and animal health worldwide. Ticks are considered to be second worldwide to mosquitoes as vectors of human diseases, the most important vectors of diseases that affect cattle industry worldwide and important vectors of diseases affecting pets. Tick vaccines are a cost-effective and environmentally friendly alternative to protect against tick-borne diseases through the control of vector infestations and reducing pathogen infection and transmission. These premises stress the need for developing improved tick vaccines in a more efficient way. In this context, development of improved vaccines for tick-borne diseases will be greatly enhanced by vaccinomics approaches starting from the study of tick–host–pathogen molecular interactions and ending in the characterization and validation of vaccine formulations. The discovery of new candidate vaccine antigens for the control of tick infestations and pathogen infection and transmission requires the development of effective screening platforms and algorithms that allow the analysis and validation of data produced by systems biology approaches to tick research. Tick vaccines that affect both tick infestations and pathogen transmission could be used to vaccinate human and animal populations at risk and reservoir species to reduce host exposure to ticks while reducing the number of infected ticks and their vectorial capacity for pathogens that affect human and animal health worldwide.

  20. ANTICANCER DNA VACCINATION: PRINCIPLE AND PERSPECTIVES OF THE METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Stegantseva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional strategies for cancer treatment are close to their efficiency limits. Meanwhile, rapid development of experimental immunology and immunotherapy led to first successful experiences in antitumor vaccination. Over last decade, remarkable results were obtained by means of anticancer vaccination being implemented into clinical settings thus causing popularity and growth of interest to tumor-specific DNA vaccines. In this review, we discuss basic principles of a DNA vaccine construction, their structural characteristics and diversity, mechanisms of their biological action, pharmaceutical forms and delivery routes into the body. 

  1. Rotavirus infection and the current status of rotavirus vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Chien Chen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Among children, rotaviruses are the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis worldwide and of diarrheal deaths in developing countries. Current vaccines (e.g., Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals; RotaTeq, Merck and Company effectively reduce rotaviral gastroenteritis, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations. The tremendous burden of rotavirus-related diarrhea in children across the world continues to drive the remarkable pace of vaccine development. This review assesses the global epidemiological and economic burden of rotavirus diseases, summarizes the relevant principles of the development of rotavirus vaccines, and presents data on the efficacy and effectiveness of currently licensed vaccines in both developed and developing countries.

  2. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  3. An expanding toolkit for preclinical pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine development: bridging traditional mouse malaria models and human trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Ryan Wj; Kappe, Stefan Hi; Sack, Brandon K

    2016-12-01

    Malaria remains a significant public health burden with 214 million new infections and over 400,000 deaths in 2015. Elucidating relevant Plasmodium parasite biology can lead to the identification of novel ways to control and ultimately eliminate the parasite within geographic areas. Particularly, the development of an effective vaccine that targets the clinically silent pre-erythrocytic stages of infection would significantly augment existing malaria elimination tools by preventing both the onset of blood-stage infection/disease as well as spread of the parasite through mosquito transmission. In this Perspective, we discuss the role of small animal models in pre-erythrocytic stage vaccine development, highlighting how human liver-chimeric and human immune system mice are emerging as valuable components of these efforts.

  4. Persistence of the immune response induced by BCG vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blitz Rose

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although BCG vaccination is recommended in most countries of the world, little is known of the persistence of BCG-induced immune responses. As novel TB vaccines may be given to boost the immunity induced by neonatal BCG vaccination, evidence concerning the persistence of the BCG vaccine-induced response would help inform decisions about when such boosting would be most effective. Methods A randomised control study of UK adolescents was carried out to investigate persistence of BCG immune responses. Adolescents were tested for interferon-gamma (IFN-γ response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis purified protein derivative (M.tb PPD in a whole blood assay before, 3 months, 12 months (n = 148 and 3 years (n = 19 after receiving teenage BCG vaccination or 14 years after receiving infant BCG vaccination (n = 16. Results A gradual reduction in magnitude of response was evident from 3 months to 1 year and from 1 year to 3 years following teenage vaccination, but responses 3 years after vaccination were still on average 6 times higher than before vaccination among vaccinees. Some individuals (11/86; 13% failed to make a detectable antigen-specific response three months after vaccination, or lost the response after 1 (11/86; 13% or 3 (3/19; 16% years. IFN-γ response to Ag85 was measured in a subgroup of adolescents and appeared to be better maintained with no decline from 3 to 12 months. A smaller group of adolescents were tested 14 years after receiving infant BCG vaccination and 13/16 (81% made a detectable IFN-γ response to M.tb PPD 14 years after infant vaccination as compared to 6/16 (38% matched unvaccinated controls (p = 0.012; teenagers vaccinated in infancy were 19 times more likely to make an IFN-γ response of > 500 pg/ml than unvaccinated teenagers. Conclusion BCG vaccination in infancy and adolescence induces immunological memory to mycobacterial antigens that is still present and measurable for at least 14 years in the

  5. Placental transfer of antibody and its relationship to vaccination in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Anna; Jones, Christine E

    2017-06-01

    Vaccination in pregnancy boosts maternal vaccine-specific antibody concentration and therefore increases transplacental transfer of antibody to optimize protection of the infant. The purpose of this review is to describe what is known about placental transfer of antibody in the context of vaccination in pregnancy, focussing on the recent literature and areas of debate, particularly about the timing of vaccination. There is a debate about the timing of pertussis vaccination in pregnancy with some studies reporting that vaccination in the third trimester results in higher pertussis antigen-specific IgG concentrations in cord blood and others finding that the concentration is higher following vaccination in the second trimester. The impact of timing of vaccination on antibody avidity in cord blood has also been investigated and one study suggests that avidity may be increased following vaccination at 27-30 gestational weeks compared with later vaccination. Understanding placental transfer of antibody is vital in informing maternal vaccination strategy. There has been recent research about the timing of pertussis vaccination in pregnancy that has implications for the timing of both current and future vaccines to be used in pregnancy.

  6. Sex-based differences in immune function and responses to vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sabra L; Marriott, Ian; Fish, Eleanor N

    2015-01-01

    Females typically develop higher antibody responses and experience more adverse reactions following vaccination than males. These differences are observed in response to diverse vaccines, including the bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine, the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, the yellow fever virus vaccine and influenza vaccines. Sex differences in the responses to vaccines are observed across diverse age groups, ranging from infants to aged individuals. Biological as well as behavioral differences between the sexes are likely to contribute to differences in the outcome of vaccination between the sexes. Immunological, hormonal, genetic and microbiota differences between males and females may also affect the outcome of vaccination. Identifying ways to reduce adverse reactions in females and increase immune responses in males will be necessary to adequately protect both sexes against infectious diseases. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Frequency distribution 0f ABO, RH blood groups and blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and fifty students (150) were randomly selected from the Department of Cell Biology and Genetics of University of Lagos, Akoka, Nigeria for ABO, RH blood groups and 6 haemoglobin genotypes studies. Blood group O was the highest with the percentage frequency of 55.3%, followed by blood group A (25.3%) ...

  8. [Vaccine does make sense, until used].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Toshi-Hiko

    2011-01-01

    In the 1990s, drug companies focused their resources on chemistry-based proprietary blockbuster compounds (small molecules) for chronic diseases that could bring in several billion dollars in a short period of time. Since then, the focus has turned to biologics (proteins/high MW molecules) such as anticancer agents, antibodies, and so on. Vaccines, in contrast, are a rather slow-growing market, administered only a few times per patient, low priced, and often undifferentiated. Due to the influenza scares of recent years, the above view has changed remarkably. According to some analysts, the annual growth of the current $2.2 bn vaccine market will become almost 10 percent over the next 5 years. In 2009, Pfizer (US), in an effort to boost their small vaccine-related business, purchased Wyeth (US). In October 2010, Johnson & Johnson announced they were buying Crucell (Germany), the only vaccine maker who had remained independent. GSK (UK) holds the top spot in the vaccine market with a 25% share. Pfizer (US), Merck (US), Novartis (Switzerland), and Sanofi-Aventis (France) are next, while Johnson & Johnson has moved into the 6th position by purchasing Crucell. There is of course an essential therapeutic need for vaccines, however, why are major pharmaceutical companies now investing a significant amount of resources in the vaccine business? Vaccine development may take more time than that of small molecules, but they are less risky from an intellectual property standpoint, and complicated manufacturing processes create a high barrier to follow-on biologics/biosimilars. Also in Japan, since the recent influenza scares, there has been acceleration in movement and cooperation among industry and government, including lawmakers.

  9. A new source of mesenchymal stem cells for articular cartilage repair: MSCs derived from mobilized peripheral blood share similar biological characteristics in vitro and chondrogenesis in vivo as MSCs from bone marrow in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei-Li; Zhou, Chun-Yan; Yu, Jia-Kuo

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow (BM) has been considered as a major source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), but it has many disadvantages in clinical application. However, MSCs from peripheral blood (PB) could be obtained by a less invasive method and be more beneficial for autologous transplantation than BM MSCs, which makes PB a promising source for articular cartilage repair in clinical use. To assess whether MSCs from mobilized PB of New Zealand White rabbits have similar biological characteristics in vitro and chondrogenesis in vivo as BM MSCs. Controlled laboratory study. A combined method of drug administration containing granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) plus CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 was adopted to mobilize the PB stem cells of adult New Zealand White rabbits in vitro. The isolated cells were identified as MSCs by morphological characteristics, surface markers, and differentiation potentials. A comparison between PB MSCs and BM MSCs was made in terms of biological characteristics in vitro and chondrogenesis in vivo. This issue was investigated from the aspects of morphology, immune phenotype, multiple differentiation capacity, expansion potential, antiapoptotic capacity, and ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo of PB MSCs compared with BM MSCs. Peripheral blood MSCs were successfully mobilized by the method of combined drug administration, then isolated, expanded, and identified in vitro. No significant difference was found concerning the morphology, immune phenotype, and antiapoptotic capacity between PB MSCs and BM MSCs. Significantly, MSCs from both sources compounded with decalcified bone matrix showed the same ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo. For multipluripotency, BM MSCs exhibited a more osteogenic potential and higher proliferation capacity than PB MSCs, whereas PB MSCs possessed a stronger adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potential than BM MSCs in vitro. Although there are some differences in the proliferation and

  10. Measles vaccination using a microneedle patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, Chris; Collins, Marcus L; Ayers, Jessica; Rota, Paul A; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2013-07-25

    Measles vaccination programs would benefit from delivery methods that decrease cost, simplify logistics, and increase safety. Conventional subcutaneous injection is limited by the need for skilled healthcare professionals to reconstitute and administer injections, and by the need for safe needle handling and disposal to reduce the risk of disease transmission through needle re-use and needlestick injury. Microneedles are micron-scale, solid needles coated with a dry formulation of vaccine that dissolves in the skin within minutes after patch application. By avoiding the use of hypodermic needles, vaccination using a microneedle patch could be carried out by minimally trained personnel with reduced risk of blood-borne disease transmission. The goal of this study was to evaluate measles vaccination using a microneedle patch to address some of the limitations of subcutaneous injection. Viability of vaccine virus dried onto a microneedle patch was stabilized by incorporation of the sugar, trehalose, and loss of viral titer was less than 1 log10(TCID50) after storage for at least 30 days at room temperature. Microneedle patches were then used to immunize cotton rats with the Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine strain. Vaccination using microneedles at doses equaling the standard human dose or one-fifth the human dose generated neutralizing antibody levels equivalent to those of a subcutaneous immunization at the same dose. These results show that measles vaccine can be stabilized on microneedles and that vaccine efficiently reconstitutes in vivo to generate a neutralizing antibody response equivalent to that generated by subcutaneous injection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Vaccine-Preventable Disease Photos

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BASICS Evaluating Online Health Information FAQs How Vaccines Work Importance of Vaccines Paying for Vaccines State Immunization Programs ... Immunization Action Coalition (IAC), a non-profit organization, works to ... facilitates communication about the safety, efficacy, and use of vaccines ...

  12. Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  13. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a doctor...

  14. Impact of Biological Feedback and Incentives on Blood Fatty Acid Concentrations, Including Omega-3 Index, in an Employer-Based Wellness Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBurney, Michael I; Bird, Julia K

    2017-08-05

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) are important fatty acids for the retina and brain. More than 95% of Americans have suboptimal EPA + DHA blood concentrations. This cross-sectional employer-based study assessed whole blood fatty acid levels of volunteers participating in an onsite wellness biometric screening program and was designed to determine if an incentive, a $5 coupon for a 90-day supply of fish oil supplement typically costing $18-30, stimulated incremental dietary behavior change relative to nutritional status assessment alone to increase EPA + DHA concentrations. Volunteers completed a dietary survey and finger stick blood samples were collected to be analyzed for fatty acid composition. In addition, 636 individuals participated in the initial onsite biometric screening. Three months later, and without prior knowledge, all employees were invited to a second screening. At the second screening, 198 employees volunteered for the first time and 149 employees had a second test (17.9%). At baseline, the average age ( n = 834) was 45 year and omega-3 index was 5.0% with 41% female. EPA + DHA concentration, i.e., omega-3 index, was significantly lower in men (4.8%) than women (5.2%), as were DHA and linoleic acid (LA) concentrations ( p omega-3 index was positively and linearly associated with omega-3 intake. Only 4% of volunteers had an omega-3 index >8% on initial screening. Among the 149 individuals with two measurements, omega-3 intake from supplements, but not food, increased significantly from 258 to 445 mg/d ( p omega-3 index (+0.21, p omega-3 supplement.

  15. Vaccines against poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A.; Saul, Allan

    2014-01-01

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented. PMID:25136089

  16. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  17. Microfluidic Devices for Blood Fractionation

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Han Wei; Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Lee, Wong Cheng J.; Huang, Sha; Han, Jongyoon; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2011-01-01

    Blood, a complex biological fluid, comprises 45% cellular components suspended in protein rich plasma. These different hematologic components perform distinct functions in vivo and thus the ability to efficiently fractionate blood into its individual components has innumerable applications in both clinical diagnosis and biological research. Yet, processing blood is not trivial. In the past decade, a flurry of new microfluidic based technologies has emerged to address this compelling problem. ...

  18. Antibody persistence 5 years after vaccination at 2 to 10 years of age with Quadrivalent MenACWY-CRM conjugate vaccine, and responses to a booster vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Stan L; Christensen, Shane; Verma, Bikash; Xie, Fang; Keshavan, Pavitra; Dull, Peter M; Smolenov, Igor

    2015-04-27

    In a multi-center extension study, children 2-10 years of age, initially vaccinated with one or two doses (2-5 year-olds) or one dose (6-10 year-olds) of quadrivalent meningococcal CRM197-conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM), were assessed five years later for antibody persistence and booster response using serum bactericidal assay with human complement (hSBA). Children 7-10 and 11-15 years of age, who received MenACWY-CRM in the original study, and age-matched vaccine-naïve children, were enrolled in this extension study. After an initial blood draw, children received one dose of MenACWY-CRM as booster or primary dose, with a second blood draw 28 days later. hSBA titers decreased five years after primary vaccination, but were higher than in non-vaccinated controls against serogroups C, W and Y, with substantial proportions having titers ≥8: 7-22% for A, 32-57% for C, 74-83% for W, and 48-54% for Y. Previously-vaccinated children demonstrated booster responses to revaccination against all four serogroups. Responses to primary vaccination in vaccine-naïve controls were lower and similar to primary responses observed in the original study. All vaccinations were generally well tolerated, with no safety concern raised. Approximately half the children vaccinated as 2-10 year-olds maintained protective antibodies against serogroups C, W and Y five years later, but fewer did against serogroup A. Declining titers five years after vaccination and robust booster responses suggest that five years may be an appropriate interval to revaccinate children, subject to epidemiology and delivery considerations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Female contraceptive vaccine possible, but not for years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    Researchers are presently testing 2 types of contraceptive vaccines in animal models. One of these is the sperm antigen vaccine which would cause immunity to sperm within the female reproductive tract. The other works against the zona pellucida (the extracellular membrane surrounding the ovum) which the sperm must bind to and penetrate for fertilization to take place. At this time, researchers do not yet know what vaccine is the best route. The sperm antigen vaccine would inhibit capacitation--that stage where they become capable of fertilizing the ovum. The researchers foresee certain problems with this vaccine, however. For example, it will be difficult to get a vaccine to work properly within just the reproductive tract since most antigen vaccines work within the entire immune system. Further, all the areas of the reproductive tract are biologically different. In addition, researchers must find a vaccine potent enough to affect the millions of sperm that enter the uterus. A potential problem with the zona pellucida vaccine is that it could create ovarian dysfunction permanently. Therefore, researchers realize the importance of finding a zona pellucida vaccine that will induce fertilization but not destroy the ovaries. WHO is in the early stages of working on a vaccine against human chorionic gonadotropin to prevent implantation, but this and any postfertilization vaccine will probably not be produced for the US market because of the present antiabortion sentiment. Additional barriers to production of a contraceptive vaccine is that pharmaceutical companies fear liability in marketing a new contraceptive and their profit margin will be low. Nevertheless, the earliest a contraceptive vaccine would become available in 1999.

  20. Vaccines and Immunization Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Michael D; Meador, Anna E

    2016-03-01

    Vaccines are among most cost-effective public health strategies. Despite effective vaccines for many bacterial and viral illnesses, tens of thousands of adults and hundreds of children die each year in the United States from vaccine-preventable diseases. Underutilization of vaccines requires rethinking the approach to incorporating vaccines into practice. Arguably, immunizations could be a part all health care encounters. Shared responsibility is paramount if deaths are to be reduced. This article reviews the available vaccines in the US market, as well as practice recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vaccine Associated Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the cases of vaccine associated myocarditis have been following small pox vaccination. Reports have also been there after streptococcal pneumonia vaccine and influenza vaccine. In some cases, autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA used in the vaccine have been implicated. Exclusion of other causes is very important in the diagnostic process, especially that of acute coronary syndrome. Management is similar to that of other etiologies of myocarditis. These rare instances of myocarditis should not preclude one from taking necessary immunization for vaccine preventable diseases.

  2. Maternal supplementation with LGG reduces vaccine-specific immune responses in infants at high-risk of developing allergic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul V Licciardi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are defined as live micro-organisms that when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Among their pleiotropic effects, inhibition of pathogen colonisation at the mucosal surface as well as modulation of immune responses are widely recognised as the principal biological activities of probiotic bacteria. In recent times, the immune effects of probiotics have led to their application as vaccine adjuvants, offering a novel strategy for enhancing the efficacy of current vaccines. Such an approach is particularly relevant in regions where infectious disease burden is greatest and where access to complete vaccination programs is limited. In this study, we report the effects of the probiotic, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG on immune responses to tetanus, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib and pneumococcal conjugate (PCV7 vaccines in infants. This study was conducted as part of a larger clinical trial assessing the impact of maternal LGG supplementation in preventing the development of atopic eczema in infants at high-risk for developing allergic disease. Maternal LGG supplementation was associated with reduced antibody responses against tetanus, Hib and pneumococcal serotypes contained in PCV7 (N=31 compared to placebo-treatment (N=30 but not total IgG levels. Maternal LGG supplementation was also associated with a trend to increased number of tetanus toxoid-specific Treg in the peripheral blood compared to placebo-treated infants. These findings suggest that maternal LGG supplementation may not be beneficial in terms of improving vaccine-specific immunity in infants. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm these findings. As probiotic immune effects can be species/strain specific, our findings do not exclude the potential use of other probiotic bacteria to modulate infant immune responses to vaccines.

  3. Deep sequencing in pre- and clinical vaccine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachi, P; Donati, C; Masciopinto, F; Rappuoli, R; Bagnoli, F

    2013-01-01

    Vaccine research has experienced a quantum leap after the beginning of the genomics era. High-throughput sequencing techniques, unlimited computing resources, as well as new bioinformatic algorithms are now changing the way we perform genomic studies. Whole genome sequencing will soon become the gold standard for phylogenetic and epidemiology studies and is already shedding new light on the dynamics of bacterial evolution. We believe that deep sequencing projects, together with structural studies on vaccine candidates, will allow targeting constant epitopes and avoid vaccine failure due to antigenic variability. Systems biology, which is expected to revolutionize vaccine research and clinical studies, greatly relies on high-throughput technologies such as RNA-seq. Furthermore, genomics is a key element to develop safer vaccines, and the accuracy of deep sequencing will allow monitoring vaccine coverage after their introduction on the market. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. HIV-1 Polymorphism: a Challenge for Vaccine Development - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgado MG

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The perspective for the development of anti-HIV/AIDS vaccines became a target sought by several research groups and pharmaceutical companies. However, the complex virus biology in addition to a striking genetic variability and the limited understanding of the immunological correlates of protection have made this an enormous scientific challenge not overcome so far. In this review we presented an updating of HIV-1 subtypes and recombinant viruses circulating in South American countries, focusing mainly on Brazil, as one of the challenges for HIV vaccine development. Moreover, we discussed the importance of stimulating developing countries to participate in the process of vaccine evaluation, not only testing vaccines according to already defined protocols, but also working together with them, in order to take into consideration their local information on virus diversity and host genetic background relevant for the vaccine development and testing, as well as including local virus based reagents to evaluate the immunogenicity of the candidate vaccines.

  5. Optimal vaccination strategies against vector-borne diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Enøe, Claes; Bødker, Rene

    2014-01-01

    Using a process oriented semi-agent based model, we simulated the spread of Bluetongue virus by Culicoides, biting midges, between cattle in Denmark. We evaluated the minimum vaccination cover and minimum cost for eight different preventive vaccination strategies in Denmark. The simulation model...... replicates both a passive and active flight of midges between cattle distributed on pastures and cattle farms in Denmark. A seasonal abundance of midges and temperature dependence of biological processes were included in the model. The eight vaccination strategies were investigated under four different...... grazing conditions. Furthermore, scenarios were tested with three different index locations stratified for cattle density. The cheapest way to vaccinate cattle with a medium risk profile (less than 1000 total affected cattle) was to vaccinate cattle on pasture. Regional vaccination displayed better...

  6. Rotavirus vaccine effectiveness in Hong Kong children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Karene Hoi Ting; Tate, Jacqueline E; Chan, Ching Ching; Chan, Martin C W; Chan, Paul K S; Poon, Kin Hung; Siu, Sylvia Luen Yee; Fung, Genevieve Po Gee; Ng, Kwok Leung; Chan, Iris Mei Ching; Yu, Pui Tak; Ng, Chi Hang; Lau, Yu Lung; Nelson, E Anthony S

    2016-09-22

    Rotavirus is a common infectious cause of childhood hospitalisation in Hong Kong. Rotavirus vaccines have been used in the private sector since licensure in 2006 but have not been incorporated in the government's universal Childhood Immunisation Programme. This study aimed to evaluate rotavirus vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisation. This case-control study was conducted in the 2014/2015 rotavirus season in six public hospitals. Hospitalised acute gastroenteritis patients meeting inclusion criteria were recruited and copies of their immunisation records were collected. Case-patients were defined as enrolled subjects with stool specimens obtained in the first 48h of hospitalisation that tested positive for rotavirus, whereas control-patients were those with stool specimens obtained in the first 48h of hospitalisation testing negative for rotavirus. Vaccine effectiveness for administration of at least one dose of either Rotarix(®) (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) or RotaTeq(®) (Merck Research Laboratories) was calculated as 1 minus the odds ratio for rotavirus vaccination history for case-patients versus control-patients. Among the 525 eligible subjects recruited, immunisation records were seen in 404 (77%) subjects. 31% (162/525 and 126/404) tested positive for rotavirus. In the 404 subjects assessed for vaccine effectiveness, 2.4% and 24% received at least 1 dose of either rotavirus vaccine in case- and control-patients respectively. The unmatched vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisation for administration of at least one dose of either rotavirus vaccines was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 75%, 98%). The matched analyses by age only and both age and admission date showed 96% (95% CI: 72%, 100%) and 89% (95% CI: 51%, 97%) protection against rotavirus hospitalisation respectively. Rotavirus vaccine is highly effective in preventing hospitalisation from rotavirus disease in young Hong Kong children. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  7. Randomized safety and immunogenicity trial of a seasonal trivalent inactivated split virion influenza vaccine (IVACFLU-S) in healthy young Vietnamese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anh, Dang Duc; Thiem, Vu Dinh; Anh, Nguyen Thi Hien; Huong, Vu Minh; Nga, Nguyen Tuyet; Thang, Tran Cong; Thai, Duong Huu; Chien, Vien Chinh; Holt, Renee; Wahid, Rahnuma; Flores, Jorge; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Taylor, David N

    2016-10-26

    Under the auspices of the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Action Plan, PATH supported evaluation of a trivalent, seasonal inactivated influenza vaccine candidate produced by the Institute of Vaccines and Medical Biologicals (IVAC), a Vietnamese manufacturer. In 2015, 60 healthy adult subjects 18-45years of age were enrolled in a Phase 1, single center, double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study conducted at a district health center in Thai Binh Province, Vietnam. The study evaluated the overall safety and immunogenicity of a seasonal, trivalent inactivated split virion influenza vaccine. Volunteers were given either vaccine or placebo in a randomized 1:1 ratio. After undergoing screening, eligible volunteers provided their signed consent and were enrolled in the study. On the first day of immunization, randomly chosen volunteers received IVACFLU-S 15μg (mcg) hemagglutinin of each of the three strains in 0.5mL or placebo by intramuscular injection. All volunteers were monitored for adverse events and underwent blood testing at screening and Day 8 to assess the vaccine candidate's safety. Sera obtained before and 21days after immunization were tested for influenza antibody titers using the hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI) and microneutralization tests (MNT). Vaccine was well tolerated, and there were no serious adverse events reported. HAI and MNT identified serum antibody responses against the three influenza strains in nearly all volunteers who received the vaccine. Overall, serum HAI responses of fourfold or greater were observed in 93 percent, 83 percent, and 77 percent of H1, H3, and B strains, respectively. Seroprotection rates were also very high. IVAC's seasonal, trivalent influenza vaccine was safe and well tolerated and induced high levels of seroconversion and seroprotection rates. These clinical data are a first step towards demonstrating the feasibility of producing the vaccine locally and that seasonal vaccine production in Vietnam may

  8. Vaccines today, vaccines tomorrow: a perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Loucq, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines are considered as one of the major contributions of the 20th century and one of the most cost effective public health interventions. The International Vaccine Institute has as a mission to discover, develop and deliver new and improved vaccines against infectious diseases that affects developing nations. If Louis Pasteur is known across the globe, vaccinologists like Maurice Hilleman, Jonas Salk and Charles M?rieux are known among experts only despite their contribution to global hea...

  9. Immune Interference After Sequential Alphavirus Vaccine Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    containing 50gmL−1 each of neomycin and streptomycin and supplemented with 0.5% human serum albumin , U.S.P. The lyophilized vaccine is the filtered...vaccine was prepared from specific pathogen-free eggs infected with the attenuated CM4884 strain of WEE virus. The supernatant was harvested and filtered...supernatant harvested from primary chicken embryo cell cultures. The vaccine was prepared from spe- cific pathogen-free eggs infected with the

  10. The effects of booster vaccination on hepatitis B vaccine in anti-HBs negative infants of HBsAg-positive mothers after primary vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hua; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Wei; Lv, Huakun; Cheng, Suyun; Ling, Luoya; Xia, Shichang; Chen, Yongdi

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in anti-HBs IgG levels after booster vaccinations in anti-HBs negative infants of HBsAg-positive mothers. After primary vaccination, the immunization effects of different dosages of booster vaccinations of hepatitis B vaccine (CHO) were compared. A group of 472 newborns were vaccinated with three-dose hepatitis B vaccine at birth, 1 mo and 6 mo of age. Blood serum was collected within 6-12 mo after the third dose, and HBsAg, anti-HBs and anti-HBc levels were determined. Of this group, 101 infants who were both anti-HBs and HBsAg negative were revaccinated with 20 μg hepatitis B vaccine (CHO), and their antibody titers were monitored. Among these 101 infants, the anti- HBs positive rates (defined as anti-HBs ≥ 100 mIU/ml) differed after the first and the third dose (79% and 90%, respectively (panti-HBs GMTs after booster vaccination were 10-fold larger than those before booster vaccination. We conclude that a single booster dose is generally adequate for infants of HBsAg-positive mothers, whereas a further booster dose should be given for non-responders.

  11. Anti-Infectious Human Vaccination in Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, Enrico; Salemi, Simonetta; D'Amelio, Raffaele

    2016-05-03

    A brief history of vaccination is presented since the Jenner's observation, through the first golden age of vaccinology (from Pasteur's era to 1938), the second golden age (from 1940 to 1970), until the current period. In the first golden age, live, such as Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), and yellow fever, inactivated, such as typhoid, cholera, plague, and influenza, and subunit vaccines, such as tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, have been developed. In the second golden age, the cell culture technology enabled polio, measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines be developed. In the era of modern vaccines, in addition to the conjugate polysaccharide, hepatitis A, oral typhoid, and varicella vaccines, the advent of molecular biology enabled to develop hepatitis B, acellular pertussis, papillomavirus, and rotavirus recombinant vaccines. Great successes have been achieved in the fight against infectious diseases, including the smallpox global eradication, the nearly disappearance of polio, the control of tetanus, diphtheria, measles, rubella, yellow fever, and rabies. However, much work should still be done for improving old vaccines, such as BCG, anthrax, smallpox, plague, or for developing effective vaccines against old or emerging infectious threats, such as human-immunodeficiency-virus, malaria, hepatitis C, dengue, respiratory-syncytial-virus, cytomegalovirus, multiresistant bacteria, Clostridium difficile, Ebola virus. In addition to search for innovative and effective vaccines and global infant coverage, even risk categories should adequately be protected. Despite patients under immunosuppressive therapy are globally increasing, their vaccine coverage is lower than recommended, even in developed and affluent countries.

  12. Leishmaniasis vaccine candidates for development: a global overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamesipour, Ali; Rafati, Sima; Davoudi, Noushin; Maboudi, Fereidoun; Modabber, Farrokh

    2006-03-01

    A vaccine against different forms of leishmaniasis should be feasible considering the wealth of information on genetics and biology of the parasite, clinical and experimental immunology of leishmaniasis, and the availability of vaccines that can protect experimental animals against challenge with different Leishmania species. However, there is no vaccine against any form of leishmaniasis for general human use. One major factor is the lack of a conceived market for human leishmaniasis vaccines. Hence pharmaceutical industries involved in vaccine development are not interested in investing millions of dollars and a decade that is required for developing a new vaccine. Besides, leishmaniasis is a local/regional problem and not a global one. According to the estimates of the World Health Organization, 90 per cent of visceral leishmaniasis occurs in five countries (Bangladesh, Brazil, India, Nepal and Sudan). Those in need are amongst the poorest people in these countries. It should therefore be the objectives of these countries to develop a vaccine. Fortunately, both Brazil and India have designated the control of visceral leishmaniasis as a top priority for their respective Ministries of Health. The purpose of this review is to present only the vaccines in use and those in development for use in dogs or humans. This is not an exhaustive review of vaccine discovery or the principles of clinical immunology underlying vaccine development.

  13. Keratitis in association with herpes zoster and varicella vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, A P; Fraunfelder, F W

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this review was to collect reports of keratitis in association with herpes zoster virus (HZV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV) vaccines. HZV vaccination is intended for at-risk adult populations and VZV vaccination is intended for all pediatric patients. We reviewed the literature and reports of keratitis in association with herpes zoster or varicella vaccine from the National Registry of Drug-Induced Ocular Side Effects and the World Health Organization. Twenty-four cases of unilateral keratitis in association with VZV vaccines were collected from the adverse reaction databases and literature. In most cases, the onset of keratitis occurred within days of vaccination and resolved with topical steroid eye drops and oral acyclovir. Data suggest that keratitis in association with herpes zoster or varicella vaccine is rare, is usually self-limited or resolves with treatment. The mechanism may be the persistence of viral antigens in the cornea after VZV vaccination or herpes zoster ophthalmicus. This reaction is probable, given the plausible biological mechanism, the temporal relationship between vaccination and keratitis, and overall patterns of presentation after vaccination. Copyright 2017 Clarivate Analytics.

  14. MMR Vaccine (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenuvax® Measles Vaccine ... R-Vax® II (as a combination product containing Measles Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine) ... M-R® II (as a combination product containing Measles Vaccine, Mumps Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine)

  15. Developing Anti-tick Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Mallon, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Ticks are responsible for the transmission of viral, bacterial, and protozoal diseases of man and animals and also produce significant economic losses to cattle industry. The use of acaricides constitutes a major component of integrated tick control strategies. However, this is accompanied by the selection of acaricide-resistant ticks and contamination of environment and milk and meat products with drug residues. These issues highlight the need for alternative approaches to control tick infestations and have triggered the search for tick protective antigens for vaccine development. Vaccination as a tick control method has been practiced since the introduction of TickGARD and Gavac that were developed using the midgut glycoprotein Bm86 as antigen. Gavac within integrated tick management systems has proven to reduce the number of acaricidal applications per year that are required to control some strains of R. microplus ticks in different geographical regions. Nevertheless, it has limited or no efficacy against other tick species. These issues have stimulated research for additional tick protective antigens with critical functions in the tick. This chapter presents methodologies for the design and test of molecules as antigens against ticks. Considerations about different methods for the tick control compared to the immunological methods, the desirable characteristics for an anti-tick vaccine and the obstacles encountered for developing this kind of vaccines are discussed. Detailed methodologies for the establishment of a biological model to test new molecules as immunogens against ticks and to perform challenge trials with this model are presented. General considerations in the efficacy calculation for any anti-tick vaccine are also discussed.

  16. Synthetic biology for therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abil, Zhanar; Xiong, Xiong; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-02-02

    Synthetic biology is a relatively new field with the key aim of designing and constructing biological systems with novel functionalities. Today, synthetic biology devices are making their first steps in contributing new solutions to a number of biomedical challenges, such as emerging bacterial antibiotic resistance and cancer therapy. This review discusses some synthetic biology approaches and applications that were recently used in disease mechanism investigation and disease modeling, drug discovery and production, as well as vaccine development and treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and metabolic disorders.

  17. 21 CFR 640.6 - Modifications of Whole Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Modifications of Whole Blood. 640.6 Section 640.6...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Whole Blood § 640.6 Modifications of Whole Blood. Upon approval by the Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, of a supplement to...

  18. From population to public institutions: what needs to be changed to benefit from the full value of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, Thomas; Quilici, Sibilia; Panfilo, Marina

    2015-01-01

    The poor perception of the benefits of vaccines, and their subsequent underuse, can result in substantial economic, societal, and political burden. Adequate support and communication from health authorities and governments is essential to promote the benefits of vaccination and reduce the risk of infectious diseases outbreaks. Cost-containment policies in the vaccine procurement processes could also be a threat to the long-term sustainability of the vaccine industry and manufacturing sites in Europe. Biologicals, such as vaccines, are highly technical and complex products to manufacture and only a few industries are engaged in this activity. Developing incentives to encourage vaccine manufacturers and identifying means of taking into consideration the specificities of vaccines in economic evaluations could allow the full value of vaccination to be appreciated. In conclusion, governments, international agencies, and other stakeholders have an important role to play to help society regain confidence in vaccination and ensure that the benefits of vaccination programmes are fully recognised and valued.

  19. Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español Your Child's Immunizations: Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV) KidsHealth / For Parents / Your Child's Immunizations: ... cochlear implants. Why Are the PCV and PPSV Vaccines Recommended? Children younger than 2 years old, adults ...

  20. Vaccine Policy Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thaul, Susan

    2005-01-01

    .... Whether a vaccine's target is naturally occurring or present because of hostile intent, the issues policy makers must deal with include vaccine development, production, availability, safety, effectiveness, and access...

  1. The HPV Vaccination Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following the release of a consensus statement from the NCI-Designated Cancer Centers urging HPV vaccination in the United States, Dr. Noel Brewer discusses the country’s low vaccination rates and how clinicians can help to improve them.

  2. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy.

  3. Vaccine Safety Datalink

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink is part of the National Immunization Program within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and was started in recognition of gaps in the scientific knowledge of rare vaccine side effects.

  4. Production of Active Nonglycosylated Recombinant B-Chain of Type-2 Ribosome-Inactivating Protein from Viscum articulatum and Its Biological Effects on Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Li Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type-2 ribosome-inactivating proteins, composed of a toxic A-chain and lectin-like B-chain, display various biological functions, including cytotoxicity and immunomodulation. We here cloned the lectin-like B-chain encoding fragment of a newly identified type-2 RIP gene, articulatin gene, from Viscum articulatum, into a bacterial expression vector to obtain nonglycosylated recombinant protein expressed in inclusion bodies. After purification and protein refolding, soluble refolded recombinant articulatin B-chain (rATB showed lectin activity specific toward galactoside moiety and was stably maintained while stored in low ionic strength solution. Despite lacking glycosylation, rATB actively bound leukocytes with preferential binding to monocytes and in vitro stimulated PBMCs to release cytokines without obvious cytotoxicity. These results implicated such a B-chain fragment as a potential immunomodulator.

  5. Vaccine Policy Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-19

    evidence “favors rejection” of the idea that either the measles- mumps-rubella vaccine or thimerosal-containing vaccines cause autism (IOM...that the vaccines or preservatives or packaging might cause autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders. One focus has been on thimerosal, a mercury...with the vaccinia virus that causes cowpox to provoke an immune response to protect against the smallpox virus. CRS-2 3A smallpox vaccine is available

  6. Vaccine Controversy Medical Oversight

    OpenAIRE

    Casady, Megan

    2010-01-01

    The anti-vaccination movement has gained significant influence because of its extremely diverse underlying support. From distrust of governmental policies regarding vaccination to scientific data that seemingly proves the dangers of vaccination, the discourses are able to reach and impact a large number of the public. My research this semester focused on the expansion of recommendations made by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) concerning the seasonal influenza vaccine, the...

  7. The pertussis vaccine controversy.

    OpenAIRE

    Hinman, A R

    1984-01-01

    Over the past few years, there has been continuing controversy about whether the benefits of routine vaccination for pertussis outweight the potential risks. Some of the epidemiologic and technical issues include ascertainment and reporting of cases, case definition and laboratory confirmation, identification and purification of antigens, vaccine potency measurement, vaccine efficacy, and vaccine safety. Other factors include legal and economic issues, ethical concerns, emotional overlays, an...

  8. Vaccine herd effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae Hyong; Johnstone, Jennie; Loeb, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Vaccination ideally protects susceptible populations at high risk for complications of the infection. However, vaccines for these subgroups do not always provide sufficient effectiveness. The herd effect or herd immunity is an attractive way to extend vaccine benefits beyond the directly targeted population. It refers to the indirect protection of unvaccinated persons, whereby an increase in the prevalence of immunity by the vaccine prevents circulation of infectious agents in susceptible pop...

  9. Anti-Vaccination Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    The current anti-vaccination movements that have established themselves in the United States as well as other regions in the world are like a hydra of discourse. Right when one effective measure is created to convince people to vaccinate two more anti-vaccination movements sprout up in its place. These anti-vaccination movements are driven by cultural beliefs, ideologies, medical exemption laws, non-medical exemption laws, distrust of the government, distrust of large pharmaceutical companies...

  10. Vaccine-associated hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Michael M; DeStefano, Frank

    2018-02-01

    Vaccine-associated hypersensitivity reactions are not infrequent; however, serious acute-onset, presumably IgE-mediated or IgG and complement-mediated anaphylactic or serious delayed-onset T cell-mediated systemic reactions are considered extremely rare. Hypersensitivity can occur because of either the active vaccine component (antigen) or one of the other components. Postvaccination acute-onset hypersensitivity reactions include self-limited localized adverse events and, rarely, systemic reactions ranging from urticaria/angioedema to full-blown anaphylaxis with multisystem involvement. Risk of anaphylaxis after all vaccines is estimated to be 1.31 (95% CI, 0.90-1.84) per million vaccine doses, respectively. Serious hypersensitivity reactions after influenza vaccines are particularly important because of the large number of persons vaccinated annually. Influenza vaccines are unique in requiring annual changes in the vaccines' antigenic composition to match the predicted circulating influenza strains. Recently, novel influenza vaccine types were introduced in the United States (recombinant vaccines, some with higher antigen content and a new adjuvanted vaccine). Providers should be aware of changing recommendations on the basis of recent published evidence for persons with a history of egg allergy to receive annual influenza vaccination. Further research is needed to elucidate the pathophysiology and risk factors for reported vaccine-associated adverse events. Further research is also needed to determine whether repeated annual inactivated influenza vaccination, the number of vaccine antigens administered at the same time, and the current timing of routine infant vaccinations are optimal for overall population well-being. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Hepatitis B Vaccination and Associated Oral Manifestations: A Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B virus is spread by blood-to-blood contact, ... complications seen after Hepatitis B vaccination are sudden infant death syndrome, multiple ... Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is described as a prolonged persistent or relapsing fatigue. The etiologies of CFS are similar to infection.[15] A retrospective Canadian study ...

  12. Polysaccharide-Based Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Violeta Fernández; Balbin, Yury Valdés; Calderón, Janoi Chang; Icart, Luis Peña; Verez-Bencomo, Vicente

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPS) and lipopolysaccharides from bacteria are employed for the production of vaccines against human diseases. Initial development of CPS as a vaccine was followed by the development and introduction of conjugate polysaccharide-protein vaccines. The principles leading to both developments are reviewed.

  13. [Improving vaccination measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannazzo, S

    2014-01-01

    Despite the benefits of routine vaccination of newborns are known and widely documented, in recent years we are observing a gradual increase in the number of parents who express doubts and concerns about the safety of vaccines and the real need to submit their children to vaccinations included in the national recommendations. This attitude is reinforced by the current epidemiological profile, in Western countries, of many vaccine preventable diseases, accompanied by a low risk perception among parents. Institutions and all the actors involved in vaccination programs have a duty to investigate the reasons for the loss of confidence in vaccination among the population in order to identify and implement appropriate and effective interventions. The improvement of vaccination should, theoretically, goes on a double track, placing side by side the provision of effective vaccines, safe and necessary, and interventions designed to increase demand for vaccination among the population, improve access to vaccination services, improve the system as a whole. But to actually improve the vaccinations' offer it is necessary also to provide interventions aimed at regaining the confidence of the population in relation to vaccination and the institutions that promote them. Particular attention should be given to the aspects of communication and risk communication.

  14. Veterinary Replicon Vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikke, Mia C.; Pijlman, Gorben P.

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination is essential in livestock farming and in companion animal ownership. Nucleic acid vaccines based on DNA or RNA provide an elegant alternative to those classical veterinary vaccines that have performed suboptimally. Recent advances in terms of rational design, safety, and efficacy have

  15. Oral vaccination of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen

  16. Vaccination: problems and perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Kharit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive vaccination had proved its effective morbidity reduction. Today it is necessary to extend vaccination schedule, creation of selective, regional schedules based on epidemiological, clinical, economical substantiation. Development of vaccination needs the profound scientific research, modernization of adverse reaction observing system, betterment training system and awareness of population.

  17. Malaria vaccine research and development: the role of the WHO MALVAC committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The WHO Malaria Vaccine Advisory Committee (MALVAC) provides advice to WHO on strategic priorities, activities and technical issues related to global efforts to develop vaccines against malaria. MALVAC convened a series of meetings to obtain expert, impartial consensus views on the priorities and best practice for vaccine-related research and development strategies. The technical areas covered during these consultations included: guidance on clinical trial design for candidate sporozoite and asexual blood stage vaccines; measures of efficacy of malaria vaccines in Phase IIb and Phase III trials; standardization of immunoassays; the challenges of developing assays and designing trials for interventions against malaria transmission; modelling impact of anti-malarial interventions; whole organism malaria vaccines, and Plasmodium vivax vaccine-related research and evaluation. These informed discussions and opinions are summarized here to provide guidance on harmonization of strategies to help ensure high standards of practice and comparability between centres and the outcome of vaccine trials. PMID:24112689

  18. Safety studies of the oral rabies vaccine SAD B19 in striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, A; Pommerening, E; Neubert, L; Kachel, S; Neubert, A

    2002-04-01

    Safety of the modified live rabies virus vaccine, SAD B19, was studied in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis). Seven skunks received 10(7.9) foci formatting units by direct oral administration. In four cages, a vaccinated animal was placed with a control animal, the other three vaccinated skunks were housed individually. Saliva and nasal swabs were collected 1, 2, 4, 24, 48, and 72 hr post-vaccination. From all vaccinated and control animals (n = 11) blood samples were collected 0, 28, 56, 84, and 296 days post-vaccination. Three of seven vaccinated skunks seroconverted. None of the control animals had detectable levels of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies. Also no vaccine virus was isolated from the nasal and saliva swabs collected from any animal. Thus, SAD B19 was innocuous for skunks in our study after direct oral administration at field concentration.

  19. [Candid#1 vaccine against Argentine hemorrhagic fever produced in Argentina. Immunogenicity and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enria, Delia A; Ambrosio, Ana M; Briggiler, Ana M; Feuillade, María Rosa; Crivelli, Eleonora

    2010-01-01

    A clinical study in 946 human volunteers was done to compare Candid #1 vaccine manufactured in Argentina with the vaccine produced in USA that had been previously used. The efficacy was evaluated using immunogenicity measured by the detection of neutralizing antibodies as a subrogate marker. Safety was evaluated comparing the rate of adverse events. Both vaccines showed a comparable rate of seroconversion, slightly higher than the efficacy estimated from previous studies (95.5%). There were no severe adverse events related to the vaccines. The general events considered related to the vaccines were not clinically relevant and disappeared either spontaneously or with symptomatic treatment. Similar rates of adverse events (29.9% for the Argentine vaccine and 35.0% for the USA vaccine) were found for both vaccines. These included: headache, weakness, myalgias, mild low blood cell (ANMAT).

  20. Hib Vaccines: Past, Present, and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Essam Zarei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib causes many severe diseases, including epiglottitis, pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis. In developed countries, the annual incidence of meningitis caused by bacteria is approximately 5–10 cases per population of 100,000. The Hib conjugate vaccine is considered protective and safe. Adjuvants, molecules that can enhance and/or regulate the fundamental immunogenicity of an antigen, comprise a wide range of diverse compounds. While earlier developments of adjuvants created effective products, there is still a need to create new generations, rationally designed based on recent discoveries in immunology, mainly in innate immunity. Many factors may play a role in the immunogenicity of Hib conjugate vaccines, such as the polysaccharides and proteins carrier used in vaccine construction, as well as the method of conjugation. A Hib conjugate vaccine has been constructed via chemical synthesis of a Hib saccharide antigen. Two models of carbohydrate-protein conjugate have been established, the single ended model (terminal amination-single method and cross-linked lattice matrix (dual amination method. Increased knowledge in the fields of immunology, molecular biology, glycobiology, glycoimmunology, and the biology of infectious microorganisms has led to a dramatic increase in vaccine efficacy.

  1. Influenza vaccination: from epidemiological aspects and advances in research to dissent and vaccination policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, R; Amicizia, D; Lai, P L; Panatto, D

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a serious public health problem, since seasonal epidemics affect approximately 5-10% of the population and thus give rise to a heavy social and healthcare burden. The heavy burden of disease is due to several factors, one of which is the biological features of the pathogen. Indeed influenza viruses display high mutation rates and undergo frequent genetic reassortment. Minor variations cause seasonal epidemics and major variations, which result from the hybridization of viruses typical of different animal species, can lead to pandemics. Vaccination remains the most efficacious means of mitigating the harmful healthcare and social effects of influenza. Influenza vaccines have evolved over time in order to offer broader protection against circulating strains. Trivalent vaccines containing two A viruses and one B virus are currently available. However, given the co-circulation of both B virus lineages (B/Yamagata and B/Victoria), quadrivalent vaccines have recently been developed. The new quadrivalent vaccines constitute a great advance, in that they can offer broader strain coverage. Despite the availability of effective and safe influenza vaccines, the Italian public's trust in vaccination has declined and, in the last few years, influenza vaccination coverage rates have decreased both among the elderly and among at-risk adults. It is therefore necessary that users, in their own interests, regain trust in this important means of disease prevention. In order to mitigate the damage wreaked by influenza, it seems important to: (i) improve clinical-epidemiological and virological surveillance of the disease; (ii) promote the development of new efficacious vaccines, as has recently been done through the introduction of the quadrivalent vaccine; (iii) extend free vaccination to the entire population, as in the US and Canada; (iv) ensure that general healthcare professionals are properly informed and always updated with regard to vaccination; (v) promote public

  2. Vaccination and antigenic drift in influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, Maciej F

    2008-07-18

    The relationship between influenza antigenic drift and vaccination lies at the intersection of evolutionary biology and public health, and it must be viewed and analyzed in both contexts simultaneously. In this paper, 1 review what is known about the effects of antigenic drift on vaccination and the effects of vaccination on antigenic drift, and I suggest some simple ways to detect the presence of antigenic drift in seasonal influenza data. If antigenic drift occurs on the time scale of a single influenza season, it may be associated with the presence of herd immunity at the beginning of the season and may indicate a need to monitor for vaccine updates at the end of the season. The relationship between antigenic drift and vaccination must also be viewed in the context of the global circulation of influenza strains and the seeding of local and regional epidemics. In the data sets I consider--from New Zealand, New York, and France--antigenic drift can be statistically detected during some seasons, and seeding of epidemics appears to be endogenous sometimes and exogenous at other times. Improved detection of short-term antigenic drift and epidemic seeding would significantly benefit influenza monitoring efforts and vaccine selection.

  3. Blood typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood typing is a method to tell what type of blood you have. Blood typing is done so you can safely donate your blood or receive a blood transfusion. It is also done to see if you have a substance called Rh factor on the surface of your red ...

  4. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KidsHealth / For Teens / Blood Types What's in this article? Four Blood Groups... Plus Rh Factor... ...Make Eight Blood Types Why Blood Type Matters Print en español Tipos de sangre About 5 million Americans need blood transfusions every ...

  5. Brucellosis vaccines for livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Zakia I; Pascual, David W

    2016-11-15

    Brucellosis is a livestock disease responsible for fetal loss due to abortions. Worldwide, this disease has profound economic and social impact by reducing the ability of livestock producers to provide an adequate supply of disease-free meat and dairy products. In addition to its presence in domesticated animals, brucellosis is harbored in a number of wildlife species creating new disease reservoirs, which adds to the difficulty of eradicating this disease. Broad and consistent use of the available vaccines would contribute in reducing the incidence of brucellosis. Unfortunately, this practice is not common. In addition, the current brucellosis vaccines cannot provide sterilizing immunity, and in certain circumstances, vaccinated livestock are not protected against co-mingling Brucella-infected wildlife. Given that these vaccines are inadequate for conferring complete protection for some vaccinated livestock, alternatives are being sought, and these include genetic modifications of current vaccines or their reformulations. Alternatively, many groups have sought to develop new vaccines. Subunit vaccines, delivered as a combination of soluble vaccine plus adjuvant or the heterologous expression of Brucella epitopes by different vaccine vectors are currently being tested. New live attenuated Brucella vaccines are also being developed and tested in their natural hosts. Yet, what is rarely considered is the route of vaccination which could improve vaccine efficacy. Since Brucella infections are mostly transmitted mucosally, mucosal delivery of a vaccine has the potential of eliciting a more robust protective immune response for improved efficacy. Hence, this review will examine these questions and provide the status of new vaccines for livestock brucellosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Uptake and Fate of Vanadyl Ion in Ascidian Blood Cells and A Detailed Hypothesis for the Mechanism and Location of Biological Vanadium Reduction: A Visible and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Patrick; Carlson, Elaine J.; Carlson, Robert M. K.; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2010-01-01

    Vanadium K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to track the uptake and fate of VO2+ ion in blood cells from Ascidia ceratodes, following exposure to dithiothreitol (DTT) or to DTT plus VO2+. The full range of endogenous vanadium was queried by fitting the XAS of blood cells with the XAS spectra of model vanadium complexes. In cells exposed only to DTT, ~0.4% of a new V(III) species was found in a site similar to Na[V(edta)(H2O)]. With exposure to DTT and VO2+, average intracellular [VO(aq)]2+ increased from 3% to 5%, and 6% of a new complexed form of vanadyl ion appeared evidencing a ligand array similar to [VO(edta)]2−. At the same time, the relative ratio of blood cell [V(H2O)6]3+ increased at the expense of [V(H2O)5(SO4)]+ in a manner consistent with a significant increase in endogenous acidity. In new UV/visible experiments, VO2+ could be reduced to 7-coordinate [V(nta)(H2O)3] or [V(nta)(ida)]2−with cysteine methyl ester in pH 6.5 solution. Ascorbate reduced [VO(edta)]2− to 7-coordinate [V(edta)(H2O)]−, while [VO(trdta)]2− was unreactive. These results corroborate the finding that the reductive EMF of VO2+ is increased by the availability of a 7-coordinate V(III) product. Finally a new and complete hypothesis is proposed for an ascidian vanadate reductase. The structure of the enzyme active site, the vanadate-vanadyl-vanadic reduction mechanism, the cellular locale, and elements of the regulatory machinery governing the biological reduction of vanadate and vanadyl ion by ascidians are all predicted. Together these constitute the new field of vanadium redox enzymology. PMID:18234345

  7. Relationship Between Tetanus Antitoxin Titration Level and Vaccination History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Işıkgöz Taşbakan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We aimed to determine tetanus antitoxin levels and to evaluate their relationship with history of vaccination among patients applying to the outpatient clinics of a University hospital. Methods: A questionnaire including socio-demographic characteristics and tetanus vaccination status was applied and blood samples taken from 218 subjects between 1 and 30 June 2015. Participants were classified into five groups according to their vaccination timing. Results: The mean age of participants was 46.7±15.4 years and 134 (61.5% were women. Tetanus antitoxin levels were found weak positive in 54 (24.8% patients, positive in 44 (20.2% and strong positive in 120 (55.0%. Tetanus antitoxin level positivity was significantly associated with vaccination timing according to history. Among 105 participants who did not remember being vaccinated or who knew they were vaccinated but did not remember the date, 16 (15.2% remembered the vaccination time when their injury, military service and pregnancy were questioned specifically. Antitoxin levels decreased with increasing age independent of gender (0.9-fold increase/year. Conclusion: We found that the booster dose recommended every 10 years was not applied sufficiently. Tetanus vaccination history must be questioned in more detail among people who do not remember/know their vaccination history, with specific questions regarding pregnancy, military service and injury histories.

  8. Haematological and blood biochemical indices of West African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haematological and blood biochemical indices of West African dwarf goats vaccinated against Pestes des petit ruminants (PPR) ... blood biochemical indices of forty randomly selected West African dwarf (WAD) goats were studied. Packed cell volume ... neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and white blood cells (WBC) than females.

  9. Determinants of vaccine hesitancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braczkowska, Bogumiła; Kowalska, Małgorzata; Braczkowski, Ryszard; Barański, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Vaccine hesitancy is a worrying phenomenon due to its range and health-related consequences. Secondary epidemiological data on the current situation of vaccination in Poland were analyzed. The source of the analyzed data were obtained from the reports of the National Sanitary Inspection and the National Institute of Public Health–National Institute of Hygiene in Warsaw. Legal basis on vaccination and the responsibilities of physicians related to these regulations were also discussed. Considering the opinions of ECDC experts, factors influencing vaccine hesitancy were identified. Attention was paid to the activities of the anti-vaccination movements, their range of activity and a strategy of action.

  10. Secreted HSP Vaccine for Malaria Prophylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    Process flow diagram for producing biological product . 1 frozen vial .Setup2 flasks .SetupB flasks o Master Cell Bank . lrradiation E@E n ffi IilIE¡EEI...and flow diagram of the manufacturing procedure is shown. Total of 50 vaccine vials was produced as well as master cell bank that can be used for future... membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA-1) and with gp96-Ig and generated vaccine cells line 293-gp96-lgPrAMAl-PrcsP. Our immunogenicity studies in mice were designed to

  11. Emerging Vaccine Informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqun He

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine informatics is an emerging research area that focuses on development and applications of bioinformatics methods that can be used to facilitate every aspect of the preclinical, clinical, and postlicensure vaccine enterprises. Many immunoinformatics algorithms and resources have been developed to predict T- and B-cell immune epitopes for epitope vaccine development and protective immunity analysis. Vaccine protein candidates are predictable in silico from genome sequences using reverse vaccinology. Systematic transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression analyses facilitate rational vaccine design and identification of gene responses that are correlates of protection in vivo. Mathematical simulations have been used to model host-pathogen interactions and improve vaccine production and vaccination protocols. Computational methods have also been used for development of immunization registries or immunization information systems, assessment of vaccine safety and efficacy, and immunization modeling. Computational literature mining and databases effectively process, mine, and store large amounts of vaccine literature and data. Vaccine Ontology (VO has been initiated to integrate various vaccine data and support automated reasoning.

  12. Vaccination elicits correlated immune and clinical responses in glioblastoma multiforme patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Christopher J; Black, Keith L; Liu, Gentao; Mazer, Mia; Zhang, Xiao-xue; Pepkowitz, Samuel; Goldfinger, Dennis; Ng, Hiushan; Irvin, Dwain; Yu, John S

    2008-07-15

    Cancer vaccine trials have failed to yield robust immune-correlated clinical improvements as observed in animal models, fueling controversy over the utility of human cancer vaccines. Therapeutic vaccination represents an intriguing additional therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM; grade 4 glioma), which has a dismal prognosis and treatment response, but only early phase I vaccine trial results have been reported. Immune and clinical responses from a phase II GBM vaccine trial are reported here. IFN-gamma responsiveness was quantified in peripheral blood of 32 GBM patients given therapeutic dendritic cell vaccines. Posttreatment times to tumor progression (TTP) and survival (TTS) were compared in vaccine responders and nonresponders and were correlated with immune response magnitudes. GBM patients (53%) exhibited >or=1.5-fold vaccine-enhanced cytokine responses. Endogenous antitumor responses of similar magnitude occurred in 22% of GBM patients before vaccination. Vaccine responders exhibited significantly longer TTS and TTP relative to nonresponders. Immune enhancement in vaccine responders correlated logarithmically with TTS and TTP spanning postvaccine chemotherapy, but not with initial TTP spanning vaccination alone. This is the first report of a progressive correlation between cancer clinical outcome and T-cell responsiveness after therapeutic vaccination in humans and the first tracing of such correlation to therapeutically exploitable tumor alteration. As such, our findings offer unique opportunities to identify cellular and molecular components of clinically meaningful antitumor immunity in humans.

  13. Vaccines as Epidemic Insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark V. Pauly

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the relationship between the research for and development of vaccines against global pandemics and insurance. It shows that development in advance of pandemics of a portfolio of effective and government-approved vaccines does have some insurance properties: it requires incurring costs that are certain (the costs of discovering, developing, and testing vaccines in return for protection against large losses (if a pandemic treatable with one of the vaccines occurs but also with the possibility of no benefit (from a vaccine against a disease that never reaches the pandemic stage. It then argues that insurance against the latter event might usefully be offered to organizations developing vaccines, and explores the benefits of insurance payments to or on behalf of countries who suffer from unpredictable pandemics. These ideas are then related to recent government, industry, and philanthropic efforts to develop better policies to make vaccines against pandemics available on a timely basis.

  14. Pertussis vaccination in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, C Mary

    2016-08-02

    Pertussis has had a resurgence with the highest incidence and complication rates in young infants, and deaths occurring mainly at Pertussis vaccination in pregnancy may protect infants through passive and active transfer of maternal antibodies that protect the infant until the primary immunization series. Studies show vaccinating pregnant women with acellular pertussis vaccine is safe for mother and infant, immunogenic with efficient transfer of antibodies to infants, and effective in preventing pertussis in young infants. Vaccine uptake in pregnant women is sub-optimal, but provider recommendation is the most important factor in improving vaccination rates. Studies are ongoing to determine the best timing of vaccination to protect infants, and into other strategies. Vaccinating pregnant women offers hope to prevent pertussis-related morbidity and mortality in infants worldwide.

  15. Vaccine epidemiology: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakant Lahariya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review article outlines the key concepts in vaccine epidemiology, such as basic reproductive numbers, force of infection, vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, vaccine failure, herd immunity, herd effect, epidemiological shift, disease modeling, and describes the application of this knowledge both at program levels and in the practice by family physicians, epidemiologists, and pediatricians. A case has been made for increased knowledge and understanding of vaccine epidemiology among key stakeholders including policy makers, immunization program managers, public health experts, pediatricians, family physicians, and other experts/individuals involved in immunization service delivery. It has been argued that knowledge of vaccine epidemiology which is likely to benefit the society through contributions to the informed decision-making and improving vaccination coverage in the low and middle income countries (LMICs. The article ends with suggestions for the provision of systematic training and learning platforms in vaccine epidemiology to save millions of preventable deaths and improve health outcomes through life-course.

  16. Immunity to viruses: learning from successful human vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulendran, Bali; Oh, Jason Z; Nakaya, Helder I; Ravindran, Rajesh; Kazmin, Dmitri A

    2013-09-01

    For more than a century, immunologists and vaccinologists have existed in parallel universes. Immunologists have for long reveled in using 'model antigens', such as chicken egg ovalbumin or nitrophenyl haptens, to study immune responses in model organisms such as mice. Such studies have yielded many seminal insights about the mechanisms of immune regulation, but their relevance to humans has been questioned. In another universe, vaccinologists have relied on human clinical trials to assess vaccine efficacy, but have done little to take advantage of such trials for studying the nature of immune responses to vaccination. The human model provides a nexus between these two universes, and recent studies have begun to use this model to study the molecular profile of innate and adaptive responses to vaccination. Such 'systems vaccinology' studies are beginning to provide mechanistic insights about innate and adaptive immunity in humans. Here, we present an overview of such studies, with particular examples from studies with the yellow fever and the seasonal influenza vaccines. Vaccination with the yellow fever vaccine causes a systemic acute viral infection and thus provides an attractive model to study innate and adaptive responses to a primary viral challenge. Vaccination with the live attenuated influenza vaccine causes a localized acute viral infection in mucosal tissues and induces a recall response, since most vaccinees have had prior exposure to influenza, and thus provides a unique opportunity to study innate and antigen-specific memory responses in mucosal tissues and in the blood. Vaccination with the inactivated influenza vaccine offers a model to study immune responses to an inactivated immunogen. Studies with these and other vaccines are beginning to reunite the estranged fields of immunology and vaccinology, yielding unexpected insights about mechanisms of viral immunity. Vaccines that have been proven to be of immense benefit in saving lives offer us a new

  17. Death and serious illness following influenza vaccination: a multidisciplinary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rue-Cover, Alison; Iskander, John; Lyn, Shauna; Burwen, Dale R; Gargiullo, Paul; Shadomy, Sean; Blostein, Joel; Bridges, Carolyn B; Haber, Penina; Satzger, R Duane; Ball, Robert; Seward, Jane F

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate a possible association between influenza vaccination and four deaths and four serious illnesses among 114 recent influenza vaccinees in a long-term care facility (LTCF) and two deaths from a nearby physician's office. All had received vaccine from the same lot (Lot A). Field investigation including (1) a retrospective cohort study among LTCF residents who received Lot A or other influenza vaccine, (2) review of medical records of cases of death or serious illness, (3) active surveillance of deaths among 1500 community based Lot A vaccinees and (4) laboratory testing of vaccine from available Lot A vials. Medical record reviews showed no common clinical syndrome or cause of death. Laboratory testing of Lot A samples revealed no evidence of tampering and no differences compared to an unrelated lot. The risk of death or hospitalization was not significantly different between persons who received Lot A versus a comparison lot, Lot B (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 0.9, 95%CI = 0.3-3.3). There was no clinical or biological evidence pointing to inherent vaccine safety issues, nor was there a detectable increased risk of death or hospitalization among persons vaccinated with Lot A. Lot specific clustering of adverse events (AEs) may reflect medical events causally unrelated to vaccination. Rapid investigations of potential AEs are important to ensure vaccine safety and to maintain public and healthcare provider confidence in vaccines.

  18. New developments and concepts related to biomarker application to vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S. Sohail; Black, Steve; Ulmer, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Summary This minireview will provide a perspective on new developments and concepts related to biomarker applications for vaccines. In the context of preventive vaccines, biomarkers have the potential to predict adverse events in select subjects due to differences in genetic make‐up/underlying medical conditions or to predict effectiveness (good versus poor response). When expanding them to therapeutic vaccines, their utility in identification of patients most likely to respond favourably (or avoid potentially negative effects of treatment) becomes self‐explanatory. Despite the progress made so far on dissection of various pathways of biological significance in humans, there is still plenty to unravel about the mysteries related to the quantitative and qualitative aspects of the human host response. This review will provide a focused overview of new concepts and developments in the field of vaccine biomarkers including (i) vaccine‐dependent signatures predicting subject response and safety, (ii) predicting therapeutic vaccine efficacy in chronic diseases, (iii) exploring the genetic make‐up of the host that may modulate subject‐specific adverse events or affect the quality of immune responses, and (iv) the topic of volunteer stratification as a result of biomarker screening (e.g. for therapeutic vaccines but also potentially for preventive vaccines) or as a reflection of an effort to compare select groups (e.g. vaccinated subjects versus patients recovering from infection) to enable the discovery of clinically relevant biomarkers for preventive vaccines. PMID:21895991

  19. Breast Cancer Vaccines: New Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaria Benedetti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is a persistent global challenge for its high frequency in women (although it seldom occurs in men, due to the large diffusion of risk factors and gene mutations, and for its peculiar biology and microenvironment. To date, BC can benefit from different therapeutic strategies involving surgery, ablation, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and more specific approaches such as hormone therapy and the administration of various substances impairing cancer growth, aggressivity, and recurrence with different modalities. Despite these relatively wide chances, also used in combinatory protocols, relevant mortality and relapse rates, often associated with resistant phenotypes, stress the need for a personalized-medicine based on prompting the patient’s immune system (IS against cancer cells. BC immunogenicity was latterly proven, so the whole immunotherapy field for BC is still at a very early stage. This immunotherapeutic approach exploits both the high specificity of adaptive immune response and the immunological memory. This review is focused on some of the majorly relevant BC vaccines available (NeuVax, AVX901, and INO-1400, providing a description of the more promising clinical trials. The efficacy of cancer vaccines highly depends on the patient’s IS, and a wide optimization is needed in terms of targets’ selection, drug design and combinations, dose finding, protocol structuring, and patients’ recruitment; moreover, new standards are being discussed for the outcome evaluation. However, early-phases excellent results suggest that the manipulation of the IS via specific vaccines is a highly attractive approach for BC.

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine in cross bred cattle calves in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rashmi; Basera, Sanjay Singh; Tewari, Kamal; Yadav, Shweta; Joshi, Sumit; Singh, Brajesh; Mukherjee, Falguni

    2012-03-01

    Safety and immunogenicity of Brucella abortus RB51 vaccine has been evaluated in an organised dairy farm in India. All the cattle (r = 29) vaccinated with strain RB51 'responded' to the vaccine as demonstrated by iELISA using acetone killed strain RB51 antigen. The percentage responders at day 35, 60 and 90 post vaccination were 100%, 95% and 20%, respectively. Strain RB51 was able to elicit a good IFN-gamma response from vaccinated animals. The post-vaccination time point analysis indicated that the cumulative IFN-gamma response of whole blood from vaccinates stimulated with heat killed RB51 antigen was elicited in 80% of calves at 60 days post vaccination. Absence of strain RB51 in the secretions and excretion and lack of local or systemic reaction indicated the safety of the vaccine.